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Sample records for receptor alpha delta

  1. Structure of alpha6 beta3 delta GABA(A) receptors and their lack of ethanol sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Baur, Roland; Kaur, Kuldeep H; Sigel, Erwin

    2009-12-01

    Delta (delta) subunit containing GABA(A) receptors are expressed extra-synaptically and mediate tonic inhibition. In cerebellar granule cells, they often form a receptor together with alpha(6) subunits. We were interested to determine the architecture of these receptors. We predefined the subunit arrangement of 24 different GABA(A) receptor pentamers by subunit concatenation. These receptors (composed of alpha(6), beta(3) and delta subunits) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and their electrophysiological properties analyzed. Currents elicited in response to GABA were determined in presence and absence of 3alpha, 21-dihydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one and to 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]-pyridin-3-ol. alpha(6)-beta(3)-alpha(6)/delta receptors showed a substantial response to GABA alone. Three receptors, beta(3)-alpha(6)-delta/alpha(6)-beta(3), alpha(6)-beta(3)-alpha(6)/beta(3)-delta and beta(3)-delta-beta(3)/alpha(6)-beta(3), were only uncovered in the combined presence of the neurosteroid 3alpha, 21-dihydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one with GABA. All four receptors were activated by 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]-pyridin-3-ol. None of the functional receptors was modulated by physiological concentrations (up to 30 mM) of ethanol. GABA concentration response curves indicated that the delta subunit can contribute to the formation of an agonist site. We conclude from the investigated receptors that the delta subunit can assume multiple positions in a receptor pentamer composed of alpha(6), beta(3) and delta subunits.

  2. A delta T-cell receptor deleting element transgenic reporter construct is rearranged in alpha beta but not gamma delta T-cell lineages.

    PubMed Central

    Shutter, J; Cain, J A; Ledbetter, S; Rogers, M D; Hockett, R D

    1995-01-01

    T cells can be divided into two groups on the basis of the expression of either alpha beta or gamma delta T-cell receptors (TCRs). Because the TCR delta chain locus lies within the larger TCR alpha chain locus, control of the utilization of these two receptors is important in T-cell development, specifically for determination of T-cell type: rearrangement of the alpha locus results in deletion of the delta coding segments and commitment to the alpha beta lineage. In the developing thymus, a relative site-specific recombination occurs by which the TCR delta chain gene segments are deleted. This deletion removes all D delta, J delta, and C delta genes and occurs on both alleles. This delta deletional mechanism is evolutionarily conserved between mice and humans. Transgenic mice which contain the human delta deleting elements and as much internal TCR delta chain coding sequence as possible without allowing the formation of a complete delta chain gene were developed. Several transgenic lines showing recombinations between deleting elements within the transgene were developed. These lines demonstrate that utilization of the delta deleting elements occurs in alpha beta T cells of the spleen and thymus. These recombinations are rare in the gamma delta population, indicating that the machinery for utilization of delta deleting elements is functional in alpha beta T cells but absent in gamma delta T cells. Furthermore, a discrete population of early thymocytes containing delta deleting element recombinations but not V alpha-to-J alpha rearrangements has been identified. These data are consistent with a model in which delta deletion contributes to the implementation of a signal by which the TCR alpha chain locus is rearranged and expressed and thus becomes an alpha beta T cell. PMID:8524269

  3. Reversal of neurosteroid effects at alpha4beta2delta GABAA receptors triggers anxiety at puberty.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Gong, Qi Hua; Aoki, Chiye; Yuan, Maoli; Ruderman, Yevgeniy; Dattilo, Michael; Williams, Keith; Smith, Sheryl S

    2007-04-01

    Puberty is characterized by mood swings and anxiety, which are often produced by stress. Here we show that THP (allopregnanolone), a steroid that is released as a result of stress, increases anxiety in pubertal female mice, in contrast to its anxiety-reducing effect in adults. Anxiety is regulated by GABAergic inhibition in limbic circuits. Although this inhibition is increased by THP administration before puberty and in adults, during puberty THP reduces the tonic inhibition of pyramidal cells in hippocampal region CA1, leading to increased excitability. This paradoxical effect of THP results from inhibition of alpha4betadelta GABAA receptors. These receptors are normally expressed at very low levels, but at puberty, their expression is increased in hippocampal area CA1, where they generate outward currents. THP also decreases the outward current at recombinant alpha4beta2delta receptors, and this effect depends on arginine 353 in the alpha4 subunit, a putative site for modulation by Cl-. Therefore, inhibition of alpha4beta2delta GABAA receptors by THP provides a mechanism for the generation of anxiety at puberty.

  4. Production of interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha by human T-cell clones expressing different forms of the gamma delta receptor.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Meager, A

    1990-12-01

    Panels of human T-cell clones bearing the gamma delta T-cell receptor (TcR) were obtained from peripheral blood and decidual tissue and maintained in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). TcR V gamma and V delta gene expression was determined in 40 TcR delta 1+ clones using the gamma delta T-cell subset markers Ti gamma A and delta TCS1, in conjunction with Southern blot analysis using TcR J gamma and J delta probes. gamma delta T-cell clones, together with control alpha beta T-cell clones derived from the same lymphocyte populations, were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and their ability to produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) tested using specific ELISA. Many clones representative of the major peripheral V gamma 9/V delta 2J1 subset produced high amounts of both cytokines and mean levels were not significantly different from those produced by alpha beta T-cell clones. Panels of clones expressing V gamma 9 and V delta 2J1 produced significantly higher levels of TNF-alpha than clones not expressing V delta 2J1 and those expressing V delta 1J1. There was no relationship between levels of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha produced by individual gamma delta T-cell clones and also no relationship between their non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic activity and levels of either cytokine. There was a significant tendency for gamma delta T-cell clones to produce more TNF-alpha than IFN-gamma in comparison to alpha beta T-cell clones. The significance of these findings is discussed in the light of the reported differences in distribution in vivo of V delta 1J1+ and V delta 2J1+ cells.

  5. Etomidate, propofol and the neurosteroid THDOC increase the GABA efficacy of recombinant alpha4beta3delta and alpha4beta3 GABA A receptors expressed in HEK cells.

    PubMed

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W; Otis, Thomas S; Wallner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    General anesthetics, once thought to exert their effects through non-specific membrane effects, have highly specific ion channel targets that can silence neuronal populations in the nervous system, thereby causing unconsciousness and immobility, characteristic of general anesthesia. Inhibitory GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs), particularly highly GABA-sensitive extrasynaptic receptor subtypes that give rise to sustained inhibitory currents, are uniquely sensitive to GABA(A)R-active anesthetics. A prominent population of extrasynaptic GABA(A)Rs is made up of alpha4, beta2 or beta3, and delta subunits. Considering the demonstrated importance of GABA receptor beta3 subunits for in vivo anesthetic effects of etomidate and propofol, we decided to investigate the effects of GABA anesthetics on "extrasynaptic" alpha4beta3delta and also binary alpha4beta3 receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Consistent with previous work on similar receptor subtypes we show that maximal GABA currents through "extrasynaptic" alpha4beta3delta receptors, receptors defined by sensitivity to EtOH (30mM) and the beta-carboline beta-CCE (1microM), are enhanced by the GABA(A)R-active anesthetics etomidate, propofol, and the neurosteroid anesthetic THDOC. Furthermore, we show that receptors formed by alpha4beta3 subunits alone also show high GABA sensitivity and that saturating GABA responses of alpha4beta3 receptors are increased to the same extent by etomidate, propofol, and THDOC as are alpha4beta3delta receptors. Therefore, both alpha4beta3 and alpha4beta3delta receptors show low GABA efficacy, and GABA is also a partial agonist on certain binary alphabeta receptor subtypes. Increasing GABA efficacy on alpha4/6beta3delta and alpha4beta3 receptors is likely to make an important contribution to the anesthetic effects of etomidate, propofol and the neurosteroid THDOC.

  6. Structure of the T-cell receptor in a Ti alpha beta, Ti gamma delta double positive T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, J; Geisler, C

    1993-02-01

    The multichain T-cell receptor is composed of at least six different polypeptide chains. The clonotypic Ti heterodimer (Ti alpha beta or Ti gamma delta) is non-covalently associated with the CD3 chains (CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta). The exact number of subunits constituting the T-cell receptor is still not known. It has been suggested that each T-cell receptor contains two Ti dimers. To gain insight into the structure of the T-cell receptor we constructed a Ti alpha beta, Ti gamma delta double positive T-cell line which contained four functional Ti chains (Ti alpha, beta, gamma, and delta). The data demonstrated an absence of Ti dimers containing mixtures of chains other than the typical Ti alpha beta and Ti gamma delta combinations. Furthermore, by co-modulation experiments we demonstrated that the Ti alpha beta and the Ti gamma delta dimers were not expressed in the same T-cell receptor. Our data indicate that the T-cell receptor does not contain two Ti dimers.

  7. Agonist-dependent single channel current and gating in alpha4beta2delta and alpha1beta2gamma2S GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Angelo; Harrison, Neil L

    2008-02-01

    The family of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs) mediates two types of inhibition in the mammalian brain. Phasic inhibition is mediated by synaptic GABA(A)Rs that are mainly comprised of alpha(1), beta(2), and gamma(2) subunits, whereas tonic inhibition is mediated by extrasynaptic GABA(A)Rs comprised of alpha(4/6), beta(2), and delta subunits. We investigated the activation properties of recombinant alpha(4)beta(2)delta and alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs in response to GABA and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3(2H)-one (THIP) using electrophysiological recordings from outside-out membrane patches. Rapid agonist application experiments indicated that THIP produced faster opening rates at alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs (beta approximately 1600 s(-1)) than at alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs (beta approximately 460 s(-1)), whereas GABA activated alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs more rapidly (beta approximately 1800 s(-1)) than alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs (beta < 440 s(-1)). Single channel recordings of alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) and alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs showed that both channels open to a main conductance state of approximately 25 pS at -70 mV when activated by GABA and low concentrations of THIP, whereas saturating concentrations of THIP elicited approximately 36 pS openings at both channels. Saturating concentrations of GABA elicited brief (<10 ms) openings with low intraburst open probability (P(O) approximately 0.3) at alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs and at least two "modes" of single channel bursting activity, lasting approximately 100 ms at alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA(A)Rs. The most prevalent bursting mode had a P(O) of approximately 0.7 and was described by a reaction scheme with three open and three shut states, whereas the "high" P(O) mode ( approximately 0.9) was characterized by two shut and three open states. Single channel activity elicited by THIP in alpha(4)beta(2)delta and alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S) GABA

  8. Stoichiometry of expressed alpha(4)beta(2)delta gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors depends on the ratio of subunit cDNA transfected.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Kelly R; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2010-05-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) is the target of many depressants, including benzodiazepines, anesthetics, and alcohol. Although the highly prevalent alphabetagamma GABA(A)R subtype mediates the majority of fast synaptic inhibition in the brain, receptors containing delta subunits also play a key role, mediating tonic inhibition and the actions of endogenous neurosteroids and alcohol. However, the fundamental properties of delta-containing GABA(A)Rs, such as subunit stoichiometry, are not well established. To determine subunit stoichiometry of expressed delta-containing GABA(A)Rs, we inserted the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site tag in the alpha(4), beta(2), and delta subunit N termini. An enhanced green fluorescent protein tag was also inserted into the beta(2) subunit to shift its molecular weight, allowing us to separate subunits using SDS-PAGE. Tagged alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs were expressed in HEK293T cells using various ratios of subunit cDNA, and receptor subunit stoichiometry was determined by quantitating fluorescent alpha-bungarotoxin bound to each subunit on Western blots of surface immunopurified tagged GABA(A)Rs. The results demonstrate that the subunit stoichiometry of alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs is regulated by the ratio of subunit cDNAs transfected. Increasing the ratio of delta subunit cDNA transfected increased delta subunit incorporation into surface receptors with a concomitant decrease in beta(2) subunit incorporation. Because receptor subunit stoichiometry can directly influence GABA(A)R pharmacological and functional properties, considering how the transfection protocols used affect subunit stoichiometry is essential when studying heterologously expressed alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs. Successful bungarotoxin binding site tagging of GABA(A)R subunits is a novel tool with which to accurately quantitate subunit stoichiometry and will be useful for monitoring GABA(A)R trafficking in live cells.

  9. 3-(alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-hydroxybenzyl)-N-alkyl-N-arylbenzamides: potent, non-peptidic agonists of both the micro and delta opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Michael J; Garrido, Dulce M; Boswell, G Evan; Collins, Mark A; Harris, Philip A; McNutt, Robert W; O'Neill, Scott J; Wei, Ke; Chang, Kwen-Jen

    2003-02-13

    Opioid analgesics with both micro and delta opioid receptor activation represent a new approach to the treatment of severe pain with an improved safety profile. Compounds with this profile may exhibit strong analgesic properties due to micro agonism, with a reduced side effect profile resulting from delta agonism. Replacing the p-diethylamide of the known potent delta opioid receptor selective agonist BW373U86 with a m-diethylamide resulted in a compound with agonist activity at both the micro and delta opioid receptors. Modifying the amide to an N-methyl-N-phenylamide increased agonist potency at both receptors. A series of 3-(alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-hydroxybenzyl)-N-alkyl-N-arylbenzamides have been made to explore the structure-activity relationship (SAR) around the N-methyl-N-phenylamide. Several potent agonists of both the micro and delta opioid receptors have been identified, including (+)-3-((alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-hydroxybenzyl)-N-(4-fluorophenyl)-N-methylbenzamide (23), which has EC50 values of 0.67 and 1.1 nM at the micro (guinea pig ileum assay) and delta (mouse vas deferens assay) opioid receptors, respectively.

  10. Organization, structure, and function of 95 kb of DNA spanning the murine T-cell receptor C alpha/C delta region.

    PubMed

    Koop, B F; Wilson, R K; Wang, K; Vernooij, B; Zallwer, D; Kuo, C L; Seto, D; Toda, M; Hood, L

    1992-08-01

    We have analyzed the organization, structure, and function of the murine T-cell receptor C alpha/C delta region. This region spans 94.6 kb of DNA and contains the C alpha and C delta genes, as well as the V delta 5, J delta 2, and 50 different J alpha gene segments. Within this sequence we have identified 15 new J alpha gene segments, 40 new 5' RNA splice signals, and 40 new DNA rearrangement signals for the J alpha gene segments. The murine C alpha/C delta sequence contains an exceptionally high level of coding sequence with over 5.7% of the total sequence found in the exons. This is much more than that found in the beta-globin locus and the HPRT locus. Using the sequence data obtained from the C alpha/C delta region, we have designed simple assays to test for J alpha gene segment transcription and to determine the level of polymorphism for simple repeat sequences among different inbred strains of mice using the polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, comparisons of this 95 kb of sequence with the available sequence from homologous regions of other species have led to the identification of a highly conserved sequence that is present throughout vertebrates and in the mouse binds lymphocyte-specific nuclear proteins. Comparisons of a 10-kb region, which includes the C alpha gene in human and mouse, average 66% sequence similarity. These studies support the contention that large-scale DNA sequencing projects of homologous regions of mouse and human will provide powerful new tools for studying the biology and evolution of loci such as the T-cell receptor and for identifying and posing new questions about the functions of conserved sequences.

  11. Expression of the alpha/beta and gamma/delta T-cell receptors in 57 cases of peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Identification of a subset of gamma/delta T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Gaulard, P.; Bourquelot, P.; Kanavaros, P.; Haioun, C.; Le Couedic, J. P.; Divine, M.; Goossens, M.; Zafrani, E. S.; Farcet, J. P.; Reyes, F.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-seven cases of peripheral T-cell lymphoma were studied for cell expression of the T-cell receptor (TCR) chains, using monoclonal antibodies specific for the beta chain (beta F1) of the alpha/beta TCR, and for the delta chain (anti-TCR delta-1) of the gamma/delta TCR. Three different patterns were demonstrated: in 39 cases (69%), the phenotype (CD3+beta F1+TCR delta-1-) was that of most normal T cells. A second pattern was found on six cases (10%), which were of CD3+beta F1-TCR delta-1+ phenotype, and in which DNA analysis showed a clonal rearrangement of the delta locus in the five cases studied. It is suggested that these cases are the neoplastic counterpart of the small subpopulation of normal T cells that express gamma delta receptor. It is of considerable interest that these gamma delta lymphomas had unusual clinicopathologic presentations, as one case corresponded to a lethal midline granuloma and the five others to hepatosplenic lymphomas with a sinusal/sinusoidal infiltration in spleen, marrow, and liver. The fact that the distribution of the neoplastic gamma delta cells in the splenic red pulp resembles that of normal gamma delta cells reinforces the concept of a preferential homing of gamma delta T cells to this tissue. A third pattern (CD3 +/- beta F1-TCR delta-1-) was seen in 12 cases (21%), in which, by contrast to normal post-thymic T cells, no evidence of either alpha beta or gamma delta T cell receptor was found. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1698028

  12. Use of the V delta 1 variable region in the functional T-cell receptor alpha chain of a WT31+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone which specifically recognizes HLA-A2 molecule.

    PubMed

    Castelli, C; Mazzocchi, A; Salvi, S; Anichini, A; Sensi, M

    1992-04-01

    We report here the molecular characterization of the T-cell receptor (TCR) expressed by a human HLA-A2 specific cytotoxic T-cell clone named CTL 49. Flow cytometry analysis with a panel of anti-TCR antibodies revealed an OKT3+, WT31+, A13+, BB3-, TCR delta-, delta TCS1-, TCR gamma/delta 1-, OKT4-, and OKT8+ phenotype, suggesting that, in CTL 49, the V delta 1-encoded A13 epitope could be included in its alpha beta TCR. Northern blot analysis confirmed the presence of C alpha, C beta and V delta 1 specific transcripts while no hybridization signal was detected by a C delta specific probe. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the first strand cDNA from CTL 49 with TCR-specific primers and sequence analysis revealed that V delta 1 region is productively rearranged to J alpha and to C alpha regions. This alpha chain pairs with a beta chain composed of V beta 13.2/D beta/J beta 2.3/C beta 2 leading to the expression of a functional TCR complex. These results, in addition to providing further evidence for the sharing of V delta 1 by alpha/beta and gamma/delta TCR, indicate that an alpha/beta T-cell receptor which includes the V delta 1 variable region can be involved in alloreactive recognition. PMID:1313600

  13. Association between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha, delta, and gamma polymorphisms and risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yufeng; Li, Peiwei; Zhang, Jinjie; Shi, Yu; Chen, Kun; Yang, Jun; Wu, Yihua; Ye, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) has been suggested to be associated with polymorphisms of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), while the results were controversial. We aimed to systematically assess the association between PPAR polymorphisms and CHD risk. Methods: A case–control study with 446 subjects was conducted to evaluate the association between CHD risk and C161T polymorphism, which was of our special interest as this polymorphism showed different effects on risks of CHD and acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Meta-analyses were conducted to assess all PPAR polymorphisms. Either a fixed- or a random-effects model was adopted to estimate overall odds ratios (ORs). Results: In the case–control study, T allele carriers of C161T polymorphism were not significantly associated with CHD risk (Odds ratio (OR) = 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47–1.15, P = 0.19), while T allele carriers showed higher risk of ACS (OR = 1.63, 95% CI 1.00–2.65, P = 0.048). The meta-analysis indicated that compared with CC homozygous, T allele carriers had lower CHD risk (OR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.59–0.82, P < 0.001) but higher ACS risk (OR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.09–1.87, P = 0.010). Three other polymorphisms were also found to be significantly associated with CHD risk under dominant model: PPAR-alpha intron 7G/C polymorphism (CC+GC vs GG, OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.13–1.78, P = 0.003), L162V polymorphism (VV+LV vs LL, OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.56–0.97, P = 0.031), and PPAR-delta +294T/C polymorphism (CC+TC vs TT, OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.12–2.05, P = 0.007). Conclusions: The results suggested that PPAR-alpha intron 7G/C and L162V, PPAR-delta +294T/C and PPAR-gamma C161T polymorphisms could affect CHD susceptibility, and C161T polymorphism might have different effects on CHD and ACS. PMID:27512842

  14. Characterization of thymus-derived lymphocytes expressing Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta, Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon eta-eta or Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta/zeta- eta antigen receptor isoforms: analysis by gene transfection

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the function of the CD3 eta subunit of the T cell receptor (TCR), we have used cDNAs encoding CD3 zeta, CD3 eta, or both to reconstitute a variant of a cytochrome c-specific, I-Ek-restricted murine T cell hybridoma, termed MA5.8, which lacks CD3 zeta and CD3 eta proteins. We provide direct evidence that assembly and surface expression of TCRs can be mediated by either of these subunits separately or together. However, the level of TCR expression on zeta transfectants is up to one order of magnitude greater than that on eta transfectants, implying that CD3 eta is weakly associated with the pentameric Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon complex and/or inefficient at salvaging the incomplete TCR from lysosomal degradation. As a component of the TCR, the CD3 eta subunit preferentially forms a heterodimer with CD3 zeta, but is also able to form a CD3 eta-eta homodimer. Crosslinking of Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta- zeta, Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon eta-eta, or Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta/zeta-eta TCR isotypes with anti-CD3 epsilon monoclonal antibody or a cytochrome c peptide epitope on I-Ek antigen-presenting cells mediates signal transduction resulting in reversible cell-cycle arrest of transfected clones. Given the potential for diversity of signals generated by these functional TCR isotypes and the expression of the CD3 eta gene product in the thymus, CD3 eta is likely to play a role in selection and/or activation of thymocytes during development. PMID:2145389

  15. Assessment of the nucleotide sequence variability in the bovine T-cell receptor alpha delta joining gene region.

    PubMed

    Fries, R; Ewald, D; Thaller, G; Buitkamp, J

    2001-05-01

    The sequence of 2,193 nucleotides from the bovine T-cell receptor alpha/delta joining gene region (TCRADJ) was determined and compared with the corresponding human and murine sequences. The identity was 75.3% for the comparison of the Bos taurus vs. the Homo sapiens sequence and 63.8% for the Bos taurus vs. the Mus musculus sequence. This comparison permitted the identification of the putatively functional elements within the bovine sequence. Direct sequencing of 2,110 nucleotides in nine animals revealed 12 variable sites. Estimates, based on direct sequencing in three Holstein Friesian animals, for the two measures of sequence variability, nucleotide polymorphism (u) and nucleotide diversity (p), were 0.00050 (60.00036) and 0.00077 (60.00056), respectively. The test statistic, Tajima's D, for the comparison of the two measures indicates that the difference between u and p is close to significance (P < 0.05), suggesting the possibility of selective forces acting on the studied genomic region. Allelic variation at 5 of the 12 variable sites was analysed in 359 animals (48 Anatolian Black, 56 Braunvieh, 115 Fleckvieh, 47 Holstein Friesian, 50 Simmental and 43 Pinzgauer) using the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) in combination with the enzyme linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA). Nine unambiguous haplotypes could be derived based on animals with a maximum of one heterozygous site. Four to seven haplotypes were present in the different breeds. When taking into account the frequencies of the haplotypes in the different breeds, especially in Anatolian Black, an ancestral cattle population, we could establish the likely phylogenetic relationships of the haplotypes. Such haplotype trees are the basis for cladistic candidate gene analysis. Our study demonstrates that the systematic search of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is useful for analysing all aspects of variability of a given genomic region.

  16. Sequential appearance of T-cell receptor gamma delta- and alpha beta-bearing intestinal intra-epithelial lymphocytes in mice after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshikai, Y; Ishida, A; Murosaki, S; Ando, T; Nomoto, K

    1991-12-01

    We have previously reported that T-cell receptor (TcR) gamma delta-bearing T cells precede TcR alpha beta-bearing T cells in appearance in the thymus after whole-body irradiation. In the present study, the kinetics of appearance of intestinal intra-epithelial lymphocytes (IEL) was examined in mice after whole-body irradiation with a lethal dose of 9.5 Gy or with a sublethal dose of 6 Gy. The number of CD3+ IEL decreased to the lowest value 4 days after irradiation with 9.5 Gy, and thereafter increased to half as many as the normal level by day 7. Thy-1+TcR alpha beta- IEL and Thy-TcR alpha beta- IEL recovered considerably by day 7 after the irradiation, whereas Thy-1+TcR alpha beta+ IEL and Thy-1+TcR alpha beta+ IEL hardly recovered at this stage. All mice died within 12 days after irradiation with a lethal dose of 9.5 Gy. On the other hand, when irradiation dose was decreased to 6 Gy, all mice survived beyond 40 days after irradiation. The number of CD3+ IEL recovered to the normal level by 10 days after irradiation with 6 Gy. Consistently with the results in mice irradiated with a lethal dose, the first cells to increase in IEL of mice irradiated with a sublethal dose were TcR gamma delta+ IEL expressing Thy-1 antigen. The number of Thy-1+TcR gamma delta+ IEL increased to approximately two-fold as many as that in normal mice by day 10, while TcR alpha beta+ IEL began to increase in number from day 20 after irradiation and recovered to the normal level by day 40 after irradiation. Thus, sequential appearance of TcR gamma delta+ and TcR alpha beta+ IEL was evident after irradiation, similar to that seen in the thymus after irradiation. The IEL on day 10 after a sublethal irradiation, which is composed mainly of Thy-1+TcR gamma delta+ IEL, exhibited a strong cytolytic activity against P815 in the presence of anti-CD3 mAb, suggesting that the early appearing Thy-1+TcR gamma delta+ IEL may play important roles in epithelial immunity at an early stage after irradiation.

  17. The dominant negative thyroid hormone receptor beta-mutant delta337T alters PPAR-alpha signaling in heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PPARalpha and TR independently regulate cardiac metabolism. Although ligands for both these receptors are currently under evaluation for treatment of congestive heart failure, their interactions or signaling cooperation have not been investigated in heart. We tested the hypothesis that cardiac TRs i...

  18. Enhanced neurosteroid potentiation of ternary GABA(A) receptors containing the delta subunit.

    PubMed

    Wohlfarth, Kai M; Bianchi, Matt T; Macdonald, Robert L

    2002-03-01

    Attenuated behavioral sensitivity to neurosteroids has been reported for mice deficient in the GABA(A) receptor delta subunit. We therefore investigated potential subunit-specific neurosteroid pharmacology of the following GABA(A) receptor isoforms in a transient expression system: alpha1beta3gamma2L, alpha1beta3delta, alpha6beta3gamma2L, and alpha6beta3delta. Potentiation of submaximal GABA(A) receptor currents by the neurosteroid tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC) was greatest for the alpha1beta3delta isoform. Whole-cell GABA concentration--response curves performed with and without low concentrations (30 nm) of THDOC revealed enhanced peak GABA(A) receptor currents for isoforms tested without affecting the GABA EC50. Alpha1beta3delta currents were enhanced the most (>150%), whereas the other isoform currents were enhanced 15-50%. At a higher concentration (1 microm), THDOC decreased peak alpha1beta3gamma2L receptor current amplitude evoked by GABA (1 mm) concentration jumps and prolonged deactivation but had little effect on the rate or extent of apparent desensitization. Thus the polarity of THDOC modulation depended on GABA concentration for alpha1beta3gamma2L GABA(A) receptors. However, the same protocol applied to alpha1beta3delta receptors resulted in peak current enhancement by THDOC of >800% and prolonged deactivation. Interestingly, THDOC induced pronounced desensitization in the minimally desensitizing alpha1beta3delta receptors. Single channel recordings obtained from alpha1beta3delta receptors indicated that THDOC increased the channel opening duration, including the introduction of an additional longer duration open state. Our results suggest that the GABA(A) receptor delta subunit confers increased sensitivity to neurosteroid modulation and that the intrinsic gating and desensitization kinetics of alpha1beta3delta GABA(A) receptors are altered by THDOC.

  19. Genomic organization of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) T cell receptor alpha/delta locus and analysis of expressed products.

    PubMed

    Seelye, Stacie L; Chen, Patricia L; Deiss, Thaddeus C; Criscitiello, Michael F

    2016-05-01

    In testing the hypothesis that all jawed vertebrate classes employ immunoglobulin heavy chain V (IgHV) gene segments in their T cell receptor (TCR)δ encoding loci, we found that some basic characterization was required of zebrafish TCRδ. We began by annotating and characterizing the TCRα/δ locus of Danio rerio based on the most recent genome assembly, GRCz10. We identified a total of 141 theoretically functional V segments which we grouped into 41 families based upon 70 % nucleotide identity. This number represents the second greatest count of apparently functional V genes thus far described in an antigen receptor locus with the exception of cattle TCRα/δ. Cloning, relative quantitative PCR, and deep sequencing results corroborate that zebrafish do express TCRδ, but these data suggest only at extremely low levels and in limited diversity in the spleens of the adult fish. While we found no evidence for IgH-TCRδ rearrangements in this fish, by determining the locus organization we were able to suggest how the evolution of the teleost α/δ locus could have lost IgHVs that exist in sharks and frogs. We also found evidence of surprisingly low TCRδ expression and repertoire diversity in this species. PMID:26809968

  20. The dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/delta agonist GFT505 exerts anti-diabetic effects in db/db mice without peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-associated adverse cardiac effects.

    PubMed

    Hanf, Rémy; Millatt, Lesley J; Cariou, Bertrand; Noel, Benoit; Rigou, Géraldine; Delataille, Philippe; Daix, Valérie; Hum, Dean W; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    We report here the efficacy and safety of GFT505, a novel liver-targeted peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/delta (PPARα/δ) agonist, in the db/db mouse model of diabetes. Mice were treated with vehicle, GFT505, PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone or dual-PPARα/γ agonist aleglitazar for up to 8 weeks. All compounds comparably reduced fasting glycaemia and HbA1c and improved insulin sensitivity. The glucose-lowering effect of GFT505 was associated with decreased hepatic gluconeogenesis, correlating with reduced expression of gluconeogenic genes. In contrast with the PPARγ-activating drugs, treatment with GFT505 did not affect heart weight and did not increase plasma adiponectin concentrations. This absence of cardiac effects of GFT505 was confirmed after 12 months of administration in cynomolgus monkeys, by the absence of echocardiographic and histological findings. Moreover, long-term GFT505 administration to monkeys induced no change in haematological parameters or in bone marrow differential cell counts. Compared to PPARγ-activating drugs, the dual-PPARα/δ agonist GFT505 therefore shows an improved benefit/risk ratio, treating multiple features of type 2 diabetes without inducing the cardiac side-effects associated with PPARγ activation.

  1. Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor delta gene in peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kanavaros, P; Farcet, J P; Gaulard, P; Haioun, C; Divine, M; Le Couedic, J P; Lefranc, M P; Reyes, F

    1991-01-01

    Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) delta-chain gene were studied in 37 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) and related to their clinical presentation and the expression of the alpha beta or gamma delta heterodimers as determined by immunostaining of frozen tissue samples. There were 22 cases of alpha beta, 5 cases of gamma delta, and 10 cases of silent TCR expressing neither the alpha beta nor gamma delta TCR. 5 different probes were used to examine the delta locus. The 22 cases of alpha beta PTCL displayed biallelic and monoallelic deletions; a monoallelic V delta 1 J delta 1 rearrangement was observed in 1 case and a monoallelic germ line configuration in 7 cases. The 5 cases of gamma delta PTCL displayed biallelic rearrangements: the productive rearrangements could be ascribed to V delta 1J delta 1 joining in 3 cases and VJ delta 1 joining in 2 cases according to the combined pattern of DNA hybridization with the appropriate probes and of cell reactivity with the TCR delta-1, delta TCS-1, and anti-V delta 2 monoclonal antibodies. In the VJ delta 1 joining, the rearranged V segments were located between V delta 1 and V delta 2. Interestingly, in the third group of 10 cases of silent PTCL, 5 cases were found to have a TCR gene configuration identical to that in the TCR alpha beta PTCL, as demonstrated by biallelic delta gene deletion. These 5 cases were CD3 positive. The 5 remaining cases showed a monoallelic delta gene rearrangement with a monoallelic germ line configuration in 4 and a monoallelic deletion in 1. Four of these cases were CD3 negative, which was consistent with an immature genotype the TCR commitent of which could not be ascertained. Finally, TCR gamma delta PTCL consisted of a distinct clinical morphological and molecular entity whereas TCR alpha beta and silent PTCL had a similar presentation. Images PMID:1991851

  2. T cell receptor gamma gene status of human alpha/beta+ and gamma/delta+ T cell clones: absence of V9JP rearrangements in alpha/beta+ clones is not a result of a lack of rearrangements involving more 5' J gamma segments.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E

    1989-11-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) gamma gene rearrangements were examined in panels of human T cell clones expressing TCR alpha/beta or gamma/delta heterodimers. Over half of the alpha/beta+ clones had both chromosomes rearranged to C gamma 2 but this was the case for only 20% of the gamma/delta+ clones. While more than half of the gamma/delta+ clones showed a V9JP rearrangement, this configuration was absent from all 49 alpha/beta+ clones analysed. However, this was not a result of all rearrangements being to the more 3' J gamma genes as 11 alpha/beta+ clones had rearrangement(s) to JP1, the most 5' J gamma gene segment. Both alpha/beta+ and gamma/delta+ clones showed a similar pattern of V gamma gene usage in rearrangements to J gamma 1 or J gamma 2 with a lower proportion of the more 3' genes being rearranged to J gamma 2 than for the more 5' genes. Several alpha/beta+ and several gamma/delta+ clones had noncoordinate patterns of rearrangement involving both C gamma 1 and C gamma 2. Eleven out of fourteen CD8+ clones tested had both chromosomes rearranged to C gamma 2 whereas all clones derived from CD4-8- cells and having unconventional phenotypes (CD4-8- or CD4+8+) had at least one C gamma 1 rearrangement. Twelve out of twenty-seven CD4+ clones also had this pattern, suggesting that CD4-8+ clones had a tendency to utilize more 3' J gamma gene segments than CD4+ clones. There was some evidence for interdonor variation in the proportions of TCR gamma rearrangements to C gamma 1 or C gamma 2 in alpha/beta+ clones as well as gamma/delta+ clones. The results illustrate the unique nature of the V9JP rearrangement in gamma/delta+ clones and the possible use of a sequential mechanism of TCR gamma gene rearrangements during T cell differentiation is discussed.

  3. Differentiation of Boc-protected alpha,delta-/delta,alpha- and beta,delta-/delta,beta-hybrid peptide positional isomers by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Raju, G; Ramesh, V; Srinivas, R; Sharma, G V M; Shoban Babu, B

    2010-06-01

    Two new series of Boc-N-alpha,delta-/delta,alpha- and beta,delta-/delta,beta-hybrid peptides containing repeats of L-Ala-delta(5)-Caa/delta(5)-Caa-L-Ala and beta(3)-Caa-delta(5)-Caa/delta(5)-Caa-beta(3)-Caa (L-Ala = L-alanine, Caa = C-linked carbo amino acid derived from D-xylose) have been differentiated by both positive and negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS(n) spectra of protonated isomeric peptides produce characteristic fragmentation involving the peptide backbone, the Boc-group, and the side chain. The dipeptide positional isomers are differentiated by the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the protonated peptides. The loss of 2-methylprop-1-ene is more pronounced for Boc-NH-L-Ala-delta-Caa-OCH(3) (1), whereas it is totally absent for its positional isomer Boc-NH-delta-Caa-L-Ala-OCH(3) (7), instead it shows significant loss of t-butanol. On the other hand, second isomeric pair shows significant loss of t-butanol and loss of acetone for Boc-NH-delta-Caa-beta-Caa-OCH(3) (18), whereas these are insignificant for its positional isomer Boc-NH-beta-Caa-delta-Caa-OCH(3) (13). The tetra- and hexapeptide positional isomers also show significant differences in MS(2) and MS(3) CID spectra. It is observed that 'b' ions are abundant when oxazolone structures are formed through five-membered cyclic transition state and cyclization process for larger 'b' ions led to its insignificant abundance. However, b(1)(+) ion is formed in case of delta,alpha-dipeptide that may have a six-membered substituted piperidone ion structure. Furthermore, ESI negative ion MS/MS has also been found to be useful for differentiating these isomeric peptide acids. Thus, the results of MS/MS of pairs of di-, tetra-, and hexapeptide positional isomers provide peptide sequencing information and distinguish the positional isomers.

  4. Rearrangement by inversion of a T-cell receptor delta variable region gene located 3' of the delta constant region gene.

    PubMed Central

    Korman, A J; Maruyama, J; Raulet, D H

    1989-01-01

    We have located a T-cell receptor variable (V) delta gene segment immediately 3' of the delta constant (C) region gene and 5' to the known joining (J) alpha gene segments. This V delta gene is in the opposite transcriptional polarity to C delta and has rearranged to C delta by inversion in a gamma/delta-expressing hybridoma, DN7.3. This V delta gene is commonly rearranged in adult but not fetal gamma/delta-expressing thymocytes and has not been observed among alpha gene rearrangements reported to date. The reciprocal joining sequence isolated from this cell line contains N region nucleotides between the recombination signal sequences, in contrast to previously analyzed reciprocal joints. The results are discussed in the context of models accounting for ordered V gene usage during lymphocyte development. Images PMID:2789518

  5. ACTIVATION OF MOUSE AND HUMAN PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTORS (PPAR ALPHA, GAMMA, BETA DELTA) BY PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID (PFOA) AND PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluates the potential for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), using a transient transfection cell assay. Cos-1 cells were cultured in DMEM with fetal bovine serum (FBS) in ...

  6. Phospholipase C-delta1 and oxytocin receptor signalling: evidence of its role as an effector.

    PubMed Central

    Park, E S; Won, J H; Han, K J; Suh, P G; Ryu, S H; Lee, H S; Yun, H Y; Kwon, N S; Baek, K J

    1998-01-01

    Although the oxytocin receptor modulates intracellular Ca2+ ion levels in myometrium, the identities of signal molecules have not been clearly clarified. Our previous studies on oxytocin receptor signalling demonstrated that 80 kDa Ghalpha is a signal mediator [Baek, Kwon, Lee, Kim, Muralidhar and Im (1996) Biochem. J. 315, 739-744]. To elucidate the effector in the oxytocin receptor signalling pathway, we evaluated the oxytocin-mediated activation of phospholipase C (PLC) by using solubilized membranes from human myometrium and a three-component preparation containing the oxytocin receptor-Ghalpha-PLC-delta1 complex. PLC-delta1 activity in the three-component preparation, as well as PLC activity in solubilized membranes, was increased by oxytocin in the presence of Ca2+ and activated Ghalpha (GTP-bound Ghalpha). Furthermore the stimulated PLC-delta1 activity resulting from activation of Ghalpha via the oxytocin receptor was significantly attenuated by the selective oxytocin antagonist desGly-NH2d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2,Thr4]ornithine vasotocin or GDP. Consistent with these observations, co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunoadsorption of PLC-delta1 in the three-component preparation by anti-Gh7alpha antibody resulted in the PLC-delta1 being tightly coupled to activated Ghalpha on stimulation of the oxytocin receptor. These results indicate that PLC-delta1 is the effector for Ghalpha-mediated oxytocin receptor signalling. PMID:9512491

  7. Dihydromorphine-peptide hybrids with delta receptor agonistic and mu receptor antagonistic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.B.; Medzihradsky, F.; Woods, J.H.

    1986-03-05

    The actions of two morphine derivatives with short peptide side chains were evaluated upon the contraction of the isolated mouse vas deferens and upon displacement of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat brain membranes. NIH-9833 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl) was a potent agonist upon the vas deferens. Its EC50 for inhibition of the twitch was 1.2 +/- 0.1 nM. Both naltrexone (10/sup -7/ M) a relatively nonselective opioid antagonist, and ICI-174864 (10/sup -/' M) a highly selective delta receptor antagonist, blocked the actions of NIH-9833 which indicates that this drug is a delta receptor agonist. In contrast, NIH-9835 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-glycyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl), which differs from NIH-9835 by the presence of a single amino acid residue, was devoid of opioid agonistic activity but was a potent antagonist of the inhibitory actions on the vas deferens of morphine and sufentanil. NIH-9833 and NIH-9835 were potent displacers of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat cerebral membranes with EC50's of 0.58 nM and 1.7 nM, respectively. The observation that addition of a single glycyl group changes a dihydromorphine-peptide analog from a potent delta receptor agonist to an equally potent mu receptor antagonist suggests that the two receptor sites might be structurally quite similar.

  8. Quantum Criticality and the (alpha)/(delta) Puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G

    2008-10-06

    In an overview of the elemental actinides Np and Pu stand out because of their anomalously low melting temperatures and the variety of complex phase transitions that occur in these elements and their alloys as a result of relatively modest changes in temperature and pressure. In this paper we suggest a novel explanation based on an analogy between the evolution of the actinide ground state as a function of spin orbit coupling and the behavior of thin film superconductors in a magnetic field. The key point is that in 'bad metals' spin orbit interactions give rise to low energy monopole-like solitons with quantized spin currents, which play much the same role as Abrikosov vortices in thin film superconductors. In Np and {alpha}-Pu these solitons form an ordered solid, while in impurity stabilized {delta}-Pu they form a pair condensate. This provides a simple explanation for the heretofore unexplained phenomenology of {alpha}/{delta} transition. Near room temperature {delta}-Pu represents a novel form of condensed matter: a 'Planckian metal' analogous to the quark-gluon plasma.

  9. Thalamic mechanisms underlying alpha-delta sleep with implications for fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Sujith; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Adler, Gail K; Kopell, Nancy J

    2015-09-01

    Alpha-delta sleep is the abnormal intrusion of alpha activity (8- to 13-Hz oscillations) into the delta activity (1- to 4-Hz oscillations) that defines slow-wave sleep. Alpha-delta sleep is especially prevalent in fibromyalgia patients, and there is evidence suggesting that the irregularities in the sleep of these patients may cause the muscle and tissue pain that characterizes the disorder. We constructed a biophysically realistic mathematical model of alpha-delta sleep. Imaging studies in fibromyalgia patients suggesting altered levels of activity in the thalamus motivated a thalamic model as the source of alpha activity. Since sodium oxybate helps to alleviate the symptoms of fibromyalgia and reduces the amount of alpha-delta sleep in fibromyalgia patients, we examined how changes in the molecular targets of sodium oxybate affected alpha-delta activity in our circuit. Our model shows how alterations in GABAB currents and two thalamic currents, Ih (a hyperpolarization-activated current) and a potassium leak current, transform a circuit that normally produces delta oscillations into one that produces alpha-delta activity. Our findings suggest that drugs that reduce Ih conductances and/or increase potassium conductances, without necessarily increasing GABAB conductances, might be sufficient to restore delta sleep. Furthermore, they suggest that delta sleep might be restored by drugs that preferentially target these currents in the thalamus; such drugs might have fewer side effects than drugs that act systemically.

  10. Thalamic mechanisms underlying alpha-delta sleep with implications for fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Adler, Gail K.; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-delta sleep is the abnormal intrusion of alpha activity (8- to 13-Hz oscillations) into the delta activity (1- to 4-Hz oscillations) that defines slow-wave sleep. Alpha-delta sleep is especially prevalent in fibromyalgia patients, and there is evidence suggesting that the irregularities in the sleep of these patients may cause the muscle and tissue pain that characterizes the disorder. We constructed a biophysically realistic mathematical model of alpha-delta sleep. Imaging studies in fibromyalgia patients suggesting altered levels of activity in the thalamus motivated a thalamic model as the source of alpha activity. Since sodium oxybate helps to alleviate the symptoms of fibromyalgia and reduces the amount of alpha-delta sleep in fibromyalgia patients, we examined how changes in the molecular targets of sodium oxybate affected alpha-delta activity in our circuit. Our model shows how alterations in GABAB currents and two thalamic currents, Ih (a hyperpolarization-activated current) and a potassium leak current, transform a circuit that normally produces delta oscillations into one that produces alpha-delta activity. Our findings suggest that drugs that reduce Ih conductances and/or increase potassium conductances, without necessarily increasing GABAB conductances, might be sufficient to restore delta sleep. Furthermore, they suggest that delta sleep might be restored by drugs that preferentially target these currents in the thalamus; such drugs might have fewer side effects than drugs that act systemically. PMID:26245315

  11. The amino-terminal domain of glutamate receptor {delta}2 triggers presynaptic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, Takeshi; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2008-12-26

    Glutamate receptor (GluR) {delta}2 selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells plays key roles in synapse formation, long-term depression and motor learning. We propose that GluR{delta}2 regulates synapse formation by making a physical linkage between the active zone and postsynaptic density. To examine the issue, GluR{delta}2-transfected 293T cells were cultured with cerebellar neurons. We found numerous punctate signals for presynaptic markers on the surface of 293T cells expressing GluR{delta}2. The presynaptic specializations induced by GluR{delta}2 were capable of exo- and endocytosis as indicated by FM1-43 dye labeling. Replacement of the extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) of GluR{delta}2 with that of the AMPA receptor GluR{alpha}1 abolished the inducing activity. The NTD of GluR{delta}2 fused to the immunoglobulin constant region successfully induced the accumulation of presynaptic specializations on the surface of beads bearing the fusion protein. These results suggest that GluR{delta}2 triggers presynaptic differentiation by direct interaction with presynaptic components through the NTD.

  12. Structure of the [delta]-opioid receptor bound to naltrindole

    SciTech Connect

    Granier, Sébastien; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2012-07-11

    The opioid receptor family comprises three members, the {mu}-, {delta}- and {kappa}-opioid receptors, which respond to classical opioid alkaloids such as morphine and heroin as well as to endogenous peptide ligands like endorphins. They belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, and are excellent therapeutic targets for pain control. The {delta}-opioid receptor ({delta}-OR) has a role in analgesia, as well as in other neurological functions that remain poorly understood. The structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR have recently been solved. Here we report the crystal structure of the mouse {delta}-OR, bound to the subtype-selective antagonist naltrindole. Together with the structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR, the {delta}-OR structure provides insights into conserved elements of opioid ligand recognition while also revealing structural features associated with ligand-subtype selectivity. The binding pocket of opioid receptors can be divided into two distinct regions. Whereas the lower part of this pocket is highly conserved among opioid receptors, the upper part contains divergent residues that confer subtype selectivity. This provides a structural explanation and validation for the 'message-address' model of opioid receptor pharmacology, in which distinct 'message' (efficacy) and 'address' (selectivity) determinants are contained within a single ligand. Comparison of the address region of the {delta}-OR with other GPCRs reveals that this structural organization may be a more general phenomenon, extending to other GPCR families as well.

  13. Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} regulates interleukin-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} mRNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eric; Jakinovich, Paul; Bae, Aekyung; Rebecchi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} (PLC{delta}{sub 1}) is a widely expressed highly active PLC isoform, modulated by Ca{sup 2+} that appears to operate downstream from receptor signaling and has been linked to regulation of cytokine production. Here we investigated whether PLC{delta}{sub 1} modulated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rat C6 glioma cells. Expression of PLC{delta}{sub 1} was specifically suppressed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the effects on cytokine mRNA expression, stimulated by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were examined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results showed that PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown enhanced expression IL-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) mRNA by at least 100 fold after 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA treatment. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knock down caused persistently high Nf{kappa}b levels at 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA-treated cells. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown was also associated with elevated nuclear levels of c-Jun after 30 min of LPS stimulation, but did not affect LPS-stimulated p38 or p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, normally associated with TLR activation of cytokine gene expression; rather, enhanced protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of cellular proteins was observed in the absence of LPS stimulation. An inhibitor of PKC, bisindolylmaleimide II (BIM), reversed phosphorylation, prevented elevation of nuclear c-Jun levels, and inhibited LPS-induced increases of IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} mRNA's induced by PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown. Our results show that loss of PLC{delta}{sub 1} enhances PKC/c-Jun signaling and up-modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription in concert with the TLR-stimulated p38MAPK/Nf{kappa}b pathway. Our findings are consistent with the idea that PLC{delta}{sub 1} is a

  14. Functional and pharmacological properties of GABArho1delta51 receptors.

    PubMed

    Demuro, A; Martínez-Torres, A; Miledi, R

    2000-02-01

    Gamma-aminobutyrate is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate brain, and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunit GABArho1delta51 is an alternatively spliced form of the GABArho1 receptor that was recently isolated from human retina cDNA libraries. The rho1delta51 receptor subunit lacks 17 amino acids in the extracellular N-terminal domain and, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, forms functional homomeric GABA receptors. Unexpectedly, even after a such a big deletion, the fundamental properties of the deleted variant receptors are very similar to those of the complete GABArho1 receptors. For example, both types of receptors are bicuculline resistant, desensitize very little, and are negatively modulated by Zn2+ and positively modulated by La3+. In spite of such similarities, the GABArho1delta51 receptors are more sensitive to GABA, to the specific GABA(C) antagonist (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid and to Zn2+, than the complete GABArho1 receptors. The GABArho1delta51 receptors extend the variety of inhibitory receptors in the retina. Their functional significance still remains to be determined.

  15. Separation of delta-, gamma- and alpha-tocopherols by CEC.

    PubMed

    Fanali, Salvatore; Catarcini, Paolo; Quaglia, Maria Giovanna; Camera, Emanuela; Rinaldi, Mariarosa; Picardo, Mauro

    2002-08-01

    In this study capillary electrochromatography (CEC) was used for the separation of three tocopherols (TOHs), namely delta-, gamma- and alpha-TOH and the antioxidant compound, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The CEC experiments were carried out using an octadecylsilica (ODS) stationary phase packed, in our laboratory, in a fused-silica capillary (100 microm I.D., 365 microm O.D. x 33 cm of total length and 24.6 or 8.4 cm effective length). The mobile phase was composed by a mixture of methanol (MeOH) and acetonitrile (ACN), at different concentrations and 0.01% (w/v) of ammonium acetate. Retention time (t(R)), retention factor (k), resolution (R(s)) of the three TOHs were strongly influenced by the organic solvent composition of the run buffer and by the effective length of the capillary. Optimum experimental conditions were found even employing the short effective length of the capillary achieving the baseline separation of the studied analytes in a relatively short time (less than 5 min). The optimized method was applied to the qualitative analysis of vitamin E (alpha-TOH) present in a human serum extract.

  16. Increased division of alpha beta TCR+ and gamma delta TCR+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes after oral administration of cholera toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Penney, I; Kilshaw, P J; MacDonald, T T

    1996-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) or its subunits were given orally to mice and division of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) in vivo measured by double immunofluorescence using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BRdU) and membrane alpha beta T-cell receptors (TCR) or gamma delta TCR staining in frozen sections. Cholera toxin (10 micrograms) produced a two- to eightfold-increase in the uptake of BRdU in alpha beta TCR+ IEL in the duodenum and a two-to fivefold increase in gamma delta TCR IEL in the ileum. Increased uptake of BRdU was also seen after a dose of 100 micrograms of CT but this dose was also associated with the loss of alpha beta TCR+ IEL and gamma delta TCR+ IEL in the duodenum. CT-A and CT-B subunit produced increased BRdU incorporation by alpha beta TCR in the duodenum and by gamma delta TCR IEL in the ileum. Cholera toxin therefore appears to be mitogenic for IEL probably due to an indirect mechanism. Images Figure 1 PMID:8911140

  17. Acetylcholine receptor-inducing factor from chicken brain increases the level of mRNA encoding the receptor. alpha. subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.A.; Falls, D.L.; Dill-Devor, R.M.; Fischbach, G.D. )

    1988-03-01

    A 42-kDa glycoprotein isolated from chicken brain, referred to as acetylcholine receptor-inducing activity (ARIA), that stimulates the rate of incorporation of acetylcholine receptors into the surface of chicken myotubes may play a role in the nerve-induced accumulation of receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses. Using nuclease-protection assays, the authors have found that ARIA causes a 2- to 16-fold increase in the level of mRNA encoding the {alpha} subunit of the receptor, with little or no change in the levels of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit messengers. ARIA also increases the amount of a putative nuclear precursor of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, consistent with an activation of gene transcription. These results suggest that the concentration of {alpha} subunit may limit the rate of biosynthesis of the acetylcholine receptors in chicken myotubes. They also indicate that neuronal factors can regulate the expression of receptor subunit genes in a selective manner. Tetrodotoxin, 8-bromo-cAMP, and forskolin also increase the amount of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, with little change in the amount of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit mRNAs. Unlike ARIA, however, these agents have little effect on the concentration of the {alpha}-subunit nuclear precursor.

  18. Pharmacologic specificity of alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Petrash, A.; Bylund, D.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have defined alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes in human and rat tissues using prazosin as a subtype selective drug. Prazosin has a lower affinity (250 nM) at alpha-2A receptor and a higher affinity (5 nM) at alpha-2B receptors. In order to determine if other adrenergic drugs are selective for one or the other subtypes, the authors performed (/sup 3/H)yohimbine inhibition experiments with various adrenergic drugs in tissues containing alpha-2A, alpha-2B or both subtypes. Oxymetazoline, WB4101 and yohimbine were found to be 80-, 20- and 10-fold more potent at alpha-2A receptors than at alpha-2B receptors. Phentolamine, adazoxan, (+)- and (-)-mianserin, clonidine, (+)-butaclamol, (-)- and (+)-norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and thioridazine were found to have equal affinities for the two subtypes. These results further validate the subdivision of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors into alpha-2A and alpha-2B subtypes.

  19. Detection and quantification of residual alpha-phase in delta-stabilized plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Daniel S; Mitchell, Jeremy N; Pereyra, Ramiro A

    2009-01-01

    The temperature range of the {delta}-phase field of plutonium can be expanded by alloying with Group IIIA elements. Ga is a particularly potent {delta}-stabilizer and effectively stabilizes the {delta}-phase to room temperature. Due to a strong propensity towards solute redistribution during cooling through the {var_epsilon} {yields} {delta} phase field, regions of the material often do not contain enough solute to stabilize the {delta}-phase even after extensive homogenization annealing in the {delta}-phase field . The result is a small but persistent, fraction of {alpha}-phase in the material. A technique using differential scanning calorimetry to measure the enthalpy of transformation of the plutonium {alpha} {yields} {beta} transformation is described which can detect and quantify {alpha}-phase in a {delta}-phase matrix at levels as low as {approx} 0.1 wt. %. A set of Pu-1.7 atomic % Ga alloys was examined using the technique and found to contain 0.32 {+-} 0.06 weight % {alpha}-phase. Complications arise due to interference from the pressure-induced {alpha}{prime}-phase, and a peak separation method was developed to accurately measure the heat signal from each phase. Due to the presence of Ga in the {alpha}-phase, the onset temperature of the {alpha} {yields} {beta} transformation in these specimens was found to be 140.2 C, significantly higher than that for the transformation in pure plutonium, 126.2 C.

  20. V{delta}1 T cell receptor binds specifically to MHC I chain related A: Molecular and biochemical evidences

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Jianqing; Huang Jie; Chen Hui; Cui Lianxian; He Wei . E-mail: heweiimu@public.bta.net.cn

    2006-01-06

    Human MHC class I chain-related A (MICA) is a tumor-associated antigen that can be recognized by V{delta}1 subset of tumor-infiltrating {gamma}{delta} T cells. We previously reported that immobilized recombinant MICA protein could induce the proliferation of tumor-infiltrating V{delta}1 {gamma}{delta} T cells in vitro. But there has been no direct evidence showing the engagement of {gamma}{delta} T cell receptors (TCR) of the induced cells with MICA. In the current investigation, we show that MICA induces specific cytolytic activity of the expanded {gamma}{delta} T cells. We expressed the coupled V domains from the MICA-induced T cells as a single polypeptide chain V{delta}V{gamma} TCR ({gamma}{delta} scTCR). Such scTCR can specifically bind MICA of HeLa cells. Direct interaction of {gamma}{delta} scTCRs with in vitro expressed MICA was monitored using an IAsys biosensor. We found that the V{delta}1 scTCR can specifically bind to immobilized MICA molecule and MICA{alpha}1{alpha}2 domains are responsible for the binding reaction.

  1. Microstructural Evidence for Conditioning-dependent (delta) -> (alpha)' Transformations in Retained (delta)-phase Pu-Ga

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, J R; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J

    2008-06-16

    The retained {delta} phase of a Pu-1.9 at.% Ga alloy is metastable with respect to the martensitic {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation that occurs at low temperatures. This transformation has been shown to proceed by means of an isothermal martensitic mode, but the kinetics of the transformation are atypical. The transformation exhibits a 'double-C' in a time-temperature-transformation diagram, wherein there exist two temperatures where a given amount of transformation occurs in a minimum amount of time. The cause of the double-C kinetics remains uncertain, eliciting proposals of multiple mechanisms, multiple paths, or different morphologies as possible origins. Recently, a 'conditioning' treatment was found to affect the {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation, but the underlying mechanism by which the conditioning treatment influences the transformation has not yet been resolved. In this study, microstructural characterization as a function of temperature, time, and conditioning has been employed to illuminate the role of conditioning in the {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation. Conditioning is found to enhance transformation in the upper-C and to enable transformation in the lower-C. The data garnered from these experiments suggest that conditioning is intimately linked to nucleation processes and of little consequence to the growth and morphology of the {alpha}{prime} product phase.

  2. [Estrogen receptor alpha in obesity and diabetes].

    PubMed

    Cahua-Pablo, José Ángel; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Cruz, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) is an important hormone in reproductive physiology, cardiovascular, skeletal and in the central nervous system (CNS). In human and rodents, E2 and its receptors are involved in the control of energy and glucose metabolism in health and metabolic diseases. The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NR), which are transcription factors that regulate gene expression. Three ER, ER-alpha, ER-beta and the G protein-coupled ER (GPER; also called GPR30) in tissues are involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Also, it may have important implications for risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome (MS), insulin resistance (IR), obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D).

  3. Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Regulates Hippocampal GABA(A) Receptor Delta Subunit Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Follesa, Paolo; Floris, Gabriele; Asuni, Gino P.; Ibba, Antonio; Tocco, Maria G.; Zicca, Luca; Mercante, Beniamina; Deriu, Franca; Gorini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption causes structural and functional reorganization in the hippocampus and induces alterations in the gene expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs). Distinct forced intermittent exposure models have been used previously to investigate changes in GABAAR expression, with contrasting results. Here, we used repeated cycles of a Chronic Intermittent Ethanol paradigm to examine the relationship between voluntary, dependence-associated ethanol consumption, and GABAAR gene expression in mouse hippocampus. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to four 16-h ethanol vapor (or air) cycles in inhalation chambers alternated with limited-access two-bottle choice between ethanol (15%) and water consumption. The mice exposed to ethanol vapor showed significant increases in ethanol consumption compared to their air-matched controls. GABAAR alpha4 and delta subunit gene expression were measured by qRT-PCR at different stages. There were significant changes in GABAAR delta subunit transcript levels at different time points in ethanol-vapor exposed mice, while the alpha4 subunit levels remained unchanged. Correlated concurrent blood ethanol concentrations suggested that GABAAR delta subunit mRNA levels fluctuate depending on ethanol intoxication, dependence, and withdrawal state. Using a vapor-based Chronic Intermittent Ethanol procedure with combined two-bottle choice consumption, we corroborated previous evidences showing that discontinuous ethanol exposure affects GABAAR delta subunit expression but we did not observe changes in alpha4 subunit. These findings indicate that hippocampal GABAAR delta subunit expression changes transiently over the course of a Chronic Intermittent Ethanol paradigm associated with voluntary intake, in response to ethanol-mediated disturbance of GABAergic neurotransmission. PMID:26617492

  4. DeltaNp73alpha regulates MDR1 expression by inhibiting p53 function.

    PubMed

    Vilgelm, A; Wei, J X; Piazuelo, M B; Washington, M K; Prassolov, V; El-Rifai, W; Zaika, A

    2008-04-01

    The p73 protein is a transcription factor and member of the p53 protein family that expresses as a complex variety of isoforms. DeltaNp73alpha is an N-terminally truncated isoform of p73. We found that DeltaNp73 protein is upregulated in human gastric carcinoma suggesting that DeltaNp73 may play an oncogenic role in these tumors. Although it has been shown that DeltaNp73alpha inhibits apoptosis and counteracts the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs, the underlying mechanism by which this p73 isoform contributes to chemotherapeutic drug response remains to be explored. We found that DeltaNp73alpha upregulates MDR1 mRNA and p-glycoprotein (p-gp), which is involved in chemotherapeutic drug transport. This p-gp upregulation was accompanied by increased p-gp functional activity in gastric cancer cells. Our data suggest that upregulation of MDR1 by DeltaNp73alpha is mediated by interaction with p53 at the MDR1 promoter.

  5. Genetic polymorphisms in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta associated with obesity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyoung Doo; Park, Byung Lae; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Jung, Hye Seung; Cho, Young Min; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Young Joo; Lee, Hong Kyu; Park, Kyong Soo

    2004-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors regulating the expression of genes involved in lipid and glucose metabolism. Three different PPARs, PPAR-alpha, -gamma, and -delta, have been characterized, and they are distinguished from each other by tissue distribution and cell activation. All PPARs are, to different extents, activated by fatty acids and derivatives. Recently, it has been shown that PPAR-delta serves as a widespread regulator of fat burning, suggesting that it might be a potential target in the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In an effort to identify polymorphic markers in potential candidate genes for type 2 diabetes, we have sequenced PPAR-delta, including -1,500 bp of the 5' flanking region. Nine polymorphisms were identified in PPAR-delta: four in the intron, one in the 5' untranslated region (UTR), and four in the 3' UTR. Among identified polymorphisms, five common sites, including c.-13454G>T, c.-87T>C, c.2022+12G>A, c.2629T>C, and c.2806C>G, were genotyped in subjects with type 2 diabetes and normal control subjects (n = 702). The genetic associations with the risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic phenotype were analyzed. No significant associations with the risk of type 2 diabetes were detected. However, several positive associations of PPAR-delta polymorphisms with fasting plasma glucose and BMI were detected in nondiabetic control subjects. The genetic information about PPAR-delta from this study would be useful for further genetic study of obesity, diabetes, and other metabolic diseases. PMID:14988273

  6. Acetylcholine receptor gating: movement in the alpha-subunit extracellular domain.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Prasad; Auerbach, Anthony

    2007-12-01

    Acetylcholine receptor channel gating is a brownian conformational cascade in which nanometer-sized domains ("Phi blocks") move in staggering sequence to link an affinity change at the transmitter binding sites with a conductance change in the pore. In the alpha-subunit, the first Phi-block to move during channel opening is comprised of residues near the transmitter binding site and the second is comprised of residues near the base of the extracellular domain. We used the rate constants estimated from single-channel currents to infer the gating dynamics of Y127 and K145, in the inner and outer sheet of the beta-core of the alpha-subunit. Y127 is at the boundary between the first and second Phi blocks, at a subunit interface. alphaY127 mutations cause large changes in the gating equilibrium constant and with a characteristic Phi-value (Phi = 0.77) that places this residue in the second Phi-block. We also examined the effect on gating of mutations in neighboring residues deltaI43 (Phi = 0.86), epsilonN39 (complex kinetics), alphaI49 (no effect) and in residues that are homologous to alphaY127 on the epsilon, beta, and delta subunits (no effect). The extent to which alphaY127 gating motions are coupled to its neighbors was estimated by measuring the kinetic and equilibrium constants of constructs having mutations in alphaY127 (in both alpha subunits) plus residues alphaD97 or deltaI43. The magnitude of the coupling between alphaD97 and alphaY127 depended on the alphaY127 side chain and was small for both H (0.53 kcal/mol) and C (-0.37 kcal/mol) substitutions. The coupling across the single alpha-delta subunit boundary was larger (0.84 kcal/mol). The Phi-value for K145 (0.96) indicates that its gating motion is correlated temporally with the motions of residues in the first Phi-block and is not synchronous with those of alphaY127. This suggests that the inner and outer sheets of the alpha-subunit beta-core do not rotate as a rigid body.

  7. Regional variation in the proliferative rate and lifespan of alpha beta TCR+ and gamma delta TCR+ intraepithelial lymphocytes in the murine small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Penney, L; Kilshaw, P J; MacDonald, T T

    1995-01-01

    Using double staining for T-cell receptor (TCR) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BRdU) we have examined the proliferation rates and lifespan of murine intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL's) in vivo. After a 24-hr pulse of BRdU the number of labelled alpha beta TCR+ IEL was significantly higher in the ileum than the duodenum. In contrast, incorporation of BRdU into gamma delta TCR+ IEL was significantly higher in the duodenum than the ileum. This regional variation was also seen after a 4-hr pulse of BRdU indicating that the differences probably reflect local rates of proliferation in the epithelium. Over a 6-day labelling period, the accumulation of labelled alpha beta TCR+ and gamma delta TCR+ IEL was linear, which allowed IEL lifespan to be calculated. There was considerable variation between groups of mice but the 50% population renewal time for alpha beta TCR+ IEL was 12-36 days in the duodenum and 9-11 days in the ileum, and for gamma delta TCR+ IEL was 12-21 days in the duodenum and 26-100 days in the ileum. The incorporation of BRdU into V beta 8+ IEL showed the same regional variation as alpha beta TCR+ IEL and the V delta 4 population behaved like the total gamma delta TCR+ IEL population. In contrast V beta 11+, potentially self-reactive IEL, showed a regional pattern of labelling like gamma delta TCR+ IEL. Incorporation of BRdU into both alpha beta TCR+ and gamma delta TCR+ IEL in germ-free mice was very low and did not show marked regional variation. alpha beta TCR+ and gamma delta TCR+ IEL from both proximal and distal bowel were cytotoxic. Therefore alpha beta TCR+ and gamma delta TCR+ IEL show different rates of division in different sections of the gut, perhaps reflecting responses to different antigens. Both alpha beta TCR+ and gamma delta TCR+ IEL reside in the epithelium for weeks during which time the gut epithelial population will have been renewed many times. PMID:7490120

  8. Delta opioid receptor analgesia: recent contributions from pharmacology and molecular approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte Lina

    2012-01-01

    Delta opioid receptors represent a promising target for the development of novel analgesics. A number of tools have been developed recently that have significantly improved our knowledge of delta receptor function in pain control. These include several novel delta agonists with potent analgesic properties, as well as genetic mouse models with targeted mutations in the delta opioid receptor gene. Also, recent findings have further documented the regulation of delta receptor function at cellular level, which impacts on the pain-reducing activity of the receptor. These regulatory mechanisms occur at transcriptional and post-translational levels, along agonist-induced receptor activation, signaling and trafficking, or in interaction with other receptors and neuromodulatory systems. All these tools for in vivo research, as well as proposed mechanisms at molecular level, have tremendously increased our understanding of delta receptor physiology, and contribute to designing innovative strategies for the treatment of chronic pain and other diseases such as mood disorders. PMID:21836459

  9. Deletion or substitution within the alpha platelet-derived growth factor receptor kinase insert domain: effects on functional coupling with intracellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Heidaran, M A; Pierce, J H; Lombardi, D; Ruggiero, M; Gutkind, J S; Matsui, T; Aaronson, S A

    1991-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase domains of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1)/c-fms receptors are interrupted by kinase inserts (ki) which vary in length and amino acid sequence. To define the role of the ki in the human alpha PDGF receptor (alpha PDGFR), we generated deletion mutants, designated alpha R delta ki-1 and alpha R delta ki-2, which lacked 80 (710 to 789) and 95 (695 to 789) amino acids of the 104-amino-acid ki region, respectively. Their functional characteristics were compared with those of the wild-type alpha PDGFR following introduction into a naive hematopoietic cell line, 32D. Biochemical responses, including PDGF-stimulated PDGFR tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover, and receptor-associated PI-3 kinase activity, were differentially impaired by the deletions. Despite a lack of any detectable receptor-associated PI-3 kinase activity, 32D cells expressing alpha R delta ki-1 showed only partially impaired chemotactic and mitogenic responses and were capable of sustained proliferation in vitro and in vivo under conditions of autocrine stimulation by the c-sis product. 32D transfectants expressing the larger ki deletion (alpha R delta ki-2) showed markedly decreased or abolished biochemical and biological responses. However, insertion of the highly unrelated smaller c-fms (685 to 750) ki domain into alpha R delta ki-2 restored each of these activities to wild-type alpha PDGFR levels. Since the CSF-1R does not normally induce PI turnover, the ability of the c-fms ki domain to reconstitute PI turnover in the alpha R delta ki-2 transfectant provides evidence that the ki domain of the alpha PDGFR does not directly couple with this pathway. Taken together, all od these bindings imply that their ki domains have evolved to play very similar roles in the known signaling functions PDGF and CSF-1 receptors. Images PMID:1702511

  10. Rhesus monkey alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: comparisons to human alpha7 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Papke, Roger L; McCormack, Thomas J; Jack, Brian A; Wang, Daguang; Bugaj-Gaweda, Bozena; Schiff, Hillary C; Buhr, Joshua D; Waber, Amanda J; Stokes, Clare

    2005-11-01

    An alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor sequence was cloned from Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). This clone differs from the mature human alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in only four amino acids, two of which are in the extracellular domain. The monkey alpha7 nicotinic receptor was characterized in regard to its functional responses to acetylcholine, choline, cytisine, and the experimental alpha7-selective agonists 4OH-GTS-21, TC-1698, and AR-R17779. For all of these agonists, the EC(50) for activation of monkey receptors was uniformly higher than for human receptors. In contrast, the potencies of mecamylamine and MLA for inhibiting monkey and human alpha7 were comparable. Acetylcholine and 4OH-GTS-21 were used to probe the significance of the single point differences in the extracellular domain. Mutants with the two different amino acids in the extracellular domain of the monkey receptor changed to the corresponding sequence of the human receptor had responses to these agonists that were not significantly different in EC(50) from wild-type human alpha7 nicotinic receptors. Monkey alpha7 nicotinic receptors have a serine at residue 171, while the human receptors have an asparagine at this site. Monkey S171N mutants were more like human alpha7 nicotinic receptors, while mutations at the other site (K186R) had relatively little effect. These experiments point toward the basic utility of the monkey receptor as a model for the human alpha7 nicotinic receptor, albeit with the caveat that these receptors will vary in their agonist concentration dependency. They also point to the potential importance of a newly identified sequence element for modeling the specific amino acids involved with receptor activation. PMID:16266703

  11. Evidence for Alpha Receptors in the Human Ureter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeb, Ralph; Knopf, Joy; Golijanin, Dragan; Bourne, Patricia; Erturk, Erdal

    2007-04-01

    An immunohistochemical and western blot expression analysis of human ureters was performed in order to characterize the alpha-1-adrenergic receptor distribution along the length of the human ureteral wall. Mapping the distribution will assist in understanding the potential role alpha -1-adrenergic receptors and their subtype density might have in the pathophysiology of ureteral colic and stone passage. Patients diagnosed with renal cancer or bladder cancer undergoing nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy, or cystectomy had ureteral specimens taken from the proximal, mid, distal and tunneled ureter. Tissues were processed for fresh frozen examination and fixed in formalin. None of the ureteral specimens were involved with cancer. Serial histologic sections and immunohistochemical studies were performed using antibodies specific for alpha-1-adrenergic receptor subtypes (alpha 1a, alpha 1b, alpha 1d). The sections were examined under a light microscope and scored as positive or negative. In order to validate and quantify the alpha receptor subtypes along the human ureter. Western blotting techniques were applied. Human ureter stained positively for alpha -1-adrenergic receptors. Immunostaining appeared red, with intense reaction in the smooth muscle of the ureter and endothelium of the neighboring blood vessels. There was differential expression between all the receptors with the highest staining for alpha-1D subtype. The highest protein expression for all three subtypes was in the renal pelvis and decreased with advancement along the ureter to the distal ureter. At the distal ureter, there was marked increase in expression as one progressed towards the ureteral orifice. The same pattern of protein expression was exhibited for all three alpha -1-adrenergic receptor subtypes. We provide preliminary evidence for the ability to detect and quantify the alpha-1-receptor subtypes along the human ureter which to the best of our knowledge has never been done with

  12. Quantitative expression patterns of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{beta}/{delta} (PPAR{beta}/{delta}) protein in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Girroir, Elizabeth E.; Hollingshead, Holly E.; He Pengfei; Zhu Bokai; Perdew, Gary H.; Peters, Jeffrey M.

    2008-07-04

    The expression patterns of PPAR{beta}/{delta} have been described, but the majority of these data are based on mRNA data. To date, there are no reports that have quantitatively examined the expression of PPAR{beta}/{delta} protein in mouse tissues. In the present study, a highly specific PPAR{beta}/{delta} antibody was developed, characterized, and used to examine tissue expression patterns of PPAR{beta}/{delta}. As compared to commercially available anti-PPAR{beta}/{delta} antibodies, one of six polyclonal anti-PPAR{beta}/{delta} antibodies developed was significantly more effective for immunoprecipitation of in vitro-translated PPAR{beta}/{delta}. This antibody was used for quantitative Western blot analysis using radioactive detection methods. Expression of PPAR{beta}/{delta} was highest in colon, small intestine, liver, and keratinocytes as compared to other tissues including heart, spleen, skeletal muscle, lung, brain, and thymus. Interestingly, PPAR{beta}/{delta} expression was localized in the nucleus and RXR{alpha} can be co-immunoprecipitated with nuclear PPAR{beta}/{delta}. Results from these studies demonstrate that PPAR{beta}/{delta} expression is highest in intestinal epithelium, liver, and keratinocytes, consistent with significant biological roles in these tissues.

  13. Relative locations of the. beta. and delta chains of the acetylcholine receptor determined by electron microscopy of isolated receptor trimer. [Fishes, electric tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.S.; Wall, J.; Karlin, A.

    1981-12-25

    The monomeric unit of the acetylcholine receptor of electric tissue of Torpedo californica has previously been shown to have a subunit composition of ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta gamma..delta. Receptor in membrane isolated from Torpedo electric tissue occurs as both monomer and dimer. In the dimer, which is the predominant form, the monomeric units are cross-linked via a disulfide bond between delta chains. The addition of diamide to receptor-rich membrane causes the formation of trimer and higher oligomers in which the monomeric units are linked by disulfide bonds alternately between pairs of delta chains and between pairs ..beta.. chains. We have isolated receptor trimer and determined the relative locations of the monomeric units by scanning transmission electron microscopy of negatively stained preparations. In face view, the trimer appears as three approximately 90 angstrom disks, each with a central, densely staining pit. From the angles of the triangle formed by the lines connecting the centers of the monomers in the trimer, we infer that the ..beta..-..beta.. disulfide bond is separated from the delta-delta disulfide bond by an angle in the range of 50-80/sup 0/.

  14. T cell receptor junctional regions of V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ T cell clones in relation to non-MHC restricted cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, B F; Wheatcroft, N J; Thornton, S M; Christmas, S E

    1993-05-01

    Human gamma delta T cell clones having V gamma 9JP and V delta 2DJ1 T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements were isolated form an individual donor and tested for non-MHC restricted cytotoxicity against the B lymphoblastoid cell line, BSM. Most clones were highly cytotoxic but 3/9 clones had very low activity, comparable to that of CD4+ alpha beta T cell clones. Although there was a tendency for clones with low cytotoxic function to produce high levels of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, this correlation was not complete. TCR gamma and delta junctional sequences were obtained and were found to be different for all clones. There were no consistent structural differences between gamma delta TCRs of cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic clones, but gamma or delta junctional regions of all three non-cytotoxic clones had unusual features. One clone had a particularly short gamma chain junctional sequence, one had a short delta chain junctional sequence and the third clone was the only one of the panel which failed to utilise the D delta 3 segment. If the gamma delta TCR is involved in target cell recognition in this model of non-MHC restricted killing, such variations in receptor structure may be sufficient to inhibit recognition and thereby reduce the cytotoxic capacity of a minority of V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ clones. Also, a panel of gamma delta T cell clones expressing V gamma 8/V delta 3 isolated from a different donor, were all highly cytotoxic against BSM, indicating that these target cells can be recognised by effector cells expressing a TCR other than the V gamma 9/V delta 2 receptor. The possible influence of other cell surface molecules on non-MHC restricted cytotoxic function is discussed.

  15. cap alpha. -2 adrenergic receptor: a radiohistochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Unnerstall, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    ..cap alpha..-2 adrenergic agents have been shown to influence blood pressure, heart rate and other physiological and behavioral functions through interactions with adrenergic pathways within the central nervous system. Pharmacologically relevant ..cap alpha..-1 adrenergic receptors were biochemically characterized and radiohistochemically analyzed in intact tissue sections of the rat and human central nervous system. The anatomical distribution of the ..cap alpha..-2 receptors, labeled with the agonist (/sup 3/H)para-aminoclonidine, verified the concept that ..cap alpha..-2 receptors are closely associated with adrenergic nerve terminals and that ..cap alpha..-2 agents can influence autonomic and endocrine function through an action in the central nervous system. Since ..cap alpha..-2 agonists can influence sympathetic outflow, ..cap alpha..-2 binding sites were closely analyzed in the intermediolateral cell column of the thoracic spinal cord. The transport of putative presynaptic ..cap alpha..-2 binding sites in the rat sciatic nerve was analyzed by light microscopic radiohistochemical techniques. Finally, in intact tissue section of the rat central nervous system, the biochemical characteristics of (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine binding were analyzed. Data were also shown which indicates that the synthetic ..cap alpha..-2 antagonist (/sup 3/H)RX781094 also binds to ..cap alpha..-2 receptors with high-affinity. Further, the distribution of (/sup 3/H)RX781094 binding sites in the rat central nervous system was identical to the distribution seen when using (/sup 3/H)para-aminoclonidine.

  16. Unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not promote human monocyte differentiation toward alternative macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Brozek, John; Derudas, Bruno; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2009-08-28

    Macrophages adapt their response to micro-environmental signals. While Th1 cytokines promote pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, Th2 cytokines promote an 'alternative' anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors expressed in macrophages where they control the inflammatory response. It has been shown that PPAR{gamma} promotes the differentiation of monocytes into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in humans and mice, while a role for PPAR{beta}/{delta} in this process has been reported only in mice and no data are available for PPAR{alpha}. Here, we show that in contrast to PPAR{gamma}, expression of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} overall does not correlate with the expression of M2 markers in human atherosclerotic lesions, whereas a positive correlation with genes of lipid metabolism exists. Moreover, unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not influence human monocyte differentiation into M2 macrophages in vitro. Thus, PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} do not appear to modulate the alternative differentiation of human macrophages.

  17. Molecular characterization of an. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.; Dewan Zeng; D'Angelo, D.D.; Tucker, A.L.; Zhihong Lu; Barber, C.M.; Lynch, K.R. )

    1990-02-26

    {alpha}{sub 2}-Adrenergic receptors comprise a heterogeneous population based on pharmacologic and molecular evidence. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone (pRNG{alpha}2) encoding a previously undescribed third subtype of an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor from a rat kidney cDNA library. The library was screened with an oligonucleotide encoding a highly conserved region found in all biogenic amine receptors described to date. The deduced amino acid sequence displays many features of G-protein coupled receptors with exception of the absence of the consensus N-linked glycosylation site at the amino terminus. Membranes prepared from COS-1 cells transfected with pRNG{alpha}2 display high affinity and saturable binding to {sup 3}H-rauwolscine (K{sub d}=2 nM).Competition curve data analysis shows that pRNG{alpha}2 protein binds to a variety of adrenergic drugs with the following rank order of potency: yohimbine {ge} cholorpromazine > prazosin {ge} clonidine > norepinephrine {ge} oxymetazoline. pRNG{alpha}2 RNA accumulates in both adult rat kidney and rat neonatal lung (predominant species is 4.0 kb). They conclude that pRNG{alpha}2 likely represents a cDNA for the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor.

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiuguo; Tanaka, Naoki . E-mail: naopi@hsp.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Nakajima, Takero; Kamijo, Yuji; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2006-08-11

    Hepatic peroxisome proliferation, increases in the numerical and volume density of peroxisomes, is believed to be closely related to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) activation; however, it remains unknown whether peroxisome proliferation depends absolutely on this activation. To verify occurrence of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation, fenofibrate treatment was used, which was expected to significantly enhance PPAR{alpha} dependence in the assay system. Surprisingly, a novel type of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation and enlargement was uncovered in PPAR{alpha}-null mice. The increased expression of dynamin-like protein 1, but not peroxisome biogenesis factor 11{alpha}, might be associated with the PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation at least in part.

  19. Pharmacological properties of the homomeric alpha 7 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, D; Bertrand, S; Ballivet, M

    1992-10-26

    The pharmacological properties of the alpha-bungarotoxin sensitive alpha 7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) were studied upon reconstitution in Xenopus oocytes. Channels formed by alpha 7 are about 10-fold more sensitive to nicotine and cytisine than to ACh but are little, if at all, activated by the ganglionic agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP). Tubocurarine (TC) was found to act as a non-competitive inhibitor, whereas dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DH beta E) behaves as a pure competitive inhibitor whose blockade is fast and fully reversible. In addition, the alpha 7 receptor displays a poor sensitivity to methonium salts. The pharmacological properties of the alpha 7 channels are readily distinguishable from those of other identified neuronal nicotinic receptors.

  20. Isochronal annealing of radiation damage in (alpha)- and (delta)-Pu alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W; Haire, R G

    2009-06-22

    Magnetic isochronal annealing curves were measured on specimens of self damaged {alpha}-Pu and several {delta}-Pu alloys stabilized by Ga and Am. These results are compared to one another and to isochronal resistivity annealing curves, where distinct differences are observed between the magnetic and resistive annealing for the case of {delta}-Pu. The first stage of annealing observed in the resistivity measurements is largely missing from the magnetic measurements, indicating that interstitials contribute little if any signal to the magnetization, while the onset of vacancy migration is strongly reflected in the magnetization signal.

  1. GRK2 Constitutively Governs Peripheral Delta Opioid Receptor Activity.

    PubMed

    Brackley, Allison Doyle; Gomez, Ruben; Akopian, Armen N; Henry, Michael A; Jeske, Nathaniel A

    2016-09-01

    Opioids remain the standard for analgesic care; however, adverse effects of systemic treatments contraindicate long-term administration. While most clinical opioids target mu opioid receptors (MOR), those that target the delta class (DOR) also demonstrate analgesic efficacy. Furthermore, peripherally restrictive opioids represent an attractive direction for analgesia. However, opioid receptors including DOR are analgesically incompetent in the absence of inflammation. Here, we report that G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) naively associates with plasma membrane DOR in peripheral sensory neurons to inhibit analgesic agonist efficacy. This interaction prevents optimal Gβ subunit association with the receptor, thereby reducing DOR activity. Importantly, bradykinin stimulates GRK2 movement away from DOR and onto Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP). protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent RKIP phosphorylation induces GRK2 sequestration, restoring DOR functionality in sensory neurons. Together, these results expand the known function of GRK2, identifying a non-internalizing role to maintain peripheral DOR in an analgesically incompetent state. PMID:27568556

  2. Sequential appearance of gamma/delta- and alpha/beta-bearing T cells in the peritoneal cavity during an i.p. infection with Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Ohga, S; Yoshikai, Y; Takeda, Y; Hiromatsu, K; Nomoto, K

    1990-03-01

    To search for a potential role of T cell antigen receptor (TcR) gamma/delta-bearing cells in host-defense against Listeria monocytogenes, we analyzed the sequential appearance of gamma/delta and alpha/beta T cell in the peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) during an i.p. infection with sublethal dose (2 X 10(3) of viable Listeria organisms in mice. The PEC on day 1 after the infection consisted of 48% macrophages and 50% lymphocytes, most of which were surface IgM+ (B) cells. The number of PEC increased to the maximal level by day 3. The PEC at this stage contained an appreciable number of CD3+ T cells in addition to a large number of macrophages. Of the CD3+ cells, the proportion of CD4- CD8- cells, most of which expressed no TcR alpha/beta, increased to the maximal level on day 3 after the infection. In correlation with an increased number of CD3+ CD4- CD8- TcR alpha/beta- cells, high level of TcR gamma/delta chain gene messages was detected in the nonadherent population of the PEC on this stage. On the other hand, the PEC on day 8 contained an increased number of CD4+ CD8- and CD4- CD8+ cells which expressed TcR alpha/beta chain on their surface. These results suggest that the gamma/delta T cells precede the alpha/beta T cells in appearance during listerial infection. The gamma/delta T cells may be involved at the first line of the host-defense against Listeria.

  3. Impact of chronic morphine on delta opioid receptor-expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Erbs, E; Faget, L; Ceredig, R A; Matifas, A; Vonesch, J-L; Kieffer, B L; Massotte, D

    2016-01-28

    Delta opioid (DOP) receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. To better appreciate the impact of repeated drug exposure on their modulatory activity, we used fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxy-terminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. We then tested the impact of chronic morphine treatment on the density and distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus. A decrease in delta receptor-positive cell density was observed in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus without alteration of the distribution across the different GABAergic populations that mainly express delta receptors. This effect partly persisted after four weeks of morphine abstinence. In addition, we observed increased DOP receptor expression at the cell surface compared to saline-treated animals. In the hippocampus, chronic morphine administration thus induces DOP receptor cellular redistribution and durably decreases delta receptor-expressing cell density. Such modifications are likely to alter hippocampal physiology, and to contribute to long-term cognitive deficits.

  4. T cell receptor gamma and delta rearrangements in hematologic malignancies. Relationship to lymphoid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Griesinger, F; Greenberg, J M; Kersey, J H

    1989-01-01

    We have studied recombinatorial events of the T cell receptor delta and gamma chain genes in hematopoietic malignancies and related these to normal stages of lymphoid differentiation. T cell receptor delta gene recombinatorial events were found in 91% of acute T cell lymphoblastic leukemia, 68% of non-T, non-B lymphoid precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 80% of mixed lineage acute leukemias. Mature B-lineage leukemias and acute nonlymphocytic leukemias retained the T-cell receptor delta gene in the germline configuration. The incidence of T cell receptor gamma and delta was particularly high in CD10+CD19+ non-T, non-B lymphoid precursor ALL. In lymphoid precursor ALL, T cell receptor delta was frequently rearranged while T cell receptor gamma was in the germline configuration. This suggests that TCR delta rearrangements may precede TCR gamma rearrangements in lymphoid ontogeny. In T-ALL, only concordant T cell receptor delta and gamma rearrangements were observed. Several distinct rearrangements were defined using a panel of restriction enzymes. Most of the rearrangements observed in T-ALL represented joining events of J delta 1 to upstream regions. In contrast, the majority of rearrangements in lymphoid precursor ALL most likely represented D-D or V-D rearrangements, which have been found to be early recombinatorial events of the TCR delta locus. We next analyzed TCR delta rearrangements in five CD3+TCR gamma/delta+ ALL and cell lines. One T-ALL, which demonstrated a different staining pattern with monoclonal antibodies against the products of the TCR gamma/delta genes than the PEER cell line, rearranges J delta 1 to a currently unidentified variable region. Images PMID:2547833

  5. Proteoglycans Act as Cellular Hepatitis Delta Virus Attachment Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lamas Longarela, Oscar; Schmidt, Tobias T.; Schöneweis, Katrin; Romeo, Raffaella; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Urban, Stephan; Schulze, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a small, defective RNA virus that requires the presence of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) for its life cycle. Worldwide more than 15 million people are co-infected with HBV and HDV. Although much effort has been made, the early steps of the HBV/HDV entry process, including hepatocyte attachment and receptor interaction are still not fully understood. Numerous possible cellular HBV/HDV binding partners have been described over the last years; however, so far only heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been functionally confirmed as cell-associated HBV attachment factors. Recently, it has been suggested that ionotrophic purinergic receptors (P2XR) participate as receptors in HBV/HDV entry. Using the HBV/HDV susceptible HepaRG cell line and primary human hepatocytes (PHH), we here demonstrate that HDV entry into hepatocytes depends on the interaction with the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans. We furthermore provide evidence that P2XR are not involved in HBV/HDV entry and that effects observed with inhibitors for these receptors are a consequence of their negative charge. HDV infection was abrogated by soluble GAGs and other highly sulfated compounds. Enzymatic removal of defined carbohydrate structures from the cell surface using heparinase III or the obstruction of GAG synthesis by sodium chlorate inhibited HDV infection of HepaRG cells. Highly sulfated P2XR antagonists blocked HBV/HDV infection of HepaRG cells and PHH. In contrast, no effect on HBV/HDV infection was found when uncharged P2XR antagonists or agonists were applied. In summary, HDV infection, comparable to HBV infection, requires binding to the carbohydrate side chains of hepatocyte-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as attachment receptors, while P2XR are not actively involved. PMID:23505490

  6. Role of TNF-alpha and its receptors in pericoronitis.

    PubMed

    Beklen, A; Laine, M; Ventä, I; Hyrkäs, T; Konttinen, Y T

    2005-12-01

    The classic stimulus for cellular cytokine production is bacterial lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin). It was therefore hypothesized that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) may be responsible for pericoronitis. TNF-alpha and its receptors were detected by immunohistochemical staining in third molar pericoronitis in ten patients and ten healthy control samples. The percentage of TNF-alpha positive cells was high in pericoronitis (p = 0.0317). TNF receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 were found in macrophage- and fibroblast-like cells, vascular endothelial cells in post-capillary venules, and basal epithelial cells in pericoronitis, but were only weakly expressed in controls. Increased expression of interleukin-1beta and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 was found as a biological indicator of TNF-alpha ligand-receptor interaction. Explanted tissues acquired destructive potential upon TNF-alpha stimulation, whereas TNF-alpha blockers controlled it in inflamed tissues. These findings suggest that, in pericoronitis, inflammatory and resident cells produce and respond to potent pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, with pathogenic and potential therapeutic relevance.

  7. DeltaNp63alpha overexpression induces downregulation of Sirt1 and an accelerated aging phenotype in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Matthias; Poliak, Nina; Upadhyay, Sunil; Ratovitski, Edward; Nelkin, Barry D; Donehower, Lawrence A; Sidransky, David

    2006-09-01

    p63 is highly expressed in the skin and appears to be an early marker of keratinocyte differentiation. To examine the role of p63 in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress deltaNp63alpha in the skin. These mice exhibited an accelerated aging phenotype in the skin characterized by striking wound healing defects, decreased skin thickness, decreased subcutaneous fat tissue, hair loss, and decreased cell proliferation. The accelerated skin aging was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in longevity of the mice. We found that aging in deltaNp63alpha transgenic mice and other mouse models correlated with levels of Sirt1, a mammalian SIR2 orthologue thought to extend the lifespan in lower species. Moreover, increased deltaNp63alpha expression induced cellular senescence that was rescued by Sirt1. Our data suggest that deltaNp63alpha levels may affect aging in mammals, at least in part, through regulation of Sirt1.

  8. Discovery of an Oxybenzylglycine Based Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Alpha Selective

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Kennedy, L; Shi, Y; Tao, S; Ye, X; Chen, S; Wang, Y; Hernandez, A; Wang, W; et al.

    2010-01-01

    An 1,3-oxybenzylglycine based compound 2 (BMS-687453) was discovered to be a potent and selective peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} agonist, with an EC{sub 50} of 10 nM for human PPAR{alpha} and {approx}410-fold selectivity vs human PPAR{gamma} in PPAR-GAL4 transactivation assays. Similar potencies and selectivity were also observed in the full length receptor co-transfection assays. Compound 2 has negligible cross-reactivity against a panel of human nuclear hormone receptors including PPAR{delta}. Compound 2 demonstrated an excellent pharmacological and safety profile in preclinical studies and thus was chosen as a development candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia. The X-ray cocrystal structures of the early lead compound 12 and compound 2 in complex with PPAR{alpha} ligand binding domain (LBD) were determined. The role of the crystal structure of compound 12 with PPAR{alpha} in the development of the SAR that ultimately resulted in the discovery of compound 2 is discussed.

  9. Identification of a new component of the agonist binding site of the nicotinic alpha 7 homooligomeric receptor.

    PubMed

    Corringer, P J; Galzi, J L; Eiselé, J L; Bertrand, S; Changeux, J P; Bertrand, D

    1995-05-19

    Tryptophan 54 of the alpha 7 neuronal nicotinic homooligomeric receptor is homologous to gamma-Trp-55 and delta-Trp-57 of non-alpha subunits of Torpedo receptor labeled by d-tubocurarine. This residue was mutated on the alpha 7-V201-5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT)3 homooligomeric chimera, which displays alpha 7 nicotinic pharmacology, and for which both equilibrium binding studies and electrophysiological recordings could be carried out in parallel. Replacement of Trp-54 by a Phe, Ala, or His causes a progressive decrease both in binding affinity and in responses (EC50 or IC50) for acetylcholine, nicotine, and dihydro-beta-erythroidine, without significant modification in alpha-Bgtx binding. Except for Gln-56, comparatively small effects are observed when the other residues of the 52-58 region are mutated into alanine. These data support the participation of Trp-54 to ligand binding, and provide evidence for a new "complementary component" of the alpha 7 nicotinic binding site, distinct from its three-loop "principal component," and homologous to the "non-alpha component" present on gamma and delta subunits.

  10. Fc alpha receptors mediate release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 by human monocytes following receptor aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Patry, C; Herbelin, A; Lehuen, A; Bach, J F; Monteiro, R C

    1995-01-01

    The functional capacity of the human monocyte receptor for the Fc portion of IgA (Fc alpha R) in mediating signal transduction was evaluated by cytokine release. F(ab')2 fragments of anti-Fc alpha R monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were used as specific probes to induce release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Multivalent cross-linking by a secondary anti-mouse antibody [F(ab')2 fragments] induced a significant release of TNF-alpha and IL-6 by human blood mononuclear cells, indicating requirements for Fc alpha R aggregation on the cell surface to transmit signals. Both cytokines were released exclusively by adherent cells, identifying monocytes as the responding cells within the mononuclear cell population. This cytokine release could not be due to contaminating endotoxins, because it was not abolished by polymyxin B, a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibitor. Moreover, purified recombinant soluble Fc alpha R inhibited the anti-Fc alpha R mAb-mediated cytokine release from blood monocytes, demonstrating that TNF-alpha and IL-6 were released in a receptor-specific manner. Our data suggest that Fc alpha R, through its capacity to mediate secretion of IL-6, may play an important role in B-cell proliferation and immunoglobulin production. On the other hand, release of TNF-alpha following stimulation of Fc alpha R molecules directly implicates these receptors in amplification and regulation of the inflammatory process occurring during IgA-mediated host defence. PMID:7590867

  11. Homomers of alpha 8 and alpha 7 subunits of nicotinic receptors exhibit similar channel but contrasting binding site properties.

    PubMed

    Gerzanich, V; Anand, R; Lindstrom, J

    1994-02-01

    alpha 8 subunits of alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive chick neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes from cRNA are shown to form homomeric, acetylcholine-gated, rapidly desensitizing, inwardly rectifying, Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels similar to those of alpha 7 homomers. alpha 8 forms oligomers of several sizes, of which < 14% are expressed on the oocyte surface, which is less efficient than for alpha 7 homomers. alpha 8 homomers are more sensitive to agonists but less sensitive to antagonists than are alpha 7 homomers, and some agonists for alpha 8 homomers are partial agonists or antagonists for alpha 7 homomers. The pharmacological properties of homomers of alpha 8 and alpha 7 subunits generally reflect those of native alpha 8 and alpha 7 receptors.

  12. Folate receptor {alpha} regulates cell proliferation in mouse gonadotroph {alpha}T3-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Congjun; Evans, Chheng-Orn; Stevens, Victoria L.; Owens, Timothy R.; Oyesiku, Nelson M.

    2009-11-01

    We have previously found that the mRNA and protein levels of the folate receptor alpha (FR{alpha}) are uniquely over-expressed in clinically human nonfunctional (NF) pituitary adenomas, but the mechanistic role of FR{alpha} has not fully been determined. We investigated the effect of FR{alpha} over-expression in the mouse gonadotroph {alpha}T3-1 cell line as a model for NF pituitary adenomas. We found that the expression and function of FR{alpha} were strongly up-regulated, by Western blotting and folic acid binding assay. Furthermore, we found a higher cell growth rate, an enhanced percentage of cells in S-phase by BrdU assay, and a higher PCNA staining. These observations indicate that over-expression of FR{alpha} promotes cell proliferation. These effects were abrogated in the same {alpha}T3-1 cells when transfected with a mutant FR{alpha} cDNA that confers a dominant-negative phenotype by inhibiting folic acid binding. Finally, by real-time quantitative PCR, we found that mRNA expression of NOTCH3 was up-regulated in FR{alpha} over-expressing cells. In summary, our data suggests that FR{alpha} regulates pituitary tumor cell proliferation and mechanistically may involve the NOTCH pathway. Potentially, this finding could be exploited to develop new, innovative molecular targeted treatment for human NF pituitary adenomas.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocotrienols under different food status.

    PubMed

    Yap, S P; Yuen, K H; Wong, J W

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocotrienols under fed and fasted conditions in eight healthy volunteers. The volunteers were administered a single oral dose of mixed tocotrienols (300 mg) under fed or fasted conditions. The bioavailability of tocotrienols under the two conditions was compared using the parameters peak plasma concentration (Cmax), time to reach peak plasma concentration (Tmax) and total area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(o-infinity)). A statistically significant difference was observed between the fed and fasted logarithmic transformed values of Cmax (P < 0.01) and AUC(0-infinity) (P < 0.01) for all three tocotrienols. In addition, the 90% confidence intervals for the ratio of the logarithmic transformed AUC(0-infinity) values of alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocotrienols under the fed state over those of the fasted state were found to lie between 2.24-3.40, 2.05-4.09 and 1.59-3.81, respectively, while those of the Cmax were between 2.28-4.39, 2.31-5.87 and 1.52-4.05, respectively. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between the fed and fasted Tmax values of the three homologues. The mean apparent elimination half-life (t(1/2)) of alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocotrienols was estimated to be 4.4, 4.3 and 2.3 h, respectively, being between 4.5- to 8.7-fold shorter than that reported for alpha-tocopherol. No statistically significant difference was observed between the fed and fasted t(1/2) values. The mean apparent volume of distribution (Vd/f) values under the fed state were significantly smaller than those of the fasted state, which could be attributed to increased absorption of the tocotrienols in the fed state.

  14. Cyclodextrin-modified microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography for separation of alpha-, gamma-, delta-tocopherol and alpha-tocopherol acetate.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lin-Chau; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Sun, Shao-Wen

    2006-03-31

    Different forms of tocopherols, together with tocotrienols, are collectively named as vitamin E, and each possesses different degree of medical, biological and physiochemical significance. The main difficulty of separating different forms of tocopherols lay in their highly structural similarities and hydrophobicities. Microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC), claimed to attain high peak efficiency with great solubilization power, has not previously been applied to the separation of tocopherols. The effects that various parameters, such as buffer system, type and concentration of cyclodextrins, temperature, and sample matrix, have on the separation of tocopherols by MEEKC have been investigated. By using a buffer mixture of 4% (w/w) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), 6.6% (w/w) 1-butanol, 0.8% (w/w) n-octane, 20% (w/w) 2-propanol, 68.6% (w/w) phosphate (25mM, pH 2.5), and 25mM heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (DM-beta-CD), the separation of alpha-, gamma-, and delta-tocopherol, alpha-tocopherol acetate, as well as the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) at -26kV, 25 degrees C was completed within 35min. The practical potential of the present approach has been further validated by the determination of tocopherols in a vitamin E preparation, with the result of 132.63 (RSD 1.25%), 176.51 (RSD 0.29%), and 64.32mg (RSD 3.34%) per 500mg capsule for alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherol, respectively.

  15. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R Croft; Cowley, Patrick M; Singh, Abhishek; Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M; Baker, Anthony J; Simpson, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  16. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart

    PubMed Central

    Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M.; Baker, Anthony J.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  17. The pharmacological profile of delta opioid receptor ligands, (+) and (-) TAN-67 on pain modulation.

    PubMed

    Nagase, H; Yajima, Y; Fujii, H; Kawamura, K; Narita, M; Kamei, J; Suzuki, T

    2001-04-01

    We designed the nonpeptidic highly selective delta opioid receptor agonist on the basis of message address concept and the accessory site theory and synthesized (+/-) TAN-67. In spite of highly potent agonistic activity in in vitro assay, (+/-) TAN-67 (racemate) afforded a weak antinociceptive effect in the mouse tail-flick test. This result led us to separate (+/-) TAN-67 to optical pure compounds, (+) and (-) TAN-67. An i.t.-treatment with (-) TAN-67 produced profound antinociceptive effects through specifically acting on delta1 receptors. Unlike (-) TAN-67, i.t.-administered (+) TAN-67 displayed dose-related nociceptive behaviors such as scratching, biting and licking. The effect of (+) TAN-67 was blocked by i.t.-treatment with NTI (delta receptor antagonist) and (-) TAN-67 (delta1 receptor agonist), but not by morphine (mu receptor agonist). The mechanisms involved in spinal pain modulation induced by (+) and (-) TAN-67 were also described. PMID:11358331

  18. Postnatal changes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 4, alpha 7 and beta 2 subunits genes expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Liu, C; Miao, H; Gong, Z H; Nordberg, A

    1998-10-01

    Postnatal changes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 4, alpha 7 and beta 2 subunits mRNAs were investigated in rat brain using ribonuclease protection assay. Multiple developmental patterns were observed: (1) transient expression during the first few postnatal weeks; alpha 2 in the hippocampus and brain stem, alpha 3 in the striatum, cerebellum and cortex, alpha 4 in the hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum, alpha 7 in the cerebellum and beta 2 in the striatum. (2) Constant expression across development; alpha 2 and alpha 3 in the thalamus, alpha 4 in the cortex, thalamus and brain stem, alpha 7 in the thalamus and brain stem and beta 2 in all brain regions except striatum. (3) Non-detection across development; alpha 2 in the cortex, striatum and cerebellum. (4) Increase with age; alpha 7 in the cortex and hippocampus. (5) Bell-shaped development; alpha 7 in the striatum. Postnatal changes of nAChR isoforms in different brain regions of rat were investigated by receptor binding assays. The developmental patterns of [3H]epibatidine and (-)-[3H]nicotine binding sites were similar to each other in each brain region, but different from that of [3H] alpha-bungarotoxin binding sites. No obvious correlation was observed between the developmental patterns of [3H] alpha-bungarotoxin, [3H]epibatidine and (-)-[3H]nicotine binding sites and corresponding subunits mRNAs. These results indicate that multiple mechanisms are involved in changes of gene expression of nAChRs subunits in the brain of developing rats.

  19. Xenopus laevis alpha and beta thyroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Yaoita, Y; Shi, Y B; Brown, D D

    1990-01-01

    The Xenopus laevis genome encodes two genes for the alpha (TR alpha) and two genes for the beta (TR beta) thyroid hormone receptors. The two TR alpha genes closely resemble their rat, human, and chicken counterparts. No alternatively spliced TR alpha cDNA clones were found in the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR). In contrast, complex alternative splicing of TR beta mRNA occurs within the 5' UTR as well as possible alternative transcriptional start sites. As many as eight exons encoding mainly the 5' UTR are alternatively spliced, giving rise to at least two amino termini for each of the two TR beta proteins. The 5' UTR of transcripts from both TR alpha and TR beta genes contain multiple AUG sequences with short open reading frames suggesting translational control mechanisms might play a role in expression of TR genes. Images PMID:2402492

  20. Enhanced behavioral sensitivity to the competitive GABA agonist, gaboxadol, in transgenic mice over-expressing hippocampal extrasynaptic alpha6beta GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Saarelainen, Kati S; Ranna, Martin; Rabe, Holger; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Möykkynen, Tommi; Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Linden, Anni-Maija; Lüddens, Hartmut; Korpi, Esa R

    2008-04-01

    The behavioral and functional significance of the extrasynaptic inhibitory GABA(A) receptors in the brain is still poorly known. We used a transgenic mouse line expressing the GABA(A) receptor alpha6 subunit gene in the forebrain under the Thy-1.2 promoter (Thy1alpha6) mice ectopically expressing alpha6 subunits especially in the hippocampus to study how extrasynaptically enriched alphabeta(gamma2)-type receptors alter animal behavior and receptor responses. In these mice extrasynaptic alpha6beta receptors make up about 10% of the hippocampal GABA(A) receptors resulting in imbalance between synaptic and extrasynaptic inhibition. The synthetic GABA-site competitive agonist gaboxadol (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol; 3 mg/kg) induced remarkable anxiolytic-like response in the light : dark exploration and elevated plus-maze tests in Thy1alpha6 mice, while being almost inactive in wild-type mice. The transgenic mice also lost quicker and for longer time their righting reflex after 25 mg/kg gaboxadol than wild-type mice. In hippocampal sections of Thy1alpha6 mice, the alpha6beta receptors could be visualized autoradiographically by interactions between gaboxadol and GABA via [(35)S]TBPS binding to the GABA(A) receptor ionophore. Gaboxadol inhibition of the binding could be partially prevented by GABA. Electrophysiology of recombinant GABA(A) receptors revealed that GABA was a partial agonist at alpha6beta3 and alpha6beta3delta receptors, but a full agonist at alpha6beta3gamma2 receptors when compared with gaboxadol. The results suggest strong behavioral effects via selective pharmacological activation of enriched extrasynaptic alphabeta GABA(A) receptors, and the mouse model represents an example of the functional consequences of altered balance between extrasynaptic and synaptic inhibition.

  1. Oestrogen receptor knockout mice: roles for oestrogen receptors alpha and beta in reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sylvia Curtis; Korach, Kenneth S

    2003-02-01

    Oestrogen is an essential component of female reproduction, with well-characterized functions in the uterus, ovaries, mammary gland and hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The mechanism of oestrogen action involves mediation of the rate of transcription by nuclear-localized oestrogen receptor molecules. Two oestrogen receptors are present in mouse tissues, oestrogen receptors alpha and beta. Each receptor exhibits differential tissue expression patterns. Mouse models with genetically engineered disruption or 'knockout' of the oestrogen receptors have been developed. Characterization of the resulting defects in reproductive tissues as well as alterations in physiological and genomic responses has given insight into the receptor-mediated effects of oestrogen in reproduction. Oestrogen receptor alpha knockout females are infertile because they are anovulatory, have disruption in LH regulation and have uteri that are insensitive to oestrogen. In contrast, oestrogen receptor beta knockout females are sub-fertile and primarily lack efficient ovulatory function. Mice with deletion of both oestrogen receptors alpha and beta are similar to those lacking oestrogen receptor alpha only, but exhibit a unique ovarian pathology. These observed phenotypes elucidate the relative roles of the oestrogen receptors in reproductive functions of female rodents.

  2. Phorbol esters promote alpha 1-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and receptor uncoupling from inositol phospholipid metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Leeb-Lundberg, L M; Cotecchia, S; Lomasney, J W; DeBernardis, J F; Lefkowitz, R J; Caron, M G

    1985-01-01

    DDT1 MF-2 cells, which are derived from hamster vas deferens smooth muscle, contain alpha 1-adrenergic receptors (54,800 +/- 2700 sites per cell) that are coupled to stimulation of inositol phospholipid metabolism. Incubation of these cells with tumor-promoting phorbol esters, which stimulate calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, leads to a marked attenuation of the ability of alpha 1-receptor agonists such as norepinephrine to stimulate the turnover of inositol phospholipids. This turnover was measured by determining the 32P content of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid after prelabeling of the cellular ATP pool with 32Pi. These phorbol ester-treated cells also displayed a decrease in binding affinity of cellular alpha 1 receptors for agonists with no change in antagonist affinity. By using affinity chromatography on the affinity resin Affi-Gel-A55414, the alpha 1 receptors were purified approximately equal to 300-fold from control and phorbol ester-treated 32Pi-prelabeled cells. As assessed by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the Mr 80,000 alpha 1-receptor ligand-binding subunit is a phosphopeptide containing 1.2 mol of phosphate per mol of alpha 1 receptor. After phorbol ester treatment this increased to 3.6 mol of phosphate per mol of alpha 1 receptor. The effect of phorbol esters on norepinephrine-stimulated inositol phospholipid turnover and alpha 1-receptor phosphorylation showed the same rapid time course with a t1/2 less than 2 min. These results indicate that calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase may play an important role in regulating the function of receptors that are coupled to the inositol phospholipid cycle by phosphorylating and deactivating them. Images PMID:2994039

  3. A hot spot for hotfoot mutations in the gene encoding the delta2 glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Matsuda, Shinji; Drews, Valerie; Torashima, Takashi; Meisler, Miriam H; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2003-04-01

    The orphan glutamate receptor delta2 is selectively expressed in Purkinje cells and plays a crucial role in cerebellar functions. Recently, ataxia in the hotfoot mouse ho4J was demonstrated to be caused by a deletion in the delta2 receptor gene (Grid2) removing the N-terminal 170 amino acids of the delta2 receptor. To understand how delta2 receptors function, we characterized mutations in eight additional spontaneously occurring hotfoot alleles of Grid2. The mouse Grid2 gene consists of 16 exons, spanning approximately 1.4 Mb. Genomic DNA analysis showed that seven hotfoot mutants had a deletion of one or more exons encoding the N-terminal domain of delta2 receptors. The exception is ho5J, which has a point mutation in exon 12. Deletions in ho7J, ho9J, ho11J and ho12J mice result in the in-frame deletion of between 40 and 95 amino acids. Expression of constructs containing these deletions in HEK293 cells resulted in protein retention in the endoplasmic reticulum or cis-Golgi without transport to the cell surface. Coimmunoprecipitation assays indicated that these deletions also reduce the intermolecular interaction between individual delta2 receptors. These results indicate that the deleted N-terminal regions are crucial for oligomerization of delta2 receptors and their subsequent transport to the cell surface of Purkinje cells. The relatively large size of the Grid2 gene may be one of the reasons why many spontaneous mutations occur in this gene. In addition, the frequent occurrence of in-frame deletions within the N-terminal domain in hotfoot mutants suggests the importance of this domain in the function of delta2 receptors.

  4. Schizophrenia and the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laura F; Freedman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the devastating symptoms of psychosis, many people with schizophrenia also suffer from cognitive impairment. These cognitive symptoms lead to marked dysfunction and can impact employability, treatment adherence, and social skills. Deficits in P50 auditory gating are associated with attentional impairment and may contribute to cognitive symptoms and perceptual disturbances. This nicotinic cholinergic-mediated inhibitory process represents a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in schizophrenia. This chapter will review evidence implicating the nicotinic cholinergic, and specifically, the alpha7 nicotinic receptor system in the pathology of schizophrenia. Impaired auditory sensory gating has been linked to the alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene on the chromosome 15q14 locus. A majority of persons with schizophrenia are heavy smokers. Although nicotine can acutely reverse diminished auditory sensory gating in people with schizophrenia, this effect is lost on a chronic basis due to receptor desensitization. The alpha7 nicotinic agonist 3-(2,4 dimethoxy)benzylidene-anabaseine (DMXBA) can also enhance auditory sensory gating in animal models. DMXBA is well tolerated in humans and a new study in persons with schizophrenia has found that DMXBA enhances both P50 auditory gating and cognition. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists appear to be viable candidates for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia.

  5. DNA encoding an. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Weinshank, R.L.; Hartig, P.R.

    1991-10-01

    This paper describes an isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding a human alpha 2B-adrenergic receptor. This patent also describes an isolated nucleic acid molecule, wherein the isolated nucleic acid molecule is a DNA molecule and a mammalian cell comprising the DNA molecule.

  6. Cholinergic modulation of microglial activation by alpha 7 nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Shytle, R Douglas; Mori, Takashi; Townsend, Kirk; Vendrame, Martina; Sun, Nan; Zeng, Jin; Ehrhart, Jared; Silver, Archie A; Sanberg, Paul R; Tan, Jun

    2004-04-01

    Almost all degenerative diseases of the CNS are associated with chronic inflammation. A central step in this process is the activation of brain mononuclear phagocyte cells, called microglia. While it is recognized that healthy neurons and astrocytes regulate the magnitude of microglia-mediated innate immune responses and limit excessive CNS inflammation, the endogenous signals governing this process are not fully understood. In the peripheral nervous system, recent studies suggest that an endogenous 'cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway' regulates systemic inflammatory responses via alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors (nAChR) found on blood-borne macrophages. These data led us to investigate whether a similar cholinergic pathway exists in the brain that could regulate microglial activation. Here we report for the first time that cultured microglial cells express alpha 7 nAChR subunit as determined by RT-PCR, western blot, immunofluorescent, and immunohistochemistry analyses. Acetylcholine and nicotine pre-treatment inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF-alpha release in murine-derived microglial cells, an effect attenuated by alpha 7 selective nicotinic antagonist, alpha-bungarotoxin. Furthermore, this inhibition appears to be mediated by a reduction in phosphorylation of p44/42 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Though preliminary, our findings suggest the existence of a brain cholinergic pathway that regulates microglial activation through alpha 7 nicotinic receptors. Negative regulation of microglia activation may also represent additional mechanism underlying nicotine's reported neuroprotective properties.

  7. Neuronal-type alpha-bungarotoxin receptors and the alpha 5-nicotinic receptor subunit gene are expressed in neuronal and nonneuronal human cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Chini, B; Clementi, F; Hukovic, N; Sher, E

    1992-01-01

    alpha-Bungarotoxin (alpha Bgtx) is a toxin known to interact with muscle nicotinic receptors and with some neuronal nicotinic receptors. We show that alpha Bgtx binding sites are also expressed in nonmuscle and nonneuronal human cells, including small cell lung carcinoma and several epithelial cell lines. These receptors are immunologically related to the alpha Bgtx receptors of unknown function described in the nervous system and in the IMR32 neuroblastoma cell line and are distinct from muscle nicotinic receptors. We have also cloned from IMR32 cells the human alpha 5-nicotinic receptor subunit, which is supposed to participate in the formation of alpha Bgtx receptors. Transcripts corresponding to the alpha 5-subunit gene were found not only in neuroblastoma cells but also in all the cell lines expressing alpha Bgtx receptors, with the exception of the TE671 cell line, whose nicotinic receptor subunits are of the muscle type. We conclude that both alpha Bgtx receptors and the alpha 5-nicotinic subunit gene are not neuron-specific, as previously thought, but are expressed in a number of human cell lines of various origin. Images PMID:1542648

  8. Retinoic acid receptor alpha is associated with tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Henrik J.; Sanchez, Betzabe C.; Mundt, Filip; Forshed, Jenny; Kovacs, Aniko; Panizza, Elena; Hultin-Rosenberg, Lina; Lundgren, Bo; Martens, Ulf; Máthé, Gyöngyvér; Yakhini, Zohar; Helou, Khalil; Krawiec, Kamilla; Kanter, Lena; Hjerpe, Anders; Stål, Olle; Linderholm, Barbro K.; Lehtiö, Janne

    2013-01-01

    About one-third of oestrogen receptor alpha-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen relapse. Here we identify the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor alpha as a marker of tamoxifen resistance. Using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics, we show that retinoic acid receptor alpha protein networks and levels differ in a tamoxifen-sensitive (MCF7) and a tamoxifen-resistant (LCC2) cell line. High intratumoural retinoic acid receptor alpha protein levels also correlate with reduced relapse-free survival in oestrogen receptor alpha-positive breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen solely. A similar retinoic acid receptor alpha expression pattern is seen in a comparable independent patient cohort. An oestrogen receptor alpha and retinoic acid receptor alpha ligand screening reveals that tamoxifen-resistant LCC2 cells have increased sensitivity to retinoic acid receptor alpha ligands and are less sensitive to oestrogen receptor alpha ligands compared with MCF7 cells. Our data indicate that retinoic acid receptor alpha may be a novel therapeutic target and a predictive factor for oestrogen receptor alpha-positive breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen. PMID:23868472

  9. Multiphysics phase field modeling of hydrogen diffusion and delta-hydride precipitation in alpha-zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokisaari, Andrea M.

    Hydride precipitation in zirconium is a significant factor limiting the lifetime of nuclear fuel cladding, because hydride microstructures play a key role in the degradation of fuel cladding. However, the behavior of hydrogen in zirconium has typically been modeled using mean field approaches, which do not consider microstructural evolution. This thesis describes a quantitative microstructural evolution model for the alpha-zirconium/delta-hydride system and the associated numerical methods and algorithms that were developed. The multiphysics, phase field-based model incorporates CALPHAD free energy descriptions, linear elastic solid mechanics, and classical nucleation theory. A flexible simulation software implementing the model, Hyrax, is built on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) finite element framework. Hyrax is open-source and freely available; moreover, the numerical methods and algorithms that have been developed are generalizable to other systems. The algorithms are described in detail, and verification studies for each are discussed. In addition, analyses of the sensitivity of the simulation results to the choice of numerical parameters are presented. For example, threshold values for the CALPHAD free energy algorithm and the use of mesh and time adaptivity when employing the nucleation algorithm are studied. Furthermore, preliminary insights into the nucleation behavior of delta-hydrides are described. These include a) the sensitivities of the nucleation rate to temperature, interfacial energy, composition and elastic energy, b) the spatial variation of the nucleation rate around a single precipitate, and c) the effect of interfacial energy and nucleation rate on the precipitate microstructure. Finally, several avenues for future work are discussed. Topics encompass the terminal solid solubility hysteresis of hydrogen in zirconium and the effects of the alpha/delta interfacial energy, as well as thermodiffusion, plasticity

  10. Tetrahydro-iso-alpha Acids Antagonize Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activity in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lempereur, Maëlle; Majewska, Claire; Brunquers, Amandine; Wongpramud, Sumalee; Valet, Bénédicte; Janssens, Philippe; Dillemans, Monique; Van Nedervelde, Laurence; Gallo, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids commonly called THIAA or Tetra are modified hop acids extracted from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) which are frequently used in brewing industry mainly in order to provide beer bitterness and foam stability. Interestingly, molecular structure of tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids is close to a new type of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) antagonists aimed at disrupting the binding of coactivators containing an LxxLL motif (NR-box). In this work we show that THIAA decreases estradiol-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 (ERα-positive breast cancer cells). Besides, we show that it inhibits ERα transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this extract fails to compete with estradiol for ERα binding and does not significantly impact the receptor turnover rate in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it does not act like classical antiestrogens. Hence, we demonstrate that THIAA is able to antagonize ERα estradiol-induced recruitment of the LxxLL binding motif. PMID:27190515

  11. Tetrahydro-iso-alpha Acids Antagonize Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activity in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lempereur, Maëlle; Majewska, Claire; Brunquers, Amandine; Wongpramud, Sumalee; Valet, Bénédicte; Janssens, Philippe; Dillemans, Monique; Van Nedervelde, Laurence; Gallo, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids commonly called THIAA or Tetra are modified hop acids extracted from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) which are frequently used in brewing industry mainly in order to provide beer bitterness and foam stability. Interestingly, molecular structure of tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids is close to a new type of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) antagonists aimed at disrupting the binding of coactivators containing an LxxLL motif (NR-box). In this work we show that THIAA decreases estradiol-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 (ERα-positive breast cancer cells). Besides, we show that it inhibits ERα transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this extract fails to compete with estradiol for ERα binding and does not significantly impact the receptor turnover rate in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it does not act like classical antiestrogens. Hence, we demonstrate that THIAA is able to antagonize ERα estradiol-induced recruitment of the LxxLL binding motif. PMID:27190515

  12. Oestrogen receptor alpha in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Audrey F.; Ewart, Marie-Ann; Mair, Kirsty; Nilsen, Margaret; Dempsie, Yvonne; Loughlin, Lynn; Maclean, Margaret R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) occurs more frequently in women with mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) and dysfunctional BMPR2 signalling underpinning heritable PAH. We have previously shown that serotonin can uncover a pulmonary hypertensive phenotype in BMPR2+/− mice and that oestrogen can increase serotinergic signalling in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (hPASMCs). Hence, here we wished to characterize the expression of oestrogen receptors (ERs) in male and female human pulmonary arteries and have examined the influence of oestrogen and serotonin on BMPR2 and ERα expression. Methods and results By immunohistochemistry, we showed that ERα, ERβ, and G-protein-coupled receptors are expressed in human pulmonary arteries localizing mainly to the smooth muscle layer which also expresses the serotonin transporter (SERT). Protein expression of ERα protein was higher in female PAH patient hPASMCs compared with male and serotonin also increased the expression of ERα. 17β-estradiol induced proliferation of hPASMCs via ERα activation and this engaged mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt signalling. Female mice over-expressing SERT (SERT+ mice) develop PH and the ERα antagonist MPP attenuated the development of PH in normoxic and hypoxic female SERT+ mice. The therapeutic effects of MPP were accompanied by increased expression of BMPR2 in mouse lung. Conclusion ERα is highly expressed in female hPASMCs from PAH patients and mediates oestrogen-induced proliferation of hPASMCs via mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt signalling. Serotonin can increase ERα expression in hPASMCs and antagonism of ERα reverses serotonin-dependent PH in the mouse and increases BMPR2 expression. PMID:25765937

  13. Potent delta-opioid receptor agonists containing the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Guerrini, Remo; Negri, Lucia; Giannini, Elisa; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Bryant, Sharon D; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2002-12-01

    Conversion of delta-opioid receptor antagonists containing the 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (Tic) pharmacophore into potent delta-agonists required a third heteroaromatic nucleus, such as 1H-benzimidazole-2-yl (Bid) and a linker of specified length both located C-terminally to Tic in the general formula H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(R)-R'. The distance between Tic and Bid is a determining factor responsible for the acquisition of delta agonism (2, 2', 3, 4, 6) or delta antagonism (8). Compounds containing a C-terminal Ala (1, 1'), Asp (5), or Asn (7) with an amide (1, 1', 5) or free acid group (7) served as delta-antagonist controls lacking the third heteroaromatic ring. A change in chirality of the spacer (2, 2') or inclusion of a negative charge via derivatives of Asp (4, 6) resulted in potent delta agonism and moderate mu agonism, although delta-receptor affinity decreased about 10-fold for 4 while mu affinity fell by over 2 orders of magnitude. Repositioning of the negative charge in the linker altered activity: H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(CH(2)-Bid)COOH (6) maintained high delta affinity (K(i) = 0.042 nM) and delta agonism (IC(50) = 0.015 nM), but attachment of the free acid group to Bid [H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(2)-Bid(CH(2)-COOH) (9)] reconstituted delta antagonism (K(e) = 0.27 nM). The data demonstrate that a linker separating the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore and Bid, regardless of the presence of a negative charge, is important in the acquisition of opioids exhibiting potent delta agonism and weak mu agonism from a parent delta antagonist.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and study of arsenate adsorption from aqueous solution by {alpha}- and {delta}-phase manganese dioxide nanoadsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Mandeep; Thanh, Dong Nguyen; Ulbrich, Pavel; Strnadova, Nina; Stepanek, Frantisek

    2010-12-15

    Single-phase {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} nanorods and {delta}-MnO{sub 2} nano-fiber clumps were synthesized using manganese pentahydrate in an aqueous solution. These nanomaterials were characterized using the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM), Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Brunauer-Elmet-Teller nitrogen adsorption technique (BET-N{sub 2} adsorption). The structural analysis shows that {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} (2x2 tunnel structure) has the form of needle-shaped nanorods and {delta}-MnO{sub 2} (2D-layered structure) consists of fine needle-like fibers arranged in ball-like aggregates. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out to determine the effect of pH on adsorption kinetics and adsorption capacity for the removal of As(V) from aqueous solution onto these two types of nanoadsorbents. The adsorption capacity of As(V) was found to be highly pH dependent. The adsorption of As(V) onto {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} reached equilibrium more rapidly with higher adsorption capacity compared to {delta}-MnO{sub 2}. -- Graphical abstract: {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} (2x2 tunnel structure) nanorods and {delta}-MnO{sub 2} (2-D layered structure) nano-fiber clumps were synthesized in a facile way in an aqueous solution and characterized by TEM, FE-SEM, XRD and BET-N{sub 2} adsorption techniques. The structural analysis shows that {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} is needle shaped nanorods and {delta}-MnO{sub 2} consists of 2-D platelets of fine needle-like fibers arranged in ball-like aggregates. Further batch experiments confirmed that both nanoadsorbents are potential candidates for the adsorption of As(V) with a capacity of 19.41 and 15.33 mg g{sup -1} for {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} and {delta}-MnO{sub 2}, respectively. The presence of As3d peak in XPS study indicates that arsenic on the surface of nanoadsorbents is in the stable form of As(V) with a percentage of arsenate onto {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} is 0.099% as compared to 0.021% onto {delta}-MnO{sub 2

  15. "Burst-like" Characteristics of the delta/alpha-prime Phase Transformation in Pu-Ga Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Blobaum, K; Krenn, C; Haslam, J; Wall, M; Schwartz, A

    2003-11-10

    The {delta} to {alpha}' phase transformation in Pu-Ga alloys is intriguing for both scientific and technological reasons. On cooling, the ductile fcc d-phase transforms martensitically to the brittle monoclinic {alpha}'-phase at approximately -120 C (depending on composition). This exothermic transformation involves a 20% volume contraction and a significant increase in resistivity. The reversion of {alpha}' to {delta} involves a large temperature hysteresis beginning just above room temperature. In an attempt to better understand the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics responsible for these unusual features, we examined the {delta}/{alpha}' transformations in a 0.6 wt% Pu-Ga alloy using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and resistometry. Both techniques indicate that the martensite start temperature is -120 C and the austenite start temperature is 35 C. The heat of transformation is approximately 3 kJ/mole. During the {alpha}' {yields} {delta} reversion, ''spikes'' and ''steps'' are observed in DSC and resistometry scans, respectively. These spikes and steps are periodic, and their periodicity with respect to temperature does not vary with heating rate. With an appropriate annealing cycle, including a ''rest'' at room temperature, these spikes and steps can be reproduced through many thermal cycles of a single sample.

  16. Probing the isothermal (delta)->(alpha)' martensitic transformation in Pu-Ga with in situ x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, J R; Blobaum, K M; Schwartz, A J; Cynn, H; Yang, W; Evans, W J

    2010-03-11

    The time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curve for the {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} isothermal martensitic transformation in a Pu-1.9 at. % Ga alloy is peculiar because it is reported to have a double-C curve. Recent work suggests that an ambient temperature conditioning treatment enables the lower-C curve. However, the mechanisms responsible for the double-C are still not fully understood. When the {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation is induced by pressure, an intermediate {gamma}{prime} phase is observed in some alloys. It has been suggested that transformation at upper-C temperatures may proceed via this intermediate phase, while lower-C transformation progresses directly from {delta} to {alpha}{prime}. To investigate the possibility of thermally induced transformation via the intermediate {gamma}{prime} phase, in situ x-ray diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source was performed. Using transmission x-ray diffraction, the {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation was observed in samples as thin at 30 {micro}m as a function of time and temperature. The intermediate {gamma}{prime} phase was not observed at -120 C (upper-C curve) or -155 C (lower-C curve). Results indicate that the bulk of the {alpha}{prime} phase forms relatively rapidly at -120 C and -155 C.

  17. Binding of receptor-recognized forms of alpha2-macroglobulin to the alpha2-macroglobulin signaling receptor activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Misra, U K; Pizzo, S V

    1998-05-29

    Ligation of the alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2M) signaling receptor by receptor-recognized forms of alpha2M (alpha2M*) initiates mitogenesis secondary to increased intracellular Ca2+. We report here that ligation of the alpha2M signaling receptor also causes a 1. 5-2.5-fold increase in wortmannin-sensitive phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity as measured by the quantitation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3). PIP3 formation was alpha2M* concentration-dependent with a maximal response at approximately 50 pM ligand concentration. The peak formation of PIP3 occurred at 10 min of incubation. The alpha2M receptor binding fragment mutant K1370R which binds to the alpha2M signaling receptor activating the signaling cascade, increased PIP3 formation by 2-fold. The mutant K1374A, which binds very poorly to the alpha2M signaling receptor, did not cause any increase in PIP3 formation. alpha2M*-induced DNA synthesis was inhibited by wortmannin. 1, 2Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acetoxymethylester a chelator of intracellular Ca2+, drastically reduced alpha2M*-induced increases in PIP3 formation. We conclude that PI3K is involved in alpha2M*-induced mitogenesis in macrophages and intracellular Ca2+ plays a role in PI3K activation. PMID:9593670

  18. T cell receptor gamma/delta+ lymphocyte subsets during HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Autran, B; Triebel, F; Katlama, C; Rozenbaum, W; Hercend, T; Debre, P

    1989-01-01

    The gamma/delta T cell receptor is expressed on 1-15% of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). This subpopulation is recognized by anti-TcR-delta 1 MoAb which is functionally defined as a pan-delta MoAb. Two other antibodies, anti-Ti-gamma A and anti-delta-TcS1 are directed at variable determinants of either the gamma or the delta chain, respectively. In normal individuals anti-Ti-gamma A characterizes two thirds of the TcR-delta 1+ subpopulation whereas anti-delta TcS1 reacts with most of the delta-TcR1+, Ti-gamma A- cells. In the present study, we have used these three MoAbs to characterize the TcR gamma/delta+ peripheral lymphocytes during HIV infection. Fifty patients at three distinct clinical stages (SPC/PGL, ARC, AIDS) of the infection have been studied. The Ti-gamma A+ subset in the whole group accounted for 3.45% of PBL and did not differ from controls; it was also unchanged when the three groups were analysed separately. The Ti-gamma A+ circulating cells were in a resting state as assessed by the absence of surface-expressed activation markers. In contrast, in some patients the proportion of circulating TcR-delta 1+, Ti-gamma A-, delta TcS1+ cells was increased (4.75%) leading to an inversion of the Ti-gamma A/delta-TcS1 ratio. Altogether, those data suggest a conservation of the Ti-gamma A+ subset during HIV infection, contrasting with an increase of the delta-TcS1+, Ti-gamma A- fraction in some cases. PMID:2522839

  19. Autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid receptors in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, R.P. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    In vitro autoradiographic techniques were coupled with selective chemical lesions of the A10 dopamine cells and intrinsic perikarya of the region to delineate the anatomical localization of mu and delta opioid receptors, as well as, neurotensin receptors. Mu opioid receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DAGO. Delta receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DPDPE. Neurotensin receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-NT3. Unilateral lesions of the dopamine perikarya were produced by injections of 6-OHDA administered in the ventral mesencephalon. Unilateral lesions of intrinsic perikarya were induced by injections of quinolinic acid in to the A10 dopamine cell region. Unilateral lesions produced with 6-OHDA resulted in the loss of neurotensin receptors in the A10 region and within the terminal fields. Mu opioid receptors were unaffected by this treatment, but delta opioid receptors increased in the contralateral striatum and nucleus accumbens following 6-OHDA administration. Quinolinic acid produced a reduction of mu opioid receptors within the A10 region with a concomitant reduction in neurotensin receptors in both the cell body region and terminal fields. These results are consistent with a variety of biochemical and behavioral data which suggest the indirect modulation of dopamine transmission by the opioids. In contrast these results strongly indicate a direct modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine system by neurotensin.

  20. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{delta}

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Zhencheng; Liu Daoyan; Zhang Lili; Shen Chenyi; Ma Qunli; Cao Tingbing; Wang Lijuan; Nie Hai; Zidek, Walter; Tepel, Martin; Zhu Zhiming . E-mail: zhuzm@yahoo.com

    2007-03-09

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{delta} (PPAR-{delta})-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each p < 0.05). Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by increased CB1 expression in adipose tissue, whereas exercise significantly reduced CB1 expression (each p < 0.05). CB1 receptor expression and adipocyte differentiation were directly regulated by PPAR-{delta}. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by reduced PPAR-{delta}. Furthermore, selective silencing of PPAR-{delta} by RNA interference in 3T3-L1-preadipocyte cells significantly increased CB1 expression from 1.00 {+-} 0.06 (n = 3) to 1.91 {+-} 0.06 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and increased adipocyte differentiation, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PPAR-{delta} significantly reduced CB1 expression to 0.39 {+-} 0.03 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and reduced adipocyte differentiation. In the presence of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant adipocyte differentiation in stimulated 3T3 L1 preadipocyte cells was significantly reduced. The study indicates that high-fat diet-induced hypertrophy of adipocytes is associated with increased CB1 receptor expression which is directly regulated by PPAR-{delta}. Both CB1 and PPAR-{delta} are intimately involved in therapeutic interventions against a most important cardiovascular risk factor.

  1. Solution structure of {alpha}-conotoxin PIA, a novel antagonist of {alpha}6 subunit containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Seung-Wook; Lee, Si-Hyung; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Olivera, Baldomero M.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Han, Kyou-Hoon . E-mail: khhan600@kribb.re.kr

    2005-12-30

    {alpha}-Conotoxin PIA is a novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist isolated from Conus purpurascens that targets nAChR subtypes containing {alpha}6 and {alpha}3 subunits. {alpha}-conotoxin PIA displays 75-fold higher affinity for rat {alpha}6/{alpha}3{beta}2{beta}3 nAChRs than for rat {alpha}3{beta}2 nAChRs. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of {alpha}-conotoxin PIA by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The {alpha}-conotoxin PIA has an '{omega}-shaped' overall topology as other {alpha}4/7 subfamily conotoxins. Yet, unlike other neuronally targeted {alpha}4/7-conotoxins, its N-terminal tail Arg{sup 1}-Asp{sup 2}-Pro{sup 3} protrudes out of its main molecular body because Asp{sup 2}-Pro{sup 3}-Cys{sup 4}-Cys{sup 5} forms a stable type I {beta}-turn. In addition, a kink introduced by Pro{sup 15} in the second loop of this toxin provides a distinct steric and electrostatic environment from those in {alpha}-conotoxins MII and GIC. By comparing the structure of {alpha}-conotoxin PIA with other functionally related {alpha}-conotoxins we suggest structural features in {alpha}-conotoxin PIA that may be associated with its unique receptor recognition profile.

  2. Inhibition of allograft rejection by anti-T-cell receptor-alpha beta monoclonal antibodies preserving resistance to bacterial infection.

    PubMed Central

    Eto, M; Yoshikai, Y; Nishimura, Y; Hiromatsu, K; Maeda, T; Nomoto, K; Kong, Y Y; Kubo, R T; Kumazawa, J; Nomoto, K

    1994-01-01

    Anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) has been administered in clinical organ transplantation to reverse acute allograft rejection; however, severe immunodeficiency can result from such mAb treatment and cause an increased incidence of opportunistic infections. Therefore, new model systems are required in order to establish better methods for suppressing allograft rejection while preserving resistance to opportunistic infections. In this study, we compared the effects of the in vivo administration of anti-T-cell receptor-alpha beta (TcR alpha beta) mAb, H57-597, with those of anti-CD3 mAb, 145-2C11. Much to our surprise, the in vivo administration of anti-TcR alpha beta mAb prior to skin grafting led to a longer allograft survival than that of anti-CD3 mAb at any of the comparable dosages examined. In the lymphoid organs of mice treated with anti-TcR alpha beta mAb, TcR alpha beta-bearing cells were almost completely depleted, while TcR gamma delta-bearing cells remained at a relatively increased level on day 14 after anti-TcR alpha beta mAb treatment. The in vitro stimulation by anti-TcR gamma delta mAb clearly showed that such TcR gamma delta-bearing cells were functionally intact. Furthermore, the mice treated with anti-TcR alpha beta mAb, but not anti-CD3 mAb, were observed to be resistant to infection with Listeria monocytogenes. Finally, treatment with H57-597, but not with 145-2C11, led to a marked prolongation of skin allograft survival in the thymectomized mice. These results strongly suggest that anti-TcR alpha beta mAb, which partially preserved anti-bacterial resistance, may be more effective in preventing graft rejection than anti-CD3 mAb in the periphery, and indicate that anti-TcR alpha beta mAb may thus be potentially applicable for human transplantation. In addition, these results also indicate that the TcR gamma delta-bearing cells alone, at least in the absence of TcR alpha beta-bearing cells, do not contribute to allograft rejection in vivo. PMID

  3. Pharmacophore modeling, in silico screening, molecular docking and molecular dynamics approaches for potential alpha-delta bungarotoxin-4 inhibitors discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Barani; Suresh, M. Xavier; Priya, B. Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Background: The alpha-delta bungartoxin-4 (α-δ-Bgt-4) is a potent neurotoxin produced by highly venomous snake species, Bungarus caeruleus, mainly targeting neuronal acetylcholine receptors (nAchRs) and producing adverse biological malfunctions leading to respiratory paralysis and mortality. Objective: In this study, we predicted the three-dimensional structure of α-δ-Bgt-4 using homology modeling and investigated the conformational changes and the key residues responsible for nAchRs inhibiting activity. Materials and Methods: From the selected plants, which are traditionally used for snake bites, the active compounds are taken and performed molecular interaction studies and also used for modern techniques like pharmacophore modeling and mapping and absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicity analysis which may increase the possibility of success. Results: Moreover, 100's of drug-like compounds were retrieved and analyzed through computational virtual screening and allowed for pharmacokinetic profiling, molecular docking and dynamics simulation. Conclusion: Finally the top five drug-like compounds having competing level of inhibition toward α-δ-Bgt-4 toxin were suggested based on their interaction with α-δ-Bgt-4 toxin. PMID:26109766

  4. Delta/Notch-Like EGF-Related Receptor (DNER) Is Not a Notch Ligand.

    PubMed

    Greene, Maxwell; Lai, Yongjie; Pajcini, Kostandin; Bailis, Will; Pear, Warren S; Lancaster, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Delta/Notch-like EGF-related receptor (DNER) has been reported to act as a Notch ligand, despite lacking a Delta/Serrate/Lag (DSL) binding domain common to all other known ligands. The established Notch ligand Delta-like 1 (DLL1), but not DNER, activated Notch1 in a luciferase assay, prevented the differentiation of myoblasts through Notch signaling, and bound Notch-fc in a cell-based assay. DNER is not a Notch ligand and its true function remains unknown. PMID:27622512

  5. Delta/Notch-Like EGF-Related Receptor (DNER) Is Not a Notch Ligand.

    PubMed

    Greene, Maxwell; Lai, Yongjie; Pajcini, Kostandin; Bailis, Will; Pear, Warren S; Lancaster, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Delta/Notch-like EGF-related receptor (DNER) has been reported to act as a Notch ligand, despite lacking a Delta/Serrate/Lag (DSL) binding domain common to all other known ligands. The established Notch ligand Delta-like 1 (DLL1), but not DNER, activated Notch1 in a luciferase assay, prevented the differentiation of myoblasts through Notch signaling, and bound Notch-fc in a cell-based assay. DNER is not a Notch ligand and its true function remains unknown.

  6. Delta/Notch-Like EGF-Related Receptor (DNER) Is Not a Notch Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yongjie; Pajcini, Kostandin; Bailis, Will; Pear, Warren S.; Lancaster, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Delta/Notch-like EGF-related receptor (DNER) has been reported to act as a Notch ligand, despite lacking a Delta/Serrate/Lag (DSL) binding domain common to all other known ligands. The established Notch ligand Delta-like 1 (DLL1), but not DNER, activated Notch1 in a luciferase assay, prevented the differentiation of myoblasts through Notch signaling, and bound Notch-fc in a cell-based assay. DNER is not a Notch ligand and its true function remains unknown. PMID:27622512

  7. PKC regulates the delta2 glutamate receptor interaction with S-SCAM/MAGI-2 protein.

    PubMed

    Yap, Chan Choo; Muto, Yuko; Kishida, Haruo; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Yano, Ryoji

    2003-02-21

    Inside cells, membrane proteins are localized at particular surface domains to perform their precise functions. Various kinds of PDZ domain proteins have been shown to play important roles in the intracellular trafficking and anchoring of membrane proteins. In this study, we show that delta2 glutamate receptor is interacting with S-SCAM/MAGI-2, a PDZ domain protein localized in the perinuclear region and postsynaptic sites of cerebellar Purkinje cells. The binding is regulated by PKC (protein kinase-C) mediated phosphorylation of the receptor with a unique repetitive structure in S-SCAM/MAGI-2. Co-expression of both proteins resulted in drastic changes of the receptor localization in COS7 cells. These results show a novel regulatory mechanism for the binding of PDZ domain proteins and suggest that the interaction between delta2 receptor and S-SCAM/MAGI-2 may be important for intracellular trafficking of the receptor.

  8. Activation of delta-opioid receptor contributes to the antinociceptive effect of oxycodone in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pao-Pao; Yeh, Geng-Chang; Yeh, Teng-Kuang; Xi, Jinghua; Loh, Horace H; Law, Ping-Yee; Tao, Pao-Luh

    2016-09-01

    Oxycodone has been used clinically for over 90 years. While it is known that it exhibits low affinity for the multiple opioid receptors, whether its pharmacological activities are due to oxycodone activation of the opioid receptor type or due to its active metabolite (oxymorphone) that exhibits high affinity for the mu-opioid receptors remains unresolved. Ross and Smith (1997) reported the antinociceptive effects of oxycodone (171nmol, i.c.v.) are induced by putative kappa-opioid receptors in SD rat while others have reported oxycodone activities are due to activation of mu- and/or delta-opioid receptors. In this study, using male mu-opioid receptor knock-out (MOR-KO) mice, we examined whether delta-opioid receptor was involved in oxycodone antinociception. Systemic subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of oxycodone (above 40mg/kg) could induce a small but significant antinociceptive effect in MOR-KO mice by the tail flick test. Delta-opioid receptor antagonist (naltrindole, 10mg/kg or 20mg/kg, i.p.) could block this effect. When oxycodone was injected directly into the brain of MOR-KO mice by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) route, oxycodone at doses of 50nmol or higher could induce similar level of antinociceptive responses to those observed in wild type mice at the same doses by i.c.v. Delta-opioid receptor antagonists (naltrindole at 10nmol or ICI 154,129 at 20μg) completely blocked the supraspinal antinociceptive effect of oxycodone in MOR-KO mice. Such oxycodone antinociceptive responses were probably not due to its active metabolites oxymorphone because (a) the relative low level of oxymorphone was found in the brain after systemically or centrally oxycodone injection using LC/MS/MS analysis; (b) oxymorphone at a dose that mimics the level detected in the mice brain did not show any significant antinocieption effect; (c) oxycodone exhibits equal potency as oxymorphone albeit being a partial agonist in regulating [Ca(2+)]I transients in a clonal cell line

  9. Delta-subunit confers novel biophysical features to alpha beta gamma-human epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) via a physical interaction.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Long; Su, Xue-Feng; Kedar, Shrestha; Li, Jie; Barbry, Pascal; Smith, Peter R; Matalon, Sadis; Benos, Dale J

    2006-03-24

    Native amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels exhibit a variety of biophysical properties, including variable sensitivities to amiloride, different ion selectivities, and diverse unitary conductances. The molecular basis of these differences has not been elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that co-expression of delta-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) underlies, at least in part, the multiplicity of amiloride-sensitive Na+ conductances in epithelial cells. For example, the delta-subunit may form multimeric channels with alpha beta gamma-ENaC. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed that delta-ENaC is co-expressed with alpha beta gamma-subunits in cultured human lung (H441 and A549), pancreatic (CFPAC), and colonic epithelial cells (Caco-2). Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that delta-ENaC is co-expressed with alpha-, beta-, and gamma-ENaC in H441 cells at the protein level. Measurement of current-voltage that cation selectivity ratios for the revealed relationships Na+/Li+/K+/Cs+/Ca2+/Mg2+, the apparent dissociation constant (Ki) for amiloride, and unitary conductances for delta alpha beta gamma-ENaC differed from those of both alpha beta gamma- and delta beta gamma-ENaC (n = 6). The contribution of the delta subunit to P(Li)/P(Na) ratio and unitary Na+ conductance under bi-ionic conditions depended on the injected cRNA concentration. In addition, the EC50 for proton activation, mean open and closed times, and the self-inhibition time of delta alpha beta gamma-ENaC differed from those of alpha beta gamma- and delta beta gamma-ENaC. Co-immunoprecipitation of delta-ENaC with alpha- and gamma-subunits in H441 and transfected COS-7 cells suggests an interaction among these proteins. We, therefore, concluded that the interactions of delta-ENaC with other subunits could account for heterogeneity of native epithelial channels. PMID:16423824

  10. The human glutamate receptor delta 2 gene (GRID2) maps to chromosome 4q22.

    PubMed

    Hu, W; Zuo, J; De Jager, P L; Heintz, N

    1998-01-01

    We isolated the human glutamate receptor delta 2 (GRID2) gene, which has 97.0% identity in amino acid sequence to the mouse glutamate receptor delta 2 (Grid2) gene. We subsequently mapped this gene to human chromosome 4q22 by radiation hybrid mapping and by hybridization to two overlapping human yeast artificial chromosomes that are located in 4q22. The Grid2 gene, which is mutated in lurcher (Lc) mice, maps to mouse chromosome 6. Thus, the mapping of the GRID2 gene to human chromosome 4q22 confirms and refines a region of synteny between mouse and human genomes.

  11. Involvement of PKC{alpha} in insulin-induced PKC{delta} expression: Importance of SP-1 and NF{kappa}B transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Horovitz-Fried, Miriam; Sampson, Sanford R. . E-mail: sampsos@mail.biu.ac.il

    2007-01-05

    Protein kinase C delta (PKC{delta}) is a key molecule in insulin signaling essential for insulin-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Recent studies in our laboratory have shown that insulin rapidly stimulates PKC{delta} activity and increases PKC{delta} protein and RNA levels, and that the SP-1 transcription factor is involved in insulin-induced transcription of the PKC{delta} gene. Activation of SP-1 involves serine phosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus. In this study we examined the possibility that PKC{alpha} might be involved in serine phosphorylation and activation of SP-1. We found that insulin rapidly phosphorylates and translocates SP-1. In the cytoplasm, SP-1 was constitutively associated with PKC{alpha}, and insulin stimulation caused these proteins to dissociate. In contrast, in the nucleus insulin induced an increase in association between PKC{alpha} and SP-1. PKC{alpha} inhibition blocked insulin-induced serine phosphorylation of SP-1 and its association with PKC{alpha} in the nucleus. Inhibition of PKC{alpha} also reduced the insulin-induced increase in PKC{delta} RNA and protein in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. We also attempted to determine if another transcription factor might be involved in regulation of PKC{delta} expression. We earlier showed that insulin did not affect nuclear NF{kappa}B levels. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B, however, increased insulin-induced increase in PKC{delta} RNA and protein in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Surprisingly, this inhibition reduced the insulin-induced increase in cytoplasmic and nuclear PKC{alpha} RNA and protein. Inhibition of PKC{delta} reduced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation as well as NF{kappa}B activation. Thus, PKC{alpha} regulates insulin-induced PKC{delta} expression levels and this regulation involves activation of SP-1 and NF{kappa}B.

  12. Agonist-Specific Recruitment of Arrestin Isoforms Differentially Modify Delta Opioid Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Perroy, Julie; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Smith, Monique L.; Vicente-Sanchez, Ana; Segura, Laura; Bana, Alia; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-specific recruitment of arrestins facilitates functional selectivity of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. Here, we describe agonist-selective recruitment of different arrestin isoforms to the delta opioid receptor in mice. A high-internalizing delta opioid receptor agonist (SNC80) preferentially recruited arrestin 2 and, in arrestin 2 knock-outs (KOs), we observed a significant increase in the potency of SNC80 to inhibit mechanical hyperalgesia and decreased acute tolerance. In contrast, the low-internalizing delta agonists (ARM390, JNJ20788560) preferentially recruited arrestin 3 with unaltered behavioral effects in arrestin 2 KOs. Surprisingly, arrestin 3 KO revealed an acute tolerance to these low-internalizing agonists, an effect never observed in wild-type animals. Furthermore, we examined delta opioid receptor–Ca2+ channel coupling in dorsal root ganglia desensitized by ARM390 and the rate of resensitization was correspondingly decreased in arrestin 3 KOs. Live-cell imaging in HEK293 cells revealed that delta opioid receptors are in pre-engaged complexes with arrestin 3 at the cell membrane and that ARM390 strengthens this membrane interaction. The disruption of these complexes in arrestin 3 KOs likely accounts for the altered responses to low-internalizing agonists. Together, our results show agonist-selective recruitment of arrestin isoforms and reveal a novel endogenous role of arrestin 3 as a facilitator of resensitization and an inhibitor of tolerance mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Agonists that bind to the same receptor can produce highly distinct signaling events and arrestins are a major mediator of this ligand bias. Here, we demonstrate that delta opioid receptor agonists differentially recruit arrestin isoforms. We found that the high-internalizing agonist SNC80 preferentially recruits arrestin 2 and knock-out (KO) of this protein results in increased efficacy of SNC80. In contrast, low-internalizing agonists (ARM390 and JNJ20788560

  13. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  14. IL-4 is able to reverse the CD2-mediated negative apoptotic signal to CD4-CD8- alpha beta and/or gamma delta T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Nicoletti, I; Agea, E; Belia, S; Moraca, R; Migliorati, G; Riccardi, C; Grignani, F; Bertotto, A

    1995-11-01

    Activation of immature thymocytes or transformed T lymphocytes via T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 signalling can induce programmed cell death (apoptosis). Recent data indicate that anti-CD3/TCR monoclonal antibodies (mAb) also trigger apoptosis in activated (but not resting) mature peripheral blood T lymphocytes. Here we report that triggering of resting CD4-CD8-TCR alpha beta+ and/or TCR gamma delta+ via the alternative CD2-dependent activation pathway is able to induce programmed cell death. A pair of mitogenic anti-CD2 mAb provoked a dramatic rise in [Ca2+]i that was almost entirely sustained by extracellular fluxes, and the inhibition of membrane [Ca2+/Mg2+] ATPase. The resulting endonuclease activation was able to induce DNA fragmentation, as revealed by propidium iodide staining and gel electrophoresis. Induction of apoptosis was prevented by the presence of interleukin-4 (IL-4) as well as by endonuclease inactivation with 100 microM ZnCl2, but enhanced by the contemporary block of protein kinase C. Thus it seems that in resting T lymphocytes the strong calcium signal delivered by the alternative CD2 activation pathway may act as a negative apoptotic signal in both alpha beta and gamma delta T cells with low (non-major histocompatibility complex restricted) antigenic affinity, so limiting the extension of polyclonal T-cell growth. PMID:8550074

  15. Differential regulation of. mu. , delta, kappa opioid receptors by Mn/sup + +/

    SciTech Connect

    Szuecs, M.; Oetting, G.M.; Coscia, C.J.

    1986-03-05

    Differential effects of Mn/sup + +/ on three opioid receptor subtypes of rat brain membranes were evaluated. Concentration dependency studies performed with 0.05-20 mM Mn/sup + +/ revealed that only the delta receptors are stimulated at any concentration. The binding of 1 nM /sup 3/H-DAGO was not stimulated by low concentrations (< 1mM) of Mn/sup + +/, and was significantly inhibited at higher concentrations (40% at 20 mM). 1 nM /sup 3/H-EKC (+100nM DAGO and 100nM DADLE) binding was inhibited by Mn/sup + +/ in the entire concentration range. While regulation of ..mu.. receptor binding did not change during postnatal development, delta and kappa binding displayed a pronounced developmental time-dependency. Kappa sites were hardly affected by Mn/sup + +/ at day 5, and adult levels of inhibition were reached only after the third week postnatal. In contrast, 1 nM /sup 3/H-DADLE (+10nM DAGO) binding was most sensitive to Mn/sup + +/ on day 5 after birth (100% stimulation with 5-20 mM). The ED/sub 50/ of Mn/sup + +/ stimulation was unchanged during maturation. These immature delta sites displayed a similar extent of Mn/sup + +/ reversal of Gpp(NH)p inhibition as seen in microsomes, which represent a good model of N/sub i/-uncoupled receptors. These data suggest that ..mu.., delta and kappa receptors are differently coupled to N/sub i/. Moreover, a second divalent cation binding site, in addition to that on N/sub i/ might exist for delta receptors.

  16. T-cell receptor gamma--delta lymphocytes and Eimeria vermiformis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, M E; Hesketh, P; Rothwell, L; Gramzinski, R A

    1996-01-01

    The role of T-cell receptor gamma--delta T lymphocytes in coccidiosis was examined by determining the course of infection with Eimeria vermiformis in BALB/c mice depleted of gamma--delta lymphocytes by treatment with GL3 monoclonal antibody. The replication of the parasite in primary infections was not greatly, or consistently, affected by this treatment, and there was no correlation between the extent of depletion of small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and the number of oocysts produced. The resistance of immunized mice to challenge was not compromised by depletion of intraintestinal epithelial lymphocytes when their depletion was effected at the time of primary infection and/or administration of the challenge inoculum. Thus, T-cell receptor gamma--delta T lymphocytes do not appear to be crucial to the establishment, or the control, of primary infection with E. vermiformis and are not principal mediators of the solid immunity to challenge that this infection induces. PMID:8890252

  17. Potent Dmt-Tic pharmacophoric delta- and mu-opioid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingyou; Fujita, Yoshio; Shiotani, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Anna; Tsuda, Yuko; Ambo, Akihiro; Sasaki, Yusuke; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Marczak, Ewa; Bryant, Sharon D; Salvadori, Severo; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Okada, Yoshio

    2005-12-15

    A series of dimeric Dmt-Tic (2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) analogues (8-14, 18-22) were covalently linked through diaminoalkane and symmetric or asymmetric 3,6-diaminoalkyl-2(1H)-pyrazinone moieties. All the compounds exhibited high affinity for both delta-opioid receptors [Ki(delta) = 0.06-1.53 nM] and mu-opioid receptors [Ki(mu) = 1.37-5.72 nM], resulting in moderate delta-receptor selectivity [Ki(mu)/Ki(delta) = 3-46]. Regardless of the type of linker between the Dmt-Tic pharmacophores, delta-opioid-mediated antagonism was extraordinarily high in all analogues (pA2 = 10.42-11.28), while in vitro agonism (MVD and GPI bioassays) was essentially absent (ca. 3 to >10 microM). While an unmodified N-terminus (9, 13, 18) revealed weak mu-opioid antagonism (pA2 = 6.78-6.99), N,N'-dimethylation (21, 22), which negatively impacts on mu-opioid-associated agonism (Balboni et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2003, 11, 5435-5441), markedly enhanced mu-opioid antagonism (pA2 = 8.34 and 7.71 for 21 and 22, respectively) without affecting delta-opioid activity. These data are the first evidence that a single dimeric opioid ligand containing the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore exhibits highly potent delta- and mu-opioid antagonist activities.

  18. Retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAralpha) Mutations in Human Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Parrado, A; Chomienne, C; Padua, R A

    2000-10-01

    The retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha) plays a central role in the biology of the myeloid cellular compartment. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARalpha locus probably represent the malignant initiating events in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Recent studies that identify novel interactions between RARalpha and the nuclear receptor co-activators and co-repressors, new functions of the oncogenic RARalpha fusion proteins and their catabolism in retinoic acid-induced differentiation, and the availability of new transgenic mice models have provided important insights into our understanding of the mechanisms by which mutant forms of RARalpha can be implicated in the development of leukemia. Novel alterations of the RARalpha gene identified in hematopoietic malignant disorders other than APL, such as myelodysplastic syndromes, non-APL acute myeloid leukemias and B-chronic lymphocytic leukemias, suggest that disruption of the RARalpha gene might predispose to myeloid and lymphoid disorders.

  19. alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors differentially modulate antidepressant-like behavior in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Doze, Van A; Handel, Evelyn M; Jensen, Kelly A; Darsie, Belle; Luger, Elizabeth J; Haselton, James R; Talbot, Jeffery N; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2009-08-18

    Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) drugs are used for the treatment of chronic depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and anxiety-related disorders. Chronic use of TCA drugs increases the expression of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(1)-ARs). Yet, it is unclear whether increased alpha(1)-AR expression contributes to the antidepressant effects of these drugs or if this effect is unrelated to their therapeutic benefit. In this study, mice expressing constitutively active mutant alpha(1A)-ARs (CAM alpha(1A)-AR) or CAM alpha(1B)-ARs were used to examine the effects of alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-AR signaling on rodent behavioral models of depression, OCD, and anxiety. CAM alpha(1A)-AR mice, but not CAM alpha(1B)-AR mice, exhibited antidepressant-like behavior in the tail suspension test and forced swim test. This behavior was reversed by prazosin, a selective alpha(1)-AR inverse agonist, and mimicked by chronically treating wild type mice with cirazoline, an alpha(1A)-AR agonist. Marble burying behavior, commonly used to model OCD in rodents, was significantly decreased in CAM alpha(1A)-AR mice but not in CAM alpha(1B)-AR mice. In contrast, no significant differences in anxiety-related behavior were observed between wild type, CAM alpha(1A)-AR, and CAM alpha(1B)-AR animals in the elevated plus maze and light/dark box. This is the first study to demonstrate that alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-ARs differentially modulate antidepressant-like behavior in the mouse. These data suggest that alpha(1A)-ARs may be a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of depression.

  20. Expression of two alpha 2-adrenergic receptor subtypes in human placenta: evidence from direct binding studies.

    PubMed

    Falkay, G; Kovács, L

    1994-09-01

    Adrenergic receptors may play an important role for mediating a variety of metabolic and haemodynamic effects of catecholamines including placental blood flow. The alpha-adrenergic receptors of the human placenta were characterized in vitro by the use of [3H]rauwolscine and [3H]prazosin as radioligands. Saturation experiments would suggest that the alpha-adrenoceptors in the human placenta are alpha 2. Comparative binding studies were performed, using recently synthesized compounds (Beecham Pharmaceuticals, UK) selective for alpha 2A (BRL-44408) and alpha 2B (BRL-41992) subtypes. The results indicate that human placenta contains at least two pharmacologically distinct alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtypes with approximately 60 per cent alpha 2A and 40 per cent alpha 2B receptors. In contrast with the pattern of increasing beta-adrenoceptor density, the concentration of alpha 2-adrenoceptors in term placentae is significantly lower than in placentae from the first trimester.

  1. ROTATIONALLY MODULATED g-MODES IN THE RAPIDLY ROTATING {delta} SCUTI STAR RASALHAGUE ({alpha} OPHIUCHI)

    SciTech Connect

    Monnier, J. D.; Che, X.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Zhao, M.; Kallinger, T.; Matthews, J.; Moffat, A. F. J.

    2010-12-10

    Despite a century of remarkable progress in understanding stellar interiors, we know surprisingly little about the inner workings of stars spinning near their critical limit. New interferometric imaging of these so-called rapid rotators combined with breakthroughs in asteroseismology promise to lift this veil and probe the strongly latitude-dependent photospheric characteristics and even reveal the internal angular momentum distribution of these luminous objects. Here, we report the first high-precision photometry on the low-amplitude {delta} Scuti variable star Rasalhague ({alpha} Oph, A5IV, 2.18 M{sub sun}, {omega}/{omega}{sub c}{approx}0.88) based on 30 continuous days of monitoring using the MOST satellite. We have identified 57 {+-} 1 distinct pulsation modes above a stochastic granulation spectrum with a cutoff of {approx}26 cycles day{sup -1}. Remarkably, we have also discovered that the fast rotation period of 14.5 hr modulates low-frequency modes (1-10 day periods) that we identify as a rich family of g-modes (|m| up to 7). The spacing of the g-modes is surprisingly linear considering Coriolis forces are expected to strongly distort the mode spectrum, suggesting we are seeing prograde 'equatorial Kelvin' waves (modes l = m). We emphasize the unique aspects of Rasalhague motivating future detailed asteroseismic modeling-a source with a precisely measured parallax distance, photospheric oblateness, latitude temperature structure, and whose low-mass companion provides an astrometric orbit for precise mass determinations.

  2. The Role of Alpha-2 Adrenergic Receptors in Anti-ulcer Activity.

    PubMed

    Suleyman, Halis

    2012-04-01

    Although peptic ulcer disease has long been recognized, the proposed mechanisms of its etiopathogenesis change every year. This review shows that gastric ulcers have a significant relationship with alpha-2 adrenergic receptors. The aggravating factors of gastric ulcer formation have been reported to act by blocking alpha-2 adrenergic receptors, whereas drugs possessing anti-ulcer activity have been shown to ensure gastric protection by stimulating the alpha-2 adrenergic receptors. The data derived from the literature indicate the likelihood that any drug or substance selectively stimulating the alpha-2 adrenergic receptors may possess anti-ulcer activity.

  3. DELTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C. )

    1993-11-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  4. Obesity and diabetes in TNF-alpha receptor- deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schreyer, S A; Chua, S C; LeBoeuf, R C

    1998-01-01

    TNF-alpha may play a role in mediating insulin resistance associated with obesity. This concept is based on studies of obese rodents and humans, and cell culture models. TNF elicits cellular responses via two receptors called p55 and p75. Our purpose was to test the involvement of TNF in glucose homeostasis using mice lacking one or both TNF receptors. C57BL/6 mice lacking p55 (p55(-)/-), p75, (p75(-)/-), or both receptors (p55(-)/-p75(-)/-) were fed a high-fat diet to induce obesity. Marked fasting hyperinsulinemia was seen for p55(-)/-p75(-)/- males between 12 and 16 wk of feeding the high-fat diet. Insulin levels were four times greater than wild-type mice. In contrast, p55(-)/- and p75(-)/- mice exhibited insulin levels that were similar or reduced, respectively, as compared with wild-type mice. In addition, high-fat diet-fed p75(-)/- mice had the lowest body weights and leptin levels, and improved insulin sensitivity. Obese (db/db) mice, which are not responsive to leptin, were used to study the role of p55 in severe obesity. Male p55(-)/-db/db mice exhibited threefold higher insulin levels and twofold lower glucose levels at 20 wk of age than control db/db expressing p55. All db/db mice remained severely insulin resistant based on fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Our data do not support the concept that TNF, acting via its receptors, is a major contributor to obesity-associated insulin resistance. In fact, data suggest that the two TNF receptors work in concert to protect against diabetes. PMID:9664082

  5. Solution conformation of alpha-conotoxin GIC, a novel potent antagonist of alpha3beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Seung-Wook; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Olivera, Baldomero M; McIntosh, J Michael; Han, Kyou-Hoon

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-conotoxin GIC is a 16-residue peptide isolated from the venom of the cone snail Conus geographus. Alpha-conotoxin GIC potently blocks the alpha3beta2 subtype of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, showing a high selectivity for neuronal versus muscle subtype [McIntosh, Dowell, Watkins, Garrett, Yoshikami, and Olivera (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 33610-33615]. We have now determined the three-dimensional solution structure of alpha-conotoxin GIC by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of alpha-conotoxin GIC is well defined with backbone and heavy atom root mean square deviations (residues 2-16) of 0.53 A and 0.96 A respectively. Structure and surface comparison of alpha-conotoxin GIC with the other alpha4/7 subfamily conotoxins reveals unique structural aspects of alpha-conotoxin GIC. In particular, the structural comparison between alpha-conotoxins GIC and MII indicates molecular features that may confer their similar receptor specificity profile, as well as those that provide the unique binding characteristics of alpha-conotoxin GIC. PMID:14992691

  6. Kaempferol is an estrogen-related receptor alpha and gamma inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjian; Fang, Fang; Huang, Zhiyan; Wang, Yanfei; Wong, Chiwai

    2009-02-18

    Kaempferol is a dietary flavonoid that is thought to function as a selective estrogen receptor modulator. In this study, we established that kaempferol also functions as an inverse agonist for estrogen-related receptors alpha and gamma (ERRalpha and ERRgamma). We demonstrated that kaempferol binds to ERRalpha and ERRgamma and blocks their interaction with coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha). Kaempferol also suppressed the expressions of ERR-target genes pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 and 4 (PDK2 and PDK4). This evidence suggests that kaempferol may exert some of its biological effect through both estrogen receptors and estrogen-related receptors. PMID:19171140

  7. Selective and interactive down-regulation of mu- and delta-opioid receptors in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Baumhaker, Y; Gafni, M; Keren, O; Sarne, Y

    1993-08-01

    Human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells, which contain both mu- and delta-opioid receptors, were grown under conditions that provided a mu:delta ratio of 1.5:1. Both receptors were down-regulated after 72 hr of exposure to 100 nM etorphine. Selective down-regulation was demonstrated using selective opioid agonists; the mu agonist Tyr-D-Ala2-Gly-(Me)Phe4-Gly-ol down-regulated mu- but not delta-opioid receptors, whereas prolonged exposure to the selective delta agonist D-Pen2,D-Pen5-enkephalin resulted in delta- but not mu-opioid receptor down-regulation. Morphine, which binds mu- as well as delta-opioid receptors, down-regulated both receptor subtypes. NG108-15 cells, which contain delta receptors exclusively, were also tested. NG108-15 cells did not exhibit delta-opioid receptor down-regulation when exposed to morphine. The discrepancy between the effect of chronic morphine treatment on delta receptors in SK-N-SH cells and in NG108-15 cells raised the question of whether the coexistence of mu receptors in the former allowed morphine to down-regulate delta receptors. The role of mu-opioid receptors in morphine-induced delta receptor down-regulation was studied by using the irreversible mu antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. Pretreatment of SK-N-SH cells with beta-funaltrexamine prevented down-regulation of delta receptors in response to chronic exposure to morphine but did not affect down-regulation of delta receptors in response to D-Pen2,D-Pen5-enkephalin. The experimental data indicate that morphine-induced delta-opioid receptor down-regulation is dependent on the presence of functional mu receptors in the same cell.

  8. Correlations between the activities of DNA polymerase alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T J; Bollum, F J; Litwack, G

    1982-01-01

    Specific inhibitors and anti-DNA polymerase alpha IgG have been utilized to probe for similarities between cytoplasmic rat hepatic glucocorticoid receptors and DNA polymerase alpha [DNA nucleotidyltransferase (DNA-directed), EC 2.7.7.7]. Rifamycin AF/013, an inhibitor of RNA and DNA polymerase activities, significantly inhibited the binding of activated [6,7-3H]-triamcinolone acetonide (TA) receptor complexes to DNA-cellulose. beta-Lapachone, an inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha and reverse transcriptase activities, inhibited the specific binding of [6,7-3H]TA when preincubated with unbound receptors. Aphidicolin, another DNA polymerase alpha inhibitor, failed to inhibit any of the glucocorticoid-receptor functions tested. Two specific anti-DNA polymerase alpha IgGs interfered with glucocorticoid receptor functions as measured by their ability to inhibit the binding of [6,7-3H]TA to unbound receptors (85% maximal inhibition) and, to a lesser extent, to inhibit the binding of activated [6,7-3H]TA receptor complexes to DNA-cellulose (50% maximal inhibition). The anti-DNA polymerase alpha IgG and beta-lapachone failed to affect the binding of tritiated estradiol, progesterone, or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone to their receptors in appropriate rat target tissues or the binding of [1,2-3H]hydrocortisone to serum transcortin. The most obvious interpretation of these data is that cytoplasmic glucocorticoid receptors and DNA polymerase alpha share antigenic determinants. An alternative interpretation is that the polyclonal anti-DNA polymerase alpha antibody contains IgG molecules raised against calf thymus cytoplasmic activated glucocorticoid-receptor complexes that copurified with DNA polymerase alpha used as the antigen. Taken collectively, however, the antibody and inhibitor data suggest a relationship between DNA polymerase alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. PMID:6812051

  9. Evaluation of the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore: conversion of a potent delta-opioid receptor antagonist into a potent delta agonist and ligands with mixed properties.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Guerrini, Remo; Salvadori, Severo; Bianchi, Clementina; Rizzi, Daniela; Bryant, Sharon D; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2002-01-31

    Analogues of the 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (Tic) pharmacophore were prepared to test the hypothesis that a "spacer" and a third aromatic center in opioid peptides are required to convert a delta-antagonist into ligands with delta-agonist or with mixed delta-antagonist/mu-agonist properties. Potent delta-agonists and bifunctional compounds with high delta- and mu-opioid receptor affinities were obtained by varying the spacer length [none, NH-CH(2), NH-CH(2)-CH(2), Gly-NH-CH(2)] and C-terminal aromatic nucleus [1H-benzimidazole-2-yl, phenyl (Ph) and benzyl groups]. C-terminal modification primarily affected mu-opioid receptor affinities, which increased maximally 1700-fold relative to the prototype delta-antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-NH(2) and differentially modified bioactivity. In the absence of a spacer (1), the analogue exhibited dual delta-agonism (pEC(50), 7.28) and delta-antagonism (pA(2), 7.90). H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(2)-1H-benzimidazole-2-yl (Bid) (2) became a highly potent delta-agonist (pEC(50), 9.90), slightly greater than deltorphin C (pEC(50), 9.56), with mu-agonism (pE(50), 7.57), while H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH(2)-Bid (4) retained potent delta-antagonism (pA(2), 9.0) but with an order of magnitude less mu-agonism. Similarly, H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Ph (5) had nearly equivalent high delta-agonism (pEC(50), 8.52) and mu-agonism (pEC(50), 8.59), while H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-CH(2)-Ph (6) whose spacer was longer by a single methylene group exhibited potent delta-antagonism (pA(2), 9.25) and very high mu-agonism (pEC(50), 8.57). These data confirm that the distance between the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore and a third aromatic nucleus is an important criterion in converting Dmt-Tic from a highly potent delta-antagonist into a potent delta-agonist or into ligands with mixed delta- and mu-opioid properties.

  10. SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED DECLINE IN HEPATIC PEROXISOMAL ENZYME ACTIVITIES CORRESPONDS WITH DIMINISHED LEVELS OF RETINOID X RECEPTOR ALPHA, BUT NOT PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR ALPHA1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Aging is associated with alterations in hepatic peroxisomal metabolism and susceptibility to hepatocarcinogenecity produced by agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa). Mechanisms involved in these effects are not well understood. Howev...

  11. Nicotine inhibits Fc epsilon RI-induced cysteinyl leukotrienes and cytokine production without affecting mast cell degranulation through alpha 7/alpha 9/alpha 10-nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Neerad C; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; Boyd, R Thomas; Singh, Shashi P; Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Langley, Raymond J; Razani-Boroujerdi, Seddigheh; Sopori, Mohan L

    2010-07-01

    Smokers are less likely to develop some inflammatory and allergic diseases. In Brown-Norway rats, nicotine inhibits several parameters of allergic asthma, including the production of Th2 cytokines and the cysteinyl leukotriene LTC(4). Cysteinyl leukotrienes are primarily produced by mast cells, and these cells play a central role in allergic asthma. Mast cells express a high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcepsilonRI). Following its cross-linking, cells degranulate and release preformed inflammatory mediators (early phase) and synthesize and secrete cytokines/chemokines and leukotrienes (late phase). The mechanism by which nicotine modulates mast cell activation is unclear. Using alpha-bungarotoxin binding and quantitative PCR and PCR product sequencing, we showed that the rat mast/basophil cell line RBL-2H3 expresses nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) alpha7, alpha9, and alpha10; exposure to exceedingly low concentrations of nicotine (nanomolar), but not the biologically inactive metabolite cotinine, for > or = 8 h suppressed the late phase (leukotriene/cytokine production) but not degranulation (histamine and hexosaminidase release). These effects were unrelated to those of nicotine on intracellular free calcium concentration but were causally associated with the inhibition of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) activity and the PI3K/ERK/NF-kappaB pathway, including phosphorylation of Akt and ERK and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. The suppressive effect of nicotine on the late-phase response was blocked by the alpha7/alpha9-nAChR antagonists methyllycaconitine and alpha-bungarotoxin, as well as by small interfering RNA knockdown of alpha7-, alpha9-, or alpha10-nAChRs, suggesting a functional interaction between alpha7-, alpha9-, and alpha10-nAChRs that might explain the response of RBL cells to nanomolar concentrations of nicotine. This "hybrid" receptor might serve as a target for novel antiallergic/antiasthmatic therapies.

  12. Knockin mice expressing fluorescent delta-opioid receptors uncover G protein-coupled receptor dynamics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Grégory; Tryoen-Tóth, Petra; Filliol, Dominique; Matifas, Audrey; Laustriat, Delphine; Cao, Yu Q; Basbaum, Allan I; Dierich, Andrée; Vonesh, Jean-Luc; Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2006-06-20

    The combination of fluorescent genetically encoded proteins with mouse engineering provides a fascinating means to study dynamic biological processes in mammals. At present, green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice were mainly developed to study gene expression patterns or cell morphology and migration. Here we used enhanced GFP (EGFP) to achieve functional imaging of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in vivo. We created mice where the delta-opioid receptor (DOR) is replaced by an active DOR-EGFP fusion. Confocal imaging revealed detailed receptor neuroanatomy throughout the nervous system of knock-in mice. Real-time imaging in primary neurons allowed dynamic visualization of drug-induced receptor trafficking. In DOR-EGFP animals, drug treatment triggered receptor endocytosis that correlated with the behavioral response. Mice with internalized receptors were insensitive to subsequent agonist administration, providing evidence that receptor sequestration limits drug efficacy in vivo. Direct receptor visualization in mice is a unique approach to receptor biology and drug design. PMID:16766653

  13. Compartmentation of alpha 1 and alpha 2 GABA(A) receptor subunits within rat extended amygdala: implications for benzodiazepine action.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Walter A; Humpel, Christian; Alheid, George F; Marksteiner, Josef

    2003-02-21

    The extended amygdala, a morphological and functional entity within the basal forebrain, is a neuronal substrate for emotional states like fear and anxiety. Anxiety disorders are commonly treated by benzodiazepines that mediate their action via GABA(A) receptors. The binding properties and action of benzodiazepines depend on the alpha-subunit profile of the hetero-pentameric receptors: whereas the alpha1 subunit is associated with benzodiazepine type I pharmacology and reportedly mediates sedative as well as amnesic actions of benzodiazepines, the alpha2 subunit confers benzodiazepine type II pharmacology and mediates the anxiolytic actions of benzodiazepines. We determined the localization of alpha1 and alpha2 subunits within the extended amygdala, identified by secretoneurin immunostaining, to define the morphological substrates for the diverse benzodiazepine actions. A moderate expression of the alpha1 subunit could be detected in compartments of the medial subdivision and a strong expression of the alpha2 subunit throughout the central subdivision. It is concluded that the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits are differentially expressed within the extended amygdala, indicating that this structure is compartmentalized with respect to function and benzodiazepine action. PMID:12573516

  14. Electrophysiological demonstration of mu, delta and kappa opioid receptors in the ventral pallidum.

    PubMed

    Mitrovic, I; Napier, T C

    1995-03-01

    Opioid mu, kappa and delta receptors are present in significant densities in the ventral pallidum (VP). To examine their contribution to VP neuronal activity, changes in firing rate during microiontophoresis of the receptor-selective agonists [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) (mu), [D-Pen2,5]-enkephalin (DPDPE) (delta) and trans-(+/-)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl) cy-clohexyl]-benzene-acetamide methane sulfonate (U50488H) (kappa), and the antagonists D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP) (mu) and norbinaltorphimine (kappa) were determined in chloral hydrate-anesthetized rats. A majority of the neurons demonstrated ejection current-dependent decreases in neuronal activity to DAMGO and U50488H. The rate suppressions were attenuated by coiontophoresis of the homotypic antagonist, indicating receptor subtype-specificity of the responses. In contrast, DPDPE decreased firing in only 24% of the recorded neurons. In those neurons tested with all three agonists, nearly 70% were sensitive to at least one. Among responding neurons, approximately one-quarter was influenced by activation of all three receptor subtypes while another quarter was sensitive to only mu activation. Thus, subpopulations of VP neurons may exist according to the influence of particular opioid receptor subtypes. These findings were compared to the nonselective opioid, morphine. Morphine iontophoresis elicited both excitations and inhibitions whereas DAMGO exclusively inhibited the same VP neurons. Responses to both were antagonized by naloxone and CTOP, indicating mu receptor-specific actions. The results are discussed in terms of differential direct and indirect effects of morphine and DAMGO. In summary, mu, delta and kappa opioid receptors can independently alter neuronal activity within the VP, and direct and indirect effects are most likely involved. PMID:7891342

  15. Subsonic investigations of vortex interaction control for enhanced high-alpha aerodynamics of a chine forebody/Delta wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Dhanvada M.; Bhat, M. K.

    1992-01-01

    A proposed concept to alleviate high alpha asymmetry and lateral/directional instability by decoupling of forebody and wing vortices was studied on a generic chine forebody/ 60 deg. delta configuration in the NASA Langley 7 by 10 foot High Speed Tunnel. The decoupling technique involved inboard leading edge flaps of varying span and deflection angle. Six component force/moment characteristics, surface pressure distributions and vapor-screen flow visualizations were acquired, on the basic wing-body configuration and with both single and twin vertical tails at M sub infinity = 0.1 and 0.4, and in the range alpha = 0 to 50 deg and beta = -10 to +10 degs. Results are presented which highlight the potential of vortex decoupling via leading edge flaps for enhanced high alpha lateral/directional characteristics.

  16. Catecholaminergic alpha-receptors and shivering in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, H W; Stoner, H B

    1979-01-01

    1. A rise or a fall in systemic blood pressure brought about by the I.V. infusion of peripherally acting drugs (adenosine, noradrenaline or methoxamine) inhibited shivering in the cold-exposed rat. 2. Since the injection of commonly used doses of noradrenaline (0.05-0.10 mumole) into a lateral cerebral ventricle of a rat was usually accompanied by a rise in blood pressure special precautious were required to determine whether noradrenaline had a specific central effect on shivering. 3. Small doses of noradrenaline (0.02-0.03 mumole) or clonidine (0.01 mumole) which had no effect on blood pressure when injected into a lateral cerebral ventricle still inhibited shivering in the cold-exposed rat and this effect was prevented by phentolamine. 4. It is concluded that noradrenaline can inhibit the cold sensor-shivering pathway in its central course by an action on alpha-receptors. PMID:226673

  17. DNA Repair, Redox Regulation and Modulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Mediated Transcription

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis-Ducey, Carol Dianne

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of estrogen receptor [alpha] (ER[alpha]) with 17[beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) facilitates binding of the receptor to estrogen response elements (EREs) in target genes, which in turn leads to recruitment of coregulatory proteins. To better understand how estrogen-responsive genes are regulated, our laboratory identified a number of…

  18. Fast skeletal muscle troponin I is a co-activator of estrogen receptor-related receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yuping; Chen Bin; Chen Jian; Lou Guiyu; Chen Shiuan; Zhou Dujin

    2008-05-16

    ERR{alpha} (estrogen receptor-related receptor {alpha}) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. To further our understanding of the detailed molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by ERR{alpha}, we searched for ERR{alpha}-interacting proteins using a yeast two-hybrid system by screening a human mammary gland cDNA expression library with the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of ERR{alpha} as the 'bait'. Fast skeletal muscle troponin I (TNNI2), along with several known nuclear receptor co-activators, were isolated. We demonstrated that TNNI2 localizes to the cell nucleus and interacts with ERR{alpha} in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. GST pull-down assays also revealed that TNNI2 interacts directly with ERR{alpha}. Through luciferase reporter gene assays, TNNI2 was found to enhance the transactivity of ERR{alpha}. Combining mutagenesis and yeast two-hybrid assays, we mapped the ERR{alpha}-interacting domain on TNNI2 to a region encompassing amino acids 1-128. These findings reveal a new function for TNNI2 as a co-activator of ERR{alpha}.

  19. Homology model of human interferon-alpha 8 and its receptor complex.

    PubMed Central

    Seto, M. H.; Harkins, R. N.; Adler, M.; Whitlow, M.; Church, W. B.; Croze, E.

    1995-01-01

    Human interferon-alpha 8 (HuIFN alpha 8), a type I interferon (IFN), is a cytokine belonging to the hematopoietic super-family that includes human growth hormone (HGH). Recent data identified two human type I IFN receptor components. One component (p40) was purified from human urine by its ability to bind to immobilized type I IFN. A second receptor component (IFNAR), consisting of two cytokine receptor-like domains (D200 and D200'), was identified by expression cloning. Murine cells transfected with a gene encoding this protein were able to produce an antiviral response to human IFN alpha 8. Both of these receptor proteins have been identified as members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of which HGH receptor is a member. The cytokine receptor-like structural motifs present in p40 and IFNAR were modeled based on the HGH receptor X-ray structure. Models of the complexes of HuIFN alpha 8 with the receptor subunits were built by superpositioning the conserved C alpha backbone of the HuIFN alpha 8 and receptor subunit models with HGH and its receptor complex. The HuIFN alpha 8 model was constructed from the C alpha coordinates of murine interferon-beta crystal structure. Electrostatic potentials and hydrophobic interactions appear to favor the model of HuIFN alpha 8 interacting with p40 at site 1 and the D200' domain of IFNAR at site 2 because there are regions of complementary electrostatic potential and hydrophobic interactions at both of the proposed binding interfaces. Some of the predicted receptor binding residues within HuIFN alpha 8 correspond to functionally important residues determined previously for human IFN alpha 1, IFN alpha 2, and IFN alpha 4 subtypes by site-directed mutagenesis studies. The models predict regions of interaction between HuIFN alpha 8 and each of the receptor proteins, and provide insights into interactions between other type I IFNs (IFN-alpha subtypes and IFN-beta) and their respective receptor components. PMID:7613464

  20. Novel time-dependent vascular actions of {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, Saoirse E. . E-mail: Saoirse.o'sullivan@nottingham.ac.uk; Tarling, Elizabeth J.; Bennett, Andrew J.; Kendall, David A.; Randall, Michael D.

    2005-11-25

    Cannabinoids have widespread effects on the cardiovascular system, only some of which are mediated via G-protein-coupled cell surface receptors. The active ingredient of cannabis, {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), causes acute vasorelaxation in various arteries. Here we show for the first time that THC also causes slowly developing vasorelaxation through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPAR{gamma}). In vitro, THC (10 {mu}M) caused time-dependent vasorelaxation of rat isolated arteries. Time-dependent vasorelaxation to THC was similar to that produced by the PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone and was inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 (1 {mu}M), but not the cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist AM251 (1 {mu}M). Time-dependent vasorelaxation to THC requires an intact endothelium, nitric oxide, production of hydrogen peroxide, and de novo protein synthesis. In transactivation assays in cultured HEK293 cells, THC-activated PPAR{gamma}, transiently expressed in combination with retinoid X receptor {alpha} and a luciferase reporter gene, in a concentration-dependent manner (100 nM-10 {mu}M). In vitro incubation with THC (1 or 10 {mu}M, 8 days) stimulated adipocyte differentiation in cultured 3T3L1 cells, a well-accepted property of PPAR{gamma} ligands. The present results provide strong evidence that THC is a PPAR{gamma} ligand, stimulation of which causes time-dependent vasorelaxation, implying some of the pleiotropic effects of cannabis may be mediated by nuclear receptors.

  1. Delta opioid receptors presynaptically regulate cutaneous mechanosensory neuron input to the spinal cord dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Bardoni, Rita; Tawfik, Vivianne L; Wang, Dong; François, Amaury; Solorzano, Carlos; Shuster, Scott A; Choudhury, Papiya; Betelli, Chiara; Cassidy, Colleen; Smith, Kristen; de Nooij, Joriene C; Mennicken, Françoise; O'Donnell, Dajan; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Woodbury, C Jeffrey; Basbaum, Allan I; MacDermott, Amy B; Scherrer, Grégory

    2014-03-19

    Cutaneous mechanosensory neurons detect mechanical stimuli that generate touch and pain sensation. Although opioids are generally associated only with the control of pain, here we report that the opioid system in fact broadly regulates cutaneous mechanosensation, including touch. This function is predominantly subserved by the delta opioid receptor (DOR), which is expressed by myelinated mechanoreceptors that form Meissner corpuscles, Merkel cell-neurite complexes, and circumferential hair follicle endings. These afferents also include a small population of CGRP-expressing myelinated nociceptors that we now identify as the somatosensory neurons that coexpress mu and delta opioid receptors. We further demonstrate that DOR activation at the central terminals of myelinated mechanoreceptors depresses synaptic input to the spinal dorsal horn, via the inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Collectively our results uncover a molecular mechanism by which opioids modulate cutaneous mechanosensation and provide a rationale for targeting DOR to alleviate injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:24583022

  2. Delta Opioid Receptors Presynaptically Regulate Cutaneous Mechanosensory Neuron Input to the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn

    PubMed Central

    Bardoni, Rita; Tawfik, Vivianne L.; Wang, Dong; François, Amaury; Solorzano, Carlos; Shuster, Scott A.; Choudhury, Papiya; Betelli, Chiara; Cassidy, Colleen; Smith, Kristen; de Nooij, Joriene C.; Mennicken, Françoise; O’Donnell, Dajan; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Woodbury, C. Jeffrey; Basbaum, Allan I.; MacDermott, Amy B.; Scherrer, Grégory

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cutaneous mechanosensory neurons detect mechanical stimuli that generate touch and pain sensation. Although opioids are generally associated only with the control of pain, here we report that the opioid system in fact broadly regulates cutaneous mechanosensation, including touch. This function is predominantly subserved by the delta opioid receptor (DOR), which is expressed by myelinated mechanoreceptors that form Meissner corpuscles, Merkel cell-neurite complexes, and circumferential hair follicle endings. These afferents also include a small population of CGRP-expressing myelinated nociceptors that we now identify as the somatosensory neurons that coexpress mu and delta opioid receptors. We further demonstrate that DOR activation at the central terminals of myelinated mechanoreceptors depresses synaptic input to the spinal dorsal horn, via the inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Collectively our results uncover a molecular mechanism by which opioids modulate cutaneous mechanosensation and provide a rationale for targeting DOR to alleviate injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:24583022

  3. [Amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease and alpha 7 nicotinic receptor].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Iyo, Masaomi

    2002-04-01

    It is known that beta amyloid protein (A beta) plays an important role in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this review, the role of cellular signaling in the protective action of nicotine for A beta-induced neurotoxicity is described. Recent biochemical and functional studies have demonstrated that A beta interacts directly with the alpha 7 nicotinic receptor, suggesting that A beta might have a function as an endogenous ligand for this receptor. Thus the role of alpha 7 nicotinic receptor in the A beta cascade hypothesis of AD and the possibility of alpha 7 nicotine receptor agonists as the therapeutic drugs for AD are discussed.

  4. Molecular evolution of the mammalian alpha 2B adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Ole; Willemsen, Diederik; Ursing, Björn M; Arnason, Ulfur; de Jong, Wilfried W

    2002-12-01

    The alpha 2B adrenergic receptor (A2AB) is a heptahelical G protein-coupled receptor for catecholamines. We compared the almost complete coding region (about 1,175 bp) of the A2AB gene from 48 mammalian species, including eight newly determined sequences, representing all the 18 eutherian and two marsupial orders. Comparison of the encoded proteins reveals that residues thought to be involved in agonist binding are highly conserved, as are the regions playing a role in G protein-coupling. The three extracellular loops are generally more variable than the transmembrane domains and two of the intracellular loops, indicating a lower functional constraint. However, the greatest variation is observed in the very long, third intracellular loop, where only a few residues and a polyglutamyl tract are preserved. Although this polyglutamyl domain displays a great variation in length, its presence in all described A2ABs confirms its proposed role in agonist-dependent phosphorylation of the third intracellular loop. Phylogenetic analyses of the A2AB data set, including Bayesian methods, recognized the superordinal clades Afrotheria, Laurasiatheria, and Euarchontoglires, in agreement with recent molecular evidence, albeit with lower support. Within Afrotheria, A2AB strongly supports the paenungulate clade and the association of the continental African otter shrew with Malagasy tenrecs. Among Laurasiatheria, A2AB confirms the nesting of whales within the artiodactyls, as a sister group to hippopotamus. Within the Euarchontoglires, there is constant support for rodent monophyly. PMID:12446807

  5. Delta opioid receptor ligands modulate anxiety-like behaviors in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Shane A; Hoshaw, Brian A; Unterwald, Ellen M

    2006-01-01

    The role of the delta opioid receptor in regulating anxiety-like behavior in male Sprague–Dawley rats was examined. Using an elevated plus maze, the effects of the selective delta opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole (1 or 5 mg kg−1) and agonist SNC80 (1, 5 or 20 mg kg−1) on anxiety-like behavior were measured. Anxiety was also measured following administration of diazepam (3 mg kg−1) and amphetamine (1 mg kg−1) and compared to the effects of SNC80. Locomotor activity following administration of naltrindole, SNC80, diazepam, and amphetamine was measured. Finally, the defensive burying paradigm was used to confirm the findings from the elevated plus maze. Results demonstrated that SNC80 produced dose-dependent anxiolytic effects similar to that of the classical antianxiety agent, diazepam. Administration of naltrindole caused anxiogenic behavior in rats further supporting the involvement of the delta opioid receptor system in regulating anxiety. Naltrindole also blocked the anxiolytic effects of SNC80. Amphetamine had no effect on anxiety-like behavior. SNC80 induced hyperactivity similar to amphetamine at the doses tested, while naltrindole and diazepam did not significantly affect locomotor activity. Although SNC80 can increase locomotor activity, control experiments reported herein indicate that hyperlocomotion is not sufficient to produce an anxiolytic response on the elevated plus maze. Together with the results from the defensive burying paradigm, this suggests that the effects of SNC80 on reducing anxiety are independent of its effects on locomotion. Collectively these data show that the delta opioid receptor system can regulate anxiety-like behavior in an anxiolytic (agonist) and anxiogenic (antagonist) manner. PMID:16491101

  6. Side chain methyl substitution in the delta-opioid receptor antagonist TIPP has an important effect on the activity profile.

    PubMed

    Tourwé, D; Mannekens, E; Diem, T N; Verheyden, P; Jaspers, H; Tóth, G; Péter, A; Kertész, I; Török, G; Chung, N N; Schiller, P W

    1998-12-17

    The delta-opioid antagonist H-Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe-OH (TIPP-OH) or its C-terminal amide analogue was systematically modified topologically by substitution of each amino acid residue by all stereoisomers of the corresponding beta-methyl amino acid. The potency and selectivity (delta- vs mu- and kappa-opioid receptor) were evaluated by radioreceptor binding assays. Agonist or antagonist potency were assayed in the mouse vas deferens and in the guinea pig ileum. In the TIPP analogues containing L-beta-methyl amino acids the influence on delta-receptor affinity and on delta-antagonist potency is limited, the [(2S,3R)-beta-MePhe3]TIPP-OH analogue being among the most potent delta-antagonists reported. In the D-beta-methyl amino acid series, the [D-beta-MeTic2] analogues are delta-selective antagonists whereas [D-Tic2]TIPP-NH2 is a delta-agonist. NMR studies did not indicate any influence of the beta-methyl substituent on the conformation of the Tic residue. The [(2R,3S)-beta-MePhe3]TIPP-NH2 is a potent delta-agonist, its C-terminal carboxylic acid analogue being more delta-selective but displaying partial agonism in both the delta- and mu-bioassay. These results constitute further examples of a profound influence of beta-methyl substitution on the potency, selectivity, and signal transduction properties of a peptide.

  7. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, S; Asare, B K; Biswas, P K; Rajnarayanan, R V

    2016-09-01

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide "I-box" derived from ER residues 503-518 specifically blocks ER dimerization. Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479-485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497-506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511-520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497-506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. PMID:27462021

  8. Nicotinic receptor Alpha7 expression during mouse adrenal gland development.

    PubMed

    Gahring, Lorise C; Myers, Elizabeth; Palumbos, Sierra; Rogers, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 (α7) is a ligand-activated ion channel that contributes to a diversity of cellular processes involved in development, neurotransmission and inflammation. In this report the expression of α7 was examined in the mouse developing and adult adrenal gland that expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter as a bi-cistronic extension of the endogenous α7 transcript (α7(G)). At embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) α7(G) expression was associated with the suprarenal ganglion and precursor cells of the adrenal gland. The α7(G) cells are catecholaminergic chromaffin cells as reflected by their progressive increase in the co-expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that is complete by E18.5. In the adult, α7(G) expression is limited to a subset of chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla that cluster near the border with the adrenal cortex. These chromaffin cells co-express α7(G), TH and DBH, but they lack phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) consistent with only norepinephrine (NE) synthesis. These cell groups appear to be preferentially innervated by pre-ganglionic afferents identified by the neurotrophin receptor p75. No afferents identified by beta-III tubulin, neurofilament proteins or p75 co-expressed α7(G). Occasional α7(G) cells in the pre-E14.5 embryos express neuronal markers consistent with intrinsic ganglion cells and in the adult some α7(G) cells co-express glutamic acid decarboxylase. The transient expression of α7 during adrenal gland development and its prominent co-expression by a subset of NE chromaffin cells in the adult suggests that the α7 receptor contributes to multiple aspects of adrenal gland development and function that persist into adulthood. PMID:25093893

  9. Nicotinic receptor Alpha7 expression during mouse adrenal gland development.

    PubMed

    Gahring, Lorise C; Myers, Elizabeth; Palumbos, Sierra; Rogers, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 (α7) is a ligand-activated ion channel that contributes to a diversity of cellular processes involved in development, neurotransmission and inflammation. In this report the expression of α7 was examined in the mouse developing and adult adrenal gland that expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter as a bi-cistronic extension of the endogenous α7 transcript (α7(G)). At embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) α7(G) expression was associated with the suprarenal ganglion and precursor cells of the adrenal gland. The α7(G) cells are catecholaminergic chromaffin cells as reflected by their progressive increase in the co-expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that is complete by E18.5. In the adult, α7(G) expression is limited to a subset of chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla that cluster near the border with the adrenal cortex. These chromaffin cells co-express α7(G), TH and DBH, but they lack phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) consistent with only norepinephrine (NE) synthesis. These cell groups appear to be preferentially innervated by pre-ganglionic afferents identified by the neurotrophin receptor p75. No afferents identified by beta-III tubulin, neurofilament proteins or p75 co-expressed α7(G). Occasional α7(G) cells in the pre-E14.5 embryos express neuronal markers consistent with intrinsic ganglion cells and in the adult some α7(G) cells co-express glutamic acid decarboxylase. The transient expression of α7 during adrenal gland development and its prominent co-expression by a subset of NE chromaffin cells in the adult suggests that the α7 receptor contributes to multiple aspects of adrenal gland development and function that persist into adulthood.

  10. Nicotinic Receptor Alpha7 Expression during Mouse Adrenal Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    Gahring, Lorise C.; Myers, Elizabeth; Palumbos, Sierra; Rogers, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 (α7) is a ligand-activated ion channel that contributes to a diversity of cellular processes involved in development, neurotransmission and inflammation. In this report the expression of α7 was examined in the mouse developing and adult adrenal gland that expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter as a bi-cistronic extension of the endogenous α7 transcript (α7G). At embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) α7G expression was associated with the suprarenal ganglion and precursor cells of the adrenal gland. The α7G cells are catecholaminergic chromaffin cells as reflected by their progressive increase in the co-expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that is complete by E18.5. In the adult, α7G expression is limited to a subset of chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla that cluster near the border with the adrenal cortex. These chromaffin cells co-express α7G, TH and DBH, but they lack phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) consistent with only norepinephrine (NE) synthesis. These cell groups appear to be preferentially innervated by pre-ganglionic afferents identified by the neurotrophin receptor p75. No afferents identified by beta-III tubulin, neurofilament proteins or p75 co-expressed α7G. Occasional α7G cells in the pre-E14.5 embryos express neuronal markers consistent with intrinsic ganglion cells and in the adult some α7G cells co-express glutamic acid decarboxylase. The transient expression of α7 during adrenal gland development and its prominent co-expression by a subset of NE chromaffin cells in the adult suggests that the α7 receptor contributes to multiple aspects of adrenal gland development and function that persist into adulthood. PMID:25093893

  11. Purification and reconstitution of the human platelet. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.W.; Cerione, R.A.; Nakata, H.; Benovic, J.L.; DeMarinis, R.M.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Human platelet ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors have been purified approx.80,000 fold to apparent homogeneity by a five step chromatographic procedure. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of radioiodinated protein from purified receptor preparations shows a single major band of M/sub r/ 64,000. The competitive binding of ligands to the purified receptor protein shows the proper ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic specificity. The ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor contains an essential sulfhydryl residues. Thus, exposure of the purified receptor to the sulfhydryl specific reagent, phenylmercuric chloride (PMC), resulted in a 80% loss of binding activity. This loss of binding activity was prevented when exposure to PMC was done in the presence of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic ligands and it was reversed by subsequent exposure to dithiothreitol. Partial proteolysis of purified ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors was obtained with S. aureus V-8 protease, ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin and papain. In a comparison with purified ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors no common partial proteolytic products were found. Partially purified preparations of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor were successfully reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles with the inhibitory guanyl nucleotide-binding regulatory protein, N/sub i/. In these reconstituted preparations, epinephrine could stimulate, and phentolamine could block, the GTPase activity of N/sub i/.

  12. Cloning and expression of a rat brain. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Flordellis, C.S.; Handy, D.E.; Bresnahan, M.R.; Zannis, V.I.; Gavras, H. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors isolated a cDNA clone (RB{alpha}{sub 2B}) and its homologous gene (GR{alpha}{sub 2B}) encoding an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype by screening a rat brain cDNA and a rat genomic library. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that both clones code for a protein of 458 amino acids, which is 87% homologous to the human kidney glycosylated adrenergic receptor ({alpha}{sub 2}-C4) and divergent from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype (RNG{alpha}{sub 2}). Transient expression of RB{alpha}{sub 2B} in COS-7 cells resulted in high-affinity saturable binding for ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine and a high receptor number in the membranes of transfected COS-7 cells. Pharmacological analysis demonstrated that the expressed receptor bound adrenergic ligands with the following order of potency: rauwolscine {gt} yohimbine {gt} prazosin {gt} oxymetazoline, with a prazosin-to-oxymetazoline K{sub i} ratio of 0.34. This profile is characteristic of the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype. Blotting analysis of rat brain mRNA gave one major and two minor mRNA species, and hybridization with strand-specific probes showed that both DNA strands of GR{alpha}{sub 2B} may be transcriptionally active. These findings show that rat brain expresses an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype that is structurally different from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype. Thus the rat expresses at least two divergent {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptors.

  13. Induction of a deficiency of steroid delta 4-5 alpha-reductase activity in liver by a porphyrinogenic drug.

    PubMed Central

    Kappas, A; Bradlow, H L; Bickers, D R; Alvares, A P

    1977-01-01

    The hepatic enzymes that catalyze drug oxidations and the reductive metabolism of steroid hormones to 5alpha-derivatives are localized in membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. Phenobarbital, which exacerbates acute intermittent porphyria in man, induces drug-oxidizing enzymes in liver. Additionally, patients in whome the primary gene defect (uroporphyrinogen-I-synthetase deficiency) of acute intermittent porphyria has become clinically expressed have low levels of hepatic steroid delta4-5alpha-reductase activity. This 5alpha-reductase deficiency in acute intermittent porphyria leads to the disproportionate generation of 5beta-steroid metabolites from precursor hormones; such steroid metabolites have significant porphyria-inducing action experimentally. In this study the effects of phenobarbital on drug oxidation and steroid 5alpha-reduction in man were examined to determine if this drug could produce changes in steroid 5alpha-reductase activity which mimicked those seen in patients with acute intermittent porphyria. Metabolic studies with [14C]-testosterone and 11beta-[3H]hydroxyandrostenedione were carried out in five normal volunteers. In all five subjects phenobarbital administration (2 mg/kg/per day for 21 days) enhanced plasma removal of the test drugs antipyrine and phenylbutazone as expected; but in four subjects phenobarbital also substantially depressed 5alpha-metabolite formation from [14C]testosterone and resulted in a pattern of hormone biotransformation characterized by a high ratio of 5beta/5alpha-metabolite formation. Studies with 11beta-[3H]hydroxy-androstenedione in three subjects confirmed that phenobarbital produced this high 5beta/5alpha ratio of steroid metabolism by depressing 5alpha-reductase activity for steroid hormones in liver. The high ratio of 5beta/5alpha-metabolites formed in normals after drug treatment mimicks the high 5beta/5alpha-steroid metabolite ratio formed from endogenous hormones in acute intermittent porphyria. The

  14. Coactivation of the human vitamin D receptor by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Savkur, Rajesh S; Bramlett, Kelli S; Stayrook, Keith R; Nagpal, Sunil; Burris, Thomas P

    2005-08-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) belongs to the superfamily of steroid/thyroid hormone receptors that is activated by 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3). Traditional targets for 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) action include tissues involved in the maintenance of calcium homeostasis and bone development and remodeling. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha), a transcriptional coactivator that plays a role in mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism, is predominantly expressed in kidney, heart, liver, and skeletal muscle. Because VDR and PGC-1alpha display an overlapping pattern of expression, we investigated the possibility that PGC-1alpha could serve as a coactivator for VDR. Transient cotransfection assays demonstrate that PGC-1alpha augments ligand-dependent VDR transcription when either full-length VDR or Gal4 DNA binding domain-VDR-ligand binding domain chimeras were analyzed. Furthermore, mammalian two-hybrid assays, coimmunoprecipitation analyses, and biochemical coactivator recruitment assays demonstrate a ligand-dependent interaction between the two proteins both in cells and in vitro. The coactivation potential of PGC-1alpha requires an intact AF-2 domain of VDR and the LXXLL motif in PGC-1alpha. Taken together, these results indicate that PGC-1alpha serves as a coactivator for VDR.

  15. Interconverting mu and delta forms of the opiate receptor in rat striatal patches.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, W D; Gentleman, S; Herkenham, M; Pert, C B

    1981-01-01

    The binding of a radiolabeled "mu receptor" prototype opiate, dihydromorphine (H2morphine), and the binding of a "delta receptor" prototype, [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin (D-Enk), to slide-mounted rat caudate slices were simultaneously compared quantitatively and visualized by autoradiography. Generally, D-Enk bound to opiate receptors distributed evenly throughout the entire striatum (type 2 pattern), whereas H2morphine labeled discrete islands or patches of receptors (type 1 pattern). In the presence of Mn2+ (3 mM) or other divalent cations, however, Na+ and GTP at 25 degrees C caused an increase in D-Enk binding at the expense of H2morphine binding at striatal opiate receptor patches. Thus, these conditions shifted D-Enk binding from an even pattern to one that included both an even and patchy distribution. These incubation conditions not only promoted D-Enk binding to striatal patches but also enabled the opiate receptor to regulate adenylate cyclase with the same (P less than 0.01) ligand selectivity pattern as that obtained by the displacement of D-Enk binding. The relative affinity of opiate receptors in striatal patches for opiate peptides, naloxone, and morphine appears to be a function of incubation conditions and coupling to adenylate cyclase and is not indicative of distinctly different opiate receptors. We postulate a three-state allosteric model consisting of mu agonist-, mu antagonists-, and adenylate cyclase-coupled delta-agonist-preferring states, whose equilibrium may be regulated by a sulfhydryl group mechanism. Images PMID:6272275

  16. Modeling the interactions between alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors and their antagonists.

    PubMed

    Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2010-09-01

    As crucial members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, alpha (1)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(1)-ARs) are recognized to intervene the actions of endogenous catecholamines such as norepinephrine and epinephrine. So far three distinct alpha(1)-AR subtypes, alpha(1A), alpha(1B) and alpha(1D), have been characterized by functional analysis, radio-ligand binding and molecular biology studies. The alpha(1)-ARs are of therapeutic interest because of their distinct and critical roles in many physiological processes, containing hypertension, benign prostatic hyperplasia, smooth muscle contraction, myocardial inotropy and chronotropy, and hepatic glucose metabolism. Accordingly, designing subtype-selective antagonists for each of the three alpha(1)-AR subtypes has been an enthusiastic region of medicinal research. Even though a large number of studies on GPCRs have been conducted, understanding of how known antagonists bind to alpha(1)-ARs still remains sketchy and has been a serious impediment to search for potent and subtype-selective alpha(1)-AR antagonists because of the lack of detailed experimental structural knowledge. This review deliberates the simulation of alpha(1)-ARs and their interactions with antagonists by using ligand-based (pharmacophore identification and QSAR modeling) and structure-based (comparative modeling and molecular docking) approaches. Combined with experimental data, these computational attempts could improve our understanding of the structural basis of antagonist binding and the molecular basis of receptor activation, thus offering a more reasonable approach in the design of drugs targeting alpha(1)-ARs.

  17. Indanylacetic acid derivatives carrying 4-thiazolyl-phenoxy tail groups, a new class of potent PPAR alpha/gamma/delta pan agonists: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Joachim; Chen, Libing; Majumdar, Dyuti; Bullock, William H; Burns, Michael; Claus, Thomas; Dela Cruz, Fernando E; Daly, Michelle; Ehrgott, Frederick J; Johnson, Jeffrey S; Livingston, James N; Schoenleber, Robert W; Shapiro, Jeffrey; Yang, Ling; Tsutsumi, Manami; Ma, Xin

    2007-03-01

    Compounds that simultaneously activate the three peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes alpha, gamma, and delta hold potential to address the adverse metabolic and cardiovascular conditions associated with diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. We recently identified the indanylacetic acid moiety as a well-tunable PPAR agonist head group. Here we report the synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies of novel aryl tail group derivatives that led to a new class of potent PPAR pan agonists. While most of the tail group modifications imparted potent PPAR delta agonist activity, improvement of PPAR alpha and gamma activity required the introduction of new heterocyclic substituents that were not known in the PPAR literature. Systematic optimization led to the discovery of 4-thiazolyl-phenyl derivatives with potent PPAR alpha/gamma/delta pan agonistic activity. The lead candidate from this series was found to exhibit excellent ADME properties and superior therapeutic potential compared to known PPAR gamma activating agents by favorably modulating lipid levels in hApoA1 mice and hyperlipidemic hamsters, while normalizing glucose levels in diabetic rodent models. PMID:17274610

  18. Estrogen alters the diurnal rhythm of alpha 1-adrenergic receptor densities in selected brain regions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.G.; Wise, P.M.

    1987-11-01

    Norepinephrine regulates the proestrous and estradiol-induced LH surge by binding to alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The density of alpha 1-receptors may be regulated by estradiol, photoperiod, and noradrenergic neuronal activity. We wished to determine whether alpha 1-receptors exhibit a diurnal rhythm in ovariectomized and/or estradiol-treated female rats, whether estradiol regulates alpha 1-receptors in those areas of brain involved with LH secretion and/or sexual behavior, and whether the concentrations of alpha-receptors vary inversely relative to previously reported norepinephrine turnover patterns. Young female rats, maintained on a 14:10 light-dark cycle were ovariectomized. One week later, half of them were outfitted sc with Silastic capsules containing estradiol. Groups of animals were decapitated 2 days later at 0300, 1000, 1300, 1500, 1800, and 2300 h. Brains were removed, frozen, and sectioned at 20 micron. Sections were incubated with (/sup 3/H)prazosin in Tris-HCl buffer, washed, dried, and exposed to LKB Ultrofilm. The densities of alpha 1-receptors were quantitated using a computerized image analysis system. In ovariectomized rats, the density of alpha 1-receptors exhibited a diurnal rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), and pineal gland. In SCN and MPN, receptor concentrations were lowest during the middle of the day and rose to peak levels at 1800 h. In the pineal gland, the density of alpha 1-receptors was lowest at middark phase, rose to peak levels before lights on, and remained elevated during the day. Estradiol suppressed the density of alpha 1 binding sites in the SCN, MPN, median eminence, ventromedial nucleus, and the pineal gland but had no effect on the lateral septum. Estrogen treatment altered the rhythm of receptor densities in MPN, median eminence, and the pineal gland.

  19. Opposite effects of the acute promyelocytic leukemia PML-retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) and PLZF-RAR alpha fusion proteins on retinoic acid signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Ruthardt, M; Testa, U; Nervi, C; Ferrucci, P F; Grignani, F; Puccetti, E; Grignani, F; Peschle, C; Pelicci, P G

    1997-01-01

    Fusion proteins involving the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) and the PML or PLZF nuclear protein are the genetic markers of acute promyelocytic leukemias (APLs). APLs with the PML-RAR alpha or the PLZF-RAR alpha fusion protein are phenotypically indistinguishable except that they differ in their sensitivity to retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation: PML-RAR alpha blasts are sensitive to RA and patients enter disease remission after RA treatment, while patients with PLZF-RAR alpha do not. We here report that (i) like PML-RAR alpha expression, PLZF-RAR alpha expression blocks terminal differentiation of hematopoietic precursor cell lines (U937 and HL-60) in response to different stimuli (vitamin D3, transforming growth factor beta1, and dimethyl sulfoxide); (ii) PML-RAR alpha, but not PLZF-RAR alpha, increases RA sensitivity of hematopoietic precursor cells and restores RA sensitivity of RA-resistant hematopoietic cells; (iii) PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha have similar RA binding affinities; and (iv) PML-RAR alpha enhances the RA response of RA target genes (those for RAR beta, RAR gamma, and transglutaminase type II [TGase]) in vivo, while PLZF-RAR alpha expression has either no effect (RAR beta) or an inhibitory activity (RAR gamma and type II TGase). These data demonstrate that PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha have similar (inhibitory) effects on RA-independent differentiation and opposite (stimulatory or inhibitory) effects on RA-dependent differentiation and that they behave in vivo as RA-dependent enhancers or inhibitors of RA-responsive genes, respectively. Their different activities on the RA signalling pathway might underlie the different responses of PML-RAR alpha and PLZF-RAR alpha APLs to RA treatment. The PLZF-RAR alpha fusion protein contains an approximately 120-amino-acid N-terminal motif (called the POZ domain), which is also found in a variety of zinc finger proteins and a group of poxvirus proteins and which mediates protein

  20. Lagging strand DNA synthesis by calf thymus DNA polymerases alpha, beta, delta and epsilon in the presence of auxiliary proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Podust, V N; Hübscher, U

    1993-01-01

    By using a defined gapped DNA substrate that mimics a lagging strand of 230 nucleotides and that contains a defined pause site, we have analyzed calf thymus DNA polymerases (pol) alpha, beta, delta, and epsilon in the presence of the three auxiliary proteins proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), replication factor C (RF-C) and replication protein A (RP-A) for their ability to complete an Okazaki fragment. Pol alpha alone could fill the gap to near completion, but was strongly stopped by the pause site. Addition of low amounts of RP-A resulted in an increased synthesis by pol alpha past the pause site. In contrast, high amounts of RP-A strongly inhibited gap filling by pol alpha. Further inhibition was evident when the two other auxiliary proteins, PCNA and RF-C, were added in addition to RP-A. Pol beta could completely fill the gap without specific pausing and also was strongly inhibited by RP-A. PCNA and RF-C had no detectable effect on pol beta. Pol delta, relied as expected, on all three auxiliary proteins for complete gap filling synthesis and could, upon longer incubation, perform a limited amount of strand displacement synthesis. Pol epsilon core enzyme was able to fill the gap completely, but like pol alpha, essentially stopped at the pause site. This pausing could only be overcome upon addition of PCNA, RF-C and E. coli single-stranded DNA binding protein. Thus pol epsilon holoenzyme preferentially synthesized to the end of the gap without pausing. Ligation of the DNA products indicated that pol beta core enzyme, pol delta and pol epsilon holoenzymes (but not pol alpha and pol epsilon core enzyme) synthesized products that were easily ligatable. Our results indicate that pol epsilon holoenzyme fills a defined lagging strand gapped template to exact completion and is able to pass a pause site. The data favour the hypothesis of Burgers (Burgers, P.M.J. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 22698-22706) that pol epsilon might be a candidate for the second

  1. Alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in hyperplastic human prostate: identification and characterization using (/sup 3/H) rauwolscine

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, E.; Lepor, H.

    1986-05-01

    (/sup 3/H)Rauwolscine ((/sup 3/H)Ra), a selective ligand for the alpha 2 adrenergic receptor, was used to identify and characterize alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in prostate glands of men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)Ra to prostatic tissue homogenates was rapid and readily reversible by addition of excess unlabelled phentolamine. Scatchard analysis of saturation experiments demonstrates a single, saturable class of high affinity binding sites (Bmax = 0.31 +/- 0.04 fmol./microgram. DNA, Kd = 0.9 +/- 0.11 nM.). The relative potency of alpha adrenergic drugs (clonidine, alpha-methylnorepinephrine and prazosin) in competing for (/sup 3/H)Ra binding sites was consistent with the order predicted for an alpha 2 subtype. The role of alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in normal prostatic function and in men with bladder outlet obstruction secondary to BPH requires further investigation.

  2. Estrogen receptor alpha and androgen receptor are commonly expressed in well-differentiated liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Liposarcoma (LS) is the second-most common type of soft-tissue sarcoma. Despite advances in knowledge and treatment of this disease, there remains a need for more effective LS therapy. Steroid hormone receptors regulate metabolism in adipocytes. Estrogen receptor alpha (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and androgen receptor (AR) have been implicated in the pathophysiology of other cancer types. We sought to comprehensively determine temporal expression patterns of these receptors in LS. Methods We analyzed 561 histologically subtyped LS specimens from 354 patients for expression of ER, PR, and AR by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using diagnostic-grade reagents and protocols. The fractions of positively stained tumor cells were scored within each specimen. IHC scores were compared across LS subtypes using the Kruskal-Wallis test, and subtypes were compared using Dunn’s post-hoc test. Ages of patients with receptor-positive vs. -negative LS were compared by t-test. Genders and races were compared for hormone receptor positivity using Fisher’s exact test and Chi-square analysis, respectively. Recurrence-free survival was compared between receptor-positive and negative patients by log-rank test. p< 0.05 was considered significant. Results ER and AR were frequently expressed in LS, while few tumors expressed PR. Most of the ER + and AR + samples were of the well-differentiated LS subtype. A smaller fraction of de-differentiated LS expressed ER or AR, but expression was common within well-differentiated regions of tumors histologically classified as de-differentiated LS. In LS specimens from patients who underwent multiple surgeries over time, receptor expression frequently changed over time, which may be attributable in part to intratumor heterogeneity, varying degrees of de-differentiation, and biopsy bias. ER and AR were frequently co-expressed. Receptor status was not significantly associated with gender or race, but AR and PR expression were

  3. Neuroanatomical patterns of the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain as determined by quantitative in vitro autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Tempel, A.; Zukin, R.S.

    1987-06-01

    Highly specific radioligands and quantitative autoradiography reveal strikingly different neuroanatomical patterns for the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain. The mu receptors are most densely localized in patches in the striatum, layers I and III of the cortex, the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampal formation, specific nuclei of the thalamus, the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, the interpeduncular nucleus, and the locus coeruleus. In contrast, delta receptors are highly confined, exhibiting selective localization in layers I, II, and VIa of the neocortex, a diffuse pattern in the striatum, and moderate concentration in the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra and in the interpeduncular nucleus. delta receptors are absent in most other brain structures. This distribution is unexpected in that the enkephalins, the putative endogenous ligands of the delta receptor, occur essentially throughout the brain. The kappa receptors of rat brain exhibit a third pattern distinct from that of the mu and delta receptors. kappa receptors occur at low density in patches in the striatum and at particularly high density in the nucleus accumbens, along the pyramidal and molecular layers of the hippocampus, in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus, specific midline nuclei of the thalamus, and hindbrain regions. kappa receptors appear to be uniformly distributed across regions in the neocortex with the exception of layer III, which revealed only trace levels of binding. An important conclusion of the present study is that delta receptors occur at high density only in the forebrain and in two midbrain structures, whereas mu and kappa receptors exhibit discrete patterns in most major brain regions.

  4. Shared receptor components but distinct complexes for alpha and beta interferons.

    PubMed

    Lewerenz, M; Mogensen, K E; Uzé, G

    1998-09-25

    The type I interferon family includes 13 alpha, one omega and one beta subtypes recognized by a complex containing the receptor subunits ifnar1 and ifnar2 and their associated Janus tyrosine kinases, Tyk2 and Jak1. To investigate the reported differences in the way that alpha and beta interferons signal through the receptor, we introduced alanine-substitutions in the ifnar2 extracellular domain, and expressed the mutants in U5A cells, lacking endogenous ifnar2. A selection, designed to recover mutants that responded preferentially to alpha or beta interferon yielded three groups: I, neutral; II, sensitive to alpha interferon, partially resistant to beta interferon; III, resistant to alpha interferon, partially sensitive to beta interferon. A mutant clone, TMK, fully resistant to alpha interferon with good sensitivity to beta interferon, was characterized in detail and compared with U5A cells complemented with wild-type ifnar2 and also with Tyk2-deficient 11.1 cells, which exhibit a similar alpha-unresponsive phenotype with a partial beta interferon response. Using anti-receptor antibodies and mutant forms of beta interferon, three distinct modes of ligand interaction could be discerned: (i) alpha interferon with ifnar1 and ifnar2; (ii) beta interferon with ifnar1 and ifnar2; (iii) beta interferon with ifnar2 alone. We conclude that alpha and beta interferons signal differently through their receptors because the two ligand subtypes interact with the receptor subunits ifnar 1 and ifnar2 in entirely different ways.

  5. Nicotine enhances expression of the alpha 3, alpha 4, alpha 5, and alpha 7 nicotinic receptors modulating calcium metabolism and regulating adhesion and motility of respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zia, S; Ndoye, A; Nguyen, V T; Grando, S A

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of direct toxic effects of nicotine (Nic) on human bronchial epithelial cells (BEC) suggested by our previous findings of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the epithelial cells lining mucocutaneous membranes. We now demonstrate for the first time that human and murine BEC both in vivo and in vitro express functional nAChRs, and that classic alpha 3, alpha 4, alpha 5 and alpha 7 subunits can contribute to formation of these acetylcholine-gated ion channels. In human bronchial and mouse lung tissues, and in cultures of human BEC, the nAChRs were visualized by subunit-specific antibodies on the cell membranes, particularly at the sites of cell-to-cell contacts. The epithelial cells of submucosal glands abundantly expressed alpha 7 nAChRs. Smoking significantly (p < 0.05) increased the relative numbers of nAChRs, and this effects could be reproduced in cultures of BEC exposed to 10 microM Nic. At a higher dose, Nic decreased the relative numbers of alpha 5-containing nAChRs, suggesting a role for receptor desensitization. The function of the nAChR channels expressed by BEC was demonstrated by biphasic increase in the concentrations of intracellular calcium ([Ca++]i) in response to activation of the channel by Nic and fluctuations of [Ca++]i due to channel blockade by mecamylamine (Mec). Long-term exposure to milimolar concentrations of Nic resulted in a steady increase of [Ca++]i, which may lead to cell damage. The biological roles of epithelial nAChRs apparently involve regulation of cell-to-cell communications, adhesion and motility, because Mec caused rapid and profound changes in these cell functions which were reversible by Nic. An over exposure of BEC to Nic, however, produced an antagonist-like effect, suggesting that the pathobiological effects of Nic toxicity might result from both activation of nAChR channels and nAChR desensitization. We conclude that medical consequences of

  6. Ovarian hormones influence corticotropin releasing factor receptor colocalization with delta opioid receptors in CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tanya J.; Akama, Keith T.; Knudsen, Margarete G.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Stress interacts with addictive processes to increase drug use, drug seeking, and relapse. The hippocampal formation (HF) is an important site at which stress circuits and endogenous opioid systems intersect and likely plays a critical role in the interaction between stress and drug addiction. Our prior studies demonstrate that the stress-related neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the delta-opioid receptor (DOR) colocalize in interneuron populations in the hilus of the dentate gyrus and stratum oriens of CA1 and CA3. While independent ultrastructural studies of DORs and CRF receptors suggest that each receptor is found in CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites and dendritic spines, whether DORs and CRF receptors colocalize in CA1 neuronal profiles has not been investigated. Here, hippocampal sections of adult male and proestrus female Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for dual label pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy using well-characterized antisera directed against the DOR for immunoperoxidase and against the CRF receptor for immunogold. DOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) was found presynaptically in axons and axon terminals as well as postsynaptically in somata, dendrites and dendritic spines in stratum radiatum of CA1. In contrast, CRF receptor-ir was predominantly found postsynaptically in CA1 somata, dendrites, and dendritic spines. CRF receptor-ir frequently was observed in DOR-labeled dendritic profiles and primarily was found in the cytoplasm rather than at or near the plasma membrane. Quantitative analysis of CRF receptor-ir colocalization with DOR-ir in pyramidal cell dendrites revealed that proestrus females and males show comparable levels of CRF receptor-ir per dendrite and similar cytoplasmic density of CRF receptor-ir. In contrast, proestrus females display an increased number of dual-labeled dendritic profiles and increased membrane density of CRF receptor-ir in comparison to males. We further examined the functional consequences of CRF

  7. Perilipin, a critical regulator of fat storage and breakdown, is a target gene of estrogen receptor-related receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Akter, Mst. Hasina; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Hirose, Fumiko; Osumi, Takashi

    2008-04-11

    Perilipin is a protein localized on lipid droplet surfaces in adipocytes and steroidogenic cells, playing a central role in regulated lipolysis. Expression of the perilipin gene is markedly induced during adipogenesis. We found that transcription from the perilipin gene promoter is activated by an orphan nuclear receptor, estrogen receptor-related receptor (ERR){alpha}. A response element to this receptor was identified in the promoter region by a gene reporter assay, the electrophoretic-gel mobility-shift assay and the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator (PGC)-1{alpha} enhanced, whereas small heterodimer partner (SHP) repressed, the transactivating function of ERR{alpha} on the promoter. Thus, the perilipin gene expression is regulated by a transcriptional network controlling energy metabolism, substantiating the functional importance of perilipin in the maintenance of body energy balance.

  8. Differences of binding characteristics of non-selective opiates towards and delta receptor types

    SciTech Connect

    Delay-Goyet, P.; Roques, B.P.; Zajac, J.M.

    1987-08-10

    (TH)ET (etorphine), which is considered either as an universal ligand or a agonist, interacts with identical affinities K/sub D/ = 0.33 - 0.38 nM to hybrid cells and rabbit cerebellum, pure delta and -enriched opioid receptor preparations, respectively. In rat brain tissue, (TH)ET binding is inhibited by DAGO (Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-(Me)-Phe-Gly-ol), a selective agonist, in a competitive manner without apparent modification of the maximal number of sites. Furthermore, even at a DAGO concentration (300 nM) which should be sufficient to block (TH)ET interaction with sites, no variation in the total capacity of the tritiated ligand is observed. In contrast, DTLET (Tyr-D-Thr-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr), a delta-preferential agonist, blocks (TH)ET binding in rat brain at a concentration able to saturate delta-sites. At higher concentrations, where DTLET cross reacts with -sites, this ligand exhibits similar properties to those of DAGO. These data are very different from those obtained with (TH)EKC (ethylketocyclazocine), another universal ligand, the binding properties of which are easily explained by the occurrence in rat brain tissue of independent sites exhibiting pharmacological profiles of , delta and kappa sites. The authors results underline the possible misinterpretation of binding data obtained by using (TH) etorphine as a non-selective ligand. 28 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  9. Nicotine cue: lack of effect of the alpha 7 nicotinic receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine.

    PubMed

    Brioni, J D; Kim, D J; O'Neill, A B

    1996-04-22

    To assess the role of the alpha 7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the discriminative stimulus properties of (-)-nicotine, this study investigated the ability of the alpha 7 receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine to modulate the nicotine cue. In rats trained to discriminate (-)-nicotine from saline, intraperitoneal injections of methyllycaconitine neither induced nor blocked the nicotine cue. Intracerebroventricular administration of methyllycaconitine, neither potentiated nor blocked the effect of (-)-nicotine. On the other hand, intracerebroventricular injections of mecamylamine blocked the nicotine cue. The available evidence indicate that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain blocked by methyllycaconitine, those presumably containing alpha 7 subunits, do not participate in the expression of the discriminative stimulus properties of (-)-nicotine.

  10. Loss of protein kinase C delta from human HaCaT keratinocytes upon ras transfection is mediated by TGF alpha.

    PubMed

    Geiges, D; Marks, F; Gschwendt, M

    1995-07-01

    The spontaneously immortalized human skin keratinocytes HaCaT contain protein kinase C (PKC) alpha, -delta, -epsilon, and -zeta. All PKC isoenzymes except PKC zeta are down-regulated by TPA as well as by bryostatin. However, with PKC delta, bryostatin but not TPA was found to be much less effective at high concentrations than at low ones. PKC delta expression at the protein and mRNA level is significantly suppressed in HaCaT cells I-7 and II-4, which are transfected with mutated c-Ha-ras. The expression of the other isoenzymes remains essentially unchanged in the ras-transfected cells compared to normal ones. PKC delta is lost when growing HaCaT cells in a medium obtained from the cultivation of ras-transfected cells ("ras-conditioned" medium). The factor secreted into the medium by the ras-transfected cells that is responsible for this effect appears to be TGF alpha, since the action of ras-conditioned medium on PKC delta expression can be overcome by the addition of an anti-TGF alpha antibody. Moreover, treatment of HaCaT cells with TGF alpha suppresses selectively the expression of the PKC isoenzyme delta.

  11. Organocatalytic alpha-hydroxymethylation of cyclopentanone with aqueous formaldehyde: easy access to chiral delta-lactones.

    PubMed

    Mase, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Azusa; Nishio, Masaki; Takabe, Kunihiko

    2009-07-15

    Optically active lactones are important synthons in perfume and aroma manufacturing. Therefore, developments of efficient asymmetric syntheses are desired. Organocatalytic asymmetric alpha-hydroxymethylations of cyclopentanone with aqueous formaldehyde have been developed, to furnish the corresponding alpha-(hydroxymethyl)cyclopentanone with high enantioselectivity. Further chemical transformation of alpha-(hydroxymethyl)cyclopentanone gave the key intermediate for jasmine lactone, which is widely found in fruits and flowers.

  12. Structural complex of sterol 14[alpha]-demethylase (CYP51) with 14[alpha]-methylenecyclopropyl-[delta]7-24, 25-dihydrolanosterol[S

    SciTech Connect

    Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Jialin; Waterman, Michael R.; Nes, W. David; Lepesheva, Galina I.

    2012-06-28

    Sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51) that catalyzes the removal of the 14{alpha}-methyl group from the sterol nucleus is an essential enzyme in sterol biosynthesis, a primary target for clinical and agricultural antifungal azoles and an emerging target for antitrypanosomal chemotherapy. Here, we present the crystal structure of Trypanosoma (T) brucei CYP51 in complex with the substrate analog 14{alpha}-methylenecyclopropyl-{Delta}7-24,25-dihydrolanosterol (MCP). This sterol binds tightly to all protozoan CYP51s and acts as a competitive inhibitor of F105-containing (plant-like) T. brucei and Leishmania (L) infantum orthologs, but it has a much stronger, mechanism-based inhibitory effect on I105-containing (animal/fungi-like) T. cruzi CYP51. Depicting substrate orientation in the conserved CYP51 binding cavity, the complex specifies the roles of the contact amino acid residues and sheds new light on CYP51 substrate specificity. It also provides an explanation for the effect of MCP on T. cruzi CYP51. Comparison with the ligand-free and azole-bound structures supports the notion of structural rigidity as the characteristic feature of the CYP51 substrate binding cavity, confirming the enzyme as an excellent candidate for structure-directed design of new drugs, including mechanism-based substrate analog inhibitors.

  13. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY.
    MC Cardon, PC Hartig,LE Gray, Jr. and VS Wilson.
    U.S. EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Typically, in vitro hazard assessments for ...

  14. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay
    Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. Wilson
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  15. Alpha1-adrenoreceptor in human hippocampus: binding and receptor subtype mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Szot, Patricia; White, Sylvia S; Greenup, J Lynne; Leverenz, James B; Peskind, Elaine R; Raskind, Murray A

    2005-10-01

    Alpha1-adrenoreceptors (AR), of which three subtypes exist (alpha1A-, alpha1B- and alpha1D-AR) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the actions of norepinephrine and epinephrine both peripherally and centrally. In the CNS, alpha1-ARs are found in the hippocampus where animal studies have shown the ability of alpha1-AR agents to modulate long-term potentiation and memory; however, the precise distribution of alpha1-AR expression and its subtypes in the human brain is unknown making functional comparisons difficult. In the human hippocampus, 3H-prazosin (alpha1-AR antagonist) labels only the dentate gyrus (molecular, granule and polymorphic layers) and the stratum lucidum of the CA3 homogeneously. Human alpha1A-AR mRNA in the hippocampus is observed only in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer, while alpha1D-AR mRNA expression is observed only in the pyramidal cell layers of CA1, CA2 and CA3, regions where 3H-prazosin did not bind. alpha1B-AR mRNA is not expressed at detectable levels in the human hippocampus. These results confirm a difference in hippocampal alpha1-AR localization between rat and humans and further describe a difference in the localization of the alpha1A- and alpha1D-AR mRNA subtype between rats and humans. PMID:16039007

  16. Stable expression and pharmacological properties of the human alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, M; Buisson, B; Touma, E; Giordano, T; Campbell, J E; Hu, I C; Donnelly-Roberts, D; Arneric, S P; Bertrand, D; Sullivan, J P

    1995-08-15

    The alpha 7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtype forms a Ca(2+)-permeable homooligomeric ion channel sensitive to alpha-bungarotoxin in Xenopus oocytes. In this study, we have stably and functionally expressed the human alpha 7 cDNA in a mammalian cell line, HEK-293 and examined its pharmacologic properties. [125I] alpha-Bungarotoxin bound to transfected cells with a Kd value of 0.7 nM and a Bmax value of 973 pmoL/mg protein. No specific binding was detected in untransfected cells. Specific binding could be displaced by unlabeled alpha-bungarotoxin (Ki = 0.5 nM) and an excellent correlation was observed between binding affinities of a series of nicotinic cholinergic ligands in transfected cells and those in the human neuroblastoma IMR-32 cell line. Additionally, cell surface expression of alpha 7 receptors was detected by fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated alpha-bungarotoxin in transfected cells. Whole cell currents sensitive to blockade by alpha-bungarotoxin, and with fast kinetics of activation and inactivation, were recorded from transfected cells upon rapid application of (-)-nicotine or acetylcholine with EC50 values of 49 microM and 155 microM respectively. We conclude that the human alpha 7 subunit when expressed alone can form functional ion channels and that the stably transfected HEK-293 cell line serves as a unique system for studying human alpha 7 nicotinic receptor function and regulation, and for examining ligand interactions.

  17. A neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit (alpha 7) is developmentally regulated and forms a homo-oligomeric channel blocked by alpha-BTX.

    PubMed

    Couturier, S; Bertrand, D; Matter, J M; Hernandez, M C; Bertrand, S; Millar, N; Valera, S; Barkas, T; Ballivet, M

    1990-12-01

    cDNA and genomic clones encoding alpha 7, a novel neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) alpha subunit, were isolated and sequenced. The mature alpha 7 protein (479 residues) has moderate homology with all other alpha and non-alpha nAChR subunits and probably assumes the same transmembrane topology. alpha 7 transcripts transiently accumulate in the developing optic tectum between E5 and E16. They are present in both the deep and the superficial layers of E12 tectum. In Xenopus oocytes, the alpha 7 protein assembles into a homo-oligomeric channel responding to acetylcholine and nicotine. The alpha 7 channel desensitizes very rapidly, rectifies strongly above -20 mV, and is blocked by alpha-bungarotoxin. A bacterial fusion protein encompassing residues 124-239 of alpha 7 binds labeled alpha-bungarotoxin. We conclude that alpha-bungarotoxin binding proteins in the vertebrate nervous system can function as nAChRs.

  18. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in the medial preoptic area are involved in the induction of sleep.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan; Vetrivelan, Ramalingam; Mallick, Hruda Nanda

    2006-08-01

    This paper reviews the recent studies that led to the conclusion that the noradrenergic neurons projecting to the medial preoptic area (mPOA) are hypnogenic and that they mediate this action through alpha(1) adrenergic receptors. Microinjection of noradrenaline (NA) into the mPOA induced arousal. Studies using alpha(2) adrenergic drugs showed that the arousal induced by intrapreoptic injection of NA was due to its action on presynaptic alpha(2) adrenergic receptors. A combination of lesion and chemical stimulation techniques demonstrated that when NA acted on the postsynaptic alpha(1 )receptors in the mPOA, it induced sleep. Intrapreoptic injection of alpha(1) agonist, methoxamine could induce sleep, when the hypothermia, which was simultaneously produced, was behaviorally compensated for by the animal. Increased arousal produced by the destruction of noradrenergic fibers in the mPOA further confirmed the hypnogenic role of these fibers.

  19. Hotfoot mouse mutations affect the delta 2 glutamate receptor gene and are allelic to lurcher.

    PubMed

    Lalouette, A; Guénet, J L; Vriz, S

    1998-05-15

    Hotfoot (ho) is a recessive mouse mutation characterized by cerebellar ataxia associated with relatively mild abnormalities of the cerebellum. It has been previously mapped to Chromosome 6, and at least eight independent alleles have been reported. Here we show that the hotfoot phenotype is associated with mutations in the glutamate receptor ionotropic delta2 gene (Grid2). We have identified a 510-bp deletion in the Grid2 coding sequence in the ho4J allele, resulting in a deletion of 170 amino acids of the extracellular domain of the receptor. Analysis of a second allele, hoTgN37INRA, revealed a 4-kb deletion in the Grid2 transcript. The GRID2 protein in these hotfoot mutants probably has a reduced (or null) activity since the phenotype of hotfoot bears similarities with the previously described phenotype of Grid2 knockout mice. The exceptionally high number of independent alleles at the ho locus is an invaluable tool for investigating the function of the glutamate receptor ionotropic delta2 protein, which so far remains largely unknown.

  20. Estrogen Receptor beta binds Sp1 and recruits a Corepressor Complex to the Estrogen Receptor alpha Gene Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Bartella, V; Rizza, P; Barone, I; Zito, D; Giordano, F; Giordano, C; Catalano, S; Mauro, L; Sisci, D; Panno, ML; Fuqua, SA; Andò, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Human estrogen receptors (ERs) alpha and beta are crucially involved in the regulation of mammary growth and development. Normal breast tissues display a prevalently expression of ER beta than ER alpha, which drastically increases during breast tumorogenesis. So, it is reasonable to assume how a dysregulation of the two estrogen receptor subtypes may induce breast cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the opposite role played by the two estrogen receptors on tumor cell growth remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we have demonstrated that ER beta overexpression in breast cancer cells decreases cell proliferation and down-regulates ER alpha mRNA and protein content along with a concomitant repression of estrogen-regulated genes. Transient transfection experiments, using a vector containing the human ER alpha promoter region, showed that elevated levels of the ER beta down-regulated basal ER alpha promoter activity. Furthermore, side-directed mutagenesis and deletion analysis have revealed that the proximal GC-rich motifs at −223 and −214 is crucial for the ER beta-induced ER alpha down-regulation in breast cancer cells. This occurred through ER beta-Sp1 protein-protein interaction within the ER alpha promoter region and the recruitment of a corepressor complex containing NCoR/SMRT (nuclear receptor corepressor/silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor), accompanied by hypoacetylation of histone H4 and displacement of RNA polymerase II. Silencing of NCoR gene expression by RNA interference reversed the down-regulatory effect of ER beta on ER alpha gene expression and cell proliferation. Our results provide evidence for a novel mechanism by which overexpression of ER beta through NCoR is able to down regulate ER alpha gene expression, thus inhibiting ER alpha’s driving role on breast cancer cell growth. PMID:22622808

  1. Age-dependent changes in expression of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors in rat myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, W.; Williams, R.S.

    1986-07-16

    The expression of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors within ventricular myocardium of rats ranging in age from 21 days of fetal life to 24 months after birth was measured from (/sup 125/I) 2-(..beta.. hydroxy phenyl) ethylaminomethyl tetralone binding isotherms. No difference was observed in binding affinity between any of the age groups studied. The number of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors was found to be 60-120% higher in membranes from fetal or immature rats up to 25 days of age when compared with adult animals. The increased expression of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors in the developing heart relative to that observed in adult heart is consistent with the hypothesis that alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor stimulation may modulate protein synthesis and growth in mammalian myocardium.

  2. Relation of central alpha-adrenoceptor and other receptors to the control of renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1983-02-01

    The location and nature of the receptors in the brain on which clonidine acts to decrease renin secretion have been investigated in dogs. Clonidine was injected into the vertebral and carotid arteries, and its effects were compared with those of norepinephrine and epinephrine when injected into the third ventricle. It was also injected intravenously (IV) after transection of the brain stem and following treatment with intraventricular 6-hydroxydopamine. The results suggest that the renin-regulating receptors are located in the brain stem in a region different from the receptors mediating the depressor response, that they are alpha 2-adrenoceptors, and that they are postsynaptic in location. Central alpha 1-adrenoceptors appear to mediate increased renin secretion. Central serotonergic receptors also mediate increased renin secretion, but it is not known how the alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors interact with the serotonergic systems.

  3. Imidazenil: a low efficacy agonist at alpha1- but high efficacy at alpha5-GABAA receptors fail to show anticonvulsant cross tolerance to diazepam or zolpidem.

    PubMed

    Auta, James; Impagnatiello, Francesco; Kadriu, Bashkim; Guidotti, Alessandro; Costa, Erminio

    2008-08-01

    Whereas advances in the molecular biology of GABA(A) receptor complex using knock-out and knock-in mice have been valuable in unveiling the structure, composition, receptor assembly, and several functions of different GABA(A) receptor subtypes, the mechanism(s) underlying benzodiazepine (BZ) tolerance and withdrawal remain poorly understood. Studies using specific GABA(A) receptor subunit knock-in mice suggest that tolerance to sedative action of diazepam requires long-term activation of alpha1 and alpha5 GABA(A) receptor subunits. We investigated the role of long-term activation of these GABA(A) receptor subunits during anticonvulsant tolerance using high affinity and high intrinsic efficacy ligands for GABA(A) receptors expressing the alpha5 subunit (imidazenil) or alpha1 subunit (zolpidem), and a non-selective BZ recognition site ligand (diazepam). We report here that long-term activation of GABA(A) receptors by zolpidem and diazepam but not by imidazenil elicits anticonvulsant tolerance. Although anticonvulsant cross-tolerance occurs between diazepam and zolpidem, there is no cross-tolerance between imidazenil and diazepam or zolpidem. Furthermore, diazepam or zolpidem long-term treatment decreased the expression of mRNA encoding the alpha1 GABA(A) receptor subunit in prefrontal cortex by 43% and 20% respectively. In addition, diazepam but not zolpidem long-term treatment produced a 30% increase in the expression of the alpha5 GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA in prefrontal cortex. In contrast, imidazenil which is devoid of anticonvulsant tolerance does not elicit significant changes in the expression of alpha1 or alpha5 GABA(A) receptor subunit. These findings suggest that long-term activation of GABA(A) receptors containing the alpha1 or other subunits but not the alpha5 receptor subunit is essential for the induction of anticonvulsant tolerance.

  4. Correlation between beta- and alpha-adrenergic receptor concentrations in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Falkay, G; Melis, K; Kovács, L

    1994-05-01

    alpha 2- and beta-adrenergic receptors in human placental membranes have been investigated using the radioligands [3H]-RX 821002 and [3H]-dihydroalprenolol, respectively. The specific binding of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist RX 821002 confirms the presence of an alpha 2-adrenoceptor in the human placenta, which has been characterized previously with [3H]-rauwolscine. The major finding presented here is a correlation between the alpha 2- and beta-adrenergic receptor concentrations (r = 0.765) in the human placenta at term. It is suggested that the alpha 2/beta adrenoceptor balance may play an important role in regulation of the vascular bed of the placenta. Determination of the alpha 2/beta ratio may help towards an understanding of the contractility of the placental vascular muscles.

  5. Discrete mapping of brain Mu and delta opioid receptors using selective peptides: Quantitative autoradiography, species differences and comparison with kappa receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, N.A.; Hughes, J. )

    1989-05-01

    The opioid peptides, (3H)DAGO and (3H)DPDPE, bound to rat and guinea pig brain homogenates with a high, nanomolar affinity and to a high density of mu and delta receptors, respectively. (3H)DAGO binding to mu receptors was competitively inhibited by unlabelled opioids with the following rank order of potency: DAGO greater than morphine greater than DADLE greater than naloxone greater than etorphine much greater than U50488 much greater than DPDPE. In contrast, (3H)DPDPE binding to delta receptors was inhibited by compounds with the following rank order of potency: DPDPE greater than DADLE greater than etorphine greater than dynorphin(1-8) greater than naloxone much greater than U50488 much greater than DAGO. These profiles were consistent with specific labelling of the mu and delta opioid receptors, respectively. In vitro autoradiographic techniques coupled with computer-assisted image analyses revealed a discrete but differential anatomical localization of mu and delta receptors in the rat and guinea pig brain. In general, mu and delta receptor density in the rat exceeded that in the guinea pig brain and differed markedly from that of kappa receptors in these species. However, while mu receptors were distributed throughout the brain with hotspots in the fore-, mid- and hindbrain of the two rodents, the delta sites were relatively diffusely distributed, and were mainly concentrated in the forebrain with particularly high levels within the olfactory bulb (OB), n. accumbens and striatum. Notable regions of high density of mu receptors in the rat and guinea pig brain were the accessory olfactory bulb, striatal patches and streaks, amygdaloid nuclei, ventral hippocampal subiculum and dentate gyrus, numerous thalamic nuclei, geniculate bodies, central grey, superior and inferior colliculi, solitary and pontine nuclei and s. nigra.

  6. Some properties of human neuronal alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors fused to the green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Palma, Eleonora; Mileo, Anna M; Martinez-Torres, Ataulfo; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2002-03-19

    The functional properties and cellular localization of the human neuronal alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine (AcCho) receptor (alpha7 AcChoR) and its L248T mutated (mut) form were investigated by expressing them alone or as gene fusions with the enhanced version of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Xenopus oocytes injected with wild-type (wt), mutalpha7, or the chimeric subunit cDNAs expressed receptors that gated membrane currents when exposed to AcCho. As already known, AcCho currents generated by wtalpha7 receptors decay much faster than those elicited by the mutalpha7 receptors. Unexpectedly, the fusion of GFP to the wt and mutated alpha7 receptors led to opposite results: the AcCho-current decay of the wt receptors became slower, whereas that of the mutated receptors was accelerated. Furthermore, repetitive applications of AcCho led to a considerable "run-down" of the AcCho currents generated by mutalpha7-GFP receptors, whereas those of the wtalpha7-GFP receptors remained stable or increased in amplitude. The AcCho-current run-down of mutalpha7-GFP oocytes was accompanied by a marked decrease of alpha-bungarotoxin binding activity. Fluorescence, caused by the chimeric receptors expressed, was seen over the whole oocyte surface but was more intense and abundant in the animal hemisphere, whereas it was much weaker in the vegetal hemisphere. We conclude that fusion of GFP to wtalpha7 and mutalpha7 receptors provides powerful tools to study the distribution and function of alpha7 receptors. We also conclude that fused genes do not necessarily recapitulate all of the properties of the original receptors. This fact must be borne close in mind whenever reporter genes are attached to proteins.

  7. Conditional expression of constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} in chondrocytes impairs longitudinal bone growth in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Imazawa, Yukiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} (caER{alpha}) in chondrocytes were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of caER{alpha} in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer caER{alpha} affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ER{alpha}in vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caER{alpha}{sup ColII}, expressing constitutively active mutant estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. These results suggest that ER{alpha} is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.

  8. Transgenic Over Expression of Nicotinic Receptor Alpha 5, Alpha 3, and Beta 4 Subunit Genes Reduces Ethanol Intake in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Xavier; Ruiz, Jessica; Valverde, Olga; Molas, Susanna; Robles, Noemí; Sabrià, Josefa; Crabbe, John C.; Dierssen, Mara

    2012-01-01

    Abuse of alcohol and smoking are extensively co-morbid. Some studies suggest partial commonality of action of alcohol and nicotine mediated through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We tested mice with transgenic over expression of the alpha 5, alpha 3, beta 4 receptor subunit genes, which lie in a cluster on human chromosome 15, that were previously shown to have increased nicotine self-administration, for several responses to ethanol. Transgenic and wild-type mice did not differ in sensitivity to several acute behavioral responses to ethanol. However, transgenic mice drank less ethanol than wild-type in a two-bottle (ethanol vs. water) preference test. These results suggest a complex role for this receptor subunit gene cluster in the modulation of ethanol’s as well as nicotine’s effects. PMID:22459873

  9. Transgenic over expression of nicotinic receptor alpha 5, alpha 3, and beta 4 subunit genes reduces ethanol intake in mice.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Xavier; Ruiz-Medina, Jessica; Valverde, Olga; Molas, Susanna; Robles, Noemí; Sabrià, Josefa; Crabbe, John C; Dierssen, Mara

    2012-05-01

    Abuse of alcohol and smoking are extensively co-morbid. Some studies suggest partial commonality of action of alcohol and nicotine mediated through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We tested mice with transgenic over expression of the alpha 5, alpha 3, beta 4 receptor subunit genes, which lie in a cluster on human chromosome 15, that were previously shown to have increased nicotine self-administration, for several responses to ethanol. Transgenic and wild-type mice did not differ in sensitivity to several acute behavioral responses to ethanol. However, transgenic mice drank less ethanol than wild-type in a two-bottle (ethanol vs. water) preference test. These results suggest a complex role for this receptor subunit gene cluster in the modulation of ethanol's as well as nicotine's effects.

  10. Synthetic. cap alpha. subunit peptide 125-147 of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor induces antibodies to native receptor

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, D.J.; Griesmann, G.E.; Huang, Z.; Lennon, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    A synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 125-147 of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ..cap alpha.. subunit proved to be a major antigenic region of the AChR. Rats inoculated with 50 ..mu..g of peptide (T ..cap alpha.. 125-147) developed T cell immunity and antibodies to native AChR and signs of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. They report the synthesis and preliminary testing of a disulfide-looped peptide comprising residues 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit. Peptide H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 differs from T ..cap alpha.. 125-147 at residues 139 (Glu for Gln) and 143 (Ser for Thr). In immunoprecipitation assays, antibodies to Torpedo AChR bound /sup 125/I-labelled H..cap alpha.. 125-147 antibody bound H..cap alpha.. 125-147, but monoclonal antibodies to an immunodominant region of native AChR bound neither H..cap alpha.. 125-147 nor T ..cap alpha.. 125-147. Rats immunized with H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 produced anti-mammalian muscle AChR antibodies that induced modulation of AChRs from cultured human myotubes. Thus, region 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit is extracellular in muscle, and is both antigenic and immunogenic. It remains to be determined whether or not autoantibodies to this region may in part cause the weakness or myasthenia gravis in man.

  11. Bipolar cells of the chick retina containing alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Hamassaki-Britto, D E; Brzozowska-Prechtl, A; Karten, H J; Lindstrom, J M

    1994-01-01

    Two cDNA clones for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits sensitive to alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-Bgt) have been isolated, the so-called alpha-Bgt binding proteins alpha 1 (or alpha 7 nAChR subunit) and alpha 2 (or alpha 8 nAChR subunit). Immunohistochemical experiments have shown that both alpha 7 and alpha 8 subunits, as well as subunits insensitive to alpha-Bgt (beta 2 and alpha 3), are present in amacrine and ganglion cells of the chick retina. However, only the alpha 8 subunit was observed in presumptive bipolar cells. The present study investigated in detail the pattern of distribution of the bipolar cells containing the alpha 8 nAChR subunit and its relation to the pattern of distribution of bipolar cells immunoreactive to protein kinase C (PKC). Presumptive alpha 8- and PKC-like immunoreactive (alpha 8-LI and PKC-LI) bipolar cells were observed sending their dendrites to the outer plexiform layers and their axons to the inner plexiform layer. Whereas alpha 8-LI bipolar cells corresponded to 40-53% of the whole population of bipolar cells, PKC-LI bipolar cells represented only 6-8% of the same population. The soma sizes of the alpha 8-LI bipolar cells were slightly smaller (mean +/- S.D.; 4.9 +/- 0.8 microns) than the soma sizes of the PKC-LI bipolar cells (5.4 +/- 0.9 microns). Double-labeling experiments indicated that probably all PKC-LI bipolar cells also contain alpha 8-LI. This indicates that two distinct groups of cholinoceptive bipolar cells exist in the chick retina, one that contains PKC-LI, and another one that does not.

  12. Cytosolic PLA2(alpha) activation in Purkinje neurons and its role in AMPA-receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Masato; Hirabayashi, Tetsuya; Murayama, Toshihiko; Shimizu, Takao

    2008-09-15

    Cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha (cPLA(2)alpha) selectively releases arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids and has been proposed to be involved in the induction of long-term depression (LTD), a form of synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum. This enzyme requires two events for its full activation: Ca(2+)-dependent translocation from the cytosol to organelle membranes in order to access phospholipids as substrates, and phosphorylation by several kinases. However, the subcellular distribution and activation of cPLA(2)alpha in Purkinje cells and the role of arachidonic acid in cerebellar LTD have not been fully elucidated. In cultured Purkinje cells, stimulation of AMPA receptors, but not metabotropic glutamate receptors, triggered translocation of cPLA(2)alpha to the somatic and dendritic Golgi compartments. This translocation required Ca(2+) influx through P-type Ca(2+) channels. AMPA plus PMA, a chemical method for inducing LTD, released arachidonic acid via phosphorylation of cPLA(2)alpha. AMPA plus PMA induced a decrease in surface GluR2 for more than 2 hours. Interestingly, this reduction was occluded by a cPLA(2)alpha-specific inhibitor. Furthermore, PMA plus arachidonic acid caused the prolonged internalization of GluR2 without activating AMPA receptors. These results suggest that cPLA(2)alpha regulates the persistent decrease in the expression of AMPA receptors, underscoring the role of cPLA(2)alpha in cerebellar LTD. PMID:18713832

  13. Evidence for thymopoietin and thymopoietin/. alpha. -bungarotoxin/nicotinic receptors within the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Quik, M. ); Babu, U.; Audhya, T.; Goldstein, G. )

    1991-03-15

    Thymopoietin, a polypeptide hormone of the thymus that has pleiotropic actions on the immune, endocrine, and nervous systems, potently interacts with the neuromuscular nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Thymopoietin binds to the nicotinic {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BGT) receptor in muscle and, like {alpha}BGT, inhibits cholinergic transmission at this site. Evidence is given that radiolabeled thymopoietin similarly binds to a nicotinic {alpha}-BGT-binding site within the brain and does so with the characteristics of a specific receptor ligand. Thus specific binding to neuronal membranes was saturable, of high affinity linear with increased tissue concentration, and readily reversible; half-time was {approximately}5 min for association and 10 min for dissociation. Binding of {sup 125}I-labeled thymopoietin was displaced not only by unlabeled thymopoietin but also by {alpha}-BGT and the nicotinic receptor ligands d-tubocurarine and nicotine; various other receptor ligands (muscarinic, adrenergic, and dopaminergic) did not affect binding of {sup 125}I-labeled thymopoietin. Thymopoietin was shown by ELISA to be present in brain extracts, displacement curves of thymus and brain extracts being parallel to the standard thymopoietin curve, and Western (immuno) blot identified in brain and thymus extracts a thymopoietin-immunoreactive polypeptide of the same molecular mass as purified thymopoietin polypeptide. The authors conclude that thymopoietin and thymopoietin-binding sites are present within the brain and that the receptor for thymopoietin is the previously identified nicotinic {alpha}-BGT-binding site of neuronal tissue.

  14. Characterization of. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Nasseri, A.

    1987-01-01

    The properties of /sup 3/H-RX 781094 binding sites and the receptors inhibiting norepinephrine (NE) release and cyclic AMP accumulation in rat cerebral cortex were compared. /sup 3/H-RX 781094, a new ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor antagonist radioligand, labelled a homogeneous population of binding sites at 37/sup 0/C with the pharmacological specificity expected of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors. Gpp(NH)p and NaCl decreased the potencies of agonists at /sup 3/H-RX 781094 binding sites 3-22 fold. Antagonists blocked the inhibition of potassium-evoked tritium release from cortical slices preloaded with /sup 3/H-NE by exogenous NE with potencies similar to those observed in competition for specific /sup 3/H-RX 781094 binding sites. EEDQ, an irreversible ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors and determine whether there was a receptor reserve for the inhibition of tritium release.

  15. Truncating Prolactin Receptor Mutations Promote Tumor Growth in Murine Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Mammary Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Obi L; Chan, Szeman Ruby; Griffith, Malachi; Krysiak, Kilannin; Skidmore, Zachary L; Hundal, Jasreet; Allen, Julie A; Arthur, Cora D; Runci, Daniele; Bugatti, Mattia; Miceli, Alexander P; Schmidt, Heather; Trani, Lee; Kanchi, Krishna-Latha; Miller, Christopher A; Larson, David E; Fulton, Robert S; Vermi, William; Wilson, Richard K; Schreiber, Robert D; Mardis, Elaine R

    2016-09-27

    Estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ERα+) luminal tumors are the most frequent subtype of breast cancer. Stat1(-/-) mice develop mammary tumors that closely recapitulate the biological characteristics of this cancer subtype. To identify transforming events that contribute to tumorigenesis, we performed whole genome sequencing of Stat1(-/-) primary mammary tumors and matched normal tissues. This investigation identified somatic truncating mutations affecting the prolactin receptor (PRLR) in all tumor and no normal samples. Targeted sequencing confirmed the presence of these mutations in precancerous lesions, indicating that this is an early event in tumorigenesis. Functional evaluation of these heterozygous mutations in Stat1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed that co-expression of truncated and wild-type PRLR led to aberrant STAT3 and STAT5 activation downstream of the receptor, cellular transformation in vitro, and tumor formation in vivo. In conclusion, truncating mutations of PRLR promote tumor growth in a model of human ERα+ breast cancer and warrant further investigation. PMID:27681435

  16. A limited spectrum of mutations causes constitutive activation of the yeast alpha-factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Sommers, C M; Martin, N P; Akal-Strader, A; Becker, J M; Naider, F; Dumont, M E

    2000-06-13

    Activation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) by binding of ligand is the initial event in diverse cellular signaling pathways. To examine the frequency and diversity of mutations that cause constitutive activation of one particular GPCR, the yeast alpha-factor receptor, we screened libraries of random mutations for constitutive alleles. In initial screens for mutant receptor alleles that exhibit signaling in the absence of added ligand, 14 different point mutations were isolated. All of these 14 mutants could be further activated by alpha-factor. Ten of the mutants also acquired the ability to signal in response to binding of desTrp(1)¿Ala(3)ălpha-factor, a peptide that acts as an antagonist toward normal alpha-factor receptors. Of these 10 mutants, at least eight alleles residing in the third, fifth, sixth, and seventh transmembrane segments exhibit bona fide constitutive signaling. The remaining alleles are hypersensitive to alpha-factor rather than constitutive. They can be activated by low concentrations of endogenous alpha-factor present in MATa cells. The strongest constitutively active receptor alleles were recovered multiple times from the mutational libraries, and extensive mutagenesis of certain regions of the alpha-factor receptor did not lead to recovery of any additional constitutive alleles. Thus, only a limited number of mutations is capable of causing constitutive activation of this receptor. Constitutive and hypersensitive signaling by the mutant receptors is partially suppressed by coexpression of normal receptors, consistent with preferential association of the G protein with unactivated receptors. PMID:10841771

  17. RNA editing of the GABA(A) receptor alpha3 subunit alters the functional properties of recombinant receptors.

    PubMed

    Nimmich, Mitchell L; Heidelberg, Laura S; Fisher, Janet L

    2009-04-01

    RNA editing provides a post-transcriptional mechanism to increase structural heterogeneity of gene products. Recently, the alpha3 subunit of the GABAA receptors has been shown to undergo RNA editing. As a result, a highly conserved isoleucine residue in the third transmembrane domain is replaced with a methionine. To determine the effect of this structural change on receptor function, we compared the GABA sensitivity, pharmacological properties and macroscopic kinetics of recombinant receptors containing either the edited or unedited forms of the alpha3 subunit along with beta3 and gamma2L. Editing substantially altered the GABA sensitivity and deactivation rate of the receptors, with the unedited form showing a lower GABA EC50 and slower decay. Comparable effects were observed with a mutation at the homologous location in the alpha1 subunit, suggesting a common role for this site in regulation of channel gating. Except for the response to GABA, the pharmacological properties of the receptor were unaffected by editing, with similar enhancement by a variety of modulators. Since RNA editing of the alpha3 subunit increases through development, our findings suggest that GABAergic neurotransmission may be more effective early in development, with greater GABA sensitivity and slower decay rates conferred by the unedited alpha3 subunit.

  18. T-cell receptor heterogeneity of gamma delta T-cell clones from human female reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Brew, R; Deniz, G; Taylor, J J

    1993-03-01

    gamma delta T cells were isolated from human decidua parietalis, decidua basalis and cervix and cloned in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). T-cell receptor (TcR) expression was then analysed and compared with that of a panel of gamma delta T-cell clones from peripheral blood. Only 17/40 (42.5%) clones from decidua parietalis were V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ as compared to 68/94 (72%) of peripheral blood clones (P < 0.005). Conversely, 50% of clones from decidua parietalis but only 15% of clones from peripheral blood were V delta 1+ (P < 0.001). At least seven distinct TcR types were identified among the panel of clones from decidua parietalis and at least six different types were expressed by the panel of 17 clones from cervix. This receptor heterogeneity was not a result of interdonor variation as in all instances where more than one clone was obtained from a single sample, individual clones having between two and five receptor types were identified. However, 23/24 (95.8%) of clones from decidua basalis were V gamma 9+/V delta 2+. Most clones from decidua parietalis and cervix, whether V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ or V delta 1+, were positive for the mucosal lymphocyte marker, HML-1, but expression was often heterogeneous within a single clone. In contrast, almost all gamma delta T-cell clones from peripheral blood were HML-1-. Thus, unlike the mouse, gamma delta T cells within these human female reproductive tissues have a diverse TcR repertoire which, in decidua parietalis, is distinct from that of peripheral blood.

  19. Muscarinic cholinergic and alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptors in murine atria: phosphatidylinositol breakdown and receptor interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Upon stimulation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors, there is a decrease in the force of contraction rate of firing in heart, while stimulation of ..cap alpha.. adrenergic receptors causes an increase in the force of contraction with no change in the heart rate. Yet both receptors stimulate the breakdown of phosphatidylinositol (PI). Therefore, the breakdown of PI was examined to determine how the process differed between the two receptor systems. Murine atria, prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)inositol, were stimulated with the muscarinic cholinergic agonists, carbamylcholine (CARB), and oxotremorine (OXO); and with the ..cap alpha.. adrenergic agonists, norepinephrine (NE) and phenylephrine (PE); either singly or in combination. Breakdown of PI was assessed by measurement of individual inositol phosphates by anion exchange chromatography. Binding of CARB to atrial muscarinic receptors was measured by competition with (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate.

  20. Histamine receptors on adult rat cardiomyocytes: antagonism of alpha/sub 1/-receptor stimulation of cAMP degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Buxton, I.L.O.; Bowen, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    Incubation of intact cardiomyocytes with the histamine antagonist (/sup 3/H)mepyramine results in rapid reversible binding to a single class of high affinity sites (K/sub D/ = 1.2nM; 50,000 sites/myocyte). In membranes from purified myocytes histamine competition of (/sup 3/H)mepyramine binding (K/sub D/ = 300nM) is not altered by GTP (10..mu..M). Competition of (/sup 3/H)mepyramine binding by H-receptor subtype-selective antagonists suggests the presence of a single class of H/sub 1/-receptors. Incubation of intact myocytes with histamine (luM, H/sub 1/ receptor activation) plus norepinephrine (NE 1uM, alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ receptor activation) for 3 min leads to significantly more cAMP accumulation (36.5 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes) than NE alone (30 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes). Histamine alone does not alter basal cAMP = 10.4 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes, or beta/sub 1/ stimulation (isoproternol, 1uM) = 39.6 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes. Cyclic AMP accumulation with NE plus prazosin 10nM, (alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ + alpha/sub 1/ blockade) is indistinguishable from NE + histamine, (alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ + H/sub 1/) stimulation. Histamine competition for (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding suggests that histamine does not block alpha/sub 1/ receptors on the myocyte. These data suggest that H/sub 1/ receptor activation leads to antagonism of the alpha/sub 1/ receptor mediated activation of cAMP phosphodiesterase the authors have recently described.

  1. Different slopes for different folks: alpha and delta EEG power predict subsequent video game learning rate and improvements in cognitive control tasks.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Kyle E; Basak, Chandramallika; Maclin, Edward L; Low, Kathy A; Boot, Walter R; Kramer, Arthur F; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2012-12-01

    We hypothesized that control processes, as measured using electrophysiological (EEG) variables, influence the rate of learning of complex tasks. Specifically, we measured alpha power, event-related spectral perturbations (ERSPs), and event-related brain potentials during early training of the Space Fortress task, and correlated these measures with subsequent learning rate and performance in transfer tasks. Once initial score was partialled out, the best predictors were frontal alpha power and alpha and delta ERSPs, but not P300. By combining these predictors, we could explain about 50% of the learning rate variance and 10%-20% of the variance in transfer to other tasks using only pretraining EEG measures. Thus, control processes, as indexed by alpha and delta EEG oscillations, can predict learning and skill improvements. The results are of potential use to optimize training regimes.

  2. Role of the alpha subunit in the modulation of GABA(A) receptors by anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Paul; Jones, Brian L; Henderson, Leslie P

    2005-09-01

    Neural transmission mediated by circuits expressing alpha2 subunit-containing gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors is critical for the expression of behaviors known to be altered by anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS). Here we show that micromolar concentrations of AAS, which reflect levels found in steroid abusers, induce positive modulation of currents from alpha2beta3 gamma2L recombinant receptors elicited by pulses of GABA that mimic synaptic conditions in a manner that is mechanistically distinct from modulation induced at alpha1beta3 gamma2L receptors. Specifically, at alpha2-containing receptors, the AAS, 17alpha-methyltestosterone (17alpha-MeT) enhanced peak current, slowed deactivation, diminished desensitization, and promoted entry of receptors into more distal states along the activation pathway. Analysis of GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic currents in primary cortical neurons followed by single cell real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that 17alpha-MeT enhancement of synaptic currents is proportional to the ratio of alpha2 to alpha1 subunit mRNA. Finally, we show that the modulation elicited by AAS is not comparable to that produced by micromolar concentrations of other positive allosteric modulators at alpha2-containing receptors. In sum, these data indicate that AAS elicit effects on GABA(A) receptor function that depend significantly on alpha subunit composition and that the mechanism of AAS modulation of GABA(A) receptors is distinct from that of other positive allosteric modulators.

  3. alpha-2 Macroglobulin receptor/Ldl receptor-related protein(Lrp)- dependent internalization of the urokinase receptor

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The GPI-anchored urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) does not internalize free urokinase (uPA). On the contrary, uPAR-bound complexes of uPA with its serpin inhibitors PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1) or PN-1 (protease nexin-1) are readily internalized in several cell types. Here we address the question whether uPAR is internalized as well upon binding of uPA-serpin complexes. Both LB6 clone 19 cells, a mouse cell line transfected with the human uPAR cDNA, and the human U937 monocytic cell line, express in addition to uPAR also the endocytic alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP/alpha 2-MR) which is required to internalize uPAR-bound uPA-PAI-1 and uPA-PN-1 complexes. Downregulation of cell surface uPAR molecules in U937 cells was detected by cytofluorimetric analysis after uPA-PAI-1 and uPA-PN-1 incubation for 30 min at 37 degrees C; this effect was blocked by preincubation with the ligand of LRP/alpha 2-MR, RAP (LRP/alpha 2-MR- associated protein), known to block the binding of the uPA complexes to LRP/alpha 2-. MR. Downregulation correlated in time with the intracellular appearance of uPAR as assessed by confocal microscopy and immuno-electron microscopy. After 30 min incubation with uPA-PAI-1 or uPA-PN-1 (but not with free uPA), confocal microscopy showed that uPAR staining in permeabilized LB6 clone 19 cells moved from a mostly surface associated to a largely perinuclear position. This effect was inhibited by the LRP/alpha 2-MR RAP. Perinuclear uPAR did not represent newly synthesized nor a preexisting intracellular pool of uPAR, since this fluorescence pattern was not modified by treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, and since in LB6 clone 19 cells all of uPAR was expressed on the cell surface. Immuno-electron microscopy confirmed the plasma membrane to intracellular translocation of uPAR, and its dependence on LRP/alpha 2-MR in LB6 clone 19 cells only after

  4. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} modulates the expression of adipogenesis-related genes during adipocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ijichi, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Yagi, Ken; Okazaki, Yasushi; Inoue, Satoshi . E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-07-06

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates cellular energy metabolism by modulating gene expression involved in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue. However, the physiological role of ERR{alpha} in adipogenesis and white adipose tissue development has not been well studied. Here, we show that ERR{alpha} and ERR{alpha}-related transcriptional coactivators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) and PGC-1{beta}, can be up-regulated in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes at mRNA levels under the adipogenic differentiation condition including the inducer of cAMP, glucocorticoid, and insulin. Gene knockdown by ERR{alpha}-specific siRNA results in mRNA down-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, PPAR{gamma}, and PGC-1{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells in the adipogenesis medium. ERR{alpha} and PGC-1{beta} mRNA expression can be also up-regulated in another preadipocyte lineage DFAT-D1 cells and a pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2 under the differentiation condition. Furthermore, stable expression of ERR{alpha} in 3T3-L1 cells up-regulates adipogenic marker genes and promotes triglyceride accumulation during 3T3-L1 differentiation. These results suggest that ERR{alpha} may play a critical role in adipocyte differentiation by modulating the expression of various adipogenesis-related genes.

  5. Platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in major depressive disorder. Binding of tritiated clonidine before and after tricyclic antidepressant drug treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Sevilla, J.A.; Zis, A.P.; Hollingsworth, P.J.; Greden, J.F.; Smith, C.B.

    1981-12-01

    The specific binding of tritiated (3H)-clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist, to platelet membranes was measured in normal subjects and in patients with major depressive disorder. The number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors from the depressed group was significantly higher than that found in platelets obtained from the control population. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressant drugs led to significant decreases in the number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. These results support the hypothesis that the depressive syndrome is related to an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor supersensitivity and that the clinical effectiveness of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is associated with a decrease in the number of these receptors.

  6. Amiloride inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) receptors depends upon the alpha subunit subtype.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Janet L

    2002-06-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptors (GABARs) are responsible for most fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian brain. The GABARs contain several allosteric modulatory sites, many of which are useful clinically. The activity of most of these modulators depends upon the subunit composition of the receptor. The diuretic amiloride was previously reported to inhibit GABARs in frog sensory neurons. We measured its effects on recombinant GABARs to determine its mechanism of action at mammalian receptors and to examine the effect of subunit composition. Amiloride acted primarily as a competitive antagonist, reducing the sensitivity of the receptor to GABA without affecting the maximal current amplitude. Receptors containing an alpha6 subunit were about 10-fold more sensitive to amiloride than those containing other alpha subunits. In contrast, the identity of the beta or gamma subtype had little effect on amiloride sensitivity. Although several other modulators have specific effects at alpha6-containing receptors, amiloride is the first inhibitor to be reported with no additional dependence on the identity of the beta or gamma subunit. Therefore, it probably represents a unique modulatory site on the GABAR, which could be useful for developing drugs targeting these receptors. The selective activity of amiloride could also be helpful for isolating the contribution of receptors composed of alpha6 subtypes in heterogeneous native GABAR populations.

  7. Separation of alpha-, beta-, gamma-, delta-tocopherols and alpha-tocopherol acetate on a pentaerythritol diacrylate monostearate-ethylene dimethacrylate monolith by capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Chaisuwan, Patcharin; Nacapricha, Duangjai; Wilairat, Prapin; Jiang, Zhengjin; Smith, Norman W

    2008-06-01

    This work reports the first use of a monolith with method development for the separation of tocopherol (TOH) compounds by CEC with UV detection. A pentaerythritol diacrylate monostearate-ethylene dimethacrylate (PEDAS-EDMA) monolithic column has been investigated for an optimised condition to separate alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-TOHs, and alpha-tocopherol acetate (TAc). The PEDAS-EDMA monolith showed a remarkably good selectivity for separation of the TOH isomers including the beta- and gamma-isomers which are not easily separated by standard C8 or C18 particle-packed columns. Retention studies indicated that an RP mechanism was involved in the separation on the PEDAS-EDMA column, but polar interactions with the underlying ester and hydroxyl groups enhanced the separation of the problematic beta- and gamma-isomers. Separation of all the compounds was achieved within 25 min using 3:10:87 v/v/v 100 mM Tris buffer (pH 9.3)/methanol/ACN as the mobile phase. The method was successfully applied to a pharmaceutical sample with recoveries from 93 to 99%. Intraday and interday precisions (%RSD) for peak area and retention time were less than 2.3. LODs for all four TOHs and TAc were below 1 ppm.

  8. Autoradiographic analysis of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors in the human brain postmortem. Effect of suicide

    SciTech Connect

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Dillon, K.A.; Fieldust, S.J.; Biegon, A. )

    1990-11-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors, using tritiated prazosin as a ligand, was performed on 24 human brains postmortem. Twelve brains were obtained from suicide victims and 12 from matched controls. We found significant lower binding to alpha 1 receptors in several brain regions of the suicide group as compared with matched controls. This decrease in receptor density was evident in portions of the prefrontal cortex, as well as the temporal cortex and in the caudate nucleus. Age, sex, presence of alcohol, and time of death to autopsy did not affect prazosin binding, in our sample, as measured by autoradiography.

  9. Progesterone prevents linkage of rabbit myometrial alpha 2-adrenergic receptors to inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y Y; Riemer, R K; Goldfien, A; Roberts, J M

    1989-04-01

    The uterine response to adrenergic stimulation is determined by the hormonal milieu. This response is particularly well characterized in the rabbit. In this species, as in humans, the response of the uterus to sympathetic stimulation is alpha-adrenergically mediated contraction with elevated circulating estrogen. However, with progesterone predominance, similar stimulation inhibits uterine contractions, a response mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors acting through their second message, cyclic adenosine monophosphate. We studied the mechanisms by which sex steroids regulate myometrial adrenergic responses. In this study, we questioned whether part of the effect of sex steroids could be explained by an alteration of the coupling of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase. We found that in the progesterone-treated rabbit, although alpha 2-receptors are present, they are not linked to inhibition of cyclic adenosine monophosphate synthesis. The net synthesis of cyclic adenosine monophosphage in response to endogenous catecholamines is determined by their activation of beta-adrenergic receptors to increase and alpha 2-receptors to decrease cyclic adenosine monophosphate formation. Thus the uncoupling of alpha 2-receptors contributes to increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate in myometrium of progesterone-treated animals consistent with the reported predominance of beta-adrenergic contractile responses in this setting.

  10. Induction of delta-opioid receptor function in the midbrain after chronic morphine treatment.

    PubMed

    Hack, Stephen P; Bagley, Elena E; Chieng, Billy C H; Christie, MacDonald J

    2005-03-23

    Delta-opioid receptor (DOPr) activation fails to produce cellular physiological responses in many brain regions, including the periaqueductal gray (PAG), despite neural expression of high densities of the receptor. Previous histochemical studies have demonstrated that a variety of stimuli, including chronic morphine treatment, induce the translocation of DOPr from intracellular pools to the surface membrane of CNS neurons. PAG neurons in slices taken from untreated mice exhibited mu-opioid receptor (MOPr) but not DOPr-mediated presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic synaptic currents. In contrast, after 5-6 d of chronic morphine treatment, DOPr stimulation inhibited synaptic GABA release onto most neurons. Shorter exposure to morphine in vitro (upto 4 h) or in vivo (18 h) did not induce functional DOPr responses. DOPr-mediated presynaptic inhibition could not be induced in slices from untreated animals by increasing synaptic activity in vitro using high extracellular potassium concentrations or activation of protein kinase A. Induction of functional DOPr signaling by chronic morphine required MOPr expression, because no DOPr receptor responses were observed in MOPr knock-out mice. DOPr agonists also had no effect on miniature IPSCs in beta-arrestin-2 knock-out mice after chronic morphine. These results suggest that induction of DOPr-mediated actions in PAG by chronic morphine requires prolonged MOPr stimulation and expression of beta-arrestin-2.

  11. Fetal liver T cell receptor gamma/delta+ T cells as cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for maternal alloantigens

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have established fetal liver-derived T cell receptor (TCR) gamma/delta+, CD3+ T cell lines that are cytotoxic for maternal T cells. Fetal liver-derived lymphoid progenitors yielded predominantly TCR-gamma/delta+ cell clusters when cultured on fetal bone marrow- derived stromal cells in the presence of a cytokine cocktail under magnetic force. These tightly adherent clusters were cloned by limiting dilution and the resulting cell lines analyzed for phenotype and function. Six of eight TCR-gamma/delta lines from 8-9.5-wk gestation fetuses were V delta 2+ as compared with zero of eight lines from later stages of gestation (10 and 15 wk), where all the lines were V delta 1+. In cytotoxicity assays, these TCR-gamma/delta+, CD3+, CD4-, and CD8+ or CD8- long-term cultured lymphoid cells (LLC) were killer cells active against the class I antigens on maternal T cells. Of the cell lines, the CD8+ TCR-gamma/delta+ LLC had the highest levels of killer activity. Thus fetal liver TCR-gamma/delta+ T cells may play a crucial role in protection against invading maternal T cells generated in the feto-maternal interaction. PMID:1535364

  12. Theoretical study of the thermodynamic properties of {alpha}-{delta}{prime} interphase boundaries in Al-Li

    SciTech Connect

    Asta, M.

    1996-10-01

    The thermodynamic properties of coherent interphase-boundary interfaces between {alpha} and {delta}{prime} phases in the Al-Li alloy system have been studied using a theoretical approach based on the cluster variation method. Interfacial excess free energies have been calculated for interphase boundaries with {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace} crystallographic orientations at several temperatures ranging between 100 and 209 C. Additionally, the dependencies of the average composition and the order parameter upon distance within the compositionally diffuse interfacial regions have been computed. The calculated interphase energies range between 7 and 11 mJ/m{sup 2}. From an analysis of the calculated composition and order-parameter profiles, interface widths are predicted to be as large as 27 {angstrom}.

  13. Transgenic mice over-expressing human beta-amyloid have functional nicotinic alpha 7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Spencer, J P; Weil, A; Hill, K; Hussain, I; Richardson, J C; Cusdin, F S; Chen, Y H; Randall, A D

    2006-02-01

    A potentially major factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease is the enhanced production of soluble beta-amyloid peptide fragments amyloid beta peptide(1-40) and amyloid beta peptide(1-42). These amyloid peptides are generated by cleavage of the amyloid-precursor protein and aggregate spontaneously to form amyloid plaques, which are a classical pathological hallmark in Alzheimer's disease. Although the precise mechanisms are unknown, it is widely believed that amyloid peptides initiate the degenerative process, resulting in subsequent cognitive decline. One interaction of amyloid beta peptide that may contribute to an impairment of cognition is its high affinity binding to the alpha 7 nicotinic receptor; a receptor shown to be important for cognition in a number of studies. There is some controversy, however, whether amyloid beta peptide inhibits or activates this receptor. We have cloned and stably expressed the human alpha 7 receptor and investigated its interaction with amyloid beta peptide using patch clamp electrophysiology. Human alpha 7 was activated in a concentration-dependent fashion by nicotine, acetylcholine and choline and potently inhibited by methyllycaconitine citrate. The responses were inwardly rectifying and exhibited rapid activation, desensitization and deactivation. Amyloid beta peptide(1-42) antagonized human alpha7 responses in a partially reversible fashion; no agonist effects of amyloid beta peptide(1-42) were detected. A similar inhibition of mouse alpha 7 was also observed. In addition, we have assessed the function of native alpha 7 receptors in hippocampal slices prepared from transgenic mice that over-express human amyloid. Despite this clear inhibition of recombinant receptors, hippocampal GABAergic interneurones in slices from beta-amyloid over-expressing mice still possess alpha 7 receptor-mediated currents.

  14. Amino acid sequence of the alpha subunit of human leukocyte adhesion receptor Mo1 (complement receptor type 3)

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Mo1 (complement receptor type 3, CR3; CD11b/CD18) is an adhesion- promoting human leukocyte surface membrane heterodimer (alpha subunit 155 kD [CD11b] noncovalently linked to a beta subunit of 95 kD [CD18]). The complete amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA of the human alpha subunit is reported. The protein consists of 1,136 amino acids with a long amino-terminal extracytoplasmic domain, a 26-amino acid hydrophobic transmembrane segment, and a 19-carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic domain. The extracytoplasmic region has three putative Ca2+- binding domains with good homology and one with weak homology to the "lock washer" Ca2+-binding consensus sequence. These metal-binding domains explain the divalent cation-dependent functions mediated by Mo1. The alpha subunit is highly homologous to the alpha subunit of leukocyte p150,95 and to a lesser extent, to the alpha subunit of other "integrin" receptors such as fibronectin, vitronectin, and platelet IIb/IIIa receptors in humans and position-specific antigen-2 (PS2) in Drosophila. Mo1 alpha, like p150, contains a unique 187-amino acid stretch NH2-terminal to the metal-binding domains. This region could be involved in some of the specific functions mediated by these leukocyte glycoproteins. PMID:2454931

  15. The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit gene: Cloning, mapping, structure, and targeting in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit is a member of a family of ligand-gated ion channels, and is the only subunit know to bind {alpha}-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. {alpha}-Bungarotoxin binding sites are known to be more abundant in the hippocampus of mouse strains that are particularly sensitive to nicotine-induced seizures. The {alpha}7 receptor is highly permeable to calcium, which could suggest a role in synaptic plasticity in the nervous system. Auditory gating deficiency, an abnormal response to a second auditory stimulus, is characteristic of schizophrenia. Mouse strains that exhibit a similar gating deficit have reduced hippocampal expression of the {alpha}7 subunit. We have cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA for the mouse {alpha}7 gene (Acra-7) and characterized its gene structure. The murine {alpha}7 shares amino acid identity of 99% and 93% with the rat and human {alpha}7 subunits, respectively. Using an interspecies backcross panel, the murine gene was mapped to chromosome 7 near the p locus, a region syntenic with human chromosome 15; the human gene (CHRNA7) was confirmed to map to 15q13-q14 by FISH. To generate a mouse {alpha}7 mutant by homologous recombination, we have constructed a replacement vector which will delete transmembrane domains II-IV and the cytoplasmic domain from the gene product. Recombinant embryonic stem (ES) cell clones were selected and used to develop mouse chimeras that are currently being bred to obtain germline transmission.

  16. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone down-regulates CXC receptors through activation of neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sunil K; Sarkar, Abira; Sreenivasan, Yashin

    2006-03-01

    Considering the role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in a large number of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, the regulation of IL-8-mediated biological responses is important. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), a tridecapeptide, inhibits most forms of inflammation by an unknown mechanism. In the present study, we have found that alpha-MSH interacts predominantly with melanocortin-1 receptors and inhibits several IL-8-induced biological responses in macrophages and neutrophils. It down-regulated receptors for IL-8 but not for TNF, IL-4, IL-13 or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in neutrophils. It down-regulated CXCR type 1 and 2 but not mRNA levels. alpha-MSH did not inhibit IL-8 binding in purified cell membrane or affinity-purified CXCR. IL-8 or anti-CXCR Ab protected against alpha-MSH-mediated inhibition of IL-8 binding. The level of neutrophil elastase, a specific serine protease, but not cathepsin G or proteinase 3 increased in alpha-MSH-treated cells, and restoration of CXCR by specific neutrophil elastase or serine protease inhibitors indicates the involvement of elastase in alpha-MSH-induced down-regulation of CXCR. These studies suggest that alpha-MSH inhibits IL-8-mediated biological responses by down-regulating CXCR through induction of serine protease and that alpha-MSH acts as a potent immunomodulator in neutrophil-driven inflammatory distress. PMID:16479540

  17. Identification of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor sites in human retinoblastoma (Y-79) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmi, S.M.; Mishra, R.K.

    1989-02-15

    The existence of specific alpha 2-adrenergic receptor sites has been shown in human retinoblastoma (Y-79) and neuroblastoma (SH-SH5Y) cells using direct radioligand binding. (/sup 3/H)Rauwolscine, a selective alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, exhibited high affinity, saturable binding to both Y-79 and SH-SY5Y cell membranes. The binding of alpha 1 specific antagonist, (/sup 3/H)Prazocine, was not detectable in either cell type. Competition studies with antagonists yielded pharmacological characteristics typical of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors: rauwolscine greater than yohimbine greater than phentolamine greater than prazocine. Based on the affinity constants of prazocine and oxymetazoline, it appears that Y-79 cells contain alpha 2A receptor, whereas SH-SY5Y cells probably represent a mixture of alpha 2A and alpha 2B receptors. alpha 2-agonists clonidine and (-)epinephrine inhibition curves yielded high and low affinity states of the receptor in SH-SY5Y cells. Gpp(NH)p and sodium ions reduced the proportion of high affinity sites of alpha 2 receptors. These two neuronal cell lines of human origin would prove useful in elucidating the action and regulation of human alpha 2-adrenergic receptors and their interaction with other receptor systems.

  18. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    May, Felicity EB

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  19. (g-2){sub {mu}} and {Delta}{alpha}: recent developments and status report

    SciTech Connect

    Teubner, T.; Liao, R.; Hagiwara, K.; Martin, A. D.; Nomura, D.

    2011-05-23

    We briefly review the Standard Model prediction of g-2 and confront it with the formidably accurate measurement from BNL. The focus is on recent improvements of the hadronic vacuum polarisation contributions. We also calculate the running QED coupling at the scale of the Z boson mass, {alpha}(M{sub Z}{sup 2}), an important ingredient in electroweak precision fits.

  20. Potent cyclic enkephalin analogues for delta opioid receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, G.; Kao, J.; Hruby, V.; Morelli, M.; Gulya, K.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-03-01

    (/sup 3/H) (D-Pen/sup 2/,D-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin ((/sup 3/H)DPDPE) and (/sup 3/H) (D-Pen/sup 2/, L-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin ((/sup 3/H)DPLPE) characterization studies showed high affinity binding of these radioligands to rat brain membranes with dissociation constants of 1.8 and 1.0 nM, respectively, while a similar number of receptor density was found with both radiolabeled ligands (77 fmoles/mg protein). Unlabeled DPDPE inhibited both radioligands with high affinity (IC50 = 7 nM0 while morphine (IC50 = 80 nM), DAGO (IC50 = 250 nM) and PLO17 (no inhibition at 1000 nM) were less effective in inhibiting the binding, thus, illustrating the selective action of these radiolabeled ligands at the delta opioid receptor. A series of conformationally restricted D-penicillamine containing cyclic enkephalin analogues were synthesized using standard solid phase methods and their ability to inhibit (/sup 3/H)DPDPE and (/sup 3/H)DPLPE were examined in rat brain radioreceptor assays. Substitutions in the DPDPE molecule were made in phe/sup 4/. These substitutions were pNO/sub 2/-phe/sup 4/, beta-methyl-phe/sup 4/, pNO/sub 2/-beta-methyl-phe/sub 4/, pNO/sub 2/-beta-methyl-phe/sup 4/ (three isomeric forms: A,B,D). The IC50 values for the above enkephalin analogues were 3.7, 16, 7, 7, 200 nM, respectively. Thus, these potent analogues of DPDPE should be useful in determining the structure activity relationships of the delta opioid receptor in rat brain.

  1. Sensitivity to the seizure-inducing effects of nicotine is associated with strain-specific variants of the alpha 5 and alpha 7 nicotinic receptor subunit genes.

    PubMed

    Stitzel, J A; Blanchette, J M; Collins, A C

    1998-03-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (rflps) have been identified for the nicotinic ACh receptor subunit genes alpha 5 and alpha 7 between two mouse strains (C3H/2ibg and DBA/2ibg) that differ in sensitivity to the convulsant effects of nicotine. In the study reported here, F2 animals derived from these two parental stains were tested for their sensitivity to the convulsant effects of nicotine as measured by seizure frequency and overall sensitivity score. Subsequently, the animals were genotyped for the alpha 5 and alpha 7 rflps. In addition, levels of alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) binding were measured in four brain regions (colliculi, hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum) to determine whether there is a correlation among alpha-BTX binding levels, sensitivity to nicotine and nicotinic ACh receptor subunit genotype. A significant relationship was observed between alpha 5 and alpha 7 genotype and sensitivity to nicotine. In addition, the alpha 7 rflp significantly correlated with levels of alpha-BTX binding in hippocampus, colliculi and striatum. The alpha 5 rflp did not correlate with alpha-BTX binding levels in any brain region. Levels of alpha-BTX binding did not correlate with nicotine-induced seizure sensitivity or overall nicotine sensitivity score in any of the four brain regions examined.

  2. Sleep-wake behavior and responses to sleep deprivation of mice lacking both interleukin-1 beta receptor 1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Baracchi, Francesca; Opp, Mark R

    2008-08-01

    Data indicate that interleukin (IL)-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) are involved in the regulation of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS). Previous studies demonstrate that mice lacking the IL-1 beta type 1 receptor spend less time in NREMS during the light period, whereas mice lacking the p55 (type 1) receptor for TNFalpha spend less time in NREMS during the dark period. To further investigate roles for IL-1 beta and TNFalpha in sleep regulation we phenotyped sleep and responses to sleep deprivation of mice lacking both the IL-1 beta receptor 1 and TNFalpha receptor 1 (IL-1R1/TNFR1 KO). Male adult mice (IL-1R1/TNFR1 KO, n=14; B6129SF2/J, n=14) were surgically instrumented with EEG electrodes and with a thermistor to measure brain temperature. After recovery and adaptation to the recording apparatus, 48 h of undisturbed baseline recordings were obtained. Mice were then subjected to 6h sleep deprivation at light onset by gentle handling. IL-1R1/TNFR1 KO mice spent less time in NREMS during the last 6h of the dark period and less time in rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) during the light period. There were no differences between strains in the diurnal timing of delta power during NREMS. However, there were strain differences in the relative power spectra of the NREMS EEG during both the light period and the dark period. In addition, during the light period relative power in the theta frequency band of the REMS EEG differed between strains. After sleep deprivation, control mice exhibited prolonged increases in NREMS and REMS, whereas the duration of the NREMS increase was shorter and there was no increase in REMS of IL-1R1/TNFR1 KO mice. Delta power during NREMS increased in both strains after sleep deprivation, but the increase in delta power during NREMS of IL-1R1/TNFR1 KO mice was of greater magnitude and of longer duration than that observed in control mice. These results provide additional evidence that the IL-1 beta and TNFalpha cytokine systems

  3. Sleep-wake behavior and responses to sleep deprivation of mice lacking both interleukin-1 beta receptor 1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Baracchi, Francesca; Opp, Mark R

    2008-08-01

    Data indicate that interleukin (IL)-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) are involved in the regulation of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS). Previous studies demonstrate that mice lacking the IL-1 beta type 1 receptor spend less time in NREMS during the light period, whereas mice lacking the p55 (type 1) receptor for TNFalpha spend less time in NREMS during the dark period. To further investigate roles for IL-1 beta and TNFalpha in sleep regulation we phenotyped sleep and responses to sleep deprivation of mice lacking both the IL-1 beta receptor 1 and TNFalpha receptor 1 (IL-1R1/TNFR1 KO). Male adult mice (IL-1R1/TNFR1 KO, n=14; B6129SF2/J, n=14) were surgically instrumented with EEG electrodes and with a thermistor to measure brain temperature. After recovery and adaptation to the recording apparatus, 48 h of undisturbed baseline recordings were obtained. Mice were then subjected to 6h sleep deprivation at light onset by gentle handling. IL-1R1/TNFR1 KO mice spent less time in NREMS during the last 6h of the dark period and less time in rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) during the light period. There were no differences between strains in the diurnal timing of delta power during NREMS. However, there were strain differences in the relative power spectra of the NREMS EEG during both the light period and the dark period. In addition, during the light period relative power in the theta frequency band of the REMS EEG differed between strains. After sleep deprivation, control mice exhibited prolonged increases in NREMS and REMS, whereas the duration of the NREMS increase was shorter and there was no increase in REMS of IL-1R1/TNFR1 KO mice. Delta power during NREMS increased in both strains after sleep deprivation, but the increase in delta power during NREMS of IL-1R1/TNFR1 KO mice was of greater magnitude and of longer duration than that observed in control mice. These results provide additional evidence that the IL-1 beta and TNFalpha cytokine systems

  4. Laser irradiation-induced {alpha} to {delta} phase transformation in Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics and nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Vila, M.; Diaz-Guerra, C.; Piqueras, J.

    2012-08-13

    The {alpha}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} to {delta}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase transformation has been locally induced by laser irradiation in ceramic samples and single-crystal nanowires of this oxide. The threshold power densities necessary to induce this transformation, as well as the corresponding transformation kinetics and its temporal stability, have been investigated in both kinds of samples by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The appearance of the {delta} phase was also monitored by spatially resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. An emission band peaked near 1.67 eV, not observed in {alpha}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is tentatively attributed to {delta}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} near band gap transitions.

  5. Human alpha 2-adrenergic receptor subtype distribution: widespread and subtype-selective expression of alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2 mRNA in multiple tissues.

    PubMed

    Eason, M G; Liggett, S B

    1993-07-01

    At present, molecular cloning and pharmacological studies have delineated three human alpha 2-adrenergic receptor (alpha 2AR) subtypes, alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2. Assignment of the alpha 2AR subtypes to specific functions has been limited by an unclear definition of tissue alpha 2AR expression outside of the central nervous system. It has been suggested that alpha 2C4 expression is confined to the brain, that alpha 2C2 expression is only in the liver and kidney, and that there is nearly ubiquitous expression of alpha 2C10. However, this is based on studies of a limited number of rat tissues or on studies using non-species-specific approaches. Therefore, to define alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2 tissue expression, we used reverse transcription of total RNA isolated from 20 human tissues, followed by amplification of alpha 2AR cDNA using the polymerase chain reaction. This technique provided two advantages: high sensitivity and, with the use of subtype-specific oligonucleotide primers and probes, differentiation between the alpha 2AR subtypes. The tissues studied were aorta, vena cava, heart (epicardium and endocardium), lung, skeletal muscle, liver, pancreas (head and tail), fat (perinephric and subcutaneous), kidney (cortex and medulla), prostate, stomach, ileum, jejunum, colon, adrenal gland, and spleen. We found that the majority of these tissues expressed alpha 2C10, with the exceptions being the head of the pancreas, subcutaneous fat, colon, and spleen. In marked distinction to other studies, however, we found a prolific expression of the alpha 2C4 and alpha 2C2 subtypes. Expression of alpha 2C4 was found in all tissues with the exception of liver, fat, stomach, and colon, and a virtually ubiquitous expression of alpha 2C2 was found, with the exception of epicardium. Of all tissues studied, only colon and subcutaneous fat expressed a single alpha 2AR subtype, which was alpha 2C2. Thus, the alpha 2AR subtypes do not have a confined expression but

  6. Human alpha 2-adrenergic receptor subtype distribution: widespread and subtype-selective expression of alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2 mRNA in multiple tissues.

    PubMed

    Eason, M G; Liggett, S B

    1993-07-01

    At present, molecular cloning and pharmacological studies have delineated three human alpha 2-adrenergic receptor (alpha 2AR) subtypes, alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2. Assignment of the alpha 2AR subtypes to specific functions has been limited by an unclear definition of tissue alpha 2AR expression outside of the central nervous system. It has been suggested that alpha 2C4 expression is confined to the brain, that alpha 2C2 expression is only in the liver and kidney, and that there is nearly ubiquitous expression of alpha 2C10. However, this is based on studies of a limited number of rat tissues or on studies using non-species-specific approaches. Therefore, to define alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2 tissue expression, we used reverse transcription of total RNA isolated from 20 human tissues, followed by amplification of alpha 2AR cDNA using the polymerase chain reaction. This technique provided two advantages: high sensitivity and, with the use of subtype-specific oligonucleotide primers and probes, differentiation between the alpha 2AR subtypes. The tissues studied were aorta, vena cava, heart (epicardium and endocardium), lung, skeletal muscle, liver, pancreas (head and tail), fat (perinephric and subcutaneous), kidney (cortex and medulla), prostate, stomach, ileum, jejunum, colon, adrenal gland, and spleen. We found that the majority of these tissues expressed alpha 2C10, with the exceptions being the head of the pancreas, subcutaneous fat, colon, and spleen. In marked distinction to other studies, however, we found a prolific expression of the alpha 2C4 and alpha 2C2 subtypes. Expression of alpha 2C4 was found in all tissues with the exception of liver, fat, stomach, and colon, and a virtually ubiquitous expression of alpha 2C2 was found, with the exception of epicardium. Of all tissues studied, only colon and subcutaneous fat expressed a single alpha 2AR subtype, which was alpha 2C2. Thus, the alpha 2AR subtypes do not have a confined expression but

  7. Impact of the Tamsulosin in Alpha Adrenergic Receptor of Airways at Patients with Increased Bronchial Reactibility

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Lirim; Ilazi, Ali; Dauti, Arta; Islami, Pellumb; Kastrati, Bashkim; Islami, Hilmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this work, effect of tamsulosin as antagonist of alpha1A and alpha1B adrenergic receptor and effect of agonists of beta2 adrenergic receptor–salbutamol in patients with increased bronchial reactibility was studied. Methods: Parameters of the lung function are determined with Body plethysmography six (6) hours after administration of tamsulosin. Raw and ITGV were registered and specific resistance (SRaw) was calculated as well. Tamsulosin was administered in per os manner as a preparation in the shape of the capsules with a brand name of “Prolosin”, produced by Niche Generics Limited, Hitchin, Herts. Results: After six (6) hours of administration of tamsulosin, results gained indicate that blockage of alpha1A and alpha1B-adrenergic receptor (0.8 mg per os) has not changed significantly (p > 0.1) the bronchomotor tonus of tracheobronchial tree in comparison to the check-up that has inhaled salbutamol agonist of adrenergic beta2 receptor (2 inh. x 0.2 mg), (p < 0.05). Blood pressure suffered no significant decrease following administration of the 0.8 mg dose of tamsulosin. Conclusion: This suggests that even after six hours of administration of tamsulosin, and determining of lung function parameters, the activity of alpha1A and alpha1B-adrenergic receptor in the smooth bronchial musculature has not changed in patients with increased bronchial reactibility. PMID:26543414

  8. Inhibition of alpha oscillations through serotonin-2A receptor activation underlies the visual effects of ayahuasca in humans.

    PubMed

    Valle, Marta; Maqueda, Ana Elda; Rabella, Mireia; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Romero, Sergio; Alonso, Joan Francesc; Mañanas, Miquel Àngel; Barker, Steven; Friedlander, Pablo; Feilding, Amanda; Riba, Jordi

    2016-07-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychotropic plant tea typically obtained from two plants, Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis. It contains the psychedelic 5-HT2A and sigma-1 agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) plus β-carboline alkaloids with monoamine-oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting properties. Although the psychoactive effects of ayahuasca have commonly been attributed solely to agonism at the 5-HT2A receptor, the molecular target of classical psychedelics, this has not been tested experimentally. Here we wished to study the contribution of the 5-HT2A receptor to the neurophysiological and psychological effects of ayahuasca in humans. We measured drug-induced changes in spontaneous brain oscillations and subjective effects in a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study involving the oral administration of ayahuasca (0.75mg DMT/kg body weight) and the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin (40mg). Twelve healthy, experienced psychedelic users (5 females) participated in four experimental sessions in which they received the following drug combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+ayahuasca, ketanserin+placebo and ketanserin+ayahuasca. Ayahuasca induced EEG power decreases in the delta, theta and alpha frequency bands. Current density in alpha-band oscillations in parietal and occipital cortex was inversely correlated with the intensity of visual imagery induced by ayahuasca. Pretreatment with ketanserin inhibited neurophysiological modifications, reduced the correlation between alpha and visual effects, and attenuated the intensity of the subjective experience. These findings suggest that despite the chemical complexity of ayahuasca, 5-HT2A activation plays a key role in the neurophysiological and visual effects of ayahuasca in humans. PMID:27039035

  9. Inhibition of alpha oscillations through serotonin-2A receptor activation underlies the visual effects of ayahuasca in humans.

    PubMed

    Valle, Marta; Maqueda, Ana Elda; Rabella, Mireia; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Romero, Sergio; Alonso, Joan Francesc; Mañanas, Miquel Àngel; Barker, Steven; Friedlander, Pablo; Feilding, Amanda; Riba, Jordi

    2016-07-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychotropic plant tea typically obtained from two plants, Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis. It contains the psychedelic 5-HT2A and sigma-1 agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) plus β-carboline alkaloids with monoamine-oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting properties. Although the psychoactive effects of ayahuasca have commonly been attributed solely to agonism at the 5-HT2A receptor, the molecular target of classical psychedelics, this has not been tested experimentally. Here we wished to study the contribution of the 5-HT2A receptor to the neurophysiological and psychological effects of ayahuasca in humans. We measured drug-induced changes in spontaneous brain oscillations and subjective effects in a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study involving the oral administration of ayahuasca (0.75mg DMT/kg body weight) and the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin (40mg). Twelve healthy, experienced psychedelic users (5 females) participated in four experimental sessions in which they received the following drug combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+ayahuasca, ketanserin+placebo and ketanserin+ayahuasca. Ayahuasca induced EEG power decreases in the delta, theta and alpha frequency bands. Current density in alpha-band oscillations in parietal and occipital cortex was inversely correlated with the intensity of visual imagery induced by ayahuasca. Pretreatment with ketanserin inhibited neurophysiological modifications, reduced the correlation between alpha and visual effects, and attenuated the intensity of the subjective experience. These findings suggest that despite the chemical complexity of ayahuasca, 5-HT2A activation plays a key role in the neurophysiological and visual effects of ayahuasca in humans.

  10. Complex cardiovascular actions of alpha-adrenergic receptors expressed in the nucleus tractus solitarii of rats.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Mohammad E R; Waki, Hidefumi; Gouraud, Sabine S; Takagishi, Miwa; Cui, He; Yamazaki, Toshiya; Kohsaka, Akira; Maeda, Masanobu

    2009-07-01

    Although both alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors (ARs) are known to be expressed in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), the functional significance of these receptors is still not fully established. In this study, we microinjected alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-AR agonists into the NTS of urethane-anaesthetized Wister rats to study the cardiovascular effects in response to their activation. When the alpha(1)-AR agonist phenylephrine was microinjected into the area where barosensitive neurons are dominantly located (baro-NTS), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were significantly elevated. When tested in the area where chemosensitive neurons are dominantly located (chemo-NTS), however, MAP and HR were significantly decreased. Pretreatment with the non-specific alpha-AR antagonist phentolamine into the NTS inhibited the phenylephrine-induced cardiovascular responses. In contrast, microinjection of the alpha(2)-AR agonist clonidine into either the baro-NTS or the chemo-NTS decreased MAP and HR; they were also inhibited by the alpha(2)-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine. Moreover, we immunohistochemically identified that cardiovascular responses induced by alpha(1)-ARs may be mediated by NTS neurons while those induced by alpha(2)-ARs may be mediated by astrocytes located in the barosensitive and chemosensitive areas of the NTS. These results suggest that both types of alpha-AR expressed in the NTS may be involved in regulating cardiovascular homeostasis via modulation of input signals from baroreceptor and chemoreceptor afferents; however, cardiovascular responses produced by stimulation of alpha(1)-ARs are strictly location specific within the NTS.

  11. Integrin alphaVbeta6 is a high-affinity receptor for coxsackievirus A9.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Outi; Susi, Petri; Stanway, Glyn; Hyypiä, Timo

    2009-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A9 (CAV9), a member of the genus Enterovirus in the family Picornaviridae, possesses an integrin-binding arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif in the C terminus of VP1 capsid protein. CAV9 has been shown to utilize integrins alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta6 as primary receptors for cell attachment. While CAV9 RGD-mutants (RGE and RGDdel) are capable of infecting rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell line, they grow very poorly in an epithelial lung carcinoma cell line (A549). In this study, the relationships between CAV9 infectivity in A549 and RD cells, receptor expression and integrin binding were analysed. A549 cells were shown to express both integrins alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta6, whereas alphaVbeta6 expression was not detected on the RD cells. Native CAV9 but not RGE and RGDdel mutants bound efficiently to immobilized alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta6. Adhesion of CAV9 but not RGE/RGDdel to A549 cells was also significantly higher than to RD cells. In contrast, no affinity or adhesion of bacterially produced VP1 proteins to the integrins or to the cells was detected. Function-blocking antibodies against alphaV-integrins blocked CAV9 but not CAV9-RGDdel infectivity, indicating that the viruses use different internalization routes; this may explain the differential infection kinetics of CAV9 and RGDdel. In an affinity assay, soluble alphaVbeta6, but not alphaVbeta3, bound to immobilized CAV9. Similarly, only soluble alphaVbeta6 blocked virus infectivity. These data suggest that CAV9 binding to alphaVbeta6 is a high-affinity interaction, which may indicate its importance in clinical infections; this remains to be determined.

  12. A key role for diacylglycerol lipase-alpha in metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent endocannabinoid mobilization.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang-Mook; Astarita, Giuseppe; Zhu, Chenggang; Wallace, Matthew; Mackie, Ken; Piomelli, Daniele

    2007-09-01

    Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors recruits the endocannabinoid system to produce both short- and long-term changes in synaptic strength in many regions of the brain. Although there is evidence that the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) mediates this process, the molecular mechanism underlying 2-AG mobilization remains unclear. In the present study, we used a combination of genetic and targeted lipidomic approaches to investigate the role of the postsynaptic membrane-associated lipase, diacylglycerol lipase type-alpha (DGL-alpha), in mGlu receptor-dependent 2-AG mobilization. DGL-alpha overexpression in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cells increased baseline 2-AG levels. This effect was accompanied by enhanced utilization of the 2-AG precursor 1-stearoyl,2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol and increased accumulation of the 2-AG breakdown product arachidonic acid. A similar, albeit less marked response was observed with other unsaturated and polyunsaturated monoacylglycerols, 1,2-diacylglycerols, and fatty acids. Silencing of DGL-alpha by RNA interference elicited lipidomic changes opposite those of DGL-alpha overexpression and abolished group I mGlu receptor-dependent 2-AG mobilization. Coimmunoprecipitation and site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that DGL-alpha interacts, via a PPxxF domain, with the coiled-coil (CC)-Homer proteins Homer-1b and Homer-2, two components of the molecular scaffold that enables group I mGlu signaling. DGL-alpha mutants that do not bind Homer maintained their ability to generate 2-AG in intact cells but failed to associate with the plasma membrane. The findings indicate that DGL-alpha mediates group I mGlu receptor-induced 2-AG mobilization. They further suggest that the interaction of CC-Homer with DGL-alpha is necessary for appropriate function of this lipase.

  13. Solubilization and characterization of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors from the human platelet and rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    Alpha-2 adrenergic receptor heterogeneity has been hypothesized to explain functional and radioligand binding differences between rodent and non-rodent species. Computer analysis of the inhibition of (/sup 3/He)yohimbine binding by prazosin in the rat cerebral cortex indicates the possibility of at least two binding sites rather than negative cooperativity at a single site. There appear to be three alternative hypotheses which may explain the rodent vs. non-rodent differences. To develop the technical capability to distinguish between the above alternatives, the human platelet and rat cerebral cortex were solubilized and p-azidoclonidine (AZC) an alpha-2 receptor photoaffinity label was synthesized. Soluble preparations from both species showed saturable, high affinity (/sup 3/He)yohimbine binding. The rank order of potencies for various adrenergic agonists and antagonists are consistent with the notion that (/sup 3/He)yohimbine binding detected solubilized alpha-2 receptors. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation of soluble alpha-2 receptors indicated no significant molecular size difference. (/sup 3/H)AZC binding to the alpha-2 receptor in the rat cerebral cortex demonstrated high affinity saturability and the correct rank order of potency.

  14. Alpha adrenergic receptor mediation of cardiovascular and metabolic responses to alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Brackett, D.J.; Gauvin, D.V.; Lerner, M.R.; Holloway, F.H.; Wilson, M.F. Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK )

    1992-02-26

    The role of alpha adrenergic receptors in acute cardiovascular and metabolic responses to alcohol (ETOH) have not been clearly defined. In this study two groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were given intravenous phentolamine mesylate or saline prior to intragastric alcohol to blockade of alpha receptors during alcohol intoxication in conscious rats. ETOH alone evoked an increase in systemic vascular resistance (SVR), heart rate (HR), and blood glucose concentrations (G) and a decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), central venous pressure (CVP), respiration rate (RR) and cardiac stroke volume (SV). Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) peaked at 30 min and remained elevated for the four hrs of monitoring. Phentolamine pretreatment produced a decrease in MAP and SV and an increase in HR. However, antagonism of the alpha receptor blocked the decrease in CO and the increase in SVR and G. The decrease in CVP was unaffected. Surprisingly, the early rise and peak in BAC in the phentolamine treated group was attenuated, but was the same as the untreated group during the final 3 hrs. These data suggest that alpha receptors are significant mediators of cardiovascular and glucoregulatory responses elicited by alcohol. Furthermore, alpha receptor blockade appears to effect the absorption and/or distribution of intragastrically administered alcohol.

  15. Structural differences determine the relative selectivity of nicotinic compounds for native alpha 4 beta 2*-, alpha 6 beta 2*-, alpha 3 beta 4*- and alpha 7-nicotine acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Grady, Sharon R; Drenan, Ryan M; Breining, Scott R; Yohannes, Daniel; Wageman, Charles R; Fedorov, Nikolai B; McKinney, Sheri; Whiteaker, Paul; Bencherif, Merouane; Lester, Henry A; Marks, Michael J

    2010-06-01

    Mammalian brain expresses multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes that differ in subunit composition, sites of expression and pharmacological and functional properties. Among known subtypes of receptors, alpha 4 beta 2* and alpha 6 beta 2*-nAChR have the highest affinity for nicotine (where * indicates possibility of other subunits). The alpha 4 beta 2*-nAChRs are widely distributed, while alpha 6 beta 2*-nAChR are restricted to a few regions. Both subtypes modulate release of dopamine from the dopaminergic neurons of the mesoaccumbens pathway thought to be essential for reward and addiction. alpha 4 beta 2*-nAChR also modulate GABA release in these areas. Identification of selective compounds would facilitate study of nAChR subtypes. An improved understanding of the role of nAChR subtypes may help in developing more effective smoking cessation aids with fewer side effects than current therapeutics. We have screened a series of nicotinic compounds that vary in the distance between the pyridine and the cationic center, in steric bulk, and in flexibility of the molecule. These compounds were screened using membrane binding and synaptosomal function assays, or recordings from GH4C1 cells expressing h alpha 7, to determine affinity, potency and efficacy at four subtypes of nAChRs found in brain, alpha 4 beta 2*, alpha 6 beta 2*, alpha 7 and alpha 3 beta 4*. In addition, physiological assays in gain-of-function mutant mice were used to assess in vivo activity at alpha 4 beta 2* and alpha 6 beta 2*-nAChRs. This approach has identified several compounds with agonist or partial agonist activity that display improved selectivity for alpha 6 beta 2*-nAChR.

  16. Status and prospects of (g-2){sub {mu}} and {delta}{alpha}{sub QED}

    SciTech Connect

    Teubner, Thomas

    2008-11-23

    A brief review of the status of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, (g-2){sub {mu}}, and the running of the electromagnetic coupling, {alpha}{sub QED}(q{sup 2}), is given. The discrepancy between the Standard Model prediction of g-2 and the measurement from BNL is discussed. The prospects for further improvements in the determination of the vacuum polarisation contributions are outlined.

  17. Sequential ordered fatty acid alpha oxidation and Delta9 desaturation are major determinants of lipid storage and utilization in differentiating adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiong; Han, Xianlin; Yang, Jingyue; Mancuso, David J; Chen, Jeannie; Bickel, Perry E; Gross, Richard W

    2004-05-01

    Herein, we exploit the power of global lipidomics to identify the critical role of peroxisomal processing of fatty acids in adipocyte lipid storage and metabolism. Remarkably, 3T3-L1 differentiating adipocytes rapidly acquired the ability to alpha oxidize unbranched fatty acids, which is manifested in the accumulation of odd chain length unbranched fatty acids in all major lipid classes. Moreover, in differentiating adipocytes, unsaturated odd chain length fatty acids in TAG molecular species contained exclusively Delta9 olefinic linkages. Unsaturated fatty acids (e.g., oleic and palmitoleic acids) were not subject to alpha oxidation, resulting in the absence of Delta8 unsaturated odd chain length fatty acids. This highly selective substrate utilization resulted in the obligatory sequential ordering of alpha oxidation prior to Delta9 desaturation. On the basis of these results, a putative type 2 peroxisomal localization sequence was identified at the N-terminus of mouse stearoyl-CoA desaturase I (SCD I) comprised of (30)KVKTVPLHL(38). Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the rate of alpha oxidation of exogenously administered [9,10-(3)H]palmitic acid increased 4-fold during differentiation. Similarly, quantitative PCR demonstrated a 4-fold increase in phytanoyl-CoA alpha hydroxylase (PAHX) and fatty acyl-CoA oxidase (FACO) mRNA levels during differentiation. Collectively, these results underscore the role of peroxisomal fatty acid processing as an important determinant of the metabolic fate of fatty acids in the differentiating adipocyte.

  18. Induction of mammary gland development in estrogen receptor-alpha knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bocchinfuso, W P; Lindzey, J K; Hewitt, S C; Clark, J A; Myers, P H; Cooper, R; Korach, K S

    2000-08-01

    Mammary glands from the estrogen receptor-a knockout (alphaERKO) mouse do not undergo ductal morphogenesis or alveolar development. Disrupted ERalpha signaling may result in reduced estrogen-responsive gene products in the mammary gland or reduced mammotropic hormones that contribute to the alphaERKO mammary phenotype. We report that circulating PRL is reduced in the female alphaERKO mouse. Implantation of an age-matched, heterozygous ERalpha pituitary isograft under the renal capsule of 25-day-old or 12-week-old alphaERKO mice increased circulating PRL and progesterone levels, and induced mammary gland development. Grafted alphaERKO mice also possessed hypertrophied corpora lutea demonstrating that PRL is luteotropic in the alphaERKO ovary. By contrast, ovariectomy at the time of pituitary grafting prevented mammary gland development in alphaERKO mice despite elevated PRL levels. Hormone replacement using pellet implants demonstrated that pharmacological doses of estradiol induced limited mammary ductal elongation, and estradiol in combination with progesterone stimulated lobuloalveolar development. PRL alone or in combination with progesterone or estradiol did not induce alphaERKO mammary growth. Estradiol and progesterone are required for the structural development of the alphaERKO mammary gland, and PRL contributes to this development by inducing ovarian progesterone levels. Therefore, the manifestation of the alphaERKO mammary phenotype appears due to the lack of direct estrogen action at the mammary gland and an indirect contributory role of estrogen signaling at the hypothalamic/pituitary axis.

  19. Pharmacological properties of rat alpha 7 nicotinic receptors expressed in native and recombinant cell systems.

    PubMed

    Virginio, Caterina; Giacometti, Angelo; Aldegheri, Laura; Rimland, Joseph M; Terstappen, Georg C

    2002-06-12

    The pharmacological properties of the rat alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor endogenously expressed in PC12 cells and recombinantly expressed in GH4C1 cells (alpha7-GH4C1 cells) were characterized and compared. Patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that activation by choline and block by methyllycaconitine and dihydro-beta-erythroidine were similar, but block by mecamylamine was different. Whereas in alpha7-GH4C1 cells the inhibition curve for mecamylamine was monophasic (IC(50) of 1.6 microM), it was biphasic in PC12 cells (IC(50) values of 341 nM and 9.6 microM). The same rank order of potency was obtained for various nicotinic agonists, while acetylcholine was 3.7-fold less potent and 1.5-fold more effective in PC12 cells. Dihydro-beta-erythroidine differentially blocked acetylcholine-evoked currents in both systems. Since reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments revealed expression of alpha3, alpha4, alpha5, alpha7 and beta4 subunits in PC12 cells, whereas GH4C1 cells express only the beta4 subunit, our results suggest that more than one form of alpha7 containing heteromeric nicotinic receptors might be functionally expressed in PC12 cells.

  20. Characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activiated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-independent effects of PPARalpha activators in the rodent liver: Di(2-ethylehexyl) phthalate activates the constitutive activated receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Recent studies indicate that the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl ph...

  1. Analysis of the Heat Shock Response in Mouse Liver Reveals Transcriptional Dependence on the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα)

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) regulates responses to chemical or physical stress in part by altering expression of genes involved in proteome maintenance. Many of these genes are also transcriptionally regulated by h...

  2. Mode of action framework analysis for receptor-mediated toxicity: the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα) as a case study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Therapeutic hypolipidemic agents and industrial chemicals that cause peroxisome proliferation and induce liver tumors in rodents activate the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Research has elucidated the cellular and molecular events by w...

  3. A subset of gamma delta T-cell receptor-positive cells produce T-helper type-2 cytokines and regulate mouse skin graft rejection following portal venous pretransplant preimmunization.

    PubMed Central

    Gorczynski, R M; Chen, Z; Hoang, Y; Rossi-Bergman, B

    1996-01-01

    C3H/HeJ mice received B10.BR skin grafts following portal or lateral tail vein infusion of irradiated B10.BR spleen cells. Thereafter mice were injected with anti-alpha beta or anti-gamma delta T-cell receptor (TCR) monoclonal antibody (mAb). Anti-gamma delta TCR mAb abolished the increased graft survival afforded by portal venous (p.v.) immunization, and reversed the bias towards expression of mRNA for type-2 cytokines [interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-10] seen in lymphoid tissue of p.v.-immunized mice. When gamma delta TCR+ and alpha beta TCR+ cells were isolated from the intestinal epithelial compartment (IEL), liver or Peyer's Patch (PP) of p.v.-immunized mice, the gamma delta TCR+ cells were found to be enriched in cells producing type-2 cytokines on rechallenge with irradiated B10.BR cells in vitro. gamma delta TCR+ cells from p.v.-immunized mice were further expanded in vitro with anti-CD3 and cytokines (combined IL-2 and IL-4). Following expansion these cells were capable of adoptively transferring increased B10.BR skin graft survival to naive mice, and continued to show a bias in type-2 cytokine synthesis after allostimulation in vitro. When gamma delta TCR chain expression was assessed in cells taken from p.v.-immunized mice, or in cells expanded in culture, our data suggest that p.v. immunization leads to oligoclonal, not polyclonal, expansion of those gamma delta TCR+ cells involved in inhibition of graft rejection. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8778022

  4. Receptor density is key to the alpha2/beta interferon differential activities.

    PubMed

    Moraga, Ignacio; Harari, Daniel; Schreiber, Gideon; Uzé, Gilles; Pellegrini, Sandra

    2009-09-01

    Multiple type I interferons (IFN-alpha/beta) elicit Jak/Stat activation, rapid gene induction, and pleiotropic effects, such as differentiation, antiviral protection, and blocks in proliferation, which are dependent on the IFN subtype and the cellular context. To date, ligand- and receptor-specific molecular determinants underlying IFN-alpha/beta differential activities or potencies have been well characterized. To analyze cellular determinants that impact subtype-specific potency, human fibrosarcoma U5A-derived clones, exhibiting a gradient of IFN sensitivity by virtue of increasing receptor levels, were monitored for Jak/Stat signaling, gene induction, cell cycle lengthening, and apoptosis. In cells with scarce receptors, IFN-beta was more potent than IFN-alpha2 in antiproliferative activity, while the two subtypes were equipotent in all other readouts. Conversely, in cells with abundant receptors, IFN-alpha2 matched or even surpassed IFN-beta in all readouts tested. Our results suggest that the differential activities of the IFN subtypes are dictated not only by the intrinsic ligand/receptor binding kinetics but also by the density of cell surface receptor components.

  5. Delta-opioid receptor blockade in the ventral pallidum increases perceived palatability and consumption of saccharin solution in rats.

    PubMed

    Inui, Tadashi; Shimura, Tsuyoshi

    2014-08-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is involved in ingestive behaviour. It receives dense GABAergic projections from the nucleus accumbens. GABAergic terminals in the VP co-express enkephalin, an endogenous ligand of delta-opioid receptors. The role of the delta-opioid receptors in the VP in the context of ingestive behaviour remains unclear, in contrast to the well-understood involvement of the mu-opioid receptors. We used the single-bottle test to examine the effects of VP microinjections of the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole on consumption of a saccharin solution. Naltrindole injections significantly increased the intake of saccharin, but not water, during a 2-h test session. We also investigated perceived palatability of saccharin using a taste reactivity test. The drug treatments increased ingestive responses to intraorally infused saccharin. Further experimentation explored the role of VP delta-opioid receptors in behavioural responses to saccharin that were previously paired with malaise upon the retrieval of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Naltrindole-injected rats exhibited longer latency for the first occurrence of aversive responses than vehicle-injected control rats. However, there was no between-group difference in total aversive responses. These results suggest that naltrindole injections into the VP induce an enhancement of perceived palatability of a normally preferred saccharin solution, and thereby facilitate consumption of the solution. On the other hand, delayed aversive responses to the conditioned aversive saccharin suggest that the delta-opioid receptors in the VP mediate the initiation of aversive taste reactivity responses to the conditioned stimulus upon CTA retrieval.

  6. Characterization and distribution of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the human intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Valet, P; Senard, J M; Devedjian, J C; Planat, V; Salomon, R; Voisin, T; Drean, G; Couvineau, A; Daviaud, D; Denis, C

    1993-01-01

    The subtype and the expression of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor were investigated in the normal mucosa from human intestine by means of radioligand binding, RNase mapping, and measurement of adenylate cyclase activity. The study of the binding of the alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist, [3H]RX821002, to epithelial cell membranes indicated the existence of a single class of noninteracting sites displaying a high affinity for the radioligand (Kd = 1.1 +/- 0.5 nM). The rank order of potency of antagonists to inhibit [3H]RX821002 binding (RX821002 > yohimbine = rauwolscine > phentolamine approximately idazoxan >> chlorpromazine > prazosin) suggested that the receptor is of the alpha 2A subtype. A conclusion which is confirmed by the fact that only alpha 2C10 transcripts were found in the human intestine mucosa. Competition curves with (-)-norepinephrine demonstrated that 60% of the receptor population exhibited high affinity for agonists. This high-affinity state was abolished by the addition of GTP plus Na+ or by prior treatment of the membranes with pertussis toxin indicating it corresponded to G protein-coupled receptors. [32P]ADP-ribosylation and immunoblotting experiments identified two pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins corresponding to Gi2 and Gi3. The study of the distribution of the receptor indicated that (a) the proximal colon is the intestine segment exhibiting the highest receptor density and (b) the receptor is predominantly expressed in crypts and is preferentially located in the basolateral membrane of the polarized cell. The distribution of the receptor along the crypt-surface axis of the colon mucosa can be correlated with a higher level of alpha 2C10-specific mRNA and a higher efficiency of UK14304 to inhibit adenylate cyclase in crypt cells. Images PMID:8098045

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonist-induced down-regulation of hepatic glucocorticoid receptor expression in SD rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiang; Li Ming; Sun Weiping; Bi Yan; Cai Mengyin; Liang Hua; Yu Qiuqiong; He Xiaoying; Weng Jianping

    2008-04-18

    It was reported that glucocorticoid production was inhibited by fenofibrate through suppression of type-1 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression in liver. The inhibition might be a negative-feedback regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}), which is quickly induced by glucocorticoid in the liver. However, it is not clear if GR expression is changed by fenofibrate-induced PPAR{alpha} activation. In this study, we tested this possibility in the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. GR expression was reduced by fenofibrate in a time- and does-dependent manner. The inhibition was observed in liver, but not in fat and muscle. The corticosterone level in the blood was increased significantly by fenofibrate. These effects of fenofibrate were abolished by PPAR{alpha} inhibitor MK886, suggesting that fenofibrate activated through PPAR{alpha}. In conclusion, inhibition of GR expression may represent a new molecular mechanism for the negative feedback regulation of GR activity by PPAR{alpha}.

  8. Structural determinants within residues 180-199 of the rodent. alpha. 5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit involved in. alpha. -bungarotoxin binding

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, K.E.; Xiadong Wu; Conti-Tronconi, B.M. )

    1991-11-05

    Synthetic peptides corresponding to sequence segments of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) {alpha} subunits have been used to identify regions that contribute to formation of the binding sites for cholinergic ligands. The authors have previously defined {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX) binding sequences between residues 180 and 199 of a putative rat neuronal nAChR {alpha} subunit, designated {alpha}5, and between residues 181 and 200 of the chick neuronal {alpha}7 and {alpha}8 subunits. These sequences are relatively divergent compared with the Torpedo and muscle nAChR {alpha}1 {alpha}-BTX binding sites, which indicates a serious limitation of predicting functional domains of proteins based on homology in general. Given the highly divergent nature of the {alpha}5 sequence, they were interested in determining the critical amino acid residues for {alpha}-BTX binding. In the present study, the effects of single amino acid substitutions of Gly or Ala for each residue of the rat {alpha}(180-199) sequence were tested, using a competition assay, in which peptides compete for {sup 125}I-{alpha}-BTX binding with native Torpedo nAChR. These results indicate that a disulfide bridge between the vicinal cysteines at positions 191 and 192 of the {alpha}5 sequence is not an absolute requirement for {alpha}-BTX binding activity.

  9. Immunohistochemical observations of methionine-enkephalin and delta opioid receptor in the digestive system of Octopus ocellatus.

    PubMed

    Sha, Ailong; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yiyan

    2013-02-01

    The study was designed to determine whether methionine-enkephalin (met-Enk) or delta opioid receptor was present in the digestive system of Octopus ocellatus. The results showed that they were both in the bulbus oris, esophagus, crop, stomach, gastric cecum, intestine, posterior salivary glands of O. ocellatus, one of them, met-Enk in the rectum, anterior salivary glands, digestive gland. And the distributions were extensive in the digestive system. Strong or general met-Enk immunoreactivity was observed in the inner epithelial cells of the bulbus oris, esophagus, stomach, gastric cecum, intestine, anterior salivary glands and the adventitia of the intestine and rectum, and so was the delta opioid receptor immunoreactivity in the inner epithelial cells of the bulbus oris, esophagus, and crop, however, they were weak in other parts. Combining with delta opioid receptor, met-Enk may be involved in the regulations of food intake, absorption, movement of gastrointestinal smooth muscle and secretion of digestive gland. The different densities of met-Enk and delta opioid receptor may be related to the different functions in the digestive system of O. ocellatus.

  10. Role of. alpha. sub 2 -adrenergic receptors in the carotid body response to hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Y.R.; Ernsberger, P.; Cherniack, N.S.; Prabhakar, N.R. )

    1990-02-26

    Clonidine, which acts in part as an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor agonist, depresses ventilation. The authors examined the role of {alpha}{sub 2}-receptors in carotid chemoreceptor activity. The density of {alpha}{sub 2}-receptors was determined in membrane fractions of 18 cat carotid bodies using {sup 125}I-iodoclonidine with 0.1 mM epinephrine or 10 {mu}M SKF-86466 defining nonspecific binding. {alpha}{sub 2}-Adrenergic receptor density averaged 0.6{plus minus}0.1 fmol/carotid body (mean {plus minus} SEM) and was comparable to other sympathetic target tissues. The authors then studied the effects of an agonist (guanabenz) and an antagonist (SKF-86466; 6-Cl-N-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1-H3-benzazepine) specific for {alpha}{sub 2}-receptors on baseline and hypoxia-stimulated carotid body discharge, in 10 anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated cats. Intracarotid infusion of guanabenz for 5 minutes caused a dose-dependent depression of the baseline activity and reduced the chemoreceptor response to hypoxia by 88.0{plus minus}5.8% of the vehicle-injected controls. Intravenous administration of SKF-86466 reversed the effects of guanabenz on the carotid body activity. in contrast, chemoreceptor depression caused by dopamine was unaffected by SKF-86466. SKF-86466 alone increased baseline discharge and potentiated the chemoreceptor response to hypoxia by 34.0 {plus minus} 9.6% of the controls. These results demonstrate that {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors are present in the cat carotid body and they exert an inhibitory influence on the chemoreceptor response to hypoxia.

  11. G protein-coupled receptor 30 expression is up-regulated by EGF and TGF alpha in estrogen receptor alpha-positive cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vivacqua, Adele; Lappano, Rosamaria; De Marco, Paola; Sisci, Diego; Aquila, Saveria; De Amicis, Francesca; Fuqua, Suzanne A W; Andò, Sebastiano; Maggiolini, Marcello

    2009-11-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the regulation of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)30 expression in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive endometrial, ovarian, and estrogen-sensitive, as well as tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells. We demonstrate that epidermal growth factor (EGF) and TGF alpha transactivate the GPR30 promoter and accordingly up-regulate GPR30 mRNA and protein levels only in endometrial and tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells. These effects exerted by EGF and TGF alpha were dependent on EGF receptor (EGFR) expression and activation and involved phosphorylation of the Tyr(1045) and Tyr(1173) EGFR sites. Using gene-silencing experiments and specific pharmacological inhibitors, we have ascertained that EGF and TGF alpha induce GPR30 expression through the EGFR/ERK transduction pathway, and the recruitment of c-fos to the activator protein-1 site located within GPR30 promoter sequence. Interestingly, we show that functional cross talk of GPR30 with both activated EGFR and ER alpha relies on a physical interaction among these receptors, further extending the potential of estrogen to trigger a complex stimulatory signaling network in hormone-sensitive tumors. Given that EGFR/HER2 overexpression is associated with tamoxifen resistance, our data may suggest that ligand-activated EGFR could contribute to the failure of tamoxifen therapy also by up-regulating GPR30, which in turn could facilitates the action of estrogen. In addition, important for resistance is the ability of tamoxifen to bind to and activate GPR30, the expression of which is up-regulated by EGFR activation. Our results emphasize the need for new endocrine agents able to block widespread actions of estrogen without exerting any stimulatory activity on transduction pathways shared by the steroid and growth factor-signaling networks.

  12. Nicotine alters lung branching morphogenesis through the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Wongtrakool, Cherry; Roser-Page, Susanne; Rivera, Hilda N; Roman, Jesse

    2007-09-01

    There is abundant epidemiological data linking prenatal environmental tobacco smoke with childhood asthma and wheezing, but the underlying molecular and physiological mechanisms that occur in utero to explain this link remain unelucidated. Several studies suggest that nicotine, which traverses the placenta, is a causative agent. Therefore, we studied the effects of nicotine on lung branching morphogenesis using embryonic murine lung explants. We found that the expression of alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which mediate many of the biological effects of nicotine, is highest in pseudoglandular stage lungs compared with lungs at later stages. We then studied the effects of nicotine in the explant model and found that nicotine stimulated lung branching in a dose-dependent fashion. alpha-Bungarotoxin, an antagonist of alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, blocked the stimulatory effect of nicotine, whereas GTS-21, a specific agonist, stimulated branching, thereby mimicking the effects of nicotine. Explants deficient in alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors did not respond to nicotine. Nicotine also stimulated the growth of the explant. Altogether, these studies suggest that nicotine stimulates lung branching morphogenesis through alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and may contribute to dysanaptic lung growth, which in turn may predispose the host to airway disease in the postnatal period.

  13. Purification and characterization of an. alpha. -bungarotoxin receptor that forms a functional nicotinic channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gotti, C.; Ogando, A.E.; Moretti, M.; Clementi, F. ); Hanke, W.; Schlue, R. )

    1991-04-15

    Neither the structure nor the function of {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}Bgtx) binding molecules in the nervous system have yet been completely defined, although it is known that some of these molecules are related to cation channels and some are not. Using an improved method of affinity chromatography, the authors have isolated a toxin binding molecule from chicken optic lobe that contains at least three subunits with apparent M{sub r} values of 52,000, 57,000, and 67,000. The M{sub r} 57,000 subunit binds {alpha}Bgtx receptors of human neuroblastoma cells, fetal calf muscle, and chicken optic lobe but not by antibodies raised against Torpedo acetylcholine receptor, the serum of myasthenic patients, or monoclonal antibody 35. {sup 125}I-labeled {alpha}Bgtx binding to the isolated receptor is blocked, with the same potency, by nicotinic agonists and antagonists, such as nicotine, neuronal bungarotoxin and, d-tubocurarine. When reconstituted in a planar lipid bilayer, the purified {alpha}Bgtx receptor forms cationic channels with a conductance of 50 pS. These channels are activated in a dose-dependent manner by carbamylcholine and blocked by d-tubocurarine.

  14. The pharmacology of spontaneously open alpha 1 beta 3 epsilon GABA A receptor-ionophores.

    PubMed

    Maksay, Gábor; Thompson, Sally A; Wafford, Keith A

    2003-06-01

    Human alpha(1)beta(3) epsilon GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined using the conventional two-electrode voltage-clamp technique and compared to alpha(1)beta(3)gamma(2) receptors. The effects of several GABA(A) agonists were studied, and the allosteric modulation of the channel by a number of GABAergic modulators investigated. The presence of the epsilon subunit increased the potency and efficacy of direct activation by partial GABA(A) agonists (piperidine-4-sulphonic acid and thio-4-PIOL), pentobarbital and neuro-steroids. Direct activation by 3-hydroxylated neurosteroids was restricted to 3alpha epimers, while chirality at C5 was indifferent. The 3beta-sulfate esters of pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone inhibited the spontaneous currents with efficacies higher, while bicuculline methiodide and SR 95531 did so lower than picrotoxin and TBPS. Furosemide, fipronil, triphenylcyanoborate and Zn(2+) blocked the spontaneous currents of alpha(1)beta(3) epsilon receptors with different efficacies. Flunitrazepam and 4'-chlorodiazepam inhibited the spontaneous currents with micromolar potencies. In conclusion, spontaneously active alpha(1)beta(3) epsilon GABA(A) receptors can be potentiated and blocked by GABAergic agents within a broad range of efficacy.

  15. Cocaine withdrawal-induced trafficking of delta-opioid receptors in rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Ambrose-Lanci, Lisa M; Peiris, Niluk B; Unterwald, Ellen M; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J

    2008-05-19

    Interactions between the opioidergic and dopaminergic systems in the nucleus accumbens (NAcb) play a critical role in mediating cocaine withdrawal-induced effects on cell signaling and behavior. In support of this, increased activation of striatal dopamine-D1 receptors (D1R) results in desensitization of delta-opioid receptor (DOR) signaling through adenylyl cyclase during early cocaine withdrawal. A potential cellular substrate underlying receptor desensitization is receptor internalization. The present study examined the effect of cocaine withdrawal on subcellular localization of DOR in dendrites of the NAcb core (NAcbC) and shell (NAcbS) using immunoelectron microscopy. Female and male rats received binge-pattern cocaine or saline for 14 days and subsequently underwent 48 h withdrawal. Animals were transcardially perfused and tissue sections were processed for immunogold-silver localization of DOR. Semi-quantitative analysis revealed that cocaine withdrawal caused an increase in the percentage of DOR localized intracellularly in the NAcbS of male and female rats and the NAcbC of male rats compared to saline controls. In contrast, in the NAcbC of female rats, there was an increase in DOR associated with the plasma membrane following cocaine withdrawal. To determine whether modulation of D1R could directly impact DOR containing neurons, the hypothesis that DOR and D1R co-exist in common neurons of the NAcb was examined in naïve rats. Semi-quantitative analysis revealed a subset of profiles containing both DOR and D1R immunoreactivities. The present findings demonstrate a redistribution of DOR in the NAcb following cocaine withdrawal and provide anatomical evidence supporting D1R regulation of DOR function in a subset of NAcb neurons. PMID:18417105

  16. Evidence that nicotinic alpha(7) receptors are not involved in the hyperlocomotor and rewarding effects of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Grottick, A J; Trube, G; Corrigall, W A; Huwyler, J; Malherbe, P; Wyler, R; Higgins, G A

    2000-09-01

    Neuronal nicotinic receptors are comprised of combinations of alpha(2-9) and beta(2-4) subunits arranged to form a pentameric receptor. Currently, the principal central nervous system (CNS) subtypes are believed to be alpha(4)beta(2) and a homomeric alpha(7) receptor, although other combinations almost certainly exist. The identity of the nicotinic receptor subtype(s) involved in the rewarding effects of nicotine are unknown. In the present study, using some recently described subtype selective nicotinic agonists and antagonists, we investigated the role of the alpha(7) nicotinic receptor in the mediation of nicotine-induced hyperactivity and self-administration in rats. The alpha(7) receptor agonists AR-R 17779 and DMAC failed to stimulate locomotor activity in both nicotine-nontolerant and -sensitized rats. In contrast, nicotine and the putative alpha(4)beta(2) subtype selective agonist SIB1765F increased activity in both experimental conditions. In nicotine-sensitized rats, the high affinity (including the alpha(4)beta(2) subtype) nicotinic antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHbetaE), but not the selective alpha(7) antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA), antagonized a nicotine-induced hyperactivity. Similarly, DHbetaE, but not MLA, pretreatment reduced nicotine self-administration. Electrophysiology experiments using Xenopus oocytes expressing the human alpha(7) receptor confirmed AR-R 17779 and DMAC to be potent agonists at this site, and further studies demonstrated the ability of systemically administered AR-R 17779 to penetrate into the CNS. Taken together, these results indicate a negligible role of alpha(7) receptors in nicotine-induced hyperlocomotion and reward in the rat, and support the view for an involvement of a member from the high-affinity nicotinic receptor subclass, possibly alpha(4)beta(2). Issues such as drug potency, CNS penetration, and desensitization of the alpha(7) receptor are discussed.

  17. Alpha/sub 1/ receptor stimulated phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis in rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Raulli, R.; Crews, F.T.

    1986-03-05

    The potency of various alpha adrenergic compounds on stimulation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis was determined using (/sup 3/H)-inositol labelled cerebral cortical slices. Norepinephrine-induced PI hydrolysis was inhibited by the alpha/sub 1/ selective antagonist prazosin (1 ..mu..M) but not the beta receptor antagonist propranolol (1 ..mu..M). Tramazoline, (-)-ephedrine, and (+/-)-phenylpropanolamine were all found to be partial agonists at 1 mM concentrations. Clonidine, naphazoline, trazodone, and the novel antidepressant mianserin at concentrations of 100 ..mu..M to 1 mM produced no significant increase in PI hydrolysis above control levels. The relationship between responses and receptor binding will be discussed.

  18. Structure of an integrin with an [alpha]I domain, complement receptor type 4

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Can; Zhu, Jianghai; Chen, Xing; Mi, Lizhi; Nishida, Noritaka; Springer, Timothy A.

    2010-08-13

    We report the structure of an integrin with an {alpha}I domain, {alpha}{sub X}{beta}{sub 2}, the complement receptor type 4. It was earlier expected that a fixed orientation between the {alpha}I domain and the {beta}-propeller domain in which it is inserted would be required for allosteric signal transmission. However, the {alpha}I domain is highly flexible, enabling two {beta}I domain conformational states to couple to three {alpha}I domain states, and greater accessibility for ligand recognition. Although {alpha}{sub X}{beta}{sub 2} is bent similarly to integrins that lack {alpha}I domains, the terminal domains of the {alpha}- and {beta}-legs, calf-2 and {beta}-tail, are oriented differently than in {alpha}I-less integrins. Linkers extending to the transmembrane domains are unstructured. Previous mutations in the {beta}2-tail domain support the importance of extension, rather than a deadbolt, in integrin activation. The locations of further activating mutations and antibody epitopes show the critical role of extension, and conversion from the closed to the open headpiece conformation, in integrin activation. Differences among 10 molecules in crystal lattices provide unprecedented information on interdomain flexibility important for modelling integrin extension and activation.

  19. Cloning and expression of a human kidney cDNA for an /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.W.; Kobilka, T.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Kobilka, B.K.

    1988-09-01

    An /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype has been cloned from a human kidney cDNA library using the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor as a probe. The deduced amino acid sequence resembles the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor and is consistent with the structure of other members of he family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptors. The cDNA was expressed in a mammalian cell line (COS-7), and the /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic ligand (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine was bound. Competition curve analysis with a variety of adrenergic ligands suggests that this cDNA clone represents the /alpha//sub 2/B-adrenergic receptor. The gene for this receptor is on human chromosome 4, whereas the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor (/alpha//sub 2/A) lies on chromosome 10. This ability to express the receptor in mammalian cells, free of other adrenergic receptor subtypes, should help in developing more selective /alpha/-adrenergic ligands.

  20. Down-regulation of the G-proteins Gq alpha and G11 alpha by transfected human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Chinese hamster ovary cells is independent of receptor down-regulation.

    PubMed Central

    van de Westerlo, E; Yang, J; Logsdon, C; Williams, J A

    1995-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors show a 40-50% reduction in the immunoreactive G-proteins Gq alpha and G11 alpha when stimulated with the cholinergic agonist carbachol. This effect is seen after 9 h, is maximal after 24 h, and occurs over a range of carbachol concentrations that activate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in these cells. The effect is specific for Gq alpha family proteins as Gs alpha was slightly increased after carbachol treatment and G13 alpha was unchanged. Using a urea gel system, we were able to resolve Gq alpha and G11 alpha, both of which were down-regulated by carbachol. An M3 receptor mutant, with C-terminal threonines changed to alanines as described previously, binds ligand and activates phosphoinositide hydrolysis normally but is not down-regulated in response to carbachol. This receptor, however, induces Gq alpha/G11 alpha down-regulation similarly to wild-type M3 receptors, indicating that G-protein down-regulation is not directly coupled to receptor down-regulation. Thus down-regulation of Gq alpha and G11 alpha may contribute to heterologous desensitization particularly at longer times of agonist exposure. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:7654194

  1. alpha-1 Adrenergic receptors stimulation induces the proliferation of neural progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Takeshi; Ihara, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2006-11-01

    The proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is regulated by classical neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, via its own receptors. Previous studies have reported that the depletion of L-norepinephrine decreases the proliferation of NPCs in the adult rat hippocampus and it has been suggested that L-norepinephrine regulates the proliferation of NPCs. However, it remains unknown whether or not adrenergic receptors are involved in the increased proliferation of NPCs. In the present study, an MTT cell proliferation assay was carried out in order to investigate the roles played by adrenergic receptors in the proliferation of NPCs. We demonstrated that L-epinephrine enhanced the proliferation of embryonic NPCs in vitro. In addition, the alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonist L-phenylephrine was found to enhance the proliferation of NPCs, whereas an alpha-adrenergic antagonist and selective alpha-1 antagonists significantly inhibited cell proliferation increases induced by L-epinephrine and L-phenylephrine. These results suggest that stimulation with alpha-1 adrenergic receptors induces the proliferation of embryonic NPCs.

  2. T-cell receptor V sub. alpha. and C sub. alpha. alleles associated with multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Oksenberg, J.R.; Cavalli-Sforza, L.L.; Steinman, L. ); Sherritt, M.; Bernard, C.C. ); Begovich, A.B.; Erlich, H.A. )

    1989-02-01

    Polymorphic markers in genes encoding the {alpha} chain of the human T-cell receptor (TcR) have been detected by Southern blot analysis in Pss I digests. Polymorphic bands were observed at 6.3 and 2.0 kilobases (kb) with frequencies of 0.30 and 0.44, respectively, in the general population. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, the authors amplified selected sequences derived from the full-length TcR {alpha} cDNA probe. These PcR products were used as specific probes to demonstrate that the 6.3-kb polymorphic fragment hybridizes to the variable (V)-region probe and the 2.0-kb fragment hybridizes to the constant (C)-region probe. Segregation of the polymorphic bands was analyzed in family studies. To look for associations between these markers and autoimmune diseases, the authors have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism distribution of the Pss I markers in patients with multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and Graves disease. Significant differences in the frequency of the polymorphic V{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {alpha}} markers were identified between patients and healthy individuals.

  3. Activity profiles of dalargin and its analogues in mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptor selective bioassays.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Pospisek, J; Hauzerova, L; Barth, T; Milanov, P

    1999-10-01

    1. To elucidate the structural features ensuring action of [D-Ala2, Leu5]-enkephalyl-Arg (dalargin), a series of dalargin analogues were tested for their effectiveness in depressing electrically-evoked contractions of the guinea-pig myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparations (mu- and kappa-opioid receptors) and the vasa deferentia of the hamster (delta-opioid receptors), mouse (mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors), rat (similar to mu-opioid receptors) and rabbit (kappa-opioid receptors). The naloxone KB values in the myenteric plexus were also obtained. 2. [L-Ala2]-dalargin was 19 times less potent than dalargin, and its pharmacological activity was peptidase-sensitive. The ratio of delta-activity to mu-activity for [L-Ala2]-dalargin was 6.78, and KB was 7.9 nM. This emphasizes the role that D-configuration of Ala2 plays in determining the active folding of dalargin molecule as well as in conferring resistance to peptidases. 3. [Met5]-dalargin was equipotent to dalargin in the myenteric plexus, but was more potent in the vasa deferentia of hamster and mouse (KB=5.5 nM). Leu5 and the interdependence of Leu5 and D-Ala2 are of importance for the selectivity of dalargin for mu-opioid receptors. 4. Dalarginamide was more potent and selective for mu-opioid receptors than dalargin, whilst dalarginethylamide, though equipotent to dalarginamide in the myenteric plexus, was more potent at delta-opioid receptors (KB=5.0 nM). [D-Phe4]-dalarginamide and N-Me-[D-Phe4]-dalarginamide were inactive indicating the contribution of L-configuration of Phe4 to the pharmacological potency of dalargin. 5. N-Me-[L-Phe4]-dalarginamide possessed the highest potency and selectivity for mu-opioid receptors (the ratio of delta-activity to mu-activity was 0.00053; KB=2.6 nM). The CONH2 terminus combined with the N-methylation of L-Phe4 increased the potency and selectivity of dalargin for mu-opioid receptors.

  4. Purification and characterization of the human platelet. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Shreeve, S.M.; Kerlavage, A.R.; Fraser, C.M.; Mariani, A.P.; Venter, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    The ..cap alpha../sub 2/-receptor (..cap alpha../sub 2/-R) from human platelets has been purified to homogeneity using a four step process. An affinity column was prepared by coupling p-aminoclonidine to CH-Sepharose 4B via the p-NH/sub 2/ group. Digitonin solubilized ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R bound to the affinity matrix were eluted with 100 ..mu..M phentolamine and directly applied to a DEAE-Sepharose column. Bound receptors were eluted with a linear gradient of 0-500 mM NaCl, pooled and chromatographed on HPLC size exclusion columns. Three peaks of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R binding were eluted from HPLC columns (t = 33, 42, 47 min). Radioiodination of HPLC eluates and analysis by SDS-PAGE indicated that ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R binding was associated with a 75-85 kDa protein. These data suggest that the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R may exist in monomeric and oligomeric forms in the purified state and support previous target size data which indicate that the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R exists as a dimer in the native membrane. The pure radioiodinated ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R (77-85 kDa) is a glycoprotein with terminal sialic acid or N-acetylglucosamine residues and has a pI of 4.1 on column isoelectric focusing. These data are consistent with those previously reported on the partially purified ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R. Electron micrographs confirm the oligomeric nature and size of the pure ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R.

  5. Altered hepatic vasopressin and alpha 1-adrenergic receptors after chronic endotoxin infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.L.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are complicated by a number of hemodynamic and metabolic aberrations. These include catecholamine refractoriness and altered glucose metabolism. Recently, a nonshock rat model of continuous endotoxin infusion via an implanted osmotic pump was developed that reproduces some of the metabolic and cardiovascular findings of human sepsis. By using this model, we have found a decreased number of hepatic plasma membrane alpha 1-adrenergic and (Arg8)vasopressin receptors in rats continuously infused with endotoxin. There was a significant decrease in (/sup 3/H)prazosin (35 +/- 7%) and (/sup 3/H) (Arg8)vasopressin (43 +/- 8%) receptors after 30 h of continuous endotoxin infusion with no change in affinity. The ability of norepinephrine to form the high-affinity complex with alpha 1-adrenergic receptors was not altered after chronic endotoxin infusion. The results are consistent with the concept that alterations in receptor number might underlie certain of the metabolic consequences of chronic sepsis.

  6. Alpha-2 adrenergic and serotonin-1B receptors in the OK cell, an opossum kidney cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Alpha-2 adrenergic and serotonin-1B (5HT{sub 1B}) receptors, both negatively-coupled to adenylyl cyclase, were characterized in the OK cell line, a renal proximal tubule epithelial cell line derived from the kidney of a North American opossum. In membrane saturation radioligand binding experiments, ({sup 3}H)yohimbine and ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine labeled an equivalent number of binding sites. Detailed pharmacological analysis of OK cell alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in competition binding assays indicate this receptor is neither an alpha-2A nor an alpha-2B adrenergic receptor subtype, although the alpha-2B receptor subtype-selective drugs prazosin, ARC-239 and chlorpromazine have affinities for OK cell alpha-2 adrenergic receptors similar to those at the alpha-2B receptor subtype. Determinations of agonist potency for inhibition of PTH-stimulated cyclic AMP production and radioligand binding analysis using ({sup 125}I)({minus})-cyanopindolol indicate that a 5HT{sub 1B} receptor is expressed in the OK cell line. A biochemical effector system coupled to this receptor subtype has not been previously described. Several compounds appear to be potent agonists at the 5TH{sub 1B} receptor including the beta adrenergic antagonists cyanopindolol, pindolol, propranolol and alprenolol.

  7. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} is essential for the expression of antioxidant protection genes and mitochondrial function

    SciTech Connect

    Rangwala, Shamina M. . E-mail: shamina.rangwala@novartis.com; Li, Xiaoyan; Lindsley, Loren; Wang, Xiaomei; Shaughnessy, Stacey; Daniels, Thomas G.; Szustakowski, Joseph; Nirmala, N.R.; Wu, Zhidan; Stevenson, Susan C.

    2007-05-25

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. To investigate the transcriptional network controlling these phenomena, we investigated mitochondrial gene expression in embryonic fibroblasts isolated from ERR{alpha} null mice. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) stimulated mitochondrial gene expression program in control cells, but not in the ERR{alpha} null cells. Interestingly, the induction of levels of mitochondrial oxidative stress protection genes in response to increased PGC-1{alpha} levels was dependent on ERR{alpha}. Furthermore, we found that the PGC-1{alpha}-mediated induction of estrogen-related receptor {gamma} and nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), was dependent on the presence of ERR{alpha}. Basal levels of NRF-2 were decreased in the absence of ERR{alpha}. The absence of ERR{alpha} resulted in a decrease in citrate synthase enzyme activity in response to PGC-1{alpha} overexpression. Our results indicate an essential role for ERR{alpha} as a key regulator of oxidative metabolism.

  8. Alpha-adrenergic regulation of angiotensin II receptors in neuronal cultures from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Sumners, C.; Watkins, L.L.; Raizada, M.K.

    1986-03-05

    Our previous studies have suggested that endogenous catecholamine (CA) levels are important regulators of angiotensin II receptors (AngII-R) in neuronal cultures. The present study was undertaken to determine the possible mechanisms by which CA exert their effects on AngII-R. Incubation of neuronal cultures with norepinephrine (NE) resulted in time and dose dependent decreases in (/sup 125/I)-AngII specific binding. A maximal effect of 60-70% was observed between 4-8 hours at 1..mu..M NE, which was the result of a decrease in Bmax (104 +/- 16.3 fmol/mg protein in controls vs 41.4 +/- 9.3 fmol/mg protein in NE treated) and little change in Kd. Similar effects were observed when neuronal cultures were incubated with dopamine (DA) or phenylephrine, but serotonin, epinephrine and isoproterenol had no effect. The NE and DA stimulated decrease in AngII-R appears to be an ..cap alpha../sub 1/=adrenergic receptor mediated phenomenon because it is abolished by coincubation with prazosin (..cap alpha../sub 1/-antagonist) and not by ..cap alpha../sub 2/- or ..beta..-antagonists. Similar incubations of neuronal cultures with NE also caused a time and dose dependent downregulation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors. Taken together these observations indicate that the NE induced downregulation of AngII-R is mediated by ..cap alpha../sub 1/-receptors, and suggest that one possible mechanism may be the cointernalization of both ..cap alpha../sub 1/- and AngII-R stimulated by ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic agonists.

  9. Structural Basis for Hormone Recognition by the Human CRFR2[alpha] G Protein-coupled Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Kuntal; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Xu, H. Eric; Pioszak, Augen A.

    2012-05-09

    The mammalian corticotropin releasing factor (CRF)/urocortin (Ucn) peptide hormones include four structurally similar peptides, CRF, Ucn1, Ucn2, and Ucn3, that regulate stress responses, metabolism, and cardiovascular function by activating either of two related class B G protein-coupled receptors, CRFR1 and CRFR2. CRF and Ucn1 activate both receptors, whereas Ucn2 and Ucn3 are CRFR2-selective. The molecular basis for selectivity is unclear. Here, we show that the purified N-terminal extracellular domains (ECDs) of human CRFR1 and the CRFR2{alpha} isoform are sufficient to discriminate the peptides, and we present three crystal structures of the CRFR2{alpha} ECD bound to each of the Ucn peptides. The CRFR2{alpha} ECD forms the same fold observed for the CRFR1 and mouse CRFR2{beta} ECDs but contains a unique N-terminal {alpha}-helix formed by its pseudo signal peptide. The CRFR2{alpha} ECD peptide-binding site architecture is similar to that of CRFR1, and binding of the {alpha}-helical Ucn peptides closely resembles CRF binding to CRFR1. Comparing the electrostatic surface potentials of the ECDs suggests a charge compatibility mechanism for ligand discrimination involving a single amino acid difference in the receptors (CRFR1 Glu104/CRFR2{alpha} Pro-100) at a site proximate to peptide residue 35 (Arg in CRF/Ucn1, Ala in Ucn2/3). CRFR1 Glu-104 acts as a selectivity filter preventing Ucn2/3 binding because the nonpolar Ala-35 is incompatible with the negatively charged Glu-104. The structures explain the mechanisms of ligand recognition and discrimination and provide a molecular template for the rational design of therapeutic agents selectively targeting these receptors.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 alpha stimulate late shedding of p75 TNF receptors but not p55 TNF receptors from human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Joyce, D A; Steer, J H

    1995-11-01

    Soluble receptors for TNF (sTNF-R) are present at elevated concentrations in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. They are presumably released by cells of the synovial membrane, including the monocyte-derived synovial macrophages. Cytokines from the synovium, including IL-1 and TNF-alpha, may stimulate release. We therefore examined the release of sTNF-R from monocytes exposed to IL-1 and TNF-alpha. Elutriator-purified human blood monocytes spontaneously released both the p75 and the p55 sTNF-R (1011 +/- 199 and 177 +/- 20 pg/10(6) cells, respectively, mean +/- SEM) during 48 h of in vitro culture. TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha induced time- and concentration-dependent increases in the release of sTNF-R75 from monocytes, but neither had a measurable effect on the release of sTNF-R55. The release of sTNF-R75 was inhibited by cycloheximide. Neither lymphocytes nor polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) released measurable sTNF-R spontaneously or in response to stimulation with IL-1 alpha, but TNF-alpha stimulated the release of small amounts of sTNF-R75 by PMN. The timing, cycloheximide sensitivity, and selectivity of stimulated release of TNF-R75 by monocytes are consistent with previous observations on other cell types of late (8-20 h) increased synthesis and turnover of cell surface TNF-R75, but not TNF-R55, after stimulation with TNF-alpha or IL-1. These observations help to explain why elevated levels of sTNF-R in synovial fluid coexist with enhanced expression of cell surface TNF-R on synovial macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:8590306

  11. The role of Pre-H2 domains of alpha- and delta-epithelial Na+ channels in ion permeation, conductance, and amiloride sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Long; Bishop, LaToya R; Anderson, Susan J; Fuller, Catherine M; Benos, Dale J

    2004-02-27

    Epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC) regulate salt and water re-absorption across the apical membrane of absorptive epithelia such as the kidney, colon, and lung. Structure-function studies have suggested that the second transmembrane domain (M2) and the adjacent pre- and post-M2 regions are involved in channel pore formation, cation selectivity, and amiloride sensitivity. Because Na(+) selectivity, unitary Na(+) conductance (gamma(Na)), and amiloride sensitivity of delta-ENaC are strikingly different from those of alpha-ENaC, the hypothesis that the pre-H2 domain may contribute to these characterizations has been examined by swapping the pre-H2, H2, and both (pre-H2+H2) domains of delta- and alpha-ENaCs. Whole-cell and single channel results showed that the permeation ratio of Li(+) and Na(+) (P(Li)/P(Na)) for the swap alpha chimeras co-expressed with betagamma-ENaC in Xenopus oocytes decreased significantly. In contrast, the ratio of P(Li)/P(Na) for the swap delta constructs was not significantly altered. Single channel studies confirmed that swapping of the H2 and the pre-H2+H2 domains increased the gamma(Na) of alpha-ENaC but decreased the gamma(Na) of delta-ENaC. A significant increment in the apparent inhibitory dissociation constant for amiloride (K(i)(amil)) was observed in the alpha chimeras by swapping the pre-H2, H2, and pre-H2+H2 domains. In contrast, a striking decline of K(i)(amil) was obtained in the chimeric delta constructs with substitution of the H2 and pre-H2+H2 domains. Our results demonstrate that the pre-H2 domain, combined with the H2 domain, contributes to the P(Li)/P(Na) ratio, single channel Na(+) conductance, and amiloride sensitivity of alpha- and delta-ENaCs. PMID:14660613

  12. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonists down-regulate alpha2-macroglobulin expression by a PPARalpha-dependent mechanism.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) regulates transcription of genes involved both in lipid and glucose metabolism as well as inflammation. Fibrates are PPARα ligands used to normalize lipid and glucose parameters and exert anti-inflammatory effects. Fibrates...

  14. GTP synthases. Proton pumping and phosphorylation in ligand-receptor-G alpha-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Nederkoorn, P H; Timmerman, H; Donné-Op Den Kelder, G M; Timms, D; Wilkinson, A J; Kelly, D R; Broadley, K J; Davies, R H

    1996-01-01

    A structural model for a ligand-receptor-Gs alpha-protein complex to function as a GTP synthase is presented. The mechanism which is dependent on the movement and rotation of the G alpha-protein alpha 2-helix is seen to involve the delivery of, at least, one proton to the phosphorylation site in the rotation of this helix. The cycle is driven by a ligand-mediated proton pump through the alpha-helices of the receptor, attachment of the conserved Tyr-Arg-Tyr receptor proton shuttle being made to an aspartate group on the Gs alpha-protein terminal sidechain, which is itself linked to the Asn-Gln interaction known to control movement and rotation of the alpha 2-helix between .GDP and .GTP structures. The energetics of proton transfer through the shuttle mechanism and delivery of a proton to the aspartate group are shown to be sufficient to rupture this controlling interaction and its associated backbone bond. The complex leads to full spatial and energetic definition of the receptor proton shuttle mechanism, while there is a striking association of further Tyrosine and Arginine residues in the vicinity of the Gs alpha-protein Asn-Gln interaction. Calculations at the HF 6-31G** level confirm that a critical balance between ion pair and neutral forms of Tyr-Arg interactions under multiply hydrogen bonded conditions in a hydrophobic environment controls proton transfer and recovery mechanisms. The intrinsic preference of the neutral Tyr-Arg form over the ion-pair is 14.0 kcal/mol. Activation of the Tyrosine oxygen atom in the neutral form by single-NH or -OH groups reduces this difference by some 6.4-8.6 kcal/mol but the dominance of the neutral form is maintained. The expected slight overestimates are consistent with the maximum activation enthalpy of 11.0-12.0 kcal/ mol required to initiate proton transfer through the shuttle. The extended form of the shuttle with the Arginine acting competitively between the two Tyrosine residues allows interpretation of observed

  15. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibition Enhances Memory Acquisition through Activation of PPAR-alpha Nuclear Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB[subscript 1]-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for alpha-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-alpha) when and where they are naturally released in the brain.…

  16. Relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and response in BC3H-1 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D.; Berger, K.D.; Taylor, P.

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy by agonists or antagonists and the regulation of intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ was examined. Receptor occupancy was measured using the antagonist (/sup 3/H)prazosin and correlated with agonist-elicited /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ fluxes. The agonists epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and phenylephrine (PE) coordinately activated Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, reflecting a substantial mobilization of intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/, as well as a smaller /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ influx. The agonist concentration dependences for influx and efflux were similar, with the order of potency expected for alpha 1 receptors (E greater than or equal to NE greater than PE). To determine the relationship between receptor occupancy and response, the slowly dissociating antagonist prazosin was used to inactivate specified fractions of the receptor population. A linear relationship was observed between the remaining activatable receptors and residual /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux elicited by E or NE, except at saturating agonist concentrations where some curvature was observed. Moreover, the concentration dependence for agonist-elicited /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was shifted toward slightly higher concentrations of E or NE following prazosin inactivation. These results suggest the presence of a modest receptor reserve which is revealed by E or NE, but not by PE. Agonist occupation was measured over the same interval as receptor activation by competition with the initial rate of (/sup 3/H)prazosin association. All three agonists exhibited the major fraction of receptor occupation over the same concentration ranges required for the functional response. Exposure of receptors to specified agonist concentrations for 30 min had little effect on the number of receptors or their ligand affinities, whereas a 2.5-hr exposure to agonist decreased apparent agonist affinity as well as the number of receptors recognized by (/sup 3/H)prazosin.

  17. Expression of retinoic acid receptor alpha mRNA in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Largman, C; Detmer, K; Corral, J C; Hack, F M; Lawrence, H J

    1989-07-01

    The expression of the newly described human retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) in six nonlymphoid and six lymphoid leukemia cell lines and nine freshly obtained samples of leukemia cells from patients with acute nonlymphoid leukemia was assessed by Northern blot analysis, using a full length cDNA clone of RAR alpha as probe. RAR alpha was expressed in all 12 cell lines and in all fresh leukemia samples as two major transcripts of 2.6 and 3.5 kb in size. Levels of RAR alpha expression and transcript sizes in retinoid-sensitive cells (such as HL60 or fresh promyelocytic leukemia cells) were not different from those in other samples. Moreover, expression of RAR alpha was not significantly modulated by exposure to cis-retinoic acid (cisRA) in either cisRA-responsive or unresponsive cells. By using a 3' fragment of the RAR alpha gene as a probe, we confirmed that the transcripts visualized did not represent the homologous RAR beta gene. RAR alpha appears to be expressed in most human leukemia cells regardless of the type of biologic response to retinoic acid.

  18. Postnatal development of the alpha1 containing GABAA receptor subunit in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Tellez, Juan Felix; Vela, Jose; del Rio, Juan Carlos; Ramos, Blanca; Baglietto-Vargas, David; Santa-Maria, Consuelo; Ruano, Diego; Gutierrez, Antonia; Vitorica, Javier

    2004-01-31

    Here we have studied the developmental expression of alpha1 subunit of the GABAA receptor in comparison with the expression of alpha2 subunit and several GABAergic markers (parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR), somatostatin (SOM), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)). The alpha1 expression (mRNA and protein) was low at birth and increased progressively until the adulthood. This expression pattern was similar to that observed for PV, opposite to that of CR (high at birth and decreased continuously until the adulthood) and differed from that observed for the alpha2 and neuropeptides (SOM, NPY and VIP) (in all cases, a clear peak in expression was observed at P10). We further investigated the expression of alpha1, PV and CR by immunohistochemistry. As expected, the alpha1 and the PV expression were low at birth and increased progressively until the adulthood. Both alpha1 and PV were co-expressed by the same interneuronal population, however, the maturation of the alpha1 subunit preceded to that of PV. Finally, we observed a gradient of maturation between the different fields of the hippocampus proper (CA2-3 preceded to CA1 and DG). This gradient could be related to the high expression of CR positive cells and fibers during the first 10 postnatal days, located principally in the stratum lacunosum moleculare of the CA2-3 layers.

  19. Ginsenoside Rf, a component of ginseng, regulates lipoprotein metabolism through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunghee; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Yoon, Michung . E-mail: yoon60@mokwon.ac.kr

    2006-01-06

    We investigated whether ginseng regulates lipoprotein metabolism by altering peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha})-mediated pathways, using a PPAR{alpha}-null mouse model. Administration of ginseng extract, ginsenosides, and ginsenoside Rf (Rf) to wild-type mice not only significantly increased basal levels of hepatic apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and C-III mRNA compared with wild-type controls, but also substantially reversed the reductions in mRNA levels of apo A-I and C-III expected following treatment with the potent PPAR{alpha} ligand Wy14,643. In contrast, no effect was detected in the PPAR{alpha}-null mice. Testing of eight main ginsenosides on PPAR{alpha} reporter gene expression indicated that Rf was responsible for the effects of ginseng on lipoprotein metabolism. Furthermore, the inhibition of PPAR{alpha}-dependent transactivation by Rf seems to occur at the level of DNA binding. These results demonstrate that ginseng component Rf regulates apo A-I and C-III mRNA and the actions of Rf on lipoprotein metabolism are mediated via interactions with PPAR{alpha}.

  20. Suppression of estrogen receptor-alpha transactivation by thyroid transcription factor-2 in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eunsook; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Lee, Keesook

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 was expressed in mammary glands and breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 repressed ER{alpha} transactivation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERs), which mediate estrogen actions, regulate cell growth and differentiation of a variety of normal tissues and hormone-responsive tumors through interaction with cellular factors. In this study, we show that thyroid transcription factor-2 (TTF-2) is expressed in mammary gland and acts as ER{alpha} co-repressor. TTF-2 inhibited ER{alpha} transactivation in a dose-dependent manner in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In addition, TTF-2 directly bound to and formed a complex with ER{alpha}, colocalizing with ER{alpha} in the nucleus. In MCF-7/TTF-2 stable cell lines, TTF-2 repressed the expression of endogenous ER{alpha} target genes such as pS2 and cyclin D1 by interrupting ER{alpha} binding to target promoters and also significantly decreased cell proliferation. Taken together, these data suggest that TTF-2 may modulate the function of ER{alpha} as a corepressor and play a role in ER-dependent proliferation of mammary cells.

  1. Administration of mu-, kappa- or delta2-receptor agonists via osmotic minipumps suppresses murine splenic antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Rahim, R T; Meissler, J J; Cowan, A; Rogers, T J; Geller, E B; Gaughan, J; Adler, M W; Eisenstein, T K

    2001-10-01

    Previously, our laboratory has shown that morphine given by implantation of a 75-mg slow-release pellet for 48 h suppresses murine splenic antibody responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBCs) in a plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay. However, the use of slow-release pellets for such studies is limited, as these pellets are only available in fixed doses and similar pellets for kappa and delta agonists have not been developed. In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of administering opioids via Alzet osmotic minipumps to assess their immunomodulatory effects. Groups of mice received minipumps dispensing morphine sulfate, which has primary activity at the mu opioid receptor; U50,488H, which is a kappa-selective agonist; deltorphin II, which is a delta2-selective agonist; or DPDPE, which has greater selectivity for delta1 than delta, receptors. Morphine, U50,488H and deltorphin II were all immunosuppressive, with biphasic dose-response curves exhibiting maximal (approximately 50%) suppression of the PFC response at doses of 0.5 to 2 mg/kg/day 48 h after pump implantation. Further, immunosuppression by morphine sulfate, U50,488H or deltorphin II was blocked by simultaneous implantation of a minipump administering the opioid receptor-selective antagonists CTAP (1 mg/kg/day), nor-binaltorphimine (5 mg/kg/day), or naltriben (3 mg/kg/day), respectively. DPDPE was inactive at doses lower than 10 mg/kg/day. We conclude that osmotic minipumps are a practical and useful way of administering opioids to study their effects on the immune system, and give further evidence that immunosuppression induced in vivo by opioid agonists is mediated not only via mu, but also via kappa and delta2 opioid receptors. PMID:11606031

  2. Role of Mu and Delta Opioid Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens in Cocaine-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Diana; Self, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that opioid receptors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but not the nucleus accumbens (NAc), play a role in relapse to drug-seeking behavior. However, environmental stimuli that elicit relapse also release the endogenous opioid β-endorphin in the NAc. Using a within–session extinction/reinstatement paradigm in rats that self-administer cocaine, we found that NAc infusions of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO moderately reinstated responding on the cocaine-paired lever at low doses (1.0–3.0 ng/side), whereas the delta opioid receptor (DOR) agonist DPDPE induced greater responding at higher doses (300–3000 ng/side) that also enhanced inactive lever responding. Using doses of either agonist that induced responding on only the cocaine-paired lever, we found that DAMGO-induced responding was blocked selectively by pretreatment with the MOR antagonist CTAP, while DPDPE-induced responding was selectively blocked by the DOR antagonist naltrindole. Cocaine-primed reinstatement was blocked by intra-NAc CTAP but not naltrindole, indicating a role for endogenous MOR-acting peptides in cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. In this regard, intra-NAc infusions of β-endorphin (100–1000 ng/side) induced marked cocaine-seeking behavior, an effect blocked by intra-NAc pretreatment with the MOR but not DOR antagonist. Conversely, cocaine seeking elicited by the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan (1–10 μg/side) was blocked by naltrindole but not CTAP. MOR stimulation in more dorsal caudate-putamen sites was ineffective, while DPDPE infusions induced cocaine seeking. Together, these findings establish distinct roles for MOR and DOR in cocaine relapse, and suggest that NAc MOR could be an important therapeutic target to neutralize the effects of endogenous β-endorphin release on cocaine relapse. PMID:19279569

  3. Alpha3Na+/K+-ATPase is a neuronal receptor for agrin.

    PubMed

    Hilgenberg, Lutz G W; Su, Hailing; Gu, Huaiyu; O'Dowd, Diane K; Smith, Martin A

    2006-04-21

    Agrin, through its interaction with the receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK, mediates accumulation of acetylcholine receptors (AChR) at the developing neuromuscular junction. Agrin has also been implicated in several functions in brain. However, the mechanism by which agrin exerts its effects in neural tissue is unknown. Here we present biochemical evidence that agrin binds to the alpha3 subunit of the Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) in CNS neurons. Colocalization with agrin binding sites at synapses supports the hypothesis that the alpha3NKA is a neuronal agrin receptor. Agrin inhibition of alpha3NKA activity results in membrane depolarization and increased action potential frequency in cortical neurons in culture and acute slice. An agrin fragment that acts as a competitive antagonist depresses action potential frequency, showing that endogenous agrin regulates native alpha3NKA function. These data demonstrate that, through its interaction with the alpha3NKA, agrin regulates activity-dependent processes in neurons, providing a molecular framework for agrin action in the CNS.

  4. Zinc finger protein 131 inhibits estrogen signaling by suppressing estrogen receptor {alpha} homo-dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Yohan; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding affinity of ZNF131 to ER{alpha} increases upon E2 stimulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-dimerization and E2-induced breast cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor. -- Abstract: Steroid hormone estrogen elicits various physiological functions, many of which are mediated through two structurally and functionally distinct estrogen receptors, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}. The functional role of zinc finger protein 131 (ZNF131) is poorly understood, but it is assumed to possess transcriptional regulation activity due to the presence of a DNA binding motif. A few recent reports, including ours, revealed that ZNF131 acts as a negative regulator of ER{alpha} and that SUMO modification potentiates the negative effect of ZNF131 on estrogen signaling. However, its molecular mechanism for ER{alpha} inhibition has not been elucidated in detail. Here, we demonstrate that ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}, which consequently inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Moreover, we show that the C-terminal region of ZNF131 containing the SUMOylation site is necessary for its inhibition of estrogen signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor.

  5. alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine reward and anxiety relief

    PubMed Central

    McGranahan, Tresa M.; Patzlaff, Natalie E.; Grady, Sharon R.; Heinemann, Stephen F.; Booker, T.K.

    2012-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary psychoactive substance in tobacco and it exerts its effects by interaction with various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain. One of the major subtypes expressed in brain, the alpha4beta2-nAChR, endogenously modulates neuronal excitability and thereby, modifies certain normal, as well as nicotine-induced, behaviors. Although alpha4-containing nAChRs are widely expressed across the brain, a major focus has been on their roles within midbrain dopaminergic regions involved in drug addition, mental illness and movement control in humans. We developed a unique model system to examine the role of alpha4-nAChRs within dopaminergic neurons by a targeted genetic deletion of the alpha4 subunit from dopaminergic neurons in mice. The loss alpha4 mRNA and alpha4beta2-nAChRs from dopaminergic neurons was confirmed, as well as selective loss of alpha4beta2-nAChR function from dopaminergic but not GABAergic neurons. Two behaviors central to nicotine dependence, reward and anxiety relief, were examined. Alpha4-nAChRs specifically on dopaminergic neurons were demonstrated to be necessary for nicotine reward as measured by nicotine place preference, but not for another drug of addiction, cocaine. Alpha4-nAChRs are necessary for the anxiolytic effects of nicotine in the elevated plus maze and elimination of alpha4-beta2-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons decreased sensitivity to the anxiolytic effects of nicotine. Deletion of alpha4-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons also increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced locomotor depression, however nicotine-induced hypothermia was unaffected. This is the first work to develop a dopaminergic specific deletion of a nAChR subunit and examine resulting changes in nicotine behaviors. PMID:21795541

  6. G Protein Coupled Receptors in Embryonic Stem Cells: A Role for Gs-Alpha Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Layden, Brian T.; Newman, Marsha; Chen, Fei; Fisher, Amanda; Lowe, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Identification of receptor mediated signaling pathways in embryonic stem (ES) cells is needed to facilitate strategies for cell replacement using ES cells. One large receptor family, largely uninvestigated in ES cells, is G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). An important role for these receptors in embryonic development has been described, but little is known about GPCR expression in ES cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We have examined the expression profile of 343 different GPCRs in mouse ES cells demonstrating for the first time that a large number of GPCRs are expressed in undifferentiated and differentiating ES cells, and in many cases at high levels. To begin to define a role for GPCR signaling in ES cells, the impact of activating Gs-alpha, one of the major alpha subunits that couples to GPCRs, was investigated. Gs-alpha activation resulted in larger embryoid bodies (EBs), due, in part, to increased cell proliferation and prevented the time-related decline in expression of transcription factors important for maintaining ES cell pluripotency. Significance/Conclusions These studies suggest that Gs-alpha signaling contributes to ES cell proliferation and pluripotency and provide a framework for further investigation of GPCRs in ES cells. PMID:20161705

  7. Developmental toxicity of perfluorononanoic acid is dependent on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is one of the predominant perfluoroalkyl acids in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife. PFNA strongly activates the mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) in vitro and negatively impacts development ...

  8. Cloning of murine IL-22 receptor alpha 2 and comparison with its human counterpart.

    PubMed

    Weiss, B; Wolk, K; Grünberg, B H; Volk, H-D; Sterry, W; Asadullah, K; Sabat, R

    2004-08-01

    We have identified the mouse and rat homologs of human interleukin-22 receptor alpha 2 (IL-22R alpha 2) and compared the localization, structure, and expression of the encoding murine and human genes. The mouse IL-22R alpha 2-encoding gene is located on chromosome 10A3 between, like in human, the genes for interferon-gamma R1 and IL-20R1. It spans a region of approximately 10 kb therefore being three times shorter than the human gene. Although the overall gene structure in both species is similar, the mouse gene lacks a counterpart to the third coding exon of the human gene known to be alternatively spliced. Like in human, mouse and rat IL-22R alpha 2 exist only as soluble receptors as deduced from the lack of transmembrane and intracellular domains encoding sequences. Quantitative expression analyses showed, analogically to the human system, a limited tissue distribution of mouse IL-22R alpha 2 mRNA. Differential modulation of IL-22R alpha 2 mRNA expression was observed upon systemic inflammation in mice in spleen, thymus, and lymph node.

  9. Polymorphic expression in the CD8alpha chain surface receptor of African lions (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Bull, Marta E; Gebhard, Douglas G; Tompkins, Wayne A F; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne

    2002-01-15

    Free-ranging African lion (Panthera leo) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were examined using flow cytometry and antibodies developed for use in the domestic cat to determine if phenotypic changes occurred in lion lymphocytes as a result of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection. The percentage of CD8 cells from lion peripheral blood was considerably lower than in the domestic cat. Lions with elevated levels of CD8+ cells were typically infected with FIV, similar to observations in the domestic cat. Antibodies against the alpha chain of the CD8 receptor (monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3.357) did not react consistently in all lions examined. Flow cytometric analysis determined that approximately 82 and 80% of the animals from Kruger and Hluhluwe-Umfolozi National Parks in South Africa reacted with the monoclonal antibody against the alpha chain of CD8 receptor, while only 17% of the lions in Etosha National Park in Namibia cross-reacted with the CD8alpha chain. There was no apparent correlation between FIV status and CD8alpha chain reactivity. The relative isolation of Etosha from the other two parks could explain the marked difference in CD8alpha chain expression and suggests that lions similar to other mammalian species demonstrate polymorphic expression of the CD8alpha chain (197).

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) {beta} has intrinsic, GR{alpha}-independent transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, Tomoshige; Manoli, Irini; Kelkar, Sujata; Wang, Yonghong; Su, Yan A.; Chrousos, George P.

    2009-04-17

    The human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene produces C-terminal GR{beta} and GR{alpha} isoforms through alternative use of specific exons 9{beta} and {alpha}, respectively. We explored the transcriptional activity of GR{beta} on endogenous genes by developing HeLa cells stably expressing EGFP-GR{beta} or EGFP. Microarray analyses revealed that GR{beta} had intrinsic gene-specific transcriptional activity, regulating mRNA expression of a large number of genes negatively or positively. Majority of GR{beta}-responsive genes was distinct from those modulated by GR{alpha}, while GR{beta} and GR{alpha} mutually modulated each other's transcriptional activity in a subpopulation of genes. We did not observe in HCT116 cells nuclear translocation of GR{beta} and activation of this receptor by RU 486, a synthetic steroid previously reported to bind GR{beta} and to induce nuclear translocation. Our results indicate that GR{beta} has intrinsic, GR{alpha}-independent, gene-specific transcriptional activity, in addition to its previously reported dominant negative effect on GR{alpha}-induced transactivation of GRE-driven promoters.

  11. The orphan nuclear receptor SHP regulates PGC-1alpha expression and energy production in brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Jun; Saha, Pradip; Huang, Jiansheng; Chan, Lawrence; Spiegelman, Bruce; Moore, David D

    2005-10-01

    Brown adipocytes increase energy production in response to induction of PGC-1alpha, a dominant regulator of energy metabolism. We have found that the orphan nuclear receptor SHP (NR0B2) is a negative regulator of PGC-1alpha expression in brown adipocytes. Mice lacking SHP show increased basal expression of PGC-1alpha, increased energy expenditure, and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Increased PGC-1alpha expression in SHP null brown adipose tissue is not due to beta-adrenergic activation, since it is also observed in primary cultures of SHP(-/-) brown adipocytes that are not exposed to such stimuli. In addition, acute inhibition of SHP expression in cultured wild-type brown adipocytes increases basal PGC-1alpha expression, and SHP overexpression in SHP null brown adipocytes decreases it. The orphan nuclear receptor ERRgamma is expressed in BAT and its transactivation of the PGC-1alpha promoter is potently inhibited by SHP. We conclude that SHP functions as a negative regulator of energy production in BAT.

  12. Both alpha2 and alpha3 GABAA receptor subtypes mediate the anxiolytic properties of benzodiazepine site ligands in the conditioned emotional response paradigm.

    PubMed

    Morris, H V; Dawson, G R; Reynolds, D S; Atack, J R; Stephens, D N

    2006-05-01

    Mice with point-mutated alpha2 GABAA receptor subunits (rendering them diazepam insensitive) are resistant to the anxiolytic-like effects of benzodiazepines (BZs) in unconditioned models of anxiety. We investigated the role of the alpha2 GABAA subtype in a model of conditioned anxiety. alpha2(H101R) and wildtype mice were trained in a conditioned emotional response (CER) task, in which lever-pressing for food on a variable interval (VI) schedule was suppressed during the presentation of a conditioned stimulus (CS+) that predicted footshock. The ability of diazepam, ethanol and pentobarbital to reduce suppression during the CS+ was interpreted as an anxiolytic response. Diazepam (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) induced a dose-dependent anxiolytic-like effect in wildtype mice. At high doses, diazepam (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) was sedative in alpha2(H101R) mice. Analysis of the anxiolytic properties of nonsedative diazepam doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg), showed that alpha2(H101R) mice were resistant to the anxiolytic effects of diazepam. Equivalent anxiolytic properties of pentobarbital (20 mg/kg) and ethanol (1 and 2 g/kg) were seen in both genotypes. These findings confirm the critical importance of the alpha2 GABAA subtype in mediating BZ anxiolysis. However, as a compound, L-838417, with agonist properties at alpha2, alpha3 and alpha5-containing receptors, gave rise to anxiolytic-like activity in alpha2(H101R) mice in the CER test, alpha3-containing GABA receptors are also likely to contribute to anxiolysis. Observations that alpha2(H101R) mice were more active, and displayed a greater suppression of lever pressing in response to fear-conditioned stimuli than wildtype mice, suggests that the alpha2(H101R) mutation may not be behaviourally silent.

  13. Contrasting signaling pathways of alpha1A- and alpha1B-adrenergic receptor subtype activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Ras in transfected NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z W; Shi, X Y; Lin, R Z; Hoffman, B B

    1999-01-01

    Activation of protein kinases is an important intermediate step in signaling pathways of many G protein-coupled receptors including alpha1-adrenergic receptors. The present study was designed to investigate the capacity of the three cloned subtypes of human alpha1-receptors, namely, alpha1A, alpha1B and alpha1D to activate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) and p21ras in transfected NIH3T3 cells. Norepinephrine activated PI 3-kinase in cells expressing human alpha1A and alpha1B via pertussis toxin-insensitive G proteins; alpha1D-receptors did not detectably activate this kinase. Transient transfection of NIH 3T3 cells with the alpha-subunit of the G protein transducin (alpha(t)) a scavenger of betagamma-subunits released from activated G proteins, inhibited alpha1B-receptor but not alpha1A-receptor-stimulated PI 3-kinase activity. Stimulation of both alpha1A- and alpha1B-receptors activated p21ras and stimulated guanine nucleotide exchange on Ras protein. Overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of p21ras attenuated alpha1B-receptor but not alpha1A-receptor activation of PI 3-kinase. Overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of PI 3-kinase attenuated alpha1A- but not alpha1B-receptor-stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. These results demonstrate the capacity for heterologous signaling of the alpha1-adrenergic receptor subtypes in promoting cellular responses in NIH3T3 cells.

  14. Ligand-dependent coactivation of the human bile acid receptor FXR by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Savkur, Rajesh S; Thomas, Jeffrey S; Bramlett, Kelli S; Gao, Yunling; Michael, Laura F; Burris, Thomas P

    2005-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) has been shown to play an important role in energy metabolism by coordinating transcriptional programs involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, adaptive thermogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation. PGC-1alpha also plays a crucial role in cholesterol metabolism by serving as a coactivator of the liver X receptor-alpha and inducing the expression of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase. Here, we demonstrate that PGC-1alpha also functions as an effective coactivator of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), the bile acid receptor. Transient cotransfection assays demonstrate that PGC-1alpha enhances ligand-mediated FXR transcription when either full-length FXR or Gal4 DNA binding domain-FXR-ligand binding domain chimeras were analyzed. Mammalian two-hybrid analyses, glutathione S-transferase affinity chromatography and biochemical coactivator recruitment assays demonstrate ligand-dependent interaction between the two proteins both in vivo and in vitro. PGC-1alpha-mediated coactivation of FXR was highly ligand-dependent and absolutely required an intact activation function-2 (AF-2) domain of FXR and the LXXLL motif in PGC-1alpha. The integrity of the charge clamp was required, further illustrating the role of the ligand binding domain of FXR in PGC-1alpha recognition. Together, these results indicate that PGC-1alpha functions as a potent coactivator for FXR and further implicates its role in the regulation of genes that are involved in bile acid and lipid metabolism.

  15. Ontogenic increase in PGE2 and PGF2 alpha receptor density in brain microvessels of pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Li, D. Y.; Varma, D. R.; Chemtob, S.

    1994-01-01

    1. The hypothesis that the relative vasoconstrictor ineffectiveness of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGF2 alpha on cerebral vessels of newborn pigs might be due to fewer receptors for these prostanoids was tested by comparing receptors for PGE2 (EP) and PGF2 alpha (FP) in cerebral microvessels from newborn and adult pigs. 2. Specific binding of [3H]-PGE2 and [3H]-PGF2 alpha to membranes prepared from brain microvessels showed that EP and FP receptor density (Bmax) in tissues from newborn animals was less than 50% of that determined in tissues from adults. By contrast, estimates of affinity (KD) were unchanged. 3. Specifically bound [3H]-PGE2 to brain microvessels from both the newborn and adult was displaced by AH 6809 (EP1-selective antagonist) by 80-90%, and only by approximately 30-35% by both 11-deoxy PGE1 (EP2/EP3 agonist) and M&B 28,767 (EP3 agonist); butaprost (EP2 agonist) was completely ineffective. 4. PGE2, 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 (EP1 agonist), PGF2 alpha and fenprostalene (PGF2 alpha analogue) caused significantly less increase in inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) in brain microvessels from the newborn than in those from adult pigs. The stimulation of IP3 by PGE2 and 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 was almost completely inhibited by the EP1 antagonist, AH 6809. 5. PGE2, 11-deoxy PGE1 and M&B 28,767 produced small reduction of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) production in adult vessels but no effect in newborn tissues. 6. The lower density of EP and FP receptors in microvessels of newborn pigs compared to adults may explain the reduced ability of PGE2 and PGF2 alpha to stimulate production of IP3 in tissues from newborn animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8032662

  16. Muscarinic cholinergic and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the epithelium and muscularis of the human ileum

    SciTech Connect

    Lepor, H.; Rigaud, G.; Shapiro, E.; Baumann, M.; Kodner, I.J.; Fleshman, J.W. )

    1990-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the binding and functional properties of muscarinic cholinergic (MCh) and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the human ileum to provide insight into pharmacologic strategies for managing urinary and fecal incontinence after bladder and rectal replacement with intestinal segments. MCh and alpha 2-adrenergic binding sites were characterized in the epithelium and muscularis of eight human ileal segments with 3H-N-methylscopolamine and 3H-rauwolscine, respectively. The dissociation constant for 3H-N-methylscopolamine in the epithelium and muscularis was 0.32 +/- 0.07 nmol/L and 0.45 +/- 0.10 nmol/L, respectively (p = 0.32). The MCh receptor content was approximately eightfold greater in the muscularis compared with the epithelium (p = 0.008). The dissociation constant for 3H-rauwolscine in the muscularis and epithelium was 2.55 +/- 0.42 nmol/L and 2.03 +/- 0.19 nmol/L, respectively (p = 0.29). The alpha 2-adrenoceptor density was twofold greater in the epithelium compared with the muscularis (p = 0.05). Noncumulative concentration-response experiments were performed with carbachol, an MCh agonist, and UK-14304, a selective alpha 2-adrenergic agonist. The epithelium did not contract in the presence of high concentrations of carbachol and UK-14304. The muscularis preparations were responsive only to carbachol. The muscularis contains primarily MCh receptors mediating smooth muscle contraction. The alpha 2-adrenoceptors are localized primarily to the epithelium and may regulate water secretion in the intestine. The distribution and functional properties of ileal MCh and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors provide a theoretic basis for the treatment of incontinence after bladder and rectal replacement with intestinal segments.

  17. Repeated activation of delta opioid receptors counteracts nerve injury-induced TNF-α up-regulation in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Vicario, Nunzio; Parenti, Rosalba; Aricò, Giuseppina; Turnaturi, Rita; Scoto, Giovanna Maria; Chiechio, Santina

    2016-01-01

    Despite mu opioid receptor agonists are the cornerstones of moderate-to-severe acute pain treatment, their effectiveness in chronic pain conditions is controversial. In contrast to mu opioid receptor agonists, a number of studies have reported the effectiveness of delta opioid receptor agonists on neuropathic pain strengthening the idea that delta opioid receptors gain importance when chronic pain develops. Among other effects, it has been shown that delta opioid receptor activation in optic nerve astrocytes inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated inflammation in response to severe hypoxia. Considering the involvement of tumor necrosis factor-α in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain, with this study we sought to correlate the effect of delta opioid receptor agonist on the development of mechanical allodynia to tumor necrosis factor-α expression at the site of nerve injury in rats subjected to chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. To this aim, we measured the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain after repeated injections with a delta opioid receptor agonist. Results obtained demonstrated that repeated administrations of the delta opioid receptor agonist SNC80 (10 mg/kg, i.p. for seven consecutive days) significantly inhibited the development of mechanical allodynia in rats with neuropathic pain and that the improvement of neuropathic symptom was timely related to the reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α in the rat sciatic nerve. We demonstrated also that when treatment with the delta opioid receptor agonist was suspended both allodynia and tumor necrosis factor-α up-regulation in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain were restored. These results show that persistent delta opioid receptor activation significantly attenuates neuropathic pain and negatively regulates sciatic nerve tumor necrosis factor-α expression in chronic constriction injury rats. PMID:27590071

  18. Inverse regulation of human ERBB2 and epidermal growth factor receptors by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Kalthoff, H; Roeder, C; Gieseking, J; Humburg, I; Schmiegel, W

    1993-10-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha decreased the expression of ERBB2 mRNA by stimulating p55 TNF receptors of pancreatic tumor cells. This decrease contrasts with an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. Both effects were selectively achieved by TNF-alpha or -beta, whereas interferon alpha or gamma or transforming growth factor beta showed no such effects. The inverse regulatory effects of TNF on ERBB2 and EGFR mRNA levels were evoked by different signaling pathways of p55 TNF receptors. The TNF-mediated ERBB2 mRNA decrease was followed by a reduction in protein. Four of five pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibited this down-regulation. This decrease of ERBB2 is a singular example of a modulation of this growth factor receptor by TNF. Overexpression of ERBB2 has been reported to cause resistance to TNF and other cytotoxic cytokines. In our study we show that the TNF-mediated down-regulation of ERBB2 in pancreatic tumor cells is accompanied by an increase in growth inhibition at low doses of TNF. The simultaneous alteration of the ERBB2/EGFR balance by TNF represents a striking model of cytokine receptor transregulation in the growth control of malignant pancreatic epithelial cells.

  19. Inverse regulation of human ERBB2 and epidermal growth factor receptors by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kalthoff, H; Roeder, C; Gieseking, J; Humburg, I; Schmiegel, W

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha decreased the expression of ERBB2 mRNA by stimulating p55 TNF receptors of pancreatic tumor cells. This decrease contrasts with an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. Both effects were selectively achieved by TNF-alpha or -beta, whereas interferon alpha or gamma or transforming growth factor beta showed no such effects. The inverse regulatory effects of TNF on ERBB2 and EGFR mRNA levels were evoked by different signaling pathways of p55 TNF receptors. The TNF-mediated ERBB2 mRNA decrease was followed by a reduction in protein. Four of five pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibited this down-regulation. This decrease of ERBB2 is a singular example of a modulation of this growth factor receptor by TNF. Overexpression of ERBB2 has been reported to cause resistance to TNF and other cytotoxic cytokines. In our study we show that the TNF-mediated down-regulation of ERBB2 in pancreatic tumor cells is accompanied by an increase in growth inhibition at low doses of TNF. The simultaneous alteration of the ERBB2/EGFR balance by TNF represents a striking model of cytokine receptor transregulation in the growth control of malignant pancreatic epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8105469

  20. Synthetic peptides used to locate the. cap alpha. -bungarotoxin binding site and immunogenic regions on. cap alpha. subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ralston, S.; Sarin, V.; Thanh, H.L.; Rivier, J.; Fox, J.L.; Lindstrom, J.

    1987-06-16

    Synthetic peptides corresponding to 57% of the sequence of ..cap alpha.. subunits of acetylcholine receptors from Torpedo californica electric organ and extending from the NH/sub 2/ to the COOCH terminus have been synthesized. The ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin binding site on denatured ..cap alpha.. subunits was mapped within the sequence ..cap alpha..185-199 by assaying binding of /sup 125/I-..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin to slot blots of synthetic peptides. Further studies showed that residues in the sequence ..cap alpha..190-194, especially cysteines-..cap alpha..192,193, were critical for binding ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin. Reduction and alkylation studies suggested that these cysteines must be disulfide linked for ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin to bind. Binding sites for serum antibodies to native receptors or ..cap alpha.. subunits were mapped by indirect immunoprecipitation of /sup 125/I-peptides. Several antigenic sequences were identified, but a synthetic peptide corresponding to the main immunogenic region (which is highly conformation dependent) was not identified.

  1. Enhanced binding of morphine and nalorphine to opioid delta receptor by glucuronate and sulfate conjugations at the 6-position

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, K.; Yamada-Mori, I.; Shigezane, J.; Hirano, T.; Yoshimura, H.

    1987-09-21

    Effect of the modification of morphine and nalorphine by glucuronate and sulfate conjugations at the 3- and 6-positions on the binding to opioid receptors was examined in a particulate fraction of rat brain. Competing potencies of both drugs against (/sup 3/H)morphine and (/sup 3/H)leucine enkephalin bindings were extremely decreased by either glucuronate or sulfate conjugation at the 3-position. On the other hand, the potencies of morphine and nalorphine against (/sup 3/H)leucine enkephalin binding were considerably enhanced by the conjugations at the 6-position, whereas the potencies against (/sup 3/H)morphine binding were decreased. These altered interactions of the conjugates at the 6-position with the two ligands were attributed to their enhanced binding to delta-receptor and reduced binding to /sup +/-receptor by Hill plot and modified Scatchard analysis. Resulted comparable and simultaneous interactions with ..mu..- and delta- receptors were assumed to be a cause of the enhanced ..mu..-receptor-directed analgesia of morphine and elevated same receptor-directed antagonistic effect of nalorphine, which have been found previously in the authors laboratory. 24 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  2. Chlordecone, a mixed pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) agonist, alters cholesterol homeostasis and lipoprotein metabolism in C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junga; Scheri, Richard C.; Zhang Yuan; Curtis, Lawrence R.

    2008-12-01

    Chlordecone (CD) is one of many banned organochlorine (OC) insecticides that are widespread persistent organic pollutants. OC insecticides alter lipid homeostasis in rodents at doses that are not neurotoxic or carcinogenic. Pretreatment of mice or rats with CD altered tissue distribution of a subsequent dose of [{sup 14}C]CD or [{sup 14}C]cholesterol (CH). Nuclear receptors regulate expression of genes important in the homeostasis of CH and other lipids. In this study, we report that CD suppresses in vitro reporter systems for human liver X receptors (LXRs) and activates those for human farnesoid X receptor (FXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) in a concentration-dependent manner (0-50 {mu}M). Consistent with human PXR activation in vitro, three days after a single dose of CD (15 mg/kg) hepatic microsomal CYP3A11 protein increases in C57BL/6 mice. CD decreases hepatic CH ester content without altering total CH concentration. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) contents of hepatic lipoprotein-rich and microsomal fractions of CD-treated mice are higher than controls. There is a significant reduction in non-high density lipoprotein CH but not apolipoprotein B-48/100 (apoB-48/100) in plasma from CD-treated mice after a 4 h fast. At 14 days after 15 mg CD/kg apoA-I and apoB-100 proteins but not CYP3A11 protein in hepatic microsomes are similar to controls. This work indicates that altered CH homeostasis is a mode of OC insecticide action of relevance after a single dose. This at least partially explains altered CH tissue distribution in CD-pretreated mice.

  3. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 regulates cAMP signal within lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Oshikawa, Jin; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Takayuki; Egawa, Masato; Kawabe, Junichi; Umemura, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-09-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are made of multiple subunits with diversified functions. The nAChR alpha 7-subunit has a property of high Ca2+ permeability and may have specific functions and localization within the plasma membrane as a signal transduction molecule. In PC-12 cells, fractionation by sucrose gradient centrifugation revealed that nAChR alpha 7 existed in low-density, cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts where flotillin also exists. In contrast, nAChR alpha 5- and beta2-subunits were located in high-density fractions, out of the lipid rafts. Type 6 adenylyl cyclase (AC6), a calcium-inhibitable isoform, was also found in lipid rafts and was coimmunoprecipitated with nAChR alpha 7. Cholesterol depletion from plasma membranes with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin redistributed nAChR alpha 7 and AC6 diffusely within plasma membranes. Nicotine stimulation reduced forskolin-stimulated AC activity by 35%, and this inhibition was negated by either treatment with alpha-bungarotoxin, a specific antagonist of nAChR alpha 7, or cholesterol depletion from plasma membranes. The effect of cholesterol depletion was negated by the addition of cholesterol. These data suggest that nAChR alpha 7 has a specific membrane localization relative to other nAChR subunits and that lipid rafts are necessary to localize nAChR alpha 7 with AC within plasma membranes. In addition, nAChR alpha 7 may regulate the AC activity via Ca2+ within lipid rafts.

  4. Calcium-dependent regulation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor signalling by copine.

    PubMed Central

    Tomsig, Jose Luis; Sohma, Hitoshi; Creutz, Carl E

    2004-01-01

    The role of copines in regulating signalling from the TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) receptor was probed by the expression of a copine dominant-negative construct in HEK293 (human embryonic kidney 293) cells. The construct was found to reduce activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB) by TNF-alpha. The introduction of calcium into HEK293 cells either through the activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors or through the application of the ionophore A23187 was found to enhance TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappaB. This effect of calcium was completely blocked by the copine dominant-negative construct. TNF-alpha was found to greatly enhance the expression of endogenous copine I, and the responsiveness of the TNF-alpha signalling pathway to muscarinic stimulation increased in parallel with the increased copine I expression. The copine dominant-negative construct also inhibited the TNF-alpha-dependent degradation of IkappaB, a regulator of NF-kappaB. All of the effects of the dominant-negative construct could be reversed by overexpression of full-length copine I, suggesting that the construct acts specifically through competitive inhibition of copine. One of the identified targets of copine I is the NEDD8-conjugating enzyme UBC12 (ubiquitin C12), that promotes the degradation of IkappaB through the ubiquitin ligase enzyme complex SCF(betaTrCP). Therefore the copine dominant-negative construct might inhibit TNF-alpha signalling by dysregulation or mislocalization of UBC12. Based on these results, a hypothesis is presented for possible roles of copines in regulating other signalling pathways in animals, plants and protozoa. PMID:14674885

  5. Perikaryal and synaptic localization of alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor-like immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Aoki, C; Go, C G; Venkatesan, C; Kurose, H

    1994-07-11

    Through molecular cloning, the existence of three distinct subtypes of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors (alpha 2AR)--A, B and C--has been established and are referred to as alpha 2A AR, alpha 2B AR and alpha 2CAR. Due to limitations in pharmacological tools, it has been difficult to ascribe the role of each subtype to the central functions of alpha 2AR. In situ hybridization studies have provided valuable information regarding their distribution within brain. However, little is known about their subcellular distribution, and in particular, their pre- versus postsynaptic localization or their relation to noradrenergic neurons in the CNS. We used an antiserum that selectively recognizes the A-subtype of alpha 2AR to determine: (1) the regional distribution of the receptor within brains of rat and monkey; (2) the subcellular distribution of the receptor in locus coeruleus (LC) of rats and prefrontal cortex of monkeys; and (3) the ultrastructural relation of the receptor to noradrenergic processes in LC. Light microscopic immunocytochemistry revealed prominent immunoreactivity in LC, the brainstem regions modulating the baroreflex, the granule cell layer of the cerebellar cortex, the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus (PVN, SON), the basal ganglia, all thalamic nuclei, the hippocampal formation and throughout cerebral cortical areas. Comparison of results obtained from rat and monkey brains revealed no apparent interspecies-differences in the regional distribution of immunoreactivity. Immunoreactivity occurred as small puncta, less than 1 micron in diameter, that cluster over neuronal perikarya. Besides these puncta, cell bodies, proximal dendrites and fine varicose processes--most likely to be axonal--of the PVN and SON and the hippocampal granule cells also exhibited homogeneously intense distribution of immunoreactivity. Subcellularly, alpha 2AAR-ir in LC and prefrontal cortex were associated with synaptic and non-synaptic plasma membrane of

  6. Inhibitory effect of alpha-fetoprotein on the binding of myasthenia gravis antibody to acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, T; Beyth, Y; Abramsky, O

    1980-01-01

    The binding of myasthenia gravis antibody acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) as measured in vitro by Radioimmunoassay with 125I-labeled alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BuTx), can be blocked by amniotic fluid, maternal serum, and umbilical cord serum. This inhibitory effect is due to alpha-fetoprotein present in high concentrations in amniotic fluid and serum, as shown by: (i) selective removal of several components from amniotic fluid and serum; (ii) selective addition of different components present in amniotic fluid and serum, including alpha-fetoprotein, to be radioimmunoassay; (iii) correlation between the inhibitory effect of both amniotic fluid and serum and between the amounts of alpha-fetoprotein they contain; (iv) blocking of the alpha-fetoprotein in vitro suggests a similar effect in vivo in pregnant women with myasthenia gravis. This effect may explain in part the variability in the development of neonatal myasthenia gravis in the babies, due to transplacental transfer of maternal anti-AcChoR antibody, only after delivery and only in the minority of the cases. It also may explain the appearnace of remissions in females with myasthenia gravis during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Similar phenomena observed during pregnancy in other autoimmune and immunopathogenic diseases also might be attributed to activity of alpha-fetoprotein. PMID:6158053

  7. Structural Basis of Natural Promoter Recognition by a Unique Nuclear Receptor, HNF4[alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Peng; Rha, Geun Bae; Melikishvili, Manana; Wu, Guangteng; Adkins, Brandon C.; Fried, Michael G.; Chi, Young-In

    2010-11-09

    HNF4{alpha} (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha}) plays an essential role in the development and function of vertebrate organs, including hepatocytes and pancreatic {beta}-cells by regulating expression of multiple genes involved in organ development, nutrient transport, and diverse metabolic pathways. As such, HNF4{alpha} is a culprit gene product for a monogenic and dominantly inherited form of diabetes, known as maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). As a unique member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, HNF4{alpha} recognizes target genes containing two hexanucleotide direct repeat DNA-response elements separated by one base pair (DR1) by exclusively forming a cooperative homodimer. We describe here the 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of human HNF4{alpha} DNA binding domain in complex with a high affinity promoter element of another MODY gene, HNF1{alpha}, which reveals the molecular basis of unique target gene selection/recognition, DNA binding cooperativity, and dysfunction caused by diabetes-causing mutations. The predicted effects of MODY mutations have been tested by a set of biochemical and functional studies, which show that, in contrast to other MODY gene products, the subtle disruption of HNF4{alpha} molecular function can cause significant effects in afflicted MODY patients.

  8. Functional properties of an isolated. cap alpha beta. heterodimeric human placenta insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Feltz, S.M.; Swanson, M.L.; Wemmie, J.A.; Pessin, J.E.

    1988-05-03

    Treatment of human placenta membranes at pH 8.5 in the presence of 2.0 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) for 5 min, followed by the simultaneous removal of the DTT and pH adjustment of pH 7.6, resulted in the formation of a functional ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor complex from the native ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/ heterotetrameric disulfide-linked state. The membrane-bound ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric complex displayed similar curvilinear /sup 125/I-IGF-1 equilibrium binding compared to the ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/ heterotetrameric complex. /sup 125/I-IGF-1 binding to both the isolated ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/ heterotetrameric and ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric complexes demonstrated a marked straightening of the Scatchard plots, compared to the placenta membrane-bound IGF-1 receptors, with a 2-fold increase in the high-affinity binding component. IGF-1 stimulation of IGF-1 receptor autophosphorylation indicated that the ligand-dependent activation of ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric protein kinase activity occurred concomitant with the reassociation into a covalent ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/ heterotetrameric state. These data demonstrate that (i) a combination of alkaline pH and DTT treatment of human placenta membranes results in the formation of an ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric IGF-1 receptor complex, (ii) unlike the insulin receptor, high-affinity homogeneous IGF-1 binding occurs in both the ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/ heterotetrameric and ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric complexes, and (iii) IGF-1-dependent autophosphorylation of the ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimeric IGF-1 receptor complex correlates wit an IGF-1 dependent covalent reassociation into an ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta../sub 2/ heterotetrameric disulfide-linked state.

  9. Interaction between retinoid acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) in asthma.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Sääf, Annika; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Mandelin, Jami; Pietras, Christina Orsmark; Ezer, Sini; Karisola, Piia; Vendelin, Johanna; Gennäs, Gustav Boije af; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Alenius, Harri; von Mutius, Erika; Doekes, Gert; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Riedler, Josef; van Hage, Marianne; D'Amato, Mauro; Scheynius, Annika; Pershagen, Göran; Kere, Juha; Pulkkinen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Retinoid acid receptor-related Orphan Receptor Alpha (RORA) was recently identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma in a genome-wide association study. To investigate the impact of RORA on asthma susceptibility, we performed a genetic association study between RORA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vicinity of the asthma-associated SNP (rs11071559) and asthma-related traits. Because the regulatory region of a previously implicated asthma susceptibility gene, Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1), has predicted elements for RORA binding, we hypothesized that RORA may interact biologically and genetically with NPSR1. 37 RORA SNPs and eight NPSR1 SNPs were genotyped in the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE (2033 children) and the European cross-sectional PARSIFAL study (1120 children). Seven RORA SNPs confined into a 49 kb region were significantly associated with physician-diagnosed childhood asthma. The most significant association with rs7164773 (T/C) was driven by the CC genotype in asthma cases (OR = 2.0, 95%CI 1.36-2.93, p = 0.0003 in BAMSE; and 1.61, 1.18-2.19, p = 0.002 in the combined BAMSE-PARSIFAL datasets, respectively), and strikingly, the risk effect was dependent on the Gln344Arg mutation in NPSR1. In cell models, stimulation of NPSR1 activated a pathway including RORA and other circadian clock genes. Over-expression of RORA decreased NPSR1 promoter activity further suggesting a regulatory loop between these genes. In addition, Rora mRNA expression was lower in the lung tissue of Npsr1 deficient mice compared to wildtype littermates during the early hours of the light period. We conclude that RORA SNPs are associated with childhood asthma and show epistasis with NPSR1, and the interaction between RORA and NPSR1 may be of biological relevance. Combinations of common susceptibility alleles and less common functional polymorphisms may modify the joint risk effects on asthma susceptibility. PMID:23565190

  10. Deletion of Glutamate Delta-1 Receptor in Mouse Leads to Aberrant Emotional and Social Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Roopali; Gupta, Subhash C.; Hillman, Brandon G.; Bhatt, Jay M.; Stairs, Dustin J.; Dravid, Shashank M.

    2012-01-01

    The delta family of ionotropic glutamate receptors consists of glutamate δ1 (GluD1) and glutamate δ2 (GluD2) receptors. While the role of GluD2 in the regulation of cerebellar physiology is well understood, the function of GluD1 in the central nervous system remains elusive. We demonstrate for the first time that deletion of GluD1 leads to abnormal emotional and social behaviors. We found that GluD1 knockout mice (GluD1 KO) were hyperactive, manifested lower anxiety-like behavior, depression-like behavior in a forced swim test and robust aggression in the resident-intruder test. Chronic lithium rescued the depression-like behavior in GluD1 KO. GluD1 KO mice also manifested deficits in social interaction. In the sociability test, GluD1 KO mice spent more time interacting with an inanimate object compared to a conspecific mouse. D-Cycloserine (DCS) administration was able to rescue social interaction deficits observed in GluD1 KO mice. At a molecular level synaptoneurosome preparations revealed lower GluA1 and GluA2 subunit expression in the prefrontal cortex and higher GluA1, GluK2 and PSD95 expression in the amygdala of GluD1 KO. Moreover, DCS normalized the lower GluA1 expression in prefrontal cortex of GluD1 KO. We propose that deletion of GluD1 leads to aberrant circuitry in prefrontal cortex and amygdala owing to its potential role in presynaptic differentiation and synapse formation. Furthermore, these findings are in agreement with the human genetic studies suggesting a strong association of GRID1 gene with several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism spectrum disorders and major depressive disorder. PMID:22412961

  11. Interaction of 3,8-diazabicyclo (3.2.1) octanes with mu and delta opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Cignarella, G; Barlocco, D; Tranquillini, M E; Volterra, A; Brunello, N; Racagni, G

    1988-05-01

    A series of 3,8-diazabicyclo (3.2.1) octanes (DBO) (1) substituted at the nitrogen atoms by acyl and aralkenyl groups, were tested in in vitro binding assays towards mu and delta opioid receptors. The most representative terms (1a, 1d, 1g, 1j,) were also evaluated for the analgesic potency in vivo by the hot plate method. Among the compounds tested the most potent was the p.nitrocinnamyl DBO (1d) which displayed a mu/delta selectivity and an analgesic activity respectively 25 and 17 fold those of morphine. On the contrary, the m.hydroxycinnamyl DBO (1g) was markedly less active as agonist than the parent 1a, thus suggesting that structure 1 interacts with opioid receptors in a different fashion than morphine. Compound 1j isomer of 1a which is provided with high mu affinity, but lower analgesic potency, was found to possess a mixed agonist-antagonist activity.

  12. Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma: sinusal/sinusoidal localization of malignant cells expressing the T-cell receptor gamma delta.

    PubMed

    Farcet, J P; Gaulard, P; Marolleau, J P; Le Couedic, J P; Henni, T; Gourdin, M F; Divine, M; Haioun, C; Zafrani, S; Goossens, M

    1990-06-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas consist of a clinically heterogeneous group of malignant disorders whose immunophenotype usually corresponds to that of normal mature T cells. We describe and correlate the clinical, histopathologic, phenotypic, and genotypic findings in two patients with malignant lymphoma presenting with hepatosplenic disease. The morphologic pattern of lymphoma was that of a sinusal/sinusoidal infiltration in spleen, marrow, and liver. This morphologic characteristic was associated with the presence of a productive clonal rearrangement of the T-cell receptor (TCR) delta gene. Lymphoma cells expressed a CD3-TCR-gamma delta- phenotype. They were also double negative (ie, CD4-CD8-) and lacked the CD5 and CD7 antigens. In one patient, tumor progression was associated with phenotypic changes that resulted in a CD3-TCR-gamma delta- phenotype with the same delta-gene rearrangement as initially. These observations suggest the existence of a new type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma characterized by its hepatosplenic presentation, and by the sinusal/sinusoidal tropism and the TCR-gamma delta phenotype of the malignant cells. PMID:2140703

  13. T-cell receptor gamma/delta expressing acute leukemia emerging from sideroblastic anemia: morphological, immunological, and cytogenetic features.

    PubMed

    Meckenstock, G; Fonatsch, C; Heyll, A; Schneider, E M; Kögler, G; Söhngen, D; Aul, C; Schneider, W

    1992-01-01

    Striking numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities (-Y, +8, i(7q), del (10)(q24), and del (11)(q21)) were detected by cytogenetic analysis in a patient's bone marrow with morphological features of both acute lymphoblastic leukemia and myelodysplastic disorder. Surface marker analysis characterized blast cells to be CD2+ CD7+ CD3+ CD4- CD8- expressing gamma/delta-T-cell receptor antigen and coexpressing CD11b and CD16. Exhibiting an identical phenotype as the leukemic cells, a prominent gamma/delta-TCR+ lymphocyte population was found in the bone marrow as well as in the peripheral blood. Cells of the latter compartment coexpressed CD56 and HLA-DR antigens and exhibited nonspecific cytotoxic activity. In the bone marrow cells NSCA could be induced after stimulation with interleukin 2 in vitro. Morphological, immunological, and cytogenetic findings suggest that gamma/delta-T-ALL emerged from a myelodysplastic disorder after sequential steps of malignant transformation. Leukemic cells with "mixed lineage" character may provide evidence for a common progenitor cell in the bone marrow. Assuming that the leukemic cells represent the malignant counterpart of normal CD3+ gamma/delta-TCR+ cells the results may contribute to our understanding of the origin and differentiation as well as the possible steps of malignant transformation of a gamma/delta-TCR+ lymphocyte population.

  14. The presence of mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptors in human heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Sobanski, Piotr; Krajnik, Malgorzata; Shaqura, Mohammed; Bloch-Boguslawska, Elzbieta; Schäfer, Michael; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2014-11-01

    Functional evidence suggests that the stimulation of peripheral and central opioid receptors (ORs) is able to modulate heart function. Moreover, selective stimulation of either cardiac or central ORs evokes preconditioning and, therefore, protects the heart against ischemic injury. However, anatomic evidence for OR subtypes in the human heart is scarce. Human heart tissue obtained during autopsy after sudden death was examined immunohistochemically for mu- (MOR), kappa- (KOR), and delta- (DOR) OR subtypes. MOR and DOR immunoreactivity was found mainly in myocardial cells, as well as on sparse individual nerve fibers. KOR immunoreactivity was identified predominantly in myocardial cells and on intrinsic cardiac adrenergic (ICA) cell-like structures. Double immunofluorescence confocal microscopy revealed that DOR colocalized with the neuronal marker PGP9.5, as well as with the sensory neuron marker calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). CGRP-immunoreactive (IR) fibers were detected either in nerve bundles or as sparse individual fibers containing varicose-like structures. Our findings offer the first hint of an anatomic basis for the existence of OR subtypes in the human heart by demonstrating their presence in CGRP-IR sensory nerve fibers, small cells with an eccentric nucleus resembling ICA cells, and myocardial cells. Taken together, this suggests the role of opioids in both the neural transmission and regulation of myocardial cell function.

  15. Protecting motor networks during perinatal ischemia: the case for delta opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stephen M.; Freiberg, Sara M.

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal ischemia is a common clinical problem with few successful therapies to prevent neuronal damage. Delta-opioid receptor (DOR) activation is a versatile, evolutionarily-conserved, endogenous neuroprotective mechanism that blocks several steps in the deleterious cascade of neurological events during ischemia. DOR activation prior to ischemia or severe hypoxia is neuroprotective in spinal motor networks, as well as cortical, cerebellar, and hippocampal neural networks. In addition to providing acute and long-lasting neuroprotection against ischemia, DOR activation appears to provide neuroprotection when given before, during, or following the onset of ischemia. Finally, DORs can be upregulated by several physiological and experimental perturbations. Potential adverse side effects affecting motor control, such as respiratory depression and seizures, are not well established in young mammals and may be mitigated by altering drug choice and method of drug administration. The unique features of DOR-dependent neuroprotection make it an attractive potential therapy that may be given to at-risk pregnant mothers shortly before delivery to provide long-lasting neuroprotection against unpredictable perinatal ischemic events. PMID:20536941

  16. Alpha/sub 1/ receptor coupling events initiated by methoxy-substituted tolazoline partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, P.; Keung, A.; Deth, R.

    1986-03-01

    A series of mono- and dimethyoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives, known to be partial agonists at the alpha/sub 1/ receptor, were compared with the ..cap alpha../sub 1/ selective full agonist phenylephrine (PE) on isolated strips of rabbit aorta Agonist activity was evaluated in contraction, /sup 45/Ca influx, /sup 45/Ca efflux, and /sup 32/P-Phospholipid labelling studies. Maximum contractile responses for the 2-, 3-, and 3, 5- methoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives (10/sup -5/M) were 53.8, 67.6 and 99.7% of the PE (10/sup -5/M) response respectively. These same partial agonists caused a stimulation of /sup 45/Ca influx to the extent of 64, 86, and 95% of the PE response respectively. In /sup 45/Ca efflux studies, (a measure of the intracellular Ca/sup +2/ release) the tolazolines caused: 30%, 63%, and 78% of the PE stimulated level. /sup 32/P-Phosphatidic acid (PA) labelling was measured as an index of PI turnover after ..cap alpha../sub 1/ receptor stimulation. Compared to PE, the 2-, 3-, and 3,5- methoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives caused 22, 46, and 72% PA labelling. The above values are all in reasonable accord with the rank order or agonist activity shown in maximum contractile responses. The results of this investigation suggest that partial agonists stimulate ..cap alpha.. receptor coupling events at a level which is quantitatively comparable to their potencies in causing contraction of arterial smooth muscle.

  17. Monovalent cation and amiloride analog modulation of adrenergic ligand binding to the unglycosylated alpha 2B-adrenergic receptor subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.L.; Seibert, K.; Brandon, S.; Cragoe, E.J. Jr.; Limbird, L.E. )

    1991-04-01

    The unglycosylated alpha 2B subtype of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor found in NG-108-15 cells possesses allosteric regulation of adrenergic ligand binding by monovalent cations and 5-amino-substituted amiloride analogs. These findings demonstrate that allosteric modulation of adrenergic ligand binding is not a property unique to the alpha 2A subtype. The observation that amiloride analogs as well as monovalent cations can modulate adrenergic ligand binding to the nonglycosylated alpha 2B subtype indicates that charge shielding due to carbohydrate moieties does not play a role in this allosteric modulation but, rather, these regulatory effects result from interactions of cations and amiloride analogs with the protein moiety of the receptor. Furthermore, the observation that both alpha 2A and alpha 2B receptor subtypes are modulated by amiloride analogs suggests that structural domains that are conserved between the two are likely to be involved in this allosteric modulation.

  18. Characterization of the retina in the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Marci L.

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are involved in visual processing and are expressed by inner retinal neurons in all species studied to date (Keyser et al., 2000; Dmitrieva et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2009), but their distribution in the mouse retina remains unknown. Reductions in alpha7 nicotinic AChRs (nAChRs) are thought to contribute to memory and visual deficits observed in Alzheimer's and schizophrenia (Coyle et al., 1983; Nordberg et al., 1999; Leonard et al., 2006). However, the alpha7 nAChR knockout (KO) mouse has a mild phenotype (Paylor et al., 1998; Fernandes et al., 2006; Young et al., 2007; Origlia et al., 2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of AChRs in wildtype (WT) mouse retina and to assess whether up-regulation of other AChRs in the alpha7 nAChR KO retina may explain the minimal deficits described in the KO mouse. Reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) showed that mRNA transcripts for alpha2-7, alpha 9, alpha10, beta2-4 nAChR subunits and m1-m5 muscarinic AChR (mAChR) subtypes were present in WT murine retina. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of alpha3-5, alpha9, and m1-m5 AChR proteins and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated nAChR and mAChR proteins expressed by subsets of bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells. This is the first reported expression of alpha9 and alpha10 nAChR transcripts and alpha9 nAChR proteins in the retina of any species. Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) showed changes in AChR transcript expression in the alpha7 nAChR KO mouse retina relative to WT. Within whole retina alpha2, alpha9, alpha10, beta4, m1 and m4 AChR transcripts were up-regulated, while alpha5 nAChR transcripts were down-regulated. However, cell populations showed subtle differences; m4 mAChR transcripts were up-regulated in the ganglion cell layer and outer portion of the inner nuclear layer (oINL),while beta4 nAChR transcript up-regulation was limited to the oINL. Surprisingly, alpha2, alpha9, beta4, m2 and m4 transcripts were

  19. Interaction of nicotinic receptor affinity reagents with central nervous system. cap alpha. -bungarotoxin-binding entities

    SciTech Connect

    Lukas, R.J.; Bennett, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Membrane-bound ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin-binding entities derived from rat brain are found to interact specifically with the affinity reagents maleimidobenzyltrimethylammonium (MBTA) and bromoacetylcholine (BAC), originally designed to label nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from electroplax and skeletal muscle. Following treatment of membranes with dithiothreitol, all specific toxin binding sites are irreversibly blocked by reaction with MBTA or BAC. Affinity reagent labeling of dithiothreitol-reduced membranes is prevented (toxin binding sites are not blocked) by prior alkylaction with N-ethylmaleimide, by prior oxidation with dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), or by incubation with neurotoxin. Reversibly associating cholinergic agonists and antagonists retard the rate of affinity reagent interaction with toxin receptors. The apparent rates of affinity reagent alkylation of toxin receptors, and the influences of other sulfhydryl/disulfide reagents on affinity labeling are comparable to those observed for reaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the periphery. The results provide further evidence that central nervous system ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin receptors share a remarkable number of biochemical properties with nicotinic receptors from the periphery.

  20. Effect of extracellular pH on recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Mercik, Katarzyna; Pytel, Maria; Cherubini, Enrico; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-08-01

    Recently, we have reported that extracellular protons allosterically modulated neuronal GABA(A) receptors [Mozrzymas, J.W., Zarnowska, E.D., Pytel, M., Mercik, K., 2003a. Modulation of GABA(A) receptors by hydrogen ions reveals synaptic GABA transient and a crucial role of desensitiztion process. Journal of Neuroscience 23, 7981-7992]. However, GABAARs in neurons are heterogeneous and the effect of hydrogen ions depends on the receptor subtype. In particular, gamma2 subunit sets the receptor sensibility to several modulators including protons. However, the mechanisms whereby protons modulate gamma2-containing and gamma2-free GABAARs have not been fully elucidated. To this end, current responses to ultrafast GABA applications were recorded for alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 receptors at different pH values. For both receptor types, increase in pH induced a decrease in amplitudes of currents elicited by saturating [GABA] but this effect was stronger for alpha1beta2 receptors. In the case of alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, protons strongly affected the current time course due to a down regulation of binding and desensitization rates. This effect was qualitatively similar to that described in neurons. Protons strongly influenced the amplitude of alpha1beta2 receptor-mediated currents but the effect on their kinetics was weak suggesting a predominant direct non-competitive inhibition with a minor allosteric modulation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that extracellular protons strongly affect GABAA receptors and that, depending on the presence of the gamma2 subunit, the modulatory mechanisms show profound quantitative and qualitative differences.

  1. A discrepancy between platelet alpha 2-receptor density and functional circulatory changes in hypertensives

    SciTech Connect

    Mores, N.; Martire, M.; Pistritto, G.; Cardillo, C.; Folli, G. )

    1990-09-01

    To investigate whether differences exist in peripheral alpha 2-adrenoceptors between normotensive and hypertensive subjects, we determined platelet alpha 2-adrenoceptor density in 10 (7 males) untreated essential hypertensives (mean age of 51.1 years, range of 44-59 years) and in 10 age- and sex-matched normotensive controls. Moreover, in hypertensive patients, we examined the relationship between receptor density and cardiovascular reactivity to mental arithmetic, static handgrip, and bicycle exercise, to verify the hypothesis that alpha 2-adrenoceptors might play a role in modulation of hemodynamic response to sympathetic stimuli. alpha 2-Adrenoceptor density, as calculated by binding of (3H)yohimbine to platelets, was significantly higher in essential hypertensives (314.8 +/- 38.7 fmol/mg) than in normotensive subjects (213.6 +/- 34.7 fmol/mg) (p less than 0.05), whereas receptor affinity was similar in both groups (4.0 +/- 0.5 nM hypertensives, 4.3 +/- 0.5 nM normotensives; p greater than 0.05). Mental arithmetic increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) by 21.5% from basal values and heart rate (HR) by 13.2%. During isometric exercise, MAP increased by 38.1% and HR by 24.7%, while during bicycle ergometry, mean increases in MAP and HR from baseline were of 27.2 and 54.3%, respectively. No correlation was found between platelet alpha 2-adrenoceptor density and percent changes in MAP induced by all tests, or between adrenoceptors and absolute basal and peak MAP values. Our findings suggest that in hypertensive patients, peripheral alpha 2-adrenoceptors are increased with respect to matched normotensives, but these receptors seem not to be involved in the modulation of cardiovascular adaptation to enhanced sympathetic activity.

  2. Activation of the recombinant human alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor significantly raises intracellular free calcium.

    PubMed

    Delbono, O; Gopalakrishnan, M; Renganathan, M; Monteggia, L M; Messi, M L; Sullivan, J P

    1997-01-01

    The alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype, unlike other neuronal nicotinic receptors, exhibits a relatively high permeability to Ca++ ions. Although Ca++ entry through this receptor subtype has been implicated in various Ca(++)-dependent processes in the central nervous system, little is known about how this receptor modulates mammalian intracellular Ca++ dynamics. Intracellular Ca++ responses evoked by activation of the human alpha 7 nAChRs stably expressed in HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney) cells were studied. Inward current and intracellular Ca++ transients were recorded simultaneously in response to a fast drug application system. Current recordings under whole-cell voltage-clamp and fast ratiometric intracellular Ca++ imaging acquisition were synchronized to drug pulses. The mean peak [Ca++]i observed with 100 microM (-)-nicotine was 356 +/- 48 nM (n = 8). The magnitude of the intracellular Ca++ elevation corresponds to a 20% fractional current carried by Ca++ ions. The EC50 of the intracellular Ca++ responses for (-)-nicotine, (+/-)-epibatidine, 1,1 dimethyl-4-phenyl-piperazinium and acetylcholine were 51, 3.5, 75 and 108 microM, respectively. These EC50 values strongly correlate with those recorded for the cationic inward current through alpha 7 nAChR. alpha-Bungarotoxin, methyllcaconitine or extracellular Ca++ chelation ablated (-)-nicotine-evoked increase in intracellular Ca++ concentration. This study provides evidence that cation influx through the human alpha 7 nAChR is sufficient to mediate a significant, transient, rise in intracellular Ca++ concentration.

  3. Relationship between alpha-1 receptors and cations in rat liver plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of cations on binding of (/sup 3/H)-prazosin (PRZ), an alpha-1 specific antagonist, to alpha receptor sites in rat liver plasma membranes was examined. All cations tested were able to produce dose-dependent shifts to lower affinity binding sites for PRZ. The maximum number of binding sites was also observed to be altered. Inclusion of cations resulted in a slower observed rate constant for association as well as a delay in the dissociation of specifically bound PRZ following the addition of phentolamine. In contrast, the ability of (-)-norepinephrine to displace PRZ was enhanced by the addition of cations. The influence of alpha-1 receptor stimulation on Na/sup +//K/sup +/-ATPase activity in rat liver was examined by two methods - rat liver plasma membrane Na/sup +//K/sup +/-ATPase activity following liver perfusion in situ and /sup 86/Tb uptake in rat liver slices. The activity of the Na/sup +/ pump was found to be biphasic following exposure to phenylephrine (PE), an alpha-1 agonist. Stimulation (35%) was present over the first two minutes, while activity was inhibited over the interval of 5 to 10 minutes of continued PE exposure. Both phases were blocked by prazosin. The influence of DAG and protein kinase C (PKC) in alpha-1 receptor modulation of the Na/sup +/ pump was studied by employing 4-beta-phorbol (PMA), a phorbol ester which activates PKC. Perfusion of livers with PMA in situ or incubation with slices yielded inhibition of ATPase activity in membranes and /sup 86/Rb uptake in that was qualitatively and quantitatively similar to PE. These results suggest cations may influence receptor function in vivo and in vitro and the inhibitory effects of PE on the sodium pump may be mediated through PKC.

  4. Reductive dechlorination of alpha-, beta-, delta-, and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane isomers by hydroxocobalamin in the presence of either dithiothreitol or titanium(III) citrate as reducing agents.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Garrido, B; Arbestain, M Camps; Monterroso, M C; Macías, F

    2004-10-01

    The effect of the reducing potential on the reductive dehalogenation of the different HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane) isomers has not yet been studied. In the present study, the potential for dehalogenation of (alpha-, beta-, delta-, and gamma-HCH isomers by the dithiothreitol (DTT) and titanium(III) citrate (reducing potential at pH 7, -0.33 and -0.48 V, respectively), with and without the addition of hydroxocobalamin was investigated. In the presence of DTT without catalyst, there was no disappearance of any of the HCH isomers studied after 1 h of treatment. However, disappearance of the gamma- and alpha-HCH isomers was observed during the same time period when titanium(III) citrate was used as the reductant in the absence of catalyst (62.9 and 16.6% disappearance, respectively). Addition of the hydroxocobalamin to the DTT system favored mainly the disappearance of gamma- and alpha-HCH (92.9 and 30.8% disappearance after 1 h, respectively); disappearance of delta-HCH and beta-HCH was small (11.9%) or negligible, respectively. Addition of the hydroxocobalamin to the titanium(III) citrate system favored the degradation of all HCH isomers under study: beta- and alpha-HCH completely disappeared to undetectable levels (<0.1%) after 1 and 2 min, respectively; degradation of delta-HCH and beta-HCH was slower than that of the other two isomers, although they had almost completely disappeared (99.9 and 99.6% disappearance, respectively) after 10 and 60 min, respectively. The order of disappearance, gamma-HCH > alpha-HCH > delta-HCH > beta-HCH, coincided with a decreasing order of the axially positioned Cl atoms of these isomers (considering their thermodynamically most stable configuration). This study is the first description of the rapid degradation of delta- and beta-HCH under abiotic conditions, and the results demonstrate the effect of the reducing potential on the reductive dehalogenation of HCH isomers. PMID:15506197

  5. Presynaptic targeting of alpha4beta 2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is regulated by neurexin-1beta.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Bin; Amici, Stephanie A; Ren, Xiao-Qin; McKay, Susan B; Treuil, Magdalen W; Lindstrom, Jon M; Rao, Jayaraman; Anand, Rene

    2009-08-28

    The mechanisms involved in the targeting of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), critical for their functional organization at neuronal synapses, are not well understood. We have identified a novel functional association between alpha4beta2 AChRs and the presynaptic cell adhesion molecule, neurexin-1beta. In non-neuronal tsA 201 cells, recombinant neurexin-1beta and mature alpha4beta2 AChRs form complexes. alpha4beta2 AChRs and neurexin-1beta also coimmunoprecipitate from rat brain lysates. When exogenous alpha4beta2 AChRs and neurexin-1beta are coexpressed in hippocampal neurons, they are robustly targeted to hemi-synapses formed between these neurons and cocultured tsA 201 cells expressing neuroligin-1, a postsynaptic binding partner of neurexin-1beta. The extent of synaptic targeting is significantly reduced in similar experiments using a mutant neurexin-1beta lacking the extracellular domain. Additionally, when alpha4beta2 AChRs, alpha7 AChRs, and neurexin-1beta are coexpressed in the same neuron, only the alpha4beta2 AChR colocalizes with neurexin-1beta at presynaptic terminals. Collectively, these data suggest that neurexin-1beta targets alpha4beta2 AChRs to presynaptic terminals, which mature by trans-synaptic interactions between neurexins and neuroligins. Interestingly, human neurexin-1 gene dysfunctions have been implicated in nicotine dependence and in autism spectrum disorders. Our results provide novel insights as to possible mechanisms by which dysfunctional neurexins, through downstream effects on alpha4beta2 AChRs, may contribute to the etiology of these neurological disorders.

  6. Effects of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} on human melanocytes and regulation of the FP receptor by ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Glynis . E-mail: Glynis_Scott@urmc.rochester.edu; Jacobs, Stacey; Leopardi, Sonya; Anthony, Frank A.; Learn, Doug; Malaviya, Rama; Pentland, Alice

    2005-04-01

    Prostaglandins are potent lipid hormones that activate multiple signaling pathways resulting in regulation of cellular growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In the skin, prostaglandins are rapidly released by keratinocytes following ultraviolet radiation and are chronically present in inflammatory skin lesions. We have shown previously that melanocytes, which provide photoprotection to keratinocytes through the production of melanin, express several receptors for prostaglandins, including the PGE{sub 2} receptors EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} and the PGF{sub 2{alpha}} receptor FP, and that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} stimulates melanocyte dendricity. We now show that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} stimulates the activity and expression of tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis. Analysis of FP receptor regulation showed that the FP receptor is regulated by ultraviolet radiation in melanocytes in vitro and in human skin in vivo. We also show that ultraviolet irradiation stimulates production of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} by melanocytes. These results show that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} binding to the FP receptor activates signals that stimulate a differentiated phenotype (dendricity and pigmentation) in melanocytes. The regulation of the FP receptor and the stimulation of production of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} in melanocytes in response to ultraviolet radiation suggest that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} could act as an autocrine factor for melanocyte differentiation.

  7. Catalposide is a natural agonistic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji Hae; Jun, Hee-jin; Hoang, Minh-Hien; Jia, Yaoyao; Han, Xiang Hua; Lee, Dong-Ho; Lee, Hak-Ju; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposide is a novel ligand for PPAR{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell stimulated with catalposide improved fatty acid uptake, regulated target genes in fatty acid {beta}-oxidation and synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposdie reduces hepatic triacylglycerides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theses demonstrate catalposide could ameliorate hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes related to cellular lipid uptake and oxidation. Thus, PPAR{alpha} agonists may be important in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. In this study, we demonstrated that catalposide is a novel natural PPAR{alpha} agonist, identified from reporter gene assay-based activity screening with approximately 900 natural plant and seaweed extracts. Results of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses suggested that the compound interacted directly with the ligand-binding domain of PPAR{alpha}. Cultured hepatocytes stimulated with catalposide exhibited significantly reduced cellular triglyceride concentrations, by 21%, while cellular uptake of fatty acids was increased, by 70% (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the increase in cellular fatty acid uptake was due to upregulation of fatty acid transporter protein-4 (+19% vs. the control) in cells stimulated with catalposide. Additionally, expression of genes related to fatty acid oxidation and high-density lipoprotein metabolism were upregulated, while that of genes related to fatty acid synthesis were suppressed. In conclusion, catalposide is hypolipidemic by activation of PPAR{alpha} via a ligand-mediated mechanism that modulates the expression of in lipid metabolism genes in hepatocytes.

  8. Archaeal translation initiation revisited: the initiation factor 2 and eukaryotic initiation factor 2B alpha-beta-delta subunit families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Woese, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    As the amount of available sequence data increases, it becomes apparent that our understanding of translation initiation is far from comprehensive and that prior conclusions concerning the origin of the process are wrong. Contrary to earlier conclusions, key elements of translation initiation originated at the Universal Ancestor stage, for homologous counterparts exist in all three primary taxa. Herein, we explore the evolutionary relationships among the components of bacterial initiation factor 2 (IF-2) and eukaryotic IF-2 (eIF-2)/eIF-2B, i.e., the initiation factors involved in introducing the initiator tRNA into the translation mechanism and performing the first step in the peptide chain elongation cycle. All Archaea appear to posses a fully functional eIF-2 molecule, but they lack the associated GTP recycling function, eIF-2B (a five-subunit molecule). Yet, the Archaea do posses members of the gene family defined by the (related) eIF-2B subunits alpha, beta, and delta, although these are not specifically related to any of the three eukaryotic subunits. Additional members of this family also occur in some (but by no means all) Bacteria and even in some eukaryotes. The functional significance of the other members of this family is unclear and requires experimental resolution. Similarly, the occurrence of bacterial IF-2-like molecules in all Archaea and in some eukaryotes further complicates the picture of translation initiation. Overall, these data lend further support to the suggestion that the rudiments of translation initiation were present at the Universal Ancestor stage.

  9. Exposure assessment to alpha- and beta-pinene, delta(3)-carene and wood dust in industrial production of wood pellets.

    PubMed

    Edman, K; Lofstedt, H; Berg, P; Eriksson, K; Axelsson, S; Bryngelsson, I; Fedeli, C

    2003-04-01

    The main aim of the study was to measure the exposure to monoterpenes (alpha- and beta-pinene and Delta(3)-carene) and wood dust during industrial production of wood pellets and briquettes. Additional aims were to compare the results from wood dust sampled on a filter with real time measurements using a direct reading instrument and to identify peak exposures to dust. Twenty-four men working at six companies involved in industrial production of wood pellets and briquettes participated in the study. Monoterpenes were measured by diffusive sampling and wood dust was measured as total dust. A data logger (DataRAM) was used for continuous monitoring of dust concentration for 18 of the participants. The sampling time was approximately 8 h. The personal exposure to monoterpenes ranged from 0.64 to 28 mg/m(3) and a statistically significant (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.0002) difference in levels of monoterpenes for workers at different companies was seen. In the companies the personal exposure to wood dust varied between 0.16 and 19 mg/m(3) and for 10 participants the levels exceeded the present Swedish occupational exposure limit (OEL) of 2 mg/m(3). The levels of wood dust during the morning shift were significantly (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.04) higher compared with the afternoon shift. Continuous registration of dust concentration showed peak values for several working operations, especially cleaning of truck engines with compressed air. For 24 workers in six companies involved in industrial production of wood pellets the personal exposure to monoterpenes was low and to wood dust high compared with the present Swedish OEL and previous studies in Swedish wood industries. Since the DataRAM can identify critical working tasks with high wood dust exposure a reduction in exposure levels could probably be achieved by changes in working routines and by the use of protective equipment.

  10. Phytol directly activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) and regulates gene expression involved in lipid metabolism in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kato, Sota; Egawa, Kahori; Ebisu, Shogo; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Fushiki, Tohru; Kawada, Teruo . E-mail: fat@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-11-18

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is one of the indispensable transcription factors for regulating lipid metabolism in various tissues. In our screening for natural compounds that activate PPAR using luciferase assays, a branched-carbon-chain alcohol (a component of chlorophylls), phytol, has been identified as a PPAR{alpha}-specific activator. Phytol induced the increase in PPAR{alpha}-dependent luciferase activity and the degree of in vitro binding of a coactivator, SRC-1, to GST-PPAR{alpha}. Moreover, the addition of phytol upregulated the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes at both mRNA and protein levels in PPAR{alpha}-expressing HepG2 hepatocytes. These findings indicate that phytol is functional as a PPAR{alpha} ligand and that it stimulates the expression of PPAR{alpha}-target genes in intact cells. Because PPAR{alpha} activation enhances circulating lipid clearance, phytol may be important in managing abnormalities in lipid metabolism.

  11. Human cytomegalovirus infection inhibits tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) signaling by targeting the 55-kilodalton TNF-alpha receptor.

    PubMed

    Baillie, J; Sahlender, D A; Sinclair, J H

    2003-06-01

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in complex interactions between viral and cellular factors which perturb many cellular functions. HCMV is known to target the cell cycle, cellular transcription, and immunoregulation, and it is believed that this optimizes the cellular environment for viral DNA replication during productive infection or during carriage in the latently infected host. Here, we show that HCMV infection also prevents external signaling to the cell by disrupting the function of TNFRI, the 55-kDa receptor for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), one of the receptors for a potent cytokine involved in eliciting a wide spectrum of cellular responses, including antiviral responses. HCMV infection of fully permissive differentiated monocytic cell lines and U373 cells resulted in a reduction in cell surface expression of TNFRI. The reduction appeared to be due to relocalization of TNFRI from the cell surface and was reflected in the elimination of TNF-alpha-induced Jun kinase activity. Analysis of specific phases of infection suggested that viral early gene products were responsible for this relocalization. However, a mutant HCMV in which all viral gene products known to be involved in down-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I were deleted still resulted in relocalization of TNFRI. Consequently, TNFRI relocalization by HCMV appears to be mediated by a novel viral early function not involved in down-regulation of cell surface MHC class I expression. We suggest that upon infection, HCMV isolates the cell from host-mediated signals, forcing the cell to respond only to virus-specific signals which optimize the cell for virus production and effect proviral responses from bystander cells.

  12. ERK phosphorylation in intact, adult brain by alpha(2)-adrenergic transactivation of EGF receptors.

    PubMed

    Du, Ting; Li, Baoman; Liu, Shufang; Zang, Peizhuo; Prevot, Vincent; Hertz, Leif; Peng, Liang

    2009-12-01

    Our previous work demonstrated dexmedetomidine-activated phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK(1/2)) in primary cultures of mouse astrocytes and showed that it is evoked by alpha(2)-adrenoceptor-mediated transactivation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors, a known response to activation of G(i/o)- or G(q)-coupled receptors [Li, B., Du, T., Li, H., Gu, L., Zhang, H., Huang, J., Hertz, L., Peng, L., 2008a. Signaling pathways for transactivation by dexmedetomidine of epidermal growth factor receptors in astrocytes and its paracrine effect on neurons. Br. J. Pharmacol. 154, 191-203]. Like most studies of transactivation, that study used cultured cells, raising the question whether a similar effect can be demonstrated in intact brain tissue and the brain in vivo. In the present study we have shown that (i) dexmedetomidine-mediated ERK(1/2) phosphorylation occurs in mouse brain slices with a similar concentration dependence as in cultured astrocytes (near-maximum effect at 50nM); (ii) intraperitoneal injection of dexmedetomidine (3microg/kg) in adult mice causes rapid phosphorylation of the EGF receptor (at Y845 and Y992) and of ERK(1/2) in the brain; (iii) both EGF receptor and ERK(1/2) phosphorylation are inhibited by intraventricular administration of (a) AG 1478, a specific inhibitor of the receptor-tyrosine kinase of the EGF receptor; (b) GM 6001, an inhibitor of metalloproteinase(s) required for release of EGF receptor agonists from membrane-bound precursors; or (c) heparin, neutralizing heparin-binding EGF (HB-EGF). Thus, in intact brain HB-EGF, known to be expressed in brain, may be the major EGF agonist released in response to stimulation of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors, the released agonist(s) activate(s) EGF receptors, and ERK(1/2) is phosphorylated as a conventional response to EGF receptor activation. Our previous paper (see above) showed that dexmedetomidine evokes no ERK(1/2) phosphorylation in cultured neurons, but neurons

  13. Description of two new alpha variants: Hb Canuts [alpha85(F6)Asp-->His (alpha1)] and Hb Ambroise Pare [alpha117(GH5)Phe-->Ile (alpha2)]; two new beta variants: Hb Beaujolais [beta84(EF8)Thr-->Asn] and Hb Monplaisir [beta147 (Tyr-Lys-Leu-Ala-Phe-Phe-Leu-Leu-Ser-Asn-Phe-Tyr-158-COOH)] and one new delta variant: Hb (A2)North Africa [delta59(E3)Lys-->Met].

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Bererd, Martine; Garcia, Caroline; Zanella-Cleon, Isabelle; Becchi, Michel; Aubry, Martine; Couprie, Nicole; Francina, Alain

    2009-01-01

    We present here five new hemoglobin (Hb) variants which have been identified during routine Hb analysis before their genotypic characterization. Four of these result from a classical missense mutation: Hb Canuts [alpha85(F6)Asp-->His (alpha1)], Hb Ambroise Pare [alpha117(GH5)Phe-->Ile (alpha2)], Hb Beaujolais [beta84(EF8)Thr-->Asn] and HbA(2)-North Africa [delta59(E3)Lys-->Met]. The last one, Hb Monplaisir [beta147 (Tyr-Lys-Leu-Ala-Phe-Phe-Leu-Leu-Ser-Asn-Phe-Tyr-158-COOH)], results from a frameshift mutation at the stop codon of the beta-globin gene which leads to a modified C-terminal sequence in the beta-globin chain. None of these variants seem to have a particular clinical expression in the heterozygous state. The circumstances of the discovery of these five new Hb variants emphasize the fact that an association of techniques is necessary for a complete screening of Hb variants during routine Hb analysis. Globin chain separation by reversed phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) appears to be the most relevant method.

  14. The estrogen receptor alpha nuclear localization sequence is critical for fulvestrant-induced degradation of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Casa, Angelo J; Hochbaum, Daniel; Sreekumar, Sreeja; Oesterreich, Steffi; Lee, Adrian V

    2015-11-01

    Fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor down-regulator (SERD) is a pure competitive antagonist of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Fulvestrant binds ERα and reduces the receptor's half-life by increasing protein turnover, however, its mechanism of action is not fully understood. In this study, we show that removal of the ERα nuclear localization sequence (ERΔNLS) resulted in a predominantly cytoplasmic ERα that was degraded in response to 17-β-estradiol (E2) but was resistant to degradation by fulvestrant. ERΔNLS bound the ligands and exhibited receptor interaction similar to ERα, indicating that the lack of degradation was not due to disruption of these processes. Forcing ERΔNLS into the nucleus with a heterologous SV40-NLS did not restore degradation, suggesting that the NLS domain itself, and not merely receptor localization, is critical for fulvestrant-induced ERα degradation. Indeed, cloning of the endogenous ERα NLS onto the N-terminus of ERΔNLS significantly restored both its nuclear localization and turnover in response to fulvestrant. Moreover, mutation of the sumoylation targets K266 and K268 within the NLS impaired fulvestrant-induced ERα degradation. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the unique role of the ERα NLS in fulvestrant-induced degradation of the receptor.

  15. Sequence of a functional invertebrate GABAA receptor subunit which can form a chimeric receptor with a vertebrate alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R J; Vreugdenhil, E; Zaman, S H; Bhandal, N S; Usherwood, P N; Barnard, E A; Darlison, M G

    1991-01-01

    The sequence of an invertebrate GABAA receptor subunit is described. This was deduced from a cDNA which was isolated from the mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis and which corresponds to a transcript of extremely low abundance. The cDNA was isolated using short exonic sequences from part of the corresponding gene in combination with a variant of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) known as RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends). The mature polypeptide has a predicted molecular weight of 54,569 Daltons and exhibits approximately 50% identity to vertebrate GABAA receptor beta subunits. The six intron-exon boundaries determined to date in the molluscan gene occur at the same relative positions as those found in vertebrate GABAA receptor genes. Functional expression, in Xenopus oocytes, of the molluscan cDNA alone results in the formation of GABA-activated chloride ion channels that have a finite open probability even in the absence of agonist. These GABA-evoked currents can be reversibly blocked by the vertebrate GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. Surprisingly, the molluscan beta subunit is capable of replacing vertebrate beta subunits in co-expression experiments with the bovine GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit. These findings suggest that invertebrate GABAA receptors exist in vivo as hetero-oligomeric complexes. PMID:1655414

  16. Functional characteristics of alpha adrenergic and endothelinergic receptors in pressurized rat mesenteric veins.

    PubMed

    Enouri, Saad; Monteith, Gabrielle; Johnson, Ron

    2013-07-01

    Increasing transmural pressure can alter the functional role of post-junctional receptor subtypes. Under conditions of changing transmural pressure, we investigated the relative contributions of alpha adrenergic (α-ARs) and endothelinergic receptors to norepinephrine (NE) and endothelin (ET-1) contractile responses, respectively, in third-order rat mesenteric small veins (MSV) and arteries (MSA). NE, phenylephrine (PE), clonidine, and ET-1 concentration-response curves were constructed in the absence and presence of α-adrenergic and ET-1 receptor antagonists, respectively. MSV were more sensitive to NE, PE, and ET-1 compared with MSA. The sensitivity of MSV to NE was higher than that to PE. Phentolamine (α1-AR/α2-AR antagonist) and prazosin (α1-AR antagonist) completely abolished NE responses. Yohimbine (α2-AR antagonist) reduced NE and clonidine contractile responses in MSV. Clonidine contractile responses were reduced by prazosin in MSA. In MSA and MSV, BQ-610 (ET(A) receptor antagonist) but not BQ-788 (ET(B) receptor antagonist) reduced ET-1 contractile responses. Combined application of BQ-610 and BQ-788 caused further reduction in ET-1 concentration-response curves obtained in MSV. These results suggest that in addition to α1-ARs and ET(A) receptors, α2-ARs and ET(B) receptors also mediate NE and ET-1 contractile responses in MSV, respectively, with no change in the participation of these receptors as transmural pressure is increased.

  17. Alpha-Bulges in G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    van der Kant, Rob; Vriend, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Agonist binding is related to a series of motions in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that result in the separation of transmembrane helices III and VI at their cytosolic ends and subsequent G protein binding. A large number of smaller motions also seem to be associated with activation. Most helices in GPCRs are highly irregular and often contain kinks, with extensive literature already available about the role of prolines in kink formation and the precise function of these kinks. GPCR transmembrane helices also contain many α-bulges. In this article we aim to draw attention to the role of these α-bulges in ligand and G-protein binding, as well as their role in several aspects of the mobility associated with GPCR activation. This mobility includes regularization and translation of helix III in the extracellular direction, a rotation of the entire helix VI, an inward movement of the helices near the extracellular side, and a concerted motion of the cytosolic ends of the helices that makes their orientation appear more circular and that opens up space for the G protein to bind. In several cases, α-bulges either appear or disappear as part of the activation process. PMID:24806342

  18. Folate Receptor Targeted Alpha-Therapy Using Terbium-149

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Cristina; Reber, Josefine; Haller, Stephanie; Dorrer, Holger; Köster, Ulli; Johnston, Karl; Zhernosekov, Konstantin; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Terbium-149 is among the most interesting therapeutic nuclides for medical applications. It decays by emission of short-range α-particles (Eα = 3.967 MeV) with a half-life of 4.12 h. The goal of this study was to investigate the anticancer efficacy of a 149Tb-labeled DOTA-folate conjugate (cm09) using folate receptor (FR)-positive cancer cells in vitro and in tumor-bearing mice. 149Tb was produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. Radiolabeling of cm09 with purified 149Tb resulted in a specific activity of ~1.2 MBq/nmol. In vitro assays performed with 149Tb-cm09 revealed a reduced KB cell viability in a FR-specific and activity concentration-dependent manner. Tumor-bearing mice were injected with saline only (group A) or with 149Tb-cm09 (group B: 2.2 MBq; group C: 3.0 MBq). A significant tumor growth delay was found in treated animals resulting in an increased average survival time of mice which received 149Tb-cm09 (B: 30.5 d; C: 43 d) compared to untreated controls (A: 21 d). Analysis of blood parameters revealed no signs of acute toxicity to the kidneys or liver in treated mice over the time of investigation. These results demonstrated the potential of folate-based α-radionuclide therapy in tumor-bearing mice. PMID:24633429

  19. Retinoid X receptor alpha controls innate inflammatory responses through the up-regulation of chemokine expression.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Vanessa; Alameda, Daniel; Rico, Daniel; Mota, Rubén; Gonzalo, Pilar; Cedenilla, Marta; Fischer, Thierry; Boscá, Lisardo; Glass, Christopher K; Arroyo, Alicia G; Ricote, Mercedes

    2010-06-01

    The retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha) plays a central role in the regulation of many intracellular receptor signaling pathways and can mediate ligand-dependent transcription by forming homodimers or heterodimers with other nuclear receptors. Although several members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily have emerged as important regulators of macrophage gene expression, the existence in vivo of an RXR signaling pathway in macrophages has not been established. Here, we provide evidence that RXRalpha regulates the transcription of the chemokines Ccl6 and Ccl9 in macrophages independently of heterodimeric partners. Mice lacking RXRalpha in myeloid cells exhibit reduced levels of CCL6 and CCL9, impaired recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation, and lower susceptibility to sepsis. These studies demonstrate that macrophage RXRalpha plays key roles in the regulation of innate immunity and represents a potential target for immunotherapy of sepsis.

  20. Alpha2A adrenergic receptor activation inhibits epileptiform activity in the rat hippocampal CA3 region.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Chris W D; Hammad, Hana M; Lichter, Jessica A; Boese, Sarah J; Nelson, Brian W; Goldenstein, Brianna L; Davis, Kylie L; Xu, Ke; Hillman, Kristin L; Porter, James E; Doze, Van A

    2007-06-01

    Norepinephrine has potent antiepileptic properties, the pharmacology of which is unclear. Under conditions in which GABAergic inhibition is blocked, norepinephrine reduces hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) epileptiform activity through alpha(2) adrenergic receptor (AR) activation on pyramidal cells. In this study, we investigated which alpha(2)AR subtype(s) mediates this effect. First, alpha(2)AR genomic expression patterns of 25 rat CA3 pyramidal cells were determined using real-time single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, demonstrating that 12 cells expressed alpha(2A)AR transcript; 3 of the 12 cells additionally expressed mRNA for alpha(2C)AR subtype and no cells possessing alpha(2B)AR mRNA. Hippocampal CA3 epileptiform activity was then examined using field potential recordings in brain slices. The selective alphaAR agonist 6-fluoronorepinephrine caused a reduction of CA3 epileptiform activity, as measured by decreased frequency of spontaneous epileptiform bursts. In the presence of betaAR blockade, concentration-response curves for AR agonists suggest that an alpha(2)AR mediates this response, as the rank order of potency was 5-bromo-N-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-quinoxalinamine (UK-14304) >or= epinephrine >6-fluoronorepinephrine > norepinephrine > phenylephrine. Finally, equilibrium dissociation constants (K(b)) of selective alphaAR antagonists were functionally determined to confirm the specific alpha(2)AR subtype inhibiting CA3 epileptiform activity. Apparent K(b) values calculated for atipamezole (1.7 nM), MK-912 (4.8 nM), BRL-44408 (15 nM), yohimbine (63 nM), ARC-239 (540 nM), prazosin (4900 nM), and terazosin (5000 nM) correlated best with affinities previously determined for the alpha(2A)AR subtype (r = 0.99, slope = 1.0). These results suggest that, under conditions of impaired GABAergic inhibition, activation of alpha(2A)ARs is primarily responsible for the antiepileptic actions of norepinephrine in the rat hippocampal CA3

  1. Prothymosin alpha selectively enhances estrogen receptor transcriptional activity by interacting with a repressor of estrogen receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Martini, P G; Delage-Mourroux, R; Kraichely, D M; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    2000-09-01

    We find that prothymosin alpha (PTalpha) selectively enhances transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor (ER) but not transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors. This selectivity for ER is explained by PTalpha interaction not with ER, but with a 37-kDa protein denoted REA, for repressor of estrogen receptor activity, a protein that we have previously shown binds to ER, blocking coactivator binding to ER. We isolated PTalpha, known to be a chromatin-remodeling protein associated with cell proliferation, using REA as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a cDNA library from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. PTalpha increases the magnitude of ERalpha transcriptional activity three- to fourfold. It shows lesser enhancement of ERbeta transcriptional activity and has no influence on the transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors (progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor, or retinoic acid receptor) or on the basal activity of ERs. In contrast, the steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 increases transcriptional activity of all of these receptors. Cotransfection of PTalpha or SRC-1 with increasing amounts of REA, as well as competitive glutathione S-transferase pulldown and mammalian two-hybrid studies, show that REA competes with PTalpha (or SRC-1) for regulation of ER transcriptional activity and suppresses the ER stimulation by PTalpha or SRC-1, indicating that REA can function as an anticoactivator in cells. Our data support a model in which PTalpha, which does not interact with ER, selectively enhances the transcriptional activity of the ER but not that of other nuclear receptors by recruiting the repressive REA protein away from ER, thereby allowing effective coactivation of ER with SRC-1 or other coregulators. The ability of PTalpha to directly interact in vitro and in vivo with REA, a selective coregulator of the ER, thereby enabling the interaction of ER with coactivators, appears to explain

  2. The role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{beta}/{delta} in epidermal growth factor-induced HaCaT cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Pengfei; Jiang Bimei; Yang Xinghua; Xiao Xianzhong Huang Xu; Long Jianhong; Zhang Pihong; Zhang Minghua; Xiao Muzhang; Xie Tinghong; Huang Xiaoyuan

    2008-10-15

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to be a potent mitogen for epidermal cells both in vitro and in vivo, thus contributing to the development of an organism. It has recently become clear that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{beta}/{delta} (PPAR{beta}/{delta}) expression and activation is involved in the cell proliferation. However, little is known about the role of PPAR{beta}/{delta} in EGF-induced proliferation of HaCaT keratinocytes. In this study, HaCaT cells were cultured in the presence and absence of EGF and we identified that EGF induced an increase of PPAR{beta}/{delta} mRNA and protein level expression in time-dependent and dose-dependent manner, and AG1487, an EGF receptor (EGFR) special inhibitor, caused attenuation of PPAR{beta}/{delta} protein expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed that EGF significantly increased PPAR{beta}/{delta} binding activity in HaCaT keratinocytes. Antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (asODNs) against PPAR{beta}/{delta} caused selectively inhibition of PPAR{beta}/{delta} protein content induced by EGF and significantly attenuated EGF-mediated cell proliferation. Treatment of the cells with L165041, a specific synthetic ligand for PPAR{beta}/{delta}, significantly enhanced EGF-mediated cell proliferation. Finally, c-Jun ablation inhibited PPAR{beta}/{delta} up-regulation induced by EGF, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) showed that c-Jun bound to the PPAR{beta}/{delta} promoter and the binding increased in EGF-stimulated cells. These results demonstrate that EGF induces PPAR{beta}/{delta} expression in a c-Jun-dependent manner and PPAR{beta}/{delta} plays a vital role in EGF-stimulated proliferation of HaCaT cells.

  3. Simulating alpha/beta selectivity at the human thyroid hormone receptor: consensus scoring using multidimensional QSAR.

    PubMed

    Vedani, Angelo; Zumstein, Martin; Lill, Markus A; Ernst, Beat

    2007-01-01

    We present a consensus-scoring study on the human thyroid hormone receptor alpha and beta using two receptor-modeling concepts (software Quasar and Raptor) that are based on multidimensional QSAR and allow for the explicit simulation of induced fit. The binding mode of 82 agonists and indirect antagonists, spanning an activity range of seven orders of magnitude in K(i), was identified through flexible docking to the respective X-ray crystal structures (Yeti software) and represented by a 4D data set with up to four conformations per compound. The receptor surrogates for the thyroid alpha receptor converged at a cross-validated r(2) of 0.846/0.919 (64 training compounds; for Quasar and Raptor, respectively) and yielded a predictive r(2) of 0.812/0.814 (18 test compounds); the models for the thyroid beta receptor resulted in a cross-validated r(2) of 0.823/0.909 and a predictive r(2) of 0.665/0.796, respectively. Consensus was achieved as, on average, the calculated activities of the training set differ only by a factor of 2.2 in K(i) and those of the test set by a factor of 2.8 when predicted by Quasar and Raptor, respectively.

  4. Estrogen Receptors Alpha (ERα) and Beta (ERβ): Subtype-Selective Ligands and Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Paterni, Ilaria; Granchi, Carlotta; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Minutolo, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) are nuclear transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of many complex physiological processes in humans. Modulation of these receptors by prospective therapeutic agents is currently being considered for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of pathological conditions, such as, cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, inflammation, and osteoporosis. This review provides an overview and update of compounds that have been recently reported as modulators of ERs, with a particular focus on their potential clinical applications. PMID:24971815

  5. Differential inhibition of rat alpha3* and alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by tetrandrine and closely related bis-benzylisoquinoline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Virginio, Caterina; Graziani, Francesca; Terstappen, Georg C

    2005-06-24

    The patch-clamp technique was used to investigate the effects of bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloids on two of the major neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), the alpha3-containing nAChR (alpha3*nAChR) endogenously expressed in PC12 cells and the rat alpha7-nAChR heterologously expressed in GH4C1 cells. Tetrandrine and hernandezine reversibly inhibited both receptors displaying half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 8.1 microM and 5.8 microM for alpha3*nAChR and 407.4 nM and 372.2 nM, respectively, for alpha7-nAChR. E6-berbamine completely inhibited the alpha3*nAChR with an IC50 of 5.1 microM, but only partially inhibited the alpha7-nAChR at concentrations up to 30 microM. Tetrandrine inhibition of alpha3*nAChR was functionally non-competitive. All three compounds displaced radiolabelled methyllycaconitine ([3H]-MLA) binding to alpha7-nAChR providing some evidence of competitive antagonism. The results demonstrate that these alkaloids are nAChRs antagonists, with tetrandrine and hernandezine displaying selectivity for one of the major neuronal subtype, the alpha7 nAChR. The different potencies and multiple modes of action on nAChRs may help to better understand the pharmacology of these receptors and to aid in novel drug design.

  6. Solid-phase synthetic strategy and bioevaluation of a labeled delta-opioid receptor ligand Dmt-Tic-Lys for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Josan, Jatinder S; Morse, David L; Xu, Liping; Trissal, Maria; Baggett, Brenda; Davis, Peg; Vagner, Josef; Gillies, Robert J; Hruby, Victor J

    2009-06-18

    A general solid-phase synthetic strategy is developed to prepare fluorescent and/or lanthanide-labeled derivatives of the delta-opioid receptor (deltaOR) ligand H-Dmt-Tic-Lys(R)-OH. The high delta-OR affinity (K(i) = 3 nM) and desirable in vivo characteristics of the Cy5 derivative 1 suggest its usefulness for structure-function studies and receptor localization and as a high-contrast noninvasive molecular marker for live imaging ex vivo or in vivo.

  7. Characterization of alpha-conotoxin interactions with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ashcom, J D; Stiles, B G

    1997-01-01

    The venoms of predatory marine cone snails, Conus species, contain numerous peptides and proteins with remarkably diverse pharmacological properties. One group of peptides are the alpha-conotoxins, which consist of 13-19 amino acids constrained by two disulphide bonds. A biologically active fluorescein derivative of Conus geographus alpha-conotoxin GI (FGI) was used in novel solution-phase-binding assays with purified Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAchR) and monoclonal antibodies developed against the toxin. The binding of FGI to nAchR or antibody had apparent dissociation constants of 10-100 nM. Structure-function studies with alpha-conotoxin GI analogues composed of a single disulphide loop revealed that different conformational restraints are necessary for effective toxin interactions with nAchR or antibodies. PMID:9359860

  8. The role of nicotinic receptor alpha 7 subunits in nicotine discrimination.

    PubMed

    Stolerman, I P; Chamberlain, S; Bizarro, L; Fernandes, C; Schalkwyk, L

    2004-03-01

    The subtypes of nicotinic receptors at which the behavioural effects of nicotine originate are not fully understood. The experiments described here use mice lacking the alpha7 subunit of nicotinic receptors to investigate the role of alpha7-containing receptors in nicotine discrimination. Wild-type and alpha7-knockout mice were trained in a two-lever nicotine discrimination procedure using a tandem schedule of food reinforcement. Mutant mice exhibited baseline rates of lever-pressing as low as 52.2% of rates in wild-type controls (n=21-24). Mutant and wild-type mice acquired discrimination of nicotine (0.4 or 0.8 mg/kg) at a similar rate (n=10-12) and reached similar final levels of accuracy (71.9 +/- 4.4% and 90.8 +/- 3.1% after 60 training sessions for 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg training doses, respectively, in mutant mice, as compared with 75.0 +/- 6.5% and 87.6 +/- 4.8% for wild types). The genotypes exhibited similar steep dose-response curves for nicotine discrimination. In both genotypes, dose-response curves for mice trained with 0.8 mg/kg of nicotine were displaced three- to four-fold to the right as compared with those for the mice trained with the smaller dose. The predominant effect of nicotine on the overall rate of responding was a reduction at the largest doses tested and there was no difference between the genotypes. The results suggest that nicotinic receptors containing the alpha7 subunit do not contribute to the discriminative stimulus or response-rate-depressant effects of nicotine, although they may regulate baseline rates of operant responding.

  9. The role of nicotinic receptor alpha 7 subunits in nicotine discrimination.

    PubMed

    Stolerman, I P; Chamberlain, S; Bizarro, L; Fernandes, C; Schalkwyk, L

    2004-03-01

    The subtypes of nicotinic receptors at which the behavioural effects of nicotine originate are not fully understood. The experiments described here use mice lacking the alpha7 subunit of nicotinic receptors to investigate the role of alpha7-containing receptors in nicotine discrimination. Wild-type and alpha7-knockout mice were trained in a two-lever nicotine discrimination procedure using a tandem schedule of food reinforcement. Mutant mice exhibited baseline rates of lever-pressing as low as 52.2% of rates in wild-type controls (n=21-24). Mutant and wild-type mice acquired discrimination of nicotine (0.4 or 0.8 mg/kg) at a similar rate (n=10-12) and reached similar final levels of accuracy (71.9 +/- 4.4% and 90.8 +/- 3.1% after 60 training sessions for 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg training doses, respectively, in mutant mice, as compared with 75.0 +/- 6.5% and 87.6 +/- 4.8% for wild types). The genotypes exhibited similar steep dose-response curves for nicotine discrimination. In both genotypes, dose-response curves for mice trained with 0.8 mg/kg of nicotine were displaced three- to four-fold to the right as compared with those for the mice trained with the smaller dose. The predominant effect of nicotine on the overall rate of responding was a reduction at the largest doses tested and there was no difference between the genotypes. The results suggest that nicotinic receptors containing the alpha7 subunit do not contribute to the discriminative stimulus or response-rate-depressant effects of nicotine, although they may regulate baseline rates of operant responding. PMID:14975691

  10. Binding properties of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex: similarity to smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Minneman, K.P.

    1983-12-01

    The characteristics of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex were examined using the radioiodinated alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist ((/sup 125/I)BE). (/sup 125/I)BE labeled a single class of high-affinity binding sites in a particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with mass action kinetics and a KD of 57 pM. The binding of (/sup 125/I)BE was inhibited by various alpha adrenergic receptor antagonists, partial agonists and full agonists. The potency of these compounds in competing for the (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites suggested that (/sup 125/I)BE was labeling alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex. In the absence of a physiological concentration of NaCl in the assay medium there was a small (20%) decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites with no effect on the KD value. The absence of NaCl also caused a 4-fold increase in the potency of norepinephrine in competing for (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites. All drugs competed for (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites with Hill coefficients greater than 0.86, except for oxymetazoline which had a Hill coefficient of 0.77. Scatchard analysis of specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding in the presence of various competing drugs showed that the inhibition by both agonists and antagonists was purely competitive, but the inhibition by oxymetazoline was complex. Treatment of the particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with 0.2 to 200 nM phenoxybenzamine for 10 min caused a dose-dependent decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites which could be mostly blocked by the presence of norepinephrine during the phenoxybenzamine exposure.

  11. Two renal. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptor sites revealed by of-aminoclonidine binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sripanidkulchai, B.; Dawson, R.; Oparil, S.; Wyss, J.M.

    1987-02-01

    (/sup 3/H)p-aminoclonidine (/sup 3/H)PAC, a specific ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist, was used to characterize ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptor binding in rat renal membranes. Rosenthal plots demonstrated two binding sites with K/sub dS/ of approx. 1.7 and 14.2 nM and B/sub max/S (maximum binding) of 47.3 and 218.8 fmol/mg protein for the high- and low-affinity sites, respectively. These characteristics were confirmed by estimate of K/sub d/ parameters based on association and dissociation experiments. Pseudo-Hill coefficients generated from drug inhibition experiments were all less than unity, suggesting differential binding at two ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptor binding sites. Specific ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonists exhibited greater binding affinity to both sites than did nonspecific drugs, and all drugs displayed greater affinity for the high- than the low-affinity binding site. Both guanyl nucleotides and sodium chloride inhibited (/sup 3/H)PAC binding more at the high-affinity than at the low-affinity site. Renal denervation resulted in significant upregulation of receptor density only at the high-affinity sites with no change in receptor affinity at either site, suggesting that a majority of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors in the kidney are postsynaptic. Thus all lines of evidence in this study indicate that two ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptor binding sites exist in the rat kidney.

  12. T lymphocytes bearing the gamma delta T cell receptor are susceptible to steroid-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Bistoni, O; Travetti, A; Migliorati, G; Moraca, R; Nicoletti, I; Riccardi, C; Paoletti, F P; Vaccaro, R

    1995-05-01

    The mechanisms by which glucocorticoids suppress immune responses have not yet been clearly defined. In steroid-sensitive pathological conditions, an increase in gamma delta T cells can occur in certain untreated systemic autoimmune disorders and seems to be a peristent feature in most cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our previously published data demonstrated that immunosuppressive therapy normalized this expanded SLE T cell subset in parallel with clinical remission of the symptoms. To establish how corticosteroid treatment determines the disappearance of peripheral blood gamma delta T lymphocytes, circulating alpha beta and gamma delta T lymphocytes from seven SLE subjects with active disease and seven healthy individuals were cultured in the presence or absence of 10(-7) M Dexamethasone (DEX). Cell suspensions were then analysed for DNA fragmentation, characteristic of apoptotic cell death, by a new cytofluorimetric method. Conventional agarose-gel electrophoresis on the same T cell populations was carried out for comparison. Regular follow-ups for 6 months revealed in vivo steroid treatment determined a dramatic fall in SLE blood gamma delta T cells, and in vitro experiments seem to indicate that DEX-triggered apoptotic signals are confined to the double negative (CD4-CD8-) gamma delta T cell subpopulation which disappears after in vivo immunosuppressive therapy. Clinical and pathological remission of some autoimmune diseases is often obtained by corticosteroids. Our results offer new insights on the mechanisms through these hormones exert their potent inhibitory activities on immune system cells postulated to play a role in the generation of autoimmune responses. PMID:7725070

  13. Estrogen prevents norepinephrine alpha-2a receptor reversal of stress-induced working memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    SHANSKY, REBECCA M.; BENDER, GENEVIEVE; ARNSTEN, A. F. T.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding effects of estrogen on the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) may help to elucidate the increased prevalence of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in women of ovarian cycling age. Estrogen replacement in ovariectomized (OVX) young rats amplifies the detrimental effects of stress on working memory (a PFC-mediated task), but the mechanisms by which this occurs have yet to be identified. In male rats, stimulation of norepinephrine alpha-2 adrenoceptors protects working memory from stress-induced impairments. However, this effect has not been studied in females, and has not been examined for sensitivity to estrogen. The current study asked whether OVX females with estrogen replacement (OVX + Est) and without replacement (OVX + Veh) responded differently to stimulation of alpha-2 adrenoceptors after administration of the benzodiazepine inverse agonist FG7142, a pharmacological stressor. The alpha-2 agonist, guanfacine, protected working memory from the impairing effects of FG7142 in OVX + Veh, but not in OVX + Est rats. Western Blot analysis for alpha-2 receptors was performed on PFC tissue from each group, but no changes in expression were found, indicating that the behavioral effects observed were likely not due to changes in receptor expression. These findings point to possible mechanisms by which estrogen may enhance the stress response, and hold implications for the gender discrepancy in the prevalence of stress-related mental illness. PMID:19005873

  14. Alpha-galactosidase stimulates acetylcholine receptor aggregation in skeletal muscle cells via PNA-binding carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Parkhomovskiy, N; Martin, P T

    2000-04-21

    Aggregation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in skeletal muscle is an essential step in the formation of the mammalian neuromuscular junction. While proteins that bind to myotube receptors such as agrin and laminin can stimulate AChR aggregation in cultured myotubes, removal of cell surface sialic acids stimulates aggregation in a ligand-independent manner. Here, we show that removal of cell surface alpha-galactosides also stimulates AChR aggregation in the absence of added laminin or agrin. AChR aggregation stimulated by alpha-galactosidase was blocked by peanut agglutinin (PNA), which binds to lactosamine-containing disaccharides, but not by the GalNAc-binding lectin Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA-B4). AChR aggregation stimulated by alpha-galactosidase potentiated AChR clustering induced by either neural agrin or laminin-1 and could be inhibited by muscle agrin. These data suggest that capping of cell surface lactosamines or N-acetyllactosamines with alpha-galactose affects AChR aggregation much as capping with sialic acids does.

  15. Delta opioid receptors colocalize with corticotropin releasing factor in hippocampal interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tanya J.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampal formation (HF) is an important site at which stress circuits and endogenous opioid systems intersect, likely playing a critical role in the interaction between stress and drug addiction. Prior study findings suggest that the stress-related neuropeptide corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and the delta opioid receptor (DOR) may localize to similar neuronal populations within HF lamina. Here, hippocampal sections of male and cycling female adult Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for immunolabeling using antisera directed against the DOR and CRF peptide, as well as interneuron subtype markers somatostatin or parvalbumin, and analyzed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Both DOR- and CRF-labeling was observed in interneurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate hilus. Males and normal cycling females displayed a similar number of CRF immunoreactive neurons co-labeled with DOR and a similar average number of CRF-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus and stratum oriens of CA1 and CA3. In addition, 70% of DOR/CRF dual-labeled neurons in the hilar region co-labeled with somatostatin, suggesting a role for these interneurons in regulating perforant path input to dentate granule cells. Ultrastructural analysis of CRF-labeled axon terminals within the hilar region revealed that proestrus females have a similar number of CRF-labeled axon terminals that contain DORs compared to males but an increased number of CRF-labeled axon terminals without DORs. Taken together, these findings suggest that while DORs are anatomically positioned to modulate CRF immunoreactive interneuron activity and CRF peptide release, their ability to exert such regulatory activity may be compromised in females when estrogen levels are high. PMID:21277946

  16. Insights into the Relationship between Toll Like Receptors and Gamma Delta T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Asif Amin; Patil, Rushikesh Sudam; Chiplunkar, Shubhada Vivek

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is an important aspect of cancer biology that contributes to tumor initiation, tumor progression and responses to therapy. The composition and characteristics of the tumor microenvironment vary widely and are important in determining the anti-tumor immune response. Successful immunization requires activation of both innate and adaptive immunity. Generally, immune system is compromised in patients with cancer due to immune suppression, loss of tumor antigen expression and dysfunction of antigen presenting cells (APC). Thus, therapeutic immunization leading to cancer regression remains a significant challenge. Certain cells of the immune system, including dendritic cells (DCs) and gamma delta (γδ) T cells are capable of driving potent anti-tumor responses. The property of MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity, high potential of cytokine release, tissue tropism and early activation in infections and malignant disease makes γδ T cells as an emerging candidate for immunotherapy. Various strategies are being developed to enhance anti-tumor immune responses of γδ T cells and DCs one of them is the use of novel adjuvants like toll like receptors (TLR) agonists, which enhance γδ T cell function directly or through DC activation, which has ability to prime γδ T cells. TLR agonists are being used clinically either alone or in combination with tumor antigens and has shown initial success in both enhancing immune responses and eliciting anti-tumor activity. TLR activated γδ T cells and DCs nurture each other’s activation. This provides a potent base for first line of defense and manipulation of the adaptive response against pathogens and cancer. The available data provides a strong rationale for initiating combinatorial therapy for the treatment of diseases and this review will summarize the application of adjuvants (TLRs) for boosting immune response of γδ T cells to treat cancer and infectious diseases and their use in combinatorial therapy

  17. A New Mouse Allele of Glutamate Receptor Delta 2 with Cerebellar Atrophy and Progressive Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Suzuki, Kinuko; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Koura, Minako; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Kajimura, Naoko; Monobe, Yoko; Kusunoki, Susumu; Matsuda, Junichiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hayasaka, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar degenerations (SCDs) are a large class of sporadic or hereditary neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive motion defects and degenerative changes in the cerebellum and other parts of the CNS. Here we report the identification and establishment from a C57BL/6J mouse colony of a novel mouse line developing spontaneous progressive ataxia, which we refer to as ts3. Frequency of the phenotypic expression was consistent with an autosomal recessive Mendelian trait of inheritance, suggesting that a single gene mutation is responsible for the ataxic phenotype of this line. The onset of ataxia was observed at about three weeks of age, which slowly progressed until the hind limbs became entirely paralyzed in many cases. Micro-MRI study revealed significant cerebellar atrophy in all the ataxic mice, although individual variations were observed. Detailed histological analyses demonstrated significant atrophy of the anterior folia with reduced granule cells (GC) and abnormal morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC). Study by ultra-high voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM) further indicated aberrant morphology of PC dendrites and their spines, suggesting both morphological and functional abnormalities of the PC in the mutants. Immunohistochemical studies also revealed defects in parallel fiber (PF)–PC synapse formation and abnormal distal extension of climbing fibers (CF). Based on the phenotypic similarities of the ts3 mutant with other known ataxic mutants, we performed immunohistological analyses and found that expression levels of two genes and their products, glutamate receptor delta2 (grid2) and its ligand, cerebellin1 (Cbln1), are significantly reduced or undetectable. Finally, we sequenced the candidate genes and detected a large deletion in the coding region of the grid2 gene. Our present study suggests that ts3 is a new allele of the grid2 gene, which causes similar but different phenotypes as compared to other grid2 mutants. PMID

  18. A new mouse allele of glutamate receptor delta 2 with cerebellar atrophy and progressive ataxia.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Suzuki, Kinuko; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Koura, Minako; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Kajimura, Naoko; Monobe, Yoko; Kusunoki, Susumu; Matsuda, Junichiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hayasaka, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar degenerations (SCDs) are a large class of sporadic or hereditary neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive motion defects and degenerative changes in the cerebellum and other parts of the CNS. Here we report the identification and establishment from a C57BL/6J mouse colony of a novel mouse line developing spontaneous progressive ataxia, which we refer to as ts3. Frequency of the phenotypic expression was consistent with an autosomal recessive Mendelian trait of inheritance, suggesting that a single gene mutation is responsible for the ataxic phenotype of this line. The onset of ataxia was observed at about three weeks of age, which slowly progressed until the hind limbs became entirely paralyzed in many cases. Micro-MRI study revealed significant cerebellar atrophy in all the ataxic mice, although individual variations were observed. Detailed histological analyses demonstrated significant atrophy of the anterior folia with reduced granule cells (GC) and abnormal morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC). Study by ultra-high voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM) further indicated aberrant morphology of PC dendrites and their spines, suggesting both morphological and functional abnormalities of the PC in the mutants. Immunohistochemical studies also revealed defects in parallel fiber (PF)-PC synapse formation and abnormal distal extension of climbing fibers (CF). Based on the phenotypic similarities of the ts3 mutant with other known ataxic mutants, we performed immunohistological analyses and found that expression levels of two genes and their products, glutamate receptor delta2 (grid2) and its ligand, cerebellin1 (Cbln1), are significantly reduced or undetectable. Finally, we sequenced the candidate genes and detected a large deletion in the coding region of the grid2 gene. Our present study suggests that ts3 is a new allele of the grid2 gene, which causes similar but different phenotypes as compared to other grid2 mutants.

  19. Dual efficacy of delta opioid receptor-selective ligands for ethanol drinking and anxiety.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Richard M; Brissett, Daniela I; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2010-10-01

    Alcoholism and anxiety disorders have a huge impact on society and afflict 17.6 million and 40 million people in the United States, respectively. A strong comorbidity exists between alcoholism and anxiety disorders. Indeed, alcohol withdrawal-induced anxiety is a primary contributing factor for relapse, and anxiolytics are a common adjuvant therapy prescribed for treatment-seeking alcoholics. It is thought that the use of alcohol to self-medicate and relieve anxiety contributes to the development of addiction. Treatment for anxiety disorders and alcoholism exist but are not universally effective. The delta opioid receptor (DOR) plays a role in both alcohol consumption and anxiety, making it a very interesting clinical target. Two pharmacologically distinct DORs have been described: DOR1 and DOR2. We find here that the relative specificity of DOR agonists for DOR1 or DOR2 can greatly affect the effects they exert on ethanol consumption and anxiety. The DOR1 agonist 2-methyl-4aα-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,3,4,4a,5,12,12aα-octahydro-quinolino[2,3,30g]isoquinoline (TAN-67), although not effective in decreasing anxiety-like behavior in naive mice, has anxiolytic-like properties in ethanol-withdrawn mice. In contrast, a less subtype-selective agonist, (+)-4-[(αR)-α-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80), while also reducing anxiety-like behavior, increases ethanol consumption. In addition, we found that the conical anxiolytic diazepam [DZ; 7-chloro-1-methyl-5-phenyl-3H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one] is a less effective anxiolytic in ethanol-withdrawn mice than in naive mice. Together, our findings suggest that selective DOR agonists can decrease anxiety-like behavior and are more effective than diazepam at reducing ethanol consumption. We believe the dual efficacy of DOR1 agonists makes these receptors an interesting therapeutic target for treatment-seeking alcoholics.

  20. Hormonal regulation of delta opioid receptor immunoreactivity in interneurons and pyramidal cells in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tanya J.; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Chapleau, Jeanette D.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that women and men differ in relapse vulnerability to drug-seeking behavior during abstinence periods. As relapse is frequently triggered by exposure of the recovered addict to objects previously associated with drug use and the formation of these associations requires memory systems engaged by the hippocampal formation (HF), studies exploring ovarian hormone modulation of hippocampal function are warranted. Previous studies revealed that ovarian steroids alter endogenous opioid peptide levels and trafficking of mu opioid receptors in the HF, suggesting cooperative interaction between opioids and estrogens in modulating hippocampal excitability. However, whether ovarian steroids affect the levels or trafficking of delta opioid receptors (DORs) in the HF is unknown. Here, hippocampal sections of adult male and normal cycling female Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for quantitative immunoperoxidase light microscopy and dual label fluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy using antisera directed against the DOR and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Consistent with previous studies in males, DOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) localized to select interneurons and principal cells in the female HF. In comparison to males, females, regardless of estrous cycle phase, show reduced DOR-ir in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and proestrus (high estrogen) females, in particular, display reduced DOR-ir in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Ultrastructural analysis of DOR-labeled profiles in CA1 revealed that while females generally show fewer DORs in the distal apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, proestrus females, in particular, exhibit DOR internalization and trafficking towards the soma. Dual label studies revealed that DORs are found in NPY-labeled interneurons in the hilus, CA3, and CA1. While DOR colocalization frequency in NPY-labeled neuron somata was similar between animals in the hilus, proestrus females had fewer NPY-labeled neurons that

  1. Hormonal regulation of delta opioid receptor immunoreactivity in interneurons and pyramidal cells in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tanya J; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Chapleau, Jeanette D; Milner, Teresa A

    2011-02-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that women and men differ in relapse vulnerability to drug-seeking behavior during abstinence periods. As relapse is frequently triggered by exposure of the recovered addict to objects previously associated with drug use and the formation of these associations requires memory systems engaged by the hippocampal formation (HF), studies exploring ovarian hormone modulation of hippocampal function are warranted. Previous studies revealed that ovarian steroids alter endogenous opioid peptide levels and trafficking of mu opioid receptors in the HF, suggesting cooperative interaction between opioids and estrogens in modulating hippocampal excitability. However, whether ovarian steroids affect the levels or trafficking of delta opioid receptors (DORs) in the HF is unknown. Here, hippocampal sections of adult male and normal cycling female Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for quantitative immunoperoxidase light microscopy and dual label fluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy using antisera directed against the DOR and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Consistent with previous studies in males, DOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) localized to select interneurons and principal cells in the female HF. In comparison to males, females, regardless of estrous cycle phase, show reduced DOR-ir in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and proestrus (high estrogen) females, in particular, display reduced DOR-ir in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Ultrastructural analysis of DOR-labeled profiles in CA1 revealed that while females generally show fewer DORs in the distal apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, proestrus females, in particular, exhibit DOR internalization and trafficking towards the soma. Dual label studies revealed that DORs are found in NPY-labeled interneurons in the hilus, CA3, and CA1. While DOR colocalization frequency in NPY-labeled neuron somata was similar between animals in the hilus, proestrus females had fewer NPY-labeled neurons that

  2. Expansion of the. alpha. sub 2 -adrenergic receptor family: Cloning and characterization of a human. alpha. sub 2 -adrenergic receptor subtype, the gene for which is located on chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lomasney, J.W.; Lorenz, W.; Allen, L.F.; King, K.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J. ); Regan, J.W. ); Yang-Feng, T.L. )

    1990-07-01

    Pharmacologic, biochemical, and genetic analyses have demonstrated the existence of multiple {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor ({alpha}{sub 2}AR) subtypes. The authors have cloned a human {alpha}{sub 2}AR by using the polymerase chain reaction with oligonucleotide primers homologous to conserved regions of the previously cloned {alpha}{sub 2}ARs, the genes for which are located on human chromosomes 4 (C4) and 10 (C10). The deduced amino acid sequence encodes a protein of 450 amino acids whose putative topology is similar to that of the family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptors, but whose structure most closely resembles that of the {alpha}{sub 2}ARs. Competition curve analysis of the binding properties of the receptor expressed in COS-7 cells with a variety of adrenergic ligands demonstrates a unique {alpha}{sub 2}AR pharmacology. Hybridization with somatic cell hybrids shows that the gene for this receptor is located on chromosome 2. Northern blot analysis of various rat tissues shows expression in liver and kidney. The unique pharmacology and tissue localization of this receptor suggest that this is an {alpha}{sub 2}AR subtype not previously identified by classical pharmacological or ligand binding approaches.

  3. Selective increase of alpha 1-adrenoceptors and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex after chronic haloperidol.

    PubMed

    Pazo, J H; Levi de Stein, M; Jerusalinsky, D; Novas, M L; Raskovsky, S; Tumilasci, O R; Medina, J H; De Robertis, E

    1987-06-30

    The effect of chronic administration of haloperidol on alpha 1-, alpha 2-, and beta-adrenoceptors, cholinergic muscarinic, GABAA and benzodiazepine receptors in the cerebral cortex of the rat was investigated. Doses of 0.3 and 2 mg/kg of haloperidol during 7 days increased markedly the density of alpha 1-adrenoceptors without changes in affinity. The alpha 2- and beta-adrenoceptors were not modified after neuroleptic administration. The number of muscarinic receptors were also increased after haloperidol treatment (2 mg/kg/day). However, the GABAA and benzodiazepine binding sites remained unchanged. In the brainstem an increment in the alpha 1-, but not the beta-adrenoceptors was observed. The well known increase in the dopamine receptors in the striatum was confirmed. These observations demonstrate a multireceptor effect of haloperidol in the cerebral cortex.

  4. Direct influence of C-terminally substituted amino acids in the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore on delta-opioid receptor selectivity and antagonism.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Guerrini, Remo; Negri, Lucia; Giannini, Elisa; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2004-07-29

    A series of 17 analogues were developed on the basis of the general formula H-Dmt-Tic-NH-CH(R)-R' (denotes chirality; R = charged, neutral, or aromatic functional group; R' = -OH or -NH(2)). These compounds were designed to test the following hypothesis: the physicochemical properties of third-residue substitutions C-terminal to Tic in the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore modify delta-opioid receptor selectivity and delta-opioid receptor antagonism through enhanced interactions with the mu-opioid receptor. The data substantiate the following conclusions: (i) all compounds had high receptor affinity [K(i)(delta) = 0.034-1.1 nM], while that for the mu-opioid receptor fluctuated by orders of magnitude [K(i)(mu) = 15.1-3966 nM]; (ii) delta-opioid receptor selectivity [K(i)(mu)/K(i)(delta)] declined 1000-fold from 22,600 to 21; (iii) a C-terminal carboxyl group enhanced selectivity but only as a consequence of the specific residue; (iv) amidated, positive charged residues [Lys-NH(2) (6), Arg-NH(2) (7)], and a negatively charged aromatic residue [Trp-OH (11)] enhanced mu-opioid affinity [K(i)(mu) = 17.0, 15.1, and 15.7 nM, respectively], while Gly-NH(2) (8), Ser-NH(2) (10), and His-OH (12) were nearly one-tenth as active; and (v) D-isomers exhibited mixed effects on mu-opioid receptor affinity (2' < 3' < 4' < 1' < 5') and decreased delta-selectivity in D-Asp-NH(2) (1') and D-Lys(Ac)-OH (5'). The analogues exhibited delta-opioid receptor antagonism (pA(2) = 6.9-10.07) and weak mu-opioid receptor agonism (IC(50) > 1 microM) except H-Dmt-Tic-Glu-NH(2) (3), which was a partial delta-opioid receptor agonist (IC(50) = 2.5 nM). Thus, these C-terminally extended analogues indicated that an amino acid residue containing a single charge, amino or guanidino functionality, or aromatic group substantially altered the delta-opioid receptor activity profile (selectivity and antagonism) of the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore, which suggests that the C-terminal constituent plays a major role in determining

  5. Comparative pharmacology of adrenergic alpha(2C) receptors coupled to Ca(2+) signaling through different Galpha proteins.

    PubMed

    Kurko, Dalma; Bekes, Zsófia; Gere, Anikó; Baki, Andrea; Boros, András; Kolok, Sándor; Bugovics, Gyula; Nagy, József; Szombathelyi, Zsolt; Ignácz-Szendrei, Györgyi

    2009-12-01

    Adrenergic alpha(1), alpha(2) and beta receptors are members of the G-protein-coupled receptor families (GPCRs) mediating physiological responses to adrenaline (epinephrine) and noradrenaline (norepinephrine). Since GPCRs are major targets for potential therapeutic agents, development of robust, reliable and cost effective functional screening methods for these receptors is in the focus of pharmacological research. For this reason, the aim of the present study was to develop an intracellular calcium assay for investigating the pharmacology of the alpha(2C) type of adrenergic receptors (alpha(2C)-AR). Although activation of alpha(2C)-AR is not linked to calcium mobilization, co-expression of these receptors with the chimeric Galpha(qi5) protein, containing the five carboxyl-terminal amino acids from G(i), or promiscuosus Galpha(16) protein can divert receptor signaling to the G(q) pathway generating Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. In order to assess the functional potency of alpha(2)-AR agonists and antagonists, we established a fluorometric Ca(2+) assay using cell lines stably and constitutively co-expressing alpha(2C)-AR and Galpha(qi5) or Galpha(16) proteins (Galpha(qi5)/alpha(2C) and Galpha(16)/alpha(2C)). As part of the pharmacological characterization, we measured the changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels due to activation of the chimeric Galpha(qi5) or Galpha(16) coupled recombinant alpha(2C) receptors as a function of increasing concentration of several agonists (noradrenaline, brimonidine, oxymetazoline, clonidine, moxonidine) and antagonists (MK912, yohimbine). The binding affinities of alpha(2)-AR agonist and antagonists and the inhibition of the forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in alpha(2C)-AR expressing cells were also measured. These results confirmed that the Galpha(qi5)/alpha(2C) and Galpha(16)/alpha(2C) recombinant systems can be useful for modelling the native G(i)-coupled system. Our results indicate that a plate-reader based

  6. Estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals: II. Tissue distribution of 17. cap alpha. -methylestradiol in normal and tumor-bearing rats

    SciTech Connect

    Feenstra, A.; Vaalburg, W.; Nolten, G.M.J.; Reiffers, S.; Talma, A.G.; Wiegman, T.; van der Molen, H.D.; Woldring, M.G.

    1983-06-01

    Tritiated 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol was synthesized to investigate the potential of the carbon-11-labeled analog as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical. In vitro, 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol is bound with high affinity to the cytoplasmic estrogen receptor from rabbit uterus (K/sub d/ = 1.96 x 10/sup -10/M), and it sediments as an 8S hormone-receptor complex in sucrose gradients. The compound shows specific uptake in the uterus of the adult rat, within 1 h after injection. In female rats bearing DMBA-induced tumors, specific uterine and tumor uptakes were observed, although at 30 min the tumor uptake was only 23 to 30% of the uptake in the uterus. Tritiated 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol with a specific activity of 6 Ci/mmole showed a similar tissue distribution. Our results indicate that a 17 ..cap alpha..-methylestradiol is promising as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical.

  7. Binding sites for. alpha. -bungarotoxin and the noncompetitive inhibitor phencyclidine on a synthetic peptide comprising residues 172-227 of the. alpha. -subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly-Roberts, D.L.; Lentz, T.L. )

    1991-07-30

    The binding of the competitive antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-Btx) and the noncompetitive inhibitor phencyclidine (PCP) to a synthetic peptide comprising residues 172-227 of the {alpha}-subunit of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor has been characterized. {sup 125}I-{alpha}-Btx bound to the 172-227 peptide in a solid-phase assay and was competed by {alpha}-Btx d-tubocurarine and NaCl. In the presence of 0.02% sodium dodecyl sulfate, {sup 125}I-{alpha}-Btx bound to the 56-residue peptide with a K{sub D} of 3.5 nM, as determined by equilibrium saturation binding studies. Because {alpha}Btx binds to a peptide comprising residues 173-204 with the same affinity and does not bind to a peptide comprising residues 205-227, the competitive antagonist and hence agonist binding site lies between residues 173 and 204. After photoaffinity labeling, ({sup 3}H)PCP was bound to the 172-227 peptide. ({sup 3}H)PCP binding was inhibited by chlorpromazine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. It is concluded that a high-affinity binding site for PCP is located between residues 205 and 227, which includes the first 18 residues of transmembrane segment M1, and that a low-affinity site is located in the competitive antagonist binding site between residues 173 and 204. These results show that a synthetic peptide comprising residues 172-227 of the {alpha} subunit contains three binding sites, one for {alpha}-Btx and two for PCP. Previous studies on the intact receptor indicate high-affinity PCP binding occurs in the receptor channel.

  8. Altered enteroendocrine cell expression in T cell receptor alpha chain knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D C; Zhang, H; Qian, P; Lorenz, R G; Hutton, K; Peters, M G

    2000-10-15

    Mice lacking T cell receptor alpha chain (TCRalpha(-/-)) develop inflammation of the colon. We have examined the effect of this inflammation on the colonic epithelium by studying markers of epithelial cuff, enteroendocrine, and immune cell differentiation. Using immunohistochemical techniques, colons were compared in normal C57/BL6 and murine TCR alpha(-/-) mice aged 2 and 3 weeks and 3-11 months. TCR alpha(-/-) mice aged 3-11 months had histologic evidence of inflammation with increased expression of CD45, CD4+, CD8+, and B220+ cells and a decrease in expression of IgA+ cells. There was a decrease in the number of cholecystokinin, serotonin, and neurotensin enteroendocrine expressing cells in the colon of TCR alpha(-/-) mice. These changes were not present in 2-3-week-old suckling/weaning mice. In contrast, peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1, and gastrin expression did not change and small intestinal enteroendocrine cells remained unaltered. The change in colonic enteroendocrine cell expression appears to be a specific response, since only a subset of these cells was altered, and the epithelium was intact by histologic analysis. The absence of functional T cells in TCR alpha(-/-) colon has a marked effect on differentiation of a specific subpopulation of enteroendocrine cells, prior to loss of integrity of the epithelium. PMID:11054861

  9. AP-2{alpha} suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darrion L.; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-15

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2{alpha} is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2{alpha} binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2{alpha}-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2{alpha} interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2{alpha} is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  10. Importin alpha from Arabidopsis thaliana is a nuclear import receptor that recognizes three classes of import signals.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H M; Hicks, G R; Raikhel, N V

    1997-01-01

    Protein import into the nucleus is a two-step process. In vitro import systems from vertebrate cell extracts have shown several soluble factors are required. One of these factors is the receptor importin alpha, which binds to nuclear localization signals (NLS) in vitro. We previously cloned an importin alpha homolog from Arabidopsis thaliana (At-IMP alpha) and demonstrated that this protein was not depleted from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts after permeabilization of the plasma membrane, (Hicks et al., 1996). To determine if At-IMP alpha is functional, we used an in vitro NLS-binding assay. We found that At-IMP alpha is specific, and the receptor is able to recognize three classes of NLS identified in plants. Purified antibodies to At-IMP alpha were used to determine the in vivo location of importin alpha in tobacco protoplasts. Importin alpha is found in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and it is most highly concentrated at the nuclear envelope. The biochemical properties of nuclear importin alpha and localization studies using purified nuclei demonstrate that importin alpha is tightly associated with the plant nucleus. Moreover, these results suggest that a fraction of nuclear importin alpha interacts with the nuclear pore complex. PMID:9193081

  11. Prostaglandin F{sub 2{alpha}} regulates cytokine responses of mast cells through the receptors for prostaglandin E

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Izumi; Hishinuma, Takanori; Suzuki, Kaori; Owada, Yuji; Kitanaka, Noriko; Kondo, Hisatake; Goto, Junichi; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Ono, Masao

    2008-03-14

    There is an increasing body of evidence that prostanoids modulate mast cell functions and contribute to the development of allergic inflammation. The present study aimed to identify an undetermined function of prostaglandin (PG) F{sub 2{alpha}} in mast cell activation and the signaling mechanism involved in it. Simultaneous quantification of prostanoids by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry revealed the constitutive release of PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, thromboxane B{sub 2}, and 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} from bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Upon activation of BMMCs by lipopolysaccharide, the cytokine production in BMMCs was enhanced when the culture was supplemented with PGF{sub 2{alpha}}. However, F prostanoid receptor-a selective receptor for PGF{sub 2{alpha}}-was not detected in BMMCs. Further investigations performed using prostanoid receptor antagonists revealed an alternative mechanism wherein the receptors for PGE species-E prostanoid receptors-mediated the PGF{sub 2{alpha}} signal in BMMCs. The present study provides an insight into a novel function of PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, i.e., an autocrine accelerator for mast cell activation.

  12. Affinity modulation of the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin (platelet GPIIb-IIIa) is an intrinsic property of the receptor.

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, T E; Loftus, J C; Du, X P; Glass, A A; Ruggeri, Z M; Shattil, S J; Plow, E F; Ginsberg, M H

    1990-01-01

    To analyze the basis of affinity modulation of integrin function, we studied cloned stable Chinese hamster ovary cell lines expressing recombinant integrins of the beta 3 family (alpha IIb beta 3 and alpha v beta 3). Antigenic and peptide recognition specificities of the recombinant receptors resembled those of the native receptors found in platelets or endothelial cells. The alpha IIb beta 3-expressing cell line (A5) bound RGD peptides and immobilized fibrinogen (Fg) but not soluble fibrinogen or the activation-specific monoclonal anti-alpha IIb beta 3 (PAC1), indicating that it was in the affinity state found on resting platelets. Several platelet agonists failed to alter the affinity state of ("activate") recombinant alpha IIb beta 3. The binding of soluble Fg and PAC1, however, was stimulated in both platelets and A5 cells by addition of IgG papain-digestion products (Fab) fragments of certain beta 3-specific monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies stimulated PAC1 binding to platelets fixed under conditions rendering them unresponsive to other agonists. Addition of these antibodies to detergent-solubilized alpha IIb beta 3 also stimulated specific Fg binding. These data demonstrate that certain anti-beta 3 antibodies activate alpha IIb beta 3 by acting directly on the receptor, possibly by altering its conformation. Furthermore, they indicate that the activation state of alpha IIb beta 3 is a property of the receptor itself rather than of the surrounding cell membrane microenvironment. Images PMID:2100193

  13. Effect of the alpha subunit subtype on the macroscopic kinetic properties of recombinant GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Picton, Amber J; Fisher, Janet L

    2007-08-24

    The GABA(A) receptors (GABARs) are chloride-permeable ligand-gated ion channels responsible for fast inhibitory neurotransmission. These receptors are structurally heterogeneous, and in mammals can be formed from a combination of sixteen different subunit subtypes. Much of this variety comes from the six different alpha subunit subtypes. All neuronal GABARs contain an alpha subunit, and the identity of the alpha subtype affects the pharmacological properties of the receptors. The expression of each of the different alpha subtypes is regulated developmentally and regionally and changes with both normal physiological processes such development and synaptic plasticity, and pathological conditions such as epilepsy. In order to understand the functional significance of this structural heterogeneity, we examined the effect of the alpha subtype on the receptor's response to GABA. Each of the six alpha subtypes was transiently co-expressed with the beta3 and gamma2L subunits in mammalian cells. The sensitivity to GABA was measured with whole-cell recordings. We also determined the activation, deactivation, desensitization, and recovery kinetics for the six isoforms using rapid application recordings from excised macropatches. We found unique characteristics associated with each alpha subunit subtype. These properties would be expected to influence the post-synaptic response to GABA, creating functional diversity among neurons expressing different alpha subunits.

  14. Localization of the gene encoding the [alpha][sub 2]/[delta] subunit (CACNL2A) of the human skeletal muscle voltage-dependent Ca[sup 2+] channel to chromosome 7q21-q22 by somatic cell hybrid analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, P.A.; Hogan, K.; Gregg, R.G. ); Scherer, S.W.; Tsui, L.C. Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario )

    1994-01-01

    Activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) by membrane depolarization triggers key cellular responses such as contraction, secretion, excitation, and electrical signaling. The skeletal muscle L-type VDCC is a heteromultimer complex containing four subunits, [alpha][sub 1],[alpha][sub 2]/[delta],[beta][sub 1], and [gamma]. The [alpha][sub 2]/[delta] subunit, an integral component of the VDCC, appears to modulate the channel kinetics. The [alpha][sub 2]/[delta] gene is expressed in many tissues, including skeletal muscle, brain, heart, and lung, and cDNAs representing the skeletal muscle and brain isoforms have been isolated. DNA sequence comparisons indicate that these cDNAs are encoding by a single gene. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Skn-1a/Oct-11 and {Delta}Np63{alpha} exert antagonizing effects on human keratin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lena, Anna Maria; Cipollone, Rita; Amelio, Ivano; Catani, Maria Valeria; Ramadan, Safaa; Browne, Gareth; Melino, Gerry; Candi, Eleonora

    2010-10-29

    Research highlights: {yields} Skn-1a markedly downregulates {Delta}Np63-driven K14 expression. {yields} {Delta}Np63 inhibits Skn-1a-mediated K10 expression. {yields} {Delta}Np63, mutated in SAM domain, is less effecting in K10 downregulation. {yields} Immunolocalization in human skin of the two transcription factors is partially overlapping. {yields} The antagonistic effects of Skn-1a and p63 is through competition for overlapping responsive elements or through an indirect interaction. -- Abstract: The formation of a stratified epidermis requires a carefully controlled balance between keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. Here, we report the reciprocal effect on keratin expression of {Delta}Np63, pivotal in normal epidermal morphogenesis and maintenance, and Skn-1a/Oct-11, a POU transcription factor that triggers and regulates the differentiation of keratinocytes. The expression of Skn-1a markedly downregulated {Delta}Np63-driven K14 expression in luciferase reporter assays. The extent of downregulation was comparable to the inhibition of Skn-1a-mediated K10 expression upon expression of {Delta}Np63. {Delta}Np63, mutated in the protein-protein interaction domain (SAM domain; mutated in human ectodermal dysplasia syndrome), was significantly less effecting in downregulating K10, raising the possibility of a direct interaction among Skn-1a and {Delta}Np63. Immunolocalization in human skin biopsies revealed that the expression of the two transcription factors is partially overlapping. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments did not, however, demonstrate a direct interaction between {Delta}Np63 and Skn-1a, suggesting that the antagonistic effects of Skn-1a and p63 on keratin promoter transactivation is probably through competition for overlapping binding sites on target gene promoter or through an indirect interaction.

  16. Doxazosin inhibits proliferation and migration of human vascular smooth-muscle cells independent of alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z W; Shi, X Y; Hoffman, B B

    1998-06-01

    Proliferation and migration of vascular smooth-muscle cells (VSMCs), stimulated by a variety of growth factors, play a critical role in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. We found unexpectedly that doxazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic-receptor antagonist, inhibits serum-stimulated proliferation of cultured human VSMCs. Subsequent experiments systematically investigated inhibitory effects of doxazosin on mitogenesis stimulated in VSMCs by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor, and G protein-coupled receptor agonists thrombin and angiotensin II. Doxazosin attenuated the stimulation of DNA synthesis for each of these ligands with median inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) from 0.3 to 1 microM. PDGF-AB (1 nM) increased cell number; doxazosin inhibited this response by 70-80%. Prazosin, a related alpha1-receptor antagonist, had similar but less potent effects on inhibiting mitogenesis in these cells. Doxazosin and prazosin inhibited PDGF-AB-stimulated and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I)-stimulated migration of VSMCs by approximately 40-50%. These effects of doxazosin were likely unrelated to alpha1-receptor blockade because pretreatment of cells with phenoxybenzamine, an irreversible alpha1 antagonist, did not change the capacity of doxazosin to inhibit of PDGF-stimulated mitogenesis. Also, doxazosin inhibited PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis in NIH 3T3 cells, which do not express alpha1 receptors. These results suggest that doxazosin is a potent inhibitor of VSMC proliferation and migration through a mechanism unrelated to alpha1-receptor antagonism.

  17. Tumor necrosis factor alpha induces the expression of transforming growth factor alpha and the epidermal growth factor receptor in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schmiegel, W; Roeder, C; Schmielau, J; Rodeck, U; Kalthoff, H

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha increased the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA and protein in all of six human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines tested. In addition, TNF-alpha increased the expression of an EGFR ligand, transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha, at the mRNA and protein level in all cell lines. Increased expression of EGFR protein was associated with elevated steady-state EGFR mRNA levels. Nuclear run-on analysis showed that increase in EGFR mRNA was due to an increased rate of transcription. Induction of EGFR mRNA expression by TNF-alpha was abrogated by cycloheximide but occurred independently of TNF-alpha-induced production of TGF-alpha protein. Protein kinase A or Gi-type guanine nucleotide-binding proteins were not involved in this process as assessed by using appropriate stimulators and inhibitors of these signal transduction pathways. By contrast, staurosporine, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, partially inhibited, and 4-bromophenacyl bromide, a phospholipase inhibitor, completely inhibited TNF-alpha-dependent EGFR mRNA expression. The phospholipase C-specific inhibitor tricyclodecan-9-yl xanthogenate did not alter TNF-alpha-dependent EGFR mRNA expression, suggesting that phospholipase A2 is involved in the modulation of EGFR expression by TNF-alpha. The simultaneous induction of a ligand/receptor system by TNF-alpha suggests that this cytokine modulates autocrine growth-regulatory pathways in pancreatic cancer cells. Images PMID:8430098

  18. Variability in response to nicotine in the LSxSS RI strains: potential role of polymorphisms in alpha4 and alpha6 nicotinic receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Tritto, Theresa; Stitzel, Jerry A; Marks, Michael J; Romm, Elena; Collins, Allan C

    2002-04-01

    Several studies have shown that genetic factors influence the effects of nicotine on respiration, acoustic startle, Y-maze crosses and rears, heart rate and body temperature in the mouse. Recently, we identified restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) associated with the alpha4 (Chrna4) and alpha6 (Chrna6) nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes in the recombinant inbred (RI) strains derived from the Long-Sleep (LS) and Short-Sleep (SS) mouse lines. The alpha4 polymorphism has been identified as a point-mutation at position 529 (threonine to alanine) and the alpha6 polymorphism has not yet been identified. The studies described here evaluated the potential role of these polymorphisms in regulating sensitivity to nicotine by constructing dose-response curves for the effects of nicotine on six responses in the LSxSS RI strains. The results obtained suggest that both of the polymorphisms may play a role in regulating variability in sensitivity to nicotine. Those RI strains carrying the LS-like alpha4 RFLP were significantly more sensitive to the effects of nicotine on Y-maze crosses and rears, temperature and respiration and were less sensitive to the effects of nicotine on acoustic startle than those strains carrying the SS-like alpha4 RFLP. Those RI strains carrying the LS-like alpha6 RFLP were more sensitive to the effects of nicotine on respiration and acoustic startle, and less sensitive to the effects of nicotine on Y-maze crosses than those strains carrying the SS-like alpha6 RFLP. These results suggest that genetically determined differences in sensitivity to nicotine may be explained, in part, by variability associated with at least two of the neuronal nicotinic receptor genes, alpha4 and alpha6.

  19. Autoradiographic comparison of the distribution of the neutral endopeptidase enkephalinase and of. mu. and delta opioid receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, G.; Hamel, E.; Fournie-Zaluski, M.C.; Roques, B.P.

    1986-03-01

    The neutral endopeptidase EC 3.4.24.11, also designated enkephalinase, has been visualized by in vitro autoradiography using the tritiated inhibitor (/sup 3/H)-N-((2RS)-3-hydroxyaminocarbonyl-2-benzyl-1-oxopropyl)glycine, ((/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly). Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly corresponding to 85% of the total binding to brain slices was inhibited by 1 ..mu..M thiorphan, a selective inhibitor of enkephalinase, but remained unchanged in the presence of captopril, a selective inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme. Very high levels of (/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly binding were found in the choroid plexus and the substantia nigra. High levels were present in the caudate putamen, globus pallidus, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and in the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal cord. The distribution of enkephalinase was compared to that of ..mu.. and delta opioid receptors, selectively labeled with (/sup 3/H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-MePhe-glycinol and (/sup 3/H)Try-D-Thr-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr, respectively. In the caudate putamen, (/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly binding overlapped the clustered ..mu.. sites but appeared more closely related to the diffusely distributed delta sites. The association of enkephalinase with delta and ..mu.. opioid receptors in these areas is consistent with the observed role of the enzyme in regulating the effects of opioid peptides in striatal dopamine release and analgesia, respectively. Except for the choroid plexus and the cerebellum, the close similarity observed in numerous rat brain areas between the distribution of enkephalinase and that of ..mu.. and/ or delta opioid binding sites could account for most of the pharmacological effects elicited by enkephalinase inhibitors.

  20. Orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1 acts as a novel corepressor of liver X receptor alpha and inhibits hepatic lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nedumaran, Balachandar; Kim, Gwang Sik; Hong, Sungpyo; Yoon, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Young Chul; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2010-03-19

    DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on X chromosome, gene 1) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that can repress diverse nuclear receptors and has a key role in adreno-gonadal development. Our previous report has demonstrated that DAX-1 can inhibit hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha transactivity and negatively regulate gluconeogenic gene expression (Nedumaran, B., Hong, S., Xie, Y. B., Kim, Y. H., Seo, W. Y., Lee, M. W., Lee, C. H., Koo, S. H., and Choi, H. S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 27511-27523). Here, we further expand the role of DAX-1 in hepatic energy metabolism. Transfection assays have demonstrated that DAX-1 can inhibit the transcriptional activity of nuclear receptor liver X receptor alpha (LXRalpha). Physical interaction between DAX-1 and LXRalpha was confirmed Immunofluorescent staining in mouse liver shows that LXRalpha and DAX-1 are colocalized in the nucleus. Domain mapping analysis shows that the entire region of DAX-1 is involved in the interaction with the ligand binding domain region of LXRalpha. Competition analyses demonstrate that DAX-1 competes with the coactivator SRC-1 for repressing LXRalpha transactivity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that endogenous DAX-1 recruitment on the SREBP-1c gene promoter was decreased in the presence of LXRalpha agonist. Overexpression of DAX-1 inhibits T7-induced LXRalpha target gene expression, whereas knockdown of endogenous DAX-1 significantly increases T7-induced LXRalpha target gene expression in HepG2 cells. Finally, overexpression of DAX-1 in mouse liver decreases T7-induced LXRalpha target gene expression, liver triglyceride level, and lipid accumulation. Overall, this study suggests that DAX-1, a novel corepressor of LXRalpha, functions as a negative regulator of lipogenic enzyme gene expression in liver. PMID:20080977

  1. Distinct modes of interaction of the retinoic acid receptor alpha with natural and synthetic retinoids.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, B; Mouchon, A; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1998-04-30

    Retinoids regulate key cellular processes through their binding to their cognate nuclear receptors, RARs and RXRs. Synthetic ligands mimic most of their biological effects and alteration of their chemical structure confers selectivity for RAR isotypes alpha, beta or gamma. In this study, we have examined the contribution of a domain (L box) of hRARalpha located at the C-terminus of the ligand binding domain (LBD), between helices H11 and H12, to the ligand binding activity of this receptor. By site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate that, in the absence of the ligand-dependent activation domain 2 (AF2-AD), the receptor discriminates between classes of structurally distinct retinoids. This property was lost in the presence of the AF2-AD domain, evidencing major structural transitions in this part of the receptor. We propose that ligand binding occurs in two steps: first, the ligand interacts with the LBD in its opened, holo-receptor conformation in which the L box plays a crucial role in defining the ligand binding repertoire of hRARalpha; secondly, the LBD adopts its closed conformation in which the ligand interacts with the receptor mostly through its carboxylic moiety.

  2. Affinity of the enantiomers of. alpha. - and. beta. -cyclazocine for binding to the phencyclidine and. mu. opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, S.L.; Balster, R.L.; Martin, B.R. )

    1990-01-01

    The enantiomers in the {alpha} and {beta} series of cyclazocine were evaluated for their ability to bind to phencyclidine (PCP) and {mu}-opioid receptors in order to determine their receptor selectivity. The affinity of (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine for the PCP receptor was 1.5 greater than PCP itself. In contrast, (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine were 3-, 5- and 138-fold less potent than PCP, respectively. Scatchard analysis of saturable binding of ({sup 3}H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) also exhibited a homogeneous population of binding sites with an apparent K{sub D} of 1.9 nM and an estimated Bmax of 117 pM. (3H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) binding studies revealed that (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine (K{sub D} = 0.48 nM) was 31-, 1020- and 12,600-fold more potent than (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine, respectively, for binding to the {mu}-opioid receptor. These data show that, although (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine is a potent PCP receptor ligand consistent with its potent PCP-like discriminative stimulus effects, it shows little selectivity for PCP receptor since it also potently displaces {mu}-opioid binding. However, these cyclazocine isomers, due to their extraordinary degree of stereoselectivity, may be useful in characterizing the structural requirements for benzomorphans having activity at the PCP receptor.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of a dual kappa-delta opioid receptor agonist analgesic blocking cocaine reward behavior.

    PubMed

    Váradi, András; Marrone, Gina F; Eans, Shainnel O; Ganno, Michelle L; Subrath, Joan J; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Hunkele, Amanda; Pasternak, Gavril W; McLaughlin, Jay P; Majumdar, Susruta

    2015-11-18

    3-Iodobenzoyl naltrexamine (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic belonging to the pharmacologically diverse 6β-amidoepoxymorphinan group of opioids. We present the synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of five analogs of IBNtxA. The scaffold of IBNtxA was modified by removing the 14-hydroxy group, incorporating a 7,8 double bond and various N-17 alkyl substituents. The structural modifications resulted in analogs with picomolar affinities for opioid receptors. The lead compound (MP1104) was found to exhibit approximately 15-fold greater antinociceptive potency (ED50 = 0.33 mg/kg) compared with morphine, mediated through the activation of kappa- and delta-opioid receptors. Despite its kappa agonism, this lead derivative did not cause place aversion or preference in mice in a place-conditioning assay, even at doses 3 times the analgesic ED50. However, pretreatment with the lead compound prevented the reward behavior associated with cocaine in a conditioned place preference assay. Together, these results suggest the promise of dual acting kappa- and delta-opioid receptor agonists as analgesics and treatments for cocaine addiction.

  4. New World arenavirus clade C, but not clade A and B viruses, utilizes alpha-dystroglycan as its major receptor.

    PubMed

    Spiropoulou, Christina F; Kunz, Stefan; Rollin, Pierre E; Campbell, Kevin P; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2002-05-01

    Alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) has been identified as a major receptor for lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Lassa virus, two Old World arenaviruses. The situation with New World arenaviruses is less clear: previous studies demonstrated that Oliveros virus also exhibited high-affinity binding to alpha-DG but that Guanarito virus did not. To extend these initial studies, several additional Old and New World arenaviruses were screened for entry into mouse embryonic stem cells possessing or lacking alpha-DG. In addition, representative viruses were further analyzed for direct binding to alpha-DG by means of a virus overlay protein blot assay technique. These studies indicate that Old World arenaviruses use alpha-DG as a major receptor, whereas, of the New World arenaviruses, only clade C viruses (i.e., Oliveros and Latino viruses) use alpha-DG as a major receptor. New World clade A and B arenaviruses, which include the highly pathogenic Machupo, Guanarito, Junin, and Sabia viruses, appear to use a different receptor or coreceptor for binding. Previous studies with LCMV have suggested the need for a small aliphatic amino acid at LCMV GP1 glycoprotein amino acid position 260 to allow high-affinity binding to alpha-DG. As reported herein, this requirement appears to be broadly applicable to the arenaviruses as determined by more extensive analysis of alpha-DG receptor usage and GP1 sequences of Old and New World arenaviruses. In addition, GP1 amino acid position 259 also appears to be important, since all arenaviruses showing high-affinity alpha-DG binding possess a bulky aromatic amino acid (tyrosine or phenylalanine) at this position.

  5. PGF(2alpha) FP receptor contributes to brain damage following transient focal brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Sofiyan; Ahmad, Abdullah Shafique; Maruyama, Takayuki; Narumiya, Shuh; Doré, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    Although some of the COX-2 metabolites and prostaglandins have been implicated in stroke and excitotoxicity, the role of prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) and its FP receptor have not been elucidated in the pathogenesis of ischemic-reperfusion (I/R) brain injury. Here we investigated the FP receptor's contribution in a unilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model of focal cerebral ischemia in mice. The MCA in wild type (WT) and FP knockout (FP(-/-)) C57BL/6 male mice was transiently occluded with a monofilament for 90 min. After 96 h of reperfusion, the FP(-/-) mice had 25.3% less neurological deficit (P < 0.05) and 34.4% smaller infarct volumes (P < 0.05) than those of the WT mice. In a separate cohort, physiological parameters were monitored before, during, and after ischemia, and the results revealed no differences between the groups. Because excitotoxicity is an acute mediator of stroke outcome, the effect of acute NMDA-induced neurotoxicity was also tested. Forty-eight hours after unilateral intrastriatal NMDA injection, excitotoxic brain damage was 20.8% less extensive in the FP(-/-) mice (P < 0.05) than in the WT counterparts, further supporting the toxic contribution of the FP receptor in I/R injury. Additionally, we investigated the effect of post-treatment with the FP agonist latanoprost in mice subjected to MCA occlusion; such treatment resulted in an increase in neurological deficit and infarct size in WT mice (P < 0.05), though no effects were observed in the latanoprost-treated FP(-/-) mice. Together, the results suggest that the PGF(2alpha) FP receptor significantly enhances cerebral ischemic and excitotoxic brain injury and that these results are of importance when planning for potential development of therapeutic drugs to treat stroke and its acute and/or long term consequences.

  6. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor is a receptor for connective tissue growth factor.

    PubMed

    Segarini, P R; Nesbitt, J E; Li, D; Hays, L G; Yates, J R; Carmichael, D F

    2001-11-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression is regulated by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and strong up-regulation occurs during wound healing; in situ hybridization data indicate that there are high levels of CTGF expression in fibrotic lesions. Recently the binding parameters of CTGF to both high and lower affinity cell surface binding components have been characterized. Affinity cross-linking and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated the binding of CTGF to a cell surface protein with a mass of approximately 620 kDa. We report here the purification of this protein by affinity chromatography on CTGF coupled to Sepharose and sequence information obtained by mass spectroscopy. The binding protein was identified as the multiligand receptor, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor (LRP). The identification of LRP as a receptor for CTGF was validated by several studies: 1) binding competition with many ligands that bind to LRP, including receptor-associated protein; 2) immunoprecipitation of CTGF-receptor complex with LRP antibodies; and 3) cells that are genetically deficient for LRP were unable to bind CTGF. Last, CTGF is rapidly internalized and degraded and this process is LRP-dependent. In summary, our data indicate that LRP is a receptor for CTGF, and may play an important role in mediating CTGF biology.

  7. Cloning and mapping of the mouse {alpha}7-neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1995-03-20

    We report the isolation of cDNA clones for the mouse {alpha}7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit (gene symbol Acra7), the only nicotinic receptor subunit known to bind a-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. This gene may have relevance to nicotine sensitivity and to some electrophysiologic findings in schizophrenia. The mouse {alpha}7 subunit gene encodes a protein of 502 amino acids with substantial identity to the rat (99.6%), human (92.8%), and chicken (87.5%) amino acid sequences. The {alpha}7 gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 7 near the p locus with the following gene order from proximal to distal: Myod1-3.5 {+-}1.7 cM-Gas2-0.9 cM {+-} 0.9 cM-D7Mit70-1.8 {+-} 1.2 cM- Acra7-4.4 {+-}1.0 cM-Hras1-ps11/Igf1r/Snrp2a. The human gene was confirmed to map to the homologous region of human chromosome 15q13-q14. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Adhesion of alpha5beta1 receptors to biomimetic substrates constructed from peptide amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Dillo, A K; Ochsenhirt, S E; McCarthy, J B; Fields, G B; Tirrell, M

    2001-06-01

    Biomimetic membrane surfaces functionalized with fragments of the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin, are constructed from mixtures of peptide and polyethylene glycol (PEG) amphiphiles. Peptides from the primary binding loop, GRGDSP, were used in conjunction with the synergy site peptide, PHSRN, in the III(9-10) sites of human fibronectin. These peptides were attached to dialkyl lipid tails to form peptide amphiphiles. PEG amphiphiles were mixed in the layer to minimize non-specific adhesion in the background. GRGDSP and PEG amphiphiles or GRGDSP, PHSRN, and PEG amphiphiles were mixed in various ratios and deposited on solid substrates from the air-water interface using Langmuir-Blodgett techniques. In this method, peptide composition, density, and presentation could be controlled accurately. The effectiveness of these substrates to mimic native fibronectin is evaluated by their ability to generate adhesive forces when they are in contact with purified activated alpha5beta1 integrin receptors that are immobilized on an opposing surface. Adhesion is measured using a contact mechanical approach (JKR experiment). The effects of membrane composition, density, temperature, and peptide conformation on adhesion to activated integrins in this simulated cell adhesion setup were determined. Addition of the synergy site, PHSRN, was found to increase adhesion of alpha5beta1, to biomimetic substrates markedly. Increased peptide mobility (due to increased experimental temperature) increased integrin adhesion markedly at low peptide concentrations. A balance between peptide density and steric accessibility of the receptor binding face to alpha5beta1 integrin was required for highest adhesion.

  9. Development of a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) for monitoring estrogen receptor alpha activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, Elisa; Mirasoli, Mara; Karp, Matti; Virta, Marko; Roda, Aldo

    2004-06-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor, able to dimerize after activation and to bind specific DNA sequences (estrogen response elements), thus activating gene target transcription. Since ER homo- and hetero-dimerization (giving a-a and a-b isoforms) is a fundamental step for receptor activation, we developed an assay for detecting compounds that induce human ERa homo-dimerization based on bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). BRET is a non-radiative energy transfer, occurring between a luminescent donor and a fluorescent acceptor, that strictly depends on the closeness between the two proteins and can therefore be used for studying protein-protein interactions. We cloned ERa coding sequence in frame with either a variant of the green fluorescent protein (enhanced yellow fluorescent protein, EYFP) or Renilla luciferase (RLuc). Upon ERa homo-dimerization, BRET process takes place in the presence of the RLuc substrate coelenterazine resulting in EYFP emission at its characteristic wavelength. The ER alpha-Rluc and ER alpha-EYFP fusion proteins were cloned, then the occurrence of BRET in the presence of ER alpha activators was assayed both in vivo, within cells, and in vitro, with purified fusion proteins.

  10. Nonequivalence of alpha-bungarotoxin binding sites in the native nicotinic receptor molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Conti-Tronconi, B.M.; Tang, F.; Walgrave, S.; Gallagher, W. )

    1990-01-30

    In the native, membrane-bound form of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (M-AcChR) the two sites for the cholinergic antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BGT) have different binding properties. One site has high affinity, and the M-AcChR/alpha-BGT complexes thus formed dissociate very slowly, similar to the complexes formed with detergent-solubilized AcChR (S-AcChR). The second site has much lower affinity (KD approximately 59 +/- 35 nM) and forms quickly reversible complexes. The nondenaturing detergent Triton X-100 is known to solubilize the AcChR in a form unable, upon binding of cholinergic ligands, to open the ion channel and to become desensitized. Solubilization of the AcChR in Triton X-100 affects the binding properties of this second site and converts it to a high-affinity, slowly reversible site. Prolonged incubation of M-AcChR at 4 degrees C converts the low-affinity site to a high-affinity site similar to those observed in the presence of Triton X-100. Although the two sites have similar properties when the AcChR is solubilized in Triton X-100, their nonequivalence can be demonstrated by the effect on alpha-BGT binding of concanavalin A, which strongly reduces the association rate of one site only. The Bmax of alpha-BGT to either Triton-solubilized AcChR or M-AcChR is not affected by the presence of concanavalin A. Occupancy of the high-affinity, slowly reversible site in M-AcChR inhibits the Triton X-100 induced conversion to irreversibility of the second site. At difference with alpha-BGT, the long alpha-neurotoxin from Naja naja siamensis venom (alpha-NTX) binds with high affinity and in a very slowly reversible fashion to two sites in the M-AcChR. We confirm here that Triton-solubilized AcChR or M-AcChR binds in a very slowly reversible fashion the same amount of alpha-NTX.

  11. Chronic nicotine treatment attenuates alpha 7 nicotinic receptor deficits following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Verbois, S L; Scheff, S W; Pauly, J R

    2003-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often causes a persistent and debilitating impairment of cognitive function. Although the neurochemical basis for TBI-induced cognitive dysfunction is not well characterized, some studies suggest prominent involvement of the CNS cholinergic system. Previous studies from our laboratories have shown that alpha 7* nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChrs) are especially vulnerable to the pathophysiological effects of TBI. Hippocampal and cortical alpha-[(125)I]-bungarotoxin (BTX) expression of alpha 7* nAChrs is significantly decreased in many brain regions following TBI and this reduction persists for at least 3 weeks following injury. In the present study we evaluated whether chronic nicotine infusion could attenuate TBI-induced deficits in alpha 7* nAChr expression. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were sham-operated, or subjected to mild or moderate unilateral cortical contusion injury. Immediately following brain injury, osmotic mini-pumps that delivered chronic saline or nicotine (0.125 or 0.25 mg/kg/h) were implanted. The animals were euthanatized and the brains prepared for nAChr quantitative autoradiography, 7 days following surgery. Brain injury caused significant decreases in BTX binding in several regions of the hippocampus. TBI-induced deficits in alpha 7* nAChr density were reversed in four of the six hippocampal brain regions evaluated following chronic nicotine administration. If TBI-induced deficits in alpha 7* nAChr expression play a role in post-injury cognitive impairment, pharmacological treatments which restore nAChr binding to control levels may be therapeutically useful.

  12. A polymorphic autoregulatory hormone response element in the human estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) promoter dictates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha control of ERRalpha expression.

    PubMed

    Laganière, Josée; Tremblay, Gilles B; Dufour, Catherine R; Giroux, Sylvie; Rousseau, François; Giguère, Vincent

    2004-04-30

    The orphan nuclear estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) and transcriptional cofactor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) are involved in the regulation of energy metabolism. Recently, extensive cross-talk between PGC-1alpha and ERRalpha has been demonstrated. The presence of PGC-1alpha is associated with an elevated expression of ERRalpha, and the two proteins can influence the transcriptional activities of one another. Using a candidate gene approach to detect regulatory variants within genes encoding nuclear receptors, we have identified a 23-bp sequence (ESRRA23) containing two nuclear receptor recognition half-site motifs that is present in 1-4 copies within the promoter of the human ESRRA gene encoding ERRalpha. The ESRRA23 sequence contains a functional ERR response element that is specifically bound by ERRalpha, and chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that endogenous ERRalpha occupies its own promoter in vivo. Strikingly, introduction of PGC-1alpha in HeLa cells by transient transfection induces the activity of the ESRRA promoter in a manner that is dependent on the presence of the ESRRA23 element and on its dosage. Coexpression of ERRalpha and PGC-1alpha results in a synergistic activation of the ESRRA promoter. In experiments using ERRalpha null fibroblasts, the ability of PGC-1alpha to stimulate the ESRRA promoter is considerably reduced but can be restored by addition of ERRalpha. Taken together, these results demonstrate that an interdependent ERRalpha/PGC-1alpha-based transcriptional pathway targets the ESRRA23 element to dictate the level of ERRalpha expression. This study further suggests that this regulatory polymorphism may provide differential responses to ERRalpha/PGC-1alpha-mediated metabolic cues in the human population.

  13. Central role of fibroblast alpha3 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in mediating cutaneous effects of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, Juan; Hall, Leon L; Ndoye, Assane; Nguyen, Vu Thuong; Chernyavsky, Alexander I; Bercovich, Dani; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Beaudet, Arthur L; Grando, Sergei A

    2003-02-01

    Smoking is associated with aberrant cutaneous tissue remodeling, such as precocious skin aging and impaired wound healing. The mechanism is not fully understood. Dermal fibroblasts (DF) are the primary cellular component of the dermis and may provide a target for pathobiologic effects of tobacco products. The purpose of this study was to characterize a mechanism of nicotine (Nic) effects on the growth and tissue remodeling function of DF. We hypothesized that the effects of Nic on DF result from its binding to specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed by these cells and that downstream signaling from the receptors alters normal cell functioning, leading to changes in skin homeostasis. Using RT-PCR and Western blotting, we found that a 24-hour exposure of human DF to 10 micro M Nic causes a 1.9- to 28-fold increase of the mRNA and protein levels of the cell cycle regulators p21, cyclin D1, Ki-67, and PCNA and a 1.7- to 2-fold increase of the apoptosis regulators Bcl-2 and caspase 3. Nic exposure also up-regulated expression of the dermal matrix proteins collagen type Ialpha1 and elastin as well as matrix metalloproteinase-1. Mecamylamine (Mec), the specific antagonist of nAChRs, abolished Nic-induced alterations, indicating that they resulted from a pharmacologic stimulation of nAChRs expressed by DF. To establish the relevance of these findings to a specific nicotinergic pathway, we studied human DF transfected with anti-alpha3 antisense oligonucleotides and murine DF from alpha3 nAChR knockout mice. In both cases, lack of alpha3 was associated with alterations in fibroblast growth and function that were opposite to those observed in DF treated with Nic, suggesting that the nicotinic effects on DF were mostly mediated by alpha3 nAChR. In addition to alpha3, the nAChR subunits detected in human DF were alpha5, alpha7, beta2, and beta4. The exposure of DF to Nic altered the relative amounts of each of these subunits, leading to reciprocal changes

  14. Integrated Summary Report: Validation of Two Binding Assays Using Human Recombinant Estrogen Receptor Alpha (hrERa)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Integrated Summary Report (ISR) summarizes, in a single document, the results from an international multi-laboratory validation study conducted for two in vitro estrogen receptor (ER) binding assays. These assays both use human recombinant estrogen receptor, alpha subtype (h...

  15. Stat2 binding to the interferon-alpha receptor 2 subunit is not required for interferon-alpha signaling.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vinh-Phúc; Saleh, Abu Z M; Arch, Allison E; Yan, Hai; Piazza, Flavia; Kim, John; Krolewski, John J

    2002-03-22

    The interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) receptor consists of two subunits, the IFNalpha receptor 1 (IFNaR1) and 2 (IFNaR2) chains. Following ligand binding, IFNaR1 is phosphorylated on tyrosine 466, and this site recruits Stat2 via its SH2 domain. In contrast, IFNaR2 binds Stat2 constitutively. In this study we have characterized the Stat2-IFNaR2 interaction and examined its role in IFNalpha signaling. Stat2 binds the major IFNaR2 protein but not a variant containing a shorter cytoplasmic domain. The interaction does not require a STAT SH2 domain. Both tyrosine-phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated Stat2 bind IFNaR2 in vitro; however, relatively little phosphorylated Stat2 associates with IFNaR2 in vivo. In vitro binding assays defined IFNaR2 residues 418-444 as the minimal interaction domain and site-specific mutation of conserved acidic residues within this domain disrupted in vitro and in vivo binding. An IFNaR2 construct carrying these mutations was either (i) overexpressed in 293T cells or (ii) used to complement IFNaR2-deficient U5A cells. Unexpectedly, the activity of an IFNalpha-dependent reporter gene was not reduced but, instead, was enhanced up to 2-fold. This suggests that this particular IFNaR2-Stat2 interaction is not required for IFNalpha signaling, but might act to negatively inhibit signaling. Finally, a doubly truncated recombinant fragment of Stat2, spanning residues 136-702, associated with IFNaR2 in vitro, indicating that the interaction with IFNaR2 is direct and occurs in a central region of Stat2 marked by a hydrophobic core.

  16. Interaction between Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists and. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in rabbit ileal cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Homeidan, F.R.; Wicks, J.; Cusolito, S.; El-Sabban, M.E.; Sharp, G.W.G.; Donowitz, M.

    1986-03-05

    An interaction between Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists and the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor on active electrolyte transport was demonstrated in rabbit ileum. Clonidine, an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-agonist, stimulated NaCl absorption apparently by Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonism since it inhibited /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ uptake across the basolateral membrane and decreased total ileal calcium content. This stimulation was inhibited by the Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists dl- and l-verapamil and cadmium but not by nifedipine. The binding of /sup 3/H-yohimbine, a specific ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic antagonist, was studied on purified ileal cell membranes using a rapid filtration technique. dl-Verapamil and Cd/sup + +/ inhibited the specific binding of /sup 3/H-yohimbine over the same concentration range in which they affected transport. In contrast, nifedipine had no effect on binding, just as it had no effect on clonidine-stimulated NaCl absorption. These data demonstrate that there is an interaction between Ca/sup + +/-channels and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in ileal basolateral membranes. Some Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists alter ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic binding to the receptor and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-agonist binding leads to changes in Ca/sup + +/ entry. A close spatial relationship between the Ca/sup + +/-channel and the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-receptor could explain the data.

  17. Genomic organization of the human T-cell receptor variable {alpha} (TCRAV) gene cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Ibberson, M.R.; Copier, J.P.; So, A.K.

    1995-07-20

    A long-range physical map of the human T-cell receptor variable {alpha} (TCRAV) locus was produced using 23 V{alpha} subgroup-specific probes. Linkage disequilibrium across the locus was also studied using polymorphic TCRAV markers. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to map V{alpha} gene segments onto one SfiI fragment of 500 kb and two of 200 kb using DNA from peripheral blood neutrophils. PCR and conventional Southern techniques on Jurkat, CEM, and H9 T-cell lines were used to establish the 5{prime} to 3{prime} order of the gene segments and the relative positions of V{alpha} gene segments on the SfiI fragments. The linkage disequilibrium study used single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis to genotype 100 normal caucasoid subjects for TCRAV5S1, V6S1, V8S1, V17S1, and V21S1 polymorphisms. Strong linkage disequilibrium was detected between V5S1 and V8S1, in concordance with the physical map. This new information will be useful for future studies of genetic variation at the TCRAV locus, its role in the shaping of the TCR repertoire, and its possible contribution to autoimmune diseases. 46 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Prenatal nicotine exposure alters the nicotinic receptor subtypes that modulate excitation of parasympathetic cardiac neurons in the nucleus ambiguus from primarily alpha3beta2 and/or alpha6betaX to alpha3beta4.

    PubMed

    Kamendi, Harriet; Stephens, Christopher; Dergacheva, Olga; Wang, Xin; Huang, Zheng-Gui; Bouairi, Evguenia; Gorini, Christopher; McIntosh, J Michael; Mendelowitz, David

    2006-07-01

    Nicotinic receptors play an essential role in central cardiorespiratory function, however, the types of nicotinic receptors responsible for activating cardiac vagal neurons in the nucleus ambiguus that control heart rate are unknown. This study tests whether alpha-conotoxin MII and alpha-conotoxin AuIB sensitive nicotinic receptors are involved in augmentation of glutamatergic neurotransmission and changes in holding current in cardiac vagal neurons, and whether exposure to nicotine in the prenatal period alters these responses. The nicotinic agonist cytisine significantly increased the holding current and amplitude of glutamatergic mEPSCs. In unexposed animals alpha-conotoxin MII (100nM) significantly reduced the increase in mEPSC amplitude and change in holding current evoked by cytisine. However, in animals prenatally exposed to nicotine, alpha-conotoxin MII blunted but did not block the increase in mEPSC amplitude but blocked the increase in holding current evoked by cytisine. In unexposed animals, alpha-conotoxin AuIB (10microM) blocked the cytisine evoked increase in mEPSC amplitude and inhibited but did not abolish the increase in holding current. In contrast, in animals exposed to nicotine, alpha-conotoxin AuIB blunted the increase in mEPSC amplitude, and completely abolished the cytisine evoked increase in holding current. These data demonstrate that the prenatal nicotine exposure alters the nicotinic receptors involved in excitation of cardiac vagal neurons.

  19. Influence of Panax ginseng on Alpha-Adrenergic Receptor of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Kang; Chung, Joo-Ho; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Kang Hyo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common prostate problem in older men. The present study aimed to investigate the inhibitory effect of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (P. ginseng) on a rat model of testosterone-induced BPH. Methods The rats were divided into 3 groups (each group, n=10): control, testosterone-induced BPH (20 mg/kg, subcutaneous injection), and P. ginseng (200 mg/kg, orally) groups. After 4 weeks, all animals were sacrificed to examine the blood biochemical profiles, prostate volume, weight, histopathological changes, alpha-1D adrenergic receptor (Adra1d) mRNA expression, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) protein expression. Results The group treated with P. ginseng showed significantly lesser prostate size and weight than the testosterone-induced BPH group. In addition, P. ginseng decreased the mRNA expression of Adra1d as well as the expression of EGFR and BCL2 in prostate tissue. Conclusions These results suggest that P. ginseng may inhibit the alpha-1-adrenergic receptor to suppress the development of BPH. PMID:25558416

  20. Relationship of changing delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase activity to (125I)iododeoxyuridine uptake during regeneration of involuted rat prostates

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, S.; Higashi, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Oshima, H. )

    1989-04-01

    To elucidate the phenotypic expression of proliferating prostatic cells, rats were castrated, and the regenerating process of involuted ventral prostates during testosterone propionate (TP) administration was investigated by examining morphology, (5-{sup 125}I)iododeoxyuridine ({sup 125}I-UdR) uptake, DNA content, weight, acid phosphatase, and delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase (5 alpha-reductase) activities. Morphologically, TP treatment initially increased the number of epithelial cells lining glandular lobules and subsequently restored the shape of epithelial cells. {sup 125}I-UdR uptake peaked on Day 3 of TP treatment and stayed at higher levels than for uncastrated controls until Day 14 of treatment. Prostatic weight, protein content, acid phosphatase, and DNA content returned to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of TP treatment. TP administration markedly stimulated prostatic 5 alpha-reductase activity, which peaked on the Day 5 of treatment and decreased to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of treatment. It is concluded that TP administration to castrated rats initially induced active mitotic division of the remaining stem cells, followed by formation of differentiated functional epithelial cells. Prostatic 5 alpha-reductase was highly active at the initial phase of active mitotic cell division. The major portion of the increased enzyme activity can be regarded as a phenotypic expression of stem or transient cells of prostatic epithelium.

  1. Normal sleep homeostasis and lack of epilepsy phenotype in GABA A receptor alpha3 subunit-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Winsky-Sommerer, R; Knapman, A; Fedele, D E; Schofield, C M; Vyazovskiy, V V; Rudolph, U; Huguenard, J R; Fritschy, J-M; Tobler, I

    2008-06-23

    Thalamo-cortical networks generate specific patterns of oscillations during distinct vigilance states and epilepsy, well characterized by electroencephalography (EEG). Oscillations depend on recurrent synaptic loops, which are controlled by GABAergic transmission. In particular, GABA A receptors containing the alpha3 subunit are expressed predominantly in cortical layer VI and thalamic reticular nucleus (nRT) and regulate the activity and firing pattern of neurons in relay nuclei. Therefore, ablation of these receptors by gene targeting might profoundly affect thalamo-cortical oscillations. Here, we investigated the role of alpha3-GABA A receptors in regulating vigilance states and seizure activity by analyzing chronic EEG recordings in alpha3 subunit-knockout (alpha3-KO) mice. The presence of postsynaptic alpha3-GABA A receptors/gephyrin clusters in the nRT and GABA A-mediated synaptic currents in acute thalamic slices was also examined. EEG spectral analysis showed no difference between genotypes during non rapid-eye movement (NREM) sleep or at waking-NREM sleep transitions. EEG power in the spindle frequency range (10-15 Hz) was significantly lower at NREM-REM sleep transitions in mutant compared with wild-type mice. Enhancement of sleep pressure by 6 h sleep deprivation did not reveal any differences in the regulation of EEG activities between genotypes. Finally, the waking EEG showed a slightly larger power in the 11-13-Hz band in alpha3-KO mice. However, neither behavior nor the waking EEG showed alterations suggestive of absence seizures. Furthermore, alpha3-KO mice did not differ in seizure susceptibility in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Strikingly, despite the disruption of postsynaptic gephyrin clusters, whole-cell patch clamp recordings revealed intact inhibitory synaptic transmission in the nRT of alpha3-KO mice. These findings show that the lack of alpha3-GABA(A) receptors is extensively compensated for to preserve the integrity of thalamo

  2. Alpha-adrenergic receptors mediate imipramine/alarm substance-induced reaction in rats.

    PubMed

    Abel, E L

    1994-08-01

    The mechanism of adverse imipramine-induced reactions (jitteriness, convulsions) was investigated by precipitating such reactions in rats with three injections (IP) of imipramine (5-40 mg/kg) at 24, 5, and 1 h before testing, and comparing their occurrence with comparable treatments using specific noradrenergic and serotonergic reuptake inhibitors [nortriptyline (10 or 30 mg/kg, IP), citalopram (0.5-5.0 mg/kg, IP)]. This initial study indicated that these reactions were mediated by imipramine's noradrenergic effects. Subsequent combinations of imipramine and an alpha 2 agonist (clonidine, 5 mg/kg) and antagonist (yohimbine, 2 mg/kg), and a beta-adrenergic antagonist (propranolol, 2 or 5 mg/kg) (all administered IP 0.5 h after the last injection of imipramine) suggested imipramine's adverse effects were mediated by alpha 2 receptors. The possible involvement of the locus ceruleus in these effects was considered.

  3. A role for alpha-adrenergic receptors in extinction of conditioned fear and cocaine conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Rick E; Lattal, K Matthew

    2010-04-01

    Previous work has demonstrated an important role for adrenergic receptors in memory processes in fear and drug conditioning paradigms. Recent studies have also demonstrated alterations in extinction in these paradigms using drug treatments targeting beta- and alpha2-adrenergic receptors, but little is known about the role of alpha-adrenergic receptors in extinction. The current study examined whether antagonism of alpha-adrenergic receptors would impair the consolidation of extinction in fear and cocaine conditioned place preference paradigms. After contextual fear conditioning, injections of the alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin (1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg) following nonreinforced context exposures slowed the loss of conditioned freezing over the course of 5 extinction sessions (Experiment 1). After cocaine place conditioning, prazosin had no effect on the rate of extinction over 8 nonreinforced test sessions. Following postextinction reconditioning, however, prazosin-treated mice showed a robust place preference, but vehicle-treated mice did not, suggesting that prazosin reduced the persistent effects of extinction (Experiment 2). These results confirm the involvement of the alpha-adrenergic receptor in extinction processes in both appetitive and aversive preparations.

  4. Expression of delta- and mu-opioid receptors in the ventricular and subventricular zones of the developing human neocortex.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anushree; Khurshid, Nazia; Kumar, Praveen; Iyengar, Soumya

    2008-07-01

    Recent research has documented the involvement of the endogenous opioid system in neural development, including neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation. However, the expression of opioid receptors (ORs) in different cell types of the human ventricular and subventricular zones (VZ and SVZ) has not been studied during early gestation. In the present study, we have used immunohistochemistry and quantified the results to demonstrate that the levels of delta- and mu-OR subtypes were high in the VZ and SVZ between 11 and 16 gestation weeks (GW) and decreased by 20GW. These results have also been confirmed by studying OR mRNA expression in the VZ and SVZ. Both delta- and mu-OR subtypes were expressed by multipotential stem cells, newly differentiated neurons and developing glial cells to different extents. However, migrating neurons expressed negligible levels of both OR subtypes. Our results suggest that the opioid system may affect cellular proliferation and/or differentiation of stem cells into neurons and glia during the first and second trimesters of gestation in humans. Since layers II and III of the cerebral cortex are being formed during the second trimester, their development is most likely affected by the opioid system mediated through delta- and mu-ORs.

  5. T helper cell recognition of muscle acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis. Epitopes on the gamma and delta subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi, A A; Protti, M P; Dalton, M W; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1993-01-01

    We tested the response of CD4+ cells and/or total lymphocytes from the blood of 22 myasthenic patients and 10 healthy controls to overlapping synthetic peptides, 20 residues long, to screen the sequence of the gamma and delta subunits of human muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The gamma subunit is part of the AChR expressed in embryonic muscle and is substituted in the AChRs of most adult muscles by an epsilon subunit. The delta subunit is present in both embryonic and adult AChRs. Adult extrinsic ocular muscles, which are preferentially and sometimes uniquely affected by myasthenic symptoms, and thymus, which has a still obscure but important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, express the embryonic gamma subunit. Anti-AChR CD4+ responses were more easily detected after CD8+ depletion. All responders recognized epitopes on both the gamma and delta subunits and had severe symptoms. In four patients the CD4+ cell response was tested twice, when the symptoms were severe and during a period of remission. Consistently, the response was only detectable, or larger, when the patients were severely affected. Images PMID:7688757

  6. Discovery of an Oxybenzylglycine Based Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor [alpha] Selective Agonist 2-((3-((2-(4-Chlorophenyl)-5-methyloxazol-4-yl)methoxy)benzyl)(methoxycarbonyl)amino)acetic Acid (BMS-687453)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Kennedy, Lawrence J.; Shi, Yan; Tao, Shiwei; Ye, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Stephanie Y.; Wang, Ying; Hernndez, Andrs S.; Wang, Wei; Devasthale, Pratik V.; Chen, Sean; Lai, Zhi; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shung; Smirk, Rebecca A.; Bolton, Scott A.; Ryono, Denis E.; Zhang, Huiping; Lim, Ngiap-Kie; Chen, Bang-Chi; Locke, Kenneth T.; O’Malley, Kevin M.; Zhang, Litao; Srivastava, Rai Ajit; Miao, Bowman; Meyers, Daniel S.; Monshizadegan, Hossain; Search, Debra; Grimm, Denise; Zhang, Rongan; Harrity, Thomas; Kunselman, Lori K.; Cap, Michael; Kadiyala, Pathanjali; Hosagrahara, Vinayak; Zhang, Lisa; Xu, Carrie; Li, Yi-Xin; Muckelbauer, Jodi K.; Chang, Chiehying; An, Yongmi; Krystek, Stanley R.; Blanar, Michael A.; Zahler, Robert; Mukherjee, Ranjan; Cheng, Peter T.W.; Tino, Joseph A.

    2010-04-12

    An 1,3-oxybenzylglycine based compound 2 (BMS-687453) was discovered to be a potent and selective peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} agonist, with an EC{sub 50} of 10 nM for human PPAR{alpha} and 410-fold selectivity vs human PPAR{gamma} in PPAR-GAL4 transactivation assays. Similar potencies and selectivity were also observed in the full length receptor co-transfection assays. Compound 2 has negligible cross-reactivity against a panel of human nuclear hormone receptors including PPAR{delta}. Compound 2 demonstrated an excellent pharmacological and safety profile in preclinical studies and thus was chosen as a development candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia. The X-ray cocrystal structures of the early lead compound 12 and compound 2 in complex with PPAR{alpha} ligand binding domain (LBD) were determined. The role of the crystal structure of compound 12 with PPAR{alpha} in the development of the SAR that ultimately resulted in the discovery of compound 2 is discussed.

  7. Comparison of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors and their regulation in rodent and porcine species

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, D.J.; Bylund, D.B.

    1984-02-01

    The alpha-2 adrenergic antagonist (/sup 3/H)yohimbine (YOH) and the alpha-2 agonist (/sup 3/H)p-aminoclonidine (PAC) saturably label high-affinity binding sites in the submandibular gland from 3-week-old rats and 5-week-old pigs and in the lung from neonatal rats and 5-week-old pigs. (/sup 3/H)YOH had KD values of 5.5, 1.8, 0.45 and 0.22 nM in the rat gland and lung and porcine gland and lung, respectively. KD values of 2.4, 5.3 and 1.3 nM were found for (/sup 3/H)PAC in rodent and pig submandibular gland and pig lung, respectively. Both /sup 3/H-ligands labeled approximately the same density of sites within each tissue except in the rat lung in which (/sup 3/H)PAC binding was too low to reliably estimate. In all cases the pharmacologic profile was indicative of an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor site. However, the Ki of yohimbine vs. (/sup 3/H)PAC was 30- to 140-fold higher for the rodent relative to the porcine species. GTP decreased the affinity of (-)-epinephrine and PAC at (/sup 3/H)YOH-labeled sites in the pig gland and lung, but did not shift the affinity of epinephrine in the rat gland. These results suggest the possibility of subtype or species differences for the alpha-2 receptor. The Ki values of the antagonists YOH and phentolamine were different at (/sup 3/H)PAC and (/sup 3/H)YOH sites. GTP caused a dose-dependent reduction in (/sup 3/H)PAC binding in the porcine submandibular gland and lung. At 10 microM GTP, this loss was due to a decrease in /sup 3/H-agonist affinity, but not density.

  8. Stable expression of transfected Torpedo acetylcholine receptor. cap alpha. subunits in mouse fibroblast L cells

    SciTech Connect

    Claudio, T.

    1987-08-01

    Torpedo californica electric organ cDNA libraries were constructed in lambdagt10 and lambdagt11. Four acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) subunit cDNA clones were isolated and shown to contain the entire coding region for each of the subunits. When in vitro synthesized AcChoR mRNA was microinjected into Xenopus laevis oocytes, functional cell surface AcChoRs were expressed. A very simple and fast /sup 22/Na-uptake experiment was performed on batches of microinjected oocytes to identify oocytes that were expressing large quantities of functional cell surface AcChoRs for use in single-channel recordings. In addition to the transient expression system, DNA-mediated contransformation is described, which is a method for stably introducing AcChoR cDNAs into the chromosomes of tissue culture cells. Because the AcChoR is composed of four different subunits, it is necessary to integrate four cDNAs into the chromosomes of the same cell before stable expression of a completely functional receptor complex can be established. The authors show that 80% of the cells that integrated the selectable marker gene into their chromosomes also integrated all four AcChoR cDNAs. When Torpedo ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA inserted into an appropriate expression vector was introduced into cells by transfection, ..cap alpha..-subunit protein was synthesized that migrated on NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gels with the same molecular mass as native Torpedo ..cap alpha.. subunits and expressed antigenic determinants similar to those of native Torpedo ..cap alpha.. subunits.

  9. Protons inhibit Cl- conductance by direct or allosteric interaction with the GABA-binding site in the rat recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2L and alpha1beta2 GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-De; Rahman, Mozibur; Zhu, Di

    2005-12-28

    Functional roles of external pH on the Cl- conductance were examined on Xenopus oocytes expressing rat recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2L and alpha1beta2 GABAA receptors. Acidic pH inhibited GABA-response in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, significantly increasing the EC50 without appreciably changing the slope or maximal currents induced by GABA in the alpha1beta2gamma2L and alpha1beta2 receptors. In contrast, protonation did not influence the pentobarbital-gated currents in the alpha1beta2gamma2L receptors, suggesting that protons do not modulate channel activity by directly affecting the channel gating process. Protons competitively inhibited the bicuculline-induced antagonism on GABA in the alpha1beta2gamma2L receptors. The data support the hypothesis that protons inhibit GABAA receptor function by direct or allosteric interaction with the GABA-binding site.

  10. Localization of transforming growth factor alpha and its receptor in gastric mucosal cells. Implications for a regulatory role in acid secretion and mucosal renewal.

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, R D; Barnard, J A; McCutchen, C M; Cherner, J A; Coffey, R J

    1989-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) shares with epidermal growth factor (EGF) structural homology (35%), a common cell-surface membrane receptor (TGF alpha/EGF receptor), and a nearly identical spectrum of biological activity, including inhibition of gastric acid secretion. Herein, we report expression of TGF alpha mRNA in normal gastric mucosa of the adult guinea pig, rat, and dog. TGF alpha mRNA was also detected in matched surgically resected gastric mucosa and adjacent gastric carcinoma from 10 patients, and in gastric mucosa adjacent to a benign ulcer from an additional patient. TGF alpha protein was quantitated by radioimmunoassay and was present in tumor and adjacent mucosa. TGF alpha/EGF receptor mRNA was also detected in gastric mucosa from all species studied. Localization of TGF alpha and TGF alpha/EGF receptor mRNA expression was examined in samples of unfractionated guinea pig gastric mucosa and from chief cell-enriched and parietal cell-enriched fractions. All samples exhibited TGF alpha and TGF alpha/EGF receptor expression. The TGF alpha signal was greatest in the parietal cell fraction (5.8-fold increase), but was also enhanced in the chief cell fraction (1.9-fold increase) relative to the unfractionated gastric mucosa. Like TGF alpha expression, TGF alpha/EGF receptor mRNA expression was most intense in the parietal cell-enriched fraction (7.8-fold increase), but was also increased in the chief cell-enriched fraction (2.7-fold increase) relative to the unfractionated guinea pig gastric mucosa. We conclude that TGF alpha and TGF alpha/EGF receptor genes are expressed in normal adult mammalian gastric mucosa. These findings, when interpreted in light of described actions of TGF alpha and EGF, provide evidence that local production of TGF alpha could play an important role in the regulation of acid secretion and mucosal renewal in the stomach. Images PMID:2760208

  11. Increased uptake of alpha-hydroxy aldehyde-modified low density lipoprotein by macrophage scavenger receptors.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, M; Heinecke, J W; Chait, A

    2000-07-01

    Reactive aldehydes can be formed during the oxidation of lipids, glucose, and amino acids and during the nonenzymatic glycation of proteins. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) modified with malondialdehyde are taken up by scavenger receptors on macrophages. In the current studies we determined whether alpha-hydroxy aldehydes also modify LDL to a form recognized by macrophage scavenger receptors. LDL modified by incubation with glycolaldehyde, glyceraldehyde, erythrose, arabinose, or glucose (alpha-hydroxy aldehydes that possess two, three, four, five, and six carbon atoms, respectively) exhibited decreased free amino groups and increased mobility on agarose gel electrophoresis. The lower the molecular weight of the aldehyde used for LDL modification, the more rapid and extensive was the derivatization of free amino groups. Approximately 50-75% of free lysine groups in LDL were modified after incubation with glyceraldehyde, glycolaldehyde, or erythrose for 24-48 h. Less extensive reductions in free amino groups were observed when LDL was incubated with arabinose or glucose, even at high concentration for up to 5 days. LDL modified with glycolaldehyde and glyceraldehyde labeled with (125)I was degraded more extensively by human monocyte-derived macrophages than was (125)I-labeled native LDL. Conversely, LDL modified with (125)I-labeled erythrose, arabinose, or glucose was degraded less rapidly than (125)I-labeled native LDL. Competition for the degradation of LDL modified with (125)I-labeled glyceraldehyde was nearly complete with acetyl-, glycolaldehyde-, and glyceraldehyde-modified LDL, fucoidin, and advanced glycation end product-modified bovine serum albumin, and absent with unlabeled native LDL. These results suggest that short-chain alpha-hydroxy aldehydes react with amino groups on LDL to yield moieties that are important determinants of recognition by macrophage scavenger receptors.

  12. PGC-1{beta} regulates mouse carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase through estrogen-related receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Gacias, Mar; Perez-Marti, Albert; Pujol-Vidal, Magdalena; Marrero, Pedro F.; Haro, Diego; Relat, Joana

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Cact gene contains a functional consensus sequence for ERR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This sequence binds ERR{alpha} both in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This ERRE is required for the activation of Cact expression by the PGC-1/ERR axis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results add Cact as a genuine gene target of these transcriptional regulators. -- Abstract: Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) is a mitochondrial-membrane carrier proteins that mediates the transport of acylcarnitines into the mitochondrial matrix for their oxidation by the mitochondrial fatty acid-oxidation pathway. CACT deficiency causes a variety of pathological conditions, such as hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiac arrest, hepatomegaly, hepatic dysfunction and muscle weakness, and it can be fatal in newborns and infants. Here we report that expression of the Cact gene is induced in mouse skeletal muscle after 24 h of fasting. To gain insight into the control of Cact gene expression, we examine the transcriptional regulation of the mouse Cact gene. We show that the 5 Prime -flanking region of this gene is transcriptionally active and contains a consensus sequence for the estrogen-related receptor (ERR), a member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. This sequence binds ERR{alpha}in vivo and in vitro and is required for the activation of Cact expression by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC)-1/ERR axis. We also demonstrate that XTC790, the inverse agonist of ERR{alpha}, specifically blocks Cact activation by PGC-1{beta} in C2C12 cells.

  13. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors in heart failure: the adaptive arm of the cardiac response to chronic catecholamine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian C; OʼConnell, Timothy D; Simpson, Paul C

    2014-04-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the nonfailing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and beta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure.

  14. DIFFERENCES IN SENSITIVITY BUT NOT SELECTIVITY OF XENOESTROGEN BINDING TO ALLIGATOR VERSUS HUMAN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Cynthia V.; Hartig, Phillip C.; Cardon, Mary C.; Lambright, Christy R.; Bobseine, Kathy L.; Guillette, Louis J.; Gray, L. Earl; Wilson, Vickie S.

    2010-01-01

    Reproductive abnormalities in alligators exposed to contaminants in Lake Apopka, Florida, USA represent a clear example of endocrine disruption in wildlife. Several of these contaminants that are not able to bind to mammalian estrogen receptors (such as atrazine and cyanazine) have previously been reported to bind to the alligator estrogen receptor from oviductal tissue. Binding of known Lake Apopka contaminants to full length estrogen receptors alpha from human (hERα) and alligator (aERα) was assessed in a side-by-side comparison within the same assay system. Baculovirus-expressed recombinant hERα and aERα were used in a competitive binding assay. Atrazine and cyanazine were not able to bind to either receptor. p,p′-Dicofol was able to bind to aERα with a concentration inhibiting 50% of binding (IC50) of 4 μM, while only partially displacing 17β-estradiol (E2) from hERα and yielding a projected IC50 of 45 μM. Chemicals that only partially displaced E2 from either receptor, including some dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) metabolites and trans-nonachlor, appeared to have higher affinity for aERα than hERα. p,p′-Dicofol-mediated transcriptional activation through aERα and hERα was assessed to further explore the preferential binding of p,p′-dicofol to aERα over hERα. p,p′-Dicofol was able to stimulate transcriptional activation in a similar manner with both receptors. However, the in vitro results obtained with p,p′-dicofol were not reflected in an in vivo mammalian model, where Kelthane™ (mixed o,p′-and p,p′-dicofol isomers) did not elicit estrogenic effects. In conclusion, although there was no evidence of exclusively species-specific estrogen receptor binders, some xenoestrogens, especially p,p′-dicofol, had a higher affinity for aERα than for hERα. PMID:20821664

  15. Delta, theta, and alpha event-related oscillations in alcoholics during Go/NoGo task: Neurocognitive deficits in execution, inhibition, and attention processing.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashwini K; Kamarajan, Chella; Manz, Niklas; Chorlian, David B; Stimus, Arthur; Porjesz, Bernice

    2016-02-01

    Higher impulsivity observed in alcoholics is thought to be due to neurocognitive functional deficits involving impaired inhibition in several brain regions and/or neuronal circuits. Event-related oscillations (EROs) offer time-frequency measure of brain rhythms during perceptual and cognitive processing, which provide a detailed view of neuroelectric oscillatory responses to external/internal events. The present study examines evoked power (temporally locked to events) of oscillatory brain signals in alcoholics during an equal probability Go/NoGo task, assessing their functional relevance in execution and inhibition of a motor response. The current study hypothesized that increases in the power of slow frequency bands and their topographical distribution is associated with tasks that have increased cognitive demands, such as the execution and inhibition of a motor response. Therefore, it is hypothesized that alcoholics would show lower spectral power in their topographical densities compared to controls. The sample consisted of 20 right-handed abstinent alcoholic males and 20 age and gender-matched healthy controls. Evoked delta (1.0-3.5Hz; 200-600ms), theta (4.0-7.5Hz; 200-400ms), slow alpha (8.0-9.5Hz; 200-300ms), and fast alpha (10.0-12.5Hz; 100-200ms) ERO power were compared across group and task conditions. Compared to controls, alcoholics had higher impulsiveness scores on the Barrett Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and made more errors on Go trials. Alcoholics showed significantly lower evoked delta, theta, and slow alpha power compared to controls for both Go and NoGo task conditions, and lower evoked fast alpha power compared to controls for only the NoGo condition. The results confirm previous findings and are suggestive of neurocognitive deficits while executing and suppressing a motor response. Based on findings in the alpha frequency ranges, it is further suggested that the inhibitory processing impairments in alcoholics may arise from inadequate early

  16. Delta, theta, and alpha event-related oscillations in alcoholics during Go/NoGo task: Neurocognitive deficits in execution, inhibition, and attention processing.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashwini K; Kamarajan, Chella; Manz, Niklas; Chorlian, David B; Stimus, Arthur; Porjesz, Bernice

    2016-02-01

    Higher impulsivity observed in alcoholics is thought to be due to neurocognitive functional deficits involving impaired inhibition in several brain regions and/or neuronal circuits. Event-related oscillations (EROs) offer time-frequency measure of brain rhythms during perceptual and cognitive processing, which provide a detailed view of neuroelectric oscillatory responses to external/internal events. The present study examines evoked power (temporally locked to events) of oscillatory brain signals in alcoholics during an equal probability Go/NoGo task, assessing their functional relevance in execution and inhibition of a motor response. The current study hypothesized that increases in the power of slow frequency bands and their topographical distribution is associated with tasks that have increased cognitive demands, such as the execution and inhibition of a motor response. Therefore, it is hypothesized that alcoholics would show lower spectral power in their topographical densities compared to controls. The sample consisted of 20 right-handed abstinent alcoholic males and 20 age and gender-matched healthy controls. Evoked delta (1.0-3.5Hz; 200-600ms), theta (4.0-7.5Hz; 200-400ms), slow alpha (8.0-9.5Hz; 200-300ms), and fast alpha (10.0-12.5Hz; 100-200ms) ERO power were compared across group and task conditions. Compared to controls, alcoholics had higher impulsiveness scores on the Barrett Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and made more errors on Go trials. Alcoholics showed significantly lower evoked delta, theta, and slow alpha power compared to controls for both Go and NoGo task conditions, and lower evoked fast alpha power compared to controls for only the NoGo condition. The results confirm previous findings and are suggestive of neurocognitive deficits while executing and suppressing a motor response. Based on findings in the alpha frequency ranges, it is further suggested that the inhibitory processing impairments in alcoholics may arise from inadequate early

  17. TRIM32 promotes retinoic acid receptor {alpha}-mediated differentiation in human promyelogenous leukemic cell line HL60

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Tomonobu; Okumura, Fumihiko; Iguchi, Akihiro; Ariga, Tadashi; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRIM32 enhanced RAR{alpha}-mediated transcriptional activity even in the absence of RA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRIM32 stabilized RAR{alpha} in the human promyelogenous leukemic cell line HL60. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of TRIM32 in HL60 cells induced granulocytic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRIM32 may function as a coactivator for RAR{alpha}-mediated transcription in APL cells. -- Abstract: Ubiquitination, one of the posttranslational modifications, appears to be involved in the transcriptional activity of nuclear receptors including retinoic acid receptor {alpha} (RAR{alpha}). We previously reported that an E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM32, interacts with several important proteins including RAR{alpha} and enhances transcriptional activity of RAR{alpha} in mouse neuroblastoma cells and embryonal carcinoma cells. Retinoic acid (RA), which acts as a ligand to nuclear receptors including RAR{alpha}, plays crucial roles in development, differentiation, cell cycles and apoptosis. In this study, we found that TRIM32 enhances RAR{alpha}-mediated transcriptional activity even in the absence of RA and stabilizes RAR{alpha} in the human promyelogenous leukemic cell line HL60. Moreover, we found that overexpression of TRIM32 in HL60 cells suppresses cellular proliferation and induces granulocytic differentiation even in the absence of RA. These findings suggest that TRIM32 functions as one of the coactivators for RAR{alpha}-mediated transcription in acute promyelogenous leukemia (APL) cells, and thus TRIM32 may become a potentially therapeutic target for APL.

  18. Successful alpha-1 receptor blockade therapy in a toddler with infrequent and difficult voiding.

    PubMed

    Robson, William Lane M; Leung, Alexander K C

    2005-01-01

    A 3-year-old neurologically intact and behaviorally normal boy developed infrequent and difficult voiding subsequent to a soft tissue injury to the glans penis. Symptoms persisted for at least 9 months, and the course was complicated by diagnostic imaging evidence of a "markedly distended" bladder and a voiding diary that suggested elevated bladder volumes. Treatment with an alpha-1 receptor blocker normalized voiding within 24 hours. Discontinuation of the medication after 2 weeks resulted in recurrence of symptoms within 48 hours. Readministration of the medication resulted in prompt resolution of symptoms.

  19. Binding of dopamine and 3-methoxytyramine as l-DOPA metabolites to human alpha(2)-adrenergic and dopaminergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Alachkar, Amal; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Jones, Owen T

    2010-07-01

    The ability of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA), l-DOPA-methyl ester and their major metabolites, dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic (HVA), 3-O-methyldopa and 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) to bind to alpha(2) adrenergic and D1 and D2 dopamine receptors was assessed by radioligand binding to cloned human receptors expressed in cell lines. As anticipated, dopamine bound with high affinity to D1 (IC(50) 1.1 + or - 0.16 microM) and D2 (IC(50) 0.7 + or - 0.3 microM) dopamine receptors. However, dopamine also bound with high affinity to alpha(2A) (IC(50) was 2.6 + or - 0.5 microM), alpha(2C) (IC(50) 3.2 + or - 0.7 microM). 3-MT bound to alpha(2A) with high affinity (IC(50), 3.6 + or - 0.2 microM) though moderate affinity to alpha(2)c, D1 and D2 receptors (values of IC(50) were 55 + or - 14, 121 + or - 43, 36 + or - 14 microM, respectively). l-DOPA-methyl ester bound with high affinity to alpha(2) (IC(50) 17-36 microM) but not dopamine receptors (IC(50) 0.9-2.5 mM). l-DOPA, 3-O-methyldopa and DOPAC had no observable effect on binding to any of the receptors tested. These data suggest that the effects of l-DOPA in Parkinson's disease may result from actions of its metabolites dopamine and 3-MT on both dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic receptors. These findings may provide explanations for the differences between l-DOPA and dopamine receptor agonists in mediating anti-parkinsonian effects and propensity to be associated with dyskinesia and motor complications such as wearing-off and on-off.

  20. Immunohistochemical localization of progesterone receptor isoforms and estrogen receptor alpha in the chicken oviduct magnum during development.

    PubMed

    González-Morán, María Genoveva

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the immunohistochemical expression of progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms and estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α), as well as the histomorphometric changes of the magnum region of the left oviduct from 8-day-old chicken embryos to one-month-old chickens were evaluated. Results indicate evident histological changes in the oviduct magnum during development mainly in the magnum's mucosa. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the oviduct magnum from 8-day-old chicken embryos to one-day-old chickens did not present any PR isoform, but the oviduct magnum of one-week and one-month-old chickens expressed PR in the nuclei of all cell types. In epithelial cells, PR-B was the only isoform expressed; in muscle and serosa cells, PR-A isoform was the only isoform expressed; and stromal cells expressed both isoforms. The results also demonstrate positive ER-α immunostaining in the nuclei of different cells from embryonic life to later developmental stages of the oviduct magnum. Data indicate that the variations of ER-α or PR expression or dominance of either PR expression is differentially regulated depending on the cell type, the development of the oviduct, and in an age-specific manner. These variations in sex steroids hormone receptors are related with histological changes of the oviduct magnum through development.

  1. Inhibition of spontaneous receptor phosphorylation by residues in a putative alpha-helix in the KIT intracellular juxtamembrane region.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y; Cunningham, M E; Wang, X; Ghosh, I; Regan, L; Longley, B J

    1999-05-01

    KIT receptor kinase activity is repressed, prior to stem cell factor binding, by unknown structural constraints. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we examined the role of KIT intracellular juxtamembrane residues Met-552 through Ile-563 in controlling receptor autophosphorylation. Alanine substitution for Tyr-553, Trp-557, Val-559, or Val-560, all sitting along the hydrophobic side of an amphipathic alpha-helix (Tyr-553-Ile-563) predicted by the Chou-Fasman algorithm, resulted in substantially increased spontaneous receptor phosphorylation, revealing inhibitory roles for these residues. Alanine substitution for other residues, most of which are on the hydrophilic side of the helix, caused no or slightly increased basal receptor phosphorylation. Converting Tyr-553 or Trp-557 to phenylalanine generated slight or no elevation, respectively, in basal KIT phosphorylation, indicating that the phenyl ring of Tyr-553 and the hydrophobicity of Trp-557 are critical for the inhibition. Although alanine substitution for Lys-558 had no effect on receptor phosphorylation, its substitution with proline produced high spontaneous receptor phosphorylation, suggesting that the predicted alpha-helical conformation is involved in the inhibition. A synthetic peptide comprising Tyr-553 through Ile-563 showed circular dichroism spectra characteristic of alpha-helix, supporting the structural prediction. Thus, the KIT intracellular juxtamembrane region contains important residues which, in a putative alpha-helical conformation, exert inhibitory control on the kinase activity of ligand-unoccupied receptor. PMID:10224103

  2. Design and synthesis of a metabolically stable and potent antitussive agent, a novel delta opioid receptor antagonist, TRK-851.

    PubMed

    Sakami, Satoshi; Kawai, Koji; Maeda, Masayuki; Aoki, Takumi; Fujii, Hideaki; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Nakao, Kaoru; Izumimoto, Naoki; Matsuura, Hirotoshi; Endo, Takashi; Ueno, Shinya; Natsume, Kazuto; Nagase, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    We have previously reported on antitussive effect of (5R,9R,13S,14S)-17-cyclopropylmethyl-6,7-didehydro-4,5-epoxy-5',6'-dihydro-3-methoxy-4'H-pyrrolo[3,2,1-ij]quinolino[2',1':6,7]morphinan-14-ol(1b) methanesulfonate (TRK-850), a selective delta opioid receptor antagonist which markedly reduced the number of coughs in a rat cough model. We designed TRK-850 based on naltrindole (NTI), a typical delta opioid receptor antagonist, to improve its permeability through the blood-brain barrier by introducing hydrophobic moieties to NTI. The ED(50) values of NTI and compound 1b by intraperitoneal injections were 104 microg/kg and 2.07 microg/kg, respectively. This increased antitussive potency probably resulted from the improved brain exposure of compound 1b. However, 1b was extremely unstable toward metabolism by cytochrome P450. In this study, we designed and synthesized compound 1b derivatives to improve the metabolic instability, which resulted in affording highly potent and metabolically stable oral antitussive agent (5R,9R,13S,14S)-17-cyclopropylmethyl-6,7-didehydro-4,5-epoxy-8'-fluoro-5',6'-dihydro-4'H-pyrrolo[3,2,1-ij]quinolino[2',1':6,7]morphinan-3,14-diol (1c) methanesulfonate (TRK-851).

  3. Localization of neuregulin-1alpha (heregulin-alpha) and one of its receptors, ErbB-4 tyrosine kinase, in developing and adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Lendeckel, Uwe; Bertram, Iris; Bukowska, Alicja; Kanakis, Dimitrios; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Stauch, Renate; Krell, Dieter; Mawrin, Christian; Budinger, Eike; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2006-05-15

    Using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and RT-polymerase chain reaction, we studied the distribution of neuregulin-1 splice variant alpha (NRG-1alpha) and one of its putative receptors, ErbB-4 tyrosine kinase, in human brain. In the pre- and perinatal human brain immunoreactivity was confined to numerous neurons, with the highest cell density found in cortical gray matter, hypothalamus and cerebellum. In the adult brain, single cortical gray and white matter neurons showed NRG-1alpha immunoreactivity. Occasionally, immunoreactive oligodendrocytes were observed. NRG-1alpha-expressing neurons were also found in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, basal ganglia and brain stem. Application of two antibodies recognizing alpha and beta isoforms revealed a different distribution pattern in that many cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons were labeled. ErbB-4 immunoreactivity was expressed in both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Our data show that NRG-1alpha expression is lower in the adult human brain than in the developing brain, and, therefore, support a role for NRG-1alpha in brain development.

  4. IFN-alpha/beta-dependent cross-priming induced by specific toll-like receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Durand, Vanessa; Wong, Simon Y C; Tough, David F; Le Bon, Agnes

    2006-04-12

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pattern recognition receptors that have been identified as crucial in the initiation of innate immune responses against pathogens. They are thought to be involved in shaping appropriate adaptive immune responses, although their precise contribution has not yet been fully characterised. Our aim was to investigate in vivo the effect of different TLR stimuli on cellular immune responses. We examined the ability of a range of TLR stimuli to induce CD8+ T cell responses against a model soluble protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA). We found that TLR 3, TLR 4, and TLR 9 agonists induced functional cross-priming, and that this process was dependent on IFN-alpha/beta signalling pathway. PMID:16823911

  5. Retinoic acid receptor alpha mediates growth inhibition by retinoids in human colon carcinoma HT29 cells.

    PubMed

    Nicke, B; Kaiser, A; Wiedenmann, B; Riecken, E O; Rosewicz, S

    1999-08-11

    Although retinoids have been suggested to inhibit chemically induced colon carcinogenesis, the molecular mechanisms underlying retinoid-mediated growth regulation in colon carcinoma cells are unknown. Therefore, we investigated the biological effects of retinoids on growth in HT29 colon carcinoma cells. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment of HT29 cells resulted in a profound inhibition of anchorage-independent growth without biochemical or morphological evidence for induction of differentiation. Treatment with the selective RARalpha agonist Ro 40-6055 completely mimicked the effects of ATRA on growth and transactivation of a betaRAREx2-luciferase reporter construct, while RARbeta- and gamma-specific analogues were ineffective. Furthermore, ATRA-regulated growth and transactivation could be completely blocked by a RARalpha-selective receptor antagonist. Thus, ATRA potently inhibits anchorage-independent growth in HT29 cells and this effect is mainly if not exclusively mediated by the retinoic acid receptor alpha.

  6. Opioid receptors in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: evidence for distinct morphine (. mu. ) and enkephalin (delta) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmi, S.M.I.; Mishra, R.K.

    1986-06-13

    Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells exhibited a heterogeneous population of ..mu.. and delta types of opioid binding sites. These specific binding sites displayed the characteristic saturability, stereospecificity and reversibility, expected of a receptor. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)-D-Ala/sup 2/-D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin (DADLE) in the presence of 10/sup -5/M D-Pro/sup 4/-morphiceptin (to block the ..mu.. receptors) and the competitive displacement by various highly selective ligands yielded the binding parameters of delta sites which closely resemble those of the delta receptors in brain and mouse neuroblastoma clones. Similarly, the high affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine, together with the higher potency of morphine analogues to displace (/sup 3/H)-naloxone binding established the presence of ..mu.. sites. Guanine nucleotides and NaCl significantly inhibited the association and increased the dissociation of (/sup 3/H)-DADLE binding.

  7. Synthesis of a potent and selective (18)F-labeled delta-opioid receptor antagonist derived from the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore for positron emission tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Eun Kyoung; Wu, Zhanhong; Chen, Kai; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Marczak, Ewa D; Sasaki, Yusuke; Ambo, Akihiro; Salvadori, Severo; Ren, Chuancheng; Zhao, Heng; Balboni, Gianfranco; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2008-03-27

    Identification and pharmacological characterization of two new selective delta-opioid receptor antagonists, derived from the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore, of potential utility in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging are described. On the basis of its high delta selectivity, H-Dmt-Tic--Lys(Z)-OH (reference compound 1) is a useful starting point for the synthesis of (18)F-labeled compounds prepared by the coupling of N-succinimidyl 4-[ (18)F]fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB) with Boc-Dmt-Tic--Lys(Z)-OH under slightly basic conditions at 37 degrees C for 15 min, deprotection with TFA, and HPLC purification. The total synthesis time was 120 min, and the decay-corrected radiochemical yield of [(18)F]- 1 was about 25-30% ( n = 5) starting from [(18)F]SFB ( n = 5) with an effective specific activity about 46 GBq/micromol. In vitro autoradiography studies showed prominent uptake of [ (18)F]- 1 in the striatum and cortex with significant blocking by 1 and UFP-501 (selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist), suggesting high specific binding of [(18)F]- 1 to delta-opioid receptors. Noninvasive microPET imaging studies revealed the absence of [(18)F]- 1 in rat brain, since it fails to cross the blood-brain barrier. This study demonstrates the suitability of [ (18)F]- 1 for imaging peripheral delta-opioid receptors.

  8. Topological dispositions of lysine. alpha. 380 and lysine. gamma. 486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.P. )

    1991-04-23

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 in the {alpha} subunit and the {gamma} subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the {alpha} subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the {gamma} subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine {alpha}380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine {gamma}486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor.

  9. The GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subtype in the ventral pallidum regulates alcohol-seeking behaviors.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Scott C; Foster, Katrina L; McKay, Pete F; Carroll, Michelle R; Seyoum, Regat; Woods, James E; Grey, Collette; Jones, Cecily M; McCane, Shannan; Cummings, Rancia; Mason, Dynesha; Ma, Chunrong; Cook, James M; June, Harry L

    2002-05-01

    We investigated the potential role of the alpha1-containing GABA(A) receptor in regulating the reinforcing properties of alcohol. To accomplish this, we developed 3-propoxy-beta-carboline hydrochloride (3-PBC), a mixed agonist-antagonist benzodiazepine site ligand with binding selectivity at the alpha1 receptor. We then tested the capacity of 3-PBC to block alcohol-maintained responding in the ventral pallidum (VP), a novel alcohol reward substrate, which primarily expresses the alpha1-receptor isoform. Our results demonstrated that bilateral microinfusion of 3-PBC (0.5-40 microg) in the anterior and medial VP produced marked reductions in alcohol-maintained responding in a genetically selected rodent model of alcohol drinking. The VP infusions showed both neuroanatomical and reinforcer specificity because no effects were seen in sites dorsal to the VP (e.g., nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen). The saccharin-maintained responding was reduced only with the highest dose (40 microg). Parenteral injections of 3-PBC (1-20 mg/kg) also showed a similar selectivity on alcohol-maintained responding. Complementary in vitro studies revealed that 3-PBC exhibited a low partial agonist efficacy profile at recombinant diazepam-sensitive receptors (e.g., alpha1beta3gamma2, alpha2beta3gamma, and alpha3beta3gamma2). The selective suppression of 3-PBC on alcohol-maintained responding after central and parenteral administrations, together with its low-efficacy agonist profile, suggest that the reduction in alcohol-maintained behaviors was not attributable to a general suppression on consummatory behaviors. These results demonstrate that the alpha1-containing GABA(A) receptors in both the anterior and medial VP are important in regulating the reinforcing properties of alcohol. These receptors represent novel targets in the design and development of pharmacotherapies for alcohol-dependent subjects. PMID:11978852

  10. Heterogeneity of alpha1 receptors associated with vascular smooth muscle: evidence from functional and ligand binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, M.; Pedigo, N.W.; Butler, B.T.; Piascik, M.T.

    1987-08-10

    The nature of the alpha1 receptor associated with rabbit aorta has been examined in functional and receptor binding studies. In isolated aortic rings the dose-response curve for (-)metaraminol was not parallel to that of (-)epinephrine, (-)norepinephrine or (-)phenylephrine. Following inactivation of a portion of the alpha receptors with phenoxybenzamine, the occupancy versus response relationship for metaraminol, in contrast to the other test agonists, was biphasic. In microsomes prepared from aorta, metaraminol bound to two classes of sites labelled by the selective alpha1 antagonist (TH) prazosin. Norepinephrine also bound to two sites on the alpha receptor in all three preparations tested. The Scatchard plot of (TH)prazosin binding to microsomes prepared from frozen aorta was curvilinear. Estimates of the affinities and site densities were 49.6 +/- 15.3 pM and 44.8 +/- 11.8 pmol/gm protein and 1.0 +/- 0.2 nM and 43.8 +/- 17.4 pmol/gm for the high and low affinity sites, respectively. These data are consistent with the idea that there are subtypes of the alpha1 receptor. 33 references, 5 figures.

  11. Effects of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator on lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammatory pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Muzaffar; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2016-07-15

    Evidence indicates that microglial activation contributes to the pathophysiology and maintenance of neuroinflammatory pain involving central nervous system alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of 3a,4,5,9b-Tetrahydro-4-(1-naphthalenyl)-3H-cyclopentan[c]quinoline-8-sulfonamide (TQS), an alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM), on tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia following lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation in hippocampus, a neuroinflammatory pain model in mice. In addition, we examined the effects of TQS on microglial activation marker, an ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1), in the hippocampus may be associated with neuroinflammatory pain. Pretreatment of TQS (4mg/kg) significantly reduced LPS (1mg/kg)-induced tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Moreover, pretreatment of methyllycaconitine (3mg/kg) significantly reversed TQS-induced antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic responses indicating the involvement of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Pretreatment of TQS significantly decreased LPS-induced increased in hippocampal Iba-1 expression. Overall, these results suggest that TQS reduces LPS-induced neuroinflammatory pain like symptoms via modulating microglial activation likely in the hippocampus and/or other brain region by targeting alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Therefore, alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor PAM such as TQS could be a potential drug candidate for the treatment of neuroinflammatory pain.