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Sample records for rebonded monocrystalline ceramic

  1. Heat treatment following surface silanization in rebonded tribochemical silica-coated ceramic brackets: shear bond strength analysis

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Emilia Adriane; TRINDADE, Flávia Zardo; RESKALLA, Hélcio Nagib José Feres; de QUEIROZ, José Renato Cavalcanti

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the effects of heat treatment on the tribochemical silica coating and silane surface conditioning and the bond strength of rebonded alumina monocrystalline brackets. Material and Methods Sixty alumina monocrystalline brackets were randomly divided according to adhesive base surface treatments (n=20): Gc, no treatment (control); Gt, tribochemical silica coating + silane application; Gh, as per Gt + post-heat treatment (air flux at 100ºC for 60 s). Brackets were bonded to the enamel premolars surface with a light-polymerized resin and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 100 days. Additionally, half the specimens of each group were thermocycled (6,000 cycles between 5-55ºC) (TC). The specimens were submitted to the shear bond strength (SBS) test using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure mode was assessed using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), together with the surface roughness (Ra) of the resin cement in the bracket using interference microscopy (IM). 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey test were used to compare the data (p>0.05). Results The strategies used to treat the bracket surface had an effect on the SBS results (p=0.0), but thermocycling did not (p=0.6974). Considering the SBS results (MPa), Gh-TC and Gc showed the highest values (27.59±6.4 and 27.18±2.9) and Gt-TC showed the lowest (8.45±6.7). For the Ra parameter, ANOVA revealed that the aging method had an effect (p=0.0157) but the surface treatments did not (p=0.458). For the thermocycled and non-thermocycled groups, Ra (µm) was 0.69±0.16 and 1.12±0.52, respectively. The most frequent failure mode exhibited was mixed failure involving the enamel-resin-bracket interfaces. Conclusion Regardless of the aging method, Gh promoted similar SBS results to Gc, suggesting that rebonded ceramic brackets are a more effective strategy. PMID:24037072

  2. Effects of silica coating and silane surface conditioning on the bond strength of rebonded metal and ceramic brackets

    PubMed Central

    ATSÜ, Saadet; ÇATALBAŞ, Bülent; GELGÖR, İbrahim Erhan

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tribochemical silica coating and silane surface conditioning on the bond strength of rebonded metal and ceramic brackets. Material and Methods Twenty debonded metal and 20 debonded ceramic brackets were randomly assigned to receive one of the following surface treatments (n=10 for each group): (1) sandblasting (control); (2) tribochemical silica coating combined with silane. Brackets were rebonded to the enamel surface on the labial and lingual sides of premolars with a light-polymerized resin composite. All specimens were stored in distilled water for 1 week and then thermocycled (5,000 cycles) between 5-55°C. Shear bond strength values were measured using a universal testing machine. Student's t-test was used to compare the data (α=0.05). Failure mode was assessed using a stereomicroscope, and the treated and non-treated bracket surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Results Rebonded ceramic brackets treated with silica coating followed by silanization had significantly greater bond strength values (17.7±4.4 MPa) than the sandblasting group (2.4±0.8 MPa, P<0.001). No significant difference was observed between the rebonded metal brackets treated with silica coating with silanization (15±3.9 MPa) and the sandblasted brackets (13.6±3.9 MPa). Treated rebonded ceramic specimens primarily exhibited cohesive failure in resin and adhesive failure at the enamel-adhesive interface. Conclusions In comparison to sandblasting, silica coating with aluminum trioxide particles followed by silanization resulted in higher bond strengths of rebonded ceramic brackets. PMID:21625739

  3. Effect of different surface treatments for ceramic bracket base on bond strength of rebonded brackets.

    PubMed

    Guarita, Monique Kruger; Moresca, Alexa Helena Köhler; Losso, Estela Maris; Moro, Alexandre; Moresca, Ricardo Cesar; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of rebonded ceramic brackets after subjecting the bracket base to different treatments. Seventy-five premolars were selected and randomly distributed into five groups (n=15), according to the type of the bracket surface treatment: I, no treatment, first bonding (control); II, sandblasting with aluminum oxide; III, sandblasting + silane; IV, silica coating + silane; and V, silicatization performed in a laboratory (Rocatec system). The brackets were fixed on an enamel surface with Transbond XT resin without acid etching. The brackets were then removed and their bases were subjected to different treatments. Thereafter, the brackets were fixed again to the enamel surface and the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) test. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was then evaluated for each specimen. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=0.05). A statistically significant difference was observed only between Rocatec and the other groups; the Rocatec group showed the lowest SBS values. The highest SBS values were observed for group 1, without any significant difference from the values for groups II, III and IV. Most groups had a higher percentage of failures at the enamel-resin interface (score 1). It was concluded that the surface treatments of rebonded ceramic brackets were effective, with SBS values similar to that of the control group, except Rocatec group.

  4. In vitro study of color stability of polycrystalline and monocrystalline ceramic brackets

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cibele Braga; Maia, Luiz Guilherme Martins; Santos-Pinto, Ary; Gandini Júnior, Luiz Gonzaga

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze color stability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline ceramic brackets after immersion in dye solutions. Methods Seven ceramic brackets of four commercial brands were tested: Two monocrystalline and two polycrystalline. The brackets were immersed in four dye solutions (coffee, red wine, Coke and black tea) and in artificial saliva for the following times: 24 hours, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Color changes were measured by a spectrophotometer. Data were assessed by Multivariate Profile Analysis, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Multiple Comparison Tests of means. Results There was a perceptible change of color in all ceramic brackets immersed in coffee (ΔE* Allure = 7.61, Inspire Ice = 6.09, Radiance = 6.69, Transcend = 7.44), black tea (ΔE* Allure = 6.24, Inspire Ice = 5.21, Radiance = 6.51, Transcend = 6.14) and red wine (ΔE* Allure = 6.49, Inspire Ice = 4.76, Radiance = 5.19, Transcend = 5.64), but no change was noticed in Coke and artificial saliva (ΔE < 3.7). Conclusion Ceramic brackets undergo color change when exposed to solutions of coffee, black tea and red wine. However, the same crystalline structure, either monocrystalline or polycrystalline, do not follow the same or a similar pattern in color change, varying according to the bracket fabrication, which shows a lack of standardization in the manufacturing process. Coffee dye produced the most marked color changes after 21 days of immersion for most ceramic brackets evaluated. PMID:25279530

  5. 40 CFR 63.1301 - Standards for rebond foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Standards for rebond foam production... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1301 Standards for rebond foam production. Each owner or operator of a new or existing rebond...

  6. Metal-On-Metal Bonding and Rebonding Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bogicevic, A.

    1999-02-23

    Density-functional calculations for a wide variety of metals show that, contrary to the rebonding view of adsorbate bonding, addimers do not have notably longer surface bonds than adatoms, do not reside farther above the surface, and do not meet the rebonding arguments for augmented mobility. Rebonding concepts are found to have some utility in explaining addimer stability.

  7. Elastic cost of silicon step rebonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, F.; Garreau, Y.; Cheynis, F.; Croset, B.; Coati, A.; Müller, P.; Prévot, G.

    2016-01-01

    We study by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction the strain field induced by periodic double steps on a Si(1 1 15) surface that is a vicinal of a Si(001) surface misoriented by 5 .4∘ towards the <110 > direction. The best fit of the experimental structure factors is reached on the basis of the rebonded DB step edge model and the displacement field is well characterized assuming that steps are described by parallel rows of extended buried elastic dipoles. The dipole characteristics are the dipole position with respect to the step edge, the dipole amplitude (2.0 ±0.5 nN), and the lever arm Ω =5 .3∘ and force Φ =3 .7∘ orientations. We show that the dipole is dominated by a large stretch component localized between the lower and the upper corners of the step, which we assign to the presence of the rebonded atom at the step.

  8. Optimization of a procedure for rebonding dislodged orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Mui, B; Rossouw, P E; Kulkarni, G V

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength (SBS) of bonded and rebonded orthodontic brackets following a variety of commonly used conditioning treatments and using both light-cured and self-cured composite resin systems. Brackets debonded during the initial determination of SBS were rebonded after the removal of residual resin from enamel surfaces using five different treatments: (1) Remove residual resin using a tungsten carbide bur, re-etch enamel surface, then bond a new bracket; (2) Remove resin from the base mesh with micro-etching then rebond the same bracket, (3) Remove residual resin from the enamel surface using resin-removing pliers, recondition the enamel with an air-powder polisher, then bond a new bracket; (4) Remove residual resin using a rubber cup and pumice, then bond a new bracket; (5) Remove residual resin using pliers alone, then bond a new bracket. The results revealed that the light-cured system produced higher shear bond strength in the initial bond than the self-cured system (p<0.005). Reconditioning the enamel surfaces using a tungsten carbide bur and acid-etching gave the highest SBS (difference 5.8 MPa; p<0.01) and clinically favorable fracture characteristics. The data suggest that the optimal procedure for rebonding dislodged orthodontic brackets is to resurface the enamel using a tungsten carbide bur, acid-etch the enamel, and use a new or re-use an old bracket after microetching.

  9. Methods for manufacturing monocrystalline or near-monocrystalline cast materials

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G

    2014-04-29

    Methods are provided for casting one or more of a semiconductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material. With such methods, a cast body of a monocrystalline form of the one or more of a semiconductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm.

  10. Shear bond strength of porcelain veneers rebonded to enamel.

    PubMed

    St Germain, H A; St Germain, T H

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory research, shear bond strength (SBS) and mode of failure of veneers rebonded to enamel in shear compression were determined. Three groups (A, B, and C; n=10 each) of mounted molar teeth were finished flat using wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper, and 30 leucite-reinforced porcelain veneers (5.0 × 0.75 mm) were air abraded on the internal surface with 50 μm aluminum oxide, etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid, and silanated. The control group (A) veneer specimens were bonded to enamel after etching with 37% phosphoric acid using bonding resin and a dual cure resin composite cement. Groups B and C were prepared similarly to group A with the exception that a release agent was placed before the veneer was positioned on the prepared enamel surface and the resin cement was subsequently light activated. The debonded veneers from groups B and C were placed in a casting burnout oven and heated to 454°C/850°F for 10 minutes to completely carbonize the resin cement and stay below the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the leucite-reinforced porcelain. The recovered veneers were then prepared for bonding. The previously bonded enamel surfaces in group B were air abraded using 50 μm aluminum oxide followed by 37% phosphoric acid etching, while group C enamel specimens were acid etched only. All specimens were thermocycled between 5°C and 55°C for 2000 cycles using a 30-second dwell time and stored in 37°C deionized water for 2 weeks. SBS was determined at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. SBS results in MPa for the groups were (A) = 20.6±5.1, (B) = 18.1±5.5, and (C) = 17.2±6.1. One-way analysis of variance indicated that there were no significant interactions (α=0.05), and Tukey-Kramer post hoc comparisons (α=0.05) detected no significant pairwise differences. An adhesive mode of failure at the enamel interface was observed to occur more often in the experimental groups (B = 40%, C = 50%). Rebonding the veneers produced SBS values that were not

  11. Effect of Removal of Enamel on Rebonding Strength of Resin Composite to Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Lassila, L.; Varrela, J.; Vallittu, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine the effect of removing the surface layer of enamel on the rebonding strength of resin composite. Methods. Teeth in four groups (n = 10) were etched, a small amount of resin composite was bonded and debonded, then specimens in three groups were ground for different lengths of time (10 s, 20 s, 30 s) to remove an increasing amount of enamel, one group was left untouched. The teeth were bonded again and the bond strengths of 1st and 2nd bonding were compared and analysed against the amount of enamel loss in different groups (7 µm (±2); 12 µm (±1); 16 µm (±3)). Specimens were examined with SEM and by noncontacting optical profilometer. Results. Although results indicated higher rebonding strength with increasing enamel removal ANOVA showed low statistical differences between the groups (p > 0.05). However, values between first bonding and rebonding strengths differed significantly (p < 0.05) in the group that was not ground. SEM revealed that enamel-surfaces that were ground after debonding etched well, compared to the surfaces that still contained adhesive remnants. Conclusions. Removal of small amount of enamel refreshed the surface for rebonding. Rebonding strengths without grinding the surface before bonding were lower than bond strength to intact enamel. PMID:27725932

  12. Methods and apparatuses for manufacturing monocrystalline cast silicon and monocrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G [Gettysburg, PA

    2011-11-01

    Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of monocrystalline silicon may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm is provided.

  13. Methods and apparatus for manufacturing monocrystalline cast silicon and monocrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, Nathan G

    2014-01-14

    Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of monocrystalline silicon may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm is provided.

  14. The tensile bond strength of new and rebonded stainless steel orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Regan, D; LeMasney, B; van Noort, R

    1993-04-01

    The study investigated the effect on the tensile/peel bond strength of the variables associated with the bracket base, the enamel surface, and the type of adhesive when both new and used brackets were rebonded to a previously bonded enamel surface. The tensile/peel bond strength was firstly evaluated for three different types of stainless steel orthodontic bracket/base combinations. The cast integral base gave a significantly lower bond strength than the foil-mesh and photo-etched bases. Following debonding, a group of new brackets were bonded to the teeth using a chemically-activated or a light-cured adhesive. The old adhesive had been removed from the enamel by either a hand scaler or a tungsten-carbide bur. The rebonded new brackets demonstrated a small, but statistically significant fall in bond strength. No differences were found between the enamel preparations or the adhesives. A further group of previously debonded brackets were rebonded to the same teeth. The bracket bases were prepared by either smoothing with a green stone or heating in a bunsen flame followed by sandblasting and electropolishing. Highly significant falls in bond strength were obtained with all the bases. No significant differences were found between the two methods of bracket preparation.

  15. Effect of enamel surface treatment on the bond strength of metallic brackets in rebonding process.

    PubMed

    Pakshir, H R; Zarif Najafi, H; Hajipour, S

    2012-12-01

    Bond failure after rebonding for newly placed brackets can be reduced by appropriate enamel surface treatment. This in vitro study investigated the effect of two enamel surface treatments on the bond strength of metallic brackets in the rebonding process. After debonding the brackets and removing the residual adhesive on the enamel surface of 50 upper premolar teeth, the teeth were divided into two equal groups. In the first group, the enamel surface was etched with phosphoric acid 37 per cent, and in the second group, the teeth were sandblasted prior to acid etching. After bonding of the new brackets, the shear bond strength (SBS), probability of bond failures, and adhesive remnant index (ARI) were determined and compared with the t-test, Weibull analysis, and chi-square test. Mean SBS in both groups did not differ significantly (P = 0.081). Most bond failures occurred with ARI scores of 2 and 3, and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Weibull analysis showed that for a given stress, the probability of failure differed between groups. Enamel surface preparation with sandblasting prior to acid etching did not significantly improve SBS in bracket rebonding and left more residual adhesive remnants on the enamel surface.

  16. Buried Porous Silicon-Germanium Layers in Monocrystalline Silicon Lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Monocrystalline semiconductor lattices with a buried porous semiconductor layer having different chemical composition is discussed and monocrystalline semiconductor superlattices with a buried porous semiconductor layers having different chemical composition than that of its monocrystalline semiconductor superlattice are discussed. Lattices of alternating layers of monocrystalline silicon and porous silicon-germanium have been produced. These single crystal lattices have been fabricated by epitaxial growth of Si and Si-Ge layers followed by patterning into mesa structures. The mesa structures are strain etched resulting in porosification of the Si-Ge layers with a minor amount of porosification of the monocrystalline Si layers. Thicker Si-Ge layers produced in a similar manner emitted visible light at room temperature.

  17. Effect of Rebonding on the Bond Strength of Orthodontic Tubes: A Comparison of Light Cure Adhesive and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Aleksiejunaite, Monika; Sidlauskas, Antanas

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different enamel preparation procedures and compare light cure composite (LCC) and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) on the bond strength of orthodontic metal tubes rebonded to the enamel. Twenty human molars were divided into two groups (n = 10). Tubes were bonded using LCC (Transbond XT) in group 1 and RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC) in group 2. The tubes in each group were bonded following manufacturers' instructions (experiment I) and then debonded using testing machine. Then, the same brackets were sandblasted and rebonded twice. Before the first rebonding, the enamel was cleaned using carbide bur (experiment II) and before second rebonding, it was cleaned using carbide bur and soda blasted (experiment III). Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed no significant difference between RMGI and LCC bond strengths in case of normal bonding and rebonding, when enamel was cleaned using carbide bur before rebonding. Enamel soda blasting before rebonding significantly increased RMGI tensile bond strength value compared to LLC (p < 0.05). LCC and RMGI (especially RMGI) provide sufficient bond strengths for rebonding of molar tubes, when residual adhesive from previous bonding is removed and enamel soda blasted. PMID:28386279

  18. Growth, Characterization and Device Development in Monocrystalline Diamond Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    AD-A256 283 Quarterly Letter Report Growth, Characterization and Device Development in Monocrystalline Diamond Films DT C * F LEC EGOT 2 1992L... Characterization and Device Development in s400003srrO8 Monocrystalline Diamond Films 1114SS 6. AUTHOR(S) N00179N66005 Robert F. Davis 4B855 7. PERFORMING...deposited on single crystal Si(100) substrates via in-situ carburization followed by bias-enhanced nucleation. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy

  19. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1300(a) § 63.1307(g) Mold release agent N/A § 63.1300(b) § 63.1307 (h) Rebond Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1301(a) § 63.1307 (g) Mold release agent N/A § 63.1301(b) §...

  20. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1300(a) § 63.1307(g) Mold release agent N/A § 63.1300(b) § 63.1307 (h) Rebond Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1301(a) § 63.1307 (g) Mold release agent N/A § 63.1301(b) §...

  1. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources 5 Table 5 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  2. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources 5 Table 5 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  3. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources 5 Table 5 to Subpart III of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  4. Monocrystalline test structures, and use for calibrating instruments

    DOEpatents

    Cresswell, Michael W.; Ghoshtagore, R. N.; Linholm, Loren W.; Allen, Richard A.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    An improved test structure for measurement of width of conductive lines formed on substrates as performed in semiconductor fabrication, and for calibrating instruments for such measurements, is formed from a monocrystalline starting material, having an insulative layer formed beneath its surface by ion implantation or the equivalent, leaving a monocrystalline layer on the surface. The monocrystalline surface layer is then processed by preferential etching to accurately define components of the test structure. The substrate can be removed from the rear side of the insulative layer to form a transparent window, such that the test structure can be inspected by transmissive-optical techniques. Measurements made using electrical and optical techniques can be correlated with other measurements, including measurements made using scanning probe microscopy.

  5. Polarization effects in femtosecond laser induced amorphization of monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Feng; Li, Hong-Jin; Huang, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Wen-Zhong; Pan, Huai-Hai; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Qian, Jing; Li, Yang-Bo; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    We have used femtosecond laser pulses to ablate monocrystalline silicon wafer. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of ablation surface indicates horizontally polarized laser beam shows an enhancement in amorphization efficiency by a factor of 1.6-1.7 over the circularly polarized laser ablation. This demonstrates that one can tune the amorphization efficiency through the polarization of irradiation laser.

  6. Silica substrate or portion formed from oxidation of monocrystalline silicon

    DOEpatents

    Matzke, Carolyn M.; Rieger, Dennis J.; Ellis, Robert V.

    2003-07-15

    A method is disclosed for forming an inclusion-free silica substrate using a monocrystalline silicon substrate as the starting material and oxidizing the silicon substrate to convert it entirely to silica. The oxidation process is performed from both major surfaces of the silicon substrate using a conventional high-pressure oxidation system. The resulting product is an amorphous silica substrate which is expected to have superior etching characteristics for microfabrication than conventional fused silica substrates. The present invention can also be used to convert only a portion of a monocrystalline silicon substrate to silica by masking the silicon substrate and locally thinning a portion the silicon substrate prior to converting the silicon portion entirely to silica. In this case, the silica formed by oxidizing the thinned portion of the silicon substrate can be used, for example, as a window to provide optical access through the silicon substrate.

  7. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T.; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H.; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments. PMID:26522051

  8. Method and apparatus for drawing monocrystalline ribbon from a melt

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, Theodore F.; Schwuttke, Guenter H.

    1981-11-10

    A method and apparatus for drawing a monocrystalline ribbon or web from a melt comprising utilizing a shaping die including at least two elements spaced one from the other each having a portion thereof located below the level of the melt and another portion located above the level of the melt a distance sufficient to form a raised meniscus of melt about the corresponding element.

  9. Picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination forms a monocrystalline silicon needle

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Fuyuto; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Hidai, Hirofumi; Yamane, Keisaku; Morita, Ryuji; Omatsu, Takashige

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a monocrystalline silicon needle by picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination was demonstrated for the first time in this study. The dynamics of this silicon needle formation was further revealed by employing an ultrahigh-speed camera. The melted silicon was collected through picosecond pulse deposition to the dark core of the optical vortex, forming the silicon needle on a submicrosecond time scale. The needle was composed of monocrystalline silicon with the same lattice index (100) as that of the silicon substrate, and had a height of approximately 14 μm and a thickness of approximately 3 μm. Overlaid vortex pulses allowed the needle to be shaped with a height of approximately 40 μm without any changes to the crystalline properties. Such a monocrystalline silicon needle can be applied to devices in many fields, such as core–shell structures for silicon photonics and photovoltaic devices as well as nano- or microelectromechanical systems. PMID:26907639

  10. Comparison of multiple rebond shear strengths of debonded brackets after preparation with sandblasting and CO2 laser

    PubMed Central

    Kachoei, Mojgan; Mohammadi, Amir; Esmaili Moghaddam, Maziar; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Pourghaznein, Mahmoud; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Failure of orthodontic bracket bonds is a common occurrence during orthodontic treatment. Different techniques have been suggested in the literature to remove resin residues from the bracket bases and enamel surfaces to prepare the surfaces again after debonding. This study attempted to compare multiple rebond shear strengths (SBS) of debonded brackets following preparation with sandblasting and CO2 laser. Methods. The brackets were bonded on 30 human and bovine maxillary central incisors using self-curing composite resin. SBS was measured using Hounsfield testing machine. The brackets were rebonded for two other times after composite resin residues on their surfaces were removed, either with air abrasion or CO2 laser. The debonded brackets and enamel surfaces were also evaluated after each debonding procedure under a stereomicroscope in order to determine adhesive remnant index (ARI). SBS of debonded brackets after each step were compared between sandblast and CO2 laser groups. Results. We observed significant differences in SBS values between pre-recycling and first (P = 0.04), second (P = 0.007) and third recycling (P = 0.007) with laser. Recycling with sandblasting resulted in a decrease in SBS after the first and second recycling procedure; however, the SBS increased after the third recycling procedure, with no significant differences. Conclusion. SBS of brackets after recycling with sandblasting and laser beams was not significantly different, and both were at a favorable level. However, repeating the recycling procedure with sandblasting resulted in more favorable SBS compared to laser. PMID:27651880

  11. Phosphorus and boron diffusion gettering of iron in monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talvitie, H.; Vähänissi, V.; Haarahiltunen, A.; Yli-Koski, M.; Savin, H.

    2011-05-01

    We have studied experimentally the phosphorus diffusion gettering (PDG) of iron in monocrystalline silicon at the temperature range of 650-800 °C. Our results fill the lack of data at low temperatures so that we can obtain a reliable segregation coefficient for iron between a phosphorus diffused layer and bulk silicon. The improved segregation coefficient is verified by time dependent PDG simulations. Comparison of the PDG to boron diffusion gettering (BDG) in the same temperature range shows PDG to be only slightly more effective than BDG. In general, we found that BDG requires more carefully designed processing conditions than PDG to reach a high gettering efficiency.

  12. Cleaning and retreatment protocol for a debonded ceramic restoration

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Pérez-Barquero, Jorge; Bruguera-Álvarez, August; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Fons-Font, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this article is to propose a resin cement cleaning protocol for use before recementing a debonded restoration. Study Design: Ceramic samples were fabricated from IPS d.sign® and IPS e.max Press® and were treated with hydrofluoric acid etching (HF), or HF+silane (S), or HF+S+adhesive or HF+S+A+resin cement. All samples were placed in a furnace at 650º for one minute in order to attempt to pyrolyze the composite. Each step was examined under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: When the cleaning protocol had been performed, it left a clean and retentive surface. Conclusions: If the restoration is placed in a furnace at 650º for one minute, the composite cement will burn or pyrolyze and disappear, allowing conventional retreatment of the ceramic before rebonding. Key words:Ceramic, debond, surface treatment. PMID:25810843

  13. Mechanical properties of monocrystalline and polycrystalline monolayer black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Pinqiang; Wu, Jianyang; Zhang, Zhisen; Ning, Fulong

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical properties of monocrystalline and polycrystalline monolayer black phosphorus (MBP) are systematically investigated using classic molecular dynamic simulations. For monocrystalline MBP, it is found that the shear strain rate, sample dimensions, temperature, atomic vacancies and applied statistical ensemble affect the shear behaviour. The wrinkled morphology is closely connected with the direction of the in-plane shear, dimensions of the samples, and applied ensembles. Particularly, small samples subjected to loading/unloading of the shear deformation along the armchair direction demonstrate a clear mechanical hysteresis loop. For polycrystalline MBP, the maximum shear stress as a function of the average grain size follows an inverse pseudo Hall-Petch type relationship under an isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensemble, whereas under a canonical (NVT) ensemble, the maximum shear stress of polycrystalline MBP exhibits a ‘flipped’ behaviour. Furthermore, polycrystalline MBP subjected to uniaxial tension also exhibits a strongly grain size-dependent mechanical response, and it can fail by brittle intergranular and transgranular fractures because of its weaker grain boundary structures and the direction-dependent edge energy, respectively. These findings provide useful insight into the mechanical design of BP for nanoelectronic devices.

  14. Development of brazing foils to join monocrystalline tungsten alloys with ODS-EUROFER steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Fedotov, V. T.; Sevrjukov, O. N.; Kalashnikov, A. N.; Suchkov, A. N.; Moeslang, A.; Rohde, M.

    2007-08-01

    Results on rapidly solidified filler metals for brazing W with W and monocrystalline W with EUROFER steel (FS) are presented. Rapidly quenched powder-type filler metals based on Ti bal-V-Cr-Be were developed to braze polycrystalline W with monocrystalline W. In addition, Fe bal-Ta-Ge-Si-B-Pd alloys were developed to braze monocrystalline W with FS for helium gas cooled divertors and plasma-facing components. The W to FS brazed joints were fabricated under vacuum at 1150 °C, using a Ta spacer of 0.1 mm in thickness to account for the different thermal expansions. The monocrystalline tungsten as well as the related brazed joints withstood 30 cycles between 750 °C/20 min and air cooling/3-5 min.

  15. Method of producing buried porous silicon-geramanium layers in monocrystalline silicon lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Lattices of alternating layers of monocrystalline silicon and porous silicon-germanium have been produced. These single crystal lattices have been fabricated by epitaxial growth of Si and Si--Ge layers followed by patterning into mesa structures. The mesa structures are stain etched resulting in porosification of the Si--Ge layers with a minor amount of porosification of the monocrystalline Si layers. Thicker Si--Ge layers produced in a similar manner emitted visible light at room temperature.

  16. Thin-film monocrystalline-silicon solar cells based on a seed layer approach with 11% efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, I.; Qiu, Y.; Van Gestel, D.; Poortmans, J.

    2010-09-01

    Solar modules made from thin-film crystalline-silicon layers of high quality on glass substrates could lower the price of photovoltaic electricity substantially. Almost half of the price of wafer-based silicon solar modules is currently due to the cost of the silicon wafers themselves. Using crystalline-silicon thin-film as the active material would substantially reduce the silicon consumption while still ensuring a high cell-efficiency potential and a stable cell performance. One way to create a crystalline-silicon thin film on glass is by using a seed layer approach in which a thin crystalline-silicon layer is first created on a non-silicon substrate, followed by epitaxial thickening of this layer. In this paper, we present new solar cell results obtained on 10-micron thick monocrystalline-silicon layers, made by epitaxial thickening of thin seed layers on transparent glass-ceramic substrates. We used thin (001)-oriented silicon single-crystal seed layers on glass-ceramic substrates provided by Corning Inc. that are made by a process based on anodic bonding and implant-induced separation. Epitaxial thickening of these seed layers was realized in an atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition system. Simple solar cell structures in substrate configuration were made from the epitaxial mono-silicon layers. The Si surface was plasma-textured to reduce the front-side reflection. No other light trapping features were incorporated. Efficiencies of up to 11% were reached with Voc values above 600 mV indicating the good electronic quality of the material. We believe that by further optimizing the material quality and by integrating an efficient light trapping scheme, the efficiency potential of these single-crystal silicon thin films on glass-ceramics should be higher than 15%.

  17. Femtosecond laser direct writing of monocrystalline hexagonal silver prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Vora, Kevin; Kang, SeungYeon; Moebius, Michael; Mazur, Eric

    2014-10-06

    Bottom-up growth methods and top-down patterning techniques are both used to fabricate metal nanostructures, each with a distinct advantage: One creates crystalline structures and the other offers precise positioning. Here, we present a technique that localizes the growth of metal crystals to the focal volume of a laser beam, combining advantages from both approaches. We report the fabrication of silver nanoprisms—hexagonal nanoscale silver crystals—through irradiation with focused femtosecond laser pulses. The growth of these nanoprisms is due to a nonlinear optical interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and a polyvinylpyrrolidone film doped with silver nitrate. The hexagonal nanoprisms have bases hundreds of nanometers in size and the crystal growth occurs over exposure times of less than 1 ms (8 orders of magnitude faster than traditional chemical techniques). Electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows that the hexagonal nanoprisms are monocrystalline. The fabrication method combines advantages from both wet chemistry and femtosecond laser direct-writing to grow silver crystals in targeted locations. The results presented in this letter offer an approach to directly positioning and growing silver crystals on a substrate, which can be used for plasmonic devices.

  18. Femtosecond laser direct writing of monocrystalline hexagonal silver prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Kevin; Kang, SeungYeon; Moebius, Michael; Mazur, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Bottom-up growth methods and top-down patterning techniques are both used to fabricate metal nanostructures, each with a distinct advantage: One creates crystalline structures and the other offers precise positioning. Here, we present a technique that localizes the growth of metal crystals to the focal volume of a laser beam, combining advantages from both approaches. We report the fabrication of silver nanoprisms—hexagonal nanoscale silver crystals—through irradiation with focused femtosecond laser pulses. The growth of these nanoprisms is due to a nonlinear optical interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and a polyvinylpyrrolidone film doped with silver nitrate. The hexagonal nanoprisms have bases hundreds of nanometers in size and the crystal growth occurs over exposure times of less than 1 ms (8 orders of magnitude faster than traditional chemical techniques). Electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows that the hexagonal nanoprisms are monocrystalline. The fabrication method combines advantages from both wet chemistry and femtosecond laser direct-writing to grow silver crystals in targeted locations. The results presented in this letter offer an approach to directly positioning and growing silver crystals on a substrate, which can be used for plasmonic devices.

  19. Surface Damage Mechanism of Monocrystalline Si Under Mechanical Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qingliang; Zhang, Quanli; To, Suet; Guo, Bing

    2017-03-01

    Single-point diamond scratching and nanoindentation on monocrystalline silicon wafer were performed to investigate the surface damage mechanism of Si under the contact loading. The results showed that three typical stages of material removal appeared during dynamic scratching, and a chemical reaction of Si with the diamond indenter and oxygen occurred under the high temperature. In addition, the Raman spectra of the various points in the scratching groove indicated that the Si-I to β-Sn structure (Si-II) and the following β-Sn structure (Si-II) to amorphous Si transformation appeared under the rapid loading/unloading condition of the diamond grit, and the volume change induced by the phase transformation resulted in a critical depth (ductile-brittle transition) of cut (˜60 nm ± 15 nm) much lower than the theoretical calculated results (˜387 nm). Moreover, it also led to abnormal load-displacement curves in the nanoindentation tests, resulting in the appearance of elbow and pop-out effects (˜270 nm at 20 s, 50 mN), which were highly dependent on the loading/unloading conditions. In summary, phase transformation of Si promoted surface deformation and fracture under both static and dynamic mechanical loading.

  20. Monocrystalline silicon gradiometer for gravity experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Jean-Paul

    1987-01-01

    A very important research effort has been made in the last decade in the field of high precision measurement with laser instrumentation. The development of a space borne gradiometer operating at a high sensitivity level using laser measurement of the distance between proof mass over a short base line of order one meter is discussed. Two aspects of laser technology make it a promising tool for gradiometry measurements: quantum limited accuracy and absolute distance measurements. The quantum limit associated with laser instrumentation was formulated. The relevant quantum and classical sources of errors in laser measurements were reviewed and corresponding laser performance requirements for gradient measurements were evaluated. Some mechanical quality factor measurements were made on simple resonant monocrystalline silicon suspensions. It was discovered that the use of zero derivative restoring forces to position the gradiometer test masses will dramatically reduce the gradiometer temperature control requirements. A laser beam side injection scheme was discovered which permits rejection of common mode accelerations. These concepts are briefly discussed.

  1. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  2. Physical assembly of Ag nanocrystals on enclosed surfaces in monocrystalline Si

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Michael S.; Theodore, N. David; Wei, Chao-Chen; Shao, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Growth of thin crystals on external substrate surfaces by many different methods is a well-known technique, but its extension to inner, enclosed surfaces of large defects in monocrystalline materials has not yet been reported. The literature on thin film growth and defects in materials can be leveraged to fabricate new structures for a variety of applications. Here we show a physical process of nucleation and evolution of nanocrystalline silver inside voids in monocrystalline silicon. We found that the Ag growth is hetero-epitaxial using a coincident site lattice. Alignment of Ag and Si atomic planes is uniformly observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and macroscopically by channeling Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. PMID:25376502

  3. Structural ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wachtman, J.B. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The present work discusses opportunities for application of structural ceramics in heat engines, industrial-wear parts, prosthetics and bearings; conceptual and detailed design principles for structural ceramics; the processing, consolidation, and properties of members of the SiC family of structural ceramics; and the silicon nitride and sialon families of hot-pressed, sintered, and reaction-bonded, structural ceramics. Also discussed are partially-stabilized zirconia and zirconia-toughened ceramics for structural applications, the processing methods and mechanisms of fiber-reinforcement in ceramic-matrix fiber-reinforced composites, and the tribological properties of structural ceramics.

  4. A new texturing technique of monocrystalline silicon surface with sodium hypochlorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Linfeng; Tang, Jiuyao

    2009-08-01

    This work proposes a new texturing technique of monocrystalline silicon surface for solar cells with sodium hypochlorite. A mixed solution consisting of 5 wt% sodium hypochlorite and 10 vl% ethanol has been found that results in a homogeneous pyramidal structure, and an optimal size of pyramids on the silicon surface. The textured silicon surface exhibits a lower average reflectivity (about 10.8%) in the main range of solar spectrum (400-1000 nm).

  5. Use of Monocrystalline Silicon as Tool Material for Highly Accurate Blanking of Thin Metal Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Hildering, Sven; Engel, Ulf; Merklein, Marion

    2011-05-04

    The trend towards miniaturisation of metallic mass production components combined with increased component functionality is still unbroken. Manufacturing these components by forming and blanking offers economical and ecological advantages combined with the needed accuracy. The complexity of producing tools with geometries below 50 {mu}m by conventional manufacturing methods becomes disproportional higher. Expensive serial finishing operations are required to achieve an adequate surface roughness combined with accurate geometry details. A novel approach for producing such tools is the use of advanced etching technologies for monocrystalline silicon that are well-established in the microsystems technology. High-precision vertical geometries with a width down to 5 {mu}m are possible. The present study shows a novel concept using this potential for the blanking of thin copper foils with monocrystallline silicon as a tool material. A self-contained machine-tool with compact outer dimensions was designed to avoid tensile stresses in the brittle silicon punch by an accurate, careful alignment of the punch, die and metal foil. A microscopic analysis of the monocrystalline silicon punch shows appropriate properties regarding flank angle, edge geometry and surface quality for the blanking process. Using a monocrystalline silicon punch with a width of 70 {mu}m blanking experiments on as-rolled copper foils with a thickness of 20 {mu}m demonstrate the general applicability of this material for micro production processes.

  6. On Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  7. Ceramic Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-02

    A ceramic material which is (1) ceramics based on monoclinic BaO.Al2O3.2SiO2; (2) ceramics based on monoclinic SrO.Al2O3.2SiO2; or (3) ceramics based on monoclinic solid solution of BaO.Al2O3.2SiO2 and SrO.Al2O3.2SiO2.

  8. Structural Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of abstracts and slides of papers presented at the NASA Lewis Structural Ceramics Workshop. Collectively, these papers depict the scope of NASA Lewis' structural ceramics program. The technical areas include monolithic SiC and Si3N4 development, ceramic matrix composites, tribology, design methodology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), fracture mechanics, and corrosion.

  9. Destruction of monocrystalline silicon with nanosecond pulsed fiber laser accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we report an observation of process of local destruction monocrystalline silicon with a scanning beam irradiation of pulse ytterbium fiber laser with a wavelength λ= 1062 nm, accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles. It is shown that depending on the power density of irradiation was observed a large scatter size of the microparticles. From a certain average power density is observed beginning oxidation particulate emitted from the surface of the irradiated area. By varying the parameters of the laser beam such as scanning speed, pulse repetition rate, overlap of laser spot, radiation dose can be achieved almost complete oxidation of all formed during the ablation of microparticles.

  10. Combined-environment influence on microcrack evolution in mono-crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.-J.; Fortuno, Z. D.; Li, M.; Liu, J.; Liao, H.; Simmons-Potter, K.; Potter, B. G.

    2014-10-01

    The impact of combined environment conditions (mechanical state, temperature, and relative humidity) on microcrack propagation characteristics in p-type monocrystalline, photovoltaic-grade Si wafers was examined. A four-point bend apparatus was used to impose static strain conditions in 280 micron thick monocrystalline Si wafers containing microindentation-initiated crack centers. The specimen under test was simultaneously subjected to varied temperature and relative humidity conditions within a controlled environment chamber. Microcrack length was monitored after exposure to two sets of temperature and relative humidity conditions (i.e. 20° and 33%, 40° and 60% respectively) using scanning electron microscopy. Two primary stages of crack elongation behavior were observed under both of the combined environment conditions. Specifically, an early-time, more rapid growth period occurred, followed by more limited crack growth at later times. The deceleration of crack propagation is consistent with stress relaxation accompanying crack elongation under the constant strain conditions imposed. In general, an increase in the average microcrack propagation rate within both growth rate ranges and in the final overall change in average crack length was observed under elevated temperature and humidity conditions. These findings support the probable role of local crack-tip environment on microcrack evolution.

  11. Enhanced cooling in mono-crystalline ultra-thin silicon by embedded micro-air channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.; Fahad, Hossain M.; Hussain, Aftab M.; Rojas, Jhonathan P.; Torres Sevilla, Galo A.; Alfaraj, Nasir; Lizardo, Ernesto B.; Hussain, Muhammad M.

    2015-12-01

    In today's digital world, complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology enabled scaling of bulk mono-crystalline silicon (100) based electronics has resulted in their higher performance but with increased dynamic and off-state power consumption. Such trade-off has caused excessive heat generation which eventually drains the charge of battery in portable devices. The traditional solution utilizing off-chip fans and heat sinks used for heat management make the whole system bulky and less mobile. Here we show, an enhanced cooling phenomenon in ultra-thin (>10 μm) mono-crystalline (100) silicon (detached from bulk substrate) by utilizing deterministic pattern of porous network of vertical "through silicon" micro-air channels that offer remarkable heat and weight management for ultra-mobile electronics, in a cost effective way with 20× reduction in substrate weight and a 12% lower maximum temperature at sustained loads. We also show the effectiveness of this event in functional MOS field effect transistors (MOSFETs) with high-κ/metal gate stacks.

  12. Solution-Phase Epitaxial Growth of Quasi-Monocrystalline Cuprous Oxide on Metal Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of monocrystalline semiconductors on metal nanostructures is interesting from both fundamental and applied perspectives. The realization of nanostructures with excellent interfaces and material properties that also have controlled optical resonances can be very challenging. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of metal–semiconductor core–shell nanowires. We demonstrate a solution-phase route to obtain stable core–shell metal–Cu2O nanowires with outstanding control over the resulting structure, in which the noble metal nanowire is used as the nucleation site for epitaxial growth of quasi-monocrystalline Cu2O shells at room temperature in aqueous solution. We use X-ray and electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and absorption spectroscopy, as well as density functional theory calculations, to characterize the core–shell nanowires and verify their structure. Metal–semiconductor core–shell nanowires offer several potential advantages over thin film and traditional nanowire architectures as building blocks for photovoltaics, including efficient carrier collection in radial nanowire junctions and strong optical resonances that can be tuned to maximize absorption. PMID:25233392

  13. Solution-phase epitaxial growth of quasi-monocrystalline cuprous oxide on metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sciacca, Beniamino; Mann, Sander A; Tichelaar, Frans D; Zandbergen, Henny W; van Huis, Marijn A; Garnett, Erik C

    2014-10-08

    The epitaxial growth of monocrystalline semiconductors on metal nanostructures is interesting from both fundamental and applied perspectives. The realization of nanostructures with excellent interfaces and material properties that also have controlled optical resonances can be very challenging. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of metal-semiconductor core-shell nanowires. We demonstrate a solution-phase route to obtain stable core-shell metal-Cu2O nanowires with outstanding control over the resulting structure, in which the noble metal nanowire is used as the nucleation site for epitaxial growth of quasi-monocrystalline Cu2O shells at room temperature in aqueous solution. We use X-ray and electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and absorption spectroscopy, as well as density functional theory calculations, to characterize the core-shell nanowires and verify their structure. Metal-semiconductor core-shell nanowires offer several potential advantages over thin film and traditional nanowire architectures as building blocks for photovoltaics, including efficient carrier collection in radial nanowire junctions and strong optical resonances that can be tuned to maximize absorption.

  14. Ceramic joining

    SciTech Connect

    Loehman, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  15. Ceramic Processing

    SciTech Connect

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  16. Ceramic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Filters were formed from ceramic fibers, organic fibers, and a ceramic bond phase using a papermaking technique. The distribution of particulate ceramic bond phase was determined using a model silicon carbide system. As the ceramic fiber increased in length and diameter the distance between particles decreased. The calculated number of particles per area showed good agreement with the observed value. After firing, the papers were characterized using a biaxial load test. The strength of papers was proportional to the amount of bond phase included in the paper. All samples exhibited strain-tolerant behavior.

  17. Photoconductivities in monocrystalline layered V2O5 nanowires grown by physical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruei-San; Wang, Wen-Chun; Chan, Ching-Hsiang; Hsu, Hung-Pin; Tien, Li-Chia; Chen, Yu-Jyun

    2013-10-01

    Photoconductivities of monocrystalline vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) nanowires (NWs) with layered orthorhombic structure grown by physical vapor deposition (PVD) have been investigated from the points of view of device and material. Optimal responsivity and gain for single-NW photodetector are at 7,900 A W-1 and 30,000, respectively. Intrinsic photoconduction (PC) efficiency (i.e., normalized gain) of the PVD-grown V2O5 NWs is two orders of magnitude higher than that of the V2O5 counterpart prepared by hydrothermal approach. In addition, bulk and surface-controlled PC mechanisms have been observed respectively by above- and below-bandgap excitations. The coexistence of hole trapping and oxygen sensitization effects in this layered V2O5 nanostructure is proposed, which is different from conventional metal oxide systems, such as ZnO, SnO2, TiO2, and WO3.

  18. Photoconductivities in monocrystalline layered V2O5 nanowires grown by physical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Photoconductivities of monocrystalline vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) nanowires (NWs) with layered orthorhombic structure grown by physical vapor deposition (PVD) have been investigated from the points of view of device and material. Optimal responsivity and gain for single-NW photodetector are at 7,900 A W-1 and 30,000, respectively. Intrinsic photoconduction (PC) efficiency (i.e., normalized gain) of the PVD-grown V2O5 NWs is two orders of magnitude higher than that of the V2O5 counterpart prepared by hydrothermal approach. In addition, bulk and surface-controlled PC mechanisms have been observed respectively by above- and below-bandgap excitations. The coexistence of hole trapping and oxygen sensitization effects in this layered V2O5 nanostructure is proposed, which is different from conventional metal oxide systems, such as ZnO, SnO2, TiO2, and WO3. PMID:24160337

  19. Numerical analysis of monocrystalline silicon solar cells with fine nanoimprinted textured surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Seiya; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Araki, Shinji; Honda, Tatsuki; Jiang, Yunjiang; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the surface reflectance of nanoimprinted textures on silicon. Zirconium oxide, which is a wide-bandgap inorganic dielectric material, was used as the texturing material. We performed several calculations to optimize the textures for the production of high-efficiency bulk-type monocrystalline silicon solar cells. Our analysis revealed that nanoimprinted textured solar cells exhibit a lower reverse saturation current density than a solar cell with a conventional etched texture. It was also confirmed that the photocarrier generation rate for a solar cell with a submicron-scale nanoimprinted texture has little dependence on the texture shape. Furthermore, the weighted average reflectance of an optimized nanoimprinted textured solar cell was substantially reduced to 3.72%, suggesting that texture formation by nanoimprint lithography is an extremely effective technology for producing high-efficiency solar cells at a low cost.

  20. Progress on the fabrication of high resolution and lightweight monocrystalline silicon x-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros, Raul E.; Biskach, Michael P.; Allgood, Kim D.; Mazzarella, James R.; Sharpe, Marton V.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-07-01

    Monocrystalline silicon is an excellent X-ray mirror substrate material due to its high stiffness, low density, high thermal conductivity, zero internal stress, and commercial availability. Our work at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center focuses on identifying and developing a manufacturing process to produce high resolution and lightweight X-ray mirror segments in a cost and time effective manner. Previous efforts focused on demonstrating the feasibility of cylindrical silicon mirror polishing and lightweighting. Present efforts are aimed towards producing true paraboloidal and hyperboloidal mirror surfaces on the lightweight silicon segments. This paper presents results from these recent investigations, including a mirror which features a surface quality sufficient for a 3 arcsecond telescope.

  1. Structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Douglas F.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief history of the field of materials sciences and goes on to expound the advantages of the fastest growing area in that field, namely ceramics. Since ceramics are moving to fill the demand for lighter, stronger, more corrosion resistant materials, advancements will rely more on processing and modeling from the atomic scale up which is made possible by advanced analytical, computer, and processing techniques. All information is presented in viewgraph format.

  2. Structural Ceramics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  3. Molecular dynamics investigations of mechanical behaviours in monocrystalline silicon due to nanoindentation at cryogenic temperatures and room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiancheng; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yihan; Xu, Hailong; Fu, Haishuang; Li, Lijia

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation tests on monocrystalline silicon (010) surface were conducted to investigate the mechanical properties and deformation mechanism from cryogenic temperature being 10 K to room temperature being 300 K. Furthermore, the load-displacement curves were obtained and the phase transformation was investigated at different temperatures. The results show that the phase transformation occurs both at cryogenic temperatures and at room temperature. By searching for the presence of the unique non-bonded fifth neighbour atom, the metastable phases (Si-III and Si-XII) with fourfold coordination could be distinguished from Si-I phase during the loading stage of nanoindentation process. The Si-II, Si-XIII, and amorphous phase were also found in the region beneath the indenter. Moreover, through the degree of alignment of the metastable phases along specific crystal orientation at different temperatures, it was found that the temperature had effect on the anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon, and the simulation results indicate that the anisotropy of monocrystalline silicon is strengthened at low temperatures. PMID:26537978

  4. Molecular dynamics investigations of mechanical behaviours in monocrystalline silicon due to nanoindentation at cryogenic temperatures and room temperature.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiancheng; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yihan; Xu, Hailong; Fu, Haishuang; Li, Lijia

    2015-11-05

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation tests on monocrystalline silicon (010) surface were conducted to investigate the mechanical properties and deformation mechanism from cryogenic temperature being 10 K to room temperature being 300 K. Furthermore, the load-displacement curves were obtained and the phase transformation was investigated at different temperatures. The results show that the phase transformation occurs both at cryogenic temperatures and at room temperature. By searching for the presence of the unique non-bonded fifth neighbour atom, the metastable phases (Si-III and Si-XII) with fourfold coordination could be distinguished from Si-I phase during the loading stage of nanoindentation process. The Si-II, Si-XIII, and amorphous phase were also found in the region beneath the indenter. Moreover, through the degree of alignment of the metastable phases along specific crystal orientation at different temperatures, it was found that the temperature had effect on the anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon, and the simulation results indicate that the anisotropy of monocrystalline silicon is strengthened at low temperatures.

  5. Microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction study of a monocrystalline nickel-base turbine blade after service

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, H.; Grossmann, B.V.; Mechsner, S.

    1997-11-01

    In turbine blades subjected to service, the hot regions near the leading and trailing edges are subjected to temperatures up to 1,100 C, whereas the regions near the cooling channels are subjected to temperatures of about 800 C. These temperature gradients cause strong inhomogeneities in the local thermal and mechanical loads. In the present paper a monocrystalline turbine blade of the nickel-base superalloy CMSX-6 with an orientation near [001] from a developmental turbine was investigated with high lateral resolution using a Bragg-Fresnel focusing optics in combination with synchrotron radiation at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble. The blade had been exposed to service in so-called accelerated mission tests for several hundred hours in two test turbines. In the bulk of the material, a {gamma}/{gamma}{prime} raft structure perpendicular to the [001]-direction is observed. At the surface, the protective aluminide coating is visible. Between these two regions, a {gamma}{prime}-enriched zone exists.

  6. Nanofabrication on monocrystalline silicon through friction-induced selective etching of Si3N4 mask.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Yu, Bingjun; Wang, Xiaodong; Qian, Linmao

    2014-01-01

    A new fabrication method is proposed to produce nanostructures on monocrystalline silicon based on the friction-induced selective etching of its Si3N4 mask. With low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) Si3N4 film as etching mask on Si(100) surface, the fabrication can be realized by nanoscratching on the Si3N4 mask and post-etching in hydrofluoric acid (HF) and potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution in sequence. Scanning Auger nanoprobe analysis indicated that the HF solution could selectively etch the scratched Si3N4 mask and then provide the gap for post-etching of silicon substrate in KOH solution. Experimental results suggested that the fabrication depth increased with the increase of the scratching load or KOH etching period. Because of the excellent masking ability of the Si3N4 film, the maximum fabrication depth of nanostructure on silicon can reach several microns. Compared to the traditional friction-induced selective etching technique, the present method can fabricate structures with lesser damage and deeper depths. Since the proposed method has been demonstrated to be a less destructive and flexible way to fabricate a large-area texture structure, it will provide new opportunities for Si-based nanofabrication.

  7. Preparation of dendritic-like Ag crystals using monocrystalline silicon as template

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yanlin; Chen, Yashao; Ye, Linjing; Chang, Pengmei

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Template-assisted method for synthesis of dendritic silver. {yields} Unique dendritic silver structure with stems, branches, and leaves. {yields} The morphology of silver depends on silicon surface roughness. {yields} Both diffusion and oriented attachment dominating the dendritic structure formation. -- Abstract: Symmetric dendritic silver structures with controlled morphology were successfully synthesized by a solvothermal method with the assistance of monocrystalline silicon. The morphology and structure of the dendritic silver were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the architecture of silver crystals could be controlled via simply adjusting the experiment parameters: AgNO{sub 3} concentration, reaction time and temperature. Moreover, structural characterizations suggested that the dendritic silver structures preferentially grew along (1 1 1) and (2 0 0) directions, leading to the formation of dendritic structures with 1-2 {mu}m in stem diameter and 10-50 {mu}m in length. Additionally, the formation process of the dendritic silver structures was studied, and a possible formation mechanism was proposed based on the experimental results.

  8. Effect of crystal plane orientation on tribochemical removal of monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chen; Guo, Jian; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Cheng; Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao

    2017-01-01

    The effect of crystal plane orientation on tribochemical removal of monocrystalline silicon was investigated using an atomic force microscope. Experimental results indicated that the tribochemical removal of silicon by SiO2 microsphere presented strong crystallography-induced anisotropy. Further analysis suggested that such anisotropic tribochemical removal of silicon was not dependent on the crystallography-dependent surface mechanical properties (i.e., hardness and elastic modulus), but was mainly attributed to various atomic planar density and interplanar spacing in different crystal planes. Phenomenological results speculated that higher density of silicon atom could promote the formation of Si-O-Si bonds between the SiO2 microsphere and silicon substrate, resulting in more severe tribochemical material removal. Larger interplanar spacing with smaller energy barrier facilitated the rupture of the Si-Si network with the help of mechanical shearing stress, which caused more serious wear of the silicon surface. The results may help understand the material removal mechanism of silicon and provide useful knowledge for chemical mechanical polishing.

  9. EFFECT OF SHOCK COMPRESSION METHOD ON THE DEFECT SUBSTRUCTURE IN MONOCRYSTALLINE COPPER

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, B Y; Lassila, D H; Schneider, M S; Kad, B K; Huang, C X; Xu, Y B; Kalantar, D H; Remington, B A; Meyers, M A

    2005-09-23

    Monocrystalline copper samples with orientations of [001] and [221] were shocked at pressures ranging from 20 GPa to 60 GPa using two techniques: direct drive lasers and explosively driven flyer plates. The pulse duration for these techniques differed substantially: 40 ns for the laser experiments at 0.5 mm into the sample and 1.1 {approx} 1.4 {micro}s for the flyer-plate experiments at 5 mm into the sample. The residual microstructures were dependent on orientation, pressure, and shocking method. The much shorter pulse duration in the laser driven shock yielded microstructures closer to the ones generated at the shock front. For the flyer-plate experiments, the longer pulse duration allows shock-generated defects to reorganize into lower energy configurations. Calculations show that the post-shock cooling for the laser driven shock is 10{sup 3} {approx} 10{sup 4} faster than that for plate-impact shock, propitiating recovery and recrystallization conditions for the latter. At the higher pressure level, extensive recrystallization was observed in the plate-impact samples, while it was absent in the laser driven shock. An effect that is proposed to contribute significantly to the formation of recrystallized regions is the existence of micro-shear-bands, which increase the local temperature beyond the prediction from adiabatic compression.

  10. Effect of Shock Compression Method on the Defect Substructure in Monocrystalline Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, B Y; Meyers, M A; Lassila, D H; Schneider, M S; Kad, B K; Huang, C X; Xu, Y B; Kalantar, D H; Remington, B A

    2005-02-17

    Monocrystalline copper samples with orientations of [001] and [221] were shocked at pressures ranging from 20 GPa to 60 GPa using two techniques: direct drive lasers and explosively driven flyer plates. The pulse duration for these techniques differed substantially: 2 ns for the laser experiments and 1.1-1.4 {micro}s for the flyer-plate experiments. The residual microstructures were dependent on orientation, pressure, and shocking method. The much shorter pulse duration in laser shock yielded recovery microstructures with no or limited dislocation motion. For the flyer-plate experiments, the longer pulse duration allow shock-generated defects to reorganize into lower energy configurations. Calculations show that the post shock cooling occurs in a time scale of 0.2 s for laser shock and 1000 s for plate-impact shock, propitiating recovery and recrystallization conditions for the latter. At the higher pressure level extensive recrystallization was observed in the plate-impact samples, while it was absent in laser shock. An effect that is proposed to contribute significantly to the formation of recrystallized regions is the existence of micro-shearbands, which increase the local temperature.

  11. The effect of surface microstructure on the optical reflectance of monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quanji; Zhou, Weidong; Chen, Fangfang; Yang, Ruizhao

    2016-12-01

    Surface texturing is an important technique used to enhance the light absorption by forming certain microstructures on silicon surface. In this article, four different microstructures, based on repeat units of triangles, perpendicular grooves, hexagons and parallel grooves respectively, were fabricated directly on the surface of monocrystalline silicon wafers by using femtosecond laser texturing technique. Compare to the silicon wafers that were not treated by laser, a significant decrease of light reflectance can be observed for those laser etched silicon surfaces. And the treated silicon surface with triangles texture was found to have the lowest relative reflectance of ∼20% in the wavelength range from 400 to 1000 nm, if the textured surfaces were irradiated using the same laser fabrication condition. In addition, the relative reflectance of laser etched silicon surfaces with similar repeat unit but different structural period was investigated as well. The results show that the relative reflectance of the treated surface increases along with the increase of structural period size. These results obtained here can provide a useful guide for fabricating silicon-based optoelectronic devices with a more excellent anti-reflective performance.

  12. Investigation of surface passivation schemes for p-type monocrystalline silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Momtazur; Udoy, Ariful Banna

    2016-10-01

    This paper represents an experiment to analyze the dark saturation current densities of passivated surfaces for monocrystalline silicon solar cells. The samples are diffused at peak temperatures of 800-950 °C. Basically, symmetrical lifetime samples with different doping profiles are prepared with alkaline textured and saw damage etched (planar) surfaces. After POCl3 diffusion, the phosphorous silicate glass layers are removed in a wet chemical etching step. Several designs are chosen for the determination of the sheet resistance ( R sh), the concentration profile for excess charge carrier and the minority carrier effective lifetime of the diffused surfaces. The dark saturation current densities ( J o ) and the doping profiles are determined accordingly via quasi-steady state photoconductance decay measurement and electrochemical capacitance-voltage measurement. Three different passivation schemes are investigated as follows: silicon nitride (SiN x ) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique, silicon-rich oxynitride (SiriO x N y ) capped with a PECVD SiN x layer, and thin thermally grown oxide, capped with a PECVD SiN x layer.

  13. A molecular dynamics study of void initiation and growth in monocrystalline and nanocrystalline copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traiviratana, Sirirat

    MD simulations in monocrystalline and nanocrystalline copper were carried out with LAMMPS to reveal void growth mechanisms. The specimens were subjected to both tensile uniaxial and hydrostatic strains; the results confirm that the emission of (shear) loops is the primary mechanism of void growth. The expansion of the loops and their cross slip leads to the severely work hardened layer surrounding a growing void. Calculations were carried out on voids with different sizes, and a size dependence of the stress response to emitted dislocations was observed, in disagreement with the Gurson model [1] which is scale independent. The growth of voids simulated by MD is compared with the Cocks-Ashby constitutive model and significant agreement is found. The density of geometrically-necessary dislocations as a function of void size is calculated based on the emission of shear loops and their outward propagation. Calculations were also carried out for a void at the interface between two grains sharing a tilt boundary. The results show similar dislocation behaviors. A code that uses Voronoi tessellation for constructing nanocrystalline structures was developed and used to prepare the structures for simulations. Nanocrystal simulations reveal grain sliding and grain rotation as the nanocrystal deformed. Voids were nucleated at grain junctions and grew to coalescence as dislocations accommodated the material transfer. A code that can be used during post-processing to extract useful dislocation information from MD simulation data was partially developed and proved the feasibility of automatically analyzing dislocations.

  14. Effect of crystal plane orientation on tribochemical removal of monocrystalline silicon

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chen; Guo, Jian; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Cheng; Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao

    2017-01-01

    The effect of crystal plane orientation on tribochemical removal of monocrystalline silicon was investigated using an atomic force microscope. Experimental results indicated that the tribochemical removal of silicon by SiO2 microsphere presented strong crystallography-induced anisotropy. Further analysis suggested that such anisotropic tribochemical removal of silicon was not dependent on the crystallography-dependent surface mechanical properties (i.e., hardness and elastic modulus), but was mainly attributed to various atomic planar density and interplanar spacing in different crystal planes. Phenomenological results speculated that higher density of silicon atom could promote the formation of Si-O-Si bonds between the SiO2 microsphere and silicon substrate, resulting in more severe tribochemical material removal. Larger interplanar spacing with smaller energy barrier facilitated the rupture of the Si-Si network with the help of mechanical shearing stress, which caused more serious wear of the silicon surface. The results may help understand the material removal mechanism of silicon and provide useful knowledge for chemical mechanical polishing. PMID:28084433

  15. Ceramic Seal.

    SciTech Connect

    Smartt, Heidi A.; Romero, Juan A.; Custer, Joyce Olsen; Hymel, Ross W.; Krementz, Dan; Gobin, Derek; Harpring, Larry; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael; Varble, Don; DiMaio, Jeff; Hudson, Stephen

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  16. High-quality YBa2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics prepared from freeze-dried nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Toshimichi; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Hiraki, Akio

    1991-07-01

    Using fine powders prepared by a freeze-drying process of a nitrate solution, a YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor has been successfully formed in a ceramic plate. The other processes employed are two heat treatments, a flash decomposition of the freeze-dried nitrates, and a subsequent calcination. It has been found that the formation of high-quality ceramics requires about 10 percent of the Cu nitrate to be added to the stoichiometric nitrate solution as a starting material to the freeze-drying process. The ceramics thus obtained have the characteristics of a very dense structure with large grains and exhibit magnetic properties as a high-Tc superconductor as good as those of a monocrystalline YBa2Cu3O(7-x).

  17. Photoionization of monocrystalline CVD diamond irradiated with ultrashort intense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomarsino, Stefano; Sciortino, Silvio; Obreshkov, Boyan; Apostolova, Tzveta; Corsi, Chiara; Bellini, Marco; Berdermann, Eleni; Schmidt, Christian J.

    2016-02-01

    Direct laser writing of conductive paths in synthetic diamond is of interest for implementation in radiation detection and clinical dosimetry. Unraveling the microscopic processes involved in laser irradiation of diamond below and close to the graphitization threshold under the same conditions as the experimental procedure used to produce three-dimensional devices is necessary to tune the laser parameters to optimal results. To this purpose a transient currents technique has been used to measure laser-induced current signals in monocrystalline diamond detectors in a wide range of laser intensities and at different bias voltages. The current transients vs time and the overall charge collected have been compared with theoretical simulations of the carrier dynamics along the duration and after the conclusion of the 30 fs laser pulse. The generated charge has been derived from the collected charge by evaluation of the lifetime of the carriers. The plasma volume has also been evaluated by measuring the modified region. The theoretical simulation has been implemented in the framework of the empirical pseudopotential method extended to include time-dependent couplings of valence electrons to the radiation field. The simulation, in the low-intensity regime, I ˜1 TW /cm2 , predicts substantial deviation from the traditional multiphoton ionization, due to nonperturbative effects involving electrons from degenerate valence bands. For strong field with intensity of about 50 TW /cm2, nonadiabatic effects of electron-hole pair excitation become prominent with high carrier densities eventually causing the optical breakdown of diamond. The comparison of theoretical prediction with experimental data of laser-generated charge vs laser energy density yields a good quantitative agreement over six orders of magnitude. At the highest intensities the change of slope in the trend is explained taking into account the dependence of the optical parameters and the carrier mobility on plasma

  18. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on microwave processing of ceramics: Microwave-material interactions; anticipated advantage of microwave sintering; ceramic sintering; and ceramic joining. 24 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  19. Monocrystalline CdTe solar cells with open-circuit voltage over 1 V and efficiency of 17%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Boccard, Mathieu; Liu, Shi; Becker, Jacob; Zhao, Xin-Hao; Campbell, Calli M.; Suarez, Ernesto; Lassise, Maxwell B.; Holman, Zachary; Zhang, Yong-Hang

    2016-06-01

    The open-circuit voltages of mature single-junction photovoltaic devices are lower than the bandgap energy of the absorber, typically by a gap of 400 mV. For CdTe, which has a bandgap of 1.5 eV, the gap is larger; for polycrystalline samples, the open-circuit voltage of solar cells with the record efficiency is below 900 mV, whereas for monocrystalline samples it has only recently achieved values barely above 1 V. Here, we report a monocrystalline CdTe/MgCdTe double-heterostructure solar cell with open-circuit voltages of up to 1.096 V. The latticed-matched MgCdTe barrier layers provide excellent passivation to the CdTe absorber, resulting in a carrier lifetime of 3.6 μs. The solar cells are made of 1- to 1.5-μm-thick n-type CdTe absorbers, and passivated hole-selective p-type a-SiCy:H contacts. This design allows CdTe solar cells to be made thinner and more efficient. The best power conversion efficiency achieved in a device with this structure is 17.0%.

  20. Ceramic fiber ceramic matrix filter development

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Stinton, D.P.; Smith, R.G.; Fischer, E.M.

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop a novel type of candle filter based on a ceramic fiber-ceramic matrix composite material, and to extend the development to full-size, 60-mm OD by 1-meter-long candle filters. The goal is to develop a ceramic filter suitable for use in a variety of fossil energy system environments such as integrated coal gasification combined cycles (IGCC), pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), and other advanced coal combustion environments. Further, the ceramic fiber ceramic matrix composite filter, hereinafter referred to as the ceramic composite filter, was to be inherently crack resistant, a property not found in conventional monolithic ceramic candle filters, such as those fabricated from clay-bonded silicon carbide. Finally, the adequacy of the filters in the fossil energy system environments is to be proven through simulated and in-plant tests.

  1. polycrystalline ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yunqi; Ma, Ji; Cui, Qi; Wang, Wenzhang; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Qingming

    2014-12-01

    La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 polycrystalline ceramics were synthesized by sol-gel method. Sharp temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) variation (with peak value up to 22 %) has been observed near the metal-insulator transition temperature T MI (273 K) for the sample sintered at 1,450 °C. This TCR value is much higher than the previously reported values for the undoped and Ag-doped La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 samples and is comparable to the optimized thin films. It was concluded that the improved physical properties of the La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 material are due to its improved microstructure and homogeneity.

  2. Atomistic simulations of the effect of embedded hydrogen and helium on the tensile properties of monocrystalline and nanocrystalline tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Kecskes, Laszlo J.; Zhu, Kaigui; Wei, Qiuming

    2016-12-01

    Uniaxial tensile properties of monocrystalline tungsten (MC-W) and nanocrystalline tungsten (NC-W) with embedded hydrogen and helium atoms have been investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the context of radiation damage evolution. Different strain rates have been imposed to investigate the strain rate sensitivity (SRS) of the samples. Results show that the plastic deformation processes of MC-W and NC-W are dominated by different mechanisms, namely dislocation-based for MC-W and grain boundary-based activities for NC-W, respectively. For MC-W, the SRS increases and a transition appears in the deformation mechanism with increasing embedded atom concentration. However, no obvious embedded atom concentration dependence of the SRS has been observed for NC-W. Instead, in the latter case, the embedded atoms facilitate GB sliding and intergranular fracture. Additionally, a strong strain enhanced He cluster growth has been observed. The corresponding underlying mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Nearly zero reflectance of nano-pyramids and dual-antireflection coating structure for monocrystalline silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyo Sik; Jung, Hyun-Chul

    2011-04-01

    The effect of two-step surface treatment on monocrystalline silicon solar cells was investigated. We changed the nanostructure on pyramidal surfaces by wet nano-texturing so that less light is reflected. The two-step nano-texturing process reduces the average reflectance to about 4% in the 300-1100 nm wavelength region. The use of an antireflection coating resulted in an effective reflectance of 1%. We found that the reflectance obtained by wet nano-texturing was lower than that obtained by conventional alkaline texturing. Thus, we can expect a further increase in the efficiency of silicon solar cells with two-step nano-texturing by a wet chemical process.

  4. Ceramic inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Werve, Michael E.

    2006-05-16

    A system for inspecting a ceramic component. The ceramic component is positioned on a first rotary table. The first rotary table rotates the ceramic component. Light is directed toward the first rotary table and the rotating ceramic component. A detector is located on a second rotary table. The second rotary table is operably connected to the first rotary table and the rotating ceramic component. The second rotary table is used to move the detector at an angle to the first rotary table and the rotating ceramic component.

  5. Dental ceramics: An update

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Arvind; Shenoy, Nina

    2010-01-01

    In the last few decades, there have been tremendous advances in the mechanical properties and methods of fabrication of ceramic materials. While porcelain-based materials are still a major component of the market, there have been moves to replace metal ceramics systems with all ceramic systems. Advances in bonding techniques have increased the range and scope for use of ceramics in dentistry. In this brief review, we will discuss advances in ceramic materials and fabrication techniques. Examples of the microstructure property relationships for these ceramic materials will also be addressed. PMID:21217946

  6. Ceramic electrolyte coating methods

    DOEpatents

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2004-10-12

    Processes for preparing aqueous suspensions of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material such as yttrium-stabilized zirconia. The invention also includes a process for preparing an aqueous coating slurry of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material. The invention further includes a process for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material on pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  7. Advanced Ceramic Armor Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-11

    materials, toughened alumina, fiber -reinforced glass matrix composites, and multilayer-gradient materials for ballistic testing. Fabrication and...material systems: Multilayer advanced armor materials consisting of a hard ceramic faceplate bonded to a graphite fiber -reinforced glass matrix...toughened alumina, and fiber - applied studies of advanced reinforced ceramic matrix glass and glass -ceramic composites for ballistic testing. technologies

  8. Brittleness of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroupa, F.

    1984-01-01

    The main characteristics of mechanical properties of ceramics are summarized and the causes of their brittleness, especially the limited mobility of dislocations, are discussed. The possibility of improving the fracture toughness of ceramics and the basic research needs relating to technology, structure and mechanical properties of ceramics are stressed in connection with their possible applications in engineering at high temperature.

  9. Ceramic to metal seal

    DOEpatents

    Snow, Gary S.; Wilcox, Paul D.

    1976-01-01

    Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

  10. Highly c-axis-oriented monocrystalline Pb(Zr, Ti)O₃ thin films on si wafer prepared by fast cooling immediately after sputter deposition.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shinya; Hanzawa, Hiroaki; Wasa, Kiyotaka; Esashi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    2014-09-01

    We successfully developed sputter deposition technology to obtain a highly c-axis-oriented monocrystalline Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 (PZT) thin film on a Si wafer by fast cooling (~-180°C/min) of the substrate after deposition. The c-axis orientation ratio of a fast-cooled film was about 90%, whereas that of a slow-cooled (~-40°C/min) film was only 10%. The c-axis-oriented monocrystalline Pb(Zr0.5, Ti0.5)O3 films showed reasonably large piezoelectric coefficients, e(31,f) = ~-11 C/m(2), with remarkably small dielectric constants, ϵ(r) = ~220. As a result, an excellent figure of merit (FOM) was obtained for piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) such as a piezoelectric gyroscope. This c-axis orientation technology on Si will extend industrial applications of PZT-based thin films and contribute further to the development of piezoelectric MEMS.

  11. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  12. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  13. All-ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Lehner, C R; Schärer, P

    1992-06-01

    Despite the good appearance and biocompatibility of dental porcelains, failures are still of considerable concern because of some limited properties common to all-ceramic crown systems. As in the years before, pertinent scientific articles published between November 1990 and December 1991 focused on strengthening mechanisms and compared fracture toughness for different ceramic systems by using various test methods. Some evaluated the clinical implications thereon for seating and loading crowns and measured wear against different ceramic surface conditions. Recently introduced with pleasing aesthetic qualities, IPS-Empress (Ivoclar, Schaan, Liechtenstein), a new European leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic, has finally drawn attention in some journals and has been reviewed with promising in vitro test results. Using a simple press-molding technique, well-fitting crowns, inlays, and veneers can be fabricated without an additional ceramming procedure. Again, only long-term clinical trials will validate achievements compared with other all-ceramic systems and with well-established metal ceramics.

  14. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel-based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  15. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  16. Self-assembly of microscopic chiplets at a liquid–liquid–solid interface forming a flexible segmented monocrystalline solar cell

    PubMed Central

    Knuesel, Robert J.; Jacobs, Heiko O.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a method for self-assembling and electrically connecting small (20–60 micrometer) semiconductor chiplets at predetermined locations on flexible substrates with high speed (62500 chips/45 s), accuracy (0.9 micrometer, 0.14°), and yield (> 98%). The process takes place at the triple interface between silicone oil, water, and a penetrating solder-patterned substrate. The assembly is driven by a stepwise reduction of interfacial free energy where chips are first collected and preoriented at an oil-water interface before they assemble on a solder-patterned substrate that is pulled through the interface. Patterned transfer occurs in a progressing linear front as the liquid layers recede. The process eliminates the dependency on gravity and sedimentation of prior methods, thereby extending the minimal chip size to the sub-100 micrometer scale. It provides a new route for the field of printable electronics to enable the integration of microscopic high performance inorganic semiconductors on foreign substrates with the freedom to choose target location, pitch, and integration density. As an example we demonstrate a fault-tolerant segmented flexible monocrystalline silicon solar cell, reducing the amount of Si that is used when compared to conventional rigid cells. PMID:20080682

  17. Nonlinear phenomenon in monocrystalline silicon based PV module for low power system: Lead acid battery for low energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Amrani, A.; El Amraoui, M.; El Abbassi, A.; Messaoudi, C.

    2014-11-01

    In the present work, we report the indoor photo-electrical measurements of monocrystalline silicon based photovoltaic (PV) module associated with 4 Ah lead acid battery as a storage unit for low power PV system applications. Concerning the PV module, our measurements show, at low illumination regime, that the short circuit current ISC increases linearly with the illumination power levels. Moreover, for high illumination levels, the mechanism of bimolecular recombination and space charge limitation may be intensified and hence the short current of the PV module ISCMod depends sublinearly on the incident optical power; the behavior is nonlinear. For the open circuit voltage of the PV module VOCMod measurements, a linear variation of the VOCMod versus the short circuit current in semi-logarithmic scale has been noticed. The diode ideality factor n and diode saturation current Is have been investigated; the values of n and Is are approximately of 1.3 and 10-9 A, respectively. In addition, we have shown, for different discharging-charging currents rates (i.e. 0.35 A, 0.2 A and 0.04 A), that the battery voltage decreases with discharging time as well as discharging battery capacity, and on the other hand it increases with the charging time and will rise up until it maximized value. The initial result shows the possibility to use such lead acid battery for low power PV system, which is generally designed for the motorcycle battery.

  18. Self-assembly of microscopic chiplets at a liquid-liquid-solid interface forming a flexible segmented monocrystalline solar cell.

    PubMed

    Knuesel, Robert J; Jacobs, Heiko O

    2010-01-19

    This paper introduces a method for self-assembling and electrically connecting small (20-60 micrometer) semiconductor chiplets at predetermined locations on flexible substrates with high speed (62500 chips/45 s), accuracy (0.9 micrometer, 0.14 degrees), and yield (> 98%). The process takes place at the triple interface between silicone oil, water, and a penetrating solder-patterned substrate. The assembly is driven by a stepwise reduction of interfacial free energy where chips are first collected and preoriented at an oil-water interface before they assemble on a solder-patterned substrate that is pulled through the interface. Patterned transfer occurs in a progressing linear front as the liquid layers recede. The process eliminates the dependency on gravity and sedimentation of prior methods, thereby extending the minimal chip size to the sub-100 micrometer scale. It provides a new route for the field of printable electronics to enable the integration of microscopic high performance inorganic semiconductors on foreign substrates with the freedom to choose target location, pitch, and integration density. As an example we demonstrate a fault-tolerant segmented flexible monocrystalline silicon solar cell, reducing the amount of Si that is used when compared to conventional rigid cells.

  19. Large-area monocrystalline silicon thin films by annealing of macroporous arrays: Understanding and tackling defects in the material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depauw, Valérie; Gordon, Ivan; Beaucarne, Guy; Poortmans, Jef; Mertens, Robert; Celis, Jean-Pierre

    2009-08-01

    A concept that could provide a thin monocrystalline-silicon absorber layer without resorting to the expensive step of epitaxy would be very appealing for reducing the cost of solar cells. The empty-space-in-silicon technique by which thin films of silicon can be formed by reorganization of regular arrays of cylindrical voids at high temperature may be such a concept if the high quality of the thin film could be ensured on centimeter-large areas. While previous works mainly investigated the influence of the porous array on the final structure, this work focuses on the practical aspects of the high-temperature step and its application to large areas. An insight into the defects that may form is given and the origin of these defects is discussed, providing recommendations on how to avoid them. Surface roughening, pitting, formation of holes, and silicon pillars could be attributed to the nonuniform reactions between Si, SiO2, and SiO. Hydrogen atmospheres are therefore preferred for reorganization of macroporous arrays. Argon atmospheres, however, may provide high-quality silicon thin films as well, possibly even more easily transferable, as long as annealing is performed in controlled, clean, and oxygen-free conditions. Our experiments on large areas also highlight the importance of kinetics, which had not been considered up to now and which will require further understanding to ensure a complete reorganization over any wafer area.

  20. Ceramic tamper-revealing seals

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Sheen, Shuh-Haw

    1992-01-01

    A flexible metal or ceramic cable with composite ceramic ends, or a u-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or zirconium, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting.

  1. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sabloff, J A

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  2. Ceramic laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin

    2008-12-01

    The word 'ceramics' is derived from the Greek keramos, meaning pottery and porcelain. The opaque and translucent cement and clay often used in tableware are not appropriate for optical applications because of the high content of optical scattering sources, that is, defects. Recently, scientists have shown that by eliminating the defects, a new, refined ceramic material - polycrystalline ceramic - can be produced. This advanced ceramic material offers practical laser generation and is anticipated to be a highly attractive alternative to conventional glass and single-crystal laser technologies in the future. Here we review the history of the development of ceramic lasers, the principle of laser generation based on this material, some typical results achieved with ceramic lasers so far, and discuss the potential future outlook for the field.

  3. NDE of ceramics and ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex; Klima, Stanley J.

    1991-01-01

    Although nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for ceramics are fairly well developed, they are difficult to apply in many cases for high probability detection of the minute flaws that can cause failure in monolithic ceramics. Conventional NDE techniques are available for monolithic and fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites, but more exact quantitative techniques needed are still being investigated and developed. Needs range from flaw detection to below 100 micron levels in monolithic ceramics to global imaging of fiber architecture and matrix densification anomalies in ceramic composites. NDE techniques that will ultimately be applicable to production and quality control of ceramic structures are still emerging from the lab. Needs are different depending on the processing stage, fabrication method, and nature of the finished product. NDE techniques are being developed in concert with materials processing research where they can provide feedback information to processing development and quality improvement. NDE techniques also serve as research tools for materials characterization and for understanding failure processes, e.g., during thermomechanical testing.

  4. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  5. Displacive Transformation in Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-28

    oxidizing atmosphere. In the fiber pullout mechanism of toughening which is thought to be the most powerful to date in ceramics, in non-graphite coated ...induced transformation of the ceramic coating promotes not only fiber pullout mechanisms, but also dissipates crack energy as well as causing frictional...1-11, (1971). 15 G. W. Taylor, "Electrical Properties of Niobium -Doped Ferroelectric Pb(Zr,SnTi)0 3 Ceramics," J. Appl. Phys., 38 [12], 4696-4706

  6. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, Kathleen B.; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.; Waters, Shirley B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite.

  7. Measuring Fracture Times Of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Bister, Leo; Bickler, Donald G.

    1989-01-01

    Electrical measurements complement or replace fast cinematography. Electronic system measures microsecond time intervals between impacts of projectiles on ceramic tiles and fracture tiles. Used in research on ceramics and ceramic-based composite materials such as armor. Hardness and low density of ceramics enable them to disintegrate projectiles more efficiently than metals. Projectile approaches ceramic tile specimen. Penetrating foil squares of triggering device activate display and recording instruments. As ceramic and resistive film break oscilloscope plots increase in electrical resistance of film.

  8. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  9. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1992-11-17

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density. 2 figs.

  10. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  11. Defect production in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Kinoshita, C.

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  12. Thermoplastic Extrusion for Ceramic Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Frank

    Originally for the extrusion of ceramic bricks and tiles, clay and water were used to endow ceramic particle mixtures with sufficient plastic behaviour to permit practical shaping of the ceramic bodies. High-performance ceramics, however, often require the elimination of clay from extrusion formulations because the chemistry of the clay is incompatible with that of the desired ceramic materials. Therefore organic materials are frequently used in ceramic extrusion to provide plastic flow. Not only plastic behaviour is important for the extrusion of ceramic bodies. There are many other characteristics that can be tailored by the suitable addition of organics in a ceramic extrusion paste, or feedstock.

  13. Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  14. Method of making a modified ceramic-ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, Billy L.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Stinton, David P.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of making a shaped ceramic-ceramic composite articles, such as gas-fired radiant heat burner tubes, heat exchangers, flame dispersers, and other furnace elements, having a formed-on ceramic-ceramic composite thereon.

  15. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-02-01

    This is the fifth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. Results of wetting experiments on commercially available Nickel based brazing alloys on perovskite surfaces are described. Additionally, experimental and numerical investigations on the strength of concentric ceramic/metal joints are presented.

  16. Industrial Ceramics: Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The expanding use of ceramic products in today's world can be seen in the areas of communications, construction, aerospace, textiles, metallurgy, atomic energy, and electronics. The demands of science have brought ceramics from an art to an industry using mass production and automated processes which requires the services of great numbers as the…

  17. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    DOEpatents

    Petty, Jack D.

    1993-01-01

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  18. Strain isolated ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolokan, R. P.; Brady, J. B.; Jarrabet, G. P.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are used in gas turbine engines to improve component temperature capability and cooling air efficiency. A compliant metal fiber strain isolator between a plasma sprayed ceramic coating and a metal substrate improves ceramic durability while allowing thicker coatings for better insulation. Development of strain isolated coatings has concentrated on design and fabrication of coatings and coating evaluation via thermal shock testing. In thermal shock testing, five types of failure are possible: buckling failure im compression on heat up, bimetal type failure, isothermal expansion mismatch failure, mudflat cracking during cool down, and long term fatigue. A primary failure mode for thermally cycled coatings is designated bimetal type failure. Bimetal failure is tensile failure in the ceramic near the ceramic-metal interface. One of the significant benefits of the strain isolator is an insulating layer protecting the metal substrate from heat deformation and thereby preventing bimetal type failure.

  19. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    LaHaye, P.G.; Rahman, F.H.; Lebeau, T.P.; Severin, B.K.

    1998-06-16

    A tube containment system is disclosed. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture. 6 figs.

  20. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    LaHaye, Paul G.; Rahman, Faress H.; Lebeau, Thomas P. E.; Severin, Barbara K.

    1998-01-01

    A tube containment system. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture.

  1. Ceramic-silicide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1998-12-01

    The area of ceramic-silicide composites represents a merging of structural ceramics and structural silicides. Such ceramic-silicide composites can possess the desirable characteristics of both classes of compounds. Important structural ceramics are materials such as Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, SiC, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and ZrO{sub 2}, which possess covalent, ionic, or mixed covalent-ionic atomic bonding. An important structural silicide is MoSi{sub 2}, which possesses mixed covalent-metallic bonding. The arena of ceramic-silicide composites encompasses both composites where the structural silicide is the matrix and the structural ceramic is the reinforcement, and composites where the structural ceramic is the matrix and the structural silicide is the reinforcement. In the former area, MoSi{sub 2}-SiC, MoSi{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}, and MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites are discussed. In the latter area, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-MoSi{sub 2} composites are described.

  2. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  3. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  4. The APS ceramic chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  5. Spacecraft ceramic protective shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larriva, Rene F. (Inventor); Nelson, Anne (M.); Czechanski, James G. (Inventor); Poff, Ray E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A low areal density protective shield apparatus, and method for making same, for protecting spacecraft structures from impact with hypervelocity objects, including a bumper member comprising a bumper ceramic layer, a bumper shock attenuator layer, and a bumper confining layer. The bumper ceramic layer can be SiC or B.sub.4 C; the bumper shock attenuator layer can be zirconia felt; and the bumper confining layer can be aluminum. A base armor member can be spaced from the bumper member and a ceramic fiber-based curtain can be positioned between the bumper and base armor members.

  6. Performance Comparison of Stion CIGS Modules to Baseline Monocrystalline Modules at the New Mexico Florida and Vermont Regional Test Centers: January 2015-December 2016.

    SciTech Connect

    Lave, Matthew Samuel; Stein, Joshua; Burnham, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    This report provides performance data and analysis for two Stion copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) module types, one framed, the other frameless, and installed at the New Mexico, Florida and Vermont RTCs. Sandia looked at data from both module types and compared the latter with data from an adjacent monocrystalline baseline array at each RTC. The results indicate that the Stion modules are slightly outperforming their rated power, with efficiency values above 100% of rated power, at 25degC cell temperatures. In addition, Sandia sees no significant performance differences between module types, which is expected because the modules differ only in their framing. In contrast to the baseline systems, the Stion strings showed increasing efficiency with increasing irradiance, with the greatest increase between zero and 400 Wm -2 but still noticeable increases at 1000 Wm -2 . Although baseline data availability in Vermont was spotty and therefore comparative trends are difficult to discern, the Stion modules there may offer snow- shedding advantages over monocrystalline-silicon modules but these findings are preliminary.

  7. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  8. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  9. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  10. Fibrous ceramic insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.E.

    1982-11-01

    Some of the reusable heat shielding materials used to protect the Space Shuttles, their manufacturing processes, properties, and applications are discussed. Emphasis is upon ceramic materials. Space Shuttle Orbiter tiles are discussed.

  11. Light emitting ceramic device

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  12. Making Ceramic Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  13. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  14. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  15. Super Thin Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Video Gallery

    New technology being developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center creates super thin ceramic coatings on engine components. The Plasma Spray – Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) rig uses a powerful ...

  16. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  17. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, Mark S.; Shlomo, Golan; Anderson, Marc A.

    1994-01-01

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range.

  18. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-07-23

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite. 5 figs.

  19. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  20. Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods

    DOEpatents

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2007-08-28

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  1. Fundamental tribological properties of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Miyoshi, K.

    1985-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with itself, another ceramic, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. Adhesion between a ceramic and itself or another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to the interface resulting from solid state contact. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid-state contact are discussed as they relate to friction and wear. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as with metals. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Lubrication is found to increase the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics with sliding or rubbing contact.

  2. Piezoelectric Ceramics and Their Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinn, I.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the piezoelectric effect in ceramics and presents a quantitative representation of this effect. Explains the processes involved in the manufacture of piezoelectric ceramics, the materials used, and the situations in which they are applied. (GS)

  3. Microstructure and properties of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamano, K.

    1984-01-01

    The history of research into the microstructure and properties of ceramic ware is discussed; methods of producing ceramics with particular characteristics are investigated. Bubbles, sintering, cracks, and electron microscopy are discussed.

  4. Ceramic automotive Stirling engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

  5. Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

  6. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  7. Ceramic combustor mounting

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Melvin G.; Janneck, Frank W.

    1982-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a metal engine block including a wall portion defining a housing for a combustor having ceramic liner components. A ceramic outlet duct is supported by a compliant seal on the metal block and a reaction chamber liner is stacked thereon and partly closed at one end by a ceramic bypass swirl plate which is spring loaded by a plurality of circumferentially spaced, spring loaded guide rods and wherein each of the guide rods has one end thereof directed exteriorly of a metal cover plate on the engine block to react against externally located biasing springs cooled by ambient air and wherein the rod spring support arrangement maintains the stacked ceramic components together so that a normal force is maintained on the seal between the outlet duct and the engine block under all operating conditions. The support arrangement also is operative to accommodate a substantial difference in thermal expansion between the ceramic liner components of the combustor and the metal material of the engine block.

  8. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  9. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  10. Ceramics with Different Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juanjuan; Feng, Lajun; Lei, Ali; Zhao, Kang; Yan, Aijun

    2014-09-01

    Li2CO3, MgCO3, BaCO3, and Bi2O3 dopants were introduced into CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) ceramics in order to improve the dielectric properties. The CCTO ceramics were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method. The phase structure, microstructure, and dielectric behavior were carefully investigated. The pure structure without any impurity phases can be confirmed by the x-ray diffraction patterns. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis illuminated that the grains of Ca0.90Li0.20Cu3Ti4O12 ceramics were greater than that of pure CCTO. It was important for the properties of the CCTO ceramics to study the additives in complex impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the Ca0.90Li0.20Cu3Ti4O12 ceramics had the higher permittivity (>45000), the lower dielectric loss (<0.025) than those of CCTO at 1 kHz at room temperature and good temperature stability from -30 to 75 °C.

  11. Ceramic coatings on smooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A. (Inventor); Brindley, W. J. (Inventor); Rouge, C. J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A metallic coating is plasma sprayed onto a smooth surface of a metal alloy substitute or on a bond coating. An initial thin ceramic layer is low pressure sprayed onto the smooth surface of the substrate or bond coating. Another ceramic layer is atmospheric plasma sprayed onto the initial ceramic layer.

  12. Assessment of ceramic membrane filters

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.; Im, K.H.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this project include the development of analytical models for evaluating the fluid mechanics of membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters, and to determine the effects of thermal and thermo-chemical aging on the material properties of emerging ceramic hot gas filters. A honeycomb cordierite monolith with a thin ceramic coating and a rigid candle filter were evaluated.

  13. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  14. Ceramic tamper-revealing seals

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Raptis, A.C.; Sheen, S.H.

    1992-12-08

    A flexible metal or ceramic cable is described with composite ceramic ends, or a U-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or zirconium, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting. 7 figs.

  15. Ceramic technology for automotive turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, A. F.

    1982-01-01

    The paper presents an update on ceramic technology for automotive turbines. Progress in research and development of improved ceramics is reviewed, including approaches for assessing time-dependent strength characteristics. Processes for making shapes are discussed, and the design and testing of selected ceramic turbine components are reviewed.

  16. Artificial Voids In Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Generazio, Edward R.; Baaklini, George Y.

    1988-01-01

    Method for creating voids in ceramic specimens developed. Silicon carbide and silicon nitride are high-temperature structural ceramic materials considered for applications in advanced gas-turbine engines. Ability to detect and characterize voids (by sizes, shapes, and locations) in structural ceramics vital for increasing strengths and reliabilities of materials. Small holes made deliberately to help quantify techniques of nondestructive evaluation.

  17. Structural and photoluminescent properties of nanowires formed by the metal-assisted chemical etching of monocrystalline silicon with different doping level

    SciTech Connect

    Georgobiani, V. A. Gonchar, K. A.; Osminkina, L. A.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2015-08-15

    Silicon-nanowire layers grown by the metal-assisted chemical etching of (100)-oriented p-type monocrystalline silicon substrates with a resistivity of 10 and 0.001 Ω · cm are studied by electron microscopy, Raman scattering, and photoluminescence measurements. It is established that nanowires grown on lightly doped substrates are structurally nonporous and formed as crystalline cores covered by nanocrystals 3–5 nm in dimensions. Nanowires grown on heavily doped substrates are structurally porous and contain both small nanocrystals and coarser crystallites with equilibrium charge carriers that influence interband radiative recombination. It is found that the photoluminescence intensity of nanowires in the spectral range 1.3–2.0 eV depends on the presence of molecular oxygen.

  18. Theoretically predicted and experimentally determined effects of the Si/(Si + C) gas phase ratio on the growth and character of monocrystalline beta silicon carbide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Davis, R. F.

    1986-10-01

    The effects of the Si/(Si + C) ratio in the reaction gas stream on the growth and properties of monocrystalline beta-SiC films grown on Si(100) substrates via chemical vapor deposition have been theoretically and experimentally studied. The amounts of condensed phases of beta-SiC and Si, and the partial pressures of the remaining Si and C-containing gases as a function of the Si/(Si + C) ratio in the source gases have been initially obtained from thermodynamic calculations using the 'SOLGASMIX-PV' computer program. Complementary and comparative experimental growth studies have shown that inclusion-free films having maximum values in growth rate and carrier concentration and a minimum value of resistivity were obtained near Si/(Si + C) = 0.5.

  19. Physical and Structural Characterization of a Monocrystalline Cu-13.7Al-4.2Ni Alloy Subjected to Thermal Cycling Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Elaine Cristina; Matlakhova, Lioudmila Aleksandrovna; Matlakhov, Anatoliy Nikolaevich; Shigue, Carlos Yujiro; Monteiro, Sérgio Neves

    2014-04-01

    A monocrystalline alloy with nominal 82wt pctCu-13.7wt pctAl-4.2wt pctNi composition and exhibiting reversible martensitic transformation (RMT) was subjected to multiple heating and cooling cycles within the RMT range of critical temperatures. Both untreated and cyclic treated alloy samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and Vickers microhardness. The results indicated that the alloy presents a complex RMT behavior disclosing a sequence of transformation steps: β 1 ↔ R and R ↔ β'1 + γ'1 as well as possible β 1 ↔ β'1 and β'1 ↔ γ'1 direct reactions. The thermal cycling treatment inhibits the development of γ'1 martensite without much change in both the physical and microstructure characteristics. This suggests a good resistance of the alloy to irreversible structural changes.

  20. Ceramic regenerator program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Jerrold E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating an Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) regenerator containing intricate hydraulic passages from a ceramic material in order to allow operation with high temperature combustion gas and to reduce weight as compared with metallic materials was demonstrated. Platelet technology, ceramic tape casting, and multilayer ceramic packaging techniques were used in this fabrication of subscale silicon nitride components. Proof-of-concept demonstrations were performed to simulate a methane cooled regenerator for an ATR engine. The regenerator vane was designed to operate at realistic service conditions, i.e., 600 psi in a 3500 R (3040 F), 500 fps combustion gas environment. A total of six regenerators were fabricated and tested. The regenerators were shown to be able to withstand internal pressurization to 1575 psi. They were subjected to testing in 500 fps, 3560 R (3100 F) air/propane combustion products and were operated satisfactorily for an excess of 100 hr and 40 thermal cycles which exceeded 2460 R (2000 F).

  1. Ceramic vane drive joint

    DOEpatents

    Smale, Charles H.

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  2. Microwave sintering of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    Successful adaptation of microwave heating to the densification of ceramic materials require a marriage of microwave and materials technologies. Using an interdisciplinary team of microwave and materials engineers, we have successfully demonstrated the ability to density ceramic materials over a wide range of temperatures. Microstructural evolution during microwave sintering has been found to be significantly different from that observed in conventional sintering. Our results and those of others indicate that microwave sintering has the potential to fabricate components to near net shape with mechanical properties equivalent to hot pressed or hot isostatically pressed material. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.

    1979-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes consists of HfO.sub.2 and sufficient Tb.sub.4 O.sub.7 to stabilize at least 60 volume percent of the HfO.sub.2 into the cubic structure. The ceramic component may also contain a small amount of PrO.sub.2, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 or a mixture of both to improve stability and electronic conductivity of the electrode. The component is highly resistant to corrosion by molten potassium seed and molten coal slag in the MHD fluid and exhibits both ionic and electronic conductivity.

  4. Ceramic breeder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E.; Kummerer, K.R.; Roth, E.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramic materials are under investigation as potential breeder material in fusion reactors. This paper will review candidate materials with respect to fabrication routes and characterization, properties in as-fabricated and irradiated condition, and experimental results from laboratory and inpile investigations on tritium transport and release. Also discussed are the resources of beryllium, which is being considered as a neutron multiplier. The comparison of ceramic properties that is attempted here aims at the identification of the most-promising material for use in a tritium breeding blanket. 82 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Environment Conscious Ceramics (Ecoceramics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Environment conscious ceramics (Ecoceramics) are a new class of materials, which can be produced with renewable natural resources (wood) or wood wastes (wood sawdust). Silicon carbide-based ecoceramics have been fabricated by reactive infiltration of carbonaceous preforms by molten silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. These carbonaceous preforms have been fabricated by pyrolysis of solid wood bodies at 1000 C. The fabrication approach, microstructure, and mechanical properties of SiC-based ecoceramics are presented. Ecoceramics have tailorable properties and behave like ceramic materials manufactured by conventional approaches.

  6. Performance of Dental Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Rekow, E.D.; Silva, N.R.F.A.; Coelho, P.G.; Zhang, Y.; Guess, P.; Thompson, V.P.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical success of modern dental ceramics depends on an array of factors, ranging from initial physical properties of the material itself, to the fabrication and clinical procedures that inevitably damage these brittle materials, and the oral environment. Understanding the influence of these factors on clinical performance has engaged the dental, ceramics, and engineering communities alike. The objective of this review is to first summarize clinical, experimental, and analytic results reported in the recent literature. Additionally, it seeks to address how this new information adds insight into predictive test procedures and reveals challenges for future improvements. PMID:21224408

  7. Why ceramic engines?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadler, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    Oil is still a problem for the U.S. and its allies. Transportation uses 61 percent of U.S. oil and its share is increasing, so more efficient technology should be concentrated there. Trucks' share of oil use is increasing because they are already much more efficient than autos. The primary truck opportunities are streamlining, more efficient engines, and shifting freight to railroads. More efficient engines are possible using ceramics to allow elimination of cooling systems and better use of waste exhaust heat. A 60 percent improvement seems possible if ceramics can be made tough enough and durable enough.

  8. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, M.S.; Shlomo, G.; Anderson, M.A.

    1994-08-30

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range. 2 figs.

  9. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Webster, E.; Anderson, M.

    1993-12-14

    A method for the formation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms. 4 figures.

  10. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Webster, Elizabeth; Anderson, Marc

    1993-01-01

    A method for permformation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms.

  11. [Ceramic couplings in orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Thomsen, M; Willmann, G

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic materials have been used as a coupling in total hip arthroplasty since the 1970s to solve the problem of polyethylene particle disease. Several problems with the material and the design have been identified and solved. Using inlays and ceramic heads of the latest generation offers the possibility of reducing the wear rate to as low as 0.001 mm per year. The problem of ceramic fractures is rare. Recently due to the manufacturing process some zirconia ceramic heads have been problematic. New developments with other ceramics are discussed.

  12. Tribological properties of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Miyoshi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The tribological and lubricated behavior of both oxide and nonoxide ceramics are reviewed in this chapter. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials and metals. Elastic, plastic and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as has been observed with metals. Grit size effects in two and three body abrasive wear are observed for ceramics. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Surface contaminants affect friction and adhesive wear. For example, carbon on silicon carbide and chlorine on aluminum oxide reduce friction while oxygen on metal surfaces in contact with ceramics increases friction. Lubrication increases the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics both in indentation and with sliding or rubbing. Ceramics compositions both as coatings and in composites are described for the high temperature lubrication of both alloys and ceramics.

  13. Light-weight ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-high temperature, light-weight, ceramic insulation such as ceramic tile is obtained by pyrolyzing a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of at least one organo dialkoxy silane and at least one tetralkoxy silane in an acid or base liquid medium. The reaction mixture of the tetra- and dialkoxy silanes may contain also an effective amount of a mono- or trialkoxy silane to obtain the siloxane gel. The siloxane gel is dried at ambient pressures to form a siloxane ceramic precursor without significant shrinkage. The siloxane ceramic precursor is subsequently pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the black ceramic insulation comprising atoms of silicon, carbon and oxygen. The ceramic insulation, can be characterized as a porous, uniform ceramic tile resistant to oxidation at temperatures ranging as high as 1700.degree. C. and is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft and other high-temperature insulation applications.

  14. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  15. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, John V.; Novak, Robert F.; McBride, James R.

    1991-01-01

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  16. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.; Guangyao Sheng.

    1993-05-04

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  17. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOEpatents

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-04-07

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  18. Silicon carbide ceramic production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method to produce sintered silicon carbide ceramics in which powdery carbonaceous components with a dispersant are mixed with silicon carbide powder, shaped as required with or without drying, and fired in nonoxidation atmosphere is described. Carbon black is used as the carbonaceous component.

  19. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Sheng, Guangyao

    1993-01-01

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  20. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  1. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-04-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-05-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  3. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  4. Ceramic Coating Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-02

    platinum, protactinium , rhenium, chemically stable in oxygen or other oxidizing atmospheres. rhodium; ruthenium, samarium, scandium, silicon, tantalum; 20...high "mismatch" platinum, protactinium , rhenium, and tantalum braze layer, 30 between ceramic (e.g., A12O3 or ZrO2 ) and carbon steel, the lower-melting

  5. Durability of ceramic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Tressler, R.E.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1994-10-01

    The objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating systems have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life.

  6. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOEpatents

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  7. Refractory ceramic fibers

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Refractory ceramic fibers ; CASRN Not found Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  8. Ceramic Laser Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Soules, T F; Clapsaddle, B J; Landingham, R L; Schaffers, K I

    2005-02-15

    Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications, not the least of which is the ability to make large aperture parts in a robust manufacturing process. After more than a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd, Japanese workers have recently succeeded in demonstrating samples that performed as laser gain media as well as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. We have established a good working relationship with Konoshima Ltd., the Japanese producer of the best ceramic laser materials, and have procured and evaluated slabs designed by us for use in our high-powered SSHCL. Our measurements indicate that these materials will work in the SSHCL, and we have nearly completed retrofitting the SSHCL with four of the largest transparent ceramic YAG:Nd slabs in existence. We have also begun our own effort to make this material and have produced samples with various degrees of transparency/translucency. We are in the process of carrying out an extensive design-of-experiments to establish the significant process variables for making transparent YAG. Finally because transparent ceramics afford much greater flexibility in the design of lasers, we have been exploring the potential for much larger apertures, new materials, for example for the Mercury laser, other designs for SSHL, such as, edge pumping designs, slabs with built in ASE suppression, etc. This work has just beginning.

  9. Ceramic tubesheet design analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, R.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    A transport combustor is being commissioned at the Southern Services facility in Wilsonville, Alabama to provide a gaseous product for the assessment of hot-gas filtering systems. One of the barrier filters incorporates a ceramic tubesheet to support candle filters. The ceramic tubesheet, designed and manufactured by Industrial Filter and Pump Manufacturing Company (EF&PM), is unique and offers distinct advantages over metallic systems in terms of density, resistance to corrosion, and resistance to creep at operating temperatures above 815{degrees}C (1500{degrees}F). Nevertheless, the operational requirements of the ceramic tubesheet are severe. The tubesheet is almost 1.5 m in (55 in.) in diameter, has many penetrations, and must support the weight of the ceramic filters, coal ash accumulation, and a pressure drop (one atmosphere). Further, thermal stresses related to steady state and transient conditions will occur. To gain a better understanding of the structural performance limitations, a contract was placed with Mallett Technology, Inc. to perform a thermal and structural analysis of the tubesheet design. The design analysis specification and a preliminary design analysis were completed in the early part of 1995. The analyses indicated that modifications to the design were necessary to reduce thermal stress, and it was necessary to complete the redesign before the final thermal/mechanical analysis could be undertaken. The preliminary analysis identified the need to confirm that the physical and mechanical properties data used in the design were representative of the material in the tubesheet. Subsequently, few exploratory tests were performed at ORNL to evaluate the ceramic structural material.

  10. Ceramic oxide powders and the formation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.L.; Chenghung Hung.

    1993-12-07

    Ceramic oxide powders and a method for their preparation. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby two or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein said precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders are determined by process conditions. 14 figures.

  11. Ceramic oxide powders and the formation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Joseph L.; Hung, Cheng-Hung

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic oxide powders and a method for their preparation. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby two or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein said precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders are determined by process conditions.

  12. Oxidation and Corrosion of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Lee, Kang N.

    2000-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites are candidates for numerous applications in high temperature environments with aggressive gases and possible corrosive deposits. There is a growing realization that high temperature oxidation and corrosion issues must be considered. There are many facets to these studies, which have been extensively covered in some recent reviews. The focus of this paper is on current research, over the past two years. In the authors' view, the most important oxidation and corrosion studies have focused on four major areas during this time frame. These are; (I) Oxidation of precursor-based ceramics; (II) Studies of the interphase material in ceramic matrix composites; (III) Water vapor interactions with ceramics, particularly in combustion environments; and (IV) Development of refractory oxide coatings for silicon-based ceramics. In this paper, we shall explore the most current work in each of these areas.

  13. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  14. Ceramic Stereolithography: Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics by Photopolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halloran, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic stereolithography and related additive manufacturing methods involving photopolymerization of ceramic powder suspensions are reviewed in terms of the capabilities of current devices. The practical fundamentals of the cure depth, cure width, and cure profile are related to the optical properties of the monomer, ceramic, and photo-active components. Postpolymerization steps, including harvesting and cleaning the objects, binder burnout, and sintering, are discussed and compared with conventional methods. The prospects for practical manufacturing are discussed.

  15. Grain boundaries in ceramics and ceramic-metal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, D.R.; Wolf, D.

    1986-01-01

    Three interfaces exist: the crystal-crystal grain boundary in very pure single-phase ceramics, the crystal-glass-crystal grain boundary in most single-phase and polyphase ceramics, and the ceramic-metal interface. It is needed to correlate their structure and adhesion/failure. Methods for studying the bonding, interfacial structure, and fracture and adhesion are discussed, and recommendations are given. 42 refs. (DLC)

  16. Seal between metal and ceramic conduits

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul; Tentarelli, Stephen Clyde

    2015-02-03

    A seal between a ceramic conduit and a metal conduit of an ion transport membrane device consisting of a sealing surface of ceramic conduit, a sealing surface of ceramic conduit, a single gasket body, and a single compliant interlayer.

  17. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    DOEpatents

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  18. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    DOEpatents

    Connolly, E.S.; Forsythe, G.D.; Domanski, D.M.; Chambers, J.A.; Rajendran, G.P.

    1999-05-11

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter is described having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during back pulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  19. Testing Ceramics for Diesel Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Adaptation of diesel engine allows prestressed ceramic materials evaluated under realistic pressure, temperature, and stress without introducing extraneous stress. Ceramic specimen part of prechamber of research engine. Specimen held in place by clamp, introduces required axial compressive stress. Specimen -- cylindrical shell -- surrounded by chamber vented or pressurized to introduce requisite radial stress in ceramic. Pressure chamber also serves as safety shield in case speimen disintegrates. Materials under consideration as cylinder liners for diesel engines.

  20. Processing method for superconducting ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Ira D.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Flandermeyer, Brian K.

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing a superconducting ceramic and particularly YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta., where .delta. is in the order of about 0.1-0.4, is carried out using a polymeric binder which decomposes below its ignition point to reduce carbon residue between the grains of the sintered ceramic and a nonhydroxylic organic solvent to limit the problems with water or certain alcohols on the ceramic composition.

  1. Processing method for superconducting ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Ira D.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Flandermeyer, Brian K.

    1993-02-02

    A process for preparing a superconducting ceramic and particularly YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta., where .delta. is in the order of about 0.1-0.4, is carried out using a polymeric binder which decomposes below its ignition point to reduce carbon residue between the grains of the sintered ceramic and a nonhydroxylic organic solvent to limit the problems with water or certain alcohols on the ceramic composition.

  2. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Joel

    2007-12-10

    Transparent ceramics match or exceed the performance of single-crystal materials in laser applications, with a more-robust fabrication process. Controlling the distribution of optical dopants in transparent ceramics would allow qualitative improvements in amplifier slab design by allowing gain and loss to be varied within the material. My work aims to achieve a controlled pattern or gradient of dopant prior to sintering, in order to produce tailored ceramics.

  3. Ceramic composite coating

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-21

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  4. Ceramic composite coating

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.

    1997-01-01

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  5. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  6. Ceramics for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications.

  7. Ceramic fabrication R D

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This project is separated into three tasks. The first task is a design and modeling effort to be carried out by MSE, Inc. The purpose of this task is to develop and analyze designs for various cohesive ceramic fabrication (CCF) components, including an MHD electrode for strategic defense initiative (SDI) applications and a high stress, low cost, reinforced ceramic component for armor applications. The MHD electrode design is substantially completed. A layered structure composed of molybdenum disilicide graded with quartz glass has been designed and analyzed using finite element methods. The design demonstrates the fabrication capabilities of the CCF process. The high stress, armor application component will be silicon carbide reinforced alumina in thick plates. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Microprobes aluminosilicate ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Sheng, Guangyao

    1993-01-01

    Methods have been developed to make mixed alumina-silicate and aluminosilicate particulate microporous ceramic membranes. One method involves the making of separate alumina and silica sols which are then mixed. Another method involves the creation of a combined sol with aluminosilicate particles. The resulting combined alumina and silica membranes have high surface area, a very small pore size, and a very good temperature stability.

  9. Miniature ceramic fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.; Zuppero, Anthony C.

    1997-06-24

    A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

  10. Transformation Toughening of Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    TRANSFORMATION ZONE SHAPE EFFECTS IN CRACK SHIELDING IN CERIA-PARTIALLY STABILIZED ZIRCONIA (Ce-TZP). ALUMINA COMPOSITES to be published in J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 13 Cl...lS85HWejw TRANSFORMATION ZONE SHAPE EFFECTS ON CRACK SHIELDING IN CERIA-PARTIALLY-STABILIZED ZIRCONIA (Ce-TZP)- ALUMINA S..COMPOSITES Cheng-Sheng Yu...zones in Ce-TZP/Al203 composites, in which the transformation zone sizes were changed significantly by varying the sintering temperature to control

  11. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, Prakash C.; Seydel, Edgar R.; Raj, Rishi

    1988-03-22

    The invention relates to producing relatively flaw free silicon nitride ceramic shapes requiring little or no machining by superplastic forging This invention herein was made in part under Department of Energy Grant DE-AC01-84ER80167, creating certain rights in the United States Government. The invention was also made in part under New York State Science and Technology Grant SB1R 1985-10.

  12. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-12-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  13. Transparent Spinel Ceramic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    2009 NRL REVIEW 215 OPTICAL SCIENCES Transparent Spinel Ceramic J.S. Sanghera, G. Villalobos , W. Kim, S. Bayya, and I.D. Aggarwal Optical Sciences...Sponsored by NRL and ONR] Reference 1 G. Villalobos , J.S. Sanghera, S.B. Bayya, and I.D. Aggarwal, “Fluoride Salt Coated Magnesium Aluminate,” U.S. Patent 7,211,325, May 1, 2007.

  14. Multifracture of ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Weitsman, Y.J. ); Zhu, H. )

    1992-03-01

    This work presents a mechanistic model for the multifracture process of uniaxially reinforced fibrous ceramic composites under monotonically increasing tension parallel to the fiber direction. The model employs an energy criterion to account for the progression of matrix cracks, bridged by intact fibers, and Weibull failure statistics to relate the failure of the fibers. Consideration is given to the interactions between the foregoing failure processes as well as to the effects of various material parameters on the response of the composite.

  15. Joined ceramic product

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles W [Kennewick, WA; Brimhall, John L [West Richland, WA

    2001-08-21

    According to the present invention, a joined product is at least two ceramic parts, specifically bi-element carbide parts with a bond joint therebetween, wherein the bond joint has a metal silicon phase. The bi-element carbide refers to compounds of MC, M.sub.2 C, M.sub.4 C and combinations thereof, where M is a first element and C is carbon. The metal silicon phase may be a metal silicon carbide ternary phase, or a metal silicide.

  16. Transformation Toughening of Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    International Science Center SC5444.FR 1. INTRODUCTION Zirconia -containing ceramics can be toughened dramatically by the marten- sitic tetragonal -to-monoclinic...cm- 1) coincide with peaks of the monoclinic phase (Fig. 3(c)), but the remaining nine do not belong to any of the tetragonal , monoclinic or cubic ... tetragonal precipitates and the remainder cubic matrix. After cooling, there was no change in the intensities of the monoclinic peaks (e.g. (G1T)and (111

  17. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roode, M. van

    1995-10-01

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  18. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roode, M. van

    1995-12-31

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  19. Anionic Conducting Oxide Ceramics: Microstructure - Property Relations of Bicuvox Ceramics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The bismuth vanadate composition, Bi4V2011, is the parent compound for a new family of oxygen ion conductors. The substitution of various metallic... bismuth vanadate ceramics. Phase-pure materials with densities above 95% of theoretical were obtained using standard ceramic processing approaches

  20. Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, T.K.; Novak, R.F.

    1991-05-07

    An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined. 3 figures.

  1. Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Thomas K.; Novak, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined.

  2. Characteristics of poly- and mono-crystalline BeO and SiO2 as thermal and cold neutron filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adib, M.; Habib, N.; Bashter, I. I.; Morcos, H. N.; El-Mesiry, M. S.; Mansy, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    A simple model along with a computer code "HEXA-FILTERS" is used to carry out the calculation of the total cross-sections of BeO and SiO2 having poly or mono-crystalline form as a function of neutron wavelength at room (R.T.) and liquid nitrogen (L.N.) temperatures. An overall agreement is indicated between the calculated neutron cross-sections and experimental data. Calculation shows that 25 cm thick of polycrystalline BeO cooled at liquid nitrogen temperature was found to be a good filter for neutron wavelengths longer than 0.46 nm. While, 50 cm of SiO2, with much less transmission, for neutrons with wavelengths longer than 0.85 nm. It was also found that 10 cm of BeO and 15 cm SiO2 thick mono-crystals cut along their (0 0 2) plane, with 0.5° FWHM on mosaic spread and cooled at L.N., are a good thermal neutron filter, with high effect-to-noise ratio.

  3. Photocarrier radiometry for predicting the degradation of electrical parameters of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell irradiated by 100 KeV proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P.; Liu, J. Y.; Yuan, H. M.; Oliullah, Md.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell irradiated by 100 KeV proton beams at various fluences is investigated. A one-dimensional two-layer carrier density wave model has been developed to estimate the minority carrier lifetime of n-region and p-region of the non-irradiated c-Si solar cell by best fitting with the experimental photocarrier radiometry (PCR) signal (the amplitude and the phase). Furthermore, the lifetime is used to determine the initial defect density of the quasi-neutral region (QNR) of the solar cell to predict its I-V characteristics. The theoretically predicted short-circuit current density (Jsc), and open-circuit voltage (Voc) of the non-irradiated samples are in good agreement with experiment. Then a three-region defect distribution model for the c-Si solar cell irradiated by proton beams is carried out to describe the defect density distribution according to Monte Carlo simulation results and the initial defect density of the non-irradiated sample. Finally, we find that the electrical measurements of Jsc and Voc of the solar cells irradiated at different fluences using 100 KeV proton beams are consistent with the PCR predicting results.

  4. Photocarrier Radiometry for Noncontact Evaluation of Monocrystalline Silicon (c-Si) Solar Cell Irradiated by 1 MeV Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P.; Liu, J. Y.; Yuan, H. M.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell irradiated by 1 MeV electron beams was investigated using noncontact photocarrier radiometry (PCR). A theoretical 1D two-layer PCR model including the impedance effect of the p-n junction was used to characterize the transport properties (carrier lifetime, diffusion coefficient, and surface recombination velocities) of c-Si solar cells irradiated by 1 MeV electron beams with different fluences. The carrier transport parameters were derived by the best fit through PCR measurements. Furthermore, an Ev+0.56 eV trap was introduced into the band gap based on the minority carrier lifetime reduction. An I-V characteristic was obtained by both AFORS-HET simulation and experimental study, and the simulation results shows in good agreement with the experimental results. Moreover, the simulation and experiment results also indicate that the increase of fluences of electron beams results in the reduction of short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage.

  5. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, Roger B.; Claar, Terry D.; Silkowski, Peter

    1988-09-06

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  6. High Technology Ceramics in Japan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-14

    ILtOjY CERAMICS IN JAPAN ,treas: among these are biotechnology . Oectronics. and new materials includins :eramics. The ceramics project is coordinated by...an emerging industr ,. During tuch an carly phase of industry development. product designs have yet to bc established. .nd several approaches to the

  7. Controlled Dynamic Fragmentation of Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-14

    mechanism determining ballistic impact performance of ceramic armors as well as reliability of gun barrels. This program, which was sponsored by the...Research Office Fragmentation is a key damage mechanism determining ballistic impact performance of ceramic armors as well as reliability of gun ...the defect distributions that were considered (Weibull, Gauss and Uniform) fall on a single universal curve. Sdf

  8. Impact-Resistant Ceramic Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, W. H.; Creedon, J. F.; Izu, Y. D.

    1986-01-01

    Refractory fibers more than double strength of coating. Impact strengths of ceramic coatings increase with increasing whisker content. Silicon carbide whiskers clearly produce largest increase, and improvement grows even more with high-temperature sintering. Coating also improves thermal and mechanical properties of electromagnetic components, mirrors, furnace linings, and ceramic parts of advanced internal-combustion engines.

  9. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, R.B.; Claar, T.D.; Silkowski, P.

    1987-04-22

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  10. Method of forming ceramic bricks

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, Roger B.; Claar, Terry D.; Silkowski, Peter

    1988-01-01

    A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

  11. Lightweight high performance ceramic material

    DOEpatents

    Nunn, Stephen D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-02

    A sintered ceramic composition includes at least 50 wt. % boron carbide and at least 0.01 wt. % of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu, the sintered ceramic composition being characterized by a density of at least 90% of theoretical density.

  12. Ceramic applications in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, J. A.; Janovicz, M. A.; Thrasher, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    Development testing activities on the 1900 F-configuration ceramic parts were completed, 2070 F-configuration ceramic component rig and engine testing was initiated, and the conceptual design for the 2265 F-configuration engine was identified. Fabrication of the 2070 F-configuration ceramic parts continued, along with burner rig development testing of the 2070 F-configuration metal combustor in preparation for 1132 C (2070 F) qualification test conditions. Shakedown testing of the hot engine simulator (HES) rig was also completed in preparation for testing of a spin rig-qualified ceramic-bladed rotor assembly at 1132 C (2070 F) test conditions. Concurrently, ceramics from new sources and alternate materials continued to be evaluated, and fabrication of 2070 F-configuration ceramic component from these new sources continued. Cold spin testing of the critical 2070 F-configuration blade continued in the spin test rig to qualify a set of ceramic blades at 117% engine speed for the gasifier turbine rotor. Rig testing of the ceramic-bladed gasifier turbine rotor assembly at 108% engine speed was also performed, which resulted in the failure of one blade. The new three-piece hot seal with the nickel oxide/calcium fluoride wearface composition was qualified in the regenerator rig and introduced to engine operation wiwth marginal success.

  13. Protective coating for ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Churchward, Rex A. (Inventor); Lowe, David M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A protective coating for ceramic materials such as those made of silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, aluminoborosilicate and silicon dioxide, and a thermal control structure comprising a ceramic material having coated thereon the protective coating. The protective coating contains, in admixture, silicon dioxide powder, colloidal silicon dioxide, water, and one or more emittance agents selected from silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, silicon carbide, molybdenum disilicide, tungsten disilicide and zirconium diboride. In another aspect, the protective coating is coated on a flexible ceramic fabric which is the outer cover of a composite insulation. In yet another aspect, a metallic foil is bonded to the outer surface of a ceramic fabric outer cover of a composite insulation via the protective coating. A primary application of this invention is as a protective coating for ceramic materials used in a heat shield for space vehicles subjected to very high aero-convective heating environments.

  14. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  15. Ceramic applications in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.; Heitman, P. W.; Lindgren, L. C.; Thrasher, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The application of ceramic components to demonstrate improved cycle efficiency by raising the operating temperature of the existing Allison IGI 404 vehicular gas turbine engine is discussed. This effort was called the Ceramic Applications in Turbine Engines (CATE) program and has successfully demonstrated ceramic components. Among these components are two design configurations featuring stationary and rotating caramic components in the IGT 404 engine. A complete discussion of all phases of the program, design, materials development, fabrication of ceramic components, and testing-including rig, engine, and vehicle demonstation test are presented. During the CATE program, a ceramic technology base was established that is now being applied to automotive and other gas turbine engine programs. This technology base is outlined and also provides a description of the CATE program accomplishments.

  16. Ceramic component for electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Bates, J. Lambert

    1980-01-01

    A ceramic component suitable for preparing MHD generator electrodes having the compositional formula: Y.sub.x (Mg.sub.y Cr.sub.z).sub.w Al.sub.(1-w) O.sub.3 where x=0.9 to 1.05, y=0.02 to 0.2, z=0.8 to 1.05 and w=1.0 to 0.5. The component is resistant to the formation of hydration products in an MHD environment, has good electrical conductivity and exhibits a lower electrochemical corrosion rate than do comparable compositions of lanthanum chromite.

  17. Ceramic heat pipe wick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidenberg, Benjamin (Inventor); Swanson, Theodore (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A wick for use in a capillary loop pump heat pipe is disclosed. The wick material is an essentially uniformly porous, permeable, open-cell, silicon dioxide/aluminum oxide inorganic ceramic foam having a silica fiber ratio, by weight, of about 78 to 22, respectively, a density of 6 lbs/cu ft, and an average pore size of less than 5 microns. A representative material having these characteristics is Lockheed Missile and Space Company, Inc.'s HTP 6-22. This material is fully compatible with the freons and anhydrous ammonia and allows for the use of these very efficient working fluids, and others, in capillary loops.

  18. Ceramic superconducting components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haertling, G. H.

    1991-01-01

    An approach to the application of high-Tc ceramic superconductors to practical circuit elements was developed and demonstrated. This method, known as the rigid conductor process (RCP), involves the mounting of a preformed, sintered, and tested superconductor material onto an appropriate, rigid substrate with an epoxy adhesive which also serves to encapsulate the element from the ambient environment. Circuit elements such as straight conductors, coils and connectors were fabricated from YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconducting material. Performance results are included for a low-noise low-thermal-conductivity superconducting grounding link for NASA.

  19. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  20. Joining of ceramics for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilpas, Martti

    1987-01-01

    Summarized is a literature survey of the methods for joining ceramics to ceramics or ceramics to metals for high temperature applications. Also mechanical properties and potential applications of the joints are considered. The joining of ceramics is usually carried out by brazing or diffusion bonding. Especially the latter has been found useful, increasing the application of bonded ceramics. The possibility of using electron beam and laser beam welding for joining ceramics has also recently been investigated. The bonding of ceramics has found numerous applications typical for high operating temperatures, i.e., sensors and thermocouples.

  1. Ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1985-01-01

    A method for producing a ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by microwaving, mixes a slurry of glass sealing material and coupling agent and applies same to ceramic workpieces. The slurry and workpieces are placed together, insulated and then microwaved at a power, time and frequency sufficient to cause a liquid phase reaction in the slurry. The reaction of the glass sealing material forms a chemically different seal than that which would be formed by conventional heating because it is formed by a diffusion rather than by wetting of the reactants.

  2. Ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1983-10-04

    A method for producing a ceramic-glass-ceramic seal by microwaving, mixes a slurry of glass sealing material and coupling agent and applies same to ceramic workpieces. The slurry and workpieces are placed together, insulated and then microwaved at a power, time and frequency sufficient to cause a liquid phase reaction in the slurry. The reaction of the glass sealing material forms a chemically different seal than that which would be formed by conventional heating because it is formed by a diffusion rather than by wetting of the reactants.

  3. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  4. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  5. Radiation effects in ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Linn W.; Clinard, Frank W.; Zinkle, Steven J.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    1994-10-01

    Ceramics represent a large class of solids with a wide spectrum of applicability, whose structures range from simple to complex, whose bonding runs from highly ionic to almost entirely covalent and, in some cases, partially metallic, and whose band structures yield wide-gap insulators, narrow-gap semiconductors or even superconductors. These solids exhibit responses to irradiation which are more complex than those for metals. In ceramic materials, atomic displacements can be produced by direct momentum transfer to often more than one distinguishable sublattice, and in some cases radiolytically by electronic excitations, and result in point defects which are in general not simple. Radiation-induced defect interaction, accumulation and aggregation modes differ significantly from those found in metals. Amorphization is a frequent option in response to high-density defect perturbation and is strongly related to structural topology. These fundamental responses to irradiation result in significant changes to important applicable properties, such as strength, toughness, electrical and thermal conductivities, dielectric response and optical behavior. The understanding of such phenomena is less well-understood than the simple responses of metals but is being increasingly driven by critical applications in fusion energy production, nuclear waste disposal and optical communications.

  6. Contemporary all-ceramic materials, part-1.

    PubMed

    Pilathadka, Shriharsha; Vahalova, Dagmar

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 35 years, multiple types of all-ceramic materials have been introduced as an ideal alternative for metal-fused to ceramic. This review covers state-of-the-art development of all-ceramic systems in terms of history, material composition, fabrication technologies, and structural and strength properties. These materials are proved to be ideal in terms of mechanical properties and biocompatibility, making metal-free ceramic restorations a realistic clinical alternative for conventional metal-fused-to ceramic.

  7. Advanced ceramics for environmental protection

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    Advanced ceramic materials offer significant thermodynamic efficiency advantages over metals and alloys because of their higher use temperatures. Using ceramic components results in higher temperature industrial processes which convert fuels to energy more efficiently, reducing environmental emissions. Ceramics have always offered high temperature strength and superior corrosion and erosion resistance. However, brittleness, poor thermal stock resistance and catastrophic failure have slowed industrial adoptions of ceramics in environmental applications. This paper will focus on environmental applications of three new advanced ceramic materials that are overcoming these barriers to industrial utilization through improved toughness, reliability, and thermal shock performance. PRD-66, a layered oxide ceramic with outstanding thermal shock resistance and high use temperature with utility in catalyst support, insulation, and hot gas filtration applications, is discussed. Tough silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) and carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) ceramic composites made by chemical vapor infiltration, and silicon carbide particulate reinforced alumina (SiC{sub p}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) composites made through Lanxide Corporation`s DIMOX{trademark} directed metal oxidation process are described. Applications of these materials to pollution reduction and energy efficiency in medical and municipal waste incineration, heat management, aluminum remelting, pyrolysis, coal combustion and gasification, catalytic pollution control, and hot gas filtration, will be discussed.

  8. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1998-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  9. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the reinforcing member and having a strengthening member wrapped around the refractory material. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  10. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Harkins, B.D.; Ward, M.E.

    1998-09-22

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

  11. Ceramics for Turbine Engine Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC NOZZLE SECTION FOR SMIALL RADIAL GAS TURBINE by J.C.Napier and J.P. Arnold 12 DEVELOPMENT OF A CERAMIC TURBINE NOZZLE RING by H.Burfeindt...this way, for instance, a Daimler engine was in 1911 awarded the prize of the "Automobiltechnische Gesell - schaft". In 1912, a Benz engine won the...blade development Turtle U~nion RB 199 v)ln BENEFITS OF CERAMICS TO GAS TURBINES by Arnold Brooks and Albert I. Bellin Aircraft Engine Group General

  12. Effect of cutting temperature on hardness of SiC and diamond in the nano-cutting process of monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiachun; Li, Yuntao; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Lv, Maoqiang

    2016-10-01

    In the process of cutting silicon by natural diamond tools, groove wear happens on the flank face of cutting tool frequently.Scholars believe that one of the wear reasons is mechanical scratching effect by hard particles like SiC. To reveal the mechanical scratching mechanism, it is essential to study changes in the mechanical properties of hard particles and diamond, especially the effect of cutting temperature on hardness of diamond and hard particles. Molecular dynamics (MD) model that contact-zone temperature between tool and workpiece was calculated by dividing zone while nano-cutting monocrystalline silicon was established, cutting temperature values in different regions were computed as the simulation was carried out.On this basis, the models of molecular dynamics simulation of SiC and diamond were established separately with setting the initial temperature to room temperature. The laws of length change of C-C bond and Si-C bond varing with increase of simulation temperature were studied. And drawing on predecessors' research on theoretical calculation of hardness of covalent crystals and the relationship between crystal valence electron density and bond length, the curves that the hardness of diamond and SiC varing with bond length were obtained. The effect of temperature on the hardness was calculated. Results show that, local cutting temperature can reach 1300K.The rise in cutting temperature leaded to a decrease in the diamond local atomic clusters hardness,SiC local atomic clusters hardness increased. As the cutting temperature was more than 1100K,diamond began to soften, the local clusters hardness was less than that of SiC.

  13. Dispersed metal-toughened ceramics and ceramic brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Moorhead, A.J.; Tiegs, T.N.; Lauf, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    An alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) based material that contains approximately 1 vol % finely dispersed platinum or chromium was developed for use in high temperature thermal-shock resistant electrical insulators. The work at ORNL is divided into two areas: (1) development of DMT ceramics; and (2) development of brazing filler metals suitable for making ceramic-to-ceramic and ceramic-to-metal brazements. The DMT ceramics and brazements are intended for service at elevated temperatures and at high stress levels in the dirty environments of advanced heat engines. The development and characterization of DMT ceramics includes processing (powder preparation, densification and heat treatment) and detailed measurement of mechanical and physical properties (strength, fracture toughness, and thermal conductivity). The brazing work includes: (1) the formulation and melting of small quantities of experimental brazing filler metals; (2) evaluation of the wetting and bonding behavior of these filler metals on Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, partially stabilized zirconia and ..cap alpha..-SiC in a sessile drop apparatus; and (3) determine the short-term strength and fracture toughness of brazements.

  14. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  15. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1996-12-17

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment, each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion, and each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component. 4 figs.

  16. Lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B.E. Jr.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic composition which, based on total composition weight, consists essentially of a solid solution of lead zirconate and lead titanate in a PbZrO/sub 3/:PbTiO/sub 3/ ratio from about 0.505:0.495 to about 0.54:0.46; a halide salt selected from the group consisting of fluorides and chlorides of alkali metal and alkaline earth elements and mixtures thereof except for francium and radium in an amount from about 0.5 to 2 weight percent; and an oxide selected from the group consisting of magnesium, barium, scandium, aluminum, lanthanum, praesodynium, neodymium, samarium, and mixtures thereof in an amount from about 0.5 to about 6 weight percent, the relative amount of oxide being from about 1 to about 4 times that of the halide.

  17. Creep in electronic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  18. Lightweight Ceramic Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, W. H.; Creedon, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    Fiber burnout process yields low densities. Low density attained by process of sacrificial burnout. Graphite or carbon fibers mixed into slurry of silica, alumina, and boron-compound fibers in amounts ranging from 25 to 75 percent of total fiber content by weight. Mixture formed into blocks and dried. Blocks placed in kiln and heated to 1,600 degrees F(870 degrees C) for several hours. Graphite or carbon fibers slowly oxidize away, leaving voids and reducing block density. Finally, blocks heated to 2,350 degrees F (1,290 degrees C) for 90 minutes to bond remaining ceramic fibers together. Developed for use on Space Shuttle and other spacecraft, rigid insulation machined to requisite shape and bonded in place.

  19. NDE of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, S. J.; Vary, A.

    1986-01-01

    Radiographic, ultrasonic, scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM), and thermo-acoustic microscopy techniques were used to characterize silicon nitride and silicon carbide modulus-of-rupture test specimens in various stages of fabrication. Conventional and microfocus X-ray techniques were found capable of detecting minute high density inclusions in as-received powders, green compacts, and fully densified specimens. Significant density gradients in sintered bars were observed by radiography, ultrasonic velocity, and SLAM. Ultrasonic attenuation was found sensitive to microstructural variations due to grain and void morphology and distribution. SLAM was also capable of detecting voids, inclusions and cracks in finished test bars. Consideration is given to the potential for applying thermo-acoustic microscopy techniques to green and densified ceramics. The detection probability statistics and some limitations of radiography and SLAM also are discussed.

  20. Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1997-04-01

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  1. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2002-07-01

    In the present quarter, oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  3. Ceramic automotive Stirling engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musikant, S.; Chiu, W.; Darooka, D.; Mullings, D. M.; Johnson, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A conceptual design study for a Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine (CASE) is performed. Year 1990 structural ceramic technology is assumed. Structural and performance analyses of the conceptual design are performed as well as a manufacturing and cost analysis. The general conclusions from this study are that such an engine would be 10-26% more efficient over its performance map than the current metal Automotive Stirling Reference Engine (ASRE). Cost of such a ceramic engine is likely to be somewhat higher than that of the ASRE but engine cost is very sensitive to the ultimate cost of the high purity, ceramic powder raw materials required to fabricate high performance parts. When the design study is projected to the year 2000 technology, substantinal net efficiency improvements, on the order of 25 to 46% over the ASRE, are computed.

  4. Ceramic regenerator systems development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucinari, C. A.; Rahnke, C. J.; Rao, V. D. N.; Vallance, J. K.

    1980-01-01

    The DOE/NASA Ceramic Regenerator Design and Reliability Program aims to develop ceramic regenerator cores that can be used in passenger car and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. The major cause of failure of early gas turbine regenerators was found to be chemical attack of the ceramic material. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines late in 1974. Results of 53,065 hours of turbine engine durability testing are described. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate, show promise. Five aluminum silicate cores attained the durability objective of 10,000 hours at 800 C (1472 F). Another aluminum silicate core shows minimal evidence of chemical attack after 8071 hours at 982 C (1800 F). Results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are included.

  5. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  6. Process for producing advanced ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kwong, Kyei-Sing

    1996-01-01

    A process for the synthesis of homogeneous advanced ceramics such as SiC+AlN, SiAlON, SiC+Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 +AlN from natural clays such as kaolin, halloysite and montmorillonite by an intercalation and heat treatment method. Included are the steps of refining clays, intercalating organic compounds into the layered structure of clays, drying the intercalated mixture, firing the treated atmospheres and grinding the loosely agglomerated structure. Advanced ceramics produced by this procedure have the advantages of homogeneity, cost effectiveness, simplicity of manufacture, ease of grind and a short process time. Advanced ceramics produced by this process can be used for refractory, wear part and structure ceramics.

  7. Nondestructive characterization of micromachined ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, Adam; Hix, Kenneth E.; Yaney, Perry; Zhan, Qiwen; Dosser, Larry R.; Blackshire, James L.

    2005-05-01

    The aerospace, automotive, and electronic industries are finding increasing need for components made from silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4). The development and use of miniaturized ceramic parts, in particular, is of significant interest in a variety of critical applications. As these application areas grow, manufacturers are being asked to find new and better solutions for machining and forming ceramic materials with microscopic precision. Recent advances in laser machining technologies are making precision micromachining of ceramics a reality. Questions regarding micromachining accuracy, residual melt region effects, and laser-induced microcracking are of critical concern during the machining process. In this activity, a variety of nondestructive inspection methods have been used to investigate the microscopic features of laser-machined ceramic components. The primary goal was to assess the micromachined areas for machining accuracy and microcracking using laser ultrasound, scanning electron microscopy, and white-light interference microscopic imaging of the machined regions.

  8. Ceramic powder for sintering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akiya, H.; Saito, A.

    1984-01-01

    Surface activity of ceramic powders such as MgO and Al2O3, for use in sintering with sp. emphasis on their particle size, shape, particle size distribution, packing, and coexisting additives and impurities are reviewed.

  9. Nonlinear fracture of concrete and ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Albert S.; Du, Jia-Ji; Hawkins, Niel M.; Bradt, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The nonlinear fracture process zones in an impacted unnotched concrete bend specimen, a prenotched ceramic bend specimen, and an unnotched ceramic/ceramic composite bend specimen were estimated through hybrid experimental numerical analysis. Aggregate bridging in concrete, particulate bridging in ceramics, and fiber bridging in ceramic/ceramic composite are modeled by Barenblatt-type cohesive zones which are incorporated into the finite-element models of the bend specimens. Both generation and propagation analyses are used to estimate the distribution of crack closure stresses in the nonlinear fracture process zones. The finite-element models are then used to simulate fracture tests consisting of rapid crack propagation in an impacted concrete bend specimen, and stable crack growth and strain softening in a ceramic and ceramic/ceramic composite bend specimens.

  10. Extruded ceramic honeycomb and method

    DOEpatents

    Day, J. Paul

    1995-04-04

    Extruded low-expansion ceramic honeycombs comprising beta-spodumene solid solution as the principal crystal phase and with less than 7 weight percent of included mullite are produced by compounding an extrusion batch comprising a lithium aluminosilicate glass powder and a clay additive, extruding a green honeycomb body from the batch, and drying and firing the green extruded cellular honeycomb to crystallize the glass and clay into a low-expansion spodumene ceramic honeycomb body.

  11. Heat distribution ceramic processing method

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.

    2001-01-01

    A multi-layered heat distributor system is provided for use in a microwave process. The multi-layered heat distributors includes a first inner layer of a high thermal conductivity heat distributor material, a middle insulating layer and an optional third insulating outer layer. The multi-layered heat distributor system is placed around the ceramic composition or article to be processed and located in a microwave heating system. Sufficient microwave energy is applied to provide a high density, unflawed ceramic product.

  12. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-01-09

    A process is disclosed for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates and nickel aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m{sup 1/2}, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa. 5 figs.

  13. Batch compositions for cordierite ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Hickman, David L.

    1994-07-26

    Ceramic products consisting principally of cordierite and a method for making them are provided, the method employing batches comprising a mineral component and a chemical component, the mineral component comprising clay and talc and the chemical component consisting essentially of a combination of the powdered oxides, hydroxides, or hydrous oxides of magnesium, aluminum and silicon. Ceramics made by extrusion and firing of the batches can exhibit low porosity, high strength and low thermal expansion coefficients.

  14. High-temperature ceramic receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, P. O.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced ceramic dome cavity receiver is discussed which heats pressurized gas to temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (1000/sup 0/C) for use in solar Brayton power systems of the dispersed receiver/dish or central receiver type. Optical, heat transfer, structural, and ceramic material design aspects of the receiver are reported and the development and experimental demonstration of a high-temperature seal between the pressurized gas and the high-temperature silicon carbide dome material is described.

  15. Casting Of Multilayer Ceramic Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedure for casting thin, multilayer ceramic membranes, commonly called tapes, involves centrifugal casting at accelerations of 1,800 to 2,000 times normal gravitational acceleration. Layers of tape cast one at a time on top of any previous layer or layers. Each layer cast from slurry of ground ceramic suspended in mixture of solvents, binders, and other components. Used in capacitors, fuel cells, and electrolytic separation of oxygen from air.

  16. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, Kathleen B.; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.; Waters, Shirley B.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 particulates and nickle aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m.sup.1/2, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa.

  17. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    DOEpatents

    Li, Jian

    2002-01-01

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  18. High-Temperature Ceramic Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-15

    magnetic susceptibility, Meissner effect and specific heat. Task 4 is an investigation of superconductor ceramic processing. Most of the important... effect of the additional heater on the microstructure is shown in Fig. 11. As the upper micrograph shows, hardly any alignment was induced with a single... effect in cal field,7 H 1 = 𔃻o In K/41TA 2, and magnetic field pene- limiting the current-carrying capability of the ceramic tration length, A. The

  19. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  20. Method for Waterproofing Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Hygroscopic ceramic materials which are difficult to waterproof with a silane, substituted silane or silazane waterproofing agent, such as an alumina containing fibrous, flexible and porous, fibrous ceramic insulation used on a reentry space vehicle, are rendered easy to waterproof if the interior porous surface of the ceramic is first coated with a thin coating of silica. The silica coating is achieved by coating the interior surface of the ceramic with a silica precursor converting the precursor to silica either in-situ or by oxidative pyrolysis and then applying the waterproofing agent to the silica coated ceramic. The silica precursor comprises almost any suitable silicon containing material such as a silane, silicone, siloxane, silazane and the like applied by solution, vapor deposition and the like. If the waterproofing is removed by e.g., burning, the silica remains and the ceramic is easily rewaterproofed. An alumina containing TABI insulation which absorbs more that five times its weight of water, absorbs less than 10 wt. % water after being waterproofed according to the method of the invention.

  1. Wedge edge ceramic combustor tile

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Holsapple, A.C.

    1997-06-10

    A multipiece combustor has a portion thereof being made of a plurality of ceramic segments. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have an outer surface and an inner surface. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have a generally cylindrical configuration and including a plurality of joints. The joints define joint portions, a first portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions have a second portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions further include a shoulder formed intermediate the first portion and the second portion. The joints provide a sealing interlocking joint between corresponding ones of the plurality of ceramic segments. Thus, the multipiece combustor having the plurality of ceramic segment with the plurality of joints reduces the physical size of the individual components and the degradation of the surface of the ceramic components in a tensile stress zone is generally eliminated reducing the possibility of catastrophic failures. 7 figs.

  2. Wedge edge ceramic combustor tile

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Holsapple, Allan C.

    1997-01-01

    A multipiece combustor has a portion thereof being made of a plurality of ceramic segments. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have an outer surface and an inner surface. Each of the plurality of ceramic segments have a generally cylindrical configuration and including a plurality of joints. The joints define joint portions, a first portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions have a second portion defining a surface being skewed to the outer surface and the inner surface. The joint portions further include a shoulder formed intermediate the first portion and the second portion. The joints provide a sealing interlocking joint between corresponding ones of the plurality of ceramic segments. Thus, the multipiece combustor having the plurality of ceramic segment with the plurality of joints reduces the physical size of the individual components and the degradation of the surface of the ceramic components in a tensile stress zone is generally eliminated reducing the possibility of catastrophic failures.

  3. Failure Analysis of Ceramic Components

    SciTech Connect

    B.W. Morris

    2000-06-29

    Ceramics are being considered for a wide range of structural applications due to their low density and their ability to retain strength at high temperatures. The inherent brittleness of monolithic ceramics requires a departure from the deterministic design philosophy utilized to analyze metallic structural components. The design program ''Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life'' (CARES/LIFE) developed by NASA Lewis Research Center uses a probabilistic approach to predict the reliability of monolithic components under operational loading. The objective of this study was to develop an understanding of the theories used by CARES/LIFE to predict the reliability of ceramic components and to assess the ability of CARES/LIFE to accurately predict the fast fracture behavior of monolithic ceramic components. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the temperature and stress distribution of a silicon carbide O-ring under diametral compression. The results of the finite element analysis were supplied as input into CARES/LIFE to determine the fast fracture reliability of the O-ring. Statistical material strength parameters were calculated from four-point flexure bar test data. The predicted reliability showed excellent correlation with O-ring compression test data indicating that the CARES/LIFE program can be used to predict the reliability of ceramic components subjected to complicated stress states using material properties determined from simple uniaxial tensile tests.

  4. FOREWORD: Focus on Advanced Ceramics Focus on Advanced Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Naoki

    2011-06-01

    Much research has been devoted recently to developing technologies for renewable energy and improving the efficiency of the processes and devices used in industry and everyday life. Efficient solutions have been found using novel materials such as platinum and palladium-based catalysts for car exhaust systems, samarium-cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets for electrical motors, and so on. However, their realization has resulted in an increasing demand for rare elements and in their deficit, the development of new materials based on more abundant elements and new functionalities of traditional materials. Moreover, increasing environmental and health concerns demand substitution of toxic or hazardous substances with nature-friendly alternatives. In this context, this focus issue on advanced ceramics aims to review current trends in ceramics science and technology. It is related to the International Conference on Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics (STAC) held annually to discuss the emerging issues in the field of ceramics. An important direction of ceramic science is the collaboration between experimental and theoretical sciences. Recent developments in density functional theory and computer technology have enabled the prediction of physical and chemical properties of ceramics, thereby assisting the design of new materials. Therefore, this focus issue includes articles devoted to theory and advanced characterization techniques. As mentioned above, the potential shortage of rare elements is becoming critical to the industry and has resulted in a Japanese government initiative called the 'Ubiquitous Element Strategy'. This focus issue also includes articles related to this strategy and to the associated topics of energy conversion, such as phosphors for high-efficiency lighting and photocatalysts for solar-energy harvesting. We hope that this focus issue will provide a timely overview of current trends and problems in ceramics science and

  5. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (<100 C) is also a key to generating these ceramic coatings on the plastics. One possible way of processing nanoceramic coatings at low temperatures (< 90 C) is to take advantage of in-situ precipitated nanoparticles and nanostructures grown from aqueous solution. These nanostructures can be tailored to ceramic film formation and the subsequent microstructure development. In addition, the process provides environment- friendly processing because of the

  6. Performance of Ceramics in Severe Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Fox, Dennis S.; Smialek, James L.; Deliacorte, Christopher; Lee, Kang N.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramics are generally stable to higher temperatures than most metals and alloys. Thus the development of high temperature structural ceramics has been an area of active research for many years. While the dream of a ceramic heat engine still faces many challenges, niche markets are developing for these materials at high temperatures. In these applications, ceramics are exposed not only to high temperatures but also aggressive gases and deposits. In this chapter we review the response of ceramic materials to these environments. We discuss corrosion mechanisms, the relative importance of a particular corrodent, and, where available, corrosion rates. Most of the available corrosion information is on silicon carbide (SIC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) monolithic ceramics. These materials form a stable film of silica (SO2) in an oxidizing environment. We begin with a discussion of oxidation of these materials and proceed to the effects of other corrodents such as water vapor and salt deposits. We also discuss oxidation and corrosion of other ceramics: precurser derived ceramics, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), ceramics which form oxide scales other than silica, and oxide ceramics. Many of the corrosion issues discussed can be mitigated with refractory oxide coatings and we discuss the current status of this active area of research. Ultimately, the concern of corrosion is loss of load bearing capability. We discuss the effects of corrosive environments on the strength of ceramics, both monolithic and composite. We conclude with a discussion of high temperature wear of ceramics, another important form of degradation at high temperatures.

  7. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-06-17

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  8. Tailored ceramics for laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, Joel Philip

    Transparent ceramics have many features that recommend them over single crystals for use as laser amplifiers. Some features, such as greater mechanical toughness and an absence of extended crystalline defects, are intrinsic to polycrystalline materials. Other advantages accrue from ceramic processing: ceramics sinter more rapidly than crystals grow from a melt, at lower temperatures. Ceramic processes are more readily scaled than Czochralski growth, facilitating larger apertures. Unlike a uniform melt, a ceramic green structure can have controlled concentration gradients, resulting in a multifunctional device upon sintering. Identifying diffusion mechanisms in a suitable host material and quantifying diffusion for a dopant with appropriate energy levels are key steps toward tailoring laser ceramics to the specifications of device designers. Toward that end, this study was the first to identify the mechanism and rate of Nd diffusion in YAG. Grain boundary diffusion was shown to dominate Nd transport under conditions relevant to laser ceramics fabrication. Based on a definition of grain boundary width as 1 A, this process occurs at a rate of DGB = 6.4 x 105 +/- 2.0 x 105 exp(-491 +/- 64 kJ/(mol K))m 2/s. Mechanism identification and the first published kinetics measurement were made possible by the introduction of a heat treatment method that isolates microstructural change from dopant diffusion: the concentration of grain boundaries was kept great enough to allow rapid diffusion, but low enough to limit the driving force for coarsening. Sintering of fine-grained and phase-pure precursor powder for 4 min at 1700 °C produced 0.8 mum grains; subsequent diffusion heat treatments at up to 1650 °C for up to 64 h caused negligible coarsening, while achieving diffusion distances of up to 23 mum.

  9. Reliability of ceramics for heat engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of monolithic ceramics in heat engines are discussed. The principle gaps in the state of understanding of ceramic material, failure origins, nondestructive tests as well as life prediction are included.

  10. Modeling projectile impact onto prestressed ceramic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmquist, T. J.; Johnson, G. R.

    2003-09-01

    This work presents computed results for the responses of ceramic targets, with and without prestress, subjected to projectile impact. Also presented is a computational technique to include prestress. Ceramic materials have been considered for armor applications for many years because of their high strength and low density. Many researchers have demonstrated that providing confinement enhances the ballistic performance of ceramic targets. More recently, prestressing the ceramic is being considered as an additional enhancement technique. This work investigates the effect of prestressing the ceramic for both thin and thick target configurations subjected to projectile impact. In all cases the targets with ceramic prestress provided enhanced ballistic performance. The computed results indicate that prestressed ceramic reduces and/or delays failure, resulting in improved ceramic performance and ballistic efficiency.

  11. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  12. Ordered ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.A.; Hill, C.G. Jr.; Zeltner, W.A.

    1991-10-01

    Ceramic membranes have been formed from colloidal sols coated on porous clay supports. These supported membranes have been characterized in terms of their permeabilities and permselectivities to various aqueous test solutions. The thermal stabilities and pore structures of these membranes have been characterized by preparing unsupported membranes of the correpsonding material and performing N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and X-ray diffraction studies on these membranes. To date, membranes have been prepared from a variety of oxides, including TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as Zr-, Fe-, and Nb-doped TiO{sub 2}. In many of these membranes pore diameters are less than 2 nm, while in others the pore diameters are between 3 and 5 nm. Procedures for fabricating porous clay supports with reproducible permeabilities for pure water are also discussed. 30 refs., 59 figs., 22 tabs.

  13. Thermally induced micromechanical stresses in ceramic/ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhuang; Bradt, R.C.

    1992-11-01

    The internal micromechanical stresses which develop in ceramic-ceramic composites as a consequence of temperature changes and thermoelastic property differences between the reinforcing and matrix phases are addressed by the Eshelby method. Results for two whisker reinforced ceramic matrix composites and for quartz particles in porcelain are discussed. It is concluded that the stresses which develop in the second phase reinforcing inclusions are quite substantial (GPa-levels) and may be highly anisotropic in character. These stresses are additive to the macroscopic thermal stresses from temperature gradients which are encountered during heating and cooling, and also to externally apphed mechanical stresses (loads). These micromechanical stresses are expected to be highly significant for thermal cycling fatigue and other failure processes.

  14. Hydridosiloxanes as precursors to ceramic products

    DOEpatents

    Blum, Y.D.; Johnson, S.M.; Gusman, M.I.

    1997-06-03

    A method is provided for preparing ceramic precursors from hydridosiloxane starting materials and then pyrolyzing these precursors to give rise to silicious ceramic materials. Si-H bonds present in the hydridosiloxane starting materials are catalytically activated, and the activated hydrogen atoms may then be replaced with nonhydrogen substituents. These preceramic materials are pyrolyzed in a selected atmosphere to give the desired ceramic product. Ceramic products which may be prepared by this technique include silica, silicon oxynitride, silicon carbide, metal silicates, and mullite.

  15. Micromechanical Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    Materials Sciences Corporation AD-A236 756 M.hM. 9 1 0513 IEIN HIfINU IIl- DTIC JUN 06 1991 MICROMECHANICAL EVALUATION OF S 0 CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES C...Classification) \\() Micromechanical Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composites ) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) C-F. Yen, Z. Hashin, C. Laird, B.W. Rosen, Z. Wang 13a. TYPE...and strengthen the ceramic composites. In this task, various possibilities of crack propagation in unidirectional ceramic matrix composites under

  16. Organopolysiloxane Waterproofing Treatment for Porous Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Cagliostro, Domenick E. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Rigid and flexible porous ceramics, including thermal insulation of a type used on space vehicles, are waterproofed by a treatment which comprises applying an aqueous solution of an organopolysiloxane water-proofing agent having reactive silanol groups to the surface of the ceramic and then heating the treated ceramic to form a waterproofed ceramic. The organopolysiloxane is formed by the hydrolysis and partial condensation of di- and trialkoxyfunctional alkylalkoxysilanes having 1-10 carbon atom hydrocarbyl groups.

  17. Baseline Industry Analysis, Advance Ceramics Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    Commerce , Department of Defense, and the National Critical Technologies Panel. Advanced Ceramics, which include ceramic matrix composites, are found in...ceramics and materials industry being identified as a National Critical Technology, Commerce Emerging Technology, and Defense Critical Technology.’ There is...total procurement cost in advanced systems, and as much as ten percent of the electronics portion of those weapons. Ceramic capacitors are almost as

  18. Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A. J.

    1993-04-06

    A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and omposite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400.degree. C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts , or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

  19. Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and omposite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400.degree. C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts , or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

  20. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  1. Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A.J.

    1991-03-07

    A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and composite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400{degrees}C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts, or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.

  2. Transient liquid phase ceramic bonding

    DOEpatents

    Glaeser, Andreas M.

    1994-01-01

    Ceramics are joined to themselves or to metals using a transient liquid phase method employing three layers, one of which is a refractory metal, ceramic or alloy. The refractory layer is placed between two metal layers, each of which has a lower melting point than the refractory layer. The three layers are pressed between the two articles to be bonded to form an assembly. The assembly is heated to a bonding temperature at which the refractory layer remains solid, but the two metal layers melt to form a liquid. The refractory layer reacts with the surrounding liquid and a single solid bonding layer is eventually formed. The layers may be designed to react completely with each other and form refractory intermetallic bonding layers. Impurities incorporated into the refractory metal may react with the metal layers to form refractory compounds. Another method for joining ceramic articles employs a ceramic interlayer sandwiched between two metal layers. In alternative embodiments, the metal layers may include sublayers. A method is also provided for joining two ceramic articles using a single interlayer. An alternate bonding method provides a refractory-metal oxide interlayer placed adjacent to a strong oxide former. Aluminum or aluminum alloys are joined together using metal interlayers.

  3. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, Blake

    1995-01-01

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow therebetween. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow.

  4. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, B.

    1995-04-11

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow there between. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow. 8 figures.

  5. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Wise, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Controlled impact methods have been employed to obtain dynamic response properties of armor materials. Experimental data have been obtained for high-strength ceramics. Continued analysis of time-resolved velocity interferometer measurements has produced systematic material-property data for Hugoniot and release response, initial and post-yield strength, pressure-induced phase transformation, and dynamic fracture strength. A new technique has been developed to measure hydrodynamic properties of ceramic through shock-wave experiments on metal-ceramic composites and data obtained for silicon carbide. Additional data on several titanium diboride ceramics and high-quality aluminum oxide ceramic have been acquired, and issues regarding the influence of microstructure on dynamic properties have emerged. Comparison of dynamic (Hugoniot elastic limit) strength and indentation hardness data has been performed and important correlations revealed. Innovative impact experiments on confined and unconfined alumina rods using axial and transverse VISAR diagnostics have been demonstrated which permit acquisition of multiaxial dynamic response data. Dynamic failure properties of a high-density aluminosilicate glass, similar in composition to the intergranular glassy phase of some aluminas, have been investigated with regard to yield, spall, and failure-wave propagation.

  6. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  7. Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites - Aerospace potential and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.

    1992-01-01

    Thermostructural ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites are attractive in numerous aerospace applications; the noncatastrophic fracture behavior and flaw-insensitivity of continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs renders them especially desirable. The present development status evaluation notes that, for most highly-loaded high-temperature applications, the requisite fiber-technology base is at present insufficient. In addition to materials processing techniques, the life prediction and NDE methods are immature and require a projection of 15-20 years for the maturity of CMC turbine rotors. More lightly loaded, moderate temperature aircraft engine applications are approaching maturity.

  8. Preparation of a dense, polycrystalline ceramic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, Jason; Chen, Ching-Fong; Alexander, David

    2010-12-07

    Ceramic nanopowder was sealed inside a metal container under a vacuum. The sealed evacuated container was forced through a severe deformation channel at an elevated temperature below the melting point of the ceramic nanopowder. The result was a dense nanocrystalline ceramic structure inside the metal container.

  9. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.

    1993-10-12

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  10. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  11. Uses of ceramics in microelectronics: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratschun, W. R.; Mountvala, A. J.; Pincus, A. G.

    1971-01-01

    The properties and behavior of ceramic materials used in components for electronic circuitry are examined to appraise the present and future directions for microelectronics, and to suggest further product development, and how innovations may be useful in other technologies. Ceramic and glass insulators, resistors, capacitors, and the use of ceramics and glasses in microcircuitry are discussed along with technology transfer to nonaerospace uses.

  12. Instructional Resources. The Significance of Form: Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawatsky, Carole; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents four lesson plans designed to teach K-12 students about ceramics and the artists using the medium. Each lesson is centered around one ceramic piece: (1) "Wall Clock," by the Chantilly Porcelain Factory; (2) "Poppy Vase," by Adelaide Robineau; (3) "Laughing Eyes," by Pablo Picasso; and (4) "Ceramic Drum Jar," by Tsayutitsa. (GEA)

  13. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  14. High impact resistant ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Derkacy, J.A.

    1991-07-16

    A ceramic material and a method of forming a ceramic material which possesses a high impact resistance are disclosed. The material comprises: (a) a first continuous phase of [beta]-SiC; and (b) a second phase of about 25-40 vol % TiB[sub 2]. Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] is preferably used as a densification aid. The material is formed by hot-pressing the mixture at a temperature from greater than about 1800 C to less than the transition temperature of [beta]-SiC to [alpha]-SiC. The hot-pressing is performed at a pressure of about 2000 psi to about 4000 psi in an inert atmosphere for several hours and results in the formation of a two phase sintered ceramic composite material. 6 figures.

  15. Thermal shock resistance ceramic insulator

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Chester S.; Johnson, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal shock resistant cermet insulators containing 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. The insulators are prepared by a process comprising the steps of (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, said metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide a cermet insulator having 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase.

  16. Nondestructive evaluation of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, Stanley J.; Baaklini, George Y.; Abel, Phillip B.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented on research and development of techniques for nondestructive evaluation and characterization of advanced ceramics for heat engine applications. Highlighted in this review are Lewis Research Center efforts in microfocus radiography, scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM), scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM), scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM), and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). The techniques were evaluated by applying them to research samples of green and sintered silicon nitride and silicon carbide in the form of modulus-of-rupture bars containing seeded voids. Probabilities of detection of voids were determined for diameters as small as 20 microns for microfucus radiography, SLAM, and SAM. Strengths and limitations of the techniques for ceramic applications are identified. Application of ultrasonics for characterizing ceramic microstructures is also discussed.

  17. Molecular and polymeric ceramic precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Sneddon, L.G.

    1991-08-01

    The development of new methods for the production of complex materials is one of the most important problems in modern solid state chemistry and materials science. This project is attempting to apply the synthetic principles which have evolved inorganic and organometallic chemistry to the production of technologically important non-oxide ceramics, such as boron nitride, boron carbide and metal borides. Our recent work has now resulted in the production of new polymer systems, including poly(B-vinylborazine), polyvinylpentaborane and polyborazylene, that have proven to be high yield precursors to boron-based ceramic materials. Current work is now directed toward the synthesis of new types of molecular and polymeric boron-containing species and on exploration of the solid state properties of the ceramics that have been produced in these studies.

  18. Surface treatment of ceramic articles

    DOEpatents

    Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Brown, Ian G.; Wei, Bo; Anders, Simone; Anders, Andre; Bhatia, C. Singh

    1998-01-01

    A process for producing an article with improved ceramic surface properties including providing an article having a ceramic surface, and placing the article onto a conductive substrate holder in a hermetic enclosure. Thereafter a low pressure ambient is provided in the hermetic enclosure. A plasma including ions of solid materials is produced the ceramic surface of the article being at least partially immersed in a macroparticle free region of the plasma. While the article is immersed in the macroparticle free region, a bias of the substrate holder is biased between a low voltage at which material from the plasma condenses on the surface of the article and a high negative voltage at which ions from the plasma are implanted into the article.

  19. Radiation damage evolution in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ramaswami

    2009-09-15

    A review is presented of recent results on radiation damage production, defect accumulation and dynamic annealing in a number of ceramics, such as silicon carbide, zircon and zirconia. Under energetic particle irradiation, ceramics can undergo amorphization by the accumulation of point defects and defect clusters (silicon carbide) or direct impact amorphization (zircon). Ceramics that resist radiation-induced amorphization have mechanisms to dissipate the primary knock-on atom energy, such as replacement collision sequences that leave the lattice undisturbed and low-energy cation site exchange. The presence of engineered mobile defects, such as structural vacancies in stabilized zirconia, can dynamically anneal radiation damage. Thus, defect engineering is a promising strategy to design radiation tolerance for applications such as nuclear waste disposal.

  20. Process for making ceramic insulation

    DOEpatents

    Akash, Akash; Balakrishnan, G. Nair

    2009-12-08

    A method is provided for producing insulation materials and insulation for high temperature applications using novel castable and powder-based ceramics. The ceramic components produced using the proposed process offers (i) a fine porosity (from nano-to micro scale); (ii) a superior strength-to-weight ratio; and (iii) flexibility in designing multilayered features offering multifunctionality which will increase the service lifetime of insulation and refractory components used in the solid oxide fuel cell, direct carbon fuel cell, furnace, metal melting, glass, chemical, paper/pulp, automobile, industrial heating, coal, and power generation industries. Further, the ceramic components made using this method may have net-shape and/or net-size advantages with minimum post machining requirements.

  1. Surface treatment of ceramic articles

    DOEpatents

    Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, C.S.

    1998-12-22

    A process is disclosed for producing an article with improved ceramic surface properties including providing an article having a ceramic surface, and placing the article onto a conductive substrate holder in a hermetic enclosure. Thereafter a low pressure ambient is provided in the hermetic enclosure. A plasma including ions of solid materials is produced the ceramic surface of the article being at least partially immersed in a macroparticle free region of the plasma. While the article is immersed in the macroparticle free region, a bias of the substrate holder is biased between a low voltage at which material from the plasma condenses on the surface of the article and a high negative voltage at which ions from the plasma are implanted into the article. 15 figs.

  2. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process.

  3. Micromechanics for ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    The fiber substructuring concepts and the micromechanics equations that are embedded in the Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer (CEMCAN) computer code are described as well as the code itself, its current features and capabilities, and some examples to demonstrate the code's versatility. The methodology is equally applicable to metal matrix and polymer matrix composites. The prediction of ply mechanical and thermal properties agree very well with the existing models in the Integrated Composite Analyzer and the Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer, lending credence to the fiber substructuring approach. Fiber substructuring can capture greater local detail than conventional unit-cell-based micromechanical theories. It offers promise in simulating complex aspects of micromechanics in ceramic matrix composites.

  4. High impact resistant ceramic composite

    SciTech Connect

    Derkacy, James A.

    1991-07-16

    A ceramic material and a method of forming a ceramic material which possesses a high impact resistance. The material comprises: (a) a first continuous phase of .beta.-SiC; and (b) a second phase of about 25-40 vol % TiB.sub.2. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is preferably used as a densification aid. The material is formed by hot-pressing the mixture at a temperature from greater than about 1800.degree. C. to less than the transition temperature of .beta.-SiC to .alpha.-SiC. The hot-pressing is performed at a pressure of about 2000 psi to about 4000 psi in an inert atmosphere for several hours and results in the formation of a two phase sintered ceramic composite material.

  5. Ceramic catalyst materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J.; Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K.

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  6. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  7. Ultrahigh-Temperature Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.; Ellerby, Donald T.; Beckman, Sarah E.; Irby, Edward; Gasch, Matthew J.; Gusman, Michael I.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs) are a class of materials that include the diborides of metals such as hafnium and zirconium. The materials are of interest to NASA for their potential utility as sharp leading edges for hypersonic vehicles. Such an application requires that the materials be capable of operating at temperatures, often in excess of 2,000 C. UHTCs are highly refractory and have high thermal conductivity, an advantage for this application. UHTCs are potentially applicable for other high-temperature processing applications, such as crucibles for molten-metal processing and high-temperature electrodes. UHTCs were first studied in the 1960 s by the U.S. Air Force. NASA s Ames Research Center concentrated on developing materials in the HfB2/SiC family for a leading-edge application. The work focused on developing a process to make uniform monolithic (2-phase) materials, and on the testing and design of these materials. Figure 1 shows arc-jet models made from UHTC materials fabricated at Ames. Figure 2 shows a cone being tested in the arc-jet. Other variations of these materials being investigated elsewhere include zirconium based materials and fiber-reinforced composites. Current UHTC work at Ames covers four broad topics: monoliths, coatings, composites, and processing. The goals include improving the fracture toughness, thermal conductivity and oxidation resistance of monolithic UHTCs and developing oxidation-resistant UHTC coatings for thermal-protection-system substrates through novel coating methods. As part of this effort, researchers are exploring compositions and processing changes that have yielded improvements in properties. Computational materials science and nanotechnology are being explored as approaches to reduce materials development time and improve and tailor properties.

  8. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-08-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

  9. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  10. Vacuum brazing ceramics to metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuhara, H.

    1987-02-01

    Attention is given to the use in ceramic/metal joint brazing alloy of silver-copper composition that incorporates 2 percent Ti. This alloy allows one-step brazing, and wets superalloys and stainless steels without prior Ni plating of the substrate. Another alloy consisting of Ag-Cu-In-Ti has been developed which alloys at lower temperatures and allows step-brazing when used with Ag-Cu-Ti alloy. If the thermal expansion difference between metal and ceramic is large, brazing with a graded seal may be used; this minimizes joint stresses upon cooling to room temperature.

  11. Clay minerals for advanced ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.H. )

    1989-11-01

    The author describes new and improved beneficiation techniques available to allow the production of clay minerals of exceptionally high purity. This is particularly true for kaolins and smectites. Wet processing techniques include particle size separation, high intensity magnetic separation, chemical leaching, flotation, and selective flocculation. The blending of clay minerals with other minerals provides opportunities to make special ceramic materials such as cordierite and other minerals that have very special ceramic properties including low heat expansion, high fired strength, low absorption, and other desired qualities.

  12. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative treatment also improved the function of the anterior guidance. It can be concluded that the conservative use of minimum thickness ceramic laminate veneers may provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure.

  13. High photovoltages in ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brody, P. S.

    1976-01-01

    The short-circuit currents and photo-emfs were measured for various ceramics including barium titanate, lead metaniobate, and lead titanate. It is suggested that the emfs and currents arise from the presence of photoconductor-insulator sandwiches in the presence of space-charge-produced internal fields. Results are in agreement with the proposed theory and indicate that the ferroelectric ceramics are not only producers of high-voltage photoelectricity but a photo-battery, the polarity and magnitude of which can be switched by application of an electrical signal.

  14. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Janney, M.A.

    1990-01-16

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, where after the product may be sintered.

  15. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Janney, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  16. Soldering ceramic-metal restorations.

    PubMed

    Presswood, R G

    1975-09-01

    This is a technique for soldering ceramic-metal restorations in a vacuum-fired furnace. Care must be exercised to prevent adherence of the flux to the porcelain surfaces. Low-heat solders have been used, but they do not flow any better and may result in a weak union. The various colors of impression plaster to form the key for removal of the assembly are used to prevent softening and distortion of the individual units. There are several techniques described in assembling and soldering ceramic-metal restorations. This technique is direct, accurate, and easily accomplished.

  17. Geopolymers for Structural Ceramic Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-31

    Chemistry Research, 40[17] 3749-3756 (2001). 14j. G. S. van Jaarsveld and J. S. J. van Deventer, "Effect of the alkali metal activator on the properties of...expansion property ," Journal of the Ceramic Society of Japan, 111[8] 533-536 (2003). 24I. Yanase, S. Tamai and H. Kobayashi, "Low-thermal-expansion properties ...Composites X Edited The American Ceramic Society, Westerville, OH, 2004. 5W. M. Kriven and J. Bell, "Effect of alkali choice on geopolymer properties

  18. Ceramic regenerator systems development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. A.; Fucinari, C. A.; Lingscheit, J. N.; Rahnke, C. J.; Rao, V. D.

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic regenerator cores are considered that can be used in passenger car gas turbine engines, Stirling engines, and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability tests/in industrial gas turbine engines. A regenerator core made from aluminum silicate shows minimal evidence of chemical attack damage after 7804 hours of engine test at 800 C and another showed little distress after 4983 hours at 982 C. The results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are also included.

  19. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative treatment also improved the function of the anterior guidance. It can be concluded that the conservative use of minimum thickness ceramic laminate veneers may provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure. PMID:24932126

  20. Ceramic component for MHD electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Bates, Junior L.

    1981-01-01

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf.sub.x In.sub.y A.sub.z O.sub.2 where x=0.1 to 0.4, y=0.3 to 0.6, z=0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  1. Ceramic components for MHD electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, D.D.

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf/sub x/In/sub y/A/sub z/O/sub 2/ where x = 0.1 to 0.4, y = 0.3 to 0.6, z = 0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  2. MHD oxidant intermediate temperature ceramic heater study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. W.; Chait, I. L.; Saari, D. P.; Marksberry, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The use of three types of directly fired ceramic heaters for preheating oxygen enriched air to an intermediate temperature of 1144K was investigated. The three types of ceramic heaters are: (1) a fixed bed, periodic flow ceramic brick regenerative heater; (2) a ceramic pebble regenerative heater. The heater design, performance and operating characteristics under conditions in which the particulate matter is not solidified are evaluated. A comparison and overall evaluation of the three types of ceramic heaters and temperature range determination at which the particulate matter in the MHD exhaust gas is estimated to be a dry powder are presented.

  3. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.; Seals, Roland D.; Morrell, Jonathan S.

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  4. Ceramic heat exchangers: Manufacturing techniques and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrigan, M. A.; Sandstrom, D. J.

    1981-05-01

    The objective of the ceramic heat pipe program being conducted at Los Alamos is demonstration of the practical feasibility of this technology for the solution of severe high temperature recuperation functions. Ceramic heat pipe recuperators were theoretically shown to offer distinct advantages over conventional ceramic heat exchangers from the standpoint of efficiency of heat recuperation and economics. The main stumbling block to their widespread utilization is related to the problems of materials for construction and the details of fabrication and assembly. The performance objectives of ceramic heat pipes and some aspects of the materials technology program aimed at solving the problem of economic ceramic heat pipe fabrication are described.

  5. Compliant sleeve for ceramic turbine blades

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Hongda; Narasimhan, Dave; Strangman, Thomas E.; Easley, Michael L.; Schenk, Bjoern

    2000-01-01

    A compliant sleeve for attaching a ceramic member to a metal member is comprised of a superalloy substrate having a metal contacting side and a ceramic contacting side. The ceramic contacting side is plated with a layer of nickel followed by a layer of platinum. The substrate is then oxidized to form nickel oxide scale on the ceramic contacting side and a cobalt oxide scale on the metal contacting side. A lubricious coating of boron nitride is then applied over the metal contacting side, and a shear-stress limiting gold coating is applied over the ceramic contacting side.

  6. Ceramic susceptor for induction bonding of metals, ceramics, and plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Buckley, John D.

    1991-01-01

    A thin (.005) flexible ceramic susceptor (carbon) was discovered. It was developed to join ceramics, plastics, metals, and combinations of these materials using a unique induction heating process. Bonding times for laboratory specimens comparing state of the art technology to induction bonding were cut by a factor of 10 to 100 times. This novel type of carbon susceptor allows for applying heat directly and only to the bondline without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. The ceramic (carbon film) susceptor produces molten adhesive or matrix material at the bond interface. This molten material flows through the perforated susceptor producing a fusion between the two parts to be joined, which in many instances has proven to be stronger than the parent material. Bonding can be accomplished in 2 minutes on areas submitted to the inductive heating. Because a carbon susceptor is used in bonding carbon fiber reinforced plastics and ceramics, there is no radar signature or return making it an ideal process for joining advanced aerospace composite structures.

  7. Hip Squeaking after Ceramic-on-ceramic Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Yan; Ma, Qi; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to review the characteristics and influencing factors of squeaking after ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) and to analyze the possible mechanisms of the audible noise. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were based on articles from PubMed and Web of Science. Study Selection: The articles selected for review were original articles and reviews found based on the following search terms: “total hip arthroplasty”, “ceramic-on-ceramic”, “hip squeaking”, and “hip noise.” Results: The mechanism of the squeaking remains unknown. The possible explanations included stripe wear, edge loading, a third body, fracture of the ceramic liner, and resonance of the prosthesis components. Squeaking occurrence is influenced by patient, surgical, and implant factors. Conclusions: Most studies indicated that squeaking after CoC THA was the consequence of increasing wear or impingement, caused by prosthesis design, patient characteristics, or surgical factors. However, as conflicts exist among different articles, the major reasons for the squeaking remain to be identified. PMID:27453238

  8. High temperature ceramics for automobile gas turbines. Part 2: Development of ceramic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walzer, P.; Koehler, M.; Rottenkolber, P.

    1978-01-01

    The development of ceramic components for automobile gas turbine engines is described with attention given to the steady and unsteady thermal conditions the ceramics will experience, and their anti-corrosion and strain-resistant properties. The ceramics considered for use in the automobile turbines include hot-pressed Si3N4, reaction-sintered, isostatically pressed Si3N4, hot-pressed SiC, reaction-bonded SiC, and glass ceramics. Attention is given to the stress analysis of ceramic structures and the state of the art of ceramic structural technology is reviewed, emphasizing the use of ceramics for combustion chambers and ceramic shrouded turbomachinery (a fully ceramic impeller).

  9. A new classification system for all-ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Gracis, Stefano; Thompson, Van P; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2015-01-01

    Classification systems for all-ceramic materials are useful for communication and educational purposes and warrant continuous revisions and updates to incorporate new materials. This article proposes a classification system for ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials in an attempt to systematize and include a new class of materials. This new classification system categorizes ceramic restorative materials into three families: (1) glass-matrix ceramics, (2) polycrystalline ceramics, and (3) resin-matrix ceramics. Subfamilies are described in each group along with their composition, allowing for newly developed materials to be placed into the already existing main families. The criteria used to differentiate ceramic materials are based on the phase or phases present in their chemical composition. Thus, an all-ceramic material is classified according to whether a glass-matrix phase is present (glass-matrix ceramics) or absent (polycrystalline ceramics) or whether the material contains an organic matrix highly filled with ceramic particles (resin-matrix ceramics). Also presented are the manufacturers' clinical indications for the different materials and an overview of the different fabrication methods and whether they are used as framework materials or monolithic solutions. Current developments in ceramic materials not yet available to the dental market are discussed.

  10. Ceramic high pressure gas path seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liotta, G. C.

    1987-01-01

    Stage 1 ceramic shrouds (high pressure turbine gas path seal) were developed for the GE T700 turbine helicopter engine under the Army/NASA Contract NAS3-23174. This contract successfully proved the viability and benefits of a Stage 1 ceramic shroud for production application. Stage 1 ceramic shrouds were proven by extensive component and engine testing. This Stage 1 ceramic shroud, plasma sprayed ceramic (ZrOs-BY2O3) and bond coating (NiCrAlY) onto a cast metal backing, offers significant engine performance improvement. Due to the ceramic coating, the amount of cooling air required is reduced 20% resulting in a 0.5% increase in horsepower and a 0.3% decrease in specific fuel consumption. This is accomplished with a component which is lower in cost than the current production shroud. Stage 1 ceramic shrouds will be introduced into field service in late 1987.

  11. Evaluation of silicon-nitride ceramic valves.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. G.; Zhang, J. M.; Andrews, M. J.; Tretheway, J. S.; Phillips, N. S .L.; Jensen, J. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Univ. of Texas; Caterpillar, Inc.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon-nitride ceramic valves can improve the performance of both light- and heavy-duty automotive engines because of the superior material properties of silicon nitrides over current metal alloys. However, ceramics are brittle materials that may introduce uncertainties in the reliability and durability of ceramic valves. As a result, the lifetime of ceramic valves are difficult to predict theoretically due to wide variations in the type and distribution of microstructural flaws in the material. Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are therefore required to assess the quality and reliability of these valves. Because ceramic materials are optically translucent and the strength-limiting flaws are normally located near the valve surface, a laser-scatter method can be used for NDE evaluation of ceramic valves. This paper reviews the progress in the development of this NDE method and its application to inspect silicon-nitride ceramic valves at various stages of manufacturing and bench and engine tests.

  12. Manufacture of high-density ceramic sinters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibata, Y.

    1986-01-01

    High density ceramic sinters are manufactured by coating premolded or presintered porous ceramics with a sealing material of high SiO2 porous glass or nitride glass and then sintering by hot isostatic pressing. The ceramics have excellent abrasion and corrosion resistances. Thus LC-10 (Si3N2 powder) and Y2O3-Al2O3 type sintering were mixed and molded to give a premolded porous ceramic (porosity 37%, relative bulk density 63%). The ceramic was dipped in a slurry containing high SiO2 porous glass and an alcohol solution of cellulose acetate and dried. The coated ceramic was treated in a nitrogen atmosphere and then sintered by hot isostatic pressing to give a dense ceramic sinter.

  13. Oxidation resistance of silicon ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasutoshi, H.; Hirota, K.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation resistance, and examples of oxidation of SiC, Si3N4 and sialon are reviewed. A description is given of the oxidation mechanism, including the oxidation product, oxidation reaction and the bubble size. The oxidation reactions are represented graphically. An assessment is made of the oxidation process, and an oxidation example of silicon ceramics is given.

  14. Superplastic forming of ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieh, T. G.; Wittenauer, J. P.; Wadsworth, J.

    1992-01-01

    Superplasticity has been demonstrated in many fine-grained structural ceramics and ceramic composites, including yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (YTZP), alumina, and Al2O3-reinforced zirconia (Al2O3/YTZ) duplex composites and SiC-reinforced Si3N4. These superplastic ceramics obviously offer the potential benefit of forming net shape or near net shape parts. This could be particularly useful for forming complicated shapes that are difficult to achieve using conventional forming techniques, or require elaborate, subsequent machining. In the present study, we successfully demonstrated the following: (1) superplastic 3Y-TXP and 20 percent Al2O3/YTZ composite have for the first time been successfully deformed into hemispherical caps via a biaxial gas-pressure forming technique; (2) no experimental difficulty was encountered in applying the required gas pressures and temperatures to achieve the results, thus, it is certain that higher rates of deformation than those presented in this study will be possible by using the current test apparatus at higher temperatures and pressures; and (3) an analytical model incorporating material parameters, such as variations during forming in the strain rate sensitivity exponent and grain growth-induced strain hardening, is needed to model accurately and therefore precisely control the biaxial gas-pressure forming of superplastic ceramics. Based on the results of this study, we propose to fabricate zirconia insulation tubes by superplastic extrusion of zirconia polycrystal. This would not only reduce the cost, but also improve the reliability of the tube products.

  15. Art Education: Creative Ceramic Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, Nora; Marinaccio, Louis

    A course in forming, decorating, glazing, and firing pottery is presented. Upon completion of the course, the student will be expected to be familiar with all terms and characteristics connected with pottery and ceramics, and he will be expected to be able to properly handle and form clay. Course content includes the history of clay handling,…

  16. Lightweight Ceramics for Aeroacoustic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, H. W.; Spamer, G. T.; Yu, J.; Yasukawa, B.

    1997-01-01

    The use of a HTP (High Temperature Performance) ceramic foam for aeroacoustic applications is investigated. HTP ceramic foam is a composition of silica and alumina fibers developed by LMMS. This foam is a lightweight high-temperature fibrous bulk material with small pore size, ultra high porosity, and good strength. It can be used as a broadband noise absorber at both room and high temperature (up to 1800 F). The investigation included an acoustic assessment as well as material development, and environmental and structural evaluations. The results show that the HTP ceramic foam provides good broadband noise absorbing capability and adequate strength when incorporating the HTP ceramic foam system into a honeycomb sandwich structure. On the other hand, the material is sensitive to Skydrol and requires further improvements. Good progress has been made in the impedance model development. A relationship between HTP foam density, flow resistance, and tortuosity will be established in the near future. Additional effort is needed to investigate the coupling effects between face sheet and HTP foam material.

  17. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  18. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  19. Ash-Based Ceramic Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This patent discloses a ceramic material made from raw coal fly ash or raw municipal solid waste fly ash and (1) sodium tetraborate or (2) a mixture of sodium tetraborate and a calcium containing material that is triple superphosphate, lime, dolomite lime, or mixtures thereof.

  20. Ceramic-Cord Gas Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etzel, C. W.

    1983-01-01

    High-temperature gasket material seals at temperatures above 1,100 degrees C. Concentric exhaust pipes are typical of applications in which ceramic-cord seals might be used. Cord is crushed to form seal between inner and outer pipes when inner pipe is expanded into place. Typical applications include engine exhaust ducts or hot pipes passing through firewalls.

  1. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    SciTech Connect

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  2. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  3. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  4. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was carried out on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} to investigate oxygen deficiency ({delta}) of the sample. The TGA was performed in a controlled atmosphere using oxygen, argon, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with adjustable gas flow rates. In this experiment, the weight loss and gain of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} was directly measured by TGA. The weight change of the sample was evaluated at between 600 and 1250 C in air or 1000 C as a function of oxygen partial pressure. The oxygen deficiencies calculated from TGA data as a function of oxygen activity and temperature will be estimated and compared with that from neutron diffraction measurement in air. The LSFT and LSFT/CGO membranes were fabricated from the powder obtained from Praxair Specialty Ceramics. The sintered membranes were subjected to microstructure analysis and hardness analysis. The LSFT membrane is composed of fine grains with two kinds of grain morphology. The grain size distribution was characterized using image analysis. In LSFT/CGO membrane a lot of grain pullout was observed from the less dense, porous phase. The hardness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes were studied at various loads. The hardness values obtained from the cross section of the membranes were also compared to that of the values obtained from the surface. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. Measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} as a function of temperature an oxygen partial pressure are reported. Further analysis of the dilatometry data obtained previously is presented. A series of isotope transients

  5. Method of forming a ceramic to ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Hutchings, Kent Neal; Kleinlein, Brian Paul; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2010-04-13

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, includes: providing a joint material between joining surfaces of first and second sintered bodies; applying pressure from 1 kP to less than 5 MPa to provide an assembly; heating the assembly to a conforming temperature sufficient to allow the joint material to conform to the joining surfaces; and further heating the assembly to a joining temperature below a minimum sintering temperature of the first and second sintered bodies. The joint material includes organic component(s) and ceramic particles. The ceramic particles constitute 40-75 vol. % of the joint material, and include at least one element of the first and/or second sintered bodies. Composite structures produced by the method are also disclosed.

  6. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  7. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Fox, Dennis; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Robinson, R. Craig; Bansal, Narottam

    2004-01-01

    One key factor that limits the performance of current gas turbine engines is the temperature capability of hot section structural components. Silicon-based ceramics, such as SiC/SiC composites and monolithic Si3N4, are leading candidates to replace superalloy hot section components in the next generation gas turbine engines due to their excellent high temperature properties. A major stumbling block to realizing Si-based ceramic hot section components is the recession of Si-based ceramics in combustion environments due to the volatilization of silica scale by water vapor. An external environmental barrier coating (EBC) is the most promising approach to preventing the recession. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3A12O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit the durability and temperature capability of current EBCs. Research is underway to develop EBCs with longer life and enhanced temperature capability. Understanding key issues affecting the performance of current EBCs is necessary for successful development of advanced EBCs. These issues include stress, chemical compatibility, adherence, and water vapor stability. Factors that affect stress are thermal expansion mismatch, phase stability, chemical stability, elastic modulus, etc. The current understanding on these issues will be discussed.

  8. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    PubMed

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (p<0.001); however, the thickness of ceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in fracture resistance values between a lithium disilicate ceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  9. Superplasticity and superplastic forming of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T.G.; Wadsworth, J.

    1994-05-01

    Recent advances in the basic understanding of superplasticity and superplastic forming of ceramics are reviewed. Deformation mechanisms as well as microstructural requirements for superplastic ceramics are discussed. Microstructural effects, such as grain size, dynamic grain growth, and the presence of grain-boundary liquid phases, on the superplastic properties and deformation behavior of ceramics are addressed. Superplastic forming, and particularly biaxial gas-pressure forming, of several ceramics, including YTZP and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/YTZP, is also presented. The forming behavior of these ceramics is correlated with that obtained from conventional uniaxial tests. Examples of concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) of metal-ceramic hybrids are given.

  10. Process for making ceramic hot gas filter

    DOEpatents

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    2001-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  11. Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Watzke, Ronny; Peschke, Arnd; Kappert, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Sintered ceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used as biomaterials for dental restoration, especially as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Biomaterials were developed either to veneer metal frameworks or to produce metal-free dental restorations. Different types of glass-ceramics and ceramics are available and necessary today to fulfill customers' needs (patients, dentists and dental technicians) regarding the properties of the biomaterials and the processing of the products. All of these different types of biomaterials already cover the entire range of indications of dental restorations. Today, patients are increasingly interested in metal-free restoration. Glass-ceramics are particularly suitable for fabricating inlays, crowns and small bridges, as these materials achieve very strong, esthetic results. High-strength ceramics are preferred in situations where the material is exposed to high masticatory forces.

  12. Ceramic processing: Experimental design and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Martin W.; Lauben, David N.; Madrid, Philip

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to: (1) gain insight into the processing of ceramics and how green processing can affect the properties of ceramics; (2) investigate the technique of slip casting; (3) learn how heat treatment and temperature contribute to density, strength, and effects of under and over firing to ceramic properties; (4) experience some of the problems inherent in testing brittle materials and learn about the statistical nature of the strength of ceramics; (5) investigate orthogonal arrays as tools to examine the effect of many experimental parameters using a minimum number of experiments; (6) recognize appropriate uses for clay based ceramics; and (7) measure several different properties important to ceramic use and optimize them for a given application.

  13. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-01-12

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  14. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Anderson, Iver E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Nosrati, Mohammad; Unal, Ozer

    1999-07-13

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  15. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-07-13

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 C to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  16. Metal-to-ceramic attachment device

    DOEpatents

    Pavelka, Edwin A.; Grindstaff, Quirinus G.; Scheppele, Stuart E.

    1985-01-01

    A metal-to-ceramic fastening device is disclosed for securing a metal member to a ceramic member with respective confronting surfaces thereon clamped together, comprising a threaded bolt adapted to extend through a bolt hole in the metal member and into an aligned opening in the ceramic member, a rod nut threadedly receiving the bolt and adapted to span the opening in the ceramic member, and a pressure limiting member received on the bolt between the nut and the confronting surface of the metal member for limiting the movement of the nut toward the metal member when the bolt is tightened, so as to limit the pressure applied by the nut to the ceramic member to avoid damage thereto. The fastening device also prevents damage to the ceramic member due to thermal stresses. The pressure limiting member may have a shallow dish-shaped depression facing the rod nut to assist in accommodating thermal stresses.

  17. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report. DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  18. Bio-Inspired Ceramic/Carbon Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    be observed (Fig. 6). 3 µm Spark Plasma Sintering We have developed an approach for the SPS of the ceramic scaffolds filled with CNTs...with other C precursors such as pitch. Spark plasma sintering can be used to compress these infiltrated materials to create brick-and-mortar structures...objective to fabricate bio-inspired ceramic/CNT or ceramic/carbon composites with nacre-like structures by combining freeze casting with spark plasma

  19. Method for preparing Pb-. beta. ''-alumina ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Hellstrom, E.E.

    1984-08-30

    A process is disclosed for preparing impermeable, polycrystalline samples of Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic from Na-..beta..''-alumina ceramic by ion exchange. The process comprises two steps. The first step is a high-temperature vapor phase exchange of Na by K, followed by substitution of Pb for K by immersing the sample in a molten Pb salt bath. The result is a polycrystalline Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic that is substantially crack-free.

  20. Tantalum-Based Ceramics for Refractory Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Leiser, Daniel; DiFiore, Robert; Kalvala, Victor

    2006-01-01

    A family of tantalum-based ceramics has been invented as ingredients of high-temperature composite insulating tiles. These materials are suitable for coating and/or permeating the outer layers of rigid porous (foam-like or fibrous) ceramic substrates to (1) render the resulting composite ceramic tiles impervious to hot gases and (2) enable the tiles to survive high heat fluxes at temperatures that can exceed 3,000 F ( 1,600 C).

  1. Corrosion-resistant ceramic thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two-layer thermal barrier coating, consisting of metal-CrA1Y bond coating and calcium silicate ceramic outer layer, greatly improves resistance of turbine parts to hot corrosion from fuel and air impurities. Both layers can be plasma sprayed, and ceramic layer may be polished to reduce frictional losses. Ceramic provides thermal barrier, so parts operate cooler metal temperatures, coolant flow can be reduced, or gas temperatures increased. Lower grade fuels also can be used.

  2. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  3. New Mechanism for Toughening Ceramic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-19

    tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline ( TZP ) ceramics, could contribute to the high toughness measured for zirconia ceramics. While it was recognized that... cubic -- tetragonal displacive transition. It was thus thought that if polycrystalline zirconia ceramics can be made by first heatign to the cubic ...stabilized tetragonal zirconia single crystals showed strength -700 MPa up to 1600°C. By contrast, the strength of the corresponding cubic crystals was

  4. Environment-Conscious Ceramics (Ecoceramics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2001-01-01

    Since the dawn of human civilization, there has always been a delicate balance between expanding human frontiers and coexisting with the ecosystem. In the new millennium, it will be extremely important to develop various materials, products, and processes to sustain a healthy life in harmony with nature that allow us to minimize any harmful effects. Environment-conscious ceramics (ecoceramics) are a new class of materials that can be produced with renewable resources (wood) and wood wastes (wood sawdust). Wood is one of the best and most intricate engineering materials created by nature. Natural woods of various types are available throughout the world. In addition, wood sawdusts are generated in abundant quantities by sawmills. Environment-conscious ceramic materials, fabricated via the pyrolysis and infiltration of natural wood-derived preforms with silicon have tailorable properties with numerous potential applications.

  5. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures.

  6. Creation of a ceramics handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craft, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    A group of common ceramic materials (alumina, magnesium oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide) were characterized through literature searches according to their physical properties. The files used were the NASA file, DDC/GRA File, Engineering Index File and standard library searches. The results of these searches are arranged by material properties including mechanical, electrical, electromagnetic, where applicable, and fracture; and the entries are arranged in chronological order by candidate. A list, by author, follows where tabular information including charts and figures of results is given along with a brief statement of the results and conclusions. In both cases, information on the independent variables along with their range is given. The results of an extensive industry survey asking for names of other candidates on which information is lacking and also what type of service, if any, is desired in keeping a current information file on general ceramic materials.

  7. Ceramics: Durability and radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W.; Weber, W.J.

    1996-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (1) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (2) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass {open_quotes}logs{close_quotes}; (3) deep borehole disposal. The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  8. Silsesquioxane-derived ceramic fibres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, F. I.; Farmer, S. C.; Terepka, F. M.; Leonhardt, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Fibers formed from blends of silsesquioxane polymers were characterized to study the pyrolytic conversion of these precursors to ceramics. The morphology of fibers pyrolyzed to 1400 C revealed primarily amorphous glasses whose conversion to beta-SiC is a function of both blend composition and pyrolysis conditions. Formation of beta-SiC crystallites within the glassy phase is favored by higher than stoichiometric C/Si ratios, while carbothermal reduction of Si-O bonds to form SiC with loss of SiO and CO occurs at higher methyl/phenylpropyl silsesquioxane (lower C/Si) ratios. As the carbothermal reduction is assumed to be diffusion controlled, the fibers can serve as model systems to gain understanding of the silsesquioxane pyrolysis behavior, and therefore are useful in the development of polysilsesquioxane-derived ceramic matrices and coatings as well.

  9. Deformation processes in forging ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, R. M.; Rhodes, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The deformation processes involved in the forging of refractory ceramic oxides were investigated. A combination of mechanical testing and forging are utilized to investigate both the flow and fracture processes involved. An additional hemisphere forging was done which failed prematurely. Analysis and comparison with available fracture data for AL2O3 indicated possible causes of the failure. Examination of previous forgings indicated an increase in grain boundary cavitation with increasing strain.

  10. Localized Impact Damage in Ceramics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-31

    approximated -quarter penny -shaped cracks surrounding the irreversibly deformed zone. Unlike cracks formed under Vickers indenters where the edges control crack...Roesler, "Brittle Fractures Near Equilibrium," Proc. Phys. Soc. (London) B69, 981-992 (1956). 2. B. R. Lawn and E. R. Fuller, "Equilibrium Penny -like...Indentations in Soda -Lime Glass," To be published in the pro- ceedings of the Third International Symposium on Fracture Mechanics of Ceramics. 7. H. P. Kirchner

  11. Reinforced ceramics employing discontinuous phases

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, P.F.

    1990-01-01

    The fracture toughness of ceramics can be improved by the incorporation of a variety of discontinuous reinforcing phases and microstructures. Observations of crack paths in these systems indicate that these reinforcing phases bridge the crack tip wake region. Recent developments in micromechanics toughening models applicable to such systems are discussed and compared with experimental observations. Because material parameters and microstructural characteristics are considered, the crack bridging models provide a means to optimize the toughening effects. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Investigation of Microtubular Ceramic Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-02-01

    decomposition temperatures , assuring that during subsequent heat- ing (to sinter the ceramic coating) the outer polymer coating decomposes along with or before...ZrSiO4 ), a refractory with excellent thermal shock resistance, but having limited usage in a high-density form since its maximum sintering temperature is... temperature difference Nmax (= tj’-ti) may be limited either by the thermal stress produced by the resulting heat flux or by a maximum temperature

  13. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-10-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sintering methods carried out to date, and compares the properties of the materials obtained to those produced by conventional sintering. The flash sintering process is described for oxides of zirconium, yttrium, aluminium, tin, zinc, and titanium; silicon and boron carbide, zirconium diboride, materials for solid oxide fuel applications, ferroelectric materials, and composite materials. While experimental observations have been made on a wide range of materials, understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the onset and latter stages of flash sintering is still elusive. Elements of the proposed theories to explain the observed behaviour include extensive Joule heating throughout the material causing thermal runaway, arrested by the current limitation in the power supply, and the formation of defect avalanches which rapidly and dramatically increase the sample conductivity. Undoubtedly, the flash sintering process is affected by the electric field strength, furnace temperature and current density limit, but also by microstructural features such as the presence of second phase particles or dopants and the particle size in the starting material. While further experimental work and modelling is still required to attain a full understanding capable of predicting the success of the flash sintering process in different materials, the technique non-etheless holds great potential for exceptional control of the ceramic sintering process.

  14. Strength and Microstructure of Ceramics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    120 keV. Chemical composition of the intergranular glass was determined using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) and Energy Dispersive...punch fixture. Details of this particular method of mechanical testing have been described elsewhere [71. 2 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Table I shows the...34 microplasticity " stage in crack initiation from the flaw’ " for alumina ceramics has been carried out. Results of (from literal adaptations of the original

  15. High-Temperature Structural Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R. Nathan

    1980-05-01

    The unique properties of ceramics based on silicon carbide and silicon nitride make them prime candidates for use in advanced energy conversion systems. These compounds are the bases for broad families of engineering materials, whose properties are reviewed. The relationships between processing, microstructure, and properties are discussed. A review and assessment of recent progress in the use of these materials in high-temperature engineering systems, and vehicular engines in particular, is presented.

  16. Refractory Oxidative-Resistant Ceramic Carbon Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    High-temperature, lightweight, ceramic carbon insulation is prepared by coating or impregnating a porous carbon substrate with a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of an organodialkoxy silane and an organotrialkoxy silane in an acid or base medium in the presence of the carbon substrate. The siloxane gel is subsequently dried on the carbon substrate to form a ceramic carbon precursor. The carbon precursor is pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the ceramic insulation containing carbon, silicon, and oxygen. The carbon insulation is characterized as a porous, fibrous, carbon ceramic tile which is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft.

  17. REVIEW OF STATUS OF CERAMIC TOOLS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CERAMIC MATERIALS, CUTTING TOOLS , ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, OXIDES, PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, FAILURE(MECHANICS), FRICTION, TEMPERATURE, SURFACE PROPERTIES, CUTTING FLUIDS, MACHINING, LATHE TOOLS, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING).

  18. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  19. Ceramic dentures manufactured with ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werelius, Kristian; Weigl, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Conventional manufacturing of individual ceramic dental prosthesis implies a handmade metallic framework, which is then veneered with ceramic layers. In order to manufacture all-ceramic dental prosthesis a CAD/CAM system is necessary due to the three dimensional shaping of high strength ceramics. Most CAD/CAM systems presently grind blocks of ceramic after the construction process in order to create the prosthesis. Using high-strength ceramics, such as Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIP)-zirconia, this is limited to copings. Anatomically shaped fixed dentures have a sculptured surface with small details, which can't be created by existing grinding tools. This procedure is also time consuming and subject to significant loss in mechanical strength and thus reduced survival rate once inserted. Ultra-short laser pulses offer a possibility in machining highly complex sculptured surfaces out of high-strength ceramic with negligible damage to the surface and bulk of the ceramic. In order to determine efficiency, quality and damage, several laser ablation parameters such as pulse duration, pulse energy and ablation strategies were studied. The maximum ablation rate was found using 400 fs at high pulse energies. High pulse energies such as 200μJ were used with low damage in mechanical strength compared to grinding. Due to the limitation of available laser systems in pulse repetition rates and power, the use of special ablation strategies provide a possibility to manufacture fully ceramic dental prosthesis efficiently.

  20. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalatur, Ekaterina Narikovich, Anton; Buyakova, Svetlana E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kulkov, Sergey E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru

    2014-11-14

    The article studies the porous ceramics consisting of ultra-fine ZrO{sub 2} powders. The porosity of ceramic samples varied from 15% to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials had a cellular configuration. The distinctive feature of all experimentally obtained strain diagrams is their nonlinearity at low deformations characterized by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformations shown in strain diagrams is due to the mechanical instability of cellular elements of the ceramic framework.

  1. Improved Slip Casting Of Ceramic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Vasquez, Peter; Hicks, Lana P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique of investment slip casting developed for making precise ceramic wind-tunnel models. Needed in wind-tunnel experiments to verify predictions of aerothermodynamical computer codes. Ceramic materials used because of their low heat conductivities and ability to survive high temperatures. Present improved slip-casting technique enables casting of highly detailed models from aqueous or nonaqueous solutions. Wet shell molds peeled off models to ensure precise and undamaged details. Used at NASA Langley Research Center to form superconducting ceramic components from nonaqueous slip solutions. Technique has many more applications when ceramic materials developed further for such high-strength/ temperature components as engine parts.

  2. Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Andrew H.; Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1994-01-01

    A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace.

  3. Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, A.H.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1994-07-26

    A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace. 5 figs.

  4. Directly susceptible, noncarbon metal ceramic composite crucible

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Morrow, S. Marvin; Rexford, Donald

    1999-01-01

    A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

  5. Development of Novel Polycrystalline Ceramic Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wisniewska, Monika; Boatner, Lynn A; Neal, John S; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; North, Andrea L; Wisniewski, Monica; Payzant, E Andrew; Howe, Jane Y; Lempicki, Aleksander; Brecher, Charlie; Glodo, J.

    2008-01-01

    For several decades most of the efforts to develop new scintillator materials have concentrated on high-light-yield inorganic single-crystals while polycrystalline ceramic scintillators, since their inception in the early 1980 s, have received relatively little attention. Nevertheless, transparent ceramics offer a promising approach to the fabrication of relatively inexpensive scintillators via a simple mechanical compaction and annealing process that eliminates single-crystal growth. Until recently, commonly accepted concepts restricted the polycrystalline ceramic approach to materials exhibiting a cubic crystal structure. Here, we report our results on the development of two novel ceramic scintillators based on the non-cubic crystalline materials: Lu SiO:Ce (LSO:Ce) and LaBr:Ce. While no evidence for texturing has been found in their ceramic microstructures, our LSO:Ce ceramics exhibit a surprisingly high level of transparency/ translucency and very good scintillation characteristics. The LSO:Ce ceramic scintillation reaches a light yield level of about 86% of that of a good LSO:Ce single crystal, and its decay time is even faster than in single crystals. Research on LaBr:Ce shows that translucent ceramics of the high-light-yield rare-earth halides can also be synthesized. Our LaBr:Ce ceramics have light yields above 42 000 photons/MeV (i.e., 70%of the single-crystal light yield).

  6. Improved ceramic heat exchange material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccollister, H. L.

    1977-01-01

    Improved corrosion resistant ceramic materials that are suitable for use as regenerative heat exchangers for vehicular gas turbines is reported. Two glass-ceramic materials, C-144 and C-145, have superior durability towards sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate compared to lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) Corning heat exchange material 9455. Material C-144 is a leached LAS material whose major crystalline phase is silica keatite plus mullite, and C-145 is a LAS keatite solid solution (S.S.) material. In comparison to material 9455, material C-144 is two orders of magnitude better in dimensional stability to sulfuric acid at 300 C, and one order of magnitude better in stability to sodium sulfate at 1000 C. Material C-145 is initially two times better in stability to sulfuric acid, and about one order of magnitude better in stability to sodium sulfate. Both C-144 and C-145 have less than 300 ppm delta L/L thermal expansion from ambient to 1000 C, and good dimensional stability of less than approximately 100 ppm delta L/L after exposure to 1000 C for 100 hours. The glass-ceramic fabrication process produced a hexagonal honeycomb matrix having an 85% open frontal area, 50 micrometer wall thickness, and less than 5% porosity.

  7. Lubricated wear of steel-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. T.; Klaus, E. E.; Duda, J. L.

    1993-04-01

    The goals of the program were to develop methods of measuring wear in the four-ball wear tester using lubricants in the fully flooded, vapor phase with condensation and vapor phase procedures with a variety of lubricant types. The use of ceramic discs as a substitute for balls in the friction dynamometer was also developed in the program. These studies show that changes in bearing systems from steel-on-steel to steel-on-ceramic can be made without changing the lubricant-additive systems now used in natural gas fired engines. The studies also showed that vapor phase lubrication could be substituted for liquid lubricants without sacrifice in performance in the four-ball wear tester.

  8. Dynamic testing and characterization of pre-fractured ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, A.K.; Hunter, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Nearly all of the mechanical behavior studies of armor ceramics, to date, havc involved the characterization and testing of pristine ceramic material. However, balhstic impact causes a strong shock front to propagate rapidly through the ceramic before much penetration can occur. A strong shock wave can result in localized compressive failure and fragmentation of the ceramic before its amplitude is amnuated below the compressive strength of the ceramic. Goals of this effort were to creatc shock-fractured ceramic using test assemblies which maintain the intergranular coupling and high density of the ceramic, characterize the extent and homogeneity of the fragmentation and dilatation of the ceramic, and test the compressive dynamic behavior of the shock-fractured ceramic under conditions of confining pressure. This effort will provide data to support models of the penetration resistance of fractured ceramics including degraded moduli, failure strength-strain, and post-failure characterization of the erosive properties of comminuted ceramic and penetratot materials.

  9. Method of making porous ceramic fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Reiner, Robert H.; Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1990-01-01

    A process for making a porous ceramic composite where fumed silica particles are coated with a nitrate, preferably aluminum nitrate. Next the nitrate is converted to an oxide and formed into a desired configuration. This configuration is heated to convert the oxide to an oxide silicate which is then react with HF, resulting in the fluoride ceramic, preferably aluminum fluoride.

  10. Ceramic Technology. Art Education: 6688.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinaccio, Louis M.

    For information on the Visual Arts Education Curriculum of which this is one course, see SO 007 721. In this course students study ceramic material, form, and decoration, historically and technically, and demonstrate competencies in preparing clay bodies and ceramic glazes. Course content is outlined in those areas. Special sections of the guide…

  11. Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl

    ScienceCinema

    Ritchie, Robert

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/12/05/scientists-create-tough-ceramic-that-mimics-mother-of-pearl/

  12. Method of manufacturing ceramic shaped articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inoue, K.

    1983-01-01

    A method of manufacturing ceramic shaped articles, wherein tapes of ceramic powder material in mixture with a binder material and special additives are shaped and then articles are stamped out from said tapes and sintered in a sintering furnace is described.

  13. Method of manufacturing ceramic shaped articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, K.

    1983-05-01

    A method of manufacturing ceramic shaped articles, wherein tapes of ceramic powder material in mixture with a binder material and special additives are shaped and then articles are stamped out from said tapes and sintered in a sintering furnace is described.

  14. Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/12/05/scientists-create-tough-ceramic-that-mimics-mother-of-pearl/

  15. Ceramics, Project Ideas for Industrial Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, James R., Ed.

    This book of ceramic project ideas is for teacher or student use in secondary industrial arts courses. It was developed in a workshop by teachers. The content objectives are to provide useful projects and units of instruction and to give direction to ceramics instruction which is in keeping with a changing technology. Forty-one project plans are…

  16. High temperature ceramic/metal joint structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  17. Synthesis of crystalline ceramics for actinide immobilisation

    SciTech Connect

    Burakov, B.; Gribova, V.; Kitsay, A.; Ojovan, M.; Hyatt, N.C.; Stennett, M.C.

    2007-07-01

    Methods for the synthesis of ceramic wasteforms for the immobilization of actinides are common to those for non-radioactive ceramics: hot uniaxial pressing (HUP); hot isostatic pressing (HIP); cold pressing followed by sintering; melting (for some specific ceramics, such as garnet/perovskite composites). Synthesis of ceramics doped with radionuclides is characterized with some important considerations: all the radionuclides should be incorporated into crystalline structure of durable host-phases in the form of solid solutions and no separate phases of radionuclides should be present in the matrix of final ceramic wasteform; all procedures of starting precursor preparation and ceramic synthesis should follow safety requirements of nuclear industry. Synthesis methods that avoid the use of very high temperatures and pressures and are easily accomplished within the environment of a glove-box or hot cell are preferable. Knowledge transfer between the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI, Russia) and Immobilisation Science Laboratory (ISL, UK) was facilitated in the framework of a joint project supported by UK Royal Society. In order to introduce methods of precursor preparation and ceramic synthesis we selected well-known procedures readily deployable in radiochemical processing plants. We accounted that training should include main types of ceramic wasteforms which are currently discussed for industrial applications. (authors)

  18. Joining of alumina ceramics and nickel alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ariga, Tadashi; Nitta, Yuji; Miyazawa, Yasuyuki

    1994-12-31

    Joining of alumina ceramics to nickel alloy was made using the various types of Ag-Cu-Ti brazing filler metal. Ti-containing brazing filler metal was produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD) method on the joining area of the alumina ceramics. The joinability of the brazing filler metal was estimated by its mechanical properties. And the composition and structure of the ceramic-metal bond zone in the alumina ceramics-nickel alloy joints were analyzed by SEM, EPMA and X-ray diffraction examinations. Some of brazing filler metal achieved the highest shear strength 100 MPa at room temperature. The elemental distributions of the interface between alumina ceramics and Ag-Cu-Ti brazing filler metal was shown to form the reaction layer consisting titanium oxide.

  19. Recent developments in glass-ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, G.H.

    1993-12-31

    Glass-ceramic materials can be made by sintering and crystallization of fine glass powders or by internal nucleation and crystallization of formed glass articles. In both cases, the final properties are controlled by phase assemblage and microstructure. Transparent glass-ceramics based upon ultra-fine grained {beta}-quartz solid solution have been developed with near-zero thermal expansion coefficient for a variety of consumer and technical products: cookware, stove-tops, telescope mirrors, optical gyroscopes. Fluormica glass-ceramics with a {open_quotes}house-of-cards{close_quotes} microstructure are easily machined and have found wide application in vacuum systems, precision dielectric components, insulators, and medical and dental prostheses. Acicular chain silicate glass-ceramics are strong and tough, and have recently been developed as high performance tableware and magnetic memory disk substrates. Sintered glass-ceramics based on magnesium aluminosilicate frits are the basis of copper-cordierite packaging for advanced IC packaging.

  20. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  1. Method and apparatus for ceramic analysis

    DOEpatents

    Jankowiak, Ryszard J.; Schilling, Chris; Small, Gerald J.; Tomasik, Piotr

    2003-04-01

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for ceramic analysis, in particular, a method for analyzing density, density gradients and/or microcracks, including an apparatus with optical instrumentation for analysis of density, density gradients and/or microcracks in ceramics. The method provides analyzing density of a ceramic comprising exciting a component on a surface/subsurface of the ceramic by exposing the material to excitation energy. The method may further include the step of obtaining a measurement of an emitted energy from the component. The method may additionally include comparing the measurement of the emitted energy from the component with a predetermined reference measurement so as to obtain a density for said ceramic.

  2. Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, D.P.

    1984-04-19

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  3. Introduction of cutting ceramics in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Logachev, G.A.; Privalov, V.A.; Shiryaev, M.Y.; Toporkov, A.O.

    1983-09-01

    Cutting ceramics of aluminum oxide Al203 produced in the form of types V3, VOK 60, and VOK 63 triangular, square, and rhombic, by the Dnepr Sintered Carbide Plant have wide use in plants. Tools of cutting ceramics are used in mass and large lot production. The design of ceramic inserts does not differ from that of cutters designed for holding sintered carbide inserts. Cutting ceramics are used at various specified plants for machining gray irons and calendars rolls of chilled cast iron, for drilling satellite gears, and in outside machining of pins, gate valves, shafts, and rollers. Tests conducted show that ceramic inserts reduce labor costs by 1.52 times and increases tool life 2-3 times.

  4. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Anderson, Iver E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Nosrati, Mohammad; Unal, Ozer

    1999-01-12

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  5. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Anderson, Iver E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Nosrati, Mohammad; Unal, Ozer

    2001-04-10

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  6. Development of BEM for ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, D. P.; Banerjee, P. K.; Dargush, G. F.

    1991-01-01

    It is evident that for proper micromechanical analysis of ceramic composites, one needs to use a numerical method that is capable of idealizing the individual fibers or individual bundles of fibers embedded within a three-dimensional ceramic matrix. The analysis must be able to account for high stress or temperature gradients from diffusion of stress or temperature from the fiber to the ceramic matrix and allow for interaction between the fibers through the ceramic matrix. The analysis must be sophisticated enough to deal with the failure of fibers described by a series of increasingly sophisticated constitutive models. Finally, the analysis must deal with micromechanical modeling of the composite under nonlinear thermal and dynamic loading. This report details progress made towards the development of a boundary element code designed for the micromechanical studies of an advanced ceramic composite. Additional effort has been made in generalizing the implementation to allow the program to be applicable to real problems in the aerospace industry.

  7. Fibrous-Ceramic/Aerogel Composite Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Fibrous-ceramic/aerogel composite tiles have been invented to afford combinations of thermal-insulation and mechanical properties superior to those attainable by making tiles of fibrous ceramics alone or aerogels alone. These lightweight tiles can be tailored to a variety of applications that range from insulating cryogenic tanks to protecting spacecraft against re-entry heating. The advantages and disadvantages of fibrous ceramics and aerogels can be summarized as follows: Tiles made of ceramic fibers are known for mechanical strength, toughness, and machinability. Fibrous ceramic tiles are highly effective as thermal insulators in a vacuum. However, undesirably, the porosity of these materials makes them permeable by gases, so that in the presence of air or other gases, convection and gas-phase conduction contribute to the effective thermal conductivity of the tiles. Other disadvantages of the porosity and permeability of fibrous ceramic tiles arise because gases (e.g., water vapor or cryogenic gases) can condense in pores. This condensation contributes to weight, and in the case of cryogenic systems, the heat of condensation undesirably adds to the heat flowing to the objects that one seeks to keep cold. Moreover, there is a risk of explosion associated with vaporization of previously condensed gas upon reheating. Aerogels offer low permeability, low density, and low thermal conductivity, but are mechanically fragile. The basic idea of the present invention is to exploit the best features of fibrous ceramic tiles and aerogels. In a composite tile according to the invention, the fibrous ceramic serves as a matrix that mechanically supports the aerogel, while the aerogel serves as a low-conductivity, low-permeability filling that closes what would otherwise be the open pores of the fibrous ceramic. Because the aerogel eliminates or at least suppresses permeation by gas, gas-phase conduction, and convection, the thermal conductivity of such a composite even at

  8. NDE for heat engine ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    Radiographic, ultrasonic, and scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) techniques were used to characterize silicon nitride and silicon carbide MOR bars in various stages of fabrication. Conventional and microfocus x-ray techniques were found capable of detecting minute high density inclusions in as-received powders, green compacts, and fully densified specimens. Significant density gradients in sintered bars were observed by radiography, ultrasonic velocity, and SLAM. Ultrasonic attenuation was found sensitive to microstructural variations due to grain and void morphology and distribution. SLAM was also capable of detecting voids, inclusions, and cracks in finished test bars. It was determined that thermoacoustic microscopy techniques have promise for application to green and densified ceramics.

  9. Ultrasonic characterization of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, S. J.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements were used to characterize density and microstructure in monolithic silicon nitride and silicon carbide. Research samples of these structural ceramics exhibited a wide range of density and microstructural variations. It was shown that bulk density variations correlate with and can be estimated by velocity measurements. Variations in microstructural features such as grain size or shape and pore morphology had a minor effect on velocity. However, these features had a pronounced effect on ultrasonic attenuation. The ultrasonic results are supplemented by low-energy radiography and scanning laser acoustic microscopy.

  10. Properties of ceramic candle filters

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, D.H.

    1995-06-01

    The mechanical integrity of ceramic filter elements is a key issue for hot gas cleanup systems. To meet the demands of the advanced power systems, the filter components must sustain the thermal stresses of normal operations (pulse cleaning), of start-up and shut-down conditions, and of unanticipated process upsets such as excessive ash accumulation without catastrophic failure. They must also survive the various mechanical loads associated with handling and assembly, normal operation, and process upsets. For near-term filter systems, these elements must survive at operating temperatures of 1650{degrees}F for three years.

  11. Fracture Behavior of Ceramic Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    AD-R158 810 FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF CERAMIC COMPOSITES(U) MATERIALS i/i SCIENCES CORP SPRING HOUSE PH K W BUESKING ET AL. AUG 83 MSC/TFR/’i482/i583...the U.S. Government . D T IC ELECTEF C01 AIR FORCE OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH MSC TFR 1402/1503 Bolling Air Force Base, DC August, 1983 q Ippreved...Bethlehem Pike, Spring House , PA * 215-542-8400 ." -- . ". ’- , ,,- . ..O TTr.AqRTTpf SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Date Enteredl REPORT

  12. Ceramics Curriculum: What Has It Been? What Could it Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sessions, Billie

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the traditional approach to ceramics education that focuses on studio-based, formalist curriculum and Modernist concerns. Argues for a comprehensive, or contextual, ceramics education in high school classrooms that would include contextual information about ceramic objects. Discusses example ceramic objects by various artists. (CMK)

  13. Interdisciplinary research concerning the nature and properties of ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    Research projects involving the development of ceramic materials are discussed. The following areas of research are reported: (1) refractory structural ceramics, (2) solid electrolyte ceramics, and (3) ceramic processing. The laboratory equipment used and the procedures followed for various development and evaluation techniques are described.

  14. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic fixed dental prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia–ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal–ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis. Methods Vinyl-polysiloxane impressions of 12 zirconia–ceramic and 6 metal–ceramic FDPs with veneer fractures were taken from the patients at the end of a mean observation of 40.3 ± 2.8 months. Epoxy replicas were produced from these impressions [1]. All replicas were gold coated, and inspected under the optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for descriptive fractography. Results Among the 12 zirconia–ceramic FDPs, 2 had small chippings, 9 had large chippings, and 1 exhibited delamination. Out of 6 metal–ceramic FDPs, 5 had small chippings and 1 had large chipping. Descriptive fractographic analysis based on SEM observations revealed that fracture initiated from the wear facet at the occlusal surface in all cases, irrespective of the type of restoration. Significance Zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic FDPs all fractured from microcracks that emanated from occlusal wear facets. The relatively low fracture toughness and high residual tensile stress in porcelain veneer of zirconia restorations may contribute to the higher chipping rate and larger chip size in zirconia–ceramic FDPs relative to their metal–ceramic counterparts. The low veneer/core interfacial fracture energy of porcelain-veneered zirconia may result in the occurrence of delamination in zirconia–ceramic FDPs. PMID:26233469

  15. Glass ceramic seals to inconel

    DOEpatents

    McCollister, Howard L.; Reed, Scott T.

    1983-11-08

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65-80% SiO.sub.2, 8-16%, Li.sub.2 O, 2-8% , Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 1-8% K.sub.2 O, 1-5% P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and 1.5-7% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to cause growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  16. Development of superplastic structural ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I.W.; Xue, L.A. )

    1990-09-01

    Superplastic structural ceramics (Y-TZP, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and their composites) that can withstand biaxial stretching to large strains have been developed. Microstructural design of these ceramics first requires an ultrafine grain size that is stable against coarsening during sintering and deformation. A low sintering temperature is a necessary, but not a sufficient, condition for achieving the required microstructure. In many cases, the selection of an appropriate phase, such as tetragonal phase in zirconia or {alpha} phase in silicon nitride, which is resistant to grain growth, is crucial. The use of sintering aids and grain-growth inhibitors, particularly those that segregate to the grain boundaries, can be beneficial. Second-phase particles are especially effective in suppressing static and dynamic grain growth. Another concern is to maintain an adequate grain-boundary cohesive strength, relative to the flow stress, to mitigate cavitation or grain-boundary cracking during large strain deformation. Existing evidence suggests that a lower grain-boundary energy is instrumental in achieving this objective.

  17. Bicomponent extrusion of ceramic fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, G.

    1995-11-01

    One of the main problems facing composite fabricators is finding high-temperature ceramic reinforcement fibers that are compatible with their matrices. Unlike metal-matrix composites, which require relatively large diameter fibers and a good bond between fibber and matrix, ceramic-matrix composites requires small diameter fibers having a weaker bond between fiber and matrix. Furthermore, they require an interfacial barrier that dissipates crack propagation energy without being absorbed by the matrix. Process speed is another important concern, because it influences the ultimate cost of the reinforcement fiber. To overcome these problems, a process has been developed to extrude, in a one-pass operation, a bicomponent (core/sheath) fiber system. It is designed to handle either oxide or non-oxide reinforcement core material, with a matching sheath material that acts as an interface between the core and its matrix, and also absorbs crack propagation energy. This article provides a closer look at the patented bicomponent extrusion process, which was developed by the author. Initial development has been undertaken with simple laboratory equipment. Therefore, only the very smallest scale extrusion has been attempted, and no characterizations have been made apart from simple bend tests against such commercially available fibers as Sigma (DRA), Tyranno (Ube), and Nicalon NL607 (Nippon Carbon).

  18. Joining NZP ceramics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklas, K.D.; Richey, M.W.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Santella, M.L.

    1995-09-26

    Objective was to assess techniques for joining NZP ceramics, a new family of ceramic materials that have low coefficient of thermal expansion, low thermal conductivity, and excellent thermal-shock resistance. Initially, the authors evaluated laser-beam welding over volatile fluxing agents (ferric oxide, copper oxide, boric acid, and boron nitride). They also examined other laser, arc-welding, brazing, and cold joining techniques. The NZP materials were capable of sustaining the thermal stresses associated with these joining processes without substantial cracking. Of the volatile fluxes, only the copper oxide promoted weld fusion. Efforts to accomplish fusion by laser-beam welding over copper, titanium, stainless steel, yttrium barium copper oxide, fused silica glass, and mullite/alumina were unsuccessful. Gas-tungsten arc welding accompanied by porosity, irregularities, and cracking was achieved on copper sheet sandwiched between NZP tiles. Attempts at conventional oxy-acetylene welding and torch brazing were unproductive. Silica-based oxide mixtures and copper oxide-based materials show potential for development into filler materials for furnace brazing, and phosphate-based cements show promise as a means of cold joining.

  19. Air Brazing: A New Method of Ceramic-Ceramic and Ceramic-Metal Joining

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Darsell, Jens T.; Kim, Jin Yong

    2011-10-01

    A new method of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal joining has emerged over the past several years. Referred to as air brazing, the technique was originally designed and developed for use in fabricating high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices such as planar SOFCs and oxygen and hydrogen concentrators. The primary advantage of air brazing is that a predominantly metallic joint can be formed directly in air without need of an inert cover gas or the use of surface reactive fluxes. The resulting bond is hermetic, offers excellent room temperature strength, and is inherently resistant to oxidation at high temperature. The key to developing a successful filler metal composition for air brazing is to identify a metal oxide wetting agent that is mutually soluble in a molten noble metal solvent. One particular oxide-metal combination that appears readily suited for this purpose is CuOx-Ag, a system originally of interest in the development of silver clad cuprate-based superconductors. Studies of the equilibrium phases studies in this system indicate that there are two invariant points in the pseudobinary CuOx-Ag phase diagram around which new braze compositions can be developed: 1) a monotectic reaction at 969±1°C, where CuO and a Ag-rich liquid L1 coexist with a second CuOx-rich liquid phase L2 at a composition of xAg/(xAg + xCu) = 0.10±0.03 Ag and 2) a eutectic reaction at 942±1°C, where CuO and Ag coexist with L1 at a composition of xAg/(xAg + xCu) = 0.99±0.005. Specifically, near-eutectic Ag-CuO filler metal compositions have shown good promise in joining electrochemically active ceramics such as yttria-stabilized zirconia, lanthanum strontium manganite, and barium strontium cobalt ferrite, as well as alumina and magnesia. More recently it has been found that various ternary additions can further improve the wetting characteristics of these filler metals, increase their potential operating temperatures, and/or increase the resulting strength of the

  20. Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial of Bilayer Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Crown Performance

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Rose, William; Oliveira, Erica; Yang, Mark; Clark, Arthur E.; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Analyzing the clinical performance of restorative materials is important, as there is an expectation that these materials and procedures will restore teeth and do no harm. The objective of this research study was to characterize the clinical performance of metal-ceramic crowns, core ceramic crowns, and core ceramic/veneer ceramic crowns based on 11 clinical criteria. Materials and Methods An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study. The following three types of full crowns were fabricated: (1) metal-ceramic crown (MC) made from a Pd-Au-Ag-Sn-In alloy (Argedent 62) and a glass-ceramic veneer (IPS d.SIGN veneer); (2) non-veneered (glazed) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC) (IPS e.max Press core and e.max Ceram Glaze); and (3) veneered lithia disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC/V) with glass-ceramic veneer (IPS Empress 2 core and IPS Eris). Single-unit crowns were randomly assigned. Patients were recalled for each of 3 years and were evaluated by two calibrated clinicians. Thirty-six crowns were placed in 31 patients. A total of 12 crowns of each of the three crown types were studied. Eleven criteria were evaluated: tissue health, marginal integrity, secondary caries, proximal contact, anatomic contour, occlusion, surface texture, cracks/chips (fractures), color match, tooth sensitivity, and wear (of crowns and opposing enamel). Numerical rankings ranged from 1 to 4, with 4 being excellent, and 1 indicating a need for immediate replacement. Statistical analysis of the numerical rankings was performed using a Fisher’s exact test. Results There was no statistically significant difference between performance of the core ceramic crowns and the two veneered crowns at year 1 and year 2 (p > 0.05). All crowns were rated either as excellent or good for each of the clinical criteria; however, between years 2 and 3, gradual roughening of the occlusal surface occurred in some of the ceramic-ceramic crowns

  1. Transparent Laser Ceramics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    SciTech Connect

    Soules, T

    2007-06-28

    LLNL has been using the largest transparent laser ceramics for the last two years in the solid-state heat capacity laser (SSHCL). The lab is very interested in extending the use of transparent ceramics to other laser applications. In this talk we will discuss work at the laboratory aimed at better understanding the sintering and the criteria needed for good ceramic transparency, the application of transparent ceramics in the SSHCL laser and possible new applications of tailored ceramics.

  2. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyakova, S.; Sablina, T.; Kulkov, S.

    2015-11-01

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO2(MgO), ZrO2(Y2O3) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO2 powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO2 grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  3. CERAMIC RESTORATION REPAIR: REPORT OF TWO CASES

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Neiva, Natália Antunes; da Silva, Gisele Rodrigues; Carlo, Hugo Lemes; da Mota, Adérito Soares; do Prado, Célio Jesus; Soares, Carlos José

    2009-01-01

    The esthetic and functional rehabilitation of patients with multiple missing teeth can be performed with several techniques and materials. Ceramic restorations provide reliable masticatory function and good esthetics. However, fracture can occur in some cases due to their brittle behavior. In some cases, the replacement of an extensive prosthesis is a problem due to the high treatment cost. In this paper, two cases are presented, in which fractures occurred in extensive metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures, and their replacement was not possible. Ceramic repair was chosen and the sequences of treatment with and without presence of the ceramic fragment are also discussed. The cases illustrate that, in some situations, fractured metal-ceramic partial dentures can be successfully repaired when prosthetic replacement is not a choice. Prosthodontists must use alternatives that allow a reliable repair to extensive metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures. Surface preparation of the ceramic with hydrofluoric acid in conjunction with a silane coupling agent is essential for a predictable bonding of composite resin. The repair performed with composite resin is an esthetic and functional alternative when extensive fixed partial dentures cannot be replaced. PMID:19274401

  4. Light-weight black ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-high temperature, light-weight, black ceramic insulation having a density ranging from about 0.12 g/cc. to 0.6 g/cc. such as ceramic tile is obtained by pyrolyzing siloxane gels derived from the reaction of at least one organo dialkoxy silane and at least one tetralkoxy silane in an acid or base liquid medium. The reaction mixture of the tetra- and dialkoxy silanes also may contain an effective amount of a mono- or trialkoxy silane to obtain the siloxane gels. The siloxane gels are dried at ambient temperatures and pressures to form siloxane ceramic precursors without significant shrinkage. The siloxane ceramic precursors are subsequently pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the black ceramic insulation comprising atoms of silicon, carbon and oxygen. The ceramic insulation can be characterized as a porous, uniform ceramic tile resistant to oxidation at temperatures ranging as high as 1700.degree. C., and particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft and other high-temperature insulation applications.

  5. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Buyakova, S. Kulkov, S.; Sablina, T.

    2015-11-17

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO{sub 2}(MgO), ZrO{sub 2}(Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO{sub 2} powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO{sub 2} grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  6. Tribology of ceramics: Report of the Committee on Tribology of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The current state of knowledge of ceramic surface structures, composition, and reactivity is reviewed. The tribological requirements of advanced mechanical systems now being deployed (in particular, heat engines) exceed the capabilities of traditional metallic-based materials because of the high temperatures encountered. Advanced ceramic materials for such applications are receiving intense scrutiny, but there is a lack of understanding of the properties and behavior of ceramic surfaces and the influence of processing on the properties of ceramics is described. The adequacy of models, ranging form atomic to macro, to describe and to predict ceramic friction and wear are discussed, as well as what is known about lubrication at elevated temperatures. From this analysis, recommendations are made for coordination, research, and development that will lead to better performance of ceramic materials in tribological systems.

  7. Joining of ceramics and ceramic matrix composites via reactive metal penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatelli, Mark Rico

    The processing and properties of ceramic and ceramic matrix composite components have improved to the point that they are now candidates for use in a variety of structural applications at high temperature. However, the lack of effective joining techniques limits further application of these materials. In an effort to remove this limitation a joining process based on the reactive metal penetration process used to make bulk metal/ceramic composites has been developed to join ceramics. This joining technique offers the potential to bond refractory components at reduced temperature, thus alleviating some of the limitations of traditional ceramic joining processes. Several experiments joining alumina and SiCf/SiC composite have been carried out at temperatures of 1100--1200°C. The results of these experiments show that processing ceramic joints with composite interlayers at these temperatures is possible, and may be technologically significant if a number of interesting processing and microstructural difficulties can be successfully overcome.

  8. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  9. Comparison of the properties of glass, glass-ceramic and ceramic materials produced from coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Erol, M; Küçükbayrak, S; Ersoy-Meriçboyu, A

    2008-05-01

    Glass, glass-ceramic and ceramic materials were produced from thermal power plant fly ash without any additives. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed the amorphous phase of the glass sample. Augite phase was detected in the glass-ceramic sample, while the enstatite and mullite phases occurred in the ceramic samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations showed that tiny crystallites homogeneously dispersed in the microstructure of the glass-ceramic sample and elongated crystals formed in the ceramic samples. Density values of the obtained samples are comparable to those of the commercially produced glass, glass-ceramic and ceramic samples. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results indicated that the produced samples could be taken as non-hazardous materials. Produced samples showed high resistance to alkali solutions in contrast to acidic solutions. Microstructural, physical, chemical and mechanical properties of the produced glass-ceramic samples are better than those of the produced glass and ceramic samples.

  10. [Preparation of porous ceramics based on waste ceramics and its Ni2+ adsorption characteristics].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Li; Wang, Cheng-Zhi; Shi, Ce; Shang, Ling-Ling; Ma, Rui; Dong, Wan-Li

    2013-07-01

    The preparation conditions of porous ceramics were determined by SEM, XRD and FT-IR characterizations as well as the nickel removal ability of porous ceramics to be: the mass fraction w of sesbania powder doped was 4%, and the calcination temperature was 800 degrees C. SEM and pore structure characterization illustrated that calcination caused changes in the structure and morphology of waste ceramics. With the increase of calcination temperature, the specific surface area and pore volume decreased, while the aperture increased. EDS analyses showed that the main elements of both the original waste porcelain powder and the porous ceramics were Si, Al and O. The SEM, XRD and FT-IR characterization of porous ceramics illustrated that the structure of porous ceramics was stable before and after adsorption. The series of experiments of Ni2+ adsorption using these porous ceramics showed that when the dosage of porous ceramics was 10 g x L(-1), the adsorption time was 60 min, the pH value was 6.32, and the concentration of nickel-containing wastewater was below 100 mg x L(-1), the Ni2+ removal of wastewater reached 89.7%. Besides, the porous ceramics showed higher removal efficiency on nickel in the wastewater. The Ni(2+)-containing wastewater was processed by the porous ceramics prepared, and the adsorption dynamics and adsorption isotherms of Ni2+ in wastewater by porous ceramics were investigated. The research results showed that the Ni2+ adsorption process of porous ceramics was in accordance with the quasi second-order kinetic model (R2 = 0.999 9), with Q(e) of 9.09 mg x g(-1). The adsorption process can be described by the Freundlich equation and Langmuir equation, and when the temperature increased from 20 degrees C to 40 degrees C, the maximum adsorption capacity Q(m) increased from 14.49 mg x g(-1) to 15.38 mg x g(-1).

  11. Properties of oxide-hydroxide sintered ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levkov, R. V.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper the study of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide with gibbsite modification is presented. It was shown that aluminum hydroxide may be used for pore formation and pore volume in the sintered ceramics can be controlled by varying the aluminum hydroxide concentration and sintering temperature. It was shown that compressive strength of alumina ceramics increases by 40 times with decreasing the pore volume from 65 to 15%. Based on these results one can conclude that the obtained structure is very close to inorganic bone matrix and can be used as promising material for bone implants production.

  12. Multiscale Modeling of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Mital, Subodh K.; Pineda, Evan J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Results of multiscale modeling simulations of the nonlinear response of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites are reported, wherein the microstructure of the ceramic matrix is captured. This micro scale architecture, which contains free Si material as well as the SiC ceramic, is responsible for residual stresses that play an important role in the subsequent thermo-mechanical behavior of the SiC/SiC composite. Using the novel Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells recursive micromechanics theory, the microstructure of the matrix, as well as the microstructure of the composite (fiber and matrix) can be captured.

  13. Fractography of glasses and ceramics II

    SciTech Connect

    Frechette, V.D.; Varner, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Topics addressed include finite element stress analysis and crack path prediction of imploding CRT; fractography and fracture mechanics of combustion growth diamond thin films; the fracture behavior of machineable hydroxyapatite; a fractal approach to crack branching (bifurcation) in glass; the fracture of glass-ionomer cements; the effect of quartz particle size on the strength and toughness of whitewares; and a proposed standard practice for fractographic analysis of monolithic advanced ceramics. Also treated are thermal exposure effects on ceramic matrix composites, fractography applied to rock core analysis, fractography of flexurally fractured glass rods, the fractographic determination of K(IC) and effects of microstructural effects in ceramics.

  14. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, II, George T.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Oden, Laurance L.; Turner, Paul C.; Ochs, Thomas L.

    1998-01-01

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  15. Experimental Techniques for Thermodynamic Measurements of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Putnam, Robert L.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1999-01-01

    Experimental techniques for thermodynamic measurements on ceramic materials are reviewed. For total molar quantities, calorimetry is used. Total enthalpies are determined with combustion calorimetry or solution calorimetry. Heat capacities and entropies are determined with drop calorimetry, differential thermal methods, and adiabatic calorimetry . Three major techniques for determining partial molar quantities are discussed. These are gas equilibration techniques, Knudsen cell methods, and electrochemical techniques. Throughout this report, issues unique to ceramics are emphasized. Ceramic materials encompass a wide range of stabilities and this must be considered. In general data at high temperatures is required and the need for inert container materials presents a particular challenge.

  16. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, G.T. II; Hansen, J.S.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.; Ochs, T.L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body followed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet. 3 figs.

  17. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, George T., II; Hansen; Jeffrey S.; Oden; Laurance L.; Turner; Paul C.; Ochs; Thomas L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  18. Properties of textile grade ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pudnos, Eric

    1992-01-01

    The availability of textile grade ceramic fibers has sparked great interest for applications in composite reinforcement and high temperature insulation. This paper summarizes the properties of various small diameter textile grade ceramic fibers currently available. Room temperature mechanical and electrical properties of the fibers are discussed for three cases: ambient conditions, after heat aging in argon, and after heat aging in wet air. Dow Corning (R) HPZ Ceramic Fiber, a silicon nitride type fiber, is shown to have improved retention of mechanical and electrical properties above 1200 C.

  19. Porous ceramic scaffolds with complex architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Munch, Etienne; Franco, Jaime; Deville, Sylvain; Hunger, Phillip; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2008-03-15

    This work compares two novel techniques for the fabrication of ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering with complex porosity: robocasting and freeze casting. Both techniques are based on the preparation of concentrated ceramic suspensions with suitable properties for the process. In robocasting, the computer-guided deposition of the suspensions is used to build porous materials with designed three dimensional (3-D) geometries and microstructures. Freeze casting uses ice crystals as a template to form porous lamellar ceramic materials. Preliminary results on the compressive strengths of the materials are also reported.

  20. Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Fibrous Composites: an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naslain, R.

    2011-10-01

    Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs) consist of a ceramic fiber architecture in a ceramic matrix, bonded together through a thin interphase. The present contribution is limited to non-oxide CMCs. Their constituents being oxidation-prone, they are protected by external coatings. We state here that CMCs display a hybrid feature, when at least one of their components is not homogeneous from a chemical or microstructural standpoint. Hybrid fiber architectures are used to tailor the mechanical or thermal CMC-properties whereas hybrid interphases, matrices and coatings to improve CMC resistance to aggressive environments.

  1. Retrieval analysis of alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearing couples

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearings have been in use in total hip replacement (THR) for more than 40 years, with excellent long-term survivorship. Although there have been several simulator studies describing the performance of these joints, there have only been a few retrieval analyses. The aim of this study was to investigate the wear patterns, the surface properties, and friction and lubrication regimes of explanted first-generation alumina bearings. Materials and methods We studied 9 explanted CoC bearings from Autophor THRs that were revised for aseptic loosening after a mean of 16 (range 7–19) years. The 3D surface roughness profiles of the femoral heads and acetabular cups (Srms, Sa, and Ssk) were measured to determine the microscopic wear. The bearings were imaged using an atomic-force microscope in contact mode, to produce a topographical map of the surfaces of the femoral heads. Friction tests were performed on the bearing couples to determine the lubrication regime under which they were operating during the walking cycle. The diametral clearances were also measured. Results 3 femoral heads showed stripe wear and the remaining 6 bearings showed minimal wear. The femoral heads with stripe wear had significantly higher surface roughness than the minimally worn bearings (0.645 vs. 0.289, p = 0.04). High diametral clearances, higher than expected friction, and mixed/boundary lubrication regimes prevailed in these retrieved bearings. Interpretation Despite the less than ideal tribological factors, these first-generation CoC bearings still showed minimal wear in the long term compared to previous retrieval analyses. PMID:24650021

  2. Energetics, bonding mechanism and electronic structure of ceramic/ceramic and metal/ceramic interfaces. Annual progress report, April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, A.J.

    1994-03-01

    Objectives were to study theory of structure of the metal/ceramic interface (heterophase ceramic interfaces), ferroelectronic materials and their epitaxially grown oxide thin films (superlattice structure), perovskites, antiferroelectric and electro-optic materials, etc.

  3. Characterization of ALON optical ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Charles T.; Hartnett, Thomas M.; Fisher, Donald; Sunne, Wayne

    2005-05-01

    ALONTM Optical Ceramic is a durable window material for UV, Visible and Mid IR window and dome applications. The mechanical, thermal, and optical properties of ALON products produced commercially by Surmet Corporation have been measured and this new data will be presented. Comparisons to previously measured data will be made. Optical quality, low scatter ALON having high strength that is nearly double previously reported has been made. Average strength values of 700 MPa at 21°C and 631 MPa at 500°C have been measured for ALON specimens prepared by precision surface finishing techniques. Polished optical domes tested have survived severe thermal shock tests. These strength levels are comparable to those for single crystal sapphire. Strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, refractive index, emissivity and absorption coefficient will be presented. The possible mechanisms for the increased strength will be discussed.

  4. Manufacturing of planar ceramic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, B.L.; Coffey, G.W.; Meinhardt, K.D.; Armstrong, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    The fabrication of ceramic interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and separator plates for electrochemical separation devices has been a perennial challenge facing developers. Electrochemical vapor deposition (EVD), plasma spraying, pressing, tape casting and tape calendering are processes that are typically utilized to fabricate separator plates or interconnects for the various SOFC designs and electrochemical separation devices. For sake of brevity and the selection of a planar fuel cell or gas separation device design, pressing will be the only fabrication technique discussed here. This paper reports on the effect of the characteristics of two doped lanthanum manganite powders used in the initial studies as a planar porous separator for a fuel cell cathode and as a dense interconnect for an oxygen generator.

  5. Deformation processes in forging ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, R. M.; Rhodes, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    The deformation processes involved in the forging of refractory ceramic oxides were investigated. A combination of mechanical testing and forging was utilized to investigate both the flow and fracture processes involved. Deformation studies of very fine grain Al203 revealed an apparent transition in behavior, characterized by a shift in the strain rate sensitivity from 0.5 at low stresses to near unity at higher stresses. The behavior is indicative of a shift in control between two dependent mechanisms, one of which is indicated to be cation limited diffusional creep with significant boundary enhancement. The possible contributions of slip, indicated by crystallographic texture, interface control of the diffusional creep and inhomogeneous boundary sliding are also discussed. Additional experiments indicated an independence of deformation behavior on MgO doping and retained hot pressing impurities, at least for ultrafine grained material, and also an independence of test atmosphere.

  6. Fracture behavior of ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Lupascu, Doru C.; Lynch, Christopher S.

    1999-06-01

    Piezoelectric actuators are key components in many smart structures applications. Long term reliability of these actuators becomes increasingly important as research makes the transition to commercial applications. Fracture toughness is a material parameter that measures a material's resistance to crack propagation. This is perhaps, one of the most important parameters for reliable device design. This paper reviews recent work by the authors on fracture behavior of ferroelectric ceramics. Vickers indentation data were used to determine the fracture toughness of a coarse and a fine grained PZT and two compositions of PLZT. R-curve data were obtained for two compositions of PLZT. The R-curve data presented here were generated using four point bend specimens with controlled surface flaws. The R-curve results compare favorably with the Vickers indentation data. A comparison of the R-curves for a ferroelectric composition of PLZT and a quadratic electrostrictive composition of PLZT demonstrate the contribution of domain reorientation to the toughening process.

  7. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J; Kuntz, J D; Roberts, J J; Hurst, T A; Drury, O B; Sanner, R D; Tillotson, T M; Payne, S A

    2008-08-24

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed.

  8. Tradition and Nature: Ceramics as Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFurio, Anthony G.

    1980-01-01

    Suggested is an alternative to the traditional ceramics instruction which uses prewedged and prepackaged clay and highly sophisticated kilns: begin with the digging of clay and end with the construction and firing of a trench kiln. (KC)

  9. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  10. Ceramic technology for solar thermal receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudirka, A. A.; Smoak, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The high-temperature capability, resistance to corrosive environments and non-strategic nature of ceramics have prompted applications in the solar thermal field whose advantages over metallic devices of comparable performance may begin to be assessed. It is shown by a survey of point-focusing receiver designs employing a variety of ceramic compositions and fabrication methods that the state-of-the-art in structural ceramics is not sufficiently advanced to fully realize the promised benefits of higher temperature capabilities at lower cost than metallic alternatives. The ceramics considered include alumina, berylia, magnesia, stabilized zirconia, fused silica, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, mullite and cordierite, processed by such methods as isostatic pressing, dry pressing, slip casting, extrusion, calendaring and injection molding.

  11. Screening and classification of ceramic powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miwa, S.

    1983-01-01

    A summary is given of the classification technology of ceramic powders. Advantages and disadvantages of the wet and dry screening and classification methods are discussed. Improvements of wind force screening devices are described.

  12. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckel, Zak C.; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H.; Jacobsen, Alan J.; Carter, William B.; Schaedler, Tobias A.

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging.

  13. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Antoniak, Zen I.; Prater, John T.; DeSteese, John G.

    1992-01-01

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed.

  14. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    DOEpatents

    Webb, B.J.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Prater, J.T.; DeSteese, J.G.

    1992-03-24

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed. 11 figs.

  15. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  16. Organic materials for ceramic molding processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, K.

    1984-01-01

    Ceramic molding processes are examined. Binders, wetting agents, lubricants, plasticizers, surface active agents, dispersants, etc., for pressing, rubber pressing, sip casting, injection casting, taping, extrusion, etc., are described, together with forming machines.

  17. Metallic nut for use with ceramic threads

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Paul F.; Shaffer, James E.

    1996-01-01

    A nozzle guide vane assembly has ceramic components therein having a conventional thread thereon including a preestablished pitch and having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion. The nozzle guide vane assembly has a metallic components therein having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater that the rate of thermal expansion of the ceramic components is positioned in a gas turbine engine. The metallic component, a nut, has a thread therein including a plurality of crests being spaced on a pitch equal to that of the ceramic component and has a pair of contacting surfaces extending from the plurality of crests. A notch spirally extends intermediate adjacent ones of the plurality of crests and has a preestablished depth which is at least twice the size of the conventional pitch. Furthermore, the pair of contacting surfaces are in contact with only a portion of the threaded surface of the ceramic components.

  18. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Helble, Joseph J.; Moniz, Gary A.; Morse, Theodore F.

    1995-09-05

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  19. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Helble, Joseph J.; Moniz, Gary A.; Morse, Theodore F.

    1997-02-04

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  20. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics.

    PubMed

    Eckel, Zak C; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H; Jacobsen, Alan J; Carter, William B; Schaedler, Tobias A

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging.

  1. Microcellular ceramic foams for radar absorbing structures

    SciTech Connect

    Huling, J.; Phillips, D.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project is to develop a lightweight, semi-structural, radar-absorbing ceramic foam that can be incorporated into aircraft exhaust systems to replace many of the currently used dense ceramic parts and thereby improve the radar cross section. Although the conventional processes for producing ceramic foams have not been able to provide materials that meet the design specifications for high strength at low density, we have developed and demonstrated a novel sol-gel emulsion process for preparing microcellular ceramic foams in which compositional and microstructural control is expected to provide the requisite high-temperature radar-absorption, strength-to-weight ratio, and thermal insulative properties.

  2. Low-thermal expansion infrared glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Philip

    2009-05-01

    L2 Tech, Inc. is in development of an innovative infrared-transparent glass ceramic material with low-thermal expansion (<0.5 ppm/°C) and high thermal-shock resistance to be used as windows and domes for high speed flight. The material is an inorganic, non-porous glass ceramic, characterized by crystalline phases of evenly distributed nano-crystals in a residual glass phase. The major crystalline phase is zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8) which has Negative Thermal Expansion (NTE). The glass phase is the infrared-transparent germanate glass which has positive thermal expansion (PTE). Then glass ceramic material has a balanced thermal expansion of near zero. The crystal structure is cubic and the thermal expansion of the glass ceramic is isotropic or equal in all directions.

  3. Advanced Ceramics Property and Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Michael; Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the what, how, how not, and why for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committees inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of all of the standards in one volume.

  4. Ceramics containing dispersants for improved fracture toughness

    DOEpatents

    Nevitt, Michael V.; Aldred, Anthony T.; Chan, Sai-Kit

    1987-01-01

    The invention is a ceramic composition containing a new class of dispersant for hindering crack propagation by means of one or more energy-dissipative mechanisms. The composition is composed of a ceramic matrix with dispersed particles of a transformation-prone rare-earth niobate, tantalate or mixtures of these with each other and/or with a rare-earth vanadate. The dispersants, having a generic composition tRMO.sub.4, where R is a rare-earth element, B is Nb or Ta and O is oxygen, are mixed in powder form with a powder of the matrix ceramic and sintered to produce a ceramic form or body. The crack-hindering mechanisms operates to provide improved performance over a wide range of temperature and operating conditions.

  5. Ceramics containing dispersants for improved fracture toughness

    DOEpatents

    Nevitt, Michael V.; Aldred, Anthony T.; Chan, Sai-Kit

    1987-07-07

    The invention is a ceramic composition containing a new class of dispersant for hindering crack propagation by means of one or more energy-dissipative mechanisms. The composition is composed of a ceramic matrix with dispersed particles of a transformation-prone rare-earth niobate, tantalate or mixtures of these with each other and/or with a rare-earth vanadate. The dispersants, having a generic composition tRMO.sub.4, where R is a rare-earth element, B is Nb or Ta and O is oxygen, are mixed in powder form with a powder of the matrix ceramic and sintered to produce a ceramic form or body. The crack-hindering mechanisms operates to provide improved performance over a wide range of temperature and operating conditions.

  6. Hybrid Flexible and Rigid Ceramic Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J. (Inventor); Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for closing out the edges of a flexible ceramic insulation member including inner and outer mold line covering layers. A rigid, segmented, ceramic frame is placed round the edges of the insulation member and exposed edges of the inner and outer mold line covering layers are affixed to the ceramic frame. In one embodiment wherein the covering layers comprise fabrics, the outer fabric is bonded to the top surface and to grooved portion of the side surface of the frame. In another embodiment wherein the outer cover layer comprises a metallic foil, clips on the edges of the frame are used to engage foil extensions. The ceramic frame is coated with a high emittance densifier coating.

  7. Testing Consent Order on Refractory Ceramic Fibers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This notice announces that EPA has signed signed an enforceable testing consent order under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), 15 U.S.C. section 2601 at seq., with three of the primary producers of refractory ceramic fibers (RCF).

  8. Metal stub and ceramic body electrode assembly

    DOEpatents

    Rolf, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    An electrically conductive ceramic electrode body having an opening therein is threadably engaged with a metal stub having at least a slot therein to provide space for expansion of the stub without damage to the electrode body.

  9. Binding agent for molding ceramic items

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshentsev, B. D.; Vityuk, N. P.; Volkov, A. V.; Yevdokimov, A. I.; Novikov, M. N.; Piskunov, Y. G.; Pobortsev, E. P.; Sadovnichaya, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    The invention refers to the fabrication of ceramic items by the molding method. It can be used to produce items of complicated configuration, in particular composition of binding agent for electroceramic items.

  10. CERAMIC WASTE FORM DATA PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

    2014-06-13

    The purpose of this data package is to provide information about simulated crystalline waste forms that can be used to select an appropriate composition for a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) proof of principle demonstration. Melt processing, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and thermal analysis information was collected to assess the ability of two potential candidate ceramic compositions to be processed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) CCIM and to guide processing parameters for the CCIM operation. Given uncertainties in the CCIM capabilities to reach certain temperatures throughout the system, one waste form designated 'Fe-MP' was designed towards enabling processing and another, designated 'CAF-5%TM-MP' was designed towards optimized microstructure. Melt processing studies confirmed both compositions could be poured from a crucible at 1600{degrees}C although the CAF-5%TM-MP composition froze before pouring was complete due to rapid crystallization (upon cooling). X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the crystalline nature and phase assemblages of the compositions. The kinetics of melting and crystallization appeared to vary significantly between the compositions. Impedance spectroscopy results indicated the electrical conductivity is acceptable with respect to processing in the CCIM. The success of processing either ceramic composition will depend on the thermal profiles throughout the CCIM. In particular, the working temperature of the pour spout relative to the bulk melter which can approach 1700{degrees}C. The Fe-MP composition is recommended to demonstrate proof of principle for crystalline simulated waste forms considering the current configuration of INL's CCIM. If proposed modifications to the CCIM can maintain a nominal temperature of 1600{degrees}C throughout the melter, drain, and pour spout, then the CAF-5%TM-MP composition should be considered for a proof of principle demonstration.

  11. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  12. Polymer-Derived Ceramic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    SiC-based ceramic fibers are derived from polycarbosilane or polymetallocarbosilane precursors and are classified into three groups according to their chemical composition, oxygen content, and C/Si atomic ratio. The first-generation fibers are Si-C-O (Nicalon) fibers and Si-Ti-C-O (Tyranno Lox M) fibers. Both fibers contain more than 10-wt% oxygen owing to oxidation during curing and lead to degradation in strength at temperatures exceeding 1,300°C. The maximum use temperature is 1,100°C. The second-generation fibers are SiC (Hi-Nicalon) fibers and Si-Zr-C-O (Tyranno ZMI) fibers. The oxygen content of these fibers is reduced to less than 1 wt% by electron beam irradiation curing in He. The thermal stability of these fibers is improved (they are stable up to 1,500°C), but their creep resistance is limited to a maximum of 1,150°C because their C/Si atomic ratio results in excess carbon. The third-generation fibers are stoichiometric SiC fibers, i.e., Hi-Nicalon Type S (hereafter Type S), Tyranno SA, and Sylramic™ fibers. They exhibit improved thermal stability and creep resistance up to 1,400°C. Stoichiometric SiC fibers meet many of the requirements for the use of ceramic matrix composites for high-temperature structural application. SiBN3C fibers derived from polyborosilazane also show promise for structural applications, remain in the amorphous state up to 1,800°C, and have good high-temperature creep resistance.

  13. Method for treating beta-spodumene ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Day, J. Paul; Hickman, David L.

    1994-09-27

    A vapor-phase method for treating a beta-spodumene ceramic article to achieve a substitution of exchangeable hydrogen ions for the lithium present in the beta-spodumene crystals, wherein a barrier between the ceramic article and the source of exchangeable hydrogen ions is maintained in order to prevent lithium contamination of the hydrogen ion source and to generate highly recoverable lithium salts, is provided.

  14. Ceramic Matrix Composites for Rotorcraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) components are being developed for turbine engine applications. Compared to metallic components, the CMC components offer benefits of higher temperature capability and less cooling requirements which correlates to improved efficiency and reduced emissions. This presentation discusses a technology develop effort for overcoming challenges in fabricating a CMC vane for the high pressure turbine. The areas of technology development include small component fabrication, ceramic joining and integration, material and component testing and characterization, and design and analysis of concept components.

  15. Microstructural characterization of nuclear-waste ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F.J.; Clarke, D.R.

    1982-09-22

    Characterization of nuclear waste ceramics requires techniques possessing high spatial and x-ray resolution. XRD, SEM, electron microprobe, TEM and analytical EM techniques are applied to ceramic formulations designed to immobilize both commercial and defense-related reactor wastes. These materials are used to address the strengths and limitations of the techniques above. An iterative approach combining all these techniques is suggested. 16 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Machinability of IPS Empress 2 framework ceramic.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C; Weigl, P

    2000-01-01

    Using ceramic materials for an automatic production of ceramic dentures by CAD/CAM is a challenge, because many technological, medical, and optical demands must be considered. The IPS Empress 2 framework ceramic meets most of them. This study shows the possibilities for machining this ceramic with economical parameters. The long life-time requirement for ceramic dentures requires a ductile machined surface to avoid the well-known subsurface damages of brittle materials caused by machining. Slow and rapid damage propagation begins at break outs and cracks, and limits life-time significantly. Therefore, ductile machined surfaces are an important demand for machine dental ceramics. The machining tests were performed with various parameters such as tool grain size and feed speed. Denture ceramics were machined by jig grinding on a 5-axis CNC milling machine (Maho HGF 500) with a high-speed spindle up to 120,000 rpm. The results of the wear test indicate low tool wear. With one tool, you can machine eight occlusal surfaces including roughing and finishing. One occlusal surface takes about 60 min machining time. Recommended parameters for roughing are middle diamond grain size (D107), cutting speed v(c) = 4.7 m/s, feed speed v(ft) = 1000 mm/min, depth of cut a(e) = 0.06 mm, width of contact a(p) = 0.8 mm, and for finishing ultra fine diamond grain size (D46), cutting speed v(c) = 4.7 m/s, feed speed v(ft) = 100 mm/min, depth of cut a(e) = 0.02 mm, width of contact a(p) = 0.8 mm. The results of the machining tests give a reference for using IPS Empress(R) 2 framework ceramic in CAD/CAM systems.

  17. Photoacoustic microscopy of ceramic turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Kinnick, R. R.; Heitman, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Scanning photoacoustic microscopy (SPAM) is evaluated as a nondestructive technique for the detection of both surface and subsurface flaws in polycrystalline ceramics, such as those currently under consideration for the high temperature components of small vehicular and industrial gas turbine engines; the fracture strength of these brittle materials is controlled by small, 25-200 micron flaws. Attention is given to the correlation of SPAM-detected flaws with actual, fracture-controlling flaws in ceramic turbine blades.

  18. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-04-05

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration. A high-power diesel engine valve for the DDC Series 149 engine was chosen as the demonstration part for this program. This was determined to be an ideal component type to demonstrate cost-effective process enhancements, the beneficial impact of advanced ceramics on transportation systems, and near-term commercialization potential. The baseline valve material was NAC's NT451 SiAION. It was replaced, later in the program, by an alternate silicon nitride composition (NT551), which utilized a lower cost raw material and a simplified powder-processing approach. The material specifications were defined based on DDC's engine requirements, and the initial and final component design tasks were completed.

  19. IMPACT STRENGTH OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bless, S.; Tolman, J.

    2009-12-28

    Strength of glass and glass ceramic was measured with a bar impact technique. High-speed movies show regions of tensile and compressive failure. The borosilicate glass had a compressive strength of at least 2.2 GPa, and the glass ceramic at least 4 GPa. However, the BSG was much stronger in tension than GC. In ballistic tests, the BSG was the superior armor.

  20. Advanced Ceramic Materials for Future Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    With growing trend toward higher temperature capabilities, lightweight, and multifunctionality, significant advances in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be required for future aerospace applications. The presentation will provide an overview of material requirements for future aerospace missions, and the role of ceramics and CMCs in meeting those requirements. Aerospace applications will include gas turbine engines, aircraft structure, hypersonic and access to space vehicles, space power and propulsion, and space communication.