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Sample records for reca gene products

  1. Protein X is the product of the recA gene of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    McEntee, K

    1977-01-01

    The inducible protein X of Escherichia coli has been compared to the recA+ protein made by specialized recA transducing phages. The molecular weights and isoelectric points of these proteins are identical. Two mutations located in the recA gene that alter the electrophoretic mobility or the isoelectric point of protein X have been studied. A recA12 mutant strain, deficient in homologous recombination and repair, produces a smaller-than-normal protein X. A transducing phage carrying the recA12 allele directs the synthesis of a smaller recA protein after infection of irradiated cells. A transducing phage carrying the recA region of a tif-1 mutant strain codes for a recA protein with an isoelectric point more basic than that of the lambdaprecA+ product. The protein X of a tif-1 mutant strain shows an identical shift in its isoelectric properties. Examination of several tsl- recA- strains indicates that protein X can be induced in several missense recA mutants but is not detected in tsl- strains carrying amber or deletion mutations of the recA gene. These results demonstrate that protein X is the product of the recA gene and that the tif-1 mutation alters the properties of the recA protein. A model is suggested for autoregulation of the recA protein in the induction of functions expressed in response to DNA damage (SOS functions). Images PMID:341151

  2. recA gene product is responsible for inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Trgovcević, Z; Petranović, D; Petranović, M; Salaj-Smic, E

    1980-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation was studied in wild-type, uvrA, recB, recA recB, and recA Escherichia coli strains. Inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, which occurs almost immediately after exposing the cells to ultraviolet radiation, depends on the functional gene recA. PMID:6997276

  3. Production of transgenic piglets using ICSI-sperm-mediated gene transfer in combination with recombinase RecA.

    PubMed

    García-Vázquez, Francisco A; Ruiz, Salvador; Matás, Carmen; Izquierdo-Rico, M José; Grullón, Luis A; De Ondiz, Aitor; Vieira, Luis; Avilés-López, Karen; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Gadea, Joaquín

    2010-08-01

    Sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is a method for the production of transgenic animals based on the intrinsic ability of sperm cells to bind and internalize exogenous DNA molecules and to transfer them into the oocyte at fertilization. Recombinase-A (RecA) protein-coated exogenous DNA has been used previously in pronuclear injection systems increasing integration into goat and pig genomes. However, there are no data regarding transgene expression after ICSI. Here, we set out to investigate whether the expression of transgenic DNA in porcine embryos is improved by recombinase-mediated DNA transfer and if it is possible to generate transgenic animals using this methodology. Different factors which could affect the performance of this transgenic methodology were analyzed by studying 1) the effect of the presence of exogenous DNA and RecA protein on boar sperm functionality; 2) the effect of recombinase RecA on in vitro enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing embryos produced by ICSI or IVF; and 3) the efficiency of generation of transgenic piglets by RecA-mediated ICSI. Our results suggested that 1) the presence of exogenous DNA and RecA-DNA complexes at 5 microg/ml did not affect sperm functionality in terms of motility, viability, membrane lipid disorder, or reactive oxygen species generation; 2) EGFP-expressing embryos were obtained with a high efficiency using the SMGT-ICSI technique in combination with recombinase; however, the use of IVF system did not result in any fluorescent embryos; and 3) transgenic piglets were produced by this methodology. To our knowledge, this is the first time that transgenic pigs have been produced by ICSI-SGMT and a recombinase.

  4. Mutagenic repair in Escherichia coli: products of the recA gene and of the umuD and umuC genes act at different steps in UV-induced mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, B A; Woodgate, R

    1985-01-01

    When excision-deficient Escherichia coli carrying umuC or umuD alleles were exposed to visible light several hours after ultraviolet irradiation, base-pair-substitution mutations were induced in these normally non-UV-mutable bacteria. It is argued that delayed photoreversal of pyrimidine dimers removes blocks to DNA replication and allows the "survival" and expression of misincorporated bases. A model for UV mutagenesis is proposed with two steps: (i) misincorporation opposite a photoproduct, which can be mediated directly by RecA protein, and (ii) bypass, only the latter process requiring umuD+ and umuC+ alleles. Basal levels of gene products are sufficient for at least some misincorporation events, although induced levels of umuD and umuC gene products are necessary for the bypass step. umuC bacteria containing the recA441 allele showed a greater yield of mutants, and those containing recA430 a reduced yield, following delayed photoreversal. The lexA51 allele (which results in constitutive derepression of RecA protein production) did not significantly alter the yield of mutants but caused them to appear marginally sooner in a recA441 umuC strain. These results emphasize that the nature of the RecA protein and not its concentration is paramount in determining the level of misincorporation. Experiments with recA441 umuC bacteria at 43 degrees C and 30 degrees C suggest that the misincorporation effect is unlikely to be attributable to cleavage of a DNA binding protein such as a repressor or a component of the polymerase complex. Moreover, misincorporation seems to occur without the need for induced synthesis of any other protein under recA control. PMID:3889923

  5. RecET driven chromosomal gene targeting to generate a RecA deficient Escherichia coli strain for Cre mediated production of minicircle DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tolmachov, Oleg; Palaszewski, Iwona; Bigger, Brian; Coutelle, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Background Minicircle DNA is the non-replicating product of intramolecular site-specific recombination within a bacterial minicircle producer plasmid. Minicircle DNA can be engineered to contain predominantly human sequences which have a low content of CpG dinucleotides and thus reduced immunotoxicity for humans, whilst the immunogenic bacterial origin and antibiotic resistance marker gene sequences are entirely removed by site-specific recombination. This property makes minicircle DNA an excellent vector for non-viral gene therapy. Large-scale production of minicircle DNA requires a bacterial strain expressing tightly controlled site-specific recombinase, such as Cre recombinase. As recombinant plasmids tend to be more stable in RecA-deficient strains, we aimed to construct a recA- bacterial strain for generation of minicircle vector DNA with less chance of unwanted deletions. Results We describe here the construction of the RecA-deficient minicircle DNA producer Escherichia coli HB101Cre with a chromosomally located Cre recombinase gene under the tight control of the araC regulon. The Cre gene expression cassette was inserted into the chromosomal lacZ gene by creating transient homologous recombination proficiency in the recA- strain HB101 using plasmid-born recET genes and homology-mediated chromosomal "pop-in, pop-out" of the plasmid pBAD75Cre containing the Cre gene and a temperature sensitive replication origin. Favourably for the Cre gene placement, at the "pop-out" step, the observed frequency of RecET-led recombination between the proximal regions of homology was 10 times higher than between the distal regions. Using the minicircle producing plasmid pFIXluc containing mutant loxP66 and loxP71 sites, we isolated pure minicircle DNA from the obtained recA- producer strain HB101Cre. The minicircle DNA preparation consisted of monomeric and, unexpectedly, also multimeric minicircle DNA forms, all containing the hybrid loxP66/71 site 5'-TACCGTTCGT ATAATGTATG

  6. Sequences of the recA gene and protein.

    PubMed

    Sancar, A; Stachelek, C; Konigsberg, W; Rupp, W D

    1980-05-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the recA gene of Escherichia coli; this permits the formulation of the primary structure for the recA protein. This structure is consistent with the amino acid composition of the tryptic peptides obtained from the recA protein. The coding region of the recA gene has 1059 base pairs, which specify 352 amino acids. The recA protein has alanine and phenylalanine as its NH2- and COOH-terminal amino acids, respectively, and has the following amino acid composition: Cys3 Asp20 Asn15 Met9 Thr17 Ser20 Glu30 Gln13 Pro10 Gly35 Ala38 Val22 Ile27 Leu31 Tyr7 Phe10 His2Lys27 Trp2 Arg14. Of the three cysteine residues, only two can be alkylated under reducing and denaturing conditions. The molecular weight of the recA polypeptide is 37,842.

  7. Transoceanic spreading of pathogenic strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus with distinctive genetic signatures in the recA gene.

    PubMed

    González-Escalona, Narjol; Gavilan, Ronnie G; Brown, Eric W; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important human pathogen whose transmission is associated with the consumption of contaminated seafood. Consistent multilocus sequence typing for V. parahaemolyticus has shown difficulties in the amplification of the recA gene by PCR associated with a lack of amplification or a larger PCR product than expected. In one strain (090-96, Peru, 1996), the produced PCR product was determined to be composed of two recA fragments derived from different Vibrio species. To better understand this phenomenon, we sequenced the whole genome of this strain. The hybrid recA gene was found to be the result of a fragmentation of the original lineage-specific recA gene resulting from a DNA insertion of approximately 30 kb in length. This insert had a G+C content of 38.8%, lower than that of the average G+C content of V. parahaemolyticus (45.2%), and contained 19 ORFs, including a complete recA gene. This new acquired recA gene deviated 24% in sequence from the original recA and was distantly related to recA genes from bacteria of the Vibrionaceae family. The reconstruction of the original recA gene (recA3) identified the precursor as belonging to ST189, a sequence type reported previously only in Asian countries. The identification of this singular genetic feature in strains from Asia reveals new evidence for genetic connectivity between V. parahaemolyticus populations at both sides of the Pacific Ocean that, in addition to the previously described pandemic clone, supports the existence of a recurrent transoceanic spreading of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus with the corresponding potential risk of pandemic expansion.

  8. Transoceanic Spreading of Pathogenic Strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus with Distinctive Genetic Signatures in the recA Gene

    PubMed Central

    González-Escalona, Narjol; Gavilan, Ronnie G.; Brown, Eric W.; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important human pathogen whose transmission is associated with the consumption of contaminated seafood. Consistent multilocus sequence typing for V. parahaemolyticus has shown difficulties in the amplification of the recA gene by PCR associated with a lack of amplification or a larger PCR product than expected. In one strain (090–96, Peru, 1996), the produced PCR product was determined to be composed of two recA fragments derived from different Vibrio species. To better understand this phenomenon, we sequenced the whole genome of this strain. The hybrid recA gene was found to be the result of a fragmentation of the original lineage-specific recA gene resulting from a DNA insertion of approximately 30 kb in length. This insert had a G+C content of 38.8%, lower than that of the average G+C content of V. parahaemolyticus (45.2%), and contained 19 ORFs, including a complete recA gene. This new acquired recA gene deviated 24% in sequence from the original recA and was distantly related to recA genes from bacteria of the Vibrionaceae family. The reconstruction of the original recA gene (recA3) identified the precursor as belonging to ST189, a sequence type reported previously only in Asian countries. The identification of this singular genetic feature in strains from Asia reveals new evidence for genetic connectivity between V. parahaemolyticus populations at both sides of the Pacific Ocean that, in addition to the previously described pandemic clone, supports the existence of a recurrent transoceanic spreading of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus with the corresponding potential risk of pandemic expansion. PMID:25679989

  9. Cloning of the recA gene from a free-living leptospire and distribution of RecA-like protein among spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, L V; Parrish, E A; Gherardini, F C

    1991-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid carrying the recA gene of Leptospira biflexa serovar patoc was isolated from a cosmid library of genomic DNA by complementation of an Escherichia coli recA mutation. The cloned serovar patoc recA gene efficiently restored resistance to UV radiation and methyl methanesulfonate. Recombination proficiency was also restored, as measured by the formation of Lac+ recombinants from duplicated mutant lacZ genes. Additionally, the cloned recA gene increased the spontaneous and mitomycin C-induced production of lambda phage in lysogens of an E. coli recA mutant. The product of the cloned recA gene was identified in maxicells as a polypeptide with an Mr of 43,000. Antibodies prepared against the E. coli RecA protein cross-reacted with the serovar patoc RecA protein, indicating structural conservation. Southern hybridization data showed that the serovar patoc recA gene has diverged from the recA gene of L. interrogans, Leptonema illini, and E. coli. With the exception of the RecA protein of L. interrogans serovar hardjo, the RecA protein of the Leptospira serovars and L. illini were synthesized at elevated levels following treatment of cells with nalidixic acid. The level of detectable RecA correlated with previous studies demonstrating that free-living cells of L. biflexa serovars and L. illini were considerably more resistant to DNA-damaging agents than were those of parasitic L. interrogans serovars. RecA protein was not detected in cells of virulent Treponema pallidum or Borrelia burgdorferi. Images PMID:2036006

  10. Characterization of RecA424 and RecA670 proteins from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kitayama, Shigeru; Yanagisawa, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    RecA protein is considered to be the most important participant in the radiation resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans. However, it is still unclear how RecA contributes to the resistance. In this study, we identified a new recA mutation (recA424) in the DNA-repair deficient mutant strain KI696, the phenotype of which is remarkably different from mutant strain rec30 carrying recA670. The properties of the gene products from the recA mutants were compared. recA424 could not complement the deficiency in Escherichia coli RecA, as found for recA670. In vitro, neither RecA424 nor RecA670 could promote DNA strand exchange under conditions in which wild-type RecA promoted the reaction, indicating that both RecA424 and Rec670 are defective in recombination activity. RecA424 promoted the autocleavage reaction of LexA in vitro, whereas RecA670 did not. The intracellular LexA level in KI696 was decreased following gamma-irradiation. However, the LexA level in strain rec30 was constant irrespective of irradiation. These results indicate that RecA424 retains co-protease activity, whereas RecA670 does not. While strain rec30 is extremely radiation sensitive, strain KI696 is only slightly sensitive. Together, these observations suggest that the co-protease activity rather than the recombination activity of RecA contributes to radiation resistance in D. radiodurans.

  11. Cloning and Characterization of the RecA Gene of Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    complementation studies with the RecA proteins of Proteus vulgaris , Shigella flexneri, Erwinia carotovara, and E. coli B/r (West et al. 1983; Keener et al...Cloning and characterization of recA genes from Proteus vulgaris , Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r. J Bacteriol 160...Cloning and Characterization of the re A Gene of (Aquaspirililun iagnetotacticum N N I Amy E. Berson, Debra V. Hudson, and Nahid S. Waleh++ Molecular

  12. Isolation and characterization of the Vibrio cholerae recA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hamood, A N; Pettis, G S; Parker, C D; McIntosh, M A

    1986-01-01

    A 3.6-kilobase PstI fragment was isolated from a Vibrio cholerae chromosomal DNA library and shown to encode RecA-like activity in complementation studies with Escherichia coli recA mutants. Although DNA hybridization experiments failed to detect any homology between the E. coli and V. cholerae recA genes, hyperimmune antiserum produced against purified E. coli RecA protein recognized epitopes shared by the V. cholerae protein. The V. cholerae chromosomal fragments, when cloned and transferred to E. coli, provided the missing recA functions, including resistance to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate, resistance to UV irradiation, and promotion of homologous recombination in Hfr mating experiments. Images PMID:3522553

  13. Involvement of recA and exr genes in the in vivo inhibition of the recBC nuclease.

    PubMed

    Marsden, H S; Pollard, E C; Ginoza, W; Randall, E P

    1974-05-01

    When Escherichia coli cells are gamma irradiated they degrade their deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The DNA of previously gamma-irradiated T4 phage is also degraded in infected cells. The amount of degradation is not only dependent on the dose but also on the genotype of the cell. The amount of degradation is less in cells carrying a recB or a recC mutation, suggesting that most of the DNA degradation is due to the recB(+) and recC(+) gene product (exonuclease V). In some strains a previous dose of ultraviolet (UV) light followed by incubation renders the cells resistant to DNA degradation after gamma irradiation. We have shown this inhibition to take place for infecting T4 phage also. By using six strains of E. coli selected for mutations in the genes recA, exr (or lex), and uvrB, we have been able to show that the preliminary UV treatment produces no change in recA and exr cells for both endogenous DNA degradation and the degradation of infecting irradiated T4 phage DNA, i.e., inhibition was not detected in these strains. On the other hand, wild-type cells and strains carrying mutations of uvrB show inhibition in both types of experiments. Because the recA gene product and the exr(+) (lex(+)) gene product are necessary for the induction of prophage, it is possible that the phenomenon of inducible inhibition requires recA(+) and exr(+) presence. One interpretation of these results is that an inducible inhibitor may be controlled by the exr gene.

  14. A recA gene phylogenetic analysis confirms the close proximity of Frankia to Acidothermus.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, J; Clement, B; Nalin, R; Gandon, C; Orso, S; Cvejic, J H; Bruneteau, M; Berry, A; Normand, P

    2000-03-01

    The closer proximity of Frankia and Acidothermus cellulolyticus relative to the morphologically close Geodermatophilus found previously was confirmed by resequencing the rrs gene of Acidothermus cellulolyticus and the housekeeping gene, recA. The diagnostic sugar 2-O-methyl-D-mannose was detected only in Frankia, while hopanoid lipids were present at high levels in both Acidothermus and Frankia.

  15. E. coli recA gene improves gene targeted homologous recombination in Mycoplasma hyorhinis.

    PubMed

    Ishag, Hassan Z A; Xiong, Qiyan; Liu, Maojun; Feng, Zhixin; Shao, Guoqing

    2017-05-01

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis is an opportunistic pathogen of pigs. Recently, it has been shown to transform cell cultures, increasing the attention of the researchers. Studies on the pathogenesis require specific genetic tool that is not yet available for the pathogen. To address this limitation, we constructed two suicide plasmids pGEMT-tetM/LR and pGEMT-recA-tetM/LR having a tetracycline resistance marker flanked by two hemolysin gene arms. The latter plasmid encodes an E. coli recA, a gene involved in DNA recombination, repair and maintenance of DNA. Using inactivation of the hemolysin gene, which results in a detectable and measurable phenotype, we found that each plasmid can disrupt the hemolysin gene of M. hyorhinis through a double cross-over homologous recombination. However, inclusion of the E. coli recA gene in the construct resulted in 9-fold increase in the frequency of hemolysin gene mutants among the screened tetracycline resistance colonies. The resultant hemolysin mutant strain lacks the ability to lyse mouse bed blood cells (RBC) when tested in vitro (p<0.001). The host-plasmid system described in this study, has applications for the genetic manipulation of this pathogen and potentially other mycoplasmas.

  16. Identification of Bacillus Probiotics Isolated from Soil Rhizosphere Using 16S rRNA, recA, rpoB Gene Sequencing and RAPD-PCR.

    PubMed

    Mohkam, Milad; Nezafat, Navid; Berenjian, Aydin; Mobasher, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-03-01

    Some Bacillus species, especially Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus groups, have highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences, which are hard to identify based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. To conquer this drawback, rpoB, recA sequence analysis along with randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) fingerprinting was examined as an alternative method for differentiating Bacillus species. The 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA genes were amplified via a polymerase chain reaction using their specific primers. The resulted PCR amplicons were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis was employed by MEGA 6 software. Identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing was underpinned by rpoB and recA gene sequencing as well as RAPD-PCR technique. Subsequently, concatenation and phylogenetic analysis showed that extent of diversity and similarity were better obtained by rpoB and recA primers, which are also reinforced by RAPD-PCR methods. However, in one case, these approaches failed to identify one isolate, which in combination with the phenotypical method offsets this issue. Overall, RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA along with concatenated genes sequence analysis discriminated closely related Bacillus species, which highlights the significance of the multigenic method in more precisely distinguishing Bacillus strains. This research emphasizes the benefit of RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA sequence analysis superior to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for suitable and effective identification of Bacillus species as recommended for probiotic products.

  17. Comparative evolution of the recA gene of surface and deep subsurface microorganisms (an evolutionary clock of intermediate rate). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.V.

    1998-04-01

    Because of the ability of the recA protein product to maintain both DNA integrity and increase genetic diversity, this gene may be essential to the survival of microorganisms following the damaging effects of numerous environmental stresses such as exposure to solar UV radiation, exposure to gamma radiation, starvation, and changing environments. While the various activities and amino-acid sequence of recA have been highly conserved among the eubacteria and archaea, little is known as to whether a strict structure-function relationship has been conserved. In other words, are the same regions of this highly plastic, functionally heterogeneous protein involved in the same catalytic capacities throughout the bacterial kingdom? While it is reasonable to assume that this type of conservation has also occurred, we felt it necessary to test the assumption by demonstrating that mutations in different genera of bacteria which eliminate similar functions (i.e., lead to similar phenotypes) are caused by changes in the amino-acid sequence in the same regions of their recA proteins. Therefore, we located the changes in nucleotide sequence in two recA mutants of P. aeruginosa which displayed mutant phenotypes in recombination and UV resistance. Our assumption was that if structure-function relationships held, these mutations would be found in areas already identified as essential for the function of the E. coli recA protein.

  18. recA gene of Escherichia coli complements defects in DNA repair and mutagenesis in Streptomyces fradiae JS6 (mcr-6).

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, P; Baltz, R H

    1987-01-01

    Streptomyces fradiae JS6 (mcr-6) is a mutant which is defective in repair of DNA damage induced by a variety of chemical mutagens and UV light. JS6 is also defective in error-prone (mutagenic) DNA repair (J. Stonesifer and R. H. Baltz, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:1180-1183, 1985). The recA gene of Escherichia coli, cloned in a bifunctional vector that replicates in E. coli and Streptomyces spp., complemented the mutation in S. fradiae JS6, indicating that E. coli and S. fradiae express similar SOS responses and that the mcr+ gene product of S. fradiae is functionally analogous to the protein encoded by the recA gene of E. coli. PMID:3308856

  19. The recA operon: A novel stress response gene cluster in Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Samantha A; Smalley, Darren; Smith, C Jeffrey; Abratt, Valerie R

    2014-05-01

    Bacteroides fragilis, an opportunistic pathogen of humans, is a leading cause of bacteraemias and anaerobic abscesses which are often treated with metronidazole, a drug which damages DNA. This study investigated the responses of the B. fragilis recA three gene operon to the stress experienced during metronidazole treatment and exposure to reactive oxygen species simulating those generated by the host immune system during infection. A transcriptionally regulated response was observed using quantitative RT-PCR after metronidazole and hydrogen peroxide treatment, with all three genes being upregulated under stress conditions. In vivo and in vitro analysis of the functional role of the second gene of the operon was done using heterologous complementation and protein expression (in Escherichia coli), with subsequent biochemical assay. This gene encoded a functional bacterioferritin co-migratory protein (BCP) which was thiol-specific and had antioxidant properties, including protection of the glutamine synthetase III enzyme. This in vitro data supports the hypothesis that the genes of the operon may be involved in protection of the bacteria from the oxidative burst during tissue invasion and may play a significant role in bacterial survival and metronidazole resistance during treatment of B. fragilis infections. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. recA730-dependent suppression of recombination deficiency in RecA loading mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vlašić, Ignacija; Simatović, Ana; Brčić-Kostić, Krunoslav

    2011-04-01

    Homologous recombination is an essential process in double-strand break repair. The main requirement for recombination is formation of a RecA filament. Double-strand breaks can be processed into a RecA filament by the action of three enzymatic activities: helicase, 5'-3' exonuclease and RecA loading onto ssDNA. These activities are provided by the RecBCD enzyme in wild type cells or by the RecF pathway gene products in recBC sbcBC(D) cells. In the recBD1080A mutant (recB∗ mutant), the recombination machineries of RecBCD and RecF pathways are interchangeable and include RecB∗CD enzyme (helicase), RecJ (5'-3' exonuclease) and RecFOR (RecA loading). The mutant RecA730 protein is able to produce a RecA filament without the help of RecFOR mediators, since it more efficiently competes with SSB protein for ssDNA than the normal RecA protein. It was previously shown that the recA730 mutation suppresses UV sensitivity in a uvrA recFOR genetic background. We tested whether the recA730 mutation can suppress recombination and DNA repair deficiency in a recB∗ mutant and its derivatives. We show that the recA730 mutation suppresses recombination deficiency in a recB∗ recFOR background, where the defect is at the level of RecA loading, but not in the recB∗ recJ background where the defect is at the level of nuclease activity.

  1. Rhodobacter sphaeroides LexA has dual activity: optimising and repressing recA gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tapias, Angels; Fernández, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C.; Barbé, Jordi

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides recA promoter (PrecA) is induced upon DNA damage in a lexA-dependent manner. In vivo experiments demonstrate that LexA protein represses and might also activate transcription of PrecA. Purified R.sphaeroides LexA protein specifically binds the SOS boxes located within the PrecA region. In vitro transcription analysis, using Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP), indicated that the presence of LexA may stimulate and repress transcription of PrecA. EMSA and DNase I footprinting experiments show that LexA and RNAP can bind simultaneously to PrecA. At low LexA concentrations it enhances RNAP binding to PrecA, stimulates open complex formation and strand separation beyond the transcription start site. At high LexA concentrations, however, RNAP-promoted strand separation is not observed beyond the +5 region. LexA might repress transcription by interfering with the clearance process instead of blocking the access of RNAP to the promoter region. Based on these findings we propose that the R.sphaeroides LexA protein performs fine tuning of the SOS response, which might provide a physiological advantage by enhancing transcription of SOS genes and delaying full activation of the response. PMID:11917014

  2. [Analysis of the meiotic recombination frequency in transgenic tomato hybrids expressing recA and NLS-recA-licBM3 genes].

    PubMed

    Komakhin, R A; Komakhina, V V; Miliukova, N A; Zhuchenko, A A

    2012-01-01

    To study and induce meiotic recombination in plants, we generated and analyzed transgenic tomato hybrids F1-RecA and F1-NLS-recA-LicBM3 expressing, respectively, the recA gene of Escherichia coli and the NLS-recA-licBM3 gene. It was found that the recA and NLS-recA-licBM3 genes are inherited through the maternal and paternal lineages, they have no selective influence on the pollen and are contained in tomato F1-RecA and F1-NLS-RecA-LicBM3 hybrids outside the second chromosome in the hemizygous state. The comparative analysis of the meiotic recombination frequency (rf) in the progenies of the transgenic and nontransgenic hybrids showed that only the expression of the recA gene of E. coli in cells of the F1-RecA plants produced a 1.2-1.5-fold increase in the frequency of recombination between some linked marker genes of the second chromosome of tomato.

  3. Overexpression of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi recA gene confers fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli DH5α.

    PubMed

    Yassien, M A M; Elfaky, M A

    2015-11-01

    A spontaneous fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant (STM1) was isolated from its parent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) clinical isolate. Unlike its parent isolate, this mutant has selective resistance to fluoroquinolones without any change in its sensitivity to various other antibiotics. DNA gyrase assays revealed that the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype of the STM1 mutant did not result from alteration of the fluoroquinolone sensitivity of the DNA gyrase isolated from it. To study the mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance, a genomic library from the STM1 mutant was constructed in Escherichia coli DH5α and two recombinant plasmids were obtained. Only one of these plasmids (STM1-A) conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. The chromosomal insert from STM1-A, digested with EcoRI and HindIII restriction endonucleases, produced two DNA fragments and these were cloned separately into pUC19 thereby generating two new plasmids, STM1-A1 and STM1-A2. Only STM1-A1 conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. Sequence and subcloning analyses of STM1-A1 showed the presence of an intact RecA open reading frame. Unlike that of the wild-type E. coli DH5α, protein analysis of a crude STM1-A1 extract showed overexpression of a 40 kDa protein. Western blotting confirmed the 40 kDa protein band to be RecA. When a RecA PCR product was cloned into pGEM-T and introduced into E. coli DH5α, the STM1-A11 subclone retained fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggest that overexpression of RecA causes selective fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli DH5α.

  4. Overexpression of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi recA gene confers fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli DH5α

    PubMed Central

    Yassien, M.A.M.; Elfaky, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    A spontaneous fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant (STM1) was isolated from its parent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) clinical isolate. Unlike its parent isolate, this mutant has selective resistance to fluoroquinolones without any change in its sensitivity to various other antibiotics. DNA gyrase assays revealed that the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype of the STM1 mutant did not result from alteration of the fluoroquinolone sensitivity of the DNA gyrase isolated from it. To study the mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance, a genomic library from the STM1 mutant was constructed in Escherichia coli DH5α and two recombinant plasmids were obtained. Only one of these plasmids (STM1-A) conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. The chromosomal insert from STM1-A, digested with EcoRI and HindIII restriction endonucleases, produced two DNA fragments and these were cloned separately into pUC19 thereby generating two new plasmids, STM1-A1 and STM1-A2. Only STM1-A1 conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. Sequence and subcloning analyses of STM1-A1 showed the presence of an intact RecA open reading frame. Unlike that of the wild-type E. coli DH5α, protein analysis of a crude STM1-A1 extract showed overexpression of a 40 kDa protein. Western blotting confirmed the 40 kDa protein band to be RecA. When a RecA PCR product was cloned into pGEM-T and introduced into E. coli DH5α, the STM1-A11 subclone retained fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggest that overexpression of RecA causes selective fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli DH5α. PMID:26375447

  5. vimA Gene Downstream of recA Is Involved in Virulence Modulation in Porphyromonas gingivalis W83

    PubMed Central

    Abaibou, Hafid; Chen, Zhuo; Olango, G. Jon; Liu, Yi; Edwards, Jessica; Fletcher, Hansel M.

    2001-01-01

    A 0.9-kb open reading frame encoding a unique 32-kDa protein was identified downstream of the recA gene of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analysis showed that both the recA gene and this open reading frame are part of the same transcriptional unit. This cloned fragment was insertionally inactivated using the ermF-ermAM antibiotic resistance cassette to create a defective mutant by allelic exchange. When plated on Brucella blood agar, the mutant strain, designated P. gingivalis FLL92, was non-black pigmented and showed significant reduction in beta-hemolysis compared with the parent strain, P. gingivalis W83. Arginine- and lysine-specific cysteine protease activities, which were mostly soluble, were approximately 90% lower than that of the parent strain. Expression of the rgpA, rgpB, and kgp protease genes was the same in P. gingivalis FLL92 as in the wild-type strain. In contrast to the parent strain, P. gingivalis FLL92 showed increased autoaggregration in addition to a significant reduction in hemagglutinating and hemolysin activities. In in vivo experiments using a mouse model, P. gingivalis FLL92 was dramatically less virulent than the parent strain. A molecular survey of this mutant and the parent strain using all known P. gingivalis insertion sequence elements as probes suggested that no intragenomic changes due to the movement of these elements have occurred in P. gingivalis FLL92. Taken together, these results suggest that the recA downstream gene, designated vimA (virulence-modulating gene), plays an important role in virulence modulation in P. gingivalis W83, possibly representing a novel posttranscriptional or translational regulation of virulence factors in P. gingivalis. PMID:11119521

  6. Evaluation of the role of recA protein in plant virulence with recA mutants of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Martínez, S; Martínez-Salazar, J; Camas, A; Sánchez, R; Soberón-Chávez, G

    1997-09-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris NRRL B1459 recA mutants were isolated by recombination with an interrupted Rhizobium etli recA gene and selection of double recombinants. The mutants were impaired in homologous genetic recombination and in DNA repair as judged by their sensitivity to methyl-methane-sulfonate and to UV irradiation; these defects are complemented in trans by the R. etli recA gene. Virulence of X. campestris pv. campestris NRRL B1459 to cabbage is considerably diminished by the recA mutation. The recA mutation is not correlated with the frequency of occurrence of a genetic rearrangement that affects chemotaxis, plant virulence, and xanthan gum production.

  7. Evidence that the phr+ gene enhances the ultraviolet resistance of Escherichia coli recA strains in the dark.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Fujiwara, Y; Shinagawa, H

    1983-01-01

    An Escherichia coli recA phr+ purA strain was more resistant to ultraviolet radiation than its isogenic derivative recA phr+ purA+ in the absence of photoreactivating light, whereas their nearly isogenic derivative recA phr showed most UV-induced lethality. The amounts of photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) per cell in the recA phr+ purA was higher than in the recA phr+ purA+. The recA phr is defective for photoreactivation. Thus, in the recA strain, UV resistance in the dark increased in proportion to the amounts of PRE per cell, suggesting that PRE participates in the process of dark repair of UV-damaged DNA.

  8. recA mutations that reduce the constitutive coprotease activity of the RecA1202(Prtc) protein: possible involvement of interfilament association in proteolytic and recombination activities.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S K; Eisen, J A; Hanawalt, P C; Tessman, I

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-eight recA mutants, isolated after spontaneous mutagenesis generated by the combined action of RecA1202(Prtc) and UmuDC proteins, were characterized and sequenced. The mutations are intragenic suppressors of the recA1202 allele and were detected by the reduced coprotease activity of the gene product. Twenty distinct mutation sites were found, among which two mutations, recA1620 (V-275-->D) and recA1631 (I-284-->N), were mapped in the C-terminal portion of the interfilament contact region (IFCR) in the RecA crystal. An interaction of this region with the part of the IFCR in which the recA1202 mutation (Q-184-->K) is mapped could occur only intermolecularly. Thus, altered IFCR and the likely resulting change in interfilament association appear to be important aspects of the formation of a constitutively active RecA coprotease. This observation is consistent with the filament-bundle theory (R. M. Story, I. T. Weber, and T. A. Steitz, Nature (London) 335:318-325, 1992). Furthermore, we found that among the 20 suppressor mutations, 3 missense mutations that lead to recombination-defective (Rec-) phenotypes also mapped in the IFCR, suggesting that the IFCR, with its putative function in interfilament association, is required for the recombinase activity of RecA. We propose that RecA-DNA complexes may form bundles analogous to the RecA bundles (lacking DNA) described by Story et al. and that these RecA-DNA bundles play a role in homologous recombination. Images PMID:8407828

  9. Sequence diversity within the argF, fbp and recA genes of natural isolates of Neisseria meningitidis: interspecies recombination within the argF gene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Spratt, B G

    1992-08-01

    Studies of natural populations of Neisseria meningitidis using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis have shown extensive genetic variation within this species, which, it has been proposed, implies a level of sequence diversity within meningococci that is greater than that normally considered as the criterion for species limits in bacteria. To obtain a direct measure of the sequence diversity among meningococci, we obtained the nucleotide sequences of most of the argF, recA and fbp genes of eight meningococci of widely differing electrophoretic type (from the reference collection of Caugant). Sequence variation between the meningococcal strains ranged from 0-0.6% for fbp, 0-1.3% for argF, and 0-3.3% for recA. These levels of diversity are no greater than those found within Escherichia coli 'housekeeping' genes and suggest that multilocus enzyme electrophoresis may overestimate the extent of nucleotide sequence diversity within meningococci. The average sequence divergence between the Neisseria meningitidis strains and N. gonorrhoeae strain FA19 was 1.0% for fbp and 1.6% for recA. The argF gene, although very uniform among the eight meningococcal isolates, had a striking mosaic structure when compared with the gonococcal argF gene: two regions of the gene differed by greater than 13% in nucleotide sequence between meningococci and gonococci, whereas the rest of the gene differed by less than 1.7%. One of the diverged regions was shown to have been introduced from the argF gene of a commensal Neisseria species that is closely related to Neisseria cinerea. The source of the other region was unclear.

  10. Molecular analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans recA locus and identification of a mutation site in a DNA repair-deficient mutant, rec30.

    PubMed

    Narumi, I; Satoh, K; Kikuchi, M; Funayama, T; Kitayama, S; Yanagisawa, T; Watanabe, H; Yamamoto, K

    1999-12-07

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain rec30, which is a DNA damage repair-deficient mutant, has been estimated to be defective in the deinococcal recA gene. To identify the mutation site of strain rec30 and obtain information about the region flanking the gene, a 4.4-kb fragment carrying the wild-type recA gene was sequenced. It was revealed that the recA locus forms a polycistronic operon with the preceding cistrons (orf105a and orf105b). Predicted amino acid sequences of orf105a and orf105b showed substantial similarity to the competence-damage inducible protein (cinA gene product) from Streptococcus pneumoniae and the 2'-5' RNA ligase from Escherichia coli, respectively. By analyzing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments derived from the genomic DNA of strain rec30, the mutation site in the strain was identified as a single G:C to A:T transition which causes an amino acid substitution at position 224 (Gly to Ser) of the deinococcal RecA protein. Furthermore, we succeeded in expressing both the wild-type and mutant recA genes of D. radiodurans in E. coli without any obvious toxicity or death. The gamma-ray resistance of an E. coli recA1 strain was fully restored by the expression of the wild-type recA gene of D. radiodurans that was cloned in an E. coli vector plasmid. This result is consistent with evidence that RecA proteins from many bacterial species can functionally complement E. coli recA mutants. In contrast with the wild-type gene, the mutant recA gene derived from strain rec30 did not complement E. coli recA1, suggesting that the mutant RecA protein lacks functional activity for recombinational repair.

  11. RecA and RadA Proteins of Brucella abortus Do Not Perform Overlapping Protective DNA Repair Functions following Oxidative Burst

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Christelle M.; Booth, Natha J.; Bellaire, Bryan H.; Gee, Jason M.; Roop, R. Martin; Kovach, Michael E.; Tsolis, Renée M.; Elzer, Philip H.; Ennis, Don G.

    2006-01-01

    Very little is known about the role of DNA repair networks in Brucella abortus and its role in pathogenesis. We investigated the roles of RecA protein, DNA repair, and SOS regulation in B. abortus. While recA mutants in most bacterial species are hypersensitive to UV damage, surprisingly a B. abortus recA null mutant conferred only modest sensitivity. We considered the presence of a second RecA protein to account for this modest UV sensitivity. Analyses of the Brucella spp. genomes and our molecular studies documented the presence of only one recA gene, suggesting a RecA-independent repair process. Searches of the available Brucella genomes revealed some homology between RecA and RadA, a protein implicated in E. coli DNA repair. We considered the possibility that B. abortus RadA might be compensating for the loss of RecA by promoting similar repair activities. We present functional analyses that demonstrated that B. abortus RadA complements a radA defect in E. coli but could not act in place of the B. abortus RecA. We show that RecA but not RadA was required for survival in macrophages. We also discovered that recA was expressed at high constitutive levels, due to constitutive LexA cleavage by RecA, with little induction following DNA damage. Higher basal levels of RecA and its SOS-regulated gene products might protect against DNA damage experienced following the oxidative burst within macrophages. PMID:16816190

  12. Specificities and Functions of the recA and pps1 Intein Genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Application for Diagnosis of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Saves, Isabelle; Lewis, Lee-Ann; Westrelin, Fabrice; Warren, Robin; Daffé, Mamadou; Masson, Jean-Michel

    2002-01-01

    The worldwide recrudescence of tuberculosis and the widespread appearance of antibiotic resistance have strengthened the need for rapid and specific diagnostic tools. The prevailing microbiological identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, which implies the use of in vitro cultures and acid-fast staining microscopy, is time-consuming. Detection of M. tuberculosis directly in clinical samples through PCR amplification of mycobacterium-specific genes, designed to shorten diagnostic delay, demonstrated reliability and high sensitivity. However, the quality of the diagnosis depends on the specificity of the target sequence for M. tuberculosis complex strains. In the present study, we demonstrated the specificity of recA and pps1 inteins for this complex and thus the feasibility of using intein-coding sequences as a new target for PCR diagnosis. Indeed, the recA and pps1 genes of 36 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and 10 field strains of M. bovis were found to be interrupted by an intein sequence at the RecA-a and Pps1-b sites, respectively, while a large number of nontuberculous mycobacterial species failed to demonstrate these insertions. Besides, the MtuPps1, which was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, was shown to possess an endonuclease activity. The intein cleaves the 40-bp sequence spanning the intein insertion site Pps1-b in the inteinless pps1 gene. In addition to the PCR amplification of recA and pps1 intein genes as a tool for diagnosis, the specific endonuclease activity could represent a new molecular approach to identify M. tuberculosis. PMID:11880421

  13. Discovery and characterization of RecA protein of thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus MAT72 phage Tt72 that increases specificity of a PCR-based DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Stefanska, Aleksandra; Kaczorowska, Anna-Karina; Plotka, Magdalena; Fridjonsson, Olafur H; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur O; Hjorleifsdottir, Sigridur; Kristjansson, Jakob K; Dabrowski, Slawomir; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2014-07-20

    The recA gene of newly discovered Thermus thermophilus MAT72 phage Tt72 (Myoviridae) was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The 1020-bp gene codes for a 339-amino-acid polypeptide with an Mr of 38,155 which shows 38.7% positional identity to the E. coli RecA protein. When expressed in E. coli, the Tt72 recA gene did not confer the ability to complement the ultraviolet light (254nm) sensitivity of an E. coli recA mutant. Tt72 RecA protein has been purified with good yield to catalytic and electrophoretic homogeneity using a three-step chromatography procedure. Biochemical characterization indicated that the protein can pair and promote ATP-dependent strand exchange reaction resulting in formation of a heteroduplex DNA at 60°C under conditions otherwise optimal for E. coli RecA. When the Tt72 RecA protein was included in a standard PCR-based DNA amplification reaction, the specificity of the PCR assays was significantly improved by eliminating non-specific products.

  14. Comparative Sequence Analysis of the tuf and recA Genes and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequences Supply Additional Tools for Discriminating Bifidobacterium lactis from Bifidobacterium animalis

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Marco; Zink, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between Bifidobacterium lactis and Bifidobacterium animalis was examined by comparative analysis of tuf and recA gene sequences and by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of their internal 16S-23S transcribed spacer region sequences. The bifidobacterial strains investigated could be divided into two distinct groups within a single species based on the tuf, recA, and 16S-23S spacer region sequence analysis. Therefore, all strains of B. lactis and B. animalis could be unified as the species B. animalis and divided into two subspecies, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. animalis. PMID:14660406

  15. The influence of carbon sources on the expression of the recA gene and genotoxicity detection by an Acinetobacter bioreporter.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Song, Yizhi; Zhang, Dayi; Huang, Wei E; Zhang, Xu; Li, Guanghe

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial whole-cell bioreporters are practical and reliable analytical tools to assess the toxicity and bioavailability of environmental contaminants, yet evidence has shown that their performance could be affected by different carbon sources. This paper evaluated the influence of carbon sources on the recA gene (ACIAD1385) in a DNA damage-inducible recA::luxCDABE Acinetobacter bioreporter and optimized the induction conditions for its practical application in environmental monitoring. Different carbon sources, including LB, potassium acetate (MMA), sodium citrate (MMC), sodium pyruvate (MMP), and sodium succinate (MMS), significantly influenced (p < 0.05) the bioluminescence intensity of the genotoxicity bioreporter. A reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed the different expression levels of the DNA damage-inducible gene recA (p < 0.05), suggesting that carbon sources influenced the DNA damage response in the Acinetobacter bioreporter at the transcriptional level. Additionally, proteomic analysis identified 122 proteins that were differentially expressed after exposure to mitomycin C in defined media and LB, and 5 of them were related to the DNA damage response, indicating the effects of carbon sources on the DNA damage response in Acinetobacter at the translational level. The repression effect caused by the rich medium, LB, was possibly related to the mechanism of carbon catabolite repression. Our results suggest that the practical application of Acinetobacter bioreporters to the genotoxicity assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils could be significantly improved by using a standard medium of defined composition, as this could increase their sensitivity.

  16. Molecular cloning of the recA analog from the marine fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum 775

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, J.T. )

    1989-11-01

    The recA analog from Vibrio anguillarum 775 was isolated by complementation of recA mutations in Escherichia coli, and its protein product was identified. The recA analog promoted recombination between two partially deleted lactose operons, stimulated both spontaneous and mitomycin C-induced phage production in RecA- lambda lysogens, and restored near wild-type levels of resistance to UV radiation and methyl methanesulfonate.

  17. New recA mutations that dissociate the various RecA protein activities in Escherichia coli provide evidence for an additional role for RecA protein in UV mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Dutreix, M; Moreau, P L; Bailone, A; Galibert, F; Battista, J R; Walker, G C; Devoret, R

    1989-01-01

    To isolate strains with new recA mutations that differentially affect RecA protein functions, we mutagenized in vitro the recA gene carried by plasmid mini-F and then introduced the mini-F-recA plasmid into a delta recA host that was lysogenic for prophage phi 80 and carried a lac duplication. By scoring prophage induction and recombination of the lac duplication, we isolated new recA mutations. A strain carrying mutation recA1734 (Arg-243 changed to Leu) was found to be deficient in phi 80 induction but proficient in recombination. The mutation rendered the host not mutable by UV, even in a lexA(Def) background. Yet, the recA1734 host became mutable upon introduction of a plasmid encoding UmuD*, the active carboxyl-terminal fragment of UmuD. Although the recA1734 mutation permits cleavage of lambda and LexA repressors, it renders the host deficient in the cleavage of phi 80 repressor and UmuD protein. Another strain carrying mutation recA1730 (Ser-117 changed to Phe) was found to be proficient in phi 80 induction but deficient in recombination. The recombination defect conferred by the mutation was partly alleviated in a cell devoid of LexA repressor, suggesting that, when amplified, RecA1730 protein is active in recombination. Since LexA protein was poorly cleaved in the recA1730 strain while phage lambda was induced, we conclude that RecA1730 protein cannot specifically mediate LexA protein cleavage. Our results show that the recA1734 and recA1730 mutations differentially affect cleavage of various substrates. The recA1730 mutation prevented UV mutagenesis, even upon introduction into the host of a plasmid encoding UmuD* and was dominant over recA+. With respect to other RecA functions, recA1730 was recessive to recA+. This demonstrates that RecA protein has an additional role in mutagenesis beside mediating the cleavage of LexA and UmuD proteins. Images PMID:2651400

  18. RecA proteins from Deinococcus geothermalis and Deinococcus murrayi--cloning, purification and biochemical characterisation.

    PubMed

    Wanarska, Marta; Krawczyk, Beata; Hildebrandt, Piotr; Kur, Józef

    2011-04-22

    Escherichia coli RecA plays a crucial role in recombinational processes, the induction of SOS responses and mutagenic lesion bypasses. It has also been demonstrated that RecA protein is indispensable when it comes to the reassembly of shattered chromosomes in γ-irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans, one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known. Moreover, some functional differences between E. coli and D. radiodurans RecA proteins have also been shown. In this study, recA genes from Deinococcus geothermalis and Deinococcus murrayi, bacteria that are slightly thermophilic and extremely γ-radiation resistant, were isolated, cloned and expressed in E. coli. After production and purification, the biochemical properties of DgeRecA and DmuRecA proteins were determined. Both proteins continued to exist in the solutions as heterogenous populations of oligomeric forms. The DNA binding by DgeRecA and DmuRecA proteins is stimulated by Mg2+ ions. Furthermore, both proteins bind more readily to ssDNA when ssDNA and dsDNA are in the same reaction mixture. Both proteins are slightly thermostable and were completely inactivated in 10 s at 80°C. Both proteins hydrolyze ATP and dATP in the presence of ssDNA or complementary ssDNA and dsDNA, but not in the absence of DNA or in the presence of dsDNA only, and dATP was hydrolyzed more rapidly than ATP. They were also able to promote DNA strand exchange reactions by a pathway common for other RecA proteins. However, we did not obtain DNA strand exchange products when reactions were performed on an inverse pathway, characteristic for RecA of D. radiodurans. The characterization of DgeRecA and DmuRecA proteins made in this study indicates that the unique properties of D. radiodurans RecA are probably not common among RecA proteins from Deinococcus sp.

  19. RecA Proteins from Deinococcus geothermalis and Deinococcus murrayi - Cloning, Purification and Biochemical Characterisation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli RecA plays a crucial role in recombinational processes, the induction of SOS responses and mutagenic lesion bypasses. It has also been demonstrated that RecA protein is indispensable when it comes to the reassembly of shattered chromosomes in γ-irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans, one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known. Moreover, some functional differences between E. coli and D. radiodurans RecA proteins have also been shown. Results In this study, recA genes from Deinococcus geothermalis and Deinococcus murrayi, bacteria that are slightly thermophilic and extremely γ-radiation resistant, were isolated, cloned and expressed in E. coli. After production and purification, the biochemical properties of DgeRecA and DmuRecA proteins were determined. Both proteins continued to exist in the solutions as heterogenous populations of oligomeric forms. The DNA binding by DgeRecA and DmuRecA proteins is stimulated by Mg2+ ions. Furthermore, both proteins bind more readily to ssDNA when ssDNA and dsDNA are in the same reaction mixture. Both proteins are slightly thermostable and were completely inactivated in 10 s at 80°C. Both proteins hydrolyze ATP and dATP in the presence of ssDNA or complementary ssDNA and dsDNA, but not in the absence of DNA or in the presence of dsDNA only, and dATP was hydrolyzed more rapidly than ATP. They were also able to promote DNA strand exchange reactions by a pathway common for other RecA proteins. However, we did not obtain DNA strand exchange products when reactions were performed on an inverse pathway, characteristic for RecA of D. radiodurans. Conclusions The characterization of DgeRecA and DmuRecA proteins made in this study indicates that the unique properties of D. radiodurans RecA are probably not common among RecA proteins from Deinococcus sp. PMID:21513512

  20. A novel role for RecA under non-stress: promotion of swarming motility in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gómez, José-María; Manfredi, Candela; Alonso, Juan-Carlos; Blázquez, Jesús

    2007-03-28

    Bacterial motility is a crucial factor in the colonization of natural environments. Escherichia coli has two flagella-driven motility types: swimming and swarming. Swimming motility consists of individual cell movement in liquid medium or soft semisolid agar, whereas swarming is a coordinated cellular behaviour leading to a collective movement on semisolid surfaces. It is known that swimming motility can be influenced by several types of environmental stress. In nature, environmentally induced DNA damage (e.g. UV irradiation) is one of the most common types of stress. One of the key proteins involved in the response to DNA damage is RecA, a multifunctional protein required for maintaining genome integrity and the generation of genetic variation. The ability of E. coli cells to develop swarming migration on semisolid surfaces was suppressed in the absence of RecA. However, swimming motility was not affected. The swarming defect of a DeltarecA strain was fully complemented by a plasmid-borne recA gene. Although the DeltarecA cells grown on semisolid surfaces exhibited flagellar production, they also presented impaired individual movement as well as a fully inactive collective swarming migration. Both the comparative analysis of gene expression profiles in wild-type and DeltarecA cells grown on a semisolid surface and the motility of lexA1 [Ind-] mutant cells demonstrated that the RecA effect on swarming does not require induction of the SOS response. By using a RecA-GFP fusion protein we were able to segregate the effect of RecA on swarming from its other functions. This protein fusion failed to regulate the induction of the SOS response, the recombinational DNA repair of UV-treated cells and the genetic recombination, however, it was efficient in rescuing the swarming motility defect of the DeltarecA mutant. The RecA-GFP protein retains a residual ssDNA-dependent ATPase activity but does not perform DNA strand exchange. The experimental evidence presented in this

  1. Control of UV induction of recA protein.

    PubMed Central

    Salles, B; Paoletti, C

    1983-01-01

    The basal level of recA protein in Escherichia coli K-12 was estimated by an immunoradiometric assay; it is approximately equal to 1,200 molecules per wild-type bacteria in midexponential phase of growth, slightly more in an excision-deficient (uvrA) strain, and markedly more in recF mutants. Kinetics of induction after UV irradiation showed a rapid increase of recA protein content, which reached a peak level after 60-90 min (20- to 55-fold amplification) and then decreased by dilution of the protein in the growing population. In order to obtain an identical extent of induction of recA protein, a 10-fold higher UV dose was necessary in a wild-type strain compared to the uvrA mutant strain. In the uvrA strain, the presence of one or only very few pyrimidine dimers on DNA was accompanied by a measurable increase of the constitutive level of recA protein; however, the unexcised dimers were unable to permanently induce the formation of recA protein. The derepressed promoter of recA gene is one of the strongest in E. coli. Its sequence displays many similarities with that of the strongest early promoters of T5 phage. Mutants (umuC uvrB and recF uvrB) unable to carry out W-reactivation produced high levels of recA protein after UV irradiation. The data suggested that the recF and umuC genes negatively control the regulation of recA protein level. PMID:6337375

  2. [Relationship between the UV-induction of exact exclusion of transposons and the function of umuDC, lexA, recA genes and plasmid pkM101].

    PubMed

    Rusina, O Iu; Andreeva, I V; Tiganova, I G; Mirskaia, E E; Skavronskaia, A G

    1997-01-01

    A pair of isogenic strains-E. coli K-12 and E. coli B/r differing by the status of umuDC genes and presence of pKM101 plasmid-were constructed and the relationship between UV induction of transposons Tn5 and Tn 10 and the gene umuDC function shown. This relationship is not absolute, in contrast to that of point mutations. Induction of precise excision of these transposons can be inhibited by pKM101 plasmid. Induction of precise excision of Tn5 and Tn 10 from the sites under study is absolutely lexA- and recA- dependent.

  3. The phylogenetic significance of peptidoglycan types: Molecular analysis of the genera Microbacterium and Aureobacterium based upon sequence comparison of gyrB, rpoB, recA and ppk and 16SrRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Richert, Kathrin; Brambilla, Evelyne; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2007-03-01

    The type strains of 27 species of the genus Microbacterium, family Microbacteriaceae, were analyzed with respect to the phylogeny of the housekeeping genes coding for DNA gyrase subunit B (gyrB), RNA-polymerase subunit B (rpoB), recombinase A (recA) and polyphosphate kinase (ppk). The resulting gene trees were compared to the 16S rRNA gene phylogeny of the same species. The topology of neighbour-joining and maximum parsimony phylogenetic trees based upon nucleic acid sequences and protein sequences of housekeeping genes differed among each other and no gene tree was identical to that of the 16S rRNA gene tree. Only some species showed consistent clustering by all genes analyzed, but the majority of species branched with different neighbours in most gene trees. The failure to phylogenetically cluster type strains into two groups based upon differences in the amino acid composition of peptidoglycan on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, once leading to the union of the genera Microbacterium and Aureobacterium, was also seen in the analysis of recA, rpoB and gyrB gene and protein phylogenies. Analysis of the pkk gene and protein as well as of a concatenate tree, combining sequences of all five genes (total of 3.700 nucleotides), sees members of the former genus Aureobacterium and other type strains with lysine as diagnostic diamino acid to form a coherent cluster that branches within the radiation of Microbacterium species with ornithine in the peptidoglycan.

  4. Phylogenetic diversity based on rrs, atpD, recA genes and 16S-23S intergenic sequence analyses of rhizobial strains isolated from Vicia faba and Pisum sativum in Peru.

    PubMed

    Santillana, Nery; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; García-Fraile, Paula; Velázquez, Encarna; Zúñiga, Doris

    2008-03-01

    In this study 17 isolates from effective nodules of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum var. macrocarpum growing in different soils from Peru were isolated and characterized. The isolates, presenting 11 different RAPD profiles, were distributed in three groups on the basis of their 16S-RFLP patterns. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains from 16S-RFLP groups I, II and III were closely related (identities higher than 99.5%) to Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii DSM 30141 (=ATCC 14480), R. leguminosarum bv. viciae DSM 30132(T) and Rhizobium etli CFN42(T) (=USDA 9032(T)), respectively. The analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) and two housekeeping genes, atpD and recA, confirmed the identification of strains from group I, however those from groups II and III were phylogenetically divergent to strains DSM 30132(T) and CFN42(T). These results support the fact that the 16S rRNA gene is not adequate for identification at species level within genus Rhizobium and suggest the existence of putative new species within the phylogenetic group of R. leguminosarum. They also confirm the need of a taxonomic revision of R. leguminosarum since the reference strains of the three biovars included in this study are phylogenetically divergent according to their ITS, atpD and recA gene sequences.

  5. Phylogeny of Vibrio cholerae Based on recA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Stine, O. Colin; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Gou, Qing; Zheng, Siqen; Morris, J. Glenn; Johnson, Judith A.

    2000-01-01

    We sequenced a 705-bp fragment of the recA gene from 113 Vibrio cholerae strains and closely related species. One hundred eighty-seven nucleotides were phylogenetically informative, 55 were phylogenetically uninformative, and 463 were invariant. Not unexpectedly, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus strains formed out-groups; we also identified isolates which resembled V. cholerae biochemically but which did not cluster with V. cholerae. In many instances, V. cholerae serogroup designations did not correlate with phylogeny, as reflected by recA sequence divergence. This observation is consistent with the idea that there is horizontal transfer of O-antigen biosynthesis genes among V. cholerae strains. PMID:11083852

  6. Modulating cellular recombination potential through alterations in RecA structure and regulation.

    PubMed

    Bakhlanova, Irina V; Dudkina, Alexandra V; Baitin, Dima M; Knight, Kendall L; Cox, Michael M; Lanzov, Vladislav A

    2010-12-01

    The wild-type Escherichia coli RecA protein is a recombinase platform with unrealized recombination potential. We have explored the factors affecting recombination during conjugation with a quantitative assay. Regulatory proteins that affect RecA function have the capacity to increase or decrease recombination frequencies by factors up to sixfold. Autoinhibition by the RecA C-terminus can affect recombination frequency by factors up to fourfold. The greatest changes in recombination frequency measured here are brought about by point mutations in the recA gene. RecA variants can increase recombination frequencies by more than 50-fold. The RecA protein thus possesses an inherently broad functional range. The RecA protein of E. coli (EcRecA) is not optimized for recombination function. Instead, much of the recombination potential of EcRecA is structurally suppressed, probably reflecting cellular requirements. One point mutation in EcRecA with a particularly dramatic effect on recombination frequency, D112R, exhibits an enhanced capacity to load onto SSB-coated ssDNA, overcome the effects of regulatory proteins such as PsiB and RecX, and to pair homologous DNAs. Comparisons of key RecA protein mutants reveal two components to RecA recombination function - filament formation and the inherent DNA pairing activity of the formed filaments.

  7. Mycobacterium leprae RecA is structurally analogous but functionally distinct from Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA protein.

    PubMed

    Patil, K Neelakanteshwar; Singh, Pawan; Harsha, Sri; Muniyappa, K

    2011-12-01

    Mycobacterium leprae is closely related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, yet causes a very different illness. Detailed genomic comparison between these two species of mycobacteria reveals that the decaying M. leprae genome contains less than half of the M. tuberculosis functional genes. The reduction of genome size and accumulation of pseudogenes in the M. leprae genome is thought to result from multiple recombination events between related repetitive sequences, which provided the impetus to investigate the recombination-like activities of RecA protein. In this study, we have cloned, over-expressed and purified M. leprae RecA and compared its activities with that of M. tuberculosis RecA. Both proteins, despite being 91% identical at the amino acid level, exhibit strikingly different binding profiles for single-stranded DNA with varying GC contents, in the ability to catalyze the formation of D-loops and to promote DNA strand exchange. The kinetics and the extent of single-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase and coprotease activities were nearly equivalent between these two recombinases. However, the degree of inhibition exerted by a range of ATP:ADP ratios was greater on strand exchange promoted by M. leprae RecA compared to its M. tuberculosis counterpart. Taken together, our results provide insights into the mechanistic aspects of homologous recombination and coprotease activity promoted by M. lepare RecA, and further suggests that it differs from the M. tuberculosis counterpart. These results are consistent with an emerging concept of DNA-sequence influenced structural differences in RecA nucleoprotein filaments and how these differences reflect on the multiple activities associated with RecA protein.

  8. Directed Evolution of RecA Variants with Enhanced Capacity for Conjugational Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taejin; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Cox, Benjamin L.; Wood, Elizabeth A.; Sandler, Steven J.; Cox, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    The recombination activity of Escherichia coli (E. coli) RecA protein reflects an evolutionary balance between the positive and potentially deleterious effects of recombination. We have perturbed that balance, generating RecA variants exhibiting improved recombination functionality via random mutagenesis followed by directed evolution for enhanced function in conjugation. A recA gene segment encoding a 59 residue segment of the protein (Val79-Ala137), encompassing an extensive subunit-subunit interface region, was subjected to degenerate oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis. An iterative selection process generated at least 18 recA gene variants capable of producing a higher yield of transconjugants. Three of the variant proteins, RecA I102L, RecA V79L and RecA E86G/C90G were characterized based on their prominence. Relative to wild type RecA, the selected RecA variants exhibited faster rates of ATP hydrolysis, more rapid displacement of SSB, decreased inhibition by the RecX regulator protein, and in general displayed a greater persistence on DNA. The enhancement in conjugational function comes at the price of a measurable RecA-mediated cellular growth deficiency. Persistent DNA binding represents a barrier to other processes of DNA metabolism in vivo. The growth deficiency is alleviated by expression of the functionally robust RecX protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. RecA filaments can be a barrier to processes like replication and transcription. RecA regulation by RecX protein is important in maintaining an optimal balance between recombination and other aspects of DNA metabolism. PMID:26047498

  9. Directed Evolution of RecA Variants with Enhanced Capacity for Conjugational Recombination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taejin; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Cox, Benjamin L; Wood, Elizabeth A; Sandler, Steven J; Cox, Michael M

    2015-06-01

    The recombination activity of Escherichia coli (E. coli) RecA protein reflects an evolutionary balance between the positive and potentially deleterious effects of recombination. We have perturbed that balance, generating RecA variants exhibiting improved recombination functionality via random mutagenesis followed by directed evolution for enhanced function in conjugation. A recA gene segment encoding a 59 residue segment of the protein (Val79-Ala137), encompassing an extensive subunit-subunit interface region, was subjected to degenerate oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis. An iterative selection process generated at least 18 recA gene variants capable of producing a higher yield of transconjugants. Three of the variant proteins, RecA I102L, RecA V79L and RecA E86G/C90G were characterized based on their prominence. Relative to wild type RecA, the selected RecA variants exhibited faster rates of ATP hydrolysis, more rapid displacement of SSB, decreased inhibition by the RecX regulator protein, and in general displayed a greater persistence on DNA. The enhancement in conjugational function comes at the price of a measurable RecA-mediated cellular growth deficiency. Persistent DNA binding represents a barrier to other processes of DNA metabolism in vivo. The growth deficiency is alleviated by expression of the functionally robust RecX protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. RecA filaments can be a barrier to processes like replication and transcription. RecA regulation by RecX protein is important in maintaining an optimal balance between recombination and other aspects of DNA metabolism.

  10. Recombination in recA cells between direct repeats of insertion element IS1.

    PubMed Central

    Braedt, G

    1985-01-01

    The IS1 sequences that flank the Tn9 chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene as direct repeats recombine after transformation into an Escherichia coli recA strain. The recombination requires the lambda pL promoter on the plasmid. A plasmid that contains mutant IS1 elements does not recombine. These results indicate that this recombination requires an IS1-specific gene product. The recombinational activity of IS1 may resolve transient cointegrates formed during the transposition of IS1. I discuss a possible role for the lambda pL promoter. Images PMID:2985536

  11. recA and catalase in H sub 2 O sub 2 -mediated toxicity in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, D.J.; Charniga, L.; Cohen, M.S. )

    1990-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae cells defective in the biosynthesis of the recA gene product are no more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide than wild-type cells. Although gonococci possess nearly 100-fold-greater catalase levels than Escherichia coli, they are more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide than this organism. The natural niche of gonococci undoubtedly results in exposure to oxidant stress; however, they do not demonstrate particularly efficient antioxidant defense systems.

  12. Evolutionary relationships among salivarius streptococci as inferred from multilocus phylogenies based on 16S rRNA-encoding, recA, secA, and secY gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Pombert, Jean-François; Sistek, Viridiana; Boissinot, Maurice; Frenette, Michel

    2009-10-30

    Streptococci are divided into six phylogenetic groups, i.e, anginosus, bovis, mitis, mutans, pyogenic, and salivarius, with the salivarius group consisting of only three distinct species. Two of these species, Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus vestibularis, are members of the normal human oral microflora whereas the third, Streptococcus thermophilus, is found in bovine milk. Given that S. salivarius and S. vestibularis share several physiological characteristics, in addition to inhabiting the same ecosystem, one would assume that they would be more closely related to each other than to S. thermophilus. However, the few phylogenetic trees published so far suggest that S. vestibularis is more closely related to S. thermophilus. To determine whether this phylogenetic relationship is genuine, we performed phylogenetic inferences derived from secA and secY, the general secretion housekeeping genes, recA, a gene from a separate genetic locus that encodes a major component of the homologous recombinational apparatus, and 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequences using other streptococcal species as outgroups. The maximum likelihood (ML) and maximum parsimony (MP) phylogenetic inferences derived from the secA and recA gene sequences provided strong support for the S. vestibularis/S. thermophilus sister-relationship, whereas 16S rRNA-encoding and secY-based analyses could not discriminate between alternate topologies. Phylogenetic analyses derived from the concatenation of these sequences unambiguously supported the close affiliation of S. vestibularis and S. thermophilus. Our results corroborated the sister-relationship between S. vestibularis and S. thermophilus and the concomitant early divergence of S. salivarius at the base of the salivarius lineage.

  13. Evolutionary relationships among salivarius streptococci as inferred from multilocus phylogenies based on 16S rRNA-encoding, recA, secA, and secY gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptococci are divided into six phylogenetic groups, i.e, anginosus, bovis, mitis, mutans, pyogenic, and salivarius, with the salivarius group consisting of only three distinct species. Two of these species, Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus vestibularis, are members of the normal human oral microflora whereas the third, Streptococcus thermophilus, is found in bovine milk. Given that S. salivarius and S. vestibularis share several physiological characteristics, in addition to inhabiting the same ecosystem, one would assume that they would be more closely related to each other than to S. thermophilus. However, the few phylogenetic trees published so far suggest that S. vestibularis is more closely related to S. thermophilus. To determine whether this phylogenetic relationship is genuine, we performed phylogenetic inferences derived from secA and secY, the general secretion housekeeping genes, recA, a gene from a separate genetic locus that encodes a major component of the homologous recombinational apparatus, and 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequences using other streptococcal species as outgroups. Results The maximum likelihood (ML) and maximum parsimony (MP) phylogenetic inferences derived from the secA and recA gene sequences provided strong support for the S. vestibularis/S. thermophilus sister-relationship, whereas 16S rRNA-encoding and secY-based analyses could not discriminate between alternate topologies. Phylogenetic analyses derived from the concatenation of these sequences unambiguously supported the close affiliation of S. vestibularis and S. thermophilus. Conclusion Our results corroborated the sister-relationship between S. vestibularis and S. thermophilus and the concomitant early divergence of S. salivarius at the base of the salivarius lineage. PMID:19878555

  14. A homolog of Escherichia coli RecA in mitochondria of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yasuna; Wakabayashi, Masayuki; Nakamura, Shogo; Kodaira, Ken-ichi; Shinohara, Hiroaki; Yasukawa, Hiro

    2004-05-04

    The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum expresses a gene encoding a 452-amino-acid polypeptide that is 47% identical to Escherichia coli RecA. A recA-deficient E. coli, JE6651, was transformed by pYSN1, which was designed to express the truncated form of the D. discoideum gene, and used in suppression assays. The viability of the transformant, JE6651(pYSN1), increased following UV irradiation or mitomycin C treatment. Phage lambda (red(-) gam(-)), which required RecA activity for DNA packaging, formed plaques on a lawn of JE6651(pYSN1). These results indicate that the gene product has a DNA recombination activity. Fluorescence of D. discoideum protein fused with GFP was detected in mitochondria. The gene disruption mutant was hypersensitive to UV-light (254nm), mitomycin C and H(2)O(2), indicating that D. discoideum recA is important for survival following exposure to DNA damaging agents.

  15. Location of functional regions of the Escherichia coli RecA protein by DNA sequence analysis of RecA protease-constitutive mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W B; Tessman, E S

    1986-01-01

    In previous work (E. S. Tessman and P. K. Peterson, J. Bacteriol. 163:677-687 and 688-695, 1985), we isolated many novel protease-constitutive (Prtc) recA mutants, i.e., mutants in which the RecA protein was always in the protease state without the usual need for DNA damage to activate it. Most Prtc mutants were recombinase positive and were designated Prtc Rec+; only a few Prtc mutants were recombinase negative, and those were designated Prtc Rec-. We report changes in DNA sequence of the recA gene for several of these mutants. The mutational changes clustered at three regions on the linear RecA polypeptide. Region 1 includes amino acid residues 25 through 39, region 2 includes amino acid residues 157 through 184, and region 3 includes amino acid residues 298 through 301. The in vivo response of these Prtc mutants to different effectors suggests that the RecA effector-binding sites have been altered. In particular we propose that the mutations may define single-stranded DNA- and nucleoside triphosphate-binding domains of RecA, that polypeptide regions 1 and 3 comprise part of the single-stranded DNA-binding domain, and that polypeptide regions 2 and 3 comprise part of the nucleoside triphosphate-binding domain. The overlapping of single-stranded DNA- and nucleoside triphosphate-binding domains in region 3 can explain previously known complex allosteric effects. Each of four Prtc Rec- mutants sequenced was found to contain a single amino acid change, showing that the change of just one amino acid can affect both the protease and recombinase activities and indicating that the functional domains for these two activities of RecA overlap. A recA promoter-down mutation was isolated by its ability to suppress the RecA protease activity of one of our strong Prtc mutants. PMID:3536864

  16. High-Throughput Screening for RecA Inhibitors Using a Transcreener Adenosine 5′-O-Diphosphate Assay

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Eliza J.R.; Janzen, William P.; Kireev, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The activities of the bacterial RecA protein are involved in the de novo development and transmission of antibiotic resistance genes, thus allowing bacteria to overcome the metabolic stress induced by antibacterial agents. RecA is ubiquitous and highly conserved among bacteria, but has only distant homologs in human cells. Together, this evidence points to RecA as a novel and attractive antibacterial drug target. All known RecA functions require the formation of a complex formed by multiple adenosine 5′-O-triphosphate (ATP)-bound RecA monomers on single-stranded DNA. In this complex, RecA hydrolyzes ATP. Although several methods for assessing RecA's ATPase activity have been reported, these assay conditions included relatively high concentrations of enzyme and ATP and thereby restricted the RecA conformational state. Herein, we describe the validation of commercial reagents (Transcreener® adenosine 5′-O-diphosphate [ADP]2 fluorescence polarization assay) for the high-throughput measurement of RecA's ATPase activity with lower concentrations of ATP and RecA. Under optimized conditions, ADP detection by the Transcreener reagent provided robust and reproducible activity data (Z′=0.92). Using the Transcreener assay, we screened 113,477 small molecules against purified RecA protein. In total, 177 small molecules were identified as confirmed hits, of which 79 were characterized by IC50 values ≤10 μM and 35 were active in bioassays with live bacteria. This set of compounds comprises previously unidentified scaffolds for RecA inhibition and represents tractable hit structures for efforts aimed at tuning RecA inhibitory activity in both biochemical and bacteriological assays. PMID:22192312

  17. High-throughput screening for RecA inhibitors using a transcreener adenosine 5'-O-diphosphate assay.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Eliza J R; Janzen, William P; Kireev, Dmitri; Singleton, Scott F

    2012-06-01

    The activities of the bacterial RecA protein are involved in the de novo development and transmission of antibiotic resistance genes, thus allowing bacteria to overcome the metabolic stress induced by antibacterial agents. RecA is ubiquitous and highly conserved among bacteria, but has only distant homologs in human cells. Together, this evidence points to RecA as a novel and attractive antibacterial drug target. All known RecA functions require the formation of a complex formed by multiple adenosine 5'-O-triphosphate (ATP)-bound RecA monomers on single-stranded DNA. In this complex, RecA hydrolyzes ATP. Although several methods for assessing RecA's ATPase activity have been reported, these assay conditions included relatively high concentrations of enzyme and ATP and thereby restricted the RecA conformational state. Herein, we describe the validation of commercial reagents (Transcreener(®) adenosine 5'-O-diphosphate [ADP](2) fluorescence polarization assay) for the high-throughput measurement of RecA's ATPase activity with lower concentrations of ATP and RecA. Under optimized conditions, ADP detection by the Transcreener reagent provided robust and reproducible activity data (Z'=0.92). Using the Transcreener assay, we screened 113,477 small molecules against purified RecA protein. In total, 177 small molecules were identified as confirmed hits, of which 79 were characterized by IC(50) values ≤ 10 μM and 35 were active in bioassays with live bacteria. This set of compounds comprises previously unidentified scaffolds for RecA inhibition and represents tractable hit structures for efforts aimed at tuning RecA inhibitory activity in both biochemical and bacteriological assays.

  18. Construction of a recA mutant of Azospirillum lipoferum and involvement of recA in phase variation.

    PubMed

    Vial, Ludovic; Pothier, Joël F; Normand, Philippe; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Bally, René; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence

    2004-07-15

    The plant-growth promoting rhizobacterium Azospirillum lipoferum strain 4B generates in vitro a stable phase variant designated 4VI at frequencies of 10(-4) to 10(-3) per cell per generation. Variant 4VI displays pleitropic modifications, such as the loss of swimming motility and the inability to assimilate certain sugars compared to the wild type. The mechanism underlying phase variation is unknown. To determine whether RecA-mediated processes are involved in phase variation, the recA gene of A. lipoferum 4B was cloned and sequenced and a recA mutant (termed 4BrecA) was constructed by allelic exchange. Strain 4BrecA showed increased sensitivity to UV and MMS compared with 4B and impaired recombinase activity. The ability to generate variants in vitro was not altered; the variants from 4BrecA exhibited all morphological and biochemical features characteristic of the variant generated by strain 4B. However, the frequency of variants generated by 4BrecA was increased by up to 10-fold. So, in contrast with many studies showing the abolition or a large reduction of the frequency of phase variation in recA mutants, this study describes an enhancement of phase variation in the absence of a functional recA.

  19. A Sister-Strand Exchange Mechanism for Reca-Independent Deletion of Repeated DNA Sequences in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, S. T.; Drapkin, P. T.; Sutera-Jr., V. A.; Gluckman-Peskind, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    In the genomes of many organisms, deletions arise between tandemly repeated DNA sequences of lengths ranging from several kilobases to only a few nucleotides. Using a plasmid-based assay for deletion of a 787-bp tandem repeat, we have found that a recA-independent mechanism contributes substantially to the deletion process of even this large region of homology. No Escherichia coli recombination gene tested, including recA, had greater than a fivefold effect on deletion rates. The recA-independence of deletion formation is also observed with constructions present on the chromosome. RecA promotes synapsis and transfer of homologous DNA strands in vitro and is indispensable for intermolecular recombination events in vivo measured after conjugation. Because deletion formation in E. coli shows little or no dependence on recA, it has been assumed that homologous recombination contributes little to the deletion process. However, we have found recA-independent deletion products suggestive of reciprocal crossovers when branch migration in the cell is inhibited by a ruvA mutation. We propose a model for recA-independent crossovers between replicating sister strands, which can also explain deletion or amplification of repeated sequences. We suggest that this process may be initiated as post-replicational DNA repair; subsequent strand misalignment at repeated sequences leads to genetic rearrangements. PMID:8293969

  20. Natural populations of lactic acid bacteria associated with silage fermentation as determined by phenotype, 16S ribosomal RNA and recA gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Huili; Qin, Guangyong; Tan, Zhongfang; Li, Zongwei; Wang, Yanping; Cai, Yimin

    2011-05-01

    One hundred and fifty-six strains isolated from corn (Zea mays L.), forage paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) silages prepared on dairy farms were screened, of which 110 isolates were considered to be lactic acid bacteria (LAB) according to their Gram-positive and catalase-negative characteristics and, mainly, the lactic acid metabolic products. These isolates were divided into eight groups (A-H) based on the following properties: morphological and biochemical characteristics, γ-aminobutyric acid production capacity, and 16S rRNA gene sequences. They were identified as Weissella cibaria (36.4%), Weissella confusa (9.1%), Leuconostoc citreum (5.3%), Leuconostoc lactis (4.9%), Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides (8.0%), Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (4.5%), Lactobacillus paraplantarum (4.5%) and Lactobacillus plantarum (27.3%). W. cibaria and W. confusa were mainly present in corn silages, and L. plantarum was dominant on sorghum and forage paddy rice silages, while L. pseudomesenteroides, L. plantarum and L. paraplantarum were the dominant species in alfalfa silage. The corn, sorghum and forage paddy rice silages were well preserved with lower pH values and ammonia-N concentrations, but had higher lactic acid content, while the alfalfa silage had relatively poor quality with higher pH values and ammonia-N concentrations, and lower lactic acid content. The present study confirmed the diversity of LAB species inhabiting silages. It showed that the differing natural populations of LAB on these silages might influence fermentation quality. These results will enable future research on the relationship between LAB species and silage fermentation quality, and will enhance the screening of appropriate inoculants aimed at improving such quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. A multicopy phr-plasmid increases the ultraviolet resistance of a recA strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Satake, M; Shinagawa, H

    1984-01-01

    It has been previously reported that the ultraviolet sensitivity of recA strains of Escherichia coli in the dark is suppressed by a plasmid pKY1 which carries the phr gene, suggesting that this is due to a novel effect of photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) of E. coli in the dark (Yamamoto et al., 1983a). In this work, we observed that an increase of UV-resistance by pKY1 in the dark is not apparent in strains with a mutation in either uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, lexA, recBC or recF. The sensitivity of recA lexA and recA recBC multiple mutants to UV is suppressed by the plasmid but that of recA uvrA, recA uvrB and recA uvrC is not. Host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated lambda phage is slightly more efficient in the recA/pKY1 strain compared with the parental recA strain. On the other hand, the recA and recA/pKY1 strains do not differ significantly in the following properties: Hfr recombination, induction of lambda by UV, and mutagenesis. We suggest that dark repair of PRE is correlated with its capacity of excision repair.

  2. A genomic island integrated into recA of Vibrio cholerae contains a divergent recA and provides multi-pathway protection from DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Rapa, Rita A; Islam, Atiqul; Monahan, Leigh G; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas; Charles, Ian G; Stokes, Harold W; Labbate, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) has been crucial in the evolution of the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. The two major virulence factors are present on two different mobile genetic elements, a bacteriophage containing the cholera toxin genes and a genomic island (GI) containing the intestinal adhesin genes. Non-toxigenic V. cholerae in the aquatic environment are a major source of novel DNA that allows the pathogen to morph via LGT. In this study, we report a novel GI from a non-toxigenic V. cholerae strain containing multiple genes involved in DNA repair including the recombination repair gene recA that is 23% divergent from the indigenous recA and genes involved in the translesion synthesis pathway. This is the first report of a GI containing the critical gene recA and the first report of a GI that targets insertion into a specific site within recA. We show that possession of the island in Escherichia coli is protective against DNA damage induced by UV-irradiation and DNA targeting antibiotics. This study highlights the importance of genetic elements such as GIs in the evolution of V. cholerae and emphasizes the importance of environmental strains as a source of novel DNA that can influence the pathogenicity of toxigenic strains. PMID:24889424

  3. Campylobacter fetus sap inversion occurs in the absence of RecA function.

    PubMed

    Ray, K C; Tu, Z C; Grogono-Thomas, R; Newell, D G; Thompson, S A; Blaser, M J

    2000-10-01

    Phase variation of Campylobacter fetus surface layer proteins (SLPs) occurs by inversion of a 6.2-kb DNA segment containing the unique sap promoter, permitting expression of a single SLP-encoding gene. Previous work has shown that the C. fetus sap inversion system is RecA dependent. When we challenged a pregnant ewe with a recA mutant of wild-type C. fetus (strain 97-211) that expressed the 97-kDa SLP, 15 of the 16 ovine-passaged isolates expressed the 97-kDa protein. However, one strain (97-209) expressed a 127-kDa SLP, suggesting that chromosomal rearrangement may have occurred to enable SLP switching. Lack of RecA function in strains 97-211 and 97-209 was confirmed by their sensitivity to the DNA-damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate. Southern hybridization and PCR of these strains indicated that the aphA insertion into recA was stably present. However, Southern hybridizations demonstrated that in strain 97-209 inversion had occurred in the sap locus. PCR data confirmed inversion of the 6.2-kb DNA element and indicated that in these recA mutants the sap inversion frequency is reduced by 2 to 3 log(10) units compared to that in the wild type. Thus, although the major sap inversion pathway in C. fetus is RecA dependent, alternative lower-frequency, RecA-independent inversion mechanisms exist.

  4. RECA: A network by students, for students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remolina Gutierrez, M. C.; Velasco Moreno, S.; Hoyos Restrepo, P.; Jimenez Nieto, J. D.; Ramos, A. F.; Buitrago-Casas, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    RECA (Red de Estudiantes Colombianos de Astronomía) is a national network created by Colombian students that needed to be connected by their love for astronomy and astrophysics. It compiles most of the university groups and individuals that are willing to make part of a bigger community that gives benefits such as outreach activities, student links, and resources. This work is divided in 3 main parts. The first one is a quick review of the history of RECA since it was proposed in the III Colombian Astronomy Congress until today. After that, we review all the achievements and activities that the network has made and the people that collaborated to make it possible. Finally, we emphasize the vision that RECA has for the next years and what it can give to the development of astronomy in Latin America regarding to students flux, training and research.

  5. Construction and Characterization of a recA Mutant of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans by Marker Exchange Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenying; Guiliani, Nicolas; Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Borne, Françoise; Ratouchniak, Jeanine; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2000-01-01

    To construct Thiobacillus ferrooxidans mutants by marker exchange mutagenesis, a genetic transfer system is required. The transfer of broad-host-range plasmids belonging to the incompatibility groups IncQ (pKT240 and pJRD215), IncP (pJB3Km1), and IncW (pUFR034) from Escherichia coli to two private T. ferrooxidans strains (BRGM1 and Tf-49) and to two collection strains (ATCC 33020 and ATCC 19859) by conjugation was analyzed. To knock out the T. ferrooxidans recA gene, a mobilizable suicide plasmid carrying the ATCC 33020 recA gene disrupted by a kanamycin resistance gene was transferred from E. coli to T. ferrooxidans ATCC 33020 by conjugation under the best conditions determined. The two kanamycin-resistant clones, which have retained the kanamycin-resistant phenotype after growth for several generations in nonselective medium, were shown to have the kanamycin resistance gene inserted within the recA gene, indicating that the recA::Ω-Km mutated allele was transferred from the suicide plasmid to the chromosome by homologous recombination. These mutants exhibited a slightly reduced growth rate and an increased sensitivity to UV and γ irradiation compared to the wild-type strain. However, the T. ferrooxidans recA mutants are less sensitive to these physical DNA-damaging agents than the recA mutants described in other bacterial species, suggesting that RecA plays a minor role in DNA repair in T. ferrooxidans. PMID:10735871

  6. Acinetobacter baumannii RecA Protein in Repair of DNA Damage, Antimicrobial Resistance, General Stress Response, and Virulence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Jesús; Bardina, Carlota; Beceiro, Alejandro; Rumbo, Soraya; Cabral, Maria P.; Barbé, Jordi; Bou, Germán

    2011-01-01

    RecA is the major enzyme involved in homologous recombination and plays a central role in SOS mutagenesis. In Acinetobacter spp., including Acinetobacter baumannii , a multidrug-resistant bacterium responsible for nosocomial infections worldwide, DNA repair responses differ in many ways from those of other bacterial species. In this work, the function of A. baumannii RecA was examined by constructing a recA mutant. Alteration of this single gene had a pleiotropic effect, showing the involvement of RecA in DNA damage repair and consequently in cellular protection against stresses induced by DNA damaging agents, several classes of antibiotics, and oxidative agents. In addition, the absence of RecA decreased survival in response to both heat shock and desiccation. Virulence assays in vitro (with macrophages) and in vivo (using a mouse model) similarly implicated RecA in the pathogenicity of A. baumannii . Thus, the data strongly suggest a protective role for RecA in the bacterium and indicate that inactivation of the protein can contribute to a combined therapeutic approach to controlling A. baumannii infections. PMID:21642465

  7. [UV-induction of the LT-toxin operon depending on genes lexA, recA, and umuD].

    PubMed

    Tiganova, I G; Rusina, O Iu; Andreeva, I V; Brukhanskiĭ, G V; Skavronskaia, A G

    1994-06-01

    UV induction of the elt operon (the LT-toxin operon in Escherichia coli) was demonstrated in experiments using fusion of elt::lac operons with the help of Mud1(Ap lac) phage. UV induction of the elt operon is lexA-dependent; thus, the possibility of SOS regulation of this process may be assumed. However, UV induction of the elt operon turned out to be recA-independent, which makes it impossible to consider this induction as a typical SOS response. UV induction of the elt operon is also observed in Salmonella typhimurium, which differs from E. coli in the product of umuD, which suggests that the UV induction of the elt operon is umuD independent.

  8. Biochemical characterization of RecA variants that contribute to extreme resistance to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Piechura, Joseph R.; Tseng, Tzu-Ling; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Byrne, Rose T.; Windgassen, Tricia A.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Battista, John R.; Li, Hung-Wen; Cox, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Among strains of Escherichia coli that have evolved to survive extreme exposure to ionizing radiation, mutations in the recA gene are prominent and contribute substantially to the acquired phenotype. Changes at amino acid residue 276, D276A and D276N, occur repeatedly and in separate evolved populations. RecA D276A and RecA D276N exhibit unique adaptations to an environment that can require the repair of hundreds of double strand breaks. These two RecA protein variants (a) exhibit a faster rate of filament nucleation on DNA, as well as a slower extension under at least some conditions, leading potentially to a distribution of the protein among a higher number of shorter filaments, (b) promote DNA strand exchange more efficiently in the context of a shorter filament, and (c) are markedly less inhibited by ADP. These adaptations potentially allow RecA protein to address larger numbers of double strand DNA breaks in an environment where ADP concentrations are higher due to a compromised cellular metabolism. PMID:25559557

  9. Polynucleotide phosphorylase exonuclease and polymerase activities on single-stranded DNA ends are modulated by RecN, SsbA and RecA proteins.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Paula P; Carzaniga, Thomas; Zangrossi, Sandro; Briani, Federica; Garcia-Tirado, Esther; Dehò, Gianni; Alonso, Juan C

    2011-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis pnpA gene product, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), is involved in double-strand break (DSB) repair via homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). RecN is among the first responders to localize at the DNA DSBs, with PNPase facilitating the formation of a discrete RecN focus per nucleoid. PNPase, which co-purifies with RecA and RecN, was able to degrade single-stranded (ss) DNA with a 3' → 5' polarity in the presence of Mn(2+) and low inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration, or to extend a 3'-OH end in the presence dNDP · Mn(2+). Both PNPase activities were observed in evolutionarily distant bacteria (B. subtilis and Escherichia coli), suggesting conserved functions. The activity of PNPase was directed toward ssDNA degradation or polymerization by manipulating the Pi/dNDPs concentrations or the availability of RecA or RecN. In its dATP-bound form, RecN stimulates PNPase-mediated polymerization. ssDNA phosphorolysis catalyzed by PNPase is stimulated by RecA, but inhibited by SsbA. Our findings suggest that (i) the PNPase degradative and polymerizing activities might play a critical role in the transition from DSB sensing to end resection via HR and (ii) by blunting a 3'-tailed duplex DNA, in the absence of HR, B. subtilis PNPase might also contribute to repair via NHEJ.

  10. UV-induced mutagenesis of phage S13 can occur in the absence of the RecA and UmuC proteins of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Tessman, I.

    1985-10-01

    The UV-induced mutagenesis of phage S13 that accompanies Weigle repair is known to require the products of the recA and umuDC genes, as does the UV-induced mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli chromosome. The author found that UV-induced mutagenesis of phage S13 occurred in the absence of both the RecA and UmuC functions when the irradiated phage was photoreactivated. Furthermore, UV-induced phage mutations were produced in a recA- umuC- cell even without photoreactivation and in the absence of any other known UV repair mechanism, at a frequency 29% of that found after photoreactivation and 7% of that found after Weigle repair, implying that DNA synthesis can proceed past a dimer at an unexpectedly high frequency even when unaided by the UmuC-RecA SOS repair functions. The unaided DNA synthesis appears capable of producing mutations in the vicinity of a pyrimidine dimer; by aiding synthesis past a dimer, a repair mechanism may disclose a mutation without having any active role in producing it.

  11. Amplified UvrA protein can ameliorate the ultraviolet sensitivity of an Escherichia coli recA mutant.

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, K; Tanaka, M; Matsunaga, T; Nikaido, O; Yamamoto, K

    2001-12-19

    When a recA strain of Escherichia coli was transformed with the multicopy plasmid pSF11 carrying the uvrA gene of E. coli, its extreme ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity was decreased. The sensitivity of the lexA1 (Ind(-)) strain to UV was also decreased by pSF11. The recA cells expressing Neurospora crassa UV damage endonuclease (UVDE), encoding UV-endonuclease, show UV resistance. On the other hand, only partial amelioration of UV sensitivity of the recA strain was observed in the presence of the plasmid pNP10 carrying the uvrB gene. Host cell reactivation of UV-irradiated lambda phage in recA cells with pSF11 was as efficient as that in wild-type cells. Using an antibody to detect cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, we found that UV-irradiated recA cells removed dimers from their DNA more rapidly if they carried pSF11 than if they carried a vacant control plasmid. Using anti-UvrA antibody, we observed that the expression level of UvrA protein was about 20-fold higher in the recA strain with pSF11 than in the recA strain without pSF11. Our results were consistent with the idea that constitutive level of UvrA protein in the recA cells results in constitutive levels of active UvrABC nuclease which is not enough to operate full nucleotide excision repair (NER), thus leading to extreme UV sensitivity.

  12. RecA Expression in Response to Solar UVR in the Marine Bacterium Vibrio natriegens.

    PubMed

    Booth, M.G.; Jeffrey, W.H.; Miller, R.V.

    2001-12-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation may produce daily stress on marine and estuarine communities as cells are damaged and repair that damage. Reduction in the earth's stratospheric ozone layer has increased awareness of the potential effects that ultraviolet radiation may have in the environment, including how marine bacteria respond to changes in solar radiation. We examined the use of the bacterial RecA protein as an indicator of the potential of bacteria to repair DNA damage caused by solar UV irradiation using the marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens as a model. RecA is universally present in bacteria and is a regulator protein for the so-called Dark Repair Systems, which include excision repair, postreplication recombinational repair, and mutagenic or SOS repair. Solar UVB and UVA both reduced V. natriegens viability in seawater microcosms. After exposure to unfiltered solar radiation or radiation in which UVB was blocked, survival dropped below 1%, whereas visible light from which UVA and UVB had been filtered had no effect on survival. Using a RecA-specific antibody for detection, RecA protein was induced by solar radiation in a diel pattern in marine microcosms conducted in the Gulf of Mexico. Peak induction was observed at dusk each day. Although RecA expression was correlated with the formation of UVB-induced cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, longer wavelength UVA radiation also induced recA gene expression. Our results demonstrate that RecA-regulated, light-independent repair is an important component in the ability of marine bacteria to survive exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation and that RecA expression is a useful monitor of bacterial repair after exposure to solar UVR.

  13. Enhanced generation of A:T-->T:A transversions in a recA730 lexA51(Def) mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Akanuma, M; Woodgate, R; Ohta, T

    1997-01-03

    RecA730 belongs to a class of mutant RecA protein that is often referred to as RecA*, since it is constitutively activated for coprotease functions in the absence of exogenous DNA-damage. Escherichia coli strains carrying recA730 (or other recA* alleles) exhibit dramatic increases in SOS-dependent spontaneous mutator activity. We have analyzed the specificity of this mutator phenotype by employing F'-plasmids carrying a set of mutant lacZ genes that can individually detect two types of transitions, four types of transversions, and four kinds of specific frameshift events. Analysis revealed that most of the spontaneous mutagenesis in a recA730 lexA51(Def) strain (which expresses derepressed levels of all LexA-regulated proteins) can be attributed to a specific increase in A:T-->T:A, A:T-->C:G and G:C-->T:A transversions, with the A:T-->T:A transversions occurring most frequently. These transversion events were completely abolished in a delta umuDC strain, indicating that the functionally active UmuD'C proteins are normally required for their generation. The spectrum obtained was similar to that of strains with a defect in the epsilon (3'-->5' proofreading) subunit of DNA polymerase III. Such an observation raises the possibility that the wild-type epsilon protein is in activated in strains expressing the RecA730 and UmuD'C proteins.

  14. RecA Inhibitors Potentiate Antibiotic Activity and Block Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Kausar; Alhhazmi, Areej; DeCoteau, John F; Luo, Yu; Geyer, C Ronald

    2016-03-17

    Antibiotic resistance arises from the maintenance of resistance mutations or genes acquired from the acquisition of adaptive de novo mutations or the transfer of resistance genes. Antibiotic resistance is acquired in response to antibiotic therapy by activating SOS-mediated DNA repair and mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer pathways. Initiation of the SOS pathway promotes activation of RecA, inactivation of LexA repressor, and induction of SOS genes. Here, we have identified and characterized phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid RecA inhibitors that block antibiotic-induced activation of the SOS response. These inhibitors potentiate the activity of bactericidal antibiotics, including members of the quinolone, β-lactam, and aminoglycoside families in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. They reduce the ability of bacteria to acquire antibiotic resistance mutations and to transfer mobile genetic elements conferring resistance. This study highlights the advantage of including RecA inhibitors in bactericidal antibiotic therapies and provides a new strategy for prolonging antibiotic shelf life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The RecX protein interacts with the RecA protein and modulates its activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, C.W.; Souza, E.M.; Etto, R.M.; Pedrosa, F.O.; Chubatsu, L.S.; Yates, M.G.; Schumacher, J.; Buck, M.; Steffens, M.B.R.

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair is crucial to the survival of all organisms. The bacterial RecA protein is a central component in the SOS response and in recombinational and SOS DNA repairs. The RecX protein has been characterized as a negative modulator of RecA activity in many bacteria. The recA and recX genes of Herbaspirillum seropedicae constitute a single operon, and evidence suggests that RecX participates in SOS repair. In the present study, we show that the H. seropedicae RecX protein (RecXHs) can interact with the H. seropedicae RecA protein (RecAHs) and that RecAHs possesses ATP binding, ATP hydrolyzing and DNA strand exchange activities. RecXHs inhibited 90% of the RecAHs DNA strand exchange activity even when present in a 50-fold lower molar concentration than RecAHs. RecAHs ATP binding was not affected by the addition of RecX, but the ATPase activity was reduced. When RecXHs was present before the formation of RecA filaments (RecA-ssDNA), inhibition of ATPase activity was substantially reduced and excess ssDNA also partially suppressed this inhibition. The results suggest that the RecXHs protein negatively modulates the RecAHs activities by protein-protein interactions and also by DNA-protein interactions. PMID:23044625

  16. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among RecA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r.

    PubMed

    Knight, K L; Hess, R M; McEntee, K

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N3ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the [alpha-32P]8N3ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T31 of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N3ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10(7) years.

  17. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  18. Construction and physiological analysis of a Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae recA mutant.

    PubMed

    Mongkolsuk, S; Rabibhadana, S; Sukchavalit, R; Vaughn, G

    1998-12-15

    A Xoo recA insertion inactivation mutant was constructed. The mutant, lacking RecA, showed increased sensitivity towards mutagen killing. This phenotype could be complemented by a cloned, functional recA. Unlike other bacteria, both the recA mutant and the parental strain had similar level of resistance to H2O2 killing and peroxide-induced mutagenesis.

  19. Fine-tuning recA expression in Staphylococcus aureus for antimicrobial photoinactivation: importance of photo-induced DNA damage in the photoinactivation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Grinholc, Mariusz; Rodziewicz, Aleksandra; Forys, Katarzyna; Rapacka-Zdonczyk, Aleksandra; Kawiak, Anna; Domachowska, Anna; Golunski, Grzegorz; Wolz, Christiane; Mesak, Lili; Becker, Karsten; Bielawski, Krzysztof P

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial cell envelope is generally accepted as the primary target for a photo-induced oxidative stress. It is plausible that DNA damage occurs during the antimicrobial photoinactivation. Here we investigate the correlation between DNA damage and photoinactivation by evaluating the level of RecA-based DNA repair system in Staphylococcus aureus. By using exogenous photosensitizers (new methylene blue (NMB), toluidine blue O (TBO), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridinio)porphyrin tetra(p-toluenesulfonate) (TMPyP), zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc), Rose Bengal (RB)) and ALA-induced endogenous porphyrin-dependent blue light (405 nm), several outcomes were observed: (i) an increase of DNA damage (from gel electrophoresis in DNA damage assay), (ii) an increase of recA expression (luminescence assay in recA-lux strain), and (iii) an increase of RecA protein level (Western blotting). When recA expression was repressed by novobiocin, or abolished by deleting the gene, S. aureus susceptibility towards photoinactivation was increased at approximately a hundred-fold. The absence of RecA increases DNA damage to yield bactericidal effect. In novobiocin-resistant mutant (gyrB), as opposed to wild type, neither RecA protein level nor cell's susceptibility was affected by photoinactivation (when novobiocin is present). This is to suggest that GyrB-dependent inhibition mediated recA repression. Therefore, we have established the role of RecA in DNA damage during photoinactivation. With the use of rifampicin mutation frequency and Ames tests, we demonstrated that photoinactivation did not increase S. aureus mutagenesis and potentially is not mutagenic toward eukaryotic cells. The results suggest that the treatment is considered safe. In conclusion, we provide an evidence that recA inhibitor may serve as therapeutic adjuvant for antimicrobial photoinactivation. Clinical relevance of our findings warrants further investigations.

  20. Efficient repair of hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage by Escherichia coli requires SOS induction of RecA and RuvA proteins.

    PubMed

    Konola, J T; Sargent, K E; Gow, J B

    2000-04-28

    The survival of Escherichia coli following treatment with a low dose (1-3 mM) of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) that causes extensive mode-one killing of DNA repair mutants is stimulated by the induction of the SOS regulon. Results for various mutants indicate that induction of recA and RecA protein-mediated recombination are critical factors contributing to the repair of H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative DNA damage. However, because DNA damage activates RecA protein's coprotease activity essential to cleavage of LexA repressor protein and derepression of all SOS genes, it is unclear to what extent induction of RecA protein stimulates this repair. To make this determination, we examined mode-one killing of DeltarecA cells carrying plasmid-borne recA (P(tac)-recA(+)) and constitutively expressing a fully induced level of wild-type RecA protein when SOS genes other than recA are non-inducible in a lexA3 (Ind(-)) genetic background or inducible in a lexA(+) background. At a H(2)O(2) dose resulting in maximal killing, DeltarecA lexA3 (Ind(-)) cells with P(tac)-recA(+) show 40-fold greater survival than lexA3 (Ind(-)) cells with chromosomal recA having a low, non-induced level of RecA protein. However, they still show 10- to 15-fold lower survival than wild-type cells and DeltarecA lexA(+) cells with P(tac)-recA(+). To determine if the inducible RuvA protein stimulates survival, we examined a ruvA60 mutant that is defective for the repair of UV-induced DNA damage. This mutant also shows 10- to 15-fold lower survival than wild-type cells. We conclude that while induction of RecA protein has a pronounced stimulatory effect on the recombinational repair of H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative DNA damage, the induction of other SOS proteins such as RuvA is essential for wild-type repair.

  1. Zinc blocks SOS-induced antibiotic resistance via inhibition of RecA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, Bryan E; Escobar, Jillian F; Bair, Kirsten L; Sutton, Mark D; Crane, John K

    2017-01-01

    Zinc inhibits the virulence of diarrheagenic E. coli by inducing the envelope stress response and inhibiting the SOS response. The SOS response is triggered by damage to bacterial DNA. In Shiga-toxigenic E. coli, the SOS response strongly induces the production of Shiga toxins (Stx) and of the bacteriophages that encode the Stx genes. In E. coli, induction of the SOS response is accompanied by a higher mutation rate, called the mutator response, caused by a shift to error-prone DNA polymerases when DNA damage is too severe to be repaired by canonical DNA polymerases. Since zinc inhibited the other aspects of the SOS response, we hypothesized that zinc would also inhibit the mutator response, also known as hypermutation. We explored various different experimental paradigms to induce hypermutation triggered by the SOS response, and found that hypermutation was induced not just by classical inducers such as mitomycin C and the quinolone antibiotics, but also by antiviral drugs such as zidovudine and anti-cancer drugs such as 5-fluorouracil, 6-mercaptopurine, and azacytidine. Zinc salts inhibited the SOS response and the hypermutator phenomenon in E. coli as well as in Klebsiella pneumoniae, and was more effective in inhibiting the SOS response than other metals. We then attempted to determine the mechanism by which zinc, applied externally in the medium, inhibits hypermutation. Our results show that zinc interferes with the actions of RecA, and protects LexA from RecA-mediated cleavage, an early step in initiation of the SOS response. The SOS response may play a role in the development of antibiotic resistance and the effect of zinc suggests ways to prevent it.

  2. Anionic Phospholipids Stabilize RecA Filament Bundles in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rajendram, Manohary; Zhang, Leili; Reynolds, Bradley J; Auer, George K; Tuson, Hannah H; Ngo, Khanh V; Cox, Michael M; Yethiraj, Arun; Cui, Qiang; Weibel, Douglas B

    2015-11-05

    We characterize the interaction of RecA with membranes in vivo and in vitro and demonstrate that RecA binds tightly to the anionic phospholipids cardiolipin (CL) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). Using computational models, we identify two regions of RecA that interact with PG and CL: (1) the N-terminal helix and (2) loop L2. Mutating these regions decreased the affinity of RecA to PG and CL in vitro. Using 3D super-resolution microscopy, we demonstrate that depleting Escherichia coli PG and CL altered the localization of RecA foci and hindered the formation of RecA filament bundles. Consequently, E. coli cells lacking aPLs fail to initiate a robust SOS response after DNA damage, indicating that the membrane acts as a scaffold for nucleating the formation of RecA filament bundles and plays an important role in the SOS response.

  3. Structure/function relationships in RecA protein-mediated homology recognition and strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Prentiss, Mara; Prévost, Chantal; Danilowicz, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    RecA family proteins include RecA, Rad51, and Dmc1. These recombinases are responsible for homology search and strand exchange. Homology search and strand exchange occur during double-strand break repair and in eukaryotes during meiotic recombination. In bacteria, homology search begins when RecA binds an initiating single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the primary DNA-binding site to form the presynaptic filament. The filament is a right-handed helix, where the initiating strand is bound deep within the filament. Once the presynaptic filament is formed, it interrogates nearby double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to find a homologous sequence; therefore, we provide a detailed discussion of structural features of the presynaptic filament that play important functional roles. The discussion includes many diagrams showing multiple filament turns. These diagrams illustrate interactions that are not evident in single turn structures. The first dsDNA interactions with the presynaptic filament are insensitive to mismatches. The mismatch insensitive interactions lead to dsDNA deformation that triggers a homology testing process governed by kinetics. The first homology test involves ∼8 bases. Almost all interactions are rejected by this initial rapid test, leading to a new cycle of homology testing. Interactions that pass the initial rapid test proceed to a slower testing stage. That slower stage induces nonhomologous dsDNA to reverse strand exchange and begin a new cycle of homology testing. In contrast, homologous dsDNA continues to extend the heteroduplex strand-exchange product until ATP hydrolysis makes strand exchange irreversible.

  4. RecA filament sliding on DNA facilitates homology search

    PubMed Central

    Ragunathan, Kaushik; Liu, Cheng; Ha, Taekjip

    2012-01-01

    During homologous recombination, RecA forms a helical filament on a single stranded (ss) DNA that searches for a homologous double stranded (ds) DNA and catalyzes the exchange of complementary base pairs to form a new heteroduplex. Using single molecule fluorescence imaging tools with high spatiotemporal resolution we characterized the encounter complex between the RecA filament and dsDNA. We present evidence in support of the ‘sliding model’ wherein a RecA filament diffuses along a dsDNA track. We further show that homology can be detected during sliding. Sliding occurs with a diffusion coefficient of approximately 8000 bp2/s allowing the filament to sample several hundred base pairs before dissociation. Modeling suggests that sliding can accelerate homology search by as much as 200 fold. Homology recognition can occur for as few as 6 nt of complementary basepairs with the recognition efficiency increasing for higher complementarity. Our data represents the first example of a DNA bound multi-protein complex which can slide along another DNA to facilitate target search. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00067.001 PMID:23240082

  5. Identification of genes and gene products necessary for bacterial bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1984-07-01

    Expression of luminescence in Escherichia coli was recently achieved by cloning genes from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. One DNA fragment on a hybrid plasmid encoded regulatory functions and enzymatic activities necessary for light production. We report the results of a genetic analysis to identify the luminescence genes (lux) that reside on this recombinant plasmid. lux gene mutations were generated by hydroxylamine treatment, and these mutations were ordered on a linear map by complementation in trans with a series of polar transposon insertions on other plasmids. lux genes were defined by complementation of lux gene defects on pairs of plasmids in trans in E. coli. Hybrid plasmids were also used to direct the synthesis of polypeptides in the E. coli minicell system. Seven lux genes and the corresponding gene products were identified from the complementation analysis and the minicell programing experiments. These genes, in the order of their position on a linear map, and the apparent molecular weights of the gene products are luxR (27,000), luxI (25,000), luxC (53,000), luxD (33,000), luxA (40,000), luxB (38,000), and luxE (42,000). From the luminescence phenotypes of E. coli containing mutant plasmids, functions were assigned to these genes: luxA, luxB, luxC, luxD, and luxE encode enzymes for light production and luxR and luxI encode regulatory functions.

  6. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein – Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, Wellington C.; Galvão, Carolina W.; Saab, Sérgio C.; Iulek, Jorge; Etto, Rafael M.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Stanage, Tyler; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.; Spies, Maria

    2016-07-22

    The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA). HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. In conclusion, our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament.

  7. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein – Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Carolina W.; Saab, Sérgio C.; Iulek, Jorge; Etto, Rafael M.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Stanage, Tyler; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA). HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. Our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament. PMID:27447485

  8. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  9. The Role of recA Protein in the Multiplicity Reactivation Pathway of Phage T4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    transfer are completed, occurs optimally in vitro when the stoichoimetry of recA to ssDNA is held to a ratio of 1 molecule per 3-5 nucleotides (McEntee...There are three possible reasons for this. First, the constitutive level of the recA protein may not be enough to satisfy the stoichoimetry of the

  10. Exopolysaccharides produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia recA lineages IIIA and IIIB.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Luigi; Cescutti, Paola; Drigo, Laura; Impallomeni, Giuseppe; Herasimenka, Yury; Bevivino, Annamaria; Dalmastri, Claudia; Tabacchioni, Silvia; Manno, Graziana; Zanetti, Flavio; Rizzo, Roberto

    2004-08-01

    Clinical and environmental strains of Burkholderia cenocepacia belonging to the recA lineages IIIA and IIIB were examined for exopolysaccharide (EPS) production. The exopolysaccharides structure was determined using mainly gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. All the strains produced Cepacian, a highly branched polysaccharide constituted of a heptasaccharide repeating unit, composed of one rhamnose, one glucose, one glucuronic acid, one mannose and three galactose residues. This polymer is the most common exopolysaccharide produced by strains of the Burkholderia cepacia (Bcc) complex. One clinical strain produced also another polysaccharide constituted of three galactose units and one 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid residues, a polymer that was previously isolated from two strains of B. cepacia genomovar I and B. cenocepacia IIIA.

  11. Prophage Induction and Differential RecA and UmuDAb Transcriptome Regulation in the DNA Damage Responses of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Janelle M.; Ferrell, Joshua C.; Witkowski, Travis A.; Grice, Alison N.

    2014-01-01

    The SOS response to DNA damage that induces up to 10% of the prokaryotic genome requires RecA action to relieve LexA transcriptional repression. In Acinetobacter species, which lack LexA, the error-prone polymerase accessory UmuDAb is instead required for ddrR induction after DNA damage, suggesting it might be a LexA analog. RNA-Seq experiments defined the DNA damage transcriptome (mitomycin C-induced) of wild type, recA and umuDAb mutant strains of both A. baylyi ADP1 and A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Of the typical SOS response genes, few were differentially regulated in these species; many were repressed or absent. A striking 38.4% of all ADP1 genes, and 11.4% of all 17978 genes, were repressed under these conditions. In A. baylyi ADP1, 66 genes (2.0% of the genome), including a CRISPR/Cas system, were DNA damage-induced, and belonged to four regulons defined by differential use of recA and umuDAb. In A. baumannii ATCC 17978, however, induction of 99% of the 152 mitomycin C-induced genes depended on recA, and only 28 of these genes required umuDAb for their induction. 90% of the induced A. baumannii genes were clustered in three prophage regions, and bacteriophage particles were observed after mitomycin C treatment. These prophages encoded esvI, esvK1, and esvK2, ethanol-stimulated virulence genes previously identified in a Caenorhabditis elegans model, as well as error-prone polymerase alleles. The induction of all 17978 error-prone polymerase alleles, whether prophage-encoded or not, was recA dependent, but only these DNA polymerase V-related genes were de-repressed in the umuDAb mutant in the absence of DNA damage. These results suggest that both species possess a robust and complex DNA damage response involving both recA-dependent and recA-independent regulons, and further demonstrates that although umuDAb has a specialized role in repressing error-prone polymerases, additional regulators likely participate in these species' transcriptional response to DNA damage

  12. Prophage induction and differential RecA and UmuDAb transcriptome regulation in the DNA damage responses of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi.

    PubMed

    Hare, Janelle M; Ferrell, Joshua C; Witkowski, Travis A; Grice, Alison N

    2014-01-01

    The SOS response to DNA damage that induces up to 10% of the prokaryotic genome requires RecA action to relieve LexA transcriptional repression. In Acinetobacter species, which lack LexA, the error-prone polymerase accessory UmuDAb is instead required for ddrR induction after DNA damage, suggesting it might be a LexA analog. RNA-Seq experiments defined the DNA damage transcriptome (mitomycin C-induced) of wild type, recA and umuDAb mutant strains of both A. baylyi ADP1 and A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Of the typical SOS response genes, few were differentially regulated in these species; many were repressed or absent. A striking 38.4% of all ADP1 genes, and 11.4% of all 17978 genes, were repressed under these conditions. In A. baylyi ADP1, 66 genes (2.0% of the genome), including a CRISPR/Cas system, were DNA damage-induced, and belonged to four regulons defined by differential use of recA and umuDAb. In A. baumannii ATCC 17978, however, induction of 99% of the 152 mitomycin C-induced genes depended on recA, and only 28 of these genes required umuDAb for their induction. 90% of the induced A. baumannii genes were clustered in three prophage regions, and bacteriophage particles were observed after mitomycin C treatment. These prophages encoded esvI, esvK1, and esvK2, ethanol-stimulated virulence genes previously identified in a Caenorhabditis elegans model, as well as error-prone polymerase alleles. The induction of all 17978 error-prone polymerase alleles, whether prophage-encoded or not, was recA dependent, but only these DNA polymerase V-related genes were de-repressed in the umuDAb mutant in the absence of DNA damage. These results suggest that both species possess a robust and complex DNA damage response involving both recA-dependent and recA-independent regulons, and further demonstrates that although umuDAb has a specialized role in repressing error-prone polymerases, additional regulators likely participate in these species' transcriptional response to DNA damage.

  13. Molecular genetic and biochemical analyses of a DNA repair gene from Serratia marcescens

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the SOS response and two 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases (TagI and TagII) are required for repair of DNA damaged by alkylating agents such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Mutations of the recA gene eliminate the SOS response. TagI and TagII are encoded by the tag and alkA genes, respectively. A gene (rpr) encoding 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase activity was isolated from the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens. The gene, localized to a 1.5-kilobase pair SmaI-HindIII restriction fragment, was cloned into plasmid pUC18. The clone complemented E. coli tag alkA and recA mutations for MMS resistance. The rpr gene did not, however, complement recA mutations for resistance to ultraviolet light or the ability to perform homologous recombination reactions, nor did it complement E. coli ada or alkB mutations. Two proteins of molecular weights 42,000 and 16,000 were produced from the rpr locus. Analysis of deletion and insertion mutants of rpr suggested that the 42kD molecule is the active protein. The 16kD protein may either be a breakdown product of the 42kD species or may be encoded by another gene overlapping the reading frame of the rpr gene. Biochemical assays showed that the rpr gene product (Rpr) possesses 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase activity.

  14. Genetic requirements for high constitutive SOS expression in recA730 mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vlašić, Ignacija; Šimatović, Ana; Brčić-Kostić, Krunoslav

    2011-09-01

    The RecA protein in its functional state is in complex with single-stranded DNA, i.e., in the form of a RecA filament. In SOS induction, the RecA filament functions as a coprotease, enabling the autodigestion of the LexA repressor. The RecA filament can be formed by different mechanisms, but all of them require three enzymatic activities essential for the processing of DNA double-stranded ends. These are helicase, 5'-3' exonuclease, and RecA loading onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). In some mutants, the SOS response can be expressed constitutively during the process of normal DNA metabolism. The RecA730 mutant protein is able to form the RecA filament without the help of RecBCD and RecFOR mediators since it better competes with the single-strand binding (SSB) protein for ssDNA. As a consequence, the recA730 mutants show high constitutive SOS expression. In the study described in this paper, we studied the genetic requirements for constitutive SOS expression in recA730 mutants. Using a β-galactosidase assay, we showed that the constitutive SOS response in recA730 mutants exhibits different requirements in different backgrounds. In a wild-type background, the constitutive SOS response is partially dependent on RecBCD function. In a recB1080 background (the recB1080 mutation retains only helicase), constitutive SOS expression is partially dependent on RecBCD helicase function and is strongly dependent on RecJ nuclease. Finally, in a recB-null background, the constitutive SOS expression of the recA730 mutant is dependent on the RecJ nuclease. Our results emphasize the importance of the 5'-3' exonuclease for high constitutive SOS expression in recA730 mutants and show that RecBCD function can further enhance the excellent intrinsic abilities of the RecA730 protein in vivo.

  15. Activation of protease-constitutive recA proteins of Escherichia coli by all of the common nucleoside triphosphates.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W B; Sassanfar, M; Tessman, I; Roberts, J W; Tessman, E S

    1988-01-01

    To understand why the RecA proteins of the protease-constitutive recA1202 and recA1211 mutants show very high protease activities in vivo without the usual need for DNA damage (E. S. Tessman and P. Peterson, J. Bacteriol. 163:677-687, 1985), we examined the activation of the mutant proteins by nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) in vitro. In vivo, the mutant protease activities are resistant to inhibition by cytidine plus guanosine (C + G) in the growth medium, in contrast to the activities of weaker mutants, such as recA441, which are sensitive to C + G inhibition. We found that RecA1202 and RecA1211 proteins, in contrast to RecA+, can use natural NTPs other than ATP and dATP as cofactors in the cleavage of LexA repressor. The effectiveness of NTPs in promoting LexA cleavage by RecA1202 and RecA1211 proteins decreased in roughly the following order: dATP greater than ATP greater than UTP greater than ATP-gamma S greater than dCTP greater than CTP greater than dGTP greater than GTP greater than TTP. These mutant proteins showed higher affinities for ATP and single-stranded DNA and higher repressor cleavage activities than RecA+ protein. With the various effectors (single-stranded DNA or NTPs), the RecA1202 protein always showed more activity than RecA1211 in the cleavage of LexA repressor in vitro, which is consistent with the greater activity of the recA1202 mutant in vivo. The results explain, in part, why some recA mutants have unusually high constitutive RecA protease activity and why that activity is more or less resistant to C + G inhibition. Images PMID:3049549

  16. ATP hydrolysis Promotes Duplex DNA Release by the RecA Presynaptic Complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja Yil; Qi, Zhi; Greene, Eric C

    2016-10-14

    Homologous recombination is an important DNA repair pathway that plays key roles in maintaining genome stability. Escherichia coli RecA is an ATP-dependent DNA-binding protein that catalyzes the DNA strand exchange reactions in homologous recombination. RecA assembles into long helical filaments on single-stranded DNA, and these presynaptic complexes are responsible for locating and pairing with a homologous duplex DNA. Recent single molecule studies have provided new insights into RecA behavior, but the potential influence of ATP in the reactions remains poorly understood. Here we examine how ATP influences the ability of the RecA presynaptic complex to interact with homologous dsDNA. We demonstrate that over short time regimes, RecA presynaptic complexes sample heterologous dsDNA similarly in the presence of either ATP or ATPγS, suggesting that initial interactions do not depend on ATP hydrolysis. In addition, RecA stabilizes pairing intermediates in three-base steps, and stepping energetics is seemingly unaltered in the presence of ATP. However, the overall dissociation rate of these paired intermediates with ATP is ∼4-fold higher than with ATPγS. These experiments suggest that ATP plays an unanticipated role in promoting the turnover of captured duplex DNA intermediates as RecA attempts to align homologous sequences during the early stages of recombination.

  17. Long-term field release of bioluminescent Sinorhizobium meliloti strains to assess the influence of a recA mutation on the strains' survival.

    PubMed

    Selbitschka, W; Keller, M; Miethling-Graff, R; Dresing, U; Schwieger, F; Krahn, I; Homann, I; Dammann-Kalinowski, T; Pühler, A; Tebbe, C C

    2006-10-01

    A field release experiment was carried out to study the fate of the isogenic, firefly luciferase (luc) gene-tagged Sinorhizobium meliloti strains L1 (RecA-) and L33 (RecA+) in the environment. Both strains were released at concentrations of approximately 10(6) cfu g(-1) soil in replicate and randomized field plots, which had been sown with alfalfa (Medicago sativa). The survival of both strains during the following 7 years could be subdivided into three phases: a sharp decline for more than two orders of magnitude within the first 4 months (phase I), followed by fluctuations around an average number of 10(4) cfu g(-1) soil for nearly 4 years (phase II), and a further decline to approximately 60 cfu g(-1) (phase III). At most sampling dates, no significant differences in the survival of both strains were detected, indicating that the recA gene function was dispensable under these environmental conditions. During the field inoculation, both strains were dispersed accidentally by wind in small numbers to noninoculated field plots. Strain L33 established at a concentration of more than 10(3) cfu g(-1) soil with subsequent seasonal fluctuations. Although strain L1 must have been disseminated to a similar extent, it could never be recovered from noninoculated field plots, indicating that the recA mutation interfered with the strain's capability to establish there. At the beginning of the field experiment, an indigenous alfalfa-nodulating population was below the limit of detection. In the following years, however, an indigenous population arose, which finally outcompeted both strains for saprophytic growth and alfalfa nodulation. RecA- strain L1 was outcompeted for alfalfa nodulation slightly faster than its RecA+ counterpart L33. The diversity of the indigenous population was characterized by employing the Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus polymerase chain reaction fingerprint method. Typing of 2731 root nodule isolates revealed a total of 38 fingerprint

  18. [Immune response genes products in human physiology].

    PubMed

    Khaitov, R M; Alekseev, L P

    2012-09-01

    Current data on physiological role of human immune response genes' proteomic products (antigens) are discussed. The antigens are specified by a very high level of diversity that mediates a wide specter ofphysiological functions. They actually provide integrity and biological stability of human as species. These data reveal new ideas on many pathological processes as well as drafts new approaches for prophylaxis and treatment.

  19. Phylogenetic diversity of rhizobia associated with horsegram [Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam.) Verdc.] grown in South India based on glnII, recA and 16S-23S intergenic sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Appunu, Chinnaswamy; Ganesan, Govindan; Kalita, Michał; Kaushik, Raghavan; Saranya, Balamurugan; Prabavathy, Vaiyapuri Ramalingam; Sudha, Nair

    2011-04-01

    Horsegram [Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam.) Verdc.) is an important grain legume and fodder crop in India. Information on root nodule endosymbionts of this legume in India is limited. In the present study, 69 isolates from naturally occurring root nodules of horsegram collected from two agro-eco-climatic regions of South India was analyzed by generation rate, acid/alkali reaction on YMA medium, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region (IGS), and sequence analyses of IGS and housekeeping genes glnII and recA. Based on the rDNA IGS RFLP by means of three restriction enzymes rhizobia were grouped in five clusters (I-V). By sequence analysis of 16S-23S rDNA IGS identified genotypes of horsegram rhizobia were distributed into five divergent lineages of Bradyrhizobium genus which comprised (I) the IGS type IV rhizobia and valid species B. yuanmingense, (II) the strains of IGS type I and Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS 3257 isolated from Vigna sp., (III) the strains of the IGS type II and Bradyrhizobium sp. CIRADAc12 from Acacia sp., (IV) the IGS type V strains and Bradyrhizobium sp. genospecies IV, and (V) comprising genetically distinct IGS type III strains which probably represent an uncharacterized new genomic species. Nearly, 87% of indigenous horsegram isolates (IGS types I, II, III, and V) could not be related to any other species within the genus Bradyrhizobium. Phylogeny based on housekeeping glnII and recA genes confirmed those results found by the analysis of the IGS sequence. All the isolated rhizobia nodulated Macrotyloma sp. and Vigna spp., and only some of them formed nodules on Arachis hypogeae. The isolates within each IGS type varied in their ability to fix nitrogen. Selection for high symbiotic effective strains could reward horsegram production in poor soils of South India where this legume is largely cultivated.

  20. groE genes affect SOS repair in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.K.; Tessman, I. )

    1990-10-01

    Repair of UV-irradiated bacteriophage in Escherichia coli by Weigle reactivation requires functional recA+ and umuD+C+ genes. When the cells were UV irradiated, the groE heat shock gene products, GroES and GroEL, were needed for at least 50% of the Weigle reactivation of the single-stranded DNA phage S13. Because of repression of the umuDC and recA genes, Weigle reactivation is normally blocked by the lexA3(Ind-) mutation (which creates a noncleavable LexA protein), but it was restored by a combination of a high-copy-number umuD+C+ plasmid and a UV dose that increases groE expression. Maximal reactivation was achieved by elevated amounts of the Umu proteins, which was accomplished in part by UV-induced expression of the groE genes. By increasing the number of copies of the umuD+C+ genes, up to 50% of the normal amount of reactivation of S13 was achieved in an unirradiated recA+ host.

  1. RecA stimulates AlkB-mediated direct repair of DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Shivange, Gururaj; Monisha, Mohan; Nigam, Richa; Kodipelli, Naveena; Anindya, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli AlkB protein is a 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent demethylase that repairs alkylated single stranded and double stranded DNA. Immunoaffinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry identified RecA, a key factor in homologous recombination, as an AlkB-associated protein. The interaction between AlkB and RecA was validated by yeast two-hybrid assay; size-exclusion chromatography and standard pull down experiment and was shown to be direct and mediated by the N-terminal domain of RecA. RecA binding results AlkB–RecA heterodimer formation and RecA–AlkB repairs alkylated DNA with higher efficiency than AlkB alone. PMID:27378775

  2. Dissecting the dissociation process of RecA monomer from a nucleoprotein filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doseok; Kim, Sung Hyun; Joo, Chirlmin; Park, Jeehae; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Ha, Taekjip

    2010-03-01

    RecA protein is a DNA-dependent ATPase and plays a key role in DNA repair mechanisms. RecA proteins form a helical filament on a single-strand DNA mediating homologous recombination. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of RecA-DNA interaction is crucial for further investigation on its biochemical properties. Using a single-molecule fluorescence technique, we dissected the dissociation process with single-monomer resolution. We could resolve the existence of an intermediate state after ATP hydrolysis in the dissociation process. In the nucleotide cofactor free environment, RecA did not dissociate indicating that the bound ADP is required for the monomer dissociation. Based on our observation, we suggest a model for the RecA dissociation process coupled with ATP hydrolysis cycle.

  3. RecA interacts with Klenow and enhances fidelity of DNA synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, G; Lakshmikant, G S; Wagle, M D; Krishnamoorthy, G; Rao, B J

    1999-08-01

    To understand the molecular basis of RecA-mediated DNA-repair, we tested the replicative fidelity of the large fragment of Pol I (Klenow) in RecA-DNA complexes in vitro. Klenow synthesis was error-prone in naked DNA substrates but essentially error-free in RecA coated complexes. Escherichia coli SSB, causes no such improvement in Klenow fidelity. RecA filaments promote better exonucleolytic proofreading by Klenow than on naked DNA substrates at select sites when replication is "stalled" due to a missing dNTP. Addition of RecA to pyrene sulfonylchloride-labeled Klenow resulted in a specific increase in steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and a concomitant decrease in fluorescence lifetime. These observations suggest the possibility of a direct interaction between RecA and Klenow even in the absence of DNA which may mediate the observed improvement in Klenow fidelity.

  4. RecA: Regulation and Mechanism of a Molecular Search Engine

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jason C.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination maintains genomic integrity by repairing broken chromosomes. The broken chromosome is partially resected to produce single-stranded DNA that is used to search for homologous dsDNA. This homology-driven ‘search and rescue’ is catalyzed by a class of DNA strand exchange proteins that are defined in relation to Escherichia coli RecA, which forms a filament on single-stranded DNA. Here, we review the regulation of RecA filament assembly and the mechanism by which RecA quickly and efficiently searches for and identifies a unique homologous sequence amongst a vast excess of heterologous DNA. Given that RecA is the prototypic DNA strand exchange protein, its behavior affords insight into the actions of eukaryotic RAD51 orthologs and their regulators, BRCA2 and other tumor suppressors. PMID:27156117

  5. RecA: Regulation and Mechanism of a Molecular Search Engine.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jason C; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Homologous recombination maintains genomic integrity by repairing broken chromosomes. The broken chromosome is partially resected to produce single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that is used to search for homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). This homology driven 'search and rescue' is catalyzed by a class of DNA strand exchange proteins that are defined in relation to Escherichia coli RecA, which forms a filament on ssDNA. Here, we review the regulation of RecA filament assembly and the mechanism by which RecA quickly and efficiently searches for and identifies a unique homologous sequence among a vast excess of heterologous DNA. Given that RecA is the prototypic DNA strand exchange protein, its behavior affords insight into the actions of eukaryotic RAD51 orthologs and their regulators, BRCA2 and other tumor suppressors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomolecular recognition ability of RecA proteins for DNA on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Oura, Shusuke; Ito, Masahiro; Nii, Daisuke; Homma, Yoshikazu; Umemura, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    We examined the biomolecular recognition ability of RecA proteins using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) wrapped with a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecule as a mimic for the usual ssDNA molecules. The ssDNA-SWNT hybrids showed larger diameters compared to those of the usual ssDNA molecules. As a result, RecA molecules bound to the ssDNA-SWNTs, as observed using atomic force microscopy and agarose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, when carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) was used rather than ssDNA, the RecA molecules did not bind to the CMC-SWNT hybrids. Our results indicate that RecA molecules recognize ssDNA on SWNT surfaces as DNA molecules through their biomolecular recognition ability.

  7. Unfinished business: Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) for post-1971 U.S. uranium underground miners.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Gary E; Dawson, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    Congress enacted the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) in 1990 and amended it in 2000. Included for compensation were underground uranium miners who developed health problems related to radiation exposures. Neither the 1990 Act nor the 2000 Amendments covered post-1971 workers. In this article, we will examine regulatory history and scientific evidence used for the passage of RECA for the pre-1972 miners and will present evidence supporting the inclusion of the post-1971 workers.

  8. RecA protein self-assembly. Multiple discrete aggregation states.

    PubMed

    Brenner, S L; Zlotnick, A; Griffith, J D

    1988-12-20

    Light scattering, sedimentation and electron microscopy have been used to investigate the aggregation states of highly purified RecA protein in solution. We show that RecA protein will self-assemble into a discrete series of quaternary structures depending upon protein concentration, ionic environment, and nucleotide cofactors. In a stock solution at moderate concentration (10 to 50 microM) RecA protein exists as small particles approximately 4 nm in diameter, larger particles approximately 12 nm in diameter (most probably rings of RecA protein), 10 nm diameter rods varying from 50 to 200 nm in length, and finally as much larger bundles of rods. The addition of monovalent salt shifts the distribution of RecA protein between its various oligomeric states. Increasing protein concentration favors more highly aggregated structures. At a given protein concentration, addition of mM levels of MgCl2 promotes the rapid formation of rods and slow formation of bundles. Under conditions typical of in vitro strand exchange reactions, RecA protein was found to exist as a mixture of rods and 12 nm particles with relatively few monomers.

  9. Genetic improvement of Escherichia coli for ethanol production: Chromosomal integration of Zymomonas mobilis genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase II

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Beall, D.S.; Mejia, J.P.; Shanmugam, K.T.; Ingram, L.O. )

    1991-04-01

    Zymomonas mobilis genes for pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adhB) were integrated into the Escherichia coli chromosome within or near the pyruvate formate-lyase gene (pfl). Integration improved the stability of the Z. mobilis genes in E. coli, but further selection was required to increase expression. Spontaneous mutants were selected for resistance to high levels of chloramphenicol that also expressed high levels of the Z. mobilis genes. Analogous mutants were selected for increased expression of alcohol dehydrogenase on aldehyde indicator plates. These mutants were functionally equivalent to the previous plasmid-based strains for the fermentation of xylose and glucose to ethanol. Ethanol concentrations of 54.4 and 41.6 g/liter were obtained from 10% glucose and 8% xylose, respectively. The efficiency of conversion exceeded theoretical limits (0.51 g of ethanol/g of sugar) on the basis of added sugars because of the additional production of ethanol from the catabolism of complex nutrients. Further mutations were introduced to inactivate succinate production (frd) and to block homologous recombination (recA).

  10. The RecD subunit of the Escherichia coli RecBCD enzyme inhibits RecA loading, homologous recombination, and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, S K; Taylor, A F; Smith, G R

    2000-06-20

    The RecBCD enzyme is required for homologous recombination and DNA repair in Escherichia coli. The structure and function of RecBCD enzyme is altered on its interaction with the recombination hotspot Chi (5'-GCTGGTGG-3'). It has been hypothesized that the RecD subunit plays a role in Chi-dependent regulation of enzyme activity [Thaler, D. S., Sampson, E., Siddiqi, I., Rosenberg, S. M., Stahl, F. W. & Stahl, M. (1988) in Mechanisms and Consequences of DNA Damage Processing, eds. Friedberg, E. & Hanawalt, P. (Liss, New York), pp. 413-422; Churchill, J. J., Anderson, D. G. & Kowalczykowski, S. C. (1999) Genes Dev. 13, 901-911]. We tested the hypothesis that the RecD subunit inhibits recombination by deleting recD from the nuclease- and recombination-deficient mutant recB(D1080A)CD. We report here that the resulting strain, recB(D1080A)C, was proficient for recombination and DNA repair. Recombination proficiency was accompanied by a change in enzyme activity: RecB(D1080A)C enzyme loaded RecA protein onto DNA during DNA unwinding whereas RecB(D1080A)CD enzyme did not. Together, these genetic and biochemical results demonstrate that RecA loading by RecBCD enzyme is required for recombination in E. coli cells and suggest that RecD interferes with the enzyme domain required for its loading. A nuclease-dependent signal appears to be required for a change in RecD that allows RecA loading. Because RecA loading is not observed with wild-type RecBCD enzyme until it acts at a Chi site, our observations support the view that RecD inhibits recombination until the enzyme acts at Chi.

  11. The RecD subunit of the Escherichia coli RecBCD enzyme inhibits RecA loading, homologous recombination, and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Susan K.; Taylor, Andrew F.; Smith, Gerald R.

    2000-01-01

    The RecBCD enzyme is required for homologous recombination and DNA repair in Escherichia coli. The structure and function of RecBCD enzyme is altered on its interaction with the recombination hotspot Chi (5′-GCTGGTGG-3′). It has been hypothesized that the RecD subunit plays a role in Chi-dependent regulation of enzyme activity [Thaler, D. S., Sampson, E., Siddiqi, I., Rosenberg, S. M., Stahl, F. W. & Stahl, M. (1988) in Mechanisms and Consequences of DNA Damage Processing, eds. Friedberg, E. & Hanawalt, P. (Liss, New York), pp. 413–422; Churchill, J. J., Anderson, D. G. & Kowalczykowski, S. C. (1999) Genes Dev. 13, 901–911]. We tested the hypothesis that the RecD subunit inhibits recombination by deleting recD from the nuclease- and recombination-deficient mutant recBD1080ACD. We report here that the resulting strain, recBD1080AC, was proficient for recombination and DNA repair. Recombination proficiency was accompanied by a change in enzyme activity: RecBD1080AC enzyme loaded RecA protein onto DNA during DNA unwinding whereas RecBD1080ACD enzyme did not. Together, these genetic and biochemical results demonstrate that RecA loading by RecBCD enzyme is required for recombination in E. coli cells and suggest that RecD interferes with the enzyme domain required for its loading. A nuclease-dependent signal appears to be required for a change in RecD that allows RecA loading. Because RecA loading is not observed with wild-type RecBCD enzyme until it acts at a Chi site, our observations support the view that RecD inhibits recombination until the enzyme acts at Chi. PMID:10840065

  12. Genes involved in transitory recombination between phage M13 and plasmid pHV33.

    PubMed Central

    Dagert, M; Ehrlich, S D

    1984-01-01

    Plasmid pHV33 and phage M13 combine in Escherichia coli cells to form a chimera, which decombines to regenerate two parental genomes. Combination can occur via two genetic pathways, one defined by the recBC genes, the other by recA, recF and possibly recL genes. Decombination can also occur via two pathways, one defined again by the recBC genes, the other by a gene not identified, but active only in the absence of the recL gene product. PMID:6323172

  13. A single mutation, RecB(D1080A,) eliminates RecA protein loading but not Chi recognition by RecBCD enzyme.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D G; Churchill, J J; Kowalczykowski, S C

    1999-09-17

    Homologous recombination and double-stranded DNA break repair in Escherichia coli are initiated by the multifunctional RecBCD enzyme. After binding to a double-stranded DNA end, the RecBCD enzyme unwinds and degrades the DNA processively. This processing is regulated by the recombination hot spot, Chi (chi: 5'-GCTGGTGG-3'), which induces a switch in the polarity of DNA degradation and activates RecBCD enzyme to coordinate the loading of the DNA strand exchange protein, RecA, onto the single-stranded DNA products of unwinding. Recently, a single mutation in RecB, Asp-1080 --> Ala, was shown to create an enzyme (RecB(D1080A)CD) that is a processive helicase but not a nuclease. Here we show that the RecB(D1080A)CD enzyme is also unable to coordinate the loading of the RecA protein, regardless of whether chi sites are present in the DNA. However, the RecB(D1080A)CD enzyme does respond to chi sites by inactivating in a chi-dependent manner. These data define a locus of the RecBCD enzyme that is essential not only for nuclease function but also for the coordination of RecA protein loading.

  14. Identification of the RecA protein-loading domain of RecBCD enzyme.

    PubMed

    Churchill, J J; Kowalczykowski, S C

    2000-03-31

    Genetic recombination in Escherichia coli is stimulated by the recombination hotspot Chi (chi), a regulatory element that modifies the activities of the RecBCD enzyme and leads to loading of the DNA strand exchange protein, RecA, onto the chi-containing DNA strand. The RecBC enzyme, which lacks the RecD subunit, loads RecA protein constitutively, in a manner that is independent of chi. Using a truncated RecBC enzyme lacking the 30 kDa C-terminal domain of the RecB subunit, we show that this domain is necessary for RecA protein-loading. We propose that this domain harbors a site that interacts with RecA protein, recruiting it to single-stranded DNA during unwinding. This ability of a translocating enzyme to deliver material (RecA protein) to a specific target site (the chi sequence) parallels that of other cellular motor proteins. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  15. An integrative approach to the study of filamentous oligomeric assemblies, with application to RecA.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Benjamin; Ezelin, Johann; Poulain, Pierre; Saladin, Adrien; Zacharias, Martin; Robert, Charles H; Prévost, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Oligomeric macromolecules in the cell self-organize into a wide variety of geometrical motifs such as helices, rings or linear filaments. The recombinase proteins involved in homologous recombination present many such assembly motifs. Here, we examine in particular the polymorphic characteristics of RecA, the most studied member of the recombinase family, using an integrative approach that relates local modes of monomer/monomer association to the global architecture of their screw-type organization. In our approach, local modes of association are sampled via docking or Monte Carlo simulations. This enables shedding new light on fiber morphologies that may be adopted by the RecA protein. Two distinct RecA helical morphologies, the so-called "extended" and "compressed" forms, are known to play a role in homologous recombination. We investigate the variability within each form in terms of helical parameters and steric accessibility. We also address possible helical discontinuities in RecA filaments due to multiple monomer-monomer association modes. By relating local interface organization to global filament morphology, the strategies developed here to study RecA self-assembly are particularly well suited to other DNA-binding proteins and to filamentous protein assemblies in general.

  16. An Integrative Approach to the Study of Filamentous Oligomeric Assemblies, with Application to RecA

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Benjamin; Ezelin, Johann; Poulain, Pierre; Saladin, Adrien; Zacharias, Martin; Robert, Charles H.; Prévost, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Oligomeric macromolecules in the cell self-organize into a wide variety of geometrical motifs such as helices, rings or linear filaments. The recombinase proteins involved in homologous recombination present many such assembly motifs. Here, we examine in particular the polymorphic characteristics of RecA, the most studied member of the recombinase family, using an integrative approach that relates local modes of monomer/monomer association to the global architecture of their screw-type organization. In our approach, local modes of association are sampled via docking or Monte Carlo simulations. This enables shedding new light on fiber morphologies that may be adopted by the RecA protein. Two distinct RecA helical morphologies, the so-called “extended” and “compressed” forms, are known to play a role in homologous recombination. We investigate the variability within each form in terms of helical parameters and steric accessibility. We also address possible helical discontinuities in RecA filaments due to multiple monomer-monomer association modes. By relating local interface organization to global filament morphology, the strategies developed here to study RecA self-assembly are particularly well suited to other DNA-binding proteins and to filamentous protein assemblies in general. PMID:25785454

  17. Molecular cloning of a recA-like gene from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Owttrim, G W; Coleman, J R

    1987-01-01

    A recA-like gene isolated from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis was cloned and partially characterized. When introduced into Escherichia coli recA mutants, the 7.5-kilobase-pair plasmid-borne DNA insert restored resistance to methyl methanesulfonate and UV irradiation, as well as recombination proficiency when measured by Hfr-mediated conjugation. The cyanobacterial recA gene restored spontaneous but not mitomycin C-induced prophage production. Restriction analysis and subcloning yielded a 1.5-kilobase-pair Sau3A fragment which also restored methylmethane sulfonate resistance and coded for a 38- to 40-kilodalton polypeptide when expressed in an in vitro transcription-translation system. Images PMID:3032896

  18. Molecular cloning of a recA-like gene from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Owttrim, G.W.; Coleman, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    A recA-like gene isolated from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis was cloned and partially characterized. When introduced into Escherichia coli recA mutants, the 7.5-kilobase-pair plasmid-borne DNA insert restored resistance to methyl methanesulfonate and UV irradiation, as well as recombination proficiency when measured by Hfr-mediated conjugation. The cyanobacterial recA gene restored spontaneous but not mitomycin C-induced prophage production. Restriction analysis and subcloning yielded a 1.5-kilobase-pair Sau3A fragment which also restored methylmethane sulfonate resistance and coded for a 38- to 40-kilodalton polypeptide when expressed in an in vitro transcription-translation system.

  19. Arrangement of RecA protein in its active filament determined by polarized-light spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Morimatsu, Katsumi; Takahashi, Masayuki; Nordén, Bengt

    2002-01-01

    Linear dichroism (LD) polarized-light spectroscopy is used to determine the arrangement of RecA in its large filamentous complex with DNA, active in homologous recombination. Angular orientation data for two tryptophan and seven tyrosine residues, deduced from differential LD of wild-type RecA vs. mutants that were engineered to attenuate the UV absorption of selected residues, revealed a rotation by some 40° of the RecA subunits relative to the arrangement in crystal without DNA. In addition, conformational changes are observed for tyrosine residues assigned to be involved in DNA binding and in RecA–RecA contacts, thus potentially related to the global structure of the filament and its biological function. The presented spectroscopic approach, called “Site-Specific Linear Dichroism” (SSLD), may find forceful applications also to other biologically important fibrous complexes not amenable to x-ray crystallographic or NMR structural analysis. PMID:12193645

  20. Optimal conditions for decorating outer surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes with RecA proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we estimated the optimal reaction conditions for decorating the outer surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with RecA proteins by comparison with hybrids of RecA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). To react SWNTs with RecA proteins, we first prepared ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. The heights of the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids increased as the amount of RecA used in the reaction increased, as determined from atomic force microscopy images. We further confirmed the increasing adsorption of RecA proteins onto ssDNA on SWNT surfaces by agarose gel electrophoresis. These results suggest that the combination of RecA proteins and ssDNA-SWNT hybrids forms RecA-ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. We also successfully controlled the amount of RecA adsorbed on the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. Our results thus indicate the optimized reaction conditions for decorating the outer surface of SWNTs with RecA proteins, which is the key to the development of novel biosensors and nanomaterial-based bioelectronics.

  1. Helicobacter pylori AddAB helicase-nuclease and RecA promote recombination-related DNA repair and survival during stomach colonization

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Susan K.; Fero, Jutta; Hansen, Lori M.; Cromie, Gareth A.; Solnick, Jay V.; Smith, Gerald R.; Salama, Nina R.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Helicobacter pylori colonization of the human stomach is characterized by profound disease-causing inflammation. Bacterial proteins that detoxify reactive oxygen species or recognize damaged DNA adducts promote infection, suggesting that H. pylori requires DNA damage-repair for successful in vivo colonization. The molecular mechanisms of repair remain unknown. We identified homologs of the AddAB class of helicase-nuclease enzymes, related to the Escherichia coli RecBCD enzyme, which, with RecA, is required for repair of DNA breaks and homologous recombination. H. pylori mutants lacking addA or addB genes lack detectable ATP-dependent nuclease activity, and the cloned H. pylori addAB genes restore both nuclease and helicase activities to an E. coli recBCD deletion mutant. H. pylori addAB and recA mutants have a reduced capacity for stomach colonization. These mutants are sensitive to DNA damaging agents and have reduced frequencies of apparent gene conversion between homologous genes encoding outer membrane proteins. Our results reveal requirements for double-strand break repair and recombination during both acute and chronic phases of H. pylori stomach infection. PMID:18573180

  2. Regulation of photoreceptor gene transcription via a highly conserved transcriptional regulatory element by vsx gene products

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Comiskey, Daniel F.; Kelly, Lisa E.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The photoreceptor conserved element-1 (PCE-1) sequence is found in the transcriptional regulatory regions of many genes expressed in photoreceptors. The retinal homeobox (Rx or Rax) gene product functions by binding to PCE-1 sites. However, other transcriptional regulators have also been reported to bind to PCE-1. One of these, vsx2, is expressed in retinal progenitor and bipolar cells. The purpose of this study is to identify Xenopus laevis vsx gene products and characterize vsx gene product expression and function with respect to the PCE-1 site. Methods X. laevis vsx gene products were amplified with PCR. Expression patterns were determined with in situ hybridization using whole or sectioned X. laevis embryos and digoxigenin- or fluorescein-labeled antisense riboprobes. DNA binding characteristics of the vsx gene products were analyzed with electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) using in vitro translated proteins and radiolabeled oligonucleotide probes. Gene transactivation assays were performed using luciferase-based reporters and in vitro transcribed effector gene products, injected into X. laevis embryos. Results We identified one vsx1 and two vsx2 gene products. The two vsx2 gene products are generated by alternate mRNA splicing. We verified that these gene products are expressed in the developing retina and that expression resolves into distinct cell types in the mature retina. Finally, we found that vsx gene products can bind the PCE-1 site in vitro and that the two vsx2 isoforms have different gene transactivation activities. Conclusions vsx gene products are expressed in the developing and mature neural retina. vsx gene products can bind the PCE-1 site in vitro and influence the expression of a rhodopsin promoter-luciferase reporter gene. The two isoforms of vsx have different gene transactivation activities in this reporter gene system. PMID:28003732

  3. RecA Protein Plays a Role in the Chemotactic Response and Chemoreceptor Clustering of Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Mayola, Albert; Irazoki, Oihane; Martínez, Ignacio A.; Petrov, Dmitri; Menolascina, Filippo; Stocker, Roman; Reyes-Darias, José A.; Krell, Tino; Barbé, Jordi; Campoy, Susana

    2014-01-01

    The RecA protein is the main bacterial recombinase and the activator of the SOS system. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium, RecA is also essential for swarming, a flagellar-driven surface translocation mechanism widespread among bacteria. In this work, the direct interaction between RecA and the CheW coupling protein was confirmed, and the motility and chemotactic phenotype of a S. Typhimurium ΔrecA mutant was characterized through microfluidics, optical trapping, and quantitative capillary assays. The results demonstrate the tight association of RecA with the chemotaxis pathway and also its involvement in polar chemoreceptor cluster formation. RecA is therefore necessary for standard flagellar rotation switching, implying its essential role not only in swarming motility but also in the normal chemotactic response of S. Typhimurium. PMID:25147953

  4. Production and pathogenicity of hepatitis C virus core gene products

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Chun; Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Yang, Chee-Hing; Lo, Shih-Yen

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver diseases, including steatosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and its infection is also associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. HCV, belonging to the Flaviviridae family, is a small enveloped virus whose positive-stranded RNA genome encoding a polyprotein. The HCV core protein is cleaved first at residue 191 by the host signal peptidase and further cleaved by the host signal peptide peptidase at about residue 177 to generate the mature core protein (a.a. 1-177) and the cleaved peptide (a.a. 178-191). Core protein could induce insulin resistance, steatosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma through various mechanisms. The peptide (a.a. 178-191) may play a role in the immune response. The polymorphism of this peptide is associated with the cellular lipid drop accumulation, contributing to steatosis development. In addition to the conventional open reading frame (ORF), in the +1 frame, an ORF overlaps with the core protein-coding sequence and encodes the alternative reading frame proteins (ARFP or core+1). ARFP/core+1/F protein could enhance hepatocyte growth and may regulate iron metabolism. In this review, we briefly summarized the current knowledge regarding the production of different core gene products and their roles in viral pathogenesis. PMID:24966583

  5. Bacillus subtilis RecA with DprA-SsbA antagonizes RecX function during natural transformation.

    PubMed

    Le, Shimin; Serrano, Ester; Kawamura, Ryo; Carrasco, Begoña; Yan, Jie; Alonso, Juan C

    2017-09-06

    Bacillus subtilis DprA and RecX proteins, which interact with RecA, are crucial for efficient chromosomal and plasmid transformation. We showed that RecA, in the rATP·Mg2+ bound form (RecA·ATP), could not compete with RecX, SsbA or SsbB for assembly onto single-stranded (ss)DNA, but RecA·dATP partially displaced these proteins from ssDNA. RecX promoted reversible depolymerization of preformed RecA·ATP filaments. The two-component DprA-SsbA mediator reversed the RecX negative effect on RecA filament extension, but not DprA or DprA and SsbB. In the presence of DprA-SsbA, RecX added prior to RecA·ATP inhibited DNA strand exchange, but this inhibition was reversed when RecX was added after RecA. We propose that RecA nucleation is more sensitive to RecX action than is RecA filament growth. DprA-SsbA facilitates formation of an active RecA filament that directly antagonizes the inhibitory effects of RecX. RecX and DprA enable chromosomal transformation by altering RecA filament dynamics. DprA-SsbA and RecX proteins constitute a new regulatory network of RecA function. DprA-SsbA contributes to the formation of an active RecA filament and directly antagonizes the inhibitory effects of RecX during natural transformation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. MG428 is a novel positive regulator of recombination that triggers mgpB and mgpC gene variation in Mycoplasma genitalium.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Raul; Totten, Patricia A

    2014-10-01

    The human pathogen Mycoplasma genitalium employs homologous recombination to generate antigenic diversity in the immunodominant MgpB and MgpC proteins. Only recently, some of the molecular factors involved in this process have been characterized, but nothing is known about its regulation. Here, we show that M. genitalium expresses N-terminally truncated RecA isoforms via alternative translation initiation, but only the full-length protein is essential for gene variation. We also demonstrate that overexpression of MG428 positively regulates the expression of recombination genes, including recA, ruvA, ruvB and ORF2, a gene of unknown function co-transcribed with ruvAB. The co-ordinated induction of these genes correlated with an increase of mgpBC gene variation. In contrast, cells lacking MG428 were unable to generate variants despite expressing normal levels of RecA. Similarly, deletion analyses of the recA upstream region defined sequences required for gene variation without abolishing RecA expression. The requirement of these sequences is consistent with the presence of promoter elements associated with MG428-dependent recA induction. Sequences upstream of recA also influence the relative abundance of RecA isoforms, possibly through translational regulation. Overall, these results suggest that MG428 is a positive regulator of recombination and that precise control of recA expression is required to initiate mgpBC variation.

  7. RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant sisters during DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J

    2014-02-13

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant sister loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one sister can be repaired efficiently using distant sister homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut sister. After sister locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in sister pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions.

  8. RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant sisters during DNA break repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J.

    2014-02-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant sister loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one sister can be repaired efficiently using distant sister homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut sister. After sister locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in sister pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions.

  9. Combining Hierarchical and Associative Gene Ontology Relations with Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2007-03-01

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the Gene Ontology, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology (GO) annotations associated with the genes or gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene subontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene subontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy, and demonstrate that further improvements can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  10. Correlating information contents of gene ontology terms to infer semantic similarity of gene products.

    PubMed

    Gan, Mingxin

    2014-01-01

    Successful applications of the gene ontology to the inference of functional relationships between gene products in recent years have raised the need for computational methods to automatically calculate semantic similarity between gene products based on semantic similarity of gene ontology terms. Nevertheless, existing methods, though having been widely used in a variety of applications, may significantly overestimate semantic similarity between genes that are actually not functionally related, thereby yielding misleading results in applications. To overcome this limitation, we propose to represent a gene product as a vector that is composed of information contents of gene ontology terms annotated for the gene product, and we suggest calculating similarity between two gene products as the relatedness of their corresponding vectors using three measures: Pearson's correlation coefficient, cosine similarity, and the Jaccard index. We focus on the biological process domain of the gene ontology and annotations of yeast proteins to study the effectiveness of the proposed measures. Results show that semantic similarity scores calculated using the proposed measures are more consistent with known biological knowledge than those derived using a list of existing methods, suggesting the effectiveness of our method in characterizing functional relationships between gene products.

  11. Determination and validation of principal gene products

    PubMed Central

    Tress, Michael L.; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Frankish, Adam; López, Gonzalo; Goldman, Nick; Löytynoja, Ari; Massingham, Tim; Pardi, Fabio; Whelan, Simon; Harrow, Jennifer; Valencia, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Motivation Alternative splicing has the potential to generate a wide range of protein isoforms. For many computational applications and for experimental research, it is important to be able to concentrate on the isoform that retains the core biological function. For many genes this is far from clear. Results We have combined five methods into a pipeline that allows us to detect the principal variant for a gene. Most of the methods were based on conservation between species, at the level of both gene and protein. The five methods used were the conservation of exonic structure, the detection of non-neutral evolution, the conservation of functional residues, the existence of a known protein structure and the abundance of vertebrate orthologues. The pipeline was able to determine a principal isoform for 83% of a set of well-annotated genes with multiple variants. PMID:18006548

  12. Integrating Ontological Knowledge and Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-08

    With the rising influence of the Gene On-tology, new approaches have emerged where the similarity between genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology code annotations associ-ated with them. So far, these approaches have solely relied on the knowledge en-coded in the Gene Ontology and the gene annotations associated with the Gene On-tology database. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that improvements to these approaches can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  13. E. coli recA protein possesses a strand separating activity on short duplex DNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, M; Riboli, B; Magni, G

    1985-01-01

    RecA protein was found to catalyze the dissociation of the strands of a DNA substrate consisting of a 20-nucleotide primer annealed to circular single-stranded M13mp DNA. The strand separation reaction requires ATP hydrolysis and the presence of single-stranded DNA flanking the duplex DNA region to be unwound. RecA-catalyzed strand separation is effective only for very short duplexes, not exceeding 30 bp, and is not stimulated by single-stranded DNA-binding protein. These results are consistent with the ability of recA protein to disrupt regions of secondary structure in single-stranded DNA and to incorporate large non-homologies into heteroduplex DNA. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 3. PMID:3905387

  14. DNA RECOMBINATION. Base triplet stepping by the Rad51/RecA family of recombinases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja Yil; Terakawa, Tsuyoshi; Qi, Zhi; Steinfeld, Justin B; Redding, Sy; Kwon, YoungHo; Gaines, William A; Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C

    2015-08-28

    DNA strand exchange plays a central role in genetic recombination across all kingdoms of life, but the physical basis for these reactions remains poorly defined. Using single-molecule imaging, we found that bacterial RecA and eukaryotic Rad51 and Dmc1 all stabilize strand exchange intermediates in precise three-nucleotide steps. Each step coincides with an energetic signature (0.3 kBT) that is conserved from bacteria to humans. Triplet recognition is strictly dependent on correct Watson-Crick pairing. Rad51, RecA, and Dmc1 can all step over mismatches, but only Dmc1 can stabilize mismatched triplets. This finding provides insight into why eukaryotes have evolved a meiosis-specific recombinase. We propose that canonical Watson-Crick base triplets serve as the fundamental unit of pairing interactions during DNA recombination. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Differential requirements of two recA mutants for constitutive SOS expression in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Long, Jarukit Edward; Renzette, Nicholas; Centore, Richard C; Sandler, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    Repairing DNA damage begins with its detection and is often followed by elicitation of a cellular response. In E. coli, RecA polymerizes on ssDNA produced after DNA damage and induces the SOS Response. The RecA-DNA filament is an allosteric effector of LexA auto-proteolysis. LexA is the repressor of the SOS Response. Not all RecA-DNA filaments, however, lead to an SOS Response. Certain recA mutants express the SOS Response (recA(C)) in the absence of external DNA damage in log phase cells. Genetic analysis of two recA(C) mutants was used to determine the mechanism of constitutive SOS (SOS(C)) expression in a population of log phase cells using fluorescence of single cells carrying an SOS reporter system (sulAp-gfp). SOS(C) expression in recA4142 mutants was dependent on its initial level of transcription, recBCD, recFOR, recX, dinI, xthA and the type of medium in which the cells were grown. SOS(C) expression in recA730 mutants was affected by none of the mutations or conditions tested above. It is concluded that not all recA(C) alleles cause SOS(C) expression by the same mechanism. It is hypothesized that RecA4142 is loaded on to a double-strand end of DNA and that the RecA filament is stabilized by the presence of DinI and destabilized by RecX. RecFOR regulate the activity of RecX to destabilize the RecA filament. RecA730 causes SOS(C) expression by binding to ssDNA in a mechanism yet to be determined.

  16. Roles of PprA, IrrE, and RecA in the resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to germicidal and environmentally relevant UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Bauermeister, Anja; Bentchikou, Esma; Moeller, Ralf; Rettberg, Petra

    2009-12-01

    To study the role of different DNA repair genes in the resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to mono- and polychromatic UV radiation, wild-type strain and knockout mutants in RecA, PprA, and IrrE of D. radiodurans were irradiated with UV-C (254 nm), UV-(A + B) (280-400 nm) and UV-A (315-400 nm) radiation, and survival was monitored. The strain deficient in recA was highly sensitive to UV-C radiation compared to the wild-type, but showed no loss of resistance against irradiation with UV-(A + B) and UV-A, while pprA and irrE-deficient strains exhibited elevated sensitivity to UV-A and UV-(A + B) radiation. These results suggest that the repair of DNA double-strand breaks is essential after treatment with highly energetic UV-C radiation, whereas protection from oxidative stress may play a greater role in resistance to environmentally relevant UV radiation.

  17. On the Mechanism of Homology Search by RecA Protein Filaments.

    PubMed

    Kochugaeva, Maria P; Shvets, Alexey A; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2017-03-14

    Genetic stability is a key factor in maintaining, survival, and reproduction of biological cells. It relies on many processes, but one of the most important is a homologous recombination, in which the repair of breaks in double-stranded DNA molecules is taking place with a help of several specific proteins. In bacteria, this task is accomplished by RecA proteins that are active as nucleoprotein filaments formed on single-stranded segments of DNA. A critical step in the homologous recombination is a search for a corresponding homologous region on DNA, which is called a homology search. Recent single-molecule experiments clarified some aspects of this process, but its molecular mechanisms remain not well understood. We developed a quantitative theoretical approach to analyze the homology search. It is based on a discrete-state stochastic model that takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes in the system. Using a method of first-passage processes, a full dynamic description of the homology search is presented. It is found that the search dynamics depends on the degree of extension of DNA molecules and on the size of RecA nucleoprotein filaments, in agreement with experimental single-molecule measurements of DNA pairing by RecA proteins. Our theoretical calculations, supported by extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations, provide a molecular description of the mechanisms of the homology search. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. On the Mechanism of Homology Search by RecA Protein Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochugaeva, Maria P.; Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2017-03-01

    Genetic stability is a key factor in maintaining, survival and reproduction of biological cells. It relies on many processes, but one of the most important is a {\\it homologous recombination}, in which the repair of breaks in double-stranded DNA molecules is taking place with a help of several specific proteins. In bacteria this task is accomplished by RecA proteins that are active as nucleoprotein filaments formed on single-stranded segments of DNA. A critical step in the homologous recombination is a search for a corresponding homologous region on DNA, which is called a {\\it homology search}. Recent single-molecule experiments clarified some aspects of this process, but its molecular mechanisms remain not well understood. We developed a quantitative theoretical approach to analyze the homology search. It is based on a discrete-state stochastic model that takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes in the system. Using a method of first-passage processes, a full dynamic description of the homology search is presented. It is found that the search dynamics depends on the degree of extension of DNA molecules and on the size of RecA nucleoprotein filaments, in agreement with experimental single-molecule measurements of DNA pairing by RecA proteins. Our theoretical calculations, supported by extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations, provide a molecular description of the mechanisms of the homology search.

  19. Use of RecA fusion proteins to induce genomic modifications in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hsin-Kai; Essner, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial recombinase RecA forms a nucleic acid-protein filament on single-stranded (ss) DNA during the repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) that efficiently undergoes a homology search and engages in pairing with the complementary DNA sequence. We utilized the pairing activity of RecA–DNA filaments to tether biochemical activities to specific chromosomal sites. Different filaments with chimeric RecA proteins were tested for the ability to induce loss of heterozygosity at the golden locus in zebrafish after injection at the one-cell stage. A fusion protein between RecA containing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the DNA-binding domain of Gal4 (NLS-RecA-Gal4) displayed the most activity. Our results demonstrate that complementary ssDNA filaments as short as 60 nucleotides coated with NLS-RecA-Gal4 protein are able to cause loss of heterozygosity in ∼3% of the injected embryos. We demonstrate that lesions in ∼9% of the F0 zebrafish are transmitted to subsequent generations as large chromosomal deletions. Co-injection of linear DNA with the NLS-RecA-Gal4 DNA filaments promotes the insertion of the DNA into targeted genomic locations. Our data support a model whereby NLS-RecA-Gal4 DNA filaments bind to complementary target sites on chromatin and stall DNA replication forks, resulting in a DNA DSB. PMID:21266475

  20. ATPase activity tightly regulates RecA nucleofilaments to promote homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bailin; Zhang, Dapeng; Li, Chengmin; Yuan, Zheng; Yu, Fangzhi; Zhong, Shangwei; Jiang, Guibin; Yang, Yun-Gui; Le, X Chris; Weinfeld, Michael; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Hailin

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR), catalyzed in an evolutionarily conserved manner by active RecA/Rad51 nucleofilaments, maintains genomic integrity and promotes biological evolution and diversity. The structures of RecA/Rad51 nucleofilaments provide information critical for the entire HR process. By exploiting a unique capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence polarization assay, we have discovered an active form of RecA nucleofilament, stimulated by ATP hydrolysis, that contains mainly unbound nucleotide sites. This finding was confirmed by a nuclease protection assay and electron microscopy (EM) imaging. We further found that these RecA-unsaturated filaments promote strand exchange in vitro and HR in vivo. RecA mutants (P67D and P67E), which only form RecA-unsaturated nucleofilaments, were able to mediate HR in vitro and in vivo, but mutants favoring the formation of the saturated nucleofilaments failed to support HR. We thus present a new model for RecA-mediated HR in which RecA utilizes its intrinsic DNA binding-dependent ATPase activity to remodel the nucleofilaments to a less saturated form and thereby promote HR. PMID:28101376

  1. Use of RecA fusion proteins to induce genomic modifications in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hsin-Kai; Essner, Jeffrey J

    2011-05-01

    The bacterial recombinase RecA forms a nucleic acid-protein filament on single-stranded (ss) DNA during the repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) that efficiently undergoes a homology search and engages in pairing with the complementary DNA sequence. We utilized the pairing activity of RecA-DNA filaments to tether biochemical activities to specific chromosomal sites. Different filaments with chimeric RecA proteins were tested for the ability to induce loss of heterozygosity at the golden locus in zebrafish after injection at the one-cell stage. A fusion protein between RecA containing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the DNA-binding domain of Gal4 (NLS-RecA-Gal4) displayed the most activity. Our results demonstrate that complementary ssDNA filaments as short as 60 nucleotides coated with NLS-RecA-Gal4 protein are able to cause loss of heterozygosity in ∼3% of the injected embryos. We demonstrate that lesions in ∼9% of the F0 zebrafish are transmitted to subsequent generations as large chromosomal deletions. Co-injection of linear DNA with the NLS-RecA-Gal4 DNA filaments promotes the insertion of the DNA into targeted genomic locations. Our data support a model whereby NLS-RecA-Gal4 DNA filaments bind to complementary target sites on chromatin and stall DNA replication forks, resulting in a DNA DSB.

  2. The effects of buffers and pH on the thermal stability, unfolding and substrate binding of RecA.

    PubMed

    Metrick, Michael A; Temple, Joshua E; MacDonald, Gina

    2013-12-31

    The Escherichia coli protein RecA is responsible for catalysis of the strand transfer reaction used in DNA repair and recombination. Previous studies in our lab have shown that high concentrations of salts stabilize RecA in a reverse-anionic Hofmeister series. Here we investigate how changes in pH and buffer alter the thermal unfolding and cofactor binding. RecA in 20mM HEPES, MES, Tris and phosphate buffers was studied in the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 using circular dichroism (CD), infrared (IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies. The results show all of the buffers studied stabilize RecA up to 50°C above the Tris melting temperature and influence RecA's ability to nucleate on double-stranded DNA. Infrared and CD spectra of RecA in the different buffers do not show that secondary structural changes are associated with increased stability or decreased ability to nucleate on dsDNA. These results suggest the differences in stability arise from decreasing positive charge and/or buffer interactions. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanical force antagonizes the inhibitory effects of RecX on RecA filament formation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Le, Shimin; Chen, Hu; Zhang, Xinghua; Chen, Jin; Patil, K Neelakanteshwar; Muniyappa, Kalappa; Yan, Jie

    2014-10-29

    Efficient bacterial recombinational DNA repair involves rapid cycles of RecA filament assembly and disassembly. The RecX protein plays a crucial inhibitory role in RecA filament formation and stability. As the broken ends of DNA are tethered during homologous search, RecA filaments assembled at the ends are likely subject to force. In this work, we investigated the interplay between RecX and force on RecA filament formation and stability. Using magnetic tweezers, at single molecular level, we found that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt) RecX could catalyze stepwise de-polymerization of preformed MtRecA filament in the presence of ATP hydrolysis at low forces (<7 pN). However, applying larger forces antagonized the inhibitory effects of MtRecX, and a partially de-polymerized MtRecA filament could re-polymerize in the presence of MtRecX, which cannot be explained by previous models. Theoretical analysis of force-dependent conformational free energies of naked ssDNA and RecA nucleoprotein filament suggests that mechanical force stabilizes RecA filament, which provides a possible mechanism for the observation. As the antagonizing effect of force on the inhibitory function of RecX takes place in a physiological range; these findings broadly suggest a potential mechanosensitive regulation during homologous recombination.

  4. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Bacterial Conjugation Factor PsiB, a Negative Regulator of RecA

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Vessela; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; George, Nicholas P.; McCaslin, Darrell; Cox, Michael M.; Keck, James L.

    2012-03-16

    During bacterial conjugation, genetic material from one cell is transferred to another as single-stranded DNA. The introduction of single-stranded DNA into the recipient cell would ordinarily trigger a potentially deleterious transcriptional response called SOS, which is initiated by RecA protein filaments formed on the DNA. During F plasmid conjugation, however, the SOS response is suppressed by PsiB, an F-plasmid-encoded protein that binds and sequesters free RecA to prevent filament formation. Among the many characterized RecA modulator proteins, PsiB is unique in using sequestration as an inhibitory mechanism. We describe the crystal structure of PsiB from the Escherichia coli F plasmid. The stucture of PsiB is surprisingly similar to CapZ, a eukaryotic actin filament capping protein. Structure-directed neutralization of electronegative surfaces on PsiB abrogates RecA inhibition whereas neutralization of an electropositive surface element enhances PsiB inhibition of RecA. Together, these studies provide a first molecular view of PsiB and highlight its use as a reagent in studies of RecA activity.

  5. A Structure-Function Study of RecA: The Structural Basis for ATP Specificity in the Strand Exchange Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegner, Julie; Spruill, Natalie; Plesniak, Leigh A.

    1999-11-01

    The terms "structure" and "function" can assume a variety of meanings. In biochemistry, the "structure" of a protein can refer to its sequence of amino acids, the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms within a subunit, or the arrangement of subunits into a larger oligomeric or filamentous state. Likewise, the function of biological macromolecules can be examined at many levels. The function of a protein can be described by its role in an organism's survival or by a chemical reaction that it promotes. We have designed a three-part biochemical laboratory experiment that characterizes the structure and function of the Escherichia coli RecA protein. The first part examines the importance of RecA in the survival of bacteria that have been exposed to UV light. This is the broadest view of function of the enzyme. Second, the students use an in vitro assay of RecA whereby the protein promotes homologous recombination. Because RecA functions not catalytically, but rather stoichiometrically, in this recombination reaction, the oligomeric state of RecA in complex with DNA must also be discussed. Finally, through molecular modeling of X-ray crystallographic structures, students identify functionally important features of the ATP cofactor binding site of RecA.

  6. Functions of the gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M

    1993-01-01

    A list of currently identified gene products of Escherichia coli is given, together with a bibliography that provides pointers to the literature on each gene product. A scheme to categorize cellular functions is used to classify the gene products of E. coli so far identified. A count shows that the numbers of genes concerned with small-molecule metabolism are on the same order as the numbers concerned with macromolecule biosynthesis and degradation. One large category is the category of tRNAs and their synthetases. Another is the category of transport elements. The categories of cell structure and cellular processes other than metabolism are smaller. Other subjects discussed are the occurrence in the E. coli genome of redundant pairs and groups of genes of identical or closely similar function, as well as variation in the degree of density of genetic information in different parts of the genome. PMID:7508076

  7. appR gene product activates transcription of microcin C7 plasmid genes.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Guerra, L; Moreno, F; San Millán, J L

    1989-01-01

    Microcin C7 (MccC7) is encoded by Escherichia coli plasmid pMccC7. However, some strains of E. coli K-12 carrying this plasmid do not produce this antibiotic. Here we show that these strains differ in the gene locus appR. This chromosomal gene product controls MccC7 production by activating the transcription of some, but not all, MccC7 plasmid genes. PMID:2651423

  8. Identification and characterization of a second lexA gene of Xanthomonas axonopodis Pathovar citri.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei-Kwei; Su, Shu-Ray; Sung, Vin-Long

    2005-07-01

    We previously identified and characterized a lexA gene from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri. For this study, we cloned and expressed a lexA homologue from X. axonopodis pv. citri. This gene was designated lexA2, and the previously identified lexA gene was renamed lexA1. The coding region of lexA2 is 606 bp long and shares 59% nucleotide sequence identity with lexA1. Analyses of the deduced amino acid sequence revealed that LexA2 has structures that are characteristic of LexA proteins, including a helix-turn-helix DNA binding domain and conserved amino acid residues required for the autocleavage of LexA. The lexA2 mutant, which was constructed by gene replacement, was 4 orders of magnitude more resistant to the DNA-damaging agent mitomycin C at 0.1 microg/ml and 1 order of magnitude more resistant to another DNA-damaging agent, methylmethane sulfonate at 30 microg/ml, than the wild type. A lexA1 lexA2 double mutant had the same degree of susceptibility to mitomycin C as the lexA1 or lexA2 single mutant but was 1 order of magnitude more resistant to methylmethane sulfonate at 30 microg/ml than the lexA1 or lexA2 single mutant. These results suggest that LexA1 and LexA2 play different roles in regulating the production of methyltransferases that are required for repairing DNA damage caused by methylmethane sulfonate. A mitomycin C treatment also caused LexA2 to undergo autocleavage, as seen with LexA1. The results of electrophoresis mobility shift assays revealed that LexA2 does not bind the lexA1 promoter. It binds to both the lexA2 and recA promoters. However, neither LexA2 nor LexA1 appears to regulate recA expression, as lexA1, lexA2, and lexA1 lexA2 mutants did not become constitutive for recA transcription and RecA production. These results suggest that recA expression in X. axonopodis pv. citri is regulated by mechanisms that have yet to be identified.

  9. Detection in vivo of a new gene product (gene III) of cauliflower mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, C.; Lebeurier, G.; Hirth, L.

    1984-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus DNA contains six major open reading frames (ORFs). As only the mRNA corresponding to the transcription of gene VI and its translation product have been isolated, the identification in infected plants of products corresponding to the five other putative genes remains to be established. The present paper reports the detection of an ORF III product by means of antibodies raised against an NH2-terminal synthetic peptide of 19 amino acids corresponding to a sequence predicted from the nucleotide sequence of ORF III. The detection of this gene product raises the question of the mechanism of its expression. Images PMID:16593524

  10. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5' UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  11. Cross-Ontological Analytics: Combining Associative and Hierarchical Relations in the Gene Ontologies to Assess Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Posse, Christian; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.

    2006-05-28

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the gene ontologies, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes/gene products is obtained by comparing gene ontology (GO) annotations associated with the gene/gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene ontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene ontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy.

  12. Regulation of Cell and Gene Therapy Medicinal Products in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chu; Wang, Po-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Chih; Lin, Chien-Liang; Tai, Hsuen-Yung; Lo, Chi-Fang; Wu, Shiow-Ing; Chiang, Yu-Mei; Liu, Li-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the rapid and mature development of emerging biotechnology in the fields of cell culture, cell preservation, and recombinant DNA technology, more and more cell or gene medicinal therapy products have been approved for marketing, to treat serious diseases which have been challenging to treat with current medical practice or medicine. This chapter will briefly introduce the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) and elaborate regulation of cell and gene therapy medicinal products in Taiwan, including regulatory history evolution, current regulatory framework, application and review procedures, and relevant jurisdictional issues. Under the promise of quality, safety, and efficacy of medicinal products, it is expected the regulation and environment will be more flexible, streamlining the process of the marketing approval of new emerging cell or gene therapy medicinal products and providing diverse treatment options for physicians and patients.

  13. A new measure for functional similarity of gene products based on Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Schlicker, Andreas; Domingues, Francisco S; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Lengauer, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Background Gene Ontology (GO) is a standard vocabulary of functional terms and allows for coherent annotation of gene products. These annotations provide a basis for new methods that compare gene products regarding their molecular function and biological role. Results We present a new method for comparing sets of GO terms and for assessing the functional similarity of gene products. The method relies on two semantic similarity measures; simRel and funSim. One measure (simRel) is applied in the comparison of the biological processes found in different groups of organisms. The other measure (funSim) is used to find functionally related gene products within the same or between different genomes. Results indicate that the method, in addition to being in good agreement with established sequence similarity approaches, also provides a means for the identification of functionally related proteins independent of evolutionary relationships. The method is also applied to estimating functional similarity between all proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to visualizing the molecular function space of yeast in a map of the functional space. A similar approach is used to visualize the functional relationships between protein families. Conclusion The approach enables the comparison of the underlying molecular biology of different taxonomic groups and provides a new comparative genomics tool identifying functionally related gene products independent of homology. The proposed map of the functional space provides a new global view on the functional relationships between gene products or protein families. PMID:16776819

  14. Gene analogue finder: a GRID solution for finding functionally analogous gene products

    PubMed Central

    Tulipano, Angelica; Donvito, Giacinto; Licciulli, Flavio; Maggi, Giorgio; Gisel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Background To date more than 2,1 million gene products from more than 100000 different species have been described specifying their function, the processes they are involved in and their cellular localization using a very well defined and structured vocabulary, the gene ontology (GO). Such vast, well defined knowledge opens the possibility of compare gene products at the level of functionality, finding gene products which have a similar function or are involved in similar biological processes without relying on the conventional sequence similarity approach. Comparisons within such a large space of knowledge are highly data and computing intensive. For this reason this project was based upon the use of the computational GRID, a technology offering large computing and storage resources. Results We have developed a tool, GENe AnaloGue FINdEr (ENGINE) that parallelizes the search process and distributes the calculation and data over the computational GRID, splitting the process into many sub-processes and joining the calculation and the data on the same machine and therefore completing the whole search in about 3 days instead of occupying one single machine for more than 5 CPU years. The results of the functional comparison contain potential functional analogues for more than 79000 gene products from the most important species. 46% of the analyzed gene products are well enough described for such an analysis to individuate functional analogues, such as well-known members of the same gene family, or gene products with similar functions which would never have been associated by standard methods. Conclusion ENGINE has produced a list of potential functionally analogous relations between gene products within and between species using, in place of the sequence, the gene description of the GO, thus demonstrating the potential of the GO. However, the current limiting factor is the quality of the associations of many gene products from non-model organisms that often have

  15. Deinococcus radiodurans RecA nucleoprotein filaments characterized at the single-molecule level with optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Pobegalov, Georgii; Cherevatenko, Galina; Alekseev, Aleksandr; Sabantsev, Anton; Kovaleva, Oksana; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Morozova, Natalia; Baitin, Dmitrii; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail

    2015-10-23

    Deinococcus radiodurans can survive extreme doses of ionizing radiation due to the very efficient DNA repair mechanisms that are able to cope even with hundreds of double-strand breaks. RecA, the critical protein of homologous recombination in bacteria, is one of the key components of the DNA-repair system. Repair of double-strand breaks requires RecA binding to DNA and assembly of the RecA nucleoprotein helical filaments. The Escherichia coli RecA protein (EcRecA) and its interactions with DNA have been extensively studied using various approaches including single-molecule techniques, while the D. radiodurans RecA (DrRecA) remains much less characterized. However, DrRecA shows some remarkable differences from E. coli homolog. Here we combine microfluidics and single-molecule DNA manipulation with optical tweezers to follow the binding of DrRecA to long double-stranded DNA molecules and probe the mechanical properties of DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments at physiological pH. Our data provide a direct comparison of DrRecA and EcRecA binding to double-stranded DNA under identical conditions. We report a significantly faster filaments assembly as well as lower values of persistence length and contour length for DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments compared to EcRecA. Our results support the existing model of DrRecA forming more frequent and less continuous filaments relative to those of EcRecA. - Highlights: • We investigate Deinococcus radiodurans RecA interactions with long double-stranded DNA at the single-molecule level. • At physiological pH D. radiodurans RecA forms nucleoprotein filaments significantly faster relative to Escherichia coli RecA. • D. radiodurans RecA-dsDNA nucleoprotein filaments are more flexible and slightly shorter compared to those of E. coli RecA.

  16. Efficacy of species-specific recA PCR tests in the identification of Burkholderia cepacia complex environmental isolates.

    PubMed

    Dalmastri, Claudia; Pirone, Luisa; Tabacchioni, Silvia; Bevivino, Annamaria; Chiarini, Luigi

    2005-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated if recA species-specific PCR assays could be successfully applied to identify environmental isolates of the widespread Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species. A total of 729 Bcc rhizosphere isolates collected in different samplings were assigned to the species B. cepacia genomovar I (61), B. cenocepacia recA lineage IIIB (514), B. ambifaria (124) and B. pyrrocinia (30), by means of recA (RFLP) analysis, and PCR tests were performed to assess sensitivity and specificity of recA species-specific primers pairs. B. cepacia genomovar I specific primers produced the expected amplicon with all isolates of the corresponding species (sensitivity, 100%), and cross-reacted with all B. pyrrocinia isolates. On the contrary, B. cenocepacia IIIB primers did not give the expected amplicon in 164 B. cenocepacia IIIB isolates (sensitivity, 68.1%), and isolates of distinct populations showed different sensitivity. B. ambifaria primers failed to amplify a recA-specific fragment only in a few isolates of this species (sensitivity, 93.5%). The absence of specific amplification in a high number of B. cenocepacia rhizosphere isolates indicates that recA specific PCR assays can lead to an underestimation of environmental microorganisms belonging to this bacterial species.

  17. Equilibrium binding of single-stranded DNA to the secondary DNA binding site of the bacterial recombinase RecA.

    PubMed

    Gourves, A S; Defais, M; Johnson, N P

    2001-03-30

    The bacterial recombinase RecA forms a nucleoprotein filament in vitro with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) at its primary DNA binding site, site I. This filament has a second site, site II, which binds ssDNA and double-stranded DNA. We have investigated the binding of ssDNA to the RecA protein in the presence of adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) cofactor using fluorescence anisotropy. The RecA protein carried out DNA strand exchange with a 5'-fluorescein-labeled 32-mer oligonucleotide. The anisotropy signal was shown to measure oligonucleotide binding to RecA, and the relationship between signal and binding density was determined. Binding of ssDNA to site I of RecA was stable at high NaCl concentrations. Binding to site II could be described by a simple two-state equilibrium, K = 4.5 +/- 1.5 x 10(5) m(-1) (37 degrees C, 150 mm NaCl, pH 7.4). The reaction was enthalpy-driven and entropy-opposed. It depended on salt concentration and was sensitive to the type of monovalent anion, suggesting that anion-dependent protein conformations contribute to ssDNA binding at site II.

  18. Polarity of heteroduplex formation promoted by Escherichia coli recA protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, R; Cunningham, R P; DasGupta, C; Radding, C M

    1981-01-01

    When recA protein pairs circular single strands with linear duplex DNA, the circular strand displaces its homolog from only one end of the duplex molecule and rapidly creates heteroduplex joints that are thousands of base pairs long [DasGupta, C., Shibata, T., Cunningham, R. P. & Radding, C. M. (1980) Cell 22, 437-446]. To examine this apparently polar reaction, we prepared chimeric duplex fragments of DNA that had M13 nucleotide sequences at one end and G4 sequences at the other. Circular single strands homologous to M13 DNA paired with a chimeric fragment when M13 sequences were located at the 3' end of the complementary strand but did not pair when the M13 sequences were located at the 5' end. Likewise circular single-stranded G4 DNA paired with chimeric fragments only when G4 sequences were located at the 3' end of the complementary strand. To confirm these observations, we prepared fd DNA labeled only at the 5' or 3' end of the plus strand, and we examined the susceptibility of these labeled ends to digestion by exonucleases when joint molecules were formed. Eighty percent of the 5' label in joint molecules became sensitive to exonuclease VII. Displacement of that 5' end by recA protein was concerted because it did not occur in the absence of single-stranded DNA or in the presence of heterologous single strands. By contrast, only a small fraction of the 3' label became sensitive to exonuclease VII or exonuclease I. These observations show that recA protein forms heteroduplex joints in a concerted and polarized way. Images PMID:6272272

  19. In vitro splicing of erythropoietin by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA intein without substituting amino acids at the splice junctions.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Jiang, Shu-qin; van Berkel, Patrick; Paulus, Henry

    2003-01-20

    Protein splicing is a self-catalyzed process involving the excision of an intervening polypeptide sequence, the intein, and joining of the flanking polypeptide sequences, the extein, by a peptide bond. We have studied the in vitro splicing of erythropoietin (EPO) using a truncated form of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA mini-intein in which the homing endonuclease domain was replaced with a hexahistidine sequence (His-tag). The intein was inserted adjacent to cysteine residues to assure that the spliced product had the natural amino acid sequence. When expressed in Escherichia coli, intein-containing EPO was found entirely as inclusion bodies but could be refolded in soluble form in the presence of 0.5 M arginine. Protein splicing of the refolded protein could be induced with a reducing agent such as DTT or tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine and led to the formation of EPO and mini-intein along with some cleavage products. Protein splicing mediated by the RecA intein requires the presence of a cysteine residue adjacent to the intein insertion site. We compared the efficiencies of protein splicing adjacent to three of the four cysteine residues of EPO (Cys29, Cys33 and Cys161) and found that insertion of intein adjacent to Cys29 allowed far more efficient protein splicing than insertion adjacent to Cys33 or Cys161. For ease of purification, our experiments involved a His-tagged EPO fusion protein and a His-tagged intein and the spliced products (25 kDa EPO and 24 kDa mini-intein) were identified by Western blotting using anti-EPO and anti-His-tag antibodies and by mass spectroscopy. The optimal splicing yield at Cys29 (40%) occurred at pH 7.0 after refolding at 4 degrees C and splicing for 18 h at 25 degrees C in the presence of 1 mM DTT.

  20. De novo design of potential RecA inhibitors using multi objective optimization.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Soumi; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2012-01-01

    De novo ligand design involves optimization of several ligand properties such as binding affinity, ligand volume, drug likeness, etc. Therefore, optimization of these properties independently and simultaneously seems appropriate. In this paper, the ligand design problem is modeled in a multiobjective using Archived MultiObjective Simulated Annealing (AMOSA) as the underlying search algorithm. The multiple objectives considered are the energy components similarity to a known inhibitor and a novel drug likeliness measure based on Lipinski's rule of five. RecA protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causative agent of tuberculosis, is taken as the target for the drug design. To gauge the goodness of the results, they are compared to the outputs of LigBuilder, NEWLEAD, and Variable genetic algorithm (VGA). The same problem has also been modeled using a well-established genetic algorithm-based multiobjective optimization technique, Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II (NSGA-II), to find the efficacy of AMOSA through comparative analysis. Results demonstrate that while some small molecules designed by the proposed approach are remarkably similar to the known inhibitors of RecA, some new ones are discovered that may be potential candidates for novel lead molecules against tuberculosis.

  1. Modeling the early stage of DNA sequence recognition within RecA nucleoprotein filaments

    PubMed Central

    Saladin, Adrien; Amourda, Christopher; Poulain, Pierre; Férey, Nicolas; Baaden, Marc; Zacharias, Martin; Delalande, Olivier; Prévost, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental process enabling the repair of double-strand breaks with a high degree of fidelity. In prokaryotes, it is carried out by RecA nucleofilaments formed on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These filaments incorporate genomic sequences that are homologous to the ssDNA and exchange the homologous strands. Due to the highly dynamic character of this process and its rapid propagation along the filament, the sequence recognition and strand exchange mechanism remains unknown at the structural level. The recently published structure of the RecA/DNA filament active for recombination (Chen et al., Mechanism of homologous recombination from the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structure, Nature 2008, 453, 489) provides a starting point for new exploration of the system. Here, we investigate the possible geometries of association of the early encounter complex between RecA/ssDNA filament and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Due to the huge size of the system and its dense packing, we use a reduced representation for protein and DNA together with state-of-the-art molecular modeling methods, including systematic docking and virtual reality simulations. The results indicate that it is possible for the double-stranded DNA to access the RecA-bound ssDNA while initially retaining its Watson–Crick pairing. They emphasize the importance of RecA L2 loop mobility for both recognition and strand exchange. PMID:20507912

  2. Modeling the early stage of DNA sequence recognition within RecA nucleoprotein filaments.

    PubMed

    Saladin, Adrien; Amourda, Christopher; Poulain, Pierre; Férey, Nicolas; Baaden, Marc; Zacharias, Martin; Delalande, Olivier; Prévost, Chantal

    2010-10-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental process enabling the repair of double-strand breaks with a high degree of fidelity. In prokaryotes, it is carried out by RecA nucleofilaments formed on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These filaments incorporate genomic sequences that are homologous to the ssDNA and exchange the homologous strands. Due to the highly dynamic character of this process and its rapid propagation along the filament, the sequence recognition and strand exchange mechanism remains unknown at the structural level. The recently published structure of the RecA/DNA filament active for recombination (Chen et al., Mechanism of homologous recombination from the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structure, Nature 2008, 453, 489) provides a starting point for new exploration of the system. Here, we investigate the possible geometries of association of the early encounter complex between RecA/ssDNA filament and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Due to the huge size of the system and its dense packing, we use a reduced representation for protein and DNA together with state-of-the-art molecular modeling methods, including systematic docking and virtual reality simulations. The results indicate that it is possible for the double-stranded DNA to access the RecA-bound ssDNA while initially retaining its Watson-Crick pairing. They emphasize the importance of RecA L2 loop mobility for both recognition and strand exchange.

  3. DNA-damaging agents stimulate gene expression at specific loci in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, C.J.; Walker, G.C.

    1988-05-01

    Operon fusions in Escherichia coli were obtained that showed increased beta-galactosidase expression in response to treatment with the DNA-damaging agent mitomycin C. These fusions were generated by using the Mud(ApR, lac) vector to insert the lactose structural genes randomly into the bacterial chromosome. Induction of beta-galactosidase in these strains, which carried fusions of lac to these din (damage-inducible) loci, was (i) triggered by UV light as well as by mitomycin C and (ii) abolished by either a recA- or a lexA- mutation. Similar characteristics of induction were observed when the lactose genes were fused to a prophage lambda promoter by using Mud(ApR, lac). These results indicate that E. coli contains a set of genes that, like prophage lambda genes, are expressed in response to DNA-damaging agents and regulated by the recA and lexA gene products. These din genes map at five bacterial loci. One din::Mud(ApR, lac) insertion results in a UV-sensitive phenotype and may be within the uvrA transcriptional unit.

  4. Regulatory Oversight of Cell and Gene Therapy Products in Canada.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Anthony; Agbanyo, Francisca; Wang, Jian; Rosu-Myles, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Health Canada regulates gene therapy products and many cell therapy products as biological drugs under the Canadian Food and Drugs Act and its attendant regulations. Cellular products that meet certain criteria, including minimal manipulation and homologous use, may be subjected to a standards-based approach under the Safety of Human Cells, Tissues and Organs for Transplantation Regulations. The manufacture and clinical testing of cell and gene therapy products (CGTPs) presents many challenges beyond those for protein biologics. Cells cannot be subjected to pathogen removal or inactivation procedures and must frequently be administered shortly after final formulation. Viral vector design and manufacturing control are critically important to overall product quality and linked to safety and efficacy in patients through concerns such as replication competence, vector integration, and vector shedding. In addition, for many CGTPs, the value of nonclinical studies is largely limited to providing proof of concept, and the first meaningful data relating to appropriate dosing, safety parameters, and validity of surrogate or true determinants of efficacy must come from carefully designed clinical trials in patients. Addressing these numerous challenges requires application of various risk mitigation strategies and meeting regulatory expectations specifically adapted to the product types. Regulatory cooperation and harmonisation at an international level are essential for progress in the development and commercialisation of these products. However, particularly in the area of cell therapy, new regulatory paradigms may be needed to harness the benefits of clinical progress in situations where the resources and motivation to pursue a typical drug product approval pathway may be lacking.

  5. Differential recognition of ultraviolet lesions by RecA protein. Possible mechanism for preferential targeting of SOS mutagenesis to (6-4) dipyrimidine sites

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M.; Echols, H. )

    1990-11-25

    A knowledge of the biochemical basis for UV-induced mutagenesis requires an understanding of the interaction of SOS-activated proteins with DNA polymerase at the replication-blocking dipyrimidine lesions. We have suggested previously that the presence of RecA in this multiprotein complex might be an important feature of induced mutagenesis because RecA associates preferentially with UV-irradiated double-stranded DNA compared to nonirradiated DNA. Previous work by others has indicated that (6-4) dipyrimidine lesions might be more mutagenic than the more common cyclobutane dimer. We have explored the possibility that RecA associates more efficiently with (6-4) lesions than with cyclobutane lesions. We have found that RecA binds DNA with (6-4) lesions much more efficiently than DNA with solely cyclobutane lesions. The distinction between substrates is probably achieved by differential nucleation of the RecA nucleoprotein filament. To investigate the structural basis for differential binding of RecA, we have estimated the unwinding of duplex DNA introduced by (6-4) and cyclobutane lesions. Our data indicate that (6-4) lesions introduce much greater distortion than cyclobutane dimers. We conclude that RecA probably binds preferentially at sites of (6-4) lesions in DNA and that this localization of RecA might target the mutagenic response more frequently to those sites.

  6. Managing the SOS Response for Enhanced CRISPR-Cas-Based Recombineering in E. coli through Transient Inhibition of Host RecA Activity.

    PubMed

    Moreb, Eirik Adim; Hoover, Benjamin; Yaseen, Adam; Valyasevi, Nisakorn; Roecker, Zoe; Menacho-Melgar, Romel; Lynch, Michael D

    2017-10-02

    Phage-derived "recombineering" methods are utilized for bacterial genome editing. Recombineering results in a heterogeneous population of modified and unmodified chromosomes, and therefore selection methods, such as CRISPR-Cas9, are required to select for edited clones. Cells can evade CRISPR-Cas-induced cell death through recA-mediated induction of the SOS response. The SOS response increases RecA dependent repair as well as mutation rates through induction of the umuDC error prone polymerase. As a result, CRISPR-Cas selection is more efficient in recA mutants. We report an approach to inhibiting the SOS response and RecA activity through the expression of a mutant dominant negative form of RecA, which incorporates into wild type RecA filaments and inhibits activity. Using a plasmid-based system in which Cas9 and recA mutants are coexpressed, we can achieve increased efficiency and consistency of CRISPR-Cas9-mediated selection and recombineering in E. coli, while reducing the induction of the SOS response. To date, this approach has been shown to be independent of recA genotype and host strain lineage. Using this system, we demonstrate increased CRISPR-Cas selection efficacy with over 10 000 guides covering the E. coli chromosome. The use of dominant negative RecA or homologues may be of broad use in bacterial CRISPR-Cas-based genome editing where the SOS pathways are present.

  7. Natural Products Version 2.0: Connecting Genes to Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Christopher T.; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Natural products have played a prominent role in the history of organic chemistry, and they continue to be important as drugs, biological probes, and targets of study for synthetic and analytical chemists. In this perspective, we explore how connecting Nature’s small molecules to the genes that encode them has sparked a renaissance in natural product research, focusing primarily on the biosynthesis of polyketides and nonribosomal peptides. We survey monomer biogenesis, coupling chemistries from templated and non-templated pathways, and the broad set of tailoring reactions and hybrid pathways that give rise to the diverse scaffolds and functionalization patterns of natural products. We conclude by considering two questions: What would it take to find all natural product scaffolds? What kind of scientists will be studying natural products in the future? PMID:20121095

  8. Epigenetic engineering of ribosomal RNA genes enhances protein production.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Raffaella; Lienemann, Philipp; Fussenegger, Martin

    2009-08-14

    Selection of mammalian high-producer cell lines remains a major challenge for the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes encode the major component of the ribosome but many rRNA gene copies are not transcribed due to epigenetic silencing by the nucleolar remodelling complex (NoRC) [6], which may limit the cell's full production capacity. Here we show that the knockdown of TIP5, a subunit of NoRC, decreases the number of silent rRNA genes, upregulates rRNA transcription, enhances ribosome synthesis and increases production of recombinant proteins. However, general enhancement of rRNA transcription rate did not stimulate protein synthesis. Our data demonstrates that the number of transcriptionally competent rRNA genes limits efficient ribosome synthesis. Epigenetic engineering of ribosomal RNA genes offers new possibilities for improving biopharmaceutical manufacturing and provides novel insights into the complex regulatory network which governs the translation machinery in normal cellular processes as well as in pathological conditions like cancer.

  9. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2017-03-21

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  10. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  11. Deduced products of C4-dicarboxylate transport regulatory genes of Rhizobium leguminosarum are homologous to nitrogen regulatory gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Ronson, C W; Astwood, P M; Nixon, B T; Ausubel, F M

    1987-01-01

    We have sequenced two genes dctB and dctD required for the activation of the C4-dicarboxylate transport structural gene dctA in free-living Rhizobium leguminosarum. The hydropathic profile of the dctB gene product (DctB) suggested that its N-terminal region may be located in the periplasm and its C-terminal region in the cytoplasm. The C-terminal region of DctB was strongly conserved with similar regions of the products of several regulatory genes that may act as environmental sensors, including ntrB, envZ, virA, phoR, cpxA, and phoM. The N-terminal domains of the products of several regulatory genes thought to be transcriptional activators, including ntrC, ompR, virG, phoB and sfrA. In addition, the central and C-terminal regions of DctD were strongly conserved with the products of ntrC and nifA, transcriptional activators that require the alternate sigma factor rpoN (ntrA) as co-activator. The central region of DctD also contained a potential ATP-binding domain. These results are consistent with recent results that show that rpoN product is required for dctA activation, and suggest that DctB plus DctD-mediated transcriptional activation of dctA may be mechanistically similar to NtrB plus NtrC-mediated activation of glnA in E. coli. PMID:3671068

  12. Transcriptional activation of cloned human beta-globin genes by viral immediate-early gene products.

    PubMed

    Green, M R; Treisman, R; Maniatis, T

    1983-11-01

    When the human beta-globin gene is transfected into Hela cells, no beta-globin RNA is detected unless the gene is linked to a viral transcription enhancer. In this paper we show that trans-acting adenovirus and herpesvirus (pseudorabies) transcriptional regulatory proteins can circumvent this enhancer requirement for detectable beta-globin transcription in transient expression assays. The viral gene products can be provided by constitutively expressed, integrated viral genes in established cell lines, by viral infection of permissive cells, or by transfection of cells with bacterial plasmids carrying the viral immediate-early genes. These results demonstrate the utility of transient expression assays for studying regulatory mechanisms involving trans-acting factors. Analysis of beta-globin promoter mutants indicates that between 75 and 128 bp of sequence 5' to the mRNA cap site is required for enhancer-dependent transcription in Hela cells. In contrast, beta-globin transcription in the presence of viral immediate-early gene products requires only 36 bp of 5'-flanking sequence, which includes the TATA box. Thus both cis and trans-acting viral factors activate beta-globin gene transcription in transient expression experiments, but the mechanisms by which they act appear to be fundamentally different.

  13. Id-1 gene and gene products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-08-19

    A method for treatment of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises targeting and modulating Id-1 gene expression, if any, for the Id-1 gene, or gene products in breast or other epithelial cancers in a patient by delivering products that modulate Id-1 gene expression. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that cancer cells are invasive and metastatic.

  14. recA protein-catalyzed strand assimilation: stimulation by Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    McEntee, K; Weinstock, G M; Lehman, I R

    1980-01-01

    The single-stranded DNA-binding protein of Escherichia coli significantly alters the strand assimilation reaction catalyzed by recA protein [McEntee, K., Weinstock, G. M. & Lehman, I. R. (1979) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 76, 2615--2619]. The binding protein (i) increases the rate and extent of strand assimilation into homologous duplex DNA, (ii) enhances the formation of a complex between recA protein and duplex DNA in the presence of homologous or heterologous single-stranded DNA, (iii) reduces the rate and extent of ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by recA protein in the presence of single-stranded DNA, (iv) reduces the high concentration of recA protein required for strand assimilation, and (v) permits detection of strand assimilation in the presence of the ATP analog, adenosine 5'-O-(O-thiotriphosphate). Single-stranded DNA-binding protein purified from a binding protein mutant (lexC) is considerably less effective than wild-type binding protein in stimulating strand assimilation, a result which suggests that single-stranded DNA-binding protein participates in general recombination in vivo. PMID:6244589

  15. Non-covalent interactions between ATP and RecA DNA-repairing proteins: DFT and semiempirical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The role of Bacterial RecA in the structural maintenance of genomes and the genetic information they carry has been established. In particular, the RecA DNA-repairing protein from D. Radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacteria, is crucial for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs). We have performed semi-empirical free-energy calculations and QM/MM calculations to study their non-covalent interactions with ATP and ADP. Such studies provide insight into the mechanisms of ATP/ADP --> RecA energy transfer and, therefore, about specific functional uses of incoming energy for DNA repairing mechanisms. We present a detailed analysis of the non-covalent interactions which minimize the interaction Gibbs free energies leading to the most stable non-covalent binding sites. Van der Waal, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions has been quantified which provides a detailed insight into the mechanisms of ATP-RecA interaction. Further, possible chemical interactions and functional roles of RecA proteins are explored based on the previously mentioned studies. Acknowledgements: Funded, in part, by DTRA award 106339 (JHR). Dr. Mark C. Palenik and Mrs. Lora Beard are gratefully acknowledged Supported in part by DTRA Award 106339.

  16. RecBCD-Dependent Joint Molecule Formation Promoted by the Escherichia coli RecA and SSB Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Linda J.; Dixon, Dan A.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    1991-04-01

    We describe the formation of homologously paired joint molecules in an in vitro reaction that is dependent on the concerted actions of purified RecA and RecBCD proteins and is stimulated by single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB), RecBCD enzyme initiates the process by unwinding the linear double-stranded DNA to produce single-stranded DNA, which is trapped by SSB and RecA. RecA uses this single-stranded DNA to catalyze the invasion of a supercoiled double-stranded DNA molecule, forming a homologously paired joint molecule. At low RecBCD enzyme concentrations, the rate-limiting step is the unwinding of duplex DNA by RecBCD, whereas at higher RecBCD concentrations, the rate-limiting step is RecA-catalyzed strand invasion. The behavior of mutant RecA proteins in this in vitro reaction parallels their in vivo phenotypes, suggesting that this reaction may define biochemical steps that occur during homologous recombination by the RecBCD pathway in vivo.

  17. Large-scale structure of RecA protein from Deinococcus radiodurance and its complexes in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelov, D. V.; Lebedev, D. V.; Suslov, A. V.; Shalguev, V. I.; Kuklin, A. I.; Islamov, A. Kh; Lauter, H.; Lanzov, V. A.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2008-03-01

    Different conformational states of the filaments formed by RecA protein from a radiation resistant strain Deinococcus radiodurance (RecADr) in solution were investigated using small angle neutron scattering. Scattering by the protein self-polymer was consistent with a long helix model, with the pitch of the helix being lower than that in the crystal structure. Compared to those of RecA proteins from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, helical filaments of RecA from D. radiodurance exhibited a lower helical pitch and lower stability at low Mg2+ concentrations or under conditions of elevated ionic strength in the absence of ATP (adenosine triphosphate). Formation of an active filament upon binding of ATPγS and either single- or double-stranded DNA brought about a significant increase in the helix pitch and a moderate decrease in the cross-sectional gyration radius, but resulted in little change in the number of monomers per helix turn. The helix pitch value of the RecADr presynaptic complex was conservative and close to that found for other RecA proteins and their analogs.

  18. Structural data suggest that the active and inactive forms of the RecA filament are not simply interconvertible.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Egelman, E H

    1992-09-05

    We have used electron microscopy to examine the two major conformational states of the helical filament formed by the RecA protein of Escherichia coli. The compressed filament, formed in the absence of a nucleotide cofactor either as a self-polymer or on a single-stranded DNA molecule, is characterized in solution by about 6.1 subunits per turn of a 76 A pitch helix, and appears to be inactive with respect to all RecA activity. The active state of the filament, formed with ATP or an ATP analog on either a single or double-stranded DNA substrate, has about 6.2 subunits per turn of a 94 A pitch helix. Measurements of the contour length of RecA-covered single-stranded DNA circles in ice, formed in the absence of nucleotide cofactor, indicate that each RecA subunit binds five bases, in contrast to the three bases or base-pairs per subunit in the active state. The different stoichiometries of DNA binding suggests that the two polymeric forms are not interconvertible, as has been suggested on biochemical grounds. A three-dimensional reconstruction of the inactive state shows the same general features as the 83 A pitch filament present in the RecA crystal. This structural similarity and the fact that the crystal does not contain ATP or DNA suggests that the crystal structure is more similar to the compressed filament than the active, extended filament.

  19. Plasmid genes required for microcin B17 production.

    PubMed Central

    San Millán, J L; Kolter, R; Moreno, F

    1985-01-01

    The production of the antibiotic substance microcin B17 (Mcc) is determined by a 3.5-kilobase DNA fragment from plasmid pMccB17. Several Mcc- mutations on plasmid pMccB17 were obtained by both transposon insertion and nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Plasmids carrying these mutations were tested for their ability to complement Mcc- insertion or deletion mutations on pMM102 (pMM102 is a pBR322 derivative carrying the region encoding microcin B17). Results from these experiments indicate that at least four plasmid genes are required for microcin production. PMID:2993228

  20. Impact of recA on Levofloxacin Exposure-Related Resistance Development▿

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Renu; Ledesma, Kimberly R.; Chang, Kai-Tai; Tam, Vincent H.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic mutations are one of the major mechanisms by which bacteria acquire drug resistance. One of the known mechanisms for inducing mutations is the SOS response system. We investigated the effect of disrupting recA, an inducer of the SOS response, on resistance development using an in vitro hollow-fiber infection model. A clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolate and a laboratory wild-type strain of Escherichia coli were compared to their respective recA-deleted isogenic daughter isolates. Approximately 2 × 105 CFU/ml of bacteria were subjected to escalating levofloxacin exposures for up to 120 h. Serial samples were obtained to ascertain simulated drug exposures and total and resistant bacterial burdens. Quinolone resistance determining regions of gyrA and grlA (parC for E. coli) in levofloxacin-resistant isolates were sequenced to confirm the mechanism of resistance. The preexposure MICs of the recA-deleted isolates were 4-fold lower than those of their respective parents. In S. aureus, a lower area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h at steady state divided by the MIC (AUC/MIC) was required to suppress resistance development in the recA-deleted mutant (an AUC/MIC of >23 versus an AUC/MIC of >32 was necessary in the mutant versus the parent isolate, respectively), and a prominent difference in the total bacterial burden was observed at 72 h. Using an AUC/MIC of approximately 30, E. coli resistance emergence was delayed by 24 h in the recA-deleted mutant. Diverse mutations in gyrA were found in levofloxacin-resistant isolates recovered. Disruption of recA provided additional benefits apart from MIC reduction, attesting to its potential role for pharmacologic intervention. The clinical relevance of our findings warrants further investigations. PMID:20660686

  1. Deinococcus radiodurans RecA nucleoprotein filaments characterized at the single-molecule level with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Pobegalov, Georgii; Cherevatenko, Galina; Alekseev, Aleksandr; Sabantsev, Anton; Kovaleva, Oksana; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Morozova, Natalia; Baitin, Dmitrii; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail

    2015-10-23

    Deinococcus radiodurans can survive extreme doses of ionizing radiation due to the very efficient DNA repair mechanisms that are able to cope even with hundreds of double-strand breaks. RecA, the critical protein of homologous recombination in bacteria, is one of the key components of the DNA-repair system. Repair of double-strand breaks requires RecA binding to DNA and assembly of the RecA nucleoprotein helical filaments. The Escherichia coli RecA protein (EcRecA) and its interactions with DNA have been extensively studied using various approaches including single-molecule techniques, while the D. radiodurans RecA (DrRecA) remains much less characterized. However, DrRecA shows some remarkable differences from E. coli homolog. Here we combine microfluidics and single-molecule DNA manipulation with optical tweezers to follow the binding of DrRecA to long double-stranded DNA molecules and probe the mechanical properties of DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments at physiological pH. Our data provide a direct comparison of DrRecA and EcRecA binding to double-stranded DNA under identical conditions. We report a significantly faster filaments assembly as well as lower values of persistence length and contour length for DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments compared to EcRecA. Our results support the existing model of DrRecA forming more frequent and less continuous filaments relative to those of EcRecA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Polymorphisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in wine production.

    PubMed

    Vigentini, Ileana; Fracassetti, Daniela; Picozzi, Claudia; Foschino, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    The setting up of new molecular methods for Saccharomyces cerevisiae typing is valuable in enology. Actually, the ability to discriminate different strains in wine making can have a benefit both for the control of the fermentation process and for the preservation of wine typicity. This study focused on the screening of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in wine production that could evolve rapidly considering the selective pressure of the isolation environment. Preliminary screening of 30 genes in silico was performed, followed by the selection of 10 loci belonging to 8 genes. The sequence analysis showed a low polymorphism and a degree of heterozygosity. However, a new potential molecular target was recognized in the TPS1 gene coding for the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase enzyme involved in the ethanol resistance mechanism. This gene showed a 1.42% sequence diversity with seven different nucleotide substitutions. Moreover, classic techniques were applied to a collection of 50 S. cerevisiae isolates, mostly with enologic origin. Our results confirmed that the wine making was not carried out only by the inoculated commercial starter because indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae present during fermentation were detected. In addition, a high genetic relationship among some commercial cultures was found, highlighting imprecision or fraudulent practices by starter manufacturers.

  3. Molecular Interaction and Cellular Location of RecA and CheW Proteins in Salmonella enterica during SOS Response and Their Implication in Swarming

    PubMed Central

    Irazoki, Oihane; Aranda, Jesús; Zimmermann, Timo; Campoy, Susana; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its role in DNA damage repair and recombination, the RecA protein, through its interaction with CheW, is involved in swarming motility, a form of flagella-dependent movement across surfaces. In order to better understand how SOS response modulates swarming, in this work the location of RecA and CheW proteins within the swarming cells has been studied by using super-resolution microscopy. Further, and after in silico docking studies, the specific RecA and CheW regions associated with the RecA-CheW interaction have also been confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and immunoprecipitation techniques. Our results point out that the CheW distribution changes, from the cell poles to foci distributed in a helical pattern along the cell axis when SOS response is activated or RecA protein is overexpressed. In this situation, the CheW presents the same subcellular location as that of RecA, pointing out that the previously described RecA storage structures may be modulators of swarming motility. Data reported herein not only confirmed that the RecA-CheW pair is essential for swarming motility but it is directly involved in the CheW distribution change associated to SOS response activation. A model explaining not only the mechanism by which DNA damage modulates swarming but also how both the lack and the excess of RecA protein impair this motility is proposed. PMID:27766091

  4. A Novel Regulatory Gene, Tri10, Controls Trichothecene Toxin Production and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tag, Andrew G.; Garifullina, Gulnara F.; Peplow, Andrew W.; Ake, Charles; Phillips, T. D.; Hohn, Thomas M.; Beremand, Marian N.

    2001-01-01

    We report here the characterization of Tri10, a novel regulatory gene within the trichothecene gene cluster. Comparison of Tri10 genomic and mRNA sequences revealed that removal of a single 77-bp intron provided a 1,260-bp open reading frame, encoding a 420-amino-acid protein. Disruption of Tri10 in Fusarium sporotrichioides abolished T-2 toxin production and dramatically decreased the transcript accumulation for four trichothecene genes (Tri4, Tri5, Tri6, and Tri101) and an apparent farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase (Fpps) gene. Conversely, homologous integration of a disruption vector by a single upstream crossover event significantly increased T-2 toxin production and elevated the transcript accumulation of the trichothecene genes and Fpps. Further analysis revealed that disruption of Tri10, and to a greater extent the disruption of Tri6, increased sensitivity to T-2 toxin under certain growth conditions. Although Tri10 is conserved in Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium sambucinum and clearly plays a central role in regulating trichothecene gene expression, it does not show any significant matches to proteins of known or predicted function or to motifs except a single transmembrane domain. We suggest a model in which Tri10 acts upstream of the cluster-encoded transcription factor TRI6 and is necessary for full expression of both the other trichothecene genes and the genes for the primary metabolic pathway that precedes the trichothecene biosynthetic pathway, as well as for wild-type levels of trichothecene self-protection. We further suggest the presence of a regulatory loop where Tri6 is not required for the transcription of Tri10 but is required to limit the expression of Tri10. PMID:11679358

  5. LexA-independent DNA damage-mediated induction of gene expression in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Campoy, Susana; Fontes, Marta; Padmanabhan, S; Cortés, Pilar; Llagostera, Montserrat; Barbé, Jordi

    2003-08-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a member of the Proteobacteria delta-class, has two independent recA genes, recA1 and recA2, but only recA2 is DNA damage-inducible. The lexA gene has been isolated from M. xanthus by PCR amplification with oligonucleotides designed after sequence identification by tblastn analysis of its genome at the Cereon Microbial Sequence Database. The M. xanthus purified LexA protein is shown to bind specifically to the consensus sequence CTRHAMRYBYGTTCAGS present upstream of lexA and recA2. A degenerate copy of this motif but with important differences can be identified in the region upstream of the recA1 gene. A knock-out lexA(Def) mutant that has been generated does not differ significantly from wild type in morphology, growth rate, light-induced carotenogenesis or development. Using transcriptional lacZ fusions and quantitative RT-PCR analysis, it has been demonstrated that expression of both lexA and recA2 genes is constitutive in the lexA(Def) mutant, whereas the transcription of the DNA damage non-inducible recA1 gene is not affected in this strain. recN and ssb, whose expression in Escherichia coli are LexA-regulated, are induced by DNA damage in the M. xanthus lexA(Def) mutant. These data reveal the existence of different regulatory mechanisms for DNA damage-inducible genes in bacteria belonging to different phyla.

  6. Metabolic engineering of Arabidopsis for butanetriol production using bacterial genes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghany, Salah E; Day, Irene; Heuberger, Adam L; Broeckling, Corey D; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2013-11-01

    1,2,4-butanetriol (butanetriol) is a useful precursor for the synthesis of the energetic material butanetriol trinitrate and several pharmaceutical compounds. Bacterial synthesis of butanetriol from xylose or arabinose takes place in a pathway that requires four enzymes. To produce butanetriol in plants by expressing bacterial enzymes, we cloned native bacterial or codon optimized synthetic genes under different promoters into a binary vector and stably transformed Arabidopsis plants. Transgenic lines expressing introduced genes were analyzed for the production of butanetriol using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Soil-grown transgenic plants expressing these genes produced up to 20 µg/g of butanetriol. To test if an exogenous supply of pentose sugar precursors would enhance the butanetriol level, transgenic plants were grown in a medium supplemented with either xylose or arabinose and the amount of butanetriol was quantified. Plants expressing synthetic genes in the arabinose pathway showed up to a forty-fold increase in butanetriol levels after arabinose was added to the medium. Transgenic plants expressing either bacterial or synthetic xylose pathways, or the arabinose pathway showed toxicity symptoms when xylose or arabinose was added to the medium, suggesting that a by-product in the pathway or butanetriol affected plant growth. Furthermore, the metabolite profile of plants expressing arabinose and xylose pathways was altered. Our results demonstrate that bacterial pathways that produce butanetriol can be engineered into plants to produce this chemical. This proof-of-concept study for phytoproduction of butanetriol paves the way to further manipulate metabolic pathways in plants to enhance the level of butanetriol production.

  7. Molecular systematics of rhizobia based on maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenies inferred from rrs, atpD, recA and nifH sequences, and their use in the classification of Sesbania microsymbionts from Venezuelan wetlands.

    PubMed

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Silva, Claudia; Lorite, María José; Izaguirre-Mayoral, María Luisa; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2005-10-01

    A well-resolved rhizobial species phylogeny with 51 haplotypes was inferred from a combined atpD + recA data set using Bayesian inference with best-fit, gene-specific substitution models. Relatively dense taxon sampling for the genera Rhizobium and Mesorhizobium was achieved by generating atpD and recA sequences for six type and 24 reference strains not previously available in GenBank. This phylogeny was used to classify nine nodule isolates from Sesbania exasperata, S. punicea and S. sericea plants native to seasonally flooded areas of Venezuela, and compared with a PCR-RFLP analysis of rrs plus rrl genes and large maximum likelihood rrs and nifH phylogenies. We show that rrs phylogenies are particularly sensitive to strain choice due to the high levels of sequence mosaicism found at this locus. All analyses consistently identified the Sesbania isolates as Mesorhizobium plurifarium or Rhizobium huautlense. Host range experiments on ten legume species coupled with plasmid profiling uncovered potential novel biovarieties of both species. This study demonstrates the wide geographic and environmental distribution of M. plurifarium, that R. galegae and R. huautlense are sister lineages, and the synonymy of R. gallicum, R. mongolense and R. yanglingense. Complex and diverse phylogeographic, inheritance and host-association patterns were found for the symbiotic nifH locus. The results and the analytical approaches used herein are discussed in the context of rhizobial taxonomy and molecular systematics.

  8. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    The following is a review of research accomplished in the first two years of funding for the above mentioned project. The work performed is a molecular characterization of nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which are deficient in different stages in the post-transcriptional expression of a single chloroplast encoded polypeptide, the D2 protein of Photosystem II. Our long-term goals are to understand the molecular mechanisms by which nuclear gene products affect the expression of chloroplast genes. Specifically, we which to understand how specific nuclear gene products affect the turnover rate of the D2 encoding mRNA (psbD), how other nuclear encoded factors work to promote the translation of psbD mRNA and/or stabilize the D2 protein, and what the role of the D2 protein itself is in Photosystem II assembly and in the control of expression of other chloroplast genes. This progress report will be organized into four major sections concerning (I) The characterization of nuclear mutants affected in D2 translation/turnover, (II) The study of trans-acting factors which associate with the 5{prime} end of the psbD mRNA, (III) In vitro mutagenesis of the psbD gene, and (IV) Additional studies.

  9. Chemiluminescent reporter gene assays: sensitive detection of the GUS and SEAP gene products.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, I; Fortin, J J; Voyta, J C; Juo, R R; Edwards, B; Olesen, C E; Lijam, N; Kricka, L J

    1994-07-01

    Chemiluminescent assays are described for the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene products. These assays provide simple, sensitive, non-isotopic alternatives to existing detection methods and are performed in microplate or tube luminometers or in a scintillation counter. The SEAP reporter gene product is secreted from mammalian cells and is thus easily detected in a sample of culture medium. Sensitive detection of secreted placental alkaline phosphatase is performed with CSPD chemiluminescent alkaline phosphatase substrate, and approximately 3 fg of enzyme can be detected. GUS has become the major reporter gene used for the analysis of plant gene expression. Sensitive chemiluminescent detection of GUS activity can be performed with an assay system we have developed using Glucuron, a beta-glucuronidase substrate. This chemiluminescent assay detects 60 fg of GUS and is linear over six orders of magnitude of enzyme concentration. CSPD and Glucuron substrates have been incorporated into two new chemiluminescent reporter gene assay kits for SEAP and GUS.

  10. Epstein-Barr Virus BKRF4 Gene Product Is Required for Efficient Progeny Production.

    PubMed

    Masud, H M Abdullah Al; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sato, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Fumi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Murata, Takayuki

    2017-09-13

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a member of human gammaherpesvirus, infects mainly B cells. EBV has two alternative life cycles, latent and lytic, and is reactivated occasionally from the latent stage to the lytic cycle. To combat EBV-associated disorders, understanding the molecular mechanisms of the EBV lytic replication cycle is also important. Here, we focused on an EBV lytic gene, BKRF4. Using our anti-BKRF4 antibody, we revealed that the BKRF4 gene product is expressed during the lytic cycle with late kinetics. To characterize the role of BKRF4, we constructed BKRF4-knockout mutants using the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and CRISPR/Cas9 systems. While disruption of the BKRF4 gene had almost no effect on viral protein expression and DNA synthesis, it significantly decreased progeny virion levels in HEK293 and Akata cells. Furthermore, we show that BKRF4 is involved not only in production of progeny virions but also in increasing the infectivity of the virus particles. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that BKRF4 interacted with a virion protein, BGLF2. We showed that the C-terminal region of BKRF4 was critical for this interaction and for efficient progeny production. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that BKRF4 partially colocalized with BGLF2 in the nucleus and perinuclear region. Finally, we showed that BKRF4 is a phosphorylated, possible tegument protein and that the EBV protein kinase BGLF4 may be important for this phosphorylation. Taken together, our data suggest that BKRF4 is involved in the production of infectious virions.IMPORTANCE While the latent genes of EBV have been studied extensively, the lytic genes are less well characterized. This study focused on one such lytic gene, BKRF4, which is conserved only among gammaherpesviruses (ORF45 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus or murine herpesvirus-68). After preparing the BKRF4 knockout virus using B95-8 EBV-BAC, we demonstrated that the BKRF4 gene was involved in infectious progeny

  11. Identification of the neurofibromatosis type 1 gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Gutmann, D.H.; Wood, D.L.; Collins, F.S. )

    1991-11-01

    The gene for neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) was recently identified by positional cloning. The complete cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 2818 amino acids. To study the NF1 gene product, antibodies were raised against both fusion proteins and synthetic peptides. Initial characterization of two anti-peptide antibodies and one fusion-protein antibody demonstrated a specific protein of {approx}250 kDa by both immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. This protein was found in all tissues and cell lines examined and is detected in human, rat, and mouse tissues. To demonstrate that these antibodies specifically recognize the NF1 protein, additional fusion proteins containing the sequence specific to the synthetic peptide were generated. Both peptide antisera recognize the proper specific fusion proteins so generated. Immunoprecipitates using the peptide antisera were shown to recognize the same protein detected by immunoblotting with either the other peptide antiserum or the fusion-protein antiserum. Immunoblotting using antiserum specific to spatially distinct epitopes conducted on tissue homogenates demonstrated the NF1 protein in all adult tissues. Based on the homology between the NF1 gene product and members of the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) superfamily, the name NF1-GAP-related protein (NF1GRP) is suggested.

  12. RecA protein reinitiates strand exchange on isolated protein-free DNA intermediates. An ADP-resistant process.

    PubMed

    Rao, B J; Jwang, B; Radding, C M

    1990-06-20

    Efficient homologous pairing de novo of linear duplex DNA with a circular single strand (plus strand) coated with RecA protein requires saturation and extension of the single strand by the protein. However, strand exchange, the transfer of a strand from duplex DNA to the nucleoprotein filament, which follows homologous pairing, does not require the stable binding of RecA protein to single-stranded DNA. When RecA protein was added back to isolated protein-free DNA intermediates in the presence of sufficient ADP to inhibit strongly the binding of RecA protein to single-stranded DNA, strand exchange nonetheless resumed at the original rate and went to completion. Characterization of the protein-free DNA intermediate suggested that it has a special site or region to which RecA protein binds. Part of the nascent displaced plus strand of the deproteinized intermediate was unavailable as a cofactor for the ATPase activity of RecA protein, and about 30% resisted digestion by P1 endonuclease, which acts preferentially on single-stranded DNA. At the completion of strand exchange, when the distal 5' end of the linear minus strand had been fully incorporated into heteroduplex DNA, a nucleoprotein complex remained that contained all three strands of DNA from which the nascent displaced strand dissociated only over the next 50 to 60 minutes. Deproteinization of this intermediate yielded a complex that also contained three strands of DNA in which the nascent displaced strand was partially resistant to both Escherichia coli exonuclease I and P1 endonuclease. The deproteinized complex showed a broad melting transition between 37 degrees C and temperatures high enough to melt duplex DNA. These results show that strand exchange can be subdivided into two stages: (1) the exchange of base-pairs, which creates a new heteroduplex pair in place of a parental pair; and (2) strand separation, which is the physical displacement of the unpaired strand from the nucleoprotein filament. Between

  13. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Basen, Mirko; Schut, Gerrit J.; Nguyen, Diep M.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Benn, Robert A.; Prybol, Cameron J.; Vaccaro, Brian J.; Poole, Farris L.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 °C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways. PMID:25368184

  14. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    SciTech Connect

    Basen, M; Schut, GJ; Nguyen, DM; Lipscomb, GL; Benn, RA; Prybol, CJ; Vaccaro, BJ; Poole, FL; Kelly, RM; Adams, MWW

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 degrees C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  15. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Basen, Mirko; Schut, Gerrit J; Nguyen, Diep M; Lipscomb, Gina L; Benn, Robert A; Prybol, Cameron J; Vaccaro, Brian J; Poole, Farris L; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 °C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  16. Alphavirus vectors: applications for DNA vaccine production and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, K

    2000-01-01

    Replication-deficient alphavirus vectors have been developed for efficient high-level transgene expression. The broad host range of alphaviruses has allowed infection of a wide variety of mammalian cell lines and primary cultures. Particularly, G protein-coupled receptors have been expressed at high levels and subjected to binding and functional studies. Expression in suspension cultures has greatly facilitated production of large quantities of recombinant proteins for structural studies. Injection of recombinant alphavirus vectors into rodent brain resulted in local reporter gene expression. Highly neuron-specific expression was obtained in hippocampal slice cultures in vivo. Additionally, preliminary studies in animal models suggest that alphavirus vectors can be attractive candidates for gene therapy applications. Traditionally alphavirus vectors, either attenuated strains or replication-deficient particles, have been used to elicit efficient immune responses in animals. Recently, the application of alphaviruses has been extended to naked nucleic acids. Injection of DNA as well as RNA vectors has demonstrated efficient antigen production. In many cases, protection against lethal challenges has been obtained after immunization with alphavirus particles or nucleic acid vectors. Alphavirus vectors can therefore be considered as potentially promising vectors for vaccine production.

  17. 76 FR 9028 - Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products'' dated January 2011. The guidance document provides manufacturers of cellular and gene therapy (CGT) products with recommendations for developing... document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products'' dated...

  18. Gas-inducible product gene expression in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wilfried; Rimann, Markus; de Glutz, François-Nicolas; Weber, Eric; Memmert, Klaus; Fussenegger, Martin

    2005-05-01

    Inducible transgene expression technologies are of unmatched potential for biopharmaceutical manufacturing of unstable, growth-impairing and cytotoxic proteins as well as conditional metabolic engineering to improve desired cell phenotypes. Currently available transgene dosing modalities which rely on physical parameters or small-molecule drugs for transgene fine-tuning compromise downstream processing and/or are difficult to implement technologically. The recently designed gas-inducible acetaldehyde-inducible regulation (AIR) technology takes advantage of gaseous acetaldehyde to modulate product gene expression levels. At regulation effective concentrations gaseous acetaldehyde is physiologically inert and approved as food additive by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA). During standard bioreactor operation, gaseous acetaldehyde could simply be administered using standard/existing gas supply tubing and eventually eliminated by stripping with inducer-free air. We have determined key parameters controlling acetaldehyde transfer in three types of bioreactors and designed a mass balance-based model for optimal product gene expression fine-tuning using gaseous acetaldehyde. Operating a standard stirred-tank bioreactor set-up at 10 L scale we have validated AIR technology using CHO-K1-derived serum-free suspension cultures transgenic for gas-inducible production of human interferon-beta (IFN-beta). Gaseous acetaldehyde-inducible IFN-beta production management was fully reversible while maintaining cell viability at over 95% during the entire process. Compatible with standard bioreactor design and downstream processing procedures AIR-based technology will foster novel opportunities for pilot and large-scale manufacturing of difficult-to-produce protein pharmaceuticals.

  19. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) improves lutein production in Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruijuan; Lin, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobin is an oxygen-binding protein that promotes oxygen delivery and reduces oxygen consumption under low oxygen conditions to increase the efficiency of cell respiration and metabolism. In this study, we introduced a Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) into Chlorella vulgaris by Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT). PCR analysis confirmed that the vgb gene was successfully integrated into the Chlorella vulgaris genome. Analysis of biomass obtained in shake flasks revealed transformant biomass concentrations as high as 3.28 g/L, which was 38.81% higher than that of the wild-type strain. Lutein content of transformants also increased slightly. Further experiments recovered a maximum lutein yield of 2.91 mg/L from the transformants, which was 36.77% higher than that of the wild-type strain. The above results suggest that integrated expression of the vgb gene may improve cell growth and lutein yield in Chlorella vulgaris, with applications to lutein production from Chlorella during fermentation.

  20. Polyhydroxyalkanoate production in Rhodobacter capsulatus: genes, mutants, expression, and physiology.

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, R G; Gabbert, K K; Locke, T A; Madigan, M T

    1997-01-01

    Like many other prokaryotes, the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus produces high levels of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) when a suitable carbon source is available. The three genes that are traditionally considered to be necessary in the PHA biosynthetic pathway, phaA (beta-ketothiolase), phaB (acetoacetylcoenzyme A reductase), and phaC (PHA synthase), were cloned from Rhodobacter capsulatus. In R. capsulatus, the phaAB genes are not linked to the phaC gene. Translational beta-galactosidase fusions to phaA and phaC were constructed and recombined into the chromosome. Both phaC and phaA were constitutively expressed regardless of whether PHA production was induced, suggesting that control is posttranslational at the enzymatic level. Consistent with this conclusion, it was shown that the R. capsulatus transcriptional nitrogen-sensing circuits were not involved in PHA synthesis. The doubling times of R. capsulatus transcriptional nitrogen-sensing circuits were not involved in PHA synthesis. The doubling times of R. capsulatus grown on numerous carbon sources were determined, indicating that this bacterium grows on C2 to C12 fatty acids. Grown on acetone, caproate, or heptanoate, wild-type R. capsulatus produced high levels of PHAs. Although a phaC deletion strain was unable to synthesize PHAs on any carbon source, phaA and phaAB deletion strains were able to produce PHAs, indicating that alternative routes for the synthesis of substrates for the synthase are present. The nutritional versatility and bioenergetic versatility of R. capsulatus, coupled with its ability to produce large amounts of PHAs and its genetic tractability, make it an attractive model for the study of PHA production. PMID:9251189

  1. RecA Binding to a Single Double-Stranded DNA Molecule: A Possible Role of DNA Conformational Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, J. F.; Robert, J.; Bourdieu, L.; Chatenay, D.; Marko, J. F.

    1998-10-01

    Most genetic regulatory mechanisms involve protein-DNA interactions. In these processes, the classical Watson-Crick DNA structure sometimes is distorted severely, which in turn enables the precise recognition of the specific sites by the protein. Despite its key importance, very little is known about such deformation processes. To address this general question, we have studied a model system, namely, RecA binding to double-stranded DNA. Results from micromanipulation experiments indicate that RecA binds strongly to stretched DNA; based on this observation, we propose that spontaneous thermal stretching fluctuations may play a role in the binding of RecA to DNA. This has fundamental implications for the protein-DNA binding mechanism, which must therefore rely in part on a combination of flexibility and thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure. We also show that this mechanism is sequence sensitive. Theoretical simulations support this interpretation of our experimental results, and it is argued that this is of broad relevance to DNA-protein interactions.

  2. RecA binding to a single double-stranded DNA molecule: a possible role of DNA conformational fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Leger, J F; Robert, J; Bourdieu, L; Chatenay, D; Marko, J F

    1998-10-13

    Most genetic regulatory mechanisms involve protein-DNA interactions. In these processes, the classical Watson-Crick DNA structure sometimes is distorted severely, which in turn enables the precise recognition of the specific sites by the protein. Despite its key importance, very little is known about such deformation processes. To address this general question, we have studied a model system, namely, RecA binding to double-stranded DNA. Results from micromanipulation experiments indicate that RecA binds strongly to stretched DNA; based on this observation, we propose that spontaneous thermal stretching fluctuations may play a role in the binding of RecA to DNA. This has fundamental implications for the protein-DNA binding mechanism, which must therefore rely in part on a combination of flexibility and thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure. We also show that this mechanism is sequence sensitive. Theoretical simulations support this interpretation of our experimental results, and it is argued that this is of broad relevance to DNA-protein interactions.

  3. RecA binding to a single double-stranded DNA molecule: A possible role of DNA conformational fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Leger, J. F.; Robert, J.; Bourdieu, L.; Chatenay, D.; Marko, J. F.

    1998-01-01

    Most genetic regulatory mechanisms involve protein–DNA interactions. In these processes, the classical Watson–Crick DNA structure sometimes is distorted severely, which in turn enables the precise recognition of the specific sites by the protein. Despite its key importance, very little is known about such deformation processes. To address this general question, we have studied a model system, namely, RecA binding to double-stranded DNA. Results from micromanipulation experiments indicate that RecA binds strongly to stretched DNA; based on this observation, we propose that spontaneous thermal stretching fluctuations may play a role in the binding of RecA to DNA. This has fundamental implications for the protein–DNA binding mechanism, which must therefore rely in part on a combination of flexibility and thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure. We also show that this mechanism is sequence sensitive. Theoretical simulations support this interpretation of our experimental results, and it is argued that this is of broad relevance to DNA–protein interactions. PMID:9770480

  4. Correlated motion of protein subdomains and large-scale conformational flexibility of RecA protein filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Garmay; A, Shvetsov; D, Karelov; D, Lebedev; A, Radulescu; M, Petukhov; V, Isaev-Ivanov

    2012-02-01

    Based on X-ray crystallographic data available at Protein Data Bank, we have built molecular dynamics (MD) models of homologous recombinases RecA from E. coli and D. radiodurans. Functional form of RecA enzyme, which is known to be a long helical filament, was approximated by a trimer, simulated in periodic water box. The MD trajectories were analyzed in terms of large-scale conformational motions that could be detectable by neutron and X-ray scattering techniques. The analysis revealed that large-scale RecA monomer dynamics can be described in terms of relative motions of 7 subdomains. Motion of C-terminal domain was the major contributor to the overall dynamics of protein. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the MD trajectories in the atom coordinate space showed that rotation of C-domain is correlated with the conformational changes in the central domain and N-terminal domain, that forms the monomer-monomer interface. Thus, even though C-terminal domain is relatively far from the interface, its orientation is correlated with large-scale filament conformation. PCA of the trajectories in the main chain dihedral angle coordinate space implicates a co-existence of a several different large-scale conformations of the modeled trimer. In order to clarify the relationship of independent domain orientation with large-scale filament conformation, we have performed analysis of independent domain motion and its implications on the filament geometry.

  5. Uncovering the microscopic mechanism of strand exchange during RecA mediated homologous recombination using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankla, Manish; Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2012-02-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a key step during the repair process of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breakage. RecA is a protein that mediates HR in bacteria. RecA monomers polymerize on a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) separated from the broken dsDNA to form a helical filament, thus allowing strand exchange to occur. Recent crystal structures depict each RecA monomer in contact with three contiguous nucleotides called DNA triplets. Surprisingly, the conformation of each triplet is similar to that of a triplet in B-form DNA. However, in the filament the neighboring triplets are separated by loops of the RecA proteins. Single molecule experiments demonstrated that strand exchange propagation occurs in 3 base-pair increments. However, the temporal resolution of the experiments was insufficient to determine the exact molecular mechanism of the triplet propagation. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effect of both the RecA protein and the conformation of the bound ssDNA fragment on the stability of the duplex DNA intermediate formed during the strand-exchange process. Specifically, we report simulations of force-induced unzipping of duplex DNA in the presence and absence of the RecA filament that explored the effect of the triplet ladder conformation.

  6. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    DOEpatents

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  7. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    DOEpatents

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2014-08-05

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  8. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    DOEpatents

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2016-11-29

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  9. Regulation of the Escherichia coli glyA gene by the metR gene product and homocysteine.

    PubMed Central

    Plamann, M D; Stauffer, G V

    1989-01-01

    The methionine component of glyA gene regulation in Escherichia coli K-12 was investigated. The results indicate that the glyA gene is positively controlled by the metR gene product. Activation of glyA by the MetR protein requires homocysteine, an intermediate in methionine biosynthesis. The positive-acting metR regulatory system functions independently of a regulatory system shown previously to control glyA gene expression. PMID:2670901

  10. A Weighted Multipath Measurement Based on Gene Ontology for Estimating Gene Products Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lizhen; Dai, Xuemin; Song, Wei; Lu, Jingli

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Many different methods have been proposed for calculating the semantic similarity of term pairs based on gene ontology (GO). Most existing methods are based on information content (IC), and the methods based on IC are used more commonly than those based on the structure of GO. However, most IC-based methods not only fail to handle identical annotations but also show a strong bias toward well-annotated proteins. We propose a new method called weighted multipath measurement (WMM) for estimating the semantic similarity of gene products based on the structure of the GO. We not only considered the contribution of every path between two GO terms but also took the depth of the lowest common ancestors into account. We assigned different weights for different kinds of edges in GO graph. The similarity values calculated by WMM can be reused because they are only relative to the characteristics of GO terms. Experimental results showed that the similarity values obtained by WMM have a higher accuracy. We compared the performance of WMM with that of other methods using GO data and gene annotation datasets for yeast and humans downloaded from the GO database. We found that WMM is more suited for prediction of gene function than most existing IC-based methods and that it can distinguish proteins with identical annotations (two proteins are annotated with the same terms) from each other. PMID:25229994

  11. Direct involvement of DprA, the transformation-dedicated RecA loader, in the shut-off of pneumococcal competence

    PubMed Central

    Mirouze, Nicolas; Bergé, Mathieu A.; Soulet, Anne-Lise; Mortier-Barrière, Isabelle; Quentin, Yves; Fichant, Gwennaele; Granadel, Chantal; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Françoise; Noirot, Philippe; Polard, Patrice; Martin, Bernard; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Natural bacterial transformation is a genetically programmed process allowing genotype alterations that involves the internalization of DNA and its chromosomal integration catalyzed by the universal recombinase RecA, assisted by its transformation-dedicated loader, DNA processing protein A (DprA). In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the ability to internalize DNA, known as competence, is transient, developing suddenly and stopping as quickly. Competence is induced by the comC-encoded peptide, competence stimulating peptide (CSP), via a classic two-component regulatory system ComDE. Upon CSP binding, ComD phosphorylates the ComE response-regulator, which then activates transcription of comCDE and the competence-specific σX, leading to a sudden rise in CSP levels and rendering all cells in a culture competent. However, how competence stops has remained unknown. We report that DprA, under σX control, interacts with ComE∼P to block ComE-driven transcription, chiefly impacting σX production. Mutations of dprA specifically disrupting interaction with ComE were isolated and shown to map mainly to the N-terminal domain of DprA. Wild-type DprA but not ComE interaction mutants affected in vitro binding of ComE to its promoter targets. Once introduced at the dprA chromosomal locus, mutations disrupting DprA interaction with ComE altered competence shut-off. The absence of DprA was found to negatively impact growth following competence induction, highlighting the importance of DprA for pneumococcal physiology. DprA has thus two key roles: ensuring production of transformants via interaction with RecA and competence shut-off via interaction with ComE, avoiding physiologically detrimental consequences of prolonged competence. Finally, phylogenetic analyses revealed that the acquisition of a new function by DprA impacted its evolution in streptococci relying on ComE to regulate comX expression. PMID:23440217

  12. Identifying the Interaction between Genes and Gene Products Based on Frequently Seen Verbs in Medline Abstracts.

    PubMed

    Sekimizu; Park; Tsujii

    1998-01-01

    We have selected the most frequently seen verbs from raw texts made up of 1-million-words of Medline abstracts, and we were able to identify (or bracket) noun phrases contained in the corpus, with a precision rate of 90%. Then, based on the noun-phrase-bracketted corpus, we tried to find the subject and object terms for some frequently seen verbs in the domain. The precision rate of finding the right subject and object for each verb was about 73%. This task was only made possible because we were able to linguistically analyze (or parse) a large quantity of a raw corpus. Our approach will be useful for classifying genes and gene products and for identifying the interaction between them. It is the first step of our effort in building a genome-related thesaurus and hierarchies in a fully automatic way.

  13. Identification of the dnaA and dnaN gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, S; Sakakibara, Y

    1980-01-01

    A specialized transducing lambda phage carrying the dnaN genes of Escherichia coli specifies two proteins of about 41 and 48 kilodaltons (kd). The temperature-sensitive mutations, dnaN59 and dnaA167, were found to result in altered isoelectric points of the 41 and 48 kd proteins, respectively. Thus the dnaN gene product was identified as a weakly acidic 41 and 48 kd protein. The synthesis of the dnaN gene product is greatly reduced by insertion of a transposon Tn3 in the dnaA gene and by deletion in the gene at the distal end to the dnaN gene. Temperature-sensitive dnaA mutations, on the dnaN gene product. These results indicate that the synthesis of the dnaN gene product is dependent on the structural integrity of the dnaA gene.

  14. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products. Progress report, June 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5` UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  15. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  16. Rad51 and RecA juxtapose dsDNA ends ready for DNA ligase-catalyzed end-joining under recombinase-suppressive conditions.

    PubMed

    Konomura, Naoto; Arai, Naoto; Shinohara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Jun; Iwasaki, Wakana; Ikawa, Shukuko; Kusano, Kohji; Shibata, Takehiko

    2017-01-09

    RecA-family recombinase-catalyzed ATP-dependent homologous joint formation is critical for homologous recombination, in which RecA or Rad51 binds first to single-stranded (ss)DNA and then interacts with double-stranded (ds)DNA. However, when RecA or Rad51 interacts with dsDNA before binding to ssDNA, the homologous joint-forming activity of RecA or Rad51 is quickly suppressed. We found that under these and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-generating suppressive conditions for the recombinase activity, RecA or Rad51 at similar optimal concentrations enhances the DNA ligase-catalyzed dsDNA end-joining (DNA ligation) about 30- to 40-fold. The DNA ligation enhancement by RecA or Rad51 transforms most of the substrate DNA into multimers within 2-5 min, and for this enhancement, ADP is the common and best cofactor. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is effective for RecA, but not for Rad51. Rad51/RecA-enhanced DNA ligation depends on dsDNA-binding, as shown by a mutant, and is independent of physical interactions with the DNA ligase. These observations demonstrate the common and unique activities of RecA and Rad51 to juxtapose dsDNA-ends in preparation for covalent joining by a DNA ligase. This new in vitro function of Rad51 provides a simple explanation for our genetic observation that Rad51 plays a role in the fidelity of the end-joining of a reporter plasmid DNA, by yeast canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in vivo.

  17. Rad51 and RecA juxtapose dsDNA ends ready for DNA ligase-catalyzed end-joining under recombinase-suppressive conditions

    PubMed Central

    Konomura, Naoto; Arai, Naoto; Shinohara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Jun; Iwasaki, Wakana; Ikawa, Shukuko; Kusano, Kohji; Shibata, Takehiko

    2017-01-01

    RecA-family recombinase-catalyzed ATP-dependent homologous joint formation is critical for homologous recombination, in which RecA or Rad51 binds first to single-stranded (ss)DNA and then interacts with double-stranded (ds)DNA. However, when RecA or Rad51 interacts with dsDNA before binding to ssDNA, the homologous joint-forming activity of RecA or Rad51 is quickly suppressed. We found that under these and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-generating suppressive conditions for the recombinase activity, RecA or Rad51 at similar optimal concentrations enhances the DNA ligase-catalyzed dsDNA end-joining (DNA ligation) about 30- to 40-fold. The DNA ligation enhancement by RecA or Rad51 transforms most of the substrate DNA into multimers within 2–5 min, and for this enhancement, ADP is the common and best cofactor. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is effective for RecA, but not for Rad51. Rad51/RecA-enhanced DNA ligation depends on dsDNA-binding, as shown by a mutant, and is independent of physical interactions with the DNA ligase. These observations demonstrate the common and unique activities of RecA and Rad51 to juxtapose dsDNA-ends in preparation for covalent joining by a DNA ligase. This new in vitro function of Rad51 provides a simple explanation for our genetic observation that Rad51 plays a role in the fidelity of the end-joining of a reporter plasmid DNA, by yeast canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in vivo. PMID:27794044

  18. The Wilms’ Tumor Suppressor Gene (wt1) Product Regulates Dax-1 Gene Expression during Gonadal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungho; Prawitt, Dirk; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Torban, Elena; Vicaner, Caroline; Goodyer, Paul; Zabel, Bernard; Pelletier, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    Gonadal differentiation is dependent upon a molecular cascade responsible for ovarian or testicular development from the bipotential gonadal ridge. Genetic analysis has implicated a number of gene products essential for this process, which include Sry, WT1, SF-1, and DAX-1. We have sought to better define the role of WT1 in this process by identifying downstream targets of WT1 during normal gonadal development. We have noticed that in the developing murine gonadal ridge, wt1 expression precedes expression of Dax-1, a nuclear receptor gene. We document here that the spatial distribution profiles of both proteins in the developing gonad overlap. We also demonstrate that WT1 can activate the Dax-1 promoter. Footprinting analysis, transient transfections, promoter mutagenesis, and mobility shift assays suggest that WT1 regulates Dax-1 via GC-rich binding sites found upstream of the Dax-1 TATA box. We show that two WT1-interacting proteins, the product of a Denys-Drash syndrome allele of wt1 and prostate apoptosis response-4 protein, inhibit WT1-mediated transactivation of Dax-1. In addition, we demonstrate that WT1 can activate the endogenous Dax-1 promoter. Our results indicate that the WT1–DAX-1 pathway is an early event in the process of mammalian sex determination. PMID:10022915

  19. Production and clinical development of nanoparticles for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Guo, Zhaopei; Tian, Huayu; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising strategy for specific treatment of numerous gene-associated human diseases by intentionally altering the gene expression in pathological cells. A successful clinical application of gene-based therapy depends on an efficient gene delivery system. Many efforts have been attempted to improve the safety and efficiency of gene-based therapies. Nanoparticles have been proved to be the most promising vehicles for clinical gene therapy due to their tunable size, shape, surface, and biological behaviors. In this review, the clinical development of nanoparticles for gene delivery will be particularly highlighted. Several promising candidates, which are closest to clinical applications, will be briefly reviewed. Then, the recent developments of nanoparticles for clinical gene therapy will be identified and summarized. Finally, the development of nanoparticles for clinical gene delivery in future will be prospected. PMID:27088105

  20. Development of small high-copy-number plasmid vectors for gene expression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Umelo-Njaka, E; Nomellini, J F; Yim, H; Smit, J

    2001-07-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is a bacterium with a distinctive life cycle and so it is studied as a cell development model. In addition, we have adapted this bacterium for recombinant protein production and display based on the crystalline surface protein (S)-layer and its C-terminal secretion signal. We report here the development of small, high-copy-number plasmid vectors and methods for producing an obligate expression host. The vectors are based on a narrow-host-range colE1-replicon-based plasmid commonly used in Escherichia coli, to which was added the replication origin of the IncQ plasmid RSF1010. C. crescentus strains were modified to enable plasmid replication by introduction of the RSF1010 repBAC genes at the recA locus. The small (4.0-4.5 kb) plasmids were in high copy numbers in both C. crescentus and E. coli and amenable to rapid methods for plasmid isolation and DNA sequencing. The method for introducing repBAC is suitable for other C. crescentus strains or any bacterium with an adequately homologous recA gene. Application of the vector for protein expression, based on the type I secretion system of the S-layer protein, when compared to constructs in broad-host-range plasmids, resulted in reduced time and steps required from clone construction to recombinant protein recovery and increased protein yield.

  1. Natural product proteomining, a quantitative proteomics platform, allows rapid discovery of biosynthetic gene clusters for different classes of natural products.

    PubMed

    Gubbens, Jacob; Zhu, Hua; Girard, Geneviève; Song, Lijiang; Florea, Bogdan I; Aston, Philip; Ichinose, Koji; Filippov, Dmitri V; Choi, Young H; Overkleeft, Herman S; Challis, Gregory L; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2014-06-19

    Information on gene clusters for natural product biosynthesis is accumulating rapidly because of the current boom of available genome sequencing data. However, linking a natural product to a specific gene cluster remains challenging. Here, we present a widely applicable strategy for the identification of gene clusters for specific natural products, which we name natural product proteomining. The method is based on using fluctuating growth conditions that ensure differential biosynthesis of the bioactivity of interest. Subsequent combination of metabolomics and quantitative proteomics establishes correlations between abundance of natural products and concomitant changes in the protein pool, which allows identification of the relevant biosynthetic gene cluster. We used this approach to elucidate gene clusters for different natural products in Bacillus and Streptomyces, including a novel juglomycin-type antibiotic. Natural product proteomining does not require prior knowledge of the gene cluster or secondary metabolite and therefore represents a general strategy for identification of all types of gene clusters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528 reference genes in gene expression studies by qRT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juanjuan; Tan, Yang; Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Xiaohua; Li, Fuli

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528 is a promising platform organism for biofuel production from syngas. Gene expression analysis permits a better understanding of the important molecular biological characteristics of this organism, such as carbon fixation and solvent adaptation. Normalization is a prerequisite for accurate gene expression analysis, but until now, no valid reference genes have been proposed for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis of C. ljungdahlii DSM 13528. In this study, seven candidate reference genes (gyrA, rho, fotl, rpoA, gukl, recA, 16S rRNA) were selected for qRT-PCR quantification of their expression levels in various culture conditions that corresponded to different carbon sources and stresses. Two analytical programs, geNorm and NormFinder, were used to evaluate reference gene stability. The results showed that gyrA, rho and fotl exhibited the most stable expression levels across all tested samples and can be confidently used as reference genes to normalize the transcriptional data of target genes in qRT-PCR analyses of C. ljungdahlii DSM 13528. This study presents the first attempt to explore the validity of candidate reference genes and provide a set of valid reference genes for normalizing C. ljungdahlii DSM 13528 target gene expression and transcriptome analysis.

  3. Development of a gene synthesis platform for the efficient large scale production of small genes encoding animal toxins.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Ana Filipa; Brás, Joana L A; Guerreiro, Catarina I P D; Vincentelli, Renaud; Fontes, Carlos M G A

    2016-12-01

    Gene synthesis is becoming an important tool in many fields of recombinant DNA technology, including recombinant protein production. De novo gene synthesis is quickly replacing the classical cloning and mutagenesis procedures and allows generating nucleic acids for which no template is available. In addition, when coupled with efficient gene design algorithms that optimize codon usage, it leads to high levels of recombinant protein expression. Here, we describe the development of an optimized gene synthesis platform that was applied to the large scale production of small genes encoding venom peptides. This improved gene synthesis method uses a PCR-based protocol to assemble synthetic DNA from pools of overlapping oligonucleotides and was developed to synthesise multiples genes simultaneously. This technology incorporates an accurate, automated and cost effective ligation independent cloning step to directly integrate the synthetic genes into an effective Escherichia coli expression vector. The robustness of this technology to generate large libraries of dozens to thousands of synthetic nucleic acids was demonstrated through the parallel and simultaneous synthesis of 96 genes encoding animal toxins. An automated platform was developed for the large-scale synthesis of small genes encoding eukaryotic toxins. Large scale recombinant expression of synthetic genes encoding eukaryotic toxins will allow exploring the extraordinary potency and pharmacological diversity of animal venoms, an increasingly valuable but unexplored source of lead molecules for drug discovery.

  4. Single-molecule imaging of DNA pairing by RecA reveals a three-dimensional homology search.

    PubMed

    Forget, Anthony L; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2012-02-08

    DNA breaks can be repaired with high fidelity by homologous recombination. A ubiquitous protein that is essential for this DNA template-directed repair is RecA. After resection of broken DNA to produce single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), RecA assembles on this ssDNA into a filament with the unique capacity to search and find DNA sequences in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) that are homologous to the ssDNA. This homology search is vital to recombinational DNA repair, and results in homologous pairing and exchange of DNA strands. Homologous pairing involves DNA sequence-specific target location by the RecA-ssDNA complex. Despite decades of study, the mechanism of this enigmatic search process remains unknown. RecA is a DNA-dependent ATPase, but ATP hydrolysis is not required for DNA pairing and strand exchange, eliminating active search processes. Using dual optical trapping to manipulate DNA, and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image DNA pairing, we demonstrate that both the three-dimensional conformational state of the dsDNA target and the length of the homologous RecA-ssDNA filament have important roles in the homology search. We discovered that as the end-to-end distance of the target dsDNA molecule is increased, constraining the available three-dimensional (3D) conformations of the molecule, the rate of homologous pairing decreases. Conversely, when the length of the ssDNA in the nucleoprotein filament is increased, homology is found faster. We propose a model for the DNA homology search process termed 'intersegmental contact sampling', in which the intrinsic multivalent nature of the RecA nucleoprotein filament is used to search DNA sequence space within 3D domains of DNA, exploiting multiple weak contacts to rapidly search for homology. Our findings highlight the importance of the 3D conformational dynamics of DNA, reveal a previously unknown facet of the homology search, and provide insight into the mechanism of DNA target location by this member of a

  5. Extended gene expression by medium exchange and repeated transient transfection for recombinant protein production enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Laura; Gutiérrez-Granados, Sonia; Berrow, Nicholas Simon; Segura, Maria Mercedes; Gòdia, Francesc

    2015-05-01

    Production of recombinant products in mammalian cell cultures can be achieved by stable gene expression (SGE) or transient gene expression (TGE). The former is based on the integration of a plasmid DNA into the host cell genome allowing continuous gene expression. The latter is based on episomal plasmid DNA expression. Conventional TGE is limited to a short production period of usually about 96 h, therefore limiting productivity. A novel gene expression approach termed extended gene expression (EGE) is explored in this study. The aim of EGE is to prolong the production period by the combination of medium exchange and repeated transfection of cell cultures with plasmid DNA to improve overall protein production. The benefit of this methodology was evaluated for the production of three model recombinant products: intracellular GFP, secreted GFP, and a Gag-GFP virus-like particles (VLPs). Productions were carried out in HEK 293 cell suspension cultures grown in animal-derived component free media using polyethylenimine (PEI) as transfection reagent. Transfections were repeated throughout the production process using different plasmid DNA concentrations, intervals of time, and culture feeding conditions in order to identify the best approach to achieve sustained high-level gene expression. Using this novel EGE strategy, the production period was prolonged between 192 and 240 h with a 4-12-fold increase in production levels, depending on the product type considered. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Collaborative study on regulatory science for facilitating clinical development of gene therapy products for genetic diseases].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Eriko; Igarashi, Yuka; Sato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy products are expected as innovative medicinal products for intractable diseases such as life-threatening genetic diseases and cancer. Recently, clinical developments by pharmaceutical companies are accelerated in Europe and the United States, and the first gene therapy product in advanced countries was approved for marketing authorization by the European Commission in 2012. On the other hand, more than 40 clinical studies for gene therapy have been completed or ongoing in Japan, most of them are conducted as clinical researches by academic institutes, and few clinical trials have been conducted for approval of gene therapy products. In order to promote the development of gene therapy products, revision of the current guideline and/or preparation of concept paper to address the evaluation of the quality and safety of gene therapy products are necessary and desired to clearly show what data should be submitted before First-in-Human clinical trials of novel gene therapy products. We started collaborative study with academia and regulatory agency to promote regulatory science toward clinical development of gene therapy products for genetic diseases based on lentivirus and adeno-associated virus vectors; National Center for Child Health and Development (NCCHD), Nippon Medical School and PMDA have been joined in the task force. At first, we are preparing pre-draft of the revision of the current gene therapy guidelines in this project.

  7. The RecBC enzyme loads RecA protein onto ssDNA asymmetrically and independently of chi, resulting in constitutive recombination activation.

    PubMed

    Churchill, J J; Anderson, D G; Kowalczykowski, S C

    1999-04-01

    Double-strand DNA break repair and homologous recombination in Escherichia coli proceed by the RecBCD pathway, which is regulated by cis-acting elements known as chi sites. A crucial feature of this regulation is the RecBCD enzyme-directed loading of RecA protein specifically onto the 3'-terminal, chi-containing DNA strand. Here we show that RecBC enzyme (lacking the RecD subunit) loads RecA protein constitutively onto the 3'-terminal DNA strand, with no requirement for chi. This strand is preferentially utilized in homologous pairing reactions. We propose that RecA protein loading is a latent property of the RecBCD holoenzyme, which is normally blocked by the RecD subunit and is revealed following interaction with chi.

  8. Form gene clustering method about pan-ethnic-group products based on emotional semantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dengkai; Ding, Jingjing; Gao, Minzhuo; Ma, Danping; Liu, Donghui

    2016-09-01

    The use of pan-ethnic-group products form knowledge primarily depends on a designer's subjective experience without user participation. The majority of studies primarily focus on the detection of the perceptual demands of consumers from the target product category. A pan-ethnic-group products form gene clustering method based on emotional semantic is constructed. Consumers' perceptual images of the pan-ethnic-group products are obtained by means of product form gene extraction and coding and computer aided product form clustering technology. A case of form gene clustering about the typical pan-ethnic-group products is investigated which indicates that the method is feasible. This paper opens up a new direction for the future development of product form design which improves the agility of product design process in the era of Industry 4.0.

  9. Requirements for Clinical Trials with Gene Therapy and Transplant Products in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Marti, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This chapter aims to describe and summarize the regulation of gene and cell therapy products in Switzerland and its legal basis. Product types are briefly described, as are Swiss-specific terminologies such as the term "transplant product," which means products manufactured from cells, tissues, or even whole organs. Although some parts of this chapter may show a guideline character, they are not legally binding, but represent the current thinking of Swissmedic, the Swiss Agency for Therapeutic Products. As so far the experience with marketing approval of gene therapy and cell therapy products in Switzerland is limited, this chapter focuses on the regulation of clinical trials conducted with these products. Quality, nonclinical, and clinical aspects are summarized separately for gene therapy products and transplant products.

  10. Regulatory Oversight of Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy Products in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minjoung; Han, Euiri; Lee, Sunmi; Kim, Taegyun; Shin, Won

    2015-01-01

    The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety regulates gene therapy and cell therapy products as biological products under the authority of the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act. As with other medicinal products, gene therapy and cell therapy products are subject to approval for use in clinical trials and for a subsequent marketing authorization and to post-market surveillance. Research and development of gene therapy and cell therapy products have been progressing rapidly in Korea with extensive investment, offering great potential for the treatment of various serious diseases. To facilitate development of safe and effective products and provide more opportunities to patients suffering from severe diseases, several regulatory programs, such as the use of investigational products for emergency situations, fast-track approval, prereview of application packages, and intensive regulatory consultation, can be applied to these products. The regulatory approach for these innovative products is case by case and founded on science-based review that is flexible and balances the risks and benefits.

  11. Chloroplast-targeted bacterial RecA proteins confer tolerance to chloroplast DNA damage by methyl viologen or UV-C radiation in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyesung; Jin, Yong-Mei; Choi, Mi Hwa; Lee, Hyeyun; Kim, Minkyun

    2013-02-01

    The nature and importance of the DNA repair system in the chloroplasts of higher plants under oxidative stress or UV radiation-induced genotoxicity was investigated via gain-of-functional approaches exploiting bacterial RecAs. For this purpose, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants and cell suspensions overexpressing Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa RecA fused to a chloroplast-targeting transit peptide were first produced. The transgenic tobacco plants maintained higher amounts of chloroplast DNA compared with wild-type (WT) upon treatments with methyl viologen (MV), a herbicide that generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in chloroplasts. Consistent with these results, the transgenic tobacco leaves showed less bleaching than WT following MV exposure. Similarly, the MV-treated transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the chloroplast RecA homologue RECA1 showed weak bleaching, while the recA1 mutant showed opposite results upon MV treatment. In addition, when exposed to UV-C radiation, the dark-grown E. coli RecA-overexpressing transgenic tobacco cell suspensions, but not their WT counterparts, resumed growth and greening after the recovery period under light conditions. Measurements of UV radiation-induced chloroplast DNA damage using DraI assays (Harlow et al. 1994) with the chloroplast rbcL DNA probe and quantitative PCR analyses showed that the transgenic cell suspensions better repaired their UV-C radiation-induced chloroplast DNA lesions compared with WT. Taken all together, it was concluded that RecA-overexpressing transgenic plants are endowed with an increased chloroplast DNA maintenance capacity and enhanced repair activities, and consequently have a higher survival tolerance to genotoxic stresses. These observations are made possible by the functional compatibility of the bacterial RecAs in chloroplasts. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  12. Aflatoxin conducive and non-conducive growth conditions reveal new gene associations with aflatoxin production.

    PubMed

    Price, Michael S; Conners, Shannon B; Tachdjian, Sabrina; Kelly, Robert M; Payne, Gary A

    2005-06-01

    Research on aflatoxin (AF) production has traditionally focused on defining the AF biosynthetic pathway with the goal of identifying potential targets for intervention. To understand the effect of nitrogen source, carbon source, temperature, and pH on the regulation of AF biosynthesis, a targeted cDNA microarray consisting of genes associated with AF production over time was employed. Expression profiles for genes involved in AF biosynthesis grouped into five clades. A putative regulon was identified consisting of 20 genes that were induced in the conducive nitrogen and pH treatments and the non-conducive carbon and temperature treatments, as well as four other putative regulons corresponding to each of the four variables studied. Seventeen genes exhibited consistent induction/repression profiles across all the experiments. One of these genes was consistently downregulated with AF production. Overexpression of this gene resulted in repression of AF biosynthesis. The cellular function of this gene is currently unresolved.

  13. A Mutant Gene That Increases Gibberellin Production in Brassica1

    PubMed Central

    Rood, Stewart B.; Williams, Paul H.; Pearce, David; Murofushi, Noboru; Mander, Lewis N.; Pharis, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    A single gene mutant (elongated internode [ein/ein]) with accelerated shoot elongation was identified from a rapid cycling line of Brassica rapa. Relative to normal plants, mutant plants had slightly accelerated floral development, greater stem dry weights, and particularly, increased internode and inflorescence elongation. The application of the triazole plant growth retardant, paclobutrazol, inhibited shoot elongation, returning ein to a more normal phenotype. Conversely, exogenous gibberellin A3 (GA3) can convert normal genotypes to a phenotype resembling ein. The content of endogenous GA1 and GA3 were estimated by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring using [2H]GA1, as a quantitative internal standard and at day 14 were 1.5- and 12.1-fold higher per stem, respectively, in ein than in normal plants, although GA concentrations were more similar. The endogenous levels of GA20 and GA1, and the rate of GA19 metabolism were simultaneously analyzed at day 7 by feeding [2H2]GA19 and measuring metabolites [2H2]GA20 and [2H2]GA1 and endogenous GA20 and GA1, with [2H5]GA20 and [2H5]GA1 as quantitative internal standards. Levels of GA1 and GA20 were 4.6- and 12.9-fold higher, respectively, and conversions to GA20 and GA1 were 8.3 and 1.3 times faster in ein than normal plants. Confirming the enhanced rate of GA1 biosynthesis in ein, the conversion of [3H]GA20 to [3H]GA1 was also faster in ein than in the normal genotype. Thus, the ein allele results in accelerated GA1 biosynthesis and an elevated content of endogenous GAs, including the dihydroxylated GAs A1 and A3. The enhanced GA production probably underlies the accelerated shoot growth and development, and particularly, the increased shoot elongation. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667574

  14. Linking gene regulation to mRNA production and export.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana; Hurt, Ed

    2011-06-01

    Regulation of gene expression can occur at many different levels. One important step in the gene expression process is the transport of mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In recent years, studies have described how nuclear mRNA export depends on the steps preceding and following transport through nuclear pore complexes. These include gene activation, transcription, mRNA processing and mRNP assembly and disassembly. In this review, we summarise recent insights into the links between these steps in the gene expression cascade.

  15. Fc-receptor and M-protein genes of group A streptococci are products of gene duplication.

    PubMed Central

    Heath, D G; Cleary, P P

    1989-01-01

    The partial nucleotide sequence for an Fc-receptor gene from an M-type 76 group A streptococcus was determined. DNA sequence analysis revealed considerable sequence similarity between the Fc-receptor and M-protein genes in their proposed promoter regions, signal sequences, and 3' termini. Additional analysis indicated that the deduced Fc-receptor protein contains a proline-rich region and membrane anchor region highly similar to that of M protein. In view of these results, we postulated that Fc-receptor and M-protein genes of group A streptococci are the products of gene duplication from a common ancestral gene. It is proposed that DNA sequence similarity between these two genes may allow for extragenic homologous recombination as a means of generating antigenic diversity in these two surface proteins. PMID:2660147

  16. Identification of potentially hazardous human gene products in GMO risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Bergmans, Hans; Logie, Colin; Van Maanen, Kees; Hermsen, Harm; Meredyth, Michelle; Van Der Vlugt, Cécile

    2008-01-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs), e.g. viral vectors, could threaten the environment if by their release they spread hazardous gene products. Even in contained use, to prevent adverse consequences, viral vectors carrying genes from mammals or humans should be especially scrutinized as to whether gene products that they synthesize could be hazardous in their new context. Examples of such potentially hazardous gene products (PHGPs) are: protein toxins, products of dominant alleles that have a role in hereditary diseases, gene products and sequences involved in genome rearrangements, gene products involved in immunomodulation or with an endocrine function, gene products involved in apoptosis, activated proto-oncogenes. For contained use of a GMO that carries a construct encoding a PHGP, the precautionary principle dictates that safety measures should be applied on a "worst case" basis, until the risks of the specific case have been assessed. The potential hazard of cloned genes can be estimated before empirical data on the actual GMO become available. Preliminary data may be used to focus hazard identification and risk assessment. Both predictive and empirical data may also help to identify what further information is needed to assess the risk of the GMO. A two-step approach, whereby a PHGP is evaluated for its conceptual dangers, then checked by data bank searches, is delineated here.

  17. Comparison of Bacillus monooxygenase genes for unique fatty acid production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper reviews Bacillus genes encoding monooxygenase enzymes producing unique fatty acid metabolites. Specifically, it examines standard monooxygenase electron transfer schemes and related domain structures of these fused domain enzymes on route to understanding the observed oxygenase activiti...

  18. Cloning large natural product gene clusters from the environment: Piecing environmental DNA gene clusters back together with TAR

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeffrey H; Feng, Zhiyang; Bauer, John D; Kallifidas, Dimitris; Calle, Paula Y; Brady, Sean F

    2010-01-01

    A single gram of soil can contain thousands of unique bacterial species, of which only a small fraction is regularly cultured in the laboratory. Although the fermentation of cultured microorganisms has provided access to numerous bioactive secondary metabolites, with these same methods it is not possible to characterize the natural products encoded by the uncultured majority. The heterologous expression of biosynthetic gene clusters cloned from DNA extracted directly from environmental samples (eDNA) has the potential to provide access to the chemical diversity encoded in the genomes of uncultured bacteria. One of the challenges facing this approach has been that many natural product biosynthetic gene clusters are too large to be readily captured on a single fragment of cloned eDNA. The reassembly of large eDNA-derived natural product gene clusters from collections of smaller overlapping clones represents one potential solution to this problem. Unfortunately, traditional methods for the assembly of large DNA sequences from multiple overlapping clones can be technically challenging. Here we present a general experimental framework that permits the recovery of large natural product biosynthetic gene clusters on overlapping soil-derived eDNA cosmid clones and the reassembly of these large gene clusters using transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The development of practical methods for the rapid assembly of biosynthetic gene clusters from collections of overlapping eDNA clones is an important step toward being able to functionally study larger natural product gene clusters from uncultured bacteria. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 93: 833–844, 2010. PMID:20577994

  19. Enhancement of astaxanthin production in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous by efficient method for the complete deletion of genes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Keisuke; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Morita, Toshihiko; Nishimura, Akira; Sasaki, Daisuke; Ishii, Jun; Ogino, Chiaki; Kizaki, Noriyuki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-09-13

    Red yeast, Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is the only yeast known to produce astaxanthin, an anti-oxidant isoprenoid (carotenoid) widely used in the aquaculture, food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. The potential of this microorganism as a platform cell factory for isoprenoid production has been recognized because of high flux through its native terpene pathway. Recently, we developed a multiple gene expression system in X. dendrorhous and enhanced the mevalonate synthetic pathway to increase astaxanthin production. In contrast, the mevalonate synthetic pathway is suppressed by ergosterol through feedback inhibition. Therefore, releasing the mevalonate synthetic pathway from this inhibition through the deletion of genes involved in ergosterol synthesis is a promising strategy to improve isoprenoid production. An efficient method for deleting diploid genes in X. dendrorhous, however, has not yet been developed. Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous was cultivated under gradually increasing concentrations of antibiotics following the introduction of antibiotic resistant genes to be replaced with target genes. Using this method, double CYP61 genes encoding C-22 sterol desaturases relating to ergosterol biosynthesis were deleted sequentially. This double CYP61 deleted strain showed decreased ergosterol biosynthesis compared with the parental strain and single CYP61 disrupted strain. Additionally, this double deletion of CYP61 genes showed increased astaxanthin production compared with the parental strain and the single CYP61 knockout strain. Finally, astaxanthin production was enhanced by 1.4-fold compared with the parental strain, although astaxanthin production was not affected in the single CYP61 knockout strain. In this study, we developed a system to completely delete target diploid genes in X. dendrorhous. Using this method, we deleted diploid CYP61 genes involved in the synthesis of ergosterol that inhibits the pathway for mevalonate, which is a common

  20. Vector systems for prenatal gene therapy: principles of non-viral vector design and production.

    PubMed

    Wong, Suet Ping; Argyros, Orestis; Harbottle, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy vectors based on viruses are the most effective gene delivery systems in use today and although efficient at gene transfer their potential toxicity (Hacein-Bey-Abina et al., Science 302:415-419, 2003) provides impetus for the development of safer non-viral alternatives. An ideal vector for human gene therapy should deliver sustainable therapeutic levels of gene expression without affecting the viability of the host at either the cellular or somatic level. Vectors, which comprise entirely human elements, may provide the most suitable method of achieving this. Non-viral vectors are attractive alternatives to viral gene delivery systems because of their low toxicity, relatively easy production, and great versatility. The development of more efficient, economically prepared, and safer gene delivery vectors is a crucial prerequisite for their successful clinical application and remains a primary strategic task of gene therapy research.

  1. High-temperature piezoelectric crystals ReCa4O(BO3)3: a review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fapeng; Hou, Shuai; Zhao, Xian; Zhang, Shujun

    2014-08-01

    High-temperature sensors are desirable for structural health monitoring and/or nondestructive evaluation of next-generation turbines, more efficient jet engines, and the furnace components of electrical power plants. Of all the investigated high-temperature piezoelectric materials, rare-earth calcium oxyborate crystals ReCa4O(BO3)3 (ReCOB, Re: rare-earth) exhibit attractive advantages for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing. In this paper, the electroelastic properties of different ReCOB piezoelectric crystals are investigated. The crosstalk between various vibration modes are discussed, from which the optimized crystal cuts are achieved. Furthermore, temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity, dielectric, elastic, piezoelectric, and electromechanical properties of ReCOB crystals are studied. Finally, the thermal properties, including thermal expansion, specific heat, and thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures are studied and compared with commercially available high-temperature piezoelectric crystals.

  2. DNA sequence, products, and transcriptional pattern of the genes involved in production of the DNA replication inhibitor microcin B17.

    PubMed Central

    Genilloud, O; Moreno, F; Kolter, R

    1989-01-01

    The 3.8-kilobase segment of plasmid DNA that contains the genes required for production of the DNA replication inhibitor microcin B17 was sequenced. The sequence contains four open reading frames which were shown to be translated in vivo by the construction of fusions to lacZ. The location of these open reading frames fits well with the location of the four microcin B17 production genes, mcbABCD, identified previously through genetic complementation. The products of the four genes have been identified, and the observed molecular weights of the proteins agree with those predicted from the nucleotide sequence. The transcription of these genes was studied by using fusions to lacZ and physical mapping of mRNA start sites. Three promoters were identified in this region. The major promoter for all the genes is a growth phase-regulated OmpR-dependent promoter located upstream of mcbA. A second promoter is located within mcbC and is responsible for a low-level basal expression of mcbD. A third promoter, located within mcbD, promotes transcription in the reverse direction starting within mcbD and extending through mcbC. The resulting mRNA appears to be an untranslated antisense transcript that could play a regulatory role in the expression of these genes. Images PMID:2644225

  3. Inducible Amplification of Gene Copy Number and Heterologous Protein Production in the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Morlino, Giovanni B.; Tizzani, Lorenza; Fleer, Reinhard; Frontali, Laura; Bianchi, Michele M.

    1999-01-01

    Heterologous protein production can be doubled by increasing the copy number of the corresponding heterologous gene. We constructed a host-vector system in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that was able to induce copy number amplification of pKD1 plasmid-based vectors upon expression of an integrated copy of the plasmid recombinase gene. We increased the production and secretion of two heterologous proteins, glucoamylase from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans and mammalian interleukin-1β, following gene dosage amplification when the heterologous genes were carried by pKD1-based vectors. The choice of the promoters for expression of the integrated recombinase gene and of the episomal heterologous genes are critical for the mitotic stability of the host-vector system. PMID:10543790

  4. Inducible amplification of gene copy number and heterologous protein production in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Morlino, G B; Tizzani, L; Fleer, R; Frontali, L; Bianchi, M M

    1999-11-01

    Heterologous protein production can be doubled by increasing the copy number of the corresponding heterologous gene. We constructed a host-vector system in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that was able to induce copy number amplification of pKD1 plasmid-based vectors upon expression of an integrated copy of the plasmid recombinase gene. We increased the production and secretion of two heterologous proteins, glucoamylase from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans and mammalian interleukin-1beta, following gene dosage amplification when the heterologous genes were carried by pKD1-based vectors. The choice of the promoters for expression of the integrated recombinase gene and of the episomal heterologous genes are critical for the mitotic stability of the host-vector system.

  5. Improvement of gougerotin and nikkomycin production by engineering their biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Du, Deyao; Zhu, Yu; Wei, Junhong; Tian, Yuqing; Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2013-07-01

    Nikkomycins and gougerotin are peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics with broad biological activities. The nikkomycin biosynthetic gene cluster comprises one pathway-specific regulatory gene (sanG) and 21 structural genes, whereas the gene cluster for gougerotin biosynthesis includes one putative regulatory gene, one major facilitator superfamily transporter gene, and 13 structural genes. In the present study, we introduced sanG driven by six different promoters into Streptomyces ansochromogenes TH322. Nikkomycin production was increased significantly with the highest increase in engineered strain harboring hrdB promoter-driven sanG. In the meantime, we replaced the native promoter of key structural genes in the gougerotin (gou) gene cluster with the hrdB promoters. The heterologous producer Streptomyces coelicolor M1146 harboring the modified gene cluster produced gougerotin up to 10-fold more than strains carrying the unmodified cluster. Therefore, genetic manipulations of genes involved in antibiotics biosynthesis with the constitutive hrdB promoter present a robust, easy-to-use system generally useful for the improvement of antibiotics production in Streptomyces.

  6. Escherichia coli yjjPB genes encode a succinate transporter important for succinate production.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Keita; Nanatani, Kei; Hara, Yoshihiko; Yamakami, Suguru; Yahagi, Daiki; Chinen, Akito; Tokura, Mitsunori; Abe, Keietsu

    2017-09-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, Escherichia coli produces succinate from glucose via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. To date, however, no genes encoding succinate exporters have been established in E. coli. Therefore, we attempted to identify genes encoding succinate exporters by screening an E. coli MG1655 genome library. We identified the yjjPB genes as candidates encoding a succinate transporter, which enhanced succinate production in Pantoea ananatis under aerobic conditions. A complementation assay conducted in Corynebacterium glutamicum strain AJ110655ΔsucE1 demonstrated that both YjjP and YjjB are required for the restoration of succinate production. Furthermore, deletion of yjjPB decreased succinate production in E. coli by 70% under anaerobic conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that YjjPB constitutes a succinate transporter in E. coli and that the products of both genes are required for succinate export.

  7. Comparative genomics of actinomycetes with a focus on natural product biosynthetic genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Actinomycetes are a diverse group of medically, industrially and ecologically important bacteria, studied as much for the diseases they cause as for the cures they hold. The genomes of actinomycetes revealed that these bacteria have a large number of natural product gene clusters, although many of these are difficult to tie to products in the laboratory. Large scale comparisons of these clusters are difficult to perform due to the presence of highly similar repeated domains in the most common biosynthetic machinery: polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Results We have used comparative genomics to provide an overview of the genomic features of a set of 102 closed genomes from this important group of bacteria with a focus on natural product biosynthetic genes. We have focused on well-represented genera and determine the occurrence of gene cluster families therein. Conservation of natural product gene clusters within Mycobacterium, Streptomyces and Frankia suggest crucial roles for natural products in the biology of each genus. The abundance of natural product classes is also found to vary greatly between genera, revealing underlying patterns that are not yet understood. Conclusions A large-scale analysis of natural product gene clusters presents a useful foundation for hypothesis formulation that is currently underutilized in the field. Such studies will be increasingly necessary to study the diversity and ecology of natural products as the number of genome sequences available continues to grow. PMID:24020438

  8. Comparative genomics of actinomycetes with a focus on natural product biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Doroghazi, James R; Metcalf, William W

    2013-09-11

    Actinomycetes are a diverse group of medically, industrially and ecologically important bacteria, studied as much for the diseases they cause as for the cures they hold. The genomes of actinomycetes revealed that these bacteria have a large number of natural product gene clusters, although many of these are difficult to tie to products in the laboratory. Large scale comparisons of these clusters are difficult to perform due to the presence of highly similar repeated domains in the most common biosynthetic machinery: polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). We have used comparative genomics to provide an overview of the genomic features of a set of 102 closed genomes from this important group of bacteria with a focus on natural product biosynthetic genes. We have focused on well-represented genera and determine the occurrence of gene cluster families therein. Conservation of natural product gene clusters within Mycobacterium, Streptomyces and Frankia suggest crucial roles for natural products in the biology of each genus. The abundance of natural product classes is also found to vary greatly between genera, revealing underlying patterns that are not yet understood. A large-scale analysis of natural product gene clusters presents a useful foundation for hypothesis formulation that is currently underutilized in the field. Such studies will be increasingly necessary to study the diversity and ecology of natural products as the number of genome sequences available continues to grow.

  9. WWOX gene and gene product: tumor suppression through specific protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Aqeilan, Rami; Huebner, Kay

    2010-02-01

    The WWOX gene, an archetypal fragile gene, encompasses a chromosomal fragile site at 16q23.2, and encodes the approximately 46-kDa Wwox protein, with WW domains that interact with a growing list of interesting proteins. If the function of a protein is defined by the company it keeps, then Wwox is involved in numerous important signal pathways for bone and germ-cell development, cellular and animal growth and death, transcriptional control and suppression of cancer development. Because alterations to genes at fragile sites are exquisitely sensitive to replication stress-induced DNA damage, there has been an ongoing scientific discussion questioning whether such gene expression alterations provide a selective advantage for clonal expansion of neoplastic cells, and a parallel discussion on why important genes would be present at sites that are susceptible to inactivation. We offer some answers through a description of known WWOX functions.

  10. Database of cattle candidate genes and genetic markers for milk production and mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Ogorevc, J; Kunej, T; Razpet, A; Dovc, P

    2009-01-01

    A cattle database of candidate genes and genetic markers for milk production and mastitis has been developed to provide an integrated research tool incorporating different types of information supporting a genomic approach to study lactation, udder development and health. The database contains 943 genes and genetic markers involved in mammary gland development and function, representing candidates for further functional studies. The candidate loci were drawn on a genetic map to reveal positional overlaps. For identification of candidate loci, data from seven different research approaches were exploited: (i) gene knockouts or transgenes in mice that result in specific phenotypes associated with mammary gland (143 loci); (ii) cattle QTL for milk production (344) and mastitis related traits (71); (iii) loci with sequence variations that show specific allele-phenotype interactions associated with milk production (24) or mastitis (10) in cattle; (iv) genes with expression profiles associated with milk production (207) or mastitis (107) in cattle or mouse; (v) cattle milk protein genes that exist in different genetic variants (9); (vi) miRNAs expressed in bovine mammary gland (32) and (vii) epigenetically regulated cattle genes associated with mammary gland function (1). Fourty-four genes found by multiple independent analyses were suggested as the most promising candidates and were further in silico analysed for expression levels in lactating mammary gland, genetic variability and top biological functions in functional networks. A miRNA target search for mammary gland expressed miRNAs identified 359 putative binding sites in 3′UTRs of candidate genes. PMID:19508288

  11. In vivo effects of antibodies to immune response gene products: prevention of experimental allergic encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, L; Rosenbaum, J T; Sriram, S; McDevitt, H O

    1981-01-01

    Prevention of experimental allergic encephalitis in SJL/J [H-2s] mice was achieved with in vivo administration of antibody reactive with I-As gene products prior to immunization with spinal cord antigen. No protection was evident in animals that received antisera specific for I-Js gene products. Administration of antibody to I-As beginning 5 days after immunization with spinal cord antigen delayed, but did not prevent, the onset of experimental allergic encephalitis. PMID:6947275

  12. Requirement of the Escherichia coli dnaA gene product for plasmid F maintenance.

    PubMed Central

    Kline, B C; Kogoma, T; Tam, J E; Shields, M S

    1986-01-01

    There are DnaA protein-binding sites in at least one F origin of replication, and only potentially leaky dnaA(Ts) mutations had ever been used in previous studies indicating that F replication was independent of the dnaA gene product. Here we show that an Escherichia coli dnaA::Tn10 host which does not make a dnaA gene product cannot sustain autonomous or integrated F plasmid maintenance. PMID:3020005

  13. Double replacement gene targeting for the production of a series of mouse strains with different prion protein gene alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.C.; Redhead, N.J.; Selfridge, J.

    1995-09-01

    We have developed a double replacement gene targeting strategy which enables the production of a series of mouse strains bearing different subtle alterations to endogenous genes. This is a two-step process in which a region of the gene of interest is first replaced with a selectable marker to produce an inactivated allele, which is then re-targeted with a second vector to reconstruct the inactivated allele, concomitantly introducing an engineered mutation. Five independent embryonic stem cell lines have been produced bearing different targeted alterations to the prion protein gene, including one which raises the level of expression. We have constructed mice bearing the codon 101 proline to leucine substitution linked to the human familial prion disease, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome. We anticipate that this procedure will have applications to the study of human inherited diseases and the development of therapies. 43 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-07-07

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  15. Natural and engineered hydroxyectoine production based on the Pseudomonas stutzeri ectABCD-ask gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Seip, Britta; Galinski, Erwin A; Kurz, Matthias

    2011-02-01

    We report on the presence of a functional hydroxyectoine biosynthesis gene cluster, ectABCD-ask, in Pseudomonas stutzeri DSM5190(T) and evaluate the suitability of P. stutzeri DSM5190(T) for hydroxyectoine production. Furthermore, we present information on heterologous de novo production of the compatible solute hydroxyectoine in Escherichia coli. In this host, the P. stutzeri gene cluster remained under the control of its salt-induced native promoters. We also noted the absence of trehalose when hydroxyectoine genes were expressed, as well as a remarkable inhibitory effect of externally applied betaine on hydroxyectoine synthesis. The specific heterologous production rate in E. coli under the conditions employed exceeded that of the natural producer Pseudomonas stutzeri and, for the first time, enabled effective hydroxyectoine production at low salinity (2%), with the added advantage of simple product processing due to the absence of other cosolutes.

  16. Coregulation of terpenoid pathway genes and prediction of isoprene production in Bacillus subtilis using transcriptomics

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Becky M.; Xue, Junfeng; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Wiley, H. S.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Linggi, Bryan E.

    2013-06-19

    The isoprenoid pathway converts pyruvate to isoprene and related isoprenoid compounds in plants and some bacteria. Currently, this pathway is of great interest because of the critical role that isoprenoids play in basic cellular processes as well as the industrial value of metabolites such as isoprene. Although the regulation of several pathway genes has been described, there is a paucity of information regarding the system level regulation and control of the pathway. To address this limitation, we examined Bacillus subtilis grown under multiple conditions and then determined the relationship between altered isoprene production and the pattern of gene expression. We found that terpenoid genes appeared to fall into two distinct subsets with opposing correlations with respect to the amount of isoprene produced. The group whose expression levels positively correlated with isoprene production included dxs, the gene responsible for the commitment step in the pathway, as well as ispD, and two genes that participate in the mevalonate pathway, yhfS and pksG. The subset of terpenoid genes that inversely correlated with isoprene production included ispH, ispF, hepS, uppS, ispE, and dxr. A genome wide partial least squares regression model was created to identify other genes or pathways that contribute to isoprene production. This analysis showed that a subset of 213 regulated genes was sufficient to create a predictive model of isoprene production under different conditions and showed correlations at the transcriptional level. We conclude that gene expression levels alone are sufficiently informative about the metabolic state of a cell that produces increased isoprene and can be used to build a model which accurately predicts production of this secondary metabolite across many simulated environmental conditions.

  17. Polymorphism of the ovocalyxin-32 gene and its association with egg production traits in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Uemoto, Y; Suzuki, C; Sato, S; Sato, S; Ohtake, T; Sasaki, O; Takahashi, H; Kobayashi, E

    2009-12-01

    We performed candidate gene analysis to identify SNP in the chicken ovocalyxin-32 (OCX-32) gene in the F(2) resource population, to develop a PCR-RFLP method for genotyping and to evaluate the associations of the gene polymorphism with egg production traits. The F(2) resource population-comprising 272 chickens-was obtained by crossing White Leghorn (WL) males and Rhode Island Red (RIR) females. They were measured for egg production traits and used for candidate gene analysis. Among parental individuals of the F(2) population, 2 novel nonsynonymous polymorphisms (c.267T>G and c.494A>C) and 1 known nonsynonymous polymorphism (c.381G>C) in the coding sequences of the chicken OCX-32 gene were detected. The PCR-RFLP method was used for screening the chickens of the F(2) population. In parental populations, genotype c.267T>G and c.494A>C were segregated within WL and RIR breeds, respectively, but genotype c.381G>C was breed-specific SNP between WL and RIR breeds. A total of 4 haplotypes were constructed based on the 3 SNP in parental populations, and there was no recombination between c.267T>G and c.494A>C. There was a significant association (P < 0.05) between the OCX-32 gene SNP and egg production traits, but there was no significant association between the haplotypes of the OCX-32 gene and egg production traits in the F(2) population. In the present study, there was the most significant association between c.381G>C of the OCX-32 gene and rate of egg production. The current study is the first step to confirm the relationship between OCX-32 gene polymorphisms and egg production traits.

  18. Antibacterial Discovery and Development: From Gene to Product and Back

    PubMed Central

    Fedorenko, Victor; Genilloud, Olga; Horbal, Liliya; Marcone, Giorgia Letizia; Marinelli, Flavia; Paitan, Yossi; Ron, Eliora Z.

    2015-01-01

    Concern over the reports of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in hospitals and in the community has been publicized in the media, accompanied by comments on the risk that we may soon run out of antibiotics as a way to control infectious disease. Infections caused by Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella species, Clostridium difficile, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and other Enterobacteriaceae species represent a major public health burden. Despite the pharmaceutical sector's lack of interest in the topic in the last decade, microbial natural products continue to represent one of the most interesting sources for discovering and developing novel antibacterials. Research in microbial natural product screening and development is currently benefiting from progress that has been made in other related fields (microbial ecology, analytical chemistry, genomics, molecular biology, and synthetic biology). In this paper, we review how novel and classical approaches can be integrated in the current processes for microbial product screening, fermentation, and strain improvement. PMID:26339625

  19. Production of viral vectors for gene therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, N; Ataai, M M

    2000-04-01

    Advances in cell culture engineering, cell metabolism, bioreactor design and operation, and downstream processing will all positively impact the bioprocessing of viral vectors. Design of appropriate vectors and tailoring of packaging cells to support more productive infections will be of paramount importance for production of high-titer and high-quality vectors. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of the infection parameters during virus propagation, such as time of infection, multiplicity of infection, the length of replication cycle, virus half-life, and burst size, will also be important to the process optimization. Finally, procedures for separation, purification and formulation of vector preparations have to be further developed.

  20. Nonlinear biosynthetic gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Jeroen G; Ebbendorf, Bjorg; Woszczynska, Marta; Boer, Rémon; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2010-11-01

    Industrial penicillin production levels by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum increased dramatically by classical strain improvement. High-yielding strains contain multiple copies of the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes three key enzymes of the β-lactam biosynthetic pathway. We have analyzed the gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production using the high-yielding P. chrysogenum strain DS17690 that was cured from its native clusters. The amount of penicillin V produced increased with the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster number but was saturated at high copy numbers. Likewise, transcript levels of the biosynthetic genes pcbAB [δ-(l-α-aminoadipyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine synthetase], pcbC (isopenicillin N synthase), and penDE (acyltransferase) correlated with the cluster copy number. Remarkably, the protein level of acyltransferase, which localizes to peroxisomes, was saturated already at low cluster copy numbers. At higher copy numbers, intracellular levels of isopenicillin N increased, suggesting that the acyltransferase reaction presents a limiting step at a high gene dose. Since the number and appearance of the peroxisomes did not change significantly with the gene cluster copy number, we conclude that the acyltransferase activity is limiting for penicillin biosynthesis at high biosynthetic gene cluster copy numbers. These results suggest that at a high penicillin production level, productivity is limited by the peroxisomal acyltransferase import activity and/or the availability of coenzyme A (CoA)-activated side chains.

  1. [Quality control of gene therapy products: approach of the French Agency for the Safety of Health Products].

    PubMed

    Chenivesse, Xavier; Ridoux, Valérie; Tissier, Marie-Hélène

    2003-04-01

    Gene therapy is a new therapeutic strategy which can constitute in some diseases a true alternative or a complement to the "classical treatments". Regarding the innovative features, the complexity and the extreme diversity of the gene therapy products (naked DNA, synthetic vectors, viral vectors, genetically modified cells), these new products presently in clinical trials have to be precisely evaluated and controlled for their medicine quality as well as their biological origin and/or their specific characteristics of genetically modified organisms. The French Agency for the Safety of Health Products engaged an in-depth scientific review concerning the control of this very heterogeneous class of potential therapeutics through the creation of a working group. The objectives of this group were to determine the testings to be performed by a national authority for each type of gene therapy products and to select the appropriate techniques or methods to be developed. Controls considered as essential are listed and include the verification of the identity, the purity, the transfer and expression efficiency as well as the microbiological and viral safety of the products. This implies the development of diverse techniques of molecular biology, cellular biology, physico-chemistry, animal testing, histology and microbiology. Finally, in order to define the basis of testings of these emerging products, the marketing of which should be effective for some of them in the next years, it appears extremely important to harmonize the quality, efficiency and safety criteria, to develop specific references and standards and to create specific guidelines for the control of gene therapy products.

  2. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer

    DOEpatents

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves [El Cerrito, CA; Campisi, Judith [Berkeley, CA

    2011-10-04

    A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

  3. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer

    DOEpatents

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-09-30

    A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

  4. Dynamics and modeling of temperature-regulated gene product expression in recombinant yeast fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C; Yang, S T

    1996-06-20

    The dynamic response of temperature-regulated gene expression in the recombinant yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, strain XK1-C2 carrying plasmid pSXR125, to temperature changes during fed-batch and continuous (chemostat) cultures was studied. The production of the gene product, beta-galactosidase, in the yeast cell is sensitive to the growth temperature. Gene expression of this product was fully turned on or off by temperature shifts between 24 and 30 degrees C. However, the response for gene turn-on and turn-off in this recombinant yeast was slow, requiring from several hours to over 10 h to fully appear. The continuous reactor took 30-60 h after the temperature shift to reach a new steady state. A dynamic process model was developed to simulate the reactor and cell responses to temperature shift. A first-order model was used to account for the effect of dilution rate on the change of protein concentration in the chemostat. It was found that cell response in gene expression to temperature shift followed first-order plus dead-time dynamics. Also, the response time for gene expression to temperature shift varied with specific growth rate or dilution rate of the continuous reactor. In general, the response was slower at a higher dilution rate and for gene turn-on than for gene turn-off.

  5. B-cell translocation gene 2 promotes hepatic hepcidin production via induction of Yin Yang 1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Hwang, Seung-Lark; Jang, Won-Gu; Chang, Hyeun Wook; Kim, Yong Deuk

    2015-05-15

    Hepcidin is a peptide hormone secreted in the liver and plays a key role in maintaining iron homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is a key player in hepatic hepcidin regulation via induction of Yin Yang 1 (YY1). Hepatic hepcidin gene expression significantly enhanced by fasting states and glucagon exposure led to induction of gluconeogenic gene expression, and elevated serum hepcidin production in mice. Notably, overexpression of BTG2 using adenoviral system (Ad-BTG2) significantly elevated serum hepcidin levels via a significant induction of YY1 gene transcription. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that BTG2 physically interacted with YY1 and recruited on the hepcidin gene promoter. Finally, ablation of hepatic BTG2 gene by gene silencing markedly attenuated the elevation of serum hepcidin production along with YY1 and hepcidin mRNA expression in fasting state. Likewise, forskolin (FSK)-stimulated hepcidin promoter activity was dramatically disrupted by endogenous BTG2 knockdown. Overall, our current study provides a novel molecular mechanism of BTG2-mediated induction of hepcidin gene expression, thereby contributing to a better understanding of the hepatic hepcidin production involved in iron homeostasis.

  6. Disruption of the Zymomonas mobilis extracellular sucrase gene (sacC) improves levan production.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, V; Rameshkumar, N; Busby, S J W; Gunasekaran, P

    2004-01-01

    Disruption of the extracellular Zymomonas mobilis sucrase gene (sacC) to improve levan production. A PCR-amplified tetracycline resistance cassette was inserted within the cloned sacC gene in pZS2811. The recombinant construct was transferred to Z. mobilis by electroporation. The Z. mobilis sacC gene, encoding an efficient extracellular sucrase, was inactivated. A sacC defective mutant of Z. mobilis, which resulted from homologous recombination, was selected and the sacC gene disruption was confirmed by PCR. Fermentation trials with this mutant were conducted, and levansucrase activity and levan production were measured. In sucrose medium, the sacC mutant strain produced threefold higher levansucrase (SacB) than the parent strain. This resulted in higher levels of levan production, whilst ethanol production was considerably decreased. Zymomonas mobilis sacC gene encoding an extracellular sucrase was inactivated by gene disruption. This sacC mutant strain produced higher level of levan in sucrose medium because of the improved levansucrase (SacB) than the parent strain. The Z. mobilis CT2, sacC mutant produces high level of levansucrase (SacB) and can be used for the production of levan.

  7. Regulation of gene expression by tobacco product preparations in cultured human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Malpass, Gloria E.; Arimilli, Subhashini; Prasad, G.L.; Howlett, Allyn C.

    2014-09-01

    Skin fibroblasts comprise the first barrier of defense against wounds, and tobacco products directly contact the oral cavity. Cultured human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to smokeless tobacco extract (STE), total particulate matter (TPM) from tobacco smoke, or nicotine at concentrations comparable to those found in these extracts for 1 h or 5 h. Differences were identified in pathway-specific genes between treatments and vehicle using qRT-PCR. At 1 h, IL1α was suppressed significantly by TPM and less significantly by STE. Neither FOS nor JUN was suppressed at 1 h by tobacco products. IL8, TNFα, VCAM1, and NFκB1 were suppressed after 5 h with STE, whereas only TNFα and NFκB1 were suppressed by TPM. At 1 h with TPM, secreted levels of IL10 and TNFα were increased. Potentially confounding effects of nicotine were exemplified by genes such as ATF3 (5 h), which was increased by nicotine but suppressed by other components of STE. Within 2 h, TPM stimulated nitric oxide production, and both STE and TPM increased reactive oxygen species. The biological significance of these findings and utilization of the gene expression changes reported herein regarding effects of the tobacco product preparations on dermal fibroblasts will require additional research. - Highlights: • Tobacco product preparations (TPPs) alter gene expression in dermal fibroblasts. • Some immediate early genes critical to the inflammatory process are affected. • Different TPPs produce differential responses in certain pro-inflammatory genes.

  8. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-05-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi.

  9. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Andy M; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M; Cox, Russell J; Willis, Christine L; O'Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W; Foster, Gary D

    2016-05-04

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi.

  10. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi. PMID:27143514

  11. Sequence search and analysis of gene products containing RNA recognition motifs in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sony; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2014-12-22

    Gene expression is tightly regulated at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. RNA-binding proteins are involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation events. They are involved in a variety of functions such as splicing, alternative splicing, nuclear import and export of mRNA, RNA stability and translation. There are several well-characterized RNA-binding motifs present in a whole genome, such as RNA recognition motif (RRM), KH domain, zinc-fingers etc. In the present study, we have investigated human genome for the presence of RRM-containing gene products starting from RRM domains in the Pfam (Protein family database) repository. In Pfam, seven families are recorded to contain RRM-containing proteins. We studied these families for their taxonomic representation, sequence features (identity, length, phylogeny) and structural properties (mapping conservation on the structures). We then examined the presence of RRM-containing gene products in Homo sapiens genome and identified 928 RRM-containing gene products. These were studied for their predicted domain architectures, biological processes, involvement in pathways, disease relevance and disorder content. RRM domains were observed to occur multiple times in a single polypeptide. However, there are 56 other co-existing domains involved in different regulatory functions. Further, functional enrichment analysis revealed that RRM-containing gene products are mainly involved in biological functions such as mRNA splicing and its regulation. Our sequence analysis identified RRM-containing gene products in the human genome and provides insights into their domain architectures and biological functions. Since mRNA splicing and gene regulation are important in the cellular machinery, this analysis provides an early overview of genes that carry out these functions.

  12. Coregulation of Terpenoid Pathway Genes and Prediction of Isoprene Production in Bacillus subtilis Using Transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Hess, Becky M; Xue, Junfeng; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C; Wiley, H Steven; Ahring, Birgitte K; Linggi, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    The isoprenoid pathway converts pyruvate to isoprene and related isoprenoid compounds in plants and some bacteria. Currently, this pathway is of great interest because of the critical role that isoprenoids play in basic cellular processes, as well as the industrial value of metabolites such as isoprene. Although the regulation of several pathway genes has been described, there is a paucity of information regarding system level regulation and control of the pathway. To address these limitations, we examined Bacillus subtilis grown under multiple conditions and determined the relationship between altered isoprene production and gene expression patterns. We found that with respect to the amount of isoprene produced, terpenoid genes fall into two distinct subsets with opposing correlations. The group whose expression levels positively correlated with isoprene production included dxs, which is responsible for the commitment step in the pathway, ispD, and two genes that participate in the mevalonate pathway, yhfS and pksG. The subset of terpenoid genes that inversely correlated with isoprene production included ispH, ispF, hepS, uppS, ispE, and dxr. A genome-wide partial least squares regression model was created to identify other genes or pathways that contribute to isoprene production. These analyses showed that a subset of 213 regulated genes was sufficient to create a predictive model of isoprene production under different conditions and showed correlations at the transcriptional level. We conclude that gene expression levels alone are sufficiently informative about the metabolic state of a cell that produces increased isoprene and can be used to build a model that accurately predicts production of this secondary metabolite across many simulated environmental conditions.

  13. Coregulation of Terpenoid Pathway Genes and Prediction of Isoprene Production in Bacillus subtilis Using Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Becky M.; Xue, Junfeng; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Wiley, H. Steven; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Linggi, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    The isoprenoid pathway converts pyruvate to isoprene and related isoprenoid compounds in plants and some bacteria. Currently, this pathway is of great interest because of the critical role that isoprenoids play in basic cellular processes, as well as the industrial value of metabolites such as isoprene. Although the regulation of several pathway genes has been described, there is a paucity of information regarding system level regulation and control of the pathway. To address these limitations, we examined Bacillus subtilis grown under multiple conditions and determined the relationship between altered isoprene production and gene expression patterns. We found that with respect to the amount of isoprene produced, terpenoid genes fall into two distinct subsets with opposing correlations. The group whose expression levels positively correlated with isoprene production included dxs, which is responsible for the commitment step in the pathway, ispD, and two genes that participate in the mevalonate pathway, yhfS and pksG. The subset of terpenoid genes that inversely correlated with isoprene production included ispH, ispF, hepS, uppS, ispE, and dxr. A genome-wide partial least squares regression model was created to identify other genes or pathways that contribute to isoprene production. These analyses showed that a subset of 213 regulated genes was sufficient to create a predictive model of isoprene production under different conditions and showed correlations at the transcriptional level. We conclude that gene expression levels alone are sufficiently informative about the metabolic state of a cell that produces increased isoprene and can be used to build a model that accurately predicts production of this secondary metabolite across many simulated environmental conditions. PMID:23840410

  14. Identification and distribution of products from novel tryptopyrokinin genes in the locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Redeker, Jana; Bläser, Marcel; Neupert, Susanne; Predel, Reinhard

    2017-04-22

    A recent analysis of the genome of Locusta migratoria indicated the presence of four novel insect neuropeptide genes encoding for multiple tryptopyrokinin peptides (tryptoPKs); hitherto only known from pyrokinin or capa genes. In our study, mature products of tryptoPK genes 1 and 2 were identified by mass spectrometry; precursor sequences assigned to the tryptoPK genes 3 and 4 are likely partial sequences of a single precursor. The expression of tryptoPK genes 1 and 2 is restricted to two cells in the subesophageal ganglion, exhibiting not only a unique neuropeptidome but also a very distinctive axonal projection. Comparative neuroendocrinology revealed that homologous cells in other insects also produce tryptoPKs but use other genes to generate this pattern. Since capa and pyrokinin genes are discussed as ancestors of the tryptoPK genes, we completed the hitherto only partially known precursor sequences of these genes by means of transcriptome analyses. The distribution of mature products of CAPA and pyrokinin precursors in the CNS is compared with that of tryptoPKs. In addition, a novel pyrokinin-like precursor is described.

  15. Characterization of a beta-tubulin gene and a beta-tubulin gene products of Brugia pahangi.

    PubMed

    Guénette, S; Prichard, R K; Klein, R D; Matlashewski, G

    1991-02-01

    A genomic clone containing a beta-tubulin gene from the parasitic nematode Brugia pahangi was isolated. This gene was sequenced to determine its size, structural organization, and corresponding primary amino acid sequence. The coding sequence of the beta-tubulin gene spans 3.8 kb, is organized into 9 exons and expresses an mNRA of 1.8 kb which codes for a protein of 448 amino acids. The predicted beta-tubulin amino acid sequence is 89%, 94%, 90% and 88% identical to the chicken beta 2, and the Caenorhabditis elegans ben-1, tub-1 and mec-7 gene products, respectively. Southern hybridization analyses demonstrated that there is only one copy of this gene isotype but that other distinct beta-tubulin genes may exist in the Brugia pahangi genome. A nematode specific antipeptide rabbit antiserum raised against the predicted amino acid sequence of the extreme carboxy-terminal region of the B. pahangi beta-tubulin was used to identify beta-tubulin isoforms in adult nematodes and microfilariae. Isoforms detected by this nematode-specific antipeptide antiserum were identical in both adult worms and microfilariae and did not differ from the isoform patterns detected by a monoclonal antibody recognizing a conserved beta-tubulin epitope. This suggests that this carboxy-terminal peptide is highly represented in the beta-tubulin isoforms of B. pahangi.

  16. ProfileGrids as a new visual representation of large multiple sequence alignments: a case study of the RecA protein family

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Alberto I; Almada, Albert E; Abajian, Aaron C

    2008-01-01

    Background Multiple sequence alignments are a fundamental tool for the comparative analysis of proteins and nucleic acids. However, large data sets are no longer manageable for visualization and investigation using the traditional stacked sequence alignment representation. Results We introduce ProfileGrids that represent a multiple sequence alignment as a matrix color-coded according to the residue frequency occurring at each column position. JProfileGrid is a Java application for computing and analyzing ProfileGrids. A dynamic interaction with the alignment information is achieved by changing the ProfileGrid color scheme, by extracting sequence subsets at selected residues of interest, and by relating alignment information to residue physical properties. Conserved family motifs can be identified by the overlay of similarity plot calculations on a ProfileGrid. Figures suitable for publication can be generated from the saved spreadsheet output of the colored matrices as well as by the export of conservation information for use in the PyMOL molecular visualization program. We demonstrate the utility of ProfileGrids on 300 bacterial homologs of the RecA family – a universally conserved protein involved in DNA recombination and repair. Careful attention was paid to curating the collected RecA sequences since ProfileGrids allow the easy identification of rare residues in an alignment. We relate the RecA alignment sequence conservation to the following three topics: the recently identified DNA binding residues, the unexplored MAW motif, and a unique Bacillus subtilis RecA homolog sequence feature. Conclusion ProfileGrids allow large protein families to be visualized more effectively than the traditional stacked sequence alignment form. This new graphical representation facilitates the determination of the sequence conservation at residue positions of interest, enables the examination of structural patterns by using residue physical properties, and permits the display

  17. A new system for the amplification of biological signals: RecA and complimentary single strand DNA probes on a leaky surface acoustic wave biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Yunxia; Chen, Ming; Luo, Yang; Deng, Kun; Chen, Dong; Fu, Weiling

    2014-10-15

    This research describes a new amplification signals system of the leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) bis-peptide nucleic acid (bis-PNA) biosensor for the simple, sensitive and rapid detection of the target double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The system consists of a RecA protein-coated complementary single-stranded DNA (cssDNA) probe complex that amplifies the biological signal to improve the sensitivity of the biosensor. The bis-PNA probe for detecting HPV was first immobilized on a gold surface membrane of the detection channel. After the probe was completely hybridized with the corresponding target DNA, different concentrations of the "RecA protein-complementary single strand DNA probe" were added to react with the bis-PNA/dsDNA complex. The phase shift of the LSAW biosensors, which was measured and found to be most significant when the RecA protein was 45 μg/mL and the ATPγS was 2.5 mmol/L. Compared with other concentrations (P<0.01) of RecA and ATPγS, the value of the phase shift was (11.74 ± 1.03) degrees and the ratio of the phase shift and hybridization time clearly outperformed that of the other concentrations. Compared to the direct hybridization of the bis-PNA probe and the target DNA sequence, the sensitivity was effectively improved and the detection time was significantly shortened. PNA binding adjacent to the area of the target sequence homologous to the probe significantly increased the yield of the hybridization reaction between the PNA/dsDNA complex and the RecA protein-coated cssDNA probe. In this condition, the phase shift was significantly obvious and the detection time was significantly shortened. In conclusion, the combination of the RecA protein-coated cssDNA probe and the LSAW bis-PNA biosensor provides sensitivity and simple and rapid detection of clinical trace pathogenic microorganisms.

  18. Detection of rice tungro bacilliform virus gene products in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hay, J; Grieco, F; Druka, A; Pinner, M; Lee, S C; Hull, R

    1994-12-01

    To study the products of the open reading frames (ORFs) of rice tungro bacilliform virus in rice plants the sequences containing ORFs I (encoding a 24-kDa protein, P24) and IV (P46) and the protease and polymerase (reverse transcriptase+RNaseH) domains of ORF III were cloned into a pGEX expression vector. The proteins, which were C-terminal fusions to glutathione S-transferase, were expressed in Escherichia coli and antisera were raised against them which, together with an antiserum against virus particles, was used to probe blots of proteins from infected and uninoculated plants and from virus preparations. The P24 antiserum detected virus-specific proteins of 74, 60, and 52 kDa, which are much bigger than expected. These proteins were found in virus preparations and immunogold labeling suggested that they might be internal in the particles. Virus-specific proteins of 33, 37, 62, and > 150 kDa were revealed by antiserum to virus particles. The antiserum to the protease revealed proteins of 13.5, 37, and 68 kDa both in extracts from infected plants and in purified virus preparations. This antiserum decorated intact virus particles as did the particle antiserum. The polymerase domain antiserum reacted with products of 56, 65, and 68 kDa in extracts from infected plants but not in virus particles. The antiserum to the ORF IV product did not detect any bands in either infected plant extracts or virus preparations. The significance of these products is discussed.

  19. The paf gene product modulates asexual development in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Sigl, Claudia; Zadra, Ivo; Pócsi, Istvan; Marx, Florentine

    2011-06-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum secretes a low molecular weight, cationic and cysteine-rich protein (PAF). It has growth inhibitory activity against the model organism Aspergillus nidulans and numerous zoo- and phytopathogenic fungi but shows only minimal conditional antifungal activity against the producing organism itself. In this study we provide evidence for an additional function of PAF which is distinct from the antifungal activity against putative ecologically concurrent microorganisms. Our data indicate that PAF enhances conidiation in P. chrysogenum by modulating the expression of brlA, the central regulatory gene for mitospore development. A paf deletion strain showed a significant impairment of mitospore formation which sustains our hypothesis that PAF plays an important role in balancing asexual differentiation in P. chrysogenum.

  20. Alphavirus vectors for vaccine production and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2003-06-01

    Alphavirus vectors demonstrate high expression of heterologous proteins in a broad range of host cells. Replication-deficient as well as replication-competent variants exist. Systemic delivery of many viral antigens has elicited strong antibody responses in immunized mice and primates, and protection against challenges with lethal viruses was obtained. Similarly, prophylactic vaccination was established against tumor challenges. Attention has been paid to the engineering of improved targeting to immunologically active cells, such as dendritic cells. In the area of gene therapy, intratumoral injections of alphavirus vectors have resulted in potentially promising tumor rejection. Moreover, encapsulation of alphavirus particles into liposomes demonstrated efficient tumor targeting in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency, which permitted the initiation of clinical trials for patients with advanced kidney carcinoma and melanoma.

  1. Systems Pharmacology-Based Discovery of Natural Products for Precision Oncology Through Targeting Cancer Mutated Genes.

    PubMed

    Fang, J; Cai, C; Wang, Q; Lin, P; Zhao, Z; Cheng, F

    2017-03-01

    Massive cancer genomics data have facilitated the rapid revolution of a novel oncology drug discovery paradigm through targeting clinically relevant driver genes or mutations for the development of precision oncology. Natural products with polypharmacological profiles have been demonstrated as promising agents for the development of novel cancer therapies. In this study, we developed an integrated systems pharmacology framework that facilitated identifying potential natural products that target mutated genes across 15 cancer types or subtypes in the realm of precision medicine. High performance was achieved for our systems pharmacology framework. In case studies, we computationally identified novel anticancer indications for several US Food and Drug Administration-approved or clinically investigational natural products (e.g., resveratrol, quercetin, genistein, and fisetin) through targeting significantly mutated genes in multiple cancer types. In summary, this study provides a powerful tool for the development of molecularly targeted cancer therapies through targeting the clinically actionable alterations by exploiting the systems pharmacology of natural products.

  2. Systems Pharmacology‐Based Discovery of Natural Products for Precision Oncology Through Targeting Cancer Mutated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, J; Cai, C; Wang, Q; Lin, P

    2017-01-01

    Massive cancer genomics data have facilitated the rapid revolution of a novel oncology drug discovery paradigm through targeting clinically relevant driver genes or mutations for the development of precision oncology. Natural products with polypharmacological profiles have been demonstrated as promising agents for the development of novel cancer therapies. In this study, we developed an integrated systems pharmacology framework that facilitated identifying potential natural products that target mutated genes across 15 cancer types or subtypes in the realm of precision medicine. High performance was achieved for our systems pharmacology framework. In case studies, we computationally identified novel anticancer indications for several US Food and Drug Administration‐approved or clinically investigational natural products (e.g., resveratrol, quercetin, genistein, and fisetin) through targeting significantly mutated genes in multiple cancer types. In summary, this study provides a powerful tool for the development of molecularly targeted cancer therapies through targeting the clinically actionable alterations by exploiting the systems pharmacology of natural products. PMID:28294568

  3. Investigation of Reference Genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus for Gene Expression Analysis Using Quantitative RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yue-Jiao; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Yong; Pan, Ying-Jie; Hwang, Cheng-An; Wu, Vivian C H

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a significant human pathogen capable of causing foodborne gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of contaminated raw or undercooked seafood. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a useful tool for studying gene expression in V. parahaemolyticus to characterize its virulence factors and understand the effect of environmental conditions on its pathogenicity. However, there is not a stable gene in V. parahaemolyticus that has been identified for use as a reference gene for qRT-PCR. This study evaluated the stability of 6 reference genes (16S rRNA, recA, rpoS, pvsA, pvuA, and gapdh) in 5 V. parahaemolyticus strains (O3:K6-clinical strain-tdh+, ATCC33846-tdh+, ATCC33847-tdh+, ATCC17802-trh+, and F13-environmental strain-tdh+) cultured at 4 different temperatures (15, 25, 37 and 42°C). Stability values were calculated using GeNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, and Delta CT algorithms. The results indicated that recA was the most stably expressed gene in the V. parahaemolyticus strains cultured at different temperatures. This study examined multiple V. parahaemolyticus strains and growth temperatures, hence the finding provided stronger evidence that recA can be used as a reference gene for gene expression studies in V. parahaemolyticus.

  4. Investigation of Reference Genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus for Gene Expression Analysis Using Quantitative RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yue-jiao; Sun, Xiao-hong; Xu, Xiao-yan; Zhao, Yong; Pan, Ying-jie; Hwang, Cheng-An; Wu, Vivian C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a significant human pathogen capable of causing foodborne gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of contaminated raw or undercooked seafood. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a useful tool for studying gene expression in V. parahaemolyticus to characterize its virulence factors and understand the effect of environmental conditions on its pathogenicity. However, there is not a stable gene in V. parahaemolyticus that has been identified for use as a reference gene for qRT-PCR. This study evaluated the stability of 6 reference genes (16S rRNA, recA, rpoS, pvsA, pvuA, and gapdh) in 5 V. parahaemolyticus strains (O3:K6-clinical strain-tdh+, ATCC33846-tdh+, ATCC33847-tdh+, ATCC17802-trh+, and F13-environmental strain-tdh+) cultured at 4 different temperatures (15, 25, 37 and 42°C). Stability values were calculated using GeNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, and Delta CT algorithms. The results indicated that recA was the most stably expressed gene in the V. parahaemolyticus strains cultured at different temperatures. This study examined multiple V. parahaemolyticus strains and growth temperatures, hence the finding provided stronger evidence that recA can be used as a reference gene for gene expression studies in V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:26659406

  5. QUANTIFICATION OF RECA GENE EXPRESSION AS AN INDICATOR OF REPAIR POTENTIAL IN MARINE BACTERIOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES OF ANTARCTICA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine bacteria in surface waters must cope daily with the damaging effects of exposure to solar radiation (containing both UV-A and UV-B wavelengths), which produces lesions in their DNA. As the stratospheric ozone layer is depleted, these coping mechanisms are likely to play an...

  6. QUANTIFICATION OF RECA GENE EXPRESSION AS AN INDICATOR OF REPAIR POTENTIAL IN MARINE BACTERIOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES OF ANTARCTICA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine bacteria in surface waters must cope daily with the damaging effects of exposure to solar radiation (containing both UV-A and UV-B wavelengths), which produces lesions in their DNA. As the stratospheric ozone layer is depleted, these coping mechanisms are likely to play an...

  7. Physiological evaluation of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei in production processes by marker gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rautio, Jari J; Bailey, Michael; Kivioja, Teemu; Söderlund, Hans; Penttilä, Merja; Saloheimo, Markku

    2007-01-01

    Background Biologically relevant molecular markers can be used in evaluation of the physiological state of an organism in biotechnical processes. We monitored at high frequency the expression of 34 marker genes in batch, fed-batch and continuous cultures of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei by the transcriptional analysis method TRAC (TRanscript analysis with the aid of Affinity Capture). Expression of specific genes was normalised either with respect to biomass or to overall polyA RNA concentration. Expressional variation of the genes involved in various process relevant cellular functions, such as protein production, growth and stress responses, was related to process parameters such as specific growth and production rates and substrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Results Gene expression of secreted cellulases and recombinant Melanocarpus albomyces laccase predicted the trends in the corresponding extracellular enzyme production rates and was highest in a narrow "physiological window" in the specific growth rate (μ) range of 0.03 – 0.05 h-1. Expression of ribosomal protein mRNAs was consistent with the changes in μ. Nine starvation-related genes were found as potential markers for detection of insufficient substrate feed for maintaining optimal protein production. For two genes induced in anaerobic conditions, increasing transcript levels were measured as dissolved oxygen decreased. Conclusion The data obtained by TRAC supported the usefulness of focused and intensive transcriptional analysis in monitoring of biotechnical processes providing thus tools for process optimisation purposes. PMID:17537269

  8. Regulation of a novel gene cluster involved in secondary metabolite production in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Hindra; Pak, Patricia; Elliot, Marie A

    2010-10-01

    Antibiotic biosynthesis in the streptomycetes is a complex and highly regulated process. Here, we provide evidence for the contribution of a novel genetic locus to antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor. The overexpression of a gene cluster comprising four protein-encoding genes (abeABCD) and an antisense RNA-encoding gene (α-abeA) stimulated the production of the blue-pigmented metabolite actinorhodin on solid medium. Actinorhodin production also was enhanced by the overexpression of an adjacent gene (abeR) encoding a predicted Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP), while the deletion of this gene impaired actinorhodin production. We found the abe genes to be differentially regulated and controlled at multiple levels. Upstream of abeA was a promoter that directed the transcription of abeABCD at a low but constitutive level. The expression of abeBCD was, however, significantly upregulated at a time that coincided with the initiation of aerial development and the onset of secondary metabolism; this expression was activated by the binding of AbeR to four heptameric repeats upstream of a promoter within abeA. Expressed divergently to the abeBCD promoter was α-abeA, whose expression mirrored that of abeBCD but did not require activation by AbeR. Instead, α-abeA transcript levels were subject to negative control by the double-strand-specific RNase, RNase III.

  9. Involvement of the Haemophilus ducreyi gmhA Gene Product in Lipooligosaccharide Expression and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Beth A.; Stevens, Marla K.; Hansen, Eric J.

    1998-01-01

    The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) present in the outer membrane of Haemophilus ducreyi is likely a virulence factor for this sexually transmitted pathogen. An open reading frame in H. ducreyi 35000 was found to encode a predicted protein that had 87% identity with the protein product of the gmhA (isn) gene of Haemophilus influenzae. In H. influenzae type b, inactivation of the gmhA gene caused the synthesis of a significantly truncated LOS which possessed only lipid A and a single 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid molecule (A. Preston, D. J. Maskell, A. Johnson, and E. R. Moxon, J. Bacteriol. 178:396–402, 1996). The H. ducreyi gmhA gene was able to complement a gmhA-deficient Escherichia coli strain, a result which confirmed the identity of this gene. When the gmhA gene of H. ducreyi was inactivated by insertion of a cat cartridge, the resultant H. ducreyi gmhA mutant, 35000.252, expressed a LOS that migrated much faster than wild-type LOS in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When the wild-type H. ducreyi strain and its isogenic gmhA mutant were used in the temperature-dependent rabbit model for dermal lesion production by H. ducreyi, the gmhA mutant was found to be substantially less virulent than the wild-type parent strain. The H. ducreyi gmhA gene was amplified by PCR from the H. ducreyi chromosome and cloned into the pLS88 vector. When the H. ducreyi gmhA gene was present in trans in gmhA mutant 35000.252, expression of the gmhA gene product restored the virulence of this mutant to wild-type levels. These results indicate that the gmhA gene product of H. ducreyi is essential for the expression of wild-type LOS by this pathogen. PMID:9712780

  10. Identification of Enzyme Genes Using Chemical Structure Alignments of Substrate-Product Pairs.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Yuki; Yamada, Takuji; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakagawa, Zenichi; Kotera, Masaaki; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2016-03-28

    Although there are several databases that contain data on many metabolites and reactions in biochemical pathways, there is still a big gap in the numbers between experimentally identified enzymes and metabolites. It is supposed that many catalytic enzyme genes are still unknown. Although there are previous studies that estimate the number of candidate enzyme genes, these studies required some additional information aside from the structures of metabolites such as gene expression and order in the genome. In this study, we developed a novel method to identify a candidate enzyme gene of a reaction using the chemical structures of the substrate-product pair (reactant pair). The proposed method is based on a search for similar reactant pairs in a reference database and offers ortholog groups that possibly mediate the given reaction. We applied the proposed method to two experimentally validated reactions. As a result, we confirmed that the histidine transaminase was correctly identified. Although our method could not directly identify the asparagine oxo-acid transaminase, we successfully found the paralog gene most similar to the correct enzyme gene. We also applied our method to infer candidate enzyme genes in the mesaconate pathway. The advantage of our method lies in the prediction of possible genes for orphan enzyme reactions where any associated gene sequences are not determined yet. We believe that this approach will facilitate experimental identification of genes for orphan enzymes.

  11. O-linked glycosylation of retroviral envelope gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Pinter, A.; Honnen, W.J. )

    1988-03-01

    Treatment of ({sup 3}H)glucosamine-labeled Friend mink cell focus-forming virus (FrMCF) gp70 with excess peptide:N-glycanase F (PNGase F) resulted in removal of the expected seven N-linked oligosaccharide chains; however, approximately 10% of the glucosamine label was retained in the resulting 49,000-M{sub r} (49K) product. For ({sup 3}H)mannose-labeled gp70, similar treatment led to removal of all the carbohydrate label from the protein. Prior digestion of the PNGase F-treated gp70 with neuraminidase resulted in an addition size shift, and treatment with O-glycanase led to the removal of almost all of the PNGase F-resistant sugars. These results indicate that gp70 possesses sialic acid-containing O-linked oligosaccharides. Analysis of intracellular env precursors demonstrated that O-linked sugars were present in gPr90{sup env}, the polyprotein intermediate which contains complex sugars, but not in the primary translation product, gPr80{sup env}, and proteolytic digestion studies allowed localization of the O-linked carbohydrates to a 10K region near the center of the gp70 molecule. similar substituents were detected on the gp70s of ecotropic and xenotropic murine leukemia viruses and two subgroups of feline leukemia virus, indicting that O-linked glycosylation is a conserved feature of retroviral env proteins.

  12. Genes, language, cognition, and culture: towards productive inquiry.

    PubMed

    Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2011-04-01

    The Queen Mary conference on “Integrating Genetic and Cultural Evolutionary Approaches to Language,” and the papers in this special issue, clearly illustrate the excitement and potential of trans-disciplinary approaches to language as an evolved biological capacity (phylogeny) and an evolving cultural entity (glossogeny). Excepting the present author, the presenters/authors are mostly young rising stars in their respective fields, and include scientists with backgrounds in linguistics, animal communication, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, anthropology, and computer science. On display was a clear willingness to engage with different approaches and terminology and a commitment to shared standards of scientific rigor, empirically driven theory, and logical argument. Because the papers assembled here, together with the introduction, speak for themselves, I will focus in this “extro-duction” on some of the terminological and conceptual difficulties which threaten to block this exciting wave of scientific progress in understanding language evolution, in both senses of that term. In particular I will first argue against the regrettably widespread practice of opposing cultural and genetic explanations of human cognition as if they were dichotomous. Second, I will unpack the debate concerning “general-purpose” and “domain-specific” mechanisms, which masquerades as a debate about nativism but is nothing of the sort. I believe that framing discussions of language in these terms has generated more heat than light, and that a modern molecular understanding of genes, development, behavior, and evolution renders many of the assumptions underlying this debate invalid.

  13. Role of Vibrio polysaccharide (vps) genes in VPS production, biofilm formation and Vibrio cholerae pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fong, Jiunn C N; Syed, Khalid A; Klose, Karl E; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2010-09-01

    Biofilm formation enhances the survival and persistence of the facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae in natural ecosystems and its transmission during seasonal cholera outbreaks. A major component of the V. cholerae biofilm matrix is the Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS), which is essential for development of three-dimensional biofilm structures. The vps genes are clustered in two regions, the vps-I cluster (vpsU, vpsA-K, VC0916-27) and the vps-II cluster (vpsL-Q, VC0934-39), separated by an intergenic region containing the rbm gene cluster that encodes biofilm matrix proteins. In-frame deletions of the vps clusters and genes encoding matrix proteins drastically altered biofilm formation phenotypes. To determine which genes within the vps gene clusters are required for biofilm formation and VPS synthesis, we generated in-frame deletion mutants for all the vps genes. Many of these mutants exhibited reduced capacity to produce VPS and biofilms. Infant mouse colonization assays revealed that mutants lacking either vps clusters or rbmA (encoding secreted matrix protein RbmA) exhibited a defect in intestinal colonization compared to the wild-type. Understanding the roles of the various vps gene products will aid in the biochemical characterization of the VPS biosynthetic pathway and elucidate how vps gene products contribute to VPS biosynthesis, biofilm formation and virulence in V. cholerae.

  14. Construction of a ColD cda Promoter-Based SOS-Green Fluorescent Protein Whole-Cell Biosensor with Higher Sensitivity toward Genotoxic Compounds than Constructs Based on recA, umuDC, or sulA Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Anders; Hestbjerg Hansen, Lars; Sørensen, Søren J.

    2005-01-01

    Four different green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based whole-cell biosensors were created based on the DNA damage inducible SOS response of Escherichia coli in order to evaluate the sensitivity of individual SOS promoters toward genotoxic substances. Treatment with the known carcinogen N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) revealed that the promoter for the ColD plasmid-borne cda gene had responses 12, 5, and 3 times greater than the recA, sulA, and umuDC promoters, respectively, and also considerably higher sensitivity. Furthermore, we showed that when the SOS-GFP construct was introduced into an E. coli host deficient in the tolC gene, the minimal detection limits toward mitomycin C, MNNG, nalidixic acid, and formaldehyde were lowered to 9.1 nM, 0.16 μM, 1.1 μM, and 141 μM, respectively, which were two to six times lower than those in the wild-type strain. This study thus presents a new SOS-GFP whole-cell biosensor which is not only able to detect minute levels of genotoxins but, due to its use of the green fluorescent protein, also a reporter system which should be applicable in high-throughput screening assays as well as a wide variety of in situ detection studies. PMID:15870320

  15. Analytical model for determination of parameters of helical structures in solution by small angle scattering: comparison of RecA structures by SANS.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, D V; Baitin, D M; Islamov, A Kh; Kuklin, A I; Shalguev, V Kh; Lanzov, V A; Isaev-Ivanov, V V

    2003-02-27

    The filament structures of the self-polymers of RecA proteins from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, their complexes with ATPgammaS, phage M13 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and the tertiary complexes RecA::ATPgammaS::ssDNA were compared by small angle neutron scattering. A model was developed that allowed for an analytical solution for small angle scattering on a long helical filament, making it possible to obtain the helical pitch and the mean diameter of the protein filament from the scattering curves. The results suggest that the structure of the filaments formed by these two RecA proteins, and particularly their complexes with ATPgammaS, is conservative.

  16. The mechanism of recA polA lethality: Suppression by RecA-independent recombination repair activated by the lexA(Def) mutation in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yang; Kogoma, Tokio

    1995-04-01

    The mechanism of recA polA lethality in Escherichia coli has been studied. Complementation tests have indicated that both the 5{prime} {yields} 3{prime} exonuclease and the polymerization activities of DNA polymerase I are essential for viability in the absence of RecA protein, whereas the viability and DNA replication of DNA polymerase I-defective cells depend on the recombinase activity of RecA. An alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis has indicated that RecA has only a minor role in Okazaki fragment processing. Double-strand break repair is proposed for the major role of RecA in the absence of DNA polymerase I. The lexA(Def)::Tn5 mutation has previously been shown to suppress the temperature-sensitive growth of recA200(Ts) polA25::spc mutants. The lexA(Def) mutation can alleviate impaired DNA synthesis in the recA200(Ts) polA25::spc mutant cells at the restrictive temperature. recF{sup +} is essential for this suppression pathway, recJ and recQ mutations have minor but significant adverse effects on the suppression. The recA200(Ts) allele in the recA200(Ts) polA25::spc lexA(Def) mutant can be replaced by {Delta}recA, indicating that the lexA(Def)-induced suppression is RecA independent. lexA(Def) reduces the sensitivity of {Delta}recA polA25::spc cells to UV damage by {approximately}10{sup 4}-fold. lexA(Def) also restores P1 transduction proficiency to the {Delta}recA polA25::spc mutant to a level that is 7.3% of the recA{sup +} wild type. These results suggest that lexA(Def) activates a RecA-independent, RecF-dependent recombination repair pathway that suppresses the defect in DNA replication in recA polA double mutants. 52 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Split-gene system for hybrid wheat seed production.

    PubMed

    Kempe, Katja; Rubtsova, Myroslava; Gils, Mario

    2014-06-24

    Hybrid wheat plants are superior in yield and growth characteristics compared with their homozygous parents. The commercial production of wheat hybrids is difficult because of the inbreeding nature of wheat and the lack of a practical fertility control that enforces outcrossing. We describe a hybrid wheat system that relies on the expression of a phytotoxic barnase and provides for male sterility. The barnase coding information is divided and distributed at two loci that are located on allelic positions of the host chromosome and are therefore "linked in repulsion." Functional complementation of the loci is achieved through coexpression of the barnase fragments and intein-mediated ligation of the barnase protein fragments. This system allows for growth and maintenance of male-sterile female crossing partners, whereas the hybrids are fertile. The technology does not require fertility restorers and is based solely on the genetic modification of the female crossing partner.

  18. Split-gene system for hybrid wheat seed production

    PubMed Central

    Kempe, Katja; Rubtsova, Myroslava; Gils, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid wheat plants are superior in yield and growth characteristics compared with their homozygous parents. The commercial production of wheat hybrids is difficult because of the inbreeding nature of wheat and the lack of a practical fertility control that enforces outcrossing. We describe a hybrid wheat system that relies on the expression of a phytotoxic barnase and provides for male sterility. The barnase coding information is divided and distributed at two loci that are located on allelic positions of the host chromosome and are therefore “linked in repulsion.” Functional complementation of the loci is achieved through coexpression of the barnase fragments and intein-mediated ligation of the barnase protein fragments. This system allows for growth and maintenance of male-sterile female crossing partners, whereas the hybrids are fertile. The technology does not require fertility restorers and is based solely on the genetic modification of the female crossing partner. PMID:24821800

  19. Phylogenomic study of lipid genes involved in microalgal biofuel production-candidate gene mining and metabolic pathway analyses.

    PubMed

    Misra, Namrata; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Parida, Bikram Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2012-01-01

    Optimizing microalgal biofuel production using metabolic engineering tools requires an in-depth understanding of the structure-function relationship of genes involved in lipid biosynthetic pathway. In the present study, genome-wide identification and characterization of 398 putative genes involved in lipid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Volvox carteri, Ostreococcus lucimarinus, Ostreococcus tauri and Cyanidioschyzon merolae was undertaken on the basis of their conserved motif/domain organization and phylogenetic profile. The results indicated that the core lipid metabolic pathways in all the species are carried out by a comparable number of orthologous proteins. Although the fundamental gene organizations were observed to be invariantly conserved between microalgae and Arabidopsis genome, with increased order of genome complexity there seems to be an association with more number of genes involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis and catabolism. Further, phylogenomic analysis of the genes provided insights into the molecular evolution of lipid biosynthetic pathway in microalgae and confirm the close evolutionary proximity between the Streptophyte and Chlorophyte lineages. Together, these studies will improve our understanding of the global lipid metabolic pathway and contribute to the engineering of regulatory networks of algal strains for higher accumulation of oil.

  20. B29 gene products complex with immunoglobulins on B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K; Wood, W J; Damore, M; Hermanson, G G; Wall, R; Kincade, P W

    1992-01-01

    B29 is a B-lineage-specific gene predicted from sequence information to be a transmembrane member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, with a single extracellular Ig-like domain. Its presumptive cytoplasmic region contains a peptide motif present in CD3 and other molecules involved in lymphocyte activation. Affinity-purified goat antibodies were prepared to a TrpE fusion protein of B29 and used to study B29 expression on lymphoid cells. The antiserum precipitated surface-labeled heterodimers from B lymphoma cells. One was 65-88 kDa (unreduced) or 36-47 plus 32-34 kDa (reduced) by SDS/PAGE analysis, regardless of detergent. A smaller heterodimer was detected only with Triton detergent extraction. IgM molecules were coprecipitated by the B29 antiserum when the weak detergent digitonin was used. In addition, cocapping experiments revealed that most B29 molecules codistribute with Ig on the cell surface. Although early B-lineage cells and plasma cells contain B29 mRNA, surface expression was detectable only on B cells that had significant amounts of surface Ig. The surface expression was B-lineage-specific and included cells from mutant xid mice and B-cell lines representing mu, delta, gamma, and alpha heavy-chain isotypes and both kappa and lambda light-chain types. The density of surface B29 protein correlated directly with surface mu heavy-chain density on subclones of a B-cell lymphoma and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated pre-B cells. These findings show that B29 is covalently linked in a heterodimer and are consistent with a recently proposed model of surface Ig complexes. Images PMID:1731334

  1. A mutant gene that increases gibberellin production in Brassica

    SciTech Connect

    Rood, S.B. ); Williams, P.H. ); Pearce, D.; Pharis, R.P. ); Murofushi, Noboru ); Mander, L.N. )

    1990-07-01

    A single gene mutant (elongated internode (ein/ein)) with accelerated shoot elongation was identified from a rapid cycling line of Brassica rapa. Relative to normal plants, mutant plants had slightly accelerated floral development, greater stem dry weights, and particularly, increased internode and inflorescence elongation. The application of the triazole plant growth retardant, paclobutrazol, inhibited shoot elongation, returning ein to a more normal phenotype. Conversely, exogenous gibberellin A{sub 3} (GA{sub 3}) can convert normal genotypes to a phenotype resembling ein. The content of endogenous GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 3} were estimated by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring using ({sup 2}H)GA{sub 1} as a quantitative internal standard and at day 14 were 1.5- and 12.1-fold higher per stem, respectively, in ein than in normal plants, although GA concentrations were more similar. The endogenous levels of GA{sub 20} and GA{sub 1}, and the rate of GA{sub 19} metabolism were simultaneously analyzed. Levels of GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 20} were 4.6- and 12.9-fold higher, respectively, and conversions to GA{sub 20} and GA{sub 1} were 8.3 and 1.3 times faster in ein than normal plants. Confirming the enhanced rate of GA{sub 1} biosynthesis in ein, the conversion of ({sup 3}H)GA{sub 20} to ({sup 3}H) GA{sub 1} was also faster in ein than in the normal genotype. Thus, the ein allele results in accelerated GA{sub 1} biosynthesis and an elevated content of endogenous GAs, including the dihydroxylated GAs A{sub 1} and A{sub 3}.

  2. Expanded natural product diversity revealed by analysis of lanthipeptide-like gene clusters in actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Doroghazi, James R; Zhao, Xiling; Walker, Mark C; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2015-07-01

    Lanthionine-containing peptides (lanthipeptides) are a rapidly growing family of polycyclic peptide natural products belonging to the large class of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs). Lanthipeptides are widely distributed in taxonomically distant species, and their currently known biosynthetic systems and biological activities are diverse. Building on the recent natural product gene cluster family (GCF) project, we report here large-scale analysis of lanthipeptide-like biosynthetic gene clusters from Actinobacteria. Our analysis suggests that lanthipeptide biosynthetic pathways, and by extrapolation the natural products themselves, are much more diverse than currently appreciated and contain many different posttranslational modifications. Furthermore, lanthionine synthetases are much more diverse in sequence and domain topology than currently characterized systems, and they are used by the biosynthetic machineries for natural products other than lanthipeptides. The gene cluster families described here significantly expand the chemical diversity and biosynthetic repertoire of lanthionine-related natural products. Biosynthesis of these novel natural products likely involves unusual and unprecedented biochemistries, as illustrated by several examples discussed in this study. In addition, class IV lanthipeptide gene clusters are shown not to be silent, setting the stage to investigate their biological activities.

  3. Expanded Natural Product Diversity Revealed by Analysis of Lanthipeptide-Like Gene Clusters in Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Doroghazi, James R.; Zhao, Xiling; Walker, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Lanthionine-containing peptides (lanthipeptides) are a rapidly growing family of polycyclic peptide natural products belonging to the large class of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs). Lanthipeptides are widely distributed in taxonomically distant species, and their currently known biosynthetic systems and biological activities are diverse. Building on the recent natural product gene cluster family (GCF) project, we report here large-scale analysis of lanthipeptide-like biosynthetic gene clusters from Actinobacteria. Our analysis suggests that lanthipeptide biosynthetic pathways, and by extrapolation the natural products themselves, are much more diverse than currently appreciated and contain many different posttranslational modifications. Furthermore, lanthionine synthetases are much more diverse in sequence and domain topology than currently characterized systems, and they are used by the biosynthetic machineries for natural products other than lanthipeptides. The gene cluster families described here significantly expand the chemical diversity and biosynthetic repertoire of lanthionine-related natural products. Biosynthesis of these novel natural products likely involves unusual and unprecedented biochemistries, as illustrated by several examples discussed in this study. In addition, class IV lanthipeptide gene clusters are shown not to be silent, setting the stage to investigate their biological activities. PMID:25888176

  4. Single molecule analysis of a red fluorescent RecA protein reveals a defect in nucleoprotein filament nucleation that relates to its reduced biological functions.

    PubMed

    Handa, Naofumi; Amitani, Ichiro; Gumlaw, Nathan; Sandler, Steven J; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2009-07-10

    Fluorescent fusion proteins are exceedingly useful for monitoring protein localization in situ or visualizing protein behavior at the single molecule level. Unfortunately, some proteins are rendered inactive by the fusion. To circumvent this problem, we fused a hyperactive RecA protein (RecA803 protein) to monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1) to produce a functional protein (RecA-RFP) that is suitable for in vivo and in vitro analysis. In vivo, the RecA-RFP partially restores UV resistance, conjugational recombination, and SOS induction to recA(-) cells. In vitro, the purified RecA-RFP protein forms a nucleoprotein filament whose k(cat) for single-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase activity is reduced approximately 3-fold relative to wild-type protein, and which is largely inhibited by single-stranded DNA-binding protein. However, RecA protein is also a dATPase; dATP supports RecA-RFP nucleoprotein filament formation in the presence of single-stranded DNA-binding protein. Furthermore, as for the wild-type protein, the activities of RecA-RFP are further enhanced by shifting the pH to 6.2. As a consequence, RecA-RFP is proficient for DNA strand exchange with dATP or at lower pH. Finally, using single molecule visualization, RecA-RFP was seen to assemble into a continuous filament on duplex DNA, and to extend the DNA approximately 1.7-fold. Consistent with its attenuated activities, RecA-RFP nucleates onto double-stranded DNA approximately 3-fold more slowly than the wild-type protein, but still requires approximately 3 monomers to form the rate-limited nucleus needed for filament assembly. Thus, RecA-RFP reveals that its attenuated biological functions correlate with a reduced frequency of nucleoprotein filament nucleation at the single molecule level.

  5. Expression of MAGE-1 and -3 genes and gene products in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kariyama, K; Higashi, T; Kobayashi, Y; Nouso, K; Nakatsukasa, H; Yamano, T; Ishizaki, M; Kaneyoshi, T; Toshikuni, N; Ohnishi, T; Fujiwara, K; Nakayama, E; Terracciano, L; Spagnoli, G C; Tsuji, T

    1999-01-01

    MAGE gene family encodes peptides recognized by autologous cytotoxic T lymphocytes in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class-I restricted fashion. In the present study, we have performed reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the genes, as well as immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting of MAGE-1 and -3 proteins in 33 surgically resected hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). MAGE-1 and -3 mRNAs were constitutively expressed exclusively in 78 and 42% of HCCs respectively. On immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies, 77B for MAGE-1 and 57B for MAGE-3, MAGE-1 and -3 proteins were recognized in cytoplasm of only six among 33 (18%) and two of 29 HCCs (7%) respectively. The distribution pattern was mostly focal in HCC nodules. By contrast, the Western blot analysis revealed that the MAGE-1 (46 kDa) and -3 proteins (48 kDa) were expressed in 80 and 60% of 15 HCCs examined respectively. The proteins of MAGE-1 and -3 were also expressed exclusively in HCCs regardless of the histological grading and clinical staging. Our results indicate that the detection of the genes by RT-PCR or the proteins by Western blotting is useful for differentiating early HCCs from non-cancerous lesions, and that the peptides derived from MAGE-1 and -3 proteins might be suitable targets for immunotherapy of human HCC. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10576668

  6. Genetic resources for advanced biofuel production described with the Gene Ontology

    SciTech Connect

    Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Purwantini, Endang; Lomax, Jane; Setubal, Joao C.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Tyler, Brett M.

    2014-10-10

    Dramatic increases in research in the area of microbial biofuel production coupled with high-throughput data generation on bioenergy-related microbes has led to a deluge of information in the scientific literature and in databases. Consolidating this information and making it easily accessible requires a unified vocabulary.The Gene Ontology (GO) fulfills that requirement, as it is a well-developed structured vocabulary that describes the activities and locations of gene products in a consistent manner across all kingdoms of life. The Microbial ENergy processes Gene Ontology (http://www.mengo.biochem.vt.edu) project is extending the GO to include new terms to describe microbial processes of interest to bioenergy production. Our effort has added over 600 bioenergy related terms to the Gene Ontology. These terms will aid in the comprehensive annotation of gene products from diverse energy-related microbial genomes. An area of microbial energy research that has received a lot of attention is microbial production of advanced biofuels. These include alcohols such as butanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, and fuels derived from fatty acids, isoprenoids, and polyhydroxyalkanoates. These fuels are superior to first generation biofuels (ethanol and biodiesel esterified from vegetable oil or animal fat), can be generated from non-food feedstock sources, can be used as supplements or substitutes for gasoline, diesel and jet fuels, and can be stored and distributed using existing infrastructure. We review the roles of genes associated with synthesis of advanced biofuels, and at the same time introduce the use of the GO to describe the functions of these genes in a standardized way.

  7. Genetic resources for advanced biofuel production described with the Gene Ontology

    DOE PAGES

    Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Purwantini, Endang; Lomax, Jane; ...

    2014-10-10

    Dramatic increases in research in the area of microbial biofuel production coupled with high-throughput data generation on bioenergy-related microbes has led to a deluge of information in the scientific literature and in databases. Consolidating this information and making it easily accessible requires a unified vocabulary.The Gene Ontology (GO) fulfills that requirement, as it is a well-developed structured vocabulary that describes the activities and locations of gene products in a consistent manner across all kingdoms of life. The Microbial ENergy processes Gene Ontology (http://www.mengo.biochem.vt.edu) project is extending the GO to include new terms to describe microbial processes of interest to bioenergymore » production. Our effort has added over 600 bioenergy related terms to the Gene Ontology. These terms will aid in the comprehensive annotation of gene products from diverse energy-related microbial genomes. An area of microbial energy research that has received a lot of attention is microbial production of advanced biofuels. These include alcohols such as butanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, and fuels derived from fatty acids, isoprenoids, and polyhydroxyalkanoates. These fuels are superior to first generation biofuels (ethanol and biodiesel esterified from vegetable oil or animal fat), can be generated from non-food feedstock sources, can be used as supplements or substitutes for gasoline, diesel and jet fuels, and can be stored and distributed using existing infrastructure. We review the roles of genes associated with synthesis of advanced biofuels, and at the same time introduce the use of the GO to describe the functions of these genes in a standardized way.« less

  8. Genetic resources for advanced biofuel production described with the Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Purwantini, Endang; Lomax, Jane; Setubal, João C; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Tyler, Brett M

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic increases in research in the area of microbial biofuel production coupled with high-throughput data generation on bioenergy-related microbes has led to a deluge of information in the scientific literature and in databases. Consolidating this information and making it easily accessible requires a unified vocabulary. The Gene Ontology (GO) fulfills that requirement, as it is a well-developed structured vocabulary that describes the activities and locations of gene products in a consistent manner across all kingdoms of life. The Microbial ENergy processes Gene Ontology () project is extending the GO to include new terms to describe microbial processes of interest to bioenergy production. Our effort has added over 600 bioenergy related terms to the Gene Ontology. These terms will aid in the comprehensive annotation of gene products from diverse energy-related microbial genomes. An area of microbial energy research that has received a lot of attention is microbial production of advanced biofuels. These include alcohols such as butanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, and fuels derived from fatty acids, isoprenoids, and polyhydroxyalkanoates. These fuels are superior to first generation biofuels (ethanol and biodiesel esterified from vegetable oil or animal fat), can be generated from non-food feedstock sources, can be used as supplements or substitutes for gasoline, diesel and jet fuels, and can be stored and distributed using existing infrastructure. Here we review the roles of genes associated with synthesis of advanced biofuels, and at the same time introduce the use of the GO to describe the functions of these genes in a standardized way.

  9. Genetic resources for advanced biofuel production described with the Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Purwantini, Endang; Lomax, Jane; Setubal, João C.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Tyler, Brett M.

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic increases in research in the area of microbial biofuel production coupled with high-throughput data generation on bioenergy-related microbes has led to a deluge of information in the scientific literature and in databases. Consolidating this information and making it easily accessible requires a unified vocabulary. The Gene Ontology (GO) fulfills that requirement, as it is a well-developed structured vocabulary that describes the activities and locations of gene products in a consistent manner across all kingdoms of life. The Microbial ENergy processes Gene Ontology () project is extending the GO to include new terms to describe microbial processes of interest to bioenergy production. Our effort has added over 600 bioenergy related terms to the Gene Ontology. These terms will aid in the comprehensive annotation of gene products from diverse energy-related microbial genomes. An area of microbial energy research that has received a lot of attention is microbial production of advanced biofuels. These include alcohols such as butanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, and fuels derived from fatty acids, isoprenoids, and polyhydroxyalkanoates. These fuels are superior to first generation biofuels (ethanol and biodiesel esterified from vegetable oil or animal fat), can be generated from non-food feedstock sources, can be used as supplements or substitutes for gasoline, diesel and jet fuels, and can be stored and distributed using existing infrastructure. Here we review the roles of genes associated with synthesis of advanced biofuels, and at the same time introduce the use of the GO to describe the functions of these genes in a standardized way. PMID:25346727

  10. Livestock biodiversity: from genes to animal products through safeguard actions.

    PubMed

    Caroli, Anna Maria; Pizzi, Flavia

    2012-01-01

    The 'livestock' term refers to animals domesticated for producing commodities for man such as food, fiber and draught. Livestock biodiversity is integral to our culture, history, environment, and economy. Thousands of livestock breeds have evolved over time to suit particular environments and farming systems. Conservation of these genetic resources relies on demographic characterization and correct breeding schemes. In addition, molecular genetic studies allow to identify and monitor the genetic diversity within and across breeds and to reconstruct their evolution history. The conservation of livestock variability is also a crucial element in order to preserve and valorise specific nutritional and nutraceutical properties of animal products. Efficient ex situ and in situ conservation strategies are obligatory tools in order to implement an appropriate action for the conservation of livestock biodiversity. The main issues concerning different species are summarised, with particular reference to'the livestock biodiversity still existing. Some examples of ex situ conservation strategies developed in Italy are presented, and the different actions in defense of Animal Genetic Resources (AnGR) developed within the European Community are illustrated.

  11. Production of the 2400 kb Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript; transcription time and cotranscriptional splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, C.N.; Worton, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    The largest known gene in any organism is the human DMD gene which has 79 exons that span 2400 kb. The extreme nature of the DMD gene raises questions concerning the time required for transcription and whether splicing begins before transcription is complete. DMD gene transcription is induced as cultured human myoblasts differentiate to form multinucleated myotubes, providing a system for studying the kinetics of transcription and splicing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, transcript accumulation was monitored from four different regions within the gene following induction of expression. By comparing the accumulation of transcripts from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene we have shown that approximately 12 hours are required to transcribe 1770 kb of the gene, extrapolating to a time of 16 hours for the transcription unit expressed in muscle. Comparison of accumulation profiles for spliced and total transcript demonstrated that transcripts are spliced at the 5{prime} end before transcription is complete, providing strong evidence for cotranscriptional splicing of DMD gene transcripts. Finally, the rate of transcript accumulation was reduced at the 3{prime} end of the gene relative to the 5{prime} end, perhaps due to premature termination of transcription complexes as they traverse this enormous transcription unit. The lag between transcription initiation and the appearance of complete transcripts could be important in limiting transcript production in dividing cells and to the timing of mRNA appearance in differentiating muscle.

  12. Candidate genes for drought tolerance and improved productivity in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Vinod, M S; Sharma, Naveen; Manjunath, K; Kanbar, Adnan; Prakash, N B; Shashidhar, H E

    2006-03-01

    Candidate genes are sequenced genes of known biological action involved in the development or physiology of a trait. Twenty-one putative candidate genes were designed after an exhaustive search in the public databases along with an elaborate literature survey for candidate gene products and/or regulatory sequences associated with enhanced drought resistance. The downloaded sequences were then used to design primers considering the flanking sequences as well. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed on 10 diverse cultivars that involved Japonica, Indica and local accessions, revealed 12 polymorphic candidate genes. Seven polymorphic candidate genes were then utilized to genotype 148 individuals of CT9993 x IR62266 doubled haploid (DH) mapping population. The segregation data were tested for deviation from the expected Mendelian ratio (1:1) using a Chi-square test (less than 1%). Based on this, four candidate genes were assessed to be significant and the remaining three, as non-significant. All the significant candidate genes were biased towards CT9993, the female parent in the DH mapping population. Single-marker analysis strongly associated (less than 1%) them to different traits under both well-watered and low-moisture stress conditions. Two candidate genes, EXP15 and EXP13, were found to be associated with root number and silicon content in the stem respectively, under both well-watered and low-moisture stress conditions.

  13. ROS production during symbiotic infection suppresses pathogenesis-related gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Peleg-Grossman, Smadar; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Levine, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Leguminous plants have exclusive ability to form symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria of the genus Rhizobium. Symbiosis is a complex process that involves multiple molecular signaling activities, such as calcium fluxes, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and synthesis of nodulation genes. We analyzed the role of ROS in defense gene expression in Medicago truncatula during symbiosis and pathogenesis. Studies in Arabidopsis thaliana showed that the induction of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes during systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is regulated by NPR1 protein, which resides in the cytoplasm as an oligomer. After oxidative burst and return of reducing conditions, the NPR1 undergoes monomerization and becomes translocated to the nucleus, where it functions in PR genes induction. We show that ROS production is both stronger and longer during symbiotic interactions than during interactions with pathogenic, nonhost or common nonpathogenic soil bacteria. Moreover, root cells inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti accumulated ROS in the cytosol but not in vacuoles, as opposed to Pseudomonas putida inoculation or salt stress treatment. Furthermore, increased ROS accumulation by addition of H2O2 reduced the PR gene expression, while catalase had an opposite effect, establishing that the PR gene expression is opposite to the level of cytoplasmic ROS. In addition, we show that salicylic acid pretreatment significantly reduced ROS production in root cells during symbiotic interaction. PMID:22499208

  14. ROS production during symbiotic infection suppresses pathogenesis-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Peleg-Grossman, Smadar; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Levine, Alex

    2012-03-01

    Leguminous plants have exclusive ability to form symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria of the genus Rhizobium. Symbiosis is a complex process that involves multiple molecular signaling activities, such as calcium fluxes, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and synthesis of nodulation genes. We analyzed the role of ROS in defense gene expression in Medicago truncatula during symbiosis and pathogenesis. Studies in Arabidopsis thaliana showed that the induction of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes during systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is regulated by NPR1 protein, which resides in the cytoplasm as an oligomer. After oxidative burst and return of reducing conditions, the NPR1 undergoes monomerization and becomes translocated to the nucleus, where it functions in PR genes induction. We show that ROS production is both stronger and longer during symbiotic interactions than during interactions with pathogenic, nonhost or common nonpathogenic soil bacteria. Moreover, root cells inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti accumulated ROS in the cytosol but not in vacuoles, as opposed to Pseudomonas putida inoculation or salt stress treatment. Furthermore, increased ROS accumulation by addition of H₂O₂ reduced the PR gene expression, while catalase had an opposite effect, establishing that the PR gene expression is opposite to the level of cytoplasmic ROS. In addition, we show that salicylic acid pretreatment significantly reduced ROS production in root cells during symbiotic interaction.

  15. [Effect of plasmid pKM101 on the expression of bacterial genes not related to DNa metabolism].

    PubMed

    Skavronskaya, A G; Tiganova, I G; Andreeva, I V; Rusina, O Iu

    1999-02-01

    An experimental system ensuring fusion of bacterial genes to the lac operon of the Mu dl(Aplac) phage was used. Fusion operons in which the lac operon was under the control of promoters of the elt gene, responsible for synthesis of the LT toxin, of the tetracyclin-resistance tet gene, and sfiA gene encoding filament production, was studied. Using this experimental system, plasmid pKM101 was shown to be capable of activating the expression of the above Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium genes, which is manifested as the activation of beta-galactosidase synthesis. The activation of the elt gene expression by the pKM101 plasmid was also confirmed in experiments on detecting the LT toxin synthesized by bacteria carrying this plasmid. Effect of the plasmid on the activation of elt operon expression, unlike the effect of this plasmid on mutability, does not depend on the functioning of the lexA and recA genes, i.e., this is not a SOS-regulated process. The mutant plasmid pGW12, a derivative of pKM101, deficient in the mucAB genes responsible for mutagenesis, causes a more pronounced activation of the elt gene than plasmid pKM101.

  16. Products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation as signals and regulators of gene expression in plants

    PubMed Central

    Chmielowska-Bąk, Jagna; Izbiańska, Karolina; Deckert, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are engaged in several processes essential for normal cell functioning, such as differentiation, anti-microbial defense, stimulus sensing and signaling. Interestingly, recent studies imply that cellular signal transduction and gene regulation are mediated not only directly by ROS but also by the molecules derived from ROS-mediated oxidation. Lipid peroxidation leads to non-enzymatic formation of oxylipins. These molecules were shown to modulate expression of signaling associated genes including genes encoding phosphatases, kinases and transcription factors. Oxidized peptides derived from protein oxidation might be engaged in organelle-specific ROS signaling. In turn, oxidation of particular mRNAs leads to decrease in the level of encoded proteins and thus, contributes to the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Present mini review summarizes latest findings concerning involvement of products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation in signal transduction and gene regulation. PMID:26082792

  17. Associations between polymorphisms of the gene and milk production traits in water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Deng, T X; Pang, C Y; Lu, X R; Zhu, P; Duan, A Q; Liang, X W

    2016-03-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 () is an important regulator of mammary gland differentiation and cell survival that has been regarded as a candidate gene affecting milk production traits in mammals. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate significant associations between SNP of the gene and milk production traits in buffaloes. Here, 18 SNP were identified in the buffalo gene, including 15 intronic mutations and 3 exon mutations. All the identified SNP were then genotyped using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry methods from 192 buffaloes. All the SNP were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and 2 haplotype blocks were successfully constructed based on these SNP data, which formed 5 and 3 major haplotypes in the population (>5%), respectively. The results of association analysis showed that only SNP13 located in exon 10 was significantly associated with the milk production traits in the population ( < 0.05). Single nucleotide polymorphism 2, SNP5, SNP8, and SNP9 were associated with protein percentage, and SNP4 and SNP10 were associated with 305-d milk yield ( < 0.05). Our results provide evidence that polymorphisms of the buffalo gene are associated with milk production traits and can be used as a candidate gene for marker-assisted selection in buffalo breeding.

  18. Engineering validamycin production by tandem deletion of γ-butyrolactone receptor genes in Streptomyces hygroscopicus 5008.

    PubMed

    Tan, Gao-Yi; Peng, Yao; Lu, Chenyang; Bai, Linquan; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Paired homologs of γ-butyrolactone (GBL) biosynthesis gene afsA and GBL receptor gene arpA are located at different positions in genome of Streptomyces hygroscopicus 5008. Inactivation of afsA homologs dramatically decreased biosynthesis of validamycin, an important anti-fungal antibiotic and a critical substrate for antidiabetic drug synthesis, and the deletion of arpA homologs increased validamycin production by 26% (ΔshbR1) and 20% (ΔshbR3). By double deletion, the ΔshbR1/R3 mutant showed higher transcriptional levels of adpA-H (the S. hygroscopicus ortholog of the global regulatory gene adpA) and validamycin biosynthetic genes, and validamycin production increased by 55%. Furthermore, by engineering a high-producing industrial strain via tandem deletion of GBL receptor genes, validamycin production and productivity were enhanced from 19 to 24 g/L (by 26%) and from 6.7 to 9.7 g/L(-1) d(-1) (by 45%), respectively, which was the highest ever reported. The strategy demonstrated here may be useful to engineering other Streptomyces spp. with multiple pairs of afsA-arpA homologs.

  19. New tools for reconstruction and heterologous expression of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunzi; Enghiad, Behnam; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Natural product scaffolds remain a major source and inspiration for human therapeutics. However, generation of a natural product in the post-genomic era often requires reconstruction of the corresponding biosynthetic gene cluster in a heterologous host. In the burgeoning fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, a significant amount of efforts has been devoted to develop DNA assembly techniques with higher efficiency, fidelity, and modularity, and heterologous expression systems with higher productivity and yield. Here we describe recent advances in DNA assembly and host engineering and highlight their applications in natural product discovery and engineering. PMID:26647833

  20. New tools for reconstruction and heterologous expression of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yunzi; Enghiad, Behnam; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-02-01

    Natural product scaffolds remain a major source and inspiration for human therapeutics. However, generation of a natural product in the post-genomic era often requires reconstruction of the corresponding biosynthetic gene cluster in a heterologous host. In the burgeoning fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, a significant amount of efforts has been devoted to develop DNA assembly techniques with higher efficiency, fidelity, and modularity, and heterologous expression systems with higher productivity and yield. Here we describe recent advances in DNA assembly and host engineering and highlight their applications in natural product discovery and engineering.

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of RecA superfamily ATPase PH0284 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kunishima, Naoki

    2006-04-01

    RecA superfamily ATPase PH0284 from P. horikoshii OT3 was overexpressed, purified, crystallized and cocrystallized with ATP. Both crystal forms belong to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}21 and diffract X-rays to 2.0 and 2.3 Å resolution, respectively. Circadian (daily) protein clocks are found in cyanobacteria, where a complex of the KaiA, KaiB and KaiC proteins generates circadian rhythms. The 28.09 kDa KaiC homologue PH0284 protein from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 was cloned and expressed and the purified protein was crystallized by the oil-microbatch method at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data from the crystal were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at 100 K. The crystal belongs to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 96.06, c = 298.90 Å. Assuming the presence of one hexamer in the asymmetric unit gives a V{sub M} value of 2.36 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 47.9%. A cocrystal with ATP was prepared and a diffraction data set was collected at 2.3 Å resolution.

  2. The Discovery of Error-prone DNA Polymerase V and Its Unique Regulation by RecA and ATP

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Myron F.

    2014-01-01

    My career pathway has taken a circuitous route, beginning with a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University, followed by five postdoctoral years in biology at Hopkins and culminating in a faculty position in biological sciences at the University of Southern California. My startup package in 1973 consisted of $2,500, not to be spent all at once, plus an ancient Packard scintillation counter that had a series of rapidly flashing light bulbs to indicate a radioactive readout in counts/minute. My research pathway has been similarly circuitous. The discovery of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase V (pol V) began with an attempt to identify the mutagenic DNA polymerase responsible for copying damaged DNA as part of the well known SOS regulon. Although we succeeded in identifying a DNA polymerase, one that was induced as part of the SOS response, we actually rediscovered DNA polymerase II, albeit in a new role. A decade later, we discovered a new polymerase, pol V, whose activity turned out to be regulated by bound molecules of RecA protein and ATP. This Reflections article describes our research trajectory, includes a review of key features of DNA damage-induced SOS mutagenesis leading us to pol V, and reflects on some of the principal researchers who have made indispensable contributions to our efforts. PMID:25160630

  3. High-temperature piezoelectric single crystal ReCa(4)O(BO(3))(3) for sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujun; Fei, Yiting; Frantz, Eric; Snyder, David W; Chai, Bruce H T; Shrout, Thomas R

    2008-12-01

    Large-size and high-quality ReCa(4)O(BO(3))(3) (ReCOB, Re = rare earth) single crystals were grown by the Czochralski pulling method. In this work, the electrical properties were investigated at room temperature and elevated temperature for YCa(4)O(BO(3))(3) (YCOB). The dielectric permittivity, piezoelectric strain coefficient, and electromechanical coupling were found to be on the order of 11, 6.5 pC/N, and 12.5%, respectively, with a high piezoelectric voltage coefficient around 0.067 Vm/N. The electrical resistivity of YCOB was found to be 2 x 10(8) Ohm.m at 800 degrees C, with Q values of 4,500 at 950 degrees C. The frequency/temperature coefficient of YCOB was found to be -75 to -85ppm/K in the temperature range of 30 to 950 degrees C, depending on the crystal orientations. Together with their temperature-independent properties, ReCOB crystals are promising candidates for sensing applications at elevated temperatures.

  4. The discovery of error-prone DNA polymerase V and its unique regulation by RecA and ATP.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Myron F

    2014-09-26

    My career pathway has taken a circuitous route, beginning with a Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University, followed by five postdoctoral years in biology at Hopkins and culminating in a faculty position in biological sciences at the University of Southern California. My startup package in 1973 consisted of $2,500, not to be spent all at once, plus an ancient Packard scintillation counter that had a series of rapidly flashing light bulbs to indicate a radioactive readout in counts/minute. My research pathway has been similarly circuitous. The discovery of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase V (pol V) began with an attempt to identify the mutagenic DNA polymerase responsible for copying damaged DNA as part of the well known SOS regulon. Although we succeeded in identifying a DNA polymerase, one that was induced as part of the SOS response, we actually rediscovered DNA polymerase II, albeit in a new role. A decade later, we discovered a new polymerase, pol V, whose activity turned out to be regulated by bound molecules of RecA protein and ATP. This Reflections article describes our research trajectory, includes a review of key features of DNA damage-induced SOS mutagenesis leading us to pol V, and reflects on some of the principal researchers who have made indispensable contributions to our efforts.

  5. Investigation of genes involved in nisin production in Enterococcus spp. strains isolated from raw goat milk.

    PubMed

    Perin, Luana Martins; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-09-01

    Different strains of Lactococcus lactis are capable of producing the bacteriocin nisin. However, genetic transfer mechanisms allow the natural occurrence of genes involved in nisin production in members of other bacterial genera, such as Enterococcus spp. In a previous study, nisA was identified in eight enterococci capable of producing antimicrobial substances. The aim of this study was to verify the presence of genes involved in nisin production in Enterococcus spp. strains, as well as nisin expression. The nisA genes from eight Enterococcus spp. strains were sequenced and the translated amino acid sequences were compared to nisin amino-acid sequences previously described in databases. Although containing nisin structural and maturation related genes, the enterococci strains tested in the present study did not present the immunity related genes (nisFEG and nisI). The translated sequences of nisA showed some point mutations, identical to those presented by Lactococcus strains isolated from goat milk. All enterococci were inhibited by nisin, indicating the absence of immunity and thus that nisin cannot be expressed. This study demonstrated for the first time the natural occurrence of nisin structural genes in Enterococcus strains and highlights the importance of providing evidence of a link between the presence of bacteriocin genes and their expression.

  6. The product of the imprinted H19 gene is an oncofetal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ariel, I.; Ayesh, S.; Perlman, E. J.; Pizov, G.; Tanos, V.; Schneider, T.; Erdmann, V. A.; Podeh, D.; Komitowski, D.; Quasem, A. S.; de Groot, N.; Hochberg, A.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: The H19 gene is an imprinted, maternally expressed gene in humans. It is tightly linked and coregulated with the imprinted, paternally expressed gene of insulin-like growth factor 2. The H19 gene product is not translated into protein and functions as an RNA molecule. Although its role has been investigated for more than a decade, its biological function is still not understood fully. H19 is abundantly expressed in many tissues from early stages of embryogenesis through fetal life, and is down regulated postnatally. It is also expressed in certain childhood and adult tumours. This study was designed to screen the expression of H19 in human cancer and its relation to the expression of H19 in the fetus. METHODS: Using in situ hybridisation with a [35S] labelled probe, H19 mRNA was detected in paraffin wax sections of fetal tissues from the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and of a large array of human adult and childhood tumours arising from these tissues. RESULTS: The H19 gene is expressed in tumours arising from tissues which express this gene in fetal life. Its expression in the fetus and in cancer is closely linked with tissue differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these and previous data, H19 is neither a tumour suppressor gene nor an oncogene. Its product is an oncofetal RNA. The potential use of this RNA as a tumour marker should be evaluated. Images PMID:9208812

  7. Overexpression of bacterial ethylene-forming enzyme gene in Trichoderma reesei enhanced the production of ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Liang, Yong; Hua, Jing; Tao, Li; Qin, Wensheng; Chen, Sanfeng

    2010-01-01

    In order to efficiently utilize natural cellulose materials to produce ethylene, three expression vectors containing the ethylene-forming enzyme (efe) gene from Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea were constructed. The target gene was respectively controlled by different promoters: cbh I promoter from Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolases I gene, gpd promoter from Aspergillus nidulans glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene and pgk I promoter from T. reesei 3-phosphoglycerate kinase I gene. After transforming into T. reesei QM9414, 43 stable transformants were obtained by PCR amplification and ethylene determination. Southern blot analysis of 14 transformants demonstrated that the efe gene was integrated into chromosomal DNA with copy numbers from 1 to 4. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of 6 transformants showed that the heterologous gene was transcribed. By using wheat straw as a carbon source, the ethylene production rates of aforementioned 14 transformants were measured. Transformant C30-3 with pgk I promoter had the highest ethylene production (4,012 nl h-1 l-1). This indicates that agricultural wastes could be used to produce ethylene in recombinant filamentous fungus T. reesei. PMID:20150979

  8. Production of indole antibiotics induced by exogenous gene derived from sponge metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Takeshige, Yuya; Egami, Yoko; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Abe, Ikuro

    2015-05-01

    Sponge metagenomes are accessible genetic sources containing genes and gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of sponge-derived bioactive natural products. In this study, we obtained the clone pDC112, producing turbomycin A and 2,2-di(3-indolyl)-3-indolone, based on the functional screening of the metagenome library derived from the marine sponge Discodermia calyx. The subcloning experiment identified ORF 25, which is homologous to inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase and required for the production of 2,2-di(3-indolyl)-3-indolone in Escherichia coli.

  9. Enhanced production of acetoin and butanediol in recombinant Enterobacter aerogenes carrying Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene.

    PubMed

    Geckil, Hikmet; Barak, Ze'ev; Chipman, David M; Erenler, Sebnem O; Webster, Dale A; Stark, Benjamin C

    2004-10-01

    Microbial production of butanediol and acetoin has received increasing interest because of their diverse potential practical uses. Although both products are fermentative in nature, their optimal production requires a low level of oxygen. In this study, the use of a recombinant oxygen uptake system on production of these metabolites was investigated. Enterobacter aerogenes was transformed with a pUC8-based plasmid carrying the gene (vgb) encoding Vitreoscilla (bacterial)hemoglobin (VHb). The presence of vgb and production of VHb by this strain resulted in an increase in viability from 72 to 96 h in culture, but no overall increase in cell mass. Accumulation of the fermentation products acetoin and butanediol were enhanced (up to 83%) by the presence of vgb/VHb. This vgb/VHb related effect appears to be due to an increase of flux through the acetoin/butanediol pathway, but not at the expense of acid production.

  10. Biofilm formation, phenotypic production of cellulose and gene expression in Salmonella enterica decrease under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lamas, A; Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2016-12-05

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is one of the main food-borne pathogens. This microorganism combines an aerobic life outside the host with an anaerobic life within the host. One of the main concerns related to S. enterica is biofilm formation and cellulose production. In this study, biofilm formation, morphotype, cellulose production and transcription of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes of 11 S. enterica strains were tested under three different conditions: aerobiosis, microaerobiosis, and anaerobiosis. The results showed an influence of oxygen levels on biofilm production. Biofilm formation was significantly higher (P<0.05) in aerobiosis than in microaerobiosis and anaerobiosis. Cellulose production and RDAR (red, dry, and rough) were expressed only in aerobiosis. In microaerobiosis, the strains expressed the SAW (smooth and white) morphotype, while in anaerobiosis the colonies appeared small and red. The expression of genes involved in cellulose synthesis (csgD and adrA) and quorum sensing (sdiA and luxS) was reduced in microaerobiosis and anaerobiosis in all S. enterica strains tested. This gene expression levels were less reduced in S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis compared to the tested serotypes. There was a relationship between the expression of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes. Thus, the results from this study indicate that biofilm formation and cellulose production are highly influenced by atmospheric conditions. This must be taken into account as contamination with these bacteria can occur during food processing under vacuum or modified atmospheres.

  11. Analysis of the genetic effects of prolactin gene polymorphisms on chicken egg production.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Fang; Shu, Jing-Ting; Du, Yu-Feng; Shan, Yan-Ju; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Zhang, Xue-Yu; Han, Wei; Xu, Wen-Juan

    2013-01-01

    Chicken prolactin (PRL) is a physiological candidate gene for egg production. Variations of T8052C and G8113C in exon 5 of PRL gene may associate with chicken egg production. The objective of the study was to investigate the association of these two single nucleotide polymorphisms in PRL gene with egg production of Recessive White chickens and Qingyuan Partridge chickens. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction (PCR-LDR) method. The T8052C and G8113C of PRL were significantly associated with age at first egg (AFE) and total egg number at 300 days of age (EN 300). A significant association was also found between T8052C-G8113C haplotypes and AFE as well as EN300, the H2H3 was the most advantageous diplotype for egg production. We putatively drew the conclusion that these two SNPs in PRL gene as well as their haplotypes could be used as the potential molecular markers for egg production traits in chicken.

  12. Improvement of oxytetracycline production mediated via cooperation of resistance genes in Streptomyces rimosus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shouliang; Wang, Xuefeng; Shi, Mingxin; Yuan, Fang; Wang, Huizhuan; Jia, Xiaole; Yuan, Fang; Sun, Jinliang; Liu, Tiejun; Yang, Keqian; Zhang, Yuxiu; Fan, Keqiang; Li, Zilong

    2017-09-01

    Increasing the self-resistance levels of Streptomyces is an effective strategy to improve the production of antibiotics. To increase the oxytetracycline (OTC) production in Streptomyces rimosus, we investigated the cooperative effect of three co-overexpressing OTC resistance genes: one gene encodes a ribosomal protection protein (otrA) and the other two express efflux proteins (otrB and otrC). Results indicated that combinational overexpression of otrA, otrB, and otrC (MKABC) exerted a synergetic effect. OTC production increased by 179% in the recombinant strain compared with that of the wild-type strain M4018. The resistance level to OTC was increased by approximately two-fold relative to the parental strain, thereby indicating that applying the cooperative effect of self-resistance genes is useful to improve OTC production. Furthermore, the previously identified cluster-situated activator OtcR was overexpressed in MKABC in constructing the recombinant strain MKRABC; such strain can produce OTC of approximately 7.49 g L(-1), which represents an increase of 19% in comparison with that of the OtcR-overexpressing strain alone. Our work showed that the cooperative overexpression of self-resistance genes is a promising strategy to enhance the antibiotics production in Streptomyces.

  13. Isolation and characterization of mutations in the bacteriophage lambda terminase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, A; Yau, P; Murialdo, H; Gold, M

    1991-01-01

    The terminase enzyme of bacteriophage lambda is a hetero-oligomeric protein which catalyzes the site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage of lambda DNA and its packaging into phage proheads; it is composed of the products of the lambda Nul and A genes. We have developed a simple method to select mutations in the terminase genes carried on a high-copy-number plasmid, based on the ability of wild-type terminase to kill recA strains of Escherichia coli. Sixty-three different spontaneous mutations and 13 linker insertion mutations were isolated by this method and analyzed. Extracts of cells transformed by mutant plasmids displayed variable degrees of reduction in the activity of one or both terminase subunits as assayed by in vitro lambda DNA packaging. A method of genetically mapping plasmid-borne mutations in the A gene by measuring their ability to rescue various lambda Aam phages showed that the A mutations were fairly evenly distributed across the gene. Mutant A genes were also subcloned into overproducing plasmid constructs, and it was determined that more than half of them directed the synthesis of normal amounts of full-length A protein. Three of the A gene mutants displayed dramatically reduced in vitro packaging activity only when immature (uncut) lambda DNA was used as the substrate; therefore, these mutations may lie in the endonuclease domain of terminase. Interestingly, the putative endonuclease mutations mapped in two distinct locations in the A gene separated by a least 400 bp. Images PMID:1830578

  14. 1,3-Propanediol production by Escherichia coli using genes from Citrobacter freundii atcc 8090.

    PubMed

    Przystałowska, Hanna; Zeyland, Joanna; Kośmider, Alicja; Szalata, Marlena; Słomski, Ryszard; Lipiński, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Compared with chemical synthesis, fermentation has the advantage of mass production at low cost, and has been used in the production of various industrial chemicals. As a valuable organic compound, 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) has numerous applications in the production of polymers, lubricants, cosmetics and medicines. Here, conversion of glycerol (a renewable substrate and waste from biodiesel production) to 1,3-PDO by E. coli bacterial strain carrying altered glycerol metabolic pathway was investigated. Two gene constructs containing the 1,3-PDO operon from Citrobacter freundii (pCF1 and pCF2) were used to transform the bacteria. The pCF1 gene expression construct contained dhaBCE genes encoding the three subunits of glycerol dehydratase, dhaF encoding the large subunit of the glycerol dehydratase reactivation factor and dhaG encoding the small subunit of the glycerol dehydratase reactivating factor. The pCF2 gene expression construct contained the dhaT gene encoding the 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase. Expression of the genes cloned in the above constructs was under regulation of the T7lac promoter. RT-PCR, SDS-PAGE analyses and functional tests confirmed that 1,3-PDO synthesis pathway genes were expressed at the RNA and protein levels, and worked flawlessly in the heterologous host. In a batch flask culture, in a short time applied just to identify the 1,3-PDO in a preliminary study, the recombinant E. coli bacteria produced 1.53 g/L of 1,3-PDO, using 21.2 g/L of glycerol in 72 h. In the Sartorius Biostat B Plus reactor, they produced 11.7 g/L of 1,3-PDO using 24.2 g/L of glycerol, attaining an efficiency of 0.58 [mol1,3-PDO/molglycerol].

  15. Diversity of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Enterococcus Strains Isolated from Ready-to-Eat Meat Products.

    PubMed

    Chajęcka-Wierzchowska, Wioleta; Zadernowska, Anna; Łaniewska-Trokenheim, Łucja

    2016-10-25

    The objective of the study was to answer the question of whether the ready-to-eat meat products can pose indirect hazard for consumer health serving as reservoir of Enterococcus strains harboring tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, and macrolides resistance genes. A total of 390 samples of ready-to-eat meat products were investigated. Enterococcus strains were found in 74.1% of the samples. A total of 302 strains were classified as: Enterococcus faecalis (48.7%), Enterococcus faecium (39.7%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (4.3%), Enterococcus durans (3.0%), Enterococcus hirae (2.6%), and other Enterococcus spp. (1.7%). A high percentage of isolates were resistant to streptomycin high level (45%) followed by erythromycin (42.7%), fosfomycin (27.2%), rifampicin (19.2%), tetracycline (36.4%), tigecycline (19.9%). The ant(6')-Ia gene was the most frequently found gene (79.6%). Among the other genes that encode aminoglycosides-modifying enzymes, the highest portion of the strains had the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia (18.5%) and aph(3'')-IIIa (16.6%), but resistance of isolates from food is also an effect of the presence of aph(2'')-Ib, aph(2'')-Ic, aph(2'')-Id genes. Resistance to tetracyclines was associated with the presence of tetM (43.7%), tetL (32.1%), tetK (14.6%), tetW (0.7%), and tetO (0.3%) genes. The ermB and ermA genes were found in 33.8% and 18.9% of isolates, respectively. Nearly half of the isolates contained a conjugative transposon of the Tn916/Tn1545 family. Enterococci are widely present in retail ready-to-eat meat products. Many isolated strains (including such species as E. casseliflavus, E. durans, E. hirae, and Enterococcus gallinarum) are antibiotic resistant and carry transferable resistance genes. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  16. Identification and engineering of regulation-related genes toward improved kasugamycin production.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenchen; Kang, Qianjin; Bai, Linquan; Cheng, Lin; Deng, Zixin

    2016-02-01

    Kasugamycin, produced by Streptomyces kasugaensis and Streptomyces microaureus, is an important amino-glycoside family antibiotic and widely used for veterinary and agricultural applications. In the left flanking region of the previously reported kasugamycin gene cluster, four additional genes (two-component system kasW and kasX, MerR-family kasV, and isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase kasS) were identified both in the low-yielding S. kasugaensis BCRC12349 and high-yielding S. microaureus XM301. Deletion of regulatory gene kasT abolished kasugamycin production, and its overexpression in BCRC12349 resulted in an increased titer by 186 %. Deletion of kasW, kasX, kasV, and kasS improved kasugamycin production by 12, 19, 194, and 22 %, respectively. qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the transcription of kas genes was significantly increased in all the four mutants. Similar gene inactivation was performed in the high-yielding strain S. microaureus XM301. As expected, the deletion of kasW/X resulted in a 58 % increase of the yield from 6 to 9.5 g/L. However, the deletion of kasV and over-expression of kasT had no obvious effect, and the disruption of kasS surprisingly decreased kasugamycin production. In addition, trans-complementation of the kasS mutant with a TTA codon-mutated kasS increased the kasugamycin yield by 20 %. A much higher transcription of kas genes was detected in the high-yielding XM301 than in the low-yielding BCRC12349, which may partially account for the discrepancy of gene inactivation effects between them. Our work not only generated engineered strains with improved kasugamycin yield, but also pointed out that different strategies on manipulating regulatory-related genes should be considered for low-yielding or high-yielding strains.

  17. DNA sequencing and gene expression of the emm gene cluster in an M50 group A streptococcus strain virulent for mice.

    PubMed

    Yung, D L; Hollingshead, S K

    1996-06-01

    The strain B514, an M serotype 50 strain, is capable of causing a natural upper respiratory infection leading to death in mice, as reported by Hook et al. in 1960 (E. W. Hook, R. R. Wagner, and R. C. Lancefield, Am. J. Hyg. 72:111-119, 1960). Thus, this strain was of interest for use in developing an animal model for group A streptococcal colonization and disease. The emm gene cluster for this strain was examined by PCR mapping and found to contain three emm family genes and cluster pattern 5. PCR-generated fragments corresponding to the SF4 (mrp50), SF2 (emmL50), and SF3 (enn50) genes were cloned and the entire gene cluster was sequenced. The gene cluster has greater than 97% DNA identity to previously sequenced regions of the gene cluster of the M2 strain T2/44/RB4 if two small divergent regions that encode the mature amino terminus of the SF-2 and SF-3 gene products are not included. If expressed, the genes encode proteins which bind human immunoglobulin G (Mrp50 and EmmL50) or immunoglobulin A (Enn50). However, in isolates taken directly after passage in mice, the surface proteins arising from these genes were barely detectable. The transcription of each gene in the B514 strain was investigated by Northern (RNA) hybridization, and mRNA transcripts were detected and quantitated relative to those of the recA gene, a housekeeping gene. Transcription of all three emm family genes was found to be over 30-fold attenuated relative to transcription of the same genes in strain T2/44/RB4. This suggests that the positive regulator, Mga, either is not expressed in this strain or has a different requirement for activation; it also suggests that the capsule may be sufficient to inhibit phagocytosis under these circumstances.

  18. Regulatory structures for gene therapy medicinal products in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Klug, Bettina; Celis, Patrick; Carr, Melanie; Reinhardt, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Taking into account the complexity and technical specificity of advanced therapy medicinal products: (gene and cell therapy medicinal products and tissue engineered products), a dedicated European regulatory framework was needed. Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007, the "ATMP Regulation" provides tailored regulatory principles for the evaluation and authorization of these innovative medicines. The majority of gene or cell therapy product development is carried out by academia, hospitals, and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Thus, acknowledging the particular needs of these types of sponsors, the legislation also provides incentives for product development tailored to them. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) and, in particular, its Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) provide a variety of opportunities for early interaction with developers of ATMPs to enable them to have early regulatory and scientific input. An important tool to promote innovation and the development of new medicinal products by micro-, small-, and medium-sized enterprises is the EMA's SME initiative launched in December 2005 to offer financial and administrative assistance to smaller companies. The European legislation also foresees the involvement of stakeholders, such as patient organizations, in the development of new medicines. Considering that gene therapy medicinal products are developed in many cases for treatment of rare diseases often of monogenic origin, the involvement of patient organizations, which focus on rare diseases and genetic and congenital disorders, is fruitful. Two such organizations are represented in the CAT. Research networks play another important role in the development of gene therapy medicinal products. The European Commission is funding such networks through the EU Sixth Framework Program.

  19. Isolated fungal promoters and gene transcription terminators and methods of protein and chemical production in a fungus

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Ziyu; Lasure, Linda L; Magnuson, Jon K

    2014-05-27

    The present invention encompasses isolated gene regulatory elements and gene transcription terminators that are differentially expressed in a native fungus exhibiting a first morphology relative to the native fungus exhibiting a second morphology. The invention also encompasses a method of utilizing a fungus for protein or chemical production. A transformed fungus is produced by transforming a fungus with a recombinant polynucleotide molecule. The recombinant polynucleotide molecule contains an isolated polynucleotide sequence linked operably to another molecule comprising a coding region of a gene of interest. The gene regulatory element and gene transcription terminator may temporally and spatially regulate expression of particular genes for optimum production of compounds of interest in a transgenic fungus.

  20. Isolated fungal promoters and gene transcription terminators and methods of protein and chemical production in a fungus

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Ziyu; Lasure, Linda L.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2008-11-11

    The present invention encompasses isolated gene regulatory elements and gene transcription terminators that are differentially expressed in a native fungus exhibiting a first morphology relative to the native fungus exhibiting a second morphology. The invention also encompasses a method of utilizing a fungus for protein or chemical production. A transformed fungus is produced by transforming a fungus with a recombinant polynucleotide molecule. The recombinant polynucleotide molecule contains an isolated polynucleotide sequence linked operably to another molecule comprising a coding region of a gene of interest. The gene regulatory element and gene transcription terminator may temporally and spatially regulate expression of particular genes for optimum production of compounds of interest in a transgenic fungus.

  1. Isolated Fungal Promoters and Gene Transcription Terminators and Methods of Protein and Chemical Production in a Fungus

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Ziyu; Lasure, Linda L.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2008-11-11

    The present invention encompasses isolated gene regulatory elements and gene transcription terminators that are differentially expressed in a native fungus exhibiting a first morphology relative to the native fungus exhibiting a second morphology. The invention also encompasses a method of utilizing a fungus for protein or chemical production. A transformed fungus is produced by transforming a fungus with a recombinant polynucleotide molecule. The recombinant polynucleotide molecule contains an isolated polynucleotide sequence linked operably to another molecule comprising a coding region of a gene of interest. The gene regulatory element and gene transcription terminator may temporally and spatially regulate expression of particular genes for optimum production of compounds of interest in a transgenic fungus.

  2. Distribution of Toxin Genes and Enterotoxins in Bacillus thuringiensis Isolated from Microbial Insecticide Products.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung-Hak; Kang, Suk-Ho; Lee, Yea-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jo; Yoo, Young-Bin; Bak, Yeong-Seok; Kim, Jung-Beom

    2015-12-28

    Bacillus thuringiensis microbial insecticide products have been applied worldwide. Although a few cases of B. thuringiensis foodborne illness have been reported, little is known about the toxigenic properties of B. thuringiensis isolates. The aims of this study were to estimate the pathogenic potential of B. thuringiensis selected from microbial insecticide products, based on its possession of toxin genes and production of enterotoxins. Fifty-two B. thuringiensis strains selected from four kinds of microbial insecticide products were analyzed. PCR assay for detection of toxin genes and immunoassay for detection of enterotoxins were performed. The hemolysin BL complex as a major enterotoxin was produced by 17 (32.7%), whereas the nonhemolytic enterotoxin complex was detected in 1 (1.9%) of 52 B. thuringiensis strains. However, cytK, entFM, and ces genes were not detected in any of the tested B. thuringiensis strains. The potential risk of food poisoning by B. thuringiensis along with concerns over B. thuringiensis microbial insecticide products has gained attention recently. Thus, microbial insecticide products based on B. thuringiensis should be carefully controlled.

  3. Development of Ecogenomic Sensors for Remote Detection of Marine Microbes, Their Genes and Gene Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholin, C.; Preston, C.; Harris, A.; Birch, J.; Marin, R.; Jensen, S.; Roman, B.; Everlove, C.; Makarewicz, A.; Riot, V.; Hadley, D.; Benett, W.; Dzenitis, J.

    2008-12-01

    An internet search using the phrase "ecogenomic sensor" will return numerous references that speak broadly to the idea of detecting molecular markers indicative of specific organisms, genes or other biomarkers within an environmental context. However, a strict and unified definition of "ecogenomic sensor" is lacking and the phrase may be used for laboratory-based tools and techniques as well as semi or fully autonomous systems that can be deployed outside of laboratory. We are exploring development of an ecogenomic sensor from the perspective of a field-portable device applied towards oceanographic research and water quality monitoring. The device is known as the Environmental Sample Processor, or ESP. The ESP employs wet chemistry molecular analytical techniques to autonomously assess the presence and abundance of specific organisms, their genes and/or metabolites in near real-time. Current detection chemistries rely on low- density DNA probe and protein arrays. This presentation will emphasize results from 2007-8 field trials when the ESP was moored in Monterey Bay, CA, as well as current engineering activities for improving analytical capacity of the instrument. Changes in microbial community structure at the rRNA level were observed remotely in accordance with changing chemical and physical oceanographic conditions. Current developments include incorporation of a reusable solid phase extraction column for purifying nucleic acids and a 4-channel real-time PCR module. Users can configure this system to support a variety of PCR master mixes, primer/probe combinations and control templates. An update on progress towards fielding a PCR- enabled ESP will be given along with an outline of plans for its use in coastal and oligotrophic oceanic regimes.

  4. Effect of induction of SOS response on expression of pBR322 genes and on plasmid copy number

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand-Burggraf, E.; Oertel, P.; Schnarr, M.; Daune, M.; Granger-Schnarr, M. )

    1989-09-01

    Several lines of evidence are presented that indicate that the level of tetracycline resistance of Esherichia coli strains harboring plasmid pBR322 varies according to whether the SOS system of the host bacteria has been induced. These include use of strains in which the SOS system is expressed constitutively (lexA def.), is thermoinducible (recA441) or noninducible (lexA ind-), or is highly repressed (multiple copies of lexA+). Similar induction was observed with the product of another plasmid gene, beta-lactamase. The amounts of extractable plasmid DNA were also increased by SOS induction, and we propose that the SOS-induced increases in levels of tetracycline resistance and beta-lactamase activity are due to an increased plasmid copy number.

  5. Polyhydroxyalkanoate production from sucrose by Cupriavidus necator strains harboring csc genes from Escherichia coli W.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hisashi; Matsumoto, Keiji; Fujiki, Tetsuya

    2017-09-09

    Cupriavidus necator H16 is the most promising bacterium for industrial production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) because of their remarkable ability to accumulate them in the cells. With genetic modifications, this bacterium can produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx), which has better physical properties, as well as poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) using plant oils and sugars as a carbon source. Considering production cost, sucrose is a very attractive raw material because it is inexpensive; however, this bacterium cannot assimilate sucrose. Here, we used the sucrose utilization (csc) genes of Escherichia coli W to generate C. necator strains that can assimilate sucrose. Especially, glucose-utilizing recombinant C. necator strains harboring the sucrose hydrolase gene (cscA) and sucrose permease gene (cscB) of E. coli W grew well on sucrose as a sole carbon source and accumulated PHB. In addition, strains introduced with a crotonyl-CoA reductase gene (ccr), ethylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase gene (emd), and some other genetic modifications besides the csc genes and the glucose-utilizing mutations produced PHBHHx with a 3-hydroxyhexanoate (3HHx) content of maximum approximately 27 mol% from sucrose. Furthermore, when one of the PHBHHx-producing strains was cultured with sucrose solution in a fed-batch fermentation, PHBHHx with a 3HHx content of approximately 4 mol% was produced and reached 113 g/L for 65 h, which is approximately 1.5-fold higher than that produced using glucose solution.

  6. Prolactin (PRL) and prolactin receptor (PRLR) genes and their role in poultry production traits.

    PubMed

    Wilkanowska, Anna; Mazurowski, Artur; Mroczkowski, Sławomir; Kokoszyński, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL), secreted from the anterior pituitary, plays extensive roles in osmoregulation, corpus luteum formation, mammogenesis, lactogenesis, lactopoiesis, and production of crop milk. In birds, prolactin (PRL) is generally accepted as crucial to the onset and maintenance of broodiness. All the actions of prolactin (PRL) hormone are mediated by its receptor (PRLR), which plays an important role in the PRL signal transduction cascade. It has been well established that the PRL gene is closely associated to the onset and maintenance of broody behavior, and could be a genetic marker in breeding against broodiness in chickens. Meanwhile, the prolactin receptor (PRLR) gene is regarded as a candidate genetic marker for reproductive traits. PRLR is also an important regulator gene for cell growth and differentiation. The identified polymorphism of this gene is mainly viewed in terms of egg production traits. Due to different biological activities attributed to PRL and PRLR, they can be used as major candidate genes in molecular animal breeding programs. Characterization of PRL and PRLR genes helps to elucidate their roles in birds and provides insights into the regulatory mechanisms of PRL and PRLR expression conserved in birds and mammals.

  7. The dam replacing gene product enhances Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 viability and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Bacal, Pawel; Wasiluk, Adrian; Trybunko, Anastasiya; Adamczyk-Poplawska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Many Neisseriaceae do not exhibit Dam methyltransferase activity and, instead of the dam gene, possess drg (dam replacing gene) inserted in the leuS/dam locus. The drg locus in Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 has a lower GC-pairs content (40.5%) compared to the whole genome of N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 (52%). The gonococcal drg gene encodes a DNA endonuclease Drg, with GmeATC specificity. Disruption of drg or insertion of the dam gene in gonococcal genome changes the level of expression of genes as shown by transcriptome analysis. For the drg-deficient N. gonorrhoeae mutant, a total of 195 (8.94% of the total gene pool) genes exhibited an altered expression compared to the wt strain by at least 1.5 fold. In dam-expressing N. gonorrhoeae mutant, the expression of 240 genes (11% of total genes) was deregulated. Most of these deregulated genes were involved in translation, DNA repair, membrane biogenesis and energy production as shown by cluster of orthologous group analysis. In vivo, the inactivation of drg gene causes the decrease of the number of live neisserial cells and long lag phase of growth. The insertion of dam gene instead of drg locus restores cell viability. We have also shown that presence of the drg gene product is important for N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 in adhesion, including human epithelial cells, and biofilm formation. Biofilm produced by drg-deficient strain is formed by more dispersed cells, compared to this one formed by parental strain as shown by scanning electron and confocal microscopy. Also adherence assays show a significantly smaller biomass of formed biofilm (OD570 = 0.242 ± 0.038) for drg-deficient strain, compared to wild-type strain (OD570 = 0.378 ± 0.057). Dam-expressing gonococcal cells produce slightly weaker biofilm with cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. This strain has also a five times reduced ability for adhesion to human epithelial cells. In this context, the presence of Drg is more advantageous for N. gonorrhoeae biology than

  8. The dam replacing gene product enhances Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 viability and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Bacal, Pawel; Wasiluk, Adrian; Trybunko, Anastasiya; Adamczyk-Poplawska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Many Neisseriaceae do not exhibit Dam methyltransferase activity and, instead of the dam gene, possess drg (dam replacing gene) inserted in the leuS/dam locus. The drg locus in Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 has a lower GC-pairs content (40.5%) compared to the whole genome of N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 (52%). The gonococcal drg gene encodes a DNA endonuclease Drg, with GmeATC specificity. Disruption of drg or insertion of the dam gene in gonococcal genome changes the level of expression of genes as shown by transcriptome analysis. For the drg-deficient N. gonorrhoeae mutant, a total of 195 (8.94% of the total gene pool) genes exhibited an altered expression compared to the wt strain by at least 1.5 fold. In dam-expressing N. gonorrhoeae mutant, the expression of 240 genes (11% of total genes) was deregulated. Most of these deregulated genes were involved in translation, DNA repair, membrane biogenesis and energy production as shown by cluster of orthologous group analysis. In vivo, the inactivation of drg gene causes the decrease of the number of live neisserial cells and long lag phase of growth. The insertion of dam gene instead of drg locus restores cell viability. We have also shown that presence of the drg gene product is important for N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 in adhesion, including human epithelial cells, and biofilm formation. Biofilm produced by drg-deficient strain is formed by more dispersed cells, compared to this one formed by parental strain as shown by scanning electron and confocal microscopy. Also adherence assays show a significantly smaller biomass of formed biofilm (OD570 = 0.242 ± 0.038) for drg-deficient strain, compared to wild-type strain (OD570 = 0.378 ± 0.057). Dam-expressing gonococcal cells produce slightly weaker biofilm with cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. This strain has also a five times reduced ability for adhesion to human epithelial cells. In this context, the presence of Drg is more advantageous for N. gonorrhoeae biology than

  9. Ethanol production by Escherichia coli strains co-expressing Zymomonas PDC and ADH genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Conway, Tyrrell; Alterthum, Flavio

    1991-01-01

    A novel operon and plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase activities of Zymomonas mobilis are described. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of microorganisms or eukaryotic cells and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of microorganisms or cells.

  10. EpsA is an essential gene in exopolysaccharide production in L actobacillus johnsonii FI9785

    PubMed Central

    Dertli, Enes; Colquhoun, Ian J.; Narbad, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Summary L actobacillus johnsonii FI9785 has an eps gene cluster which is required for the biosynthesis of homopolymeric exopolysaccharides (EPS)‐1 and heteropolymeric EPS‐2 as a capsular layer. The first gene of the cluster, epsA, is the putative transcriptional regulator. In this study we showed the crucial role of epsA in EPS biosynthesis by demonstrating that deletion of epsA resulted in complete loss of both EPS‐1 and EPS‐2 on the cell surface. Plasmid complementation of the epsA gene fully restored EPS production, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Furthermore, this complementation resulted in a twofold increase in the expression levels of this gene, which almost doubled amounts of EPS production in comparison with the wild‐type strain. Analysis of EPS by NMR showed an increased ratio of the heteropolysaccharide to homopolysaccharide in the complemented strain and allowed identification of the acetylated residue in EPS‐2 as the (1,4)‐linked βGlcp unit, with the acetyl group located at O‐6. These findings indicate that epsA is a positive regulator of EPS production and that EPS production can be manipulated by altering its expression. PMID:26401596

  11. Role of nitric oxide and flavohemoglobin homolog genes in Aspergillus nidulans sexual development and mycotoxin production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flavohemoglobins are widely distributed proteins in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, conferring resistance against nitrosative stress. In the present study we investigated the role of two flavohemoglobin homologous genes, fhbA and fhbB, in morphogenesis and in the production of the mycotox...

  12. Direct cellobiose production from cellulose using sextuple beta-glucosidase gene deletion Neurospora crassa mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Direct cellobiose production from cellulose by a genetically modified fungus—Neurospora crassa, was explored in this study. A library of N. crassa sextuple beta-glucosidase (bgl) gene deletion strains was constructed. Various concentrations of cellobiose were detected in the culture broth of the N. ...

  13. Optimizing heterologous protein production in the periplasm of E. coli by regulating gene expression levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Escherichia coli many heterologous proteins are produced in the periplasm. To direct these proteins to the periplasm, they are equipped with an N-terminal signal sequence so that they can traverse the cytoplasmic membrane via the protein-conducting Sec-translocon. For poorly understood reasons, the production of heterologous secretory proteins is often toxic to the cell thereby limiting yields. To gain insight into the mechanism(s) that underlie this toxicity we produced two secretory heterologous proteins, super folder green fluorescent protein and a single-chain variable antibody fragment, in the Lemo21(DE3) strain. In this strain, the expression intensity of the gene encoding the target protein can be precisely controlled. Results Both SFGFP and the single-chain variable antibody fragment were equipped with a DsbA-derived signal sequence. Producing these proteins following different gene expression levels in Lemo21(DE3) allowed us to identify the optimal expression level for each target gene. Too high gene expression levels resulted in saturation of the Sec-translocon capacity as shown by hampered translocation of endogenous secretory proteins and a protein misfolding/aggregation problem in the cytoplasm. At the optimal gene expression levels, the negative effects of the production of the heterologous secretory proteins were minimized and yields in the periplasm were optimized. Conclusions Saturating the Sec-translocon capacity can be a major bottleneck hampering heterologous protein production in the periplasm. This bottleneck can be alleviated by harmonizing expression levels of the genes encoding the heterologous secretory proteins with the Sec-translocon capacity. Mechanistic insight into the production of proteins in the periplasm is key to optimizing yields in this compartment. PMID:23497240

  14. Engineering a regulatory region of jadomycin gene cluster to improve jadomycin B production in Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Ting; Wang, Sheng-Lan; Yang, Ke-Qian

    2007-09-01

    Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230 produces a group of jadomycin congeners with cytotoxic activities. To improve jadomycin fermentation process, a genetic engineering strategy was designed to replace a 3.4-kb regulatory region of jad gene cluster that contains four regulatory genes (3' end 272 bp of jadW2, jadW3, jadR2, and jadR1) and the native promoter upstream of jadJ (P(J)) with the ermEp* promoter sequence so that ermEp* drives the expression of the jadomycin biosynthetic genes from jadJ in the engineered strain. As expected, the mutant strain produced jadomycin B without ethanol treatment, and the yield increased to about twofold that of the stressed wild-type. These results indicated that manipulation of the regulation of a biosynthetic gene cluster is an effective strategy to increase product yield.

  15. [A tetracycline-inducible gene system allows for regulated production of proteins with therapeutic potential].

    PubMed

    Castillo-Ureta, Hipólito; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia G

    2004-01-01

    The adoption of a bacterial system of control of genic expression with tetracycline, combined with the advances in the identification of regulatory sequences and mechanisms of expression of eukaryotic genes, has increased the versatility and effectiveness of techniques to reintroduce and to make genes function in cells and in superior organisms by being able to control the activity of the transgene in a temporary or reversible manner. This approach has also facilitated making detailed studies of different cellular processes and diseases; for example, the study of the function of oncogenes and other genes involved in the formation and progression of cancer, the generation of cellular models for recombinant protein production with therapeutic purposes, the ex-vivo genetic manipulation of extracted cells from patients and returned to them for gene therapy procedures, as well as the modulation of transgenes to revert hereditary suffering in animal models.

  16. Efficient production of multi-modified pigs for xenotransplantation by 'combineering', gene stacking and gene editing.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Konrad; Kraner-Scheiber, Simone; Petersen, Björn; Rieblinger, Beate; Buermann, Anna; Flisikowska, Tatiana; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Christan, Susanne; Edlinger, Marlene; Baars, Wiebke; Kurome, Mayuko; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Kessler, Barbara; Plotzki, Elena; Szczerbal, Izabela; Switonski, Marek; Denner, Joachim; Wolf, Eckhard; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Niemann, Heiner; Kind, Alexander; Schnieke, Angelika

    2016-06-29

    Xenotransplantation from pigs could alleviate the shortage of human tissues and organs for transplantation. Means have been identified to overcome hyperacute rejection and acute vascular rejection mechanisms mounted by the recipient. The challenge is to combine multiple genetic modifications to enable normal animal breeding and meet the demand for transplants. We used two methods to colocate xenoprotective transgenes at one locus, sequential targeted transgene placement - 'gene stacking', and cointegration of multiple engineered large vectors - 'combineering', to generate pigs carrying modifications considered necessary to inhibit short to mid-term xenograft rejection. Pigs were generated by serial nuclear transfer and analysed at intermediate stages. Human complement inhibitors CD46, CD55 and CD59 were abundantly expressed in all tissues examined, human HO1 and human A20 were widely expressed. ZFN or CRISPR/Cas9 mediated homozygous GGTA1 and CMAH knockout abolished α-Gal and Neu5Gc epitopes. Cells from multi-transgenic piglets showed complete protection against human complement-mediated lysis, even before GGTA1 knockout. Blockade of endothelial activation reduced TNFα-induced E-selectin expression, IFNγ-induced MHC class-II upregulation and TNFα/cycloheximide caspase induction. Microbial analysis found no PERV-C, PCMV or 13 other infectious agents. These animals are a major advance towards clinical porcine xenotransplantation and demonstrate that livestock engineering has come of age.

  17. Functional Reconstitution of a Fungal Natural Product Gene Cluster by Advanced Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jakob; Valiante, Vito; Nødvig, Christina S; Mattern, Derek J; Slotkowski, Rebecca A; Mortensen, Uffe H; Brakhage, Axel A

    2017-01-20

    Filamentous fungi produce varieties of natural products even in a strain dependent manner. However, the genetic basis of chemical speciation between strains is still widely unknown. One example is trypacidin, a natural product of the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, which is not produced among different isolates. Combining computational analysis with targeted gene editing, we could link a single nucleotide insertion in the polyketide synthase of the trypacidin biosynthetic pathway and reconstitute its production in a nonproducing strain. Thus, we present a CRISPR/Cas9-based tool for advanced molecular genetic studies in filamentous fungi, exploiting selectable markers separated from the edited locus.

  18. Analysis of ldh genes in Lactobacillus casei BL23: role on lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Rico, Juan; Yebra, María Jesús; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Deutscher, Josef; Monedero, Vicente

    2008-06-01

    Lactobacillus casei is a lactic acid bacterium that produces L-lactate as the main product of sugar fermentation via L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh1) activity. In addition, small amounts of the D-lactate isomer are produced by the activity of a D-hydroxycaproate dehydrogenase (HicD). Ldh1 is the main L-lactate producing enzyme, but mutation of its gene does not eliminate L-lactate synthesis. A survey of the L. casei BL23 draft genome sequence revealed the presence of three additional genes encoding Ldh paralogs. In order to study the contribution of these genes to the global lactate production in this organism, individual, as well as double mutants (ldh1 ldh2, ldh1 ldh3, ldh1 ldh4 and ldh1 hicD) were constructed and lactic acid production was assessed in culture supernatants. ldh2, ldh3 and ldh4 genes play a minor role in lactate production, as their single mutation or a mutation in combination with an ldh1 deletion had a low impact on L-lactate synthesis. A Deltaldh1 mutant displayed an increased production of D-lactate, which was probably synthesized via the activity of HicD, as it was abolished in a Deltaldh1 hicD double mutant. Contrarily to HicD, no Ldh1, Ldh2, Ldh3 or Ldh4 activities could be detected by zymogram assays. In addition, these assays revealed the presence of extra bands exhibiting D-/L-lactate dehydrogenase activity, which could not be attributed to any of the described genes. These results suggest that L. casei BL23 possesses a complex enzymatic system able to reduce pyruvic to lactic acid.

  19. Consistent quantitative gene product expression: #2. Antigen intensities on bone marrow cells are invariant between individuals

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Andrew P.; Eidenschink Brodersen, Lisa; Fritschle, Wayne; Menssen, Andrew J.; Meshinchi, Soheil; Wells, Denise A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Five reference populations in bone marrow specimens were identified by flow cytometry using specific combinations of reagents in order define the variation of gene product expression intensities both within and between individuals. Mature lymphocytes, uncommitted progenitor cells, promyelocytes, mature monocytes and mature neutrophils can be reproducibly identified as distinct clusters of events in heterogeneous, maturing bone marrow specimens. Support Vector Machines were used to identify the reference populations in order to reduce subjective bias in manually defining boundaries of these populations since they were not discretely separated from the remainder of the cells. Reference populations were identified in 50 randomly selected bone marrow aspirates obtained over a period spanning 3 years and 6 months from pediatric patients following chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The quantitative expression of gene products (cell surface antigens) and light scattering characteristics on these stressed specimens were demonstrated to be tightly regulated both within individuals and between individuals. Within an individual most gene products (CD45, CD34, CD14, CD16, CD64, CD33) demonstrated limited variability with a standard deviation of <0.20 log units while CD13 and CD36 exhibited broader variation >0.25 log units. Surprisingly, with the exception of CD33, the variation of the mean intensities of each antigen between individuals was even less than the variation within an individual. These data confirm that the amounts of gene products expressed on normal developing cells are highly regulated but differ in intensities between different lineages and during the maturational pathway of those lineages. The amounts of gene products expressed at specific stages of development of each lineage are a biologic constant with minimal variation within or between individuals. © 2016 The Authors. Cytometry Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  20. Ghrelin gene products rescue cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells from high glucose insult.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sehee; Kim, Chanyang; Park, Seungjoon

    2016-10-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is decreased in type 2 diabetes, and this impairment appears to be important in cognitive dysfunction. Previous studies suggest that ghrelin gene products (acylated ghrelin (AG), unacylated ghrelin (UAG) and obestatin (OB)) promote neurogenesis. Therefore, we hypothesize that ghrelin gene products may reduce the harmful effects of high glucose (HG) on hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of these peptides on the survival of cultured hippocampal NSCs exposed to HG insult. Treatment of hippocampal NSCs with AG, UAG or OB inhibited HG-induced cell death and apoptosis. Exposure of cells to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a antagonist abolished the protective effects of AG against HG toxicity, whereas those of UAG or OB were preserved. All three peptides attenuated HG-induced decrease in BrdU-labeled and phosphohistone-H3-labeled cells. We also investigated the effects of ghrelin gene products on the regulation of apoptosis at the mitochondrial level. AG, UAG or OB rescued hippocampal NSCs from HG insult by inhibiting intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and stabilizing mitochondrial transmembrane potential. In addition, cells treated with ghrelin gene products showed an increased Bcl-2 and decreased Bax levels, thereby increasing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, inhibiting cytochrome c release and preventing caspase-3 activation. Finally, AG-, UAG- or OB-mediated protection was dependent on the activities of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/uncoupling protein 2 pathway. Our data indicate that ghrelin gene products may act as survival factors that preserve mitochondrial function and inhibit oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  1. The Gene bldA, a regulator of morphological differentiation and antibiotic production in streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Hackl, Stefanie; Bechthold, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Streptomyces species are well known for their particular features of morphological differentiation. On solid agar, a mold-like aerial mycelium is formed and spores are produced, in which the bld genes play a crucial role. In S. coelicolor, mutations in one specific bld gene called bldA led to a "naked" phenotype lacking aerial hyphae and spores. This peculiar behavior became a major interest for scientific research in the past and it was revealed that bldA is coding for a unique tRNA able to translate a UUA codon into the amino acid leucine. UUA codons are a very rare property of G + C-rich Streptomyces genomes. The impact of bldA on morphology can in parts be attributed to the regulatory effect of bldA on the translational level, because TTA-containing genes can only be translated into their corresponding protein in the presence of a fully functioning bldA gene. In addition to the visible effect of bldA expression on the phenotype of S. coelicolor, bldA mutants were also deficient in antibiotic production. This led to the assumption that the role of bldA must exceed translational control. Many TTA-containing genes are coding for transcriptional regulators which are activating or repressing the transcription of many more genes. Proteomics and transcriptomics are two powerful methods for identifying bldA target genes and it was possible to assign also post-translational regulation to bldA. This review wants to give a short overview on the importance of bldA as a regulator of morphological differentiation and antibiotic production by switching on "silent" gene clusters in Streptomyces.

  2. Modern plant metabolomics: Advanced natural product gene discoveries, improved technologies, and future prospects

    DOE PAGES

    Sumner, Lloyd W.; Lei, Zhentian; Nikolau, Basil J.; ...

    2014-10-24

    Plant metabolomics has matured and modern plant metabolomics has accelerated gene discoveries and the elucidation of a variety of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways. This study highlights specific examples of the discovery and characterization of novel genes and enzymes associated with the biosynthesis of natural products such as flavonoids, glucosinolates, terpenoids, and alkaloids. Additional examples of the integration of metabolomics with genome-based functional characterizations of plant natural products that are important to modern pharmaceutical technology are also reviewed. This article also provides a substantial review of recent technical advances in mass spectrometry imaging, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, integrated LC-MS-SPE-NMR formore » metabolite identifications, and x-ray crystallography of microgram quantities for structural determinations. The review closes with a discussion on the future prospects of metabolomics related to crop species and herbal medicine.« less

  3. Modern plant metabolomics: Advanced natural product gene discoveries, improved technologies, and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, Lloyd W.; Lei, Zhentian; Nikolau, Basil J.; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-10-24

    Plant metabolomics has matured and modern plant metabolomics has accelerated gene discoveries and the elucidation of a variety of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways. This study highlights specific examples of the discovery and characterization of novel genes and enzymes associated with the biosynthesis of natural products such as flavonoids, glucosinolates, terpenoids, and alkaloids. Additional examples of the integration of metabolomics with genome-based functional characterizations of plant natural products that are important to modern pharmaceutical technology are also reviewed. This article also provides a substantial review of recent technical advances in mass spectrometry imaging, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, integrated LC-MS-SPE-NMR for metabolite identifications, and x-ray crystallography of microgram quantities for structural determinations. The review closes with a discussion on the future prospects of metabolomics related to crop species and herbal medicine.

  4. Correlation of gene expression and protein production rate - a system wide study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Growth rate is a major determinant of intracellular function. However its effects can only be properly dissected with technically demanding chemostat cultivations in which it can be controlled. Recent work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemostat cultivations provided the first analysis on genome wide effects of growth rate. In this work we study the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) that is an industrial protein production host known for its exceptional protein secretion capability. Interestingly, it exhibits a low growth rate protein production phenotype. Results We have used transcriptomics and proteomics to study the effect of growth rate and cell density on protein production in chemostat cultivations of T. reesei. Use of chemostat allowed control of growth rate and exact estimation of the extracellular specific protein production rate (SPPR). We find that major biosynthetic activities are all negatively correlated with SPPR. We also find that expression of many genes of secreted proteins and secondary metabolism, as well as various lineage specific, mostly unknown genes are positively correlated with SPPR. Finally, we enumerate possible regulators and regulatory mechanisms, arising from the data, for this response. Conclusions Based on these results it appears that in low growth rate protein production energy is very efficiently used primarly for protein production. Also, we propose that flux through early glycolysis or the TCA cycle is a more fundamental determining factor than growth rate for low growth rate protein production and we propose a novel eukaryotic response to this i.e. the lineage specific response (LSR). PMID:22185473

  5. Report of the International Regulatory Forum on Human Cell Therapy and Gene Therapy Products.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Takao; Harris, Ian; Joung, Jeewon; Kanai, Nobuo; Kawamata, Shin; Kellathur, Srinivasan; Koga, Junichi; Lin, Yi-Chu; Maruyama, Yoshiaki; McBlane, James; Nishimura, Takuya; Renner, Matthias; Ridgway, Anthony; Salmikangas, Paula; Sakamoto, Norihisa; Sato, Daisaku; Sato, Yoji; Toda, Yuzo; Umezawa, Akihiro; Werner, Michael; Wicks, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    The development of human cell therapy and gene therapy products has progressed internationally. Efforts have been made to address regulatory challenges in the evaluation of quality, efficacy, and safety of the products. In this forum, updates on the specific challenges in quality, efficacy, and safety of products in the view of international development were shared through the exchange of information and opinions among experts from regulatory authorities, academic institutions, and industry practitioners. Sessions identified specific/critical points to consider for the evaluation of human cell therapy and gene therapy products that are different from conventional biological products; common approaches and practices among regulatory regions were also shared. Certain elements of current international guidelines might not be appropriate to be applied to these products. Further, international discussion on the concept of potency and in vivo tumorigenicity studies, among others, is needed. This forum concluded that the continued collective actions are expected to promote international convergence of regulatory approaches of the products. The Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency and Japanese Society for Regenerative Medicine jointly convened the forum with support from the National Institutes of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition. Participants at the forum include 300 experts in and outside of Japan. Copyright © 2016.

  6. Organization of the lexA gene of Escherichia coli and nucleotide sequence of the regulatory region.

    PubMed Central

    Miki, T; Ebina, Y; Kishi, F; Nakazawa, A

    1981-01-01

    The product of the lexA gene of Escherichia coli has been shown to regulate expression of the several cellular functions (SOS functions) induced by treatments which abruptly inhibit DNA synthesis. We have cloned and mapped the lexA gene on a small segment of approximately 600 base pairs. The lexA promotor was located by transcription R-loop analysis, and the lexA product of 22,000 daltons was identified by protein synthesis in vitro. An unknown gene was found which directed the synthesis of a protein of 35,000 daltons in a region downstream from the lexA gene. Nucleotide sequence of the regulatory region of the lexA gene was determined. The sequence contained inverted repeats homologous to that of the recA regulatory region. These inverted repeats may be recognized by the lexA protein, because the protein is considered to repress both the genes as a common repressor. Images PMID:6261224

  7. Engineering Escherichia coli to increase plasmid DNA production in high cell-density cultivations in batch mode.

    PubMed

    Borja, Gheorghe M; Meza Mora, Eugenio; Barrón, Blanca; Gosset, Guillermo; Ramírez, Octavio T; Lara, Alvaro R

    2012-09-19

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA) is a promising molecule for therapeutic applications. pDNA is produced by Escherichia coli in high cell-density cultivations (HCDC) using fed-batch mode. The typical limitations of such cultivations, including metabolic deviations like aerobic acetate production due to the existence of substrate gradients in large-scale bioreactors, remain as serious challenges for fast and effective pDNA production. We have previously demonstrated that the substitution of the phosphotransferase system by the over-expressed galactose permease for glucose uptake in E. coli (strain VH33) allows efficient growth, while strongly decreases acetate production. In the present work, additional genetic modifications were made to VH33 to further improve pDNA production. Several genes were deleted from strain VH33: the recA, deoR, nupG and endA genes were inactivated independently and in combination. The performance of the mutant strains was evaluated in shake flasks for the production of a 6.1 kb plasmid bearing an antigen gene against mumps. The best producer strain was cultivated in lab-scale bioreactors using 100 g/L of glucose to achieve HCDC in batch mode. For comparison, the widely used commercial strain DH5α, carrying the same plasmid, was also cultivated under the same conditions. The various mutations tested had different effects on the specific growth rate, glucose uptake rate, and pDNA yields (YP/X). The triple mutant VH33 Δ (recA deoR nupG) accumulated low amounts of acetate and resulted in the best YP/X (4.22 mg/g), whereas YP/X of strain VH33 only reached 1.16 mg/g. When cultivated at high glucose concentrations, the triple mutant strain produced 186 mg/L of pDNA, 40 g/L of biomass and only 2.2 g/L of acetate. In contrast, DH5α produced only 70 mg/L of pDNA and accumulated 9.5 g/L of acetate. Furthermore, the supercoiled fraction of the pDNA produced by the triple mutant was nearly constant throughout the cultivation. The p

  8. Engineering Escherichia coli to increase plasmid DNA production in high cell-density cultivations in batch mode

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plasmid DNA (pDNA) is a promising molecule for therapeutic applications. pDNA is produced by Escherichia coli in high cell-density cultivations (HCDC) using fed-batch mode. The typical limitations of such cultivations, including metabolic deviations like aerobic acetate production due to the existence of substrate gradients in large-scale bioreactors, remain as serious challenges for fast and effective pDNA production. We have previously demonstrated that the substitution of the phosphotransferase system by the over-expressed galactose permease for glucose uptake in E. coli (strain VH33) allows efficient growth, while strongly decreases acetate production. In the present work, additional genetic modifications were made to VH33 to further improve pDNA production. Several genes were deleted from strain VH33: the recA, deoR, nupG and endA genes were inactivated independently and in combination. The performance of the mutant strains was evaluated in shake flasks for the production of a 6.1 kb plasmid bearing an antigen gene against mumps. The best producer strain was cultivated in lab-scale bioreactors using 100 g/L of glucose to achieve HCDC in batch mode. For comparison, the widely used commercial strain DH5α, carrying the same plasmid, was also cultivated under the same conditions. Results The various mutations tested had different effects on the specific growth rate, glucose uptake rate, and pDNA yields (YP/X). The triple mutant VH33 Δ (recA deoR nupG) accumulated low amounts of acetate and resulted in the best YP/X (4.22 mg/g), whereas YP/X of strain VH33 only reached 1.16 mg/g. When cultivated at high glucose concentrations, the triple mutant strain produced 186 mg/L of pDNA, 40 g/L of biomass and only 2.2 g/L of acetate. In contrast, DH5α produced only 70 mg/L of pDNA and accumulated 9.5 g/L of acetate. Furthermore, the supercoiled fraction of the pDNA produced by the triple mutant was nearly constant throughout the cultivation

  9. Production of 2-ketoisocaproate with Corynebacterium glutamicum strains devoid of plasmids and heterologous genes

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Michael; Haas, Sabine; Polen, Tino; van Ooyen, Jan; Bott, Michael

    2015-01-01

    2-Ketoisocaproate (KIC), the last intermediate in l-leucine biosynthesis, has various medical and industrial applications. After deletion of the ilvE gene for transaminase B in l-leucine production strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum, KIC became the major product, however, the strains were auxotrophic for l-isoleucine. To avoid auxotrophy, reduction of IlvE activity by exchanging the ATG start codon of ilvE by GTG was tested instead of an ilvE deletion. The resulting strains were indeed able to grow in glucose minimal medium without amino acid supplementation, but at the cost of lowered growth rates and KIC production parameters. The best production performance was obtained with strain MV-KICF1, which carried besides the ilvE start codon exchange three copies of a gene for a feedback-resistant 2-isopropylmalate synthase, one copy of a gene for a feedback-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase and deletions of ltbR and iolR encoding transcriptional regulators. In the presence of 1 mM l-isoleucine, MV-KICF1 accumulated 47 mM KIC (6.1 g l−1) with a yield of 0.20 mol/mol glucose and a volumetric productivity of 1.41 mmol KIC l−1 h−1. Since MV-KICF1 is plasmid free and lacks heterologous genes, it is an interesting strain for industrial application and as platform for the production of KIC-derived compounds, such as 3-methyl-1-butanol. PMID:25488800

  10. Production of 2-ketoisocaproate with Corynebacterium glutamicum strains devoid of plasmids and heterologous genes.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Michael; Haas, Sabine; Polen, Tino; van Ooyen, Jan; Bott, Michael

    2015-03-01

    2-Ketoisocaproate (KIC), the last intermediate in l-leucine biosynthesis, has various medical and industrial applications. After deletion of the ilvE gene for transaminase B in l-leucine production strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum, KIC became the major product, however, the strains were auxotrophic for l-isoleucine. To avoid auxotrophy, reduction of IlvE activity by exchanging the ATG start codon of ilvE by GTG was tested instead of an ilvE deletion. The resulting strains were indeed able to grow in glucose minimal medium without amino acid supplementation, but at the cost of lowered growth rates and KIC production parameters. The best production performance was obtained with strain MV-KICF1, which carried besides the ilvE start codon exchange three copies of a gene for a feedback-resistant 2-isopropylmalate synthase, one copy of a gene for a feedback-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase and deletions of ltbR and iolR encoding transcriptional regulators. In the presence of 1 mM l-isoleucine, MV-KICF1 accumulated 47 mM KIC (6.1 g l(-1)) with a yield of 0.20 mol/mol glucose and a volumetric productivity of 1.41 mmol KIC l(-1)  h(-1). Since MV-KICF1 is plasmid free and lacks heterologous genes, it is an interesting strain for industrial application and as platform for the production of KIC-derived compounds, such as 3-methyl-1-butanol. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. The full-length transcript of a caulimovirus is a polycistronic mRNA whose genes are trans activated by the product of gene VI.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Gowda, S; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1992-05-01

    Gene expression of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, was investigated by electroporation of Nicotiana edwardsonii cell suspension protoplasts with cloned viral constructs in which a reporter gene was inserted at various positions on the genome. The results showed that the genome of FMV contains two promoters; one is used for the production of a full-length RNA and another initiates synthesis of a separate monocistronic RNA for gene VI. Evidence is provided that the full-length transcript, the probable template for reverse transcription, can serve as a polycistronic mRNA for translation of genes I through V and perhaps also gene VI. Expression of all the genes on the polycistronic mRNA is trans activated by the gene VI protein. Reporter gene expression appears most efficient when its start codon is in close proximity to the stop codon of the preceding gene, as for the native genes of caulimoviruses. We propose that the gene VI product enables expression of the polycistronic mRNA by promoting reinitiation of ribosomes to give translational coupling of individual genes.

  12. 1,3-Propanediol production by new recombinant Escherichia coli containing genes from pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Przystałowska, Hanna; Zeyland, Joanna; Szymanowska-Powałowska, Daria; Szalata, Marlena; Słomski, Ryszard; Lipiński, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    1,3-Propanediol (1,3-PDO) is an organic compound, which is a valuable intermediate product, widely used as a monomer for synthesizing biodegradable polymers, increasing their strength; as well as an ingredient of textile, cosmetic and medical products. 1,3-PDO is mostly synthesized chemically. Global companies have developed technologies for 1,3-PDO synthesis from petroleum products such as acrolein and ethylene oxide. A potentially viable alternative is offered by biotechnological processes using microorganisms capable of synthesizing 1,3-PDO from renewable substrates (waste glycerol, a by-product of biofuel production, or glucose). In the present study, genes from Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae were introduced into Escherichia coli bacteria to enable the synthesis of 1,3-PDO from waste glycerol. These strains belong to the best 1,3-PDO producers, but they are pathogenic, which restricts their application in industrial processes. The present study involved the construction of two gene expression constructs, containing a total of six heterologous glycerol catabolism pathway genes from C. freundii ATCC 8090 and K. pneumoniae ATCC 700721. Heterologous genes encoding glycerol dehydratase (dhaBCE) and the glycerol dehydratase reactivation factor (dhaF, dhaG) from C. freundii and gene encoding 1,3-PDO oxidoreductase (dhaT) from K. pneumoniae were expressed in E. coli under the control of the T7lac promoter. An RT-PCR analysis and overexpression confirmed that 1,3-PDO synthesis pathway genes were expressed on the RNA and protein levels. In batch fermentation, recombinant E. coli bacteria used 32.6gl(-1) of glycerol to produce 10.6 gl(-1) of 1,3-PDO, attaining the efficiency of 0.4 (mol₁,₃-PDO molglycerol(-1)). The recombinant E. coli created is capable of metabolizing glycerol to produce 1,3-PDO, and the efficiency achieved provides a significant research potential of the bacterium. In the face of shortage of fossil fuel supplies and climate warming

  13. Decarboxylase gene expression and cadaverine and putrescine production by Serratia proteamaculans in vitro and in beef.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Francesca; Pennacchia, Carmela; Di Pasqua, Rosangela; Fiore, Alberto; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Villani, Francesco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2013-08-01

    Studies of the molecular basis of microbial metabolic activities that are important for the changes in food quality are valuable in order to help in understanding the behavior of spoiling bacteria in food. The growth of a psychrotrophic Serratia proteamaculans strain was monitored in vitro and in artificially inoculated raw beef. Two growth temperatures (25°C and 4°C) were tested in vitro, while growth at 15°C and 4°C was monitored in beef. During growth, the expression of inducible lysine and ornithine-decarboxylase genes was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), while the presence of cadaverine and putrescine was quantified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The expression of the decarboxylase genes, and the consequent production of cadaverine and putrescine were shown to be influenced by the temperature, as well as by the complexity of the growth medium. Generally, the maximum gene expression and amine production took place during the exponential and early stationary phase, respectively. In addition, lower temperatures caused slower growth and gene downregulation. Higher amounts of cadaverine compared to putrescine were found during growth in beef with the highest concentrations corresponding to microbial loads of ca. 9CFU/g. The differences found in gene expression evaluated in vitro and in beef suggested that such activities are more reliably investigated in situ in specific food matrices.

  14. IgM antigen receptor complex contains phosphoprotein products of B29 and mb-1 genes.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, K S; Hager, E J; Friedrich, R J; Cambier, J C

    1991-01-01

    Membrane immunoglobulin M (mIgM) and mIgD are major B-lymphocyte antigen receptors, which function by internalizing antigens for processing and presentation to T cells and by transducing essential signals for proliferation and differentiation. Although ligation of mIgM or mIgD results in rapid activation of a phospholipase C and a tyrosine kinase(s), these receptors have cytoplasmic tails of only three amino acid residues (Lys-Val-Lys), which seem ill suited for direct physical coupling with cytoplasmic signal transduction structures. In this report, we identify the alpha, beta, and gamma components of the mIgM-associated phosphoprotein complex, which may play a role in signal transduction. Proteolytic peptide mapping demonstrated that the IgM-alpha chain differs from Ig-beta and Ig-gamma. The chains were purified, and amino-terminal sequencing revealed identity with two previously cloned B-cell-specific genes. One component, IgM-alpha, is a product of the mb-1 gene, and the two additional components, Ig-beta and Ig-gamma, are products of the B29 gene. Immunoblotting analysis using rabbit antibodies prepared against predicted peptide sequences of each gene product confirmed the identification of these mIgM-associated proteins. The deduced sequence indicates that these receptor subunits lack inherent protein kinase domains but include common tyrosine-containing sequence motifs, which are likely sites of induced tyrosine phosphorylation. Images PMID:2023945

  15. Major histocompatibility complex gene product expression on pancreatic beta cells in acutely diabetic BB rats.

    PubMed Central

    Issa-Chergui, B.; Yale, J. F.; Vigeant, C.; Seemayer, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    Type I diabetes mellitus was induced in young, diabetes-prone BB rats by the passive transfer of concanavalin A-activated T lymphocytes from the spleens of acutely diabetic BB rats. The pancreas of the recipients was examined 1-2 days after the onset of glycosuria by immunocytochemistry by means of monoclonal antibodies for determining whether 1) Class I and/or II major histocompatibility gene complex (MHC) products were expressed on beta cells and 2) the mononuclear cell infiltrates were represented by T cells. Marked expression of Class I MHC gene products was evident on beta cells. In contrast, Class II MHC gene products were not identified on normal-appearing beta cells. Dendritic cells dispersed throughout the acinar and interstitial pancreas were markedly increased in number. The mononuclear cell infiltrate contained few cells (1-15%) recognized by a pan-T cell marker. Although it is possible that this passive transfer model might differ considerably from the spontaneously occurring diabetic state in the rat, this study suggests that 1) Class I, rather than Class II, MHC gene expression may be pivotal to beta-cell injury in diabetic rats, and 2) non-T cells may constitute an effector cell population central to beta-cell necrosis in Type I diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3276208

  16. Knockdown of Broad-Complex Gene Expression of Bombyx mori by Oligopyrrole Carboxamides Enhances Silk Production.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asfa; Bovilla, Venugopal Reddy; Mysarla, Danti Kumari; Siripurapu, Prasanthi; Pathak, Rashmi U; Basu, Bhakti; Mamillapalli, Anitha; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2017-04-11

    Bombyx mori (B. mori) is important due to its major role in the silk production. Though DNA binding ligands often influence gene expression, no attempt has been made to exploit their use in sericulture. The telomeric heterochromatin of B. mori is enriched with 5'-TTAGG-3' sequences. These sequences were also found to be present in several genes in the euchromatic regions. We examined three synthetic oligopyrrole carboxamides that target 5'-TTAGG-3' sequences in controlling the gene expression in B. mori. The ligands did not show any defect or feeding difference in the larval stage, crucial for silk production. The ligands caused silencing of various isoforms of the broad-complex transcription factor and cuticle proteins which resulted in late pupal developmental defects. Furthermore, treatment with such drugs resulted in statistically enhanced cocoon weight, shell weight, and silk yield. This study shows for the first time use of oligopyrrole carboxamide drugs in controlling gene expression in B. mori and their long term use in enhancing silk production.

  17. Scarless and sequential gene modification in Pseudomonas using PCR product flanked by short homology regions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The lambda Red recombination system has been used to inactivate chromosomal genes in various bacteria and fungi. The procedure consists of electroporating a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment containing antibiotic cassette flanked by homology regions to the target locus into a strain that can express the lambda Red proteins (Gam, Bet, Exo). Results Here a scarless gene modification strategy based on the Red recombination system has been developed to modify Pseudomonas genome DNA via sequential deletion of multiple targets. This process was mediated by plasmid pRKaraRed encoding the Red proteins regulated by PBAD promoter, which was functional in P. aeruginosa as well as in other bacteria. First the target gene was substituted for the sacB-bla cassette flanked by short homology regions (50 bp), and then this marker gene cassette could be replaced by the PCR fragment flanking itself, generating target-deleted genome without any remnants and no change happened to the surrounding region. Twenty genes involved in the synthesis and regulation pathways of the phenazine derivate, pyocyanin, were modified, including one single-point mutation and deletion of two large operons. The recombination efficiencies ranged from 88% to 98%. Multiple-gene modification was also achieved, generating a triple-gene deletion strain PCA (PAO1, ΔphzHΔphzMΔphzS), which could produce another phenazine derivate, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), efficiently and exclusively. Conclusions This lambda Red-based technique can be used to generate scarless and sequential gene modification mutants of P. aeruginosa efficiently, using one-step PCR product flanked by short homology regions. Single-point mutation, scarless deletion of genes can be achieved easily in less than three days. This method may give a new way to construct genetically modified P. aeruginosa strains more efficiently and advance the regulatory network study of this organism. PMID:20682065

  18. Correlation of methane production and functional gene transcriptional activity in a peat soil.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Thomas E; Prosser, James I

    2009-11-01

    The transcription dynamics of subunit A of the key gene in methanogenesis (methyl coenzyme M reductase; mcrA) was studied to evaluate the relationship between process rate (methanogenesis) and gene transcription dynamics in a peat soil ecosystem. Soil methanogen process rates were determined during incubation of peat slurries at temperatures from 4 to 37 degrees C, and real-time quantitative PCR was applied to quantify the abundances of mcrA genes and transcripts; corresponding transcriptional dynamics were calculated from mcrA transcript/gene ratios. Internal standards suggested unbiased recovery of mRNA abundances in comparison to DNA levels. In comparison to those in pure-culture studies, mcrA transcript/gene ratios indicated underestimation by 1 order of magnitude, possibly due to high proportions of inactive or dead methanogens. Methane production rates were temperature dependent, with maxima at 25 degrees C, but changes in abundance and transcription of the mcrA gene showed no correlation with temperature. However, mcrA transcript/gene ratios correlated weakly (regression coefficient = 0.76) with rates of methanogenesis. Methanogen process rates increased over 3 orders of magnitude, while the corresponding maximum transcript/gene ratio increase was only 18-fold. mcrA transcript dynamics suggested steady-state expression in peat soil after incubation for 24 and 48 h, similar to that in stationary-phase cultures. mcrA transcript/gene ratios are therefore potential in situ indicators of methanogen process rate changes in complex soil systems.

  19. New Insights about Antibiotic Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A Gene Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gionco, Bárbara; Tavares, Eliandro R.; de Oliveira, Admilton G.; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F.; do Carmo, Anderson O.; Pereira, Ulisses de Pádua; Chideroli, Roberta T.; Simionato, Ane S.; Navarro, Miguel O. P.; Chryssafidis, Andreas L.; Andrade, Galdino

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial resistance for antibiotics is one of the most important problems in public health and only a small number of new products are in development. Antagonistic microorganisms from soil are a promising source of new candidate molecules. Products of secondary metabolism confer adaptive advantages for their producer, in the competition for nutrients in the microbial community. The biosynthesis process of compounds with antibiotic activity is the key to optimize their production and the transcriptomic study of microorganisms is of great benefit for the discovery of these metabolic pathways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa LV strain growing in the presence of copper chloride produces a bioactive organometallic compound, which has a potent antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms. The objective of this study was to verify overexpressed genes and evaluate their relation to the organometallic biosynthesis in this microorganism. P. aeruginosa LV strain was cultured in presence and absence of copper chloride. Two methods were used for transcriptomic analysis, genome reference-guided assembly and de novo assembly. The genome referenced analysis identified nine upregulated genes when bacteria were exposed to copper chloride, while the De Novo Assembly identified 12 upregulated genes. Nineteen genes can be related to an increased microbial metabolism for the extrusion process of exceeding intracellular copper. Two important genes are related to the biosynthesis of phenazine and tetrapyrroles compounds, which can be involved in the bioremediation of intracellular copper and we suggesting that may involve in the biosynthesis of the organometallic compound. Additional studies are being carried out to further prove the function of the described genes and relate them to the biosynthetic pathway of the organometallic compound. PMID:28966922

  20. Identification of the phoM gene product and its regulation in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Ludtke, D; Bernstein, J; Hamilton, C; Torriani, A

    1984-01-01

    Plasmids containing the chromosome region of Escherichia coli encoding phoM, whose product is a positive regulator of alkaline phosphatase expression, were isolated from the Clarke and Carbon plasmid bank. A 9.9-kilobase EcoRI fragment of plasmid pLC17-39 (subcloned into pBR322) was able to complement both phoM and thrB mutations. Restriction endonuclease analysis and in vitro mutagenesis of the hybird plasmids enabled the localization of the phoM gene locus to 3 kilobases of the cloned chromosomal fragment. The phoM gene product was identified, with maxicell techniques, as a protein with an approximate molecular weight of 55,000. A phoM-lacZ protein fusion was constructed by using a plasmid carrying the phoM gene and a derivative of phage lambda, lambda plac Mu2. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the plasmid carrying the fusion indicated that phoM is transcribed in a clockwise direction on the circular E. coli chromosome. Analysis of strains bearing the fusion on a multiple-copy plasmid or integrated at the lambda attachment site of the chromosome indicated that the synthesis of the phoM gene product was unaffected by phosphate limitation of growth. The expression of the phoM gene was studied in strains with mutations in genes encoding effectors of the pho regulon. A threefold increase in phoM expression was seen in a phoU strain in comparison with the wild-type strain. Images PMID:6330029

  1. Comprehensive curation and analysis of fungal biosynthetic gene clusters of published natural products.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong Fuga; Tsai, Kathleen J S; Harvey, Colin J B; Li, James Jian; Ary, Beatrice E; Berlew, Erin E; Boehman, Brenna L; Findley, David M; Friant, Alexandra G; Gardner, Christopher A; Gould, Michael P; Ha, Jae H; Lilley, Brenna K; McKinstry, Emily L; Nawal, Saadia; Parry, Robert C; Rothchild, Kristina W; Silbert, Samantha D; Tentilucci, Michael D; Thurston, Alana M; Wai, Rebecca B; Yoon, Yongjin; Aiyar, Raeka S; Medema, Marnix H; Hillenmeyer, Maureen E; Charkoudian, Louise K

    2016-04-01

    Microorganisms produce a wide range of natural products (NPs) with clinically and agriculturally relevant biological activities. In bacteria and fungi, genes encoding successive steps in a biosynthetic pathway tend to be clustered on the chromosome as biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). Historically, "activity-guided" approaches to NP discovery have focused on bioactivity screening of NPs produced by culturable microbes. In contrast, recent "genome mining" approaches first identify candidate BGCs, express these biosynthetic genes using synthetic biology methods, and finally test for the production of NPs. Fungal genome mining efforts and the exploration of novel sequence and NP space are limited, however, by the lack of a comprehensive catalog of BGCs encoding experimentally-validated products. In this study, we generated a comprehensive reference set of fungal NPs whose biosynthetic gene clusters are described in the published literature. To generate this dataset, we first identified NCBI records that included both a peer-reviewed article and an associated nucleotide record. We filtered these records by text and homology criteria to identify putative NP-related articles and BGCs. Next, we manually curated the resulting articles, chemical structures, and protein sequences. The resulting catalog contains 197 unique NP compounds covering several major classes of fungal NPs, including polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenoids, and alkaloids. The distribution of articles published per compound shows a bias toward the study of certain popular compounds, such as the aflatoxins. Phylogenetic analysis of biosynthetic genes suggests that much chemical and enzymatic diversity remains to be discovered in fungi. Our catalog was incorporated into the recently launched Minimum Information about Biosynthetic Gene cluster (MIBiG) repository to create the largest known set of fungal BGCs and associated NPs, a resource that we anticipate will guide future genome mining and

  2. [Association of both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, gene-gene interactions and the lipid accumulation product].

    PubMed

    Hai, Bo; Xie, Hui-jian; Guo, Zhi-rong; Wu, Ming; Chen, Qiu; Zhou, Zheng-yuan; Yu, Hao; Ding, Yi

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the association of ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα, δ, γ) with lipid accumulation product (LAP) and the additional role of a gene-gene interactions among the 10 SNPs. Participants were recruited under the framework of the PMMJS (Prevention of Multiple Metabolic Disorders and Metabolic Syndrome in Jiangsu province) cohort populations survey in the urban community of Jiangsu province of China. A total of 820 subjects were randomly selected and no individual was related. Ten SNPs (rs135539, rs4253778, rs1800206, rs2016520, rs9794, rs10865710, rs1805192, rs709158, rs3856806 and rs4684847) were selected from the HapMap database, which covered PPARα, PPARδ and PPARγ. A linear regression model was used to analyze the relations between ten SNPs in the PPARs and LAP. Mean difference (Difference) and 95% confident interval (95%CI)were calculated. Interactions were explored by using the method of Generalized Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (GMDR). After adjusting the factors as age, gender, smoking status, occupational physical activity, educational level, high-fat diet as well as low-fiber diet, both rs1800206, s1805192 and rs3856806 were significantly associated with the increased level of LAP. Difference (95% CI) values were 32.47 (22.62-42.31), 12.97 (4.61-21.33) and 12.49 (4.24-20.75). Whereas rs2016520 was significantly associated with the decreased level of LAP. Difference (95%CI) values was -14.67 ( -22.97--6.55). GMDR analysis showed a significant gene-gene interaction among rs135539, rs1800206 of PPARα, rs2016520 of PPARδ and rs10865710, rs3856806, rs709158, rs1805192, rs4684847 of PPARγ for eight-dimension models (P < 0.05), in which prediction accuracy was 0.5902 and cross-validation consistency was 10/10. The rs1800206 of PPARα and rs1805192, rs3856806 of PPARγ were significantly associated with the increased level of LAP; rs2016520 of PPARδ was associated with

  3. Association of methionine synthase gene polymorphisms with wool production and quality traits in Chinese Merino population.

    PubMed

    Rong, E G; Yang, H; Zhang, Z W; Wang, Z P; Yan, X H; Li, H; Wang, N

    2015-10-01

    Methionine synthase (MTR) plays a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis of intracellular methionine, folate, and homocysteine, and its activity correlates with DNA methylation in many mammalian tissues. Our previous genomewide association study identified that 1 SNP located in the gene was associated with several wool production and quality traits in Chinese Merino. To confirm the potential involvement of the gene in sheep wool production and quality traits, we performed sheep tissue expression profiling, SNP detection, and association analysis with sheep wool production and quality traits. The semiquantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis showed that the gene was differentially expressed in skin from Merino and Kazak sheep. The sequencing analysis identified a total of 13 SNP in the gene from Chinese Merino sheep. Comparison of the allele frequencies revealed that these 13 identified SNP were significantly different among the 6 tested Chinese Merino strains ( < 0.001). Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed that SNP 3 to 11 were strongly linked in a single haplotype block in the tested population. Association analysis showed that SNP 2 to 11 were significantly associated with the average wool fiber diameter and the fineness SD and that SNP 4 to 11 were significantly associated with the CV of fiber diameter trait ( < 0.05). Single nucleotide polymorphism 2 and SNP 5 to 12 were weakly associated with wool crimp. Similarly, the haplotypes derived from these 13 identified SNP were also significantly associated with the average wool fiber diameter, fineness SD, and the CV of fiber diameter ( < 0.05). Our results suggest that is a candidate gene for sheep wool production and quality traits, and the identified SNP might be used in sheep breeding.

  4. Iterative carotenogenic screens identify combinations of yeast gene deletions that enhance sclareol production.

    PubMed

    Trikka, Fotini A; Nikolaidis, Alexandros; Athanasakoglou, Anastasia; Andreadelli, Aggeliki; Ignea, Codruta; Kotta, Konstantia; Argiriou, Anagnostis; Kampranis, Sotirios C; Makris, Antonios M

    2015-04-24

    Terpenoids (isoprenoids) have numerous applications in flavors, fragrances, drugs and biofuels. The number of microbially produced terpenoids is increasing as new biosynthetic pathways are being elucidated. However, efforts to improve terpenoid production in yeast have mostly taken advantage of existing knowledge of the sterol biosynthetic pathway, while many additional factors may affect the output of the engineered system. Aiming to develop a yeast strain that can support high titers of sclareol, a diterpene of great importance for the perfume industry, we sought to identify gene deletions that improved carotenoid, and thus potentially sclareol, production. Using a carotenogenic screen, the best 100 deletion mutants, out of 4,700 mutant strains, were selected to create a subset for further analysis. To identify combinations of deletions that cooperate to further boost production, iterative carotenogenic screens were applied, and each time the top performing gene deletions were further ranked according to the number of genetic and physical interactions known for each specific gene. The gene selected in each round was deleted and the resulting strain was employed in a new round of selection. This approach led to the development of an EG60 derived haploid strain combining six deletions (rox1, dos2, yer134c, vba5, ynr063w and ygr259c) and exhibiting a 40-fold increase in carotenoid and 12-fold increase in sclareol titers, reaching 750 mg/L sclareol in shake flask cultivation. Using an iterative approach, we identified novel combinations of yeast gene deletions that improve carotenoid and sclareol production titers without compromising strain growth and viability. Most of the identified deletions have not previously been implicated in sterol pathway control. Applying the same approach using a different starting point could yield alternative sets of deletions with similar or improved outcome.

  5. Agroinfiltration as an Effective and Scalable Strategy of Gene Delivery for Production of Pharmaceutical Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lai, Huafang; Hurtado, Jonathan; Stahnke, Jake; Leuzinger, Kahlin; Dent, Matthew

    2013-06-01

    Current human biologics are most commonly produced by mammalian cell culture-based fermentation technologies. However, its limited scalability and high cost prevent this platform from meeting the ever increasing global demand. Plants offer a novel alternative system for the production of pharmaceutical proteins that is more scalable, cost-effective, and safer than current expression paradigms. The recent development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed rapid and high-level transient expression of recombinant proteins, and in turn, provided a preferred plant based production platform. One of the remaining challenges for the commercial application of this platform was the lack of a scalable technology to deliver the transgene into plant cells. Therefore, this review focuses on the development of an effective and scalable technology for gene delivery in plants. Direct and indirect gene delivery strategies for plant cells are first presented, and the two major gene delivery technologies based on agroinfiltration are subsequently discussed. Furthermore, the advantages of syringe and vacuum infiltration as gene delivery methodologies are extensively discussed, in context of their applications and scalability for commercial production of human pharmaceutical proteins in plants. The important steps and critical parameters for the successful implementation of these strategies are also detailed in the review. Overall, agroinfiltration based on syringe and vacuum infiltration provides an efficient, robust and scalable gene-delivery technology for the transient expression of recombinant proteins in plants. The development of this technology will greatly facilitate the realization of plant transient expression systems as a premier platform for commercial production of pharmaceutical proteins.

  6. [Adeno-associated viral vectors: methods for production and purification for gene therapy applications].

    PubMed

    Mena-Enriquez, Mayra; Flores-Contreras, Lucia; Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Viral vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are widely used in gene therapy protocols, because they have characteristics that make them valuable for the treatment of genetic and chronic degenerative diseases. AAV2 serotype had been the best characterized to date. However, the AAV vectors developed from other serotypes is of special interest, since they have organ-specific tropism which increases their potential for transgene delivery to target cells for performing their therapeutic effects. This article summarizes AAV generalities, methods for their production and purification. It also discusses the use of these vectors in vitro, in vivo and their application in gene therapy clinical trials.

  7. Glutamic acid promotes monacolin K production and monacolin K biosynthetic gene cluster expression in Monascus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chan; Liang, Jian; Yang, Le; Chai, Shiyuan; Zhang, Chenxi; Sun, Baoguo; Wang, Chengtao

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of glutamic acid on production of monacolin K and expression of the monacolin K biosynthetic gene cluster. When Monascus M1 was grown in glutamic medium instead of in the original medium, monacolin K production increased from 48.4 to 215.4 mg l(-1), monacolin K production increased by 3.5 times. Glutamic acid enhanced monacolin K production by upregulating the expression of mokB-mokI; on day 8, the expression level of mokA tended to decrease by Reverse Transcription-polymerase Chain Reaction. Our findings demonstrated that mokA was not a key gene responsible for the quantity of monacolin K production in the presence of glutamic acid. Observation of Monascus mycelium morphology using Scanning Electron Microscope showed glutamic acid significantly increased the content of Monascus mycelium, altered the permeability of Monascus mycelium, enhanced secretion of monacolin K from the cell, and reduced the monacolin K content in Monascus mycelium, thereby enhancing monacolin K production.

  8. Regulation of gene expression by tobacco product preparations in cultured human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Malpass, Gloria E; Arimilli, Subhashini; Prasad, G L; Howlett, Allyn C

    2014-09-01

    Skin fibroblasts comprise the first barrier of defense against wounds, and tobacco products directly contact the oral cavity. Cultured human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to smokeless tobacco extract (STE), total particulate matter (TPM) from tobacco smoke, or nicotine at concentrations comparable to those found in these extracts for 1h or 5h. Differences were identified in pathway-specific genes between treatments and vehicle using qRT-PCR. At 1h, IL1α was suppressed significantly by TPM and less significantly by STE. Neither FOS nor JUN was suppressed at 1h by tobacco products. IL8, TNFα, VCAM1, and NFκB1 were suppressed after 5h with STE, whereas only TNFα and NFκB1 were suppressed by TPM. At 1h with TPM, secreted levels of IL10 and TNFα were increased. Potentially confounding effects of nicotine were exemplified by genes such as ATF3 (5h), which was increased by nicotine but suppressed by other components of STE. Within 2h, TPM stimulated nitric oxide production, and both STE and TPM increased reactive oxygen species. The biological significance of these findings and utilization of the gene expression changes reported herein regarding effects of the tobacco product preparations on dermal fibroblasts will require additional research.

  9. Regulation of gene expression by tobacco product preparations in cultured human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Malpass, Gloria E.; Arimilli, Subhashini; Prasad, G. L.; Howlett, Allyn C.

    2015-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts comprise the first barrier of defense against wounds, and tobacco products directly contact the oral cavity. Cultured human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to smokeless tobacco extract (STE), total particulate matter (TPM) from tobacco smoke, or nicotine at concentrations comparable to those found in these extracts for 1 h or 5 h. Differences were identified in pathway-specific genes between treatments and vehicle using qRT-PCR. At 1 h, IL1α was suppressed significantly by TPM and less significantly by STE. Neither FOS nor JUN was suppressed at 1 h by tobacco products. IL8, TNFα, VCAM1, and NFκB1 were suppressed after 5 h with STE, whereas only TNFα and NFκB1 were suppressed by TPM. At 1 h with TPM, secreted levels of IL10 and TNFα were increased. Potentially confounding effects of nicotine were exemplified by genes such as ATF3 (5 h), which was increased by nicotine but suppressed by other components of STE. Within 2 h, TPM stimulated nitric oxide production, and both STE and TPM increased reactive oxygen species. The biological significance of these findings and utilization of the gene expression changes reported herein regarding effects of the tobacco product preparations on dermal fibroblasts will require additional research. PMID:24927667

  10. Improving Pertuzumab production by gene optimization and proper signal peptide selection.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Amin; Mahmoudi Maymand, Elham; Yazdanpanah-Samani, Mahsa; Hosseini, Ahmad; Toghraie, Fatemeh Sadat; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2017-07-01

    Using proper signal peptide and codon optimization are important factors that must be considered when designing the vector to increase protein expression in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The aim of the present study is to investigate how to enhance Pertuzumab production through heavy and light chain coding gene optimization and proper signal peptide selection. First, CHO-K1 cells were transiently transfected with whole-antibody-gene-optimized, variable-regions-optimized and non-optimized constructs and then we employed five different signal peptides to improve the secretion efficiency of Pertuzumab. Compared to the native antibody gene, a 3.8 fold increase in Pertuzumab production rate was achieved with the whole heavy and light chain sequence optimization. Although an overall two fold increase in monoclonal antibody production was achieved by human albumin signal peptide compared to the control signal peptide, this overproduction was not statistically significant. Selected signal peptides had no effect on the binding of Pertuzumab to the ErbB2 antigen. The combined data indicate that human albumin signal peptide along with whole antibody sequence optimization can be used to improve Pertuzumab production rates. This sequence was used to produce Pertuzumab producing CHO-K1 stably transfected cells. This result is useful for producing Pertuzumab as a biosimilar drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early gene product trans-activates gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, S.; Kamine, J.; Markovitz, D.; Fenrick, R.; Pagano, J.

    1988-03-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are frequently coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this report, the authors demonstrate that an EBV immediate-early gene product, BamHI MLF1, stimulates expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene linked to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter. The HIV promoter sequences necessary for trans-activation by EBV do not include the tat-responsive sequences. In addition, in contrast to the other herpesvirus trans-activators previously studied, the EBV BamHI MLF1 gene product appears to function in part by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since it increases pHIV-CAT protein activity more than it increases HIV-CAT mRNA. This ability of an EBV gene product to activate HIV gene expression may have biologic consequences in persons coinfected with both viruses.

  12. Sequencing rare marine actinomycete genomes reveals high density of unique natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Schorn, Michelle A; Alanjary, Mohammad M; Aguinaldo, Kristen; Korobeynikov, Anton; Podell, Sheila; Patin, Nastassia; Lincecum, Tommie; Jensen, Paul R; Ziemert, Nadine; Moore, Bradley S

    2016-12-01

    Traditional natural product discovery methods have nearly exhausted the accessible diversity of microbial chemicals, making new sources and techniques paramount in the search for new molecules. Marine actinomycete bacteria have recently come into the spotlight as fruitful producers of structurally diverse secondary metabolites, and remain relatively untapped. In this study, we sequenced 21 marine-derived actinomycete strains, rarely studied for their secondary metabolite potential and under-represented in current genomic databases. We found that genome size and phylogeny were good predictors of biosynthetic gene cluster diversity, with larger genomes rivalling the well-known marine producers in the Streptomyces and Salinispora genera. Genomes in the Micrococcineae suborder, however, had consistently the lowest number of biosynthetic gene clusters. By networking individual gene clusters into gene cluster families, we were able to computationally estimate the degree of novelty each genus contributed to the current sequence databases. Based on the similarity measures between all actinobacteria in the Joint Genome Institute's Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters database, rare marine genera show a high degree of novelty and diversity, with Corynebacterium, Gordonia, Nocardiopsis, Saccharomonospora and Pseudonocardia genera representing the highest gene cluster diversity. This research validates that rare marine actinomycetes are important candidates for exploration, as they are relatively unstudied, and their relatives are historically rich in secondary metabolites.

  13. The FHIT gene product: tumor suppressor and genome ‘caretaker’

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Catherine E.; Saldivar, Joshua C.; Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Huebner, Kay

    2014-01-01

    The FHIT gene at FRA3B is one of the earliest and most frequently altered genes in the majority of human cancers. It was recently discovered that the FHIT gene is not the most fragile locus in epithelial cells, the cell of origin for most Fhit negative cancers, eroding support for past claims that deletions at this locus are simply passenger events that are carried along in expanding cancer clones, due to extreme vulnerability to DNA damage rather than to loss of FHIT function. Indeed, recent reports have reconfirmed FHIT as a tumor suppressor gene with roles in apoptosis and prevention of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Other recent works have identified a novel role for the FHIT gene product, Fhit, as a genome ‘caretaker.’ Loss of this caretaker function leads to nucleotide imbalance, spontaneous replication stress, and DNA breaks. Because Fhit loss-induced DNA damage is “checkpoint blind,” cells accumulate further DNA damage during subsequent cell cycles, accruing global genome instability that could facilitate oncogenic mutation acquisition and expedite clonal expansion. Loss of Fhit activity therefore induces a mutator phenotype. Evidence for FHIT as a mutator gene is discussed in light of these recent investigations of Fhit loss and subsequent genome instability. PMID:25283145

  14. Leptin and leptin receptor gene polymorphisms are correlated with production performance in the Arctic fox.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Bai, X J

    2015-05-25

    The polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism technique was employed to measure mononucleotide diversity in the coding region of the leptin and leptin receptor genes in the Arctic fox. The relationships between specific genetic mutations and reproductive performance in Arctic foxes were determined to im-prove breeding strategies. We found that a leptin gene polymorphism was significantly associated with body weight (P < 0.01), abdominal circumference (P < 0.01), and fur length (P < 0.01). Furthermore, a polymorphism in the leptin receptor gene was associated with carcass weight and guard hair length (P < 0.01). Leptin and leptin receptor gene combinatorial genotypes were significantly associated with abdominal circumference, fur length (P < 0.01), and body weight (P < 0.05). The leptin gene is thus a key gene affecting body weight, abdominal circumference, and fur length in Arctic foxes, whereas variations in the leptin receptor mainly affect carcass weight and guard hair. The marker loci identified in this study can be used to assist in the selection of Arctic foxes for breeding to raise the production performance of this species.

  15. Stable disruption of ethanol production by deletion of the genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ida, Yoshihiro; Furusawa, Chikara; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    We analyzed the effects of the deletions of genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isozymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The decrease in ethanol production by ADH1 deletion alone could be partially compensated by the upregulation of other isozyme genes, while the deletion of all known ADH isozyme genes stably disrupted ethanol production. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. IS26-Mediated Formation of Transposons Carrying Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Harmer, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The IS26 transposase, Tnp26, catalyzes IS26 movement to a new site and deletion or inversion of adjacent DNA via a replicative route. The intramolecular deletion reaction produces a circular molecule consisting of a DNA segment and a single IS26, which we call a translocatable unit or TU. Recently, Tnp26 was shown to catalyze an additional intermolecular, conservative reaction between two preexisting copies of IS26 in different plasmids. Here, we have investigated the relative contributions of homologous recombination and Tnp26-catalyzed reactions to the generation of a transposon from a TU. Circular TUs containing the aphA1a kanamycin and neomycin resistance gene or the tet(D) tetracycline resistance determinant were generated in vitro and transformed into Escherichia coli recA cells carrying R388::IS26. The TU incorporated next to the IS26 in R388::IS26 forms a transposon with the insertion sequence (IS) in direct orientation. Introduction of a second TU produced regions containing both the aphA1a gene and the tet(D) determinant in either order but with only three copies of IS26. The integration reaction, which required a preexisting IS26, was precise and conservative and was 50-fold more efficient when both IS26 copies could produce an active Tnp26. When both ISs were inactivated by a frameshift in tnp26, TU incorporation was not detected in E. coli recA cells, but it did occur in E. coli recA+ cells. However, the Tnp-catalyzed reaction was 100-fold more efficient than RecA-dependent homologous recombination. The ability of Tnp26 to function in either a replicative or conservative mode is likely to explain the prominence of IS26-bounded transposons in the resistance regions found in Gram-negative bacteria. IMPORTANCE In Gram-negative bacteria, IS26 recruits antibiotic resistance genes into the mobile gene pool by forming transposons carrying many different resistance genes. In addition to replicative transposition, IS26 was recently shown to use a

  17. IS26-Mediated Formation of Transposons Carrying Antibiotic Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Hall, Ruth M

    2016-01-01

    The IS26 transposase, Tnp26, catalyzes IS26 movement to a new site and deletion or inversion of adjacent DNA via a replicative route. The intramolecular deletion reaction produces a circular molecule consisting of a DNA segment and a single IS26, which we call a translocatable unit or TU. Recently, Tnp26 was shown to catalyze an additional intermolecular, conservative reaction between two preexisting copies of IS26 in different plasmids. Here, we have investigated the relative contributions of homologous recombination and Tnp26-catalyzed reactions to the generation of a transposon from a TU. Circular TUs containing the aphA1a kanamycin and neomycin resistance gene or the tet(D) tetracycline resistance determinant were generated in vitro and transformed into Escherichia coli recA cells carrying R388::IS26. The TU incorporated next to the IS26 in R388::IS26 forms a transposon with the insertion sequence (IS) in direct orientation. Introduction of a second TU produced regions containing both the aphA1a gene and the tet(D) determinant in either order but with only three copies of IS26. The integration reaction, which required a preexisting IS26, was precise and conservative and was 50-fold more efficient when both IS26 copies could produce an active Tnp26. When both ISs were inactivated by a frameshift in tnp26, TU incorporation was not detected in E. coli recA cells, but it did occur in E. coli recA (+) cells. However, the Tnp-catalyzed reaction was 100-fold more efficient than RecA-dependent homologous recombination. The ability of Tnp26 to function in either a replicative or conservative mode is likely to explain the prominence of IS26-bounded transposons in the resistance regions found in Gram-negative bacteria. IMPORTANCE In Gram-negative bacteria, IS26 recruits antibiotic resistance genes into the mobile gene pool by forming transposons carrying many different resistance genes. In addition to replicative transposition, IS26 was recently shown to use a novel

  18. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

  19. Localization of the mei-1 gene product of Caenorhaditis elegans, a meiotic-specific spindle component

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Genetic evidence suggests that the product of the mei-1 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans is specifically required for meiosis in the female germline. Loss-of-function mei-1 mutations block meiotic spindle formation while a gain-of-function allele instead results in spindle defects during the early mitotic cleavages. In this report, we use immunocytochemistry to examine the localization of the mei-1 product in wild-type and mutant embryos. During metaphase of meiosis I in wild- type embryos, mei-1 protein was found throughout the spindle but was more concentrated toward the poles. At telophase I, mei-1 product colocalized with the chromatin at the spindle poles. The pattern was repeated during meiosis II but no mei-1 product was visible during the subsequent mitotic cleavages. The mei-1 gain-of-function allele resulted in ectopic mei-1 staining in the centers of the microtubule- organizing centers during interphase and in the spindles during the early cleavages. This aberrant localization is probably responsible for the poorly formed and misoriented cleavage spindles characteristic of the mutation. We also examined the localization of mei-1(+) product in the presence of mutations of genes that genetically interact with mei-1 alleles. mei-2 is apparently required to localize mei-1 product to the spindle during meiosis while mel-26 acts as a postmeiotic inhibitor. We conclude that mei-1 encodes a novel spindle component, one that is specialized for the acentriolar meiotic spindles unique to female meiosis. The genes mei-2 and mel-26 are part of a regulatory network that confines mei-1 activity to meiosis. PMID:8027178

  20. Production of taxadiene from cultured ginseng roots transformed with taxadiene synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Cha, Mijeong; Shim, Sang Hee; Kim, Sung Hong; Kim, Ok Tae; Lee, Se-Weon; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    Paclitaxel is produced by various species of yew trees and has been extensively used to treat tumors. In our research, a taxadiene synthase (TS) gene from Taxus brevifolia was used to transform the roots of cultured ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) to produce taxadiene, the unique skeletal precursor to taxol. The TS gene was successfully introduced into the ginseng genome, and the de novo formation of taxadiene was identified by mass spectroscopy profiling. Without any change in phenotypes or growth difference in a TS-transgenic ginseng line, the transgenic TSS3-2 line accumulated 9.1 μg taxadiene per gram of dry weight. In response to the treatment of methyl jasmonate for 3 or 6 days, the accumulation was 14.6 and 15.9 μg per g of dry weight, respectively. This is the first report of the production of taxadiene by engineering ginseng roots with a taxadiene synthase gene.

  1. Disruption of ubiquitin-related genes in laboratory yeast strains enhances ethanol production during sake brewing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Watanabe, Tomoko; Araki, Yoshio; Kitagaki, Hiroshi; Akao, Takeshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2009-06-01

    Sake yeast can produce high levels of ethanol in concentrated rice mash. While both sake and laboratory yeast strains belong to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the laboratory strains produce much less ethanol. This disparity in fermentation activity may be due to the strains' different responses to environmental stresses, including ethanol accumulation. To obtain more insight into the stress response of yeast cells under sake brewing conditions, we carried out small-scale sake brewing tests using laboratory yeast strains disrupted in specific stress-related genes. Surprisingly, yeast strains with disrupted ubiquitin-related genes produced more ethanol than the parental strain during sake brewing. The elevated fermentation ability conferred by disruption of the ubiquitin-coding gene UBI4 was confined to laboratory strains, and the ubi4 disruptant of a sake yeast strain did not demonstrate a comparable increase in ethanol production. These findings suggest different roles for ubiquitin in sake and laboratory yeast strains.

  2. PepPSy: a web server to prioritize gene products in experimental and biocuration workflows

    PubMed Central

    Sallou, Olivier; Duek, Paula D.; Darde, Thomas A.; Collin, Olivier; Lane, Lydie; Chalmel, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Among the 20 000 human gene products predicted from genome annotation, about 3000 still lack validation at protein level. We developed PepPSy, a user-friendly gene expression-based prioritization system, to help investigators to determine in which human tissues they should look for an unseen protein. PepPSy can also be used by biocurators to revisit the annotation of specific categories of proteins based on the ‘omics’ data housed by the system. In this study, it was used to prioritize 21 dubious protein-coding genes among the 616 annotated in neXtProt for reannotation. PepPSy is freely available at http://peppsy.genouest.org. Database URL: http://peppsy.genouest.org. PMID:27173522

  3. Stable production of mutant mice from double gene converted ES cells with puromycin and neomycin.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Kai, N; Yasuda, M; Kohmura, N; Sanbo, M; Mishina, M; Yagi, T

    1995-08-04

    The antibiotic puromycin is an effective inhibitor of protein synthesis and puromycin N-acetyl transferase gene could be used as a dominant selection marker. We report the effective production of mutant mice from double gene-converted ES cells by selection with G418 and puromycin. We confirmed that (i) puromycin efficiently inhibited the growth of ES cells at a low-dose (0.1 microgram/ml) and for a short time (2 days), independent of G418 selection; (ii) when these selected ES cells were injected into eight-cell stage embryos, the cells produced chimeras with high levels of chimerism; (iii) these chimeric males were fertile and exclusively yielded ES cell-derived offspring; and (iv) each offspring contained both neomycin transferase and puromycin N-acetyl transferase genes.

  4. EMEA and Gene Therapy Medicinal Products Development in the European Union

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    The evaluation of quality, safety, and efficacy of medicinal products by the European Medicines Evaluation Agency (EMEA) via the centralized procedure is the only available regulatory procedure for obtaining marketing authorization for gene therapy (GT) medicinal products in the European Union. The responsibility for the authorization of clinical trials remains with the national competent authorities (NCA) acting in a harmonized framework from the scientific viewpoint. With the entry into force of a new directive on good clinical practice implementation in clinical trials as of 1 May 2004, procedural aspects will also be harmonized at EU level. Scientifically sound development of medicinal products is the key for the successful registration of dossiers and for contributing to the promotion and protection of public health. The objective of this paper is to introduce the EMEA regulatory processes and scientific activities relevant to GT medicinal products. PMID:12686717

  5. The SKP1-like gene family of Arabidopsis exhibits a high degree of differential gene expression and gene product interaction during development.

    PubMed

    Dezfulian, Mohammad H; Soulliere, Danielle M; Dhaliwal, Rajdeep K; Sareen, Madhulika; Crosby, William L

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes several families of polypeptides that are known or predicted to participate in the formation of the SCF-class of E3-ubiquitin ligase complexes. One such gene family encodes the Skp1-like class of polypeptide subunits, where 21 genes have been identified and are known to be expressed in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis based on deduced polypeptide sequence organizes the family of ASK proteins into 7 clades. The complexity of the ASK gene family, together with the close structural similarity among its members raises the prospect of significant functional redundancy among select paralogs. We have assessed the potential for functional redundancy within the ASK gene family by analyzing an expanded set of criteria that define redundancy with higher resolution. The criteria used include quantitative expression of locus-specific transcripts using qRT-PCR, assessment of the sub-cellular localization of individual ASK:YFP auto-fluorescent fusion proteins expressed in vivo as well as the in planta assessment of individual ASK-F-Box protein interactions using bimolecular fluorescent complementation techniques in combination with confocal imagery in live cells. The results indicate significant functional divergence of steady state transcript abundance and protein-protein interaction specificity involving ASK proteins in a pattern that is poorly predicted by sequence-based phylogeny. The information emerging from this and related studies will prove important for defining the functional intersection of expression, localization and gene product interaction that better predicts the formation of discrete SCF complexes, as a prelude to investigating their molecular mode of action.

  6. Gene expression and flavonolignan production in fruits and cell cultures of Silybum marianum.

    PubMed

    Torres, María; Corchete, Purificación

    2016-03-15

    The hepatoprotectant flavonolignan silymarin (Sm) is synthesized through 4-coumaroyl-CoA, which enters both the flavonoid and the monolignol pathway giving the two immediate precursors taxifolin (Tx) and coniferyl alcohol (CA), respectively. Sm formation occurs via oxidative radicalization of Tx and CA and is accumulated at high levels at final stages of maturation of Silybum marianum fruits. By contrast, Sm production is severely reduced in cell cultures of this species, although suspensions are able to excrete Sm compounds into the medium upon elicitation with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) or cyclodextrins (CD). Knowledge of gene expression is important to understand Sm dynamics and to develop strategies aimed at increasing production by means of cell cultures but, to date, only one gene of the pathway (chalcone synthase, SmCHS) has been cloned. Therefore, to elucidate the relationship between expression of Sm pathway genes and production of these metabolites, four cDNA fragments of genes putatively involved in flavonolignan biosynthesis, chalcone isomerase, flavanone 3-hydroxylase, flavonol 3'-hydroxylase and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, were isolated from Sm producing S. marianum fruits and their expression, together with that of the SmCHS, were studied both in fruits at different maturation stages and in elicited cell suspensions. Combined results at both transcript expression and metabolite levels at three different stages of fruit maturation revealed that the formation of the flavonoid moiety precedes flavonolignan biosynthesis, being Sm accumulation associated to expression of the monolignol pathway. There was not detectable accumulation of transcripts in cell suspensions, however, elicitation with MeJA or CD notably induced expression of the studied fragments. These results indicate that the five genes expressed during maturation of S. marianum fruits may contribute to observed increases in flavonolignan accumulation upon treatment of cell cultures with

  7. Regulation of Aspergillus genes encoding plant cell wall polysaccharide-degrading enzymes; relevance for industrial production.

    PubMed

    de Vries, R P

    2003-03-01

    The genus Aspergillus is widely used for the production of plant cell wall polysaccharide-degrading enzymes. The range of enzymes purified from these fungi covers nearly every function required for the complete degradation of cellulose, xyloglucan, xylan, galacto(gluco)mannan and pectin. This paper describes the Aspergillus enzymes involved in the degradation of these polysaccharides and discusses the regulatory systems involved in the expression of the genes encoding these proteins. The latter is of major importance in the large-scale production of these enzymes for industrial applications.

  8. Gene Disruption Technologies Have the Potential to Transform Stored Product Insect Pest Control.

    PubMed

    Perkin, Lindsey C; Adrianos, Sherry L; Oppert, Brenda

    2016-09-19

    Stored product insects feed on grains and processed commodities manufactured from grain post-harvest, reducing the nutritional value and contaminating food. Currently, the main defense against stored product insect pests is the pesticide fumigant phosphine. Phosphine is highly toxic to all animals, but is the most effective and economical control method, and thus is used extensively worldwide. However, many insect populations have become resistant to phosphine, in some cases to very high levels. New, environmentally benign and more effective control strategies are needed for stored product pests. RNA interference (RNAi) may overcome pesticide resistance by targeting the expression of genes that contribute to resistance in insects. Most data on RNAi in stored product insects is from the coleopteran genetic model, Tribolium castaneum, since it has a strong RNAi response via injection of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) in any life stage. Additionally, Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) technology has been suggested as a potential resource for new pest control strategies. In this review we discuss background information on both gene disruption technologies and summarize the advances made in terms of molecular pest management in stored product insects, mainly T. castaneum, as well as complications and future needs.

  9. Gene Disruption Technologies Have the Potential to Transform Stored Product Insect Pest Control

    PubMed Central

    Perkin, Lindsey C.; Adrianos, Sherry L.; Oppert, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Stored product insects feed on grains and processed commodities manufactured from grain post-harvest, reducing the nutritional value and contaminating food. Currently, the main defense against stored product insect pests is the pesticide fumigant phosphine. Phosphine is highly toxic to all animals, but is the most effective and economical control method, and thus is used extensively worldwide. However, many insect populations have become resistant to phosphine, in some cases to very high levels. New, environmentally benign and more effective control strategies are needed for stored product pests. RNA interference (RNAi) may overcome pesticide resistance by targeting the expression of genes that contribute to resistance in insects. Most data on RNAi in stored product insects is from the coleopteran genetic model, Tribolium castaneum, since it has a strong RNAi response via injection of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) in any life stage. Additionally, Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) technology has been suggested as a potential resource for new pest control strategies. In this review we discuss background information on both gene disruption technologies and summarize the advances made in terms of molecular pest management in stored product insects, mainly T. castaneum, as well as complications and future needs. PMID:27657138

  10. Induction of mitotic gene conversion by browning reaction products and its modulation by naturally occurring agents.

    PubMed

    Rosin, M P; Stich, H F; Powrie, W D; Wu, C H

    1982-05-01

    Mitotic gene conversion in the D7 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was significantly enhanced by exposure to non-enzymatic browning reaction products. These products were formed during the heating of sugar (caramelization reaction) or sugar-amino acid mixtures (Maillard reaction) at temperatures normally used during the cooking of food. Several modulating factors of this convertogenic activity were identified. These factors included two main groups: (1) trace metals which are widely distributed in the environment; and (2) several cellular enzymatic systems. The convertogenic activities of a heated glucose-lysine mixture and a commercial caramel powder were completely suppresses when yeast were concurrently exposed to these products and to either FeIII or CuII. Equimolar concentrations of MnII or sodium selenite had no effect on the convertogenic activity of the products of either model system. Horse-radish peroxidase, beef liver catalase and rat liver S9 preparations each decreased the frequency of gene conversion induced by the caramel powder and the heated glucose-lysine products. This modulating activity of the enzymes was lost if they were heat-inactivated. These studies indicate the presence of a variety of protective mechanisms which can modify genotoxic components in complex food mixtures.

  11. A repressor-response regulator gene pair controlling jadomycin B production in Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230.

    PubMed

    Yang, K; Han, L; He, J; Wang, L; Vining, L C

    2001-11-28

    A second regulatory gene (jadR(1)) is located immediately upstream of the putative repressor gene (jadR(2)) in the jad cluster for biosynthesis of the antibiotic jadomycin B in Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230. It encodes a 234-amino acid polypeptide with a sequence resembling those of response regulator proteins in two-component control systems. Features in the conserved C-terminal domain of JadR(1) place the protein in the OmpR-PhoB subfamily of response regulators. In mutants where jadR(1) was deleted or disrupted, jadomycin B was not produced, implying that the gene has an essential role in biosynthesis of the antibiotic. Cloning jadR(1) from S. venezuelae in pJV73A, and introducing additional copies of the gene into the wild-type parent by plasmid transformation gave unstable strains with pJV73A integrated into the chromosome. The transformants initially showed increased production of jadomycin B but gave lower titers as excess copies of jadR(1) were lost; mature cultures stabilized with a wild-type level of antibiotic production. The mutant from which jadR(1) had been deleted could not be transformed with pJV73A. Altering the composition of jadR genes in the chromosome by integration of vectors carrying intact and disrupted copies of jadR(1) and jadR(2) provided evidence that the two genes form a regulatory pair different in function from previously reported two-component systems controlling antibiotic biosynthesis in streptomycetes.

  12. TITER AND PRODUCT AFFECTS THE DISTRIBUTION OF GENE EXPRESSION AFTER INTRAPUTAMINAL CONVECTION-ENHANCED DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Emborg, Marina E.; Hurley, Samuel A.; Joers, Valerie; Tromp, Do P.M.; Swanson, Christine R.; Ohshima-Hosoyama, Sachiko; Bondarenko, Viktorya; Cummisford, Kyle; Sonnemans, Marc; Hermening, Stephan; Blits, Bas; Alexander, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Efficacy and safety of intracerebral gene therapy for brain disorders, like Parkinson’s disease, depends on appropriate distribution of gene expression. Objectives To assess if the distribution of gene expression is affected by vector titer and protein type. Methods Four adult macaque monkeys seronegative for adeno-associated virus 5 (AAV5) received in the right and left ventral postcommisural putamen 30μl inoculation of a high or low titer suspension of AAV5 encoding glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or green fluorescent protein (GFP). Inoculations were performed using convection enhanced delivery and intraoperative MRI (IMRI). Results IMRI confirmed targeting and infusion cloud irradiating from the catheter tip into surrounding area. Postmortem analysis six weeks after surgery revealed GFP and GDNF expression ipsilateral to the injection side that had a titer-dependent distribution. GFP and GDNF expression was also observed in fibers in the Substantia Nigra (SN) pars reticulata (pr), demonstrating anterograde transport. Few GFP-positive neurons were present in the SN pars compacta (pc), possibly by direct retrograde transport of the vector. GDNF was present in many SNpc and SNpr neurons. Conclusions After controlling for target and infusate volume, intracerebral distribution of gene product is affected by vector titer and product biology. PMID:24943657

  13. Effects of Copper on Hemocyte Apoptosis, ROS Production, and Gene Expression in White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Li, Kexu; Wang, Wei; Wang, Chenggui; Shen, Yuchun

    2017-02-25

    Copper, a common chemical contaminant in aquatic environment, is known to be toxic to aquatic life at high concentrations. In the present study, we evaluated the apoptotic cell ratio and ROS production in hemocytes of the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei exposed to 1 or 5 mg L(-1) Cu for 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h. The expression changes of antioxidant biomarker genes, i.e., copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD) and catalase (CAT), apoptosis-related genes, i.e., caspase-3 and inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP), and a specific biomarker gene of heavy metal pollution, i.e., metallothionein (MT), were also determined in hemocytes. Significant increases in ROS production were observed in both treatment groups at each time points. The apoptotic cell ratios were significantly increased at 6-48 h among shrimp exposed to 1 mg L(-1) Cu and at each time points in 5 mg L(-1) Cu group. These results indicated that Cu would induce oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hemocyte of L. vannamei. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the relative expression levels of Cu-Zn SOD, CAT, caspase-3, IAP, and MT were upregulated in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner, suggesting the involvement of these genes in stress response against Cu exposure.

  14. Golden pigment production and virulence gene expression are affected by metabolisms in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lan, Lefu; Cheng, Alice; Dunman, Paul M; Missiakas, Dominique; He, Chuan

    2010-06-01

    The pathogenesis of staphylococcal infections is multifactorial. Golden pigment is an eponymous feature of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus that shields the microbe from oxidation-based clearance, an innate host immune response to infection. Here, we screened a collection of S. aureus transposon mutants for pigment production variants. A total of 15 previously unidentified genes were discovered. Notably, disrupting metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, purine biosynthesis, and oxidative phosphorylation yields mutants with enhanced pigmentation. The dramatic effect on pigment production seems to correlate with altered expression of virulence determinants. Microarray analysis further indicates that purine biosynthesis impacts the expression of approximately 400 genes involved in a broad spectrum of functions including virulence. The purine biosynthesis mutant and oxidative phosphorylation mutant strains exhibit significantly attenuated virulence in a murine abscess model of infection. Inhibition of purine biosynthesis with a known small-molecule inhibitor results in altered virulence gene expression and virulence attenuation during infection. Taken together, these results suggest an intimate link between metabolic processes and virulence gene expression in S. aureus. This study also establishes the importance of purine biosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation for in vivo survival.

  15. Golden Pigment Production and Virulence Gene Expression Are Affected by Metabolisms in Staphylococcus aureus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Lefu; Cheng, Alice; Dunman, Paul M.; Missiakas, Dominique; He, Chuan

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of staphylococcal infections is multifactorial. Golden pigment is an eponymous feature of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus that shields the microbe from oxidation-based clearance, an innate host immune response to infection. Here, we screened a collection of S. aureus transposon mutants for pigment production variants. A total of 15 previously unidentified genes were discovered. Notably, disrupting metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, purine biosynthesis, and oxidative phosphorylation yields mutants with enhanced pigmentation. The dramatic effect on pigment production seems to correlate with altered expression of virulence determinants. Microarray analysis further indicates that purine biosynthesis impacts the expression of ∼400 genes involved in a broad spectrum of functions including virulence. The purine biosynthesis mutant and oxidative phosphorylation mutant strains exhibit significantly attenuated virulence in a murine abscess model of infection. Inhibition of purine biosynthesis with a known small-molecule inhibitor results in altered virulence gene expression and virulence attenuation during infection. Taken together, these results suggest an intimate link between metabolic processes and virulence gene expression in S. aureus. This study also establishes the importance of purine biosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation for in vivo survival. PMID:20400547

  16. CAPA-Gene Products in the Haematophagous Sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) - Vector for Leishmaniasis Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this article in press as: Predel R, et al. CAPA-gene products in the haematophagous sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) – vector for...the haematophagous sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) – vector for leishmaniasis disease 1 2 Reinhard Predela,e,∗, Susanne Neuperta,e...neuropeptides24 Periviscerokinins25 Corazonin26 Phlebotomus papatasi27 Psychodidae28 Differential processing29 a b s t r a c t Sandflies

  17. Genetic resources for methane production from biomass described with the Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Purwantini, Endang; Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Lomax, Jane; Setubal, João C; Tyler, Brett M; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is a valuable fuel, constituting 70-95% of natural gas, and a potent greenhouse gas. Release of CH4 into the atmosphere contributes to climate change. Biological CH4 production or methanogenesis is mostly performed by methanogens, a group of strictly anaerobic archaea. The direct substrates for methanogenesis are H2 plus CO2, acetate, formate, methylamines, methanol, methyl sulfides, and ethanol or a secondary alcohol plus CO2. In numerous anaerobic niches in nature, methanogenesis facilitates mineralization of complex biopolymers such as carbohydrates, lipids and proteins generated by primary producers. Thus, methanogens are critical players in the global carbon cycle. The same process is used in anaerobic treatment of municipal, industrial and agricultural wastes, reducing the biological pollutants in the wastes and generating methane. It also holds potential for commercial production of natural gas from renewable resources. This process operates in digestive systems of many animals, including cattle, and humans. In contrast, in deep-sea hydrothermal vents methanogenesis is a primary production process, allowing chemosynthesis of biomaterials from H2 plus CO2. In this report we present Gene Ontology (GO) terms that can be used to describe processes, functions and cellular components involved in methanogenic biodegradation and biosynthesis of specialized coenzymes that methanogens use. Some of these GO terms were previously available and the rest were generated in our Microbial Energy Gene Ontology (MENGO) project. A recently discovered non-canonical CH4 production process is also described. We have performed manual GO annotation of selected methanogenesis genes, based on experimental evidence, providing "gold standards" for machine annotation and automated discovery of methanogenesis genes or systems in diverse genomes. Most of the GO-related information presented in this report is available at the MENGO website (http://www.mengo.biochem.vt.edu/).

  18. Genetic resources for methane production from biomass described with the Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Purwantini, Endang; Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Lomax, Jane; Setubal, João C.; Tyler, Brett M.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is a valuable fuel, constituting 70–95% of natural gas, and a potent greenhouse gas. Release of CH4 into the atmosphere contributes to climate change. Biological CH4 production or methanogenesis is mostly performed by methanogens, a group of strictly anaerobic archaea. The direct substrates for methanogenesis are H2 plus CO2, acetate, formate, methylamines, methanol, methyl sulfides, and ethanol or a secondary alcohol plus CO2. In numerous anaerobic niches in nature, methanogenesis facilitates mineralization of complex biopolymers such as carbohydrates, lipids and proteins generated by primary producers. Thus, methanogens are critical players in the global carbon cycle. The same process is used in anaerobic treatment of municipal, industrial and agricultural wastes, reducing the biological pollutants in the wastes and generating methane. It also holds potential for commercial production of natural gas from renewable resources. This process operates in digestive systems of many animals, including cattle, and humans. In contrast, in deep-sea hydrothermal vents methanogenesis is a primary production process, allowing chemosynthesis of biomaterials from H2 plus CO2. In this report we present Gene Ontology (GO) terms that can be used to describe processes, functions and cellular components involved in methanogenic biodegradation and biosynthesis of specialized coenzymes that methanogens use. Some of these GO terms were previously available and the rest were generated in our Microbial Energy Gene Ontology (MENGO) project. A recently discovered non-canonical CH4 production process is also described. We have performed manual GO annotation of selected methanogenesis genes, based on experimental evidence, providing “gold standards” for machine annotation and automated discovery of methanogenesis genes or systems in diverse genomes. Most of the GO-related information presented in this report is available at the MENGO website (http

  19. Identification of the Three Genes Involved in Controlling Production of a Phytotoxin Tropolone in Burkholderia plantarii

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Shunpei; Kihira, Eri; Yoshioka, Akinori; Nakasone, Kaoru; Okamoto, Sho; Hatano, Masaki; Igarashi, Masayuki; Eguchi, Yoko; Kato, Akinori; Ichikawa, Natsuko; Sekine, Mitsuo; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tropolone, a phytotoxin produced by Burkholderia plantarii, causes rice seedling blight. To identify genes involved in tropolone synthesis, we systematically constructed mutations in the genes encoding 55 histidine kinases and 72 response regulators. From the resulting defective strains, we isolated three mutants, KE1, KE2, and KE3, in which tropolone production was repressed. The deleted genes of these mutants were named troR1, troK, and troR2, respectively. The mutant strains did not cause rice seedling blight, and complementation experiments indicated that TroR1, TroK, and TroR2 were involved in the synthesis of tropolone in B. plantarii. However, tropolone synthesis was repressed in the TroR1 D52A, TroK H253A, and TroR2 D46A site-directed mutants. These results suggest that the putative sensor kinase (TroK) and two response regulators (TroR1 and TroR2) control the production of tropolone in B. plantarii. IMPORTANCE A two-component system is normally composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a cognate response regulator (RR) pair. In this study, HK (TroK) and two RRs (TroR1 and TroR2) were found to be involved in controlling tropolone production in B. plantarii. These three genes may be part of a bacterial signal transduction network. Such networks are thought to exist in other bacteria to regulate phytotoxin production, as well as environmental adaptation and signal transduction. PMID:27002128

  20. Increasing cocoa butter-like lipid production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of selected cocoa genes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yongjun; Gossing, Michael; Bergenholm, David; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-12-01

    Cocoa butter (CB) extracted from cocoa beans mainly consists of three different kinds of triacylglycerols (TAGs), 1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (POP, C16:0-C18:1-C16:0), 1-palmitoyl-3-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (POS, C16:0-C18:1-C18:0) and 1,3-distearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (SOS, C18:0-C18:1-C18:0), but CB supply is limited. Therefore, CB-like lipids (CBL, which are composed of POP, POS and SOS) are in great demand. Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces TAGs as storage lipids, which are also mainly composed of C16 and C18 fatty acids. However, POP, POS and SOS are not among the major TAG forms in yeast. TAG synthesis is mainly catalyzed by three enzymes: glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), lysophospholipid acyltransferase (LPAT) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT). In order to produce CBL in S. cerevisiae, we selected six cocoa genes encoding GPAT, LPAT and DGAT potentially responsible for CB biosynthesis from the cocoa genome using a phylogenetic analysis approach. By expressing the selected cocoa genes in S. cerevisiae, we successfully increased total fatty acid production, TAG production and CBL production in some S. cerevisiae strains. The relative CBL content in three yeast strains harboring cocoa genes increased 190, 230 and 196% over the control strain, respectively; especially, the potential SOS content of the three yeast strains increased 254, 476 and 354% over the control strain. Moreover, one of the three yeast strains had a 2.25-fold increased TAG content and 6.7-fold higher level of CBL compared with the control strain. In summary, CBL production by S. cerevisiae were increased through expressing selected cocoa genes potentially involved in CB biosynthesis.

  1. Characterization of the Expression of Basigin Gene Products Within the Pineal Gland of Mice.

    PubMed

    Tokar, Derek; van Ekeris, Leslie; Linser, Paul J; Ochrietor, Judith D

    2016-11-04

    The expression of Basigin gene products and monocarboxylate transporter-1 (MCT1) has been investigated within the mammalian neural retina and suggests a role for these proteins in cellular metabolism within that tissue. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the expression of these same proteins in the pineal gland of the mouse brain. Mouse pineal gland and neural retina RNA and protein were subjected to quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses. In addition, paraffin-embedded sections of each tissue were analyzed for expression of Basigin gene products and MCT1 via immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that MCT1 and Basigin variant-2, but not Basigin variant-1, are expressed within the mouse pineal gland. The expression of Basigin variant-2 and MCT1 was localized to the capsule surrounding the gland. The position and relative amounts of the gene products suggest that they play a much less prominent role within the pineal gland than in the neural retina.

  2. Diversity of Streptococcus thermophilus in bacteriocin production; inhibitory spectrum and occurrence of thermophilin genes.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Franca; Marzotto, Marta; Cremonese, Silvia; Rizzotti, Lucia; Torriani, Sandra

    2013-08-01

    The bacteriocin-producing Streptococcus thermophilus strains that can dominate in natural dairy ecosystems, may also enhance safety in products obtained from natural cultures. In this study, we sought to identify bacteriocin production and bacteriocin genes in 75 strains of dairy and plant origin. The strains were tested for antimicrobial activity against pathogens or pathogen models, spoiling bacteria, and lactic acid bacteria associated with dairy products. All strains moderately inhibited Staphylococcus aureus P310, none inhibited Listeria innocua LMG 11387(T) or Clostridium tyrobutyricum LMG 1285(T). In addition, 14 were active against one or more indicators in addition to S. aureus P310. Inhibition of other starter bacteria was more common than the inhibition of unwanted microorganisms. The involvement of a proteinaceous compound was ascertained in all cases. Results suggested that the selection of bacteriocinogenic S. thermophilus strains for use in biopreservation must take into account the effects exerted on other lactic acid bacteria. PCR detection of thermophilin genes proved unreliable in predicting antimicrobial activity. For S. thermophilus PRI36 and PRI45, with relevant inhibitory features, the identity of the bacteriocin genes present in the thermophilin 9 cluster was defined, thus revealing novel variants for this genome region.

  3. The transport of antibiotic resistance genes and residues in groundwater near swine production facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. F.; Yannarell, A. C.; Mackie, R. I.; Krapac, I. G.; Chee-Sanford, J. S.; Koike, S.

    2008-12-01

    The use of antibiotics at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) for disease prevention, disease treatment, and growth promotion can contribute to the spread of antibiotic compounds, their breakdown products, and antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or the genes that confer resistance. In addition, constitutive use of antibiotics at sub-therapeutic levels can select for antibiotic resistance among the bacteria that inhabit animal intestinal tracts, onsite manure treatment facilities, and any environments receiving significant inputs of manure (e.g. through waste lagoon leakage or fertilizer amendments to farm soils). If the antibiotic resistant organisms persist in these new environments, or if they participate in genetic exchanges with the native microflora, then CAFOs may constitute a significant reservoir for the spread of antibiotic resistance to the environment at large. Our results have demonstrated that leakage from waste treatment lagoons can influence the presence and persistence of tetracycline resistance genes in the shallow aquifer adjacent to swine CAFOs, and molecular phylogeny allowed us to distinguish "native" tetracycline resistance genes in control groundwater wells from manure-associated genes introduced from the lagoon. We have also been able to detect the presence of erythromycin resistance genes in CAFO surface and groundwater even though erythromycin is strictly reserved for use in humans and thus is not utilized at any of these sites. Ongoing research, including modeling of particle transport in groundwater, will help to determine the potential spatial and temporal extent of CAFO-derived antibiotic resistance.

  4. Identification of the Pr1 Gene Product Completes the Anthocyanin Biosynthesis Pathway of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mandeep; Cortes-Cruz, Moises; Ahern, Kevin R.; McMullen, Michael; Brutnell, Thomas P.; Chopra, Surinder

    2011-01-01

    In maize, mutations in the pr1 locus lead to the accumulation of pelargonidin (red) rather than cyanidin (purple) pigments in aleurone cells where the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway is active. We characterized pr1 mutation and isolated a putative F3′H encoding gene (Zmf3′h1) and showed by segregation analysis that the red kernel phenotype is linked to this gene. Genetic mapping using SNP markers confirms its position on chromosome 5L. Furthermore, genetic complementation experiments using a CaMV 35S::ZmF3′H1 promoter–gene construct established that the encoded protein product was sufficient to perform a 3′-hydroxylation reaction. The Zmf3′h1-specific transcripts were detected in floral and vegetative tissues of Pr1 plants and were absent in pr1. Four pr1 alleles were characterized: two carry a 24 TA dinucleotide repeat insertion in the 5′-upstream promoter region, a third has a 17-bp deletion near the TATA box, and a fourth contains a Ds insertion in exon1. Genetic and transcription assays demonstrated that the pr1 gene is under the regulatory control of anthocyanin transcription factors red1 and colorless1. The cloning and characterization of pr1 completes the molecular identification of all genes encoding structural enzymes of the anthocyanin pathway of maize. PMID:21385724

  5. Expression of the HMGI(Y) gene products in human neuroblastic tumours correlates with differentiation status

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, G; Kim, C J; Marcotullio, L Di; Manfioletti, G; Cardinali, B; Cerignoli, F; Ristori, E; Zani, M; Frati, L; Screpanti, I; Gulino, A

    2000-01-01

    HMGI and HMGY are splicing variants of the HMGI(Y) gene and together with HMGI-C, belong to a family of DNA binding proteins involved in maintaining active chromatin conformation and in the regulation of gene transcription. The expression of the HMGI(Y) gene is maximal during embryonic development, declines in adult differentiated tissues and is reactivated in most transformed cells in vitro and in many human cancers in vivo. The HMGI(Y) genomic locus is frequently rearranged in mesenchymal tumours, suggesting a biological role for HMGI(Y) gene products in tumour biology. HMGIs are both target and modulators of retinoic acid activity. In fact, HMGI(Y) gene expression is differentially regulated by retinoic acid in retinoid-sensitive and -resistant neuroblastoma cells, while HMGI-C participates in conferring retinoic acid resistance in some neuroblastoma cells. In this paper we show that HMGI and HMGY isoforms are equally regulated by retinoic acid in neuroblastoma cell lines at both RNA and protein levels. More importantly our immunohistochemical analysis shows that, although HMGI(Y) is expressed in all neuroblastic tumours, consistently higher levels are observed in less differentiated neuroblastomas compared to more differentiated ganglioneuromas, indicating that HMGI(Y) expression should be evaluated as a potential diagnostic and prognostic marker in neuroblastic tumours. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11076660

  6. Characterization of Toxin Genes and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in Fishery Products in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Arfatahery, Noushin; Davoodabadi, Abolfazl; Abedimohtasab, Taranehpeimaneh

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of seafood-borne diseases worldwide, which are attributable to the contamination of food by preformed enterotoxins. In this study, a total of 206 (34.3%) Staphylococcus aureus strains were obtained from 600 fish and shrimp samples and were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibility. We assessed the prevalence of the genes responsible for the staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEA, SEB) and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) genes. The results indicated that 34% of aqua food samples were contaminated with S. aureus, and 23.8% of these isolates were mec-A-positive. Sixty-four percent of the strains isolated from contaminated seafood was enterotoxigenic S. aureus, and 28.2% of SEs were MRSA-positive. The most prevalent genotype was characterized by the presence of the sea gene (45.2%), followed by the seb gene (18.5%), and the tst gene encoding TSST-1 was found in eight strains (3.9%). Of the 206 S. aureus isolates, 189 strains (84.9%) were resistant to at least one antibiotic. Given the frequent outbreaks of enterotoxigenic MRSA, it is necessary to make revisions to mandatory programmes to facilitate improved hygiene practices during fishing, aquaculture, processing, and sales to prevent the contamination of fishery products in Iran. PMID:27694813

  7. Functional cooperation of the dnaE and dnaN gene products in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, N; Uchida, H

    1981-01-01

    A system was designed to isolate second-site intergenic suppressors of a thermosensitive mutation of the dnaE gene of Escherichia coli. The dnaE gene codes for the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III [McHenry, C. S. & Crow, W. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 1748-1753]. One such suppressor, named sueA77, was finely mapped and found to be located at 82 min on the E. coli chromosome, between dnaA and recF, and within the dnaN gene [Sakakibara, Y. & Mizukami, T. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 178, 541-553]. The dnaN gene codes for the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme [Burgers, P. M. J., Kornberg, A. & Sakakibara, Y. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 5391-5395]. The sueA77 mutation was trans-dominant over its wild-type allele, and it suppressed different thermosensitive mutations of dnaE with different maximal permissive temperature. These properties were interpreted as providing genetic evidence for interaction of the dnaE and dnaN gene products in E. coli. Images PMID:6458043

  8. Functional cooperation of the dnaE and dnaN gene products in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, N; Uchida, H

    1981-09-01

    A system was designed to isolate second-site intergenic suppressors of a thermosensitive mutation of the dnaE gene of Escherichia coli. The dnaE gene codes for the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III [McHenry, C. S. & Crow, W. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 1748-1753]. One such suppressor, named sueA77, was finely mapped and found to be located at 82 min on the E. coli chromosome, between dnaA and recF, and within the dnaN gene [Sakakibara, Y. & Mizukami, T. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 178, 541-553]. The dnaN gene codes for the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme [Burgers, P. M. J., Kornberg, A. & Sakakibara, Y. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 5391-5395]. The sueA77 mutation was trans-dominant over its wild-type allele, and it suppressed different thermosensitive mutations of dnaE with different maximal permissive temperature. These properties were interpreted as providing genetic evidence for interaction of the dnaE and dnaN gene products in E. coli.

  9. A mutation in the Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae wxoD gene affects xanthan production and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jae-Young; Kim, Hong-Il; Lee, Chang-Soo; Park, Young-Jin

    2013-11-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae causes bacterial blight in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The effect of a mutation in the wxoD gene, that encodes a putative O-antigen acetylase, on xanthan production as well as bacterial chemotaxis was investigated. The mutation increased xanthan production by 52 %. The mutant strain was non-motile on semi-solid agar swarm plates. In addition, several genes involved in chemotaxis, including the cheW, cheV, cheR, and cheD genes, were down-regulated by a mutation in the wxoD gene. Thus, the mutation in the wxoD gene affects xanthan production as well as bacterial chemotaxis. However, the wxoD gene is not essential for the virulence of X. oryzae.

  10. Molecular characterization of genes involved in the production of the bacteriocin leucocin A from Leuconostoc gelidum.

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, M J; Stiles, M E

    1995-01-01

    Leucocin A is a small heat-stable bacteriocin produced by Leuconostoc gelidum UAL187. A 2.9-kb fragment of plasmid DNA that contains the leucocin structural gene and a second open reading frame (ORF) in an operon was previously cloned (J. W. Hastings, M. Sailer, K. Johnson, K. L. Roy, J. C. Vederas, and M. E. Stiles, J. Bacteriol. 173:7491-7500, 1991). When a 1-kb DraI-HpaI fragment containing this operon was introduced into a bacteriocin-negative variant (UAL187-13), immunity but no leucocin production was detected. Leucocin production was observed when an 8-kb SacI-HindIII fragment of the leucocin plasmid was introduced into L. gelidum UAL187-13 and Lactococcus lactis IL1403. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this 8-kb fragment revealed the presence of three ORFs in an operon upstream of and on the strand opposite from the leucocin structural gene. The first ORF (lcaE) encodes a putative protein of 149 amino acids with no apparent function in leucocin A production. The second ORF (lcaC) contains 717 codons that encode a protein homologous to members of the HlyB family of ATP-binding cassette transporters. The third ORF (lcaD) contains 457 codons that encode a protein with marked similarity to LcnD, a protein essential for the expression of the lactococcal bacteriocin lactococcin A. Deletion mutations in lcaC and lcaD resulted in loss of leucocin production, indicating that LcaC and LcaD are involved in production and translocation of leucocin A. The secretion apparatus for lactococcin A did not complement mutations in the lcaCD genes to express leucocin A in L. lactis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7486992

  11. Molecular characterization of genes involved in the production of the bacteriocin leucocin A from Leuconostoc gelidum.

    PubMed

    van Belkum, M J; Stiles, M E

    1995-10-01

    Leucocin A is a small heat-stable bacteriocin produced by Leuconostoc gelidum UAL187. A 2.9-kb fragment of plasmid DNA that contains the leucocin structural gene and a second open reading frame (ORF) in an operon was previously cloned (J. W. Hastings, M. Sailer, K. Johnson, K. L. Roy, J. C. Vederas, and M. E. Stiles, J. Bacteriol. 173:7491-7500, 1991). When a 1-kb DraI-HpaI fragment containing this operon was introduced into a bacteriocin-negative variant (UAL187-13), immunity but no leucocin production was detected. Leucocin production was observed when an 8-kb SacI-HindIII fragment of the leucocin plasmid was introduced into L. gelidum UAL187-13 and Lactococcus lactis IL1403. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this 8-kb fragment revealed the presence of three ORFs in an operon upstream of and on the strand opposite from the leucocin structural gene. The first ORF (lcaE) encodes a putative protein of 149 amino acids with no apparent function in leucocin A production. The second ORF (lcaC) contains 717 codons that encode a protein homologous to members of the HlyB family of ATP-binding cassette transporters. The third ORF (lcaD) contains 457 codons that encode a protein with marked similarity to LcnD, a protein essential for the expression of the lactococcal bacteriocin lactococcin A. Deletion mutations in lcaC and lcaD resulted in loss of leucocin production, indicating that LcaC and LcaD are involved in production and translocation of leucocin A. The secretion apparatus for lactococcin A did not complement mutations in the lcaCD genes to express leucocin A in L. lactis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Dynamic gene expression regulation model for growth and penicillin production in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Douma, Rutger D; Verheijen, Peter J T; de Laat, Wim T A M; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2010-07-01

    As is often the case for microbial product formation, the penicillin production rate of Penicillium chrysogenum has been observed to be a function of the growth rate of the organism. The relation between the biomass specific rate of penicillin formation (q(p)) and growth rate (mu) has been measured under steady state conditions in carbon limited chemostats resulting in a steady state q(p)(mu) relation. Direct application of such a relation to predict the rate of product formation during dynamic conditions, as they occur, for example, in fed-batch experiments, leads to errors in the prediction, because q(p) is not an instantaneous function of the growth rate but rather lags behind because of adaptational and regulatory processes. In this paper a dynamic gene regulation model is presented, in which the specific rate of penicillin production is assumed to be a linear function of the amount of a rate-limiting enzyme in the penicillin production pathway. Enzyme activity assays were performed and strongly indicated that isopenicillin-N synthase (IPNS) was the main rate-limiting enzyme for penicillin-G biosynthesis in our strain. The developed gene regulation model predicts the expression of this rate limiting enzyme based on glucose repression, fast decay of the mRNA encoding for the enzyme as well as the decay of the enzyme itself. The gene regulation model was combined with a stoichiometric model and appeared to accurately describe the biomass and penicillin concentrations for both chemostat steady-state as well as the dynamics during chemostat start-up and fed-batch cultivation.

  13. Effects of Enterococcus faecalis fsr genes on production of gelatinase and a serine protease and virulence.

    PubMed

    Qin, X; Singh, K V; Weinstock, G M; Murray, B E

    2000-05-01

    Three agr-like genes (fsrA, fsrB, and fsrC, for Enterococcus faecalis regulator) were found upstream of the previously reported gelatinase gene (gelE) and a downstream putative serine protease gene (sprE; accession number Z12296) of Enterococcus faecalis OG1RF. The deduced amino acid sequence of fsrA shows 26% identity and 38% similarity to Staphylococcus aureus AgrA (the response regulator of the accessory gene regulator system in the agr locus), FsrB shows 23% identity and 41% similarity to S. aureus AgrB, and FsrC shows 23% identity and 36% similarity to S. aureus AgrC (the sensor transducer of Agr system). Northern blot analysis suggested that gelE and sprE are cotranscribed and that fsrB and fsrC are also cotranscribed in OG1RF. Northern blot analysis of fsrA, fsrB, fsrC, gelE, and sprE insertion mutants showed that fsrB, fsrC, gelE, and sprE are not expressed in fsrA, fsrB, and fsrC mutants, while insertion in an open reading frame further upstream of fsrA did not effect the expression of these genes, suggesting that agr-like genes may be autoregulated and that they regulate gelE and sprE expression, as further confirmed by complementation of fsr gene mutations with a 6-kb fragment which contains all three fsr genes in the shuttle vector, pAT18. Testing of 95 other isolates of E. faecalis showed that 62% produced gelatinase (Gel(+)), while 91% (including all Gel(+) strains) hybridized to a gelE probe; 71% (including all Gel(+) strains) hybridized to an fsr probe, corroborating the conclusion that both gelE and fsr are necessary for gelatinase production. Testing of fsrA, fsrB, and sprE mutants in a mouse peritonitis model showed that sprE and agr-like gene mutants resulted in highly significantly prolonged survival compared to the parent strain OG1RF, a finding similar to what we had previously shown for a gelE mutant. These results suggest that sprE and agr-like genes contribute to the virulence of E. faecalis OG1RF in this model.

  14. Engineering cell lines for production of replication defective HSV-1 gene therapy vectors.

    PubMed

    Grant, Kyle G; Krisky, David M; Ataai, Mohammed M; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2009-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) represents an attractive vehicle for a variety of gene therapy applications. To render this virus safe for clinical use, its cytotoxic genes must be removed without losing its ability to express transgenes efficiently. Our vectors are deleted for the essential immediate early genes ICP4 and ICP27. These genes are controlled by unique promoters having enhancer elements responsive to a viral structural protein VP16. The expression of these genes occurs prior to the activation of all other lytic functions and is thus required to initiate and complete the virus replication cycle. For large scale manufacture of clinical grade vectors, efficient cell lines must be generated that express the essential viral gene products in trans during vector propagation. Here we describe methods for engineering HSV-1 production cell lines that improve vector growth by altering the kinetics of complementing gene expression. We examined the ability of Vero cells independently transduced with ICP4 and ICP27 under transcriptional control of their respective promoters to support the growth of a replication defective vector (JDTOZHE), deleted for ICP4, ICP27 and approximately 20 kb of internal elements that are not required for virus growth in Vero cells. Vector yield on this cell line was 3 logs lower than wild-type virus grown on Vero cells. To understand the mechanism underlying poor vector yield, we examined the expression of ICP4 and ICP27 during virus complementation. While ICP27 was expressed immediately on vector infection, the expression of ICP4 was considerably delayed by 8-10 h, suggesting that the ICP4 promoter was not adequately activated by VP16 delivered by the infectious vector particle. Use of the ICP0 promoter to express ICP4 from the cellular genome resulted in higher induction levels and faster kinetics of ICP4 expression and a 10-fold improvement in vector yield. This study suggests that vector complementation is highly dependent on the

  15. Tetracycline residues and tetracycline resistance genes in groundwater impacted by swine production facilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mackie, R.I.; Koike, S.; Krapac, I.; Chee-Sanford, J.; Maxwell, Susan; Aminov, R.I.

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotics are used at therapeutic levels to treat disease; at slightly lower levels as prophylactics; and at low, subtherapeutic levels for growth promotion and improvement of feed efficiency. Over 88% of swine producers in the United States gave antimicrobials to grower/finisher pigs in feed as a growth promoter in 2000. It is estimated that ca. 75% of antibiotics are not absorbed by animals and are excreted in urine and feces. The extensive use of antibiotics in swine production has resulted in antibiotic resistance in many intestinal bacteria, which are also excreted in swine feces, resulting in dissemination of resistance genes into the environment.To assess the impact of manure management on groundwater quality, groundwater samples have been collected near two swine confinement facilities that use lagoons for manure storage and treatment. Several key contaminant indicators-including inorganic ions, antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance genes-were analyzed in groundwater collected from the monitoring wells. Chloride, ammonium, potassium, and sodium were predominant inorganic constituents in the manure samples and served as indicators of groundwater contamination. Based on these analyses, shallow groundwater has been impacted by lagoon seepage at both sites. Liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) was used to measure the dissolved concentrations of tetracycline, chlortetracycline, and oxytetracycline in groundwater and manure. Although tetracyclines were regularly used at both facilities, they were infrequently detected in manure samples and then at relatively trace concentrations. Concentrations of all tetracyclines and their breakdown products in the groundwater sampled were generally less than 0.5 ??g/L.Bacterial tetracycline resistance genes served as distinct genotypic markers to indicate the dissemination and mobility of antibiotic resistance genes that originated from the lagoons. Applying PCR to genomic DNA extracted from the lagoon and

  16. Production of Phloroglucinol, a Platform Chemical, in Arabidopsis using a Bacterial Gene

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Ghany, Salah E.; Day, Irene; Heuberger, Adam L.; Broeckling, Corey D.; Reddy, Anireddy S.N.

    2016-01-01

    Phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene; PG) and its derivatives are phenolic compounds that are used for various industrial applications. Current methods to synthesize PG are not sustainable due to the requirement for carbon-based precursors and co-production of toxic byproducts. Here, we describe a more sustainable production of PG using plants expressing a native bacterial or a codon-optimized synthetic PhlD targeted to either the cytosol or chloroplasts. Transgenic lines were analyzed for the production of PG using gas and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy. Phloroglucinol was produced in all transgenic lines and the line with the highest PhlD transcript level showed the most accumulation of PG. Over 80% of the produced PG was glycosylated to phlorin. Arabidopsis leaves have the machinery to glycosylate PG to form phlorin, which can be hydrolyzed enzymatically to produce PG. Furthermore, the metabolic profile of plants with PhlD in either the cytosol or chloroplasts was altered. Our results provide evidence that plants can be engineered to produce PG using a bacterial gene. Phytoproduction of PG using a bacterial gene paves the way for further genetic manipulations to enhance the level of PG with implications for the commercial production of this important platform chemical in plants. PMID:27924918

  17. Manipulation of IL-10 gene expression by Toxoplasma gondii and its products

    PubMed Central

    Pestechian, Nader; Khanahmad Shahreza, Hosein; Faridnia, Roghiyeh; Kalani, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate whether or not T. gondii and its derivatives can change the gene expression level of IL-10 in murine leukocytes in vivo. Methods: Fifty BALB/c mice were divided into 5 groups, four of which received the excretory/secretory product (ESP) from cell culture medium, the ESP from cell free medium, the Toxoplasma lysate product (TLP) and the active tachyzoites, respectively. The fifth group was considered as control and received PBS. The peritoneal leukocytes from the mice were collected. Their total RNA were extracted and converted to cDNA and the gene expression levels of IL-10 in the samples were evaluated by quantitative real time-PCR using the REST-2009 software. Results: The findings showed a decrease in the expression level of IL-10 in the TLP group (p=0.004). Moreover, the IL-10 gene expression level was upregulated in the group of the ESP from cell culture medium (p=0.04) and the active tachyzoite group (p=0.04). The expression of IL-10 gene in the group of ESP from cell-free medium was not significant compared to the control one (p=0.45). Conclusion: T. gondii and its derivatives are able to increase (the active T. gondii tachyzoite and the ESP from cell culture medium) and decrease (the TLP) the gene expression level of IL-10 in a murine model. The question remains to be examined in further study about which molecules are involved in this process. PMID:27683651

  18. Potential for hydrogen production with inducible chloroplast gene expression in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Surzycki, Raymond; Cournac, Laurent; Peltier, Gilles; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2007-01-01

    An inducible chloroplast gene expression system was developed in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by taking advantage of the properties of the copper-sensitive cytochrome c6 promoter and of the nucleus-encoded Nac2 chloroplast protein. This protein is specifically required for the stable accumulation of the chloroplast psbD RNA and acts on its 5′ UTR. A construct containing the Nac2 coding sequence fused to the cytochrome c6 promoter was introduced into the nac2-26 mutant strain deficient in Nac2. In this transformant, psbD is expressed in copper-depleted but not in copper-replete medium. Because psbD encodes the D2 reaction center polypeptide of photosystem II (PSII), the repression of psbD leads to the loss of PSII. We have tested this system for hydrogen production. Upon addition of copper to cells pregrown in copper-deficient medium, PSII levels declined to a level at which oxygen consumption by respiration exceeded oxygen evolution by PSII. The resulting anaerobic conditions led to the induction of hydrogenase activity. Because the Cyc6 promoter is also induced under anaerobic conditions, this system opens possibilities for sustained cycling hydrogen production. Moreover, this inducible gene expression system is applicable to any chloroplast gene by replacing its 5′ UTR with the psbD 5′ UTR in the same genetic background. To make these strains phototrophic, the 5′ UTR of the psbD gene was replaced by the petA 5′ UTR. As an example, we show that the reporter gene aadA driven by the psbD 5′ UTR confers resistance to spectinomycin in the absence of copper and sensitivity in its presence in the culture medium. PMID:17951433

  19. Production of lentiviral vectors by transient expression of minimal packaging genes from recombinant adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Kuate, Seraphin; Stefanou, Daniela; Hoffmann, Dennis; Wildner, Oliver; Uberla, Klaus

    2004-11-01

    The potential of lentiviral vectors for clinical gene therapy has not yet been evaluated. One of the reasons is the cytotoxicity of lentiviral packaging genes which makes the generation of stable producer cell lines difficult. Therefore, a novel packaging system for lentiviral vectors based on transient expression of packaging genes by recombinant adenoviruses was developed. Adenoviral vectors expressing VSV-G, codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol, and codon-optimized SIV gag-pol under the control of a tetracycline-regulatable promoter (adenoviral lenti-pack vectors) were constructed and the production levels of this vector system were evaluated. The generated adenoviral lenti-pack vectors could be grown to high titers when transgene expression was suppressed and no evidence for instabilities was obtained. Cells stably transfected with a SIV-based vector construct were converted into lentiviral vector producer cells by infection with the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors. Lentiviral vector titers obtained were as high as vector titers obtained by transient cotransfection experiments. A protocol was developed that allowed preparation of lentiviral vector stocks with undetectable levels of contaminating adenoviral lenti-pack vectors. The adenoviral lenti-pack vectors described should provide a convenient alternative approach to inducible packaging cell lines for large-scale lentiviral vector production. Transient expression of cytotoxic lentiviral packaging genes by the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors circumvents loss of titers during prolonged culture of packaging cell lines. The design of the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors should reduce the risk of transfer of packaging genes to target cells and at the same time provide flexibility with respect to the lentiviral vector constructs that can be packaged.

  20. Transcriptome analysis of pigeon milk production - role of cornification and triglyceride synthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Meagan J; Crowley, Tamsyn M; Haring, Volker R; Wilson, Susanne L; Harper, Jennifer A; Payne, Jean S; Green, Diane; Monaghan, Paul; Stanley, Dragana; Donald, John A; Nicholas, Kevin R; Moore, Robert J

    2013-03-13

    The pigeon crop is specially adapted to produce milk that is fed to newly hatched young. The process of pigeon milk production begins when the germinal cell layer of the crop rapidly proliferates in response to prolactin, which results in a mass of epithelial cells that are sloughed from the crop and regurgitated to the young. We proposed that the evolution of pigeon milk built upon the ability of avian keratinocytes to accumulate intracellular neutral lipids during the cornification of the epidermis. However, this cornification process in the pigeon crop has not been characterised. We identified the epidermal differentiation complex in the draft pigeon genome scaffold and found that, like the chicken, it contained beta-keratin genes. These beta-keratin genes can be classified, based on sequence similarity, into several clusters including feather, scale and claw keratins. The cornified cells of the pigeon crop express several cornification-associated genes including cornulin, S100-A9 and A16-like, transglutaminase 6-like and the pigeon 'lactating' crop-specific annexin cp35. Beta-keratins play an important role in 'lactating' crop, with several claw and scale keratins up-regulated. Additionally, transglutaminase 5 and differential splice variants of transglutaminase 4 are up-regulated along with S100-A10. This study of global gene expression in the crop has expanded our knowledge of pigeon milk production, in particular, the mechanism of cornification and lipid production. It is a highly specialised process that utilises the normal keratinocyte cellular processes to produce a targeted nutrient solution for the young at a very high turnover.

  1. Transcriptome analysis of pigeon milk production – role of cornification and triglyceride synthesis genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The pigeon crop is specially adapted to produce milk that is fed to newly hatched young. The process of pigeon milk production begins when the germinal cell layer of the crop rapidly proliferates in response to prolactin, which results in a mass of epithelial cells that are sloughed from the crop and regurgitated to the young. We proposed that the evolution of pigeon milk built upon the ability of avian keratinocytes to accumulate intracellular neutral lipids during the cornification of the epidermis. However, this cornification process in the pigeon crop has not been characterised. Results We identified the epidermal differentiation complex in the draft pigeon genome scaffold and found that, like the chicken, it contained beta-keratin genes. These beta-keratin genes can be classified, based on sequence similarity, into several clusters including feather, scale and claw keratins. The cornified cells of the pigeon crop express several cornification-associated genes including cornulin, S100-A9 and A16-like, transglutaminase 6-like and the pigeon ‘lactating’ crop-specific annexin cp35. Beta-keratins play an important role in ‘lactating’ crop, with several claw and scale keratins up-regulated. Additionally, transglutaminase 5 and differential splice variants of transglutaminase 4 are up-regulated along with S100-A10. Conclusions This study of global gene expression in the crop has expanded our knowledge of pigeon milk production, in particular, the mechanism of cornification and lipid production. It is a highly specialised process that utilises the normal keratinocyte cellular processes to produce a targeted nutrient solution for the young at a very high turnover. PMID:23497009

  2. Overproduction of the rbo gene product from Desulfovibrio species suppresses all deleterious effects of lack of superoxide dismutase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Pianzzola, M J; Soubes, M; Touati, D

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to isolate the superoxide dismutase (SOD) gene from the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfoarculus baarsii, a DNA fragment was isolated which functionally complemented an Escherichia coli mutant (sodA sodB) deficient in cytoplasmic SODs. This region carries two open reading frames with sequences which are very similar to that of the rbo-rub operon from Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Independent expression of the rbo and rub genes from ptac showed that expression of rbo was responsible for the observed phenotype. rbo overexpression suppressed all deleterious effects of SOD deficiency in E. coli, including inactivation by superoxide of enzymes containing 4Fe-4S clusters and DNA damage produced via the superoxide-enhanced Fenton reaction. Thus, rbo restored to the sodA sodB mutant the ability to grow on minimal medium without the addition of branched amino acids, and growth on gluconate and succinate carbon sources was no longer impaired. The spontaneous mutation rate, which is elevated in SOD-deficient mutants, returned to the wild-type level in the presence of Rbo, which also restored aerobic viability of sodA sodB recA mutants. Rbo from Desulfovibrio vulgaris, but not Desulfovibrio gigas desulforedoxin, which corresponds to the NH2-terminal domain of Rbo, complemented sod mutants. The physiological role of Rbo in sulfate-reducing bacteria is unknown. In E. coli, Rbo may permit the bacterium to avoid superoxide stress by maintaining functional (reduced) superoxide sensitive 4Fe-4S clusters. It would thereby restore enzyme activities and prevent the release of iron that occurs after cluster degradation and presumably leads to DNA damage. PMID:8955290

  3. Engineering Klebsiella oxytoca for efficient 2, 3-butanediol production through insertional inactivation of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiao-Jun; Huang, He; Zhu, Jian-Guo; Ren, Lu-Jing; Nie, Zhi-Kui; Du, Jun; Li, Shuang

    2010-02-01

    Ethanol was a major byproduct of 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) fermentation by Klebsiella oxytoca ME-UD-3. In order to achieve a high efficiency of 2,3-BD production, K. oxytoca mutants deficient in ethanol formation were successfully constructed by replace the aldA gene coding for aldehyde dehydrogenase with a tetracycline resistance cassette. The results suggested that inactivation of aldA led to a significantly improved 2,3-BD production. The carbon flux to 2,3-BD was enhanced by eliminating the byproducing ethanol and at the same time reducing the accumulation of another byproduct acetoin. At last, by fed-batch culturing of the mutant, the final 2,3-BD titer up to 130 g/l with the productivity of 1.63 g/l.h and the 2,3-BD yield relative to glucose of 0.48 g/g was obtained.

  4. Overexpression of polyphosphate kinase gene (ppk) increases bioinsecticide production by Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Doruk, Tugrul; Avican, Ummehan; Camci, Irem Yalim; Gedik, Sedef Tunca

    2013-05-06

    Polyphosphate (polyP), synthesized by polyP kinase (PPK) using the terminal phosphate of ATP as substrate, performs important functions in every living cell. The present work reports on the relationship between polyP metabolism and bioinsecticide production in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti). The ppk gene of Bti was cloned into vector pHT315 and the effect of its overexpression on endotoxin production was determined. Endotoxin production by the recombinant strain was found to be consistently higher than that by the wild type strain and the strain that carried the empty plasmid. The toxicity of the recombinant mutant strain (LC50 5.8±0.6ngml(-1)) against late 2nd instar Culex quinquefasciatus was about 7.7 times higher than that of Bti (LC50 44.9±7ngml(-1)). To our knowledge this is the first reported study which relates polyP metabolism with bioinsecticide biosynthesis.

  5. Structural analysis of RecA protein-DNA complexes by fluorescence-detected linear dichroism: absence of structural change of filament for pairing of complementary DNA strands.

    PubMed

    Morimatsu, Katsumi; Takahashi, Masayuki

    2006-11-15

    We have developed a simple measuring system for fluorescence-detected linear dichroism and applied it to the structural analysis of the RecA-DNA complex filaments, which are intermediates of the homologous recombination reaction. Taking advantage of the selectivity of fluorescence signals, we distinguished the linear dichroism signals of ethidium bromide and tryptophan residues in the RecA-DNA-ethidium bromide complex, whereas the conventional (absorption-detected) linear dichroism measurement provides only the sum of the signals because signals overlap each other and that of DNA. We further observed that the tryptophan residue at position 290 of RecA in the RecA-DNA-adenosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) complex was oriented parallel to the long axis of the filament, in good agreement with the previous site-specific linear dichroism analysis, and that this orientation was not significantly modified by the pairing of the complementary DNA strand. These results suggest that the pairing reaction occurs without a large structural change of the RecA filament.

  6. A plasmid-encoded UmuD homologue regulates expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa SOS genes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Magaña, Amada; Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; Chávez-Moctezuma, Martha P; López-Meza, Joel E; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Cervantes, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505 contains the umuDC operon that encodes proteins similar to error-prone repair DNA polymerase V. The umuC gene appears to be truncated and its product is probably not functional. The umuD gene, renamed umuDpR, possesses an SOS box overlapped with a Sigma factor 70 type promoter; accordingly, transcriptional fusions revealed that the umuDpR gene promoter is activated by mitomycin C. The predicted sequence of the UmuDpR protein displays 23 % identity with the Ps. aeruginosa SOS-response LexA repressor. The umuDpR gene caused increased MMC sensitivity when transferred to the Ps. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. As expected, PAO1-derived knockout lexA-  mutant PW6037 showed resistance to MMC; however, when the umuDpR gene was transferred to PW6037, MMC resistance level was reduced. These data suggested that UmuDpR represses the expression of SOS genes, as LexA does. To test whether UmuDpR exerts regulatory functions, expression of PAO1 SOS genes was evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative PCR assays in the lexA-  mutant with or without the pUC_umuD recombinant plasmid. Expression of lexA, imuA and recA genes increased 3.4-5.3 times in the lexA-  mutant, relative to transcription of the corresponding genes in the lexA+ strain, but decreased significantly in the lexA- /umuDpR transformant. These results confirmed that the UmuDpR protein is a repressor of Ps. aeruginosa SOS genes controlled by LexA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, however, did not show binding of UmuDpR to 5' regions of SOS genes, suggesting an indirect mechanism of regulation.

  7. Ubiquinone-10 production using Agrobacterium tumefaciens dps gene in Escherichia coli by coexpression system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Shrestha, Binaya; Li, Zhaopeng; Tan, Tianwei

    2007-01-01

    Ubiquinone (Coenzyme Q; abbreviation, UQ) acts as a mobile component of the respiratory chain by playing an essential role in the electron transport system, and has been widely used in pharmaceuticals. The biosynthesis of UQ involves 10 sequential reactions brought about by various enzymes. In this study we have cloned, expressed the decaprenyl diphosphate synthase, designated dps gene, from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and succeeded in detecting UQ-10 in addition to innate UQ-8 in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the production of UQ-10 was higher than UQ-8. To establish an efficient expression system for UQ- 10 production, we used genes, including ubiC, ubiA, and ubiG involved in UQ biosynthesis in E. coli, to construct a better co-expression system. The expression coupled by dps and ubiCA was effective for increasing UQ-10 production by five times than that by expressing single dps gene in the shake flask culture. To study for a large-scale production of UQ-10 in E. coli, fed-batch fermentations were implemented to achieve a high cell density culture. A cell concentration of 85.40 g/L and 94.58 g/L dry cell weight (DCW), and UQ-10 content of 50.29 mg/L and 45.86 mg/L was obtained after 32.5 h and 27.5 h of cultivation, subsequent to isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside and lactose induction, respectively. In addition, plasmid stability was maintained at high level throughout the fermentation.

  8. Expressing the sweet potato orange gene in transgenic potato improves drought tolerance and marketable tuber production.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Soo; Han, Eun-Heui; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Cho, Ji-Hong; Im, Ju-Seong; Hong, Su-Young; Sohn, Hwang-Bae; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is generally considered to be sensitive to drought stress. Even short periods of water shortage can result in reduced tuber production and quality. We previously reported that transgenic potato plants expressing the sweet potato orange gene (IbOr) under the control of the stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SOR plants) showed increased tolerance to methyl viologen-mediated oxidative stress and high salinity, along with increased carotenoid contents. In this study, in an effort to improve the productivity and environmental stress tolerance of potato, we subjected transgenic potato plants expressing IbOr to water-deficient conditions in the greenhouse. The SOR plants exhibited increased tolerance to drought stress under greenhouse conditions. IbOr expression was associated with slightly negative phenotypes, including reduced tuber production. Controlling IbOr expression imparted the same degree of drought tolerance while ameliorating these negative phenotypic effects, leading to levels of tuber production similar to or better than those of wild-type plants under drought stress conditions. In particular, under drought stress, drought tolerance and the production of marketable tubers (over 80g) were improved in transgenic plants compared with non-transgenic plants. These results suggest that expressing the IbOr transgene can lead to significant gains in drought tolerance and tuber production in potato, thereby improving these agronomically important traits. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Automated type specific ELISA probe detection of amplified NS3 gene products of dengue viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, V T; Yong, R Y; Ngoh, B L; Chan, Y C

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To apply an automated system of nucleic acid hybridisation coupled with the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the type specific detection of amplification products of dengue viruses. METHODS: Non-structural 3 (NS3) gene targets of reference strains of all four dengue and other flaviviruses, as well as dengue patient viraemic sera, were subjected to reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction using consensus and dengue type specific primers and digoxigenin-11-dUTP label incorporation. The amplification products were detected by biotinylated type specific primers which served as ELISA capture probes bound to streptavidin coated tubes. RESULTS: Significantly high spectrophotometric absorbance readings were obtained by hybridisation of the consensus and seminested amplification products of all four dengue viruses with their respective capture probes. In contrast, extremely low absorbances were observed for consensus products of Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever, and Kunjin viruses, which served as negative controls. These ELISA data correlated well with agarose gel electrophoresis of dengue type specific amplified products of diagnostic sizes. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of in vitro amplification and antibody based detection offers rapid, type specific, high throughput, and gel-free detection of amplified products of dengue viruses. Images PMID:9215155

  10. Novel diabetes mellitus treatment: mature canine insulin production by canine striated muscle through gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Niessen, S J M; Fernandez-Fuente, M; Mahmoud, A; Campbell, S C; Aldibbiat, A; Huggins, C; Brown, A E; Holder, A; Piercy, R J; Catchpole, B; Shaw, J A M; Church, D B

    2012-07-01

    Muscle-targeted gene therapy using insulin genes has the potential to provide an inexpensive, low maintenance alternative or adjunctive treatment method for canine diabetes mellitus. A canine skeletal muscle cell line was established through primary culture, as well as through transdifferentiation of canine fibroblasts after infection with a myo-differentiation gene containing adenovirus vector. A novel mutant furin-cleavable canine preproinsulin gene insert (cppI4) was designed and created through de novo gene synthesis. Various cell lines, including the generated canine muscle cell line, were transfected with nonviral plasmids containing cppI4. Insulin and desmin immunostaining were used to prove insulin production by muscle cells and specific canine insulin ELISA to prove mature insulin secretion into the medium. The canine myoblast cultures proved positive on desmin immunostaining. All cells tolerated transfection with cppI4-containing plasmid, and double immunostaining for insulin and desmin proved present in the canine cells. Canine insulin ELISA assessment of medium of cppI4-transfected murine myoblasts and canine myoblast and fibroblast mixture proved presence of mature fully processed canine insulin, 24 and 48 h after transfection. The present study provides proof of principle that canine muscle cells can be induced to produce and secrete canine insulin on transfection with nonviral plasmid DNA containing a novel mutant canine preproinsulin gene that produces furin-cleavable canine preproinsulin. This technology could be developed to provide an alternative canine diabetes mellitus treatment option or to provide a constant source for background insulin, as well as C-peptide, alongside current treatment options.

  11. Prevalence of ten putative virulence genes in the emerging foodborne pathogen Arcobacter isolated from food products.

    PubMed

    Girbau, Cecilia; Guerra, Cristian; Martínez-Malaxetxebarria, Irati; Alonso, Rodrigo; Fernández-Astorga, Aurora

    2015-12-01

    Arcobacter spp. are considered to be emerging food- and waterborne pathogens for both humans and animals. However, their virulence mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this study the presence of ten virulence genes (cadF, ciaB, cj1349, hecA, hecB, mviN, pldA, irgA, tlyA and iroE) was assessed in a set of 47 strains of Arcobacter butzleri, 10 of Arcobacter cryaerophilus and 1 Arcobacter skirrowii strain recovered from different food products (pork, chicken, beef, milk, clams and mussels). Overall, the genes cadF, ciaB, cj1349, mviN, pldA and tlyA were detected in all A. butzleri and A. skirrowii strains. Lower detection rates were observed for irgA, iroE, hecA and hecB. The genes hecB and iroE were detected neither in A. cryaerophilus nor in A. skirrowii. The genes hecA and irgA were not detected in A. skirrowii. It was noteworthy that the genes hecA and hecB were significantly (P < 0.05) highly detected in A. butzleri strains isolated from clams compared with strains isolated from milk and chicken. Therefore, our findings underline clams as a source of A. butzleri strains with high prevalence of putative virulence genes. This could be hazardous to human health, especially because these bivalves are usually consumed raw or undercooked.

  12. Silver Resistance Genes Are Overrepresented among Escherichia coli Isolates with CTX-M Production

    PubMed Central

    Edquist, Petra; Sandegren, Linus; Adler, Marlen; Tängdén, Thomas; Drobni, Mirva; Olsen, Björn; Melhus, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Enterobacteriaceae with extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) of the CTX-M type have disseminated rapidly in recent years and have become a threat to public health. In parallel with the CTX-M type expansion, the consumption and widespread use of silver-containing products has increased. To determine the carriage rates of silver resistance genes in different Escherichia coli populations, the presence of three silver resistance genes (silE, silP, and silS) and genes encoding CTX-M-, TEM-, and SHV-type enzymes were explored in E. coli isolates of human (n = 105) and avian (n = 111) origin. The antibiotic profiles were also determined. Isolates harboring CTX-M genes were further characterized, and phenotypic silver resistance was examined. The silE