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Sample records for receptor antagonist bd1047

  1. Sigma-1 receptor antagonist, BD1047 reduces nociceptive responses and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in mice orofacial formalin model.

    PubMed

    Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) play a role in different types of pain and in central sensitization mechanism in spinal cord. However, it is currently unexplored whether Sig-1Rs are involved in orofacial pain processing. Here we show whether a selective Sig-1R antagonist, BD1047 reduces nociceptive responses in the mouse orofacial formalin model and the number of Fos-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). In addition, it was examined whether the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) or p38 (pp38) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), which are closely linked to pain signaling and sensitization, in TNC was modified by BD1047. The 5% formalin (10 µL) was subcutaneously injected into the right upper lip, and the rubbing responses with ipsilateral fore- or hind paw were counted for 45 min. BD1047 (1, 3 or 10 mg/kg) were intraperitoneally treated 30 min before formalin injection. High dose of BD1047 (10 mg/kg) produced significant anti-nociceptive effects in the first and the second phase. The number of Fos-ir cells in ipsilateral side of TNC was also reduced by BD1047 as compared to that in saline-treated animals. In addition, the number of pp38-ir cells in ipsilateral TNC was decreased in BD1047-treated animals, whereas the number of pERK-ir cells was not modified. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Sig-1Rs play a pivotal role in the orofacial pain processing, and the pp38 signaling pathway can be associated with Sig-1R's action in TNC.

  2. Clonidine Reduces Nociceptive Responses in Mouse Orofacial Formalin Model: Potentiation by Sigma-1 Receptor Antagonist BD1047 without Impaired Motor Coordination.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kang, Suk-Yun; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Chan; Roh, Dae-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Although the administration of clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, significantly attenuates nociception and hyperalgesia in several pain models, clinical trials of clonidine are limited by its side effects such as drowsiness, hypotension and sedation. Recently, we determined that the sigma-1 receptor antagonist BD1047 dose-dependently reduced nociceptive responses in a mouse orofacial formalin model. Here we examined whether intraperitoneal injection of clonidine suppressed the nociceptive responses in the orofacial formalin test, and whether co-administration with BD1047 enhances lower-dose clonidine-induced anti-nociceptive effects without the disruption of motor coordination and blood pressure. Formalin (5%, 10 µL) was subcutaneously injected into the right upper lip, and the rubbing responses with the ipsilateral fore- or hind-paw were counted for 45 min. Clonidine (10, 30 or 100 µg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered 30 min before formalin injection. Clonidine alone dose-dependently reduced nociceptive responses in both the first and second phases. Co-localization for alpha-2A adrenoceptors and sigma-1 receptors was determined in trigeminal ganglion cells. Interestingly, the sub-effective dose of BD1047 (3 mg/kg) significantly potentiated the anti-nociceptive effect of lower-dose clonidine (10 or 30 µg/kg) in the second phase. In particular, the middle dose of clonidine (30 µg/kg) in combination with BD1047 produced an anti-nociceptive effect similar to that of the high-dose clonidine, but without a significant motor dysfunction or hypotension. In contrast, mice treated with the high dose of clonidine developed severe impairment in motor coordination and blood pressure. These data suggest that a combination of low-dose clonidine with BD1047 may be a novel and safe therapeutic strategy for orofacial pain management.

  3. Sigma-1 Receptor Antagonist BD1047 Reduces Mechanical Allodynia in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain through the Inhibition of Spinal NR1 Phosphorylation and Microglia Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Chenchen; Han, Yuan; Song, Chao; Hu, Xueming; Liu, Yannan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that sigma-1 receptor plays important roles in the induction phase of rodent neuropathic pain; however, whether it is involved in bone cancer pain (BCP) and the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The aim of this study was to examine the potential role of the spinal sigma-1 receptor in the development of bone cancer pain. Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of the right tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats to induce ongoing bone cancer-related pain behaviors; our findings indicated that, on days 7, 10, 14, and 21 after operation, the expression of sigma-1 receptor in the spinal cord was higher in BCP rats compared to the sham rats. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of 120 nmol of sigma-1 receptor antagonist BD1047 on days 5, 6, and 7 after operation attenuated mechanical allodynia as well as the associated induction of c-Fos and activation of microglial cells, NR1, and the subsequent Ca2+-dependent signals of BCP rats. These results suggest that sigma-1 receptor is involved in the development of bone cancer pain and that targeting sigma-1 receptor may be a new strategy for the treatment of bone cancer pain. PMID:26696751

  4. Sigma-1 Receptor Antagonist BD1047 Reduces Mechanical Allodynia in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain through the Inhibition of Spinal NR1 Phosphorylation and Microglia Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Chenchen; Han, Yuan; Song, Chao; Hu, Xueming; Liu, Yannan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that sigma-1 receptor plays important roles in the induction phase of rodent neuropathic pain; however, whether it is involved in bone cancer pain (BCP) and the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The aim of this study was to examine the potential role of the spinal sigma-1 receptor in the development of bone cancer pain. Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of the right tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats to induce ongoing bone cancer-related pain behaviors; our findings indicated that, on days 7, 10, 14, and 21 after operation, the expression of sigma-1 receptor in the spinal cord was higher in BCP rats compared to the sham rats. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of 120 nmol of sigma-1 receptor antagonist BD1047 on days 5, 6, and 7 after operation attenuated mechanical allodynia as well as the associated induction of c-Fos and activation of microglial cells, NR1, and the subsequent Ca(2+)-dependent signals of BCP rats. These results suggest that sigma-1 receptor is involved in the development of bone cancer pain and that targeting sigma-1 receptor may be a new strategy for the treatment of bone cancer pain.

  5. Straub tail reaction in mice treated with σ(1) receptor antagonist in combination with methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Junichi; Kitanaka, Nobue; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Tanaka, Koh-Ichi; Nishiyama, Nobuyoshi; Takemura, Motohiko

    2012-10-30

    Straub tail reaction (STR) was observed in male ddY mice after simultaneous administration with BMY 14802 (a non-specific σ receptor antagonist) and methamphetamine (METH). The intensity and duration of STR depended on the dose of BMY 14802. The tail reaction was inhibited completely by (+)-SKF 10,047 (a putative σ(1) receptor agonist) and partially by PB 28 (a putative σ(2) receptor agonist). The STR was mimicked in mice treated with BD 1047 (a putative σ(1) receptor antagonist), but not SM-21, a putative σ(2) receptor antagonist, in combination with METH. STR evoked with BD 1047 plus METH was inhibited by (+)-SKF 10,047. STR induced by BMY 14802 and METH was abolished by naloxone (a relatively non-selective opioid receptor antagonist) or U-50,488H (a selective κ-agonist), suggesting that the STR may be mediated by activation of opioid receptor system.

  6. Differential effects of sigma1 receptor blockade on self-administration and conditioned reinstatement motivated by cocaine vs natural reward.

    PubMed

    Martin-Fardon, Rémi; Maurice, Tangui; Aujla, Harinder; Bowen, Wayne D; Weiss, Friedbert

    2007-09-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for sigma(1) (sigma(1)) receptors in cognitive function, anxiety, depression, regulation of stress responses, and, recently, the appetitive effects of cocaine as measured by conditioned place preference. This study was designed to extend understanding of the role of sigma(1) receptors in addiction-relevant conditioned effects of cocaine by testing the effects of a potent and selective sigma(1) receptor antagonist, BD1047, on conditioned reinstatement of cocaine-seeking. To determine whether modification of conditioned reinstatement by BD1047 is selective for drug-directed behavior or reflects general suppressant effects on motivated behavior, BD1047 was tested also on reinstatement induced by stimuli conditioned to a natural reward, sweetened condensed milk (SCM). Additionally, because sigma(1) receptors have been implicated also in processes linked to the acute reinforcing actions of cocaine, tests of the effects of BD1047 on cocaine self-administration-including a comparison with the sigma(1) antagonist effects on SCM self-administration-were conducted as well. Cocaine self-administering male Wistar rats were trained to associate a discriminative stimulus (S(D)) with the availability of cocaine or SCM, and then subjected to reinstatement tests following extinction of cocaine or SCM-reinforced behavior. BD1047 (1-30 mg/kg) reversed response reinstatement induced by the cocaine S(D) at 20 and 30 mg/kg but did not modify SCM S(D)-induced responding at all but the highest 30 mg dose, at which responding was reversed to extinction levels. BD1047 did not modify responding reinforced directly by SCM or cocaine. The findings support a role for sigma(1) receptors in regulating conditioned responses to cocaine-related contextual stimuli and identify this receptor as a potential treatment target for the prevention of craving and relapse.

  7. Pharmacological interaction with the sigma1 (σ1)-receptor in the acute behavioral effects of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Villard, Vanessa; Meunier, Johann; Chevallier, Nathalie; Maurice, Tangui

    2011-01-01

    Selective agonists of the sigma-1 (σ(1)) ligand-operated chaperone protein, like igmesine or PRE-084, are antidepressants in preclinical depression models. σ(1)-Protein activation may contribute to the antidepressant efficacy of drugs known to act as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) or noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors through direct or indirect involvement of the σ(1)-receptor in the drug effect. We here compared antidepressant effects in two behavioral procedures, the forced swimming test (FST) and conditioned fear stress (CFS). The involvement of the σ(1)-receptor was examined using a co-treatment with the σ(1)-antagonist BD1047 or using σ(1)-knockout (KO) mice. Igmesine but not PRE-084 decreased FST immobility. The SSRI fluoxetine and sertraline, but not fluvoxamine, and the tricyclic antidepressants imipramine, desipramine, and amitriptyline were also effective. Only the effect of igmesine was blocked by BD1047 or in σ(1)-KO mice. Igmesine, PRE-084, fluvoxamine, and sertraline decreased the CFS immobility in a BD1047- and σ(1)-KO-sensitive manner. Among tricyclics, only amitriptyline was effective and its effect was unaffected by BD1047 or in σ(1)-KO mice. The behavioral effects induced by mixed σ(1)-receptor/SSRI antidepressants, like fluvoxamine or sertraline, may therefore involve a non-selective action at both targets. Moreover, the CFS appears to more reliably uncover a σ(1) pharmacological component in antidepressant screening.

  8. The sigma receptor agonist SA4503 both attenuates and enhances the effects of methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Rodvelt, Kelli R.; Oelrichs, Clark E.; Blount, Lucas R.; Fan, Kuo-Hsien; Lever, Susan Z.; Lever, John R.; Miller, Dennis K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine’s behavioral effects have been attributed to its interaction with monoamine transporters; however, methamphetamine also has affinity for sigma receptors. Method The present study investigated the effect of the sigma receptor agonist SA 4503 and the sigma receptor antagonists BD-1047 and BD-1063 on methamphetamine-evoked [3H] dopamine release from preloaded rat striatal slices. The effect of SA 4503 on methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity and on the discriminative stimulus properties of methamphetamine also was determined. Results SA 4503 attenuated methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine release in a concentration-dependent manner. BD-1047 and BD-1063 did not affect release. SA 4503 dose-dependently potentiated and attenuated methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity. SA 4503 pretreatment augmented the stimulus properties of methamphetamine. Conclusions Our findings indicate that SA 4503 both enhances and inhibits methamphetamine’s effects and that sigma receptors are involved in the neurochemical, locomotor stimulatory and discriminative stimulus properties of methamphetamine. PMID:21277708

  9. NOP Receptor Mediates Anti-analgesia Induced by Agonist-Antagonist Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Gear, Robert W.; Bogen, Oliver; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ~90 minutes after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69,593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  10. Influence of sigma-1 receptor modulators on ethanol-induced conditioned place preference in the extinction-reinstatement model.

    PubMed

    Bhutada, Pravinkumar S; Mundhada, Yogita R; Ghodki, Yogesh R; Chaware, Parag; Dixit, Pankaj V; Jain, Kishor S; Umathe, Sudhir N

    2012-02-01

    Sigma-1 receptor agonists are reported to augment and antagonists block the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. However, their effect on reinstatement of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) has not yet been explored. Therefore, we investigated the ability of 2-(4-morpholino)ethyl-1-phenylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate (PRE-084), a sigma-1 receptor agonist, and N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(dimethylamino) ethylamine dihydrobromide (BD-1047), a sigma-1 receptor antagonist, on the acquisition, expression, and reinstatement of ethanol-induced CPP using adult male Swiss mice. BD-1047 (0.1-10 μg/mouse, intracerebroventricularly) dose-dependently blocked the development, expression, and reinstatement of ethanol-induced CPP, and PRE-084 (0.01-10 μg/mouse, intracerebroventricularly) dose-dependently reinstated the extinguished response. These effects of PRE-084 and BD-1047 alone or in combination with ethanol did not influence the motor activity. Therefore, it is concluded that sigma-1 receptor ligands can modulate the acquisition, expression, and reinstatement of conditioned reinforcing effects of ethanol with no reinforcing or aversive influence of their own. The results add to the growing literature on sigma-1 receptor modulation in the pharmacotherapy of ethanol addiction.

  11. Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Matera, Maria Gabriella; Cazzola, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Parasympathetic activity is increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma and appears to be the major reversible component of airway obstruction. Therefore, treatment with muscarinic receptor antagonists is an effective bronchodilator therapy in COPD and also in asthmatic patients. In recent years, the accumulating evidence that the cholinergic system controls not only contraction by airway smooth muscle but also the functions of inflammatory cells and airway epithelial cells has suggested that muscarinic receptor antagonists could exert other effects that may be of clinical relevance when we must treat a patient suffering from COPD or asthma. There are currently six muscarinic receptor antagonists licenced for use in the treatment of COPD, the short-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (SAMAs) ipratropium bromide and oxitropium bromide and the long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (LAMAs) aclidinium bromide, tiotropium bromide, glycopyrronium bromide and umeclidinium bromide. Concerns have been raised about possible associations of muscarinic receptor antagonists with cardiovascular safety, but the most advanced compounds seem to have an improved safety profile. Further beneficial effects of SAMAs and LAMAs are seen when added to existing treatments, including LABAs, inhaled corticosteroids and phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors. The importance of tiotropium bromide in the maintenance treatment of COPD, and likely in asthma, has spurred further research to identify new LAMAs. There are a number of molecules that are being identified, but only few have reached the clinical development.

  12. Effect of σ₁ receptor antagonism on ethanol and natural reward seeking.

    PubMed

    Martin-Fardon, Rémi; Strong, Elena M; Weiss, Friedbert

    2012-10-03

    σ₁ Receptors have been implicated in cognitive function, anxiety, depression, and the regulation of stress responses. In addition, σ₁ receptors have been shown to participate in the behavioral and motivational effects of psychostimulants. Recent studies have shown that σ₁ receptor antagonism prevents ethanol-induced conditioned place preference in mice and excessive drinking in alcohol-dependent or alcohol-preferring rats. Therefore, this study was designed to determine whether this role for σ₁ receptors extends to ethanol-seeking behavior using an animal model of relapse and tested whether the suppressant effect of a potent σ₁ receptor antagonist, BD1047, generalizes to natural reward-seeking behavior. Two separate groups of rats were trained to orally self-administer 10% (w/v) ethanol or a highly palatable reinforcer, 3%/0.125% (w/v) glucose/saccharin (SuperSac), in the presence of a discriminative stimulus (S). Following extinction, during which the reinforcers and S were withheld, the presentation of the ethanol or SuperSac S produced comparable recovery of responding. BD1047 (1-20 mg/kg) exerted similar behavioral effects on both ethanol S-induced and SuperSac S-induced reinstatement, with the prevention of conditioned reinstatement only at the highest BD1047 dose. The present results show that σ₁ receptor blockade under the present conditions exerts similar effects on conditioned reinstatement induced by ethanol-related and SuperSac-related stimuli, suggestive of overlapping neural mechanisms that control ethanol and natural reward seeking.

  13. A nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jeffrey N; Tyree, Curtis; Hu, Junlian; Berger, Elaine; Marschke, Keith; Nakane, Masaki; Coghlan, Michael J; Clemm, Dave; Lane, Ben; Rosen, Jon

    2003-01-01

    Selective intracellular receptor antagonists are used clinically to ameliorate hormone-dependent disease states. Patients with Cushing's syndrome have high levels of the glucocorticoid, cortisol, and suffer significant consequences from this overexposure. High levels of this hormone are also implicated in exacerbating diabetes and the stress response. Selectively inhibiting this hormone may have clinical benefit in these disease states. To this end, we have identified the first selective, nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist. This compound is characterized by a tri-aryl methane core chemical structure. This GR-specific antagonist binds with nanomolar affinity to the GR and has no detectable binding affinity for the highly related receptors for mineralocorticoids, androgens, estrogens, and progestins. We demonstrate that this antagonist inhibits glucocorticoid-mediated transcriptional regulation. This compound binds competitively with steroids, likely occupying a similar site within the ligand-binding domain. Once bound, however, the compound fails to induce critical conformational changes in the receptor necessary for agonist activity.

  14. Spinal sigma-1 receptors activate NADPH oxidase 2 leading to the induction of pain hypersensitivity in mice and mechanical allodynia in neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sheu-Ran; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kang, Suk-Yun; Moon, Ji-Young; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2013-08-01

    We have recently demonstrated that spinal sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) mediate pain hypersensitivity in mice and neuropathic pain in rats. In this study, we examine the role of NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) on Sig-1R-induced pain hypersensitivity and the induction of chronic neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was produced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the right sciatic nerve in rats. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated in mice and CCI-rats. Western blotting and dihydroethidium (DHE) staining were performed to assess the changes in Nox2 activation and ROS production in spinal cord, respectively. Direct activation of spinal Sig-1Rs with the Sig-1R agonist, PRE084 induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, which were dose-dependently attenuated by pretreatment with the ROS scavenger, NAC or the Nox inhibitor, apocynin. PRE084 also induced an increase in Nox2 activation and ROS production, which were attenuated by pretreatment with the Sig-1R antagonist, BD1047 or apocynin. CCI-induced nerve injury produced an increase in Nox2 activation and ROS production in the spinal cord, all of which were attenuated by intrathecal administration with BD1047 during the induction phase of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, administration with BD1047 or apocynin reversed CCI-induced mechanical allodynia during the induction phase, but not the maintenance phase. These findings demonstrate that spinal Sig-1Rs modulate Nox2 activation and ROS production in the spinal cord, and ultimately contribute to the Sig-1R-induced pain hypersensitivity and the peripheral nerve injury-induced induction of chronic neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ethanol Stimulates Endoplasmic Reticulum Inositol Triphosphate and Sigma Receptors to Promote Withdrawal-Associated Loss of Neuron-Specific Nuclear Protein/Fox-3.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Anna R; Saunders, Meredith A; Prendergast, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Prior studies demonstrate that ethanol (EtOH) exposure induces the release of intracellular calcium (CA(2+) ) in modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic tone and produces concomitant alterations in sigma (σ)-1 protein expression that may contribute to the development EtOH dependence. However, the influence of CA(2+) released from endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound inositol triphosphate (IP3) and σ-1 receptors in regulating hippocampal function has yet to be delineated. Rat hippocampal explants were subjected to chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) exposure with or without the addition of IP3 inhibitor xestospongin C (0 to 0.5 μM) or σ-1 receptor antagonist BD-1047 (0 to 80 μM). Hippocampal viability was assessed via immunohistochemical labeling of neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)/Fox-3 in CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) subregions. Exposure to CIE produced consistent and significant decreases of NeuN/Fox-3 in each primary cell layer of the hippocampal formation. Co-exposure to xestospongin reversed these effects in the CA1 subregion and significantly attenuated these effects in the CA3 and DG regions. Xestospongin application also significantly increased NeuN/Fox-3 immunofluorescence in EtOH-naïve hippocampi. Co-exposure to 20 μM BD-1047 also reversed the loss of NeuN/Fox-3 during CIE exposure in each hippocampal cell layer, whereas exposure to 80 μM BD-1047 did not alter NeuN/Fox-3 in EtOH-treated hippocampi. By contrast, 80 μM BD-1047 application significantly increased NeuN/Fox-3 immunofluorescence in EtOH-naïve hippocampi in each subregion. These data suggest that EtOH stimulates ER IP3 and σ-1 receptors to promote hippocampal loss of NeuN/Fox-3 during CIE. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  16. Role of sigma 1 receptor in high fat diet-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Song, Tieying; Zhao, Jianhui; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhang, Zaiwang; Jiang, Bo; Yang, Yunliang

    2017-09-26

    The neurobiological mechanisms of obesity-induced peripheral neuropathy are poorly understood. We evaluated the role of Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) and NMDA receptor (NMDARs) in the spinal cord in peripheral neuropathy using an animal model of high fat diet-induced diabetes. We examined the expression of Sig-1R and NMDAR subunits GluN2A and GluN2B along with postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) in the spinal cord after 24-week HFD treatment in both wild-type and Sig-1R-/- mice. Finally, we examined the effects of repeated intrathecal administrations of selective Sig-1R antagonists BD1047 in HFD-fed wild-type mice on peripheral neuropathy. Wild-type mice developed tactile allodynia and thermal hypoalgesia after 24-week HFD treatment. HFD-induced peripheral neuropathy correlated with increased expression of GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDARs, PDS-95, and Sig-1R, as well as increased Sig-1R-NMDAR interaction in the spinal cord. In contrast, Sig-1R-/- mice did not develop thermal hypoalgesia or tactile allodynia after 24-week HFD treatment, and the levels of GluN2A, GluN2B, and PSD-95 were not altered in the spinal cord of HFD-fed Sig-1R-/- mice. Finally, repeated intrathecal administrations of selective Sig-1R antagonists BD1047 in HFD-fed wild-type mice attenuated peripheral neuropathy. Our results suggest that obesity-associated peripheral neuropathy may involve Sig-1R-mediated enhancement of NMDAR expression in the spinal cord.

  17. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats. PMID:7568074

  18. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J; Spaltenstein, A

    1995-09-26

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats.

  19. Pharmacological analysis of calcium antagonist receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    This work focuses on two aspects of the action of calcium antagonist drugs, namely, the interaction of drugs with receptors for verapamil-like calcium antagonists, and the interactions of drugs with voltage-sensitive calcium fluxes in rat brain synaptosomes. From binding studies I have found that the ligand of choice for labeling the verapamil receptor is (-)(/sup 3/H)desmethoxy-verapamil. This drug labels potently, reversibly and stereoselectively two receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain and rabbit skeletal muscle tissues. In equilibrium studies dihydropyridine calcium antagonists interact in a non-competitive fashion, while many non-DHPs are apparently competitive. In-depth kinetic studies in skeletal muscle membranes indicate that the two receptors are linked in a negative heterotropic fashion, and that low-affinity binding of (-) (/sup 3/H)desmethoxy-verapamil may be to the diltiazem receptor. However, these studies were not able to distinguish between the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to spatially separate, allosterically coupled receptors, and the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to a subsite of the verapamil receptor.

  20. Emerging cardiovascular indications of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Parviz, Yasir; Iqbal, Javaid; Pitt, Bertram; Adlam, David; Al-Mohammad, Abdallah; Zannad, Faiez

    2015-04-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism is a well-established treatment modality for patients with hypertension, heart failure, and left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) post-myocardial infarction (MI). There are emerging data showing potential benefits of MR antagonists in other cardiovascular conditions. Studies have shown association between MR activation and the development of myocardial fibrosis, coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome, and cerebrovascular diseases. This review examines the preclinical and clinical data of MR antagonists for novel indications including heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, valvular heart disease, metabolic syndrome, renal disease, and stroke. MR antagonists are not licensed for these conditions yet; however, emerging data suggest that indication for MR antagonists are likely to broaden; further studies are warranted.

  1. NMDA Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ates-Alagoz, Zeynep; Adejare, Adeboye

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a psychiatric disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. Individuals battling this disorder commonly experience high rates of relapse, persistent residual symptoms, functional impairment, and diminished well-being. Medications have important utility in stabilizing moods and daily functions of many individuals. However, only one third of patients had considerable improvement with a standard antidepressant after 2 months and all patients had to deal with numerous side effects. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor family has received special attention because of its critical role in psychiatric disorders. Direct targeting of the NMDA receptor could result in more rapid antidepressant effects. Antidepressant-like effects of NMDA receptor antagonists have been demonstrated in different animal models. MK-801 (a use-dependent channel blocker), and CGP 37849 (an NMDA receptor antagonist) have shown antidepressant properties in preclinical studies, either alone or combined with traditional antidepressants. A recent development is use of ketamine clinically for refractory depression. The purpose of this review is to examine and analyze current literature on the role of NMDA receptor antagonists for treatment of depression and whether this is a feasible route in drug discovery. PMID:24276119

  2. Medicinal Chemistry of Competitive Kainate Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1−5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure−activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field. PMID:22778857

  3. Medicinal chemistry of competitive kainate receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ann M; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-02-16

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1-5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure-activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field.

  4. Agonists and antagonists for P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Costanzi, Stefano; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Besada, Pedro; Shin, Dae Hong; Ko, Hyojin; Ivanov, Andrei A.; Mamedova, Liaman

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has identified nucleotide agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2 and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y12 and P2X1 receptors. Selective non-nucleotide antagonists have been reported for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y6, P2Y12, P2Y13, P2X2/3/P2X3 and P2X7 receptors. For example, the dinucleotide INS 37217 (Up4dC) potently activates the P2Y2 receptor, and the non-nucleotide antagonist A-317491 is selective for P2X2/3/P2X3 receptors. Nucleotide analogues in which the ribose moiety is substituted by a variety of novel ring systems, including conformation-ally locked moieties, have been synthesized as ligands for P2Y receptors. The focus on conformational factors of the ribose-like moiety allows the inclusion of general modifications that lead to enhanced potency and selectivity. At P2Y1,2,4,11 receptors, there is a preference for the North conformation as indicated with (N)-methanocarba analogues. The P2Y1 antagonist MRS2500 inhibited ADP-induced human platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 0.95 nM. MRS2365, an (N)-methanocarba analogue of 2-MeSADP, displayed potency (EC50) of 0.4 nM at the P2Y1 receptor, with >10 000-fold selectivity in comparison to P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors. At P2Y6 receptors there is a dramatic preference for the South conformation. Three-dimensional structures of P2Y receptors have been deduced from structure activity relationships (SAR), mutagenesis and modelling studies. Detailed three-dimensional structures of P2X receptors have not yet been proposed. PMID:16805423

  5. Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists: Effects on Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Buels, Kalmia S.

    2014-01-01

    In healthy lungs, muscarinic receptors control smooth muscle tone, mucus secretion, vasodilation, and inflammation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma, cholinergic mechanisms contribute to increased bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion that limit airflow. This chapter reviews neuronal and nonneuronal sources of acetylcholine in the lung and the expression and role of M1, M2, and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in lung physiology. It also discusses the evidence for and against the role of parasympathetic nerves in asthma, and the current use and therapeutic potential of muscarinic receptor antagonists in COPD and asthma. PMID:22222705

  6. Development of Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, F. Ivy; Carlezon, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) belong to the G-protein coupled class of receptors (GPCRs). They are activated by the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin (DYN) and expressed at particularly high levels within brain areas implicated in modulation of motivation, emotion, and cognitive function. Chronic activation of KORs in animal models has maladaptive effects including increases in behaviors that reflect depression, the propensity to engage in drug-seeking behavior, and drug craving. The fact that KOR activation has such a profound influence on behaviors often triggered by stress has led to interest in selective KOR antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. This perspective provides a description of preclinical research conducted in the development of several different classes of selective KOR antagonists, a summary of the clinical studies conducted thus far, and recommendations for the type of work needed in the future to determine if these agents would be useful as pharmacotherapies for neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:23360448

  7. Role of peripheral sigma-1 receptors in ischaemic pain: Potential interactions with ASIC and P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    Kwon, S G; Roh, D H; Yoon, S Y; Choi, S R; Choi, H S; Moon, J Y; Kang, S Y; Kim, H W; Han, H J; Beitz, A J; Oh, S B; Lee, J H

    2016-04-01

    The role of peripheral sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) in normal nociception and in pathologically induced pain conditions has not been thoroughly investigated. Since there is mounting evidence that Sig-1Rs modulate ischaemia-induced pathological conditions, we investigated the role of Sig-1Rs in ischaemia-induced mechanical allodynia (MA) and addressed their possible interaction with acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and P2X receptors at the ischaemic site. We used a rodent model of hindlimb thrombus-induced ischaemic pain (TIIP) to investigate their role. Western blot was performed to observe changes in Sig-1R expression in peripheral nervous tissues. MA was measured after intraplantar (i.pl.) injections of antagonists for the Sig-1, ASIC and P2X receptors in TIIP rats or agonists of each receptor in naïve rats. Sig-1R expression significantly increased in skin, sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglia at 3 days post-TIIP surgery. I.pl. injections of the Sig-1R antagonist, BD-1047 on post-operative days 0-3 significantly attenuated the development of MA during the induction phase, but had no effect on MA when given during the maintenance phase (days 3-6 post-surgery). BD-1047 synergistically increased amiloride (an ASICs blocker)- and TNP-ATP (a P2X antagonist)-induced analgesic effects in TIIP rats. In naïve rats, i.pl. injection of Sig-1R agonist PRE-084 alone did not produce MA; but it did induce MA when co-administered with either an acidic pH solution or a sub-effective dose of αβmeATP. Peripheral Sig-1Rs contribute to the induction of ischaemia-induced MA via facilitation of ASICs and P2X receptors. Thus, peripheral Sig-1Rs represent a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of ischaemic pain. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  8. Sigma 1 receptor activation regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor through NR2A-CaMKIV-TORC1 pathway to rescue the impairment of learning and memory induced by brain ischaemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Ji, Xue-Fei; Chi, Tian-Yan; Liu, Peng; Jin, Ge; Gu, Shao-Li; Zou, Li-Bo

    2015-05-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) agonists showed anti-amnesic properties in Alzheimer's disease models and anti-inflammatory properties in cerebrum ischaemia models. The agonist of Sig-1R was reported to up-regulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the hippocampus of mice. Here, we investigate whether the activation of Sig-1R attenuates the learning and memory impairment induced by ischaemia/reperfusion and how it affects the expression of BDNF. Bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) was induced for 20 min in C57BL/6 mice. Sig-1R agonist, PRE084, sigma 1/2 non-selective agonist, DTG, Sig-1R antagonist and BD1047 were injected once daily throughout the experiment. Behavioural tests were performed from day 8. On day 22 after BCCAO, mice were sacrificed for biochemical analysis. PRE084 and DTG ameliorated learning and memory impairments in the Y maze, novel object recognition, and water maze tasks and prevented the decline of synaptic proteins and BDNF expression in the hippocampus of BCCAO mice. Furthermore, PRE084 and DTG up-regulated the level of NMDA receptor 2A (NR2A), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV (CaMKIV) and CREB-specific co-activator transducer of regulated CREB activity 1 (TORC1). Additionally, the effects of PRE084 and DTG were antagonised by the co-administration of BD1047. Sig-1R activation showed an attenuation in the ischaemia/reperfusion model and the activation of Sig-1R increased the expression of BDNF, possibly through the NR2A-CaMKIV-TORC1 pathway, and Sig-1R agonists might function as neuroprotectant agents in vascular dementia.

  9. Investigation of orexin-2 selective receptor antagonists: Structural modifications resulting in dual orexin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Skudlarek, Jason W; DiMarco, Christina N; Babaoglu, Kerim; Roecker, Anthony J; Bruno, Joseph G; Pausch, Mark A; O'Brien, Julie A; Cabalu, Tamara D; Stevens, Joanne; Brunner, Joseph; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Wuelfing, W Peter; Garson, Susan L; Fox, Steven V; Savitz, Alan T; Harrell, Charles M; Gotter, Anthony L; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J; Kuduk, Scott D; Coleman, Paul J

    2017-03-15

    In an ongoing effort to explore the use of orexin receptor antagonists for the treatment of insomnia, dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) were structurally modified, resulting in compounds selective for the OX2R subtype and culminating in the discovery of 23, a highly potent, OX2R-selective molecule that exhibited a promising in vivo profile. Further structural modification led to an unexpected restoration of OX1R antagonism. Herein, these changes are discussed and a rationale for selectivity based on computational modeling is proposed.

  10. Rational discovery of novel nuclear hormone receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schapira, Matthieu; Raaka, Bruce M.; Samuels, Herbert H.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2000-02-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) are potential targets for therapeutic approaches to many clinical conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological diseases. The crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of agonist-bound NRs enables the design of compounds with agonist activity. However, with the exception of the human estrogen receptor-, the lack of antagonist-bound "inactive" receptor structures hinders the rational design of receptor antagonists. In this study, we present a strategy for designing such antagonists. We constructed a model of the inactive conformation of human retinoic acid receptor- by using information derived from antagonist-bound estrogen receptor-α and applied a computer-based virtual screening algorithm to identify retinoic acid receptor antagonists. Thus, the currently available crystal structures of NRs may be used for the rational design of antagonists, which could lead to the development of novel drugs for a variety of diseases.

  11. Sigma-1 receptor activation inhibits osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial (Müller) cells by transactivation of glutamatergic and purinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Stefanie; Winters, Helge; Pannicke, Thomas; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Water accumulation in retinal glial (Müller) and neuronal cells resulting in cellular swelling contributes to the development of retinal edema and neurodegeneration. Sigma (σ) receptor activation is known to have neuroprotective effects in the retina. Here, we show that the nonselective σ receptor agonist ditolylguanidine, and the selective σ1 receptor agonist PRE-084, inhibit the osmotic swelling of Müller cell somata induced by superfusion of rat retinal slices with a hypoosmotic solution containing barium ions. In contrast, PRE-084 did not inhibit the osmotic swelling of bipolar cell somata. The effects of σ receptor agonists on the Müller cell swelling were abrogated in the presence of blockers of metabotropic glutamate and purinergic P2Y1 receptors, respectively, suggesting that σ receptor activation triggers activation of a glutamatergic-purinergic signaling cascade which is known to prevent the osmotic Müller cell swelling. The swelling-inhibitory effect of 17β-estradiol was prevented by the σ1 receptor antagonist BD1047, suggesting that the effect is mediated by σ1 receptor activation. The data may suggest that the neuroprotective effect of σ receptor activation in the retina is in part mediated by prevention of the cytotoxic swelling of retinal glial cells.

  12. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality, in part, by ameliorating the adverse effects of aldosterone on vascular function. Although spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly utilized in patients with cardiovascular disease, widespread clinical use is limited by the development of gynecomastia with spironolactone and hyperkalemia with both agents. This suggests that the development of newer agents with favorable side effect profiles is warranted. PMID:18729003

  13. HIGH AFFINITY ACYLATING ANTAGONISTS FOR MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Baumgold, Jesse; Karton, Yishai; Malka, Naftali; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The muscarinic antagonists pirenzepine and telenzepine were derivitized as alkylamino derivatives at a site on the molecules corresponding to a region of bulk tolerance in receptor binding. The distal primary amino groups were coupled to the cross-linking reagent meta-phenylene diisothiocyanate, resulting in two isothiocyanate derivatives that were found to inhibit muscarinic receptors irreversibly and in a dose-dependent fashion. Preincubation of rat forebrain membranes with an isothiocyanate derivative followed by radioligand binding using [3H]N-methylscopolamine diminished the Bmax value, but did not affect the Kd value. The receptor binding site was not restored upon repeated washing, indicating that irreversible inhibition had occurred. IC50 values for the irreversible inhibition at rat forebrain muscarinic receptors were 0.15 nM and 0.19 nM, for derivatives of pirenzepine and telenzepine, respectively. The isothiocyanate derivative of pirenzepine was non-selective as an irreversible muscarinic inhibitor, and the corresponding derivative prepared from telenzepine was 5-fold selective for forebrain (mainly m1) vs. heart (m2) muscarinic receptors. PMID:1625525

  14. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists: pharmacological opportunities, clinical experience, and translational prognosis.

    PubMed

    Janero, David R; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2009-03-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (CB) (endocannabinoid) signaling system is involved in a variety of (patho)physiological processes, primarily by virtue of natural, arachidonic acid-derived lipids (endocannabinoids) that activate G protein-coupled CB1 and CB2 receptors. A hyperactive endocannabinoid system appears to contribute to the etiology of several disease states that constitute significant global threats to human health. Consequently, mounting interest surrounds the design and profiling of receptor-targeted CB antagonists as pharmacotherapeutics that attenuate endocannabinoid transmission for salutary gain. Experimental and clinical evidence supports the therapeutic potential of CB1 receptor antagonists to treat overweight/obesity, obesity-related cardiometabolic disorders, and substance abuse. Laboratory data suggest that CB2 receptor antagonists might be effective immunomodulatory and, perhaps, anti-inflammatory drugs. One CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, rimonabant, has emerged as the first-in-class drug approved outside the United States for weight control. Select follow-on agents (taranabant, otenabant, surinabant, rosonabant, SLV-319, AVE1625, V24343) have also been studied in the clinic. However, rimonabant's market withdrawal in the European Union and suspension of rimonabant's, taranabant's, and otenabant's ongoing development programs have highlighted some adverse clinical side effects (especially nausea and psychiatric disturbances) of CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists. Novel CB1 receptor ligands that are peripherally directed and/or exhibit neutral antagonism (the latter not affecting constitutive CB1 receptor signaling) may optimize the benefits of CB1 receptor antagonists while minimizing any risk. Indeed, CB1 receptor-neutral antagonists appear from preclinical data to offer efficacy comparable to or better than that of prototype CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists, with less propensity to induce nausea. Continued

  15. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Mohammad A.; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  16. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  17. Sigma1 receptor ligands and related neuroactive steroids interfere with the cocaine-induced state of memory.

    PubMed

    Romieu, Pascal; Lucas, Morgan; Maurice, Tangui

    2006-07-01

    The present series of experiments examined the involvement of the sigma(1) receptor and related neuroactive steroids in the memory state induced by a very low dose of cocaine. Using a modified passive avoidance procedure in mice, we examined whether cocaine induces state-dependent (StD) learning. Animals trained and tested with saline or the same dose of cocaine (0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg) showed correct retention, measured using two independent parameters: the retention latency and a ratio between the retention latency and the last training latency. Animals trained with cocaine (0.1 mg/kg) and tested with saline or cocaine (0.03, 0.3 mg/kg), or trained with saline and tested with cocaine, showed altered retention parameters, demonstrating that StD occurred. Therefore, cocaine administered before training produced a chemical state used as an endogenous cue to insure optimal retention. Since sigma(1) receptor activation is an important event during the acquisition of cocaine reward, we tested several sigma(1) ligands and related neurosteroids. The sigma(1) agonist igmesine or antagonist BD1047 failed to produce StD, but modified the cocaine state. Among neuroactive steroids, pregnanolone and allopregnanolone, positive modulators of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor, produced StD. However, steroids also acting as sigma(1) agonists, dehydroepiandrosterone (3beta-hydroxy-5alpha-androsten-17-one (DHEA)), pregnenolone, or antagonist, progesterone, failed to induce StD but modified the cocaine state. Furthermore, optimal retention was observed with mice trained with (igmesine or DHEA)+cocaine and tested with a higher dose of cocaine, or with mice trained with (BD1047 or progesterone)+cocaine and tested with vehicle. This study demonstrated that: (i) low doses of cocaine induce a chemical state/memory trace sustaining StD; (ii) modulation of the sigma(1) receptor activation, although insufficient to provoke StD, modulates the cocaine state; (iii) neuroactive

  18. Discovery of Novel Triazole-Based Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Keenan, Susan M.; Peng, Youyi; Nair, Anil C.; Yu, Seong Jae; Howells, Richard D.; Welsh, William J.

    2009-01-01

    We report the computer-aided design, chemical synthesis, and biological evaluation of a novel family of δ opioid receptor (DOR) antagonists containing a 1,2,4-triazole core structure that are structurally distinct from other known opioid receptor active ligands. Among those δ antagonists sharing this core structure, 8 exhibited strong binding affinity (Ki = 50 nM) for the DOR and appreciable selectivity for δ over μ and opioid receptors (δ/μ = 80; δ/κ > 200). PMID:16821764

  19. Antinociceptive Profile of Levo-tetrahydropalmatine in Acute and Chronic Pain Mice Models: Role of spinal sigma-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong-Wook; Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Jae-Gyun; Kang, Suk-Yun; Ryu, Yeonhee; Park, Jin Bong; Lee, Jang-Hern; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2016-01-01

    We have recently reported that repeated systemic treatments of extract from Corydalis yanhusuo alleviate neuropathic pain and levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) is one of active components from Corydalis. We designed this study to investigate antinociceptive effect of l-THP in acute and chronic pain models and related mechanism within the spinal cord. We found that intraperitoneal pretreatment with l-THP significantly inhibited the second phase of formalin-induced pain behavior. In addition, intrathecal as well as intraperitoneal pretreatment with l-THP reduced the mechanical allodynia (MA) induced by direct activation of sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1). In chronic constriction injury mice, these treatments remarkably suppressed the increase in MA and spinal phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit expression on day 7 after surgery. Intrathecal treatment with l-THP combined with the Sig-1R antagonist, BD1047 synergistically blocked MA suggesting that l-THP modulates spinal Sig-1R activation. CatWalk gait analysis also supported that antinociceptive effect of l-THP as demonstrated by restoration of percentages of print area and single stance. Meanwhile, intrathecal pretreatment with naloxone, non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, did not affect the effect of l-THP. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that l-THP possesses antinociceptive effects through spinal Sig-1R mechanism and may be a useful analgesic in the management of neuropathic pain. PMID:27910870

  20. Phenylacetamides as selective alpha-1A adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Patane, M A; DiPardo, R M; Newton, R C; Price, R P; Broten, T P; Chang, R S; Ransom, R W; Di Salvo, J; Nagarathnam, D; Forray, C; Gluchowski, C; Bock, M G

    2000-08-07

    A novel class of potent and selective alpha-1a receptor antagonists has been identified. The structures of these antagonists were derived from truncating the 4-aryl dihydropyridine subunit present in known alpha-1a antagonists. The design principles which led to the discovery of substituted phenylacetamides, the synthesis and SAR of key analogues, and the results of select in vitro and in vivo studies are described.

  1. Prostanoid receptor antagonists: development strategies and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Jones, RL; Giembycz, MA; Woodward, DF

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the primary products of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)/prostaglandin synthase(s), which occurred between 1958 and 1976, was followed by a classification system for prostanoid receptors (DP, EP1, EP2 …) based mainly on the pharmacological actions of natural and synthetic agonists and a few antagonists. The design of potent selective antagonists was rapid for certain prostanoid receptors (EP1, TP), slow for others (FP, IP) and has yet to be achieved in certain cases (EP2). While some antagonists are structurally related to the natural agonist, most recent compounds are ‘non-prostanoid’ (often acyl-sulphonamides) and have emerged from high-throughput screening of compound libraries, made possible by the development of (functional) assays involving single recombinant prostanoid receptors. Selective antagonists have been crucial to defining the roles of PGD2 (acting on DP1 and DP2 receptors) and PGE2 (on EP1 and EP4 receptors) in various inflammatory conditions; there are clear opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The vast endeavour on TP (thromboxane) antagonists is considered in relation to their limited pharmaceutical success in the cardiovascular area. Correspondingly, the clinical utility of IP (prostacyclin) antagonists is assessed in relation to the cloud hanging over the long-term safety of selective COX-2 inhibitors. Aspirin apart, COX inhibitors broadly suppress all prostanoid pathways, while high selectivity has been a major goal in receptor antagonist development; more targeted therapy may require an intermediate position with defined antagonist selectivity profiles. This review is intended to provide overviews of each antagonist class (including prostamide antagonists), covering major development strategies and current and potential clinical usage. PMID:19624532

  2. CXCR2 receptor antagonists: a medicinal chemistry perspective.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Michael P; Yu, Younong

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated leukocyte recruitment is believed to be a key contributor to various acute and chronic inflammatory disorders which can lead to serious pathological consequences. Chemokines are small molecular weight proteins that have been shown to be imperative in the direction of leukocytes to the sites of inflammation. In humans, several of these chemokines (CXCL8 and CXCL1) are elevated in inflammatory disorders such as asthma, arthritis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These chemokines modulate their downstream effects thru G-protein coupled receptors, such as CXCR2, making the identification of small-molecule antagonists of this receptor attractive towards developing novel therapies to treat inflammatory conditions. Since the first report of a CXCR2 receptor antagonist in 1998, there has been a considerable effort conducted mainly in the pharmaceutical industry to identify novel classes of CXCR2 receptor antagonists. Over a dozen distinct classes of CXCR2 receptor antagonists have been reported in the literature to date with a number of these compounds having reached mid-stage clinical trials. This review will provide a broad overview the medicinal chemistry efforts over the past 15 years towards the identification of CXCR2 receptor antagonists. The discussion will focus upon the early preclinical space covering the structure activity relationships (SAR), pharmacology, as well in preclinical in vivo evaluation for the different series of CXCR2 receptor antagonists. In addition, the available clinical data for the most advanced compounds in the clinic will be discussed and along with a perspective of the area moving forward.

  3. Involvement of Sigma-1 Receptors in the Antidepressant-like Effects of Dextromethorphan

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Linda; Robson, Matthew J.; Healy, Jason R.; Scandinaro, Anna L.; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2014-01-01

    Dextromethorphan is an antitussive with a high margin of safety that has been hypothesized to display rapid-acting antidepressant activity based on pharmacodynamic similarities to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine. In addition to binding to NMDA receptors, dextromethorphan binds to sigma-1 (σ1) receptors, which are believed to be protein targets for a potential new class of antidepressant medications. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dextromethorphan elicits antidepressant-like effects and the involvement of σ1 receptors in mediating its antidepressant-like actions. The antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan were assessed in male, Swiss Webster mice using the forced swim test. Next, σ1 receptor antagonists (BD1063 and BD1047) were evaluated in conjunction with dextromethorphan to determine the involvement of σ receptors in its antidepressant-like effects. Quinidine, a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 inhibitor, was also evaluated in conjunction with dextromethorphan to increase the bioavailability of dextromethorphan and reduce exposure to additional metabolites. Finally, saturation binding assays were performed to assess the manner in which dextromethorphan interacts at the σ1 receptor. Our results revealed dextromethorphan displays antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test that can be attenuated by pretreatment with σ1 receptor antagonists, with BD1063 causing a shift to the right in the dextromethorphan dose response curve. Concomitant administration of quinidine potentiated the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan. Saturation binding assays revealed that a Ki concentration of dextromethorphan reduces both the Kd and the Bmax of [3H](+)-pentazocine binding to σ1 receptors. Taken together, these data suggest that dextromethorphan exerts some of its antidepressant actions through σ1 receptors. PMID:24587167

  4. Involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Linda; Robson, Matthew J; Healy, Jason R; Scandinaro, Anna L; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2014-01-01

    Dextromethorphan is an antitussive with a high margin of safety that has been hypothesized to display rapid-acting antidepressant activity based on pharmacodynamic similarities to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine. In addition to binding to NMDA receptors, dextromethorphan binds to sigma-1 (σ1) receptors, which are believed to be protein targets for a potential new class of antidepressant medications. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dextromethorphan elicits antidepressant-like effects and the involvement of σ1 receptors in mediating its antidepressant-like actions. The antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan were assessed in male, Swiss Webster mice using the forced swim test. Next, σ1 receptor antagonists (BD1063 and BD1047) were evaluated in conjunction with dextromethorphan to determine the involvement of σ receptors in its antidepressant-like effects. Quinidine, a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 inhibitor, was also evaluated in conjunction with dextromethorphan to increase the bioavailability of dextromethorphan and reduce exposure to additional metabolites. Finally, saturation binding assays were performed to assess the manner in which dextromethorphan interacts at the σ1 receptor. Our results revealed dextromethorphan displays antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test that can be attenuated by pretreatment with σ1 receptor antagonists, with BD1063 causing a shift to the right in the dextromethorphan dose response curve. Concomitant administration of quinidine potentiated the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan. Saturation binding assays revealed that a Ki concentration of dextromethorphan reduces both the Kd and the Bmax of [(3)H](+)-pentazocine binding to σ1 receptors. Taken together, these data suggest that dextromethorphan exerts some of its antidepressant actions through σ1 receptors.

  5. Vasopressin-receptor antagonist therapy in patients with hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Vachharajani, Tushar; Vachharajani, Vidula

    2007-07-01

    Hyponatraemia often complicates the treatment of underlying conditions in patients who are seriously ill. Arginine vasopressin receptor antagonists block the action of arginine vasopressin and correct sodium and water imbalance in patients with euvolaemic or hypervolaemic hyponatraemia.

  6. [Angiotensin II receptor antagonists: different or equivalent?].

    PubMed

    Mounier-Vehier, C; Devos, P

    ARA-II: Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA-II) belong to a recent class of antihypertensive drugs whose mechanism of action is similar to converting enzyme inhibitors (CEI). ARA-II are particularly interesting due to the excellent clinical and biological tolerance, similar to placebo, and their antihypertensive efficacy, comparable with classical drug classes. PUBLISHED TRIALS: A meta-analysis, published by Conlin in the American Journal of Hypertension, suggests that ARA-II, specifically losartan, valsartan, irbesartan and candesartan, have an equipotent blood pressure lowering effect. The careful lecture of this meta-analysis however discloses a faulty methodology from which no valid conclusion can be drawn. Since this early publication, several other comparative studies have been published. These multicentric, randomized double-blind studies enrolled a sufficient number of patients and demonstrated a clinical difference between certain ARA-II at usual dosages. CLINICAL PRACTICE: These studies do have an impact on everyday practice. For the practitioner, the goal is to obtain and then maintain a long-term and optimal reduction in the blood pressure level (reduction or prevention of target-organ disorders and cardiovascular complications of high blood pressure). This reduction in the cardiovascular risk will also depend directly on tolerance and compliance to the antihypertensive treatment. This element must also be considered in assessing treatment efficacy, independent of the blood pressure lowering effect. The results of several other studies will be published in 2001-2003. These large-scale studies on ARA-II related morbidity and mortality will be most useful in determining the role of these drugs in different therapeutic strategies compared with other drug classes.

  7. Sigma-1 receptor stimulation attenuates calcium influx through activated L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels in purified retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Brett H; Park, Yong; Daudt, Donald R; Ma, Hai-Ying; Akopova, Irina; Stankowska, Dorota L; Clark, Abbot F; Yorio, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Sigma-1 receptors (σ-1rs) exert neuroprotective effects on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) both in vivo and in vitro. This receptor has unique properties through its actions on several voltage-gated and ligand-gated channels. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role that σ-1rs play in regulating cell calcium dynamics through activated L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (L-type VGCCs) in purified RGCs. RGCs were isolated from P3-P7 Sprague-Dawley rats and purified by sequential immunopanning using a Thy1.1 antibody. Calcium imaging was used to measure changes in intracellular calcium after depolarizing the cells with potassium chloride (KCl) in the presence or absence of two σ-1r agonists [(+)-SKF10047 and (+)-Pentazocine], one σ-1r antagonist (BD1047), and one L-type VGCC antagonist (Verapamil). Finally, co-localization studies were completed to assess the proximity of σ-1r with L-type VGCCs in purified RGCs. VGCCs were activated using KCl (20 mM). Pre-treatment with a known L-type VGCC blocker demonstrated a 57% decrease of calcium ion influx through activated VGCCs. Calcium imaging results also demonstrated that σ-1r agonists, (+)-N-allylnormetazocine hydrochloride [(+)-SKF10047] and (+)-Pentazocine, inhibited calcium ion influx through activated VGCCs. Antagonist treatment using BD1047 demonstrated a potentiation of calcium ion influx through activated VGCCs and abolished all inhibitory effects of the σ-1r agonists on VGCCs, implying that these ligands were acting through the σ-1r. An L-type VGCC blocker (Verapamil) also inhibited KCl activated VGCCs and when combined with the σ-1r agonists there was not a further decline in calcium entry suggesting similar mechanisms. Lastly, co-localization studies demonstrated that σ-1rs and L-type VGCCs are co-localized in purified RGCs. Taken together, these results indicated that σ-1r agonists can inhibit KCl induced calcium ion influx through activated L-type VGCCs in purified RGCs. This is the

  8. Antagonists of the kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Mariangela; Guerrero, Miguel; Rosen, Hugh; Roberts, Edward

    2014-05-01

    The research community has increasingly focused on the development of OPRK antagonists as pharmacotherapies for the treatment of depression, anxiety, addictive disorders and other psychiatric conditions produced or exacerbated by stress. Short-acting OPRK antagonists have been recently developed as a potential improvement over long-acting prototypic ligands including nor-BNI and JDTic. Remarkably the short-acting LY2456302 is undergoing phase II clinical trials for the augmentation of the antidepressant therapy in treatment-resistant depression. This Letter reviews relevant chemical and pharmacological advances in the identification and development of OPRK antagonists.

  9. Recent advances in CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lange, Jos H M; Kruse, Chris G

    2004-07-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists are currently the subject of intensive research due to their highly promising therapeutic prospects. Novel chemical entities having CB1 antagonistic properties have recently been disclosed by several pharmaceutical companies and some academic research groups, some of which are close structural analogs of the leading compound rimonabant (SR-141716A; Sanofi-Synthélabo). A considerable number of these CB1 antagonists are bioisosteres that are derived from rimonabant by the replacement of the pyrazole moiety with an alternative heterocycle. As well as these achiral compounds, Solvay Pharmaceuticals have disclosed a novel class of chiral pyrazolines that are potent and CB1/CB2 subtype-selective cannabinoid receptor antagonists, in which the interactions with the CB1 receptor are highly stereoselective.

  10. Solution structures and molecular interactions of selective melanocortin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Yun, Ji-Hye; Lim, Sung-Kil; Lee, Weontae

    2010-12-01

    The solution structures and inter-molecular interaction of the cyclic melanocortin antagonists SHU9119, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 with receptor molecules have been determined by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. While SHU9119 is known as a nonselective antagonist, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 are selective for the melanocortin subtype-4 receptor (MC4R) involved in modulation of food intake. Data from NMR and molecular dynamics suggest that the conformation of the Trp9 sidechain in the three MC4R-selective antagonists is quite different from that of SHU9119. This result strongly supports the concept that the spatial orientation of the hydrophobic aromatic residue is more important for determining selectivity than the presence of a basic, "arginine-like" moiety responsible for biological activity. We propose that the conformation of hydrophobic residues of MCR antagonists is critical for receptor-specific selectivity.

  11. NK-1 receptor antagonists: a new paradigm in pharmacological therapy.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M; Coveñas, R

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance P (SP) shows a widespread distribution in both the central and peripheral nervous systems and it is known that after binding to the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptors, SP regulates many biological functions in the central nervous system such as emotional behaviour, stress, depression, anxiety, emesis, migraine, alcohol addiction and neurodegeneration. SP has been also implicated in pain, inflammation, hepatotoxicity and in virus proliferation, and it plays an important role in cancer (e.g., tumour cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and the migration of tumour cells for invasion and metastasis). By contrast, it is known that after binding to NK-1 receptors, NK-1 receptor antagonists specifically inhibit the above-mentioned biological functions mediated by SP. Thus, these antagonists exert an anxyolitic, antidepressant, antiemetic, antimigraine, antialcohol addiction or neuroprotector effect in the central nervous system, and they play a role in analgesic, antiinflammatory, hepatoprotector processes and in antivirus proliferation. Regarding cancer, NK-1 receptor antagonists exert an antitumour action (inducing tumour cell death by apoptosis), and induce antiangiogenesis and inhibit the migration of tumour cells. It is also known that NK-1 receptors have a widespread distribution and that they are overexpressed in tumour cells. Thus, NK-1 receptor antagonists are molecularly targeted agents. In general, current drugs have a single therapeutic effect, although less commonly they may exert several. However, the data reported above indicate that NK-1 receptor antagonists are promising drugs, exerting many therapeutic effects (the action of such antagonists is dose-dependent and, depending on the concentration, has more positive effects). In this review, we update the multiple therapeutic effects exerted by NK-1 receptor antagonists.

  12. Combining Elements from Two Antagonists of Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 Generates More Potent Peptidomimetic Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Holdfeldt, André; Nielsen, Christina; Hansen, Anna Mette; Perez-Gassol, Iris; Dahlgren, Claes; Forsman, Huamei; Franzyk, Henrik

    2017-08-24

    Structural optimization of a peptidomimetic antagonist of formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) was explored by an approach involving combination of elements from the two most potent FPR2 antagonists described: a Rhodamine B-conjugated 10-residue gelsonin-derived peptide (i.e., PBP10, RhB-QRLFQVKGRR-OH) and the palmitoylated α-peptide/β-peptoid hybrid Pam-(Lys-βNspe)6-NH2. This generated an array of hybrid compounds from which a new subclass of receptor-selective antagonists was identified. The most potent representatives displayed activity in the low nanomolar range. The resulting stable and potent FPR2-selective antagonists (i.e., RhB-(Lys-βNphe)n-NH2; n = 4-6) are expected to become valuable tools in further elucidation of the physiological role of FPR2 in health and disease.

  13. Pharmacophore development for antagonists at α1 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, J. B.; Coban, B.; Griffith, R.

    1996-12-01

    Many receptors, including α1 adrenergic receptors, have a range of subtypes. This offers possibilities for the development of highly selective antagonists with potentially fewer detrimental effects. Antagonists developed for α1A receptors, for example, would have potential in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. As part of the molecular design process, structural features necessary for the selective affinity for α1A and α1B adrenergic receptors have been investigated. The molecular modelling software (particularly the Apex module) of Molecular Simulations, Inc. was used to develop pharmacophore models for these two subtypes. Low-energy conformations of a set of known antagonists were used as input, together with a classification of the receptor affinity data. The biophores proposed by the program were evaluated and pharmacophores were proposed. The pharmacophore models were validated by testing the fit of known antagonists, not included in the training set. The critical structural feature for selectivity between the α1A and α1B adrenergic receptor sites is the distance between the basic nitrogen atom and the centre of an aromatic ring system. This will be exploited in the design and synthesis of structurally new selective antagonists for these sites.

  14. Triterpenes from Alisma orientalis act as androgen receptor agonists, progesterone receptor antagonists, and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiang-Ru

    2014-08-01

    Alisma orientalis, a well-known traditional medicine, exerts numerous pharmacological effects including anti-diabetes, anti-hepatitis, and anti-diuretics but its bioactivity is not fully clear. Androgen receptor (AR), progesterone receptor (PR), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are three members of nuclear receptor superfamily that has been widely targeted for developing treatments for essential diseases including prostate cancer and breast cancer. In this study, two triterpenes, alisol M 23-acetate and alisol A 23-acetate from Alisma orientalis were determined whether they may act as androgen receptor (AR), progesterone receptor (PR), or glucocorticoid receptor (GR) modulators. Indeed, in the transient transfection reporter assays, alisol M 23-acetate and alisol A 23-acetate transactivated AR in dose-dependent manner, while they transrepressed the transactivation effects exerted by agonist-activated PR and GR. Through molecular modeling docking studies, they were shown to respectively interact with AR, PR, or GR ligand binding pocket fairly well. All these results indicate that alisol M 23-acetate and alisol A 23-acetate from Alisma orientalis might possess therapeutic effects through their modulation of AR, PR, and GR pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  16. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Endothelin receptor antagonists for subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Shi, Zhenghong; Yang, Kehu; Tian, Jin Hui; Jiang, Lei

    2012-09-12

    A subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition where blood leaks out of blood vessels over the surface of the brain. Delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) and the related feature of vasospasm, where patients experience a delayed deterioration, have long been recognized as the leading potentially treatable cause of death and disability in patients with SAH. Endothelin is a potent, long-lasting endogenous vasoconstrictor that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of DIND. Therefore, endothelin receptor antagonists (ETAs) have emerged as a promising therapeutic option for SAH-induced cerebral vasospasm. To assess the efficacy and tolerability of ETAs for SAH. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (December 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 11), MEDLINE (1950 to December 2011), EMBASE (1946 to December 2011) and the Chinese Biomedical Database (1978 to December 2011). In an effort to identify further published, unpublished and ongoing trials we searched additional Chinese databases, ongoing trials registers, Google Scholar and Medical Matrix, handsearched journals, scanned reference lists, and contacted researchers and pharmaceutical companies. We only included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared an ETA with placebo for SAH in adult (18 years of age or older) patients who met the diagnostic criteria for SAH based on clinical symptoms, with confirmation on computerized tomography scan results or angiography. Two review authors independently selected RCTs according to the inclusion criteria. We resolved disagreements by discussion with a third review author. Two review authors independently selected relevant articles and assessed their eligibility according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. We resolved disagreements by discussion with a third review author. We used the random-effects model and expressed the results as

  18. Novel arylpiperazines as selective alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Murray, W V; Jolliffe, L; Pulito, V

    2000-05-15

    A novel series of arylpiperazines has been synthesized and identified as antagonists of alpha1a adrenergic receptor (alpha1a-AR) implicated in benign prostatic hyperplasia. These compounds selectively bind to membrane bound alpha1a-AR with K(i)s as low as 0.66 nM. As such, these potentially represent a viable treatment for BPH without the side effects associated with known alpha1-adrenergic antagonists.

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of antagonist and agonist interactions with dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Duarte, E P; Oliveira, C R; Carvalho, A P

    1988-03-01

    The binding of [3H]spiperone to dopamine D-2 receptors and its inhibition by antagonists and agonists were examined in microsomes derived from the sheep caudate nucleus, at temperatures between 37 and 1 degree C, and the thermodynamic parameters of the binding were evaluated. The affinity of the receptor for the antagonists, spiperone and (+)-butaclamol, decreased as the incubation temperature decreased; the affinity for haloperidol did not further decrease at temperatures below 15 degrees C. The binding of the antagonists was associated with very large increases in entropy, as expected for hydrophobic interactions. The enthalpy and entropy changes associated with haloperidol binding were dependent on temperature, in contrast to those associated with spiperone and (+)-butaclamol. The magnitude of the entropy increase associated with the specific binding of the antagonists did not correlate with the degree of lipophilicity of these drugs. The data suggest that, in addition to hydrophobic forces, other forces are also involved in the antagonist-dopamine receptor interactions, and that a conformational change of the receptor could occur when the antagonist binds. Agonist binding data are consistent with a two-state model of the receptor, a high-affinity state (RH) and a low-affinity state (RL). The affinity of dopamine binding to the RH decreased with decreasing temperatures below 20 degrees C, whereas the affinity for the RL increased at low temperatures. In contrast, the affinity of apomorphine for both states of receptor decreased as the temperature decreased from 30 to 8 degrees C. A clear distinction between the energetics of high-affinity and low-affinity agonist binding was observed. The formation of the high-affinity complex was associated with larger increases in enthalpy and entropy than the interaction with the low-affinity state was. The results suggest that the interaction of the receptor with the G-proteins, induced or stabilized by the binding of

  20. Allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors elicits anti-seizure activities

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lin; Chen, Yanke; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Guanghui; Friedman, Eitan; Zhang, Ao; Zhen, Xuechu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Application of orthosteric sigma-1 receptor agonists as anti-seizure drugs has been hindered by questionable efficacy and potential adverse effects. Here, we have investigated the anti-seizure effects of the novel and potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptors, SKF83959 and its derivative SOMCL-668 (3-methyl-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-benzo[d]azepin-7-ol). Experimental Approach The anti-seizure effects of SKF83959 were investigated in three mouse models, maximal electroshock seizures, pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions and kainic acid-induced ‘status epilepticus’. Also, in rats, the cortical epileptiform activity induced by topical application of picrotoxin was recorded in electrocorticograms. In rat hippocampal brain slices, effects of the drugs on the high potassium-evoked epileptiform local field potentials were studied. Anti-seizure activities of SOMCL-668, a newly developed sigma-1 receptor selective allosteric modulator, were also investigated. Key Results SKF83959 (20, 40 mg·kg−1) exhibited anti –seizure actitity in the three mouse models and reduced the cortical epileptiform activity without alteration of spontaneous motor activity and motor coordination. These effects were blocked by the sigma-1 receptor antagonist BD1047, but not the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390. SKF83959 alone did not directly inhibit the epileptiform firing of CA3 neurons induced by high potassium in hippocampal slices, but did potentiate inhibition by the orthosteric sigma-1 receptor agonist SKF10047. Lastly, a selective sigma-1 receptor allosteric modulator SOMCL-668, which does not bind to dopamine receptors, exerted similar anti-seizure activities. Conclusions and Implications SKF83959 and SOMCL-668 displayed anti-seizure activities, indicating that allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors may provide a novel approach for discovering new anti-seizure drugs. PMID:25989224

  1. Mixed antagonistic effects of bilobalide at rho1 GABAC receptor.

    PubMed

    Huang, S H; Duke, R K; Chebib, M; Sasaki, K; Wada, K; Johnston, G A R

    2006-01-01

    Bilobalide was found to be a moderately potent antagonist with a weak use-dependent effect at recombinant human rho(1) GABA(C) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes using two-electrode voltage clamp methodology. Antagonism of bilobalide at homomeric rho(1) GABA(C) receptors appeared to be mixed. At low concentration, bilobalide (3 microM) caused a parallel right shift and surmountable GABA maximal response of the GABA dose-response curve characteristic of a competitive antagonist. At high concentrations, bilobalide (10-100 microM) caused nonparallel right shifts and reduced maximal GABA responses of GABA dose-response curves characteristic of a noncompetitive antagonist. The potency of bilobalide appears to be dependent on the concentrations of GABA and was more potent at lower GABA concentrations. The mechanism of action of bilobalide at rho(1) GABA(C) receptors appears to be similar to that of the chloride channel blocker picrotoxinin.

  2. Third Generation Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists; Why We Need a Fourth

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise

    2015-01-01

    The first mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, spironolactone, was developed almost 60 years ago to treat primary aldosteronism and pathological edema. Its use waned in part due to its lack of selectivity. Subsequently knowledge of the scope of MR function was expanded along with clinical evidence of the therapeutic importance of MR antagonists to prevent the ravages of inappropriate MR activation. Forty-two years elapsed between the first and MR-selective second generation of MR antagonists. Fifteen years later, despite serious shortcomings of the existing antagonists, a third generation antagonist has yet to be marketed. Progress has been slowed by the lack of appreciation of the large variety of cell types that express the MR and its diverse cell-type-specific actions, as well as its uniquely complex interactions actions at the molecular level. New MR antagonists should preferentially target the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of MR and perhaps its excitatory effects on sympathetic nervous system, but not the renal tubular epithelium or neurons of the cortex and hippocampus. This review briefly describes efforts to develop a third generation MR antagonist and why fourth generation antagonists and selective agonists based on structural determinants of tissue and ligand-specific MR activation should be contemplated. PMID:26466326

  3. Spinal sigma-1 receptor activation increases the production of D-serine in astrocytes which contributes to the development of mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Beitz, Alvin J; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2015-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated that activation of the spinal sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) plays an important role in the development of mechanical allodynia (MA) via secondary activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Sig-1Rs have been shown to localize to astrocytes, and blockade of Sig-1Rs inhibits the pathologic activation of astrocytes in neuropathic mice. However, the mechanism by which Sig-1R activation in astrocytes modulates NMDA receptors in neurons is currently unknown. d-serine, synthesized from l-serine by serine racemase (Srr) in astrocytes, is an endogenous co-agonist for the NMDA receptor glycine site and can control NMDA receptor activity. Here, we investigated the role of d-serine in the development of MA induced by spinal Sig-1R activation in chronic constriction injury (CCI) mice. The production of d-serine and Srr expression were both significantly increased in the spinal cord dorsal horn post-CCI surgery. Srr and d-serine were only localized to astrocytes in the superficial dorsal horn, while d-serine was also localized to neurons in the deep dorsal horn. Moreover, we found that Srr exists in astrocytes that express Sig-1Rs. The CCI-induced increase in the levels of d-serine and Srr was attenuated by sustained intrathecal treatment with the Sig-1R antagonist, BD-1047 during the induction phase of neuropathic pain. In behavioral experiments, degradation of endogenous d-serine with DAAO, or selective blockade of Srr by LSOS, effectively reduced the development of MA, but not thermal hyperalgesia in CCI mice. Finally, BD-1047 administration inhibited the development of MA and this inhibition was reversed by intrathecal treatment with exogenous d-serine. These findings demonstrate for the first time that the activation of Sig-1Rs increases the expression of Srr and d-serine in astrocytes. The increased production of d-serine induced by CCI ultimately affects dorsal horn neurons that are involved in the development of MA in neuropathic

  4. Endothelin receptor antagonists influence cardiovascular morphology in uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Nabokov, A V; Amann, K; Wessels, S; Münter, K; Wagner, J; Ritz, E

    1999-02-01

    In is generally held that renal failure results in blood pressure (BP)-independent structural changes of the myocardium and the vasculature. The contribution, if any, of endothelin (ET) to these changes has been unknown. We morphometrically studied random samples of the left ventricle myocardium and small intramyocardial arteries in subtotally (5/6) nephrectomized (SNx) male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with either the selective ETA receptor antagonist BMS182874 (30 mg/kg/day) or the nonselective ETA/ETB receptor antagonist Ro46-2005 (30 mg/kg/day) in comparison with either sham-operated rats, untreated SNx, or SNx rats treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor trandolapril (0.1 mg/kg/day). Eight weeks later, systolic BP was lower in trandolapril-treated SNx compared with untreated SNx animals. No decrease in BP was seen following either ET receptor antagonist at the dose used. A significantly increased volume density of the myocardial interstitium was found in untreated SNx rats as compared with sham-operated controls. Such interstitial expansion was prevented by trandolapril and either ET receptor antagonist. SNx caused a substantial increase in the wall thickness of small intramyocardial arteries. The increase was prevented by trandolapril or BMS182874 treatment. The arteriolar wall:lumen ratio was significantly lower in all treated groups when compared with untreated SNx. In contrast, only trandolapril, but not the ET receptor antagonists, attenuated thickening of the aortic media in SNx animals. The ETA-selective and ETA/ETB-nonselective receptor antagonists appear to prevent development of myocardial fibrosis and structural changes of small intramyocardial arteries in experimental chronic renal failure. This effect is independent of systemic BP.

  5. Drug discovery and chemokine receptor antagonists: eppur si muove!

    PubMed

    Terricabras, Emma; Benjamim, Claudia; Godessart, Nuria

    2004-11-01

    The blockade of leukocyte migration has been demonstrated to be a valid option for the treatment of several autoimmune diseases. Chemokines play an active role in regulating cell infiltration into inflammatory sites and disrupting chemokine-receptor interactions has emerged as an alternative therapeutic approach. Pharmaceutical companies have developed an intense activity in the drug discovery of chemokine receptor antagonists in the last 10 years. Potent and selective compounds have been obtained and some of them are currently being evaluated in the clinic. The success of these trials will demonstrate whether the blockade of a single receptor is of therapeutic benefit. Alternative approaches, such as pan-receptor antagonists or inhibitors of the signalling pathways evoked by chemokines, are also being explored. In the meantime, new relationships between chemokines and receptors will be revealed, increasing our knowledge of such a fascinating field.

  6. Possible involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the anti-immobility action of bupropion, a dopamine reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-08-01

    Sigma receptors particularly, sigma-1 subtype is known to modulate the release of catecholamines in the brain and may participate in the mechanism of action of various antidepressants. The present study investigated the possible involvement of sigma receptors in modulating the anti-immobility-like effect of bupropion (a dopamine reuptake inhibitor) using the forced swim test (FST) in mice. Bupropion produced dose-dependent (10-40 mg/kg, i.p.) reduction in immobility period and the ED(50) value was found to be 18.5 (7.34-46.6) mg/kg, i.p. (+)-Pentazocine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a high-affinity sigma-1 receptor agonist, produced synergistic response when it was co-administered with a subeffective dose of bupropion (10 mg/kg, i.p.). On the contrary, pretreatment with progesterone (10 mg/kg, s.c.), a sigma-1 receptor antagonist neurosteroid, rimcazole (5 mg/kg, i.p.), another sigma-1 receptor antagonist, or BD 1047 (1 mg/kg, i.p.), a novel sigma-1 receptor antagonist, reversed the anti-immobility effects of bupropion (20 mg/kg, i.p.). The various modulators used in the study did not show any effect per se on locomotor activity except bupropion which at a higher dose (15-40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the locomotor activity. The results for the first time demonstrated the involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the anti-immobility effects of bupropion.

  7. Discovery of Tertiary Sulfonamides as Potent Liver X Receptor Antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zuercher, William J.; Buckholz†, Richard G.; Campobasso, Nino; Collins, Jon L.; Galardi, Cristin M.; Gampe, Robert T.; Hyatt, Stephen M.; Merrihew, Susan L.; Moore, John T.; Oplinger, Jeffrey A.; Reid, Paul R.; Spearing, Paul K.; Stanley, Thomas B.; Stewart, Eugene L.; Willson, Timothy M.

    2010-08-12

    Tertiary sulfonamides were identified in a HTS as dual liver X receptor (LXR, NR1H2, and NR1H3) ligands, and the binding affinity of the series was increased through iterative analogue synthesis. A ligand-bound cocrystal structure was determined which elucidated key interactions for high binding affinity. Further characterization of the tertiary sulfonamide series led to the identification of high affinity LXR antagonists. GSK2033 (17) is the first potent cell-active LXR antagonist described to date. 17 may be a useful chemical probe to explore the cell biology of this orphan nuclear receptor.

  8. Combination decongestion therapy in hospitalized heart failure: loop diuretics, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Mentz, Robert J; Greene, Stephen J; Senni, Michele; Sato, Naoki; Nodari, Savina; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Congestion is the most common reason for admissions and readmissions for heart failure (HF). The vast majority of hospitalized HF patients appear to respond readily to loop diuretics, but available data suggest that a significant proportion are being discharged with persistent evidence of congestion. Although novel therapies targeting congestion should continue to be developed, currently available agents may be utilized more optimally to facilitate complete decongestion. The combination of loop diuretics, natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists represents a regimen of currently available therapies that affects early and persistent decongestion, while limiting the associated risks of electrolyte disturbances, hemodynamic fluctuations, renal dysfunction and mortality.

  9. Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    treatment; Analgesia; Nociception; Antinociception; Inflammation ; Chemokines; Chemokine receptor antagonists; Opioid analgesics; Animal models of pain...multiplex quantitative analysis of protein levels of these molecules. 2. KEYWORDS: Pain treatment; Analgesia; Nociception; Antinociception; Inflammation ...with a circulating water bath (Model 9500, Fisher Scientific; Pittsburgh, PA). Rats were held over the bath with their tails submerged

  10. Endothelin receptor antagonists and cardiovascular diseases of aging.

    PubMed

    Love, M P; McMurray, J J

    2001-01-01

    Our understanding of the role of the endothelin system in human cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology has evolved very rapidly since the initial description of its constituent parts in 1988. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is the predominant endothelin isoform in the human cardiovascular system and has potent vasoconstrictor, mitogenic and antinatriuretic properties which have implicated it in the pathophysiology of a number of cardiovascular diseases. The effects of ET-1 have been shown to be mediated by 2 principal endothelin receptor subtypes: ET(A) and ET(B). The development of a range of peptidic and nonpeptidic endothelin receptor antagonists represents an exciting breakthrough in human cardiovascular therapeutics. Two main classes of endothelin receptor antagonist have been developed for possible human therapeutic use: ET(A)-selective and nonselective antagonists. Extensive laboratory and clinical research with these agents has highlighted their promise in various cardiovascular diseases. Randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trials have yielded very encouraging results in patients with hypertension and chronic heart failure with more preliminary data suggesting a possible role in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis and stroke. Much more research is needed, however, before endothelin receptor antagonists can be considered for clinical use.

  11. [Medical economics evaluation of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist drugs].

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Junpei; Hirano, Shigeki; Fukui, Aiko; Funabashi, Kazuaki; Deguchi, Yuko; Yamada, Susumu; Naito, Kazuyuki

    2010-10-01

    At Komaki City Hospital, the drug cost in connection with cancer chemotherapy was re-examined as part of improved management along with the introduction of DPC in July 2008. With due attention to the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, both the change from injections to oral drugs and the change from brand-name drugs to generic drugs were tried between July 2008 and June 2009. After that, in order to examine the economic impact of these changes, we investigated and analyzed the number of medications, the cost of medicine purchased, and the average drug cost per medication of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists between April 2008 and September 2009. As a result, the cost of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists purchased decreased greatly, and the impact of the improvement was mainly due to the change to oral drugs, and partially to the change to generic drugs. Therefore, from the viewpoint of hospital economic improvement in DPC, it was thought that the change to oral drugs(5-HT3 receptor antagonists)is given top priority.

  12. Novel benzopolycyclic amines with NMDA receptor antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Elena; Sureda, Francesc X; Vázquez, Santiago

    2014-05-01

    A new series of benzopolycyclic amines active as NMDA receptor antagonists were synthesized. Most of them exhibited increased activity compared with related analogues previously published. All the tested compounds were more potent than clinically approved amantadine and one of them displayed a lower IC50 value than memantine, an anti-Alzheimer's approved drug.

  13. The muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and atropine are competitive antagonists at 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Martin; Thompson, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Scopolamine is a high affinity muscarinic antagonist that is used for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are used for the same purpose and are structurally related to scopolamine. To examine whether 5-HT3 receptors are affected by scopolamine we examined the effects of this drug on the electrophysiological and ligand binding properties of 5-HT3A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells, respectively. 5-HT3 receptor-responses were reversibly inhibited by scopolamine with an IC50 of 2.09 μM. Competitive antagonism was shown by Schild plot (pA2 = 5.02) and by competition with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists [(3)H]granisetron (Ki = 6.76 μM) and G-FL (Ki = 4.90 μM). The related molecule, atropine, similarly inhibited 5-HT evoked responses in oocytes with an IC50 of 1.74 μM, and competed with G-FL with a Ki of 7.94 μM. The reverse experiment revealed that granisetron also competitively bound to muscarinic receptors (Ki = 6.5 μM). In behavioural studies scopolamine is used to block muscarinic receptors and induce a cognitive deficit, and centrally administered concentrations can exceed the IC50 values found here. It is therefore possible that 5-HT3 receptors are also inhibited. Studies that utilise higher concentrations of scopolamine should be mindful of these potential off-target effects.

  14. Sigma-1 receptor-mediated increase in spinal p38 MAPK phosphorylation leads to the induction of mechanical allodynia in mice and neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Young; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kang, Suk-Yun; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2013-09-01

    The direct activation of the spinal sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) produces mechanical allodynia (MA) and thermal hyperalgesia (TH) in mice. In addition, the blockade of the spinal Sig-1R prevents the induction of MA, but not TH in chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic rats. The present study was designed to investigate whether the increase in spinal p38 MAPK phosphorylation (p-p38 MAPK) mediates Sig-1R-induced MA or TH in mice and the induction of MA in neuropathic rats. MA and TH were evaluated using von Frey filaments and a hot-plate apparatus, respectively. Neuropathic pain was produced by CCI of the right sciatic nerve in rats. Western blot assay and immunohistochemistry were performed to determine the changes of p-p38 MAPK expression in the spinal cord. Intrathecal (i.t.) injection of PRE084, a selective Sig-1R agonist, into naïve mice time-dependently increased the expression of p-p38 MAPK, which was blocked by pretreatment with BD1047, a Sig-1R antagonist. I.t. pretreatment with SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor also dose-dependently inhibited PRE084-induced MA, whereas TH induction was not affected. In CCI rats, i.t. injection of BD1047 during the induction phase (postoperative days 0 to 5) reduced the CCI-induced increase in p-p38 MAPK. In addition, i.t. SB203580 treatment during the induction phase also suppressed the development of CCI-induced MA, but not TH. Conversely, i.t. SB203580 treatment during the maintenance phase (postoperative days 15 to 20) had no effect on CCI-induced MA or TH. These results demonstrate that the increase in spinal p-p38 MAPK is closely associated with the induction of Sig-1R mediated MA, but not TH. Sigma-1 receptor modulation of p-p38 MAPK also plays an important role in the induction, but not the maintenance, of MA in neuropathic pain.

  15. Small molecule antagonists for chemokine CCR3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Willems, Lianne I; Ijzerman, Ad P

    2010-09-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR3 is believed to play a role in the development of allergic diseases such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis. Despite the conflicting results that have been reported regarding the importance of eosinophils and CCR3 in allergic inflammation, inhibition of this receptor with small molecule antagonists is thought to provide a valuable approach for the treatment of these diseases. This review describes the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of small molecule CCR3 antagonists as reported in the scientific and patent literature. Various chemical classes of small molecule CCR3 antagonists have been described so far, including (bi)piperidine and piperazine derivatives, N-arylalkylpiperidine urea derivatives and (N-ureidoalkyl)benzylpiperidines, phenylalanine derivatives, morpholinyl derivatives, pyrrolidinohydroquinazolines, arylsulfonamides, amino-alkyl amides, imidazole- and pyrimidine-based antagonists, and bicyclic diamines. The (N-ureidoalkyl)benzylpiperidines are the best studied class in view of their generally high affinity and antagonizing potential. For many of these antagonists subnanomolar IC(50) values were reported for binding to CCR3 along with the ability to effectively inhibit intracellular calcium mobilization and eosinophil chemotaxis induced by CCR3 agonist ligands in vitro.

  16. Clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the endothelin receptor antagonist macitentan.

    PubMed

    Sidharta, P N; Treiber, A; Dingemanse, J

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease of the lung vascular system, which leads to right-sided heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. Treatments to regulate the pulmonary vascular pressure target the prostacyclin, nitric oxide, and endothelin (ET) pathways. Macitentan, an oral, once-daily, dual ETA and ETB receptor antagonist with high affinity and sustained receptor binding is the first ET receptor antagonist to show significant reduction of the risk of morbidity and mortality in PAH patients in a large-scale phase III study with a long-term outcome. Here we present a review of the available clinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship, and drug-drug interaction data of macitentan in healthy subjects, patients with PAH, and in special populations.

  17. Scaffold variations in amine warhead of histamine H₃ receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wingen, Kerstin; Stark, Holger

    2013-12-01

    The histamine H₃ receptor (H₃R) is involved in numerous regulatory neurotransmission processes and there-fore, is a prominent target for centrally occurring disease with some promising clinical candidates. Previous research resulted in the identification of a core pharmacophore blueprint for H₃R antagonists/inverse agonists, which when inserted in a molecule, mostly ensures acceptable affinity. Nevertheless, variations of scaffold and peripheral areas can increase potency and pharmacokinetic profile of drug candidates. The variations in amine scaffolds of antagonists for this aminergic GPCR are of special importance.

  18. Hyperglycemia of Diabetic Rats Decreased by a Glucagon Receptor Antagonist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David G.; Ulichny Goebel, Camy; Hruby, Victor J.; Bregman, Marvin D.; Trivedi, Dev

    1982-02-01

    The glucagon analog [l-Nα-trinitrophenylhistidine, 12-homoarginine]-glucagon (THG) was examined for its ability to lower blood glucose concentrations in rats made diabetic with streptozotocin. In vitro, THG is a potent antagonist of glucagon activation of the hepatic adenylate cyclase assay system. Intravenous bolus injections of THG caused rapid decreases (20 to 35 percent) of short duration in blood glucose. Continuous infusion of low concentrations of the inhibitor led to larger sustained decreases in blood glucose (30 to 65 percent). These studies demonstrate that a glucagon receptor antagonist can substantially reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic animals without addition of exogenous insulin.

  19. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates.

  20. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates. PMID:26888328

  1. Antagonistic action of pitrazepin on human and rat GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Demuro, Angelo; Martinez-Torres, Ataulfo; Francesconi, Walter; Miledi, Ricardo

    1999-01-01

    Pitrazepin, 3-(piperazinyl-1)-9H-dibenz(c,f) triazolo(4,5-a)azepin is a piperazine antagonist of GABA in a variety of electrophysiological and in vitro binding studies involving GABA and glycine receptors. In the present study we have investigated the effects of pitrazepin, and the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, on membrane currents elicited by GABA in Xenopus oocytes injected with rat cerebral cortex mRNA or cDNAs encoding α1β2 or α1β2γ2S human GABAA receptor subunits.The three types of GABAA receptors expressed were reversibly antagonized by bicuculline and pitrazepin in a concentration-dependent manner. GABA dose-current response curves for the three types of receptors were shifted to the right, in a parallel manner, by increasing concentrations of pitrazepin.Schild analyses gave pA2 values of 6.42±0.62, n=4, 6.41±1.2, n=5 and 6.21±1.24, n=6, in oocytes expressing rat cerebral cortex, α1β2 or α1β2γ2S human GABAA receptors respectively (values are given as means±s.e.mean), and the Hill coefficients were all close to unity. All this is consistent with the notion that pitrazepin acts as a competitive antagonist of these GABAA receptors; and that their antagonism by pitrazepin is not strongly dependent on the subunit composition of the receptors here studied.Since pitrazepin has been reported to act also at the benzodiazepine binding site, we studied the effect of the benzodiazepine antagonist Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil) on the inhibition of α1β2γ2S receptors by pitrazepin. Co-application of Ro 15-1788 did not alter the inhibiting effect of pitrazepin. Moreover, pitrazepin did not antagonize the potentiation of GABA-currents by flunitrazepam. All this suggests that pitrazepin does not affect the GABA receptor-chloride channel by interacting with the benzodiazepine receptor site. PMID:10369456

  2. Aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines as 5-HT7 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeeyeon; Kim, Youngjae; Tae, Jinsung; Yeom, Miyoung; Moon, Bongjin; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Lee, Kangho; Rhim, Hyewhon; Choo, Il Han; Chong, Youhoon; Keum, Gyochang; Nam, Ghilsoo; Choo, Hyunah

    2013-11-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7 R) is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of depression and neuropathic pain. The 5-HT7 R antagonist SB-269970 exhibited antidepressant-like activity, whereas systemic administration of the 5-HT7 R agonist AS-19 significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity and thermal hyperalgesia. In our efforts to discover selective 5-HT7 R antagonists or agonists, aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines were designed, synthesized, and biologically evaluated against the 5-HT7 R. Among the synthesized compounds, 1-([2'-methoxy-(1,1'-biphenyl)-3-yl]methyl)-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine (28) was the best binder to the 5-HT7 R (pKi =7.83), and its antagonistic property was confirmed by functional assays. The selectivity profile of compound 28 was also recorded for the 5-HT7 R over other serotonin receptor subtypes, such as 5-HT1 R, 5-HT2 R, 5-HT3 R, and 5-HT6 R. In a molecular modeling study, the 2-methoxyphenyl moiety attached to the piperazine ring of compound 28 was proposed to be essential for the antagonistic function.

  3. Optimization of amide-based EP3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lee, Esther C Y; Futatsugi, Kentaro; Arcari, Joel T; Bahnck, Kevin; Coffey, Steven B; Derksen, David R; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Loria, Paula M; Sharma, Raman

    2016-06-01

    Prostaglandin E receptor subtype 3 (EP3) antagonism may treat a variety of symptoms from inflammation to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Previously, most EP3 antagonists were large acidic ligands that mimic the substrate, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). This manuscript describes the optimization of a neutral small molecule amide series with improved lipophilic efficiency (LipE) also known as lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) ((a) Nat. Rev. Drug Disc.2007, 6, 881; (b) Annu. Rep. Med. Chem.2010, 45, 380).

  4. Human glucagon receptor antagonists based on alkylidene hydrazides.

    PubMed

    Ling, Anthony; Plewe, Michael; Gonzalez, Javier; Madsen, Peter; Sams, Christian K; Lau, Jesper; Gregor, Vlad; Murphy, Doug; Teston, Kimberly; Kuki, Atsuo; Shi, Shenghua; Truesdale, Larry; Kiel, Dan; May, John; Lakis, James; Anderes, Kenna; Iatsimirskaia, Eugenia; Sidelmann, Ulla G; Knudsen, Lotte B; Brand, Christian L; Polinsky, Alex

    2002-02-25

    A series of alkylidene hydrazide derivatives containing an alkoxyaryl moiety was optimized. The resulting hydrazide-ethers were competitive antagonists at the human glucagon receptor. Pharmacokinetic experiments showed fast clearance of most of the compounds tested. A representative compound [4-hydroxy-3-cyanobenzoic acid (4-isopropylbenzyloxy-3,5-dimethoxymethylene)hydrazide] with an IC50 value of 20 nM was shown to reduce blood glucose levels in fasted rats.

  5. Can angiotensin receptor antagonists prevent restenosis after stent placement?

    PubMed

    Peters, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Restenosis rates after coronary stent implantation in complex lesions are between 30 and 50%. Neointimal hyperplasia promoted by complex interaction between cellular and acellular elements, such as cytokines and growth factors, is thought to be the primary process responsible for restenosis. The risk of in-stent restenosis is increased in patients with a history of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, in long lesions, in total occlusions, in patients with diabetes mellitus, in small vessels, in the proximal parts of the left anterior descending coronary artery and in cases of stent oversizing. In-stent restenosis represents a serious economic burden on society because treatment strategies include expensive approaches such as cutting-balloon angioplasty, rotational atherectomy and brachytherapy. A number of pharmacological agents, including ACE inhibitors, have been unsuccessful in preventing restenosis. Alternative procedures such as brachytherapy, radioactive stents and drug-eluting stents are under evaluation. Although sirolimus- or paclitaxel-eluting stents have been associated with very low restenosis rates over durations of 6 to 12 months, the long-term efficacy and tolerability of this approach is currently being investigated. Although ACE inhibitors have failed in reducing restenosis rates, the selective angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor antagonist valsartan has shown encouraging results in the single-center Valsartan for Prevention of Restenosis after Stenting of Type B2/C lesions trial (ValPREST). The ValPREST trial is the first randomized, placebo-controlled study to have evaluated the effect of an angiotensin receptor antagonist on in-stent restenosis in a moderate number of patients. Compared with ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers exert additional effects on the pathophysiological processes which lead to restenosis. Angiotensin receptor antagonists may affect several mechanisms involved in neointimal

  6. A synthetic peptide derivative that is a cholecystokinin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lignon, M F; Galas, M C; Rodriguez, M; Laur, J; Aumelas, A; Martinez, J

    1987-05-25

    So far, there are no known peptidic effective receptor antagonists of both peripheral and central effects of cholecystokinin (CCK). Here, we describe a synthetic peptide derivative of CCK, t-butyloxycarbonyl-Tyr(SO3-)-Met-Gly-D-Trp-Nle-Asp 2-phenylethyl ester 1 (where Nle is norleucine), which is a potent CCK receptor antagonist. In rat and guinea pig dispersed pancreatic acini, this peptide derivative did not alter amylase secretion, but was able to antagonize the stimulation caused by cholecystokinin-related agonists. It caused a parallel rightward shift in the dose-response curve for the stimulation of amylase secretion with half-maximal inhibition of CCK-8-stimulated amylase release at a concentration of about 0.1 microM. Compound 1 was able to inhibit the binding of labeled CCK-9 (the C-terminal nonapeptide of CCK) to rat and guinea pig pancreatic acini (IC50 = 5 X 10(-8) M) as well as to guinea pig cerebral cortical membranes (IC50 = 5 X 10(-7) M). These results indicate that Compound 1 is a potent competitive CCK receptor antagonist.

  7. Discovery of new muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists from Scopolia tangutica

    PubMed Central

    Du, Nana; Liu, Yanfang; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Jixia; Zhao, Jianqiang; He, Jian; Zhou, Han; Mei, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2017-01-01

    Scopolia tangutica (S. tangutica) is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant used for antispasmodics, anesthesia, analgesia and sedation. Its pharmacological activities are mostly associated with the antagonistic activity at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAchRs) of several known alkaloids such as atropine and scopolamine. With our recent identification of four hydroxycinnamic acid amides from S. tangutica, we hypothesized that this plant may contain previously unidentified alkaloids that may also contribute to its in vivo effect. Herein, we used a bioassay-guided multi-dimension separation strategy to discover novel mAchR antagonists from S. tangutica. The core of this approach is to use label-free cell phenotypic assay to first identify active fractions, and then to guide purification of active ligands. Besides four tropanes and six cinnamic acid amides that have been previously isolated from S. tangutica, we recently identified two new tropanes, one new cinnamic acid amide, and nine other compounds. Six tropane compounds purified from S. tangutica for the first time were confirmed to be competitive antagonists of muscarinic receptor 3 (M3), including the two new ones 8 and 12 with IC50 values of 1.97 μM and 4.47 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the cinnamic acid amide 17 displayed 15-fold selectivity for M1 over M3 receptors. These findings will be useful in designing lead compounds for mAchRs and elucidating mechanisms of action of S. tangutica. PMID:28387362

  8. [5-HT3 receptor antagonist als analgetics in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Müller, W; Fiebich, B L; Stratz, T

    2006-10-01

    Various rheumatic diseases like fibromyalgia, systemic inflammatory rheumatic disorders and localized diseases, such as arthritides and activated arthroses, tendinopathies and periarthropathies, as well as trigger points can be improved considerably by treatment with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron. Particularly in the latter group of diseases, local injections have done surprisingly rapid analgesic action. This effect matches that of local anesthetics, but lasts considerably longer and is comparable to local injections of local anesthetics combined with corticosteroids. The action of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists can be attributed to an antinociceptive effect that occurs at the same time as an antiphlogistic and probably also an immunosuppressive effect. Whereas an inhibited release of substance P from the nociceptors, and possibly some other neurokins as well, seems to be the most likely explanation for the antinociceptive action, the antiphlogistic effect is primarily due to an inhibited formation of various different phlogistic substances; in some conditions, like systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, for example, the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists may exert an immunosuppressive effect in addition to this.

  9. A prototypical Sigma-1 receptor antagonist protects against brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Schetz, John A; Perez, Evelyn; Liu, Ran; Chen, Shiuhwei; Lee, Ivan; Simpkins, James W

    2007-11-21

    Previous studies indicate that the Sigma-1 ligand 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl) piperidine (PPBP) protects the brain from ischemia. Less clear is whether protection is mediated by agonism or antagonism of the Sigma-1 receptor, and whether drugs already in use for other indications and that interact with the Sigma-1 receptor might also prevent oxidative damage due to conditions such as cerebral ischemic stroke. The antipsychotic drug haloperidol is an antagonist of Sigma-1 receptors and in this study it potently protects against oxidative stress-related cell death in vitro at low concentrations. The protective potency of haloperidol and a number of other butyrophenone compounds positively correlate with their affinity for a cloned Sigma-1 receptor, and the protection is mimicked by a Sigma-1 receptor-selective antagonist (BD1063), but not an agonist (PRE-084). In vivo, an acute low dose (0.05 mg/kg s.c.) of haloperidol reduces by half the ischemic lesion volume induced by a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. These in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical results suggest that a low dose of acutely administered haloperidol might have a novel application as a protective agent against ischemic cerebral stroke and other types of brain injury with an ischemic component.

  10. Allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhuang; Li, Linlang; Zheng, Long-Tai; Xu, Zhihong; Guo, Lin; Zhen, Xuechu

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that sigma-1 receptor orthodox agonists can inhibit neuroinflammation. SKF83959 (3-methyl-6-chloro-7,8-hydroxy-1-[3-methylphenyl]-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine), an atypical dopamine receptor-1 agonist, has been recently identified as a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of SKF83959 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia. Our results indicated that SKF83959 significantly suppressed the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species. All of these responses were blocked by selective sigma-1 receptor antagonists (BD1047 or BD1063) and by ketoconazole (an inhibitor of enzyme cytochrome c17 to inhibit the synthesis of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA). Additionally, we found that SKF83959 promoted the binding activity of DHEA with sigma-1 receptors, and enhanced the inhibitory effects of DHEA on LPS-induced microglia activation in a synergic manner. Furthermore, in a microglia-conditioned media system, SKF83959 inhibited the cytotoxicity of conditioned medium generated by LPS-activated microglia toward HT-22 neuroblastoma cells. Taken together, our study provides the first evidence that allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation. SKF83959 is a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Our results indicated that SKF83959 enhanced the activity of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in a synergic manner, and inhibited the activation of BV2 microglia and the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).

  11. Functionalized Congeners of P2Y1 Receptor Antagonists:

    SciTech Connect

    de Castro, Sonia; Maruoka, Hiroshi; Hong, Kunlun; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Costanzi, Stefano; Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The P2Y{sub 1} receptor is a prothrombotic G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by ADP. Preference for the North (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of adenine nucleotide 3',5'-bisphosphate antagonists of the P2Y{sub 1} receptor was established by using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring as a ribose substitute. A series of covalently linkable N{sup 6}-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine-3',5'-bisphosphates containing extended 2-alkynyl chains was designed, and binding affinity at the human (h) P2Y{sub 1} receptor determined. The chain of these functionalized congeners contained hydrophilic moieties, a reactive substituent, or biotin, linked via an amide. Variation of the chain length and position of an intermediate amide group revealed high affinity of carboxylic congener 8 (K{sub i} 23 nM) and extended amine congener 15 (K{sub i} 132 nM), both having a 2-(1-pentynoyl) group. A biotin conjugate 18 containing an extended {epsilon}-aminocaproyl spacer chain exhibited higher affinity than a shorter biotinylated analogue. Alternatively, click coupling of terminal alkynes of homologous 2-dialkynyl nucleotide derivatives to alkyl azido groups produced triazole derivatives that bound to the P2Y{sub 1} receptor following deprotection of the bisphosphate groups. The preservation of receptor affinity of the functionalized congeners was consistent with new P2Y{sub 1} receptor modeling and ligand docking. Attempted P2Y{sub 1} antagonist conjugation to PAMAM dendrimer carriers by amide formation or palladium-catalyzed reaction between an alkyne on the dendrimer and a 2-iodopurine-derivatized nucleotide was unsuccessful. A dialkynyl intermediate containing the chain length favored in receptor binding was conjugated to an azide-derivatized dendrimer, and the conjugate inhibited ADP-promoted human platelet aggregation. This is the first example of attaching a strategically functionalized P2Y receptor antagonist to a PAMAM dendrimer to

  12. Muscarinic Receptor Agonists and Antagonists: Effects on Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Many epithelial and endothelial cells express a cholinergic autocrine loop in which acetylcholine acts as a growth factor to stimulate cell growth. Cancers derived from these tissues similarly express a cholinergic autocrine loop and ACh secreted by the cancer or neighboring cells interacts with M3 muscarinic receptors expressed on the cancer cells to stimulate tumor growth. Primary proliferative pathways involve MAPK and Akt activation. The ability of muscarinic agonists to stimulate, and M3 antagonists to inhibit tumor growth has clearly been demonstrated for lung and colon cancer. The ability of muscarinic agonists to stimulate growth has been shown for melanoma, pancreatic, breast, ovarian, prostate and brain cancers, suggesting that M3 antagonists will also inhibit growth of these tumors as well. As yet no clinical trials have proven the efficacy of M3 antagonists as cancer therapeutics, though the widespread clinical use and low toxicity of M3 antagonists support the potential role of these drugs as adjuvants to current cancer therapies. PMID:22222710

  13. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng; Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A.; Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang; Mais, Dale E.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  14. The calcium-sensitive Sigma-1 receptor prevents cannabinoids from provoking glutamate NMDA receptor hypofunction: implications in antinociception and psychotic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar; Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Herrero-Labrador, Raquel; Burgueño, Javier; Zamanillo, Daniel; Garzón, Javier

    2014-12-01

    Through the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), the endocannabinoid system plays a physiological role in maintaining the activity of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor within harmless limits. The influence of cannabinoids must be proportional to the stimulus in order to prevent NMDAR overactivation or exaggerated hypofunction that may precipitate symptoms of psychosis. In this framework, the recently reported association of CB1s with NMDARs, which mediates the reduction of cannabinoid analgesia promoted by NMDAR antagonism, could also support the precipitation of schizophrenia brought about by the abuse of smoked cannabis, mostly among vulnerable individuals. Accordingly, we have investigated this possibility using neuroprotection and analgesia as reporters of the CB1-NMDAR connection. We found that the Sigma 1 receptor (σ1R) acts as a safety switch, releasing NMDARs from the influence of CB1s and thereby avoiding glutamate hypofunction. In σ1R(-/-) mice the activity of NMDARs increases and cannot be regulated by cannabinoids, and NMDAR antagonism produces no effect on cannabinoid analgesia. In wild-type mice, ligands of the σ1R did not affect the CB1-NMDAR regulatory association, however, experimental NMDAR hypofunction enabled σ1R antagonists to release NMDARs from the negative control of CB1s. Of the σ1R antagonists tested, their order of activity was: S1RA > BD1047 ≫ NE100 = BD1063, although SKF10047, PRE-084 and (+)pentazocine were inactive yet able to abolish the effect of S1RA in this paradigm. Thus, the σ1R controls the extent of CB1-NMDAR interaction and its failure might constitute a vulnerability factor for cannabis abuse, potentially precipitating schizophrenia that might otherwise be induced later in time by the endogenous system.

  15. NMDA receptor antagonists extend the sensitive period for imprinting.

    PubMed

    Parsons, C H; Rogers, L J

    2000-03-01

    Filial imprinting in the domestic chick occurs during a sensitive period of development. The exact timing of this period can vary according to the methods used to measure imprinting. Using our imprinting paradigm, we have shown that normal, dark-reared chicks lose the ability to imprint after the second day post-hatching. Further, we reported that chicks treated 10 h after hatching with a mixture of the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine (55 mg/kg) and the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist xylazine (6 mg/kg) were able to imprint on day 8 after hatching, whereas controls treated with saline did not imprint. We now show that the effect of the ketamine-xylazine mixture can be mimicked by treating chicks with ketamine alone or with another noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (5 mg/kg). Treating chicks with a single dose of ketamine (55 mg/kg) or with a single dose of xylazine (6 mg/kg) failed to produce the effect on the sensitive period. However, prolonging the action of ketamine by treating chicks with two doses of ketamine (at 10 and 12 h after hatching) did allow imprinting on day 8. In contrast, prolonging the action of xylazine had no effect on the sensitive period for imprinting. Chicks treated with MK-801 were also able to imprint on day 8. Thus, we have evidence that the NMDA receptor system is involved in the mechanisms that control the sensitive period for imprinting.

  16. Vasopressin receptor antagonists, heart failure, and polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente E

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of nonpeptide orally bioavailable vasopressin antagonists devoid of agonistic activity (vaptans) has made possible the selective blockade of vasopressin receptor subtypes for therapeutic purposes. Vaptans acting on the vasopressin V2 receptors (aquaretics) have attracted attention as a possible therapy for heart failure and polycystic kidney disease. Despite a solid rationale and encouraging preclinical testing, aquaretics have not improved clinical outcomes in randomized clinical trials for heart failure. Additional clinical trials with select population targets, more flexible dosing schedules, and possibly a different drug type or combination (balanced V1a/V2 receptor antagonism) may be warranted. Aquaretics are promising for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and have been approved in Japan for this indication. More studies are needed to better define their long-term safety and efficacy and optimize their utilization.

  17. Crystal Structure of Antagonist Bound Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Roth, Christopher B.; Terakado, Masahiko; Kurata, Haruto; Omi, Rie; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Warshaviak, Dora; Nakade, Shinji; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo; Mileni, Mauro; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Griffith, Mark T.; Rodgers, Caroline; Han, Gye Won; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Chun, Jerold; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid biology continues to emerge as an area of significant therapeutic interest, particularly as the result of an enhanced understanding of the wealth of signaling molecules with diverse physiological properties. This growth in knowledge is epitomized by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which functions through interactions with six cognate G protein-coupled receptors. Herein we present three crystal structures of LPA1 in complex with antagonist tool compounds selected and designed through structural and stability analysis. Structural analysis combined with molecular dynamics identified a basis for ligand access to the LPA1 binding pocket from the extracellular space contrasting with the proposed access for the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor. Characteristics of the LPA1 binding pocket raise the possibility of promiscuous ligand recognition of phosphorylated endocannabinoids. Cell-based assays confirmed this hypothesis, linking the distinct receptor systems through metabolically related ligands with potential functional and therapeutic implications for treatment of disease. PMID:26091040

  18. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  19. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, Philip; Kane, Emilie; Giaid, Adel

    2011-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) binds to its receptor, UT, playing an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland, and central nervous system. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, however, this constriction-dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome, and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) activity leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII), as well as inflammation, high blood pressure, and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases.

  20. Carbobenzoxy amino acids: Structural requirements for cholecystokinin receptor antagonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Sutliff, V.E.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors used dispersed acini prepared from guinea pig pancreas to examine 28 carbobenzoxy (CBZ) amino acids for their abilities to function as cholecystokinin receptor antagonists. All amino acid derivatives tested, except for CBZ-alanine, CBZ-glycine, and N alpha-CBZ- lysine, were able to inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin. In general, there was a good correlation between the ability of a carbobenzoxy amino acid to inhibit stimulated amylase secretion and the ability of the amino acid derivative to inhibit binding of /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin. The inhibition of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion was competitive, fully reversible, and specific for those secretagogues that interact with the cholecystokinin receptor. The potencies with which the various carbobenzoxy amino acids inhibited the action of cholecystokinin varied 100-fold and CBZ-cystine was the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. This variation in potency was primarily but not exclusively a function of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chain.

  1. Safety profile of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists: Spironolactone and eplerenone.

    PubMed

    Lainscak, Mitja; Pelliccia, Francesco; Rosano, Giuseppe; Vitale, Cristiana; Schiariti, Michele; Greco, Cesare; Speziale, Giuseppe; Gaudio, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Spironolactone was first developed over 50 years ago as a potent mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist with undesirable side effects; it was followed a decade ago by eplerenone, which is less potent but much more mineralocorticoid receptor-specific. From a marginal role as a potassium-sparing diuretic, spironolactone has been shown to be an extraordinarily effective adjunctive agent in the treatment of progressive heart failure. Also, spironolactone is safe and protective in arterial hypertension, particularly in patients with so-called resistant hypertension. Eplerenone is the second oral aldosterone antagonist available for the treatment of arterial hypertension and heart failure. Treatment with eplerenone has been associated with decreased blood pressure and improved survival for patients with heart failure and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Due to the selectivity of eplerenone for the aldosterone receptor, severe adverse effects such as gynecomastia and vaginal bleeding seem to be less likely in patients who take eplerenone than in those who take spironolactone. The most common and potentially dangerous side effect of spironolactone--hyperkalemia--is also observed with eplerenone but the findings from clinical trials do not indicate more hyperkalemia induced drug withdrawals. Treatment with eplerenone should be initiated at a dosage of 25mg once daily and titrated to a target dosage of 50mg once daily preferably within 4 weeks. Serum potassium levels and renal function should be assessed prior to initiating eplerenone therapy, and periodic monitoring is recommended, especially in patients at high risk of developing hyperkalemia.

  2. Internalization of the chemokine receptor CCR4 can be evoked by orthosteric and allosteric receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ajram, Laura; Begg, Malcolm; Slack, Robert; Cryan, Jenni; Hall, David; Hodgson, Simon; Ford, Alison; Barnes, Ashley; Swieboda, Dawid; Mousnier, Aurelie; Solari, Roberto

    2014-04-15

    The chemokine receptor CCR4 has at least two natural agonist ligands, MDC (CCL22) and TARC (CCL17) which bind to the same orthosteric site with a similar affinity. Both ligands are known to evoke chemotaxis of CCR4-bearing T cells and also elicit CCR4 receptor internalization. A series of small molecule allosteric antagonists have been described which displace the agonist ligand, and inhibit chemotaxis. The aim of this study was to determine which cellular coupling pathways are involved in internalization, and if antagonists binding to the CCR4 receptor could themselves evoke receptor internalization. CCL22 binding coupled CCR4 efficiently to β-arrestin and stimulated GTPγS binding however CCL17 did not couple to β-arrestin and only partially stimulated GTPγS binding. CCL22 potently induced internalization of almost all cell surface CCR4, while CCL17 showed only weak effects. We describe four small molecule antagonists that were demonstrated to bind to two distinct allosteric sites on the CCR4 receptor, and while both classes inhibited agonist ligand binding and chemotaxis, one of the allosteric sites also evoked receptor internalization. Furthermore, we also characterize an N-terminally truncated version of CCL22 which acts as a competitive antagonist at the orthosteric site, and surprisingly also evokes receptor internalization without demonstrating any agonist activity. Collectively this study demonstrates that orthosteric and allosteric antagonists of the CCR4 receptor are capable of evoking receptor internalization, providing a novel strategy for drug discovery against this class of target.

  3. New perspectives on glutamate receptor antagonists as antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chihye

    2012-03-01

    Classical antidepressants elevate the monoamine levels in the brain by preventing re-uptake of monoamines after release. Treatment of depression with monoamine re-uptake inhibitors is associated with low clinical efficacy and remission rate due to the delayed onset of therapeutic responses. Therefore, the development of alternative antidepressants is essential for successful treatment of this disease. Recently, glutamate receptor antagonists including ketamine and 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP) have received wide attention as fast-acting therapeutic alternatives for treatment of depression.

  4. Substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines as selective antagonists for the orexin 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Perrey, David A; German, Nadezhda A; Gilmour, Brian P; Li, Jun-Xu; Harris, Danni L; Thomas, Brian F; Zhang, Yanan

    2013-09-12

    Increasing evidence implicates the orexin 1 (OX1) receptor in reward processes, suggesting OX1 antagonism could be therapeutic in drug addiction. In a program to develop an OX1 selective antagonist, we designed and synthesized a series of substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines and determined their potency in OX1 and OX2 calcium mobilization assays. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies revealed limited steric tolerance and a preference for electron deficiency at the 7-position. Pyridylmethyl groups were shown to be optimal for activity at the acetamide position. Computational studies resulted in a pharmacophore model and confirmed the SAR results. Compound 72 significantly attenuated the development of place preference for cocaine in rats.

  5. Substituted Tetrahydroisoquinolines as Selective Antagonists for the Orexin 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Perrey, David A.; German, Nadezhda A.; Gilmour, Brian P.; Li, Jun-Xu; Harris, Danni L.; Thomas, Brian F.; Zhang, Yanan

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates the orexin 1 (OX1) receptor in reward processes, suggesting OX1 antagonism could be therapeutic in drug addiction. In a program to develop an OX1 selective antagonist, we designed and synthesized a series of substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines and determined their potency in OX1 and OX2 calcium mobilization assays. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies revealed limited steric tolerance and preference for electron deficiency at the 7-position. Pyridylmethyl groups were shown to be optimal for activity at the acetamide position. Computational studies resulted in a pharmacophore model and confirmed the SAR results. Compound 72 significantly attenuated the development of place preference for cocaine in rats. PMID:23941044

  6. Cangrelor: a novel P2Y12 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Norgard, Nicholas B

    2009-08-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is critical in the prevention of thrombotic complications of acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary interventions. Current antiplatelet agents (aspirin, clopidogrel and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists) have demonstrated the capacity to reduce major adverse cardiac events. However, these agents have limitations that compromise their clinical utility. The platelet P2Y12 receptor plays a central role in platelet function and is a focus in the development of antiplatelet therapies. Cangrelor is a potent, competitive inhibitor of the P2Y12 receptor that is administered by intravenous infusion and rapidly achieves near complete inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. This investigational drug has been studied for use during coronary procedures and the management of patients experiencing acute coronary syndrome and is undergoing evaluation for use in the prevention of perioperative stent thrombosis.

  7. Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists in Preventing Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng; Zhang, Hao; Du, Bo-Xiang; Xu, Feng-Ying; Zou, Zui; Sui, Bo; Shi, Xue-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Newly developed neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) antagonists have been recently tried in the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). This systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to explore whether NK-1R antagonists were effective in preventing PONV. The PRISMA statement guidelines were followed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that tested the preventive effects of NK-1R antagonists on PONV were identified by searching EMBASE, CINAHL, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library databases followed by screening. Data extraction was performed using a predefined form and trial quality was assessed using a modified Jadad scale. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of PONV. Meta-analysis was performed for studies using similar interventions. Network meta-analysis (NMA) was conducted to compare the anti-vomiting effects of placebo, ondansetron, and aprepitant at different doses. Fourteen RCTs were included. Meta-analysis found that 80 mg of aprepitant could reduce the incidences of nausea (3 RCTs with 224 patients, pooled risk ratio (RR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.47 to 0.75), and vomiting (3 RCTs with 224 patients, pooled RR = 0.13, 95% CI = 0.04 to 0.37) compared with placebo. Neither 40 mg (3 RCTs with 1171 patients, RR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.37 to 0.60) nor 125 mg (2 RCTs with 1058 patients, RR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.13 to 0.78) of aprepitant showed superiority over 4 mg of ondansetron in preventing postoperative vomiting. NMA did not find a dose-dependent effect of aprepitant on preventing postoperative vomiting. Limited data suggested that NK-1R antagonists, especially aprepitant were effective in preventing PONV compared with placebo. More large-sampled high-quality RCTs are needed. PMID:25984662

  8. Is All Radiation-Induced Emesis Ameliorated by 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    5 - HT3 receptor antagonists ;~// 9-72 Bernard M.I Rabin 0’) and Gregory L. Kingt2) -) Behavioral Sciences and 2 PhYSzo~o~y Dcpiarlrnvni . Arm,. ii - R...RY Exposing ferrets to gamuma rays or X-rays produces vomiting that can be attenuated by 5 - HT3 receptor antagonists and by subdiaphraqmatic vagotomy...Pretreating ferrets with serotonin type-3 ( 5 - HT3 ) receptor antagonists or performing bilateral subdiaphragmatic vagotomy reliably attenuates the

  9. Activation of the sigma receptor 1 modulates AMPA receptor-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei-Lei; Deng, Qin-Qin; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-09-22

    Sigma receptor (σR), a unique receptor family, is classified into three subtypes: σR1, σR2 and σR3. It was previously shown that σR1 activation induced by 1μM SKF10047 (SKF) suppressed N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses of rat retinal ganglion cells (GCs) and the suppression was mediated by a distinct Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase C (PLC)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. In the present work, using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in rat retinal slice preparations, we further demonstrate that SKF of higher dosage (50μM) significantly suppressed AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (L-EPSCs) of retinal ON-type GCs (ON GCs), and the effect was reversed by the σR1 antagonist BD1047, suggesting the involvement of σR1. The SKF (50μM) effect was unlikely due to a change in glutamate release from bipolar cells, as suggested by the unaltered paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of AMPAR-mediated EPSCs of ON GCs. SKF (50μM) did not change L-EPSCs of ON GCs when the G protein inhibitor GDP-β-S or the protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor KT5823 was intracellularly infused. Calcium imaging further revealed that SKF (50μM) did not change intracellular calcium concentration in GCs and persisted to suppress L-EPSCs when intracellular calcium was chelated by BAPTA. The SKF (50μM) effect was intact when protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphatidylinostiol (PI)-PLC signaling pathways were both blocked. We conclude that the SKF (50μM) effect is Ca(2+)-independent, PKG-dependent, but not involving PKA, PI-PLC pathways.

  10. Sigma-1 receptors are essential for capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity: studies with selective sigma-1 ligands and sigma-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Entrena, José Manuel; Cobos, Enrique José; Nieto, Francisco Rafael; Cendán, Cruz Miguel; Gris, Georgia; Del Pozo, Esperanza; Zamanillo, Daniel; Baeyens, José Manuel

    2009-06-01

    We evaluated the role of sigma(1) receptors on capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and on nociceptive pain induced by punctate mechanical stimuli, using wild-type and sigma(1) receptor knockout (sigma(1)-KO) mice and selective sigma(1) receptor-acting drugs. Mutation in sigma(1)-KO mice was confirmed by PCR analysis of genomic DNA and, at the protein level, by [(3)H](+)-pentazocine binding assays. Both wild-type and sigma(1)-KO mice not treated with capsaicin showed similar responses to different intensities of mechanical stimuli (0.05-8 g force), ranging from innocuous to noxious, applied to the hind paw. This indicates that sigma(1) gene inactivation does not modify the perception of punctate mechanical stimuli. The intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of capsaicin induced dose-dependent mechanical allodynia in wild-type mice (markedly reducing both the threshold force necessary to induce paw withdrawal and the latency to paw withdrawal induced by a given force). In contrast, capsaicin was completely unable to induce mechanical hypersensitivity in sigma(1)-KO mice. The high-affinity and selective sigma(1) antagonists BD-1063, BD-1047 and NE-100, administered subcutaneously (s.c.), dose-dependently inhibited mechanical allodynia induced by capsaicin (1 microg,i.pl.), yielding ED(50) (mg/kg) values of 15.80+/-0.93, 29.31+/-1.65 and 40.74+/-7.20, respectively. The effects of the sigma(1) antagonists were reversed by the sigma(1) agonist PRE-084 (32 mg/kg, s.c.). None of the drugs tested modified the responses induced by a painful mechanical punctate stimulus (4 g force) in nonsensitized animals. These results suggest that sigma(1) receptors are essential for capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, but are not involved in mechanical nociceptive pain.

  11. Evodiamine as a novel antagonist of aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hui; Tu, Yongjiu; Zhang, Chun; Fan, Xia; Wang, Xi; Wang, Zhanli; Liang, Huaping

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Evodiamine interacted with the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine inhibited the specific binding of [{sup 3}H]-TCDD to the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine acts as an antagonist of the AhR. -- Abstract: Evodiamine, the major bioactive alkaloid isolated from Wu-Chu-Yu, has been shown to interact with a wide variety of proteins and modify their expression and activities. In this study, we investigated the interaction between evodiamine and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Molecular modeling results revealed that evodiamine directly interacted with the AhR. Cytosolic receptor binding assay also provided the evidence that evodiamine could interact with the AhR with the K{sub i} value of 28.4 {+-} 4.9 nM. In addition, we observed that evodiamine suppressed the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced nuclear translocation of the AhR and the expression of CYP1A1 dose-dependently. These results suggested that evodiamine was able to bind to the AhR as ligand and exhibit antagonistic effects.

  12. Classification and virtual screening of androgen receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiazhong; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-24

    Computational tools, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), are highly useful as screening support for prioritization of substances of very high concern (SVHC). From the practical point of view, QSAR models should be effective to pick out more active rather than inactive compounds, expressed as sensitivity in classification works. This research investigates the classification of a big data set of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, mainly aiming to improve the external sensitivity and to screen for potential AR binders. The kNN, lazy IB1, and ADTree methods and the consensus approach were used to build different models, which improve the sensitivity on external chemicals from 57.1% (literature) to 76.4%. Additionally, the models' predictive abilities were further validated on a blind collected data set (sensitivity: 85.7%). Then the proposed classifiers were used: (i) to distinguish a set of AR binders into antagonists and agonists; (ii) to screen a combined estrogen receptor binder database to find out possible chemicals that can bind to both AR and ER; and (iii) to virtually screen our in-house environmental chemical database. The in silico screening results suggest: (i) that some compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a complex mechanism binding both to ER and AR; (ii) new EDCs, which are nonER binders, but can in silico bind to AR, are recognized; and (iii) about 20% of compounds in a big data set of environmental chemicals are predicted as new AR antagonists. The priority should be given to them to experimentally test the binding activities with AR.

  13. SA4503, a sigma-1 receptor agonist, suppresses motor neuron damage in in vitro and in vivo amyotrophic lateral sclerosis models.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yoko; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Takata, Masafumi; Nagahara, Yuki; Noda, Yasuhiro; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hozumi, Isao; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-01-24

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Recently, it has been reported that a mutation in the sigma-1 receptor causes juvenile ALS. Therefore, the function of the sigma-1 receptor may be important in the pathology of ALS. In the present study, we investigated the effect of SA4503, a sigma-1 receptor agonist, against in in vitro and in vivo ALS models. We first investigated whether SA4503, a sigma-1 receptor agonist, prevented superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1(G93A))- and serum free-induced cell death of mice motor neuron cells (NSC34) in in vitro model of an ALS. At concentrations of 1-10μM, SA4503 reduced SOD1(G93A)-induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner, and BD1047, a sigma-1 receptor antagonist, inhibited the protective effect of SA4503. Next, we investigated whether SA4503 affected the phosphorylation levels of Akt (Ser 473) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and the expression of the sigma-1 receptor. SA4503 promoted the phosphorylation of Akt (Ser 473) and ERK1/2 in a time-dependent manner, but SA4503 did not affect the expression of the sigma-1 receptor. These results suggest that the protective effect of SA4503 might be involved in promoting the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2. We then investigated whether SA4503 suppressed the progression of ALS in an SOD1(G93A) ALS mouse model. SA4503 did not affect the onset time of ALS. However, it significantly extended the survival time in the SOD1(G93A) mice compared with a vehicle-treated group. These findings indicate that SA4503 is effective in suppressing motor neuron degeneration and symptom progression in ALS.

  14. Guanidinoethyl sulphonate is a glycine receptor antagonist in striatum.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Olga A; Chepkova, Aisa N; Haas, Helmut L

    2002-11-01

    1. Guanidinoethyl sulphonate (GES) is an analogue of taurine and an inhibitor of taurine transport. Interactions of GES with GABA(A) and glycine receptors are studied by whole cell recording and fast drug application in isolated striatal neurons of the mouse. 2. We confirm that GES is a weak agonist at GABA(A) receptors, and is able to antagonize GABA-evoked responses. GES did not gate GlyR. 3. GES antagonized glycine responses in a concentration-dependent and surmountable manner. Glycine dose-response curves were shifted to the right by GES (0.5 mM), yielding EC(50)s and Hill coefficients of 62 micro M and 2.5 in control, 154 micro M and 1.3 in the presence of GES. 4. GlyR-mediated taurine responses were competitively antagonized by GES. Taurine dose-response curves, in contrast to the glycine dose-response curves were shifted by GES to the right in a parallel manner. 5. The GlyR-block by GES was not voltage-dependent. 6. In contrast to our findings in the mouse, in rat striatal neurons which lack expression of the alpha3 GlyR subunit, GES shifted the glycine dose-response curve to the right in a parallel way without affecting the maximal response. Subtype-specificity of the GES action at GlyR must await further investigation in artificial expression systems. 7. We conclude that GES is a competitive antagonist at GlyR. The antagonistic action of GES at inhibitory ionotropic receptors can explain its epileptogenic action. Care must be taken with the interpretation of data on GES evoked taurine release.

  15. Potentiation of morphine-induced mechanical antinociception by σ₁ receptor inhibition: role of peripheral σ₁ receptors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fernández, Cristina; Nieto, Francisco Rafael; González-Cano, Rafael; Artacho-Cordón, Antonia; Romero, Lucía; Montilla-García, Ángeles; Zamanillo, Daniel; Baeyens, José Manuel; Entrena, José Manuel; Cobos, Enrique José

    2013-07-01

    We studied the modulation of morphine-induced mechanical antinociception and side effects by σ₁ receptor inhibition. Both wild-type (WT) and σ₁ receptor knockout (σ₁-KO) mice showed similar responses to paw pressure (100-600 g). The systemic (subcutaneous) or local (intraplantar) administration of σ₁ antagonists (BD-1063, BD-1047, NE-100 and S1RA) was devoid of antinociceptive effects in WT mice. However, σ₁-KO mice exhibited an enhanced mechanical antinociception in response to systemic morphine (1-16 mg/kg). Similarly, systemic treatment of WT mice with σ₁ antagonists markedly potentiated morphine-induced antinociception, and its effects were reversed by the selective σ₁ agonist PRE-084. Although the local administration of morphine (50-200 μg) was devoid of antinociceptive effects in WT mice, it induced dose-dependent antinociception in σ₁-KO mice. This effect was limited to the injected paw. Enhancement of peripheral morphine antinociception was replicated in WT mice locally co-administered with σ₁ antagonists and the opioid. None of the σ₁ antagonists tested enhanced morphine-antinociception in σ₁-KO mice, confirming a σ₁-mediated action. Morphine-induced side-effects (hyperlocomotion and inhibition of gastrointestinal transit) were unaltered in σ₁-KO mice. These results cannot be explained by a direct interaction of σ₁ ligands with μ-opioid receptors or adaptive changes of μ-receptors in σ₁-KO mice, given that [(3)H]DAMGO binding in forebrain, spinal cord, and hind-paw skin membranes was unaltered in mutant mice, and none of the σ₁ drugs tested bound to μ-opioid receptors. These results show that σ₁ receptor inhibition potentiates morphine-induced mechanical analgesia but not its acute side effects, and that this enhanced analgesia can be induced at peripheral level.

  16. Identification of New Agonists and Antagonists of the Insect Odorant Receptor Co-Receptor Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sisi; Luetje, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Insects detect attractive and aversive chemicals using several families of chemosensory receptors, including the OR family of olfactory receptors, making these receptors appealing targets for the control of insects. Insect ORs are odorant-gated ion channels, comprised of at least one common subunit (the odorant receptor co-receptor subunit, Orco) and at least one variable odorant specificity subunit. Each of the many ORs of an insect species is activated or inhibited by an unique set of odorants that interact with the variable odorant specificity subunits, making the development of OR directed insect control agents complex and laborious. However, several N-,2-substituted triazolothioacetamide compounds (VUAA1, VU0450667 and VU0183254) were recently shown to act directly on the highly conserved Orco subunit, suggesting that broadly active compounds can be developed. We have explored the chemical space around the VUAA1 structure in order to identify new Orco ligands. Principal Findings We screened ORs from several insect species, using heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes and an electrophysiological assay, with a panel of 22 compounds structurally related to VUAA1. By varying the nitrogen position in the pyridine ring and altering the moieties decorating the phenyl ring, we identified two new agonists and a series of competitive antagonists. Screening smaller compounds, similar to portions of the VUAA1 structure, also yielded competitive antagonists. Importantly, we show that Orco antagonists inhibit odorant activation of ORs from several insect species. Detailed examination of one antagonist demonstrated inhibition to be through a non-competitive mechanism. Conclusions A similar pattern of agonist and antagonist sensitivity displayed by Orco subunits from different species suggests a highly conserved binding site structure. The susceptibility to inhibition of odorant activation by Orco antagonism is conserved across disparate insect species

  17. NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine impairs feature integration in visual perception.

    PubMed

    Meuwese, Julia D I; van Loon, Anouk M; Scholte, H Steven; Lirk, Philipp B; Vulink, Nienke C C; Hollmann, Markus W; Lamme, Victor A F

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent interactions between neurons in the visual cortex are crucial for the integration of image elements into coherent objects, such as in figure-ground segregation of textured images. Blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in monkeys can abolish neural signals related to figure-ground segregation and feature integration. However, it is unknown whether this also affects perceptual integration itself. Therefore, we tested whether ketamine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, reduces feature integration in humans. We administered a subanesthetic dose of ketamine to healthy subjects who performed a texture discrimination task in a placebo-controlled double blind within-subject design. We found that ketamine significantly impaired performance on the texture discrimination task compared to the placebo condition, while performance on a control fixation task was much less impaired. This effect is not merely due to task difficulty or a difference in sedation levels. We are the first to show a behavioral effect on feature integration by manipulating the NMDA receptor in humans.

  18. Orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents for insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Equihua, Ana C.; De La Herrán-Arita, Alberto K.; Drucker-Colin, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia is a common clinical condition characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or non-restorative sleep with impairment of daytime functioning. Currently, treatment for insomnia involves a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBTi) and pharmacological therapy. Among pharmacological interventions, the most evidence exists for benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor agonist drugs (GABAA receptor), although concerns persist regarding their safety and their limited efficacy. The use of these hypnotic medications must be carefully monitored for adverse effects. Orexin (hypocretin) neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep by promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. This has led to the development of a new class of pharmacological agents that antagonize the physiological effects of orexin. The development of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side effect profile of hypnotics (e.g., impaired cognition, disturbed arousal, and motor balance difficulties). However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle may create an entirely different side effect profile. In this review, we discuss the role of orexin and its receptors on the sleep-wake cycle and that of orexin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia. PMID:24416019

  19. Orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Equihua, Ana C; De La Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; Drucker-Colin, Rene

    2013-12-25

    Insomnia is a common clinical condition characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or non-restorative sleep with impairment of daytime functioning. Currently, treatment for insomnia involves a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBTi) and pharmacological therapy. Among pharmacological interventions, the most evidence exists for benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor agonist drugs (GABAA receptor), although concerns persist regarding their safety and their limited efficacy. The use of these hypnotic medications must be carefully monitored for adverse effects. Orexin (hypocretin) neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep by promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. This has led to the development of a new class of pharmacological agents that antagonize the physiological effects of orexin. The development of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side effect profile of hypnotics (e.g., impaired cognition, disturbed arousal, and motor balance difficulties). However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle may create an entirely different side effect profile. In this review, we discuss the role of orexin and its receptors on the sleep-wake cycle and that of orexin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia.

  20. Bovine pancreatic polypeptide as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, G.Z.; Lu, L.; Qian, J.; Xue, B.G.

    1987-03-01

    In dispersed acini from rat pancreas, it was found that bovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP) and its C-fragment hexapeptide amide (PP-6), at concentrations of 0.1 and 30 ..mu..M, respectively, could significantly inhibit amylase secretion stimulated by carbachol, and this inhibition by BPP was dose dependent. /sup 45/Ca outflux induced by carbachol was also inhibited by BPP or PP-6, but they had no effect on cholecystokinin octapeptide- (CCK-8) or A23187-stimulated /sup 45/Ca outflux. BPP was also capable of displacing the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate to its receptors, and it possessed a higher affinity (K/sub i/35nM) than carbachol (K/sub i/ 1.8 ..mu..M) in binding with M-receptors. It is concluded from this study that BPP acts as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat pancreatic acini. In addition, BPP inhibited the potentiation of amylase secretion caused by the combination of carbachol plus secretin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. This may be a possible explanation of the inhibitory effect of BPP on secretin-induced pancreatic enzyme secretion shown in vivo, since pancreatic enzyme secretion stimulated by secretin under experimental conditions may be the result of potentiation of enzyme release produced by the peptide in combination with a cholinergic stimulant.

  1. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukas, Philip; Kane, Émilie; Giaid, Adel

    2011-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) binds to its receptor, UT, playing an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland, and central nervous system. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, however, this constriction–dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome, and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) activity leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII), as well as inflammation, high blood pressure, and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases. PMID:21811463

  2. Correlation between myometrial receptor affinity, lipophilicity and antagonistic potency of oxytocin analogues in the rat.

    PubMed

    Atke, A; Vilhardt, H; Melin, P

    1988-08-01

    Purified myometrial plasma membrane fractions were prepared from rats treated with oestradiol to induce oestrus. The binding affinities of 11 antagonistic oxytocin analogues to the oxytocin receptor of the plasma membranes were measured. Furthermore, lipophilicity of the peptides was assessed by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. No significant correlation was found between lipophilicity of the analogues and values for antagonistic potencies or binding affinities. Also, receptor-binding affinity did not correlate with in-vitro antagonistic activity whereas a significant correlation was obtained between binding affinities and in-vivo antagonistic potency for analogues void of partial agonist properties. It is concluded that neither receptor affinity nor lipophilicity in the analogues can predict the potency of the antagonists in vitro. However, receptor affinity was found to be a relatively good predictor of the in-vivo potency, while the usefulness of measuring antagonistic potency in vitro is questioned.

  3. SB-334867-A: the first selective orexin-1 receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Smart, D; Sabido-David, C; Brough, S J; Jewitt, F; Johns, A; Porter, R A; Jerman, J C

    2001-01-01

    The pharmacology of various peptide and non-peptide ligands was studied in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing human orexin-1 (OX1) or orexin-2 (OX2) receptors by measuring intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) using Fluo-3AM. Orexin-A and orexin-B increased [Ca2+]i in CHO-OX1 (pEC50=8.38±0.04 and 7.26±0.05 respectively, n=12) and CHO-OX2 (pEC50=8.20±0.03 and 8.26±0.04 respectively, n=8) cells. However, neuropeptide Y and secretin (10 pM – 10 μM) displayed neither agonist nor antagonist properties in either cell-line. SB-334867-A (1-(2-Methyylbenzoxanzol-6-yl)-3-[1,5]naphthyridin-4-yl-urea hydrochloride) inhibited the orexin-A (10 nM) and orexin-B (100 nM)-induced calcium responses (pKB=7.27±0.04 and 7.23±0.03 respectively, n=8), but had no effect on the UTP (3 μM)-induced calcium response in CHO-OX1 cells. SB-334867-A (10 μM) also inhibited OX2 mediated calcium responses (32.7±1.9% versus orexin-A). SB-334867-A was devoid of agonist properties in either cell-line. In conclusion, SB-334867-A is a non-peptide OX1 selective receptor antagonist. PMID:11250867

  4. Adenosine receptor antagonist and augmented vasodilation during hypoxic exercise.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Madery, Brandon D; Pike, Tasha L; Eisenach, John H; Dietz, Niki M; Joyner, Michael J; Wilkins, Brad W

    2009-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that adenosine contributes to augmented skeletal muscle vasodilation during hypoxic exercise. In separate protocols, subjects performed incremental rhythmic forearm exercise (10% and 20% of maximum) during normoxia and normocapnic hypoxia (80% arterial O2 saturation). In protocol 1 (n = 8), subjects received an intra-arterial administration of saline (control) and aminophylline (adenosine receptor antagonist). In protocol 2 (n = 10), subjects received intra-arterial phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) and combined phentolamine and aminophylline administration. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; in ml x min(-1).100 mmHg(-1)) was calculated from forearm blood flow (in ml/min) and blood pressure (in mmHg). In protocol 1, the change in FVC (DeltaFVC; change from normoxic baseline) during hypoxic exercise with saline was 172 +/- 29 and 314 +/- 34 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20%, respectively). Aminophylline administration did not affect DeltaFVC during hypoxic exercise at 10% (190 +/- 29 ml x min(-1)x100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.4) or 20% (287 +/- 48 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.3). In protocol 2, DeltaFVC due to hypoxic exercise with phentolamine infusion was 313 +/- 30 and 453 +/- 41 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20% respectively). DeltaFVC was similar at 10% (352 +/- 39 ml min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.8) and 20% (528 +/- 45 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.2) hypoxic exercise with combined phentolamine and aminophylline. In contrast, DeltaFVC to exogenous adenosine was reduced by aminophylline administration in both protocols (P < 0.05 for both). These observations suggest that adenosine receptor activation is not obligatory for the augmented hyperemia during hypoxic exercise in humans.

  5. Implementation of a fluorescence-based screening assay identifies histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit as subunit-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kasper B; Mullasseril, Praseeda; Dawit, Sara; Kurtkaya, Natalie L; Yuan, Hongjie; Vance, Katie M; Orr, Anna G; Kvist, Trine; Ogden, Kevin K; Le, Phuong; Vellano, Kimberly M; Lewis, Iestyn; Kurtkaya, Serdar; Du, Yuhong; Qui, Min; Murphy, T J; Snyder, James P; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2010-06-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate a slow, Ca(2+)-permeable component of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity, neuronal development, and several neurological diseases. We describe a fluorescence-based assay that measures NMDA receptor-mediated changes in intracellular calcium in a BHK-21 cell line stably expressing NMDA receptor NR2D with NR1 under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter (Tet-On). The assay selectively identifies allosteric modulators by using supramaximal concentrations of glutamate and glycine to minimize detection of competitive antagonists. The assay is validated by successfully identifying known noncompetitive, but not competitive NMDA receptor antagonists among 1800 screened compounds from two small focused libraries, including the commercially available library of pharmacologically active compounds. Hits from the primary screen are validated through a secondary screen that used two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings on recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. This strategy identified several novel modulators of NMDA receptor function, including the histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit, as well as the vanilloid receptor transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine. These compounds are noncompetitive antagonists and the histamine H3 receptor ligand showed submicromolar potency at NR1/NR2B NMDA receptors, which raises the possibility that compounds can be developed that act with high potency on both glutamate and histamine receptor systems simultaneously. Furthermore, it is possible that some actions attributed to histamine H3 receptor inhibition in vivo may also involve NMDA receptor antagonism.

  6. Interleukin-36-receptor antagonist deficiency and generalized pustular psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Marrakchi, Slaheddine; Guigue, Philippe; Renshaw, Blair R; Puel, Anne; Pei, Xue-Yuan; Fraitag, Sylvie; Zribi, Jihen; Bal, Elodie; Cluzeau, Céline; Chrabieh, Maya; Towne, Jennifer E; Douangpanya, Jason; Pons, Christian; Mansour, Sourour; Serre, Valérie; Makni, Hafedh; Mahfoudh, Nadia; Fakhfakh, Faiza; Bodemer, Christine; Feingold, Josué; Hadj-Rabia, Smail; Favre, Michel; Genin, Emmanuelle; Sahbatou, Mourad; Munnich, Arnold; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Sims, John E; Turki, Hamida; Bachelez, Hervé; Smahi, Asma

    2011-08-18

    Generalized pustular psoriasis is a life-threatening disease of unknown cause. It is characterized by sudden, repeated episodes of high-grade fever, generalized rash, and disseminated pustules, with hyperleukocytosis and elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein, which may be associated with plaque-type psoriasis. We performed homozygosity mapping and direct sequencing in nine Tunisian multiplex families with autosomal recessive generalized pustular psoriasis. We assessed the effect of mutations on protein expression and conformation, stability, and function. We identified significant linkage to an interval of 1.2 megabases on chromosome 2q13-q14.1 and a homozygous missense mutation in IL36RN, encoding an interleukin-36-receptor antagonist (interleukin-36Ra), an antiinflammatory cytokine. This mutation predicts the substitution of a proline residue for leucine at amino acid position 27 (L27P). Homology-based structural modeling of human interleukin-36Ra suggests that the proline at position 27 affects both the stability of interleukin-36Ra and its interaction with its receptor, interleukin-1 receptor-like 2 (interleukin-1 receptor-related protein 2). Biochemical analyses showed that the L27P variant was poorly expressed and less potent than the nonvariant interleukin-36Ra in inhibiting a cytokine-induced response in an interleukin-8 reporter assay, leading to enhanced production of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-8 in particular) by keratinocytes from the patients. Aberrant interleukin-36Ra structure and function lead to unregulated secretion of inflammatory cytokines and generalized pustular psoriasis. (Funded by Agence Nationale de la Recherche and Société Française de Dermatologie.).

  7. Drug discrimination analysis of NMDA receptor channel blockers as nicotinic receptor antagonists in rats.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, E S; Danysz, W; Bespalov, A Y

    2005-04-01

    Antagonists acting at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors inhibit various phenomena associated with exposures to nicotine (e.g., tolerance, sensitization, dependence, and intravenous self-administration). These effects are often discussed in terms of nicotine-induced glutamate release with subsequent glutamate-dependent stimulation of dopamine metabolism and neuronal plasticity in brain areas critically involved in drug-addiction mechanisms. However, it is also well established that certain types of NMDA receptor antagonists (channel blockers) potently bind to nicotinic receptors and may act as nicotinic receptor antagonists. The present study aimed to evaluate the discriminative-stimulus effects of the NMDA receptor channel blockers (+)MK-801, dextromethorphan, and memantine in rats trained to discriminate nicotine from its vehicle. Adult male Wistar rats were trained to discriminate 0.6 mg/kg nicotine from saline under a two-lever, fixed-ratio 10 schedule of food reinforcement. During test sessions, injections of (+)MK-801 (0.03--0.3 mg/kg, i.p.), dextromethorphan (30 mg/kg, s.c.), or memantine (1--10 mg/kg, i.p.) were co-administered with s.c. nicotine (0.075--0.6 mg/kg; interaction tests) or saline (generalization tests). Additional interaction and generalization tests were conducted with the selective nicotinic receptor antagonists mecamylamine (0.1--3 mg/kg, s.c.) and MRZ 2/621 (0.3--10 mg/kg, i.p.), and the mGlu5 receptor antagonist MPEP (3--10 mg/kg, i.p.). In generalization tests, none of the compounds produced any appreciable levels of substitution for nicotine. The nicotine discriminative-stimulus control was dose dependently attenuated by mecamylamine (ED(50)=0.67 mg/kg) and MRZ 2/621 (ED(50)=9.7 mg/kg). Both agents produced a marked downward shift in the nicotine dose-response curve. Memantine and MPEP slightly attenuated nicotine discriminative-stimulus effects, while (+)MK-801 and dextromethorphan did not affect the

  8. Histamine and histamine receptor antagonists in cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Blaya, Bruno; Nicolau-Galmés, Francesca; Jangi, Shawkat M; Ortega-Martínez, Idoia; Alonso-Tejerina, Erika; Burgos-Bretones, Juan; Pérez-Yarza, Gorka; Asumendi, Aintzane; Boyano, María D

    2010-07-01

    Histamine has been demonstrated to be involved in cell proliferation, embryonic development, and tumour growth. These various biological effects are mediated through the activation of specific histamine receptors (H1, H2, H3, and H4) that differ in their tissue expression patterns and functions. Although many in vitro and in vivo studies of the modulatory roles of histamine in tumour development and metastasis have been reported, the effect of histamine in the progression of some types of tumours remains controversial; however, recent findings on the role of histamine in the immune system have shed new light on this question. This review focuses on the recent advances in understanding the roles of histamine and its receptors in tumour biology. We report our recent observations of the anti-tumoural effect of H1 histamine antagonists on experimental and human melanomas. We have found that in spite of exogenous histamine stimulated human melanoma cell proliferation, clonogenic ability and migration activity in a dose-dependent manner, the melanoma tumour growth was not modulated by in vivo histamine treatment. On the contrary, terfenadine-treatment in vitro induced melanoma cell death by apoptosis and in vivo terfenadine treatment significantly inhibited tumour growth in murine models. These observations increase our understanding of cancer biology and may inspire novel anticancer therapeutic strategies.

  9. Vasopressin receptor antagonists and their role in clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Narayen, Girish; Mandal, Surya Narayan

    2012-03-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality in hospitalized patients. Its treatment is based not only on extracellular fluid volume status of patients but also on its pathogenetic mechanisms. Conventional treatment of hyponatremia like fluid restriction, which is useful in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, has very poor patient compliance over long term. Vasopressin receptor antagonists (Vaptans) are a new group of nonpeptide drugs which have been used in various clinical conditions with limited success. Whereas conivaptan is to be administered intravenously, the other vaptans like tolvaptan, lixivaptan, and satavaptan are effective as oral medication. They produce aquaresis by their action on vasopressin type 2 (V2R) receptors in the collecting duct and thus increase solute free water excretion. Vaptans are being used as an alternative to fluid restriction in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremic patients. Efficacy of vaptans is now well accepted for management of correction of hyponatremia over a short period. However, its efficacy in improving the long-term morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic hyponatremia due to cirrhosis and heart failure is yet to be established. Vaptans have not become the mainstay treatment of hyponatremia yet.

  10. Management of hyperkalaemia consequent to mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Roscioni, Sara S; de Zeeuw, Dick; Bakker, Stephan J L; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J

    2012-12-01

    Mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists (MRAs) reduce blood pressure and albuminuria in patients treated with angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II-receptor blockers. The use of MRAs, however, is limited by the occurrence of hyperkalaemia, which frequently occurs in patients older than 65 years with impaired kidney function, and/or diabetes. Patients with these characteristics might still benefit from MRA therapy, however, and should not be excluded from this treatment option. This limitation raises the question of how to optimize the therapeutic use of MRAs in this population of patients. Understanding the individual variability in patients' responses to MRAs, in terms of albuminuria, blood pressure and serum potassium levels, might lead to targeted intervention. MRA use might be restricted to patients with high levels of mineralocorticoid activity, evaluated by circulating renin and aldosterone levels or renal excretion of potassium. In addition, reviewing the patient's diet and concomitant medications might prove useful in reducing the risk of developing subsequent hyperkalaemia. If hyperkalaemia does develop, treatment options exist to decrease potassium levels, including administration of calcium gluconate, insulin, β(2)-agonists, diuretics and cation-exchange resins. In combination with novel aldosterone blockers, these strategies might offer a rationale with which to optimize therapeutic intervention and extend the population of patients who can benefit from use of MRAs.

  11. Inhibition of radiation-induced polyuria by histamine receptor antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Donlon, M.A.; Melia, J.A.; Helgeson, E.A.; Wolfe, W.W.

    1986-03-01

    In previous studies the authors have demonstrated that gamma radiation results in polyuria, which is preceded by polydypsia. This suggests that the increased thirst elicited by radiation causes increased urinary volume (UV). Histamine, which is released following radiation exposure, also elicits drinking by nonirradiated rats when administered exogenously. In this study the authors have investigated both the role of water deprivation and the effect of histamine receptor antagonists (HRA) on radiation-induced polyuria. Sprague-Dawley rats were housed individually in metabolic cages. Water was allowed ad libitum except in deprivation experiments where water was removed for 24 hr immediately following radiation. Cimetidine (CIM), an H2 HRA, and dexbromopheniramine (DXB), an H1 HRA, were administered i.p. (16 and 1 mg/kg, respectively) 30 min prior to irradiation (950 rads from a cobalt source). UV was determined at 24-hr intervals for 3 days preceding irradiation and 24 hr postirradiation. UV in DXB treated rats was significantly reduced 24 hr postirradiation (CON = 427 +/- 54%; DXB = 247 +/- 39% of preirradiated CON) compared to postirradiation control values. CIM did not affect postirradiation UV. These data suggest that radiation-induced polyuria is caused by polydypsia which is, in part, mediated by histamine induced by an H1 receptor.

  12. Vasopressin receptor antagonists and their role in clinical medicine

    PubMed Central

    Narayen, Girish; Mandal, Surya Narayan

    2012-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality in hospitalized patients. Its treatment is based not only on extracellular fluid volume status of patients but also on its pathogenetic mechanisms. Conventional treatment of hyponatremia like fluid restriction, which is useful in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, has very poor patient compliance over long term. Vasopressin receptor antagonists (Vaptans) are a new group of nonpeptide drugs which have been used in various clinical conditions with limited success. Whereas conivaptan is to be administered intravenously, the other vaptans like tolvaptan, lixivaptan, and satavaptan are effective as oral medication. They produce aquaresis by their action on vasopressin type 2 (V2R) receptors in the collecting duct and thus increase solute free water excretion. Vaptans are being used as an alternative to fluid restriction in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremic patients. Efficacy of vaptans is now well accepted for management of correction of hyponatremia over a short period. However, its efficacy in improving the long-term morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic hyponatremia due to cirrhosis and heart failure is yet to be established. Vaptans have not become the mainstay treatment of hyponatremia yet. PMID:22470853

  13. Dihydromorphine-peptide hybrids with delta receptor agonistic and mu receptor antagonistic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.B.; Medzihradsky, F.; Woods, J.H.

    1986-03-05

    The actions of two morphine derivatives with short peptide side chains were evaluated upon the contraction of the isolated mouse vas deferens and upon displacement of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat brain membranes. NIH-9833 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl) was a potent agonist upon the vas deferens. Its EC50 for inhibition of the twitch was 1.2 +/- 0.1 nM. Both naltrexone (10/sup -7/ M) a relatively nonselective opioid antagonist, and ICI-174864 (10/sup -/' M) a highly selective delta receptor antagonist, blocked the actions of NIH-9833 which indicates that this drug is a delta receptor agonist. In contrast, NIH-9835 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-glycyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl), which differs from NIH-9835 by the presence of a single amino acid residue, was devoid of opioid agonistic activity but was a potent antagonist of the inhibitory actions on the vas deferens of morphine and sufentanil. NIH-9833 and NIH-9835 were potent displacers of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat cerebral membranes with EC50's of 0.58 nM and 1.7 nM, respectively. The observation that addition of a single glycyl group changes a dihydromorphine-peptide analog from a potent delta receptor agonist to an equally potent mu receptor antagonist suggests that the two receptor sites might be structurally quite similar.

  14. Anti-amnesic and neuroprotective potentials of the mixed muscarinic receptor/sigma 1 (σ1) ligand ANAVEX2-73, a novel aminotetrahydrofuran derivative.

    PubMed

    Villard, Vanessa; Espallergues, Julie; Keller, Emeline; Vamvakides, Alexandre; Maurice, Tangui

    2011-08-01

    Tetrahydro-N, N-dimethyl-2, 2-diphenyl-3-furanmethanamine hydrochloride (ANAVEX2-73) binds to muscarinic acetylcholine and sigma(1) (σ(1)) receptors with affinities in the low micromolar range. We characterized its anti-amnesic and neuroprotective potentials in pharmacological and pathological amnesia models. Spatial working memory was evaluated using spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze and non-spatial memory using passive avoidance procedures. ANAVEX2-73 (0.01-3.0 mg/kg i.p.) alleviated the scopolamine- and dizocilpine-induced learning impairments. ANAVEX2-73 (300 µg/kg) also reversed the learning deficits in mice injected with Aβ(25-35) peptide, a non-transgenic Alzheimer's disease model. When the drug was injected simultaneously with Aβ(25-35), 7 days before the tests, it blocked the appearance of learning impairments. This protective activity was confirmed since ANAVEX2-73 blocked the Aβ(25-35)-induced oxidative stress in the hippocampus. This effect was differentially sensitive to the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine or the σ(1) protein antagonist BD1047, confirming the mixed muscarinic/σ(1) pharmacological action. Finally, its unique demethyl metabolite, ANAVEX19-144, was also effective and ANAVEX2-73 presented a longer duration of action, effective 12 h before Aβ(25-35), than its related compound ANAVEX1-41. The neuroprotective activity of ANAVEX2-73, its mixed cholinergic/σ(1) activity, its low active dose range and its long duration of action together reinforce its therapeutic potential in Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Use of Enterally Delivered Angiotensin II Type Ia Receptor Antagonists to Reduce the Severity of Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Okawada, Manabu; Koga, Hiroyuki; Larsen, Scott D.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Turbiak, Anjanette J.; Jin, Xiaohong; Lucas, Peter C.; Lipka, Elke; Hillfinger, John; Kim, Jae Seung

    2011-01-01

    Background Renin-angiotensin system blockade reduces inflammation in several organ systems. Having found a fourfold increase in angiotensin II type Ia receptor expression in a dextran sodium sulfate colitis model, we targeted blockade with angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists to prevent colitis development. Because hypotension is a major complication of angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists use, we hypothesized that use of angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists compounds which lack cell membrane permeability, and thus enteric absorption, would allow for direct enteral delivery at far higher concentrations than would be tolerated systemically, yet retain efficacy. Methods Based on the structure of the angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist losartan, deschloro-losartan was synthesized, which has extremely poor cell membrane permeability. Angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist efficacy was evaluated by determining the ability to block NF-κB activation in vitro. Dextran sodium sulfate colitis was induced in mice and angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist efficacy delivered transanally was assessed. Results In vitro, deschloro-losartan demonstrated near equal angiotensin II type Ia receptor blockade compared to losartan as well as another angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist, candesartan. In the dextran sodium sulfate model, each compound significantly improved clinical and histologic scores and epithelial cell apoptosis. Abundance of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL6 mRNA were significantly decreased with each compound. In vitro and in vivo intestinal drug absorption, as well as measures of blood pressure and mucosal and colonic blood flow, showed significantly lower uptake of deschloro-losartan compared to losartan and candesartan. Conclusions This study demonstrated efficacy of high-dose angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists in this colitis model. We postulate that a specially designed angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist with

  16. Anticonvulsive effect of nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Kuder, Kamil; Subramanian, Dhanasekaran; Shafiullah, Mohamed; Stark, Holger; Lażewska, Dorota; Adem, Abdu; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2014-06-01

    To determine the potential of histamine H3 receptor (H3R) ligands as new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), aromatic ether, and diether derivatives (1-12) belonging to the nonimidazole class of ligands, with high in-vitro binding affinity at human H3R, were tested for their in-vivo anticonvulsive activity in the maximal electroshock (MES)-induced and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled seizure models in rats. The anticonvulsive effects of a systemic injection of 1-12 on MES-induced and PTZ-kindled seizures were evaluated against the reference AED phenytoin (PHT) and the structurally related H3R antagonist/inverse agonist pitolisant (PIT). Among the most promising ligands 2, 4, 5, and 11, there was a significant and dose-dependent reduction in the duration of tonic hind limb extension (THLE) in MES-induced seizure subsequent to administration of 4 and 5 [(5, 10, and 15 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)]. The protective effects observed for the 1-(3-(3-(4-chlorophenyl)propoxy)propyl)-3-methylpiperidine derivative 11 at 10 mg/kg, i.p. were significantly greater than those of PIT, and were reversed by pretreatment with the central nervous system penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR) (10 mg/kg). Moreover, the protective action of the reference AED PHT, at a dose of 5 mg/kg (without considerable protection in the MES model), was significantly augmented when coadministered with derivative 11 (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Surprisingly, pretreatment with derivative 7 (10 mg/kg, i.p.), an ethylphenoxyhexyl-piperidine derivative without considerable protection in the MES model, potently altered PTZ-kindled seizure, significantly prolonged myoclonic latency time, and clearly shortened the total seizure time when compared with control, PHT, and PIT. These interesting results highlight the potential of H3R ligands as new AEDs or as adjuvants to available AED therapeutics.

  17. Chronic antidepressants potentiate via sigma-1 receptors the brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced signaling for glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Yuki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Kumamaru, Emi; Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2006-05-05

    Up-regulation of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) has been suggested to contribute to the action of antidepressants. However, it is unclear whether chronic treatment with antidepressants may influence acute BDNF signaling in central nervous system neurons. Because BDNF has been shown by us to reinforce excitatory glutamatergic transmission in cultured cortical neurons via the phospholipase-gamma (PLC-gamma)/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)/Ca2+ pathway (Numakawa, T., Yamagishi, S., Adachi, N., Matsumoto, T., Yokomaku, D., Yamada, M., and Hatanaka, H. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 6520-6529), we examined in this study the possible effects of pretreatment with antidepressants on the BDNF signaling through the PLC-gamma)/IP3/Ca2+ pathway. Furthermore, because the PLC-gamma/IP3/Ca2+ pathway is regulated by sigma-1 receptors (Hayashi, T., and Su, T. P. (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 98, 491-496), we examined whether the BDNF signaling is modulated by sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1R). We found that the BDNF-stimulated PLC-gamma activation and the ensued increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) were potentiated by pretreatment with imipramine or fluvoxamine, so was the BDNF-induced glutamate release. Furthermore, enhancement of the interaction between PLC-gamma and TrkB (receptor for BDNF) after imipramine pretreatment was observed. Interestingly, BD1047, a potent Sig-1R antagonist, blocked the imipramine-dependent potentiation on the BDNF-induced PLC-gamma activation and glutamate release. In contrast, overexpression of Sig-1R per se, without antidepressant pretreatment, enhances BDNF-induced PLC-gamma activation and glutamate release. These results suggest that antidepressant pretreatment selectively enhance the BDNF signaling on the PLC-gamma/IP3/Ca2+ pathway via Sig-1R, and that Sig-1R plays an important role in BDNF signaling leading to glutamate release.

  18. The dextromethorphan analog dimemorfan attenuates kainate-induced seizures via σ1 receptor activation: comparison with the effects of dextromethorphan

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Won-Ki; Ko, Kwang Ho; Jhoo, Wang-Kee; Lim, Yong-Kwang; Cha, Joo Young; Chen, Chieh-Fu; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2005-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that a dextromethorphan analog, dimemorfan, has neuroprotective effects. Dextromethorphan and dimemorfan are high-affinity ligands at σ1 receptors. Dextromethorphan has moderate affinities for phencyclidine sites, while dimemorfan has very low affinities for such sites, suggesting that these sites are not essential for the anticonvulsant actions of dimemorfan. Kainate (KA) administration (10 mg kg−1, i.p.) produced robust convulsions lasting 4–6 h in rats. Pre-treatment with dimemorfan (12 or 24 mg kg−1) reduced seizures in a dose-dependent manner. Dimemorfan pre-treatment also attenuated the KA-induced increases in c-fos/c-jun expression, activator protein (AP)-1 DNA-binding activity, and loss of cells in the CA1 and CA3 fields of the hippocampus. These effects of dimemorfan were comparable to those of dextromethorphan. The anticonvulsant action of dextromethorphan or dimemorfan was significantly counteracted by a selective σ1 receptor antagonist BD 1047, suggesting that the anticonvulsant action of dextromethorphan or dimemorfan is, at least in part, related to σ1 receptor-activated modulation of AP-1 transcription factors. We asked whether dimemorfan produces the behavioral side effects seen with dextromethorphan or dextrorphan (a phencyclidine-like metabolite of dextromethorphan). Conditioned place preference and circling behaviors were significantly increased in mice treated with phencyclidine, dextrorphan or dextromethorphan, while mice treated with dimemorfan showed no behavioral side effects. Our results suggest that dimemorfan is equipotent to dextromethorphan in preventing KA-induced seizures, while it may lack behavioral effects, such as psychotomimetic reactions. PMID:15723099

  19. Sigma-1 Receptor Antagonism Restores Injury-Induced Decrease of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Current in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Bin; Guo, Yuan; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hogan, Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (σ1R), an endoplasmic reticulum–chaperone protein, can modulate painful response after peripheral nerve injury. We have demonstrated that voltage-gated calcium current is inhibited in axotomized sensory neurons. We examined whether σ1R contributes to the sensory dysfunction of voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) after peripheral nerve injury through electrophysiological approach in dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Animals received either skin incision (Control) or spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Both σ1R agonists, (+)pentazocine (PTZ) and DTG [1,3-di-(2-tolyl)guanidine], dose dependently inhibited calcium current (ICa) with Ba2+ as charge carrier in control sensory neurons. The inhibitory effect of σ1R agonists on ICa was blocked by σ1R antagonist, BD1063 (1-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-4-m​ethylpiperazine dihydrochloride) or BD1047 (N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-m​ethyl-2-(dimethylamino)ethylamine dihydrobromide). PTZ and DTG showed similar effect on ICa in axotomized fifth DRG neurons (SNL L5). Both PTZ and DTG shifted the voltage-dependent activation and steady-state inactivation of VGCC to the left and accelerated VGCC inactivation rate in both Control and axotomized L5 SNL DRG neurons. The σ1R antagonist, BD1063 (10 μM), increases ICa in SNL L5 neurons but had no effect on Control and noninjured fourth lumbar neurons in SNL rats. Together, the findings suggest that activation of σR1 decreases ICa in sensory neurons and may play a pivotal role in pain generation. PMID:24891452

  20. Anti-amnesic and neuroprotective actions of the sigma-1 receptor agonist (-)-MR22 in rats with selective cholinergic lesion and amyloid infusion.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Vuokko; Marrazzo, Agostino; Kleiner, Giulio; Coradazzi, Marino; Ronsisvalle, Simone; Prezzavento, Orazio; Ronsisvalle, Giuseppe; Leanza, Giampiero

    2011-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor agonists have recently attracted much attention as potential therapeutic drugs for cognitive and affective disorders, however, it is still unclear whether they act via modulation of transmitter release or activation of sigma-1 receptors in memory-related brain regions. In the present study,we have investigated the anti-amnesic and neuroprotective actions of the compound (-)-methyl (1S,2R)-2-{[1-adamantyl(methyl)amino]methyl}-1-phenylcyclopropane-carboxylate) [(-)-MR22],a selective sigma-1 receptor agonist able to protect cultured cortical neurons from amyloid toxicity. To this aim, cognitive deficits, cholinergic loss, and amyloid peptide accumulation were obtained in the rat by simultaneous injections of a selective immunotoxin and pre-aggregated amyloid peptide into the basal forebrain and the hippocampus, respectively. At about five–six weeks post-lesion, the double-lesioned animals exhibited dramatic deficits in spatial learning and memory, whereas animals with single injections of either compound were not or only marginally affected, in spite of equally severe cholinergic loss oramyloid deposition. Administration of (-)-MR22 appeared to reverse cognitive impairments in double lesioned animals, whereas pre-treatment with the selective sigma-1 antagonist BD1047 abolished this effect. Moreover, (-)-MR22 normalized the levels of cell-associated amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) in the neocortex and hippocampus, thus sustaining a non-amyloidogenic AβPP processing. By contrast, treatment with (-)-MR22 produced no effects whatsoever in intact animals. Thus, sigma-1 receptor agonists such as (-)-MR22 may ameliorate perturbed cognitive abilities and exert a protective action onto target neurons, holding promises as viable tools for memory enhancement and neuroprotection.

  1. Heterocyclic 1,7-disubstituted indole sulfonamides are potent and selective human EP3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Hategan, Georgeta; Polozov, Alexandre M; Zeller, Wayne; Cao, Hua; Mishra, Rama K; Kiselyov, Alex S; Ramirez, Jose; Halldorsdottir, Gudrún; Andrésson, Thornorkell; Gurney, Mark E; Singh, Jasbir

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a pharmacophore model for the EP(3) receptor antagonists based on its endogenous ligand PGE(2). This ligand-based design yielded a series of novel peri-substituted [4.3.0] bicyclic aromatics featuring 1-alklyaryl 7-heterocyclic sulfonamide substituents. The synthesized molecules are potent antagonists of human EP(3) receptor in vitro and show inhibition of rat platelets aggregation. Optimized derivatives display high selectivity over IP, FP, and other EP receptor panels.

  2. Mechanisms of Radiosensitization by the Neurotensin Receptor Antagonist SR48692 in Prostate Cancer Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Neurotensin Receptor Antagonist SR48692 in Prostate Cancer Models PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jaroslaw Dziegielewski, Ph.D...Receptor Antagonist 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER SR48692 in Prostate Cancer Models 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0114 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...neurotensin receptor by SR48692 drug could sensitize cancer cells to radiation. SR48692 activity was measured in PC3, C42 and LNCaP prostate cancer

  3. The effects of histamine H3-receptor antagonists on amygdaloid kindled seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Kakinoki, H; Ishizawa, K; Fukunaga, M; Fujii, Y; Kamei, C

    1998-07-15

    The effects of histamine H3-receptor antagonists, thioperamide, and clobenpropit on amygdaloid kindled seizures were investigated in rats. Both intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of H3-antagonists resulted in a dose-related inhibition of amygdaloid kindled seizures. An inhibition induced by thioperamide was antagonized by an H3-agonist [(R)-alpha-methylhistamine] and H1-antagonists (diphenhydramine and chlorpheniramine). On the other hand, an H2-antagonist (cimetidine and ranitidine) caused no antagonistic effect. Metoprine, an inhibitor of N-methyltransferase was also effective in inhibiting amygdaloid kindled seizure, and this effect was augmented by thioperamide treatment.

  4. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Saad, Ali; Schwed, Johannes Stephan; Weizel, Lilia; Walter, Miriam; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin (PHT), valproic acid, and modern antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), eg, remacemide, loreclezole, and safinamide, are only effective within a maximum of 70%-80% of epileptic patients, and in many cases the clinical use of AEDs is restricted by their side effects. Therefore, a continuous need remains to discover innovative chemical entities for the development of active and safer AEDs. Ligands targeting central histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) for epilepsy might be a promising therapeutic approach. To determine the potential of H3Rs ligands as new AEDs, we recently reported that no anticonvulsant effects were observed for the (S)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propanamide (1). In continuation of our research, we asked whether anticonvulsant differences in activities will be observed for its R-enantiomer, namely, (R)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propaneamide (2) and analogs thereof, in maximum electroshock (MES)-, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-, and strychnine (STR)-induced convulsion models in rats having PHT and valproic acid (VPA) as reference AEDs. Unlike the S-enantiomer (1), the results show that animals pretreated intraperitoneally (ip) with the R-enantiomer 2 (10 mg/kg) were moderately protected in MES and STR induced models, whereas proconvulsant effect was observed for the same ligand in PTZ-induced convulsion models. However, animals pretreated with intraperitoneal doses of 5, 10, or 15 mg/kg of structurally bulkier (R)-enantiomer (3), in which 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol in ligand 2 was replaced by (4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)phenyl)methanol, and its (S)-enantiomer (4) significantly and in a dose-dependent manner reduced convulsions or exhibited full protection in MES and PTZ convulsions model, respectively. Interestingly, the protective effects observed for the (R)-enantiomer (3) in MES model were significantly greater than those of the standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant, comparable with those observed for PHT, and

  5. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Bassem; Saad, Ali; Schwed, Johannes Stephan; Weizel, Lilia; Walter, Miriam; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin (PHT), valproic acid, and modern antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), eg, remacemide, loreclezole, and safinamide, are only effective within a maximum of 70%–80% of epileptic patients, and in many cases the clinical use of AEDs is restricted by their side effects. Therefore, a continuous need remains to discover innovative chemical entities for the development of active and safer AEDs. Ligands targeting central histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) for epilepsy might be a promising therapeutic approach. To determine the potential of H3Rs ligands as new AEDs, we recently reported that no anticonvulsant effects were observed for the (S)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propanamide (1). In continuation of our research, we asked whether anticonvulsant differences in activities will be observed for its R-enantiomer, namely, (R)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propaneamide (2) and analogs thereof, in maximum electroshock (MES)-, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-, and strychnine (STR)-induced convulsion models in rats having PHT and valproic acid (VPA) as reference AEDs. Unlike the S-enantiomer (1), the results show that animals pretreated intraperitoneally (ip) with the R-enantiomer 2 (10 mg/kg) were moderately protected in MES and STR induced models, whereas proconvulsant effect was observed for the same ligand in PTZ-induced convulsion models. However, animals pretreated with intraperitoneal doses of 5, 10, or 15 mg/kg of structurally bulkier (R)-enantiomer (3), in which 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol in ligand 2 was replaced by (4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)phenyl)methanol, and its (S)-enantiomer (4) significantly and in a dose-dependent manner reduced convulsions or exhibited full protection in MES and PTZ convulsions model, respectively. Interestingly, the protective effects observed for the (R)-enantiomer (3) in MES model were significantly greater than those of the standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant, comparable with those observed for PHT, and

  6. Development of selective agonists and antagonists of P2Y receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei A.; de Castro, Sonia; Harden, T. Kendall; Ko, Hyojin

    2008-01-01

    Although elucidation of the medicinal chemistry of agonists and antagonists of the P2Y receptors has lagged behind that of many other members of group A G protein-coupled receptors, detailed qualitative and quantitative structure–activity relationships (SARs) were recently constructed for several of the subtypes. Agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2, and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors are now known. Selective nonnucleotide antagonists were reported for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y6, P2Y11, P2Y12, and P2Y13 receptors. At the P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors, nucleotide agonists (5′-diphosphate derivatives) were converted into antagonists of nanomolar affinity by altering the phosphate moieties, with a focus particularly on the ribose conformation and substitution pattern. Nucleotide analogues with conformationally constrained ribose-like rings were introduced as selective receptor probes for P2Y1 and P2Y6 receptors. Screening chemically diverse compound libraries has begun to yield new lead compounds for the development of P2Y receptor antagonists, such as competitive P2Y12 receptor antagonists with antithrombotic activity. Selective agonists for the P2Y4, P2Y11, and P2Y13 receptors and selective antagonists for P2Y4 and P2Y14 receptors have not yet been identified. The P2Y14 receptor appears to be the most restrictive of the class with respect to modification of the nucleobase, ribose, and phosphate moieties. The continuing process of ligand design for the P2Y receptors will aid in the identification of new clinical targets. PMID:18600475

  7. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit platelet adhesion and aggregation by nitric oxide release.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Leszek; Matys, Tomasz; Chabielska, Ewa; Buczko, Włodzimierz; Malinski, Tadeusz

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the process of nitric oxide (NO) release from platelets after stimulation with different angiotensin II type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonists and its effect on platelet adhesion and aggregation. Angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets was compared with that in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by using a highly sensitive porphyrinic microsensor. In vitro and ex vivo effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on platelet adhesion to collagen and thromboxane A2 analog U46619-induced aggregation were evaluated. Losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan alone caused NO release from platelets and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner in the range of 0.01 to 100 micro mol/L, which was attenuated by NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. The angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists had more than 70% greater potency in NO release in platelets than in endothelial cells. The degree of inhibition of platelet adhesion (collagen-stimulated) and aggregation (U46619-stimulated) elicited by losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan, either in vitro or ex vivo, closely correlated with the NO levels produced by each of these drugs alone. The inhibiting effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on collagen-stimulated adhesion and U46619-stimulated aggregation of platelets were significantly reduced by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Neither the AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319, the cyclooxygenase synthase inhibitor indomethacin, nor the selective thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist SQ29,548 had any effect on angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets and endothelial cells. The presented studies clearly indicate a crucial role of NO in the arterial antithrombotic effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists.

  8. Histamine H4 receptor antagonists as potent modulators of mammalian vestibular primary neuron excitability

    PubMed Central

    Desmadryl, G; Gaboyard-Niay, S; Brugeaud, A; Travo, C; Broussy, A; Saleur, A; Dyhrfjeld-Johnsen, J; Wersinger, E; Chabbert, C

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Betahistine, the main histamine drug prescribed to treat vestibular disorders, is a histamine H3 receptor antagonist. Here, we explored the potential for modulation of the most recently cloned histamine receptor (H4 receptor) to influence vestibular system function, using a selective H4 receptor antagonist JNJ 7777120 and the derivate compound JNJ 10191584. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH RT-PCR was used to assess the presence of H4 receptors in rat primary vestibular neurons. In vitro electrophysiological recordings and in vivo behavioural approaches using specific antagonists were employed to examine the effect of H4 receptor modulation in the rat vestibular system. KEY RESULTS The transcripts of H4 and H3 receptors were present in rat vestibular ganglia. Application of betahistine inhibited the evoked action potential firing starting at micromolar range, accompanied by subsequent strong neuronal depolarization at higher concentrations. Conversely, reversible inhibitory effects elicited by JNJ 10191584 and JNJ 7777120 began in the nanomolar range, without inducing neuronal depolarization. This effect was reversed by application of the selective H4 receptor agonist 4-methylhistamine. Thioperamide, a H3/H4 receptor antagonist, exerted effects similar to those of H3 and H4 receptor antagonists, namely inhibition of firing at nanomolar range and membrane depolarization above 100 µM. H4 receptor antagonists significantly alleviated the vestibular deficits induced in rats, while neither betahistine nor thioperamide had significant effects. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS H4 receptor antagonists have a pronounced inhibitory effect on vestibular neuron activity. This result highlights the potential role of H4 receptors as pharmacological targets for the treatment of vestibular disorders. PMID:22624822

  9. Peripheral 5-HT2-like receptors. Can they be classified with the available antagonists?

    PubMed Central

    Leff, P.; Martin, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    Interactions between 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and the so-called 5-HT2 receptor antagonists ketanserin, spiperone, trazodone and methysergide were studied in isolated preparations of the rabbit aorta, rat jugular vein, and rat caudal artery. Trazodone and spiperone were apparently simple competitive antagonists since they produced antagonism that was surmountable over the concentration range studied and, in each tissue, their apparent affinity appeared to be independent of the antagonist concentration. Furthermore, concentration-ratios obtained with the two antagonists in combination suggested that antagonism was additive, implying mutual competition with a single population of 5-HT receptors. Ketanserin was a non-surmountable antagonist of 5-HT in the rat caudal artery and methysergide demonstrated surmountable, competitive antagonism only in the rabbit aorta. Antagonist dissociation constants estimated for apparently competitive interactions showed that ketanserin, spiperone and trazodone expressed affinities which differed according to the tissue used. In the case of trazodone, affinity estimates differed by as much as 12 fold. These discrepancies were independent of the 5-HT receptor agonist used and could not be attributed to an inadequate equilibration of the antagonist. These results can be interpreted in two ways: either the receptors in the different tissues are heterogeneous or the antagonists used here must be considered as unreliable probes for the classification of 5-HT2-like receptors. PMID:2943354

  10. A comprehensive patents review on cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonists as antiobesity agents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mayank Kumar; Murumkar, Prashant R; Barmade, Mahesh A; Giridhar, Rajani; Yadav, Mange Ram

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a rapidly expanding worldwide health problem. Various targets are investigated presently for the treatment of obesity, but there remains an unmet need for an effective drug therapy with acceptable efficacy levels and reduced side effects. Targeting peripherally located cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors is an attractive strategy as these receptors play a vital role in energy homeostasis. CB1 receptor antagonists constitute one of the most important categories of compounds of interest for the control of obesity. In this review, the authors focus on recent advances (since 2007) in diverse chemical classes of patented compounds belonging to the category of CB1 receptor antagonists. Safer CB1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of obesity can be discovered by developing such compounds that act peripherally. Increasing the polar service area, decreasing the lipophilicity and designing of neutral antagonists and allosteric inhibitors are some interesting strategies that could offer promising results.

  11. Alvimopan: a peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Leslie, John B

    2007-09-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI), a transient cessation of coordinated bowel motility after surgery, is an important factor in extending the length of hospital stay. The etiology of POI is multifactorial, and related to both the surgical and anesthetic pathways chosen. Additionally, opioids used to manage non-cancer-related and cancer-related chronic pain may also decrease gastrointestinal (GI) motility resulting in opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OBD). Postoperative ileus has been associated with prolonged hospital stay and readmission, and thus may increase the overall hospital costs per patient with POI. Alvimopan, a peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist, accelerated time to GI recovery and reduced postoperative hospital length of stay in phase III POI clinical trials and improved symptoms of OBD compared with placebo in phase II/III clinical trials. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is currently evaluating alvimopan for the management of POI after bowel resection. Alvimopan may provide clinically meaningful benefits to patients and may lower the economic burden of POI to the healthcare system.

  12. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Hypertension and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sica, Domenic A.

    2015-01-01

    Spironolactone and eplerenone are both mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists. These compounds block both the epithelial and nonepithelial actions of aldosterone, with the latter assuming increasing clinical relevance. Spironolactone and eplerenone both affect reductions in blood pressure either as mono- or add-on therapy; moreover, they each afford survival benefits in diverse circumstances of heart failure and the probability of renal protection in proteinuric chronic kidney disease. However, as use of mineralocorticoid-blocking agents has expanded, the hazards inherent in taking such drugs have become more apparent. Whereas the endocrine side effects of spironolactone are in most cases little more than a cosmetic annoyance, the potassium-sparing effects of both spironolactone and eplerenone can prove disastrous, even fatal, if sufficient degrees of hyperkalemia emerge. For most patients, however, the risk of developing hyperkalemia in and of itself should not discourage the sensible clinician from bringing these compounds into play. Hyperkalemia should always be considered a possibility in patients receiving either of these medications; therefore, anticipatory steps should be taken to minimize the likelihood of its occurrence if long-term therapy of these agents is being considered. PMID:27057293

  13. Applicability of DPI formulations for novel neurokinin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kumon, M; Yabe, Y; Kasuya, Y; Suzuki, M; Kusai, A; Yonemochi, E; Terada, K

    2008-05-22

    A novel triple neurokinin receptor antagonist (TNRA) could have pharmaceutical efficacy for asthma and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. TNRA is potentially developed as inhalation medicine. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the applicability of dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation for TNRA. DPI formulation containing lactose was used for this feasibility study. Mechanofusion process for surface modification was applied on lactose particles to prepare four different DPI formulations. The mixture of TNRA and lactose was administered to rats intratracheally using an insufflator. The deposition pattern and blood concentration profile of TNRA were evaluated. Although there was no significant difference in deposition on deep lungs between the four formulations, DPI formulations containing mechanofusion-processed lactose showed longer T(max) and t(1/2) and higher AUC(0-infinity) and MRT compared to that containing intact lactose. On the other hand, the contact angle measurement showed that the mechanofusion process decreased the polar part of the surface energy of the lactose. Therefore, the prolongation of the wetting of the formulated powder mixture seemed to delay the dissolution of TNRA deposited in respiratory tract. It was concluded that DPI formulation containing mechanofusion-processed lactose could be suitable for inhalation of TNRA.

  14. Effects of cholecystokinin receptor antagonist loxiglumide on rat exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Nakano, S; Tachibana, I; Otsuki, M

    1994-07-01

    Effects of long-term administration of the cholecystokinin receptor antagonist loxiglumide on exocrine pancreas were studied in adult rats. Plasma concentrations of loxiglumide at 8 h after a single subcutaneous injection of 50 mg/kg body weight of loxiglumide were 3.2 +/- 0.8 microgram/ml, which were comparable to those at 12 h after oral administration of the same dose (3.7 +/- 0.9 microgram/ml). Eight hours' prior subcutaneous injection of loxiglumide (50 mg/kg body weight) significantly suppressed pancreatic exocrine secretion stimulated by an intravenous bolus injection of 50 ng/kg body weight caerulein compared with the control rats. Based on these results, in the first experiment, loxiglumide at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight was given subcutaneously three times a day (low dose) for 6 days to adult rats fed a standard laboratory diet. Low dose of loxiglumide significantly decreased pancreatic wet weight (-14%) and pancreatic contents of protein (-26%), trypsin (-38%), and lipase (-68%), while having no significant effect on pancreatic contents of DNA and amylase. In the second experiment, three times higher dose of loxiglumide (150 mg/kg body weight) was given by an orogastric tube twice daily for 6 days. High dose of loxiglumide significantly decreased pancreatic weight (-11%) and contents of protein (-20%) and DNA (-22%), whereas it significantly increased amylase (+92%) and trypsin content (+20%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Side Effects of Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists in Asthmatic Children

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Nacaroglu, Hikmet Tekin; Unsal Karkiner, Canan Sule; Gunay, Ilker; Can, Demet

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs) are drugs which have been widely used more than ten years. As the use of LTRAs increases, our knowledge with respect to their side effects increases as well. Objectives: The objective of our study was to evaluat the observed side effects of LTRAs used in patients with astma. Patients and Methods: 1024 patients treated only with LTRAs owing to asthma or early wheezing were included in the study for a five-year period. The observed side effects of LTRAs in these patients were retrospectively investigated. The side effects were divided into two parts as psychiatric and non-psychiatric. Results: Among the 1024 cases included in the study, 67.5% of the patients out of 41 with side effects were male, 32.5% were female and the average age was 6.5 years. The rate of patients with asthma was 63.41% and 36.58% of the patients had early wheezing. It was determined that sex, age and diagnosis (early wheezing or asthma) of the patients were ineffective in the emergence of side effects. The average period for the emergence of side effects was the first month. It was observed that hyperactivity was the most frequently observed psychiatric side effect and that abdominal pain was the non-psychiatric side effect. Conclusions: The side effects of LTRAs were common in children. Therefore, patients must be informed at the beginning of the treatment and they must be evaluated at certain intervals. PMID:26495098

  16. Side Effects of Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists in Asthmatic Children.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Nacaroglu, Hikmet Tekin; Unsal Karkiner, Canan Sule; Gunay, Ilker; Can, Demet

    2015-10-01

    Leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs) are drugs which have been widely used more than ten years. As the use of LTRAs increases, our knowledge with respect to their side effects increases as well. The objective of our study was to evaluat the observed side effects of LTRAs used in patients with astma. 1024 patients treated only with LTRAs owing to asthma or early wheezing were included in the study for a five-year period. The observed side effects of LTRAs in these patients were retrospectively investigated. The side effects were divided into two parts as psychiatric and non-psychiatric. Among the 1024 cases included in the study, 67.5% of the patients out of 41 with side effects were male, 32.5% were female and the average age was 6.5 years. The rate of patients with asthma was 63.41% and 36.58% of the patients had early wheezing. It was determined that sex, age and diagnosis (early wheezing or asthma) of the patients were ineffective in the emergence of side effects. The average period for the emergence of side effects was the first month. It was observed that hyperactivity was the most frequently observed psychiatric side effect and that abdominal pain was the non-psychiatric side effect. The side effects of LTRAs were common in children. Therefore, patients must be informed at the beginning of the treatment and they must be evaluated at certain intervals.

  17. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Hypertension and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2015-01-01

    Spironolactone and eplerenone are both mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists. These compounds block both the epithelial and nonepithelial actions of aldosterone, with the latter assuming increasing clinical relevance. Spironolactone and eplerenone both affect reductions in blood pressure either as mono- or add-on therapy; moreover, they each afford survival benefits in diverse circumstances of heart failure and the probability of renal protection in proteinuric chronic kidney disease. However, as use of mineralocorticoid-blocking agents has expanded, the hazards inherent in taking such drugs have become more apparent. Whereas the endocrine side effects of spironolactone are in most cases little more than a cosmetic annoyance, the potassium-sparing effects of both spironolactone and eplerenone can prove disastrous, even fatal, if sufficient degrees of hyperkalemia emerge. For most patients, however, the risk of developing hyperkalemia in and of itself should not discourage the sensible clinician from bringing these compounds into play. Hyperkalemia should always be considered a possibility in patients receiving either of these medications; therefore, anticipatory steps should be taken to minimize the likelihood of its occurrence if long-term therapy of these agents is being considered.

  18. Receptors and Channels Targeted by Synthetic Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    It is widely accepted that non-endogenous compounds that target CB1 and/or CB2 receptors possess therapeutic potential for the clinical management of an ever growing number of disorders. Just a few of these disorders are already treated with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol or nabilone, both CB1/CB2 receptor agonists, and there is now considerable interest in expanding the clinical applications of such agonists and also in exploiting CB2-selective agonists, peripherally restricted CB1/CB2 receptor agonists and CB1/CB2 antagonists and inverse agonists as medicines. Already, numerous cannabinoid receptor ligands have been developed and their interactions with CB1 and CB2 receptors well characterized. This review describes what is currently known about the ability of such compounds to bind to, activate, inhibit or block non-CB1, non-CB2 G protein-coupled receptors such as GPR55, transmitter gated channels, ion channels and nuclear receptors in an orthosteric or allosteric manner. It begins with a brief description of how each of these ligands interacts with CB1 and/or CB2 receptors. PMID:20166927

  19. Synthesis and pharmacology of willardiine derivatives acting as antagonists of kainate receptors.

    PubMed

    Dolman, Nigel P; Troop, Helen M; More, Julia C A; Alt, Andrew; Knauss, Jody L; Nistico, Robert; Jack, Samantha; Morley, Richard M; Bortolotto, Zuner A; Roberts, Peter J; Bleakman, David; Collingridge, Graham L; Jane, David E

    2005-12-01

    The natural product willardiine (8) is an AMPA receptor agonist while 5-iodowillardiine (10) is a selective kainate receptor agonist. In an attempt to produce antagonists of kainate and AMPA receptors analogues of willardiine with substituents at the N3 position of the uracil ring were synthesized. The N3-4-carboxybenzyl substituted analogue (38c) was found to be equipotent at AMPA and GLUK5-containing kainate receptors in the neonatal rat spinal cord. The N3-2-carboxybenzyl substituted analogue (38a) proved to be a potent and selective GLUK5 subunit containing kainate receptor antagonist when tested on native rat and human recombinant AMPA and kainate receptor subtypes. The GLUK5 kainate receptor antagonist activity was found to reside in the S enantiomer (44a) whereas the R enantiomer (44b) was almost inactive. 5-Iodo substitution of the uracil ring of 44a gave 45, which was found to have enhanced potency and selectivity for GLUK5.

  20. Non-selectivity of new bradykinin antagonists for B1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Rhaleb, N E; Gobeil, F; Regoli, D

    1992-01-01

    Two new B1 receptor antagonists, [Hyp3,Thi5,DTic7,Oic8]desArg9-BK and DArg[Hyp3,Thi5,DTic7,Oic8]desArg9-BK were tested in vitro on the rabbit jugular vein and the guinea pig ileum (preparations containing B2 receptors) and on the rabbit aorta (preparation containing B1 receptors) for pharmacological characterization. The results indicate that both compounds are antagonists on both B1 and B2 receptors, are competitive and discriminate between B2A and B2B receptor subtypes.

  1. CGS 8216: receptor binding characteristics of a potent benzodiazepine antagonist.

    PubMed

    Czernik, A J; Petrack, B; Kalinsky, H J; Psychoyos, S; Cash, W D; Tsai, C; Rinehart, R K; Granat, F R; Lovell, R A; Brundish, D E; Wade, R

    1982-01-25

    CGS 8216 is a novel nonbenzodiazepine that inhibited 3H-flunitrazepam (3H-FLU) binding to rat synaptosomal membranes in vitro at subnanomolar concentrations. It prevented the in vivo labeling of brain benzodiazepine receptors by 3H-FLU with the same potency as diazepam when given orally to mice. Pharmacologic tests showed that it was devoid of benzodiazepine-like activity but it antagonized the actions of diazepam in these tests. It did not interact with alpha- or beta- adrenergic, H1-histaminergic or GABA receptors but it inhibited adenosine-activation of cyclic AMP formation. Studies with 3H-CGS 8216 demonstrated that it bound specifically and with high affinity to rat forebrain membranes and was displaced by drugs with an order of potencies similar to that observed when 3H-diazepam and 3H-FLU were used as radioligands. The regional distribution of 3H-CGS 8216 binding sites in the brain was also similar to that of 3H-FLU. Dissociation of 3H-CGS 8216 binding was slow at 0 degrees C but increased with temperature and was almost complete within 1 min at 37 degrees C. Scatchard analyses were linear, yielding KD values of 0.044, 0.11 and 0.18 nM at 0, 25 and 37 degrees C, respectively; the Bmax value did not change appreciably with temperature and was approximately 1000 fmoles/mg protein. Using 3H-FLU, the value for Bmax as well as for the KD increased with temperature. The total number of binding sites determined for 3H-FLU was greater than that for 3H-CGS 8216 at each temperature. CGS 8216 exhibited mixed-type inhibition of 3H-FLU binding. GABA did not stimulate 3H-CGS 8216 binding whereas it enhanced 3H-FLU binding. CGS 8216 may be a useful ligand for probing the antagonist properties of the benzodiazepine receptor and is likely to exhibit interesting therapeutic effects.

  2. Tamoxifen resistant breast cancer: coregulators determine the direction of transcription by antagonist-occupied steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Takimoto, G S; Graham, J D; Jackson, T A; Tung, L; Powell, R L; Horwitz, L D; Horwitz, K B

    1999-01-01

    Pharmacological antagonists of steroid receptor action had been thought to exert their effects by a passive mechanism driven principally by the ability of the antagonist to compete with agonist for the ligand binding site. However, recent analyses of antagonist-occupied receptor function suggest a more complex picture. Antagonists can be subdivided into two groups, type I, or pure antagonists, and type II, or mixed antagonists that can have variable transcriptional activity based upon differential dimerization and DNA binding properties. This led us to propose that receptor antagonism may not simply be a passive competition for the ligand binding site, but may, in some cases, involve active recruitment of corepressor or coactivator proteins to produce a mixed transcriptional phenotype. We used a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that interact specifically with antagonist-occupied receptors. Two proteins have been characterized: L7/SPA, a ribosome-associated protein that is localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, but with no known extranucleolar nuclear function; and hN-CoR, the human homolog of the mouse thyroid receptor corepressor mN-CoR. In in vivo transcription assays we show that L7/SPA enhances the partial agonist activity of type II mixed antagonists, and that N-CoR and the related corepressor, SMRT, suppresses it. The coregulators do not affect agonists or pure antagonists. Moreover, the net agonist activity seen with mixed antagonists is a function of the ratio of coactivator to corepressor. Based upon these results, we proposed that in breast tumors the inappropriate agonist activity seen with therapeutic antagonists such as tamoxifen is responsible for the hormone-resistant state. To confirm this, we are quantitating coactivator/corepressor ratios in breast tumor cells lines and clinical breast cancers. Results should provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the progression of breast cancer to hormone resistance, and may

  3. The NK1 receptor antagonist L822429 reduces heroin reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Estelle; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Edwards, Scott; Juergens, Nathan; Park, Paula E; Misra, Kaushik K; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Schank, Jesse; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F; Heilig, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Genetic deletion of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) has been shown to decrease the reinforcing properties of opioids, but it is unknown whether pharmacological NK1R blockade has the same effect. Here, we examined the effect of L822429, a rat-specific NK1R antagonist, on the reinforcing properties of heroin in rats on short (1 h: ShA) or long (12 h: LgA) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. ShA produces heroin self-administration rates that are stable over time, whereas LgA leads to an escalation of heroin intake thought to model important dependence-related aspects of addiction. L822429 reduced heroin self-administration and the motivation to consume heroin, measured using a progressive-ratio schedule, in both ShA and LgA rats. L822429 also decreased anxiety-like behavior in both groups, measured on the elevated plus maze, but did not affect mechanical hypersensitivity observed in LgA rats. Expression of TacR1 (the gene encoding NK1R) was decreased in reward- and stress-related brain areas both in ShA and LgA rats compared with heroin-naïve rats, but did not differ between the two heroin-experienced groups. In contrast, passive exposure to heroin produced increases in TacR1 expression in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results show that pharmacological NK1R blockade attenuates heroin reinforcement. The observation that animals with ShA and LgA to heroin were similarly affected by L822429 indicates that the SP/NK1R system is not specifically involved in neuroadaptations that underlie escalation resulting from LgA self-administration. Instead, the NK1R antagonist appears to attenuate acute, positively reinforcing properties of heroin and may be useful as an adjunct to relapse prevention in detoxified opioid-dependent subjects.

  4. The NK1 Receptor Antagonist L822429 Reduces Heroin Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Estelle; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Edwards, Scott; Juergens, Nathan; Park, Paula E; Misra, Kaushik K; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Schank, Jesse; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F; Heilig, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Genetic deletion of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) has been shown to decrease the reinforcing properties of opioids, but it is unknown whether pharmacological NK1R blockade has the same effect. Here, we examined the effect of L822429, a rat-specific NK1R antagonist, on the reinforcing properties of heroin in rats on short (1 h: ShA) or long (12 h: LgA) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. ShA produces heroin self-administration rates that are stable over time, whereas LgA leads to an escalation of heroin intake thought to model important dependence-related aspects of addiction. L822429 reduced heroin self-administration and the motivation to consume heroin, measured using a progressive-ratio schedule, in both ShA and LgA rats. L822429 also decreased anxiety-like behavior in both groups, measured on the elevated plus maze, but did not affect mechanical hypersensitivity observed in LgA rats. Expression of TacR1 (the gene encoding NK1R) was decreased in reward- and stress-related brain areas both in ShA and LgA rats compared with heroin-naïve rats, but did not differ between the two heroin-experienced groups. In contrast, passive exposure to heroin produced increases in TacR1 expression in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results show that pharmacological NK1R blockade attenuates heroin reinforcement. The observation that animals with ShA and LgA to heroin were similarly affected by L822429 indicates that the SP/NK1R system is not specifically involved in neuroadaptations that underlie escalation resulting from LgA self-administration. Instead, the NK1R antagonist appears to attenuate acute, positively reinforcing properties of heroin and may be useful as an adjunct to relapse prevention in detoxified opioid-dependent subjects. PMID:23303056

  5. Emergence of NMDAR-independent long-term potentiation at hippocampal CA1 synapses following early adolescent exposure to chronic intermittent ethanol: role for sigma-receptors.

    PubMed

    Sabeti, Jilla; Gruol, Donna L

    2008-01-01

    Adolescent humans who abuse alcohol are more vulnerable than adults to the development of memory impairments. Memory impairments often involve modifications in the ability of hippocampal neurons to establish long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory neurotransmission; however, few studies have examined how chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence affects LTP mechanisms in hippocampus. We investigated changes in LTP mechanisms in hippocamal slices from rats exposed to intoxicating concentrations of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapors in their period of early-adolescent (i.e., prepubescent) or late-adolescent (i.e., postpubescent) development. LTP was evaluated at excitatory CA1 synapses in hippocampal slices at 24 h after the cessation of air (control) or CIE vapor treatments. CA1 synapses in control slices showed steady LTP following induction by high-frequency stimulation, which was fully dependent on NMDAR function. By contrast, slices from early-adolescent CIE exposed animals showed a compound form of LTP consisting of an NMDAR-dependent component and a slow-developing component independent of NMDARs. These components summated to yield LTP of robust magnitude above LTP levels in age-matched control slices. Bath-application of the sigma-receptor antagonist BD1047 and the neuroactive steroid pregnenolone sulfate, but not acute ethanol application, blocked NMDAR-independent LTP, while leaving NMDAR-dependent LTP intact. Analysis of presynaptic function during NMDAR-independent LTP induction demonstrated increased presynaptic function via a sigma-receptor-dependent mechanism in slices from early-adolescent CIE-exposed animals. By contrast, CIE exposure after puberty onset in late-adolescent animals produced decrements in LTP levels. The identification of a role for sigma-receptors and neuroactive steroids in the development of NMDAR-independent LTP suggests an important pathway by which hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and perhaps memory, may be uniquely

  6. Decreases in Cocaine Self-Administration with Dual Inhibition of the Dopamine Transporter and σ Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Soto, Paul L.; Kohut, Stephen J.; Kopajtic, Theresa; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy H.; Tanda, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptor (σR) antagonists attenuate many behavioral effects of cocaine but typically not its reinforcing effects in self-administration procedures. However, the σR antagonist rimcazole and its N-propylphenyl analogs, [3-(cis-3,5-dimethyl-4-[3-phenylpropyl]-1-piperazinyl)-propyl]diphenylamine hydrochloride (SH 3-24) and 9-[3-(cis-3,5-dimethyl-4-[3-phenylpropyl]-1-piperazinyl)-propyl]carbazole hydrobromide (SH 3-28), dose-dependently decreased the maximal rates of cocaine self-administration without affecting comparable responding maintained by food reinforcement. In contrast, a variety of σR antagonists [N-phenethylpiperidine oxalate (AC927), N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethylamine dihydrobromide (BD 1008), N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(dimethylamino) ethylamine dihydrobromide (BD 1047), N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) ethyl]-4-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride (BD 1063), and N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]-ethylamine monohydrochloride (NE-100)] had no effect on cocaine self-administration across the range of doses that decreased rates of food-maintained responding. Rimcazole analogs differed from selective σR antagonists in their dual affinities for σRs and the dopamine transporter (DAT) assessed with radioligand binding. Selective DAT inhibitors and σR antagonists were studied alone and in combination on cocaine self-administration to determine whether actions at both σRs and the DAT were sufficient to reproduce the effects of rimcazole analogs. Typical DAT inhibitors [2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (WIN 35,428), methylphenidate, and nomifensine] dose-dependently shifted the cocaine dose-effect curve leftward. Combinations of DAT inhibitor and σR antagonist doses that were behaviorally inactive alone decreased cocaine self-administration without effects on food-maintained responding. In addition, whereas the DAT inhibitors were self-administered at rates similar to those of

  7. Discovery of indole alkaloids with cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Mariko; Iwai, Masumi; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro; Iida, Mitsuru; Yabushita, Hisatoshi; Takayama, Hiromitsu

    2011-04-01

    Three indole alkaloids, voacamine (1), 3,6-oxidovoacangine (2), and a new alkaloid, 5-hydroxy-3,6-oxidovoacangine (3), isolated from Voacanga africana were found to exhibit potent cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonistic activity. This is the first example of CB1 antagonists derived from natural alkaloids. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Anti-idiotypic antibody: A new strategy for the development of a growth hormone receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hainan; Zheng, Xin; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Li, Steven

    2015-11-01

    In general, traditional growth hormone receptor antagonist can be divided into two major classes: growth hormone (GH) analogues and anti-growth hormone receptor (GHR) antibodies. Herein, we tried to explore a new class of growth hormone receptor (GHR) antagonist that may have potential advantages over the traditional antagonists. For this, we developed a monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody growth hormone, termed CG-86. A series of experiments were conducted to characterize and evaluate this antibody, and the results from a competitive receptor-binding assay, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) and epitope mapping demonstrate that CG-86 behaved as a typical Ab2β. Next, we examined its antagonistic activity using in vitro cell models, and the results showed that CG-86 could effectively inhibit growth hormone receptor-mediated signalling and effectively inhibit growth hormone-induced Ba/F3-GHR638 proliferation. In summary, these studies show that an anti-idiotypic antibody (CG-86) has promise as a novel growth hormone receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the current findings also suggest that anti-idiotypic antibody may represent a novel strategy to produce a new class of growth hormone receptor antagonist, and this strategy may be applied with other cytokines or growth factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transition strategies from cangrelor to oral platelet P2Y12 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David J

    2016-01-01

    Cangrelor is the first parenteral antagonist of the platelet P2Y12 receptor. This direct-acting antagonist of the platelet P2Y12 receptor should be considered an adjunct to a percutaneous coronary intervention in patients who have not been adequately pretreated with platelet P2Y12 receptor antagonists at the time of the procedure. The use of cangrelor requires transition to an oral platelet P2Y12 receptor antagonist. Transition strategies have been developed on the basis of pharmacologic characteristics of platelet P2Y12 receptor antagonists, results of pharmacodynamic studies, and results from clinical trials. Cangrelor blocks the binding to the platelet P2Y12 receptor of the active metabolite of the thienopyridines, clopidogrel and prasugrel. The active metabolite of thienopyridines is present in blood for a short interval after administration. For this reason, clopidogrel should be administered after cangrelor is stopped. Prasugrel can be administered at the end of the cangrelor infusion or up to 30 min before cangrelor is stopped. Ticagrelor is also a reversible direct-acting antagonist of the platelet P2Y12 receptor. Because there is no interaction between ticagrelor and cangrelor, ticagrelor can be administered before or during the infusion of cangrelor.

  10. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-2 Antagonists: Therapeutic Potential and Potential Risks

    PubMed Central

    Blankenbach, Kira V.; Schwalm, Stephanie; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling system with its specific G-protein-coupled S1P receptors, the enzymes of S1P metabolism and the S1P transporters, offers a multitude of promising targets for drug development. Until today, drug development in this area has nearly exclusively focused on (functional) antagonists at the S1P1 receptor, which cause a unique phenotype of immunomodulation. Accordingly, the first-in class S1P1 receptor modulator, fingolimod, has been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and novel S1P1 receptor (functional) antagonists are being developed for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, lupus erythematodes, or polymyositis. Besides the S1P1 receptor, also S1P2 and S1P3 are widely expressed and regulate many diverse functions throughout the body. The S1P2 receptor, in particular, often exerts cellular functions which are opposed to the functions of the S1P1 receptor. As a consequence, antagonists at the S1P2 receptor have the potential to be useful in a contrasting context and different areas of indication compared to S1P1 antagonists. The present review will focus on the therapeutic potential of S1P2 receptor antagonists and discuss their opportunities as well as their potential risks. Open questions and areas which require further investigations will be emphasized in particular. PMID:27445808

  11. Total synthesis of anibamine, a novel natural product as a chemokine receptor CCR5 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo; Watson, Karen; Buckheit, Robert W; Zhang, Yan

    2007-05-10

    The total synthesis of anibamine, the first and only natural product known as a chemokine receptor CCR5 antagonist, is reported herein. Anibamine was synthesized from acetylacetone and cyanoacetamide in 10 steps.

  12. Novel morpholine scaffolds as selective dopamine (DA) D3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Fabrizio; Cremonesi, Susanna; Semeraro, Teresa; Tarsi, Luca; Tomelleri, Silvia; Cavanni, Paolo; Oliosi, Beatrice; Perdonà, Elisabetta; Sava, Anna; Zonzini, Laura; Feriani, Aldo; Braggio, Simone; Heidbreder, Christian

    2016-02-15

    A new series of morpholine derivatives has been identified as selective DA D3 receptor antagonists; their in vitro profile and pharmacokinetic data are provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An expedient route to a potent gastrin/CCK-B receptor antagonist (+)-AG-041R.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shigeki; Shibuya, Masatoshi; Kanoh, Naoki; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu

    2009-10-02

    An enantiocontrolled synthesis of (+)-AG-041R (1), a potent gastrin/CCK-B receptor antagonist, has been achieved employing a chiral rhodium(II)-catalyzed, oxidative intramolecular aza-spiroannulation as the key step.

  14. Crystal structure of human glycine receptor-α3 bound to antagonist strychnine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Chen, Hao; Michelsen, Klaus; Schneider, Stephen; Shaffer, Paul L

    2015-10-08

    Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels of the Cys-loop receptor family are essential mediators of fast neurotransmission throughout the nervous system and are implicated in many neurological disorders. Available X-ray structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic Cys-loop receptors provide tremendous insights into the binding of agonists, the subsequent opening of the ion channel, and the mechanism of channel activation. Yet the mechanism of inactivation by antagonists remains unknown. Here we present a 3.0 Å X-ray structure of the human glycine receptor-α3 homopentamer in complex with a high affinity, high-specificity antagonist, strychnine. Our structure allows us to explore in detail the molecular recognition of antagonists. Comparisons with previous structures reveal a mechanism for antagonist-induced inactivation of Cys-loop receptors, involving an expansion of the orthosteric binding site in the extracellular domain that is coupled to closure of the ion pore in the transmembrane domain.

  15. Update on leukotriene receptor antagonists in preschool children wheezing disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease in young children. About 40% of all preschool children regularly wheeze during common cold infections. The heterogeneity of wheezing phenotypes early in life and various anatomical and emotional factors unique to young children present significant challenges in the clinical management of this problem. Anti-inflammatory therapy, mainly consisting of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), is the cornerstone of asthma management. Since Leukotrienes (LTs) are chemical mediators of airway inflammation in asthma, the leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs) are traditionally used as potent anti-inflammatory drugs in the long-term treatment of asthma in adults, adolescents, and school-age children. In particular, montelukast decreases airway inflammation, and has also a bronchoprotective effect. The main guidelines on asthma management have confirmed the clinical utility of LTRAs in children older than five years. In the present review we describe the most recent advances on the use of LTRAs in the treatment of preschool wheezing disorders. LTRAs are effective in young children with virus-induced wheeze and with multiple-trigger disease. Conflicting data do not allow to reach definitive conclusions on LTRAs efficacy in bronchiolitis or post-bronchiolitis wheeze, and in acute asthma. The excellent safety profile of montelukast and the possibility of oral administration, that entails better compliance from young children, represent the main strengths of its use in preschool children. Montelukast is a valid alternative to ICS especially in poorly compliant preschool children, or in subjects who show adverse effects related to long-term steroid therapy. PMID:22734451

  16. Thrombin-receptor antagonist vorapaxar in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tricoci, Pierluigi; Huang, Zhen; Held, Claes; Moliterno, David J; Armstrong, Paul W; Van de Werf, Frans; White, Harvey D; Aylward, Philip E; Wallentin, Lars; Chen, Edmond; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Pei, Jinglan; Leonardi, Sergio; Rorick, Tyrus L; Kilian, Ann M; Jennings, Lisa H K; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Bode, Christoph; Cequier, Angel; Cornel, Jan H; Diaz, Rafael; Erkan, Aycan; Huber, Kurt; Hudson, Michael P; Jiang, Lixin; Jukema, J Wouter; Lewis, Basil S; Lincoff, A Michael; Montalescot, Gilles; Nicolau, José Carlos; Ogawa, Hisao; Pfisterer, Matthias; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Ruzyllo, Witold; Sinnaeve, Peter R; Storey, Robert F; Valgimigli, Marco; Whellan, David J; Widimsky, Petr; Strony, John; Harrington, Robert A; Mahaffey, Kenneth W

    2012-01-05

    Vorapaxar is a new oral protease-activated-receptor 1 (PAR-1) antagonist that inhibits thrombin-induced platelet activation. In this multinational, double-blind, randomized trial, we compared vorapaxar with placebo in 12,944 patients who had acute coronary syndromes without ST-segment elevation. The primary end point was a composite of death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, stroke, recurrent ischemia with rehospitalization, or urgent coronary revascularization. Follow-up in the trial was terminated early after a safety review. After a median follow-up of 502 days (interquartile range, 349 to 667), the primary end point occurred in 1031 of 6473 patients receiving vorapaxar versus 1102 of 6471 patients receiving placebo (Kaplan-Meier 2-year rate, 18.5% vs. 19.9%; hazard ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 1.01; P=0.07). A composite of death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, or stroke occurred in 822 patients in the vorapaxar group versus 910 in the placebo group (14.7% and 16.4%, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.98; P=0.02). Rates of moderate and severe bleeding were 7.2% in the vorapaxar group and 5.2% in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.58; P<0.001). Intracranial hemorrhage rates were 1.1% and 0.2%, respectively (hazard ratio, 3.39; 95% CI, 1.78 to 6.45; P<0.001). Rates of nonhemorrhagic adverse events were similar in the two groups. In patients with acute coronary syndromes, the addition of vorapaxar to standard therapy did not significantly reduce the primary composite end point but significantly increased the risk of major bleeding, including intracranial hemorrhage. (Funded by Merck; TRACER ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00527943.).

  17. Oxycodone combined with opioid receptor antagonists: efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar; Goforth, Harold W; Gamier, Pam

    2013-05-01

    A mu receptor antagonist combined with oxycodone (OXY) may improve pain control, reduce physical tolerance and withdrawal, minimizing opioid-related bowel dysfunction and act as an abuse deterrent. The authors cover the use of OXY plus ultra-low-dose naltrexone for analgesia and the use of sustained-release OXY plus sustained-release naloxone to reduce the opioid bowel syndrome. The authors briefly describe the use of sustained-release OXY and naltrexone pellets as a drug abuse deterrent formulation. Combinations of ultra-low-dose naltrexone plus OXY have been in separate trials involved in patients with chronic pain from osteoarthritis and idiopathic low back pain. High attrition and marginal differences between ultra-low-dose naltrexone plus OXY and OXY led to discontinuation of development. Prolonged-release (PR) naloxone combined with PR OXY demonstrates a consistent reduction in opioid-related bowel dysfunction in multiple randomized controlled trials. However, gastrointestinal side effects, including diarrhea, were increased in several trials with the combination compared with PR OXY alone. Analgesia appeared to be maintained although non-inferiority to PR OXY is not formally established. There were flaws to trial design and safety monitoring. Naltrexone has been combined with OXY in individual pellets encased in a capsule. This combination has been reported in a Phase II trial and is presently undergoing Phase III studies. Due to the lack of efficacy the combination of altered low-dose naltrexone with oxycodone should cease in development. The combination of sustained release oxycodone plus naloxone reduces constipation with a consistent benefit. Safety has been suboptimally evaluated which is a concern. Although the drug is commercially available in several countries, ongoing safety monitoring particularly high doses would be important.

  18. The discovery of the benzazepine class of histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David M; Apps, James; Bailey, Nicholas; Bamford, Mark J; Beresford, Isabel J; Briggs, Michael A; Calver, Andrew R; Crook, Barry; Davis, Robert P; Davis, Susannah; Dean, David K; Harris, Leanne; Heightman, Tom D; Panchal, Terry; Parr, Christopher A; Quashie, Nigel; Steadman, Jon G A; Schogger, Joanne; Sehmi, Sanjeet S; Stean, Tania O; Takle, Andrew K; Trail, Brenda K; White, Trevor; Witherington, Jason; Worby, Angela; Medhurst, Andrew D

    2013-12-15

    This Letter describes the discovery of a novel series of H3 receptor antagonists. The initial medicinal chemistry strategy focused on deconstructing and simplifying an early screening hit which rapidly led to the discovery of a novel series of H3 receptor antagonists based on the benzazepine core. Employing an H3 driven pharmacodynamic model, the series was then further optimised through to a lead compound that showed robust in vivo functional activity and possessed overall excellent developability properties.

  19. Cannabinoid type 1 receptor antagonists for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Kate; Ussher, Michael H

    2011-03-16

    Selective type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptor antagonists may assist with smoking cessation by restoring the balance of the endocannabinoid system, which can be disrupted by prolonged use of nicotine. They also seeks to address many smokers' reluctance to persist with a quit attempt because of concerns about weight gain. To determine whether selective CB1 receptor antagonists (currently rimonabant and taranabant) increase the numbers of people stopping smoking To assess their effects on weight change in successful quitters and in those who try to quit but fail. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Review Group specialized register for trials, using the terms ('rimonabant' or 'taranabant') and 'smoking' in the title or abstract, or as keywords. We also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO, using major MESH terms. We acquired electronic or paper copies of posters of preliminary trial results presented at the American Thoracic Society Meeting in 2005, and at the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco European Meeting 2006. We also attempted to contact the authors of ongoing studies of rimonabant, and Sanofi Aventis (manufacturers of rimonabant). The most recent search was in January 2011. Types of studies Randomized controlled trialsTypes of participants Adult smokersTypes of interventions Selective CB1 receptor antagonists, such as rimonabant and taranabant. Types of outcome measures The primary outcome is smoking status at a minimum of six months after the start of treatment. We preferred sustained cessation rates to point prevalence, and biochemically verified cessation to self-reported quitting. We regarded smokers who drop out or are lost to follow up as continuing smokers. We have noted any adverse effects of treatment.A secondary outcome is weight change associated with the cessation attempt. Two authors checked the abstracts for relevance, and attempted to acquire full trial reports. One author extracted the data, and a second author checked

  20. Discovery of antagonists of tick dopamine receptors via chemical library screening and comparative pharmacological analyses.

    PubMed

    Ejendal, Karin F K; Meyer, Jason M; Brust, Tarsis F; Avramova, Larisa V; Hill, Catherine A; Watts, Val J

    2012-11-01

    Ticks transmit a wide variety of disease causing pathogens to humans and animals. Considering the global health impact of tick-borne diseases, there is a pressing need to develop new methods for vector control. We are exploring arthropod dopamine receptors as novel targets for insecticide/acaricide development because of their integral roles in neurobiology. Herein, we developed a screening assay for dopamine receptor antagonists to further characterize the pharmacological properties of the two D₁-like dopamine receptors (Isdop1 and Isdop2) identified in the Lyme disease vector, Ixodes scapularis, and develop a screening assay for receptor antagonists. A cell-based, cyclic AMP luciferase reporter assay platform was implemented to screen the LOPAC(1280) small molecule library for Isdop2 receptor antagonists, representing the first reported chemical library screen for any tick G protein-coupled receptor. Screening resulted in the identification of 85 "hit" compounds with antagonist activity at the Isdop2 receptor. Eight of these chemistries were selected for confirmation assays using a direct measurement of cAMP, and the effects on both Isdop1 and Isdop2 were studied for comparison. Each of these eight compounds showed antagonistic activity at both Isdop1 and Isdop2, although differences were observed regarding their relative potencies. Furthermore, comparison of the pharmacological properties of the tick dopamine receptors with that of the AaDOP2 receptor from the yellow fever mosquito and the human dopamine D₁ receptor (hD₁) revealed species-specific pharmacological profiles of these receptors. Compounds influencing dopaminergic functioning, such as the dopamine receptor antagonists discovered here, may provide lead chemistries for discovery of novel acaricides useful for vector control

  1. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists rimonabant (SR141716) and AM251 directly potentiate GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Baur, R; Gertsch, J; Sigel, E

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Rimonabant (SR141716) and the structurally related AM251 are widely used in pharmacological experiments as selective cannabinoid receptor CB1 antagonists / inverse agonists. Concentrations of 0.5–10 µM are usually applied in in vitro experiments. We intended to show that these drugs did not act at GABAA receptors but found a significant positive allosteric modulation instead. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Recombinant GABAA receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Receptors were exposed to AM251 or rimonabant in the absence and presence of GABA. Standard electrophysiological techniques were used to monitor the elicited ionic currents. KEY RESULTS AM251 dose-dependently potentiated responses to 0.5 µM GABA at the recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor with an EC50 below 1 µM and a maximal potentiation of about eightfold. The Hill coefficient indicated that more than one binding site for AM251 was located in this receptor. Rimonabant had a lower affinity, but a fourfold higher efficacy. AM251 potentiated also currents mediated by α1β2, αxβ2γ2 (x = 2,3,5,6), α1β3γ2 and α4β2δ GABAA receptors, but not those mediated by α1β1γ2. Interestingly, the CB1 receptor antagonists LY320135 and O-2050 did not significantly affect α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor-mediated currents at concentrations of 1 µM. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study identified rimonabant and AM251 as positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors. Thus, potential GABAergic effects of commonly used concentrations of these compounds should be considered in in vitro experiments, especially at extrasynaptic sites where GABA concentrations are low. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-8. To view Part I of Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-7 PMID:21470203

  2. Unsaturated phosphinic analogues of gamma-aminobutyric acid as GABA(C) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chebib, M; Vandenberg, R J; Froestl, W; Johnston, G A

    1997-06-25

    The phosphinic and methylphosphinic analogues of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are potent GABA(C) receptor antagonists but are even more potent as GABA(B) receptor agonists. Conformationally restricted unsaturated phosphinic and methylphosphinic analogues of GABA and some potent GABA(B) receptor phosphonoamino acid antagonists were tested on GABA(C) receptors in Xenopus oocytes expressing human retinal rho1 mRNA. 3-Aminopropyl-n-butyl-phosphinic acid (CGP36742), an orally active GABA(B) receptor antagonist, was found to be a moderately potent GABA(C) receptor antagonist (IC50 = 62 microM). The unsaturated methylphosphinic and phosphinic analogues of GABA were competitive antagonists of the GABA(C) receptors, the order of potency being [(E)-3-aminopropen-1-yl]methylphosphinic acid (CGP44530, IC50 = 5.53 microM) > [(E)-3-aminopropen-1-yl]phosphinic acid (CGP38593, IC50 = 7.68 microM) > [(Z)-3-aminopropen-1-yl]methylphosphinic acid (CGP70523, IC50 = 38.94 microM) > [(Z)-3-aminopropen-1-yl]phosphinic acid (CGP70522, IC50 > 100 microM). This order of potency differs from that reported for these compounds as GABA(B) receptor agonists, where the phosphinic acids are more potent than the corresponding methylphosphinic acids.

  3. QT interval prolongation and torsade de pointes: Synergistic effect of flecainide and H1 receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Materán, Carlos; Díaz-Oliva, Eloy; Fernández-Rodríguez, Diego; Hernández-Afonso, Julio

    2016-01-01

    A high percentage of patients having atrial fibrillation (AF) presents with paroxysmal AF. Flecainide, the prototypic class Ic anti-arrhythmic drug is the most effective drug to maintain sinus rhythm in this subgroup of patients, though the drug has potential pro-arrhythmic effects. Furthermore, the H1 receptor antagonists are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the symptomatic treatment of pruritus. Despite having low number of adverse effects, the H1 receptor antagonists have cardiotoxic effects. Flecainide and H1 receptor antagonists present arrhythmic complications including QT interval prolongation and torsade de pointes (TdP). The case presented here is a 65-year-old female who was diagnosed of atrial fibrillation and presented with rashes in lower extremities. The patient was treated using flecainide and H1 receptor antagonists (loratadine and hydroxyzine) that prolonged QT interval and induced TdP. The concomitant administration of flecainide and H1 receptor antagonists seems to have a synergistic effect in QT interval prolongation and subsequent TdP. The concurrent administration of H1 receptor antagonists to patients receiving class Ic anti-arrhythmic drugs should be avoided in order to reduce arrhythmic risk in this population. PMID:27440957

  4. Morphine in combination with metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists on schedule-controlled responding and thermal nociception.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Bradford D; Zimmerman, Eric I; Picker, Mitchell J; Dykstra, Linda A

    2008-02-01

    The present study examined the interactive effects of morphine in combination with metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor antagonists on schedule-controlled responding and thermal nociception. Drug interaction data were examined with isobolographic and dose-addition analysis. Morphine, the mGlu1 receptor antagonist JNJ16259685 [(3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrano-[2,3-b]quinolin-7-yl)-(cis-4-methoxycyclohexyl)-methanone], the mGlu5 receptor antagonist MPEP [2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride], and the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist LY341495 [(2S)-2-amino-2-[(1S,2S-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl]-3-(xanth-9-yl) propanoic acid] all decreased rates of schedule-controlled responding. JNJ16259685/morphine, MPEP/morphine, and LY341495/morphine mixtures produced additive effects on this endpoint. Morphine also produced dose-dependent antinociception in the assay of thermal nociception, whereas JNJ16259685, MPEP, and LY341495 failed to produce an effect. In this assay, JNJ16259685 and LY341495 potentiated the antinociceptive effects of morphine, whereas MPEP/morphine mixtures produced additive effects. These results suggest that an mGlu1 and an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, but not an mGlu5 receptor antagonist, selectively enhance the antinociceptive effects of morphine. In addition, these data confirm that the behavioral effects of drug mixtures depend on the endpoint under study.

  5. Effect of ghrelin receptor antagonist on meal patterns in cholecystokinin type 1 receptor null mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer; Martin, Elizabeth; Paulino, Gabriel; de Lartigue, Guillaume; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-05-03

    Vagal afferent neurons (VAN) express the cholecystokinin (CCK) type 1 receptor (CCK₁R) and, as predicted by the role of CCK in inducing satiation, CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingest larger and longer meals. However, after a short fast, CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingesting high fat (HF) diets initiate feeding earlier than wild-type mice. We hypothesized that the increased drive to eat in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice eating HF diet is mediated by ghrelin, a gut peptide that stimulates food intake. The decrease in time to first meal, and the increase in meal size and duration in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ compared to wild-type mice ingesting high fat (HF) diet were reversed by administration of GHSR1a antagonist D-(Lys3)-GHRP-6 (p<0.05). Administration of the GHSR1a antagonist significantly increased expression of the neuropeptide cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in VAN of HF-fed CCK₁R⁻/⁻ but not wild-type mice. Administration of the GHSR1a antagonist decreased neuronal activity measured by immunoreactivity for fos protein in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and the arcuate nucleus of both HF-fed wild-type and CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice. The data show that hyperphagia in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingesting HF diet is reversed by blockade of the ghrelin receptor, suggesting that in the absence of the CCK₁R, there is an increased ghrelin-dependent drive to feed. The site of action of ghrelin receptors is unclear, but may involve an increase in expression of CART peptide in VAN in HF-fed CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice.

  6. High antagonist potency of GT-2227 and GT-2331, new histamine H3 receptor antagonists, in two functional models.

    PubMed

    Tedford, C E; Hoffmann, M; Seyedi, N; Maruyama, R; Levi, R; Yates, S L; Ali, S M; Phillips, J G

    1998-06-26

    GT-2227 (4-(6-cyclohexylhex-cis-3-enyl)imidazole) and GT-2331 ((1R,2R)-4-(2-(5,5-dimethylhex-1-ynyl)cyclopropyl)imidazole) were developed as new potent histamine H3 receptor antagonists. The functional activity of these ligands on the histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of neurogenic contraction of the guinea-pig jejunum and histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of norepinephrine release from guinea-pig heart synaptosomes were investigated. GT-2227 and GT-2331 both antagonized the inhibitory effects of (R)-alpha-methylhistamine on the contraction induced by electrical field stimulation in the guinea-pig jejunum with pA2 values of 7.9+/-0.1 and 8.5+/-0.03, respectively. In addition, GT-2227 and GT-2331 antagonized the inhibition of norepinephrine release in cardiac synaptosomes by GT-2203 ((1R,2R)-trans-2-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)cyclopropylamine), a histamine H3 receptor agonist. The current results demonstrate the antagonist activity for both GT-2227 and GT-2331 in two functional assays for histamine H3 receptors.

  7. From Chemotherapy-Induced Emesis to Neuroprotection: Therapeutic Opportunities for 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Fakhfouri, Gohar; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Mehr, Sharam Ejtemaei; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Rahimian, Reza

    2015-12-01

    5-HT3 receptor antagonists are extensively used as efficacious agents in counteracting chemotherapy-induced emesis. Recent investigations have shed light on other potential effects (analgesic, anxiolytic, and anti-psychotic). Some studies have reported neuroprotective properties for the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in vitro and in vivo. When administered to Aβ-challenged rat cortical neurons, 5-HT3 receptor antagonists substantially abated apoptosis, elevation of cytosolic Ca(2), glutamate release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and caspase-3 activity. In addition, in vivo studies show that 5-HT3 receptor antagonists possess, alongside their anti-emetic effects, notable immunomodulatory properties in CNS. We found that pretreatment with tropisetron significantly improved neurological deficits and diminished leukocyte transmigration into the brain, TNF-α level, and brain infarction in a murine model of embolic stroke. Our recent investigation revealed that tropisetron protects against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in vivo through both 5-HT3 receptor-dependent and -independent pathways. Tropisetron, in vitro, was found to be an efficacious inhibitor of the signaling pathway leading to the activation of pro-inflammatory NF-κB, a transcription factor pivotal to the upregulation of several neuroinflammatory mediators in brain. This mini review summarizes novel evidence concerning effects of 5-HT3 antagonists and their possible mechanisms of action in ameliorating neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. Further, we discuss some newly synthesized 5-HT3 receptor antagonists with dual properties of 5-HT3 receptor blockade/alpha-7 nicotinic receptor activator and their potential in management of memory impairment. Since 5-HT3 receptor antagonists possess a large therapeutic window, they can constitute a scaffold for design and synthesis of new neuroprotective medications.

  8. Mechanism of action of species-selective P2X7 receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Anton D; Ng, Sin-Wei; Roman, Shilina; Clay, William C; Dean, David K; Walter, Daryl S

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: AZ11645373 and N-{2-methyl-5-[(1R, 5S)-9-oxa-3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]non-3-ylcarbonyl]phenyl}-2-tricyclo[3.3.1.13,7]dec-1-ylacetamide hydrochloride (compound-22) are recently described P2X7 receptor antagonists. In this study we have further characterized these compounds to determine their mechanism of action and interaction with other species orthologues. Experimental approach: Antagonist effects at recombinant and chimeric P2X7 receptors were assessed by ethidium accumulation and radioligand-binding studies. Key results: AZ11645373 and compound-22 were confirmed as selective non-competitive antagonists of human or rat P2X7 receptors respectively. Both compounds were weak antagonists of the mouse and guinea-pig P2X7 receptors and, for each compound, their potency estimates at human and dog P2X7 receptors were similar. The potency of compound-22 was moderately temperature-dependent while that of AZ11645373 was not. The antagonist effects of both compounds were slowly reversible and were not prevented by decavanadate, suggesting that they were allosteric antagonists. Indeed, the compounds competed for binding sites labelled by an allosteric radio-labelled P2X7 receptor antagonist. The species selectivity of AZ11645373, but not compound-22, was influenced by the nature of the amino acid at position 95 of the P2X7 receptor. N2-(3,4-difluorophenyl)-N1-[2-methyl-5-(1-piperazinylmethyl)phenyl]glycinamide dihydrochloride, a positive allosteric modulator of the rat receptor, reduced the potency of compound-22 at the rat receptor but had little effect on the actions of AZ11645373. Conclusions: AZ11645373 and compound-22 are allosteric antagonists of human and rat P2X7 receptors respectively. The differential interaction of the two compounds with the receptor suggests there may be more than one allosteric regulatory site on the P2X7 receptor at which antagonists can bind and affect receptor function. PMID:19309360

  9. Activation of the ζ receptor 1 suppresses NMDA responses in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X-J; Liu, L-L; Jiang, S-X; Zhong, Y-M; Yang, X-L

    2011-03-17

    The sigma receptor 1 (σR1) has been shown to modulate the activity of several voltage- and ligand-gated channels. Using patch-clamp techniques in rat retinal slice preparations, we demonstrated that activation of σR1 by SKF10047 (SKF) or PRE-084 suppressed N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated current responses from both ON and OFF type ganglion cells (GCs), dose-dependently, and the effect could be blocked by the σR1 antagonist BD1047 or the σR antagonist haloperidol. The suppression by SKF of NMDA currents was abolished with pre-incubation of the G protein inhibitor GDP-β-S or the Gi/o activator mastoparan. We further explored the intracellular signaling pathway responsible for the SKF-induced suppression of NMDA responses. Application of either cAMP/the PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMP or cGMP/the PKG inhibitor KT5823 did not change the SKF-induced effect, suggesting the involvement of neither cAMP/PKA nor cGMP/PKG pathway. In contrast, suppression of NMDA responses by SKF was abolished by internal infusion of the phosphatidylinostiol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, but not by the phosphatidylcholine-PLC inhibitor D609. SKF-induced suppression of NMDA responses was dependent on intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), as evidenced by the fact that the effect was abolished when [Ca2+]i was buffered with 10 mM BAPTA. The SKF effect was blocked by xestospongin-C/heparin, IP3 receptor antagonists, but unchanged by ryanodine/caffeine, ryanodine receptor modulators. Furthermore, application of protein kinase C inhibitors Bis IV and Gö6976 eliminated the SKF effect. These results suggest that the suppression of NMDA responses of rat retinal GCs caused by the activation of σR1 may be mediated by a distinct [Ca2+]i-dependent PLC-PKC pathway. This effect of SKF could help ameliorate malfunction of GCs caused by excessive stimulation of NMDA receptors under pathological conditions.

  10. Design of novel neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists based on conformationally constrained aromatic amino acids and discovery of a potent chimeric opioid agonist-neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Ballet, Steven; Feytens, Debby; Buysse, Koen; Chung, Nga N.; Lemieux, Carole; Tumati, Suneeta; Keresztes, Attila; Van Duppen, Joost; Lai, Josephine; Varga, Eva; Porreca, Frank; Schiller, Peter W.; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Tourwé, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    A screening of conformationally constrained aromatic amino acids as base cores for the preparation of new NK1 receptor antagonists resulted in the discovery of three new NK1 receptor antagonists, 19 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NH-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn], 20 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NMe-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn] and 23 [Ac-Tic-NMe-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn], which were able to counteract the agonist effect of substance P, the endogenous ligand of NK1R. The most active NK1 antagonist of the series, 20 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NMe-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn], was then used in the design of a novel, potent chimeric opioid agonist-NK1 receptor antagonist, 35 [Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-NMe-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn], which combines the N-terminus of the established Dmt1-DALDA agonist opioid pharmacophore (H-Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2) and 20, the NK1R ligand. The opioid component of the chimeric compound 35, i.e. Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-NH2 36, also proved to be an extremely potent and balanced μ- and δ opioid receptor agonist with subnanomolar binding and in vitro functional activity. PMID:21413804

  11. Palliation of bone cancer pain by antagonists of platelet-activating factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Morita, Katsuya; Shiraishi, Seiji; Motoyama, Naoyo; Kitayama, Tomoya; Kanematsu, Takashi; Uezono, Yasuhito; Dohi, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Bone cancer pain is the most severe among cancer pain and is often resistant to current analgesics. Thus, the development of novel analgesics effective at treating bone cancer pain are desired. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonists were recently demonstrated to have effective pain relieving effects on neuropathic pain in several animal models. The present study examined the pain relieving effect of PAF receptor antagonists on bone cancer pain using the femur bone cancer (FBC) model in mice. Animals were injected with osteolytic NCTC2472 cells into the tibia, and subsequently the effects of PAF receptor antagonists on pain behaviors were evaluated. Chemical structurally different type of antagonists, TCV-309, BN 50739 and WEB 2086 ameliorated the allodynia and improved pain behaviors such as guarding behavior and limb-use abnormalities in FBC model mice. The pain relieving effects of these antagonists were achieved with low doses and were long lasting. Blockade of spinal PAF receptors by intrathecal injection of TCV-309 and WEB 2086 or knockdown of the expression of spinal PAF receptor protein by intrathecal transfer of PAF receptor siRNA also produced a pain relieving effect. The amount of an inducible PAF synthesis enzyme, lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 2 (LPCAT2) protein significantly increased in the spinal cord after transplantation of NCTC 2472 tumor cells into mouse tibia. The combination of morphine with PAF receptor antagonists develops marked enhancement of the analgesic effect against bone cancer pain without affecting morphine-induced constipation. Repeated administration of TCV-309 suppressed the appearance of pain behaviors and prolonged survival of FBC mice. The present results suggest that PAF receptor antagonists in combination with, or without, opioids may represent a new strategy for the treatment of persistent bone cancer pain and improve the quality of life of patients.

  12. The identification of a series of novel, soluble non-peptidic neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lunniss, Gillian E; Barnes, Ashley A; Barton, Nick; Biagetti, Matteo; Bianchi, Federica; Blowers, Stephen M; Caberlotto, Laura L; Emmons, Amanda; Holmes, Ian P; Montanari, Dino; Norris, Roz; Puckey, Gemma V; Walters, Dewi J; Watson, Steve P; Willis, John

    2010-12-15

    The identification and subsequent optimisation of a selective non-peptidic NPY Y2 antagonist series is described. This led to the development of amine 2, a selective, soluble NPY Y2 receptor antagonist with enhanced CNS exposure.

  13. Blockade of Cocaine or σ Receptor Agonist Self Administration by Subtype-Selective σ Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jonathan L; Hiranita, Takato; Kopajtic, Theresa A; Rice, Kenner C; Mesangeau, Christophe; Narayanan, Sanju; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2016-07-01

    The identification of sigma receptor (σR) subtypes has been based on radioligand binding and, despite progress with σ1R cellular function, less is known about σR subtype functions in vivo. Recent findings that cocaine self administration experience will trigger σR agonist self administration was used in this study to assess the in vivo receptor subtype specificity of the agonists (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride], and 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and several novel putative σR antagonists. Radioligand binding studies determined in vitro σR selectivity of the novel compounds, which were subsequently studied for self administration and antagonism of cocaine, (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084, or DTG self administration. Across the dose ranges studied, none of the novel compounds were self administered, nor did they alter cocaine self administration. All compounds blocked DTG self administration, with a subset also blocking (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084 self administration. The most selective of the compounds in binding σ1Rs blocked cocaine self administration when combined with a dopamine transport inhibitor, either methylphenidate or nomifensine. These drug combinations did not decrease rates of responding maintained by food reinforcement. In contrast, the most selective of the compounds in binding σ2Rs had no effect on cocaine self administration in combination with either dopamine transport inhibitor. Thus, these results identify subtype-specific in vivo antagonists, and the utility of σR agonist substitution for cocaine self administration as an assay capable of distinguishing σR subtype selectivity in vivo. These results further suggest that effectiveness of dual σR antagonism and dopamine transport inhibition in blocking cocaine self administration is specific for σ1Rs and further support this dual targeting approach to development of cocaine antagonists. U.S. Government work not protected by U

  14. Blockade of Cocaine or σ Receptor Agonist Self Administration by Subtype-Selective σ Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Kopajtic, Theresa A.; Rice, Kenner C.; Mesangeau, Christophe; Narayanan, Sanju; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H.; McCurdy, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of sigma receptor (σR) subtypes has been based on radioligand binding and, despite progress with σ1R cellular function, less is known about σR subtype functions in vivo. Recent findings that cocaine self administration experience will trigger σR agonist self administration was used in this study to assess the in vivo receptor subtype specificity of the agonists (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride], and 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and several novel putative σR antagonists. Radioligand binding studies determined in vitro σR selectivity of the novel compounds, which were subsequently studied for self administration and antagonism of cocaine, (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084, or DTG self administration. Across the dose ranges studied, none of the novel compounds were self administered, nor did they alter cocaine self administration. All compounds blocked DTG self administration, with a subset also blocking (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084 self administration. The most selective of the compounds in binding σ1Rs blocked cocaine self administration when combined with a dopamine transport inhibitor, either methylphenidate or nomifensine. These drug combinations did not decrease rates of responding maintained by food reinforcement. In contrast, the most selective of the compounds in binding σ2Rs had no effect on cocaine self administration in combination with either dopamine transport inhibitor. Thus, these results identify subtype-specific in vivo antagonists, and the utility of σR agonist substitution for cocaine self administration as an assay capable of distinguishing σR subtype selectivity in vivo. These results further suggest that effectiveness of dual σR antagonism and dopamine transport inhibition in blocking cocaine self administration is specific for σ1Rs and further support this dual targeting approach to development of cocaine antagonists. PMID:27189970

  15. Effects of sigma(1) receptor ligand MS-377 on D(2) antagonists-induced behaviors.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Shinji; Takagi, Kaori; Horikomi, Kazutoshi

    2002-10-01

    (R)-(+)-1-(4-Chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377) is a novel antipsychotic agent with selective and high affinity for sigma(1) receptor. The present study was carried out to clarify the interaction of MS-377 with dopamine D(2) receptor antagonists (D(2) antagonists) in concurrent administration, and then the involvement of sigma receptors in the interaction. The effects of MS-377 on haloperidol- or sultopride-induced inhibition of apomorphine-induced climbing behavior and catalepsy were investigated in mice and rats, respectively. In addition, the effects of (+)-SKF-10,047 and SA4503, both of which are sigma receptor agonists, and WAY-100,635, which is a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, on the interaction due to the concurrent use were also investigated. MS-377 potentiated the inhibitory effects of haloperidol or sultopride on apomorphine-induced climbing behavior in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, MS-377 did not affect the catalepsy induction by these drugs. The potentiation of the inhibitory effects of haloperidol or sultopride on apomorphine-induced climbing behavior by MS-377 was not inhibited by WAY-100,635, but was inhibited by (+)-SKF-10,047 and SA4503. These findings showed that MS-377 potentiates the efficacy of D(2) antagonists, but it does not deteriorate the adverse effect. Moreover, sigma(1) receptors are involved in this potentiation of the efficacy of D(2) antagonists by MS-377.

  16. Heterogeneity of binding of muscarinic receptor antagonists in rat brain homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1985-06-01

    The binding properties of (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate and (/sup 3/H) N-methylscopolamine to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have been investigated in rat brain homogenates. The binding of both antagonists demonstrated high affinity and saturability. Analysis of the binding data resulted in linear Scatchard plots. However, (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate showed a significantly higher maximal binding capacity than that of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine. Displacement of both ligands with several muscarinic receptor antagonists resulted in competition curves in accordance with the law of mass-action for quinuclidinyl benzilate, atropine and scopolamine. A similar profile was found for the quaternary ammonium analogs of atropine and scopolamine when (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine was used to label the receptors. However, when these hydrophilic antagonists were used to displace (-)-(/sup 3/H) quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, they showed interaction with high- and low-affinity binding sites. On the other hand, the nonclassical muscarinic receptor antagonist, pirenzepine, was able to displace both ligands from two binding sites. The present data are discussed in terms of the relationship of this anomalous heterogenity of binding of these hydrophilic muscarinic receptor antagonists and the proposed M1 and M2 receptor subtypes.

  17. Change in pharmacological effect of endothelin receptor antagonists in rats with pulmonary hypertension: Role of ETB-receptor expression levels

    PubMed Central

    Sauvageau, Stéphanie; Thorin, Eric; Villeneuve, Louis; Dupuis, Jocelyn

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The endothelin (ET) system is activated in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The therapeutic value of pharmacological blockade of ET receptors has been demonstrated in various animal models and led to the current approval and continued development of these drugs for the therapy of human PAH. However, we currently incompletely comprehend what local modifications of this system occur as a consequence of PAH, particularly in small resistance arteries, and how this could affect the pharmacological response to ET receptor antagonists with various selectivities for the receptor subtypes. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to evaluate potential modifications of the pharmacology of the ET system in rat pulmonary resistance arteries from monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension. Experimental approach ET-1 levels were quantified by ELISA. PreproET-1, ETA and ETB receptor mRNA expressions were quantified in pulmonary resistance arteries using Q-PCR, while protein expression was evaluated by Western blots. Reactivity to ET-1 of isolated pulmonary resistance arteries was measured in the presence of ETA (A-147627), ETB (A-192621) and dual ETA/B (bosentan) receptor antagonists. Key results In rats with PAH, plasma ET-1 increased (p < 0.001) while pulmonary levels were reduced (p < 0.05). In PAH arteries, preproET-1 (p < 0.05) and ETB receptor (p < 0.001) gene expressions were reduced, as were ETB receptor protein levels (p < 0.05). ET-1 induced similar vasoconstrictions in both groups. In arteries from sham animals, neither bosentan nor the ETA or the ETB receptor antagonists modified the response. In arteries from PAH rats, however, bosentan and the ETA receptor antagonist potently reduced the maximal contraction, while bosentan also reduced sensitivity (p < 0.01). Conclusions and implications The effectiveness of both selective ETA and dual ETA/B receptor antagonists is markedly increased in PAH. Down-regulation of

  18. Diphenyl ethers as androgen receptor antagonists for the topical suppression of sebum production.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Lorna H; Hu, Lain-Yen; Nguyen, Maria; Fakhoury, Stephen; Smith, Yvonne; Iula, Donna; Kostlan, Catherine; Carroll, Matthew; Dettling, Danielle; Du, Daniel; Pocalyko, David; Wade, Kimberly; Lefker, Bruce

    2009-04-15

    A series of diphenyl ethers was prepared and evaluated for androgen receptor antagonist activity in human androgen receptor binding and cellular functional assays. Analogs with potent in vitro activities were evaluated for topical in vivo efficacy in the Golden Syrian Hamster ear model. Several compounds showed reduction in wax esters in this validated animal model.

  19. SAR studies of novel 5-substituted 2-arylindoles as nonpeptidyl GnRH receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chu, L; Lo, J L; Yang, Y T; Cheng, K; Smith, R G; Fisher, M H; Wyvratt, M J; Goulet, M T

    2001-02-26

    The discovery of the potency-enhancing effect of 5-substitutions on the novel 2-arylindoles as nonpeptidyl GnRH receptor antagonists led to the identification of several analogues with high affinities on the GnRH receptor. The syntheses and SARs of these 5-substituted-2-arylindole analogues are reported.

  20. Functions of 5-HT2A receptor and its antagonists in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Takafumi; Rashid, Mamunur; Abul Muntasir, Habib; Komiyama, Tadazumi

    2004-10-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptors have conventionally been divided into seven subfamilies, most of which have several subtypes. Among them, 5-HT(2A) receptor is associated with the contraction of vascular smooth muscle, platelet aggregation and thrombus formation and coronary artery spasms. Accordingly, selective 5-HT(2A) antagonists may have potential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT(2A) antagonist, has been introduced clinically as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of ischemic diseases associated with thrombosis. Molecular modeling studies also suggest that sarpogrelate is a 5-HT(2A) selective antagonist and is likely to have pharmacological effects beneficial in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This review describes the above findings as well as the signaling linkages of the 5-HT(2A) receptors and the mode of agonist binding to 5-HT(2A) receptor using data derived from molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis.

  1. Anti free radical action of calcium antagonists and H1 and H2 receptors antagonists in neoplastic disease.

    PubMed

    della Rovere, F; Broccio, M; Granata, A; Zirilli, A; Brugnano, L; Artemisia, A; Broccio, G

    1996-01-01

    The blood of the subjects suffering from Neoplastic Disease (ND) shows phenomena of membrane peroxidation due to the presence of Free Radicals (FRs), in a quantity much greater than the one observed in the blood of healthy subjects. This can be detected either by calculating the time necessary for the formation of "Heinz bodies" (Hbs), (p < 0.00001) after oxidative stress of the blood in vitro with acetylphenylidrazine (APH), or by calculating the methemoglobin (metHb) quantity that forms after the same treatment (P < 0.00001). The statistical analyses we carried out showed that metHb formation was not affected by age, sex, smoking habits, red blood cell number, Hb, Ht or tumor staging. In this study, by using equal parameters of investigation, we noted that the blood of the subjects with ND who were previously treated with calcium-antagonists drugs and with antagonists of H1 and H2 receptors, gave results completely superimposable on the results obtained from healthy subjects, implying that the treatment had avoided the increase of FRs. Therefore we concluded that calcium-antagonists and the antagonists of the H1 and H2 receptors behave as antioxidant substances, having decreased the FRs damaging activity on the cellular membranes, thus controlling, although to a limited degree, the pejorative evolution of the disease. It is also important to remember that investigations into the ND, even possible screenings, must take into account the above said data, submitting the subjects under investigation to a pharmacological wash out, particularly with those substances which, are considered to be scavengers of FRs. Some of these substances are investigated in this work.

  2. In Silico Discovery of Androgen Receptor Antagonists with Activity in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Howard C.; Shanmugasundaram, Kumaran; Simon, Nicholas I.; Cai, Changmeng; Wang, Hongyun; Chen, Sen; Rigby, Alan C.

    2012-01-01

    Previously available androgen receptor (AR) antagonists (bicalutamide, flutamide, and nilutamide) have limited activity against AR in prostate cancers that relapse after castration [castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)]. However, recent AR competitive antagonists such as MDV3100, generated through chemical modifications to the current AR ligands, appear to have increased activity in CRPC and have novel mechanisms of action. Using pharmacophore models and a refined homology model of the antagonist-liganded AR ligand binding domain, we carried out in silico screens of small molecule libraries and report here on the identification of a series of structurally distinct nonsteroidal small molecule competitive AR antagonists. Despite their unique chemical architectures, compounds representing each of six chemotypes functioned in vitro as pure AR antagonists. Moreover, similarly to MDV3100 and in contrast to previous AR antagonists, these compounds all prevented AR binding to chromatin, consistent with each of the six chemotypes stabilizing a similar AR antagonist conformation. Additional studies with the lead chemotype (chemotype A) showed enhanced AR protein degradation, which was dependent on helix 12 in the AR ligand binding domain. Significantly, chemotype A compounds functioned as AR antagonists in vivo in normal male mice and suppressed AR activity and tumor cell proliferation in human CRPC xenografts. These data indicate that certain ligand-induced structural alterations in the AR ligand binding domain may both impair AR chromatin binding and enhance AR degradation and support continued efforts to develop AR antagonists with unique mechanisms of action and efficacy in CRPC. PMID:23023563

  3. In silico discovery of androgen receptor antagonists with activity in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Howard C; Shanmugasundaram, Kumaran; Simon, Nicholas I; Cai, Changmeng; Wang, Hongyun; Chen, Sen; Balk, Steven P; Rigby, Alan C

    2012-11-01

    Previously available androgen receptor (AR) antagonists (bicalutamide, flutamide, and nilutamide) have limited activity against AR in prostate cancers that relapse after castration [castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)]. However, recent AR competitive antagonists such as MDV3100, generated through chemical modifications to the current AR ligands, appear to have increased activity in CRPC and have novel mechanisms of action. Using pharmacophore models and a refined homology model of the antagonist-liganded AR ligand binding domain, we carried out in silico screens of small molecule libraries and report here on the identification of a series of structurally distinct nonsteroidal small molecule competitive AR antagonists. Despite their unique chemical architectures, compounds representing each of six chemotypes functioned in vitro as pure AR antagonists. Moreover, similarly to MDV3100 and in contrast to previous AR antagonists, these compounds all prevented AR binding to chromatin, consistent with each of the six chemotypes stabilizing a similar AR antagonist conformation. Additional studies with the lead chemotype (chemotype A) showed enhanced AR protein degradation, which was dependent on helix 12 in the AR ligand binding domain. Significantly, chemotype A compounds functioned as AR antagonists in vivo in normal male mice and suppressed AR activity and tumor cell proliferation in human CRPC xenografts. These data indicate that certain ligand-induced structural alterations in the AR ligand binding domain may both impair AR chromatin binding and enhance AR degradation and support continued efforts to develop AR antagonists with unique mechanisms of action and efficacy in CRPC.

  4. The pharmacological properties of a novel MCH1 receptor antagonist isolated from combinatorial libraries

    PubMed Central

    Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Chung, Shinjae; Dooley, Colette T.; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Chunying; Saito, Yumiko; Clark, Stewart D; Houghten, Richard A.; Civelli, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a neuropeptide that exhibits potent orexigenic activity. In rodents, it exerts its actions by interacting with one receptor, MCH1 receptor which is expressed in many parts of the central nervous system (CNS). To study the physiological implications of the MCH system, we need to be able to block it locally and acutely. This necessitates the use of MCH1 receptor antagonists. While MCH1 receptor antagonists have been previously reported, they are mainly not accessible to academic research. We apply here a strategy that leads to the isolation of a high affinity and selective MCH1 receptor antagonist amenable to in vivo analyses without further chemical modifications. This antagonist, TPI 1361-17, was identified through the screening of multiple non-peptide positional scanning synthetic combinatorial libraries (PS-SCL) totaling more than eight hundred thousand compounds in conditions that allow for the identification of only high-affinity compounds. TPI 1361-17 exhibited an IC50 value of 6.1 nM for inhibition of 1 nM MCH-induced Ca2+ mobilization and completely displaced the binding of [125I] MCH to rat MCH1 receptor. TPI 1361-17 was found specific, having no affinity for a variety of other G-protein coupled receptors and channels. TPI 1361-17 was found active in vivo since it blocked MCH-induced food intake by 75 %. Our results indicate that TPI 1361-17 is a novel and selective MCH1 receptor antagonist and is an effective tool to study the physiological functions of the MCH system. These results also illustrate the successful application of combinatorial library screening to identify specific surrogate antagonists in an academic setting. PMID:19041642

  5. 3,4-Disubstituted indole acylsulfonamides: a novel series of potent and selective human EP3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nian; Zeller, Wayne; Krohn, Michael; Anderson, Herb; Zhang, Jun; Onua, Emmanuel; Kiselyov, Alex S; Ramirez, Jose; Halldorsdottir, Gułrún; Andrésson, Thornorkell; Gurney, Mark E; Singh, Jasbir

    2009-01-01

    A series of potent and selective EP(3) receptor antagonists are described. Utilizing a pharmacophore model developed for the EP(3) receptor, a series of 3,4-disubstituted indoles were shown to be high affinity ligands for this target. These compounds showed high selectivity over IP, FP and other EP receptors and are potent antagonists in functional assays.

  6. Identification of Receptor Ligands and Receptor Subtypes Using Antagonists in a Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Cell Biosensor Separation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Harvey A.; Orwar, Owe; Scheller, Richard H.; Zare, Richard N.

    1995-08-01

    A capillary electrophoresis system with single-cell biosensors as a detector has been used to separate and identify ligands in complex biological samples. The power of this procedure was significantly increased by introducing antagonists that inhibited the cellular response from selected ligand-receptor interactions. The single-cell biosensor was based on the ligand-receptor binding and G-protein-mediated signal transduction pathways in PC12 and NG108-15 cell lines. Receptor activation was measured as increases in cytosolic free calcium ion concentration by using fluorescence microscopy with the intracellular calcium ion indicator fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester. Specifically, a mixture of bradykinin (BK) and acetylcholine (ACh) was fractionated and the components were identified by inhibiting the cellular response with icatibant (HOE 140), a selective antagonist to the BK B_2 receptor subtype (B_2BK), and atropine, an antagonist to muscarinic ACh receptor subtypes. Structurally related forms of BK were also identified based on inhibiting B_2BK receptors. Applications of this technique include identification of endogenous BK in a lysate of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep G2) and screening for bioactivity of BK degradation products in human blood plasma. The data demonstrate that the use of antagonists with a single-cell biosensor separation system aids identification of separated components and receptor subtypes.

  7. 5-HT2B Receptor Antagonists Inhibit Fibrosis and Protect from RV Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Wiebke; Schymura, Yves; Novoyatleva, Tatyana; Luitel, Himal; Tretyn, Aleksandra; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai; Weissmann, Norbert; Seeger, Werner; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Schermuly, Ralph Theo

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The serotonin (5-HT) pathway was shown to play a role in pulmonary hypertension (PH), but its functions in right ventricular failure (RVF) remain poorly understood. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of Terguride (5-HT2A and 2B receptor antagonist) or SB204741 (5-HT2B receptor antagonist) on right heart function and structure upon pulmonary artery banding (PAB) in mice. Methods. Seven days after PAB, mice were treated for 14 days with Terguride (0.2 mg/kg bid) or SB204741 (5 mg/kg day). Right heart function and remodeling were assessed by right heart catheterization, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and histomorphometric methods. Total secreted collagen content was determined in mouse cardiac fibroblasts isolated from RV tissues. Results. Chronic treatment with Terguride or SB204741 reduced right ventricular fibrosis and showed improved heart function in mice after PAB. Moreover, 5-HT2B receptor antagonists diminished TGF-beta1 induced collagen synthesis of RV cardiac fibroblasts in vitro. Conclusion. 5-HT2B receptor antagonists reduce collagen deposition, thereby inhibiting right ventricular fibrosis. Chronic treatment prevented the development and progression of pressure overload-induced RVF in mice. Thus, 5-HT2B receptor antagonists represent a valuable novel therapeutic approach for RVF. PMID:25667920

  8. Muscarinic receptor antagonists, from folklore to pharmacology; finding drugs that actually work in asthma and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Bart C; Fryer, Allison D

    2011-01-01

    In the lungs, parasympathetic nerves provide the dominant control of airway smooth muscle with release of acetylcholine onto M3 muscarinic receptors. Treatment of airway disease with anticholinergic drugs that block muscarinic receptors began over 2000 years ago. Pharmacologic data all indicated that antimuscarinic drugs should be highly effective in asthma but clinical results were mixed. Thus, with the discovery of effective β-adrenergic receptor agonists the use of muscarinic antagonists declined. Lack of effectiveness of muscarinic antagonists is due to a variety of factors including unwanted side effects (ranging from dry mouth to coma) and the discovery of additional muscarinic receptor subtypes in the lungs with sometimes competing effects. Perhaps the most important problem is ineffective dosing due to poorly understood differences between routes of administration and no effective way of testing whether antagonists block receptors stimulated physiologically by acetylcholine. Newer muscarinic receptor antagonists are being developed that address the problems of side effects and receptor selectivity that appear to be quite promising in the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Respiratory Pharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-1 PMID:21198547

  9. Coptis extracts enhance the anticancer effect of estrogen receptor antagonists on human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; He, Chengwei; Zhou, Keyuan; Wang, Jingdong; Kang, Jing X

    2009-01-09

    Estrogen receptor (ER) antagonists have been widely used for breast cancer treatment, but the efficacy and drug resistance remain to be clinical concerns. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extracts of coptis, an anti-inflammatory herb, improve the anticancer efficacy of ER antagonists. The results showed that the combined treatment of ER antagonists and the crude extract of coptis or its purified compound berberine conferred synergistic growth inhibitory effect on MCF-7 cells (ER+), but not on MDA-MB-231 cells (ER-). Similar results were observed in the combined treatment of fulvestrant, a specific aromatase antagonist. Analysis of the expression of breast cancer related genes indicated that EGFR, HER2, bcl-2, and COX-2 were significantly downregulated, while IFN-beta and p21 were remarkably upregulated by berberine. Our results suggest that coptis extracts could be promising adjuvant to ER antagonists in ER positive breast cancer treatment through regulating expression of multiple genes.

  10. Design and synthesis of peripherally restricted transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Nuria; Liao, Hongyu; Stec, Markian M; Wang, Xianghong; Chakrabarti, Partha; Retz, Dan; Doherty, Elizabeth M; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Tamir, Rami; Bannon, Anthony W; Gavva, Narender R; Norman, Mark H

    2008-05-08

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel antagonists may have clinical utility for the treatment of chronic nociceptive and neuropathic pain. We recently advanced a TRPV1 antagonist, 3 (AMG 517), into clinical trials as a new therapy for the treatment of pain. However, in addition to the desired analgesic effects, this TRPV1 antagonist significantly increased body core temperature following oral administration in rodents. Here, we report one of our approaches to eliminate or minimize the on-target hyperthermic effect observed with this and other TRPV1 antagonists. Through modifications of our clinical candidate, 3 a series of potent and peripherally restricted TRPV1 antagonists have been prepared. These analogues demonstrated on-target coverage in vivo but caused increases in body core temperature, suggesting that peripheral restriction was not sufficient to separate antagonism mediated antihyperalgesia from hyperthermia. Furthermore, these studies demonstrate that the site of action for TRPV1 blockade elicited hyperthermia is outside the blood-brain barrier.

  11. Combining the α1-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist, Prazosin, with the β-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist, Propranolol, Reduces Alcohol Drinking More Effectively Than Either Drug Alone

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Dennis D; Beckwith, Lauren E; Kincaid, Carrie L; Froehlich, Janice C

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that activation of the noradrenergic system may contribute to alcohol drinking in animals and humans. Our previous studies demonstrated that blocking α1-adrenergic receptors with the antagonist, prazosin, decreased alcohol drinking in rats under various conditions. Since noradrenergic activation is also regulated by β-adrenergic receptors, we now examine the effects of the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol, alone or in combination with prazosin, on alcohol drinking in rats selectively bred for high voluntary alcohol intake and alcohol preference (P line). Methods Two studies were conducted with male P rats. In study one, rats were allowed to become alcohol-dependent during 14 weeks of ad libitum access to food, water and 20% alcohol and the effect of propranolol (5–15 mg/kg, IP) and prazosin (1–2 mg/kg, IP) on alcohol intake during withdrawal were assessed. In study two, the effect of propranolol (5 mg/kg, IP) and prazosin (2 mg/kg, IP) on alcohol intake following prolonged imposed abstinence was assessed. Results Alcohol drinking following propranolol treatment was variable, but the combination of propranolol + prazosin consistently suppressed alcohol drinking during both alcohol withdrawal and following prolonged imposed abstinence, and the combination of these two drugs was more effective than was treatment with either drug alone. Conclusions Treatment with prazosin + propranolol, or a combination of other centrally active α1- and β-adrenergic receptor antagonists, may assist in preventing alcohol relapse in some individuals. PMID:24891220

  12. Diisothiocyanate derivatives as potent, insurmountable antagonists of P2Y6 nucleotide receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mamedova, Liaman K.; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; von Kügelgen, Ivar; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The physiological role of the P2Y6 nucleotide receptor may involve cardiovascular, immune and digestive functions based on the receptor tissue distribution, and selective antagonists for this receptor are lacking. We have synthesized a series of symmetric aryl diisothiocyanate derivatives and examined their ability to inhibit phospholipase C (PLC) activity induced by activation of five subtypes of recombinant P2Y receptors. Several derivatives were more potent at inhibiting action of UDP at both human and rat P2Y6 receptors expressed in 1321N1 human astrocytes than activation of human P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4 and P2Y11 receptors. The inhibition by diisothiocyanate derivatives of 1,2-diphenylethane (MRS2567) and 1,4-di-(phenylthioureido) butane (MRS2578) was concentration-dependent and insurmountable, with IC50 values of 126 ± 15 nM and 37 ± 16 nM (human) and 101 ± 27 nM (rat), respectively. A derivative of 1,4-phenylendiisothiocyanate (MRS2575) inhibited only human but not rat P2Y6 receptor activity. MRS2567 and MRS2578 at 10 μM did not affect the UTP (100 nM)-induced responses of cells expressing P2Y2 and P2Y4 receptors, nor did they affect the 2-methylthio-ADP (30 nM)-induced responses at the P2Y1 receptor or the ATP (10 μM)-induced responses at the P2Y11 receptor. Other antagonists displayed mixed selectivities. The selective antagonists MRS2567, MRS2575 and MRS2578 (1 μM) completely blocked the protection by UDP of cells undergoing TNFα-induced apoptosis. Thus, we have identified potent, insurmountable antagonists of P2Y6 receptors that are selective within the family of PLC-coupled P2Y receptors. PMID:15081875

  13. Molecular modeling of histamine H3 receptor and QSAR studies on arylbenzofuran derived H3 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Ghafourian, Taravat; Hamzeiy, Hossain

    2008-01-01

    Histamine H3 receptors are presynaptic autoreceptors found in both central and peripheral nervous systems of many species. The central effects of these receptors suggest a potential therapeutic role for their antagonists in treatment of several neurological disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The purpose of this study was to identify the structural requirements for H3 antagonistic activity via quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies and receptor modeling/docking techniques. A combination of partial least squares (PLS) and genetic algorithm (GA) was used in the QSAR approach to select the structural descriptors relevant to the receptor binding affinity of a series of 58 H3 antagonists. The descriptors were selected out of a pool of >1000 descriptors calculated by DRAGON, Hyperchem and ACD labs suite of programs. The resulting QSAR models for rat and human H3 binding affinities were validated using different strategies. QSAR models generated in the current work suggested the role of charge transfer interactions in the ligand-receptor interaction verified using the molecular modeling of the receptor and docking two antagonists to the binding site. The 3D model of human H3 receptor was built based on bovine rhodopsin structure and evaluated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in a mixed water-vacuum-water environment. The results were indicative of the stability of the model relating the observed structural changes during the MD simulation to the suggested ligand-receptor interactions. The results of this investigation are expected to be useful in the process of design and development of new potent H3 receptor antagonists.

  14. Medicinal chemistry of P2X receptors: agonists and orthosteric antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lambertucci, Catia; Dal Ben, Diego; Buccioni, Michela; Marucci, Gabriella; Thomas, Ajiroghene; Volpini, Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have highlighted data reported in the literature trying to draw a complete picture of the structures and biological activity of agonists and orthosteric antagonists of P2X receptors. Actually, only few P2X receptor agonists have been found and most of them are derived from modification of the natural ligand ATP and they are P2X receptor subtype unselective. In particular, BzATP (9) is one of the most potent P2X receptor agonists with EC50 value in the nanomolar range at some subtypes. Differently from agonists, P2X receptor antagonists belong to different chemical classes such as high molecular weight aryl polysulfonate molecules like suramin and its simplified derivatives and anthraquinone compounds. All these molecules proved to be non selective at P2X receptors, and they are endowed with micromolar activity and not favourable pharmacokinetic properties due to the presence of several charged groups. Also modification of the natural ligand ATP led to the discovery of P2X receptor antagonists like TNP-ATP (29), which, although not selective, showed high potency at P2X1, P2X3 (IC50 of 0.006 µM and 0.001 µM, respectively), and heteromeric P2X2/3 receptors. Also the dinucleotide inosine polyphosphate Ip5I (33) was found to be a potent and selective antagonist at P2X1 vs P2X3 receptors with IC50 = 0.003 µM. A significant improvement has been gained from the interest of pharmaceutical companies that in the last years discovered, through the use of high-throughput screening, potent and selective antagonists endowed with novel structures, some of which are currently in clinical trials for several therapeutic applications.

  15. N-Arylpiperazine-1-carboxamide derivatives: a novel series of orally active nonsteroidal androgen receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kinoyama, Isao; Taniguchi, Nobuaki; Kawaminami, Eiji; Nozawa, Eisuke; Koutoku, Hiroshi; Furutani, Takashi; Kudoh, Masafumi; Okada, Minoru

    2005-04-01

    A novel series of N-arylpiperazine-1-carboxamide derivatives was synthesized and their androgen receptor (AR) antagonist activities and in vivo antiandrogenic properties were evaluated. Reporter assays indicated that trans-2,5-dimethylpiperazine derivatives are potent AR antagonists, and in this series trans-N-4-[4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-N-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-2,5-dimethylpiperazine-1-carboxamide (18 g, YM-175735) exhibited the most potent antiandrogenic activity. Compared to bicalutamide, YM-175735 is an approximately 4-fold stronger AR antagonist and has slightly increased antiandrogenic activity, suggesting that YM-175735 may be useful in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  16. Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists as Antitumor Drugs in Gastrointestinal Cancer: A New Approach

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Miguel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer is the term for a group of cancers affecting the digestive system. After binding to the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor, the undecapeptide substance P (SP) regulates GI cancer cell proliferation and migration for invasion and metastasis, and controls endothelial cell proliferation for angiogenesis. SP also exerts an antiapoptotic effect. Both SP and the NK-1 receptor are located in GI tumor cells, the NK-1 receptor being overexpressed. By contrast, after binding to the NK-1 receptor, NK-1 receptor antagonists elicit the inhibition (epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition) of the proliferation of GI cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner, induce the death of GI cancer cells by apoptosis, counteract the Warburg effect, inhibit cancer cell migration (counteracting invasion and metastasis), and inhibit angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition). NK-1 receptor antagonists are safe and well tolerated. Thus, the NK-1 receptor could be considered as a new target in GI cancer and NK-1 receptor antagonists (eg, aprepitant) could be a new promising approach for the treatment of GI cancer. PMID:27488320

  17. Antagonist-perturbation mechanism for activation function-2 fixed motifs: active conformation and docking mode of retinoid X receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Motonori

    2017-06-01

    HX531, which contains a dibenzodiazepine skeleton, is one of the first retinoid X receptor (RXR) antagonists. Functioning via RXR-PPARγ heterodimer, this compound is receiving a lot of attention as a therapeutic drug candidate for diabetic disease controlling differentiation of adipose tissue. However, the active conformation of HX531 for RXRs is not well established. In the present study, quantum mechanics calculations and molecular mechanical docking simulations were carried out to precisely study the docking mode of HX531 with the human RXRα ligand-binding domain, as well as to provide a new approach to drug design using a structure-based perspective. It was suggested that HX531, which has the R configuration for the bent dibenzodiazepine plane together with the equatorial configuration for the N-methyl group attached to the nitrogen atom in the seven-membered diazepine ring, is a typical activation function-2 (AF-2) fixed motif perturbation type antagonist, which destabilizes the formation of AF-2 fixed motifs. On the other hand, the docking simulations supported the experimental result that LG100754 is an RXR homodimer antagonist and an RXR heterodimer agonist.

  18. Antagonist-perturbation mechanism for activation function-2 fixed motifs: active conformation and docking mode of retinoid X receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Motonori

    2017-06-01

    HX531, which contains a dibenzodiazepine skeleton, is one of the first retinoid X receptor (RXR) antagonists. Functioning via RXR-PPARγ heterodimer, this compound is receiving a lot of attention as a therapeutic drug candidate for diabetic disease controlling differentiation of adipose tissue. However, the active conformation of HX531 for RXRs is not well established. In the present study, quantum mechanics calculations and molecular mechanical docking simulations were carried out to precisely study the docking mode of HX531 with the human RXRα ligand-binding domain, as well as to provide a new approach to drug design using a structure-based perspective. It was suggested that HX531, which has the R configuration for the bent dibenzodiazepine plane together with the equatorial configuration for the N-methyl group attached to the nitrogen atom in the seven-membered diazepine ring, is a typical activation function-2 (AF-2) fixed motif perturbation type antagonist, which destabilizes the formation of AF-2 fixed motifs. On the other hand, the docking simulations supported the experimental result that LG100754 is an RXR homodimer antagonist and an RXR heterodimer agonist.

  19. Bismuth increases hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity of histamine H2-receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kirkova, Margarita; Alexandrova, Albena; Yordanova, Neli

    2006-01-01

    The effects of histamine H2-receptor antagonists, alone or in a combination with bismuth, on *OH-provoked degradation of deoxyribose were studied. The histamine H2-receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine and roxatidine), themselves decreased the deoxyribose damage in Fenton-type systems. In combinations with bismuth, their inhibitory effect in Fenton system (Fe(III)/ascorbic acid + H2O2 was stronger. Moreover, unlike F(III) and Cu(II), which in the presence of ascorbic acid + H2O2 led to an increase in the *OH formation (deoxyribose damage), Bi(III) showed an opposite effect. The present results are interpreted in view of a better ( )OH scavenging activity of bismuth complexes of histamine H2-receptor antagonists as compared to that of the corresponding drugs. These findings might be one more explanation why bismuth salts, in combination with acid-reducing agents, are more effective anti-ulcer agents.

  20. Immunopharmacological role of the leukotriene receptor antagonists and inhibitors of leukotrienes generating enzymes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mirshafiey, Abbas; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad

    2010-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that involves central nervous system, and is generally associated with demyelination and axonal lesion. The effective factors for initiation of the inflammatory responses have not been known precisely so far. Leukotrienes (LTs) are inflammatory mediators with increased levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients and in experimental models of multiple sclerosis. Inhibition of LT receptors with specific antagonists can decrease inflammatory responses. In this review article we try to clarify the role of LT receptor antagonists and also inhibitors of enzymes which are involved in LTs generating pathway for treating multiple sclerosis as new targets for MS therapy. Moreover, we suggest that blockage of LT receptors by potent specific antagonists and/or agonists can be as a novel useful method in treatment of MS.

  1. Optimizing subcutaneous injection of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor antagonist degarelix.

    PubMed

    Barkin, Jack; Burton, Shelley; Lambert, Carole

    2016-02-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor antagonist degarelix has several unique characteristics compared to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs used in the management of prostate cancer. Notable differences of GnRH receptor antagonists include no flare reaction, and a more rapid suppression of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) compared to LHRH analogs. Despite emerging evidence supporting the use of GnRH receptor antagonists over the more widely used LHRH analogs in the management of prostate cancer, physicians may be reluctant to prescribe degarelix. They may be concerned about patient complaints about injection-site reactions (ISRs). The subcutaneous injection of degarelix has been associated with a higher rate of ISRs compared with the intramuscular injections of LHRH analogs. This "How I Do It" article describes techniques and strategies that have been developed by physicians and nurses to reduce the discomfort associated with the subcutaneous delivery of degarelix.

  2. [Selective disturbance of associative memory reactivation by serotonin or NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists in snail].

    PubMed

    Solntseva, S V; Nikitin, V P

    2007-10-01

    Effects of serotonin or glutamate receptors antagonists on reactivation of food aversion conditioning were studied in snail Helix lucorum. Metiotepin (nonselective serotonin receptor antagonist, 0.1 mg/snail) or MK-801 (NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist, 0.005 mg/snail) were injected 24 hours after 3 days of food aversion conditioning, then reminding stimulus (banana, "conditioned" food) was presented and food aversion conditioning was tested. Long-term impairing (more then 2 weeks) of food aversion conditioning was found 3 hours after concurrent reminding and inhibitors injection. Injection of receptor antagonists without reminding stimulus did not influence on food aversion conditioning retrieval. Besides, in snails with amnesia after metiotepin/reminder, facilitation of repeated elaboration aversion conditioning on banana is revealed. The repeated training of snails with amnesia caused by MK-801/reminder did not result in food aversion conditioning. It is was suggested that 5-HT5,6,7 serotonin receptors are involved in mechanisms of memory "trace" extraction of food aversion conditioning, whereas NMDA glutamate receptor - in processes of its storage in snail.

  3. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Ian R.; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L.; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Sayers, Jon R.; Ross, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days. In conclusion: we provide proof of concept that a fusion of GHR antagonist to its binding protein generates a long acting GHR antagonist and we confirmed that introducing the W104A amino acid change in the GH binding domain enhances antagonist activity. PMID:27731358

  4. Kinetic properties of "dual" orexin receptor antagonists at OX1R and OX2R orexin receptors.

    PubMed

    Callander, Gabrielle E; Olorunda, Morenike; Monna, Dominique; Schuepbach, Edi; Langenegger, Daniel; Betschart, Claudia; Hintermann, Samuel; Behnke, Dirk; Cotesta, Simona; Fendt, Markus; Laue, Grit; Ofner, Silvio; Briard, Emmanuelle; Gee, Christine E; Jacobson, Laura H; Hoyer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Orexin receptor antagonists represent attractive targets for the development of drugs for the treatment of insomnia. Both efficacy and safety are crucial in clinical settings and thorough investigations of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics can predict contributing factors such as duration of action and undesirable effects. To this end, we studied the interactions between various "dual" orexin receptor antagonists and the orexin receptors, OX1R and OX2R, over time using saturation and competition radioligand binding with [(3)H]-BBAC ((S)-N-([1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl)-1-(2-((1-methyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)thio)acetyl)pyrrolidine-2-carboxamide). In addition, the kinetics of these compounds were investigated in cells expressing human, mouse and rat OX1R and OX2R using FLIPR® assays for calcium accumulation. We demonstrate that almorexant reaches equilibrium very slowly at OX2R, whereas SB-649868, suvorexant, and filorexant may take hours to reach steady state at both orexin receptors. By contrast, compounds such as BBAC or the selective OX2R antagonist IPSU ((2-((1H-Indol-3-yl)methyl)-9-(4-methoxypyrimidin-2-yl)-2,9-diazaspiro[5.5]undecan-1-one) bind rapidly and reach equilibrium very quickly in binding and/or functional assays. Overall, the "dual" antagonists tested here tend to be rather unselective under non-equilibrium conditions and reach equilibrium very slowly. Once equilibrium is reached, each ligand demonstrates a selectivity profile that is however, distinct from the non-equilibrium condition. The slow kinetics of the "dual" antagonists tested suggest that in vitro receptor occupancy may be longer lasting than would be predicted. This raises questions as to whether pharmacokinetic studies measuring plasma or brain levels of these antagonists are accurate reflections of receptor occupancy in vivo.

  5. Preclinical pharmacology of bilastine, a new selective histamine H1 receptor antagonist: receptor selectivity and in vitro antihistaminic activity.

    PubMed

    Corcóstegui, Reyes; Labeaga, Luis; Innerárity, Ana; Berisa, Agustin; Orjales, Aurelio

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to establish the receptor selectivity and antihistaminic activity of bilastine, a new selective antihistamine receptor antagonist. In vitro experiments were conducted using a receptor binding screening panel and guinea-pig and rat tissues. Antihistaminic activity was determined using H1 receptor binding studies and in vitro H1 antagonism studies conducted in guinea-pig tissues and human cell lines. Receptor selectivity was established using a receptor binding screening panel and a receptor antagonism screening conducted in guinea-pig, rat and rabbit tissues. Inhibition of inflammatory mediators was determined through the Schultz-Dale reaction in sensitised guinea-pig ileum. Bilastine binds to histamine H1-receptors as indicated by its displacement of [3H]-pyrilamine from H1-receptors expressed in guinea-pig cerebellum and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines. The studies conducted on guinea-pig smooth muscle demonstrated the capability of bilastine to antagonise H1-receptors. Bilastine is selective for histamine H1-receptors as shown in receptor-binding screening conducted to determine the binding capacity of bilastine to 30 different receptors. The specificity of its H1-receptor antagonistic activity was also demonstrated in a series of in vitro experiments conducted on guinea-pig and rat tissues. The results of these studies confirmed the lack of significant antagonism against serotonin, bradykinin, leukotriene D4, calcium, muscarinic M3-receptors, alpha1-adrenoceptors, beta2-adrenoceptors, and H2- and H3-receptors. The results of the in vitro Schultz-Dale reaction demonstrated that bilastine also has anti-inflammatory activity. These preclinical studies provide evidence that bilastine has H1- antihistamine activity, with high specificity for H1-receptors, and poor or no affinity for other receptors. Bilastine has also been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties.

  6. First and second generation H₁ histamine receptor antagonists produce different sleep-inducing profiles in rats.

    PubMed

    Unno, Katsuya; Ozaki, Tomoya; Mohammad, Shahid; Tsuno, Saki; Ikeda-Sagara, Masami; Honda, Kazuki; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2012-05-15

    First generation H₁ histamine receptor antagonists, such as d-chlorpheniramine (d-CPA) and diphenhydramine, produce drowsiness in humans. They are currently used as over-the-counter sleep aids. However, the mechanisms underlying drowsiness induced by these H₁ histamine receptor antagonists remain obscure because they produce heterogeneous receptor-independent actions. Ketotifen is a second generation H₁ histamine receptor antagonist which is more permeable to the brain than newer H₁ histamine receptor antagonists. Therefore, to access sleep-inducing profiles by H₁ histamine receptor blocking actions, the present study compared the dose-dependent effects of diphenhydramine and ketotifen (1-40 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection at dark onset time) on daily sleep-wake patterns in rats. Ketotifen dose-dependently decreased rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep and increased non-REM sleep by amplifying slow-wave electroencephalogram powers. Diphenhydramine at 4 mg/kg transiently increased non-REM sleep and reduced REM sleep similar to the effects of ketotifen. The larger injections of diphenhydramine (10-40 mg/kg), however, reduced non-REM sleep, abolished slow-wave enhancements and facilitated wakefulness. The bi-directional action of diphenhydramine on sleep is similar to our former results using d-CPA. Taken together, the arousal effects caused by over-dose administrations of the first generation H₁ histamine receptor antagonists may be mediated by H₁ histamine receptor-independent actions. To further examine the tolerance of ketotifen-induced sleep, 3 mg/kg ketotifen was injected daily for 5 days 3 h before light onset time. These experiments consistently enhanced non-REM-sleep at the end of the active phase of rats, suggesting that ketotifen may function as a desirable sleep aid although the coincidental REM sleep reduction requires attention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of PCS1055, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Croy, Carrie H; Chan, Wai Y; Castetter, Andrea M; Watt, Marla L; Quets, Anne T; Felder, Christian C

    2016-07-05

    Identification of synthetic ligands selective for muscarinic receptor subtypes has been challenging due to the high sequence identity and structural homology among the five muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Here, we report the pharmacological characterization of PCS1055, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist. PCS1055 inhibited radioligand [(3)H]-NMS binding to the M4 receptor with a Ki=6.5nM. Though the potency of PCS1055 is lower than that of pan-muscarinic antagonist atropine, it has better subtype selectivity over previously reported M4-selective reagents such as the muscarinic-peptide toxins (Karlsson et al., 1994; Santiago and Potter, 2001a) at the M1 subtype, and benzoxazine ligand PD102807 at the M3-subtype (Bohme et al., 2002). A detailed head-to-head comparison study using [(3)H]-NMS competitive binding assays characterizes the selectivity profiles of PCS1055 to that of other potent muscarinic-antagonist compounds PD102807, tropicamide, AF-DX-384, pirenzapine, and atropine. In addition to binding studies, the subtype specificity of PCS1055 is also demonstrated by functional receptor activation as readout by GTP-γ-[(35)S] binding. These GTP-γ-[(35)S] binding studies showed that PCS1055 exhibited 255-, 69.1-, 342- and >1000-fold greater inhibition of Oxo-M activity at the M4 versus the M1-, M2(-), M3-or M5 receptor subtypes, respectively. Schild analyses indicates that PCS1055 acts as a competitive antagonist to muscarinic M4 receptor, and confirms the affinity of the ligand to be low nanomolar, Kb=5.72nM. Therefore, PCS1055 represents a new M4-preferring antagonist that may be useful in elucidating the roles of M4 receptor signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Topical interleukin-1 receptor antagonist inhibits inflammatory cell infiltration into the cornea.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, W Michael; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Medeiros, Fabricio W; Mohan, Rajiv R; Sinha, Sunilima; Wilson, Steven E

    2008-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-1alpha and beta are important modulators of many functions of corneal epithelial and stromal cells that occur following injury to the cornea, including the influx of bone marrow-derived inflammatory cells into the stroma attracted by chemokines released from the stroma and epithelium. In this study, we examined the effect of topical soluble IL-1 receptor antagonist on bone marrow-derived cell influx following corneal epithelial scrape injury in a mouse model. C57BL/6 mice underwent corneal epithelial scrape followed by application of IL-1 receptor antagonist (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA) at a concentration of 20 mg/ml or vehicle for 24 h prior to immunocytochemical detection of marker CD11b-positive cells into the stroma. In two experiments, topical IL-1 receptor antagonist had a marked effect in blocking cell influx. For example, in experiment 1, topical IL-1 receptor antagonist markedly reduced detectible CD11b-positive cells into the corneal stroma at 24h after epithelial injury compared with the vehicle control (3.5+/-0.5 (standard error of the mean) cells/400x field and 13.9+/-1.2 cells/400x field, respectively, p<0.01). A second experiment with a different observer performing cell counting had the same result. Thus, the data demonstrate conclusively that topical IL-1 receptor antagonist markedly down-regulates CD-11b-positive monocytic cell appearance in the corneal stroma. Topical IL-1 receptor antagonist could be an effective adjuvant for clinical treatment of corneal conditions in which unwanted inflammation has a role in the pathophysiology of the disorder.

  9. Tranylcypromine Substituted cis-Hydroxycyclobutylnaphthamides as Potent and Selective Dopamine D3 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a class of potent and selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonists based upon tranylcypromine. Although tranylcypromine has a low affinity for the rat D3 receptor (Ki = 12.8 μM), our efforts have yielded (1R,2S)-11 (CJ-1882), which has Ki values of 2.7 and 2.8 nM at the rat and human dopamine D3 receptors, respectively, and displays respective selectivities of >10000-fold and 223-fold over the rat and human D2 receptors. Evaluation in a β-arrestin functional assay showed that (1R,2S)-11 is a potent and competitive antagonist at the human D3 receptor. PMID:24848155

  10. Optimization of ketone-based P2Y(12) receptor antagonists as antithrombotic agents: pharmacodynamics and receptor kinetics considerations.

    PubMed

    Giordanetto, Fabrizio; Bach, Peter; Zetterberg, Fredrik; Antonsson, Thomas; Bylund, Ruth; Johansson, Johan; Sellén, Mikael; Brown, David; Hideståhl, Lotta; Berntsson, Pia; Hovdal, Daniel; Zachrisson, Helen; Björkman, Jan-Arne; van Giezen, J J J

    2014-07-01

    Modification of a series of P2Y12 receptor antagonists by replacement of the ester functionality was aimed at minimizing the risk of in vivo metabolic instability and pharmacokinetic variability. The resulting ketones were then optimized for their P2Y12 antagonistic and anticoagulation effects in combination with their physicochemical and absorption profiles. The most promising compound showed very potent antiplatelet action in vivo. However, pharmacodynamic-pharmacokinetic analysis did not reveal a significant separation between its anti-platelet and bleeding effects. The relevance of receptor binding kinetics to the in vivo profile is described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Non-peptidic CRF1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of anxiety, depression and stress disorders.

    PubMed

    Kehne, J; De Lombaert, S

    2002-10-01

    Anxiety and depression are psychiatric disorders that constitute a major health concern worldwide, and new pharmacological approaches with the potential for improved efficacy and decreased side effect profiles relative to currently marketed drugs are desired. Since the identification of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) by Vale and colleagues in 1981, an extensive research effort has solidified the importance of this 41 amino acid peptide in mediating the body's behavioral, endocrine, and autonomic responses to stress. The further identification of CRF receptor subtypes has provided compelling targets for novel pharmaceutical agents. The present review focuses on the potential of non-peptidic antagonists of the CRF(1) receptor subtype as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of anxiety and depression. The first section reviews preclinical and clinical evidence implicating CRF, in general, and CRF(1) receptors, in particular, in anxiety and depression. Clinical studies have demonstrated a dysfunctional hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and/or elevated CRF levels in depression and in some anxiety disorders. Preclinical data utlilizing correlational methods, genetic models, and exogenous CRF administration techniques in rodents and non-human primates supports a link between hyperactive CRF pathways and anxiogenic and depressive-like symptoms. Studies employing the use of receptor knockouts and selective, non-peptidic antagonists of the CRF(1) receptor have demonstrated anxiolytic and antidepressant effects under certain types of laboratory conditions. A Phase II, open-label, clinical trial in major depressive disorder has reported that a CRF(1) receptor antagonist was safe and effective in reducing symptoms of anxiety and depression. In the second section, a topological approach is used to describe the design strategies employed to produce potent, non-peptidic CRF(1) receptor antagonists. Two main topologies, featuring a center core, a top side

  12. CGRP receptor antagonists: A new frontier of anti-migraine medications

    PubMed Central

    de Prado, Blanca Marquez; Russo, Andrew F.

    2009-01-01

    Migraine is a chronic pain condition that affects 12% of the population. Currently, the most effective treatments are the triptans, but they are limited in their efficacy and have potentially deleterious cardiovascular complications. Based on basic science studies over the past decade, a new generation of anti-migraine drugs is now being developed. At the forefront of these studies is a new calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist that is as effective as triptans in the acute treatment of migraines, without the cardiovascular effects. This review will address the likely mechanisms and therapeutic potential of CGRP receptor antagonists. PMID:19784396

  13. Combinatorial diffusion assay used to identify topically active melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Quillan, J M; Jayawickreme, C K; Lerner, M R

    1995-01-01

    alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) is implicated in pigmentation, central nervous system and immune system functions, growth, mitogenesis, and melanoma. Evaluation of these roles has been hindered by the lack of alpha-MSH antagonists. A combinatorial chemistry-based diffusion assay is used to find random tripeptides that antagonize normal frog and human melanoma MSH receptors and to identify pharmacological groups responsible for receptor interaction. The alpha-MSH antagonist D-Trp-Arg-Leu-NH2 is used to demonstrate directly the contribution of MSH to normal skin tone in frogs following injection or topical application. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:7708744

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluations of chalcones, flavones and chromenes as farnesoid x receptor (FXR) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoning; Liu, Shuainan; Tan, Wenjuan; Verma, Ruchi; Chen, Yuan; Sun, Deyang; Huan, Yi; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Xing; Wang, Na; Xu, Yang; Wong, Chiwai; Shen, Zhufang; Deng, Ruitang; Liu, Jinsong; Zhang, Yanqiao; Fang, Weishuo

    2017-03-31

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor mainly distributed in liver and intestine, has been regarded as a potential target for the treatment of various metabolic diseases, cancer and infectious diseases related to liver. Starting from two previously identified chalcone-based FXR antagonists, we tried to increase the activity through the design and synthesis of a library containing chalcones, flavones and chromenes, based on substitution manipulation and conformation (ring closure) restriction strategy. Many chalcones and four chromenes were identified as microM potent FXR antagonists, among which chromene 11c significantly decreased the plasma and hepatic triglyceride level in KKay mice.

  15. [Effects of agonists and antagonists of benzodiazepine, GABA and NMDA receptors, on caffeine-induced seizures in mice].

    PubMed

    Inano, S

    1992-08-01

    In mice, tonic convulsive seizure induced by intravenous administration of caffeine (adenosine A1, A2 receptors antagonist) was significantly potentiated by any one of L-PIA (adenosine A1 receptor agonist), NECA (adenosine A2 receptor agonist) and 2-ClAd (adenosine A1, A2 receptors agonist). The caffeine-induced seizure was unaffected by diazepam (benzodiazepine receptor agonist), but was inhibited by Ro 15-1788 (antagonist or partial agonist). beta-DMCM (antagonist or inverse agonist) increased the seizure. Muscimol (GABA-a receptor agonist), baclofen (GABA-b receptor agonist) and AOAA (GABA transaminase inhibitor) did not show significant effect on caffeine-induced convulsion. Bicuculline (GABA-a receptor antagonist) and picrotoxin (chloride channel blocker) significantly potentiated the convulsion at the doses which did not induce it. Caffeine-induced convulsion was potentiated by NMDA with its non-convulsive dose. CPP (competitive NMDA receptor antagonist) and MK-801 (non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist) significantly inhibited the seizures. These results suggest that caffeine-induced seizure is not caused by blockade of adenosine receptors. Caffeine may act to beta-carboline sensitive benzodiazepine receptor (Type 1) which has no linkage with GABA-a receptor. Furthermore, it is implied that caffeine plays some role at NMDA receptor calcium ion channel complex.

  16. Ethanol exposure in early adolescence inhibits intrinsic neuronal plasticity via sigma-1 receptor activation in hippocampal CA1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sabeti, Jilla

    2011-01-01

    Background We demonstrated previously that rats exposed to chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapors in early adolescence show increased magnitudes of long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory transmission when recorded at dendritic synapses in hippocampus. Large amplitude LTP following CIE exposure is mediated by sigma-1 receptors; however, not yet addressed is the role of sigma-1 receptors in modulating the intrinsic properties of neurons to alter their action potential firing during LTP. Methods Activity-induced plasticity of spike firing was investigated using rat hippocampal slice recordings to measure changes in both field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and population spikes (pop. spikes) concomitantly at dendritic inputs and soma of CA1 pyramidal neurons, respectively. Results We observed unique modifications in plasticity of action potential firing in hippocampal slices from CIE exposed adolescent rats, where the induction of large amplitude LTP by 100 Hz stimulations was accompanied by reduced CA1 neuronal excitability—reflected as decreased pop. spike efficacy and impaired activity-induced fEPSP-to-spike (E-S) potentiation. By contrast, LTP induction in ethanol-naïve control slices resulted in increased spike efficacy and robust E-S potentiation. E-S potentiation impairments emerged at 24 hr after CIE treatment cessation, but not before the alcohol withdrawal period, and were restored with bath-application of the sigma-1 receptor selective antagonist BD1047, but not the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5. Further evidence revealed a significantly shortened somatic fEPSP time course in adolescent CIE-withdrawn hippocampal slices during LTP; however, paired-pulse data show no apparent correspondence between E-S dissociation and altered recurrent feedback inhibition. Conclusions Results here suggest that acute withdrawal from adolescent CIE exposure triggers sigma-1 receptors that act to depress the efficacy of excitatory inputs in triggering

  17. Ethanol exposure in early adolescence inhibits intrinsic neuronal plasticity via sigma-1 receptor activation in hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Sabeti, Jilla

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrated previously that rats exposed to chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapors in early adolescence show increased magnitudes of long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory transmission when recorded at dendritic synapses in hippocampus. Large amplitude LTP following CIE exposure is mediated by sigma-1 receptors; however, not yet addressed is the role of sigma-1 receptors in modulating the intrinsic properties of neurons to alter their action potential firing during LTP. Activity-induced plasticity of spike firing was investigated using rat hippocampal slice recordings to measure changes in both field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and population spikes (pop. spikes) concomitantly at dendritic inputs and soma of CA1 pyramidal neurons, respectively. We observed unique modifications in plasticity of action potential firing in hippocampal slices from CIE exposed adolescent rats, where the induction of large amplitude LTP by 100 Hz stimulations was accompanied by reduced CA1 neuronal excitability--reflected as decreased pop. spike efficacy and impaired activity-induced fEPSP-to-spike (E-S) potentiation. In contrast, LTP induction in ethanol-naïve control slices resulted in increased spike efficacy and robust E-S potentiation. E-S potentiation impairments emerged at 24 hours after CIE treatment cessation, but not before the alcohol withdrawal period, and were restored with bath-application of the sigma-1 receptor selective antagonist BD1047, but not the NMDA receptor antagonist d-AP5. Further evidence revealed a significantly shortened somatic fEPSP time course in adolescent CIE-withdrawn hippocampal slices during LTP; however, paired-pulse data show no apparent correspondence between E-S dissociation and altered recurrent feedback inhibition. Results here suggest that acute withdrawal from adolescent CIE exposure triggers sigma-1 receptors that act to depress the efficacy of excitatory inputs in triggering action potentials during LTP. Such

  18. Molecular determinants of the species selectivity of neurokinin type 1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Pradier, L; Habert-Ortoli, E; Emile, L; Le Guern, J; Loquet, I; Bock, M D; Clot, J; Mercken, L; Fardin, V; Garret, C

    1995-02-01

    Most nonpeptide neurokinin (NK)1 antagonists display a marked difference in affinity for rat versus human NK1 receptors. The molecular basis for the species selectivity of RP67580 and CP96,345 has been previously addressed [J. Biol. Chem. 267:25668-25671 (1992); J. Biol. Chem. 268:2319-2323 (1993)]. We are extending these previous results to additional NK1 antagonists, which are members of different chemical families. Included is a new perhydroisoindolol, RPR100893, which unlike its parent compound (RP67580) is human receptor selective. Chimeric rat/human NK1 receptors, as well as rat and human mutant NK1 receptors, were constructed and expressed in COS-1 cells, and affinities for substance P and the various antagonists were determined in binding studies. With human receptor-selective antagonists, the rat R290(S-->I) mutation was the most effective in increasing antagonist affinity (from 7- to 23-fold). Combination with the R116(L-->V) mutation led to an additional increase in affinity for trans-4-hydroxy-1-(1H-indol-3-ylcarbonyl)-L-prolyl-N- methyl-N-(phenylmethyl)-L-tyrosineamide (a derivative of FK888) and to nearly full human receptor affinity for RPR100893 and (+/-)-CP99,994. Based on the gains in affinities, these results confirm and extend the role of residues 116 and 290 of the NK1 receptor in the species selectivity of these three new human receptor-selective NK1 antagonists. In comparison, the affinity of RP67580, the least selective molecule, was most affected by changes at position 116, and combination with mutations at either position 97 (V-->E) or position 290 led to the human receptor phenotype. For the heterosteroid KAN610857, modifications of the rat receptor at positions 97 and 290, and to a lesser degree position 116, were the most effective in reducing affinity. Two double-mutants [R(97,290) and R(116,290)], although different from those identified for RP67580, also displayed human receptor-like affinity. Therefore, the molecular determinants of

  19. Pharmacological analysis of CCK2 receptor antagonists using isolated rat stomach ECL cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Erik; Björkqvist, Maria; Håkanson, Rolf

    1999-01-01

    Gastrin stimulates rat stomach ECL cells to secrete histamine and pacreastatin, a chromogranin A (CGA)-derived peptide. The present report describes the effect of nine cholecystokinin2 (CCK2) receptor antagonists and one CCK1 receptor antagonist on the gastrin-evoked secretion of pancreastatin from isolated ECL cells.The CCK2 receptor antagonists comprised three benzodiazepine derivatives L-740,093, YM022 and YF476, one ureidoacetamide compound RP73870, one benzimidazole compound JB 93182, one ureidoindoline compound AG041R and three tryptophan dipeptoids PD 134308 (CI988), PD135158 and PD 136450. The CCK1 receptor antagonist was devazepide.A preparation of well-functioning ECL cells (∼80% purity) was prepared from rat oxyntic mucosa using counter-flow elutriation. The cells were cultured for 48 h in the presence of 0.1 nM gastrin; they were then washed and incubated with antagonist alone or with various concentrations of antagonist plus 10 nM gastrin (a maximally effective concentration) for 30 min. Gastrin dose-response curves were constructed in the absence or presence of increasing concentrations of antagonist. The amount of pancreastatin secreted was determined by radioimmunoassay.The gastrin-evoked secretion of pancreastatin was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. YM022, AG041R and YF476 had IC50 values of 0.5, 2.2 and 2.7 nM respectively. L-740,093, JB93182 and RP73870 had IC50 values of 7.8, 9.3 and 9.8 nM, while PD135158, PD136450 and PD134308 had IC50 values of 76, 135 and 145 nM. The CCK1 receptor antagonist devazepide was a poor CCK2 receptor antagonist with an IC50 of about 800 nM.YM022, YF476 and AG041R were chosen for further analysis. YM022 and YF476 shifted the gastrin dose-response curve to the right in a manner suggesting competitive antagonism, while the effects of AG041R could not be explained by simple competitive antagonism. pKB values were 11.3 for YM022, 10.8 for YF476 and the apparent pKB for AG041R was 10.4. PMID

  20. Inverse agonism of histamine H2 antagonist accounts for upregulation of spontaneously active histamine H2 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Smit, M J; Leurs, R; Alewijnse, A E; Blauw, J; Van Nieuw Amerongen, G P; Van De Vrede, Y; Roovers, E; Timmerman, H

    1996-01-01

    Histamine H2 receptors transfected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are time- and dose-dependently upregulated upon exposure to the H2 antagonists cimetidine and ranitidine. This effect appears to be H2 receptor-mediated as no change in receptor density was observed after H1 or H3 antagonist treatment or after incubation with the structural analogue of cimetidine, VUF 8299, which has no H2 antagonistic effects. By using transfected CHO cells expressing different densities of wild-type H2 receptors or an uncoupled H2Leu124Ala receptor, the histamine H2 receptor was found to display considerable agonist-independent H2 receptor activity. Cimetidine and ranitidine, which both induce H2 receptor upregulation, actually functioned as inverse agonists in those cell lines displaying spontaneous agonist-independent H2 receptor activity. Burimamide, on the other hand, was shown to act as a neutral antagonist and did as expected not induce H2 receptor upregulation after long-term exposure. The displayed inverse agonism of H2 antagonists appears to be a mechanistic basis for the observed H2 antagonist-induced H2 receptor upregulation in transfected CHO cells. These observations shed new light on the pharmacological classification of the H2 antagonists and may offer a plausible explanation for the observed development of tolerance after prolonged clinical use. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8692899

  1. The dual orexin receptor antagonist TCS1102 does not affect reinstatement of nicotine-seeking

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Gavan P.; Clemens, Kelly J.

    2017-01-01

    The orexin/hypocretin system is important for appetitive motivation towards multiple drugs of abuse, including nicotine. Both OX1 and OX2 receptors individually have been shown to influence nicotine self-administration and reinstatement. Due to the increasing clinical use of dual orexin receptor antagonists in the treatment of disorders such as insomnia, we examined whether a dual orexin receptor antagonist may also be effective in reducing nicotine seeking. We tested the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the potent and selective dual orexin receptor antagonist TCS1102 on orexin-A-induced food self-administration, nicotine self-administration and reinstatement of nicotine-seeking in rats. Our results show that 30 μg of TCS1102 i.c.v. abolishes orexin-A-induced increases in food self-administration but does not reduce nicotine self-administration. Neither i.c.v. 10 μg nor 30 μg of TCS1102 reduced compound reinstatement after short-term (15 days) self-administration nicotine, but 30 μg transiently reduced cue/nicotine compound reinstatement after chronic self-administration (29 days). These results indicate that TCS1102 has no substantial effect on motivation for nicotine seeking following chronic self-administration and no effect after shorter periods of intake. Orexin receptor antagonists may therefore have little clinical utility against nicotine addiction. PMID:28296947

  2. The dual orexin receptor antagonist TCS1102 does not affect reinstatement of nicotine-seeking.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Shaun Yon-Seng; McNally, Gavan P; Clemens, Kelly J

    2017-01-01

    The orexin/hypocretin system is important for appetitive motivation towards multiple drugs of abuse, including nicotine. Both OX1 and OX2 receptors individually have been shown to influence nicotine self-administration and reinstatement. Due to the increasing clinical use of dual orexin receptor antagonists in the treatment of disorders such as insomnia, we examined whether a dual orexin receptor antagonist may also be effective in reducing nicotine seeking. We tested the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the potent and selective dual orexin receptor antagonist TCS1102 on orexin-A-induced food self-administration, nicotine self-administration and reinstatement of nicotine-seeking in rats. Our results show that 30 μg of TCS1102 i.c.v. abolishes orexin-A-induced increases in food self-administration but does not reduce nicotine self-administration. Neither i.c.v. 10 μg nor 30 μg of TCS1102 reduced compound reinstatement after short-term (15 days) self-administration nicotine, but 30 μg transiently reduced cue/nicotine compound reinstatement after chronic self-administration (29 days). These results indicate that TCS1102 has no substantial effect on motivation for nicotine seeking following chronic self-administration and no effect after shorter periods of intake. Orexin receptor antagonists may therefore have little clinical utility against nicotine addiction.

  3. A mechanistic basis for converting a receptor tyrosine kinase agonist to an antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, W. David; Daugherty, Jennifer; Gao, ChongFeng; Xie, Qian; Miranti, Cindy; Gherardi, Ermanno; Vande Woude, George; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) activates the Met receptor tyrosine kinase by binding and promoting receptor dimerization. Here we describe a mechanistic basis for designing Met antagonists based on NK1, a natural variant of HGF containing the N-terminal and the first kringle domain. Through detailed biochemical and structural analyses, we demonstrate that both mouse and human NK1 induce Met dimerization via a conserved NK1 dimer interface. Mutations designed to alter the NK1 dimer interface abolish its ability to promote Met dimerization but retain full Met-binding activity. Importantly, these NK1 mutants act as Met antagonists by inhibiting HGF-mediated cell scattering, proliferation, branching, and invasion. The ability to separate the Met-binding activity of NK1 from its Met dimerization activity thus provides a rational basis for designing Met antagonists. This strategy of antagonist design may be applicable for other growth factor receptors by selectively abolishing the receptor activation ability but not the receptor binding of the growth factors.

  4. The necessity and effectiveness of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetic nephropathy is the most common primary disease necessitating dialysis treatment in the world including Japan. Major guidelines for treatment of hypertension in Japan, the United States and Europe recommend the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, which suppress the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), as the antihypertensive drugs of first choice in patients with coexisting diabetes. However, even with the administration of RAS inhibitors, failure to achieve adequate anti-albuminuric, renoprotective effects and a reduction in cardiovascular events has also been reported. Inadequate blockade of aldosterone may be one of the reasons why long-term administration of RAS inhibitors may not be sufficiently effective in patients with diabetic nephropathy. This review focuses on treatment in diabetic nephropathy and discusses the significance of aldosterone blockade. In pre-nephropathy without overt nephropathy, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist can be used to enhance the blood pressure-lowering effects of RAS inhibitors, improve insulin resistance and prevent clinical progression of nephropathy. In CKD categories A2 and A3, the addition of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to an RAS inhibitor can help to maintain 'long-term' antiproteinuric and anti-albuminuric effects. However, in category G3a and higher, sufficient attention must be paid to hyperkalemia. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are not currently recommended as standard treatment in diabetic nephropathy. However, many studies have shown promise of better renoprotective effects if mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are appropriately used.

  5. Modification of formalin-induced nociception by different histamine receptor agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Farzin, Davood; Nosrati, Farnaz

    2007-01-15

    The present study evaluated the effects of different histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on the nociceptive response in the mouse formalin test. Intracerebroventricular (20-40 microg/mouse i.c.v.) or subcutaneous (1-10 mg/kg s.c.) injection of HTMT (H(1) receptor agonist) elicited a dose-related hyperalgesia in the early and late phases. Conversely, intraperitoneal (20 and 30 mg/kg i.p.) injection of dexchlorpheniramine (H(1) receptor antagonist) was antinociceptive in both phases. At a dose ineffective per se, dexchlorpheniramine (10 mg/kg i.p.) antagonized the hyperalgesia induced by HTMT (40 mug/mouse i.c.v. or 10 mg/kg s.c.). Dimaprit (H(2) receptor agonist, 30 mg/kg i.p.) and ranitidine (H(2) receptor antagonist, 20 and 40 mg/kg i.p.) reduced the nociceptive responses in the early and late phases. No significant change in the antinociceptive activity was found following the combination of dimaprit (30 mg/kg i.p.) with ranitidine (10 mg/kg i.p.). The antinociceptive effect of dimaprit (30 mg/kg i.p.) was prevented by naloxone (5 mg/kg i.p.) in the early phase or by imetit (H(3) receptor agonist, 25 mg/kg i.p.) in both early and late phases. The histamine H(3) receptor agonist imetit was hyperalgesic following i.p. administration of 50 mg/kg. Imetit-induced hyperalgesia was completely prevented by treatment with a dose ineffective per se of thioperamide (H(3) receptor antagonist, 5 mg/kg i.p.). The results suggest that histamine H(1) and H(3) receptor activations increase sensitivity to nociceptive stimulus in the formalin test.

  6. SRA880, in vitro characterization of the first non-peptide somatostatin sst(1) receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, D; Nunn, C; Hannon, J; Schoeffter, P; Feuerbach, D; Schuepbach, E; Langenegger, D; Bouhelal, R; Hurth, K; Neumann, P; Troxler, T; Pfaeffli, P

    2004-05-06

    This report describes the in vitro features of the first somatostatin sst(1) receptor selective non-peptide antagonist, SRA880 ([3R,4aR,10aR]-1,2,3,4,4a,5,10,10a-Octahydro-6-methoxy-1-methyl-benz[g] quinoline-3-carboxylic-acid-4-(4-nitro-phenyl)-piperazine-amide, hydrogen malonate). SRA was evaluated in a number of in vitro systems of various species, both at native and recombinant receptors, using radioligand binding and second messenger/transduction studies. SRA880 has high affinity for native rat, mouse, monkey and human cerebral cortex somatostatin sst(1) receptors (pK(d) = 7.8-8.6) and for human recombinant sst(1) receptors (pK(d) = 8.0-8.1). SRA880 displayed significantly lower affinity for the other human recombinant somatostatin receptors ( pK(d) < or = 6.0) or a wide range of neurotransmitter receptors, except for the human dopamine D4 receptors. SRA880 was characterized in various transduction assays: somatotropin release inhibiting factor (SRIF) induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, SRIF stimulated-GTPgammaS binding, and SRIF stimulated luciferase gene expression; in all tests, SRA880 was devoid of intrinsic activity and acted as an apparently surmountable antagonist with pK(B) values of 7.5-7.7. Combined with the data from binding studies, these results suggest that SRA880 acts as a competitive antagonist. Thus, SRA880 is the first non-peptide somatostatin sst(1) receptor antagonist to be reported; SRA880 will be a useful tool for the characterization of somatostatin sst(1) receptor-mediated effects both in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Identification of three muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat lung using binding studies with selective antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, A.D.; El-Fakahany, E.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Heterogeneity of the muscarinic receptor population in the rat central and peripheral lung was found in competition binding experiments against ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (({sup 3}H)QNB) using the selective antagonists pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 and hexahydrosiladifenidol (HHSiD). Pirenzepine displaced ({sup 3}H)QNB with low affinity from preparations of central airways indicating the absence of M{sub 1} receptors in the trachea and bronchi. Muscarinic receptors in the central airways are comprised of both M{sub 2} and M{sub 3} receptors since AF-DX 116, an M{sub 2}-selective antagonist, bound with high affinity to 70% of the available sites while HHSiD, an M{sub 3}-selective antagonist bound with high affinity to the remaining binding sites. In the peripheral lung, pirenzepine bound with high affinity to 14% of the receptor population, AF-DX 116 bound with high affinity 79% of the binding sites while HHSiD bound with high affinity to 18% of the binding sites. The presence of M{sub 1} receptors in the peripheral airways but not in the central airways was confirmed using ({sup 3}H)telenzepine, an M{sub 1} receptor ligand. ({sup 3}H)Telenzepine showed specific saturable binding to 8% of ({sup 3}H)QNB labeled binding sites in homogenates of rat peripheral lung, while there was no detectable specific binding in homogenates of rat trachea or heart.

  8. Emerging interleukin receptor antagonists for the treatment of asthma.

    PubMed

    Al Efraij, Khalid; FitzGerald, J Mark

    2017-09-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease, usually characterized by chronic airway inflammation. Most patients with asthma can be well-controlled with inhaled corticosteroids and, if necessary, the addition of a long-acting beta agonist. Despite these therapies, 5% to 10% of patients with asthma have severe, uncontrolled asthma. Selecting patients based on peripheral eosinophil counts and a history of exacerbations has led to significant decreases in exacerbations and an improvement in asthma control with medications that target IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13/. Areas covered: This review will cover the definition of severe asthma, existing treatment options, biomarkers, and the emerging role of interleukin antagonists in the treatment of severe asthma. Expert opinion: IL antagonists are novel drugs targeting important inflammatory cytokines in asthma. Anti-IL-5 drugs provide the most promise as they have obtained regulatory approval and are available for use. Anti-IL-4 drug results are also promising. There is, however, uncertainty regarding the success of anti-IL-13 drugs development at this point. An ongoing focus of research is to significantly increase our understanding of the biology of asthma, and in particular severe asthma, making more and better targeted therapies. There may also be potential in the future to use these new drugs earlier in the development of asthma, as disease-modifying interventions that might be associated with remission or even cure.

  9. Rational Design of Potent Antagonists to the Human Growth Hormone Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Germaine; Cunningham, Brian C.; Fukunaga, Rikiro; Nagata, Shigekazu; Goeddel, David V.; Wells, James A.

    1992-06-01

    A hybrid receptor was constructed that contained the extracellular binding domain of the human growth hormone (hGH) receptor linked to the transmembrane and intracellular domains of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor. Addition of hGH to a myeloid leukemia cell line (FDC-P1) that expressed the hybrid receptor caused proliferation of these cells. The mechanism for signal transduction of the hybrid receptor required dimerization because monoclonal antibodies to the hGH receptor were agonists whereas their monovalent fragments were not. Receptor dimerization occurs sequentially-a receptor binds to site 1 on hGH, and then a second receptor molecule binds to site 2 on hGH. On the basis of this sequential mechanism, which may occur in many other cytokine receptors, inactive hGH analogs were designed that were potent antagonists to hGH-induced cell proliferation. Such antagonists could be useful for treating clinical conditions of hGH excess, such as acromegaly.

  10. Inhibition of Morphine Tolerance and Dependence by the NMDA Receptor Antagonist MK-801

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Keith A.; Akil, Huda

    1991-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of the glutamate receptor is an important mediator of several forms of neural and behavioral plasticity. The present studies examined whether NMDA receptors might be involved in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence, two examples of behavioral plasticity. The noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine without affecting acute morphine analgesia. In addition, MK-801 attenuated the development of morphine dependence as assessed by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. These results suggest that NMDA receptors may be important in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence.

  11. (-) Arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β.

    PubMed

    Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor; Crouch, Rebecca A; Demeritte, Teresa

    2014-11-24

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (-) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor.

  12. (−) Arctigenin and (+) Pinoresinol Are Antagonists of the Human Thyroid Hormone Receptor β

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (−) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor. PMID:25383984

  13. Identification of Trisubstituted-pyrazol Carboxamide Analogs as Novel and Potent Antagonists of Farnesoid X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Donna D.; Lin, Wenwei; Forman, Barry M.; Chen, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NRIH4) plays a major role in the control of cholesterol metabolism. This suggests that antagonizing the transcriptional activity of FXR is a potential means to treat cholestasis and related metabolic disorders. Here we describe the synthesis, biological evaluation, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies of trisubstituted-pyrazol carboxamides as novel and potent FXR antagonists. One of these novel FXR antagonists, 4j has an IC50 of 7.5 nM in an FXR binding assay and 468.5 nM in a cell-based FXR antagonistic assay. Compound 4j has no detectable FXR agonistic activity or cytotoxicity. Notably, 4j is the most potent FXR antagonist identified to date; it has a promising in vitro profile and could serve as an excellent chemical tool to elucidate the biological function of FXR. PMID:24775917

  14. Slow receptor dissociation kinetics differentiate macitentan from other endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Sasse, Thomas; Clozel, Martine; Nayler, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Two endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs), bosentan and ambrisentan, are currently approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a devastating disease involving an activated endothelin system and aberrant contraction and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). The novel ERA macitentan has recently concluded testing in a Phase III morbidity/mortality clinical trial in PAH patients. Since the association and dissociation rates of G protein-coupled receptor antagonists can influence their pharmacological activity in vivo, we used human PASMC to characterize inhibitory potency and receptor inhibition kinetics of macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan using calcium release and inositol-1-phosphate (IP(1)) assays. In calcium release assays macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan were highly potent ERAs with K(b) values of 0.14 nM, 0.12 nM and 1.1 nM, respectively. Macitentan, but not ambrisentan and bosentan, displayed slow apparent receptor association kinetics as evidenced by increased antagonistic potency upon prolongation of antagonist pre-incubation times. In compound washout experiments, macitentan displayed a significantly lower receptor dissociation rate and longer receptor occupancy half-life (ROt(1/2)) compared to bosentan and ambrisentan (ROt(1/2):17 minutes versus 70 seconds and 40 seconds, respectively). Because of its lower dissociation rate macitentan behaved as an insurmountable antagonist in calcium release and IP(1) assays, and unlike bosentan and ambrisentan it blocked endothelin receptor activation across a wide range of endothelin-1 (ET-1) concentrations. However, prolongation of the ET-1 stimulation time beyond ROt(1/2) rendered macitentan a surmountable antagonist, revealing its competitive binding mode. Bosentan and ambrisentan behaved as surmountable antagonists irrespective of the assay duration and they lacked inhibitory activity at high ET-1 concentrations. Thus, macitentan is a competitive ERA with

  15. Synthesis and dual histamine H₁ and H₂ receptor antagonist activity of cyanoguanidine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Alisch, Rudi; Buschauer, Armin; Elz, Sigurd

    2013-11-15

    Premedication with a combination of histamine H₁ receptor (H₁R) and H₂ receptor (H₂R) antagonists has been suggested as a prophylactic principle, for instance, in anaesthesia and surgery. Aiming at pharmacological hybrids combining H₁R and H₂R antagonistic activity, a series of cyanoguanidines 14-35 was synthesized by linking mepyramine-type H₁R antagonist substructures with roxatidine-, tiotidine-, or ranitidine-type H₂R antagonist moieties. N-desmethylmepyramine was connected via a poly-methylene spacer to a cyanoguanidine group as the "urea equivalent" of the H₂R antagonist moiety. The title compounds were screened for histamine antagonistic activity at the isolated ileum (H₁R) and the isolated spontaneously beating right atrium (H₂R) of the guinea pig. The results indicate that, depending on the nature of the H₂R antagonist partial structure, the highest H₁R antagonist potency resided in roxatidine-type compounds with spacers of six methylene groups in length (compound 21), and tiotidine-type compounds irrespective of the alkyl chain length (compounds 28, 32, 33), N-cyano-N'-[2-[[(2-guanidino-4-thiazolyl)methyl]thio]ethyl]-N″-[2-[N-[2-[N-(4-methoxybenzyl)-N-(pyridyl)-amino] ethyl]-N-methylamino]ethyl] guanidine (25, pKB values: 8.05 (H₁R, ileum) and 7.73 (H₂R, atrium) and the homologue with the mepyramine moiety connected by a six-membered chain to the tiotidine-like partial structure (compound 32, pKB values: 8.61 (H₁R) and 6.61 (H₂R) were among the most potent hybrid compounds. With respect to the development of a potential pharmacotherapeutic agent, structural optimization seems possible through selection of other H₁R and H₂R pharmacophoric moieties with mutually affinity-enhancing properties.

  16. Histamine H3 receptor antagonist decreases cue-induced alcohol reinstatement in mice.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Saara; Mäki, Tiia; Rozov, Stanislav; Bäckström, Pia; Hyytiä, Petri; Piepponen, Petteri; Panula, Pertti

    2016-07-01

    We have earlier found that the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) antagonism diminishes motivational aspects of alcohol reinforcement in mice. Here we studied the role of H3Rs in cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in C57BL/6J mice using two different H3R antagonists. Systemic administration of H3R antagonists attenuated cue-induced alcohol seeking suggesting that H3R antagonists may reduce alcohol craving. To understand how alcohol affects dopamine and histamine release, a microdialysis study was performed on C57BL/6J mice and the levels of histamine, dopamine and dopamine metabolites were measured in the nucleus accumbens. Alcohol administration was combined with an H3R antagonist pretreatment to reveal whether modulation of H3R affects the effects of alcohol on neurotransmitter release. Alcohol significantly increased the release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens but did not affect histamine release. Pretreatment with H3R antagonist ciproxifan did not modify the effect of alcohol on dopamine release. However, histamine release was markedly increased with ciproxifan. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that H3R antagonism attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in mice. Alcohol alone does not affect histamine release in the nucleus accumbens but H3R antagonist instead increases histamine release significantly suggesting that the mechanism by which H3R antagonist inhibits alcohol seeking found in the present study and the decreased alcohol reinforcement, reward and consumption found earlier might include alterations in the histaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. These findings imply that selective antagonists of H3Rs could be a therapeutic strategy to prevent relapse and possibly diminish craving to alcohol use. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'.

  17. Orexin Receptor Antagonists: New Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Roecker, Anthony J; Cox, Christopher D; Coleman, Paul J

    2016-01-28

    Since its discovery in 1998, the orexin system, composed of two G-protein coupled receptors, orexins 1 and 2, and two neuropeptide agonists, orexins A and B, has captured the attention of the scientific community as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity, anxiety, and sleep/wake disorders. Genetic evidence in rodents, dogs, and humans was revealed between 1999 and 2000, demonstrating a causal link between dysfunction or deletion of the orexin system and narcolepsy, a disorder characterized by hypersomnolence during normal wakefulness. These findings encouraged efforts to discover agonists to treat narcolepsy and, alternatively, antagonists to treat insomnia. This perspective will focus on the discovery and development of structurally diverse orexin antagonists suitable for preclinical pharmacology studies and human clinical trials. The work described herein culminated in the 2014 FDA approval of suvorexant as a first-in-class dual orexin receptor antagonist for the treatment of insomnia.

  18. Bradykinin as a pain mediator: receptors are localized to sensory neurons, and antagonists have analgesic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Steranka, L.R.; Manning, D.C.; DeHaas, C.J.; Ferkany, J.W.; Borosky, S.A.; Connor, J.R.; Vavrek, R.J.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-05-01

    Autoradiographic studies localize (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptor binding sites to the substantia gelatinosa, dorsal root, and a subset of small cells in both the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of the guinea pig. (/sup 3/H)Bradykinin labeling is also observed over myocardinal/coronary visceral afferent fibers. The localization of (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptors to nociceptive pathways supports a role for bradykinin in pain mediation. Several bradkykinin antagonists block bradykinin-induced acute vascular pain in the rat. The bradykinin antagonists also relieve bradykinin- and urate-induced hyperalgesia in the rat paw. These results indicate that bradykinin is a physiologic mediator of pain and that bradykinin antagonists have analgesic activity in both acute and chronic pain models.

  19. 1,7-Disubstituted oxyindoles are potent and selective EP(3) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nian; Polozov, Alexandre M; O'Connell, Matthew; Burgeson, James; Yu, Peng; Zeller, Wayne; Zhang, Jun; Onua, Emmanuel; Ramirez, Jose; Palsdottir, Gudrun A; Halldorsdottir, Gudrun V; Andresson, Thorkell; Kiselyov, Alex S; Gurney, Mark; Singh, Jasbir

    2010-04-15

    A series of novel 1,7-disubstituted oxyindoles were shown to be potent and selective EP(3) receptor antagonists. Variation of substitution pattern at the C-3 position of indole enhanced in vitro metabolic stability of the resulting derivatives. Series 27a-c showed >1000-fold selectivity over a panel of prostanoid receptors including IP, FP, EP(1), EP(2) and EP(4). These agents also featured low CYP inhibition and good activity in the functional rat platelet aggregation assay.

  20. An angiotensin II receptor antagonist suppresses running-enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis in rat.

    PubMed

    Mukuda, Takao; Sugiyama, Hiroyuki

    2007-06-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is enhanced by voluntary running exercise in adult mammals. To elucidate the factors involved in this enhancement, we examined the effects of losartan, an antagonist of angiotensin II type 1 receptors, on the running-enhanced neurogenesis in the adult rat hippocampus. When losartan was administered orally via the drinking water, the running-enhanced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone was almost completely suppressed, indicating that this enhancement may be mediated by angiotensin II and its receptors.

  1. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (AT1-blockers, ARBs, sartans): similarities and differences

    PubMed Central

    van Zwieten, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    A survey is presented of the registered non-peptidergic angiotensin II receptor antagonists (AT1 blockers, ARBs, sartans) and their general properties and similarities. Accordingly, their receptor profile, pharmacokinetic and therapeutic applications are discussed. In addition, attention is paid to the individual characteristics of the AT1 blockers now available. A few components of this category offer additional potentially beneficial properties, owing to their pharmacological or metabolic characteristics. Such additional properties are critically discussed for eprosartan, losartan, telmisartan and valsartan. PMID:25696573

  2. Synthesis and SAR studies of benzimidazolone derivatives as histamine H3-receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qingbei; Rosenblum, Stuart B; Yang, Zhaoxia; Jiang, Yueheng; McCormick, Kevin D; Aslanian, Robert G; Duguma, Luli; Kozlowski, Joseph A; Shih, Neng-Yang; Hey, John A; West, Robert E; Korfmacher, Walter A; Berlin, Michael; Boyce, Christopher W

    2013-11-01

    A novel series of benzimidazolone-containing histamine H3-receptor antagonists were prepared and their structure-activity relationship was explored. These benzimidazolone analogs demonstrate potent H3-receptor binding affinities, no P450 enzyme inhibition, and strong H3 functional activity. Compound 1o exhibits the best overall profile with H3Ki=0.95nM and rat AUC=12.9μMh.

  3. NF449: a subnanomolar potency antagonist at recombinant rat P2X1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Braun, K; Rettinger, J; Ganso, M; Kassack, M; Hildebrandt, C; Ullmann, H; Nickel, P; Schmalzing, G; Lambrecht, G

    2001-09-01

    Antagonistic effects of the novel suramin analogue 4,4',4",4"'-(carbonylbis(imino-5,1,3-benzenetriylbis(carbonylimino)))tetrakis-benzene-1,3-disulfonic acid (NF449) were studied on contractions of the rat vas deferens elicited by alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alphabetameATP; mediated by P2X1 receptors), contractions of the guinea-pig ileal longitudinal smooth muscle elicited by alphabetameATP (mediated by P2X3 receptors) or adenosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (ADPbetaS; mediated by P2Y1 receptors), ATP-induced increases of [Ca2+]i in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells (mediated by P2Y2 receptors), inward currents evoked by ATP in follicle cell-free Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing rP2X1 or rP2X3 receptors and degradation of ATP by ecto-nucleotidases in folliculated Xenopus laevis oocytes. In addition, NF449 was examined for its P2 receptor specificity in rat vas deferens (alpha1A-adrenoceptors) and guinea-pig ileum (histamine H1 and muscarinic M3 receptors). At native (pIC50=7.15) and recombinant (pIC50=9.54) P2X1 receptors, NF449 was a highly potent antagonist. The P2X3 receptors present in guinea-pig ileum (pIC50=5.04) or expressed in oocytes (pIC50 approximately 5.6) were much less sensitive for NF449. It also was a very weak antagonist at P2Y1 receptors in guinea-pig ileum (pIC50=4.85) and P2Y2 receptors in HEK 293 cells (pIC50=3.86), and showed very low inhibitory potency on ecto-nucleotidases (pIC50<3.5). NF449 (100 microM) did not interact with alpha1A-adrenoceptors or histamine H1 and muscarinic M3 receptors. Thus, the antagonism by NF449 is highly specific for P2 receptors. In conclusion, the subnanomolar potency at rP2X1 receptors and the rank order of potency, P2X1 > P2X3 > P2Y1 > P2Y2 > ecto-nucleotidases, make NF449 unique among the P2 receptor antagonists reported to date. NF449 may fill the long-standing need for a P2X1-selective radioligand.

  4. Oxycodone with an opioid receptor antagonist: A review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P; Goforth, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    The rationale for putting opioid antagonists with an agonist is to improve pain control, to reduce side effects, and/or to reduce abuse. The combination of prolonged release (PR) oxycodone and naloxone reduces constipation as demonstrated in multiple studies and has been designated a tamper-resistant opioid by the Food and Drug Administration. Bioequivalence of the combination product compared with PR oxycodone has not been established. Several of the pivotal studies provided suboptimal laxative support in the control arm of the randomized trials. Two noninferiority trials have demonstrated equivalent analgesia between PR oxycodone and the combination product at doses of less than 120 mg of oxycodone per day. There appears to be an analgesic ceiling above 80-120 mg of oxycodone per day. Safety monitoring during randomized trials was not been well described in published manuscripts. Benefits appear to be better for those with chronic noncancer pain compared with individuals with cancer when constipation was the primary outcome.

  5. Mesenteric vascular reactivity to histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Walus, K.M.; Fondacaro, J.D.; Jacobson, E.D.

    1981-05-01

    Response patterns of intestinal blood flow, oxygen extraction and consumption, blood flow distribution, and motility were assessed during intraarterial infusions of histamine, histamine after H1 or H2 blockade, dimaprit or dimaprit after H2 blockade. Histamine produced an initial peak response of blood flow with a slow decrease thereafter. Oxygen extraction was evenly depressed throughout the infusion, and oxygen consumption increased at the beginning. All initial responses were blocked by tripelennamine. Ranitidine, a new H2 antagonist, accelerated the decay of all responses. Dimaprit produced effects identical to those of histamine after tripelennamine. Distribution of blood flow was unchanged at the beginning of histamine infusion, but subsequently showed a shift to muscularis which was blocked by tripelennamine. Histamine usually stimulated intestinal contractions and this effect was abolished by tripelennamine. Thus, H1 stimulation, besides producing an initial vasodilation, increases oxygen uptake and redistributes flow to the muscularis.

  6. Pantolactams as androgen receptor antagonists for the topical suppression of sebum production.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Karen E; Barrett, Stephen; Bridgwood, Katy; Carroll, Matthew; Dettling, Danielle; Du, Daniel; Fakhoury, Stephen; Fedij, Victor; Hu, Lain-Yen; Kostlan, Catherine; Pocalyko, David; Raheja, Neil; Smith, Yvonne; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu; Wade, Kimberly

    2011-09-15

    A series of pantolactam based compounds were identified as potent antagonists for the androgen receptor (AR). Those that possessed properties suitable for topical delivery were evaluated in the validated Hamster Ear Model. Several compounds were found to be efficacious in reducing wax esters, a major component of sebum, initiating further preclinical work on these compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. I. Effects of a Dopamine Receptor Antagonist on Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas ,Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used a 21 d fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction assay to test the hypothesis that exposure to the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) antagonist, haloperidol, would impair fish reproduction. Additionally, a 96 h experiment with fathead minnows and zebrafish (Danio ...

  8. A Time-course Study with the Androgen Receptor Antagonist Flutamide in Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flutamide, a drug registered to treat some types of prostate cancer in humans, has been used for many years as a model androgen receptor (AR) antagonist in studies aimed at characterizing disruption of the vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Various studies hav...

  9. Tetrahydroisoquinoline Phenols: Selective Estrogen Receptor Downregulator Antagonists with Oral Bioavailability in Rat.

    PubMed

    Scott, James S; Bailey, Andrew; Davies, Robert D M; Degorce, Sébastien L; MacFaul, Philip A; Gingell, Helen; Moss, Thomas; Norman, Richard A; Pink, Jennifer H; Rabow, Alfred A; Roberts, Bryan; Smith, Peter D

    2016-01-14

    A series of tetrahydroisoquinoline phenols was modified to give an estrogen receptor downregulator-antagonist profile. Optimization around the core, alkyl side chain, and pendant aryl ring resulted in compounds with subnanomolar levels of potency. The phenol functionality was shown to be required to achieve highly potent compounds, but unusually this was compatible with obtaining high oral bioavailabilities in rat.

  10. Tetrahydroisoquinoline Phenols: Selective Estrogen Receptor Downregulator Antagonists with Oral Bioavailability in Rat

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of tetrahydroisoquinoline phenols was modified to give an estrogen receptor downregulator-antagonist profile. Optimization around the core, alkyl side chain, and pendant aryl ring resulted in compounds with subnanomolar levels of potency. The phenol functionality was shown to be required to achieve highly potent compounds, but unusually this was compatible with obtaining high oral bioavailabilities in rat. PMID:26819673

  11. I. Effects of a Dopamine Receptor Antagonist on Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas ,Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used a 21 d fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction assay to test the hypothesis that exposure to the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) antagonist, haloperidol, would impair fish reproduction. Additionally, a 96 h experiment with fathead minnows and zebrafish (Danio ...

  12. Discovery of Heterobicyclic Templates for Novel Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Santosh S.; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2007-01-01

    Investigation of a series of heterobicyclic compounds with essential pharmacophoric features of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) antagonists MPEP and MTEP provided novel structural templates with sub-micromolar affinities at the mGluR5. PMID:17446071

  13. High potency antagonists of the pancreatic glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Montrose-Rafizadeh, C; Yang, H; Rodgers, B D; Beday, A; Pritchette, L A; Eng, J

    1997-08-22

    GLP-1-(7-36)-amide and exendin-4-(1-39) are glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, whereas exendin-(9-39) is the only known antagonist. To analyze the transition from agonist to antagonist and to identify the amino acid residues involved in ligand activation of the GLP-1 receptor, we used exendin analogs with successive N-terminal truncations. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the rat GLP-1 receptor were assayed for changes in intracellular cAMP caused by the test peptides in the absence or presence of half-maximal stimulatory doses of GLP-1. N-terminal truncation of a single amino acid reduced the agonist activity of the exendin peptide, whereas N-terminal truncation of 3-7 amino acids produced antagonists that were 4-10-fold more potent than exendin-(9-39). N-terminal truncation of GLP-1 by 2 amino acids resulted in weak agonist activity, but an 8-amino acid N-terminal truncation inactivated the peptide. Binding studies performed using 125I-labeled GLP-1 confirmed that all bioactive peptides specifically displaced tracer with high potency. In a set of exendin/GLP-1 chimeric peptides, substitution of GLP-1 sequences into exendin-(3-39) produced loss of antagonist activity with conversion to a weak agonist. The results show that receptor binding and activation occur in separate domains of exendin, but they are more closely coupled in GLP-1.

  14. Synthesis and SAR evaluation of 1,2,4-triazoles as A(2A) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Alanine, Alexander; Anselm, Lilli; Steward, Lucinda; Thomi, Stefan; Vifian, Walter; Groaning, Michael D

    2004-02-09

    The synthesis and in vitro structure-activity relationships (SAR) of a series of triazoles as A(2A) receptor antagonists is reported. This resulted in the identification of potent, selective and permeable 1,2,4-triazoles such as 42 for further optimization and evaluation in vivo.

  15. A Time-course Study with the Androgen Receptor Antagonist Flutamide in Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flutamide, a drug registered to treat some types of prostate cancer in humans, has been used for many years as a model androgen receptor (AR) antagonist in studies aimed at characterizing disruption of the vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Various studies hav...

  16. Cholecystokinin receptor antagonist halts progression of pancreatic cancer precursor lesions and fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jill P; Cooper, Timothy K; McGovern, Christopher O; Gilius, Evan L; Zhong, Qing; Liao, Jiangang; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Gutkind, J Silvio; Matters, Gail L

    2014-10-01

    Exogenous administration of cholecystokinin (CCK) induces hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the pancreas with an increase in DNA content. We hypothesized that endogenous CCK is involved in the malignant progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions and the fibrosis associated with pancreatic cancer. The presence of CCK receptors in early PanIN lesions was examined by immunohistochemistry in mouse and human pancreas. Pdx1-Cre/LSL-Kras transgenic mice were randomized to receive either untreated drinking water or water supplemented with a CCK receptor antagonist (proglumide, 0.1 mg/mL). Pancreas from the mice were removed and examined histologically for number and grade of PanINs after 1, 2, or 4 months of antagonist therapy. Both CCK-A and CCK-B receptors were identified in early stage PanINs from mouse and human pancreas. The grade of PanIN lesions was reversed, and progression to advanced lesions arrested in mice treated with proglumide compared with the controls (P = 0.004). Furthermore, pancreatic fibrosis was significantly reduced in antagonist-treated animals compared with vehicle (P < 0.001). These findings demonstrate that endogenous CCK is in part responsible for the development and progression of pancreatic cancer. The use of CCK receptor antagonists may have a role in cancer prophylaxis in high-risk subjects and may reduce fibrosis in the microenvironment.

  17. Generation of a highly diverse panel of antagonistic chicken monoclonal antibodies against the GIP receptor

    PubMed Central

    Könitzer, Jennifer D.; Pan, Qi; Augustin, Robert; Bandholtz, Sebastian; Harriman, William; Izquierdo, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Raising functional antibodies against G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is challenging due to their low density expression, instability in the absence of the cell membrane's lipid bilayer and frequently short extracellular domains that can serve as antigens. In addition, a particular therapeutic concept may require an antibody to not just bind the receptor, but also act as a functional receptor agonist or antagonist. Antagonizing the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor may open up new therapeutic modalities in the treatment of diabetes and obesity. As such, a panel of monoclonal antagonistic antibodies would be a useful tool for in vitro and in vivo proof of concept studies. The receptor is highly conserved between rodents and humans, which has contributed to previous mouse and rat immunization campaigns generating very few usable antibodies. Switching the immunization host to chicken, which is phylogenetically distant from mammals, enabled the generation of a large and diverse panel of monoclonal antibodies containing 172 unique sequences. Three-quarters of all chicken-derived antibodies were functional antagonists, exhibited high-affinities to the receptor extracellular domain and sampled a broad epitope repertoire. For difficult targets, including GPCRs such as GIPR, chickens are emerging as valuable immunization hosts for therapeutic antibody discovery. PMID:28055305

  18. Generation of a highly diverse panel of antagonistic chicken monoclonal antibodies against the GIP receptor.

    PubMed

    Könitzer, Jennifer D; Pramanick, Shreya; Pan, Qi; Augustin, Robert; Bandholtz, Sebastian; Harriman, William; Izquierdo, Shelley

    2017-01-05

    Raising functional antibodies against G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is challenging due to their low density expression, instability in the absence of the cell membrane's lipid bilayer and frequently short extracellular domains that can serve as antigens. In addition, a particular therapeutic concept may require an antibody to not just bind the receptor, but also act as a functional receptor agonist or antagonist. Antagonizing the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor may open up new therapeutic modalities in the treatment of diabetes and obesity. As such, a panel of monoclonal antagonistic antibodies would be a useful tool for in vitro and in vivo proof of concept studies. The receptor is highly conserved between rodents and humans, which has contributed to previous mouse and rat immunization campaigns generating very few usable antibodies. Switching the immunization host to chicken, which is phylogenetically distant from mammals, enabled the generation of a large and diverse panel of monoclonal antibodies containing 172 unique sequences. Three-quarters of all chicken-derived antibodies were functional antagonists, exhibited high-affinities to the receptor extracellular domain and sampled a broad epitope repertoire. For difficult targets, including GPCRs such as GIPR, chickens are emerging as valuable immunization hosts for therapeutic antibody discovery.

  19. Evaluation of adenine as scaffold for the development of novel P2X3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lambertucci, Catia; Sundukova, Mayya; Kachare, Dhuldeo D; Panmand, Deepak S; Dal Ben, Diego; Buccioni, Michela; Marucci, Gabriella; Marchenkova, Anna; Thomas, Ajiroghene; Nistri, Andrea; Cristalli, Gloria; Volpini, Rosaria

    2013-07-01

    Ligands that selectively block P2X3 receptors localized on nociceptive sensory fibres may be useful for the treatment of chronic pain conditions including neuropathic pain, migraine, and inflammatory pain. With the aim at exploring the suitability of adenine moiety as a scaffold for the development of antagonists of this receptor, a series of 9-benzyl-2-aminoadenine derivatives were designed and synthesized. These new compounds were functionally evaluated at rat or human P2X3 receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and on native P2X3 receptors from mouse trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons using patch clamp recording under voltage clamp configuration. The new molecules behaved as P2X3 antagonists, as they rapidly and reversibly inhibited (IC50 in the low micromolar range) the membrane currents induced via P2X3 receptor activation by the full agonist α,β-methyleneATP. Introduction of a small lipophilic methyl substituent at the 6-amino group enhanced the activity, in comparison to the corresponding unsubstituted derivative, resulting in the 9-(5-iodo-2-isopropyl-4-methoxybenzyl)-N(6)-methyl-9H-purine-2,6-diamine (24), which appears to be a good antagonist on recombinant and native P2X3 receptors with IC50 = 1.74 ± 0.21 μM.

  20. Agonist and antagonist protect sulfhydrals in the binding site of the D-1 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, A.; Kebabian, J.W.; Fishman, P.H.

    1986-05-01

    An iodinated compound (/sup 125/I)-SCH 23982 (8-iodo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine-7-ol) has been characterized as a specific, high affinity (Kd = 0.7 nM) ligand for the D-1 dopamine receptor. The ligand binding site of the D-1 receptor in rat striatum was inactivated by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) in a time and concentration dependent manner. The inactivation was rapid and irreversible with a 70% net loss of binding sites. Scatchard analysis of binding to NEM-treated tissue showed a decrease both in receptor number and in radioligand affinity. The remaining receptors retained their selectivity for stereoisomers of both agonist and antagonist. Receptor occupancy by either a D-1 specific agonist or antagonist protected in a dose dependent manner the binding sites from inactivation by NEM; the agonist was more effective than the antagonist. The agonist high affinity site, however, was abolished in the absence or presence of protective compound, presumably because of inactivation of the GTP-binding component of adenylate cyclase. In this regard, there was a total loss of agonist- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity after NEM treatment. The authors conclude that the D-1 dopamine receptor contains NEM-sensitive sulfhydral group(s) at or near the vicinity of the ligand binding site.

  1. Theoretical analysis of somatostatin receptor 5 with antagonists and agonists for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Santhosh Kumar; Babu, Sathya; Madhavan, Thirumurthy

    2017-02-02

    We report on SSTR5 receptor modeling and its interaction with reported antagonist and agonist molecules. Modeling of the SSTR5 receptor was carried out using multiple templates with the aim of improving the precision of the generated models. The selective SSTR5 antagonists, agonists and native somatostatin SRIF-14 were employed to propose the binding site of SSTR5 and to identify the critical residues involved in the interaction of the receptor with other molecules. Residues Q2.63, D3.32, Q3.36, C186, Y7.34 and Y7.42 were found to be highly significant for their strong interaction with the receptor. SSTR5 antagonists were utilized to perform a 3D quantitative structure-activity relationship study. A comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) was conducted using two different alignment schemes, namely the ligand-based and receptor-based alignment methods. The best statistical results were obtained for ligand-based ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] = 0.988, noc = 4) and receptor-guided methods (docked mode 1:[Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], noc = 5), (docked mode 2:[Formula: see text] = 0.555, [Formula: see text], noc = 5). Based on CoMFA contour maps, an electropositive substitution at [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] position and bulky group at [Formula: see text] position are important in enhancing molecular activity.

  2. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist.

    PubMed

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2012-01-25

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  3. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  4. In silico modelling of prostacyclin and other lipid mediators to nuclear receptors reveal novel thyroid hormone receptor antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    Perez Diaz, Noelia; Zloh, Mire; Patel, Pryank; Mackenzie, Louise S

    2016-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is a key mediator involved in cardiovascular homeostasis, acting predominantly on two receptor types; cell surface IP receptor and cytosolic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ. Having a very short half-life, direct methods to determine its long term effects on cells is difficult, and little is known of its interactions with nuclear receptors. Here we used computational chemistry methods to investigate the potential for PGI2, beraprost (IP receptor agonist), and GW0742 (PPARβ/δ agonist), to bind to nuclear receptors, confirmed with pharmacological methods. In silico screening predicted that PGI2, beraprost, and GW0742 have the potential to bind to different nuclear receptors, in particular thyroid hormone β receptor (TRβ) and thyroid hormone α receptor (TRα). Docking analysis predicts a binding profile to residues thought to have allosteric control on the TR ligand binding site. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that beraprost and GW0742 display TRβ and TRα antagonistic properties; beraprost IC50 6.3 × 10(-5)mol/L and GW0742 IC50 4.9 × 10(-6) mol/L. Changes to triiodothyronine (T3) induced vasodilation of rat mesenteric arteries measured on the wire myograph were measured in the presence of the TR antagonist MLS000389544 (10(-5) mol/L), beraprost (10(-5) mol/L) and GW0742 (10(-5) mol/L); all significantly inhibited T3 induced vasodilation compared to controls. We have shown that both beraprost and GW0742 exhibit TRβ and TRα antagonist behaviour, and suggests that PGI2 has the ability to affect the long term function of cells through binding to and inactivating thyroid hormone receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. TNF-α receptor antagonist attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    YANG, NENGLI; LIANG, YAFENG; YANG, PEI; WANG, WEIJIAN; ZHANG, XUEZHENG; WANG, JUNLU

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a common clinical in aged patients, is characterized by deficits in cognitive functions in patients following anesthesia and surgery. It has been demonstrated that isoflurane may lead to cognitive impairment in aged rats; however, effective clinical interventions for preventing this disorder are limited. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has been suggested to be involved in neuroinflammation as well as the development of POCD. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate whether TNF-α signaling is involved in the isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats, and whether TNF-α receptor antagonist are able to attenuate isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats. A population of 20-month-old rats were administered TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 or an equal volume of saline by intraperitoneal injection 12 h prior to exposure to isoflurane to model cognitive impairment following anesthesia in old patients. Then the rats were exposed to 1.3% isoflurane for 4 h. In the control group, rats showed impaired cognitive functions evaluated by Morris water maze assay after isoflurane exposure. Furthermore, isoflurane exposure induced marked upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in the hippocampus tissue. In the experimental group, intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 significantly attenuated isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Further investigation revealed that intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 notably suppressed isoflurane-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling. Collectively, the present results suggest that TNF-α receptor antagonist may serve as a potential agent for the prevention of anesthesia-induced cognitive decline in aged patients. PMID:27347079

  6. Current perspectives on selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonists as pharmacotherapeutics for addictions and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Heidbreder, Christian A.; Newman, Amy H.

    2011-01-01

    Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse produces long-term molecular and neurochemical changes that may explain the core features of addiction, such as the compulsive seeking and taking of the drug, as well as the risk of relapse. A growing number of new molecular and cellular targets of addictive drugs have been identified, and rapid advances are being made in relating those targets to specific behavioral phenotypes in animal models of addiction. In this context, the pattern of expression of the dopamine (DA) D3 receptor in the rodent and human brain and changes in this pattern in response to drugs of abuse have contributed primarily to direct research efforts toward the development of selective DA D3 receptor antagonists. Growing preclinical evidence indicates that these compounds may actually regulate the motivation to self-administer drugs and disrupt drug-associated cue-induced craving. This report will be divided into three parts. First, preclinical evidence in support of the efficacy of selective DA D3 receptor antagonists in animal models of drug addiction will be reviewed. The effects of mixed DA D2/D3 receptor antagonists will not be discussed here because most of these compounds have low selectivity at the D3 versus D2 receptor, and their efficacy profile is related primarily to functional antagonism at D2 receptors and possibly interactions with other neurotransmitter systems. Second, major advances in medicinal chemistry for the identification and optimization of selective DA D3 receptor antagonists and partial agonists will be analyzed. Third, translational research from preclinical efficacy studies to so-called proof-of-concept studies for drug addiction indications will be discussed. PMID:20201845

  7. Alpha-conotoxin GIC from Conus geographus, a novel peptide antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, J Michael; Dowell, Cheryl; Watkins, Maren; Garrett, James E; Yoshikami, Doju; Olivera, Baldomero M

    2002-09-13

    Many venomous organisms produce toxins that disrupt neuromuscular communication to paralyze their prey. One common class of such toxins comprises nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists (nAChRs). Thus, most toxins that act on nAChRs are targeted to the neuromuscular subtype. The toxin characterized in this report, alpha-conotoxin GIC, is a most striking exception. The 16-amino acid peptide was identified from a genomic DNA clone from Conus geographus. The predicted mature toxin was synthesized, and synthetic toxin was used in all studies described. alpha-Conotoxin GIC shows no paralytic activity in fish or mice. Furthermore, even at concentrations up to 100 microm, the peptide has no detectable effect on the human muscle nicotinic receptor subtype heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, the toxin has high affinity (IC(50) approximately 1.1 nm) for the human alpha3beta2 subunit combination, making it the most neuronally selective nicotinic antagonist characterized thus far. Although alpha-conotoxin GIC shares some sequence similarity with alpha-conotoxin MII, which is also a potent alpha3beta2 nicotinic antagonist, it is much less hydrophobic, and the kinetics of channel block are substantially different. It is noteworthy that the nicotinic ligands in C. geographus venom fit an emerging pattern in venomous predators, with one nicotinic antagonist targeted to the muscle subtype (thereby causing paralysis) and a second nicotinic antagonist targeted to the alpha3beta2 nAChR subtype (possibly inhibiting the fight-or-flight response).

  8. Therapeutic potential of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 antagonists as multifunctional agents.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Ohashi, Nami; Masuno, Hiroyuki; Tamamura, Hirokazu; Hiramatsu, Kenichi; Araki, Takanobu; Ueda, Satoshi; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2007-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 possesses multiple critical functions in normal and pathologic physiology. CXCR4 is a G-protein-coupled receptor that transduces signals of its endogenous ligand, the chemokine CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1, SDF-1). The interaction between CXCL12 and CXCR4 plays an important role in the migration of progenitors during embryologic development of the cardiovascular, hemopoietic, central nervous systems, and so on. This interaction is also known to be involved in several intractable disease processes, including HIV infection, cancer cell metastasis, leukemia cell progression, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and pulmonary fibrosis. It is conjectured that this interaction may be a critical therapeutic target in all of these diseases, and several CXCR4 antagonists have been proposed as potential drugs. Fourteen-mer peptides, T140 and its analogues, were previously developed in our laboratory as specific CXCR4 antagonists that were identified as HIV-entry inhibitors, anti-cancer-metastatic agents, anti-chronic lymphocytic/acute lymphoblastic leukemia agents, and anti-RA agents. Cyclic pentapeptides, such as FC131 [cyclo(D-Tyr-Arg-Arg-L-3-(2-naphthyl)alanine-Gly)], were also previously found as CXCR4 antagonist leads based on pharmacophores of T140. This review article describes the elucidation of multiple functions of CXCR4 antagonists and the development of a number of low-molecular weight CXCR4 antagonists involving FC131 analogues and other compounds with different scaffolds including linear-type structures.

  9. Inhibition of Ebola and Marburg Virus Entry by G Protein-Coupled Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Han; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Johansen, Lisa; Varhegyi, Elizabeth; Chen, Zheng W.; Olinger, Gene G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses, consisting of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV), are among the most lethal infectious threats to mankind. Infections by these viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans and nonhuman primates with high mortality rates. Since there is currently no vaccine or antiviral therapy approved for humans, there is an urgent need to develop prophylactic and therapeutic options for use during filoviral outbreaks and bioterrorist attacks. One of the ideal targets against filoviral infection and diseases is at the entry step, which is mediated by the filoviral glycoprotein (GP). In this report, we screened a chemical library of small molecules and identified numerous inhibitors, which are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs, including histamine receptors, 5-HT (serotonin) receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, and adrenergic receptor. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of both infectious EBOV and MARV, indicating a broad antiviral activity of the GPCR antagonists. The time-of-addition experiment and microscopic studies suggest that GPCR antagonists block filoviral entry at a step following the initial attachment but prior to viral/cell membrane fusion. These results strongly suggest that GPCRs play a critical role in filoviral entry and GPCR antagonists can be developed as an effective anti-EBOV/MARV therapy. IMPORTANCE Infection of Ebola virus and Marburg virus can cause severe illness in humans with a high mortality rate, and currently there is no FDA-approved vaccine or therapeutic treatment available. The 2013-2015 epidemic in West Africa underscores a lack of our understanding in the infection and pathogenesis of these viruses and the urgency of drug discovery and development. In this study, we have identified numerous inhibitors that are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of

  10. Major Depressive Disorder and Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Sun, Huijiao; Chen, Hao; Yang, Xicheng; Xiao, Li; Liu, Renyu; Shao, Liming; Qiu, Zhuibai

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disease worldwide. The clinical use of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)/serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRIs) for this condition have been widely accepted, but they were challenged by unacceptable side-effects, potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) or slow onset/lack of efficacy. The endogenous opioid system is involved in stress and emotion regulatory processes and its role in MDD has been implicated. Although several KOR antagonists including JDTic and PF-04455242 were discontinued in early clinical trials, ALKS 5461 and CERC-501(LY-2456302) survived and entered into Phase-III and Phase-II trials, respectively. Considering the efficacy and safety of early off-label use of buprenorphine in the management of the treatment-resistant depression (TRD), it will be not surprising to predict the potential success of ALKS 5461 (a combination of buprenorphine and ALKS-33) in the near future. Moreover, CERC-501 will be expected to be available as monotherapy or adjuvant therapy with other first-line antidepressants in the treatment of TRD, if ongoing clinical trials continue to provide positive benefit-risk profiles. Emerging new researches might bring more drug candidates targeting the endogenous opioid system to clinical trials to address current challenges in MDD treatment in clinical practice. PMID:27213169

  11. Radiosensitizing Effect of P2X7 Receptor Antagonist on Melanoma in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tanamachi, Keisuke; Nishino, Keisuke; Mori, Natsuki; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Tanuma, Sei-Ichi; Abe, Ryo; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-03-24

    Melanoma is highly malignant, and generally exhibits radioresistance, responding poorly to radiation therapy. We previously reported that activation of P2X7, P2Y6, and P2Y12 receptors is involved in the DNA damage response after γ-irradiation of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. However, it is not clear whether these receptors are also involved in the case of melanoma cells, although P2X7 receptor is highly expressed in various cancers, including melanoma. Here, we show that P2X7 receptor antagonist enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in B16 melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. We confirmed that these cells express P2X7 receptor mRNA and exhibit P2X7 receptor-mediated activities, such as ATP-induced pore formation and cytotoxicity. We further examined the radiosensitizing effect of P2X7 receptor antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG) in vitro by colony formation assay of B16 cells. γ-Irradiation dose-dependently reduced cell survival, and pretreatment with BBG enhanced the radiation-induced cytotoxicity. BBG pretreatment also decreased the number of DNA repair foci in nuclei, supporting involvement of P2X7 receptor in the DNA damage response. Finally, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of BBG on B16 melanoma cells inoculated into the hind footpad of C57BL/6 mice. Neither 1 Gy γ-irradiation alone nor BBG alone suppressed the increase of tumor volume, but the combination of irradiation and BBG significantly suppressed tumor growth. Our results suggest that P2X7 receptor antagonist BBG has a radiosensitizing effect in melanoma in vitro and in vivo. BBG, which is used as a food coloring agent, appears to be a promising candidate as a radiosensitizer.

  12. N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Antagonists Have Variable Affect in 3-Nitropropionic Acid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Carbery, Timothy; Geddes, James W.

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that excitotoxicity and oxidative stress resulting from excessive activation of glutamate (N-methyl-d-aspartate) NMDA receptors are major participants in striatal degeneration associated with 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) administration. Although excitotoxic and oxidative mechanisms are implicated in 3NP toxicity, there are conflicting reports as to whether NMDA receptor antagonists attenuate or exacerbate the 3NP-induced neurodegeneration. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of NMDA receptors in striatal degeneration, protein oxidation and motor impairment following systemic 3NP administration. We examined whether NMDA receptor antagonists, memantine and ifenprodil, influence the neurotoxicity of 3NP. The development of striatal lesion and protein oxidation following 3NP administration is delayed by memantine but not affected by ifenprodil. However, in behavioral experiments, memantine failed to improve and ifenprodil exacerbated the motor deficits associated with 3NP toxicity. Together, these findings suggest caution in the application of NMDA receptor antagonists as a neuroprotective agent in neurodegenerative disorders associated with metabolic impairment. PMID:18688711

  13. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists have variable affect in 3-nitropropionic acid toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Payman; Carbery, Timothy; Geddes, James W

    2009-03-01

    There is accumulating evidence that excitotoxicity and oxidative stress resulting from excessive activation of glutamate (N-methyl-D-aspartate) NMDA receptors are major participants in striatal degeneration associated with 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) administration. Although excitotoxic and oxidative mechanisms are implicated in 3NP toxicity, there are conflicting reports as to whether NMDA receptor antagonists attenuate or exacerbate the 3NP-induced neurodegeneration. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of NMDA receptors in striatal degeneration, protein oxidation and motor impairment following systemic 3NP administration. We examined whether NMDA receptor antagonists, memantine and ifenprodil, influence the neurotoxicity of 3NP. The development of striatal lesion and protein oxidation following 3NP administration is delayed by memantine but not affected by ifenprodil. However, in behavioral experiments, memantine failed to improve and ifenprodil exacerbated the motor deficits associated with 3NP toxicity. Together, these findings suggest caution in the application of NMDA receptor antagonists as a neuroprotective agent in neurodegenerative disorders associated with metabolic impairment.

  14. Dopamine D3 Receptor Antagonists as Potential Therapeutics for the Treatment of Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Maramai, Samuele; Gemma, Sandra; Brogi, Simone; Campiani, Giuseppe; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger; Brindisi, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    D3 receptors represent a major focus of current drug design and development of therapeutics for dopamine-related pathological states. Their close homology with the D2 receptor subtype makes the development of D3 selective antagonists a challenging task. In this review, we explore the relevance and therapeutic utility of D3 antagonists or partial agonists endowed with multireceptor affinity profile in the field of central nervous system disorders such as schizophrenia and drug abuse. In fact, the peculiar distribution and low brain abundance of D3 receptors make them a valuable target for the development of drugs devoid of motor side effects classically elicited by D2 antagonists. Recent research efforts were devoted to the conception of chemical templates possibly endowed with a multi-target profile, especially with regards to other G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). A comprehensive overview of the recent literature in the field is herein provided. In particular, the evolution of the chemical templates has been tracked, according to the growing advancements in both the structural information and the refinement of the key pharmacophoric elements. The receptor/multireceptor affinity and functional profiles for the examined compounds have been covered, together with their most significant pharmacological applications. PMID:27761108

  15. Rodent antinociception following acute treatment with different histamine receptor agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Farzin, Davood; Asghari, Ladan; Nowrouzi, Mahvash

    2002-06-01

    The effects of different histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on the nociceptive threshold were investigated in mice by two different kinds of noxious stimuli: thermal (hot plate) and chemical (acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing). Intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of the histamine H(1) receptor agonist, HTMT (6-[2-(4-imidazolyl)ethylamino]-N-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl) heptanecarboxamide) (50 microg/mouse), produced a hypernociception in the hot plate and writhing tests. Conversely, intraperitoneal (ip) injection of dexchlorpheniramine (30 and 40 mg/kg) and diphenhydramine (20 and 40 mg/kg) increased the pain threshold in both tests. The histamine H(2) receptor agonist, dimaprit (50 and 100 microg/mouse icv), or antagonist, ranitidine (50 and 100 microg/mouse icv), raised the pain threshold in both hot plate and writhing tests. In the mouse hot plate test, the histamine H(3) receptor agonist, imetit (50 mg/kg ip), reduced the pain threshold, while the histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, thioperamide (10 and 20 mg/kg ip), produced an antinociception. The hypernociceptive effects of HTMT and imetit were antagonized by dexchlorpheniramine (20 mg/kg ip) and thioperamide (5 mg/kg ip), respectively. The results suggest that histaminergic mechanisms may be involved in the modulation of nociceptive stimuli.

  16. Mixed antagonistic effects of the ginkgolides at recombinant human ρ1 GABAC receptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shelley H; Lewis, Trevor M; Lummis, Sarah C R; Thompson, Andrew J; Chebib, Mary; Johnston, Graham A R; Duke, Rujee K

    2012-11-01

    The diterpene lactones of Ginkgo biloba, ginkgolides A, B and C are antagonists at a range of Cys-loop receptors. This study examined the effects of the ginkgolides at recombinant human ρ(1) GABA(C) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes using two-electrode voltage clamp. The ginkgolides were moderately potent antagonists with IC(50)s in the μM range. At 10 μM, 30 μM and 100 μM, the ginkgolides caused rightward shifts of GABA dose-response curves and reduced maximal GABA responses, characteristic of noncompetitive antagonists, while the potencies showed a clear dependence on GABA concentration, indicating apparent competitive antagonism. This suggests that the ginkgolides exert a mixed-type antagonism at the ρ(1) GABA(C) receptors. The ginkgolides did not exhibit any obvious use-dependent inhibition. Fitting of the data to a number of kinetic schemes suggests an allosteric inhibition as a possible mechanism of action of the ginkgolides which accounts for their inhibition of the responses without channel block or use-dependent inhibition. Kinetic modelling predicts that the ginkgolides exhibit saturation of antagonism at high concentrations of GABA, but this was only partially observed for ginkgolide B. It also suggests that there may be different binding sites in the closed and open states of the receptor, with a higher affinity for the receptor in the closed state.

  17. Central administration of GPR55 receptor agonist and antagonist modulates anxiety-related behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Abbasali; Hajizadeh Moghaddam, Akbar; Roohbakhsh, Ali

    2015-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) has been proposed as an atypical cannabinoid receptor, which is activated by lysophosphatidylinositols and some synthetic or endogenous cannabinoid molecules. The exact role of GPR55 receptors in the central nervous system especially in anxiety needs to be evaluated. In this study, the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of agonist and antagonist of GPR55 receptor on anxiety-related behaviors in rats were investigated. Here, O-1602 (GPR55 agonist) at the doses of 0.2, 1, and 5 μg/rat increased %OAT and %OAE but not the locomotor activity, showing an anxiolytic response, whereas i.c.v. injection of ML193 (GPR55 antagonist) at the doses of 0.1 and 1 μg/rat increased anxiety-like behaviors while causing locomotor impairment. The antagonistic effect of ML193 on the anxiolytic-like effect of O-1602 was also evaluated. The results showed that ML193 decreased the anxiolytic-like effect of O-1602. Based on these results, it may be concluded that central GPR55 may have a role in modulation of anxiety-like behaviors in rats. Further experiments are needed to elucidate the exact role of these receptors in anxiety.

  18. In dermographic urticaria H2 receptor antagonists have a small but therapeutically irrelevant additional effect compared with H1 antagonists alone.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, G R; Shuster, S

    1993-11-01

    Two studies of the additional effect of an H2 receptor antagonist when given in combination with an H1 antagonist were undertaken in dermographic urticaria. Using a randomized, double-blind, crossover design in 19 patients, a combination of cetirizine (10 mg at night) and ranitidine (150 mg twice daily) was compared with a combination of cetirizine (10 mg at night) and placebo. The addition of ranitidine did not produce any significant difference in linear analogue scores for weal, itch or sleep disturbance. There was a significant depression of the frictional force/wealing response curve with an increase in wealing threshold (P < 0.0001) following the addition of H2 blockade. The wealing threshold was 54.7 +/- 4.4 (mean +/- SEM) g/mm2 for the H1 antagonist alone, and 73.2 +/- 5.7 for the combination of H1 and H2 antagonists. In a second similar study involving nine different patients, comparing terfenadine (120 mg twice daily) with a combination of terfenadine and ranitidine (150 mg twice daily), the weal threshold was 59.8 +/- 6.6 for the H1 antagonist alone, and 73.0 +/- 6.4 for the combination of H1 and H2 antagonists. Thus, in dermographic urticaria, adding an H2 antagonist to treatment with a potent H1 antagonist gives a small, significant reduction in wealing response, but no symptomatic benefit. We conclude that involvement of the H2 receptor in this urticarial disease is minimal, and does not justify the use of H2 receptor antagonists.

  19. Identification of a GPER/GPR30 Antagonist with Improved Estrogen Receptor Counterselectivity

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Megan K.; Field, Angela S.; Burai, Ritwik; Ramesh, Chinnasamy; Petrie, Whitney K.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Yamaguchi, Yuri; Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Sklar, S. Larry A.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.; Prossnitz, Eric R.

    2011-01-01

    GPER/GPR30 is a seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled estrogen receptor that regulates many aspects of mammalian biology and physiology. We have previously described both a GPER-selective agonist G-1 and antagonist G15 based on a tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinoline scaffold. The antagonist lacks an ethanone moiety that likely forms important hydrogen bonds involved in receptor activation. Computational docking studies suggested that the lack of the ethanone substituent in G15 could minimize key steric conflicts, present in G-1, that limit binding within the ERα ligand binding pocket. In this report, we identify low-affinity cross-reactivity of the GPER antagonist G15 to the classical estrogen receptor ERα. To generate an antagonist with enhanced selectivity, we therefore synthesized an isosteric G-1 derivative, G36, containing an isopropyl moiety in place of the ethanone moiety. We demonstrate that G36 shows decreased binding and activation of ERα, while maintaining its antagonist profile towards GPER. G36 selectively inhibits estrogen-mediated activation of PI3K by GPER but not ERα. It also inhibits estrogen- and G-1-mediated calcium mobilization as well as ERK1/2 activation, with no effect on EGF-mediated ERK1/2 activation. Similar to G15, G36 inhibits estrogen- and G-1-stimulated proliferation of uterine epithelial cells in vivo. The identification of G36 as a GPER antagonist with improved ER counterselectivity represents a significant step towards the development of new highly selective therapeutics for cancer and other diseases. PMID:21782022

  20. Histamine H3 receptor antagonists: from target identification to drug leads.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, P; Letavic, M; Dugovic, C; Wilson, S; Aluisio, L; Pudiak, C; Lord, B; Mazur, C; Kamme, F; Nishino, S; Carruthers, N; Lovenberg, T

    2007-04-15

    The successful cloning and functional expression of the histamine H(3) receptor in the late 1990 s has greatly facilitated our efforts to identify small molecule, non-imidazole based compounds to permit the evaluation of H(3) antagonists in models of CNS disorders. High-throughput screening identified several series of lead compounds, including a series of imidazopyridines, which led to JNJ-6379490, a compound with high affinity for the human H(3) receptor. Analysis of structural features common to several series of non-imidazole H(3) receptor ligands resulted in a pharmacophore model. This model led to the design of JNJ-5207852, a diamine-based H(3) antagonist with good in vitro and in vivo efficacy but with an undesirable long half-life. However, further modifications of the template provided an understanding of the effect of structural modifications on pharmacokinetic properties, ultimately affording several additional series of compounds including JNJ-10181457, a compound with an improved pharmacokinetic profile. These compounds allowed in vivo pharmacological evaluation to show that H(3) antagonists promote wakefulness, but unlike modafinil and classical psychostimultants, they do not increase locomotor activity or produce any alteration of the EEG power spectral activity in rats. H(3) antagonists also increase extracellular acetylcholine and norepinephrine but not dopamine in rat frontal cortex and show efficacy in various models of learning-memory deficit. In addition, cFos immunoreactivity studies show H(3) antagonists activate neuronal cells in restricted rat brain regions in contrast to widespread activation after modafinil or amphetamine treatment. Therefore, H(3) antagonists are promising clinical candidates for the treatment of excessive day time sleepiness and/or cognitive disorders.

  1. Small-molecule endothelin receptor antagonists: a review of patenting activity across therapeutic areas.

    PubMed

    Mucke, Hermann A M

    2009-06-01

    In the field of nonpeptide NCEs with endothelin receptor antagonist activity, a burst in corporate IP filings occurred in the 1990s once the human endothelin system had been characterized, but patent activity has declined in the past decade. Universities have not been active in this area of research to a degree that would have led to many patent applications. While three endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxentan and ambrisentan) are already available for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, the use of such compounds for the larger therapy areas of heart failure, cancer and nephropathy is still being evaluated in late-stage clinical trials. Marketed and advanced-stage endothelin receptor blockers have remarkably little chemical diversity; thus, the substantially larger chemical space defined by patenting remains to be explored.

  2. Neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Fahad

    2012-07-01

    Chemotherapy can be a life-prolonging treatment for many cancer patients, but it is often associated with profound nausea and vomiting that is so distressing that patients may delay or decline treatment to avoid these side effects. The discovery of several NK1 receptor antagonists is a big revolution to dealt this problem. NK1 receptor antagonists prevent both acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). These agents act centrally at NK-1 receptors in vomiting centers within the central nervous system to block their activation by substance P released as an unwanted consequence of chemotherapy. By controlling nausea and vomiting, these agents help improve patients' daily living and their ability to complete multiple cycles of chemotherapy. They are effective for both moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy regimens. Their use might be associated with increased infection rates; however, additional appraisal of specific data from RCTs is needed.

  3. Selective opioid growth factor receptor antagonists based on a stilbene isostere.

    PubMed

    Stockdale, David P; Titunick, Michelle B; Biegler, Jessica M; Reed, Jessie L; Hartung, Alyssa M; Wiemer, David F; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Neighbors, Jeffrey D

    2017-08-15

    As part of an ongoing drug development effort aimed at selective opioid receptor ligands based on the pawhuskin natural products we have synthesized a small set of amide isosteres. These amides were centered on lead compounds which are selective antagonists for the delta and kappa opioid receptors. The amide isomers revealed here show dramatically different activity from the parent stilbene compounds. Three of the isomers synthesized showed antagonist activity for the opioid growth factor (OGF)/opioid growth factor receptor (OGFR) axis which is involved in cellular and organ growth control. This cellular signaling mechanism is targeted by "low-dose" naltrexone therapy which is being tested clinically for multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease, cancer, and wound healing disorders. The compounds described here are the first selective small molecule ligands for the OGF/OGFR system and will serve as important leads and probes for further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Therapeutic Opportunities for Caffeine and A2A Receptor Antagonists in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boia, Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine, the major component of coffee, is the most consumed psychostimulant in the world. Caffeine is an adenosine analog and acts as a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. The majority of the effects of caffeine are mainly mediated by the blockade of adenosine receptors, and the proved neuroprotective effects of caffeine in brain disorders have been mimicked by the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of brain and retinal diseases. Moreover, the control of microglia reactivity by blocking A2AR has been proposed to be the mechanism underlying the observed protective effects of caffeine. Hence, it is conceivable that caffeine and A2AR antagonists offer therapeutic value for the treatment of retinal diseases, mainly those involving microglia-mediated neuroinflammation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Assembly of high-affinity insulin receptor agonists and antagonists from peptide building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, Lauge; Brissette, Renee E.; Spetzler, Jane C.; Pillutla, Renuka C.; Østergaard, Søren; Lennick, Michael; Brandt, Jakob; Fletcher, Paul W.; Danielsen, Gillian M.; Hsiao, Ku-Chuan; Andersen, Asser S.; Dedova, Olga; Ribel, Ulla; Hoeg-Jensen, Thomas; Hertz Hansen, Per; Blume, Arthur J.; Markussen, Jan; Goldstein, Neil I.

    2003-04-01

    Insulin is thought to elicit its effects by crosslinking the two extracellular -subunits of its receptor, thereby inducing a conformational change in the receptor, which activates the intracellular tyrosine kinase signaling cascade. Previously we identified a series of peptides binding to two discrete hotspots on the insulin receptor. Here we show that covalent linkage of such peptides into homodimers or heterodimers results in insulin agonists or antagonists, depending on how the peptides are linked. An optimized agonist has been shown, both in vitro and in vivo, to have a potency close to that of insulin itself. The ability to construct such peptide derivatives may offer a path for developing agonists or antagonists for treatment of a wide variety of diseases.

  6. Two affinities for a single antagonist at the neuronal NK1 tachykinin receptor: evidence from quantitation of receptor endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, Karl M; Southwell, Bridget R; Furness, John B

    1999-01-01

    In smooth muscle contractility assays, many NK1 receptor (NK1r) antagonists inhibit responses to the neurotransmitter, substance P (SP), and its analogue, septide, with markedly different potency, leading to the proposal that there is a septide-preferring receptor related to the NK1r.We used fluorescence immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy to visualize agonist-induced NK1r endocytosis and analyse agonist/antagonist interactions at native NK1r in neurons of the myenteric plexus of guinea-pig ileum.SP and septide gave sigmoid log concentration-response curves and were equipotent in inducing NK1r endocytosis.The NK1r antagonists, CP-99994 (2S,3S)-3-(2-methoxybenzyl)amino-2-phenylpiperidine dihydrochloride and MEN-10581, cyclo(Leuψ[CH2NH]Lys(benzyloxycarbonyl)-Gln-Trp-Phe-βAla) were both more potent in inhibiting endocytosis (50× and 8× greater respectively) against septide than against SP.The results suggest that SP and septide interact differently with the NK1r, and that a single antagonist can exhibit different affinities at a single NK1r population, depending on the agonist with which it competes. Thus it may not be necessary to posit a separate septide-preferring tachykinin receptor. PMID:10051129

  7. Effect of iontophoretical application of NK1 receptor antagonists on pulpal blood flow in cats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kyung; Chu, Wan-sik; Lee, Ho-Jeong; Ahn, Dong-Kuk; Kim, Sung Kyo

    2005-09-01

    The influence of NK1 receptor antagonists applied iontophoretically on pulpal blood flow (PBF) was investigated. Along with substance P (SP, 0.8 approximately 20.0 ng/kg) administration to the canine pulp through the catheterized lingual artery, two NK1 receptor antagonists, [D-Pro2,D-Trp7,9]-SP and [D-Pro2,D-Phe7,D-Trp9]-SP (0.2 approximately 3.4 mM) were applied iontophoretically (cathodal current, 0.02 approximately 0.1 mA, 1 min) to the prepared class V dentinal cavity of ipsilateral teeth in 11 generally anesthetized cats. A paired t-test showed that SP administration caused significant increases of PBF (p < 0.05) without changing systemic blood pressure, and that SP and SP antagonist administration caused significantly less increase of PBF than in control of SP and 0.9% saline administration (p < 0.05). These data provide evidence that the iontophoretic application of NK1 receptor antagonists effectively attenuates SP-induced vasodilatation and show the possibility of their use in the control of neurogenic inflammation in the dental pulp.

  8. Glutamate NMDA receptor antagonists rapidly reverse behavioral and synaptic deficits caused by chronic stress exposure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nanxin; Liu, Rong-Jian; Dwyer, Jason M.; Banasr, Mounira; Lee, Boyoung; Son, Hyeon; Li, Xiao-Yuan; Aghajanian, George; Duman, Ronald S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite widely reported clinical and preclinical studies of rapid antidepressant actions of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonists, there has been very little work examining the effects of these drugs in stress models of depression that require chronic administration of antidepressants, or the molecular mechanisms that could account for the rapid responses. Methods We used a rat 21-day chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) model to test the rapid actions of NMDA receptor antagonists on depressant-like behavior, neurochemistry, and spine density and synaptic function of prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons. Results The results demonstrate that acute treatment with the non-competitive NMDA channel blocker ketamine or the selective NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981 rapidly ameliorates CUS-induced anhedonia and anxiogenic behaviors. We also find that CUS exposure decreases the expression levels of synaptic proteins and spine number and the frequency/amplitude of synaptic currents (EPSCs) in layer V pyramidal neurons in the PFC, and that these deficits are rapidly reversed by ketamine. Blockade of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein synthesis cascade abolishes both the behavioral and biochemical effects of ketamine. Conclusions The results indicate that the structural and functional deficits resulting from long-term stress exposure, which could contribute to the pathophysiology of depression, are rapidly reversed by NMDA receptor antagonists in an mTOR-dependent manner. PMID:21292242

  9. Methylnaltrexone, a novel peripheral opioid receptor antagonist for the treatment of opioid side effects.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chun-Su; Israel, Robert J

    2006-05-01

    Methylnaltrexone is an investigational peripheral opioid receptor antagonist, a quaternary derivative of naltrexone. Methylnaltrexone has greater polarity and lower lipid solubility, thus it does not cross the blood-brain barrier in humans. Methylnaltrexone offers the therapeutic potential to block or reverse the undesired side effects of opioids that are mediated by receptors located in the periphery (e.g., in the gastrointestinal tract), without affecting analgesia or precipitating the opioid withdrawal symptoms that are predominantly mediated by receptors in the CNS. This article reviews preclinical studies and clinical opioid bowel dysfunction trial data, and briefly discusses other potential roles of this compound in clinical practice.

  10. Blonanserin, an antipsychotic and dopamine D₂/D₃receptor antagonist, and ameliorated alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Manabu; Ujike, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Blonanserin (BNS) is used for treatment of both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia in Japan and Korea. Because BNS has weak α1 receptor blocking activities and is almost devoid of histamine H1 and muscarinic M1 antagonist activity, BNS is better tolerated than other atypical antipsychotics. A high degree of D₃ receptor blockage is reported to be predictive of drug abuse and alcoholism, and BNS has strong D₃ receptor antagonism. Thus, BNS may be useful in the treatment of alcoholism. We present a case in which BNS ameliorated alcohol dependence.

  11. Suppression of conditioned nicotine and sucrose seeking by the cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist SR141716A.

    PubMed

    De Vries, Taco J; de Vries, Wendy; Janssen, Mieke C W; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M

    2005-06-03

    The present study shows that the selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A attenuated responding for both nicotine- and sucrose-associated stimuli in a long-term extinction-reinstatement model. The results suggest that endocannabinoids play a general role in modulating cue reactivity or conditioned reinforcement following prolonged abstinence of both drug and natural reinforcers. In line with previous preclinical and recent clinical observations, our results provide a strong rationale for the use of CB1 antagonists in the treatment of addictive behaviors.

  12. Identification of clinical candidates from the benzazepine class of histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David M; Apps, James; Bailey, Nicholas; Bamford, Mark J; Beresford, Isabel J; Brackenborough, Kim; Briggs, Michael A; Brough, Stephen; Calver, Andrew R; Crook, Barry; Davis, Rebecca K; Davis, Robert P; Davis, Susannah; Dean, David K; Harris, Leanne; Heslop, Teresa; Holland, Vicky; Jeffrey, Phillip; Panchal, Terrance A; Parr, Christopher A; Quashie, Nigel; Schogger, Joanne; Sehmi, Sanjeet S; Stean, Tania O; Steadman, Jon G A; Trail, Brenda; Wald, Jeffrey; Worby, Angela; Takle, Andrew K; Witherington, Jason; Medhurst, Andrew D

    2013-12-15

    This Letter describes the discovery of GSK189254 and GSK239512 that were progressed as clinical candidates to explore the potential of H3 receptor antagonists as novel therapies for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. By carefully controlling the physicochemical properties of the benzazepine series and through the implementation of an aggressive and innovative screening strategy that employed high throughput in vivo assays to efficiently triage compounds, the medicinal chemistry effort was able to rapidly progress the benzazepine class of H3 antagonists through to the identification of clinical candidates with robust in vivo efficacy and excellent developability properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of β-amino-carbonyl compounds as androgen receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-yun; Zhu, Yan-hui; Zhou, Cai-hong; Liu, Qing; Lu, Hui-li; Ge, Yun-jun; Wang, Ming-wei

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Androgen receptor (AR) antagonists have proven to be useful in the early control of prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize a novel β-amino-carbonyl-based androgen receptor antagonist. Methods: Different isomers of the β-amino-carbonyl compounds were obtained by chiral separation. The bioactivities of the isomers were evaluated by AR nuclear translocation, mammalian two-hybrid, competitive receptor binding and cell proliferation assays. The expression of genes downstream of AR was analyzed with real-time PCR. The therapeutic effects on tumor growth in vivo were observed in male SCID mice bearing LNCaP xenografts. Results: Compound 21 was previously identified as an AR modulator by the high-throughput screening of a diverse compound library. In the present study, the two isomers of compound 21, termed compounds 21-1 and 21-2, were characterized as partial AR agonists in terms of androgen-induced AR nuclear translocation, prostate-specific antigen expression and cell proliferation. Further structural modifications led to the discovery of a androgen receptor antagonist (compound 6012), which blocked androgen receptor nuclear translocation, androgen-responsive gene expression and androgen-dependent LNCaP cell proliferation. Four stereoisomers of compound 6012 were isolated, and their bioactivities were assessed. The pharmacological effects of 6012, including AR binding, androgen-induced AR translocation, NH2- and COOH-terminal interaction, growth inhibition of LNCaP cells in vitro and LNCaP xenograft growth in nude mice, were mainly restricted to isomer 6012-4 (1R, 3S). Conclusion: Compound 6012-4 was determined to be a novel androgen receptor antagonist with prostate cancer inhibitory activities comparable to bicalutamide both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24786235

  14. Serotonin receptor antagonists discriminate between PKA- and PKC-mediated plasticity in aplysia sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Dumitriu, Bogdan; Cohen, Jonathan E; Wan, Qin; Negroiu, Andreea M; Abrams, Thomas W

    2006-04-01

    Highly selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptor antagonists developed for mammals are ineffective in Aplysia due to the evolutionary divergence of neurotransmitter receptors and because the higher ionic strength of physiological saline for marine invertebrates reduces antagonist affinity. It has therefore been difficult to identify antagonists that specifically block individual signaling cascades initiated by 5-HT. We studied two broad-spectrum 5-HT receptor antagonists that have been characterized biochemically in Aplysia CNS: methiothepin and spiperone. Methiothepin is highly effective in inhibiting adenylyl cyclase (AC)-coupled 5-HT receptors in Aplysia. Spiperone, which blocks phospholipase C (PLC)-coupled 5-HT receptors in mammals, does not block AC-coupled 5-HT receptors in Aplysia. In electrophysiological studies, we explored whether methiothepin and spiperone can be used in parallel to distinguish between the AC-cAMP and PLC-protein kinase C (PKC) modulatory cascades that are initiated by 5-HT. 5-HT-induced broadening of the sensory neuron action potential in the presence of tetraethylammonium/nifedipine, which is mediated by modulation of the S-K+ currents, was used an assay for the AC-cAMP cascade. Spike broadening initiated by 5 microM 5-HT was unaffected by 100 microM spiperone, whereas it was effectively blocked by 100 microM methiothepin. Facilitation of highly depressed sensory neuron-to-motor neuron synapses by 5-HT was used as an assay for the PLC-PKC cascade. Spiperone completely blocked facilitation of highly depressed synapses by 5 microM 5-HT. In contrast, methiothepin produced a modest, nonsignificant, reduction in the facilitation of depressed synapses. Interestingly, these experiments revealed that the PLC-PKC cascade undergoes desensitization during exposure to 5-HT.

  15. Structure-based discovery of antagonists of nuclear receptor LRH-1.

    PubMed

    Benod, Cindy; Carlsson, Jens; Uthayaruban, Rubatharshini; Hwang, Peter; Irwin, John J; Doak, Allison K; Shoichet, Brian K; Sablin, Elena P; Fletterick, Robert J

    2013-07-05

    Liver receptor homolog 1 (nuclear receptor LRH-1, NR5A2) is an essential regulator of gene transcription, critical for maintenance of cell pluripotency in early development and imperative for the proper functions of the liver, pancreas, and intestines during the adult life. Although physiological hormones of LRH-1 have not yet been identified, crystallographic and biochemical studies demonstrated that LRH-1 could bind regulatory ligands and suggested phosphatidylinositols as potential hormone candidates for this receptor. No synthetic antagonists of LRH-1 are known to date. Here, we identify the first small molecule antagonists of LRH-1 activity. Our search for LRH-1 modulators was empowered by screening of 5.2 million commercially available compounds via molecular docking followed by verification of the top-ranked molecules using in vitro direct binding and transcriptional assays. Experimental evaluation of the predicted ligands identified two compounds that inhibit the transcriptional activity of LRH-1 and diminish the expression of the receptor's target genes. Among the affected transcriptional targets are co-repressor SHP (small heterodimer partner) as well as cyclin E1 (CCNE1) and G0S2 genes that are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation. Treatments of human pancreatic (AsPC-1), colon (HT29), and breast adenocarcinoma cells T47D and MDA-MB-468 with the LRH-1 antagonists resulted in the receptor-mediated inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our data suggest that specific antagonists of LRH-1 could be used as specific molecular probes for elucidating the roles of the receptor in different types of malignancies.

  16. Correlation between the plasma concentration of mepirodipine and its occupancy of Ca2+ antagonist receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Matsuoka, Y; Kimura, R

    1993-09-01

    The relationship between the plasma concentration of mepirodipine (1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+ antagonist) and its occupancy of cardiac and cerebral Ca2+ antagonist receptors in rats has been characterized by a radioreceptor assay technique using (+)-[3H]PN 200-110. Oral administration of mepirodipine in rats produced a dose-dependent and sustained decrease in the number of specific (+)-[3H]PN 200-110 binding sites in both tissues, and the effect was more pronounced in the cardiac tissue than in the cerebral cortex. The occupancy of cardiac and cerebral Ca2+ antagonist receptors by mepirodipine correlated well with its plasma concentration, whereas a 20-fold higher plasma concentration of this drug was necessary to occupy Ca2+ antagonist receptors in the cerebral cortex. Thus, these data suggest that mepirodipine occupies Ca2+ antagonist receptors in cardiovascular tissue selectively over those in brain tissue.

  17. Species differences in the effects of the κ-opioid receptor antagonist zyklophin

    PubMed Central

    Sirohi, Sunil; Aldrich, Jane V.; Walker, Brendan M.

    2016-01-01

    We have shown that dysregulation of the dynorphin/kappa-opioid receptor (DYN/KOR) system contributes to escalated alcohol self-administration in alcohol dependence and that KOR antagonists with extended durations of action selectively reduce escalated alcohol consumption in alcohol-dependent animals. As KOR antagonism has gained widespread attention as a potential therapeutic target to treat alcoholism and multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, we tested the effect of zyklophin (a short-acting KOR antagonist) on escalated alcohol self-administration in rats made alcohol-dependent using intermittent alcohol vapor exposure. Following dependence induction, zyklophin was infused centrally prior to alcohol self-administration sessions and locomotor activity tests during acute withdrawal. Zyklophin did not impact alcohol self-administration or locomotor activity in either exposure condition. To investigate the neurobiological basis of this atypical effect for a KOR antagonist, we utilized a κ-, μ-, and δ-opioid receptor agonist-stimulated GTPyS coupling assay to examine the opioid receptor specificity of zyklophin in the rat brain and mouse brain. In rats, zyklophin did not affect U50488-, DAMGO-, or DADLE-stimulated GTPyS coupling, whereas the prototypical KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI) attenuated U50488-induced stimulation in the rat brain tissue at concentrations that did not impact μ- and δ-receptor function. To reconcile the discrepancy between the present rat data and published mouse data, comparable GTPyS assays were conducted using mouse brain tissue; zyklophin effects were consistent with KOR antagonism in mice. Moreover, at higher concentrations, zyklophin exhibited agonist properties in rat and mouse brains. These results identify species differences in zyklophin efficacy that, given the rising interest in the development of short-duration KOR antagonists, should provide valuable information for therapeutic development efforts. PMID:26992699

  18. Halogenation of a capsaicin analogue leads to novel vanilloid TRPV1 receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Appendino, Giovanni; Harrison, Selena; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Daddario, Nives; Bianchi, Federica; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; Trevisani, Marcello; Benvenuti, Francesca; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    The C-5 halogenation of the vanillyl moiety of resiniferatoxin, an ultrapotent agonist of vanilloid TRPV1 receptors, results in a potent antagonist for these receptors. Here, we have synthesized a series of halogenated derivatives of ‘synthetic capsaicin' (nonanoyl vanillamide=nordihydrocapsaicin) differing for the nature (iodine, bromine–chlorine) and the regiochemistry (C-5, C-6) of the halogenation.The activity of these compounds was investigated on recombinant human TRPV1 receptors overexpressed in HEK-293 cells. None of the six compounds exerted any significant agonist activity, as assessed by measuring their effect on TRPV1-mediated calcium mobilization. Instead, all compounds antagonized, to various extents, the effect of capsaicin in this assay.All 6-halo-nordihydrocapsaicins behaved as competitive antagonists against human TRPV1 according to the corresponding Schild's plots, and were more potent than the corresponding 5-halogenated analogues. The iodo-derivatives were more potent than the bromo- and chloro-derivatives.Using human recombinant TRPV1, 6-iodo-nordihydrocapsaicin (IC50=10 nM against 100 nM capsaicin) was about four times more potent than the prototypical TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, and was tested against capsaicin also on native TRPV1 in: (i) rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture; (ii) guinea-pig urinary bladder; and (iii) guinea-pig bronchi. In all cases, except for the guinea-pig bronchi, the compound was significantly more potent than capsazepine as a TRPV1 antagonist.In conclusion, 6-iodo-nordihydrocapsaicin, a stable and easily prepared compound, is a potent TRPV1 antagonist and a convenient replacement for capsazepine in most of the in vitro preparations currently used to assess the activity of putative vanilloid receptor agonists. PMID:12922928

  19. Antagonist pharmacology of desensitizing and non-desensitizing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cockroach neurons.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Vincent L

    2016-09-01

    Two α-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor subtypes in neurons of the American cockroach have been identified as desensitizing (nAChD) and selectively inhibitable with 100nM imidacloprid, and non-desensitizing (nAChN) and selectively inhibitable with 100pM methyllycaconitine. In this paper, the single-electrode voltage-clamp technique was used to measure concentration-response relations for the action of ACh and five antagonists on pharmacologically separated nAChD and nAChN receptors of acutely dissociated neurons from thoracic ganglia of the American cockroach. A dual bath and U-tube perfusion system was used to achieve rapid application of ACh in the continued presence of antagonists, which was essential to accurately measure inhibition by rapidly-reversible antagonists. ACh activated both receptors with an EC50 of 7μM and the antagonist potencies were (nAChD/nAChN in nM): dihydro-β-erythroidine: 1.0/5.6, d-tubocurarine: 1000/34, condelphine: 0.39/0.65, phencyclidine: 74/980 and mecamylamine 47/1150. While each of these antagonists displayed some subtype selectivity, none are selective enough to be used as subtype-selective tools. These results bring to a total of 16 the number of nicotinic compounds that have been measured on nAChD and nAChN currents. Characterization of these receptors is important for understanding the role of nAChRs in the insect nervous system and the mechanism of action of insecticides.

  20. CysLT1 leukotriene receptor antagonists inhibit the effects of nucleotides acting at P2Y receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mamedova, Liaman; Capra, Valérie; Accomazzo, Maria Rosa; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Ferrario, Silvia; Fumagalli, Marta; Abbracchio, Maria P.; Rovati, G. Enrico; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Montelukast and pranlukast are orally active leukotriene receptor antagonists selective for the CysLT1 receptor. Conversely, the hP2Y1,2,4,6,11,12,13,14 receptors represent a large family of GPCRs responding to either adenine or uracil nucleotides, or to sugar-nucleotides. Montelukast and pranlukast were found to inhibit nucleotide-induced calcium mobilization in a human monocyte-macrophage like cell line, DMSO-differentiated U937 (dU937). Montelukast and pranlukast inhibited the effects of UTP with IC50 values of 7.7 and 4.3 μM, respectively, and inhibited the effects of UDP with IC50 values of 4.5 and 1.6 μM, respectively, in an insurmountable manner. Furthermore, ligand binding studies using [3H]LTD4 excluded the possibility of orthosteric nucleotide binding to the CysLT1 receptor. dU937 cells were shown to express P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y11, P2Y13 and P2Y14 receptors. Therefore, these antagonists were studied functionally in a heterologous expression system for the human P2Y receptors. In 1321N1 astrocytoma cells stably expressing human P2Y1,2,4,6 receptors, CysLT1 antagonists inhibited both the P2Y agonist-induced activation of phospholipase C and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. IC50 values at P2Y1 and P2Y6 receptors were <1 μM. In control astrocytoma cells expressing an endogenous M3 muscarinic receptor, 10 μM montelukast had no effect on the carbachol-induced rise in intracellular Ca2+. These data demonstrated that CysLT1 receptor antagonists interact functionally with signaling pathways of P2Y receptors, and this should foster the study of possible implications for the clinical use of these compounds in asthma or in other inflammatory conditions. PMID:16280122

  1. Effect of dopamine and serotonin receptor antagonists on fencamfamine-induced abolition of latent inhibition.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Cilene Rejane Ramos Alves; de Aguiar, Marlison José Lima; DeLucia, Roberto; Silva, Maria Teresa Araujo

    2013-01-05

    The purpose of this investigation was to verify the role of dopamine and serotonin receptors in the effect of fencamfamine (FCF) on latent inhibition. FCF is a psychomotor stimulant with an indirect dopaminergic action. Latent inhibition is a model of attention. Latent inhibition is blocked by dopaminergic agents and facilitated by dopamine receptor agonists. FCF has been shown to abolish latent inhibition. The serotonergic system may also participate in the neurochemical mediation of latent inhibition. The selective dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (7-chloro-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1,2,4,5-tetrahydro-3-benzazepin-8-ol), D(2) receptor antagonists pimozide (PIM) and methoclopramide (METH), and serotonin 5-HT(2A/C) receptor antagonist ritanserin (RIT) were used in the present study. Latent inhibition was evaluated using a conditioned emotional response procedure. Male Wistar rats that were water-restricted were subjected to a three-phase procedure: preexposure to a tone, tone-shock conditioning, and a test of the effect of the tone on licking frequency. All of the drugs were administered before the preexposure and conditioning phases. The results showed that FCF abolished latent inhibition, and this effect was clearly antagonized by PIM and METH and moderately attenuated by SCH 23390. At the doses used in the present study, RIT pretreatment did not affect latent inhibition and did not eliminate the effect of FCF, suggesting that the FCF-induced abolition of latent inhibition is not mediated by serotonin 5-HT(2A/C) receptors. These results suggest that the effect of FCF on latent inhibition is predominantly related to dopamine D(2) receptors and that dopamine D(2) receptors participate in attention processes.

  2. A Functionalized Congener Approach to Adenosine Receptor Antagonists: Amino Acid Conjugates of 1,3-Dipropylxanthine

    PubMed Central

    JACOBSON, KENNETH A.; KIRK, KENNETH L.; PADGETT, WILLIAM L.; DALY, JOHN W.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY 1,3-Dipropyl-8-phenylxanthine, a synthetic analog of theophylline and a potent antagonist of adenosine at A1 and A2-adenosine receptors, has been attached covalently through a functionalized chain to amino acids and oligopeptides. The xanthine conjugates have been studied as competitive inhibitors of the specific binding of [3H]N6-cyclohexyladenosine to A1-receptors of rat cerebral cortical membranes and for inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation elicited by 2-chloroadenosine in guinea pig brain slices through A2-receptors. A free amino group on the extended chain generally resulted in high potency at A1-receptors. The potency (in some cases extending into the subnanomolar range) and selectivity for A1-receptors (up to 200-fold) suggest that this approach can yield a versatile class of “functionalized congeners” of adenosine receptor antagonists in which distal modifications of the attached moiety (“carrier”) can serve also to improve pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters. The water solubility in many of the more potent analogs has been enhanced by two orders of magnitude over that of simple, uncharged 8-phenyl xanthine derivatives. Analogs in which the carrier contains d-tyrosine have potential for development of iodinated radioligands for adenosine receptors. The functionalized congener approach is potentially applicable to other drugs and for development of prodrugs. PMID:3005825

  3. 5-HT2 Receptor Regulation of Mitochondrial Genes: Unexpected Pharmacological Effects of Agonists and Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Jennifer L; Wills, Lauren P; McOmish, Caitlin E; Demireva, Elena Y; Gingrich, Jay A; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2016-04-01

    In acute organ injuries, mitochondria are often dysfunctional, and recent research has revealed that recovery of mitochondrial and renal functions is accelerated by induction of mitochondrial biogenesis (MB). We previously reported that the nonselective 5-HT2 receptor agonist DOI [1-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)propan-2-amine] induced MB in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs). The goal of this study was to determine the role of 5-HT2 receptors in the regulation of mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in the kidney. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP-809,101 [2-[(3-chlorophenyl)methoxy]-6-(1-piperazinyl)pyrazine] and antagonist SB-242,084 [6-chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-N-[6-[(2-methyl-3-pyridinyl)oxy]-3-pyridinyl]-1H-indole-1-carboxyamide dihydrochloride] were used to examine the induction of renal mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in RPTCs and in mouse kidneys in the presence and absence of the 5-HT2C receptor. Unexpectedly, both CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased RPTC respiration and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA expression in RPTCs at 1-10 nM. In addition, CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased mRNA expression of PGC-1α and the mitochondrial proteins NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) β subcomplex 8 in mice. These compounds increased mitochondrial genes in RPTCs in which the 5-HT2C receptor was downregulated with small interfering RNA and in the renal cortex of mice lacking the 5-HT2C receptor. By contrast, the ability of these compounds to increase PGC-1α mRNA and respiration was blocked in RPTCs treated with 5-HT2A receptor small interfering RNA or the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist eplivanserin. In addition, the 5-HT2A receptor agonist NBOH-2C-CN [4-[2-[[(2-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]amino]ethyl]-2,5-dimethoxybenzonitrile] increased RPTC respiration at 1-100 nM. These results suggest that agonism of the 5-HT2A receptor induces MB and that the classic 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP

  4. Opioid Receptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Serecigni, Josep Guardia

    2015-09-29

    Objetivos: A partir de los recientes progresos en la farmacoterapia del alcoholismo, hemos efectuado una revisión sobre los fármacos antagonistas de los receptores opioides, que tienen aprobada la indicación para el tratamiento del alcoholismo, como son naltrexona y nalmefeno. Metodología: Hemos revisado más de 100 publicaciones sobre péptidos y receptores opioides, el efecto de los fármacos antagonistas de los receptores opioides sobre el consumo de alcohol, tanto en animales como en humanos, tanto en el laboratorio como para el tratamiento del alcoholismo. También se describen las características farmacológicas de naltrexona y de nalmefeno y su utilidad en la práctica clínica. Resultados: Múltiples evidencias han demostrado la eficacia de naltrexona y nalmefeno para reducir el consumo de alcohol, tanto en animales de laboratorio como también en personas estudiadas en situación de bar experimental, aunque debido al diferente perfil receptorial, nalmefeno ha sido relacionado con una mayor eficacia para la reducción del consumo de alcohol, en ratas que presentan dependencia del alcohol. Además, un gran número de ensayos clínicos controlados han demostrado la eficacia de naltrexona para la prevención de recaídas, en personas que presentan un trastorno por dependencia del alcohol. Ensayos clínicos controlados recientes han demostrado la eficacia de nalmefeno “a demanda” para reducir el consumo de alcohol, en personas que presentan un trastorno por dependencia del alcohol de baja gravedad. Conclusiones: Tanto naltrexona como nalmefeno han demostrado ser fármacos seguros, bien tolerados, de manejo sencillo, y eficaces para el tratamiento del trastorno por dependencia del alcohol, (actualmente llamado trastorno por consumo de alcohol). A partir de recientes ensayos clínicos controlados se ha comprobado que nalmefeno produce una reducción significativa del consumo de alcohol, lo cual supone un nuevo objetivo que amplía las posibilidades de

  5. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1

  6. Allosteric antagonist binding sites in class B GPCRs: corticotropin receptor 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Subramanian, Govindan; Hall, Spencer; Lin, Jianping; Laoui, Abdelazize; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2010-08-01

    The 41 amino acid neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and its associated receptors CRF1-R and CRF2-R have been targeted for treating stress related disorders. Both CRF1-R and CRF2-R belong to the class B G-protein coupled receptors for which little information is known regarding the small molecule antagonist binding characteristics. However, it has been shown recently that different non-peptide allosteric ligands stabilize different receptor conformations for CRF1-R and hence an understanding of the ligand induced receptor conformational changes is important in the pharmacology of ligand binding. In this study, we modeled the receptor and identified the binding sites of representative small molecule allosteric antagonists for CRF1-R. The predicted binding sites of the investigated compounds are located within the transmembrane (TM) domain encompassing TM helices 3, 5 and 6. The docked compounds show strong interactions with H228 on TM3 and M305 on TM5 that have also been implicated in the binding by site directed mutation studies. H228 forms a hydrogen bond of varied strengths with all the antagonists in this study and this is in agreement with the decreased binding affinity of several compounds with H228F mutation. Also mutating M305 to Ile showed a sharp decrease in the calculated binding energy whereas the binding energy loss on M305 to Leu was less significant. These results are in qualitative agreement with the decrease in binding affinities observed experimentally. We further predicted the conformational changes in CRF1-R induced by the allosteric antagonist NBI-27914. Movement of TM helices 3 and 5 are dominant and generates three degenerate conformational states two of which are separated by an energy barrier from the third, when bound to NBI-27914. Binding of NBI-27914 was predicted to improve the interaction of the ligand with M305 and also enhanced the aromatic stacking between the ligand and F232 on TM3. A virtual ligand screening of 13

  7. A common intracellular allosteric binding site for antagonists of the CXCR2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Salchow, K; Bond, ME; Evans, SC; Press, NJ; Charlton, SJ; Hunt, PA; Bradley, ME

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: We have previously shown that SB265610 (1-(2-bromo-phenyl)-3-(7-cyano-3H-benzotriazol-4-yl)-urea) behaves as an allosteric, inverse agonist at the C-X-C chemokine (CXCR)2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine whether SB265610, in addition to two other known antagonists, bind to either of the two putative, topographically distinct, allosteric binding sites previously reported in the Literature. Experimental approach: Ten single point mutations were introduced into the CXCR2 receptor using site-directed mutagenesis. Three CXCR2 antagonists were investigated, SB265610, Pteridone-1 (2-(2,3 difluoro-benzylsulphanyl)-4-((R)-2-hydroxy-1-methyl-ethylamino)-8H-pteridin-7-one) and Sch527123 (2-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyl-3-{2-[[(R)-1-(5-methyl-furan-2-yl)-propyl]amino]-3,4-dioxo-cyclobut-1enylamino}-benzamide), and the effect of these mutations on their binding affinity and ability to inhibit interleukin-8-stimulated binding of [35S]GTPγS was examined. Key results: Seven of the nine mutations introduced into the C-terminal domain and intracellular loops of the receptor produced a significant reduction in affinity at least one of the antagonists tested. Of those seven mutations, three produced a significant reduction in the affinity of all three antagonists, namely K320A, Y314A and D84N. In all but one mutation, the changes observed on antagonist affinity were matched with effects on inhibition of interleukin-8-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding. Conclusions and implications: These antagonists bind to a common intracellular, allosteric, binding site of the CXCR2 receptor, which has been further delineated. As many of these mutations are close to the site of G protein coupling or to a region of the receptor that is responsible for the transduction of the activation signal, our results suggest a molecular mechanism for the inhibition of receptor activation. PMID:20233217

  8. Ventilatory stimulation by dopamine-receptor antagonists in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, L. G.; Saunders, N. A.

    1985-01-01

    Ventilation was measured by a plethysmographic method in awake mice before and after intraperitoneal injection of neuroleptic drugs to test the hypothesis that dopaminergic mechanisms modulate control of breathing in this species. Dose-dependent augmentation of ventilation at rest and during hypoxia, and reduced ventilation during hypercapnia was demonstrated for haloperidol, droperidol, prochlorperazine and chlorpromazine (P less than 0.05 or less for each drug). Doses of drugs causing maximal increase of the ventilatory response to hypoxia were linearly related (r = 0.98, P less than 0.001) to in vitro affinity of the drugs for dopamine receptors. Despite presumed equal dopamine-receptor blockade, the drugs had unequal effects on the ventilatory response to hypoxia. Droperidol augmented hypoxic ventilation to 290% of the control value, chlorpromazine to 250% control, prochlorperazine to 190% control and haloperidol to 120% control. These differences in efficacy were in the same order as the affinities of the drugs for alpha-adrenoceptors. The effect of combined haloperidol (90 nmol kg-1) and varying doses of phentolamine (175-900 nmol kg-1) was assessed to test the hypothesis that alpha-antagonism was a factor in determining the increase in ventilation following dopamine blockade. Phentolamine caused dose-dependent augmentation of the ventilatory effects of haloperidol (P less than 0.01) but had no ventilatory effect when given alone. Carotid body resection in anaesthetized mice abolished the stimulation of hypoxic ventilation caused by droperidol. It is concluded that dopaminergic mechanisms in the carotid body modulate ventilatory control in the awake mouse. The drugs most effective in augmenting hypoxic ventilation are those that block both dopamine and alpha-adrenoceptors. PMID:2862937

  9. A novel human-based receptor antagonist of sustained action reveals body weight control by endogenous GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Patterson, James T; Ottaway, Nickki; Gelfanov, Vasily M; Smiley, David L; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul T; Tschöp, Matthias H; Dimarchi, Richard D

    2011-02-18

    Ex-4 (9-39)a is a well characterized GLP-1 receptor antagonist that suffers from two notable limitations, its nonhuman amino acid sequence and its relatively short in vivo duration of action. Comparable N-terminal shortening of human GLP-1 lessens agonism but does not provide a high potency antagonist. Through a series of GLP-1/Ex-4 hybrid peptides, the minimal structural changes required to generate a pure GLP-1-based antagonist were identified as Glu16, Val19, and Arg20, yielding an antagonist of approximately 3-fold greater in vitro potency compared with Ex-4 (9-39)a. The structural basis of antagonism appears to result from stabilization of the α helix combined with enhanced electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with the extracellular domain of the receptor. Site-specific acylation of the human-based antagonist yielded a peptide of increased potency as a GLP-1 receptor antagonist and 10-fold greater selectivity relative to the GIP receptor. The acylated antagonist demonstrated sufficient duration of action to maintain inhibitory activity when administered as a daily subcutaneous injection. The sustained pharmacokinetics and enhanced human sequence combine to form an antagonist optimized for clinical study. Daily administration of this antagonist by subcutaneous injection to diet-induced obese mice for 1 week caused a significant increase in food intake, body weight, and glucose intolerance, demonstrating endogenous GLP-1 as a relevant hormone in mammalian energy balance in the obese state.

  10. Discovery of novel 6,6-heterocycles as transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Blum, Charles A; Caldwell, Timothy; Zheng, Xiaozhang; Bakthavatchalam, Rajagopal; Capitosti, Scott; Brielmann, Harry; De Lombaert, Stéphane; Kershaw, Mark T; Matson, David; Krause, James E; Cortright, Daniel; Crandall, Marci; Martin, William J; Murphy, Beth Ann; Boyce, Susan; Jones, A Brian; Mason, Glenn; Rycroft, Wayne; Perrett, Helen; Conley, Rachael; Burnaby-Davies, Nicola; Chenard, Bertrand L; Hodgetts, Kevin J

    2010-04-22

    The transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel that can be activated by a wide range of noxious stimuli, including capsaicin, acid, and heat. Blockade of TRPV1 activation by selective antagonists is under investigation in an attempt to identify novel agents for pain treatment. The design and synthesis of a series of novel TRPV1 antagonists with a variety of different 6,6-heterocyclic cores is described, and an extensive evaluation of the pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties of a number of these compounds is reported. For example, the 1,8-naphthyridine 52 was characterized as an orally bioavailable and brain penetrant TRPV1 antagonist. In vivo, 52 fully reversed carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia (CITH) in rats and dose-dependently potently reduced complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced chronic inflammatory pain after oral administration.

  11. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist binding site. Part I: Active conformation of cyproheptadine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Drooge, Marc J.; Donné-op den Kelder, Gabriëlle M.; Timmerman, Hendrik

    1991-08-01

    The active conformation of several histamine H1-antagonists is investigated. As a template molecule we used the antagonist cyproheptadine, which consists of a piperidylene ring connected to a tricyclic system. The piperidylene moiety is shown to be flexible. The global minimum is a chair conformation but, additionally, a second chair and various boat conformations have to be considered, as their energies are less than 5 kcal/mol above the energy of the global minimum. Two semi-rigid histamine H1-antagonists, phenindamine and triprolidine, were fitted onto the various conformations of cyproheptadine in order to derive the pharmacologically active conformation of cyproheptadine. At the same time, the active conformation of both phenindamine and triprolidine was derived. It is demonstrated that, within the receptor-bound conformation of cyproheptadine, the piperidylene ring most probably exists in a boat form.

  12. Interactions of tachykinin receptor antagonists with lipopolysaccharide-induced airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Veron, M; Guenon, I; Nenan, S; Emonds-Alt, X; Advenier, C; Lagente, V; Boichot, E

    2004-09-01

    1. Several observations suggest that tachykinins are involved in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary alterations. We have investigated the effect of antagonists for tachykinin NK1 (SR 140333), NK2 (SR 48968) or NK3 (SR 142801) receptors on inflammatory cell recruitment, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 release and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 microg/mL aerosol for 30 min). 2. Treatment of mice with a combination of SR 140333 and SR 48968 (10(-6) mol/L, aerosol) significantly reduced the increase in the number of total cells and neutrophils and MMP-9 activity in the BALF of mice 2.5 h after LPS exposure. Treatment with the NK3 antagonist SR 142801 (10(-6) mol/L, aerosol) did not inhibit the influx of neutrophils, but markedly reduced the increase in TNF-alpha and IL-6 levels at 2.5 h and MMP-9 activity at 20 h. 3. These results show that the three tachykinin receptor antagonists may interfere with the development of airway inflammation, namely neutrophilia, TNF-alpha release or MMP-9 activity in the BALF of mice exposed to LPS and suggest that not only NK1 and NK2 receptors, but also NK3 receptors are involved in the modulation of the inflammatory response and airway remodelling.

  13. New benzimidazole derivatives: selective and orally active 5-HT3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Pascual, David; Girón, Rocío; Alsasua, Angela; Benhamú, Belinda; López-Rodríguez, María Luz; Martín, María Isabel

    2003-02-21

    The synthesis of new 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists is an interesting field of research because of their wide therapeutic use. The aim of this work is to functionally characterise a new series of benzimidazole derivatives previously described. These compounds bind to 5-HT(3) receptors and have been evaluated using in vitro (rat tunica muscularis mucosae) and in vivo tests (Bezold-Jarisch reflex in rat and gastrointestinal motility and spontaneous motility in mice). Ondansetron and 1-[4-amino-5-chloro-2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenil)methyloxy]-3-[1-[2-methylsulfonylamino]piperidin-4-yl]propan-1-one hydrochloride (RS 39604) were used as well known 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(4) receptor antagonists. These benzimidazole derivatives have proved to be 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists. Interestingly, they are as active as ondansetron when they are intraperitoneally (i.p.) or orally (p.o.) administered and, in mice, they seem to induce fewer behavioural changes at similar effective doses than does ondansetron. The present results confirm the usefulness of the previously proposed pharmacophore and justify the interest in these new benzimidazole derivatives.

  14. Pharmacology of JB-9315, a new selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Palacios, B; Montero, M J; Sevilla, M A; San Román, L

    1998-02-01

    1. The histamine H2-receptor antagonistic activity and antisecretory and antiulcer effects of JB-9315 were studied in comparison with the standard H2 blocker ranitidine. 2. In vitro, JB-9315 is a competitive antagonist of histamine H2 receptors in the isolated, spontaneously beating guinea-pig right atrium, with a pA2 value of 7.30 relative to a value of 7.36 for ranitidine. JB-9315 was specific for the histamine H2 receptor because, at high concentration, it did not affect histamine- or acetylcholine-induced contractions in guinea-pig isolated ileum or rat isolated duodenum, respectively. 3. JB-9315 dose dependently inhibited histamine-, pentagastrin- or carbachol-stimulated acid secretion and basal secretion in the perfused stomach preparation of the anesthetized rat. In the pylorus-ligated rat after intraperitoneal administration, total acid output over 4 h was inhibited by JB-9315 with an ID50 of 32.8 mg/kg, confirming its H2-receptor antagonist properties. 4. JB-9315 showed antiulcer activity against cold stress plus indomethacin-induced lesions with an ID50 of 6.8 mg/kg. 5. JB-9315, 50 and 100 mg/kg, inhibited macroscopic gastric hemorrhagic lesions induced by ethanol. In contrast, ranitidine (50 mg/kg) failed to reduce these lesions. 6. These results indicate that JB-9315 is a new antiulcer drug that exerts a cytoprotective effect in addition to its gastric antisecretory activity.

  15. Modulation of a 40-kDa catecholamine regulated protein by dopamine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sharan, N; Nair, V D; Mishra, R K

    2001-02-09

    Previous reports have shown that catecholamine regulated proteins (CRP) are central nervous system specific and covalently bind to catecholamines. In the present study, we report the subcellular localization and differential modulation of a 40-kDa catecholamine regulated protein (CRP40) by dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists. CRP40 was found to be localized with nuclear and synaptosomal/mitochondrial and fractions. Chronic treatment with dopamine D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol in rats significantly increased the levels of CRP40 in the striatum, whereas, chronic R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (SCH 23390) dopamine D1 receptor antagonist administration significantly decreased striatal CRP40 levels. Moreover, acute haloperidol treatment did not alter the levels of CRP40 in any of the brain regions. Despite a sequence homology with the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), levels of HSP70 remained unchanged after either drug treatment, suggesting a distinct function of CRP40 than HSP70. These results further suggest that CRP40 play an important role in dopaminergic neuronal function and the dopamine D1 receptor-mediated signaling pathway may be involved in the regulation of CRP40.

  16. A selective, high affinity 5-HT 2B receptor antagonist inhibits visceral hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Doi, K; Himaki, D; Nagao, K; Kawai, M; Gale, J D; Furness, J B; Kurebayashi, Y

    2010-02-01

    RS-127445 is a selective, high affinity 5-HT(2B)receptor antagonist. We investigated whether 5-HT(2B)receptor antagonists can reduce colonic visceral hypersensitivity caused by restraint stress or by proximal colonic inflammation. Visceral hypersensitivity was induced in rats by either restraint stress or injection of 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) into the proximal colon. Restraint stress produced a significant increase in numbers of abdominal contractions evoked by colorectal distension (CRD), measured as a quantitative index of visceral nociception in rats. Seven days after TNBS injection, the pain threshold to CRD at the non-inflamed distal colon, that was determined as the minimum pressure required to evoke abdominal cramp, was significantly decreased. The effect of RS-127445 on visceral hypersensitivity was assessed in either naïve or TNBS-treated rats. Oral administration of a selective, high affinity 5-HT(2B)receptor antagonist, RS-127445, significantly inhibited visceral hypersensitivity provoked by restraint stress (35 to 74% inhibition at 1 to 10 mg kg(-1)). Oral RS-127445 produced a significant suppression of TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity (15 to 62% inhibition at 3 to 30 mg kg(-1)), although it was without significant effect on the visceral nociceptive threshold of naïve rats. RS-127445 (1 to 30 mg kg(-1), p.o.) also dose-dependently reduced the restraint stress-induced defecation in naïve and TNBS-treated rats. These results suggest that 5-HT(2B)receptors are involved in signaling from the colon in rats in which there is visceral hypersensitivity and that a selective 5-HT(2B)receptor antagonist could have therapeutic potential for the treatment of gut disorders characterized by visceral hypersensitivity.

  17. Neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Lucas Vieira; Souza, Fabiano Hahn; Brunetto, Andre Tesainer; Sasse, Andre Deeke; da Silveira Nogueira Lima, João Paulo

    2012-09-05

    The addition of neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists to antiemetic regimens has substantially reduced chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). We sought to systematically review the overall impact of NK1R antagonists on CINV prevention. We systematically searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases, and meeting proceedings for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated NK1R antagonists plus standard antiemetic therapy for CINV prevention. Complete response (CR) to therapy was defined as the absence of emesis and the absence of rescue therapy. The endpoints were defined as CR in the overall phase (during the first 120 hours of chemotherapy), CR in the acute phase (first 24 hours), and the delayed phase (24-120 hours) after chemotherapy, nausea, and toxicity. Subgroup analyses evaluated the type of NK1R antagonist used, the emetogenic potential of the chemotherapy regimen, and prolonged use of 5-HT3 (serotonin) receptor antagonists, a class of standard antiemetic agents. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. Statistical tests for heterogeneity were one-sided; statistical tests for effect estimates and publication bias were two-sided. Seventeen trials (8740 patients) were included in this analysis. NK1R antagonists increased the CR rate in the overall phase from 54% to 72% (OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.46 to 0.57, P < .001). CR and nausea were improved in all phases and subgroups. The expected side effects from NK1R antagonists did not statistically significantly differ from previous reports; however, this analysis suggests that the incidence of severe infection increased from 2% to 6% in the NK1R antagonist group (three RCTs with a total of 1480 patients; OR = 3.10; 95% CI = 1.69 to 5.67, P < .001). NK1R antagonists increased CINV control in the acute, delayed, and overall phases. They are effective for both moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy regimens. Their use might be

  18. Evidence for allosteric interactions of antagonist binding to the smoothened receptor.

    PubMed

    Rominger, Cynthia M; Bee, Wei-Lin Tiger; Copeland, Robert A; Davenport, Elizabeth A; Gilmartin, Aidan; Gontarek, Richard; Hornberger, Keith R; Kallal, Lorena A; Lai, Zhihong; Lawrie, Kenneth; Lu, Quinn; McMillan, Lynette; Truong, Maggie; Tummino, Peter J; Turunen, Brandon; Will, Matthew; Zuercher, William J; Rominger, David H

    2009-06-01

    The Smoothened receptor (Smo) mediates hedgehog (Hh) signaling critical for development, cell growth, and migration, as well as stem cell maintenance. Aberrant Hh signaling pathway activation has been implicated in a variety of cancers, and small-molecule antagonists of Smo have entered human clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Here, we report the biochemical characterization of allosteric interactions of agonists and antagonists for Smo. Binding of two radioligands, [(3)H]3-chloro-N-[trans-4-(methylamino)cyclohexyl]-N-{[3-(4-pyridinyl)-phenyl]methyl}-1-benzothiophene-2-carboxamide (SAG-1.3) (agonist) and [(3)H]cyclopamine (antagonist), was characterized using human Smo expressed in human embryonic kidney 293F membranes. We observed full displacement of [(3)H]cyclopamine by all Smo agonist and antagonist ligands examined. N-[(1E)-(3,5-Dimethyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)methylidene]-4-(phenylmethyl)-1-piperazinamine (SANT-1), an antagonist, did not fully inhibit the binding of [(3)H]SAG-1.3. In a functional cell-based beta-lactamase reporter gene assay, SANT-1 and N-[3-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-4-chlorophenyl]-3,4,5-tris(ethyloxy)-benzamide (SANT-2) fully inhibited 3-chloro-4,7-difluoro-N-[trans-4-(methylamino)cyclohexyl]-N-{[3-(4-pyridinyl)phenyl]methyl}-1-benzothiophene-2-carboxamide (SAG-1.5)-induced Hh pathway activation. Detailed "Schild-type" radioligand binding analysis with [(3)H]SAG-1.3 revealed that two structurally distinct Smoothened receptor antagonists, SANT-1 and SANT-2, bound in a manner consistent with that of allosteric modulation. Our mechanism of action characterization of radioligand binding to Smo combined with functional data provides a better understanding of small-molecule interactions with Smo and their influence on the Hh pathway.

  19. Discovery and development of orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutics for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Winrow, C J; Renger, J J

    2014-01-01

    Insomnia persistently affects the quality and quantity of sleep. Currently approved treatments for insomnia primarily target γ-aminobutyric acid-A (GABA-A) receptor signalling and include benzodiazepines and GABA-A receptor modulators. These drugs are used to address this sleep disorder, but have the potential for side effects such as tolerance and dependence, making them less attractive as maintenance therapy. Forward and reverse genetic approaches in animals have implicated orexin signalling (also referred to as hypocretin signalling) in the control of vigilance and sleep/wake states. Screening for orexin receptor antagonists using in vitro and in vivo methods in animals has identified compounds that block one or other of the orexin receptors (single or dual orexin receptor antagonists [SORAs and DORAs], respectively) in animals and humans. SORAs have primarily been used as probes to further elucidate the roles of the individual orexin receptors, while a number of DORAs have progressed to clinical development as pharmaceutical candidates for insomnia. The DORA almorexant demonstrated significant improvements in a number of clinically relevant sleep parameters in animal models and in patients with insomnia but its development was halted. SB-649868 and suvorexant have demonstrated efficacy and tolerability in Phase II and III trials respectively. Furthermore, suvorexant is currently under review by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of insomnia. Based on the publication of recent non-clinical and clinical data, orexin receptor antagonists potentially represent a targeted, effective and well-tolerated new class of medications for insomnia. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. The orally active urotensin receptor antagonist, KR36676, attenuates cellular and cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Oh, K S; Lee, J H; Yi, K Y; Lim, C J; Lee, S; Park, C H; Seo, H W; Lee, B H

    2015-05-01

    Blockade of the actions of urotensin-II (U-II) mediated by the urotensin (UT) receptor should improve cardiac function and prevent cardiac remodelling in cardiovascular disease. Here, we have evaluated the pharmacological properties of the recently identified UT receptor antagonist, 2-(6,7-dichloro-3-oxo-2H-benzo[b][1,4]oxazin-4(3H)-yl)-N-methyl-N-(2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)-1-(4-(thiophen-3-yl)phenyl) ethyl)acetamide (KR36676). Pharmacological properties of KR36676 were studied in a range of in vitro assays (receptor binding, calcium mobilization, stress fibre formation, cellular hypertrophy) and in vivo animal models such as cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or myocardial infarction (MI). KR36676 displayed high binding affinity for the UT receptor (Ki : 0.7 nM), similar to that of U-II (0.4 nM), and was a potent antagonist at that receptor (IC50 : 4.0 nM). U-II-induced stress fibre formation and cellular hypertrophy were significantly inhibited with low concentrations of KR36676 (≥0.01 μM). Oral administration of KR36676 (30 mg·kg(-1) ) in a TAC model in mice attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. Moreover, KR36676 restored cardiac function and myocyte size in rats with MI-induced cardiac hypertrophy. A highly potent UT receptor antagonist exerted anti-hypertrophic effects not only in infarcted rat hearts but also in pressure-overloaded mouse hearts. KR36676 could be a valuable pharmacological tool in elucidating the complicated physiological role of U-II and UT receptors in cardiac hypertrophy. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. The orally active urotensin receptor antagonist, KR36676, attenuates cellular and cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Oh, K S; Lee, J H; Yi, K Y; Lim, C J; Lee, S; Park, C H; Seo, H W; Lee, B H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Blockade of the actions of urotensin-II (U-II) mediated by the urotensin (UT) receptor should improve cardiac function and prevent cardiac remodelling in cardiovascular disease. Here, we have evaluated the pharmacological properties of the recently identified UT receptor antagonist, 2-(6,7-dichloro-3-oxo-2H-benzo[b][1,4]oxazin-4(3H)-yl)-N-methyl-N-(2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)-1-(4-(thiophen-3-yl)phenyl) ethyl)acetamide (KR36676). Experimental Approach Pharmacological properties of KR36676 were studied in a range of in vitro assays (receptor binding, calcium mobilization, stress fibre formation, cellular hypertrophy) and in vivo animal models such as cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or myocardial infarction (MI). Key Results KR36676 displayed high binding affinity for the UT receptor (Ki: 0.7 nM), similar to that of U-II (0.4 nM), and was a potent antagonist at that receptor (IC50: 4.0 nM). U-II-induced stress fibre formation and cellular hypertrophy were significantly inhibited with low concentrations of KR36676 (≥0.01 μM). Oral administration of KR36676 (30 mg·kg−1) in a TAC model in mice attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. Moreover, KR36676 restored cardiac function and myocyte size in rats with MI-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Conclusions and Implications A highly potent UT receptor antagonist exerted anti-hypertrophic effects not only in infarcted rat hearts but also in pressure-overloaded mouse hearts. KR36676 could be a valuable pharmacological tool in elucidating the complicated physiological role of U-II and UT receptors in cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25597918

  2. A PET study comparing receptor occupancy by five selective cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonists in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Hjorth, Stephan; Karlsson, Cecilia; Jucaite, Aurelija; Varnäs, Katarina; Hamrén, Ulrika Wählby; Johnström, Peter; Gulyás, Balázs; Donohue, Sean R; Pike, Victor W; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars

    2015-01-01

    There is a medical need for safe and efficacious anti-obesity drugs with acceptable side effect profiles. To mitigate the challenge posed by translating target interaction across species and balancing beneficial vs. adverse effects, a positron emission tomography (PET) approach could help guide clinical dose optimization. Thus, as part of a compound differentiation effort, three novel selective CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonists, developed by AstraZeneca (AZ) for the treatment of obesity, were compared with two clinically tested reference compounds, rimonabant and taranabant, with regard to receptor occupancy relative to dose and exposure. A total of 42 PET measurements were performed in 6 non-human primates using the novel CB1R antagonist radioligand [11C]SD5024. The AZ CB1R antagonists bound in a saturable manner to brain CB1R with in vivo affinities similar to that of rimonabant and taranabant, compounds with proven weight loss efficacy in clinical trials. Interestingly, it was found that exposures corresponding to those needed for optimal clinical efficacy of rimonabant and taranabant resulted in a CB1R occupancy typically around ~20–30%, thus much lower than what would be expected for classical G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists in other therapeutic contexts. These findings are also discussed in relation to emerging literature on the potential usefulness of ‘neutral’ vs. ‘classical’ CB1R (inverse agonist) antagonists. The study additionally highlighted the usefulness of the radioligand [11C]SD5024 as a specific tracer for CB1R in the primate brain, though an arterial input function would ideally be required in future studies to further assure accurate quantitative analysis of specific binding. PMID:25791528

  3. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer.

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D; Schiffmann, Serge N; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-07-07

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain.

  4. Darifenacin: a novel M3 muscarinic selective receptor antagonist for the treatment of overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Chapple, Christopher R

    2004-11-01

    Darifenacin is a novel M3 muscarinic selective receptor antagonist for once-daily treatment of overactive bladder (OAB), a highly prevalent, chronic and debilitating disease defined by urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, usually with increased frequency of micturition and nocturia. In vitro, darifenacin is a potent and specific muscarinic receptor antagonist with receptors relative to other muscarinic receptor subtypes. This profile may, therefore, confer clinical efficacy in the treatment of OAB, with a lower propensity for adverse effects and safety issues related to blockade of other muscarinic receptor subtypes. Indeed, consistent with its low relative affinity for M1 and M2 receptors, no effects on cognitive function and heart-rate variability, respectively, have been observed with darifenacin. Subsequent large-scale clinical trials have confirmed that darifenacin (at doses of 7.5 and 15 mg/day) results in central nervous system and cardiac adverse events comparable to placebo, and provides early and meaningful improvement across a range of OAB symptoms including incontinence episodes, urgency and urinary frequency. On the basis of such findings, darifenacin would appear to meet the current need for an effective OAB pharmacotherapy that is efficacious, well-tolerated and, more importantly, minimises the risk of safety-related adverse effects.

  5. A rational approach to the design and synthesis of a new bradykinin B(1) receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Bedos, P; Amblard, M; Subra, G; Dodey, P; Luccarini, J M; Paquet, J L; Pruneau, D; Aumelas, A; Martinez, J

    2000-06-15

    We have previously synthesized a potent and selective B(1) bradykinin receptor antagonist, JMV1645 (H-Lys-Arg-Pro-Hyp-Gly-Igl-Ser-D-BT-OH), containing a dipeptide mimetic ((3S)-amino-5-carbonylmethyl-2,3-dihydro-1, 5-benzothiazepin-4(5H)-one (D-BT) moiety) at the C-terminal. Analogues of this potent B(1) bradykinin receptor antagonist in which the central Pro(2)-Hyp(3)-Gly(4)-Igl(5) tetrapeptide has been replaced by constrained N-1-substituted-1,3,8-triazaspiro¿4. 5decan-4-one ring system were synthesized. Among these analogues, compound JMV1640 (1) was found to have an affinity of 24.10 +/- 9.48 nM for the human cloned B(1) receptor. It antagonized the ¿des-Arg(10)-kallidin-induced contraction of the human umbilical vein (pA(2) = 6.1 +/- 0.1). Compound 1 was devoid of agonist activity at the kinin B(1) receptor. Moreover, it did not bind to the human cloned B(2) receptor. Therefore, JMV1640 constitutes a lead compound for the rational search of nonpeptide B(1) receptor analogues based on the BK sequence.

  6. X-ray structures define human P2X3 receptor gating cycle and antagonist action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansoor, Steven E.; Lü, Wei; Oosterheert, Wout; Shekhar, Mrinal; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-10-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric, non-selective cation channels activated by ATP that have important roles in the cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems. Despite their central function in human physiology and although they are potential targets of therapeutic agents, there are no structures of human P2X receptors. The mechanisms of receptor desensitization and ion permeation, principles of antagonism, and complete structures of the pore-forming transmembrane domains of these receptors remain unclear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the human P2X3 receptor in apo/resting, agonist-bound/open-pore, agonist-bound/closed-pore/desensitized and antagonist-bound/closed states. The open state structure harbours an intracellular motif we term the ‘cytoplasmic cap’, which stabilizes the open state of the ion channel pore and creates lateral, phospholipid-lined cytoplasmic fenestrations for water and ion egress. The competitive antagonists TNP-ATP and A-317491 stabilize the apo/resting state and reveal the interactions responsible for competitive inhibition. These structures illuminate the conformational rearrangements that underlie P2X receptor gating and provide a foundation for the development of new pharmacological agents.

  7. Serotonergic 5-HT6 Receptor Antagonists: Heterocyclic Chemistry and Potential Therapeutic Significance.

    PubMed

    Bali, Alka; Singh, Shalu

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT(6) receptor (5- HT(6)R) is amongst the recently discovered serotonergic receptors with almost exclusive localization in the brain. Hence, this receptor is fast emerging as a promising target for cognition enhancement in central nervous system (CNS) diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (cognitive function), obesity, schizophrenia and anxiety. The last decade has seen a surge of literature reports on the functional role of this receptor in learning and memory processes and investigations related to the chemistry and pharmacology of 5-HT(6) receptor ligands, especially 5- HT(6) receptor antagonists. Studies show the involvement of multiple neurotransmitter systems in cognitive enhancement by 5-HT(6)R antagonists including cholinergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic systems. Several of the 5-HT(6)R ligands are indole based agents bearing structural similarity to the endogenous neurotransmitter serotonin. Based on the pharmacophoric models proposed for these agents, drug designing has been carried out incorporating various heterocyclic replacements for the indole nucleus. In this review, we have broadly summarized the medicinal chemistry and current status of this fairly recent class of drugs along with their potential therapeutic applications.

  8. Progesterone receptor antagonist CDB-4124 increases depression-like behavior in mice without affecting locomotor ability

    PubMed Central

    Beckley, Ethan H.; Scibelli, Angela C.; Finn, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    Progesterone withdrawal has been proposed as an underlying factor in premenstrual syndrome and postpartum depression. Progesterone withdrawal induces forced swim test (FST) immobility in mice, a depression-like behavior, but the contribution of specific receptors to this effect is unclear. The role of progesterone’s GABAA receptor-modulating metabolite allopregnanolone in depression- and anxiety-related behaviors has been extensively documented, but little attention has been paid to the role of progesterone receptors. We administered the classic progesterone receptor antagonist mifepristone (RU-38486) and the specific progesterone receptor antagonist CDB-4124 to mice that had been primed with progesterone for five days, and found that both compounds induced FST immobility reliably, robustly, and in a dose-dependent fashion. Although CDB-4124 increased FST immobility, it did not suppress initial activity in a locomotor test. These findings suggest that decreased progesterone receptor activity contributes to depression-like behavior in mice, consistent with the hypothesis that progesterone withdrawal may contribute to the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression. PMID:21163582

  9. Progesterone receptor antagonist CDB-4124 increases depression-like behavior in mice without affecting locomotor ability.

    PubMed

    Beckley, Ethan H; Scibelli, Angela C; Finn, Deborah A

    2011-07-01

    Progesterone withdrawal has been proposed as an underlying factor in premenstrual syndrome and postpartum depression. Progesterone withdrawal induces forced swim test (FST) immobility in mice, a depression-like behavior, but the contribution of specific receptors to this effect is unclear. The role of progesterone's GABA(A) receptor-modulating metabolite allopregnanolone in depression- and anxiety-related behaviors has been extensively documented, but little attention has been paid to the role of progesterone receptors. We administered the classic progesterone receptor antagonist mifepristone (RU-38486) and the specific progesterone receptor antagonist CDB-4124 to mice that had been primed with progesterone for five days, and found that both compounds induced FST immobility reliably, robustly, and in a dose-dependent fashion. Although CDB-4124 increased FST immobility, it did not suppress initial activity in a locomotor test. These findings suggest that decreased progesterone receptor activity contributes to depression-like behavior in mice, consistent with the hypothesis that progesterone withdrawal may contribute to the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cardiac effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists used for voiding dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Karl-Erik; Campeau, Lysanne; Olshansky, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Antimuscarinic agents are the main drugs used to treat patients with the overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome, defined as urgency, with or without urgency incontinence, usually with increased daytime frequency and nocturia. Since the treatment is not curative and since OAB is a chronic disease, treatment may be life-long. Antimuscarinics are generally considered to be ‘safe’ drugs, but among the more serious concerns related to their use is the risk of cardiac adverse effects, particularly increases in heart rate (HR) and QT prolongation and induction of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsade de pointes). An elevated resting HR has been linked to overall increased morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with cardiovascular diseases. QT prolongation and its consequences are not related to blockade of muscarinic receptors, but rather linked to inhibition of the hERG potassium channel in the heart. However, experience with terodiline, an antimuscarinic drug causing torsade de pointes in patients, has placed the whole drug class under scrutiny. The potential of the different antimuscarinic agents to increase HR and/or prolong the QT time has not been extensively explored for all agents in clinical use. Differences between drugs cannot be excluded, but risk assessments based on available evidence are not possible. PMID:21595741

  11. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Liu, Yong; Peng, XiangPing; Liu, Wei; Zhao, FeiYan; Feng, DanDan; Han, JianZhong; Huang, YanHong; Luo, SiWei; Li, Lian; Yue, Shao Jie; Cheng, QingMei; Huang, XiaoTing; Luo, ZiQiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Large amount of glutamate can overstimulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), causing neuronal injury and death. Recently, NMDAR has been reported to be found in the lungs. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of memantine, a NMDAR channel blocker, on bleomycin-induced lung injury mice. Methods C57BL/6 mice were intratracheally injected with bleomycin (BLM) to induce lung injury. Mice were randomized to receive saline, memantine (Me), BLM, BLM plus Me. Lungs and BALF were harvested on day 3 or 7 for further evaluation. Results BLM caused leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary edema and increase in cytokines, and imposed significant oxidative stress (MDA as a marker) in lungs. Memantine significantly mitigated the oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury caused by BLM. Moreover, activation of NMDAR enhances CD11b expression on neutrophils. Conclusions Memantine mitigates oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury in BLM challenged mice. PMID:25942563

  12. MIBE acts as antagonist ligand of both estrogen receptor α and GPER in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The multiple biological responses to estrogens are mainly mediated by the classical estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ, which act as ligand-activated transcription factors. ERα exerts a main role in the development of breast cancer; therefore, the ER antagonist tamoxifen has been widely used although its effectiveness is limited by de novo and acquired resistance. Recently, GPR30/GPER, a member of the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor family, has been implicated in mediating the effects of estrogens in various normal and cancer cells. In particular, GPER triggered gene expression and proliferative responses induced by estrogens and even ER antagonists in hormone-sensitive tumor cells. Likewise, additional ER ligands showed the ability to bind to GPER eliciting promiscuous and, in some cases, opposite actions through the two receptors. We synthesized a novel compound (ethyl 3-[5-(2-ethoxycarbonyl-1-methylvinyloxy)-1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]but-2-enoate), referred to as MIBE, and investigated its properties elicited through ERα and GPER in breast cancer cells. Methods Molecular modeling, binding experiments and functional assays were performed in order to evaluate the biological action exerted by MIBE through ERα and GPER in MCF7 and SkBr3 breast cancer cells. Results MIBE displayed the ability to act as an antagonist ligand for ERα and GPER as it elicited inhibitory effects on gene transcription and growth effects by binding to both receptors in breast cancer cells. Moreover, GPER was required for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ERK activation by EGF as ascertained by using MIBE and performing gene silencing experiments. Conclusions Our findings provide novel insights on the functional cross-talk between GPER and EGFR signaling. Furthermore, the exclusive antagonistic activity exerted by MIBE on ERα and GPER could represent an innovative pharmacological approach targeting breast carcinomas which express one or both receptors at

  13. 2-Aminothienopyridazines as Novel Adenosine A1 Receptor Allosteric Modulators and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Gemma N.; Valant, Celine; Horne, James; Figler, Heidi; Flynn, Bernard L.; Linden, Joel; Chalmers, David K.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Scammells, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    A pharmacophore-based screen identified 32 compounds including ethyl 5-amino-3-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-4-oxo-3,4-dihydrothieno[3,4-d]pyridazine-1-carboxylate (8) as a new allosteric modulator of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR). On the basis of this lead, various derivatives were prepared and evaluated for activity at the human A1AR. A number of the test compounds allosterically stabilized agonist-receptor-G protein ternary complexes in dissociation kinetic assays, but were found to be more potent as antagonists in subsequent functional assays of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Additional experiments on the most potent antagonist, 13b, investigating A1AR-mediated [35S]GTPγS binding and [3H]CCPA equilibrium binding confirmed its antagonistic mode of action and also identified inverse agonism. This study has thus identified a new class of A1AR antagonists that can also recognize the receptor’s allosteric site with lower potency. PMID:18771255

  14. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists as potential pharmacotherapies for drug abuse disorders.

    PubMed

    Beardsley, Patrick M; Thomas, Brian F; McMahon, Lance R

    2009-04-01

    Since the discovery of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) in 1988, and subsequently of the CB2 receptor (CB2R) in 1993, there has been an exponential growth of research investigating the functions of the endocannabinoid system. The roles of CB1Rs have been of particular interest to psychiatry because of their selective presence within the CNS and because of their association with brain-reward circuits involving mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems. One potential role that has become of considerable focus is the ability of CB1Rs to modulate the effects of the drugs of abuse. Many drugs of abuse elevate dopamine levels, and the ability of CB1R antagonists or inverse agonists to modulate these elevations has suggested their potential application as pharmacotherapies for treating drug abuse disorders. With the identification of the selective CB1R antagonist, rimonabant, in 1994, and subsequently of other CB1R antagonists, there has been a rapid expansion of research investigating their ability to modulate the effects of the drugs of abuse. This review highlights some of the preclinical and clinical studies that have examined the effects of CB1R antagonists under conditions potentially predictive of their therapeutic efficacy as treatments for drug abuse disorders.

  15. Exploratory studies on development of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 antagonists toward downsizing.

    PubMed

    Tamamura, Hirokazu; Tsutsumi, Hiroshi; Nomura, Wataru; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2008-02-10

    Seven transmembrane (7TM) G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) families are important targets for drug discovery, and specific antagonists for GPCR can accelerate research in the field of medicinal chemistry. The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a GPCR that possesses a unique ligand CXCL12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1). The interaction between CXCL12 and CXCR4 is essential for the migration of progenitor cells during embryonic development of the cardiovascular, hemopoietic and central nervous systems, and also involved in several intractable disease processes, including HIV infection, cancer cell metastasis, progression of acute and chronic leukemias, rheumatoid arthritis and pulmonary fibrosis. Thus, CXCR4 may be an important therapeutic target in all of these diseases, and various CXCR4 antagonists have been proposed as potential drugs. Fourteen-mer peptides, T140 and its analogs, and downsized cyclic pentapeptides have been developed by us as potent CXCR4 antagonists. This article describes the development of a number of specific CXCR4 antagonists in our laboratory, including downsizing.

  16. [N-allyl-Dmt1]-endomorphins are micro-opioid receptor antagonists lacking inverse agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Marczak, Ewa D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Li, Tingyou; Bryant, Sharon D; Tsuda, Yuko; Okada, Yoshio; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2007-10-01

    [N-allyl-Dmt1]-endomorphin-1 and -2 ([N-allyl-Dmt1]-EM-1 and -2) are new selective micro-opioid receptor antagonists obtained by N-alkylation with an allyl group on the amino terminus of 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt) derivatives. To further characterize properties of these compounds, their intrinsic activities were assessed by functional guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) binding assays and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in cell membranes obtained from vehicle, morphine, and ethanol-treated SK-N-SH cells and brain membranes isolated from naive and morphine-dependent mice; their mode of action was compared with naloxone or naltrexone, which both are standard nonspecific opioid-receptor antagonists. [N-allyl-Dmt1]-EM-1 and -2 were neutral antagonists under all of the experimental conditions examined, in contrast to naloxone and naltrexone, which behave as neutral antagonists only in membranes from vehicle-treated cells and mice but act as inverse agonists in membranes from morphine- and ethanol-treated cells as well as morphine-treated mice. Both endomorphin analogs inhibited the naloxone- and naltrexone-elicited withdrawal syndromes from acute morphine dependence in mice. This suggests their potential therapeutic application in the treatment of drug addiction and alcohol abuse without the adverse effects observed with inverse agonist alkaloid-derived compounds that produce severe withdrawal symptoms.

  17. Coptis extracts enhance the anticancer effect of estrogen receptor antagonists on human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; He, Chengwei; Zhou, Keyuan; Wang, Jingdong; Kang, Jing X.

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) antagonists have been widely used for breast cancer treatment, but the efficacy and drug resistance remain to be clinical concerns. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extracts of coptis, an anti-inflammatory herb, improve the anticancer efficacy of ER antagonists. The results showed that the combined treatment of ER antagonists and the crude extract of coptis or its purified compound berberine conferred synergistic growth inhibitory effect on MCF-7 cells (ER+), but not on MDA-MB-231 cells (ER-). The similar results were observed in the combined treatment of fulvestrant, a specific aromatase antagonist. Analysis of the expression of breast cancer related genes indicated that EGFR, HER2, bcl-2 and COX-2 were significantly downregulated, while IFN-β and p21 were remarkably upregulated by berberine. Our results suggest that coptis extracts could be promising adjuvant to ER antagonists in ER positive breast cancer treatment through regulating expression of multiple genes. PMID:19000652

  18. Antagonists at metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5: structure activity relationships and therapeutic potential for addiction.

    PubMed

    Carroll, F Ivy

    2008-10-01

    As a result of intensive investigation, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry, a number of potent and selective metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) antagonists have been discovered. The structure activity relationship studies that led to the discovery of these mGluR5 antagonists are presented in this review. Results from studies on selected mGluR5 antagonists in animal models that simulate drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse appear promising. The comorbidity between drug abuse and anxiety and depression make drugs active in these disorders of great interest. Clinical studies showed that the mGluR5 antagonist fenobam was an active anxiolytic drug. Several new mGluR5 antagonists produced anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects in animal models of these disorders. The results from the clinical and animal studies provide information for new approaches to finding mechanistically distinct pharmacotherapies to help patients achieve and maintain abstinence from cocaine, methamphetamine, opiates, ethanol, and nicotine (smoking).

  19. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Ian R; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J; Sayers, Jon R; Ross, Richard J

    2016-10-12

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days.

  20. [The safety of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Riente, L

    2004-01-01

    The safety profile of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra) has been studied with randomised, placebo-controlled trials involving 2932 patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis. The most frequently reported adverse events were represented by injection site reactions (71%) and headache (13.6%). No statistically significant difference in the incidence of infections was observed among the patients treated with the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and the patients receiving placebo. In particular, the incidence of serious infections was 1,8% in rheumatoid arthritis patients on anakinra therapy and 0,7% in patients on placebo. The reported serious infections consisted of pneumonia, cellulitis, bone and joint infections, bursitis. No case of opportunistic infections or tubercolosis was observed. The results of clinical studies suggest that anakinra is a new well-tolerated drug for the treatment of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Synthesis of Arylpiperazine Derivatives As Protease Activated Receptor 1 Antagonists And Their Evaluation As Antiproliferative Agents.

    PubMed

    Zotti, Andrea Ilaria; Di Gennaro, Elena; Corvino, Angela; Frecentese, Francesco; Magli, Elisa; Perissutti, Elisa; Cirino, Giuseppe; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Terranova-Barberio, Manuela; Iannelli, Federica; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Santagada, Vincenzo; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Budillon, Alfredo; Severino, Beatrice

    2016-09-26

    Protease activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G-coupled receptor activated by α-thrombin and other proteases. Several reports demonstrate PAR1 involvement in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In order to investigate on potential use of PAR1 antagonists as antiproliferative agents, we have identified a series of arylpiperazine derivatives acting as PAR1 antagonists; the selected molecules have been evaluated for their antiproliferative properties. All the compounds inhibited the growth of a panel of cell lines expressing PAR1; two of them, compounds 13 and 15, were able to inhibit, in a dose dependent manner, the growth of the selected cell lines with the lowest IC50 values, and were further characterized to define the mechanism responsible for the observed antiproliferative effect. This study directed us to the identification of two interesting leads that may help to further validate PAR1 as an important therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  2. Ether derivatives of 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol as non-imidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Łazewska, Dorota; Ligneau, Xavier; Schwartz, Jean-Charles; Schunack, Walter; Stark, Holger; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2006-05-15

    A series of aliphatic and aromatic ether derivatives of 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol has been prepared by four different methods. The ethers obtained were evaluated for their affinities at recombinant human histamine H3 receptor, stably expressed in CHO-K1 or HEK 293 cells. All compounds investigated show from moderate to high in vitro affinities in the nanomolar concentration range. Selected compounds were investigated under in vivo conditions after oral administration to mice. Some proved to be highly potent and orally available histamine H3 receptor antagonists. The most potent antagonists in this series have been in vitro the 4-(1,1-dimethylpropyl)phenyl ether 19 (hH3R K(i) = 8.4 nM) and in vivo the simple ethyl ether 2 (ED50 = 1.0mg/kg).

  3. Immunoactive effects of cannabinoids: considerations for the therapeutic use of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Greineisen, William E; Turner, Helen

    2010-05-01

    The active constituents of Cannabis sativa have been used for centuries as recreational drugs and medicinal agents. Today, marijuana is the most prevalent drug of abuse in the United States and, conversely, therapeutic use of marijuana constituents are gaining mainstream clinical and political acceptance. Given the documented contributions of endocannabinoid signaling to a range of physiological systems, including cognitive function, and the control of eating behaviors, it is unsurprising that cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are showing significant clinical potential. In addition to the neuroactive effects of cannabinoids, an emerging body of data suggests that both endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids are potently immunoactive. The central premise of this review article is that the immunological effects of cannabinoids should be considered in the context of each prescribing decision. We present evidence that the immunological effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are highly relevant to the spectrum of disorders for which cannabinoid therapeutics are currently offered.

  4. Biaryls as potent, tunable dual neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists and serotonin transporter inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Andrew P; Tora, George O; Han, Ying; Rajamani, Ramkumar; Bertekap, Robert; Krause, Rudolph; Davis, Carl D; Hu, Joanna; Morgan, Daniel; Taylor, Sarah J; Krause, Kelly; Li, Yu-Wen; Mattson, Gail; Cunningham, Melissa A; Taber, Matthew T; Lodge, Nicholas J; Bronson, Joanne J; Gillman, Kevin W; Macor, John E

    2015-08-01

    Depression is a serious illness that affects millions of patients. Current treatments are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. Neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists have recently been shown to potentiate the antidepressant effects of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in a number of animal models. Herein we describe the optimization of a biaryl chemotype to provide a series of potent dual NK1R antagonists/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors. Through the choice of appropriate substituents, the SERT/NK1R ratio could be tuned to afford a range of target selectivity profiles. This effort culminated in the identification of an analog that demonstrated oral bioavailability, favorable brain uptake, and efficacy in the gerbil foot tap model. Ex vivo occupancy studies with compound 58 demonstrated the ability to maintain NK1 receptor saturation (>88% occupancy) while titrating the desired level of SERT occupancy (11-84%) via dose selection.

  5. The antiparkinsonian drugs budipine and biperiden are use-dependent (uncompetitive) NMDA receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Jackisch, R; Kruchen, A; Sauermann, W; Hertting, G; Feuerstein, T J

    1994-10-24

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA-) evoked [3H]acetylcholine release in rabbit caudate nucleus slices was inhibited by the antiparkinsonian drugs budipine (1-tert-butyl-4,4-diphenylpiperidine) and biperiden (1-bicyclo[2.2.1.]hept-5-en-2-yl-1-phenyl-3-piperidino propanol) yielding functional Ki values of 4.6 and 8.8 microM. In contrast to the competitive antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentaonate, budipine and biperidene significantly reduced both the apparent KD and the Emax value of NMDA. Moreover, they displaced [3H]MK-801 specifically bound to membranes of the same tissue, although with low affinity (IC50: 38 and 92 microM). It is concluded that budipine and biperiden are use-dependent (uncompetitive) antagonists at the NMDA receptor, binding to the receptor-linked ion channel, but probably not to the MK-801 binding site. NMDA antagonism may contribute to the antiparkinsonian effects of budipine.

  6. Immunoactive effects of cannabinoids: considerations for the therapeutic use of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Greineisen, William E.; Turner., Helen

    2013-01-01

    The active constituents of Cannabis sativa have been used for centuries as recreational drugs and medicinal agents. Today, marijuana is the most prevalent drug of abuse in the United States and, conversely, therapeutic use of marijuana constituents are gaining mainstream clinical and political acceptance. Given the documented contributions of endocannabinoid signaling to a range of physiological systems, including cognitive function, and the control of eating behaviors, it is unsurprising that cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are showing significant clinical potential. In addition to the neuroactive effects of cannabinoids, an emerging body of data suggests that both endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids are potently immunoactive. The central premise of this review article is that the immunological effects of cannabinoids should be considered in the context of each prescribing decision. We present evidence that the immunological effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are highly relevant to the spectrum of disorders for which cannabinoid therapeutics are currently offered. PMID:20219697

  7. Pharmacological significance of the interplay between angiotensin receptors: MAS receptors as putative final mediators of the effects elicited by angiotensin AT1 receptors antagonists.

    PubMed

    Pernomian, Larissa; Pernomian, Laena; Gomes, Mayara S; da Silva, Carlos H T P

    2015-12-15

    The interplay between angiotensin AT1 receptors and MAS receptors relies on several inward regulatory mechanisms from renin-angiotensin system (RAS) including the functional crosstalk between angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7), the competitive AT1 antagonism exhibited by angiotensin-(1-7), the antagonist feature assigned to AT1/MAS heterodimerization on AT1 signaling and the AT1-mediated downregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Recently, such interplay has acquired an important significance to RAS Pharmacology since a few studies have supporting strong evidences that MAS receptors mediate the effects elicited by AT1 antagonists. The present Perspective provides an overview of the regulatory mechanisms involving AT1 and MAS receptors, their significance to RAS Pharmacology and the future directions on the interplay between angiotensin receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sigma-1 receptor stimulation protects retinal ganglion cells from ischemia-like insult through the activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Brett H; Park, Yong; Ma, Hai-Ying; Dibas, Adnan; Ellis, Dorette Z; Clark, Abbot F; Yorio, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (σ-1) activation and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been shown to protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from cell death. The purpose of this study was to determine if σ-1 receptor stimulation with pentazocine could promote neuroprotection under conditions of an ischemia-like insult (oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)) through the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (pERK)1/2. Primary RGCs were isolated from P3-P7 Sprague-Dawley rats and purified by sequential immunopanning using Thy1.1 antibodies. RGCs were cultured for 7 days before subjecting the cells to an OGD insult (0.5% oxygen in glucose-free medium) for 6 h. During the OGD, RGCs were treated with pentazocine (σ-1 receptor agonist) with or without BD 1047 (σ-1 receptor antagonist). In other experiments, primary RGCs were treated with pentazocine in the presence or absence of an MEK1/2 inhibitor, PD098059. Cell survival/death was assessed by staining with the calcein-AM/ethidium homodimer reagent. Levels of pERK1/2, total ERK1/2, and beta tubulin expression were determined by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence staining. RGCs subjected to OGD for 6 h induced 50% cell death in primary RGCs (p < 0.001) and inhibited pERK1/2 expression by 65% (p < 0.001). Cell death was attenuated when RGCs were treated with pentazocine under OGD (p < 0.001) and pERK1/2 expression was increased by 1.6 fold (p < 0.05) compared to OGD treated RGCs without pentazocine treatment. The co-treatment of PD098059 (MEK1/2 inhibitor) with pentazocine significantly abolished the protective effects of pentazocine on the RGCs during this OGD insult. Activation of the σ-1 receptor is a neuroprotective target that can protect RGCs from an ischemia-like insult. These results also established a direct relationship between σ-1 receptor stimulation and the neuroprotective effects of the ERK1/2 pathway in purified RGCs subjected to OGD. These findings suggest that activation of

  9. Characterization of protoberberine analogs employed as novel human P2X{sub 7} receptor antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ga Eun; Lee, Won-Gil; Lee, Song-Yi; Lee, Cho-Rong; Park, Chul-Seung; Chang, Sunghoe; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Kim, Yong-Chul

    2011-04-15

    The P2X{sub 7} receptor (P2X{sub 7}R), a member of the ATP-gated ion channel family, is regarded as a promising target for therapy of immune-related diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and chronic pain. A group of novel protoberberine analogs (compounds 3-5), discovered by screening of chemical libraries, was here investigated with respect to their function as P2X{sub 7}R antagonists. Compounds 3-5 non-competitively inhibited BzATP-induced ethidium ion influx into hP2X{sub 7}-expressing HEK293 cells, with IC{sub 50} values of 100-300 nM. This antagonistic action on the channel further confirmed that both BzATP-induced inward currents and Ca{sup 2+} influx were strongly inhibited by compounds 3-5 in patch-clamp and Ca{sup 2+} influx assays. The antagonists also effectively suppressed downstream signaling of P2X{sub 7} receptors including IL-1{beta} release and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 proteins in hP2X{sub 7}-expressing HEK293 cells or in differentiated human monocytes (THP-1 cells). Moreover, IL-2 secretion from CD3/CD28-stimulated Jurkat T cell was also dramatically inhibited by the antagonist. These results imply that novel protoberberine analogs may modulate P2X{sub 7} receptor-mediated immune responses by allosteric inhibition of the receptor. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted

  10. New aminopropandiol derivatives as orally available and short-acting calcium-sensing receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Yuko; Inoue, Teruhiko; Hirata, Kazuyuki; Katsushima, Takeo; Nakagawa, Takashi; Matsuo, Yushi; Shindo, Masanori; Hashimoto, Hiromasa

    2010-06-15

    Synthesis and structure-activity relationship studies on a new aminopropandiol class of derivatives as calcium-sensing receptor antagonists are described. Modification of the phenolic moiety of a calcilytic compound NPS 2143 led to the identification of an orally available compound (R,R)-31 which demonstrated a rapid and transient stimulation of PTH release in rats. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural and pharmacological analysis of O-2050, a putative neutral cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Breivogel, Christopher S.; Mahadevan, Anu; Pertwee, Roger G.; Cascio, Maria Grazia; Bolognini, Daniele; Huffman, John W.; Walentiny, D. Matthew; Vann, Robert E.; Razdan, Raj K.; Martin, Billy R.

    2010-01-01

    Rimonabant, the prototypic antagonist of cannabinoid CB1 receptors, has been reported to have inverse agonist properties at higher concentrations, which may complicate its use as a tool for mechanistic evaluation of cannabinoid pharmacology. Consequently, recent synthesis efforts have concentrated on discovery of a neutral antagonist using a variety of structural templates. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological properties of the putative neutral cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist O-2050, a sulfonamide side chain analog of Δ8-tetrahydrocannabinol. O-2050 and related sulfonamide cannabinoids exhibited good affinity for both cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. While the other sulfonamide analogs produced cannabinoid agonist effects in vivo (e.g., activity suppression, antinociception, and hypothermia), O-2050 stimulated activity and was inactive in the other two tests. O-2050 also decreased food intake in mice, an effect that was reminiscent of that produced by rimonabant. Unlike rimonabant, however, O-2050 did not block the effects of cannabinoid agonists in vivo, even when administered i.c.v. In contrast, O-2050 antagonized the in vitro effects of cannabinoid agonists in [35S]GTPγS and mouse vas deferens assays without having activity on its own in either assay. Further evaluation revealed that O-2050 fully and dose-dependently substituted for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in a mouse drug discrimination procedure (a cannabinoid agonist effect) and that it inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP signaling with a maximum efficacy of approximately half that of the full agonist CP55,940 [(−)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4(1,1-dimethyl-heptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hydroxy-propyl)cyclohexanol]. Together, these results suggest that O-2050 is not a viable candidate for classification as a neutral cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist. PMID:21114999

  12. Effects of Olopatadine Hydrochloride, a Histamine H1 Receptor Antagonist, on Histamine-Induced Skin Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Ishii, Norito; Hamada, Takahiro; Dainichi, Teruki; Karashima, Tadashi; Nakama, Takekuni; Yasumoto, Shinichiro

    2010-01-01

    Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, on histamine-induced skin responses were evaluated in 10 healthy subjects in comparison with placebo, fexofenadine hydrochloride, and bepotastine besilate. Olopatadine significantly suppressed histamine-induced wheal, flare, and itch, starting 30 minutes after oral administration. Olopatadine was more effective than fexofenadine and bepotastine. None of the drugs studied impaired performance of word processing tasks. These results suggest that olopatadine can suppress skin symptoms caused by histamine soon after administration. PMID:20886023

  13. Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride, a histamine h(1) receptor antagonist, on histamine-induced skin responses.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Ishii, Norito; Hamada, Takahiro; Dainichi, Teruki; Karashima, Tadashi; Nakama, Takekuni; Yasumoto, Shinichiro

    2010-01-01

    Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride, a histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, on histamine-induced skin responses were evaluated in 10 healthy subjects in comparison with placebo, fexofenadine hydrochloride, and bepotastine besilate. Olopatadine significantly suppressed histamine-induced wheal, flare, and itch, starting 30 minutes after oral administration. Olopatadine was more effective than fexofenadine and bepotastine. None of the drugs studied impaired performance of word processing tasks. These results suggest that olopatadine can suppress skin symptoms caused by histamine soon after administration.

  14. Fosaprepitant: a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Navari, Rudolph M

    2008-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a distressing and common adverse event associated with cancer treatment. Updated antiemetic guidelines were published in 2008 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and, in 2006, by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, which have included the use of the new and more effective antiemetic agents 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT(3)) receptor antagonist and neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor antagonist. Aprepitant is a selective NK-1 receptor antagonist approved as part of combination therapy with a corticosteroid and a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist for the prevention of acute and delayed CINV in patients receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Fosaprepitant (also known as MK-0517 and L-758,298) is a water-soluble phosphoryl prodrug for aprepitant, which, when administered intravenously, is converted to aprepitant within 30 min of intravenous administration via the action of ubiquitous phosphatases. Owing to the rapid conversion of fosaprepitant to the active form (aprepitant), fosaprepitant 115 mg provided the same aprepitant exposure in terms of AUC as aprepitant 12 mg orally, and fosaprepitant is expected to provide a correspondingly similar antiemetic effect as aprepitant. Clinical studies have suggested that fosaprepitant could be appropriate as an intravenous alternative to the aprepitant oral capsule. In a study in healthy subjects, fosaprepitant 115 mg was generally well tolerated at a final drug concentration of 1 mg/ml, and fosaprepitant 115 mg was AUC bioequivalent to aprepitant 125 mg. Fosaprepitant in the dose of 115 mg has been approved by the US FDA, the EU and the Australian authorities on day 1 of a 3-day oral aprepitant regimen, with oral aprepitant administered on days 2 and 3. Fosaprepitant may be a useful parenteral alternative to oral aprepitant. Further study is needed to clarify the utility of fosaprepitant in the prevention of CINV and to clarify optimal dosing regimens that may

  15. An Autoinflammatory Disease with Deficiency of the Interleukin-1–Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Aksentijevich, Ivona; Masters, Seth L.; Ferguson, Polly J.; Dancey, Paul; Frenkel, Joost; van Royen-Kerkhoff, Annet; Laxer, Ron; Tedgård, Ulf; Cowen, Edward W.; Pham, Tuyet-Hang; Booty, Matthew; Estes, Jacob D.; Sandler, Netanya G.; Plass, Nicole; Stone, Deborah L.; Turner, Maria L.; Hill, Suvimol; Butman, John A.; Schneider, Rayfel; Babyn, Paul; El-Shanti, Hatem I.; Pope, Elena; Barron, Karyl; Bing, Xinyu; Laurence, Arian; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Chapelle, Dawn; Clarke, Gillian I.; Ohson, Kamal; Nicholson, Marc; Gadina, Massimo; Yang, Barbara; Korman, Benjamin D.; Gregersen, Peter K.; van Hagen, P. Martin; Hak, A. Elisabeth; Huizing, Marjan; Rahman, Proton; Douek, Daniel C.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2010-01-01

    Background Autoinflammatory diseases manifest inflammation without evidence of infection, high-titer autoantibodies, or autoreactive T cells. We report a disorder caused by mutations of IL1RN, which encodes the interleukin-1–receptor antagonist, with prominent involvement of skin and bone. Methods We studied nine children from six families who had neonatal onset of sterile multifocal osteomyelitis, periostitis, and pustulosis. Response to empirical treatment with the recombinant interleukin-1–receptor antagonist anakinra in the first patient prompted us to test for the presence of mutations and changes in proteins and their function in interleukin-1–pathway genes including IL1RN. Results We identified homozygous mutations of IL1RN in nine affected children, from one family from Newfoundland, Canada, three families from the Netherlands, and one consanguineous family from Lebanon. A nonconsanguineous patient from Puerto Rico was homozygous for a genomic deletion that includes IL1RN and five other interleukin-1–family members. At least three of the mutations are founder mutations; heterozygous carriers were asymptomatic, with no cytokine abnormalities in vitro. The IL1RN mutations resulted in a truncated protein that is not secreted, thereby rendering cells hyperresponsive to interleukin-1β stimulation. Patients treated with anakinra responded rapidly. Conclusions We propose the term deficiency of the interleukin-1–receptor antagonist, or DIRA, to denote this autosomal recessive autoinflammatory disease caused by mutations affecting IL1RN. The absence of interleukin-1–receptor antagonist allows unopposed action of interleukin-1, resulting in life-threatening systemic inflammation with skin and bone involvement. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00059748.) PMID:19494218

  16. A novel DP2 receptor antagonist (AM-461): a patent evaluation of WO2011085033.

    PubMed

    Norman, Peter

    2011-12-01

    This application claims salts and crystalline forms of a previously disclosed DP2 receptor antagonist (2-[3-[2-(tert-butylsulfanylmethyl)-4-(2,2-dimethylpropanoylamino)phenoxy]-4-methoxy-phenyl]acetic acid (1)). It also claims compositions containing the free acid and its salts, especially the sodium salt and their use in the treatment of inflammatory and respiratory diseases, especially asthma. Notably, the application presents Phase I clinical data on compound (1).

  17. Cardiovascular effects of selective agonists and antagonists of histamine H3 receptors in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Coruzzi, G; Gambarelli, E; Bertaccini, G; Timmerman, H

    1995-06-01

    The cardiovascular responses to a series of selective histamine H3 receptor agonists, (R) alpha-methylhistamine, imetit and immepip and selective antagonists, thioperamide, clobenpropit and clophenpropit, were studied in anaesthetized rats. At 0.003-1 mumol/kg i.v. doses, H3 agonists failed to produce any significant change in the basal blood pressure and heart rate. Larger doses of (R) alpha-methylhistamine increased the blood pressure and heart rate and higher doses of imetit caused vasodepressor responses and reduced heart rate, whereas immepip proved virtually inactive. While (R) alpha-methylhistamine-induced effects were not blocked by histamine H1-, H2- and H3-receptor antagonists, they were however reduced by idazoxan and propranolol, which indicates that the mechanisms involved are adrenergic. The effects induced by imetit are not related to histamine H3 receptors but are mediated by indirect (via 5HT3 receptors) cholinergic mechanisms, since these effects were prevented by 1 mg/kg i.v. atropine and by 0.1 mg/kg i.v. ondansetron. Similarly, the H3 antagonists per se failed to change basal cardiovascular function up to 10 mumol/kg i.v. and only at 30 mumol/kg i.v. were marked decreases observed in the blood pressure and heart rate with a significant reduction in the effects of noradrenaline. These data indicate that in anaesthetized rats, histamine H3 receptor activation or blockade has no effect on basal cardiovascular function. The effects recorded after the administration of large doses of (R) alpha-methylhistamine and imetit are clearly unrelated to histamine H3 receptors and should be taken into account when using these compounds as H3 ligands for "in vivo" experiments.

  18. Efficient photoaffinity labeling of the rat V1a vasopressin receptor using a linear azidopeptidic antagonist.

    PubMed

    Carnazzi, E; Aumelas, A; Phalipou, S; Mouillac, B; Guillon, G; Barberis, C; Seyer, R

    1997-08-01

    We have synthesized and fully characterized by fast-atom-bombardment-mass, NMR and ultraviolet spectroscopies the vasopressin antagonist 3-azidophenylpropionyl-D-Tyr(Me)-Phe-Gln-Asn-Arg-Pro-Arg-Tyr(3I )-NH2. Easily radioiodinatable just before use, it has a high affinity for the natural rat liver V1a receptor [dissociation constant (Kd) = 54 +/- 20 pM; Carnazzi, E., Aumelas, A., Barberis, C., Guillon, G. & Seyer, R. (1994) J. Med. Chem. 37, 1841-1849] and for both the rat vasopressin V1a receptor expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells (Sf9 cells, Kd = 688 +/- 35 pM) and in COS-7 cells (Kd = 320 +/- 20 pM). This probe labels specifically the V1a receptors in an ultraviolet-dependent manner, and binds covalently to about 12% of the receptors with high stability over several days, even in dissociation or solubilization conditions. SDS/PAGE studies and autoradiographic analyses of the photolabeled receptors reveal a single band (49.5 kDa) and two bands (63 kDa and 93.6 kDa) for receptor-probe associations obtained in Sf9 and COS-7 cells respectively. These molecular masses are consistent with non-glycosylated and highly glycosylated forms of the receptor, according to each expression system. In rat liver membranes, we have identified apparent molecular masses of about 32, 45 and more than 67 kDa. We finally demonstrated a proteolysis of the receptor that appeared to be Zn2+ and leupeptin sensitive. The high potency of this ligand is promising for the monitoring of the purification of the V1a receptor and for mapping its antagonist-binding site.

  19. 2-Aminoethyl Methylphosphonate, a Potent and Rapidly Acting Antagonist of GABAA-ρ1 Receptors

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, A.; Yan, J.; Yue, L.; ...

    2011-08-02

    All three classes of receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (GABAR) are expressed in the retina. This study investigated roles of GABAR, especially GABA(C)R (GABA(A)-rho), in retinal signaling in vivo by studying effects on the mouse electroretinogram (ERG) of genetic deletion of GABA(C)R versus pharmacological blockade using receptor antagonists. Brief full-field flash ERGs were recorded from anesthetized GABA(C)R(-/-) mice, and WT C57BL/6 (B6) mice, before and after intravitreal injection of GABA(C)R antagonists, TPMPA, 3-APMPA, or the more recently developed 2-AEMP; GABA(A)R antagonist, SR95531; GABA(B)R antagonist, CGP, and agonist, baclofen. Intravitreal injections of TPMPA and SR95531 were also made in Brownmore » Norway rats. The effect of 2-AEMP on GABA-induced current was tested directly in isolated rat rod bipolar cells, and 2-AEMP was found to preferentially block GABA(C)R in those cells. Maximum amplitudes of dark (DA) and light-adapted (LA) ERG b-waves were reduced in GABA(C)R(-/-) mice, compared to B6 mice, by 30-60%; a-waves were unaltered and oscillatory potential amplitudes were increased. In B6 mice, after injection of TPMPA (also in rats), 3-APMPA or 2-AEMP, ERGs became similar to ERGs of GABA(C)R(-/-) mice. Blockade of GABA(A)Rs and GABA(B)Rs, or agonism of GABA(B)Rs did not alter B6 DA b-wave amplitude. The negative scotopic threshold response (nSTR) was slightly less sensitive in GABA(C)R(-/-) than in B6 mice, and unaltered by 2-AEMP. However, amplitudes of nSTR and photopic negative response (PhNR), both of which originate from inner retina, were enhanced by TPMPA and 3-APMPA, each of which has GABA(B) agonist properties, and further increased by baclofen. The finding that genetic deletion of GABA(C)R, the GABA(C)R antagonist 2-AEMP, and other antagonists all reduced ERG b-wave amplitude, supports a role for CABA(C)R in determining the maximum response amplitude of bipolar cells contributing to the b-wave. GABA(C)R antagonists

  20. Dynamics of the Development of Amnesia Caused by Disruption of Memory Reconsolidation by Neurotransmitter Receptors Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, V P; Solntseva, S V; Kozyrev, S A

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of amnesia development under conditions of memory reconsolidation disruption by serotonin receptor antagonist methiothepin or NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 was studied in snails trained in conventional food aversion. In 2 days after training, injection of methiothepin or MK-801 before reminder induced amnesia development. During repeated training in 3 days after amnesia induction, the skill was formed more rapidly than during the initial training. During repeated training in 10 days after administration of methiothepin and reminder, the dynamics of habit formation was similar to that during initial learning. At the same time, repeated training in 10 days after MK-801 administration and reminder did not result in long-term memory formation. Disruption of reconsolidation of conditioned food aversion memory by antagonists of serotonin or NMDA glutamate receptors led to the development of different types of amnesia that had similar strengthening gradient at the early stages, but differed by the possibility of memory formation during re-training at the late stage.

  1. Evidence that Argos is an antagonistic ligand of the EGF receptor.

    PubMed

    Vinós, J; Freeman, M

    2000-07-20

    Argos, the inhibitor of the Drosophila epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, remains the only known extracellular inhibitor of this family of receptors in any organism. The functional domain of Argos includes an atypical EGF domain and it is not clear whether it binds to the EGF receptor or if it acts via a distinct receptor to reduce Egfr activity indirectly. Here we present two lines of evidence that strongly suggest that Argos directly interacts with the EGF receptor. First, Argos is unable to inhibit a chimeric receptor that contains an extracellular domain from an unrelated RTK, indicating the need for the EGF receptor extracellular domain. Second, Argos can inhibit the Drosophila EGF receptor even when expressed in human cells, implying that no other Drosophila protein is necessary for inhibition. We also report that Argos and the Drosophila activating ligand, Spitz, can influence mammalian RTK activation, albeit in a cell-type specific manner. This includes the first evidence that Argos can inhibit signalling in mammalian cells, raising the possibility of engineering an effective human EGF receptor/ErbB antagonist. Oncogene (2000) 19, 3560 - 3562

  2. New insights into the stereochemical requirements of the bradykinin B2 receptor antagonists binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupala, Cecylia S.; Gomez-Gutierrez, Patricia; Perez, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is a member of the kinin family, released in response to inflammation, trauma, burns, shock, allergy and some cardiovascular diseases, provoking vasodilatation and increased vascular permeability among other effects. Their actions are mediated through at least two G-protein coupled receptors, B1 a receptor up-regulated during inflammation episodes or tissue trauma and B2 that is constitutively expressed in a variety of cell types. The goal of the present work is to carry out a structure-activity study of BK B2 antagonism, taking into account the stereochemical features of diverse non-peptide antagonists and the way these features translate into ligand anchoring points to complementary regions of the receptor, through the analysis of the respective ligand-receptor complex. For this purpose an atomistic model of the BK B2 receptor was built by homology modeling and subsequently refined embedded in a lipid bilayer by means of a 600 ns molecular dynamics trajectory. The average structure from the last hundred nanoseconds of the molecular dynamics trajectory was energy minimized and used as model of the receptor for docking studies. For this purpose, a set of compounds with antagonistic profile, covering maximal diversity were selected from the literature. Specifically, the set of compounds include Fasitibant, FR173657, Anatibant, WIN64338, Bradyzide, CHEMBL442294, and JSM10292. Molecules were docked into the BK B2 receptor model and the corresponding complexes analyzed to understand ligand-receptor interactions. The outcome of this study is summarized in a 3D pharmacophore that explains the observed structure-activity results and provides insight into the design of novel molecules with antagonistic profile. To prove the validity of the pharmacophore hypothesized a virtual screening process was also carried out. The pharmacophore was used as query to identify new hits using diverse databases of molecules. The results of this study revealed a set of new

  3. Ergoline derivatives as highly potent and selective antagonists at the somatostatin sst 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Troxler, Thomas; Enz, Albert; Hoyer, Daniel; Langenegger, Daniel; Neumann, Peter; Pfäffli, Paul; Schoeffter, Philippe; Hurth, Konstanze

    2008-02-01

    Non-peptidic compounds containing the octahydro-indolo[4,3-fg]quinoline (ergoline) structural element have been optimized into derivatives with high affinity (pK(d) r sst(1)>9) and selectivity (>1000-fold for h sst(1) over h sst(2)-h sst(5)) for the somatostatin sst(1) receptor. In functional assays, these ergolines act as antagonists at human recombinant sst(1) receptors. Pharmacokinetic studies in rodents reveal good oral bioavailability and brain penetration for some of these compounds.

  4. Naphthalene/quinoline amides and sulfonylureas as potent and selective antagonists of the EP4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Burch, Jason D; Farand, Julie; Colucci, John; Sturino, Claudio; Ducharme, Yves; Friesen, Richard W; Lévesque, Jean-François; Gagné, Sébastien; Wrona, Mark; Therien, Alex G; Mathieu, Marie-Claude; Denis, Danielle; Vigneault, Erika; Xu, Daigen; Clark, Patsy; Rowland, Steve; Han, Yongxin

    2011-02-01

    Two new series of EP(4) antagonists based on naphthalene/quinoline scaffolds have been identified as part of our on-going efforts to develop treatments for inflammatory pain. One series contains an acidic sulfonylurea pharmacophore, whereas the other is a neutral amide. Both series show subnanomolar intrinsic binding potency towards the EP(4) receptor, and excellent selectivity towards other prostanoid receptors. While the amide series generally displays poor pharmacokinetic parameters, the sulfonylureas exhibit greatly improved profile. MF-592, the optimal compound from the sulfonylurea series, has a desirable overall preclinical profile that suggests it is suitable for further development.

  5. Effects of iodoproxyfan, a potent and selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, on alpha 2 and 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Pertz, H; Bitschnau, H; Purand, K; Kathmann, M; Elz, S; Schunack, W

    1995-07-01

    We determined the affinity and/or potency of the novel H3 receptor antagonist iodoproxyfan at alpha 2 and 5-HT3 receptors. Iodoproxyfan and rauwolscine (a reference alpha 2 ligand) (i) monophasically displaced 3H-rauwolscine binding to rat brain cortex membranes (pKi 6.79 and 8.59); (ii) facilitated the electrically evoked tritium overflow from superfused mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline (pEC50 6.46 and 7.91) and (iii) produced rightward shifts of the concentration-response curve (CRC) of (unlabelled) noradrenaline for its inhibitory effect on the evoked overflow (pA2 6.65 and 7.88). In the guinea-pig ileum, iodoproxyfan 6.3 mumol/l failed to evoke a contraction by itself but depressed the maximum of the CRC of 5-hydroxytryptamine (pD'2 5.24). Tropisetron (a reference 5-HT3 antagonist) produced rightward shifts of the CRC of 5-hydroxytryptamine (pA2 7.84). In conclusion, the affinity/potency of iodoproxyfan at H3 receptors (range 8.3-9.7 [1]) exceeds that at alpha 2 receptors by at least 1.5 log units and that at 5-HT3 receptors by at least 3 log units.

  6. Activity of 2-substituted lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) analogs at LPA receptors: discovery of a LPA1/LPA3 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Heise, C E; Santos, W L; Schreihofer, A M; Heasley, B H; Mukhin, Y V; Macdonald, T L; Lynch, K R

    2001-12-01

    The physiological implications of lysophosphatidic acid occupancy of individual receptors are largely unknown because selective agonists/antagonists are unavailable currently. The molecular cloning of three high-affinity lysophosphatidic acid receptors, LPA1, LPA2, and LPA3, provides a platform for developing receptor type-selective ligands. Starting with an N-acyl ethanolamide phosphate LPA analog, we made a series of substitutions at the second carbon to generate compounds with varying spatial, stereochemical, and electronic characteristics. Analysis of this series at each recombinant LPA receptor using a guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate (GTP[gamma35S]) binding assay revealed sharp differences in activity. Our results suggest that these receptors have one spatially restrictive binding pocket that interacts with the 2-substituted moieties and prefers small hydrophobic groups and hydrogen bonding functionalities. The agonist activity predicted by the GTP[gamma35S] binding assay was reflected in the activity of a subset of compounds in increasing arterial pressure in anesthetized rats. One compound with a bulky hydrophobic group (VPC12249) was a dual LPA1/LPA3 competitive antagonist. Several compounds that had smaller side chains were found to be LPA1-selective agonists.

  7. Antidepressant-like effect of 17beta-estradiol: involvement of dopaminergic, serotonergic, and (or) sigma-1 receptor systems.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-10-01

    -1 receptor antagonist), or BD 1047 (1 mg/kg, i.p.; a novel sigma-1 receptor antagonist) reversed the antiimmobility effects of 17beta-estradiol (20 microg/kg, i.p.). Similarly, in mice pretreated with a subthreshold dose of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, a 5-HT1A serotonin receptor agonist), 17beta-estradiol (5 microg/kg, i.p.) produced an antidepressant-like effect. These findings demonstrate that 17beta-estradiol exerted an antidepressant-like effect preferentially through the modulation of dopaminergic and serotonergic receptors. This action may also involve the participation of sigma-1 receptors.

  8. A Molecular Basis for Selective Antagonist Destabilization of Dopamine D3 Receptor Quaternary Organization.

    PubMed

    Marsango, Sara; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Jiménez-Rosés, Mireia; Millan, Mark J; Pediani, John D; Ward, Richard J; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-05-18

    The dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) is a molecular target for both first-generation and several recently-developed antipsychotic agents. Following stable expression of this mEGFP-tagged receptor, Spatial Intensity Distribution Analysis indicated that a substantial proportion of the receptor was present within dimeric/oligomeric complexes and that increased expression levels of the receptor favored a greater dimer to monomer ratio. Addition of the antipsychotics, spiperone or haloperidol, resulted in re-organization of D3R quaternary structure to promote monomerization. This action was dependent on ligand concentration and reversed upon drug washout. By contrast, a number of other antagonists with high affinity at the D3R, did not alter the dimer/monomer ratio. Molecular dynamics simulations following docking of each of the ligands into a model of the D3R derived from the available atomic level structure, and comparisons to the receptor in the absence of ligand, were undertaken. They showed that, in contrast to the other antagonists, spiperone and haloperidol respectively increased the atomic distance between reference α carbon atoms of transmembrane domains IV and V and I and II, both of which provide key interfaces for D3R dimerization. These results offer a molecular explanation for the distinctive ability of spiperone and haloperidol to disrupt D3R dimerization.

  9. X-ray structures define human P2X3 receptor gating cycle and antagonist action

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Steven E.; Lü, Wei; Oosterheert, Wout; Shekhar, Mrinal; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Summary P2X receptors are trimeric, non-selective cation channels activated by ATP that play important roles in cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems. Despite their central function in human physiology and as potential targets of therapeutic agents, there are no structures of human P2X receptors. Mechanisms of receptor desensitization and ion permeation, principles of antagonism, and complete structure of the pore-forming transmembrane domains remain unclear. We report x-ray crystal structures of human P2X3 receptor in apo/resting, agonist-bound/open-pore, agonist-bound/desensitized and antagonist-bound closed states. The open state structure harbors an intracellular motif we term the “cytoplasmic cap”, that stabilizes the open state of the ion channel pore and creates lateral, phospholipid-lined cytoplasmic fenestrations for water and ion egress. Competitive antagonists TNP-ATP and A-317491 stabilize the apo/resting state and reveal the interactions responsible for competitive inhibition. These structures illuminate the conformational rearrangements underpinning P2X receptor gating and provide a foundation for development of new pharmacologic agents. PMID:27626375

  10. Hypersensitivity of dopamine transmission in the rat striatum after treatment with the NMDA receptor antagonist amantadine.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Magali; Page, Guylène; Maloteaux, Jean-Marie; Hermans, Emmanuel

    2002-09-13

    Amantadine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist known to increase dopamine synthesis and release in the striatum, is frequently associated with L-DOPA in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, the biochemical mechanisms involved in the effect of amantadine and the consequences of its repetitive administration on the modulation of striatal dopamine transmission still need to be clarified. We have investigated the effects of short-term amantadine treatments on the expression of dopamine receptors and the functional coupling to G proteins in rat striatal membranes. Dopamine-induced stimulation of guanosine 5'-[gamma-35S]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding was significantly enhanced (40%) in striatum homogenates from rats treated for 4 days with amantadine (40 mg/kg, i.p.) compared to vehicle-treated animals. This effect was specific for dopamine receptors and was transient as no significant modifications were observed when animals were treated for either 2 or 7 days. Administration of amantadine did not directly affect the animal behaviour. However, treated animals exhibited hypersensitive dopamine transmission since rats treated for 4 days showed exacerbated responses to a single apomorphine administration (enhanced locomotor activity and reduced stereotypy). Since the effects of amantadine administration differ from those usually observed with direct dopamine receptor agonists or other NMDA receptor antagonists, we suggest that multiple biochemical mechanisms contribute to the modulation of dopamine transmission by amantadine.

  11. Different antagonist binding properties of rat pancreatic and cardiac muscarinic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroeck, M.; Camus, J.; Winand, J.; Christophe, J.

    1987-11-09

    The antagonist binding properties of rat pancreatic and cardiac muscarinic receptors were compared. In both tissues pirenzepine (PZ) had a low affinity for muscarinic receptors labelled by (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine ((/sup 3/)NMS) (K/sub D/ values of 140 and 280nM, respectively, in pancreatic and cardiac homogenates). The binding properties of pancreatic and cardiac receptors were, however, markedly different. This was indicated by different affinities for dicyclomine, (11-(/(2-((diethylamino)-methyl)-1-piperidinyl/acetyl)-5, 11-dihydro-6H-pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4) benzodiazepin-6-on)(AFDX-116), 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine methobromide (4-DAMP) and hexahydrosiladifenidol (HHSiD). Pancreatic and cardiac muscarinic receptros also showed different (/sup 3/H)NMS association and dissociation rates. These results support the concept of M2 receptor subtypes have different binding kinetic properties. 20 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  12. 5{alpha}-Bile alcohols function as farnesoid X receptor antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko . E-mail: mogami@nihs.go.jp; Kawahara, Yosuke; Tamehiro, Norimasa; Yoshida, Takemi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ohno, Yasuo; Nagao, Taku; Une, Mizuho

    2006-01-06

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid/alcohol-activated nuclear receptor that regulates lipid homeostasis. Unlike other steroid receptors, FXR binds bile acids in an orientation that allows the steroid nucleus A to face helix 12 in the receptor, a crucial domain for coactivator-recruitment. Because most naturally occurring bile acids and alcohols contain a cis-oriented A, which is distinct from that of other steroids and cholesterol metabolites, we investigated the role of this 5{beta}-configuration in FXR activation. The results showed that the 5{beta}-(A/B cis) bile alcohols 5{beta}-cyprinol and bufol are potent FXR agonists, whereas their 5{alpha}-(A/B trans) counterparts antagonize FXR transactivation and target gene expression. Both isomers bound to FXR, but their ability to induce coactivator-recruitment and thereby induce transactivation differed. These findings suggest a critical role for the A orientation of bile salts in agonist/antagonist function.

  13. Early Use of the NMDA Receptor Antagonist Ketamine in Refractory and Superrefractory Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) and superrefractory status epilepticus (SRSE) pose a difficult clinical challenge. Multiple cerebral receptor and transporter changes occur with prolonged status epilepticus leading to pharmacoresistance patterns unfavorable for conventional antiepileptics. In particular, n-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor upregulation leads to glutamate mediated excitotoxicity. Targeting these NMDA receptors may provide a novel approach to otherwise refractory seizures. Ketamine has been utilized in RSE. Recent systematic review indicates 56.5% and 63.5% cessation in seizures in adults and pediatrics, respectively. No complications were described. We should consider earlier implementation of ketamine or other NMDA receptor antagonists, for RSE. Prospective study of early implementation of ketamine should shed light on the role of such medications in RSE. PMID:25649724

  14. [Induction of amnesia evoked by memory reconsolidation disruption with glutamate or serotonin receptor antagonists depends on protein synthesis activation].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, V P; Solntseva, S V

    2010-12-01

    Effects of DNQX (ionotropic AMPA/cainate glutamate receptor antagonist) and metiotepin (serotonin receptor antagonist) and cycloheximide (protein synthesis inhibitor) on long-term memory reconsolidation processes were studied in snail Helix lucorum with definite type of food aversion conditioned reflex. DNQX or cycloheximide injected immediately before reminding disrupt retrieval of the food aversion 24 hours after conditioning, and repeated trials of learning with the same food as at initial trials did not form the food aversion 2 weeks later. Metiotepin + reminding also discrupt recalling of food aversion 24 hours after conditioning, while food aversion was repaired after repeated trials 2 weeks later. Simultaneous injections of DNQX + cycloheximide or metiotepin + cycloheximide immediately before reminding do not discrupt the food aversion. We suggest that unrecovered and recovered forms of amnesia induced by AMPA/cainate glutamate receptor antagonists or serotonin receptor antagonist, respectively, need specific protein molecules de novo.

  15. Chemical function based pharmacophore generation of endothelin-A selective receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Funk, Oliver F; Kettmann, Viktor; Drimal, Jan; Langer, Thierry

    2004-05-20

    Both quantitative and qualitative chemical function based pharmacophore models of endothelin-A (ET(A)) selective receptor antagonists were generated by using the two algorithms HypoGen and HipHop, respectively, which are implemented in the Catalyst molecular modeling software. The input for HypoGen is a training set of 18 ET(A) antagonists exhibiting IC(50) values ranging between 0.19 nM and 67 microM. The best output hypothesis consists of five features: two hydrophobic (HY), one ring aromatic (RA), one hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), and one negative ionizable (NI) function. The highest scoring Hip Hop model consists of six features: three hydrophobic (HY), one ring aromatic (RA), one hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), and one negative ionizable (NI). It is the result of an input of three highly active, selective, and structurally diverse ET(A) antagonists. The predictive power of the quantitative model could be approved by using a test set of 30 compounds, whose activity values spread over 6 orders of magnitude. The two pharmacophores were tested according to their ability to extract known endothelin antagonists from the 3D molecular structure database of Derwent's World Drug Index. Thereby the main part of selective ET(A) antagonistic entries was detected by the two hypotheses. Furthermore, the pharmacophores were used to screen the Maybridge database. Six compounds were chosen from the output hit lists for in vitro testing of their ability to displace endothelin-1 from its receptor. Two of these are new potential lead compounds because they are structurally novel and exhibit satisfactory activity in the binding assay.

  16. Flavonoids as aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists/antagonists: effects of structure and cell context.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Qin, Chunhua; Safe, Stephen H

    2003-01-01

    Chemoprotective phytochemicals exhibit multiple activities and interact with several cellular receptors, including the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor (AhR). In this study we investigated the AhR agonist/antagonist activities of the following flavonoids: chrysin, phloretin, kaempferol, galangin, naringenin, genistein, quercetin, myricetin, luteolin, baicalein, daidzein, apigenin, and diosmin. We also investigated the AhR-dependent activities of cantharidin and emodin (in herbal extracts) in Ah-responsive MCF-7 human breast cells, HepG2 human liver cancer cells, and mouse Hepa-1 cells transiently or stably transfected with plasmids expressing a luciferase reporter gene linked to multiple copies of a consensus dioxin-responsive element. The AhR agonist activities of the compounds (1 and 10 micro M) were as high as 25% of the maximal response induced by 5 nM 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and their potencies were dependent on cell context. Galangin, genistein, daidzein, and diosmin were active only in Hepa-1 cells, and cantharidin induced activity only in human HepG2 and MCF-7 cells. Western blot analysis confirmed that baicalein and emodin also induced CYP1A1 protein in the human cancer cell lines. The AhR antagonist activities of four compounds inactive as agonists in MCF-7 and HepG2 cells (kaempferol, quercetin, myricetin, and luteolin) were also investigated. Luteolin was an AhR antagonist in both cell lines, and the inhibitory effects of the other compound were dependent on cell context. These data suggest that dietary phytochemicals exhibit substantial cell context-dependent AhR agonist as well as antagonist activities. Moreover, because phytochemicals and other AhR-active compounds in food are present in the diet at relatively high concentrations, risk assessment of dietary toxic equivalents of TCDD and related compounds should also take into account AhR agonist/antagonist activities of phytochemicals. PMID:14644660

  17. Serotonin (5-HT3) receptor antagonists for the reduction of symptoms of low anterior resection syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Itagaki, Ryohei; Koda, Keiji; Yamazaki, Masato; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Kosugi, Chihiro; Hirano, Atsushi; Arimitsu, Hidehito; Shiragami, Risa; Yoshimura, Yukino; Suzuki, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT])3 receptor antagonists are effective for the treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D), in which exaggerated intestinal/colonic hypermotility is often observed. Recent studies have suggested that the motility disorder, especially spastic hypermotility, seen in the neorectum following sphincter-preserving operations for rectal cancer may be the basis of the postoperative defecatory malfunction seen in these patients. We investigated the efficacy of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in patients suffering from severe low anterior resection syndrome. Patients and methods A total of 25 male patients with complaints of uncontrollable urgency or fecal incontinence following sphincter-preserving operations were enrolled in this study. Defecatory status, assessed on the basis of incontinence score (0–20), urgency grade (0–3), and number of toilet visits per day, was evaluated using a questionnaire before and 1 month after the administration of the 5-HT3 antagonist ramosetron. Results All the parameters assessed improved significantly after taking ramosetron for 1 month. The effect was more prominent in cases whose anastomotic line was lower, ie, inside the anal canal. Defecatory function was better in patients who commenced ramosetron therapy within 6 months postoperatively, as compared to those who were not prescribed ramosetron for more than 7 months postoperatively. Conclusion These results suggest that 5-HT3 antagonists are effective for the treatment of low anterior resection syndrome, as in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. The improvement in symptoms is not merely time dependent, but it is related to treatment with 5-HT3 antagonists. PMID:24648748

  18. A comparison of three NMDA receptor antagonists in the treatment of prolonged status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Weiwei; Williamson, John; Bertram, Edward H.; Kapur, Jaideep

    2010-01-01

    Three different classes of NMDA receptor antagonists were compared for their effectiveness in terminating prolonged status epilepticus (SE), induced by continuous hippocampal stimulation. Animals were treated after 150 min of SE by intraperitoneal administration of increasing doses of 3-((R,S)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP), MK-801 (dizocilpine), ifenprodil, or saline. EEG recordings were used to determine seizure termination. The first experiment (n = 57 animals) determined the most effective anticonvulsant dose of each agent by determining its ability to terminate SE within the next 300 min. Five control rats treated with normal saline after 150 min of SE continued to exhibit continuous seizures for the next 300 min. All drugs were administered after 150 min of SE. CPP terminated seizures with an ED50 of 6.4 mg/kg; the maximal effective dose was 15 mg/kg. MK-801 has an ED50 of 1.4 mg/kg; the maximal effective dose was 2 mg/kg. Ifenprodil was maximally effective at 30 mg/kg. However, an ED50 could not be calculated. In a subsequent experiment, the NMDA antagonists were compared for their ability to terminate prolonged SE within 60 min of their administration at the most effective dose. MK-801 (2.0 mg/kg) terminated SE in 6 of 10 animals within 60 min, CPP (15 mg/kg) terminated it in 1 of 9 animals; ifenprodil (30 mg/kg) did not terminate it in any of 9 animals treated. In the 300 min following administration, CPP (6/9) and MK-801 (6/10) were equally efficacious in terminating SE but ifenprodil (2/7) was less effective (P = 0.065, chi-square test). The results indicate that the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 was superior to the competitive antagonist CPP and the pH-sensitive site antagonist ifenprodil, in terminating prolonged experimental SE. PMID:15135166

  19. Monomeric gremlin is a novel vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Grillo, Elisabetta; Ravelli, Cosetta; Corsini, Michela; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Zammataro, Luca; Oreste, Pasqua; Zoppetti, Giorgio; Tobia, Chiara; Ronca, Roberto; Presta, Marco; Mitola, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in various physiological and pathological conditions, including inflammation and tumor growth. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist gremlin has been identified as a novel pro-angiogenic factor. Gremlin promotes neovascular responses via a BMP-independent activation of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 (VEGFR2). BMP antagonists may act as covalent or non-covalent homodimers or in a monomeric form, while VEGFRs ligands are usually dimeric. However, the oligomeric state of gremlin and its role in modulating the biological activity of the protein remain to be elucidated. Here we show that gremlin is expressed in vitro and in vivo both as a monomer and as a covalently linked homodimer. Mutagenesis of amino acid residue Cys141 prevents gremlin dimerization leading to the formation of gremlinC141A monomers. GremlinC141A monomer retains a BMP antagonist activity similar to the wild-type dimer, but is devoid of a significant angiogenic capacity. Notably, we found that gremlinC141A mutant engages VEGFR2 in a non-productive manner, thus acting as receptor antagonist. Accordingly, both gremlinC141A and wild-type monomers inhibit angiogenesis driven by dimeric gremlin or VEGF-A165. Moreover, by acting as a VEGFR2 antagonist, gremlinC141A inhibits the angiogenic and tumorigenic potential of murine breast and prostate cancer cells in vivo. In conclusion, our data show that gremlin exists in multiple forms endowed with specific bioactivities and provide new insights into the molecular bases of gremlin dimerization. Furthermore, we propose gremlin monomer as a new inhibitor of VEGFR2 signalling during tumor growth. PMID:27174917

  20. Evidence that diclofenac and celecoxib are thyroid hormone receptor beta antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zloh, Mire; Perez-Diaz, Noelia; Tang, Leslie; Patel, Pryank; Mackenzie, Louise S

    2016-02-01

    Long term use of NSAIDs is linked to side effects such as gastric bleeding and myocardial infarction. Use of in silico methods and pharmacology to investigate the potential for NSAIDs diclofenac, celecoxib and naproxen to bind to nuclear receptors. In silico screening predicted that both diclofenac and celecoxib has the potential to bind to a number of different nuclear receptors; docking analysis confirmed a theoretical ability for diclofenac and celecoxib but not naproxen to bind to TRβ. Results from TRβ luciferase reporter assays confirmed that both diclofenac and celecoxib display TRβ antagonistic properties; celecoxib, IC50 3.6 × 10(-6)M, and diclofenac IC50 5.3 × 10(-6)M, comparable to the TRβ antagonist MLS (IC50 3.1 × 10(-6)M). In contrast naproxen, a cardio-sparing NSAID, lacked TRβ antagonist effects. In order to determine the effects of NSAIDs in whole organ in vitro, we used isometric wire myography to measure the changes to Triiodothyronine (T3) induced vasodilation of rat mesenteric arteries. Incubation of arteries in the presence of the TRβ antagonist MLS000389544 (10(-5)M), as well as diclofenac (10(-5)M) and celecoxib (10(-5)M) but not naproxen significantly inhibited T3 induced vasodilation compared to controls. These results highlight the benefits of computational chemistry methods used to retrospectively analyse well known drugs for side effects. Using in silico and in vitro methods we have shown that both celecoxib and diclofenac but not naproxen exhibit off-target TRβ antagonist behaviour, which may be linked to their detrimental side effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ciproxifan and chemically related compounds are highly potent and selective histamine H3-receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kathmann, M; Schlicker, E; Marr, I; Werthwein, S; Stark, H; Schunack, W

    1998-12-01

    We determined the affinities of five newly synthesized histamine H3-receptor antagonists in an H3-receptor binding assay and their potencies in a functional H3-receptor model. Furthermore, we determined their potencies in a histamine H2- and H1-receptor model. The compounds differ from histamine in that the ethylamine side chain is replaced by an aryl-substituted propyloxy chain and they differ from one another by varying substituents of the aryl rest. Iodoproxyfan, a highly potent and selective antagonist at H3 receptors, is structurally related to these five compounds. The specific binding of [3H]-Nalpha-methylhistamine to rat brain cortex membranes was monophasically displaced by each of the five compounds at pKi values ranging from 8.24 to 9.27. Inhibition by histamine of the electrically evoked tritium overflow from mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with [3H]noradrenaline was antagonized by all compounds and the concentration-response curve was shifted to the right with apparent pA2 values ranging from 7.78 to 9.39. The five compounds under study possess negligible potencies at histamine H2 and H1 receptors studied in the guinea-pig right atrium and ileum, respectively (pD'2 or pKp values < or = 5.2). The present paper shows that the five compounds under study possess high affinities and potencies at histamine H3 receptors, four out of the five compounds in this respect being equipotent with iodoproxyfan. Like iodoproxyfan, the five compounds show an at least 1000-fold selectivity for H3 as compared to H2 and H1 receptors.

  2. A locus of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor that differentiates agonist and antagonist binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W; Rodic, V; Kitanovic, S; Flanagan, C A; Chi, L; Weinstein, H; Maayani, S; Millar, R P; Sealfon, S C

    1995-08-11

    The decapeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone controls reproductive function via interaction with a heptahelical G protein-coupled receptor. Because of molecular model of the receptor predicts that Lys121 in the third transmembrane helix contributes to the binding pocket, the function of this side chain was studied by site-directed mutagenesis. Substitution of Arg at this position preserved high affinity agonist binding, whereas Gln at this position reduced binding below the limits of detection. Leu and Asp at this locus abolished both binding and detectable signal transduction. The EC50 of concentration-response curves for coupling to phosphatidyl inositol hydrolysis obtained with the Gln121 receptor was more than 3 orders of magnitude higher than that obtained for the wild-type receptor. In order to determine whether the increased EC50 obtained with this mutant reflects an altered receptor affinity, the effect of decreases in wild-type receptor density on concentration-response curves was determined by irreversible antagonism. Progressively decreasing the concentration of the wild-type receptor increased the EC50 values obtained to a maximal level of 2.4 +/- 0.2 nM. Comparison of this value with the EC50 of 282 +/- 52 nM observed with the Gln121 receptor mutant indicates that the agonist affinity for this mutant is reduced more than 100-fold. In contrast, antagonist had comparable high affinities for the wild-type, Arg121, and Gln121 mutants. The results indicate that a charge-strengthened hydrogen bond donor is required at this locus for high affinity agonist binding but not for high affinity antagonist binding.

  3. Actions of picrodendrin antagonists on dieldrin-sensitive and -resistant Drosophila GABA receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Ozoe, Y.; Koike, K.; Ohmoto, T.; Nikaido, T.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. A series of terpenoid compounds, recently isolated from Picrodendron baccatum, share a picrotoxane skeleton with picrotoxinin, an antagonist of ionotropic GABA receptors. Referred to as picrodendrins, they inhibit the binding of [35S]-tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) to rat GABAA receptors. Hitherto, their effects on GABA receptors have not been investigated electrophysiologically. Under two-electrode voltage-clamp, the actions of picrodendrins and related terpenoids have been assayed on homooligomeric GABA receptors formed by the expression of a Drosophila GABA receptor subunit (RDLac) in Xenopus oocytes. 2. All the terpenoids tested, dose-dependently antagonized currents induced by 30 microM (EC50) GABA. 3. Tutin and its analogues (dihydrotutin and isohyenanchin) differ in the structure of their axial C4 substituents. Of these compounds, tutin, which bears an isopropenyl group at this carbon atom, was the most potent antagonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, whereas isohyenanchin, which bears a hydroxyisopropyl group, was the least potent antagonist tested. 4. Picrodendrins differ mainly in the structure of their C9 substituents. The IC50s of picrodendrins ranged from 17 +/- 1.3 nM (picrodendrin-Q) to 1006 +/- 1.3 nM (picrodendrin-O). As such, the most potent picrodendrins (Q, A and B) were approximately equipotent with picrotoxinin as antagonists of RDLac homo-oligomers. 5. Certain picrodendrin compounds effected a use-dependent blockade of RDLac homo-oligomers. Such a biphasic block was not observed with tutin analogues. 6. Picrotoxin-resistant RDLacA3025 homo-oligomers, which have a single amino acid substitution (A302S) in the 2nd transmembrane region, were markedly less sensitive to picrodendrin-O than the wild-type, dieldrin-sensitive, homo-oligomers. 7. The relative potency of tutin analogues demonstrates that the structure-activity relationship of the C4 substituent of picrotoxane-based compounds is conserved in vertebrates and insects. However, the

  4. Biochemical characterization of desloratadine, a potent antagonist of the human histamine H(1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Anthes, John C; Gilchrest, Helen; Richard, Christian; Eckel, Stephen; Hesk, Dave; West, Robert E; Williams, Shirley M; Greenfeder, Scott; Billah, Motasim; Kreutner, William; Egan, Robert E

    2002-08-09

    We have characterized desloratadine (5H-benzo[5,6]cyclohepta[1,2-b]pyridine, 8-chloro-6,11-dihydro-11-(4-piperidinylidene), CAS 100643-71-8) as a potent antagonist of the human histamine H(1) receptor. [3H]Desloratadine bound to membranes expressing the recombinant human histamine H(1) receptor in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-H(1)) in a specific and saturable manner with a K(d) of 1.1+/-0.2 nM, a B(max) of 7.9+/-2.0 pmol/mg protein, and an association rate constant of 0.011 nM(-1) x min(-1). The K(d) calculated from the kinetic measurements was 1.5 nM. Dissociation of [3H]desloratadine from the human histamine H(1) receptor was slow, with only 37% of the binding reversed at 6 h in the presence of 5 microM unlabeled desloratadine. Seventeen histamine H(1)-receptor antagonists were evaluated in competition-binding studies. Desloratadine had a K(i) of 0.9+/-0.1 nM in these competition studies. In CHO-H(1) cells, histamine stimulation resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](i) with an EC(50) of 170+/-30 nM. After a 90-min preincubation with desloratadine, the histamine-stimulated increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was shifted to the right, with a depression of the maximal response at higher concentrations of antagonist. The apparent K(b) value was 0.2+/-0.14 nM with a slope of 1.6+/-0.1. The slow dissociation from the receptor and noncompetitive antagonism suggests that desloratadine may be a pseudoirreversible antagonist of the human histamine H(1) receptor. The mechanism of desloratadine antagonism of the human histamine H(1) receptor may help to explain the high potency and 24-h duration of action observed in clinical studies.

  5. A neutral CB1 receptor antagonist reduces weight gain in rat.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Adam P; Vemuri, V Kiran; Peng, Yan; Wood, Jodianne T; Olszewska, Teresa; Pittman, Quentin J; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Sharkey, Keith A

    2007-12-01

    Cannabinoid (CB)1 receptor inverse agonists inhibit food intake in animals and humans but also potentiate emesis. It is not clear whether these effects result from inverse agonist properties or from the blockade of endogenous cannabinoid signaling. Here, we examine the effect of a neutral CB1 antagonist, AM4113, on food intake, weight gain, and emesis. Neutral antagonist and binding properties were confirmed in HEK-293 cells transfected with human CB1 or CB2 receptors. AM4113 had no effect on forskolin-stimulated cAMP production at concentrations up to 630 nM. The Ki value of AM4113 (0.80 +/- 0.44 nM) in competitive binding assays with the CB1/2 agonist [3H]CP55,940 was 100-fold more selective for CB1 over CB2 receptors. We determined that AM4113 antagonized CB1 receptors in brain by blocking hypothermia induced by CP55,940. AM4113 (0-20 mg/kg) significantly reduced food intake and weight gain in rat. Compared with AM251, higher doses of AM4113 were needed to produce similar effects on food intake and body weight. Unlike AM251 (5 mg/kg), a highly anorectic dose of AM4113 (10 mg/kg) did not significantly potentiate vomiting induced by the emetic morphine-6-glucoronide. We show that a centrally active neutral CB1 receptor antagonist shares the appetite suppressant and weight loss effects of inverse agonists. If these compounds display similar properties in humans, they could be developed into a new class of antiobesity agents.

  6. A covalent antagonist for the human adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue; Dong, Guo; Michiels, Thomas J M; Lenselink, Eelke B; Heitman, Laura; Louvel, Julien; IJzerman, Ad P

    2016-12-03

    The structure of the human A2A adenosine receptor has been elucidated by X-ray crystallography with a high affinity non-xanthine antagonist, ZM241385, bound to it. This template molecule served as a starting point for the incorporation of reactive moieties that cause the ligand to covalently bind to the receptor. In particular, we incorporated a fluorosulfonyl moiety onto ZM241385, which yielded LUF7445 (4-((3-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1, 2, 4]triazolo[1,5-a][1, 3, 5]triazin-5-yl)amino)propyl)carbamoyl)benzene sulfonyl fluoride). In a radioligand binding assay, LUF7445 acted as a potent antagonist, with an apparent affinity for the hA2A receptor in the nanomolar range. Its apparent affinity increased with longer incubation time, suggesting an increasing level of covalent binding over time. An in silico A2A-structure-based docking model was used to study the binding mode of LUF7445. This led us to perform site-directed mutagenesis of the A2A receptor to probe and validate the target lysine amino acid K153 for covalent binding. Meanwhile, a functional assay combined with wash-out experiments was set up to investigate the efficacy of covalent binding of LUF7445. All these experiments led us to conclude LUF7445 is a valuable molecular tool for further investigating covalent interactions at this receptor. It may also serve as a prototype for a therapeutic approach in which a covalent antagonist may be needed to counteract prolonged and persistent presence of the endogenous ligand adenosine.

  7. Novel class of medications, orexin receptor antagonists, in the treatment of insomnia - critical appraisal of suvorexant.

    PubMed

    Norman, Jessica L; Anderson, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia, a highly prevalent disorder, can be detrimental to patients' overall health and worsen existing comorbidities. Patients may have acute episodes of insomnia related to a traumatic event, but more commonly insomnia occurs chronically. While proper sleep hygiene and behavioral therapy play important roles in the nonpharmacologic management of short-term and chronic insomnia, medications may also be required. Historically, insomnia has been treated with agents such as benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepine receptor agonists, and melatonin agonists. Dual orexin receptor antagonists represent a new class of medications for the treatment of insomnia, which block the binding of wakefulness-promoting neuropeptides orexin A and orexin B to their respective receptor sites. Suvorexant (Belsomra) is the first dual orexin receptor antagonist to be approved in the US and Japan and has demonstrated efficacy in decreasing time to sleep onset and increasing total sleep time. Its unique mechanism of action, data to support efficacy and safety over 12 months of use, and relative lack of withdrawal effects when discontinued may represent an alternative for patients with chronic insomnia who cannot tolerate or do not receive benefit from more traditional sleep agents. Suvorexant is effective and well tolerated, but precautions exist for certain patient populations, including females, obese patients, and those with respiratory disease. Suvorexant has only been studied vs placebo, and hence it is unknown how it directly compares with other medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for insomnia. Suvorexant is not likely to replace benzodiazepines or nonbenzodiazepine receptor antagonists as a first-line sleep agent but does represent a novel option for the treatment of patients with chronic insomnia.

  8. IL-1 receptor antagonist improves morphine and buprenorphine efficacy in a rat neuropathic pain model.

    PubMed

    Pilat, Dominika; Rojewska, Ewelina; Jurga, Agnieszka M; Piotrowska, Anna; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2015-10-05

    An interesting research and therapeutic problem is the reduced beneficial efficacy of opioids in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The present study sought to investigate the potential role of IL-1 family members in this phenomenon. We studied the time course of changes in IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-1 receptor type I and IL-1 receptor antagonist mRNA and protein levels experienced by rats after chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. In CCI-exposed rats, spinal levels of IL-1alpha mRNA were slightly downregulated on the 7th day, and protein levels were not changed on the 7th and 14th days. Levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-1 receptor type I were slightly upregulated in the ipsilateral part of the spinal cord on the 7th and 14th days; however, protein levels were not changed at those time points. Interestingly, we observed that IL-1beta mRNA and protein levels were strongly elevated in the ipsilateral part of the dorsal spinal cord on the 7th and 14th days following CCI. Moreover, in rats exposed to a single intrathecal administration of an IL-1 receptor antagonist (100 ng i.t.) on the 7th and 14th day following CCI, symptoms of neuropathic pain were attenuated, and the analgesic effects of morphine (2.5 µg i.t.) and buprenorphine (2.5 µg i.t.) were enhanced. In summary, restoration of the analgesic activity of morphine and buprenorphine by blockade of IL-1 signaling suggests that increased IL-1beta responses may account for the decreased analgesic efficacy of opioids observed in the treatment of neuropathy.

  9. CP-465,022, a selective noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist, blocks AMPA receptors but is not neuroprotective in vivo.

    PubMed

    Menniti, Frank S; Buchan, Alistair M; Chenard, Bertrand L; Critchett, Donald J; Ganong, Alan H; Guanowsky, Victor; Seymour, Patricia A; Welch, Willard M

    2003-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor inhibition has been hypothesized to provide neuroprotective efficacy after cerebral ischemia on the basis of the activity in experimental ischemia models of a variety of compounds with varying selectivity for AMPA over other glutamate receptor subtypes. CP-465,022 is a new, potent, and selective noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist. The present study investigated the ability of this compound to reduce neuronal loss after experimental cerebral ischemia to probe the neuroprotective potential of AMPA receptor inhibition. To demonstrate that CP-465,022 gains access to the brain, the effects of systemic administration of CP-465,022 were investigated on AMPA receptor-mediated electrophysiological responses in hippocampus and on chemically induced seizures in rats. The compound was then investigated for neuroprotective efficacy in rat global and focal ischemia models at doses demonstrated to be maximally effective in the electrophysiology and seizure models. CP-465,022 potently and efficaciously inhibited AMPA receptor-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission and the induction of seizures. However, at comparable doses, CP-465,022 failed to prevent CA1 neuron loss after brief global ischemia or to reduce infarct volume after temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion. Given the high selectivity of CP-465,022 for AMPA over kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartate subtypes of glutamate receptors, the lack of neuroprotective efficacy of the compound calls into question the neuroprotective efficacy of AMPA receptor inhibition after ischemia.

  10. Discovery of novel dihydrobenzofuran cyclopropane carboxylic acid based calcium sensing receptor antagonists for the treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gui-Bai; Zhou, Changyou; Huo, Xianghong; Wang, Hank; Yang, Xuelin; Huang, Shaoqiang; Wang, Haisheng; Wilkinson, Hilary; Luo, Lusong; Tang, Wei; Sutton, David; Li, Hong; Zaller, Dennis; Meinke, Peter T

    2016-08-15

    In a search for novel small molecule calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) antagonists as oral bone anabolic agents, we discovered dihydrobenzofuran cyclopropane carboxylic acid derivatives, such as 12f (IC50=27.6nM), are highly potent calcium-sensing receptor antagonists. Studies in rats established that compound 12f stimulates parathyroid hormone (PTH) release in a fast-acting, pulsatile manner.

  11. Responding for a conditioned reinforcer, and its enhancement by nicotine, is blocked by dopamine receptor antagonists and a 5-HT(2C) receptor agonist but not by a 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Guy, Elizabeth Glenn; Fletcher, Paul J

    2014-10-01

    An aspect of nicotine reinforcement that may contribute to tobacco addiction is the effect of nicotine to enhance the motivational properties of reward-associated cues, or conditioned stimuli (CSs). Several studies have now shown that nicotine enhances responding for a stimulus that has been paired with a natural reinforcer. This effect of nicotine to enhance responding for a conditioned reinforcer is likely due to nicotine-induced enhancements in mesolimbic dopaminergic activity, but this has not been directly assessed. In this study, we assessed roles for dopamine (DA) D1 or D2 receptors, and two serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes known to modulate DA activity, the 5-HT2C or 5-HT2A subtypes, on nicotine-enhanced responding for a conditioned reinforcer. Water-restricted rats were exposed to Pavlovian conditioning sessions, where a CS was paired with water delivery. Then, in a second phase, animals were required to perform a novel, lever-pressing response for presentations of the CS as a conditioned reinforcer. Nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) enhanced responding for the conditioned reinforcer. To examine potential roles for dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) receptors in this effect, separate groups of animals were used to assess the impact of administering the D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390, D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride, 5-HT2C receptor agonist Ro 60-0175, or 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 on nicotine-enhanced responding for conditioned reinforcement. SCH 23390, eticlopride, and Ro 60-0175 all reduced responding for conditioned reinforcement, and the ability of nicotine to enhance this effect. M100907 did not alter this behavior. Together, these studies indicate that DA D1 and D2 receptors, but not 5-HT2A receptors, contribute to the effect of nicotine to enhance responding for a conditioned reinforcer. This effect can also be modulated by 5-HT2C receptor activation.

  12. A cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist ameliorates impairment of recognition memory on withdrawal from MDMA (Ecstasy).

    PubMed

    Nawata, Yoko; Hiranita, Takato; Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki

    2010-01-01

    (+/-)-3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') abusers have persistent neuropsychiatric deficits including memory impairments after the cessation of abuse. On the other hand, cannabinoid CB(1) receptors have been implicated in learning/memory, and are highly expressed in the hippocampus, a region of the brain believed to have an important function in certain forms of learning and memory. In this study, we clarified the mechanism underlying the cognitive impairment that develops during MDMA withdrawal from the standpoint of the cannabinoid CB(1) receptors. Mice were administered MDMA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) once a day for 7 days. On the 7th day of withdrawal, a novel object recognition task was performed and the amount of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor protein was measured with western blotting. Recognition performance was impaired on the 7th day of withdrawal. This impairment was blocked by AM251, a cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist, administered 30 min before the training trial or co-administered with MDMA. At this time, the level of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor protein increased significantly in the hippocampus but not the prefrontal cortex or striatum. This increase of CB(1) receptor protein in the hippocampus was also blocked by the co-administration of AM251. Furthermore, CB(1) receptor knockout mice showed no impairment of recognition performance on the withdrawal from MDMA. The impairment of recognition memory during withdrawal from MDMA may result from the activation of cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in the hippocampus.

  13. First pharmacophore model of CCR3 receptor antagonists and its homology model-assisted, stepwise virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vaibhav; Saravanan, Parameswaran; Arvind, Akanksha; Mohan, Chethampadi Gopi

    2011-05-01

    CCR3, a G protein-coupled receptor, plays a central role in allergic inflammation and is an important drug target for inflammatory diseases. To understand the structure-function relationship of CCR3 receptor, different computational techniques were employed, which mainly include: (i) homology modeling of CCR3 receptor, (ii) 3D-quantitative pharmacophore model of CCR3 antagonists, (iii) virtual screening of small compound databases, and (iv) finally, molecular docking at the binding site of the CCR3 receptor homology model. Pharmacophore model was developed for the first time, on a training data set of 22 CCR3 antagonists, using CATALYST HypoRefine program. Best hypothesis (Hypo1) has three different chemical features: two hydrogen-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic, and one ring aromatic. Hypo1 model was further validated using (i) 87 test set CCR3 antagonists, (ii) Cat Scramble randomization technique, and (iii) Decoy data set. Molecular docking studies were performed on modeled CCR3 receptor using 303 virtually screened hits, obtained from small compound database virtual screening. Finally, five hits were identified as potential leads against CCR3 receptor, which exhibited good estimated activities, favorable binding interactions, and high docking scores. These studies provided useful information on the structurally vital residues of CCR3 receptor involved in the antagonist binding, and their unexplored potential for the future development of potent CCR3 receptor antagonists.

  14. (±)-Nantenine analogs as antagonists at human 5-HT2A receptors: C1 and flexible congeners

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Sandeep; Pecic, Stevan; LeGendre, Onica; Navarro, Hérnan A.; Harding, Wayne W.

    2009-01-01

    C1 and flexible analogs of (±)-nantenine were synthesized and evaluated for antagonist activity at human 5-HT2A receptors in a calcium mobilization assay. This work has resulted in the identification of the most potent 5-HT2A antagonist known based on an aporphine. Our results also suggest that the C1 position may be a key site for increasing 5-HT2A antagonist activity in this compound series. In addition, the structural rigidity of the aporphine core appears to be required for nantenine to function as a 5-HT2A antagonist. PMID:19328689

  15. Nonpeptidic urotensin-II receptor antagonists I: in vitro pharmacological characterization of SB-706375

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Stephen A; Behm, David J; Aiyar, Nambi V; Naselsky, Diane; Disa, Jyoti; Brooks, David P; Ohlstein, Eliot H; Gleason, John G; Sarau, Henry M; Foley, James J; Buckley, Peter T; Schmidt, Dulcie B; Wixted, William E; Widdowson, Katherine; Riley, Graham; Jin, Jian; Gallagher, Timothy F; Schmidt, Stanley J; Ridgers, Lance; Christmann, Lisa T; Keenan, Richard M; Knight, Steven D; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2005-01-01

    SB-706375 potently inhibited [125I]hU-II binding to both mammalian recombinant and ‘native' UT receptors (Ki 4.7±1.5 to 20.7±3.6 nM at rodent, feline and primate recombinant UT receptors and Ki 5.4±0.4 nM at the endogenous UT receptor in SJRH30 cells). Prior exposure to SB-706375 (1 μM, 30 min) did not alter [125I]hU-II binding affinity or density in recombinant cells (KD 3.1±0.4 vs 5.8±0.9 nM and Bmax 3.1±1.0 vs 2.8±0.8 pmol mg−1) consistent with a reversible mode of action. The novel, nonpeptidic radioligand [3H]SB-657510, a close analogue of SB-706375, bound to the monkey UT receptor (KD 2.6±0.4 nM, Bmax 0.86±0.12 pmol mg−1) in a manner that was inhibited by both U-II isopeptides and SB-706375 (Ki 4.6±1.4 to 17.6±5.4 nM) consistent with the sulphonamides and native U-II ligands sharing a common UT receptor binding domain. SB-706375 was a potent, competitive hU-II antagonist across species with pKb 7.29–8.00 in HEK293-UT receptor cells (inhibition of [Ca2+]i-mobilization) and pKb 7.47 in rat isolated aorta (inhibition of contraction). SB-706375 also reversed tone established in the rat aorta by prior exposure to hU-II (Kapp∼20 nM). SB-706375 was a selective U-II antagonist with ⩾100-fold selectivity for the human UT receptor compared to 86 distinct receptors, ion channels, enzymes, transporters and nuclear hormones (Ki/IC50>1 μM). Accordingly, the contractile responses induced in isolated aortae by KCl, phenylephrine, angiotensin II and endothelin-1 were unaltered by SB-706375 (1 μM). In summary, SB-706375 is a high-affinity, surmountable, reversible and selective nonpeptide UT receptor antagonist with cross-species activity that will assist in delineating the pathophysiological actions of U-II in mammals. PMID:15852036

  16. Recent Patents on Novel P2X7 Receptor Antagonists and Their Potential for Reducing Central Nervous System Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Friedle, Scott A.; Curet, Marjorie A.; Watters, Jyoti J.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation arises in the CNS from a number of neurodegenerative and oncogenic disorders, as well as from ischemic and traumatic brain injuries. These pathologies give rise to increased levels of extracellular adenine nucleotides which, via activation of a variety of cell surface P2 purinergic receptors, influence the inflammatory activities of responding immune cells. One P2 receptor subtype in particular, the P2X7 receptor, potentiates the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) from macrophage-like cells. It is also thought to contribute to secondary brain injury by inducing neuronal cell death. Therefore, antagonism of this receptor could have significant therapeutic impact on all disorders, not just CNS, to which excessive inflammatory activities contribute. The use of currently available P2X7 receptor antagonists for the treatment of CNS inflammation has been limited to the generally non-selective antagonists PPADS, oxidized ATP, Brilliant Blue G, suramin, calmidizolium, and KN-62. However, the recent patents and development of novel P2X7 receptor antagonists, as discussed in this review, will provide new tools both for clinical and research purposes. Here we discuss compounds for which patents have been applied since 2006, from the following categories: benzamide inhibitors, bicycloheteroaryl compounds, acylhdranzine antagonists, biaromatic P2X7 antagonists, heterocyclic compounds and amide derivatives, and aromatic amine antagonists. PMID:19705995

  17. [Hepatotoxicity in patients treated with endothelin receptor antagonists: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Macías Saint-Gerons, Diego; de la Fuente Honrubia, César; Montero Corominas, Dolores; Catalá-López, Ferrán

    2014-04-22

    We evaluated the risk of hepatotoxicity associated to endothelin receptor antagonists. Systematic searches in PubMed/MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library as well as regulatory agencies websites were performed. Randomized controlled trials in patients receiving endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxentan or ambrisentan) in at least one treatment group were included. Prior to data extraction, definitions of hepatotoxicity were established. Effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using random effects models. Heterogeneity was analysed using Cochran's Q and I(2) tests. Publication bias was assessed using Egger's method and funnel plots were generated. Twenty-one trials met the inclusion criteria (3,644 patients). Bosentan was the evaluated drug in 1,689 (74%) patients who received endothelin receptor antagonists. Compared with controls, relative risk for any hepatic adverse reaction was 2.92 (1.85-4.62; I(2)=30.6%). When hepatotoxicity was defined as elevations of liver alanine or aspartate aminotransferases equal or greater than 3 times the upper limit of normal, relative risk was 2.98 (1.69-5.25; I(2) = 40.9%). No evidence of publication bias was found (Egger's method: p = 0.68). Our results suggest an increased risk of hepatotoxicity in patients receiving endothelin receptor antagonists. Given the limited data available for endothelin receptor antagonists other than bosentan, it is not possible to draw firm conclusions about the individual risk associated for the remaining endothelin receptor antagonists. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Label-Free Kinetics: Exploiting Functional Hemi-Equilibrium to Derive Rate Constants for Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Riddy, Darren M; Valant, Celine; Rueda, Patricia; Charman, William N; Sexton, Patrick M; Summers, Roger J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Langmead, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Drug receptor kinetics is as a key component in drug discovery, development, and efficacy; however, determining kinetic parameters has historically required direct radiolabeling or competition with a labeled tracer. Here we present a simple approach to determining the kinetics of competitive antagonists of G protein-coupled receptors by exploiting the phenomenon of hemi-equilibrium, the state of partial re-equilibration of agonist, antagonist, and receptor in some functional assays. Using functional [Ca(2+)]i-flux and extracellular kinases 1 and 2 phosphorylation assays that have short incubation times and therefore are prone to hemi-equilibrium "behaviors," we investigated a wide range of structurally and physicochemically distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists. Using a combined operational and hemi-equilibrium model of antagonism to both simulate and analyze data, we derived estimates of association and dissociation rates for the test set of antagonists, identifying both rapidly dissociating (4-DAMP, himbacine) and slowly dissociating (tiotropium, glycopyrrolate) ligands. The results demonstrate the importance of assay incubation time and the degree of receptor reserve in applying the analytical model. There was an excellent correlation between estimates of antagonist pK(B), k(on), and k(off) from functional assays and those determined by competition kinetics using whole-cell [(3)H]N-methylscopolamine binding, validating this approach as a rapid and simple method to functionally profile receptor kinetics of competitive antagonists in the absence of a labeled tracer.

  19. Novel endomorphin analogues with antagonist activity at the mu-opioid receptor in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Fichna, Jakub; Gach, Katarzyna; Perlikowska, Renata; Cravezic, Aurore; Bonnet, Jean Jacques; do-Rego, Jean-Claude; Janecka, Anna; Storr, Martin A

    2010-06-08

    Opioid bowel dysfunction (OBD) summarizes common adverse side effects of opiate-based management of pain. A promising therapeutic approach to prevent OBD and other opioid-related disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the co-administration of opiates with peripherally-restricted mu-opioid receptor (MOR)-selective antagonists. The aim of this study was to investigate the selectivity and efficacy of three novel peptide antagonists: antanal-1, antanal-2, and antanal-2A at MOR in the GI tract in vitro and in vivo. The effects of the antanals on GI motility were studied in vitro, using isolated preparations of mouse ileum and colon and in vivo, by measuring colonic propulsion in mice. Additionally, in vitro stability against enzymatic degradation and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability using the hot plate test in mice were examined. The antanals significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of the MOR agonists endomorphin-2, morphine, and loperamide on mouse ileum and colon contractions in vitro and blocked morphine-induced decrease of colonic bead expulsion in vivo. The hot plate test in mice showed that the antagonist activity of all antanals was restricted to the periphery. Antanal-1, antanal-2, and antanal-2A are promising MOR antagonists with limited BBB permeability, which may be developed into future therapeutics of opioid-related GI dysfunction.

  20. Monovalent mannose-based DC-SIGN antagonists: targeting the hydrophobic groove of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Tomašić, Tihomir; Hajšek, David; Švajger, Urban; Luzar, Jernej; Obermajer, Nataša; Petit-Haertlein, Isabelle; Fieschi, Franck; Anderluh, Marko

    2014-03-21

    Dendritic cell-specific, intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) is a C-type lectin expressed specifically on dendritic cells. It is a primary site for recognition and binding of various pathogens and thus a promising therapeutic target for inhibition of pathogen entry and subsequent prevention of immune defense cell infection. We report the design and synthesis of d-mannose-based DC-SIGN antagonists bearing diaryl substituted 1,3-diaminopropanol or glycerol moieties incorporated to target the hydrophobic groove of the receptor. The designed glycomimetics were evaluated by in vitro assay of the isolated DC-SIGN extracellular domain for their ability to compete with HIV-1 gp120 for binding to the DC-SIGN carbohydrate recognition domain. Compounds 14d and 14e, that display IC50 values of 40 μM and 50 μM, are among the most potent monovalent DC-SIGN antagonists reported. The antagonistic effect of all the synthesized compounds was further evaluated by a one-point in vitro assay that measures DC adhesion. Compounds 14d, 14e, 18d and 18e were shown to act as functional antagonists of DC-SIGN-mediated DC adhesion. The binding mode of 14d was also studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation, which revealed flexibility of 14d in the binding site and provides a basis for further optimization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Simulations reveal increased fluctuations in estrogen receptor-alpha conformation upon antagonist binding.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ho Leung

    2016-09-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to model dynamic fluctuations in the structure of estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) upon binding to the natural agonist 17β-estradiol (E2) and to the active metabolite of the breast cancer drug and antagonist, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT). We present the most extensive MD simulations to date of ER-α, with over 1μs of combined simulations for the monomer and dimer forms. Simulations reveal that the antagonist-bound complex includes significant fluctuations while the agonist-bound complex is tightly restrained. OHT increases dynamic disorder in the loops located to either side of the tail H12 helix; H12 has been associated with the activation status of ER-α. We also report that fluctuations near H12 lead to greater conformational variation in the binding mode of the ethylamine tail of OHT. Both the agonist and antagonist conformations are stable throughout the 240ns simulations, supporting the hypothesis that there are no transitions between these two states or into intermediate states. The stable position of H12 in the OHT-bound conformation suggests that OHT stabilizes a well-defined antagonist conformational ensemble rather than merely blocking the agonist-driven activation of ER-α. Simultaneously, the increased dynamic properties of the OHT-bound complex is a potential source of binding entropy.

  2. Interactions of antagonists with subtypes of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Huma; Tovey, Stephen C; Molinski, Tedeusz F; Taylor, Colin W

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) are intracellular Ca2+ channels. Interactions of the commonly used antagonists of IP3Rs with IP3R subtypes are poorly understood. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH IP3-evoked Ca2+ release from permeabilized DT40 cells stably expressing single subtypes of mammalian IP3R was measured using a luminal Ca2+ indicator. The effects of commonly used antagonists on IP3-evoked Ca2+ release and 3H-IP3 binding were characterized. KEY RESULTS Functional analyses showed that heparin was a competitive antagonist of all IP3R subtypes with different affinities for each (IP3R3 > IP3R1 ≥ IP3R2). This sequence did not match the affinities for heparin binding to the isolated N-terminal from each IP3R subtype. 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) and high concentrations of caffeine selectively inhibited IP3R1 without affecting IP3 binding. Neither Xestospongin C nor Xestospongin D effectively inhibited IP3-evoked Ca2+ release via any IP3R subtype. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Heparin competes with IP3, but its access to the IP3-binding core is substantially hindered by additional IP3R residues. These interactions may contribute to its modest selectivity for IP3R3. Practicable concentrations of caffeine and 2-APB inhibit only IP3R1. Xestospongins do not appear to be effective antagonists of IP3Rs. PMID:24628114

  3. Devazepide, a nonpeptide antagonist of CCK receptors, induces apoptosis and inhibits Ewing tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Jaime; Agra, Noelia; Fernández, Noemí; Pestaña, Angel; Alonso, Javier

    2009-08-01

    The Ewing family of tumors is a group of highly malignant tumors that mainly arise in bone and most often affect children and young adults in the first two decades of life. Despite the use of multimodal therapy, the long-term disease-free survival rate of patients with Ewing tumors is still disappointingly low, making the discovery of innovative therapeutic strategies all the more necessary. We have recently shown that cholecystokinin (CCK), a neuroendocrine peptide, involved in many biological functions, including cell growth and proliferation, is a relevant target of the EWS/FLI1 oncoprotein characteristic of Ewing tumors. CCK silencing inhibits cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo, suggesting that CCK acts as an autocrine growth factor for Ewing cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of two CCK receptor antagonists, devazepide (a CCK1-R antagonist) and L365 260 (a CCK2-R antagonist), on the growth of Ewing tumor cells. Devazepide (10 micromol/l) inhibited cell growth of four different Ewing tumor cells in vitro (range 85-88%), whereas the effect of the CCK2-R antagonist on cell growth was negligible. In a mouse tumor xenograft model, devazepide reduced tumor growth by 40%. Flow cytometry experiments showed that devazepide, but not L365 260, induced apoptosis of Ewing tumor cells. In summary, devazepide induces cell death of Ewing tumor cells, suggesting that it could represent a new therapeutic approach in the management of Ewing's tumor patients.

  4. Structure of CC chemokine receptor 2 with orthosteric and allosteric antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Zacarías, Natalia V. Ortiz; de Vries, Henk; Han, Gye Won; Gustavsson, Martin; Dabros, Marta; Zhao, Chunxia; Cherney, Robert J.; Carter, Percy; Stamos, Dean; Abagyan, Ruben; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Heitman, Laura H.; Tebben, Andrew; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-12-07

    CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is one of 19 members of the chemokine receptor subfamily of human class A G-protein-coupled receptors. CCR2 is expressed on monocytes, immature dendritic cells, and T-cell subpopulations, and mediates their migration towards endogenous CC chemokine ligands such as CCL2 (ref. 1). CCR2 and its ligands are implicated in numerous inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases2 including atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, neuropathic pain, and diabetic nephropathy, as well as cancer3. These disease associations have motivated numerous preclinical studies and clinical trials4 (see http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) in search of therapies that target the CCR2–chemokine axis. To aid drug discovery efforts5, here we solve a structure of CCR2 in a ternary complex with an orthosteric (BMS-681 (ref. 6)) and allosteric (CCR2-RA-[R]7) antagonist. BMS-681 inhibits chemokine binding by occupying the orthosteric pocket of the receptor in a previously unseen binding mode. CCR2-RA-[R] binds in a novel, highly druggable pocket that is the most intracellular allosteric site observed in class A G-protein-coupled receptors so far; this site spatially overlaps the G-protein-binding site in homologous receptors. CCR2-RA-[R] inhibits CCR2 non-competitively by blocking activation-associated conformational changes and formation of the G-protein-binding interface. The conformational signature of the conserved microswitch residues observed in double-antagonist-bound CCR2 resembles the most inactive G-protein-coupled receptor structures solved so far. Like other protein–protein interactions, receptor–chemokine complexes are considered challenging therapeutic targets for small molecules, and the present structure suggests diverse pocket epitopes that can be exploited to overcome obstacles in drug design.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of novel angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists as anti-hypertension drugs.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaolu; Zhu, Weibo; Zhang, Ruijing; Wen, Caihong; Wang, Li; Yan, Yijia; Tang, Hesheng; Chen, Zhilong

    2016-05-01

    Three new angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists, 1, 2 and 3 were designed, synthesized and evaluated. The AT1 receptor-binding assays in vitro showed that all the synthesized compounds had nanomolar affinity for the AT1 receptor. From which compound 3 was found to be the most potent ligands with an IC50 value of 2.67±0.23 nM. Biological evaluation in vivo revealed that all the compounds could cause significant decrease on MBP in a dose dependent manner in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and compound 3 especially showed an efficient and long-lasting effect in reducing blood pressure, whose maximal response lowered 41 mmHg of MBP at 10mg/kg and 62 mmHg at 15 mg/kg after oral administration, the significant anti-hypertensive effect lasted beyond 12 h, which is better than the reference compound losartan. The pharmacokinetic experiments showed that compound 3 could be absorbed efficiently and metabolized smoothly both in blood and in tissues in Wistar rats. The acute toxicity assay suggested that it has low toxicity with the LD50 value of 2974.35 mg/kg. These results demonstrate that compound 3 is a potent angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist which could be considered as a novel anti-hypertension candidate and deserved for further investigation.

  6. Structural Determinants of the γ-8 TARP Dependent AMPA Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew R; Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Schober, Douglas A; Wright, Rebecca A; Wang, He; Qian, Yuewei; Witkin, Jeffrey M; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Kato, Akihiko S

    2017-09-05

    The forebrain specific AMPA receptor antagonist, LY3130481/CERC-611, which selectively antagonizes the AMPA receptors associated with TARP γ-8, an auxiliary subunit enriched in the forebrain, has potent antiepileptic activities without motor side effects. We designated the compounds with such activities as γ-8 TARP dependent AMPA receptor antagonists (γ-8 TDAAs). In this work, we further investigated the mechanisms of action using a radiolabeled γ-8 TDAA and ternary structural modeling with mutational validations to characterize the LY3130481 binding to γ-8. The radioligand binding to the cells heterologously expressing GluA1 and/or γ-8 revealed that γ-8 TDAAs binds to γ-8 alone without AMPA receptors. Homology modeling of γ-8, based on the crystal structures of a distant TARP homologue, murine claudin 19, in conjunction with knowledge of two γ-8 residues previously identified as critical for the LY3130481 TARP-dependent selectivity provided the basis for a binding mode prediction. This allowed further rational mutational studies for characterization of the structural determinants in TARP γ-8 for LY3130481 activities, both thermodynamically as well as kinetically.

  7. Serotonin 2C receptor antagonist improves fear discrimination and subsequent safety signal recall

    PubMed Central

    Foilb, Allison R.; Christianson, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to discriminate between safety and danger is fundamental for survival, but is disrupted in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Acute stressors cause a release of serotonin (5-HT) in the forebrain, which is one mechanism for enhanced fear and anxiety; these effects are mediated by the 5-HT2C receptor. Using a fear discrimination paradigm where a danger signal conditioned stimulus (CS+) coterminates with a mild footshock and a safety signal (CS-) indicates the absence of shock, we demonstrate that danger/safety discrimination and fear inhibition develops over the course of 4 daily conditioning sessions. Systemic administration of the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB 242084 (0.25 or 1.0 mg/kg) prior to conditioning reduced behavioral freezing during conditioning, improved learning and subsequent inhibition of fear by the safety signal. Discrimination was apparent in the first recall test, and discrimination during training was evident after 3 days of conditioning versus 5 days in the vehicle treated controls. These results suggest a novel therapeutic use for 5-HT2C receptor antagonists to improve learning under stressful circumstances. Potential anatomical loci for 5-HT2C receptor modulation of fear discrimination learning and cognitive performance enhancement are discussed. PMID:26344640

  8. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of dimer derivatives of the bradykinin receptor antagonist HOE-140.

    PubMed

    Daffix, I; Amblard, M; Bergé, G; Dodey, P; Pruneau, D; Paquet, J L; Fouchet, C; Franck, R M; Defrêne, E; Luccarini, J M; Bélichard, P; Martinez, J

    1998-07-01

    The synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of dimer derivatives of the C-terminal fragments of the potent bradykinin antagonist HOE-140, linked through their N-termini, were performed. The influence of peptide moiety length was studied using the succinyl moiety as a linker. Our attention focused on the dimer of the C-terminal tetrapeptide of HOE-140 (compound JMV 980), which displayed some inhibiting activity (IC50 = 247 nM) for bradykinin B2 receptors. Unexpectedly, it was orally active in inhibiting bradykinin-induced hypotension in the rat. Based on this tetrapeptide dimer model, we synthesized pseudotetrapeptide dimer bradykinin antagonists 29 and 33, which exhibited high affinity (Ki = 76 and 61 nM, respectively) for the human cloned B2 receptor. In addition, compound 29 inhibited bradykinin-induced contraction of the human umbilical vein giving a pKB value of 6.45. Compounds 29 and 33 were selective toward B2 receptors because they did not bind to the cloned human B1 receptor up to 10 microM.

  9. Identification of a Potent and Selective Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Antagonist from Auxarthron reticulatum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The fungus Auxarthron reticulatum derived from the marine sponge Ircinia variabilis produced the diketopiperazine alkaloid amauromine (1) and the quinolinone methyl-penicinoline (2). Compound 2 is identical to the reported methyl-marinamide, whose structure is herewith revised. In radioligand binding studies at human cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors recombinantly expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, amauromine (1) was found to exhibit high affinity and selectivity for the CB1 receptor (Ki = 178 nM). The compound was shown to be a neutral CB1 antagonist with a Kb value of 66.6 nM determined in cAMP assays. Compound 2 exhibited only weak or no effects at CB receptors. To the best of our knowledge, compound 1 is the first fungal natural product that shows affinity for cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Because of its high antagonistic potency and selectivity, it may have potential for use as a drug and/or serve as a lead structure for drug development. PMID:24900275

  10. Identification of a Potent and Selective Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Antagonist from Auxarthron reticulatum.

    PubMed

    Elsebai, Mahmoud Fahmi; Rempel, Viktor; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Kehraus, Stefan; Müller, Christa E; König, Gabriele M

    2011-11-10

    The fungus Auxarthron reticulatum derived from the marine sponge Ircinia variabilis produced the diketopiperazine alkaloid amauromine (1) and the quinolinone methyl-penicinoline (2). Compound 2 is identical to the reported methyl-marinamide, whose structure is herewith revised. In radioligand binding studies at human cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors recombinantly expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, amauromine (1) was found to exhibit high affinity and selectivity for the CB1 receptor (K i = 178 nM). The compound was shown to be a neutral CB1 antagonist with a K b value of 66.6 nM determined in cAMP assays. Compound 2 exhibited only weak or no effects at CB receptors. To the best of our knowledge, compound 1 is the first fungal natural product that shows affinity for cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Because of its high antagonistic potency and selectivity, it may have potential for use as a drug and/or serve as a lead structure for drug development.

  11. Novel antagonists of serotonin-4 receptors: synthesis and biological evaluation of pyrrolothienopyrazines.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Stéphane; Lepailleur, Alban; Bureau, Ronan; Butt-Gueulle, Sabrina; Lelong-Boulouard, Véronique; Duchatelle, Pascal; Boulouard, Michel; Dumuis, Aline; Daveu, Cyril; Lezoualc'h, Frank; Pfeiffer, Bruno; Dauphin, François; Rault, Sylvain

    2009-03-15

    Based on the definition of a 5-HT(4) receptor antagonist pharmacophore, a series of pyrrolo[1,2-a]thieno[3,2-e] and pyrrolo[1,2-a]thieno[2,3-e] pyrazine derivatives were designed, prepared, and evaluated to determine the properties necessary for high-affinity binding to 5-HT(4) receptors. The compounds were synthesized by substituting the chlorine atom of the pyrazine ring with various N-alkyl-4-piperidinylmethanolates. They were evaluated in binding assays with [(3)H]GR113808 (1) as the 5-HT(4) receptor radioligand. The affinity values (K(i) or inhibition percentages) were affected by both the substituent on the aromatic ring and the substituent on the lateral piperidine chain. A methyl group on the tricyclic ring produced a marked increase in affinity while an N-propyl or N-butyl group gave compounds with nanomolar affinities. Among the most potent ligands, 34d was selected for further pharmacological studies and evaluated in vivo. This compound acts as an antagonist/weak partial agonist in COS-7 cells stably expressing the 5-HT(4(a)) receptor and is of great interest as a peripheral antinociceptive agent.

  12. Selective 5-hydroxytryptamine2 receptor antagonists protect against the neurotoxicity of methylenedioxymethamphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C J; Abbate, G M; Black, C K; Taylor, V L

    1990-11-01

    The serotonergic deficits resulting from methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)-induced neurotoxicity were prevented by the simultaneous administration of 5-hydroxytryptamine2 (5-HT2) receptor antagonists such as MDL 11,939 or ritanserin. This effect was not region specific as protection was observed in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum 1 week after the administration of a single dose of MDMA. MDL 11,939 also showed some efficacy at reducing the deficits in 5-HT concentrations and tryptophan hydroxylase activity produced by multiple administrations of MDMA. Protection against the neurotoxicity required the administration of MDL 11,939 within 1 hr of MDMA indicating 5-HT2 receptor activation was an early event in the process leading to terminal damage. Examination of the effect of the 5-HT2 receptor blockade on the early neurochemical alterations induced by MDMA revealed an inhibitory effect on MDMA-stimulated dopamine synthesis. Analysis of these data and the associated changes in dopamine metabolites indicates that 5-HT2 receptor antagonists block MDMA-induced neurotoxicity by interfering with the ability of the dopamine neuron to maintain its cytoplasmic pool of transmitter and thereby sustain carrier-mediated dopamine release.

  13. Guanidino acids act as rho1 GABA(C) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chebib, Mary; Gavande, Navnath; Wong, Kit Yee; Park, Anna; Premoli, Isabella; Mewett, Kenneth N; Allan, Robin D; Duke, Rujee K; Johnston, Graham A R; Hanrahan, Jane R

    2009-10-01

    GABA(C) receptors play a role in myopia, memory-related disorders and circadian rhythms signifying a need to develop potent and selective agents for this class of receptors. Guanidino analogs related to glycine, beta-alanine and taurine were evaluated at human rho(1)GABA(C) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes using 2-electrode voltage clamp methods. Of the 12 analogs tested, 8 analogs were active as antagonists and the remaining were inactive. (S)-2-guanidinopropionic acid (IC(50) = 2.2 microM) and guanidinoacetic acid (IC(50) = 5.4 microM; K (B) = 7.75 microM [pK (B) = 5.11 +/- 0.06]) were the most potent being competitive antagonists at this receptor. In contrast, the beta-alanine and GABA guanidino analogs showed reduced activity, indicating the distance between the carboxyl carbon and terminal nitrogen of the guanidino group is critical for activity. Substituting the C2-position of guanidinoacetic acid with various alkyl groups reduced activity indicating that steric effects may impact on activity. The results of this study contribute to the structure-activity-relationship profile required in developing novel therapeutic agents.

  14. Discovery and characterization of novel small-molecule CXCR4 receptor agonists and antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rama K.; Shum, Andrew K.; Platanias, Leonidas C.; Miller, Richard J.; Schiltz, Gary E.

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 (SDF-1) and its cognate receptor CXCR4 are involved in a large number of physiological processes including HIV-1 infectivity, inflammation, tumorigenesis, stem cell migration, and autoimmune diseases. While previous efforts have identified a number of CXCR4 antagonists, there have been no small molecule agonists reported. Herein, we describe the identification of a novel series of CXCR4 modulators, including the first small molecules to display agonist behavior against this receptor, using a combination of structure- and ligand-based virtual screening. These agonists produce robust calcium mobilization in human melanoma cell lines which can be blocked by the CXCR4-selective antagonist AMD3100. We also demonstrate the ability of these new agonists to induce receptor internalization, ERK activation, and chemotaxis, all hallmarks of CXCR4 activation. Our results describe a new series of biologically relevant small molecules that will enable further study of the CXCR4 receptor and may contribute to the development of new therapeutics. PMID:27456816

  15. Post-Stress Combined Administration of Beta-Receptor and Glucocorticoid Antagonists as a Novel Preventive Treatment in an Animal Model of PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    glucocorticoid receptors, propranolol, mifepristone 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME...PTSD (Stam, 2007). We could then administer a combination of the β-receptor antagonist propranolol and the glucocorticoid antagonist mifepristone ...antagonist, mifepristone , immediately after each MFS session In this first test of the combined drug intervention intended to attenuate

  16. Lack of NMDA-AMPA interaction in antidepressant-like effect of CGP 37849, an antagonist of NMDA receptor, in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Dybała, Małgorzata; Siwek, Agata; Poleszak, Ewa; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2008-11-01

    The NMDA receptor antagonist, CGP 37849-induced reduction in immobility time in the forced swim test in mice was not antagonized by pre-treatment with the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX. This is the first demonstration of the antidepressant effect of the NMDA antagonist not being dependent on the AMPA transmission.

  17. Estrogen receptor (ER) agonists and androgen receptor (AR) antagonists in effluents from Norwegian North Sea oil production platforms.

    PubMed

    Tollefsen, Knut-Erik; Harman, Christopher; Smith, Andy; Thomas, Kevin V

    2007-03-01

    The in vitro estrogen receptor (ER) agonist and androgen receptor (AR) antagonist potencies of offshore produced water effluents collected from the Norwegian Sector were determined using recombinant yeast estrogen and androgen screens. Solid phase extraction (SPE) concentrates of the effluents showed E2 agonist activities similar to those previously reported for the United Kingdom (UK) Continental Shelf (<0.1-4 ng E2 L(-1)). No activity was detected in the filtered oil droplets suggesting that produced water ER activity is primarily associated with the dissolved phase. Targeted analysis for methyl- to nonyl-substituted alkylphenol isomers show the occurrence of known ER agonists in the analysed samples. For the first time, AR antagonists were detected in both the dissolved and oil associated phase at concentrations of between 20 and 8000 microg of flutamide equivalents L(-1). The identity of the AR antagonists is unknown, however this represents a significant input into the marine environment of unknown compounds that exert a known biological effect. It is recommended that further analysis using techniques such as bioassay-directed analysis is performed to identify the compounds/groups of compounds that are responsible in order to improve the assessment of the risk posed by produced water discharges to the marine environment.

  18. Receptor binding and selectivity of three 11C-labelled dopamine receptor antagonists in the brain of rhesus monkeys studied with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Hartvig, P; Eckernäs, S A; Ekblom, B; Lindström, L; Lundqvist, H; Axelsson, S; Fasth, K J; Gullberg, P; Långström, B

    1988-04-01

    The regional distribution of 3 11C-labelled dopamine receptor antagonists, N-methyl spiperone, raclopride and clozapine, in the brain of Rhesus monkeys was studied by positron emission tomography (PET). The measured radioactivities in the striatal area were similar for the 3 antagonists, although the highest selectivity as compared to cerebellum was found for 11C-raclopride 60 min after administration. The selectivity of the radiotracers for the serotonin and D2-dopamine receptors was evaluated after pretreatment of the monkeys with serotonin and dopamine receptor antagonists. 11C-N-methylspiperone and 11C-clozapine both bound to serotonin receptors in the frontal cortex and to D2-dopamine receptors in the striatal area. Raclopride was selectively bound to the D2-dopamine receptors. The radioactivities measured in the striatal area with cerebellum as reference were fitted to a 3-compartment model which made possible evaluation of receptor binding characteristics. The rate proportional to the association rate constant for the receptor, kon and number of receptors, Bmax, varied from 0.02-0.07 min-1 between the studied radiolabelled drugs, whereas the apparent dissociation rate was highest for clozapine. This means that clozapine had the lowest affinity for the receptors in the striatum, assuming that the Bmax values are identical. The observed difference in selective receptor binding and binding characteristics of the 3 tracers may have an influence both on the clinical efficacy and side effects of the studied dopamine receptor antagonists.

  19. Synthesis of [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrazines as adenosine A2A receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Dowling, James E; Vessels, Jeffrey T; Haque, Serajul; Chang, He Xi; van Vloten, Kurt; Kumaravel, Gnanasambandam; Engber, Thomas; Jin, Xiaowei; Phadke, Deepali; Wang, Joy; Ayyub, Eman; Petter, Russell C

    2005-11-01

    Potent and selective antagonists of the adenosine A2A receptor often contain a nitrogen-rich fused-ring heterocyclic core. Replacement of the core with an isomeric ring system has previously been shown to improve target affinity, selectivity, and in vivo activity. This paper describes the preparation, by a novel route, of A2A receptor antagonists containing the [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrazine nucleus, which is isomeric with the [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine core of a series of known A2A antagonists with in vivo activity in animal models of Parkinson's disease.

  20. 2-Benzenesulfonyl-8a-benzyl-hexahydro-2H-isoquinolin-6-ones as selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robin D; Ray, Nicholas C; Blaney, Paul; Crackett, Peter H; Hurley, Christopher; Williams, Karen; Dyke, Hazel J; Clark, David E; Lockey, Peter M; Devos, Rene; Wong, Melanie; White, Anne; Belanoff, Joseph K

    2007-10-15

    The 2-azadecalin ring system was evaluated as a scaffold for the preparation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists. High affinity, selective GR antagonists were discovered based on a hypothetical binding mode related to the steroidal GR antagonist RU-43044. 2-Benzenesulfonyl substituted 8a-benzyl-hexahydro-2H-isoquinolin-6-ones exemplified by (R)-37 had low nanomolar affinity for GR with moderate functional activity (200 nM) in a reporter gene assay. These compounds were devoid of affinity for other steroidal receptors (ER, AR, MR, and PR). Analogues based on an alternative putative binding mode (CP-like) were found to be inactive.

  1. Histamine H3 receptor antagonists ameliorate attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder-like behavioral changes caused by neonatal habenula lesion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Jeong; Goto, Yukiori; Lee, Young-A

    2017-08-31

    A partial agonist and a full antagonist of the histamine H3 receptor have been suggested to have therapeutic effects on cognitive deficits in psychiatric disorders. We have previously shown that neonatal habenula lesion (NHL) induces behavioral deficits that resemble the symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this study, we examined the effects of three H3 antagonists on ADHD-like behavioral changes caused by NHL in rats. Behavioral tests and administration of the H3 receptor antagonists were performed in juvenile rats with NHL. H3 antagonist administration to juvenile rats dose dependently improved NHL-induced hyperlocomotion, impulsive behavior, and attention deficit. These results suggest that histamine H3 antagonists may be used as alternative therapeutic drugs for the treatment of ADHD.

  2. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 antagonist (+)-naloxone protects mice from inflammation-induced preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Chin, Peck Yin; Dorian, Camilla L; Hutchinson, Mark R; Olson, David M; Rice, Kenner C; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M; Robertson, Sarah A

    2016-11-07

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation by bacterial infection, or by sterile inflammatory insult is a primary trigger of spontaneous preterm birth. Here we utilize mouse models to investigate the efficacy of a novel small molecule TLR4 antagonist, (+)-naloxone, the non-opioid isomer of the opioid receptor antagonist (-)-naloxone, in infection-associated preterm birth. Treatment with (+)-naloxone prevented preterm delivery and alleviated fetal demise in utero elicited by i.p. LPS administration in late gestation. A similar effect with protection from preterm birth and perinatal death, and partial correction of reduced birth weight and postnatal mortality, was conferred by (+)-naloxone administration after intrauterine administration of heat-killed E. coli. Local induction by E. coli of inflammatory cytokine genes Il1b, Il6, Tnf and Il10 in fetal membranes was suppressed by (+)-naloxone, and cytokine expression in the placenta, and uterine myometrium and decidua, was also attenuated. These data demonstrate that inhibition of TLR4 signaling with the novel TLR4 antagonist (+)-naloxone can suppress the inflammatory cascade of preterm parturition, to prevent preterm birth and perinatal death. Further studies are warranted to investigate the utility of small molecule inhibition of TLR-driven inflammation as a component of strategies for fetal protection and delaying preterm birth in the clinical setting.

  3. Point mutations affecting antagonist affinity and agonist dependent gating of GABAA receptor channels.

    PubMed Central

    Sigel, E; Baur, R; Kellenberger, S; Malherbe, P

    1992-01-01

    Two variant amino acid sequences, which differ in a single amino acid residue, have been reported for the alpha 1-subunit of the rat brain GABAA receptor. We separately co-expressed these two variants in Xenopus oocytes, in combination with beta 2 and gamma 2. This experiment showed that substitution of alpha 1-Phe64 by Leu strongly decreases the apparent affinity for GABA dependent channel gating from 6 microM to 1260 microM. Starting from this observation, we used in vitro mutagenesis to obtain information relevant for the localization of the agonist/antagonist binding site in the GABAA receptor. Homologous mutation in alpha 5 had similar consequences for alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2. Homologous mutation in beta 2 and gamma 2 resulted in intermediate and small shifts in EC50, respectively. The apparent affinities of the competitive antagonists bicuculline methiodide and SR95531, the latter sharing close structural similarity with the agonist GABA, were decreased 60- to 200-fold by these mutations in alpha-subunits. Interestingly, these affinities remained nearly unaffected upon introduction of the homologous mutations in beta 2 and gamma 2, or upon mutation of the neighbouring amino acid in alpha 1, Phe65 to Leu. These results suggest close functional and structural association of alpha-subunits with the agonist/antagonist binding site, and involvement of N-terminal portions of the extracellular domains of all subunits in the gating of the channel. PMID:1376242

  4. Natural variants of cytotoxic epitopes are T-cell receptor antagonists for antiviral cytotoxic T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoletti, Antonio; Sette, Alessandro; Chisari, Francis V.; Penna, Amalia; Levrero, Massimo; Carli, Marco De; Fiaccadori, Franco; Ferrari, Carlo

    1994-06-01

    IT has been suggested that mutations within immunodominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes may be exploited by viruses to evade protective immune responses critical for clearance1-4. Viral escape could originate from passive mechanisms, such as mutations within crucial CTL epitopes, either affecting major histocompatibility complex binding or T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognition. Additionally, it has recently been shown that substitutions of TCR contact sites can yield analogue peptides that can still interact with the T-cell receptor but be unable to deliver a full stimulatory signal, thus inducing anergy5 or acting as an antagonist for the TCR6-8. We report here that hepatitis B virus isolates derived from two chronically infected patients display variant epitopes that act as natural TCR antagonists with the capacity to inhibit the CTL response to the wild-type epitope. During natural infection, TCR antagonist mutations of CTL epitopes could contribute to the development of viral persistence, especially if the antiviral CTL response is monospecific or the epitope is strongly immunodominant.

  5. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 antagonist (+)-naloxone protects mice from inflammation-induced preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Peck Yin; Dorian, Camilla L.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Olson, David M.; Rice, Kenner C.; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M.; Robertson, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation by bacterial infection, or by sterile inflammatory insult is a primary trigger of spontaneous preterm birth. Here we utilize mouse models to investigate the efficacy of a novel small molecule TLR4 antagonist, (+)-naloxone, the non-opioid isomer of the opioid receptor</