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Sample records for receptor complete cdna

  1. The human serotonin 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor: Complete cDNA, genomic structure, and alternatively spliced variant

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Enzhong; Zhu, Lingyu; Zhao, Lingyun

    1996-08-01

    The complete 4775-nt cDNA encoding the human serotonin 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor (5-HT{sub 2C}R), a G-protein-coupled receptor, has been isolated. It contains a 1377-nt coding region flanked by a 728-nt 5{prime}-untranslated region and a 2670-nt 3{prime}-untranslated region. By using the cloned 5-HT{sub 2C}R cDNA probe, the complete human gene for this receptor has been isolated and shown to contain six exons and five introns spanning at least 230 kb of DNA. The coding region of the human 5-HT{sub 2C}R gene is interrupted by three introns, and the positions of the intron/exon junctions are conserved between the human and the rodent genes. In addition, an alternatively spliced 5-HT{sub 2C}R RNA that contains a 95-nt deletion in the region coding for the second intracellular loop and the fourth transmembrane domain of the receptor has been identified. This deletion leads to a frameshift and premature termination so that the short isoform RNA encodes a putative protein of 248 amino acids. The ratio for the short isoform over the 5-HT{sub 2C}R RNA was found to be higher in choroid plexus tumor than in normal brain tissue, suggesting the possibility of differential regulation of the 5-HT{sub 2C}R gene in different neural tissues or during tumorigenesis. Transcription of the human 5-HT{sub 2C}R gene was found to be initiated at multiple sites. No classical TATA-box sequence was found at the appropriate location, and the 5{prime}-flanking sequence contains many potential transcription factor-binding sites. A 7.3-kb 5{prime}-flanking 5-HT{sub 2C}R DNA directed the efficient expression of a luciferase reported gene in SK-N-SH and IMR32 neuroblastoma cells, indicating that is contains a functional promoter. 69 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Human liver apolipoprotein B-100 cDNA: complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Grant, S M; Higuchi, K; Hospattankar, A; Lackner, K; Lee, N; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), the ligand on low density lipoproteins that interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor and initiates receptor-mediated endocytosis and low density lipoprotein catabolism, has been cloned, and the complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequences have been determined. ApoB-100 cDNAs were isolated from normal human liver cDNA libraries utilizing immunoscreening as well as filter hybridization with radiolabeled apoB-100 oligodeoxynucleotides. The apoB-100 mRNA is 14.1 kilobases long encoding a mature apoB-100 protein of 4536 amino acids with a calculated amino acid molecular weight of 512,723. ApoB-100 contains 20 potential glycosylation sites, and 12 of a total of 25 cysteine residues are located in the amino-terminal region of the apolipoprotein providing a potential globular structure of the amino terminus of the protein. ApoB-100 contains relatively few regions of amphipathic helices, but compared to other human apolipoproteins it is enriched in beta-structure. The delineation of the entire human apoB-100 sequence will now permit a detailed analysis of the conformation of the protein, the low density lipoprotein receptor binding domain(s), and the structural relationship between apoB-100 and apoB-48 and will provide the basis for the study of genetic defects in apoB-100 in patients with dyslipoproteinemias. PMID:3464946

  3. Expression cloning of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, S; Maniatis, T

    1989-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a receptor for murine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) was isolated from an expression library made from murine thymocytes. The clone was identified by transfecting the library into monkey COS cells and probing the transfected monolayer with radiolabeled murine IFN-gamma. Cells expressing the receptor were identified by autoradiography and plasmids encoding the receptor were directly rescued from those cells producing a positive signal. A partial cDNA so obtained was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from mouse L929 cells by conventional means. When this cDNA was expressed in COS cells it produced a specific binding site for murine IFN-gamma with an affinity constant similar to that of the receptor found on L929 cells. The predicted amino acid sequence of the murine IFN-gamma receptor shows homology to that previously reported for the human IFN-gamma receptor. However, although the two proteins are clearly related, they show less than 60% identity in both the putative extracellular domain and the intracellular domain. Images PMID:2531896

  4. Chicken epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor: cDNA cloning, expression in mouse cells, and differential binding of EGF and transforming growth factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Lax, I; Johnson, A; Howk, R; Sap, J; Bellot, F; Winkler, M; Ullrich, A; Vennstrom, B; Schlessinger, J; Givol, D

    1988-01-01

    The primary structure of the chicken epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor was deduced from the sequence of a cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence and shown to be highly homologous to the human EGF receptor. NIH-3T3 cells devoid of endogenous EGF receptor were transfected with the appropriate cDNA constructs and shown to express either chicken or human EGF receptors. Like the human EGF receptor, the chicken EGF receptor is a glycoprotein with an apparent molecular weight of 170,000. Murine EGF bound to the chicken receptor with approximately 100-fold lower affinity than to the human receptor molecule. Surprisingly, human transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) bound equally well or even better to the chicken EGF receptor than to the human EGF receptor. Moreover, TGF-alpha stimulated DNA synthesis 100-fold better than did EGF in NIH 3T3 cells that expressed the chicken EGF receptor. The differential binding and potency of mammalian EGF and TGF-alpha by the avian EGF receptor contrasts with the similar affinities of the mammalian receptor for the two growth factors. Images PMID:3260329

  5. Bovine dopamine beta-hydroxylase cDNA. Complete coding sequence and expression in mammalian cells with vaccinia virus vector.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E J; Allison, S; Fader, D; Claflin, V; Baizer, L

    1990-01-15

    We have isolated cDNA clones for bovine dopamine beta-hydroxylase from an adrenal medulla cDNA library and have determined the complete coding sequence. The largest cDNA clone isolated from the library is 2.4 kilobase pairs (kb) and contains an open reading frame of 1788 bases, coding for a protein of 597 amino acids and Mr = 66,803. The predicted amino acid sequence of the bovine cDNA contains 85% identity with human dopamine beta-hydroxylase (Lamouroux, A., Vingny, A., Faucon Biquet, N., Darmon, M. C., Franck, R., Henry, J.P., and Mallet, J. (1987) EMBO J. 6, 3931-3937; Kobayashi, K., Kurosawa, Y., Fujita, K., and Nagatsu, T. (1989) Nucleic Acids Res. 17, 1089-1102). Northern blot analysis reveals that the cDNA hybridizes to an mRNA of 2.4 kb present in bovine adrenal medulla, but not in kidney, heart, or liver. In addition, the cDNA hybridizes to a second RNA species of 5.5 kb, which is 4-fold less abundant than the 2.4-kb RNA. In vitro translation of a synthetic RNA transcribed from the 2.4-kb cDNA produces a 68-kDa protein, which is specifically immunoprecipitated by antiserum to bovine dopamine beta-hydroxylase. The 2.4-kb cDNA was cloned into a vaccinia virus vector, and the recombinant virus was used to infect the rat pheochromocytoma PC12 and monkey BSC-40 fibroblast cell lines. In both cell lines, infection with recombinant virus produces a protein of Mr = 75,000, which reacts with antiserum to bovine dopamine beta-hydroxylase. These results indicate that the 2.4-kb cDNA contains the genetic information necessary to code for the bovine dopamine beta-hydroxylase subunit.

  6. Molecular characterization of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C S; Muthukumaran, G; Frost, L J; Noe, M; Ahn, Y H; Mariano, T M; Pestka, S

    1989-10-25

    Interferon gamma receptors (IFN-gamma R) exhibit remarkable species specificity. In order to understand the basis for this phenomenon, we have isolated a recombinant cDNA clone corresponding to the mouse (Mu) IFN-gamma R. Microinjection of the mRNA synthesized in vitro corresponding to the cloned cDNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes resulted in the synthesis of a protein that specifically binds Mu-IFN-gamma. Analysis of murine genomic and RNA blots with the cDNA probe indicates the presence of a single gene and a single mRNA species of about 2300 bases. Sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding the Mu-IFN-gamma R and comparison with the corresponding human IFN-gamma R sequence shows about 68% conservation of the extracellular domains and 51% conservation of the cytoplasmic domains at the nucleotide level. The results indicate that, as expected, the sequence of the receptor confers species specificity for the binding of IFN-gamma to the cell surface receptor. Moreover, it was previously shown that a human factor is required in addition to the receptor for the human IFN-gamma to function in hamster or mouse cells (Jung, V., Rashidbaigi, A., Jones, C., Tischfield, J.A., Shows, T.B., and Pestka, S. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 4151-4155). These results suggest an explanation for the second species-specific event required for function of the human receptor in mouse or hamster cells in that the intracellular domains are significantly different and thus cannot interact with the corresponding heterologous factor. PMID:2530216

  7. Molecular characterization of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C S; Muthukumaran, G; Frost, L J; Noe, M; Ahn, Y H; Mariano, T M; Pestka, S

    1989-10-25

    Interferon gamma receptors (IFN-gamma R) exhibit remarkable species specificity. In order to understand the basis for this phenomenon, we have isolated a recombinant cDNA clone corresponding to the mouse (Mu) IFN-gamma R. Microinjection of the mRNA synthesized in vitro corresponding to the cloned cDNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes resulted in the synthesis of a protein that specifically binds Mu-IFN-gamma. Analysis of murine genomic and RNA blots with the cDNA probe indicates the presence of a single gene and a single mRNA species of about 2300 bases. Sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding the Mu-IFN-gamma R and comparison with the corresponding human IFN-gamma R sequence shows about 68% conservation of the extracellular domains and 51% conservation of the cytoplasmic domains at the nucleotide level. The results indicate that, as expected, the sequence of the receptor confers species specificity for the binding of IFN-gamma to the cell surface receptor. Moreover, it was previously shown that a human factor is required in addition to the receptor for the human IFN-gamma to function in hamster or mouse cells (Jung, V., Rashidbaigi, A., Jones, C., Tischfield, J.A., Shows, T.B., and Pestka, S. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 4151-4155). These results suggest an explanation for the second species-specific event required for function of the human receptor in mouse or hamster cells in that the intracellular domains are significantly different and thus cannot interact with the corresponding heterologous factor.

  8. Increased mRNA expression of a laminin-binding protein in human colon carcinoma: Complete sequence of a full-length cDNA encoding the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, Hsiukang; Wong, Jau Min; Chen, Hai Shiene; Lee, C.; Steele, G.D. Jr.; Chen, Lanbo

    1988-09-01

    Reliable markers to distinguish human colon carcinoma from normal colonic epithelium are needed particularly for poorly differentiated tumors where no useful marker is currently available. To search for markers the authors constructed cDNA libraries from human colon carcinoma cell lines and screened for clones that hybridize to a greater degree with mRNAs of colon carcinomas than with their normal counterparts. Here they report one such cDNA clone that hybridizes with a 1.2-kilobase (kb) mRNA, the level of which is /approx/9-fold greater in colon carcinoma than in adjacent normal colonic epithelium. Blot hybridization of total RNA from a variety of human colon carcinoma cell lines shows that the level of this 1.2-kb mRNA in poorly differentiated colon carcinomas is as high as or higher than that in well-differentiated carcinomas. Molecular cloning and complete sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the full-length open reading frame of this 1.2-kb mRNA unexpectedly show it to contain all the partial cDNA sequence encoding 135 amino acid residues previously reported for a human laminin receptor. The deduced amino acid sequence suggests that this putative laminin-binding protein from human colon carcinomas consists of 295 amino acid residues with interesting features. There is an unusual C-terminal 70-amino acid segment, which is trypsin-resistant and highly negatively charged.

  9. The murine biglycan: Complete cDNA cloning, genomic organization, promoter function, and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wegrowski, Y.; Pillarisetti, J.; Danielson, K.G.; Iozzo, R.V.; Suzuki, S.

    1995-11-01

    Biglycan is a ubiquitous chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that belongs to a growing family of proteins harboring leucine-rich repeats. We have cloned and sequenced the cDNA containing the complete murine biglycan, elucidated its genomic organization, and demonstrated functional promoter activity of its 5{prime} flanking region. The deduced biglycan protein core was highly conserved across species. However, the mouse biglycan (Bgn) gene was significantly larger than the human counterpart, primarily because of a large > 4.5-kb intron between exons 1 and 2. The mouse Bgn gene spanned over 9.5 kb of continuous DNA and comprised 8 exons, with a perfectly conserved intron/exon organization vis-a-vis the human counterpart. The promoter region was enriched in GC dinucleotide and contained numerous cis-acting elements including binding sites for SP-1, AP-1, and AP-2 factors. It lacked TATA and CAAT boxes typical of housekeeping genes. In support of this, primer extension analysis showed the existence of multiple transcription start sites. Transient cell transfection assays with a construct comprising the 548 hp upstream of the major transcription start site fused to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene showed functional promoter activity. Internal and 5{prime} deletion constructs showed that the distal promoter of the Bgn gene was required for full transcriptional activity. In contrast to the homologous proteoglycan decorin, the highest expression of biglycan mRNA was observed in lung, liver, and spleen of adult mouse and the lowest in skin, heart, and kidney. These results will be useful for the study of biglycan gene regulation and for the generation of mice with targeted null mutation of the Bgn gene. 56 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V.

    PubMed Central

    Jenny, R J; Pittman, D D; Toole, J J; Kriz, R W; Aldape, R A; Hewick, R M; Kaufman, R J; Mann, K G

    1987-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A) tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approximately equal to 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approximately 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approximately 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues. Images PMID:3110773

  11. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  12. Cloning and expression of a human kidney cDNA for an /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.W.; Kobilka, T.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Kobilka, B.K.

    1988-09-01

    An /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype has been cloned from a human kidney cDNA library using the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor as a probe. The deduced amino acid sequence resembles the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor and is consistent with the structure of other members of he family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptors. The cDNA was expressed in a mammalian cell line (COS-7), and the /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic ligand (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine was bound. Competition curve analysis with a variety of adrenergic ligands suggests that this cDNA clone represents the /alpha//sub 2/B-adrenergic receptor. The gene for this receptor is on human chromosome 4, whereas the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor (/alpha//sub 2/A) lies on chromosome 10. This ability to express the receptor in mammalian cells, free of other adrenergic receptor subtypes, should help in developing more selective /alpha/-adrenergic ligands.

  13. Mouse muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gamma subunit: cDNA sequence and gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L; LaPolla, R J; Davidson, N

    1986-01-01

    Clones coding for the mouse nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) gamma subunit precursor have been selected from a cDNA library derived from a mouse myogenic cell line and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence consists of a signal peptide of 22 amino acid residues and a mature gamma subunit of 497 amino acid residues. There is a high degree of sequence conservation between this mouse sequence and published human and calf AChR gamma subunits and, after allowing for functional amino acid substitutions, also to the more distantly related chicken and Torpedo AChR gamma subunits. The degree of sequence conservation is especially high in the four putative hydrophobic membrane spanning regions, supporting the assignment of these domains. RNA blot hybridization showed that the mRNA level of the gamma subunit increases by 30 fold or more upon differentiation of the two mouse myogenic cell lines, BC3H-1 and C2C12, suggesting that the primary controls for changes in gene expression during differentiation are at the level of transcription. One cDNA clone was found to correspond to a partially processed nuclear transcript containing two as yet unspliced intervening sequences. Images PMID:3010242

  14. Human brain n-chimaerin cDNA encodes a novel phorbol ester receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S; Kozma, R; Monfries, C; Hall, C; Lim, H H; Smith, P; Lim, L

    1990-01-01

    A human brain-specific cDNA encoding n-chimaerin, a protein of predicted molecular mass 34 kDa, has sequence identity with two different proteins: protein kinase C (PKC) at the N-terminus and BCR protein [product of the breakpoint-cluster-region (BCR) gene, involved in Philadelphia chromosome translocation] at the C-terminus [Hall, Monfries, Smith, Lim, Kozma, Ahmed, Vannaisungham, Leung & Lim (1990) J. Mol. Biol. 211, 11-16]. The sequence identity of n-chimaerin with PKC includes the cysteine-rich motif CX2CX13CX2CX7CX7C, and amino acids upstream of the first cysteine residue, but not the kinase domain. This region of PKC has been implicated in the binding of diacylglycerol and phorbol esters in a phospholipid-dependent fashion. Part of this cysteine-rich motif (CX2CX13CX2C) has the potential of forming a 'Zn-finger' structure. Phorbol esters cause a variety of physiological changes and are among the most potent tumour promoters that have been described. PKC is the only known protein target for these compounds. We now report that n-chimaerin cDNA encodes a novel phospholipid-dependent phorbol ester receptor, with the cysteine-rich region being responsible for this activity. This finding has wide implications for previous studies equating phorbol ester binding with the presence of PKC in the brain. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2268301

  15. CDNA CLONING OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) ESTROGEN AND ANDROGEN RECEPTORS FOR USE IN STEROID RECEPTOR EXTRAPOLATION STUDIES FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    cDNA Cloning of Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) Estrogen and Androgen Receptors for Use in Steroid Receptor Extrapolation Studies for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals.

    Wilson, V.S.1,, Korte, J.2, Hartig P. 1, Ankley, G.T.2, Gray, L.E., Jr 1, , and Welch, J.E.1. 1U.S...

  16. [Characterization of cDNA of T-cell receptor beta chain in rainbow trout].

    PubMed

    Partula, S; Fellah, J S; de Guerra, A; Charlemagne, J

    1994-08-01

    Using a two-step PCR strategy, we have cloned several cDNA segments encoding the T-cell receptor beta chain in a Teleost fish, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The nine clones analyzed encode identical N-terminal-truncated V beta regions which present limited sequence similarities with several mammalian TcR V beta chains, from residue Tyr-35 to residue Ser-95. These V beta regions are followed by V beta-D beta-J beta-like regions which are different in all the sequenced clones, and by identical C beta regions. The trout C beta domain (156 amino acids) is most related to the chicken and to amphibian (axolotl) C beta domains but no cysteine residue appears in the hinge region. Like in other vertebrate C beta s, the TM region carries a positively charged lysine residue (Lys-271). The intracytoplasmic domain is virtually absent. The possibility to analyze the structure, expression and diversity of a T-cell receptor chain in a Teleost fish model will be important for our future understanding of the evolution of specific immune recognition in vertebrates. PMID:7882160

  17. Cloning of Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor cDNA and Expression of Recombinant Soluble TNF-Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Patrick W.; Barrett, Kathy; Chantry, David; Turner, Martin; Feldmann, Marc

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extra-cellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ).

  18. The complete cDNA sequence of laminin alpha 4 and its relationship to the other human laminin alpha chains.

    PubMed

    Richards, A; Al-Imara, L; Pope, F M

    1996-06-15

    We previously localised the gene (LAMA4) encoding a novel laminin alpha 4 chain to chromosome 6q21. In this study, we describe the complete coding sequence and compare the protein with the other three known human laminin alpha chains. Although closely linked to LAMA2, the LAMA4 product most closely resembles laminin alpha 3, a constituent of laminin 5. Like laminin alpha 3A, the alpha 4 chain is a truncated version of the alpha 1 and alpha 2 chains, with a much reduced short arm. While the alpha 4 molecule is most similar to alpha 3, it shares some features of the C-terminal domains G4 and G5 in common with alpha 2. Unlike the LAMA3 gene, LAMA4 appears to encode only a single transcript, as determined by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The cDNA sequence encodes 1816 amino acids, which include a 24-residue signal peptide. The gene is expressed in skin, placenta, heart, lung, skeletal muscle, and pancreas. We have also shown that the mRNA can be readily reverse transcribed and amplified from cultured dermal fibroblasts. PMID:8706685

  19. Genomic organization and complete cDNA sequence of the human phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C {beta}3 gene (PLCB3)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagercrantz, J.; Carson, E.; Phelan, C.

    1995-04-10

    We have characterized the complete cDNA sequence, genomic structure, and expression of the human phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C {beta}3 (PLC {beta}3) gene (gene symbol PLCB3). PLC {beta}3 plays an important role in initiating receptor-mediated signal transduction. Activation of PLC takes place in many cells as a response to stimulation by hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and other ligands. The partial cDNA sequence of PLC {beta}3, previously published, was extended with 876 bp in the 5{prime} direction, giving a transcript of 4400 bp and a total open reading frame of 1234 amino acids. This was in accordance with expression analysis by Northern blotting that revealed a single 4.4-kb transcript in all tissues tested. Genomic data were obtained by sequencing plasmid subclones of a cosmid that contained the whole gene. The size of the complete transcription unit was estimated to be on the order of 15 kb. The gene contains 31 exons, with all splice donor and acceptor sites conforming to the GT/AG rule. No exon exceeds 571 bp in length, and the shortest exon spans only 36 bp. More than half of the introns are smaller than 200 bp, with the smallest being only 79 bp long. The transcription initiation site was determined to be within an 8-bp cluster 328-321 bp upstream of the translation initiation site. The 5{prime} flanking region is highly GC rich, with multiple CpG doublets, and contains multiple binding sites for Sp1. Lacking typical transcriptional regulatory sequences such as TATA and CAAT boxes, the putative promoter region conforms to the group of housekeeping promoters. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma cells transfected with the NGF receptor cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushima, H.; Bogenmann, E. )

    1990-09-01

    Human nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor (NGFR) cDNA was transfected into a neuroblastoma cell line (HTLA 230) which does not express a functional NGF-NGFR signal transduction cascade. Short-term treatment of stably transfected cells (98-3) expressing membrane-bound NGF receptor molecules resulted in a cell cycle-dependent, transient expression of the c-fos gene upon treatment with NGF, suggesting the presence of functional high-affinity NGFR. Extensive outgrowth of neurites and cessation of DNA synthesis occurred in transfectants grown on an extracellular matrix after long-term treatment with NGF, suggesting terminal differentiation. Our data support the idea that introduction of a constitutively expressed NGFR cDNA into cells with neuronal background results in the assembly of a functional NGF-NGFR signal cascade in a permissive extracellular environment.

  1. Novel cDNA sequences of aryl hydrocarbon receptors and gene expression in turtles (Chrysemys picta and Pseudemys scripta) exposed to different environments

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Emily C.; Traylor-Knowles, Nikki; Novillo-Villajos, Apolonia; Callard, Ian P.

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive changes have been observed in painted turtles from a site with known contamination located on Cape Cod, MA, USA. We hypothesize that these changes are caused by exposure to endocrine-disrupting compounds and that genes involved in reproduction are affected. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is an orphan receptor that is activated by environmental contaminants. AHR mRNA was measured in turtles exposed to soil collected from a contaminated site. Adult turtles were trapped from the study site (Moody Pond, MP) or a reference site and exposed to laboratory environments containing soil from either site. The red-eared slider was used to assess neonatal exposure to soil and water from the sites. The environmental exposures occurred over a 13-month period. Juveniles showed an age-dependent increase in brain AHR1. Juvenile turtles exposed to the MP environment had elevated gonadal AHR1. Adult turtles exposed to the MP environment showed significantly decreased brain AHR2. The painted turtle AHR is the first complete reptile AHR cDNA sequence. Phylogenetic analysis of the painted turtle AHR showed that it clusters with other AHR2s. Partial AHR1 and partial AHR2 cDNA sequences were cloned from the red-eared slider. MEME analysis identified 18 motifs in the turtle AHRs, showing high conservation between motifs that overlapped functional regions in both AHR isoforms. PMID:21763458

  2. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of Toll-like receptor 21 cDNA from Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Wu, Lian; Sun, Jin-Sheng; Geng, Xu-Yun; Pan, Bao-Ping

    2013-10-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) is believed to play crucial role in host defense of pathogenic microbes in innate immune system. In the present study, the full-length cDNA of Paralichthys olivaceus Toll-like receptor 21 (Po-TLR21) was cloned by homology cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. The Po-TLR21 cDNA sequence was 3687 bp, containing an open reading frame of 2922 bp encoding 973 amino acids. TMHMM and SMART program analysis indicated that protein contained one transmembrane domain, eighteen leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), and one Toll/IL-1 receptor homology domain (TIR). Multiple alignment analysis of the Po-TLR21 protein-coding sequence with other known TLR21 from grouper, pufferfish, zebrafish, cod, catfish, carp and chicken showed the homology of 67%, 63%, 54%, 52%, 51%, 49%, and 39%, respectively. The Po-TLR21 mRNA expression patterns were measured by real-time PCR. The results revealed that TLR21 is widely expressed in various tested healthy tissues, and highly expressed in spleen and gill. In vivo immunostimulation experiments revealed that expression of TLR21 is modulated by Vibrio anguillarum (V. anguillarum), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN) and poly I:C. Moreover, the inhibitor of homodimerization of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) could significantly reduce the up-regulation of TLR21, MyD88, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) expression in CpG ODN or poly I:C-treated head kidney cells in vitro. These results indicate that TLR21 may be involved in the pathogen recognition in the early innate immune. PMID:23880453

  3. High-level expression of human insulin receptor cDNA in mouse NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, J.; Okamoto, A.K.; Thys, R.; Bell, G.I.; Steiner, D.F.; Hofmann, C.A.

    1987-08-01

    In order to develop a simple, efficient system for the high-level expression of human insulin receptors in eukaryotic cells, a full-length human kidney insulin receptor cDNA was inserted into a bovine papilloma virus vector under the control of the mouse metallothionein promoter. After transfection of mouse NIH 3T3 cells with this construct, seven cell lines expressing insulin receptors were isolated; two cell lines had more than 10/sup 6/ receptors per cell. The cell line with the highest /sup 125/I-insulin binding (NIH 3T3 HIR3.5) had 6 x 10/sup 6/ receptors with a K/sub d/ of 10/sup -9/ M. This level was not dependent on exposure to metals but could be increased further to 2 x 10/sup 7/ receptors per cell by addition of sodium butyrate to the culture medium. The ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits had apparent molecular weights of 147,000 and 105,000, respectively (compared to 135,000 and 95,000 in IM-9 human lymphocytes), values identical to those of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of the insulin receptors of nontransformed NIH 3T3 cells. This size difference was due to altered carbohydrate composition, as N-glycanase digestion reduced the apparent receptor subunit size of the transfected cells and IM-9 lymphocytes to identical values. The alteration in N-linked oligosaccharide composition could not be ascribed to differences in the kinetics of posttranslational processing of the insulin receptors, which was comparable to that of other cells studied. The basal rate of glycogen synthesis in the cells overexpressing insulin receptors was increased 4- to 5-fold compared with controls. Low levels of added insulin (0.1 nM) caused a 50% increase in the rate of glycogen synthesis

  4. Molecular cloning of the cDNA and chromosomal localization of the gene for a putative seven-transmembrane segment (7-TMS) receptor isolated from human spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Federsppiel, B.; Melhado, I.G.; Delaney, A.; Clark-Lewis, I. ); Duncan, A.M.V. ); Jirik, F.R. )

    1993-06-01

    A family of proinflammatory cytokines sharing several structural features has been described and includes, for example, interleukin-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and melanocyte growth stimulatory activity. Recently, the receptors for interleukin-8 have been isolated and found to belong to the seven-transmembrane domain class of G protein-coupled receptors. As other members of this cytokine family likely interact with similar receptors, the polymerase chain reaction was employed to isolate related receptors from human peripheral blood adherent cells. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on the rabbit interleukin-8 receptor sequence were used. The corresponding full-length cDNA was isolated from a human spleen cDNA library. The predicted protein sequence of this clone, designated pBE1.3, was 93% identical to that of a cDNA isolated from bovine locus coeruleus, which apparently encodes a neuropeptide Y receptor, and also shows similarity with the interleukin-8 receptor and the human cytomegalovirus US28 sequences. The gene, designated D2S201E, was localized to human chromosome 2q21. By Northern blotting, transcripts hybridizing to this cDNA were present in a variety of tissues and cells, including those of hemopoietic origin. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  5. The complete sequence of a full length cDNA for human liver glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: evidence for multiple mRNA species.

    PubMed Central

    Arcari, P; Martinelli, R; Salvatore, F

    1984-01-01

    A recombinant M13 clone (O42) containing a 65 b.p. cDNA fragment from human fetal liver mRNA coding for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase has been identified and it has been used to isolate from a full-length human adult liver cDNA library a recombinant clone, pG1, which has been subcloned in M13 phage and completely sequenced with the chain terminator method. Besides the coding region of 1008 b.p., the cDNA sequence includes 60 nucleotides at the 5'-end and 204 nucleotides at the 3'-end up to the polyA tail. Hybridization of pG1 to human liver total RNA shows only one band about the size of pG1 cDNA. A much stronger hybridization signal was observed using RNA derived from human hepatocarcinoma and kidney carcinoma cell lines. Sequence homology between clone 042 and the homologous region of clone pG1 is 86%. On the other hand, homology among the translated sequences and the known human muscle protein sequence ranges between 77 and 90%; these data demonstrate the existence of more than one gene coding for G3PD. Southern blot of human DNA, digested with several restriction enzymes, also indicate that several homologous sequences are present in the human genome. Images PMID:6096821

  6. The complete primary structure of the T-cell receptor genes from an alloreactive cytotoxic human T-lymphocyte clone.

    PubMed

    Leiden, J M; Fraser, J D; Strominger, J L

    1986-01-01

    The complete primary structure of the cDNAs encoding the alpha and beta chains of the T-lymphocyte receptor for antigen from a human alloreactive, cytotoxic T-cell clone, L17, is presented. Sequence analysis of these genes reveals that both are related to immunoglobulins and are composed of variable, diversity (at least in the case of the Ti beta clone), joining, and constant region sequences. Comparison of the sequence of the alpha-chain cDNA to that of previously sequenced mouse and human alpha cDNAs suggests the presence of human T-cell receptor alpha D-region sequences. Southern blot analysis confirms the finding that these cDNAs represent the functional receptor genes expressed by the L17 cytotoxic T-cell clone. The availability of these full-length T-cell receptor cDNA clones from a human T-lymphocyte clone of known antigen specificity should allow an analysis of the relationship between T-cell receptor structure and function. PMID:2426193

  7. Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, chemokine receptor CXCR4 cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemokine receptor CXCR4, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, binds selectively CXCL12. This protein plays many important roles in immunological as well as pathophysiological functions. In this communication, we identified and characterized the channel catfish CXCR4 transcript....

  8. cDNA cloning of an intracellular form of the human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist associated with epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Haskill, S; Martin, G; Van Le, L; Morris, J; Peace, A; Bigler, C F; Jaffe, G J; Hammerberg, C; Sporn, S A; Fong, S

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a receptor antagonist of interleukin 1 (IL-1ra), secreted from human monocytes, has recently been isolated and sequenced [Eisenberg, S. P., Evans, R. J., Arend, W. P., Verderber, E., Brewer, M. T., Hannum, C. H. & Thompson, R. C. (1990) Nature (London) 343, 341-346]. We have identified another version of this IL-1ra, which is predominantly expressed in epithelial cells. This IL-1ra lacks a leader sequence and, thus, is probably intracellular. Both proteins are derived from the same gene through use of an alternative transcriptional start site and internal splice-acceptor site. Expression of intracellular IL-1ra cDNA in COS cells demonstrated that the intracellular product specifically inhibited exogenous interleukin 1-dependent responses. Keratinocytes were shown to contain significant amounts of nonsecreted IL-1ra protein. Constitutive expression of the intracellular IL-1ra may be an intracellular defensive mechanism in exposed epithelial cells and/or may serve to regulate autocrine interleukin 1-mediated pathways of differentiation. Images PMID:1827201

  9. cDNA cloning of a serotonin 5-HT1C receptor by electrophysiological assays of mRNA-injected Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lübbert, H; Hoffman, B J; Snutch, T P; van Dyke, T; Levine, A J; Hartig, P R; Lester, H A; Davidson, N

    1987-01-01

    We describe a strategy for the cloning of neurotransmitter-receptor and ion-channel cDNAs that is based on electrophysiological assays of mRNA-injected Xenopus oocytes. This procedure circumvents the purification of these membrane proteins, which is hindered by their low abundance and their hydrophobic nature. It involves methods for RNA fractionation by high-resolution gel electrophoresis, directional cDNA cloning in a single-stranded vector, and screening of the cDNA library by voltage-clamp measurements of currents induced by serotonin in mRNA-injected oocytes. The applicability of our approach is demonstrated by the isolation of a serotonin receptor cDNA clone from a mouse choroid plexus papilloma. The clone was identified by hybrid-depletion and hybrid-selection procedures. The receptor expressed in oocytes injected with hybrid-selected RNA is fully functional, indicating that it is composed of a single subunit encoded by a 5-kilobase RNA. The pharmacology of the hybrid-selected receptor confirms that we have successfully cloned a serotonin 5-HT1C receptor cDNA. Images PMID:3473504

  10. Vitamin D receptor alleles: Cloning and characterization of the VDR gene and RT-PCR of VDR cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Javed, A.A.; Huang, Y.; Bombard, A.T.

    1994-09-01

    Vitamin D{sub 3} receptors (VDR) function as regulators through the action of the ligand 1{alpha}, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D{sub 3}. The receptor specifically finds its ligand and exerts it effect on the regulation of the expression of target genes. It has been shown that mutations in the VDR gene affect the function of the receptors and cause a corresponding disorder state. Recently, it has been reported that common allelic variations found normally in the Caucasian (Australian) population pose varying degrees of risk for osteoporosis. We present here the cloning of the VDR gene and RT-PCR of VDR cDNA. Studies are in progress to establish allele frequency in the Black, Hispanic and Caucasian populations to systematically study the influence of allele types and to develop a risk profile for osteoporosis. The present method for detection of various alleles is based on RFLP analysis. We are developing PCR-based methods for the rapid detection and typing of alleles.

  11. Characterization and expression analysis of Toll-like receptor 3 cDNA from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Vidal, R; González, R; Gil, F

    2015-06-10

    Innate pathway activation is fundamental for early anti-viral defense in fish, but currently there is insufficient understanding of how salmonid fish identify viral molecules and activate these pathways. The Toll-like receptor (TLR) is believed to play a crucial role in host defense of pathogenic microbes in the innate immune system. In the present study, the full-length cDNA of Salmo salar TLR3 (ssTLR3) was cloned. The ssTLR3 cDNA sequence was 6071 bp long, containing an open reading frame of 2754 bp and encoding 971 amino acids. The TLR group motifs, such as leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains and Toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains, were maintained in ssTLR3, with sixteen LRR domains and one TIR domain. In contrast to descriptions of the TLR3 in rainbow trout and the murine (TATA-less), we found a putative TATA box in the proximal promoter region 29 bp upstream of the transcription start point of ssTLR3. Multiple-sequence alignment analysis of the ssTLR3 protein-coding sequence with other known TLR3 sequences showed the sequence to be conserved among all species analyzed, implying that the function of the TLR3 had been sustained throughout evolution. The ssTLR3 mRNA expression patterns were measured using real-time PCR. The results revealed that TLR3 is widely expressed in various healthy tissues. Individuals challenged with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus and immunostimulated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid exhibited increased expression of TLR3 at the mRNA level, indicating that ssTLR3 may be involved in pathogen recognition in the early innate immune system.

  12. Molecular cloning and expression of the porcine trigeminal ganglion cDNA encoding a 5-ht(1F) receptor.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Pankaj; Sharma, Hari S; Wurch, Thierry; Pauwels, Petrus J; Saxena, Pramod R

    2002-02-01

    Using a combination of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and inverse-PCR techniques, we amplified, cloned and sequenced a full-length porcine 5-hydroxytryptamine 1F (5-ht(1F)) receptor complementary DNA (cDNA) derived from porcine trigeminal ganglion. Sequence analysis revealed 1101 base pairs (bp) encoding an open reading frame of 366 amino acids showing a high similarity (>90%) with the 5-ht(1F) receptor sequences from other species, including human. The recombinant porcine 5-ht(1F) receptor was expressed in African green monkey kidney cell lines (COS-7 cells) and its ligand binding profile was determined using [3H]5-HT. The affinities of several agonists (LY334370 (5-(4-fluorobenzoyl)amino-3-(1-methylpiperidin-4-yl)-1H-indole fumarate)>CP122638 (N-methyl-3 [pyrrolidin 2(R)-yl methyl]-1H-indol-5-ylmethyl sulphonamide)=naratriptan =5HT>eletriptan>sumatriptan>frovatriptan =avitriptan>dihydroergotamine>zolmitriptan>5-carboxamidotryptamine>rizatriptan>alniditan=donitriptan>L694247 (2-[5-[3-(4-methylsulphonylamino)benzyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]-1H-indole-3-yl] ethylamine) and putative antagonists (methiothepin>GR127935 (N-[4-methoxy-3-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl) phenyl]-2'-methyl 4'-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl) [1,1-biphenyl]-4-carboxamide hydrochloride)>ritanserin>SB224289 (2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-1'-methyl-5-[2'-methyl-4'(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl) biphenyl-4-carbonyl] furo [2,3-f] indole-3-spiro-4'-piperidine hydrochloride)>BRL155572 ([1-(3-chlorophenyl)-4-[3,3-diphenyl (2-(S,R) hydroxypropanyl)piperazine] hydrochloride)>ketanserin=pindolol) correlated highly with those described for the recombinant human 5-ht(1F) receptor (Spearman correlation coefficient; r(s)=0.942). Nevertheless, as compared to the human homologue, some triptans (i.e. sumatriptan, zolmitriptan and rizatriptan) displayed a 10- to 15-fold lower affinity for the porcine 5-ht(1F) receptor. Using RT-PCR technique, the expression of porcine 5-ht(1F) receptor mRNA was observed in

  13. Cloning of the. gamma. -aminobutyric acid (GABA). rho. sub 1 cDNA: A GABA receptor subunit highly expressed in the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Cutting, G.R.; Lu, Luo; Kasch, L.M.; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Guggino, W.B.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr. ); O'Hara, B.F.; Donovan, D.M.; Shimada, Shoichi ); Uhl, G.R. Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD )

    1991-04-01

    Type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptors are a family of ligand-gated chloride channels that are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system. Molecular cloning has revealed diversity in the subunits that compose this heterooligomeric receptor, but each previously elucidated subunit displays amino acid similarity in conserved structural elements. The authors have used these highly conserved regions to identify additional members of this family by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One PCR product was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a human retina cDNA library. The mature protein predicted from this cDNA sequence is 458 amino acids long and displays between 30 and 38% amino acid similarity to the previously identified GABA{sub A} subunits. This gene is expressed primarily in the retina but transcripts are also detected in the brain, lung, and thymus. Injection of Xenopus oocytes with RNA transcribed in vitro produces a GABA-responsive chloride conductance and expression of the cDNA in COS cells yields GABA-displaceable muscimol binding. These features are consistent with our identification of a GABA subunit, GABA {rho}{sub 1}, with prominent retinal expression that increases the diversity and tissue specificity of this ligand-gated ion-channel receptor family.

  14. Reverse genetics in high throughput: rapid generation of complete negative strand RNA virus cDNA clones and recombinant viruses thereof

    PubMed Central

    Nolden, T.; Pfaff, F.; Nemitz, S.; Freuling, C. M.; Höper, D.; Müller, T.; Finke, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Reverse genetics approaches are indispensable tools for proof of concepts in virus replication and pathogenesis. For negative strand RNA viruses (NSVs) the limited number of infectious cDNA clones represents a bottleneck as clones are often generated from cell culture adapted or attenuated viruses, with limited potential for pathogenesis research. We developed a system in which cDNA copies of complete NSV genomes were directly cloned into reverse genetics vectors by linear-to-linear RedE/T recombination. Rapid cloning of multiple rabies virus (RABV) full length genomes and identification of clones identical to field virus consensus sequence confirmed the approache’s reliability. Recombinant viruses were recovered from field virus cDNA clones. Similar growth kinetics of parental and recombinant viruses, preservation of field virus characters in cell type specific replication and virulence in the mouse model were confirmed. Reduced titers after reporter gene insertion indicated that the low level of field virus replication is affected by gene insertions. The flexibility of the strategy was demonstrated by cloning multiple copies of an orthobunyavirus L genome segment. This important step in reverse genetics technology development opens novel avenues for the analysis of virus variability combined with phenotypical characterization of recombinant viruses at a clonal level. PMID:27046474

  15. Mapping, cDNA cloning and tissue expression of the porcine thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoling; Cai, Zhaowei; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Lifan; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Ying; Guo, Xiaoling; Xu, Ningying

    2011-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that plays a crucial role in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis by conveying the action of the hypothalamic tripeptide TRH, which is the primary central activator of this hormonal cascade. In the present study, the porcine TRHR (pTRHR) gene was localized to chromosome 4 by Radiation hybrid mapping. Quantitative trait loci affecting average backfat thickness, daily gain, and carcass and meat quality traits have been mapped to the region containing this gene. Further, the full-length cDNA of pTRHR was cloned and sequenced. pTRHR contains an open reading frame encoding 398 amino acids and shares 96.2% amino acid identity to human TRHR. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR showed that the mRNA of pTRHR is expressed in a variety of tissues, with high expression in the brain, hypothalamus, pituitary, testis, and fat tissue. The considerable expression level of TRHR mRNA found in fat tissue indicates potential direct action of TRH on lipocyte might exist. Additionally, two alternative spliced transcript variants of pTRHR were also isolated in this study. Our data provided basic molecular information which will be useful for further investigation on pTRHR gene.

  16. The vicilin gene family of pea (Pisum sativum L.): a complete cDNA coding sequence for preprovicilin.

    PubMed Central

    Lycett, G W; Delauney, A J; Gatehouse, J A; Gilroy, J; Croy, R R; Boulter, D

    1983-01-01

    A cDNA plasmid bank has been constructed using mRNA from developing pea seeds and three cDNAs coding for vicilin polypeptides have been selected. These cDNAs have been sequenced and between them cover the whole of the coding sequence plus part of the 5' and 3' untranslated regions. Comparison with amino acid sequence data from the protein indicates that vicilin is synthesised as preprovicilin with subsequent removal of a signal peptide and a C-terminal peptide as well as post translational endo-proteolytic cleavage. The cDNAs represent two different classes of vicilin genes whilst amino acid data show that there are at least three major classes of vicilin polypeptide. The vicilin sequences show extensive homology with conglycinin and phaseolin except in the regions of the internal proteolytic cleavages. The evolutionary significance of this relationship is discussed. Images PMID:6687941

  17. kappa-Opioid receptor in humans: cDNA and genomic cloning, chromosomal assignment, functional expression, pharmacology, and expression pattern in the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, F; Gavériaux-Ruff, C; Befort, K; Matthes, H; Lannes, B; Micheletti, G; Mattéi, M G; Charron, G; Bloch, B; Kieffer, B

    1995-01-01

    Using the mouse delta-opioid receptor cDNA as a probe, we have isolated genomic clones encoding the human mu- and kappa-opioid receptor genes. Their organization appears similar to that of the human delta receptor gene, with exon-intron boundaries located after putative transmembrane domains 1 and 4. The kappa gene was mapped at position q11-12 in human chromosome 8. A full-length cDNA encoding the human kappa-opioid receptor has been isolated. The cloned receptor expressed in COS cells presents a typical kappa 1 pharmacological profile and is negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase. The expression of kappa-opioid receptor mRNA in human brain, as estimated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, is consistent with the involvement of kappa-opioid receptors in pain perception, neuroendocrine physiology, affective behavior, and cognition. In situ hybridization studies performed on human fetal spinal cord demonstrate the presence of the transcript specifically in lamina II of the dorsal horn. Some divergences in structural, pharmacological, and anatomical properties are noted between the cloned human and rodent receptors. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7624359

  18. Localization of the human fibromodulin gene (FMOD) to chromosome 1q32 and completion of the cDNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the human fibromodulin cDNA and its use to map the gene. For somatic cell hybrids, the generation of the PCR product was concordant with the presence of chromosome 1 and discordant with the presence of all other chromosomes, confirming that the fibromodulin gene is located within region q32 of chromosome 1. The physical mapping of genes is a critical step in the process of identifying which genes may be responsible for various inherited disorders. Specifically, the mapping of the fibromodulin gene now provides the information necessary to evaluate its potential role in genetic disorders of connective tissues. The analysis of previously reported diseases mapped to chromosome 1 reveals two genes located in the proximity of the fibromodulin locus. These are Usher syndrome type II, a recessive disorder characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, and Van der Woude syndrome, a dominant condition associated with abnormalities such as cleft lip and palate and hyperdontia. The genes for both of these disorders have been projected to be localized to 1q32 of a physical map that integrates available genetic linkage and physical data. However, it seems improbable that either of these disorders, exhibiting restricted tissue involvement, could be linked to the fibromodulin gene, given the wide tissue distribution of the encoded proteoglycan, although it remains possible that the relative importance of the quantity and function of the proteoglycan may avry between tissues. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  19. [Molecular cloning and characteristics of cDNA encoding pig beta6 subunit for FMDV receptor].

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan-Dian; Du, Jun-Zheng; Chang, Hui-Yun; Cong, Guo-Zheng; Shao, Jun-Jun; Shan, Yi Hua; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Xie, Qing-Ge

    2007-09-01

    In order to study the roles of integrin beta6 in Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus infection, pig integrin beta6 was firstly molecularly cloned from RNA of the tongue and lung of recovered pig infected experimentally with foot-and-mouth-disease virus (FMDV), and was compared with the beta6 gene of other animals available in GenBank at nucleotide and amino acid leves. GeneBank association number of the beta6 gene is EF432729. Pig integrin beta6 gene (2367bp) encodes a polypeptide of 788 amino acids consisting of 9 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 3 Glycosaminoglycan attachment sites, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site, 10 Protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, 2 EGF-like domains and 2 cysteine-rich regions. Pig integrin beta6 subunit has a 26-residue putative signal peptide, a 681-residue ectodomain, a 29-residue transmembrane domain, and a 52-residue cytoplasmic domain. 11 mutant nucleotides were found in beta6 gene coding region and 9 amino acids were changed. The nucleotide sequence similarity of integrin beta6 gene between rheses monkey, mouse, Norway rat, dog, guinea pig, human, bovine, sheep is 79.5%, 84.9%, 85.4%, 85.2%, 88.7%, 90.1%, 91.9% and 91.9%, and the amino acid sequence similarity is 93.5%, 88.2%, 88.5%, 88.3%, 91.0%, 92.8%, 93.3% and 93.4% respectively. This study will lay a foundation for understanding the interactions of FMDV with receptors. PMID:18064756

  20. Evolution of vertebrate IgM: complete amino acid sequence of the constant region of Ambystoma mexicanum mu chain deduced from cDNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Fellah, J S; Wiles, M V; Charlemagne, J; Schwager, J

    1992-10-01

    cDNA clones coding for the constant region of the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) mu heavy immunoglobulin chain were selected from total spleen RNA, using a cDNA polymerase chain reaction technique. The specific 5'-end primer was an oligonucleotide homologous to the JH segment of Xenopus laevis mu chain. One of the clones, JHA/3, corresponded to the complete constant region of the axolotl mu chain, consisting of a 1362-nucleotide sequence coding for a polypeptide of 454 amino acids followed in 3' direction by a 179-nucleotide untranslated region and a polyA+ tail. The axolotl C mu is divided into four typical domains (C mu 1-C mu 4) and can be aligned with the Xenopus C mu with an overall identity of 56% at the nucleotide level. Percent identities were particularly high between C mu 1 (59%) and C mu 4 (71%). The C-terminal 20-amino acid segment which constitutes the secretory part of the mu chain is strongly homologous to the equivalent sequences of chondrichthyans and of other tetrapods, including a conserved N-linked oligosaccharide, the penultimate cysteine and the C-terminal lysine. The four C mu domains of 13 vertebrate species ranging from chondrichthyans to mammals were aligned and compared at the amino acid level. The significant number of mu-specific residues which are conserved into each of the four C mu domains argues for a continuous line of evolution of the vertebrate mu chain. This notion was confirmed by the ability to reconstitute a consistent vertebrate evolution tree based on the phylogenic parsimony analysis of the C mu 4 sequences. PMID:1382992

  1. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by a deep intronic pseudoexon-activating mutation in the androgen receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Känsäkoski, Johanna; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Tommiska, Johanna; Saarinen, Lilli; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Frilander, Mikko J; Palvimo, Jorma J; Toppari, Jorma; Raivio, Taneli

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) gene underlie complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), the most common cause of 46,XY sex reversal. Molecular genetic diagnosis of CAIS, however, remains uncertain in patients who show normal coding region of AR. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of AR disruption leading to CAIS in two 46,XY sisters. We analyzed whole-genome sequencing data of the patients for pathogenic variants outside the AR coding region. Patient fibroblasts from the genital area were used for AR cDNA analysis and protein quantification. Analysis of the cDNA revealed aberrant splicing of the mRNA caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.2450-118A>G) in the intron 6 of AR. The mutation creates a de novo 5' splice site and a putative exonic splicing enhancer motif, which leads to the preferential formation of two aberrantly spliced mRNAs (predicted to include a premature stop codon). Patient fibroblasts contained no detectable AR protein. Our results show that patients with CAIS and normal AR coding region need to be examined for deep intronic mutations that can lead to pseudoexon activation. PMID:27609317

  2. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by a deep intronic pseudoexon-activating mutation in the androgen receptor gene

    PubMed Central

    Känsäkoski, Johanna; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Tommiska, Johanna; Saarinen, Lilli; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Frilander, Mikko J.; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Toppari, Jorma; Raivio, Taneli

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) gene underlie complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), the most common cause of 46,XY sex reversal. Molecular genetic diagnosis of CAIS, however, remains uncertain in patients who show normal coding region of AR. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of AR disruption leading to CAIS in two 46,XY sisters. We analyzed whole-genome sequencing data of the patients for pathogenic variants outside the AR coding region. Patient fibroblasts from the genital area were used for AR cDNA analysis and protein quantification. Analysis of the cDNA revealed aberrant splicing of the mRNA caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.2450-118A>G) in the intron 6 of AR. The mutation creates a de novo 5′ splice site and a putative exonic splicing enhancer motif, which leads to the preferential formation of two aberrantly spliced mRNAs (predicted to include a premature stop codon). Patient fibroblasts contained no detectable AR protein. Our results show that patients with CAIS and normal AR coding region need to be examined for deep intronic mutations that can lead to pseudoexon activation. PMID:27609317

  3. Complete sequence of HLA-B27 cDNA identified through the characterization of structural markers unique to the HLA-A, -B, and -C allelic series

    SciTech Connect

    Szoets, H.; Reithmueller, G.; Weiss, E.; Meo, T.

    1986-03-01

    Antigen HLA-B27 is a high-risk genetic factor with respect to a group of rheumatoid disorders, especially ankylosing spondylitis. A cDNA library was constructed from an autozygous B-cell line expressing HLA-B27, HLA-Cw1, and the previously cloned HLA-A2 antigen. Clones detected with an HLA probe were isolated and sorted into homology groups by differential hybridization and restriction maps. Nucleotide sequencing allowed the unambiguous assignment of cDNAs to HLA-A, -B, and -C loci. The HLA-B27 mRNA has the structure features and the codon variability typical of an HLA class I transcript but it specifies two uncommon amino acid replacements: a cysteine in position 67 and a serine in position 131. The latter substitution may have functional consequences, because it occurs in a conserved region and at a position invariably occupied by a species-specific arginine in humans and lysine in mice. The availability of the complete sequence of HLA-B27 and of the partial sequence of HLA-Cw1 allows the recognition of locus-specific sequence markers, particularly, but not exclusively, in the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains.

  4. Rat pristanoyl-CoA oxidase. cDNA cloning and recognition of its C-terminal (SQL) by the peroxisomal-targeting signal 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Vanhooren, J C; Fransen, M; de Béthune, B; Baumgart, E; Baes, M; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Mannaerts, G P; Van Veldhoven, P P

    1996-07-15

    The composite pristanoyl-CoA oxidase cDNA sequence, derived from two overlapping clones from a rat liver cDNA library and a 5'-RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) PCR fragment, consisted of 2600 bases and contained an open reading frame of 2100 bases, encoding a protein of 700 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 78445 Da. This value is somewhat larger than the reported molecular mass of 70 kDa as determined earlier by SDS-gel electrophoresis. The amino acid identity with rat palmitoyl-CoA oxidase was rather low (28%) and barely higher than that with the yeast acyl-CoA oxidases (20%), suggesting that the palmitoyl-CoA oxidase/pristanoyl-CoA oxidase duplication occurred early in evolution. The carboxy-terminal tripeptide of pristanoyl-CoA oxidase was SQL. In vitro studies with the bacterially expressed human peroxisomal-targeting signal-1 import receptor indicated that SQL functions as a peroxisome-targeting signal. Northern analysis of tissues from control and clofibrate treated rats demonstrated that the pristanoyl-CoA oxidase gene is transcribed in liver and extrahepatic tissues and that transcription is not enhanced by treatment of rats with peroxisome proliferators. No mRNA could be detected by northern analysis of human tissues, suggesting that the human pristanoyl-CoA oxidase gene, if present, is only poorly or not transcribed.

  5. Stoichiometry of expressed alpha(4)beta(2)delta gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors depends on the ratio of subunit cDNA transfected.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Kelly R; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2010-05-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) is the target of many depressants, including benzodiazepines, anesthetics, and alcohol. Although the highly prevalent alphabetagamma GABA(A)R subtype mediates the majority of fast synaptic inhibition in the brain, receptors containing delta subunits also play a key role, mediating tonic inhibition and the actions of endogenous neurosteroids and alcohol. However, the fundamental properties of delta-containing GABA(A)Rs, such as subunit stoichiometry, are not well established. To determine subunit stoichiometry of expressed delta-containing GABA(A)Rs, we inserted the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site tag in the alpha(4), beta(2), and delta subunit N termini. An enhanced green fluorescent protein tag was also inserted into the beta(2) subunit to shift its molecular weight, allowing us to separate subunits using SDS-PAGE. Tagged alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs were expressed in HEK293T cells using various ratios of subunit cDNA, and receptor subunit stoichiometry was determined by quantitating fluorescent alpha-bungarotoxin bound to each subunit on Western blots of surface immunopurified tagged GABA(A)Rs. The results demonstrate that the subunit stoichiometry of alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs is regulated by the ratio of subunit cDNAs transfected. Increasing the ratio of delta subunit cDNA transfected increased delta subunit incorporation into surface receptors with a concomitant decrease in beta(2) subunit incorporation. Because receptor subunit stoichiometry can directly influence GABA(A)R pharmacological and functional properties, considering how the transfection protocols used affect subunit stoichiometry is essential when studying heterologously expressed alpha(4)beta(2)delta GABA(A)Rs. Successful bungarotoxin binding site tagging of GABA(A)R subunits is a novel tool with which to accurately quantitate subunit stoichiometry and will be useful for monitoring GABA(A)R trafficking in live cells.

  6. Liganded thyroid hormone receptor inhibits phorbol 12-O-tetradecanoate-13-acetate-induced enhancer activity via firefly luciferase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Hiroko; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Ohba, Kenji; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Shingo; Ishizuka, Keiko; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR) belongs to the nuclear hormone receptor (NHR) superfamily and regulates the transcription of its target genes in a thyroid hormone (T3)-dependent manner. While the detail of transcriptional activation by T3 (positive regulation) has been clarified, the mechanism of T3-dependent repression (negative regulation) remains to be determined. In addition to naturally occurring negative regulations typically found for the thyrotropin β gene, T3-bound TR (T3/TR) is known to cause artificial negative regulation in reporter assays with cultured cells. For example, T3/TR inhibits the transcriptional activity of the reporter plasmids harboring AP-1 site derived from pUC/pBR322-related plasmid (pUC/AP-1). Artificial negative regulation has also been suggested in the reporter assay with firefly luciferase (FFL) gene. However, identification of the DNA sequence of the FFL gene using deletion analysis was not performed because negative regulation was evaluated by measuring the enzymatic activity of FFL protein. Thus, there remains the possibility that the inhibition by T3 is mediated via a DNA sequence other than FFL cDNA, for instance, pUC/AP-1 site in plasmid backbone. To investigate the function of FFL cDNA as a transcriptional regulatory sequence, we generated pBL-FFL-CAT5 by ligating FFL cDNA in the 5' upstream region to heterologous thymidine kinase promoter in pBL-CAT5, a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT)-based reporter gene, which lacks pUC/AP-1 site. In kidney-derived CV1 and choriocarcinoma-derived JEG3 cells, pBL-FFL-CAT5, but not pBL-CAT5, was strongly activated by a protein kinase C activator, phorbol 12-O-tetradecanoate-13-acetate (TPA). TPA-induced activity of pBL-FFL-CAT5 was negatively regulated by T3/TR. Mutation of nt. 626/640 in FFL cDNA attenuated the TPA-induced activation and concomitantly abolished the T3-dependent repression. Our data demonstrate that FFL cDNA sequence mediates the TPA-induced transcriptional activity

  7. Deletion of the steroid-binding domain of the human androgen receptor gene in one family with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome: Evidence for further genetic heterogeneity in this syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.R.; Lubahn, D.B.; Wilson, E.M.; Joseph, D.R.; French, F.S.; Migeon, C.J. )

    1988-11-01

    The cloning of a cDNA for the human androgen receptor gene has resulted in the availability for cDNA probes that span various parts of the gene, including the entire steroid-binding domain and part of the DNA-binding domain, as well as part of the 5' region of the gene. The radiolabeled probes were used to screen for androgen receptor mutations on Southern blots prepared by restriction endonuclease digestion of genomic DNA from human subjects with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). In this investigation, the authors considered only patients presenting complete AIS and with the androgen receptor (-) form as the most probably subjects to show a gene deletion. One subject from each of six unrelated families with the receptor (-) form of complete AIS and 10 normal subjects were studied. In the 10 normal subjects and in 5 of the 6 patients, identical DNA restriction fragment patterns were observed with EcoRI and BamHI. Analysis of other members of this family confirmed the apparent gene deletion. The data provide direct proof that complete AIS in some families can result from a deletion of the androgen receptor structural gene. However, other families do not demonstrate such a deletion, suggesting that point mutations may also result in the receptor (-) form of complete AIS, adding further to the genetic heterogeneity of this syndrome.

  8. Functional Expression of Two Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors from cDNA Clones Identifies a Gene Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulter, Jim; Connolly, John; Deneris, Evan; Goldman, Dan; Heinemann, Steven; Patrick, Jim

    1987-11-01

    A family of genes coding for proteins homologous to the α subunit of the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor has been identified in the rat genome. These genes are transcribed in the central and peripheral nervous systems in areas known to contain functional nicotinic receptors. In this paper, we demonstrate that three of these genes, which we call alpha3, alpha4, and beta2, encode proteins that form functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Oocytes expressing either alpha3 or alpha4 protein in combination with the beta2 protein produced a strong response to acetylcholine. Oocytes expressing only the alpha4 protein gave a weak response to acetylcholine. These receptors are activated by acetylcholine and nicotine and are blocked by Bungarus toxin 3.1. They are not blocked by α -bungarotoxin, which blocks the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Thus, the receptors formed by the alpha3, alpha4, and beta2 subunits are pharmacologically similar to the ganglionic-type neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. These results indicate that the alpha3, alpha4, and beta2 genes encode functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits that are expressed in the brain and peripheral nervous system.

  9. Partial Purification and Characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A Toxin Receptor A from Heliothis virescens and Cloning of the Corresponding cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Oltean, Daniela I.; Pullikuth, Ashok K.; Lee, Hyun-Ku; Gill, Sarjeet S.

    1999-01-01

    Although extensively studied, the mechanism of action of insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins remains elusive and requires further elucidation. Toxin receptors in the brush border membrane demand particular attention as they presumably initiate the cascade of events leading to insect mortality after toxin activation. The 170-kDa Cry1Ac toxin-binding aminopeptidase from the tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens) was partially purified, and its corresponding cDNA was cloned. The cDNA encodes a protein with a putative glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchor and a polythreonine stretch clustered near the C terminus with predicted O-glycosylation. Partial purification of the 170-kDa aminopeptidase also resulted in isolation of a 130-kDa protein that was immunologically identical to the 170-kDa protein, and the two proteins had identical N termini. These proteins were glycosylated, as suggested by soybean agglutinin lectin blot results. Cry1Ac toxin affinity data for the two proteins indicated that the 130-kDa protein had a higher affinity than the 170-kDa protein. The data suggest that posttranslational modifications can have a significant effect on Cry1A toxin interactions with specific insect midgut proteins. PMID:10543783

  10. The nuclear receptor E75 from the swimming crab, Portunus trituberculatus: cDNA cloning, transcriptional analysis, and putative roles on expression of ecdysteroid-related genes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi; Zhou, Yanqi; Liu, Mingxin; Tao, Tian; Jiang, Qinghua; Zhu, Dongfa

    2016-10-01

    The nuclear receptor E75 is an early-responsive gene in 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) signaling pathway, and is found to play essential roles in many aspects of arthropods development. In this study, a cDNA encoding the E75 nuclear receptor of the swimming crab, Portunus trituberculatus was cloned using RT-PCR and RACE. The PtE75 cDNA was 3211bp in length, and encodes a protein of 795 amino acids. The DBD region of the predicted amino acid sequence for PtE75 was highly conserved with other arthropoda E75s, while its LBD region was more similar to decapod E75s. Tissue distribution analysis showed that PtE75 transcript was widespread among tissues and relatively abundant in Y-organ, epidermis, eyestalk, and muscles. PtE75 exhibited tissue-specific expression patterns in these four tissues, which may depend on the distinct action of 20E on different tissues. The expression of PtE75 in Y-organ and epidermis were induced by eyestalk ablation (ESA), indicating its responsiveness to the increasing hemolymph 20E titer. To identify potential targets for ecdysteroid control the in Y-organ, epidermis, and eyestalk, the expression change of an ecdysteroid synthesis gene PtSad in Y-organ, a chitin degradation gene PtChi1 in epidermis, and the molt-inhibiting hormone gene PtMIH in eyestalk were investigated after silencing of PtE75 mRNA. The double stranded RNA (dsRNA) of PtE75 caused a loss in PtChi and PtMIH expression, while an increase in PtSad expression. The results suggested that the ecdysteroids may act through E75, and play a stimulatory role on chitin degradation in epidermis and MIH synthesis in eyestalk, and an negative feedback effect on ecdysteroid synthesis in Y-organ.

  11. The human beta-subunit of rod photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterase: complete retinal cDNA sequence and evidence for expression in brain.

    PubMed

    Collins, C; Hutchinson, G; Kowbel, D; Riess, O; Weber, B; Hayden, M R

    1992-07-01

    We have identified and sequenced cDNA clones that encode for the human beta-subunit of rod cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB). A single 2565-bp open reading frame that codes for an 854-amino-acid protein was identified. The human beta-subunit protein is 90% identical to the bovine beta-subunit and 91% identical to the mouse protein. Northern blot analysis indicates that the gene is expressed as an abundant 3.5-kb transcript in retina and as a rare 2.9-kb transcript in brain. The isolation of cDNAs from human brain cDNA libraries confirms the brain as a site of expression for this gene. The molecular defect underlying retinal degeneration in the rd mouse has been found to be a nonsense mutation in the beta-subunit of the mouse cGMP PDE, resulting in a truncated protein (Pittler et al., 1991b, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 88: 8322-8326). The molecular cloning of the cDNA encoding for the PDEB represents the first step in establishing whether this gene plays a causative role in any one of the several human hereditary retinopathies or, based on its localization to chromosome 4p 16.3, in the pathogenesis of Huntington disease.

  12. Sequence analysis, characterization and mRNA distribution of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque, 1818) chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) cDNA.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Klesius, Phillip H

    2010-04-15

    Chemokine receptor CXCR4, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, binds selectively CXCL12. This protein plays many important roles in immunological as well as pathophysiological functions. In this study, we identified and characterized the channel catfish CXCR4 transcript. The full-length nucleic acid sequence of channel catfish CXCR4 cDNA comprised of 1994 nucleotides, including an open reading frame, which appears to encode a putative peptide of 357 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 40.1kDa. By comparison with the human counterpart, the channel catfish CXCR4 peptide can be divided into domains, including seven transmembrane domains, four cytoplasmic domains, and four extracellular domains. The CXCR4 transcript was detected in spleen, anterior kidney, liver, intestine, skin and gill of all catfish examined in this study. Because four CXCL of channel catfish have been identified, the result provides valuable information for further exploring the channel catfish chemokine signalling pathways and their roles in immune responses to infection. PMID:19853928

  13. Identification of a new P450 expressed in human lung: complete cDNA sequence, cDNA-directed expression, and chromosome mapping.

    PubMed

    Nhamburo, P T; Gonzalez, F J; McBride, O W; Gelboin, H V; Kimura, S

    1989-10-01

    A cDNA coding for a P450 expressed in human lung was isolated from a lambda gt11 library constructed from human lung mRNA using a cDNA probe to rat P450 IVA1. The cDNA-deduced amino acid sequence of this P450, designated IVB1, consisted of 511 amino acids and had a calculated molecular weight of 59,558. The IVB1 amino acid sequence bore 51%, 53%, and 52% similarities to rat IVA1, IVA2, and rabbit P450p-2, respectively. Comparison of the primary amino acid sequence of human IVB1 with rat IVA and rabbit p-2 P450 sequences revealed a region of absolute sequence identity of 17 amino acids between residues 304 and 320. However, the functional significance of this conserved sequence is unknown. Human IVB1 also appears to be related to P450 isozyme 5 that has been extensively characterized in rabbits. The IVB1 cDNA was inserted into a vaccinia virus expression vector and the enzyme expressed in human cell lines. The expressed enzyme had an absorption spectrum with a lambda max at 450 nm when reduced and complexed with carbon monoxide, typical of other cytochrome P450s. Unlike rabbit P450 isozyme 5, however, human IVB1 was unable to activate the promutagen 2-aminofluorene. Human lung microsomal P450s were also unable to metabolize this compound despite the presence of IVB1 mRNA in three out of four human lungs analyzed. In contrast to its expression in lung, IVB1 mRNA was undetectable in livers from 14 individuals, including those from which the lungs were derived. IVB1-related mRNA was also expressed in rat lung and was undetectable in untreated rat liver.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Isolation of the human anionic glutathione S-transferase cDNA and the relation of its gene expression to estrogen-receptor content in primary breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Moscow, J A; Townsend, A J; Goldsmith, M E; Whang-Peng, J; Vickers, P J; Poisson, R; Legault-Poisson, S; Myers, C E; Cowan, K H

    1988-01-01

    The development of multidrug resistance in MCF7 human breast cancer cells is associated with overexpression of P-glycoprotein, changes in activities of several detoxication enzymes, and loss of hormone sensitivity and estrogen receptors (ERs). We have cloned the cDNA for one of the drug-detoxifying enzymes overexpressed in multidrug-resistant MCF7 cells (AdrR MCF7), the anionic isozyme of glutathione S-transferase (GST pi). Hybridization with this GST pi cDNA, GST pi-1, demonstrated that increased GST pi activity in AdrR MCF7 cells is associated with overexpression but not with amplification of the gene. We mapped the GST pi gene to human chromosome 11q13 by in situ hybridization. Since multidrug resistance and GST pi overexpression are associated with the loss of ERs in AdrR MCF7 cells, we examined several other breast cancer cell lines that were not selected for drug resistance. In each of these cell lines we found an inverse association between GST pi expression and ER content. We also examined RNA from 21 primary breast cancers and found a similar association between GST pi expression and ER content in vivo. GST pi mRNA content in 11 ER-positive tumors (less than or equal to 10 fmol/mg of protein) was significantly different from the GST pi content of 10 ER-negative tumors (P = 0.002; Mann-Whitney Wilcoxon test for two independent samples). The finding of similar patterns of expression of a drug-detoxifying enzyme and of ERs in vitro as well as in vivo suggests that ER-negative breast cancer cells may have greater protection against antineoplastic agents conferred by GST pi than ER-positive tumors. Images PMID:2842775

  15. Complete genome sequence and construction of infectious full-length cDNA clones of tobacco ringspot Nepovirus, a viral pathogen causing bud blight in soybean.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fumei; Hwang, Un Sun; Lim, Seungmo; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Lee, Su-Heon; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Moon, Jae Sun

    2015-08-01

    Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV, genus Nepovirus), causes severe diseases in soybean and tobacco plants. TRSV-induced bud blight disease significantly reduced both the yield and quality of soybeans. The function of the encoded viral gene product involved in TRSV infection was unclear due to the limitation of reverse genetics studies on the viral genome. Here, we represent the successful construction of infectious full-length cDNA clones of TRSV genome (RNA1 and RNA2). The cDNAs of TRSV RNA1 and RNA2 were cloned into the binary vector pPZP211 immediately downstream of a double cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and upstream of the nopaline synthase terminator. Seven days after agrobacterium-mediated co-inoculation of these two constructs, Nicotiana benthamiana plants developed a systemic infection with necrotic ringspot symptoms and weak stunting of the leaves, similar to that induced by natural TRSV. The systemic infection was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Western blot analysis. Simultaneously, soybean, tomato, and Arabidopsis ecotype Estland were mechanically inoculated with sap prepared from TRSV-agroinfiltrated N. benthamiana leaves, showing typical symptoms of bud blight, necrotic spots, and lethal systemic necrosis, respectively. The system developed herein will be an appealing way to determine TRSV viral gene functions and study host-TRSV interactions. PMID:26159876

  16. A cosmid and yeast artificial chromosome contig containing the complete ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Rouquier, S.; Giorgi, D.; Trask, B.; Bergmann, A.; De Jong, P. ); Phillips, M.S.; MacLennan, D.H. )

    1993-08-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene is responsible for some forms of malignant hyperthermia and has been localized to 19q13.1. Central core disease is a genetic myopathy that is genetically linked to RYR1. The authors have identified an overlapping set of cosmid and YAC clones that spans more than 800 kb and includes the RYR1 gene ([approximately]205 kb). Cosmids from this region were identified by screening three chromosome 19 cosmid libraries (11-fold coverage) with six subclones representing the entire RYR1 cDNA. Genomic sequences from positive cosmids were then used as probes to identify additional cosmids. A minimally overlapping set of 23 cosmids was assembled into two contigs on the basis of restriction fragment analysis and hybridization data. Three YAC clones were isolated by screening a human YAC library with selected cosmid inserts. Overlaps among these YACs and the cosmid contigs were determined by hybridizing YAC Alu-PCR products to cosmid DNAs. The YACs bridged the gap between the cosmid contigs and extended the contig on both sides. Fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments positioned the RYR1 contig between GPI, MAG, and D19S191 on the proximal side and D19S190, CYP2A, CYP2F, SNRPA, BCKDHA, and other markers on the distal side. The 800-kb contig of cloned reagents will facilitate the detailed characterization of the RYR1 gene and other loci that may be closely related to central core disease. 62 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in a child with complete Interferon-γ Receptor 1 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Olbrich, Peter; Martínez-Saavedra, Maria Teresa; Hurtado, José Maria Perez; Sanchez, Cristina; Sanchez, Berta; Deswarte, Carolina; Obando, Ignacio; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Speckmann, Carsten; Bustamante, Jacinta; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Neth, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive (AR) complete Interferon-γ Receptor1 (IFN-γR1) deficiency is a rare variant of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD). Whilst hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains the only curative treatment, outcomes are heterogeneous; delayed engraftment and/or graft rejection being commonly observed. This case report and literature review expands the knowledge about this rare but potentially fatal pathology, providing details regarding diagnosis, antimicrobial treatment, transplant performance and outcome that may help to guide physicians caring for patients with AR complete IFN-γR1 or IFN-γR2 deficiency. PMID:26173802

  18. Interleukin-1 stimulates the expression of type I and type II interleukin-1 receptors in the rat insulinoma cell line Rinm5F; sequencing a rat type II interleukin-1 receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Bristulf, J; Gatti, S; Malinowsky, D; Bjork, L; Sundgren, A K; Bartfai, T

    1994-01-01

    The insulin secreting rat Rinm5F cells are often used to study the cytotoxic actions of interleukin-1 (IL-1) on pancreatic beta-cells. We demonstrate here that Rinm5F insulinoma cells express both type I and type II interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) mRNAs and gene products. IL-1R agonists, recombinant murine IL-1 alpha (rmIL-1 alpha, 10 ng/ml) and recombinant rat IL-1 beta (rrIL-1 beta, 100 pg/ml or 10 ng/ml) induce the upregulation of mRNA expression for both types of IL-1 receptors (IL-1Rs). This effect of rrIL-1 beta is antagonised by preincubation with recombinant human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist protein (rhIL-1ra, 5 micrograms/ml). Furthermore, this rrIL-1 beta induced upregulation of IL-1R mRNAs is blocked by actinomycin D (7.5 micrograms/ml), whereas cycloheximide (20 micrograms/ml) has no effect. The phorbol ester PMA (20 nM) upregulates the expression of mRNAs both IL-1 receptors, whereas glucose (50 mM) upregulates the expression of the type I IL-1R mRNA only. Pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml) partially blocks the rrIL-1 beta induced expression of mRNA for the type I and, to a lesser extent, the type II IL-1R. Incubation of the cells with rrIL-1 beta also induces a time-dependent expression of c-fos, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNAs. Binding studies with 125I-recombinant human IL-1 beta (125I-rhIL-1 beta) indicate that IL-1R gene products, with the ligand binding characteristics of the type I IL-1R, are constitutively present on Rinm5F cells. Treatment with rrIL-1 beta (6h) increases the number of 125I-rhIL-1 beta binding sites on Rinm5F cells. We have also demonstrated that the number of type II IL-1R binding sites increases after induction with rrIL-1 beta (6h), by indirect immunofluorescence using a monoclonal antibody (ALVA 42) raised against the human type II IL-1R. Furthermore, we have sequenced the type II IL-1R cDNA in the rat insulinoma Rinm5F cells. The comparison of the amino acid

  19. T−B+NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency caused by complete deficiency of the CD3ζ subunit of the T-cell antigen receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Lauritsen, Jens Peter H.; Cooney, Myriah; Parrott, Roberta E.; Sajaroff, Elisa O.; Win, Chan M.; Keller, Michael D.; Carpenter, Jeffery H.; Carabana, Juan; Krangel, Michael S.; Sarzotti, Marcella; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Wiest, David L.; Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2007-01-01

    CD3ζ is a subunit of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) complex required for its assembly and surface expression that also plays an important role in TCR-mediated signal transduction. We report here a patient with T−B+NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) who was homozygous for a single C insertion following nucleotide 411 in exon 7 of the CD3ζ gene. The few T cells present contained no detectable CD3ζ protein, expressed low levels of cell surface CD3ε, and were nonfunctional. CD4+CD8−CD3εlow, CD4−CD8+CD3εlow, and CD4−CD8−CD3εlow cells were detected in the periphery, and the patient also exhibited an unusual population of CD56−CD16+ NK cells with diminished cytolytic activity. Additional studies demonstrated that retrovirally transduced patient mutant CD3ζ cDNA failed to rescue assembly of nascent complete TCR complexes or surface TCR expression in CD3ζ-deficient MA5.8 murine T-cell hybridoma cells. Nascent transduced mutant CD3ζ protein was also not detected in metabolically labeled MA5.8 cells, suggesting that it was unstable and rapidly degraded. Taken together, these findings provide the first demonstration that complete CD3ζ deficiency in humans can cause SCID by preventing normal TCR assembly and surface expression. PMID:17170122

  20. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein/Apolipoprotein E receptor and assignment of the gene to chromosome 9pter-p23[sup 6

    SciTech Connect

    Gafvels, M.E.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Caird, M.; Patterson, D. ); Britt, D.; Jackson, C.L. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors report the cloning of a 3656-bp cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)/apolipoprotein E (ApoE) receptor. The gene encoding this protein was mapped to chromosome 9pter-p23. Northern analysis of human RNA identified cognate mRNAs of 6.0 and 3.8 kb with most abundant expression in heart and skeletal muscle, followed by kidney, placenta, pancreas, and brain. The pattern of expression generally paralleled that of lipoprotein lipase mRNA but differed from that of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/[alpha][sub 2]-macroglobulin receptor (LRP), which are members of the same gene family. VLDL/ApoE receptor message was not detected in liver, whereas mRNAs for both LDL receptor and LRP were found in hepatic tissue. In mouse 3T3-L1 cells, VLDL/ApoE receptor mRNA was induced during the transformation of the cells into adipocytes. Expression was also detected in human choriocarcinoma cells, suggesting that at least part of the expression observed in placenta may be in trophoblasts, cells which would be exposed to maternal blood. Expression in brain may be related to high levels of ApoE expression in that organ, an observation of potential relevance to the recently hypothesized role for ApoE in late onset Alzheimer disease. The results suggest that the putative VLDL/ApoE receptor could play a role in the uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles by specific organs including striated and cardiac muscle and adipose tissue and in the transport of maternal lipids across the placenta. The findings presented here, together with recent observations from other laboratories, bring up the possibility that a single gene, the VLDL/ApoE receptor, may play a role in the pathogenesis of certain forms of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and obesity.

  1. Mechanisms and concepts paving the way towards a complete transport cycle of plant vacuolar sorting receptors.

    PubMed

    De Marcos Lousa, Carine; Gershlick, David C; Denecke, Jurgen

    2012-05-01

    Delivery of proteins to the lytic vacuole in plants is a complex cascade of selective interactions that specifically excludes residents of the endoplasmic reticulum and secreted proteins. Vacuolar transport must be highly efficient to avoid mistargeting of hydrolytic enzymes to locations where they could be harmful. While plant vacuolar sorting signals have been well described for two decades, it is only during the last 5 years that a critical mass of data was gathered that begins to reveal how vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) may complete a full transport cycle. Yet, the field is far from reaching a consensus regarding the organelles that could be involved in vacuolar sorting, their potential biogenesis, and the ultimate recycling of membranes and protein machinery that maintain this pathway. This review will highlight the important landmarks in our understanding of VSR function and compare recent transport models that have been proposed so that an emerging picture of plant vacuolar sorting mechanisms can be drawn. PMID:22570446

  2. Neuronal Deletion of Ghrelin Receptor Almost Completely Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Han; Lin, Ligen; Xu, Pingwen; Saito, Kenji; Wei, Qiong; Meadows, Adelina G; Bongmba, Odelia Y N; Pradhan, Geetali; Zheng, Hui; Xu, Yong; Sun, Yuxiang

    2016-08-01

    Ghrelin signaling has major effects on energy and glucose homeostasis, but it is unknown whether ghrelin's functions are centrally and/or peripherally mediated. The ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), is highly expressed in the brain and detectable in some peripheral tissues. To understand the roles of neuronal GHS-R, we generated a mouse line where Ghsr gene is deleted in all neurons using synapsin 1 (Syn1)-Cre driver. Our data showed that neuronal Ghsr deletion abolishes ghrelin-induced spontaneous food intake but has no effect on total energy intake. Remarkably, neuronal Ghsr deletion almost completely prevented diet-induced obesity (DIO) and significantly improved insulin sensitivity. The neuronal Ghsr-deleted mice also showed improved metabolic flexibility, indicative of better adaption to different fuels. In addition, gene expression analysis suggested that hypothalamus and/or midbrain might be the sites that mediate the effects of GHS-R in thermogenesis and physical activity, respectively. Collectively, our results indicate that neuronal GHS-R is a crucial regulator of energy metabolism and a key mediator of DIO. Neuronal Ghsr deletion protects against DIO by regulating energy expenditure, not by energy intake. These novel findings suggest that suppressing central ghrelin signaling may serve as a unique antiobesity strategy. PMID:27207529

  3. Distinct effects of loss of classical estrogen receptor signaling versus complete deletion of estrogen receptor alpha on bone

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Farhan A.; Fraser, Daniel G.; Monroe, David G.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)α is a major regulator of bone metabolism which can modulate gene expression via a “classical” pathway involving direct DNA binding to estrogen-response elements (EREs) or via “non-classical” pathways involving protein-protein interactions. While the skeletal consequences of loss of ERE binding by ERα have been described, a significant unresolved question is how loss of ERE binding differs from complete loss of ERα. Thus, we compared the skeletal phenotype of wild-type (ERα+/+) and ERα knock out (ERα−/−) mice with that of mice in which the only ERα present had a knock-in mutation abolishing ERE binding (non-classical ERα knock-in [NERKI], ERα−/NERKI). All three groups were in the same genetic background (C57BL/6). As compared to both ERα+/+ and ERα−/− mice, ERα−/NERKI mice had significantly reduced cortical volumetric bone mineral density and thickness at the tibial diaphysis; this was accompanied by significant decreases in periosteal and endocortical mineral apposition rates. Colony forming unit (CFU)-fibroblast, CFU-alkaline phosphatase, and CFU-osteoblast numbers were all increased in ERα−/− compared to ERα+/+ mice, but reduced in ERα−/NERKI mice compared to the two other groups. Thus, using mice in identical genetic backgrounds, our data indicate that the presence of an ERα that cannot bind DNA but can function through protein-protein interactions may have more deleterious skeletal effects than complete loss of ERα. These findings suggest that shifting the balance of classical versus non-classical ERα signaling triggers pathways that impair bone formation. Further studies defining these pathways may lead to novel approaches to selectively modulate ER signaling for beneficial skeletal effects. PMID:21458604

  4. Human RON receptor tyrosine kinase induces complete epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition but causes cellular senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, Marceline; Miller, A. Dusty; Liu, Shan-Lu . E-mail: shan-lu.liu@mcgill.ca

    2007-08-17

    The RON receptor tyrosine kinase is a member of the MET proto-oncogene family and is important for cell proliferation, differentiation, and cancer development. Here, we created a series of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell clones that express different levels of RON, and have investigated their biological properties. While low levels of RON correlated with little morphological change in MDCK cells, high levels of RON expression constitutively led to morphological scattering or complete and stabilized epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Unexpectedly, MDCK clones expressing higher levels of RON exhibited retarded proliferation and senescence, despite increased motility and invasiveness. RON was constitutively tyrosine-phosphorylated in MDCK cells expressing high levels of RON and undergoing EMT, and the MAPK signaling pathway was activated. This study reveals for the first time that RON alone is sufficient to induce complete and stabilized EMT in MDCK cells, and overexpression of RON does not cause cell transformation but rather induces cell cycle arrest and senescence, leading to impaired cell proliferation.

  5. Molecular cloning, cDNA analysis, and localization of a monomer of the N-acetylglucosamine-specific receptor of the thyroid, NAGR1, to chromosome 19p13. 3-13. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Blanck, O.; Perrin, C.; Mziaut, H.; Miquelis, R. ); Darbon, H. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1994-05-01

    The authors have proposed that the GlcNAc thyroid receptor triggers selective recycling of immature GlcNAc-bearing thyroglobulin molecules through the Golgi back to the apical membrane for further processing until maturation is achieved. This process, which is called [open quotes]receptor-mediated exocytosis,[close quotes] prevents lysosomal degradation of thyroid prohormones. In the present study, the authors report cloning of the cDNA encoding the (or one of the) monomer(s) constituting the human GlcNAc thyroid receptor. This novel gene, called NAGR1, was assigned by in situ hybridization to subbands p13.3-p13.2 of chromosome 19. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA encoding NAGR1 was present as a single transcript of 2.1 kb in the thyroid, but not in the heart, brain, placenta, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney, and pancreas. The deduced amino acid sequence comprised a 51-kDa type I membrane protein with a single spanning region and a short intracytoplasmic domain. Sequence analysis showed that NAGR1 is a glycine-, tryptophan-, and methionine-rich protein with no cysteine residues or glycosylation site. No sequence homology with any known cDNA or protein was noted. The extracellular domain is composed of 420 amino acids and contains a region of 204 residues showing 15 repeats of 4 amino acids, each 1 having an acidic amino acid presumably involved in calcium coordination. The intracellular domain contained what appeared to be a tyrosine internalization signal. The usefulness of this clone in glycobiology, cell biology, and thyroid pathology studies is discussed. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Sequence analysis, characterization and mRNA distribution of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque, 1818) chemokine (C-X-C Motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemokine receptor CXCR4, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, binds selectively CXCL12. This protein plays many important roles in immunological as well as pathophysiological functions. In this study, we identified and characterized the channel catfish CXCR4 transcript. The fu...

  7. Origin of metazoan adhesion molecules and adhesion receptors as deduced from cDNA analyses in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium: a review.

    PubMed

    Müller, W E

    1997-09-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the kingdom Animalia (Metazoa) have long been questioned. Whether the lowest eukaryotic multicellular organisms, the metazoan phylum Porifera (sponges), independently evolved multicellularity from a separate protist lineage (polyphyly of animals) or whether they were derived from the same protist group as the other animal phyla (monophyly) remains unclear. Analyses of the genes that are typical for multicellularity, e.g. those coding for adhesion molecules (galectin) and adhesion receptors (receptor tyrosine kinase, integrin receptor, receptors featuring scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains) or elements involved in signal transduction pathways (G-proteins, Ser/Thr protein kinases), especially from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium, indicate that all animals, including sponges, are of monophyletic origin. PMID:9232818

  8. Mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene in two Chinese families with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SONG; XU, HAIKUN; AN, WEI; ZHU, DECHUN; LI, DEJUN

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for normal male sex differentiation and are responsible for the normal development of male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. The physiological effects of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Mutations in the AR gene are the most common cause of androgen insensitivity syndrome. The present study undertook a genetic analysis of the AR gene in two unrelated families affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) in China. In family 1, a previously reported nonsense mutation (G-to-A; p.W751X) was identified in exon 5 of the AR gene. In addition, a novel missense mutation was detected in exon 6 of the AR gene from family 2; this mutation resulted in a predicted amino acid change from phenylalanine to serine at codon 804 (T-to-C; p.F804S) in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR. Computer simulation of the structural changes generated by the p.F804S substitution revealed marked conformational alterations in the hydrophobic core responsible for the stability and function of the AR-LBD. In conclusion, the present study identified two mutations from two unrelated Chinese families affected by CAIS. The novel mutation (p.F804S) may provide insights into the molecular mechanism underlying CAIS. Furthermore, it expands on the number of mutational hot spots in the international AR mutation database, which may be useful in the future for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:27284311

  9. cDNA cloning, molecular characterization, and chromosomal localization of NET(EPHT2), a human EPH-related receptor protein-tyrosine kinase gene preferentially expressed in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X.X.; Yoshioka, A.; Pleasure, D.E.

    1995-09-20

    By screening a human fetal brain cDNA expression library using a monoclonal anti-phosphotyrosine antibody , we have isolated a cDNA clone encoding a receptor type protein-tyrosine kinase belonging to the EPH family, NET (neuronally expressed EPH-related tyrosine kinase). NET shows 87% homology in nucleotide sequence and 99% homology in the deduced amino acid sequence to rat elk, suggesting that NET is the human homologue of elk. The NET gene is mapped to human chromosome 3q21-q23 by PCR screening of a human rodent somatic cell hybrid panel and by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Examination of NET mRNA expression in several human tissues has shown that the NET gene is expressed preferentially in brain as a 5-kb transcript. Steady-state levels of NET mRNA in human brain are greater in the midterm fetus than in the adult. Lower levels of NET mRNA are found in fetal kidney and adult skeletal muscle. The expression pattern of NET mRNA thus differs from that of elk, suggesting that these two gene products may preform distinct roles in human and rat. NET transcripts are detected in human acid-induced neuronal differentiation. Several human tumor cell lines derived from neuroectoderm including primitive neuroblastoma also express NET transcripts. Since the NET mRNA expression in human brain is developmentally regulated and is induced during neuronal differentiation, NET potentially plays important roles in human neurogenesis. 89 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Pharmacological Intervention of Hippocampal CA3 NMDA Receptors Impairs Acquisition and Long-Term Memory Retrieval of Spatial Pattern Completion Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fellini, Laetitia; Florian, Cedrick; Courtey, Julie; Roullet, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Pattern completion is the ability to retrieve complete information on the basis of incomplete retrieval cues. Although it has been demonstrated that this cognitive capacity depends on the NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) of the hippocampal CA3 region, the role played by these glutamatergic receptors in the pattern completion process has not yet been…

  11. Neuronal deletion of ghrelin receptor almost completely prevents diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin signaling has major effects on energy- and glucose-homeostasis, but it is unknown whether ghrelin's functions are centrally and/or peripherally mediated. The ghrelin receptor, Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor (GHS-R), is highly expressed in brain and detectable in some peripheral tissues...

  12. Targeted disruption of a single sex pheromone receptor gene completely abolishes in vivo pheromone response in the silkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Mikami, Akihisa; Uchino, Keiro; Tabuchi, Masashi; Zhang, Feng; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2015-01-01

    Male moths use species-specific sex pheromones to identify and orientate toward conspecific females. Odorant receptors (ORs) for sex pheromone substances have been identified as sex pheromone receptors in various moth species. However, direct in vivo evidence linking the functional role of these ORs with behavioural responses is lacking. In the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, female moths emit two sex pheromone components, bombykol and bombykal, but only bombykol elicits sexual behaviour in male moths. A sex pheromone receptor BmOR1 is specifically tuned to bombykol and is expressed in specialized olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the pheromone sensitive long sensilla trichodea of male silkmoth antennae. Here, we show that disruption of the BmOR1 gene, mediated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), completely removes ORN sensitivity to bombykol and corresponding pheromone-source searching behaviour in male moths. Furthermore, transgenic rescue of BmOR1 restored normal behavioural responses to bombykol. Our results demonstrate that BmOR1 is required for the physiological and behavioural response to bombykol, demonstrating that it is the receptor that mediates sex pheromone responses in male silkmoths. This study provides the first direct evidence that a member of the sex pheromone receptor family in moth species mediates conspecific sex pheromone information for sexual behaviour. PMID:26047360

  13. Androgen receptors in the bonnethead, Sphyrna tiburo: cDNA cloning and tissue-specific expression in the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Tyminski, John P; Gelsleichter, James J; Motta, Philip J

    2015-12-01

    As demonstrated in past studies, androgens appear to play critical roles in regulating reproduction in male sharks. However, little is known about the cell-specific actions of androgens in these fishes. To address this, this study examined androgen targets in reproductive organs of a seasonally reproducing shark, the bonnethead (Sphyrna tiburo). A partial bonnethead AR cDNA clone was isolated and found to exhibit strong homology with known vertebrate ARs. Using RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, AR was found to be expressed in multiple cell types in the male bonnethead testis (premeiotic germ cells, Leydig-like interstitial cells, Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cells, and mature spermatozoa) and gonadal ducts (stromal cells, luminal epithelial cells, mature spermatozoa). Furthermore, AR expression in these organs was found to vary temporally in relation to the seasonal reproductive cycle. Based on immunocytochemistry, the presence of AR protein in male bonnethead reproductive organs was largely consistent with patterns of AR gene expression with the single exception of mature spermatozoa, which exhibited consistently strong mRNA expression but only inconsistent and weak AR protein immunoreactivity. These results suggest important roles for androgens in regulating germ cell proliferation, hormone production, spermatid elongation, spermiation, and gonadal duct function in male bonnetheads. In addition, high abundance of AR mRNA in bonnethead spermatozoa suggest the potential for de novo protein synthesis following spermiation/copulation and/or a role for AR mRNA in early embryonic development, both of which have been proposed to explain the occurrence of mRNA transcripts in spermatozoa from various vertebrates.

  14. Androgen receptors in the bonnethead, Sphyrna tiburo: cDNA cloning and tissue-specific expression in the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Tyminski, John P; Gelsleichter, James J; Motta, Philip J

    2015-12-01

    As demonstrated in past studies, androgens appear to play critical roles in regulating reproduction in male sharks. However, little is known about the cell-specific actions of androgens in these fishes. To address this, this study examined androgen targets in reproductive organs of a seasonally reproducing shark, the bonnethead (Sphyrna tiburo). A partial bonnethead AR cDNA clone was isolated and found to exhibit strong homology with known vertebrate ARs. Using RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, AR was found to be expressed in multiple cell types in the male bonnethead testis (premeiotic germ cells, Leydig-like interstitial cells, Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cells, and mature spermatozoa) and gonadal ducts (stromal cells, luminal epithelial cells, mature spermatozoa). Furthermore, AR expression in these organs was found to vary temporally in relation to the seasonal reproductive cycle. Based on immunocytochemistry, the presence of AR protein in male bonnethead reproductive organs was largely consistent with patterns of AR gene expression with the single exception of mature spermatozoa, which exhibited consistently strong mRNA expression but only inconsistent and weak AR protein immunoreactivity. These results suggest important roles for androgens in regulating germ cell proliferation, hormone production, spermatid elongation, spermiation, and gonadal duct function in male bonnetheads. In addition, high abundance of AR mRNA in bonnethead spermatozoa suggest the potential for de novo protein synthesis following spermiation/copulation and/or a role for AR mRNA in early embryonic development, both of which have been proposed to explain the occurrence of mRNA transcripts in spermatozoa from various vertebrates. PMID:26320857

  15. Soluble leptin receptor in serum of subjects with complete resistance to leptin: relation to fat mass.

    PubMed

    Lahlou, N; Clement, K; Carel, J C; Vaisse, C; Lotton, C; Le Bihan, Y; Basdevant, A; Lebouc, Y; Froguel, P; Roger, M; Guy-Grand, B

    2000-08-01

    Leptin resistance and obesity have been related to mutations of the leptin receptor gene in rodents and, recently, in a consanguineous family. The latter mutation results in a receptor lacking transmembrane and intracellular domains. Homozygous and heterozygous individuals with this mutation had serum leptin levels higher than expected, given their BMIs: 600, 670, and 526 ng/ml and 145, 362, 294, 240, and 212 ng/ml, respectively. Their serum leptin was fractionated by gel filtration: >80% was present as a high-molecular size complex vs. 7.5% in the nonmutated sister. Western blot analysis showed a band at 146 kDa reacting specifically with an antibody directed against the leptin receptor ectodomain. In 10 obese control subjects, as in the mutated patients, free leptin levels correlated with BMI (r = 0.70, P = 0.0011) and reflected fat mass, regardless of leptin receptor functioning. In the patients, bound leptin levels correlated with BMI (r = 0.99, P = 0.0002) and were related to the number of mutated alleles. These data demonstrate that the truncated receptor is secreted into blood and binds the majority of serum leptin, markedly increasing bound and total leptin. Free serum leptin was similarly correlated with BMI in the mutated and nonmutated obese individuals, providing evidence that the relationship between BMI and circulating free leptin is preserved in this family. This finding suggests that the leptin receptor itself may not be specifically involved in the control of leptin secretion, and it supports the concept of relative resistance to leptin in common obesity. PMID:10923636

  16. Serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A) of the sea lamprey: cDNA cloning and expression in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cornide-Petronio, María Eugenia; Anadón, Ramón; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2013-09-01

    Serotonergic cells are among the earliest neurons to be born in the developing central nervous system and serotonin is known to regulate the development of the nervous system. One of the major targets of the activity of serotonergic cells is the serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A), an ancestral archetypical serotonin receptor. In this study, we cloned and characterized the 3D structure of the sea lamprey 5-HT1A, and studied the expression of its transcript in the central nervous system by means of in situ hybridization. In phylogenetic analyses, the sea lamprey 5-HT1A sequence clustered together with 5-HT1A sequences of vertebrates and emerged as an outgroup to all gnathostome sequences. In situ hybridization analysis during prolarval, larval and adult stages showed a widespread expression of the lamprey 5-ht1a transcript. In P1 prolarvae 5-ht1a mRNA expression was observed in diencephalic nuclei, the rhombencephalon and rostral spinal cord. At P2 prolarval stage the 5-ht1a expression extended to other brain areas including telencephalic regions. 5-ht1a expression in larvae was observed throughout almost all the main brain regions with the strongest expression in the olfactory bulbs, lateral pallium, striatum, preoptic region, habenula, prethalamus, thalamus, pretectum, hypothalamus, rhombencephalic reticular area, dorsal column nucleus and rostral spinal cord. In adults, the 5-ht1a transcript was also observed in cells of the subcommissural organ. Comparison of the expression of 5-ht1a between the sea lamprey and other vertebrates reveals a conserved pattern in most of the brain regions, likely reflecting the ancestral vertebrate condition.

  17. Serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A) of the sea lamprey: cDNA cloning and expression in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cornide-Petronio, María Eugenia; Anadón, Ramón; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2013-09-01

    Serotonergic cells are among the earliest neurons to be born in the developing central nervous system and serotonin is known to regulate the development of the nervous system. One of the major targets of the activity of serotonergic cells is the serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A), an ancestral archetypical serotonin receptor. In this study, we cloned and characterized the 3D structure of the sea lamprey 5-HT1A, and studied the expression of its transcript in the central nervous system by means of in situ hybridization. In phylogenetic analyses, the sea lamprey 5-HT1A sequence clustered together with 5-HT1A sequences of vertebrates and emerged as an outgroup to all gnathostome sequences. In situ hybridization analysis during prolarval, larval and adult stages showed a widespread expression of the lamprey 5-ht1a transcript. In P1 prolarvae 5-ht1a mRNA expression was observed in diencephalic nuclei, the rhombencephalon and rostral spinal cord. At P2 prolarval stage the 5-ht1a expression extended to other brain areas including telencephalic regions. 5-ht1a expression in larvae was observed throughout almost all the main brain regions with the strongest expression in the olfactory bulbs, lateral pallium, striatum, preoptic region, habenula, prethalamus, thalamus, pretectum, hypothalamus, rhombencephalic reticular area, dorsal column nucleus and rostral spinal cord. In adults, the 5-ht1a transcript was also observed in cells of the subcommissural organ. Comparison of the expression of 5-ht1a between the sea lamprey and other vertebrates reveals a conserved pattern in most of the brain regions, likely reflecting the ancestral vertebrate condition. PMID:23052550

  18. Specific amplification of cDNA ends (SPACE): a new tool for the analysis of rare transcripts and its application for the promoter analysis of killer cell receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Radeloff, Britta; Nagler, Lydia; Zirra, Maja; Ziegler, Andreas; Volz, Armin

    2005-02-01

    The expression control of activating and inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR) on natural killer (NK) cells is highly relevant for the initiation of NK cell mediated cytolysis and cytokine secretion. Transcription start points of nine human KIR genes from two Caucasian donors and the NK cell line NK3.3 were investigated. To overcome sensitivity problems due to the low abundance of the respective transcripts, a novel protocol, specific amplification of cDNA ends (SPACE) with superior specificity and sensitivity was applied. A total of 235 individual SPACE clones resulting from different KIR genes were analysed and revealed a series of transcription start sites tightly clustered between 10 and 60 bp upstream of the start codon. The comparison of the adjacent putative promoter region of the human, chimpanzee and macaque KIR genes revealed a very high conservation for almost all of the KIR family members. An inter-gene and inter-species comparative approach revealed transcription factor binding sites at regions of maximal homology for all primate KIR genes analysed.

  19. Cloning of a parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) cDNA from a rat osteosarcoma (UMR 106) cell line: Chromosomal assignment of the gene in the human, mouse, and rat genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Pausova, Z.; Bourdon, J.; Clayton, D.; Janicic, N.; Goltzman, D.; Hendy, G.N. ); Mattei, M.G. ); Seldin, M.F. ); Riviere, M.; Szpirer, J. )

    1994-03-01

    Complementary DNAs spanning the entire coding region of the rat parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) were isolated from a rat osteosarcoma (UMR 106) cell-line cDNA library. The longest of these clones (rPTHrec4) was used to chromosomally assign the PTHR gene in the human, rat, and mouse genomes. By somatic cell hybrid analysis, the gene was localized to human chromosome 3 and rat chromosome 8; by in situ hybridization, the gene was mapped to human chromosome 3p21.1-p22 and to mouse chromosome 9 band F; and by interspecific backcross analysis, the Pthr gene segregated with the transferrin (Trf) gene in chromosome 9 band F. Mouse chromosome 9 and rat chromosome 8 are known to be highly homologous and to also show synteny conservation with human chromosome 3. These three chromosomes share the transferrin gene (TF), the myosin light polypeptide 3 gene (MYL3), and the acelpeptide hydrolase gene (APEH). These results add a fourth gene, the PTHR gene, to the synteny group conserved in these chromosomes. 34 refs., 7 figs. 1 tab.

  20. Comparative mapping on the mouse and human X chromosomes of a human cDNA clone encoding the vasopressin renal-type receptor (AVP2R)

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, C.J.; Gonzales, J.C.; Seibold, A.; Birnbaumer, M.; Herman, G.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Mutation in the gene for the human renal-type vasopressin receptor (V2R) have recently been identified in patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Both V2R and NDI have been independently mapped to Xq28. Using a combination of genetic and physical mapping, we have localized the murine V2r locus to within 100 kb of L1Cam on the mouse X chromosome in a region syntenic with human Xq28. Based on conserved gene order of mouse and human loci in this region, physical mapping using DNA derived form human lymphoblasts has established that the corresponding human loci V2R and L1CAM are linked within 210 kb. The efficiency and precision of genetic mapping of V2r and other loci in the mouse suggest that it might be easier to map additional human genes in the mouse first and infer the corresponding human location. More precise physical mapping in man could then be performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and/or yeast artificial chromosomes. 16 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  1. Complete structure of the cell surface polysaccharide of Streptococcus oralis ATCC 10557: A receptor for lectin-mediated interbacterial adherence

    SciTech Connect

    Abeygunawardana, C.; Bush, C.A. ); Cisar, J.O. )

    1991-07-02

    Lectin-carbohydrate binding is known to play an important role in a number of different cell-cell interactions including those between certain species of oral streptococci and actinomyces that colonize teeth. The cell wall polysaccharides of Streptococcus oralis ATCC 10557, S. oralis 34, and Streptococcus mitis J22, although not identical antigenically, each function as a receptor molecule for the galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine reactive fimbrial lectins of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii. Carbohydrate analysis of the receptor polysaccharide isolated from S. oralis ATCC 10557 shows galactose (3 mol), glucose (1 mol), GalNAc (1 mol), and rhamnose (1 mol). {sup 1}H NMR spectra of the polysaccharide show that is partially O-acetylated. Analysis of the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the de-O-acetylated polysaccharide shows that it is composed of repeating subunits containing six monosaccharides and that the subunits are joined by a phosphodiester linkage. The {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra were completely assigned by two-dimensional homonuclear correlation methods and by {sup 1}H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum correlation ({sup 1}H({sup 13}C)HMQC). The complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C assignment of the native polysaccharide was carried out by the same techniques augmented by a {sup 13}C-coupled hybrid HMQC-COSY method, which is shown to be especially useful for carbohydrates in which strong coupling and overlapping peaks in the {sup 1}H spectrum pose difficulties.

  2. The H1 histamine receptor blocker, chlorpheniramine, completely prevents the increase in REM sleep induced by immobilization stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Zamorano, J A; Esqueda-Leon, E; Jimenez-Anguiano, A; Cintra-McGlone, L; Mendoza Melendez, M A; Velazquez Moctezuma, J

    2009-01-01

    Chlorpheniramine is a selective antagonist of the H1 histaminergic receptor subtype and its effects in humans include somnolence. Chlorpheniramine affects sleep in rats, mainly by decreasing REM sleep. On the other hand, stress by immobilization induces an important increase in the percentage of REM sleep. In this study we analyzed the effects of blocking histaminergic receptors on REM sleep induced by immobilization stress. Adult male Wistar rats were chronically implanted for sleep recording. Immobilization stress was induced by placing the rat in a small cylinder for 2 h. Experimental conditions were: A. Control; B. Stress; C. Stress plus vehicle and D. Stress plus chlorpheniramine. Independent experiments were done both in the dark, as well as the light period. Results showed that the increase in REM sleep observed after immobilization stress was completely abolished by chlorpheniramine, both in the dark and in the light phase. Furthermore, the decrease in REM sleep was significant even when compared to the non-stressed control rats. REM sleep latency was also significantly longer during both light phases. The present results suggest that REM sleep is quite sensitive to histaminergic blockage. It is possible that chlorpheniramine is also blocking the cholinergic mechanisms generating REM sleep.

  3. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1997-06-10

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  4. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  5. Crystal structure of a complete ternary complex of T-cell receptor, peptide-MHC, and CD4

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yiyuan; Wang, Xin Xiang; Mariuzza, Roy A

    2012-07-11

    Adaptive immunity depends on specific recognition by a T-cell receptor (TCR) of an antigenic peptide bound to a major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecule on an antigen-presenting cell (APC). In addition, T-cell activation generally requires binding of this same pMHC to a CD4 or CD8 coreceptor. Here, we report the structure of a complete TCR-pMHC-CD4 ternary complex involving a human autoimmune TCR, a myelin-derived self-peptide bound to HLA-DR4, and CD4. The complex resembles a pointed arch in which TCR and CD4 are each tilted ~65° relative to the T-cell membrane. By precluding direct contacts between TCR and CD4, the structure explains how TCR and CD4 on the T cell can simultaneously, yet independently, engage the same pMHC on the APC. The structure, in conjunction with previous mutagenesis data, places TCR-associated CD3εγ and CD3εδ subunits, which transmit activation signals to the T cell, inside the TCR-pMHC-CD4 arch, facing CD4. By establishing anchor points for TCR and CD4 on the T-cell membrane, the complex provides a basis for understanding how the CD4 coreceptor focuses TCR on MHC to guide TCR docking on pMHC during thymic T-cell selection.

  6. Enhanced Salt Tolerance Conferred by the Complete 2.3 kb cDNA of the Rice Vacuolar Na+/H+ Antiporter Gene Compared to 1.9 kb Coding Region with 5′ UTR in Transgenic Lines of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Amin, U. S. M.; Biswas, Sudip; Elias, Sabrina M.; Razzaque, Samsad; Haque, Taslima; Malo, Richard; Seraj, Zeba I.

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most challenging problems that restricts the normal growth and production of rice worldwide. It has therefore become very important to produce more saline tolerant rice varieties. This study shows constitutive over-expression of the vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter gene (OsNHX1) from the rice landrace (Pokkali) and attainment of enhanced level of salinity tolerance in transgenic rice plants. It also shows that inclusion of the complete un-translated regions (UTRs) of the alternatively spliced OsNHX1 gene provides a higher level of tolerance to the transgenic rice. Two separate transformation events of the OsNHX1 gene, one with 1.9 kb region containing the 5′ UTR with CDS and the other of 2.3 kb, including 5′ UTR, CDS, and the 3′ UTR regions were performed. The transgenic plants with these two different constructs were advanced to the T3 generation and physiological and molecular screening of homozygous plants was conducted at seedling and reproductive stages under salinity (NaCl) stress. Both transgenic lines were observed to be tolerant compared to WT plants at both physiological stages. However, the transgenic lines containing the CDS with both the 5′ and 3′ UTR were significantly more tolerant compared to the transgenic lines containing OsNHX1 gene without the 3′ UTR. At the seedling stage at 12 dS/m stress, the chlorophyll content was significantly higher (P < 0.05) and the electrolyte leakage significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the order 2.3 kb > 1.9 kb > and WT lines. Yield in g/plant in the best line from the 2.3 kb plants was significantly more (P < 0.01) compared, respectively, to the best 1.9 kb line and WT plants at stress of 6 dS/m. Transformation with the complete transcripts rather than the CDS may therefore provide more durable level of tolerance. PMID:26834778

  7. Enhanced Salt Tolerance Conferred by the Complete 2.3 kb cDNA of the Rice Vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) Antiporter Gene Compared to 1.9 kb Coding Region with 5' UTR in Transgenic Lines of Rice.

    PubMed

    Amin, U S M; Biswas, Sudip; Elias, Sabrina M; Razzaque, Samsad; Haque, Taslima; Malo, Richard; Seraj, Zeba I

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most challenging problems that restricts the normal growth and production of rice worldwide. It has therefore become very important to produce more saline tolerant rice varieties. This study shows constitutive over-expression of the vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene (OsNHX1) from the rice landrace (Pokkali) and attainment of enhanced level of salinity tolerance in transgenic rice plants. It also shows that inclusion of the complete un-translated regions (UTRs) of the alternatively spliced OsNHX1 gene provides a higher level of tolerance to the transgenic rice. Two separate transformation events of the OsNHX1 gene, one with 1.9 kb region containing the 5' UTR with CDS and the other of 2.3 kb, including 5' UTR, CDS, and the 3' UTR regions were performed. The transgenic plants with these two different constructs were advanced to the T3 generation and physiological and molecular screening of homozygous plants was conducted at seedling and reproductive stages under salinity (NaCl) stress. Both transgenic lines were observed to be tolerant compared to WT plants at both physiological stages. However, the transgenic lines containing the CDS with both the 5' and 3' UTR were significantly more tolerant compared to the transgenic lines containing OsNHX1 gene without the 3' UTR. At the seedling stage at 12 dS/m stress, the chlorophyll content was significantly higher (P < 0.05) and the electrolyte leakage significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the order 2.3 kb > 1.9 kb > and WT lines. Yield in g/plant in the best line from the 2.3 kb plants was significantly more (P < 0.01) compared, respectively, to the best 1.9 kb line and WT plants at stress of 6 dS/m. Transformation with the complete transcripts rather than the CDS may therefore provide more durable level of tolerance. PMID:26834778

  8. Efficacy of the Salmonella siderophore receptor protein vaccine against lymph node carriage and fecal shedding of Samonella in commercial feedlot cattle: A randomized complete block design study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of the Salmonella Newport siderophore receptor protein (SRP)® vaccine for reducing lymph node (LN) carriage and fecal shedding of Salmonella at harvest was investigated in a study of commercial feedlot cattle. The study was designed as a randomized complete block with pen as the experi...

  9. AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation and Synaptic Colocalization on Motor Neurons Drive Maladaptive Plasticity below Complete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stuck, Ellen D.; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Clinical spinal cord injury (SCI) is accompanied by comorbid peripheral injury in 47% of patients. Human and animal modeling data have shown that painful peripheral injuries undermine long-term recovery of locomotion through unknown mechanisms. Peripheral nociceptive stimuli induce maladaptive synaptic plasticity in dorsal horn sensory systems through AMPA receptor (AMPAR) phosphorylation and trafficking to synapses. Here we test whether ventral horn motor neurons in rats demonstrate similar experience-dependent maladaptive plasticity below a complete SCI in vivo. Quantitative biochemistry demonstrated that intermittent nociceptive stimulation (INS) rapidly and selectively increases AMPAR subunit GluA1 serine 831 phosphorylation and localization to synapses in the injured spinal cord, while reducing synaptic GluA2. These changes predict motor dysfunction in the absence of cell death signaling, suggesting an opportunity for therapeutic reversal. Automated confocal time-course analysis of lumbar ventral horn motor neurons confirmed a time-dependent increase in synaptic GluA1 with concurrent decrease in synaptic GluA2. Optical fractionation of neuronal plasma membranes revealed GluA2 removal from extrasynaptic sites on motor neurons early after INS followed by removal from synapses 2 h later. As GluA2-lacking AMPARs are canonical calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs), their stimulus- and time-dependent insertion provides a therapeutic target for limiting calcium-dependent dynamic maladaptive plasticity after SCI. Confirming this, a selective CP-AMPAR antagonist protected against INS-induced maladaptive spinal plasticity, restoring adaptive motor responses on a sensorimotor spinal training task. These findings highlight the critical involvement of AMPARs in experience-dependent spinal cord plasticity after injury and provide a pharmacologically targetable synaptic mechanism by which early postinjury experience shapes motor plasticity. PMID:26668821

  10. AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation and Synaptic Colocalization on Motor Neurons Drive Maladaptive Plasticity below Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Huie, J Russell; Stuck, Ellen D; Lee, Kuan H; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Grau, James W; Ferguson, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    Clinical spinal cord injury (SCI) is accompanied by comorbid peripheral injury in 47% of patients. Human and animal modeling data have shown that painful peripheral injuries undermine long-term recovery of locomotion through unknown mechanisms. Peripheral nociceptive stimuli induce maladaptive synaptic plasticity in dorsal horn sensory systems through AMPA receptor (AMPAR) phosphorylation and trafficking to synapses. Here we test whether ventral horn motor neurons in rats demonstrate similar experience-dependent maladaptive plasticity below a complete SCI in vivo. Quantitative biochemistry demonstrated that intermittent nociceptive stimulation (INS) rapidly and selectively increases AMPAR subunit GluA1 serine 831 phosphorylation and localization to synapses in the injured spinal cord, while reducing synaptic GluA2. These changes predict motor dysfunction in the absence of cell death signaling, suggesting an opportunity for therapeutic reversal. Automated confocal time-course analysis of lumbar ventral horn motor neurons confirmed a time-dependent increase in synaptic GluA1 with concurrent decrease in synaptic GluA2. Optical fractionation of neuronal plasma membranes revealed GluA2 removal from extrasynaptic sites on motor neurons early after INS followed by removal from synapses 2 h later. As GluA2-lacking AMPARs are canonical calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs), their stimulus- and time-dependent insertion provides a therapeutic target for limiting calcium-dependent dynamic maladaptive plasticity after SCI. Confirming this, a selective CP-AMPAR antagonist protected against INS-induced maladaptive spinal plasticity, restoring adaptive motor responses on a sensorimotor spinal training task. These findings highlight the critical involvement of AMPARs in experience-dependent spinal cord plasticity after injury and provide a pharmacologically targetable synaptic mechanism by which early postinjury experience shapes motor plasticity.

  11. High-Throughput Plasmid cDNA Library Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Kenneth H.; Yu, Charles; George, Reed A.; Carlson, JosephW.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Svirskas, Robert; Stapleton, Mark; Celniker, SusanE.

    2006-05-24

    Libraries of cDNA clones are valuable resources foranalysing the expression, structure, and regulation of genes, as well asfor studying protein functions and interactions. Full-length cDNA clonesprovide information about intron and exon structures, splice junctionsand 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). Open reading frames (ORFs)derived from cDNA clones can be used to generate constructs allowingexpression of native proteins and N- or C-terminally tagged proteins.Thus, obtaining full-length cDNA clones and sequences for most or allgenes in an organism is critical for understanding genome functions.Expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing samples cDNA libraries at random,which is most useful at the beginning of large-scale screening projects.However, as projects progress towards completion, the probability ofidentifying unique cDNAs via EST sequencing diminishes, resulting in poorrecovery of rare transcripts. We describe an adapted, high-throughputprotocol intended for recovery of specific, full-length clones fromplasmid cDNA libraries in five days.

  12. Expression, crystallization and derivatization of the complete extracellular domain of the beta(c) subunit of the human IL-5, IL-3 and GM-CSF receptors.

    PubMed

    Gustin, S E; Church, A P; Ford, S C; Mann, D A; Carr, P D; Ollis, D L; Young, I G

    2001-05-01

    The major signalling entity of the receptors for the haemopoietic cytokines granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-3 (IL-3) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) is the shared beta(c) receptor, which is activated by ligand-specific alpha receptors. The beta(c) subunit is a stable homodimer whose extracellular region consists of four fibronectin domains and appears to be a duplication of the cytokine receptor homology module. No four domain structure has been determined for this receptor family and the structure of the beta(c) subunit remains unknown. We have expressed the extracellular domain in insect cells using the baculovirus system, purified it to homogeneity and determined its N-terminal sequence. N-glycosylation at two sites was demonstrated. Crystals of the complete domain have been obtained that are suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies, following mutagenesis to remove one of the N-glycosylation sites. The rhombohedral crystals of space group R3, with unit cell dimensions 186.1 A and 103.5 A, diffracted to a resolution of 2.9 A using synchrotron radiation. Mutagenesis was also used to engineer cysteine substitution mutants which formed isomorphous Hg derivatives in order to solve the crystallographic phase problem. The crystal structure will help to elucidate how the beta(c) receptor is activated by heterodimerization with the respective alpha/ligand complexes.

  13. Primary structure of the T3 gamma subunit of the T3/T cell antigen receptor complex deduced from cDNA sequences: evolution of the T3 gamma and delta subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Krissansen, G W; Owen, M J; Verbi, W; Crumpton, M J

    1986-01-01

    cDNA clones, whose fusion proteins were recognised by an anti-(T3 gamma chain) serum, were isolated from a lambda gt11 expression library prepared from the human T leukaemia cell line J6. The clones encoded a unique sequence related to that of the T3 delta chain, and hybridised to two mRNA transcripts of 0.8 and 3.5 kb in size, whose expression was restricted to T lymphocytes. The 182 amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA revealed a typical signal peptide, a predominantly hydrophilic 89 amino residue domain with two N-glycosylation sites, a hydrophobic domain with a centrally located glutamic acid residue and a 44-residue domain with at least one potential serine phosphorylation site for protein kinase C. Given this arrangement the T3 gamma polypeptide most probably has a transmembrane orientation with the N-terminal domain exposed on the cell surface. The amino acid and nucleotide sequences showed marked homology with those of the T3 delta chain, suggesting that the respective genes arose by duplication about 200 million years ago. The intracellular and membrane-proximal half of the extracellular domains were especially well conserved. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 5. PMID:2944745

  14. Pathological complete response rate in hormone receptor-negative breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant FEC, followed by weekly paclitaxel administration: A retrospective study and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    KIBA, TAKAYOSHI; MORII, NAO; TAKAHASHI, HIROTOSHI; OZAKI, SHINJI; ATSUMI, MISAO; MASUMOTO, FUMI; YAMASHIRO, HIROYASU

    2016-01-01

    While tumor size, the presence of inflammatory carcinoma and lymph node involvement are the main prognostic factors of women with locally advanced breast cancer, the prognostic value of the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status has not been fully clarified. The present study examined the therapeutic efficacy of a neoadjuvant fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide regimen (FEC), followed by weekly paclitaxel and/or trastuzumab administration, in the treatment of hormone receptor-negative breast cancer patients. Between April 2012 and February 2014, 14 patients with hormone receptor-negative local breast cancer (triple-negative type, 9 patients; HER2 type, 5 patients) were included in the study. In all cases, the histological type of the primary cancer was invasive ductal carcinoma. Among the 14 women who received the regimen, 5 presented with stage I cancer (35.7%), 3 with stage IIA (21.4%), 3 with stage IIB (21.4%), 1 with stage IIIB (7.1%) and 2 with stage IIIC (14.3%), according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system. With regard to the tumor-node-metastasis classification, 5 patients were T1N0M0 (35.7%), 3 were T2N0M0 (21.4%), 3 were T2N1M0 (21.4%), 2 were T3N3M0 (14.3%) and 1 was T4N1M0 (7.1%). The pathological response was evaluated using resected tissue following neoadjuvant chemotherapy, according to the criteria established by the Japanese Breast Cancer Society. Patients were classified into pathological responders (grades 2 and 3, 71.4% of all patients) and non-responders (grade 1, 28.6% of all patients). A pathological complete response (pCR) was achieved in 50.0% of all cases (7/14); 44.4% of triple-negative-type cases (4/9) and 60.0% of HER2-type cases (3/5). Hematological and non-hematological toxicity was reversible and manageable. No patients withdrew from treatment, and favorable compliance was achieved. The present study demonstrated that neoadjuvant FEC followed

  15. Rescue of mumps virus from cDNA.

    PubMed

    Clarke, D K; Sidhu, M S; Johnson, J E; Udem, S A

    2000-05-01

    A complete DNA copy of the genome of a Jeryl Lynn strain of mumps virus (15,384 nucleotides) was assembled from cDNA fragments such that an exact antigenome RNA could be generated following transcription by T7 RNA polymerase and cleavage by hepatitis delta virus ribozyme. The plasmid containing the genome sequence, together with support plasmids which express mumps virus NP, P, and L proteins under control of the T7 RNA polymerase promoter, were transfected into A549 cells previously infected with recombinant vaccinia virus (MVA-T7) that expressed T7 RNA polymerase. Rescue of infectious virus from the genome cDNA was demonstrated by amplification of mumps virus from transfected-cell cultures and by subsequent consensus sequencing of reverse transcription-PCR products generated from infected-cell RNA to verify the presence of specific nucleotide tags introduced into the genome cDNA clone. The only coding change (position 8502, A to G) in the cDNA clone relative to the consensus sequence of the Jeryl Lynn plaque isolate from which it was derived, resulting in a lysine-to-arginine substitution at amino acid 22 of the L protein, did not prevent rescue of mumps virus, even though an amino acid alignment for the L proteins of paramyxoviruses indicates that lysine is highly conserved at that position. This system may provide the basis of a safe and effective virus vector for the in vivo expression of immunologically and biologically active proteins, peptides, and RNAs.

  16. Neuroendocrine function and response to stress in mice with complete disruption of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    MacLusky, N J; Cook, S; Scrocchi, L; Shin, J; Kim, J; Vaccarino, F; Asa, S L; Drucker, D J

    2000-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent regulator of glucose homeostasis, is also produced in the central nervous system, where GLP-1 has been implicated in the neuroendocrine control of hypothalamic-pituitary function, food intake, and the response to stress. The finding that intracerebroventricular GLP-1 stimulates LH, TSH, corticosterone, and vasopressin secretion in rats prompted us to assess the neuroendocrine consequences of disrupting GLP-1 signaling in mice in vivo. Male GLP-1 receptor knockout (GLP-1R-/-) mice exhibit reduced gonadal weights, and females exhibit a slight delay in the onset of puberty; however, male and female GLP-1R-/- animals reproduce successfully and respond appropriately to fluid restriction. Although adrenal weights are reduced in GLP-1R-/- mice, hypothalamic CRH gene expression and circulating levels of corticosterone, thyroid hormone, testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone are normal in the absence of GLP-1R-/- signaling. Intriguingly, GLP-1R-/- mice exhibit paradoxically increased corticosterone responses to stress as well as abnormal responses to acoustic startle that are corrected by glucocorticoid treatment. These findings suggest that although GLP-1R signaling is not essential for development and basal function of the murine hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, abrogation of GLP-1 signaling is associated with impairment of the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stress.

  17. Glucagon receptor antibody completely suppresses type 1 diabetes phenotype without insulin by disrupting a novel diabetogenic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, May-Yun; Yan, Hai; Shi, Zhiqing; Evans, Matthew R.; Yu, Xinxin; Lee, Young; Chen, Shiuhwei; Williams, Annie; Philippe, Jacques; Roth, Michael G.; Unger, Roger H.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin monotherapy can neither maintain normoglycemia in type 1 diabetes (T1D) nor prevent the long-term damage indicated by elevated glycation products in blood, such as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Here we find that hyperglycemia, when unaccompanied by an acute increase in insulin, enhances itself by paradoxically stimulating hyperglucagonemia. Raising glucose from 5 to 25 mM without insulin enhanced glucagon secretion ∼two- to fivefold in InR1-G9 α cells and ∼18-fold in perfused pancreata from insulin-deficient rats with T1D. Mice with T1D receiving insulin treatment paradoxically exhibited threefold higher plasma glucagon during hyperglycemic surges than during normoglycemic intervals. Blockade of glucagon action with mAb Ac, a glucagon receptor (GCGR) antagonizing antibody, maintained glucose below 100 mg/dL and HbA1c levels below 4% in insulin-deficient mice with T1D. In rodents with T1D, hyperglycemia stimulates glucagon secretion, up-regulating phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and enhancing hyperglycemia. GCGR antagonism in mice with T1D normalizes glucose and HbA1c, even without insulin. PMID:25675519

  18. Functional and pharmacological properties of GABArho1delta51 receptors.

    PubMed

    Demuro, A; Martínez-Torres, A; Miledi, R

    2000-02-01

    Gamma-aminobutyrate is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate brain, and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunit GABArho1delta51 is an alternatively spliced form of the GABArho1 receptor that was recently isolated from human retina cDNA libraries. The rho1delta51 receptor subunit lacks 17 amino acids in the extracellular N-terminal domain and, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, forms functional homomeric GABA receptors. Unexpectedly, even after a such a big deletion, the fundamental properties of the deleted variant receptors are very similar to those of the complete GABArho1 receptors. For example, both types of receptors are bicuculline resistant, desensitize very little, and are negatively modulated by Zn2+ and positively modulated by La3+. In spite of such similarities, the GABArho1delta51 receptors are more sensitive to GABA, to the specific GABA(C) antagonist (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid and to Zn2+, than the complete GABArho1 receptors. The GABArho1delta51 receptors extend the variety of inhibitory receptors in the retina. Their functional significance still remains to be determined.

  19. A large deletion/insertion-induced frameshift mutation of the androgen receptor gene in a family with a familial complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cong, Peikuan; Ye, Yinghui; Wang, Yue; Lu, Lingping; Yong, Jing; Yu, Ping; Joseph, Kimani Kagunda; Jin, Fan; Qi, Ming

    2012-06-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder with a normal 46, XY karyotype caused by abnormality of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. One Chinese family consisting of the proband and 5 other members with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) was investigated. Mutation analysis by DNA sequencing on all 8 exons and flanking intron regions of the AR gene revealed a unique large deletion/insertion mutation in the family. A 287 bp deletion and 77 bp insertion (c.933_1219delins77) mutation at codon 312 resulted in a frameshift which caused a premature stop (p.Phe312Aspfs*7) of polypeptide formation. The proband's mother and grandmother were heterozygous for the mutant allele. The proband's father, uncle and grandfather have the normal allele. From the pedigree constructed from mutational analysis of the family, it is revealed that the probably pathogenic mutation comes from the maternal side.

  20. L712V mutation in the androgen receptor gene causes complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to severe loss of androgen function.

    PubMed

    Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Nalini J; Chakrabarty, Baidyanath; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2013-12-11

    Inability to respond to the circulating androgens is named as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene are the most common cause of AIS. A cause and effect relationship between some of these mutations and the AIS phenotype has been proven by in vitro studies. Several other mutations have been identified, but need to be functionally validated for pathogenicity. Screening of the AR mutations upon presumptive diagnosis of AIS is recommended. We analyzed a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) for mutations in the AR gene. Sequencing of the entire coding region revealed C>G mutation (CTT-GTT) at codon 712 (position according to the NCBI database) in exon 4 of the gene, resulting in replacement of leucine with valine in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. No incidence of this mutation was observed in 230 normal male individuals analyzed for comparison. In vitro androgen binding and transactivation assays using mutant clone showed approximately 71% loss of ligand binding and about 76% loss of transactivation function. We conclude that CAIS in this individual was due to L712V substitution in the androgen receptor protein.

  1. A Recurrent Germline Mutation in the 5'UTR of the Androgen Receptor Causes Complete Androgen Insensitivity by Activating Aberrant uORF Translation.

    PubMed

    Hornig, Nadine C; de Beaufort, Carine; Denzer, Friederike; Cools, Martine; Wabitsch, Martin; Ukat, Martin; Kulle, Alexandra E; Schweikert, Hans-Udo; Werner, Ralf; Hiort, Olaf; Audi, Laura; Siebert, Reiner; Ammerpohl, Ole; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2016-01-01

    A subset of patients with monogenic disorders lacks disease causing mutations in the protein coding region of the corresponding gene. Here we describe a recurrent germline mutation found in two unrelated patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) generating an upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. We show in patient derived primary genital skin fibroblasts as well as in cell-based reporter assays that this mutation severely impacts AR function by reducing AR protein levels without affecting AR mRNA levels. Importantly, the newly generated uORF translates into a polypeptide and the expression level of this polypeptide inversely correlates with protein translation from the primary ORF of the AR thereby providing a model for AR-5'UTR mediated translational repression. Our findings not only add a hitherto unrecognized genetic cause to complete androgen insensitivity but also underline the importance of 5'UTR mutations affecting uORFs for the pathogenesis of monogenic disorders in general.

  2. A Recurrent Germline Mutation in the 5’UTR of the Androgen Receptor Causes Complete Androgen Insensitivity by Activating Aberrant uORF Translation

    PubMed Central

    Hornig, Nadine C.; de Beaufort, Carine; Denzer, Friederike; Cools, Martine; Wabitsch, Martin; Ukat, Martin; Kulle, Alexandra E.; Schweikert, Hans-Udo; Werner, Ralf; Hiort, Olaf; Audi, Laura; Siebert, Reiner; Ammerpohl, Ole; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2016-01-01

    A subset of patients with monogenic disorders lacks disease causing mutations in the protein coding region of the corresponding gene. Here we describe a recurrent germline mutation found in two unrelated patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) generating an upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the 5’ untranslated region (5’-UTR) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. We show in patient derived primary genital skin fibroblasts as well as in cell-based reporter assays that this mutation severely impacts AR function by reducing AR protein levels without affecting AR mRNA levels. Importantly, the newly generated uORF translates into a polypeptide and the expression level of this polypeptide inversely correlates with protein translation from the primary ORF of the AR thereby providing a model for AR-5′UTR mediated translational repression. Our findings not only add a hitherto unrecognized genetic cause to complete androgen insensitivity but also underline the importance of 5′UTR mutations affecting uORFs for the pathogenesis of monogenic disorders in general. PMID:27110943

  3. Exploring the complete mutational space of the LDL receptor LA5 domain using molecular dynamics: linking SNPs with disease phenotypes in familial hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Orozco, Modesto; Sancho, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a genetic disorder with a prevalence of 0.2%, represents a high-risk factor to develop cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The majority and most severe FH cases are associated to mutations in the receptor for low-density lipoproteins receptor (LDL-r), but the molecular basis explaining the connection between mutation and phenotype is often unknown, which hinders early diagnosis and treatment of the disease. We have used atomistic simulations to explore the complete SNP mutational space (227 mutants) of the LA5 repeat, the key domain for interacting with LDL that is coded in the exon concentrating the highest number of mutations. Four clusters of mutants of different stability have been identified. The majority of the 50 FH known mutations (33) appear distributed in the unstable clusters, i.e. loss of conformational stability explains two-third of FH phenotypes. However, one-third of FH phenotypes (17 mutations) do not destabilize the LR5 repeat. Combining our simulations with available structural data from different laboratories, we have defined a consensus-binding site for the interaction of the LA5 repeat with LDL-r partner proteins and have found that most (16) of the 17 stable FH mutations occur at binding site residues. Thus, LA5-associated FH arises from mutations that cause either the loss of stability or a decrease in domain's-binding affinity. Based on this finding, we propose the likely phenotype of each possible SNP in the LA5 repeat and outline a procedure to make a full computational diagnosis for FH. PMID:26755827

  4. Exploring the complete mutational space of the LDL receptor LA5 domain using molecular dynamics: linking SNPs with disease phenotypes in familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Orozco, Modesto; Sancho, Javier

    2016-03-15

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a genetic disorder with a prevalence of 0.2%, represents a high-risk factor to develop cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The majority and most severe FH cases are associated to mutations in the receptor for low-density lipoproteins receptor (LDL-r), but the molecular basis explaining the connection between mutation and phenotype is often unknown, which hinders early diagnosis and treatment of the disease. We have used atomistic simulations to explore the complete SNP mutational space (227 mutants) of the LA5 repeat, the key domain for interacting with LDL that is coded in the exon concentrating the highest number of mutations. Four clusters of mutants of different stability have been identified. The majority of the 50 FH known mutations (33) appear distributed in the unstable clusters, i.e. loss of conformational stability explains two-third of FH phenotypes. However, one-third of FH phenotypes (17 mutations) do not destabilize the LR5 repeat. Combining our simulations with available structural data from different laboratories, we have defined a consensus-binding site for the interaction of the LA5 repeat with LDL-r partner proteins and have found that most (16) of the 17 stable FH mutations occur at binding site residues. Thus, LA5-associated FH arises from mutations that cause either the loss of stability or a decrease in domain's-binding affinity. Based on this finding, we propose the likely phenotype of each possible SNP in the LA5 repeat and outline a procedure to make a full computational diagnosis for FH.

  5. Complete structure of an increasing capillary permeability protein (ICPP) purified from Vipera lebetina venom. ICPP is angiogenic via vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Gasmi, Ammar; Bourcier, Christine; Aloui, Zohra; Srairi, Najet; Marchetti, Sandrine; Gimond, Clotilde; Wedge, Stephen R; Hennequin, Laurent; Pouysségur, Jacques

    2002-08-16

    The partial sequence of the increasing capillary permeability protein (ICPP) purified from Vipera lebetina venom revealed a strong homology to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A. We now report its complete amino acid sequence determined by Edman degradation and its biological effects on mouse and human vascular endothelial cells. ICPP is a homodimeric protein linked by cysteine disulfide bonds of 25115 Da revealed by mass spectrometry. Each monomer is composed of 110 amino acids including eight cysteine residues and a pyroglutamic acid at the N-terminal extremity. ICPP shares 52% sequence identity with human VEGF but lacks the heparin binding domain and Asn glycosylation site. Besides its strong capillary permeability activity, ICPP was found to be a potent in vitro angiogenic factor when added to mouse embryonic stem cells or human umbilical vein endothelial cells. ICPP was found to be as potent as human VEGF165 in activating p42/p44 MAPK, in reinitiation of DNA synthesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and in promoting in vitro angiogenesis of mouse embryonic stem cells. All these biological actions, including capillary permeability in mice, were fully inhibited by 1 microm of a new specific VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (ZM317450) from AstraZeneca that belongs to the anilinocinnoline family of compounds. Indeed, up to a 30 times higher concentration of inhibitor did not affect platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, FGF-2, insulin, alpha-thrombin, or fetal calf serum-induced p42/p44 MAPK and reinitiation of DNA synthesis. Therefore, we conclude that this venom-derived ICPP exerts its biological action (permeability and angiogenesis) through activation of VEGF receptor signaling (VEGF-R2 and possibly VEGF-R1).

  6. [Comparison of methods to construct a full-length cDNA library].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xin-Guo; Jing, Rui-Lian; Kong, Xiu-Ying; Zhao, Guang-Yao; Jia, Ji-Zeng

    2006-07-01

    The use of full-length cDNA libraries is an effective tool to obtain complete gene information in a high-efficiency, high-throughput manner, especially in organisms with huge genomes that are not amenable to whole genome sequencing. In this review, we outlined several methods of full-length cDNA library construction and compared their advantages and disadvantages based on their respective principles. Drawing on our own experience, we described the Cap-trapper method in detail, with an emphasis on its application in wheat full-length cDNA library construction as well as the determination of the ratio of full-length cDNA in a library. PMID:16825176

  7. Characterization of a cDNA clone coding for the beta chain of bovine fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, D W; Rixon, M W; MacGillivray, R T; Davie, E W

    1981-01-01

    Recombinant plasmids containing bovine cDNA have been screened with a radiolabeled cDNA enriched for bovine fibrinogen. A number of plasmids containing cDNAs for fibrinogen were identified by this assay. One plasmid, designated pBI beta 1, was found to contain a cDNA insert of 1372 base pairs. The sequence of the cDNA insert for this plasmid was then determined. It was shown to code for 424 amino acids of the beta chain of fibrinogen, starting with residue 44. This and other data made it possible to construct the complete amino acid sequence of the beta chain of the protein. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of the beta chain of bovine fibrinogen with the corresponding chain of the human molecule indicated that the two chains are greater than 80% homologous. PMID:6262803

  8. The up-regulation of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 in rats with inflammatory pain induced by complete Freund's adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Ting; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral inflammation induces central sensitization that displays the features by the development of pain hypersensitivity to the stimuli. It has been shown that activation of glia contributes to the development of behavioral hypersensitivity after peripheral inflammation. It has been suggested that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) primarily expressed on microglia affects central pain response. The present study was designed to examine the expressions of TLR4 and microglia in the spinal cord in different time points of inflammatory pain induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The results show that CFA induces significant pain hypersensitivity and paw edema as well as spinal dorsal horn (SDH) microglia activation with the increased expressions of OX-42 and TLR4 during the inflammatory pain, respectively. The quantification of TLR4 with Western Blot analysis also suggests the same patter with the morphological results during the progress of inflammatory pain. In addition, chronic minocycline hydrochloride intrathecal injection reverses pain hypersensitivity and suppresses activation of microglia and TLR4 induced by CFA, but has hardly any effects on paw edema. Taken together, our data demonstrate the importance of TLR4 and microglia in rats in CFA inflammatory pain states, and suggest that blockade of microglia should likely be considered as a therapeutic opportunity.

  9. Biological characterization of liver fatty acid binding gene from miniature pig liver cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y H; Wang, K F; Zhang, S; Fan, Y N; Guan, W J; Ma, Y H

    2015-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP) are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind to long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Wuzhishan miniature pig, and then the L-FABP gene was cloned from this cDNA library and an expression vector (pEGFP-N3-L-FABP) was constructed in vitro. This vector was transfected into hepatocytes to test its function. The results of western blotting analysis demonstrated that the L-FABP gene from our full-length enriched cDNA library regulated downstream genes, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family in hepatocytes. This study provides a theoretical basis and experimental evidence for the application of L-FABP for the treatment of liver injury. PMID:26345909

  10. Biological characterization of liver fatty acid binding gene from miniature pig liver cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y H; Wang, K F; Zhang, S; Fan, Y N; Guan, W J; Ma, Y H

    2015-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP) are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind to long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Wuzhishan miniature pig, and then the L-FABP gene was cloned from this cDNA library and an expression vector (pEGFP-N3-L-FABP) was constructed in vitro. This vector was transfected into hepatocytes to test its function. The results of western blotting analysis demonstrated that the L-FABP gene from our full-length enriched cDNA library regulated downstream genes, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family in hepatocytes. This study provides a theoretical basis and experimental evidence for the application of L-FABP for the treatment of liver injury.

  11. The effects of RB101, a mixed inhibitor of enkephalin-catabolizing enzymes, on carrageenin-induced spinal c-Fos expression are completely blocked by beta-funaltrexamine, a selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Le Guen, S; Honoré, P; Catheline, G; Fournié-Zaluski, M C; Roques, B P; Besson, J M

    1999-07-10

    We have demonstrated that pre-administered RB101 (40 mg/kg, i.v.), a mixed inhibitor of enkephalin-catabolizing enzymes, decreased spinal c-Fos expression induced 1 h and 30 min after intraplantar (i.pl.) carrageenin (41% reduction, p<0.01). These effects were completely blocked by pre-administered beta-funaltrexamine (10 mg/kg, i.v., 24 h prior to stimulation), a selective long-lasting mu-opioid receptor antagonist. In conclusion, these results clearly demonstrate that the effects of endogenous enkephalins on noxiously evoked spinal c-Fos expression are essentially mediated via mu-opioid receptors.

  12. APPLICATION OF CDNA MICROARRAY TO THE STUDY OF ARSENIC TOXICOLOGY AND CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (As) is a common environmental toxicant and known human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies link As exposure to various disorders and cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms for As toxicity and carcinogenicity are not completely known. The cDNA microarray, a high-th...

  13. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  14. A drosophila full-length cDNA resource

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph; Brokstein, Peter; Yu, Charles; Champe, Mark; George, Reed; Guarin, Hannibal; Kronmiller, Brent; Pacleb, Joanne; Park, Soo; Rubin, Gerald M.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2003-05-09

    Background: A collection of sequenced full-length cDNAs is an important resource both for functional genomics studies and for the determination of the intron-exon structure of genes. Providing this resource to the Drosophila melanogaster research community has been a long-term goal of the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project. We have previously described the Drosophila Gene Collection (DGC), a set of putative full-length cDNAs that was produced by generating and analyzing over 250,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from a variety of tissues and developmental stages. Results: We have generated high-quality full-insert sequence for 8,921 clones in the DGC. We compared the sequence of these clones to the annotated Release 3 genomic sequence, and identified more than 5,300 cDNAs that contain a complete and accurate protein-coding sequence. This corresponds to at least one splice form for 40 percent of the predicted D. melanogaster genes. We also identified potential new cases of RNA editing. Conclusions: We show that comparison of cDNA sequences to a high-quality annotated genomic sequence is an effective approach to identifying and eliminating defective clones from a cDNA collection and ensure its utility for experimentation. Clones were eliminated either because they carry single nucleotide discrepancies, which most probably result from reverse transcriptase errors, or because they are truncated and contain only part of the protein-coding sequence.

  15. Fabrication of high quality cDNA microarray using a small amount of cDNA.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Hee; Jeong, Ha Jin; Jung, Jae Jun; Lee, Gui Yeon; Kim, Sang-Chul; Kim, Tae Soo; Yang, Sang Hwa; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Rha, Sun Young

    2004-05-01

    DNA microarray technology has become an essential part of biological research. It enables the genome-scale analysis of gene expression in various types of model systems. Manufacturing high quality cDNA microarrays of microdeposition type depends on some key factors including a printing device, spotting pins, glass slides, spotting solution, and humidity during spotting. UsingEthe Microgrid II TAS model printing device, this study defined the optimal conditions for producing high density, high quality cDNA microarrays with the least amount of cDNA product. It was observed that aminosilane-modified slides were superior to other types of surface modified-slides. A humidity of 30+/-3% in a closed environment and the overnight drying of the spotted slides gave the best conditions for arraying. In addition, the cDNA dissolved in 30% DMSO gave the optimal conditions for spotting compared to the 1X ArrayIt, 3X SSC and 50% DMSO. Lastly, cDNA in the concentration range of 100-300 ng/ micro l was determined to be best for arraying and post-processing. Currently, the printing system in this study yields reproducible 9000 spots with a spot size 150 mm diameter, and a 200 nm spot spacing. PMID:15067369

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of the allatotropin precursor and receptor in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Lismont, Els; Vleugels, Rut; Marchal, Elisabeth; Badisco, Liesbeth; Van Wielendaele, Pieter; Lenaerts, Cynthia; Zels, Sven; Tobe, Stephen S; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Verlinden, Heleen

    2015-01-01

    Allatotropins (ATs) are pleiotropic neuropeptides initially isolated from the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. In 2008, the first receptor for AT-like peptides (ATR) was characterized in Bombyx mori. Since then, ATRs have also been characterized in M. sexta, Tribolium castaneum, Aedes aegypti and Bombus terrestris. These receptors show sequence similarity to vertebrate orexin (ORX) receptors. When generating an EST-database of the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria) central nervous system, we found cDNA sequences encoding the Schgr-AT precursor and a fragment of its putative receptor. This receptor cDNA has now been completed and functionally expressed in mammalian cell lines. Activation of this receptor, designated as Schgr-ATR, by Schgr-AT caused an increase in intracellular calcium ions, as well as cyclic AMP (cAMP), with an EC50 value in the nanomolar range. In addition, the transcript distribution of both the Schgr-AT precursor and Schgr-ATR was investigated by means of quantitative real-time PCR. Moreover, we found more evidence for the myotropic and allatostimulatory actions of Schgr-AT in the desert locust. These data are discussed and situated in a broader context by comparison with literature data on AT and ATR in insects. PMID:25814925

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of the allatotropin precursor and receptor in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria

    PubMed Central

    Lismont, Els; Vleugels, Rut; Marchal, Elisabeth; Badisco, Liesbeth; Van Wielendaele, Pieter; Lenaerts, Cynthia; Zels, Sven; Tobe, Stephen S.; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Verlinden, Heleen

    2015-01-01

    Allatotropins (ATs) are pleiotropic neuropeptides initially isolated from the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. In 2008, the first receptor for AT-like peptides (ATR) was characterized in Bombyx mori. Since then, ATRs have also been characterized in M. sexta, Tribolium castaneum, Aedes aegypti and Bombus terrestris. These receptors show sequence similarity to vertebrate orexin (ORX) receptors. When generating an EST-database of the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria) central nervous system, we found cDNA sequences encoding the Schgr-AT precursor and a fragment of its putative receptor. This receptor cDNA has now been completed and functionally expressed in mammalian cell lines. Activation of this receptor, designated as Schgr-ATR, by Schgr-AT caused an increase in intracellular calcium ions, as well as cyclic AMP (cAMP), with an EC50 value in the nanomolar range. In addition, the transcript distribution of both the Schgr-AT precursor and Schgr-ATR was investigated by means of quantitative real-time PCR. Moreover, we found more evidence for the myotropic and allatostimulatory actions of Schgr-AT in the desert locust. These data are discussed and situated in a broader context by comparison with literature data on AT and ATR in insects. PMID:25814925

  18. A compilation of partial sequences of randomly selected cDNA clones from the rat incisor.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Y; Nakashima, M; Amizuka, N; Warshawsky, H; Goltzman, D; Yamada, K M; Yamada, Y

    1995-01-01

    The formation of tooth organs is regulated by a series of developmental programs. We have initiated a genome project with the ultimate goal of identifying novel genes important for tooth development. As an initial approach, we constructed a unidirectional cDNA library from the non-calcified portion of incisors of 3- to 4-week-old rats, sequenced cDNA clones, and classified their sequences by homology search through the GenBank data base and the PIR protein data base. Here, we report partial DNA sequences obtained by automated DNA sequencing on 400 cDNA clones randomly selected from the library. Of the sequences determined, 51% represented sequences of new genes that were not related to any previously reported gene. Twenty-six percent of the clones strongly matched genes and proteins in the data bases, including amelogenin, alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) collagen chains, osteonectin, and decorin. Nine percent of clones revealed partial sequence homology to known genes such as transcription factors and cell surface receptors. A significant number of the previously identified genes were expressed redundantly and were found to encode extracellular matrix proteins. Identification and cataloging of cDNA clones in these tissues are the first step toward identification of markers expressed in a tissue- or stage-specific manner, as well as the genetic linkage study of tooth anomalies. Further characterization of the clones described in this paper should lead to the discovery of novel genes important for tooth development. PMID:7876422

  19. Cloning of a member of the arrestin family from a human thyroid cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, B; Kaufman, K D; Chazenbalk, G D

    1992-04-01

    We used the cDNA of human retinal arrestin as a probe to screen a human thyroid cDNA library. We isolated and plaque-purified one clone (hTHY-ARRX). The nucleotide sequence of the 1.8 kb cDNA insert had an open reading frame of 1227 bp coding for a protein of 409 amino acids. Northern blot analysis revealed a single transcript of 1.7 kb in human thyroid cells. There is significant homology between amino acid sequences of human thyroid arrestin and human retinal arrestin (63%) and bovine beta-arrestin (74%), respectively. The hTHY-ARRX cDNA was stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells already expressing a functional human thyrotropin (TSH) receptor. The cAMP response to TSH stimulation was unaltered in these cells, and homologous desensitization to TSH stimulation was not restored. It is not presently known whether hTHY-ARRX is human beta-adrenergic arrestin or a new member of the arrestin family.

  20. A novel insA2933 causes premature termination of translation and is accompanied by overexpression of truncated androgen receptor gene in a patient with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turek-Plewa, J; Starzyk, J B; Trzeciak, W H

    2015-11-01

    A patient with a female phenotype, 46,XY karyotype, and a diagnosis of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) was examined. Her mother and three 46,XX sisters were also included in the study. Sequence analysis of the androgen receptor gene (AR) revealed a novel A2933 insertion that alters the Tyr codon to a termination codon (Y857X), resulting in a truncated form of the receptor. Computer simulation revealed major conformational changes in the hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the hormone. An insA2933 results in a truncated receptor incapable of binding the ligand and is responsible for the clinical symptoms of CAIS in the patient. The levels of the AR transcript in peripheral blood leukocytes were higher in the patient than in her heterozygous mother and her heterozygous sister, as well as in the two healthy sisters. It is hypothesized that elevated levels of the AR transcript in the patient might be caused by the inability of the truncated receptor to react with IFI-16, which functions in complex with AR to inhibit the expression of the AR gene.

  1. Expressed sequence tags: normalization and subtraction of cDNA libraries expressed sequence tags\\ normalization and subtraction of cDNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Soares, Marcelo Bento; de Fatima Bonaldo, Maria; Hackett, Jeremiah D; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2009-01-01

    Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) provide a rapid and efficient approach for gene discovery and analysis of gene expression in eukaryotes. ESTs have also become particularly important with recent expanded efforts in complete genome sequencing of understudied, nonmodel eukaryotes such as protists and algae. For these projects, ESTs provide an invaluable source of data for gene identification and prediction of exon-intron boundaries. The generation of EST data, although straightforward in concept, requires nonetheless great care to ensure the highest efficiency and return for the investment in time and funds. To this end, key steps in the process include generation of a normalized cDNA library to facilitate a high gene discovery rate followed by serial subtraction of normalized libraries to maintain the discovery rate. Here we describe in detail, protocols for normalization and subtraction of cDNA libraries followed by an example using the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense.

  2. Human kidney amiloride-binding protein: cDNA structure and functional expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barbry, P.; Chassande, O.; Champigny, G.; Lingueglia, E.; Frelin, C.; Lazdunski, M. ); Champe, M.; Munemitsu, S.; Ullrich, A. ); Maes, P.; Tartar, A. Institut Pasteur de Lille )

    1990-10-01

    Phenamil, an analog of amiloride, is a potent blocker of the epithelial Na{sup plus} channel. It has been used to purify the porcine kidney amiloride-binding protein. Synthetic oligonucleotides derived from partial sequences have been used to screen a human kidney cDNA library and to isolate the cDNA encoding the human amiloride-binding protein. The primary structure was deduced from the DNA sequence analysis. The protein is 713 residues long, with a 19-amino acid signal peptide. The mRNA was expressed in 293-S and NIH 3T3 cells, yielding a glycoprotein (i) that binds amiloride and amiloride analogs with affinities similar to the amiloride receptor associated with the apical Na{sup plus} channel in pig kidney membranes and (ii) that is immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibodies raised against pig kidney amiloride-binding protein.

  3. Human kidney amiloride-binding protein: cDNA structure and functional expression.

    PubMed Central

    Barbry, P; Champe, M; Chassande, O; Munemitsu, S; Champigny, G; Lingueglia, E; Maes, P; Frelin, C; Tartar, A; Ullrich, A

    1990-01-01

    Phenamil, an analog of amiloride, is a potent blocker of the epithelial Na+ channel. It has been used to purify the porcine kidney amiloride-binding protein. Synthetic oligonucleotides derived from partial sequences have been used to screen a human kidney cDNA library and to isolate the cDNA encoding the human amiloride-binding protein. The primary structure was deduced from the DNA sequence analysis. The protein is 713 residues long, with a 19-amino acid signal peptide. The mRNA was expressed in 293-S and NIH 3T3 cells, yielding a glycoprotein (i) that binds amiloride and amiloride analogs with affinities similar to the amiloride receptor associated with the apical Na+ channel in pig kidney membranes and (ii) that is immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibodies raised against pig kidney amiloride-binding protein. Images PMID:2217167

  4. cDNA cloning and immunological characterization of the rye grass allergen Lol p I.

    PubMed

    Perez, M; Ishioka, G Y; Walker, L E; Chesnut, R W

    1990-09-25

    The complete amino acid sequence of two "isoallergenic" forms of Lol p I, the major rye grass (Lolium perenne) pollen allergen, was deduced from cDNA sequence analysis. cDNA clones isolated from a Lolium perenne pollen library contained an open reading frame coding for a 240-amino acid protein. Comparison of the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of two of these clones revealed four changes at the amino acid level and numerous nucleotide differences. Both clones contained one possible asparagine-linked glycosylation site. Northern blot analysis shows one RNA species of 1.2 kilobases. Based on the complete amino acid sequence of Lol p I, overlapping peptides covering the entire molecule were synthesized. Utilizing these peptides we have identified a determinant within the Lol p I molecule that is recognized by human leukocyte antigen class II-restricted T cells obtained from persons allergic to rye grass pollen.

  5. Cloning and sequence analysis of Hemonchus contortus HC58cDNA.

    PubMed

    Muleke, Charles I; Ruofeng, Yan; Lixin, Xu; Xinwen, Bo; Xiangrui, Li

    2007-06-01

    The complete coding sequence of Hemonchus contortus HC58cDNA was generated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends and polymerase chain reaction using primers based on the 5' and 3' ends of the parasite mRNA, accession no. AF305964. The HC58cDNA gene was 851 bp long, with open reading frame of 717 bp, precursors to 239 amino acids coding for approximately 27 kDa protein. Analysis of amino acid sequence revealed conserved residues of cysteine, histidine, asparagine, occluding loop pattern, hemoglobinase motif and glutamine of the oxyanion hole characteristic of cathepsin B like proteases (CBL). Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequences showed the protein shared 33.5-58.7% identity to cathepsin B homologues in the papain clan CA family (family C1). Phylogenetic analysis revealed close evolutionary proximity of the protein sequence to counterpart sequences in the CBL, suggesting that HC58cDNA was a member of the papain family.

  6. Rapid and Efficient cDNA Library Screening by Self-Ligation ofInverse PCR Products (SLIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Stapleton, Mark; George, Reed A.; Yu, Charles; Wan, Kenneth H.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2005-04-22

    The production of comprehensive cDNA clone collections is an important goal of the human and model organism genome projects. cDNA sequences are used to determine the structures of transcripts, including splice junctions, polyadenylation sites, and 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). cDNA collections are also valuable resources for functional studies of genes and proteins. Expressed Sequence Tag (EST)sequencing is the method of choice for recovering cDNAs representing a majority of the transcripts encoded in a eukaryotic genome. However, EST sequencing samples a library at random, so it realizes diminishing returns as the project progresses. To drive cDNA collections toward completion new methods are needed to recover cDNAs representing specific genes and alternative transcripts, including transcripts with low expression levels. We describe a simple and effective inverse-PCR-based method for screening plasmid libraries to recover intact cDNAs for specific transcripts. We tested the method by screening libraries used in our Drosophila EST projects for 153 transcription factor genes that were not yet represented by full-length cDNAs. We recovered target-specific clones for 104 of the genes: 46 exactly match, 30 improve and 28partially match current gene annotations. Successful application of the screening method depends on cDNA library complexity and quality of the gene models. The approach should be effective for improving cDNA collections for other model organisms and the human. It also provides a simple and rapid method for isolating cDNAs of interest in any system for which plasmid cDNA libraries and complete or partial gene sequences are available.

  7. The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    PubMed

    Gerhard, Daniela S; Wagner, Lukas; Feingold, Elise A; Shenmen, Carolyn M; Grouse, Lynette H; Schuler, Greg; Klein, Steven L; Old, Susan; Rasooly, Rebekah; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Peck, Allison M; Derge, Jeffery G; Lipman, David; Collins, Francis S; Jang, Wonhee; Sherry, Steven; Feolo, Mike; Misquitta, Leonie; Lee, Eduardo; Rotmistrovsky, Kirill; Greenhut, Susan F; Schaefer, Carl F; Buetow, Kenneth; Bonner, Tom I; Haussler, David; Kent, Jim; Kiekhaus, Mark; Furey, Terry; Brent, Michael; Prange, Christa; Schreiber, Kirsten; Shapiro, Nicole; Bhat, Narayan K; Hopkins, Ralph F; Hsie, Florence; Driscoll, Tom; Soares, M Bento; Casavant, Tom L; Scheetz, Todd E; Brown-stein, Michael J; Usdin, Ted B; Toshiyuki, Shiraki; Carninci, Piero; Piao, Yulan; Dudekula, Dawood B; Ko, Minoru S H; Kawakami, Koichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Gruber, C E; Smith, M R; Simmons, Blake; Moore, Troy; Waterman, Richard; Johnson, Stephen L; Ruan, Yijun; Wei, Chia Lin; Mathavan, S; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Wu, Jiaqian; Garcia, Angela M; Hulyk, Stephen W; Fuh, Edwin; Yuan, Ye; Sneed, Anna; Kowis, Carla; Hodgson, Anne; Muzny, Donna M; McPherson, John; Gibbs, Richard A; Fahey, Jessica; Helton, Erin; Ketteman, Mark; Madan, Anuradha; Rodrigues, Stephanie; Sanchez, Amy; Whiting, Michelle; Madari, Anup; Young, Alice C; Wetherby, Keith D; Granite, Steven J; Kwong, Peggy N; Brinkley, Charles P; Pearson, Russell L; Bouffard, Gerard G; Blakesly, Robert W; Green, Eric D; Dickson, Mark C; Rodriguez, Alex C; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Myers, Richard M; Butterfield, Yaron S N; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Krzywinski, Martin I; Liao, Nancy; Morin, Ryan; Morrin, Ryan; Palmquist, Diana; Petrescu, Anca S; Skalska, Ursula; Smailus, Duane E; Stott, Jeff M; Schnerch, Angelique; Schein, Jacqueline E; Jones, Steven J M; Holt, Robert A; Baross, Agnes; Marra, Marco A; Clifton, Sandra; Makowski, Kathryn A; Bosak, Stephanie; Malek, Joel

    2004-10-01

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

  8. The Status, Quality, and Expansion of the NIH Full-Length cDNA Project: The Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC)

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5′-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline. PMID:15489334

  9. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  10. Problem-Solving Test: Expression Cloning of the Erythropoietin Receptor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: cytokines, cytokine receptors, cDNA library, cDNA synthesis, poly(A)[superscript +] RNA, primer, template, reverse transcriptase, restriction endonucleases, cohesive ends, expression vector, promoter, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, poly(A) signal, DNA helicase, DNA ligase, topoisomerases,…

  11. Molecular cloning and functional expression of cDNA encoding a mammalian inorganic pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Wensel, T G

    1992-12-01

    Extracts of soluble proteins from bovine retina contain multiple species of inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase) that can be resolved by hydroxylapatite or ion exchange chromatography. We have purified one of these isoforms by a combination of chromatography and electrophoresis under denaturing conditions and have partially sequenced four peptides generated from it by CNBr digestion. This sequence information was used to clone PPase cDNA from a retinal cDNA library. Of five cDNA inserts, three were 1.3 kilobase pairs in length and two of these contained a complete open reading frame that was 867 base pairs long and encoded a 289-amino acid protein of 33 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence is 49.5% identical to that of PPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and contains identical amino acid residues at all of the positions previously identified as essential for catalytic activity in that enzyme. When the bovine PPase cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli, catalytically active PPase was produced that comigrated with bovine retinal PPase in a nondenaturing gel and was clearly distinguishable from the host PPase. Northern analysis of poly(A)+ RNA from human, canine, and bovine retinas revealed that each contained a single major band of 1.4 kilobases that hybridized strongly with a pyrophosphatase cDNA probe. Southern analysis of bovine genomic DNA was consistent with the existence of one PPase gene. Thus, the multiple forms separated by chromatography may be derived from a common precursor or from mRNAs of very similar size.

  12. cDNA cloning and expression of a collectin from red-spotted grouper ( Epinephelus akaara)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwen; Ding, Shaoxiong; Wang, Ying; Mao, Yong; Su, Yongquan; Wang, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Lectins play a crucial role in the innate immunity of invertebrates and vertebrates by recognizing and disposing of pathogens. We obtained the complete cDNA of a C-type lectin (EALec1) from Epinephelus akaara using RACE. The complete EALec1 cDNA sequence was 827 bp. The 5-UTR and 3-UTR were 28 bp and 151 bp, respectively, in length. The sequence also contained a polyadenylation signal AATAAA and a poly(A) tail. The EALec1 cDNA encodes polypeptides with 215 amino acids, including a signal peptide of 31 amino acids. The protein has a cysteine-rich region at the N terminal, a collagenous region characterized by G-X-Y repeats, a neck region, and a typical carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), indicating that EALec1 is a collectin. The key recognition positions of this CRD are EPD, isolated for the first time in fish. These are likely the interim types, between mannan-binding lectin and galactose-binding lectin. We evaluated the expression pattern of EALec1 in 12 different tissues using RT-PCR. EALec1 was expressed in all tissues, though at different levels. In addition, we inserted EALec1 into an expression vector (pET-28a) for transformation into the BL21 engineering bacteria. Based on enzyme digestion and sequencing of the positive clone, we successfully constructed the EALec1 recombinant expression vector.

  13. Critical roles for nitric oxide and ERK in the completion of prosurvival autophagy in 4OHTAM-treated estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lei; Danzer, Brian; Levenson, Victor V; Maki, Carl G

    2014-10-28

    Autophagy is a mechanism of tamoxifen (TAM) resistance in ER-positive (ER+) breast cancer cells. In this study, we showed in ER+ MCF7 cells that 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4OHTAM) induced cellular nitric oxide (NO) that negatively regulates cellular superoxide (O2-) and cytotoxicity. 4OHTAM stimulated LC3 lipidation and formation of monodansylcadaverine (MDC)-labeled autophagic vesicles dependent on O2-. Depletion of NO increased O2- and LC3 lipidation, yet reduced formation of MDC-labeled autophagic vesicles. Instead, NO-depleted cells formed remarkably large vacuoles with rims decorated by LC3. The vacuoles were not labeled by MDC or the acidic lysosome-specific fluorescence dye acridine orange (AO). The vacuoles were increased by the late stage autophagy inhibitor chloroquine, which also increased LC3 lipidation. These results suggest NO is required for proper autophagic vesicle formation or maturation at a step after LC3 lipidation. In addition, 4OHTAM induced O2--dependent activation of ERK, inhibition of which destabilized lysosomes/autolysosomes upon 4OHTAM treatment and together with depletion of NO led to necrotic cell death. These results suggest an essential role for endogenous NO and ERK activation in the completion of pro-survival autophagy.

  14. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of an Acetylcholinesterase cDNA in the Brown Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhifan; Chen, Jun; Chen, Yongqin; Jiang, Sijing

    2010-01-01

    A full cDNA encoding an acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) was cloned and characterized from the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens Stål (Hemiptera: Delphacidae). The complete cDNA (2467 bp) contains a 1938-bp open reading frame encoding 646 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequence of the AChE deduced from the cDNA consists of 30 residues for a putative signal peptide and 616 residues for the mature protein with a predicted molecular weight of 69,418. The three residues (Ser242, Glu371, and His485) that putatively form the catalytic triad and the six Cys that form intra-subunit disulfide bonds are completely conserved, and 10 out of the 14 aromatic residues lining the active site gorge of the AChE are also conserved. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA showed an approximately 2.6-kb transcript, and Southern blot analysis revealed there likely was just a single copy of this gene in N. lugens. The deduced protein sequence is most similar to AChE of Nephotettix cincticeps with 83% amino acid identity. Phylogenetic analysis constructed with 45 AChEs from 30 species showed that the deduced N. lugens AChE formed a cluster with the other 8 insect AChE2s. Additionally, the hypervariable region and amino acids specific to insect AChE2 also existed in the AChE of N. lugens. The results revealed that the AChE cDNA cloned in this work belongs to insect AChE2 subgroup, which is orthologous to Drosophila AChE. Comparison of the AChEs between the susceptible and resistant strains revealed a point mutation, Gly185Ser, is likely responsible for the insensitivity of the AChE to methamidopho in the resistant strain. PMID:20874389

  15. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1996-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  16. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1996-01-09

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form. The method comprises: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  17. Complete prewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyshin, P.; Parry, A. O.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We study continuous interfacial transitions, analagous to two-dimensional complete wetting, associated with the first-order prewetting line, which can occur on steps, patterned walls, grooves and wedges, and which are sensitive to both the range of the intermolecular forces and interfacial fluctuation effects. These transitions compete with wetting, filling and condensation producing very rich phase diagrams even for relatively simple prototypical geometries. Using microscopic classical density functional theory to model systems with realistic Lennard-Jones fluid–fluid and fluid–substrate intermolecular potentials, we compute mean-field fluid density profiles, adsorption isotherms and phase diagrams for a variety of confining geometries.

  18. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1998-11-03

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries. 19 figs.

  19. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1998-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries.

  20. Constructing and detecting a cDNA library for mites.

    PubMed

    Hu, Li; Zhao, YaE; Cheng, Juan; Yang, YuanJun; Li, Chen; Lu, ZhaoHui

    2015-10-01

    RNA extraction and construction of complementary DNA (cDNA) library for mites have been quite challenging due to difficulties in acquiring tiny living mites and breaking their hard chitin. The present study is to explore a better method to construct cDNA library for mites that will lay the foundation on transcriptome and molecular pathogenesis research. We selected Psoroptes cuniculi as an experimental subject and took the following steps to construct and verify cDNA library. First, we combined liquid nitrogen grinding with TRIzol for total RNA extraction. Then, switching mechanism at 5' end of the RNA transcript (SMART) technique was used to construct full-length cDNA library. To evaluate the quality of cDNA library, the library titer and recombination rate were calculated. The reliability of cDNA library was detected by sequencing and analyzing positive clones and genes amplified by specific primers. The results showed that the RNA concentration was 836 ng/μl and the absorbance ratio at 260/280 nm was 1.82. The library titer was 5.31 × 10(5) plaque-forming unit (PFU)/ml and the recombination rate was 98.21%, indicating that the library was of good quality. In the 33 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of P. cuniculi, two clones of 1656 and 1658 bp were almost identical with only three variable sites detected, which had an identity of 99.63% with that of Psoroptes ovis, indicating that the cDNA library was reliable. Further detection by specific primers demonstrated that the 553-bp Pso c II gene sequences of P. cuniculi had an identity of 98.56% with those of P. ovis, confirming that the cDNA library was not only reliable but also feasible.

  1. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon. .

  2. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  3. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of cDNA vaccine encoded antigens by modulation of antigen processing.

    PubMed

    Platteel, Anouk C M; Marit de Groot, A; Keller, Christin; Andersen, Peter; Ovaa, Huib; Kloetzel, Peter M; Mishto, Michele; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2016-09-30

    Most vaccines are based on protective humoral responses while for intracellular pathogens CD8(+) T cells are regularly needed to provide protection. However, poor processing efficiency of antigens is often a limiting factor in CD8(+) T cell priming, hampering vaccine efficacy. The multistage cDNA vaccine H56, encoding three secreted Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens, was used to test a complete strategy to enhance vaccine' immunogenicity. Potential CD8(+) T cell epitopes in H56 were predicted using the NetMHC3.4/ANN program. Mice were immunized with H56 cDNA using dermal DNA tattoo immunization and epitope candidates were tested for recognition by responding CD8(+) T cells in ex vivo assays. Seven novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes were identified. H56 immunogenicity could be substantially enhanced by two strategies: (i) fusion of the H56 sequence to cDNA of proteins that modify intracellular antigen processing or provide CD4(+) T cell help, (ii) by substitution of the epitope's hydrophobic C-terminal flanking residues for polar glutamic acid, which facilitated their proteasome-mediated generation. We conclude that this whole strategy of in silico prediction of potential CD8(+) T cell epitopes in novel antigens, followed by fusion to sequences with immunogenicity-enhancing properties or modification of epitope flanking sequences to improve proteasome-mediated processing, may be exploited to design novel vaccines against emerging or 'hard to treat' intracellular pathogens. PMID:27593157

  4. Ohanin, a novel protein from king cobra venom: its cDNA and genomic organization.

    PubMed

    Pung, Yuh Fen; Kumar, Sanjeed Vijaya; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Fry, Bryan G; Kumar, Prakash P; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2006-04-26

    Ohanin, from king cobra venom, is a novel protein which induces hypolocomotion and hyperalgesia in mice [Pung, Y.F., Wong, P.T.H., Kumar, P.P., Hodgson W.C., Kini, R.M., 2005. Ohanin, a novel protein from king cobra venom induces hypolocomotion and hyperalgesia in mice. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 13137-13147.]. It is weakly similar to PRY-SPRY domains (B30.2-like domain). Here we report the complete cDNA and genomic organization of ohanin. Interestingly, cDNA sequence does not show significant sequence similarity to any known sequences, including those of B30.2-like domain-containing proteins. Its full-length cDNA sequence of 1558 bp encodes for prepro-ohanin with a propeptide segment at the C-terminal. Ohanin is the first member of a new subfamily of proteins containing B30.2-like domain with short N-terminal segment. We named this subfamily as vespryns. There are two mRNA subtypes differing in their 5'-untranslated regions. Southern hybridization study shows that ohanin is encoded by a single gene. Its genomic sequence is 7086 bp with five exons and four introns, and the two types of mRNAs are generated by alternative splicing of exon 2. Our results indicate that ohanin and vespryns may have evolved from the same ancestral gene as B30.2 domain. PMID:16472942

  5. Ohanin, a novel protein from king cobra venom: its cDNA and genomic organization.

    PubMed

    Pung, Yuh Fen; Kumar, Sanjeed Vijaya; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Fry, Bryan G; Kumar, Prakash P; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2006-04-26

    Ohanin, from king cobra venom, is a novel protein which induces hypolocomotion and hyperalgesia in mice [Pung, Y.F., Wong, P.T.H., Kumar, P.P., Hodgson W.C., Kini, R.M., 2005. Ohanin, a novel protein from king cobra venom induces hypolocomotion and hyperalgesia in mice. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 13137-13147.]. It is weakly similar to PRY-SPRY domains (B30.2-like domain). Here we report the complete cDNA and genomic organization of ohanin. Interestingly, cDNA sequence does not show significant sequence similarity to any known sequences, including those of B30.2-like domain-containing proteins. Its full-length cDNA sequence of 1558 bp encodes for prepro-ohanin with a propeptide segment at the C-terminal. Ohanin is the first member of a new subfamily of proteins containing B30.2-like domain with short N-terminal segment. We named this subfamily as vespryns. There are two mRNA subtypes differing in their 5'-untranslated regions. Southern hybridization study shows that ohanin is encoded by a single gene. Its genomic sequence is 7086 bp with five exons and four introns, and the two types of mRNAs are generated by alternative splicing of exon 2. Our results indicate that ohanin and vespryns may have evolved from the same ancestral gene as B30.2 domain.

  6. Identification of a highly abundant cDNA isolated from senescent WI-38 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, T. ); Foster, D.N. )

    1989-12-01

    A cDNA library was constructed from poly(A){sup +} RNA derived from late passage WI-38 cells and differentially screened with cDNA probes from early and late passage cells. From a number of clones which exhibited differences in intensity of hybridization to the early or late passage probes, one was chosen for further analysis because of its large increase in hybridization to the late passage probe. This clone accounted for approximately 1% of the recombinants in the library. The partial cDNA clone shows complete sequence homology to elongation factor I {alpha} (EF-I {alpha}). Northern analysis of poly(A){sup +} RNA from cells at various population doublings suggested that a 2.2-kb transcript, homologous to EF-I {alpha} accumulates as cells near the end of their replicative life span (phase 3). When early and late passage cells were reexposed to serum after serum starvation, this transcript decreased in abundance. Additionally, a lower molecular weight transcript (1.6 kb) was detected 18 hours following serum stimulation in early passage cells and 9 hours after stimulation in late passage cells.

  7. Identification of a highly abundant cDNA isolated from senescent WI-38 cells.

    PubMed

    Giordano, T; Foster, D N

    1989-12-01

    A cDNA library was constructed from poly(A)+ RNA derived from late passage WI-38 cells and differentially screened with cDNA probes from early and late passage cells. From a number of clones which exhibited differences in intensity of hybridization to the early or late passage probes, one was chosen for further analysis because of its large increase in hybridization to the late passage probe. This clone accounted for approximately 1% of the recombinants in the library. The partial cDNA clone shows complete sequence homology to elongation factor I alpha (EF-I alpha). Northern analysis of poly(A)+ RNA from cells at various population doublings suggested that a 2.2-kb transcript, homologous to EF-I alpha accumulates as cells near the end of their replicative life span (phase III). When early and late passage cells were reexposed to serum after serum starvation, this transcript decreased in abundance. Additionally, a lower molecular weight transcript (1.6 kb) was detected 18 h following serum stimulation in early passage cells and 9 h after stimulation in late passage cells. PMID:2480908

  8. Receptors bound to antiprogestin from abortive complexes with hormone responsive elements.

    PubMed

    Guiochon-Mantel, A; Loosfelt, H; Ragot, T; Bailly, A; Atger, M; Misrahi, M; Perricaudet, M; Milgrom, E

    1988-12-15

    The mechanism of action of antisteroids is not understood and explanations of their antagonistic activity have been sought at all levels of hormone action. It has been proposed that antisteroids, after binding to receptor, trap it into a non-activated (non DNA-binding) form possibly through interaction with a heat-shock protein of relative molecular mass (Mr) 90,000 (90 K), or that the antisteroids provoke binding of receptor to nonspecific DNA sites but not to hormone responsive elements (HREs), or that the antisteroid-receptor complexes can bind to HREs but form abortive complexes that fail to regulate transcription. We have constructed a deleted cDNA encoding a mutant form of rabbit progesterone receptor which exhibits constitutive activity, that is, binds to HREs in the absence of hormone and thus bypasses the first two steps discussed above. Co-transfection experiments allowed the expression of both constitutive and wild-type receptors in the same recipient cells. Antiprogestin RU486-wild-type receptor complexes completely suppressed the activity of the constitutive receptor on a reporter gene, showing that the inhibition is at the level of their common responsive elements. PMID:3200320

  9. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding hexokinase from tomato.

    PubMed

    Menu, T; Rothan, C; Dai, N; Petreikov, M; Etienne, C; Destrac-Irvine, A; Schaffer, A; Granot, D; Ricard, B

    2001-01-01

    Two different partial sequences encoding putative hexokinase (HXK, ATP: hexose-6-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.1) were isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) by RT-PCR using degenerate primers. Southern blot analysis suggested the existence of two divergent HXK genes. A complete cDNA of one HXK was isolated by screening a cDNA library prepared from young cherry tomato fruit. The 1770 bp cDNA of LeHXK2 contained an open reading frame encoding a 496 amino acid protein that has 69% identity with the two Arabidopsis HXKs, 83 and 85% identity with potato StHXK1 and tobacco NtHXK, respectively. However, this clone had 97% amino acid identity with potato StHXK2 and, therefore, was named LeHXK2. LeHXK2 cDNA was expressed in a triple mutant yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strain which lacked the ability to phosphorylate glucose and fructose and, therefore, was unable to grow on these sugars as carbon sources. Mutant cells expressing LeHXK2 grew on both glucose and fructose with shorter doubling time on glucose. The kinetic properties of LeHXK2 expressed in yeast were determined after the purification of LeHXK2 by HPLC-ion exchange chromatography, confirming the identity of LeHXK2 as hexokinase with higher affinity to glucose. LeHXK2 mRNA was detected by RT-PCR expression analysis in all organs and tissues and at all stages of fruit development. However, semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that LeHXK2 was most highly expressed in flowers.

  10. A putative peroxidase cDNA from turnip and analysis of the encoded protein sequence.

    PubMed

    Romero-Gómez, S; Duarte-Vázquez, M A; García-Almendárez, B E; Mayorga-Martínez, L; Cervantes-Avilés, O; Regalado, C

    2008-12-01

    A putative peroxidase cDNA was isolated from turnip roots (Brassica napus L. var. purple top white globe) by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Total RNA extracted from mature turnip roots was used as a template for RT-PCR, using a degenerated primer designed to amplify the highly conserved distal motif of plant peroxidases. The resulting partial sequence was used to design the rest of the specific primers for 5' and 3' RACE. Two cDNA fragments were purified, sequenced, and aligned with the partial sequence from RT-PCR, and a complete overlapping sequence was obtained and labeled as BbPA (Genbank Accession No. AY423440, named as podC). The full length cDNA is 1167bp long and contains a 1077bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 358 deduced amino acid peroxidase polypeptide. The putative peroxidase (BnPA) showed a calculated Mr of 34kDa, and isoelectric point (pI) of 4.5, with no significant identity with other reported turnip peroxidases. Sequence alignment showed that only three peroxidases have a significant identity with BnPA namely AtP29a (84%), and AtPA2 (81%) from Arabidopsis thaliana, and HRPA2 (82%) from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana). Work is in progress to clone this gene into an adequate host to study the specific role and possible biotechnological applications of this alternative peroxidase source. PMID:18686036

  11. Analysis of beta-carotene hydroxylase gene cDNA isolated from the American oil-palm (Elaeis oleifera) mesocarp tissue cDNA library

    PubMed Central

    Bhore, Subhash J; Kassim, Amelia; Loh, Chye Ying; Shah, Farida H

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that the nutritional quality of the American oil-palm (Elaeis oleifera) mesocarp oil is superior to that of African oil-palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. Tenera) mesocarp oil. Therefore, it is of important to identify the genetic features for its superior value. This could be achieved through the genome sequencing of the oil-palm. However, the genome sequence is not available in the public domain due to commercial secrecy. Hence, we constructed a cDNA library and generated expressed sequence tags (3,205) from the mesocarp tissue of the American oil-palm. We continued to annotate each of these cDNAs after submitting to GenBank/DDBJ/EMBL. A rough analysis turned our attention to the beta-carotene hydroxylase (Chyb) enzyme encoding cDNA. Then, we completed the full sequencing of cDNA clone for its both strands using M13 forward and reverse primers. The full nucleotide and protein sequence was further analyzed and annotated using various Bioinformatics tools. The analysis results showed the presence of fatty acid hydroxylase superfamily domain in the protein sequence. The multiple sequence alignment of selected Chyb amino acid sequences from other plant species and algal members with E. oleifera Chyb using ClustalW and its phylogenetic analysis suggest that Chyb from monocotyledonous plant species, Lilium hubrid, Crocus sativus and Zea mays are the most evolutionary related with E. oleifera Chyb. This study reports the annotation of E. oleifera Chyb. Abbreviations ESTs - expressed sequence tags, EoChyb - Elaeis oleifera beta-carotene hydroxylase, MC - main cluster PMID:21364789

  12. Influence of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor/HLA ligand matching on achievement of T-cell complete donor chimerism in related donor nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sobecks, R M; Ball, E J; Askar, M; Theil, K S; Rybicki, L A; Thomas, D; Brown, S; Kalaycio, M; Andresen, S; Pohlman, B; Dean, R; Sweetenham, J; Macklis, R; Bernhard, L; Cherni, K; Copelan, E; Maciejewski, J P; Bolwell, B J

    2008-04-01

    Achievement of complete donor chimerism (CDC) after allogeneic nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (NMHSCT) is important for preventing graft rejection and for generating a graft-vs-malignancy effect. The alloreactivity of NK cells and some T-cell subsets is mediated through the interaction of their killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) with target cell HLA/KIR ligands. The influence of KIR matching on the achievement of T-cell CDC after NMHSCT has not been previously described. We analyzed 31 patients undergoing T-cell replete related donor NMHSCT following fludarabine and 200 cGy TBI. Recipient inhibitory KIR genotype and donor HLA/KIR ligand matches were used to generate an inhibitory KIR score from 1 to 4 based upon the potential number of recipient inhibitory KIRs that could be engaged with donor HLA/KIR ligands. Patients with a score of 1 were less likely to achieve T-cell CDC (P=0.016) and more likely to develop graft rejection (P=0.011) than those with scores greater than 1. Thus, patients with lower inhibitory KIR scores may have more active anti-donor immune effector cells that may reduce donor chimerism. Conversely, patients with greater inhibitory KIR scores may have less active NK cell and T-cell populations, which may make them more likely to achieve CDC.

  13. cDNA cloning and promoter analysis of rat caspase-9.

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, J; Yi, X; Venkatachalam, M A; Dong, Z

    2001-01-01

    Caspase-9 is the apex caspase of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, which plays a critical role in apoptotic initiation and progression. However, gene regulation of caspase-9 is largely unknown. This is in part due to the lack of information on the gene promoter. Here we have cloned the full-length cDNA of rat caspase-9 and have isolated promoter regions of this gene. The rat caspase-9 cDNA of 2058 bp predicts a protein of 454 amino acids, which contains a caspase-recruitment domain ('CARD') at the N-terminus and enzymic domains at the C-terminus. The enzyme's active site, with a characteristic motif of QACGG, was also identified. Overall, rat and human caspase-9 have 71% identity. With the cDNA sequence, we subsequently isolated the proximal 5'-flanking regions of rat caspase-9 by the procedure of genomic walking. The 2270 bp genomic segment is 'TATA-less', but contains several GC boxes. Elements binding known transcription factors such as Sp-1, Pit-1, CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP), glucocorticoid receptor and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) were also identified. When cloned into reporter gene vectors, the genomic segment showed significant promoter activity, indicating that the 5'-flanking regions isolated by genomic walking contain the gene promoter of rat caspase-9. Of significance is that the cloned promoter segments were activated by severe hypoxia, conditions inducing caspase-9 transcription. Thus, the genomic sequences reported here contain not only the basal promoter of rat caspase-9 but also regulatory elements responsive to pathophysiological stimuli including hypoxia. PMID:11695991

  14. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Bonaldo, Maria DeFatima; Soares, Marcelo Bento

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  15. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Bonaldo, M.D.; Soares, M.B.

    1997-12-30

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 1 fig.

  16. cDNA microarray screening in food safety.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K

    2006-04-01

    The cDNA microarray technology and related bioinformatics tools presents a wide range of novel application opportunities. The technology may be productively applied to address food safety. In this mini-review article, we present an update highlighting the late breaking discoveries that demonstrate the vitality of cDNA microarray technology as a tool to analyze food safety with reference to microbial pathogens and genetically modified foods. In order to bring the microarray technology to mainstream food safety, it is important to develop robust user-friendly tools that may be applied in a field setting. In addition, there needs to be a standardized process for regulatory agencies to interpret and act upon microarray-based data. The cDNA microarray approach is an emergent technology in diagnostics. Its values lie in being able to provide complimentary molecular insight when employed in addition to traditional tests for food safety, as part of a more comprehensive battery of tests.

  17. Restriction landmark cDNA scanning (RLCS): a novel cDNA display system using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, H; Yaoi, T; Kawai, J; Hara, A; Kuwajima, G; Wantanabe, S

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a new method, designated restriction landmark cDNA scanning (RLCS), which displays many cDNA species quantitatively and simultaneously as two-dimensional gel spots. In this method cDNA species of uniform length were prepared for each mRNA species using restriction enzymes. After the restriction enzyme sites were radiolabeled as landmarks, the labeled fragments were subjected to high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In analyses of cDNA samples from adult mouse liver and brain (cerebral cortex, cerebellum and brain stem) we detected approximately 500 and >1000 discrete gel spots respectively of various intensities at a time. The spot patterns of the three brain regions were very similar, although not identical, but were quite different from the pattern for the liver. RNA blot hybridization analysis using several cloned spot DNAs as probes showed that differences in intensity of the spots among RLCS profiles correlated well with expression levels of the corresponding mRNA species in the brain regions. Because the spots and their intensities reflect distinct mRNA species and their expression level respectively, the RLCS is a novel cDNA display system which provides a great deal of information and should be useful for systematic documentation of differentially expressed genes. PMID:8628652

  18. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  19. cDNA sequences of two inducible T-cell genes

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, B.S. Guthrie Research Institute, Sayre, PA ); Weissman, S.M. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors have previously described a set of human T-lymphocyte-specific cDNA clones isolated by a modified differential screening procedure. Apparent full-length cDNAs containing the sequences of 14 of the 16 initial isolates were sequenced and were found to represent five different species of mRNA; three of the five species were identical to previously reported cDNA sequences of preproenkephalin, T-cell-replacing factor, and a serine esterase, respectively. The other two species, 4-1BB and L2G25B, were inducible sequences found in mRNA from both a cytolytic T-lymphocyte and a helper T-lymphocyte clone and were not previously described in T-cell mRNA; these mRNA sequences encode peptides of 256 and 92 amino acids, respectively. Both peptides contain putative leader sequences. The protein encoded by 4-1BB also has a potential membrane anchor segment and other features also seen in known receptor proteins.

  20. Molecular cloning and analysis of cDNA encoding a plant tryptophan decarboxylase: comparison with animal dopa decarboxylases.

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, V; Marineau, C; Brisson, N

    1989-01-01

    The sequence of a cDNA clone that includes the complete coding region of tryptophan decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.28, formerly EC 4.1.1.27) from periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) is reported. The cDNA clone (1747 base pairs) was isolated by antibody screening of a cDNA expression library produced from poly(A)+ RNA found in developing seedlings of C. roseus. The clone hybridized to a 1.8-kilobase mRNA from developing seedlings and from young leaves of mature plants. The identity of the clone was confirmed when extracts of transformed Escherichia coli expressed a protein containing tryptophan decarboxylase enzyme activity. The tryptophan decarboxylase cDNA clone encodes a protein of 500 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 56,142 Da. The amino acid sequence shows a high degree of similarity with the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (dopa decarboxylase) and the alpha-methyldopa-hypersensitive protein of Drosophila melanogaster. The tryptophan decarboxylase sequence also showed significant similarity to feline glutamate decarboxylase and mouse ornithine decarboxylase, suggesting a possible evolutionary link between these amino acid decarboxylases. Images PMID:2704736

  1. Putative diazepam binding inhibitor peptide: cDNA clones from rat.

    PubMed Central

    Mocchetti, I; Einstein, R; Brosius, J

    1986-01-01

    cDNA clones corresponding to the polypeptide that has been shown to be an endogenous diazepam binding inhibitor and may act as a physiological ligand for the benzodiazepine/beta-carboline receptor have been isolated from bacteriophage lambda recombinant libraries from rat hypothalamus, total brain, and liver. The clones contain an open reading frame corresponding to 87 amino acids. A signal sequence is not present. In addition to high levels of mRNA in various brain regions, RNA blot analysis reveals an abundance of diazepam binding inhibitor mRNA in many peripheral organs (e.g., testes, kidney, liver, and heart) that are known to be rich in peripheral benzodiazepine recognition sites. The size of the mRNA in all tissue examined is approximately 0.7 kilobase. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA suggests the presence of about six genes in the rat, some of which may be pseudogenes. Images PMID:3463960

  2. NORMAL NASAL GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS USING CDNA ARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal Nasal Gene Expression Levels Using cDNA Array Technology.

    The nasal epithelium is a target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity. To detect and analyze genetic events which contribute to nasal tumor development, we first defined the gene expressi...

  3. A BIOINFORMATIC STRATEGY TO RAPIDLY CHARACTERIZE CDNA LIBRARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Bioinformatic Strategy to Rapidly Characterize cDNA Libraries

    G. Charles Ostermeier1, David J. Dix2 and Stephen A. Krawetz1.
    1Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, & Institute for Scientific Computing, Wayne State Univer...

  4. cDNA expression cloning in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, B J

    2001-05-01

    This unit contains protocols for expression cloning in mammalian cells. Either calcium phosphate- or liposome-mediated transfection of mammalian cells, or virus infection and liposome-mediated transfection are used to screen pools derived from a cDNA library. cDNA pools are prepared for cloning from library-transformed E. coli grown in liquid culture medium or on antibiotic-containing selection plates. Results of screening assays for expression can be detected using autoradiography of dishes of cultured cells to identify clones, direct visualization of radiolabeled cells on emulsion-coated and developed chamber slides, detection and quantification of gene activity by a functional (transport) assay with scintillation counting, or detection using a filter-based assay for binding of radioligand to membranes or whole cells. The most critical step of any cDNA cloning project is the establishment of the screening protocol. Therefore, the bioassay for the gene product must be established prior to executing any of these protocols, including construction of the cDNA library. PMID:18428491

  5. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION IN FISH USING CDNA ARRAYS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are developing cDNA macroarrays to measure the induction of gene expression in sheepshead minnows and largemouth bass exposed to anthropogenic chemicals that can mimic the action of endogenous hormones. For sheepshead minnows exposed in aqua, we observed similar genetic profil...

  6. Molecular cloning and expression of the human interleukin 5 receptor

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Human interleukin 5 (IL-5) plays an important role in proliferation and differentiation of human eosinophils. We report the isolation of cDNA clones from cDNA libraries of human eosinophils by using murine IL-5 receptor alpha chain cDNA as a probe. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence indicated that the human IL-5 receptor has approximately 70% amino acid sequence homology with the murine IL-5 receptor and retains features common to the cytokine receptor superfamily. One cDNA clone encodes a glycoprotein of 420 amino acids (Mr 47,670) with an NH2- terminal hydrophobic region (20 amino acids), a glycosylated extracellular domain (324 amino acids), a transmembrane domain (21 amino acids), and a cytoplasmic domain (55 amino acids). Another cDNA encodes only the extracellular domain of this receptor molecule. Other cDNA clones encode molecules having diversified cytoplasmic domains. COS7 cells transfected with the cDNA expressed a approximately 60-kD protein and bound IL-5 with a single class of affinity (Kd = 250-590 pM). The Kd values were similar to that observed in normal human eosinophils. In contrast to the murine 60-kD alpha chain, which binds IL-5 with low affinity (Kd = approximately 10 nM), the human alpha chain homologue can bind IL-5 with much higher affinity by itself. RNA blot analysis of human cells demonstrated two transcripts (approximately 5.3 and 1.4 kb). Both of them were expressed in normal human eosinophils and in erythroleukemic cell line TF-1, which responds to IL-5. The human IL-5 receptor characterized in this paper is essential for signal transduction, because expression of this molecule in murine IL-3-dependent cell line FDC-P1 allowed these cells to proliferate in response to IL-5. PMID:1732409

  7. Human and rat TR4 orphan receptors specify a subclass of the steroid receptor superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C; Da Silva, S L; Ideta, R; Lee, Y; Yeh, S; Burbach, J P

    1994-01-01

    We have identified a member of the steroid receptor superfamily and cloned it from human and rat hypothalamus, prostate, and testis cDNA libraries. The open reading frame between first ATG and terminator TGA can encode 615 (human) and 596 (rat) amino acids with calculated molecular mass of 67.3 (human) and 65.4 (rat) kDa. The amino acid sequence of this protein, called TR4 orphan receptor, is closely related to the previously identified TR2 orphan receptor. The high homology between TR2 and TR4 orphan receptor suggests that these two orphan receptors constitute a unique subfamily within the steroid receptor superfamily. These two orphan receptors are differentially expressed in rat tissues. Unlike TR2 orphan receptors, the TR4 orphan receptor appears to be predominantly located in granule cells of the hippocampus and the cerebellum, suggesting that it may play some role(s) in transcriptional regulation in these neurons. Images PMID:8016112

  8. Full-length cDNA cloning and structural characterization of preproinsulin in Alligator sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R; Zhang, S Z; Li, E; Wang, C; Wang, C L; Wu, X B

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is an important endocrine hormone that plays a critical physiological role in regulating metabolism and glucostasis in vertebrates. In this study, the complete cDNA of Alligator sinensis preproinsulin gene was cloned for the first time by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and rapid amplification of cDNA ends methods; the amino acid sequence encoded and protein structure were analyzed. The full-length of preproinsulin cDNA sequence consists of 528 base pairs (bp), comprising a 34-bp 5'-untranslated region, a 170-bp 3'-untranslated region and an open reading frame that is 324 bp in length. The open reading frame encodes a 107-amino acid preproinsulin with a molecular weight of approximately 12,153.8 Da, theoretical isoelectric point of 5.68, aliphatic index of 92.06, and grand average of hydropathicity of -0.157, from which a signal peptide, a B-chain, a C-peptide, and an A-chain are derived. Online analysis suggested that the deduced preproinsulin amino acid sequence contains a transmembrane region, and that it has a signal peptide whose cleavage site occurs between alanine 24 and alanine 25. Comparative analysis of preproinsulin amino acid sequences indicated that the A-chain and B-chain sequences of preproinsulins are highly conserved between reptiles and birds, and that the preproinsulin amino acid sequence of Alligator sinensis shares 89% similarity to that of Chelonia mydas, but low similarity of 48-63% to those of mammals and fishes. The phylogenetic tree constructed using the neighbor-joining method revealed that preproinsulin of Alligator sinensis had high homology with reptiles and birds, such as Chelonia mydas, Gallus gallus, and Columba livia. PMID:25366775

  9. Development of an agroinoculation system for full-length and GFP-tagged cDNA clones of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongying; Xiao, Caili; Han, Kelei; Peng, Jiejun; Lin, Lin; Lu, Yuwen; Xie, Li; Wu, Xiaohua; Xu, Pei; Li, Guojing; Chen, Jianping; Yan, Fei

    2015-11-01

    The complete 6243-nucleotide sequence of a cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolate from bottle gourd in Zhejiang province, China, was determined. A full-length cDNA clone of this isolate was constructed by inserting the cDNA between the 35S promoter and the ribozyme in the binary plasmid pCB301-CH. A suspension of an Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105 clone carrying this construct was highly infectious in Nicotiana benthamiana and bottle gourd. Another infectious clone containing the green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter gene was also successfully constructed. This study is the first report of the efficient use of agroinoculation for generating CGMMV infections. PMID:26323263

  10. A new antifungal peptide from the seeds of Phytolacca americana: characterization, amino acid sequence and cDNA cloning.

    PubMed

    Shao, F; Hu, Z; Xiong, Y M; Huang, Q Z; WangCG; Zhu, R H; Wang, D C

    1999-03-19

    An antifungal peptide from seeds of Phytolacca americana, designated PAFP-s, has been isolated. The peptide is highly basic and consists of 38 residues with three disulfide bridges. Its molecular mass of 3929.0 was determined by mass spectrometry. The complete amino acid sequence was obtained from automated Edman degradation, and cDNA cloning was successfully performed by 3'-RACE. The deduced amino acid sequence of a partial cDNA corresponded to the amino acid sequence from chemical sequencing. PAFP-s exhibited a broad spectrum of antifungal activity, and its activities differed among various fungi. PAFP-s displayed no inhibitory activity towards Escherichia coli. PAFP-s shows significant sequence similarities and the same cysteine motif with Mj-AMPs, antimicrobial peptides from seeds of Mirabilis jalapa belonging to the knottin-type antimicrobial peptide.

  11. Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica: cDNA cloning of a histone H3 with a divergent primary structure.

    PubMed

    Födinger, M; Ortner, S; Plaimauer, B; Wiedermann, G; Scheiner, O; Duchêne, M

    1993-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica has an unusual nuclear structure characterized by a low degree of chromatin condensation and the absence of stainable metaphase chromosomes. Although nucleosome-like particles were observed, no information about histones was available so far. In this paper we describe a cDNA clone with significant homology to H3 histones that was isolated from a library of pathogenic E. histolytica. The complete cDNA encodes a 15-kDa polypeptide, which like the histone sequence from Volvox carteri is shorter by one residue than the human homologue. The amino acid sequence has only 69% identity with human H3.3 histone and 67% identity with the human H3.1 histone. This is the highest degree of sequence divergence observed for any eukaryote H3 histone sequence. Our results indicate that this divergence may contribute to the unusual chromatin structure of E. histolytica. PMID:8341328

  12. Expressed sequence tags from a NaCl-treated Suaeda salsa cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Ma, X L; Zhang, Q; Ma, C L; Wang, P P; Sun, Y F; Zhao, Y X; Zhang, H

    2001-04-18

    Past efforts to improve plant tolerance to osmotic stress have had limited success owing to the genetic complexity of stress responses. The first step towards cataloging and categorizing genetically complex abotic stress responses is the rapid discovery of genes by the large-scale partial sequencing of randomly selected cDNA clones or expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Suaeda salsa, which can survive seawater-level salinity, is a favorite halophytic model for salt tolerant research. We constructed a NaCl-treated cDNA library of Suaeda salsa and sequenced 1048 randomly selected clones, out of which 1016 clones produced readable sequences (773 showed homology to previously identified genes, 227 matched unknown protein coding regions, 16 anomalous sequences or sequences of bacterial origin were excluded from further analysis). By sequence analysis we identified 492 unique clones: 315 showed homology to previously identified genes, 177 matched unknown protein coding regions (101 of which have been found before in other organisms and 76 are completely novel). All our EST data are available on the Internet. We believe that our dbEST and the associated DNA materials will be a useful source to scientists engaging in stress-tolerance study. PMID:11313146

  13. Amino acid sequence of the alpha subunit of human leukocyte adhesion receptor Mo1 (complement receptor type 3)

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Mo1 (complement receptor type 3, CR3; CD11b/CD18) is an adhesion- promoting human leukocyte surface membrane heterodimer (alpha subunit 155 kD [CD11b] noncovalently linked to a beta subunit of 95 kD [CD18]). The complete amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA of the human alpha subunit is reported. The protein consists of 1,136 amino acids with a long amino-terminal extracytoplasmic domain, a 26-amino acid hydrophobic transmembrane segment, and a 19-carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic domain. The extracytoplasmic region has three putative Ca2+- binding domains with good homology and one with weak homology to the "lock washer" Ca2+-binding consensus sequence. These metal-binding domains explain the divalent cation-dependent functions mediated by Mo1. The alpha subunit is highly homologous to the alpha subunit of leukocyte p150,95 and to a lesser extent, to the alpha subunit of other "integrin" receptors such as fibronectin, vitronectin, and platelet IIb/IIIa receptors in humans and position-specific antigen-2 (PS2) in Drosophila. Mo1 alpha, like p150, contains a unique 187-amino acid stretch NH2-terminal to the metal-binding domains. This region could be involved in some of the specific functions mediated by these leukocyte glycoproteins. PMID:2454931

  14. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

  15. Molecular cloning of lungfish proopiomelanocortin cDNA.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Y; Takahashi, A; Meguro, H; Kawauchi, H

    1999-09-01

    To investigate the evolution of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) from fish to tetrapods, nucleotide sequence of POMC cDNA from a lobe-finned fish, the African lungfish, was determined. POMC cDNA was prepared from lungfish pituitary glands. The POMC cDNA is composed of 1114 bp, excluding a poly-A tail, and encodes 255 amino acids (aa) including a signal peptide of 25 aa. The lungfish POMC contains the segment corresponding to gamma-melanotropin (MSH), corticotropin, alpha-MSH, beta-MSH, and beta-endorphin at positions (50-61), (108-146), (108-120), (178-194), and (197-230), respectively. The lungfish POMC shows greater sequence identity on average with amphibian (62%), ancient ray-finned fishes including acipenseriformes and semionotiformes (62%), and mammalian POMC (52%) than with teleostean (49%), elasmobranch (46%), and agnathan POMC (31%). Thus, the overall structural feature of lungfish POMC is close to the tetrapod POMCs which contain gamma-MSH and the ancient ray-finned fishes POMCs containing gamma-MSH-like sequence. However, amino acid sequence of lungfish beta-endorphin exhibits properties which are specifically observed in the ray-finned fishes and the elasmobranchs.

  16. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  17. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  18. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

  19. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  20. Controlled ribonucleotide tailing of cDNA ends (CRTC) by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase: a new approach in PCR-mediated analysis of mRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, W M; Mueller, M W

    1996-05-01

    Controlled ribonucleotide tailing of cDNA ends (CRTC) by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase is a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated technique that was developed to facilitate cloning and direct sequence analysis of complete 5'-terminal unknown coding regions of rare RNA molecules. In contrast with standard tailing protocols using dNTPs as the substrate, ribo-tailing of cDNA ends is easily controllable, self-limited (from two to four rNMP incorporations) and highly efficient (>98%). By virtue of the homopolymeric ribo-tail, the modified cDNA is anchored to the 3' overhang of a double-stranded DNA-adaptor in a T4 DNA ligase-dependent ligation. PCR amplification, mediated by two sequence-specific primers, yields the desired unique product suitable for cloning and dideoxy-sequencing.

  1. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding the cytosolic copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase from sweet potato tuberous root.

    PubMed

    Lin, C T; Yeh, K W; Kao, M C; Shaw, J F

    1993-11-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding a putative copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD) of sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. cv Tainong 57, was isolated from a cDNA library constructed in lambda gt10 from tuber root mRNA. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this cDNA clone revealed that it comprises a complete open reading frame coding for 152 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence showed higher homology (78-86%) with the sequence of the cytosolic SOD than that of the chloroplast SOD from other plant species. The residues required for coordinating copper and zinc are conserved as they are among all reported Cu/Zn-SOD sequences. In addition, it lacks recognizable plastic or mitochondrial targeting sequences. These data suggest that the isolated sweet potato clone encodes a cytosolic Cu/Zn-SOD.

  2. Stable expression of transfected Torpedo acetylcholine receptor. cap alpha. subunits in mouse fibroblast L cells

    SciTech Connect

    Claudio, T.

    1987-08-01

    Torpedo californica electric organ cDNA libraries were constructed in lambdagt10 and lambdagt11. Four acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) subunit cDNA clones were isolated and shown to contain the entire coding region for each of the subunits. When in vitro synthesized AcChoR mRNA was microinjected into Xenopus laevis oocytes, functional cell surface AcChoRs were expressed. A very simple and fast /sup 22/Na-uptake experiment was performed on batches of microinjected oocytes to identify oocytes that were expressing large quantities of functional cell surface AcChoRs for use in single-channel recordings. In addition to the transient expression system, DNA-mediated contransformation is described, which is a method for stably introducing AcChoR cDNAs into the chromosomes of tissue culture cells. Because the AcChoR is composed of four different subunits, it is necessary to integrate four cDNAs into the chromosomes of the same cell before stable expression of a completely functional receptor complex can be established. The authors show that 80% of the cells that integrated the selectable marker gene into their chromosomes also integrated all four AcChoR cDNAs. When Torpedo ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA inserted into an appropriate expression vector was introduced into cells by transfection, ..cap alpha..-subunit protein was synthesized that migrated on NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gels with the same molecular mass as native Torpedo ..cap alpha.. subunits and expressed antigenic determinants similar to those of native Torpedo ..cap alpha.. subunits.

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of a new cDNA sequence encoding a venom peptide from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanhong; Luo, Feng; He, Jing; Cao, Zhijian; Miao, Lixia

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on venomous peptides derived from animals. However, little of this research has focused on peptides from centipede venoms. Here, a venom gland cDNA library was successfully constructed for the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. A new cDNA encoding the precursor of a venom peptide, named SsmTx, was cloned from the venomous gland cDNA library of the centipede S. subspinipes mutilans. The full-length SsmTx cDNA sequence is 465 nt, including a 249 nt ORF, a 45 nt 5' UTR and a 171 nt 3' UTR. There is a signal tail AATAAA 31 nt upstream of the poly (A) tail. The precursor nucleotide sequence of SsmTx encodes a signal peptide of 25 residues and a mature peptide of 57 residues, which is bridged by two pairs of disulfide bonds. SsmTx displays a unique cysteine motif that is completely different from that of other venomous animal toxins. This is the first reported cDNA sequence encoding a venom peptide from the centipede S. subspinipes mutilans.

  4. Cloning and pharmacological characterization of a rat kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, F; Xie, G X; Thompson, R C; Mansour, A; Goldstein, A; Watson, S J; Akil, H

    1993-01-01

    A full-length cDNA was isolated from a rat striatal library by using low-stringency screening with two PCR fragments, one spanning transmembrane domains 3-6 of the mouse delta opioid receptor and the other unidentified but homologous to the mouse delta receptor from rat brain. The novel cDNA had a long open reading frame encoding a protein of 380 residues with 59% identity to the mouse delta receptor and topography consistent with a seven-helix guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptor. COS-1 cells transfected with the coding region of this clone showed high-affinity binding to kappa opioid receptor-selective ligands such as dynorphin A and U-50,488 and also nonselective opioid ligands such as bremazocine, ethylketocyclazocine, and naloxone. Not bound at all (or bound with low affinity) were dynorphin A-(2-13), enantiomers of naloxone and levophanol [i.e., (+)-naloxone and dextrorphan], and selective mu and delta opioid receptor ligands. Activation of the expressed receptor by kappa receptor agonists led to inhibition of cAMP. Finally, in situ hybridization revealed a mRNA distribution in rat brain that corresponded well to the distribution of binding sites labeled with kappa-selective ligands. These observations indicate that we have cloned a cDNA encoding a rat kappa receptor of the kappa 1 subtype. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8234341

  5. Cloning and characterization of salmon hsp90 cDNA: upregulation by thermal and hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Pan, F; Zarate, J M; Tremblay, G C; Bradley, T M

    2000-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that glucocorticoids are essential for development of hypoosmoregulatory capacity in salmon during adaptation to seawater. Heat shock protein (hsp)90 has been reported to function in signal transduction and the maturation and affinity of glucocorticoid receptors. We sought to determine whether this hsp might be upregulated by thermal and hyperosmotic stress in salmon, a species that migrates between the freshwater and marine environments. A 2625-bp cDNA cloned from a salmon cDNA library was found to code for a protein of 722 amino acids exhibiting a high degree of identity with zebra fish (92%) and human (89%) hsp90beta. Accumulation of hsp90 mRNA was observed in isolated branchial lamellae incubated under hyperosmotic conditions and in branchial lamellae of salmon exposed to hyperosmotic stress in vivo. In contrast, exposure of kidney to hyperosmotic stress in vitro and in vivo failed to elicit an increase in the quantity of hsp90 mRNA. By way of comparison, accumulation of hsp90 mRNA was observed in both branchial lamellae and kidney tissue subjected to thermal stress in vitro and in vivo. Western blot analyses of proteins isolated from tissues under identical conditions in vitro revealed that the pool of hsp90 increased with thermal stress but not with osmotic stress. The results suggest that accumulation of hsp90 mRNA in response to osmotic stress is unrelated to cellular protein denaturation and that synthesis of hsp90 may be regulated at both the level of transcription and translation.

  6. cDNA cloning of luteinizing hormone subunits from brushtail possum and red kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Harrison, G A; Deane, E M; Cooper, D W

    1998-08-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) plays an important role in the reproductive cycles of all mammals. There is a large amount of both nucleotide and amino acid sequence data available for LH from eutherian mammals, but little is known about the primary structure of LH in marsupials. We have used consensus PCR primers to generate specific probes for screening pituitary cDNA libraries and report the cloning of the cDNAs encoding the alpha-subunit of LH (also shared by a number of other glycoprotein hormones) and the LH-specific beta-subunit, from the common brushtail possum, Trichosurus vulpecula, and the red kangaroo, Macropus rufus. Southern blotting experiments indicated that both genes are probably present as single copies. Comparison of the deduced marsupial protein sequences with homologous sequences from other vertebrates revealed a high degree of conservation, especially for the alpha-subunit. These sequences represent the first complete primary structures for a marsupial glycoprotein hormone to have been elucidated.

  7. Molecular cloning and sequencing of zeta-crystallin/quinone reductase cDNA from human liver.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, P; Rao, P V; Zigler, J S

    1993-03-31

    Zeta-crystallin is an enzyme-crystallin highly expressed in the lens of some hystricomorph rodents and camels. It has been shown to have a novel NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase activity and is present at enzymatic levels in a variety of tissues from various mammals. We report here the cDNA cloning of zeta-crystallin from a human liver library. One clone with the complete open reading frame was obtained. Ten nucleotides of the 5' and 796 of the 3' nontranslated regions are present in the clone including two possible polyadenylation signals. The deduced amino acid sequence is 328 residues long with a calculated molecular mass of 34910 daltons and isoelectric point of 8.73. It shows 84% identity with the guinea pig protein.

  8. Processing the Loblolly Pine PtGen2 cDNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, W. Walter; Yu, Yuan-Sheng; Simões, Marta; Dean, Jeffrey F. D.

    2009-01-01

    PtGen2 is a 26,496 feature cDNA microarray containing amplified loblolly pine ESTs. The array is produced in our laboratory for use by researchers studying gene expression in pine and other conifer species. PtGen2 was developed as a result of our gene discovery efforts in loblolly pine, and is comprised of sequences identified primarily from root tissues, but also from needle and stem.1,2 PtGen2 has been tested by hybridizing different Cy-dye labeled conifer target cDNAs, using both amplified and non-amplified indirect labeling methods, and also tested with a number of hybridization and washing conditions. This video focuses on the handling and processing of slides before and after pre-hybridization, as well as after hybridization, using some modifications to procedures developed previously.3,4 Also included, in text form only, are the protocols used for the generation, labeling and clean up of target cDNA s, as well as information on software used for downstream data processing. PtGen2 is printed with a proprietary print buffer that contains high concentrations of salt that can be difficult to remove completely. The slides are washed first in a warm SDS solution prior to pre-hybridization. After pre-hybridization, the slides are washed vigorously in several changes of water to complete removal of remaining salts. LifterSlips™ are then cleaned and positioned on the slides and labeled cDNA is carefully loaded onto the microarray by way of capillary action which provides for even distribution of the sample across the slide, and reduces the chance of bubble incorporation. Hybridization of targets to the array is done at 48°C in high humidity conditions. After hybridization, a series of standard washes are done at 53°C and room temperature for extended times. Processing PtGen2 slides using this technique reduces salt and SDS-derived artifacts often seen when the array is processed less rigorously. Hybridizing targets derived from several different conifer RNA

  9. Processing the loblolly pine PtGen2 cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, W Walter; Yu, Yuan-Sheng; Simões, Marta; Dean, Jeffrey F D

    2009-01-01

    PtGen2 is a 26,496 feature cDNA microarray containing amplified loblolly pine ESTs. The array is produced in our laboratory for use by researchers studying gene expression in pine and other conifer species. PtGen2 was developed as a result of our gene discovery efforts in loblolly pine, and is comprised of sequences identified primarily from root tissues, but also from needle and stem. PtGen2 has been tested by hybridizing different Cy-dye labeled conifer target cDNAs, using both amplified and non-amplified indirect labeling methods, and also tested with a number of hybridization and washing conditions. This video focuses on the handling and processing of slides before and after pre-hybridization, as well as after hybridization, using some modifications to procedures developed previously. Also included, in text form only, are the protocols used for the generation, labeling and clean up of target cDNA s, as well as information on software used for downstream data processing. PtGen2 is printed with a proprietary print buffer that contains high concentrations of salt that can be difficult to remove completely. The slides are washed first in a warm SDS solution prior to pre-hybridization. After pre-hybridization, the slides are washed vigorously in several changes of water to complete removal of remaining salts. LifterSlips are then cleaned and positioned on the slides and labeled cDNA is carefully loaded onto the microarray by way of capillary action which provides for even distribution of the sample across the slide, and reduces the chance of bubble incorporation. Hybridization of targets to the array is done at 48 degrees C in high humidity conditions. After hybridization, a series of standard washes are done at 53 degrees C and room temperature for extended times. Processing PtGen2 slides using this technique reduces salt and SDS-derived artifacts often seen when the array is processed less rigorously. Hybridizing targets derived from several different conifer RNA

  10. Sequence of a functional invertebrate GABAA receptor subunit which can form a chimeric receptor with a vertebrate alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R J; Vreugdenhil, E; Zaman, S H; Bhandal, N S; Usherwood, P N; Barnard, E A; Darlison, M G

    1991-01-01

    The sequence of an invertebrate GABAA receptor subunit is described. This was deduced from a cDNA which was isolated from the mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis and which corresponds to a transcript of extremely low abundance. The cDNA was isolated using short exonic sequences from part of the corresponding gene in combination with a variant of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) known as RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends). The mature polypeptide has a predicted molecular weight of 54,569 Daltons and exhibits approximately 50% identity to vertebrate GABAA receptor beta subunits. The six intron-exon boundaries determined to date in the molluscan gene occur at the same relative positions as those found in vertebrate GABAA receptor genes. Functional expression, in Xenopus oocytes, of the molluscan cDNA alone results in the formation of GABA-activated chloride ion channels that have a finite open probability even in the absence of agonist. These GABA-evoked currents can be reversibly blocked by the vertebrate GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. Surprisingly, the molluscan beta subunit is capable of replacing vertebrate beta subunits in co-expression experiments with the bovine GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit. These findings suggest that invertebrate GABAA receptors exist in vivo as hetero-oligomeric complexes. PMID:1655414

  11. Identification, molecular characterization, and chromosomal localization of the cDNA encoding a novel leucine zipper motif-containing protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Der-Shan; Chang, Nan-Chi A.; Chang, A.C.

    1996-08-15

    cDNA clones encoding a novel protein (LUZP) with three leucine zipper motifs were first identified from a murine bone marrow cDNA library. After screening two additional cDNA libraries of activated peritoneal exudate cells, 32 positive clones were obtained from 1.3 x 10{sup 7} phage plaques. Four overlapping clones constituting a total of 7399 hp were sequenced on both strands. The complete open reading frame of LUZP is 1067 amino acids. In addition to three leucine zipper motifs located at the NH2 terminus, there are three nuclear localization signals and a large number of putative Ser/Thr phosphorylation sites. Western blot analyses indicate that LUZP is predominantly expressed in brain, whereas immunocytochemistry data clearly reveal its presence in the nucleus of neutrons. Interspecific backcross analyses have mapped Luzp to mouse chromosome 4 in proximity to Gpcr14. Comparative mapping data suggest that the human homolog of Luzp will map to human chromosome 1p36. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Cloning and sequence analysis of a cDNA clone coding for the mouse GM2 activator protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bellachioma, G; Stirling, J L; Orlacchio, A; Beccari, T

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA (1.1 kb) containing the complete coding sequence for the mouse GM2 activator protein was isolated from a mouse macrophage library using a cDNA for the human protein as a probe. There was a single ATG located 12 bp from the 5' end of the cDNA clone followed by an open reading frame of 579 bp. Northern blot analysis of mouse macrophage RNA showed that there was a single band with a mobility corresponding to a size of 2.3 kb. We deduce from this that the mouse mRNA, in common with the mRNA for the human GM2 activator protein, has a long 3' untranslated sequence of approx. 1.7 kb. Alignment of the mouse and human deduced amino acid sequences showed 68% identity overall and 75% identity for the sequence on the C-terminal side of the first 31 residues, which in the human GM2 activator protein contains the signal peptide. Hydropathicity plots showed great similarity between the mouse and human sequences even in regions of low sequence similarity. There is a single N-glycosylation site in the mouse GM2 activator protein sequence (Asn151-Phe-Thr) which differs in its location from the single site reported in the human GM2 activator protein sequence (Asn63-Val-Thr). Images Figure 1 PMID:7689829

  13. Hibiscus latent Fort Pierce virus in Brazil and synthesis of its biologically active full-length cDNA clone.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruimin; Niu, Shengniao; Dai, Weifang; Kitajima, Elliot; Wong, Sek-Man

    2016-10-01

    A Brazilian isolate of Hibiscus latent Fort Pierce virus (HLFPV-BR) was firstly found in a hibiscus plant in Limeira, SP, Brazil. RACE PCR was carried out to obtain the full-length sequences of HLFPV-BR which is 6453 nucleotides and has more than 99.15 % of complete genomic RNA nucleotide sequence identity with that of HLFPV Japanese isolate. The genomic structure of HLFPV-BR is similar to other tobamoviruses. It includes a 5' untranslated region (UTR), followed by open reading frames encoding for a 128-kDa protein and a 188-kDa readthrough protein, a 38-kDa movement protein, 18-kDa coat protein, and a 3' UTR. Interestingly, the unique feature of poly(A) tract is also found within its 3'-UTR. Furthermore, from the total RNA extracted from the local lesions of HLFPV-BR-infected Chenopodium quinoa leaves, a biologically active, full-length cDNA clone encompassing the genome of HLFPV-BR was amplified and placed adjacent to a T7 RNA polymerase promoter. The capped in vitro transcripts from the cloned cDNA were infectious when mechanically inoculated into C. quinoa and Nicotiana benthamiana plants. This is the first report of the presence of an isolate of HLFPV in Brazil and the successful synthesis of a biologically active HLFPV-BR full-length cDNA clone. PMID:27139727

  14. Characterization of MMP-9 gene from a normalized cDNA library of kidney tissue of yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco).

    PubMed

    Ke, Fei; Wang, Yun; Hong, Jun; Xu, Chen; Chen, Huan; Zhou, Shuai-Bang

    2015-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), one of members of the MMP family, is important for the cleaving of structural extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and involved in inflammatory processes. In this study, MMP-9 cDNA was isolated and characterized from a normalized cDNA library of kidney tissue of yellow catfish (designated as YcMMP-9). The complete sequence of YcMMP-9 cDNA consisted of 2561 nucleotides. The open reading frame potentially encoded a protein of 685 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of approximately 77.182 kDa. Amino acid sequence of YcMMP-9 have typical characteristics of MMP-9 family and showed highest identity (85.3%) to channel catfish MMP-9. The YcMMP-9 genomic DNA contains 13 exons and 12 introns. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that YcMMP-9 mRNA was constitutively expressed in all examined tissues in normal fish with high expression in head kidney, trunk kidney, blood, and spleen. However, expression of YcMMP-9 mRNA was induced by Aeromonas hydrophila stimulation, especially in these four tissues mentioned above. It indicated that YcMMP-9 was involved in innate immune responses against bacterial infection. PMID:25910849

  15. Isolation of an additional member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor family, FGFR-3.

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, K; Johnson, D E; Williams, L T; Hayman, M J

    1991-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factors are a family of polypeptide growth factors involved in a variety of activities including mitogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have previously been identified in chicken, mouse, and human and have been shown to contain an extracellular domain with either two or three immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain. We have isolated a human cDNA for another tyrosine kinase receptor that is highly homologous to the previously described FGFR. Expression of this receptor cDNA in COS cells directs the expression of a 125-kDa glycoprotein. We demonstrate that this cDNA encodes a biologically active receptor by showing that human acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors activate this receptor as measured by 45Ca2+ efflux assays. These data establish the existence of an additional member of the FGFR family that we have named FGFR-3. Images PMID:1847508

  16. Rainbow trout prolactin cDNA cloning in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mercier, L; Rentier-Delrue, F; Swennen, D; Lion, M; Le Goff, P; Prunet, P; Martial, J A

    1989-03-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a cDNA for trout prolactin (tPrl). An extensive analysis of tPrl recombinant clones by restriction analysis and sequencing revealed the presence of only one form of tPrl mRNA. The deduced protein sequence consists of 210 amino acids, including a signal peptide of 23 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of the mature protein is compared among teleosts and mammals, showing two domains of strong similarity that may be involved in biological activity. PMID:2647439

  17. Nucleotide sequence of equine caspase-1 cDNA.

    PubMed

    Wardlow, S; Penha-Goncalves, M N; Argyle, D J; Onions, D E; Nicolson, L

    1999-01-01

    Caspases are a family of cysteine proteases which have important roles in activation of cytokines and in apoptosis. Caspase-1, or interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE), promotes maturation of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) by proteolytic cleavage of precursor forms to generate biologically active peptides. We report the cloning and sequencing of equine caspase-1 cDNA. Equine caspase-1 is 405 amino acids in length and has 72% and 63% identity to human and mouse caspase-1, respectively, at the amino acid level. Sites of proteolytic cleavage and catalytic activity as identified in human caspase-1, are conserved. PMID:10376217

  18. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA from Aspergillus parasiticus encoding an O-methyltransferase involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Cary, J W; Bhatnagar, D; Cleveland, T E; Keller, N P; Chu, F S

    1993-11-01

    Aflatoxins are polyketide-derived secondary metabolites produced by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Among the catalytic steps in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway, the conversion of sterigmatocystin to O-methylsterigmatocystin and the conversion of dihydrosterigmatocystin to dihydro-O-methylsterigmatocystin are catalyzed by an S-adenosylmethionine-dependent O-methyltransferase. A cDNA library was constructed by using RNA isolated from a 24-h-old culture of wild-type A. parasiticus SRRC 143 and was screened by using polyclonal antiserum raised against a purified 40-kDa O-methyltransferase protein. A clone that harbored a full-length cDNA insert (1,460 bp) containing the 1,254-bp coding region of the gene omt-1 was identified by the antiserum and isolated. The complete cDNA sequence was determined, and the corresponding 418-amino-acid sequence of the native enzyme with a molecular weight of 46,000 was deduced. This 46-kDa native enzyme has a leader sequence of 41 amino acids, and the mature form of the enzyme apparently consists of 377 amino acids and has a molecular weight of 42,000. Direct sequencing of the purified mature enzyme from A. parasiticus SRRC 163 showed that 19 of 22 amino acid residues were identical to the amino acid residues in an internal region of the deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein. The 1,460-bp omt-1 cDNA was cloned into an Escherichia coli expression system; a Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of crude extracts from this expression system revealed a 51-kDa fusion protein (fused with a 5-kDa beta-galactosidase N-terminal fragment).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8285664

  19. Molecular and functional characterization of the first tick CAP2b (periviscerokinin) receptor from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cDNA of the receptor for CAP2b/periviscerokinin (PVK) neuropeptides, designated Rhimi-CAP2b-R, was cloned from synganglia of tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. This receptor is the ortholog of the insect CAP2b/PVK receptor, as concluded from analyses of the predicted protein sequence, ph...

  20. Isolation and characterization of goat ovarian aromatase cDNA: assessment of the activity using an intact cell system and placental expression.

    PubMed

    Bobes, Raúl José; Miranda, Carolina; Pérez-Martinez, Mario; Luu-The, Van; Romano, Marta C

    2004-08-01

    Goat ovarian follicles produce estrone and estradiol from androgens. The synthesis of C18 estrogens from C19 androgens requires cytochrome P450 aromatase, but little information about this key enzyme is available in the goat. We report here for the first time the cDNA sequence of the goat ovarian aromatase, the activity of the enzyme in a cell system, and its expression in the term goat placenta. A cDNA library from goat ovarian poly(A)+ RNA was constructed. Human aromatase cDNA was selected as probe to screen the library; several clones were isolated, but none was complete. The longest clone was 3.1 kb long, but it lacked the sequence coding for a few amino acids in the NH(2)-terminal. To obtain the missing sequence, we performed reverse amplification of the cDNA end (RACE). Sequence analysis indicated that goat aromatase possessed a very long 3'-untranslated region ( approximately 1790 bp), and a polyadenylation signal (AATAAA) located at position 3320 downstream from the ATG start codon. The coding region of goat cDNA was inserted in an expression vector and transfected into HEK-293 cells that were cultured in presence of [14C]-androstenedione, steroids extracted and further separated by TLC. The transfected cells efficiently transformed [14C]-androstenedione into estrone. This activity was inhibited by 4-hydroxyandrostenedione. We also investigated the presence of mRNA for P450 aromatase in the goat placenta, using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and primers derived from the cDNA ovarian sequence and confirmed the expression of the mRNA in term placenta.

  1. Isolation of an insulin-like growth factor II cDNA with a unique 5 prime untranslated region from human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shujane; Daimon, Makoto; Wang, Chunyeh; Ilan, J. ); Jansen, M. )

    1988-03-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) cDNA from a placental library was isolated and sequenced. The 5{prime} untranslated region (5{prime}-UTR) sequence of this cDNA differs completely from that of adult human liver and has considerable base sequence identity to the same region of an IGF-II cDNA of a rat liver cell line, BRL-3A. Human placental poly(A){sup +} RNA was probed with either the 5{prime}-UTR of the isolated human placental IGF-II cDNA or the 5{prime}-UTR of the IGF-II cDNA obtained from adult human liver. No transcripts were detected by using the 5{prime}-UTR of the adult liver IGF-II as the probe. In contrast, three transcripts of 6.0, 3.2, and 2.2 kilobases were detected by using the 5{prime}-UTR of the placental IGF-II cDNA as the probe or the probe from the coding sequence. A fourth IGF-II transcript of 4.9 kilobases presumably containing a 5{prime}-UTR consisting of a base sequence dissimilar to that of either IGF-II 5{prime}-UTR was apparent. Therefore, IGF-II transcripts detected may be products of alternative splicing as their 5{prime}-UTR sequence is contained within the human IGF-II gene or they may be a consequence of alternative promoter utilization in placenta.

  2. Sequence of a cDNA encoding pancreatic preprosomatostatin-22.

    PubMed

    Magazin, M; Minth, C D; Funckes, C L; Deschenes, R; Tavianini, M A; Dixon, J E

    1982-09-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence of a precursor to somatostatin that upon proteolytic processing may give rise to a hormone of 22 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence of a cDNA from the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) encodes a precursor to somatostatin that is 105 amino acids (Mr, 11,500). The cDNA coding for somatostatin-22 consists of 36 nucleotides in the 5' untranslated region, 315 nucleotides that code for the precursor to somatostatin-22, 269 nucleotides at the 3' untranslated region, and a variable length of poly(A). The putative preprohormone contains a sequence of hydrophobic amino acids at the amino terminus that has the properties of a "signal" peptide. A connecting sequence of approximately 57 amino acids is followed by a single Arg-Arg sequence, which immediately precedes the hormone. Somatostatin-22 is homologous to somatostatin-14 in 7 of the 14 amino acids, including the Phe-Trp-Lys sequence. Hybridization selection of mRNA, followed by its translation in a wheat germ cell-free system, resulted in the synthesis of a single polypeptide having a molecular weight of approximately 10,000 as estimated on Na-DodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. PMID:6127673

  3. Sequence of a cDNA encoding pancreatic preprosomatostatin-22.

    PubMed Central

    Magazin, M; Minth, C D; Funckes, C L; Deschenes, R; Tavianini, M A; Dixon, J E

    1982-01-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence of a precursor to somatostatin that upon proteolytic processing may give rise to a hormone of 22 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence of a cDNA from the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) encodes a precursor to somatostatin that is 105 amino acids (Mr, 11,500). The cDNA coding for somatostatin-22 consists of 36 nucleotides in the 5' untranslated region, 315 nucleotides that code for the precursor to somatostatin-22, 269 nucleotides at the 3' untranslated region, and a variable length of poly(A). The putative preprohormone contains a sequence of hydrophobic amino acids at the amino terminus that has the properties of a "signal" peptide. A connecting sequence of approximately 57 amino acids is followed by a single Arg-Arg sequence, which immediately precedes the hormone. Somatostatin-22 is homologous to somatostatin-14 in 7 of the 14 amino acids, including the Phe-Trp-Lys sequence. Hybridization selection of mRNA, followed by its translation in a wheat germ cell-free system, resulted in the synthesis of a single polypeptide having a molecular weight of approximately 10,000 as estimated on Na-DodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. Images PMID:6127673

  4. cDNA sequences of two apolipoproteins from lamprey

    SciTech Connect

    Pontes, M.; Xu, X.; Graham, D.; Riley, M.; Doolittle, R.F.

    1987-03-24

    The messages for two small but abundant apolipoproteins found in lamprey blood plasma were cloned with the aid of oligonucleotide probes based on amino-terminal sequences. In both cases, numerous clones were identified in a lamprey liver cDNA library, consistent with the great abundance of these proteins in lamprey blood. One of the cDNAs (LAL1) has a coding region of 105 amino acids that corresponds to a 21-residue signal peptide, a putative 8-residue propeptide, and the 76-residue mature protein found in blood. The other cDNA (LAL2) codes for a total of 191 residues, the first 23 of which constitute a signal peptide. The two proteins, which occur in the high-density lipoprotein fraction of ultracentrifuged plasma, have amino acid compositions similar to those of apolipoproteins found in mammalian blood; computer analysis indicates that the sequences are largely helix-permissive. When the sequences were searched against an amino acid sequence data base, rat apolipoprotein IV was the best matching candidate in both cases. Although a reasonable alignment can be made with that sequence and LAL1, definitive assignment of the two lamprey proteins to typical mammalian classes cannot be made at this point.

  5. Leydig cell hypoplasia due to inactivation of luteinizing hormone receptor by a novel homozygous nonsense truncation mutation in the seventh transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Salameh, W; Choucair, M; Guo, T B; Zahed, L; Wu, S-M; Leung, M Y-K; Rennert, O M; Chan, W-Y

    2005-01-14

    Inactivating mutations in the LH receptor are the predominant cause for male pseudohermaphroditism in subjects with Leydig cell hypoplasia (LCH). The severity of the mutations, correlates with residual receptor activities. Here, we detail the clinical presentation of one subject with complete male pseudohermaphroditism and LCH. We identify within the proband and her similarly afflicted sibling a homozygous T to G transversion at nucleotide 1836 in exon 11 of the LH/CGR gene. This causes conversion of a tyrosine codon into a stop codon at codon 612 in the seventh transmembrane domain, resulting in a truncated receptor that lacks a cytoplasmic tail. In vitro, in contrast to cells expressing a normal LHR, cells transfected with the mutant cDNA exhibit neither surface binding of radiolabeled hCG nor cAMP generation. In vitro expression under the control of the LHR signal peptide of either a wild type or mutant LHR-GFP fusion protein shows no differences in receptor cellular localization. In conclusion, the in vitro studies suggest that residues in the seventh transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail are important for receptor binding and activation without playing a major role in receptor cellular trafficking.

  6. Leydig cell hypoplasia due to inactivation of luteinizing hormone receptor by a novel homozygous nonsense truncation mutation in the seventh transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Salameh, W; Choucair, M; Guo, T B; Zahed, L; Wu, S-M; Leung, M Y-K; Rennert, O M; Chan, W-Y

    2005-01-14

    Inactivating mutations in the LH receptor are the predominant cause for male pseudohermaphroditism in subjects with Leydig cell hypoplasia (LCH). The severity of the mutations, correlates with residual receptor activities. Here, we detail the clinical presentation of one subject with complete male pseudohermaphroditism and LCH. We identify within the proband and her similarly afflicted sibling a homozygous T to G transversion at nucleotide 1836 in exon 11 of the LH/CGR gene. This causes conversion of a tyrosine codon into a stop codon at codon 612 in the seventh transmembrane domain, resulting in a truncated receptor that lacks a cytoplasmic tail. In vitro, in contrast to cells expressing a normal LHR, cells transfected with the mutant cDNA exhibit neither surface binding of radiolabeled hCG nor cAMP generation. In vitro expression under the control of the LHR signal peptide of either a wild type or mutant LHR-GFP fusion protein shows no differences in receptor cellular localization. In conclusion, the in vitro studies suggest that residues in the seventh transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail are important for receptor binding and activation without playing a major role in receptor cellular trafficking. PMID:15607529

  7. cDNA cloning of portions of the bacteriophage phi 6 genome.

    PubMed Central

    Mindich, L; MacKenzie, G; Strassman, J; McGraw, T; Metzger, S; Romantschuk, M; Bamford, D

    1985-01-01

    Phage phi 6 has a genome consisting of three pieces of double-stranded RNA. Single-stranded RNA was prepared from phi 6 nucleocapsids by in vitro transcription with the phage RNA polymerase. These transcripts were polyadenylated and used as templates for the preparation of cDNA copies. The resulting DNA was cloned into the PstI restriction nuclease site of plasmid pBR322. Insert-bearing plasmids were annealed to phi 6 RNA to assign the inserts to their proper segments. In this way we identified inserts corresponding to the large, medium, and small segments. Two large overlapping inserts of the small segment constitute the complete complement of the segment as determined by the sequence analysis of the DNA. In vitro coupled transcription and translation showed that the small segment inserts were able to direct the synthesis of the four known genes in the small segment. Two overlapping inserts in the medium segment constitute the entire segment and were shown to direct the in vitro synthesis of two of the three known proteins of the medium segment. Several inserts bearing about one-third the complement of the large segment were also isolated, and one of these directed the synthesis of a peptide that resembles protein P1. Restriction endonuclease maps were prepared for the inserts, and by in vitro synthesis it was possible to refine the genetic map of phi 6. A chimeric plasmid was constructed that combines plasmids pUC8 and RSF1010. Inserts placed on this plasmid were transformed to Pseudomonas phaseolicola, the natural host of phage phi 6. It was possible to refine further the genetic map by complementation of nonsense mutants of phi 6 with the cDNA. Images PMID:3858275

  8. Rabbit muscle creatine phosphokinase. CDNA cloning, primary structure and detection of human homologues.

    PubMed

    Putney, S; Herlihy, W; Royal, N; Pang, H; Aposhian, H V; Pickering, L; Belagaje, R; Biemann, K; Page, D; Kuby, S

    1984-12-10

    A cDNA library was constructed from rabbit muscle poly(A) RNA. Limited amino acid sequence information was obtained on rabbit muscle creatine phosphokinase and this was the basis for design and synthesis of two oligonucleotide probes complementary to a creatine kinase cDNA sequence which encodes a pentapeptide. Colony hybridizations with the probes and subsequent steps led to isolation of two clones, whose cDNA segments partially overlap and which together encode the entire protein. The primary structure was established from the sequence of two cDNA clones and from independently determined sequences of scattered portions of the polypeptide. The reactive cysteine has been located to position 282 within the 380 amino acid polypeptide. The rabbit cDNA hybridizes to digests of human chromosomal DNA. This reveals a restriction fragment length polymorphism associated with the human homologue(s) which hybridizes to the rabbit cDNA.

  9. Tilapia growth hormone: molecular cloning of cDNA and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rentier-Delrue, F; Swennen, D; Philippart, J C; L'Hoir, C; Lion, M; Benrubi, O; Martial, J A

    1989-05-01

    A cDNA library was prepared from poly(A)+RNA extracted from tilapia Oreochromis niloticus anterior pituitaries. The recombinant clones carrying the cDNA sequence of tilapia growth hormone (tiGH) were selected using a fragment of the trout growth hormone (tGH) cDNA as hybridization probe. The nucleotide sequence of the full-length tiGH cDNA was determined. This cDNA encodes a protein of 204 amino acids, including the putative signal peptide of 17 amino acids. Mature tiGH cDNA was inserted in an Escherichia coli expression vector which led to the production of tiGH protein with a yield estimated to be 20% of the total bacterial proteins. PMID:2670496

  10. Putative multiadhesive protein from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium: cloning of the cDNA encoding a fibronectin-, an SRCR-, and a complement control protein module.

    PubMed

    Pahler, S; Blumbach, B; Müller, I; Müller, W E

    1998-10-15

    Sponges (Porifera) representing the simplest metazoan phylum so far have been thought to possess no basal lamina tissue structures. One major extracellular matrix protein that is also a constitutive glycoprotein of the basal lamina is fibronectin. It was the aim of the present study to identify the native protein from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium and to isolate the corresponding cDNA. In crude extracts from this sponge protein(s) of M(r) of approximately 230 and approximately 210 kDa could be visualized by Western-blotting using an anti-fibronectin [human] antibody. By PCR cloning from a cDNA library of G. cydonium we isolated a cDNA comprising one element of fibronectin, the type-III (FN3) module. The cDNA (2.3 kb long), encoding a 701 amino acid [aa] long putative "multiadhesive protein" termed MAP_GEOCY, was found to contain (i) a fibronectin-, (ii) a scavenger receptor cysteine-rich [SRCR]-, and (iii) a short consensus repeat [SCR] module. The 89 aa long fibronectin module comprises the characteristic topology and conserved aa found in fibronectin type-III (FN3) elements. The SRCR module (101 aa) features the characteristics of group B SRCR molecules. The predominant proteins belonging to this group are the mammalian WC1-, M130-, CD6- and CD5 antigens that probably are involved in immunological reactions. The SCR module (54 aa) shows the characteristics of type III SCR modules found in complement receptors. Phylogenetic analyses performed with all three building blocks of the "multiadhesive protein" showed that the respective sponge modules form independent, possibly basal, lineages in trees that include the corresponding modules from higher metazoan animals. In summary, these data demonstrate for the first time that the phylogenetically oldest Metazoa, the sponges, contain protein modules seen in higher animals in proteins of the extracellular matrix and in molecules involved in cell-mediated immune reactions in vertebrates. PMID:9755483

  11. Leukemia inhibitory factor receptor is structurally related to the IL-6 signal transducer, gp130.

    PubMed Central

    Gearing, D P; Thut, C J; VandeBos, T; Gimpel, S D; Delaney, P B; King, J; Price, V; Cosman, D; Beckmann, M P

    1991-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine with a broad range of activities that in many cases parallel those of interleukin-6 (IL-6) although LIF and IL-6 appear to be structurally unrelated. A cDNA clone encoding the human LIF receptor was isolated by expression screening of a human placental cDNA library. The LIF receptor is related to the gp130 'signal-transducing' component of the IL-6 receptor and to the G-CSF receptor, with the transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions of the LIF receptor and gp130 being most closely related. This relationship suggests a common signal transduction pathway for the two receptors and may help to explain similar biological effects of the two ligands. Murine cDNAs encoding soluble LIF receptors were isolated by cross-hybridization and share 70% amino acid sequence identity to the human sequence. Images PMID:1915266

  12. c-DNA vaccination against parasitic infections: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Kofta, W; Wedrychowicz, H

    2001-09-12

    Recently developed technology for DNA vaccination appears to offer the good prospect for the development of a multivalent vaccines that will effectively activate both the humoral and cell mediated mechanisms of the immune system. Currently, DNA vaccination against such important parasitic diseases like malaria, leishmaniosis, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, schistosomosis, fasciolosis offers several new opportunities. However, the outcome of vaccination depends very much on vaccine formulations, dose and route of vaccine delivery, and the species and even strain of the vaccinated host. To overcome these problems much research is still needed, specifically focused on cloning and testing of new c-DNA sequences in the following: genome projects: different ways of delivery: design of vectors containing appropriate immunostimulatory sequences and very detailed studies on safety. PMID:11522401

  13. Isolation and characterization of a chicken tyrosinase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Mochii, M; Iio, A; Yamamoto, H; Takeuchi, T; Eguchi, G

    1992-10-01

    Complementary DNA clones coding for chicken tyrosinase were isolated from retinal pigmented epithelium of chicken embryo. Sequence analysis shows that one of the cDNA clones consisting of 1,997 nucleotides has an open reading frame coding for 529 amino acids. The deduced protein has nine N-glycosylation sites and a transmembrane region. A sequence comparison of the deduced chicken tyrosinase with the mouse and human homologues revealed that amino acid sequences are conserved for the entire polypeptides. Seventy-two percent and 73% of amino acids in the chicken sequence are identical to that of the mouse and human tyrosinases, respectively. Histidines neighboring the postulated copper-binding sites and the cysteines are well conserved. RNA blotting analysis showed that a major transcript of 2.5 kb is detected in retinal pigmented epithelium of a 9-day-old chicken embryo.

  14. The evolution of vertebrate opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2011-01-01

    The proteins that mediate the analgesic and other effects of opioid drugs and endogenous opioid peptides are known as opioid receptors. Opioid receptors consist of a family of four closely-related proteins belonging to the large superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors. The three types of opioid receptors shown unequivocally to mediate analgesia in animal models are the mu (MOR), delta (DOR), and kappa (KOR) opioid receptor proteins. The role of the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, the nociceptin or orphanin FQ receptor (ORL), is not as clear as hyperalgesia, analgesia, and no effect was reported after administration of ORL agonists. There are now cDNA sequences for all four types of opioid receptors that are expressed in the brain of six species from three different classes of vertebrates. This review presents a comparative analysis of vertebrate opioid receptors using bioinformatics and data from recent human genome studies. Results indicate that opioid receptors arose by gene duplication, that there is a vector of opioid receptor divergence, and that MOR shows evidence of rapid evolution. PMID:19273128

  15. Thymus cDNA library survey uncovers novel features of immune molecules in Chinese giant salamander Andrias davidianus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong; Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Wang, Jun; Yuan, Jiang-Di; Liao, Xiang-Yong; Gui, Jian-Fang; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2014-10-01

    A ranavirus-induced thymus cDNA library was constructed from Chinese giant salamander, the largest extant amphibian species. Among the 137 putative immune-related genes derived from this library, these molecules received particular focus: immunoglobulin heavy chains (IgM, IgD, and IgY), IFN-inducible protein 6 (IFI6), and T cell receptor beta chain (TCRβ). Several unusual features were uncovered: IgD displays a structure pattern distinct from those described for other amphibians by having only four constant domains plus a hinge region. A unique IgY form (IgY(ΔFc)), previously undescribed in amphibians, is present in serum. Alternative splicing is observed to generate IgH diversification. IFI6 is newly-identified in amphibians, which occurs in two forms divergent in subcelluar distribution and antiviral activity. TCRβ immunoscope profile follows the typical vertebrate pattern, implying a polyclonal T cell repertoire. Collectively, the pioneering survey of ranavirus-induced thymus cDNA library from Chinese giant salamander reveals immune components and characteristics in this primitive amphibian.

  16. Lysosomal {beta}-mannosidase: cDNA cloning and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Leipprandt, J.R.; Traviss, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Lysosomal {beta}-mannosidase is an exoglycosidase that cleaves the single {beta}-linked mannose residue from the non-reducing end of all N-linked glycoprotein oligosaccharides. Deficiency of this enzyme results in {beta}-mannosidosis, a severe neurodegenerative disease in goats and cattle. The human cases described have a milder, highly variable presentation. Study of the molecular pathology of this disease in ruminants and humans and development of the animal model for gene therapy studies required cloning of the gene for {beta}-mannosidase has been cloned. {beta}-Mannosidase cDNA were obtained from a bovine thyroid cDNA library by screening with mixed oligonucleotides derived from peptide sequences resulting from microsequencing of bovine {beta}-mannosidase peptides. A total of six independent positive clones were identified from 5 x 10{sup 5} plaques, covering about 80% of the C-terminal region. The missing 5{prime} region was obtained using 5{prime} RACE. The full-length construct contains 3852-bp nucleotides, encoding 879 amino acids. The initiation codon is followed by 17 amino acids containing the characteristics of a typical signal peptide sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence is colinear with all peptide sequences determined by protein microsequencing. Northern blot analysis demonstrated a 4.2 kb single transcript in various tissues from both normal and affected goats and calves. The mRNA level was decreased in affected {beta}-mannosidosis animals. The gene encoding {beta}-mannosidase was localized on human chromosome 4 by Southern analysis of rodent/human somatic cell hybrids. The mutation in bovine {beta}-mannosidosis has been identified. This is the first report of cloning of the {beta}-mannosidase gene.

  17. Isolation, expression analysis and functional characterization of the first anti-diuretic hormone receptor in insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diuresis following blood-gorging in Rhodnius prolixus is the major process leading to the transmission of Chagas' disease. We have cloned the cDNA of the first receptor known to be involved in an antidiuretic strategy in insects; a strategy that prevents diuresis. This receptor belongs to the insect...

  18. A simplified approach to construct infectious cDNA clones of a tobamovirus in a binary vector.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Bruna Rayane Teodoro; Nicolini, Cícero; Lucinda, Natalia; Orílio, Anelise Franco; Nagata, Tatsuya

    2014-03-01

    Infectious cDNA clones of RNA viruses are important tools to study molecular processes such as replication and host-virus interactions. However, the cloning steps necessary for construction of cDNAs of viral RNA genomes in binary vectors are generally laborious. In this study, a simplified method of producing an agro-infectious Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) clone is described in detail. Initially, the complete genome of PMMoV was amplified by a single-step RT-PCR, cloned, and subcloned into a small plasmid vector under the T7 RNA polymerase promoter to confirm the infectivity of the cDNA clone through transcript inoculation. The complete genome was then transferred to a binary vector using a single-step, overlap-extension PCR. The selected clones were agro-infiltrated to Nicotiana benthamiana plants and showed to be infectious, causing typical PMMoV symptoms. No differences in host responses were observed when the wild-type PMMoV isolate, the T7 RNA polymerase-derived transcripts and the agroinfiltration-derived viruses were inoculated to N. benthamiana, Capsicum chinense PI 159236 and Capsicum annuum plants. PMID:24388933

  19. A simplified approach to construct infectious cDNA clones of a tobamovirus in a binary vector.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Bruna Rayane Teodoro; Nicolini, Cícero; Lucinda, Natalia; Orílio, Anelise Franco; Nagata, Tatsuya

    2014-03-01

    Infectious cDNA clones of RNA viruses are important tools to study molecular processes such as replication and host-virus interactions. However, the cloning steps necessary for construction of cDNAs of viral RNA genomes in binary vectors are generally laborious. In this study, a simplified method of producing an agro-infectious Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) clone is described in detail. Initially, the complete genome of PMMoV was amplified by a single-step RT-PCR, cloned, and subcloned into a small plasmid vector under the T7 RNA polymerase promoter to confirm the infectivity of the cDNA clone through transcript inoculation. The complete genome was then transferred to a binary vector using a single-step, overlap-extension PCR. The selected clones were agro-infiltrated to Nicotiana benthamiana plants and showed to be infectious, causing typical PMMoV symptoms. No differences in host responses were observed when the wild-type PMMoV isolate, the T7 RNA polymerase-derived transcripts and the agroinfiltration-derived viruses were inoculated to N. benthamiana, Capsicum chinense PI 159236 and Capsicum annuum plants.

  20. Subtractive cDNA cloning using oligo(dT)30-latex and PCR: isolation of cDNA clones specific to undifferentiated human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hara, E; Kato, T; Nakada, S; Sekiya, S; Oda, K

    1991-01-01

    The human embryonal carcinoma cell line NEC14 can be induced to differentiate by the addition of 10(-2)M N,N'-hexamethylene-bis-acetamide (HMBA). A subtractive cDNA library specific to undifferentiated NEC14 cells was constructed using oligo(dT)30-Latex and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The method was designed to improve the efficiency of subtraction and the enrichment of cDNA clones corresponding to low abundance mRNAs. The single strand of cDNA was made from mRNA prepared from the HMBA-treated NEC14 cells using an oligo(dT)30 primer covalently linked to Latex particles. After removal of the mRNA template by heat-denaturation and centrifugation, the subtractive hybridization was carried out between the cDNA-oligo(dT)30-Latex and mRNA from untreated NEC14 cells. Unhybridized mRNA collected by centrifugation was hybridized repeatedly to the cDNA-oligo(dT)30-Latex and subtractive mRNA was converted to cDNA. The subtractive cDNA was then amplified by PCR and cloned into pBluescript II KS-. The cDNA library thus constructed consisted of approximately 10,000 independent clones with cDNA inserts of 1.7 Kb on average. Differential hybridization of these transformants indicated that approximately 3% of them contained cDNA inserts specific to the undifferentiated EC cells, some of which were derived from low abundance mRNAs. Images PMID:1766870

  1. cDNA sequence coding for the alpha'-chain of the third complement component in the African lungfish.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Sültmann, H; Mayer, W E; Figueroa, F; Tichy, H; Klein, J

    1999-04-01

    cDNA clones coding for almost the entire C3 alpha-chain of the African lungfish (Protopterus aethiopicus), a representative of the Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fishes), were sequenced and characterized. From the sequence it is deduced that the lungfish C3 molecule is probably a disulphide-bonded alpha:beta dimer similar to that of the C3 components of other jawed vertebrates. The deduced sequence contains conserved sites presumably recognized by proteolytic enzymes (e.g. factor I) involved in the activation and inactivation of the component. It also contains the conserved thioester region and the putative site for binding properdin. However, the site for the interaction with complement receptor 2 and factor H are poorly conserved. Either complement receptor 2 and factor H are not present in the lungfish or they bind to different residues at the same or a different site than mammalian complement receptor 2 and factor H. The C3 alpha-chain sequences faithfully reflect the phylogenetic relationships among vertebrate classes and can therefore be used to help to resolve the long-standing controversy concerning the origin of the tetrapods. PMID:10219761

  2. Evaluation of epidermal growth factor-related growth factors and receptors and of neoangiogenesis in completely resected stage I-IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer: amphiregulin and microvessel count are independent prognostic indicators of survival.

    PubMed

    Fontanini, G; De Laurentiis, M; Vignati, S; Chinè, S; Lucchi, M; Silvestri, V; Mussi, A; De Placido, S; Tortora, G; Bianco, A R; Gullick, W; Angeletti, C A; Bevilacqua, G; Ciardiello, F

    1998-01-01

    We have determined the expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha), amphiregulin (AR), CRIPTO, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), erbB-2, erbB-3, and tumor angiogenesis in a series of 195 patients with stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with radical surgery to define their usefulness as prognostic indicators of survival. A variable degree of specific staining in cancer cells was observed for the three growth factors and for the three growth factor receptors in the majority of NSCLC patients. A statistically significant association between overexpression of TGF alpha, AR, and CRIPTO was observed. Enhanced expression of AR was significantly correlated with enhanced expression of erbB-2 and advanced T-stage. A direct association was also detected for overexpression of TGF alpha and of erbB-2 or erbB-3, respectively. Sex, tumor size, nodal status, stage, microvessel count, as a measure of neovascularization, and AR overexpression significantly correlated with overall survival at univariate analysis. In a Cox multivariate analysis, the only characteristics with an independent prognostic effect on OAS were microvessel count [relative hazard (RH), 6.61; P < 0.00001), nodal status (RH, 1.59; P = 0.0013), and AR overexpression (RH, 1.72; P = 0.02). These results suggest that evaluation of neoangiogenesis and of certain growth factors, such as AR, can be useful in addition to conventional pathological staging to select high-risk NSCLC patients who may benefit from post-surgical systemic therapies.

  3. Cloning and functional expression of a human pancreatic islet glucose-transporter cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Permutt, M.A.; Koranyi, L.; Keller, K.; Lacy, P.E.; Scharp, D.W.; Mueckler, M. )

    1989-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested that pancreatic islet glucose transport is mediated by a high-K{sub m}, low-affinity facilitated transporter similar to that expressed in liver. To determine the relationship between islet and liver glucose transporters, liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clones were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clone hybridized to mRNA transcripts of the same size in human liver and pancreatic islet RNA. A cDNA library was prepared from purified human pancreatic islet tissue and screened with human liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA. The authors isolated two overlapping cDNA clones encompassing 2600 base pairs, which encode a pancreatic islet protein identical in sequence to that of the putative liver-type glucose-transporter protein. Xenopus oocytes injected with synthetic mRNA transcribed from a full-length cDNA construct exhibited increased uptake of 2-deoxyglucose, confirming the functional identity of the clone. These cDNA clones can now be used to study regulation of expression of the gene and to assess the role of inherited defects in this gene as a candidate for inherited susceptibility to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  4. Preparation of microbial community cDNA for metatranscriptomic analysis in marine plankton.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Frank J

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing and analysis of microbial community cDNA (metatranscriptomics) are providing valuable insight into in situ microbial activity and metabolism in the oceans. A critical first step in metatranscriptomic studies is the preparation of high-quality cDNA. At the minimum, preparing cDNA for sequencing involves steps of biomass collection, RNA preservation, total RNA extraction, and cDNA synthesis. Each of these steps may present unique challenges for marine microbial samples, particularly for deep-sea samples whose transcriptional profiles may change between water collection and RNA preservation. Because bacterioplankton community RNA yields may be relatively low (<500 ng), it is often necessary to amplify total RNA to obtain sufficient cDNA for downstream sequencing. Additionally, depending on the nature of the samples, budgetary considerations, and the choice of sequencing technology, steps may be required to deplete the amount of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcripts in a sample in order to maximize mRNA recovery. cDNA preparation may also involve the addition of internal RNA standards to biomass samples, thereby allowing for absolute quantification of transcript abundance following sequencing. This chapter describes a general protocol for cDNA preparation from planktonic microbial communities, from RNA preservation to final cDNA synthesis, with specific emphasis placed on topics of sampling bias and rRNA depletion. Consideration of these topics is critical for helping standardize metatranscriptomics methods as they become widespread in marine microbiology research.

  5. Amodal Completion in Bonobos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagasaka, Yasuo; Brooks, Daniel I.; Wasserman, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    We trained two bonobos to discriminate among occluded, complete, and incomplete stimuli. The occluded stimulus comprised a pair of colored shapes, one of which appeared to occlude the other. The complete and incomplete stimuli involved the single shape that appeared to have been partially covered in the occluded stimulus; the complete stimulus…

  6. Synaptic Neurotransmitter-Gated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Trevor G.; Paoletti, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors in the brain, many have deliberated over their likely structures and how these may relate to function. This was initially satisfied by the determination of the first amino acid sequences of the Cys-loop receptors that recognized acetylcholine, serotonin, GABA, and glycine, followed later by similar determinations for the glutamate receptors, comprising non-NMDA and NMDA subtypes. The last decade has seen a rapid advance resulting in the first structures of Cys-loop receptors, related bacterial and molluscan homologs, and glutamate receptors, determined down to atomic resolution. This now provides a basis for determining not just the complete structures of these important receptor classes, but also for understanding how various domains and residues interact during agonist binding, receptor activation, and channel opening, including allosteric modulation. This article reviews our current understanding of these mechanisms for the Cys-loop and glutamate receptor families. PMID:22233560

  7. Cloning and expresion of cDNA for rat O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Sakumi, K; Shiraishi, A; Hayakawa, H; Sekiguchi, M

    1991-10-25

    cDNA for O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase was isolated by screening rat liver cDNA libraries, using as a probe the human cDNA sequence for methyltransferase. The rat cDNA encodes a protein with 209 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence of the rat methyltransferase exhibits considerable homology with those of the human, yeast and bacterial enzymes, especially around putative methyl acceptor sites. When the cDNA was placed under control of the lac promoter and expressed in methyltransferase-deficient Escherichia coli (ada-, ogt-) cells, a characteristic methyltransferase protein was produced. The rat DNA methyltransferase thus expressed could complement the biological defects of the E. coli cell caused by lack of its own DNA methyltransferases; e.g. increased sensitivity to alkylating agents in terms of both cell death and mutation induction.

  8. Functional cloning of an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA encoding cycloeucalenol cycloisomerase.

    PubMed

    Lovato, M A; Hart, E A; Segura, M J; Giner, J L; Matsuda, S P

    2000-05-01

    Plants and certain protists use cycloeucalenol cycloisomerase (EC ) to convert pentacyclic cyclopropyl sterols to conventional tetracyclic sterols. We used a novel complementation strategy to clone a cycloeucalenol cycloisomerase cDNA. Expressing an Arabidopsis thaliana cycloartenol synthase cDNA in a yeast lanosterol synthase mutant provided a sterol auxotroph that could be genetically complemented with the isomerase. We transformed this yeast strain with an Arabidopsis yeast expression library and selected sterol prototrophs to obtain a strain that accumulated biosynthetic ergosterol. The novel phenotype was conferred by an Arabidopsis cDNA that potentially encodes a 36-kDa protein. We expressed this cDNA (CPI1) in Escherichia coli and showed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry that extracts from this strain isomerized cycloeucalenol to obtusifoliol in vitro. The cDNA will be useful for obtaining heterologously expressed protein for catalytic studies and elucidating the in vivo roles of cyclopropyl sterols.

  9. Cloning of two putative ecdysteroid receptor isoforms from Tenebrio molitor and their developmental expression in the epidermis during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Mouillet, J F; Delbecque, J P; Quennedey, B; Delachambre, J

    1997-09-15

    Using the Drosophila EcR-B1 cDNA as a probe, we have cloned the putative ecdysteroid receptor from the mealworm Tenebrio molitor. We have isolated two cDNAs with different 5' termini that contain a complete open reading frame. These two cDNAs encode two proteins with distinct N-terminal regions corresponding to two isoforms. The coleopteran receptor is obviously related to the ecdysteroid receptor of other insects, but shares only 89% and 61% amino acid identities with the DNA-binding and ligand-binding domains of the Drosophila receptor, respectively. Its expression pattern has been examined in the epidermis during the last larval instar and pupal stage of T. molitor, in correlation with the hemolymph ecdysteroid titer. Hybridizations revealed two transcripts of 7 kb and 6.5 kb detected in most stages during metamorphosis and corresponding to the A and B1 isoforms. These two mRNAs are highly evident just before the rise of each ecdysteroid peak both in prepupae and in pupae. They show almost the same expression pattern in epidermis except for the second part of the pupal stage, during which only the A isoform is detected.

  10. Mutation of tyrosine-141 inhibits insulin-promoted tyrosine phosphorylation and increased responsiveness of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Valiquette, M; Parent, S; Loisel, T P; Bouvier, M

    1995-01-01

    The ability of insulin to promote phosphorylation of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor (beta 2AR) was assessed in Chinese hamster fibroblasts transfected with beta 2AR cDNA. Phosphotyrosine residues were detected in purified beta 2AR using a polyclonal anti-phosphotyrosine antibody and by phosphoamino acid analysis following metabolic labelling with inorganic 32P. Treatment of the cells with insulin induced a 2.4-fold increase in the phosphotyrosine content of the receptor. The insulin-promoted phosphorylation of the beta 2AR was accompanied by an increase in the beta-adrenergic-stimulated adenyl cyclase activity. Substitution of a phenylalanine residue for tyrosine-141 completely prevented both the increased tyrosine phosphorylation and the enhanced responsiveness of the beta 2AR promoted by insulin treatment. Mutation of three other tyrosines located in the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor, tyrosine-366, tyrosine-350 and tyrosine-354, did not abolish the insulin-promoted tyrosine phosphorylation. Taken together, these results suggest that insulin promotes phosphorylation of the beta 2AR on tyrosine-141 and that such phosphorylation leads to a supersensitization of the receptor. Images PMID:8521811

  11. Cloning and expression of the estrogen receptor-alpha (Esr1) from the Harderian gland of the sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea).

    PubMed

    Chávez, Bertha; Ramos, Luis; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; Vilchis, Felipe

    2009-06-01

    The effects of estradiol on the Harderian gland (HG) are believed to be partially regulated by the transcriptional regulation of the estrogen-related genes via estrogen receptor (ER). In reptiles, however, it has not been well established whether the HG contains or expresses steroid nuclear receptors. As a first step toward investigating the molecular mechanisms of estrogen signalling in the HG, we isolated the cDNA for ERalpha in the sea turtle Lepidochelys olivacea. ERalpha was cloned using RT-PCR coupled with 5' and 3' RACE procedures. The cDNA contains a complete open reading frame encoding 588 amino acid residues. Comparative analysis of this amino acid sequence showed moderate to strong conservation of the ERalpha (Esr1) gene within divergent vertebrate groups. In transfection studies, the cloned ER displayed high affinity K(d)=0.25nM and high specificity for 17beta-estradiol. Binding assays using sucrose density gradients demonstrated a specific 7-7.5 S binding component in the HG cytosolic fractions. RT-qPCR analysis showed significant ERalpha mRNA expression in the liver, HG, lung and brain. Altogether, these results provide evidence for the expression of intracellular ERs in the HG of the sea turtle and suggest that ERalpha may be an important modulator of the estrogen-mediated response in the HG of reptiles.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Border Disease Virus Genotype 3 Strain Gifhorn

    PubMed Central

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Höper, Dirk; Schirrmeier, Horst; Beer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the genotype 3 border disease virus strain Gifhorn has been determined; this strain was originally isolated from pigs. This represents the consensus sequence for the virus used to produce the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cDNA clone pBeloGif3, which yields a virus that is severely attenuated in cell culture. PMID:24435861

  13. First complete genome sequence of an emerging cucumber green mottle mosaic virus isolate in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence (6,423 nt) of an emerging Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolate on cucumber in North America was determined through deep sequencing of sRNA and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. It shares 99% nucleotide sequence identity to the Asian genotype, but only 90% t...

  14. Pneumolysin-dependent and -independent gene expression identified by cDNA microarray analysis of THP-1 human mononuclear cells stimulated by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P David; Thornton, Justin; Barker, Katherine S; McDaniel, D Olga; Sacks, Gordon S; Swiatlo, Edwin; McDaniel, Larry S

    2003-04-01

    Pneumolysin is an important virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae, interacting with the membranes of host cells to elicit a multitude of inflammatory responses. We used cDNA microarrays to identify genes which are responsive to S. pneumoniae in a pneumolysin-dependent and -independent fashion. The THP-1 human monocytic cell line was coincubated for 3 h with medium alone, with the virulent type 2 S. pneumoniae strain D39, or with the isogenic strain PLN, which does not express pneumolysin. RNA was isolated from the monocytes and hybridized on cDNA microarrays. Of 4,133 genes evaluated, 142 were found to be responsive in a pneumolysin-dependent fashion, whereas 40 were found to be responsive independent of pneumolysin. Genes that were up-regulated in cells exposed to D39 relative to those exposed to PLN included genes encoding proteins such as mannose binding lectin 1, lysozyme, alpha-1 catenin, cadherin 17, caspases 4 and 6, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta (MIP-1beta), interleukin 8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein 3 (MCP-3), IL-2 receptor beta (IL-2Rbeta), IL-15 receptor alpha (IL-15Ralpha), interferon receptor 2, and prostaglandin E synthase. Down-regulated genes included those encoding complement component receptor 2/CD21, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1). Pneumolysin-independent responses included down-regulation of the genes encoding CD68, CD53, CD24, transforming growth factor beta2, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1. These results demonstrate the striking effects of pneumolysin on the host cell upon exposure to S. pneumoniae.

  15. The human mitochondrial elongation factor tu (EF-Tu) gene: cDNA sequence, genomic localization, genomic structure, and identification of a pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Ling, M; Merante, F; Chen, H S; Duff, C; Duncan, A M; Robinson, B H

    1997-09-15

    The human mitochondrial elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) is nuclear-encoded and functions in the translational apparatus of mitochondria. The complete human EF-Tu cDNA sequence of 1677 base pairs (bp) with a 101 bp 5'-untranslated region, a 1368 bp coding region, and a 207 bp 3'-untranslated region, has been determined and updated. The predicted protein from this cDNA sequence is approximately 49.8 kDa in size and is composed of 455 amino acids (aa) with a putative N-terminal mitochondrial leader sequence of approximately 50 aa residues. The predicted amino acid sequence shows high similarity to other EF-Tu protein sequences from ox, yeast, and bacteria, and also shows limited similarity to human cystolic elongation factor 1 alpha. The complete size of this cDNA (1677 bp) obtained by cloning and sequencing was confirmed by Northern blot analysis, which showed a single transcript (mRNA) of approximately 1.7 kb in human liver. The genomic structure of this EF-Tu gene has been determined for the first time. This gene contains nine introns with a predicted size of approximately 3.6 kilobases (kb) and has been mapped to chromosome 16p11.2. In addition, an intronless pseudogene of approximately 1.7 kb with 92.6% nucleotide sequence similarity to the EF-Tu gene has also been identified and mapped to chromosome 17q11.2. PMID:9332382

  16. The complete human olfactory subgenome.

    PubMed

    Glusman, G; Yanai, I; Rubin, I; Lancet, D

    2001-05-01

    Olfactory receptors likely constitute the largest gene superfamily in the vertebrate genome. Here we present the nearly complete human olfactory subgenome elucidated by mining the genome draft with gene discovery algorithms. Over 900 olfactory receptor genes and pseudogenes (ORs) were identified, two-thirds of which were not annotated previously. The number of extrapolated ORs is in good agreement with previous theoretical predictions. The sequence of at least 63% of the ORs is disrupted by what appears to be a random process of pseudogene formation. ORs constitute 17 gene families, 4 of which contain more than 100 members each. "Fish-like" Class I ORs, previously considered a relic in higher tetrapods, constitute as much as 10% of the human repertoire, all in one large cluster on chromosome 11. Their lower pseudogene fraction suggests a functional significance. ORs are disposed on all human chromosomes except 20 and Y, and nearly 80% are found in clusters of 6-138 genes. A novel comparative cluster analysis was used to trace the evolutionary path that may have led to OR proliferation and diversification throughout the genome. The results of this analysis suggest the following genome expansion history: first, the generation of a "tetrapod-specific" Class II OR cluster on chromosome 11 by local duplication, then a single-step duplication of this cluster to chromosome 1, and finally an avalanche of duplication events out of chromosome 1 to most other chromosomes. The results of the data mining and characterization of ORs can be accessed at the Human Olfactory Receptor Data Exploratorium Web site (http://bioinfo.weizmann.ac.il/HORDE). PMID:11337468

  17. The complete human olfactory subgenome.

    PubMed

    Glusman, G; Yanai, I; Rubin, I; Lancet, D

    2001-05-01

    Olfactory receptors likely constitute the largest gene superfamily in the vertebrate genome. Here we present the nearly complete human olfactory subgenome elucidated by mining the genome draft with gene discovery algorithms. Over 900 olfactory receptor genes and pseudogenes (ORs) were identified, two-thirds of which were not annotated previously. The number of extrapolated ORs is in good agreement with previous theoretical predictions. The sequence of at least 63% of the ORs is disrupted by what appears to be a random process of pseudogene formation. ORs constitute 17 gene families, 4 of which contain more than 100 members each. "Fish-like" Class I ORs, previously considered a relic in higher tetrapods, constitute as much as 10% of the human repertoire, all in one large cluster on chromosome 11. Their lower pseudogene fraction suggests a functional significance. ORs are disposed on all human chromosomes except 20 and Y, and nearly 80% are found in clusters of 6-138 genes. A novel comparative cluster analysis was used to trace the evolutionary path that may have led to OR proliferation and diversification throughout the genome. The results of this analysis suggest the following genome expansion history: first, the generation of a "tetrapod-specific" Class II OR cluster on chromosome 11 by local duplication, then a single-step duplication of this cluster to chromosome 1, and finally an avalanche of duplication events out of chromosome 1 to most other chromosomes. The results of the data mining and characterization of ORs can be accessed at the Human Olfactory Receptor Data Exploratorium Web site (http://bioinfo.weizmann.ac.il/HORDE).

  18. Identification of a common low density lipoprotein receptor mutation (R329X) in the south of England: complete linkage disequilibrium with an allele of microsatellite D19S394.

    PubMed Central

    Day, I N; Haddad, L; O'Dell, S D; Day, L B; Whittall, R A; Humphries, S E

    1997-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia is commonly caused by mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene and more than 300 different mutations have been described worldwide. Some mutations occur at relatively higher frequency in certain populations, reflecting both chance and demography, most evident in founder populations. As part of a study of kindreds of 78 probands from Southampton and south west Hampshire, we identified the same mutation (R329X) in 9/78 (11.5%) probands. In all (100%) of these probands, length allele 259nt of the 17 allele microsatellite D19S394, sited approximately 250 kilobases telomeric and 5' to the LDLR gene, was observed, although in the general population this allele has a prevalence of only 16.1%. A simple diagnostic assay for R329X was constructed in conjunction with more detailed family studies. Both the R329X and linked D19S394 allele also cosegregated with the FH phenotype within each kindred. Although R329X involves a CpG site, it is highly likely that the families are identical by descent for R329X, we surmise with a common ancestor within 500 to 1000 years, although the mutation is not restricted to this geographical area. This relationship illustrates that the linkage disequilibrium of gene LDLR with marker D19S394 will enable rapid recognition using D19S394 genotype of possible common FH mutation(s) within a cohort of FH patients from a particular locality or ethnic group. Images PMID:9039985

  19. Construction and characterization of an infectious cDNA clone of rat hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Yang, Tingting; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Ishii, Koji; Haga, Kei; Nakamura, Tomofumi; Ochiai, Susumu; Takaji, Wakita; Johne, Reimar

    2015-06-01

    Rat hepatitis E virus (HEV) is related to human HEV and has been detected in wild rats worldwide. Here, the complete genome of rat HEV strain R63/DEU/2009 was cloned downstream of the T7 RNA polymerase promoter and capped genomic RNA generated by in vitro transcription was injected into nude rats. Rat HEV RNA could be detected in serum and faeces of rats injected intrahepatically, but not in those injected intravenously. Rat HEV RNA-positive faecal suspension was intravenously inoculated into nude rats and Wistar rats leading to rat HEV RNA detection in serum and faeces of nude rats, and to seroconversion in Wistar rats. In addition, rat HEV was isolated in PLC/PRF/5 cells from the rat HEV RNA-positive faecal suspension of nude rats and then passaged. The cell culture supernatant was infectious for nude rats. Genome analysis identified nine point mutations of the cell-culture-passaged virus in comparison with the originally cloned rat HEV genome. The results indicated that infectious rat HEV could be generated from the cDNA clone. As rats are widely used and well-characterized laboratory animals, studies on genetically engineered rat HEV may provide novel insights into organ tropism, replication and excretion kinetics as well as immunological changes induced by hepeviruses.

  20. Construction and characterization of an infectious cDNA clone of rat hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Yang, Tingting; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Ishii, Koji; Haga, Kei; Nakamura, Tomofumi; Ochiai, Susumu; Takaji, Wakita; Johne, Reimar

    2015-06-01

    Rat hepatitis E virus (HEV) is related to human HEV and has been detected in wild rats worldwide. Here, the complete genome of rat HEV strain R63/DEU/2009 was cloned downstream of the T7 RNA polymerase promoter and capped genomic RNA generated by in vitro transcription was injected into nude rats. Rat HEV RNA could be detected in serum and faeces of rats injected intrahepatically, but not in those injected intravenously. Rat HEV RNA-positive faecal suspension was intravenously inoculated into nude rats and Wistar rats leading to rat HEV RNA detection in serum and faeces of nude rats, and to seroconversion in Wistar rats. In addition, rat HEV was isolated in PLC/PRF/5 cells from the rat HEV RNA-positive faecal suspension of nude rats and then passaged. The cell culture supernatant was infectious for nude rats. Genome analysis identified nine point mutations of the cell-culture-passaged virus in comparison with the originally cloned rat HEV genome. The results indicated that infectious rat HEV could be generated from the cDNA clone. As rats are widely used and well-characterized laboratory animals, studies on genetically engineered rat HEV may provide novel insights into organ tropism, replication and excretion kinetics as well as immunological changes induced by hepeviruses. PMID:25634930

  1. Random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RRACE) allows for cloning of multiple novel human cDNA fragments containing (CAG)n repeats.

    PubMed

    Carney, J P; McKnight, C; VanEpps, S; Kelley, M R

    1995-04-01

    We describe a new technique for isolating cDNA fragments in which (i) either a partial sequence of the cDNA is known or (ii) a repeat sequence is utilized. We have used this technique, termed random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (random RACE), to isolate a number of trinucleotide repeat (CAG)n-containing genes. Using the random RACE (RRACE) technique, we have isolated over a hundred (CAG)n-containing genes. The results of our initial analysis of ten clones indicate that three are identical to previously cloned (CAG)n-containing genes. Three of our clones matched with expressed sequence tags, one of which contained a CA repeat. The remaining four clones did not match with any sequence in GenBank. These results indicate that this approach provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating trinucleotide repeat-containing cDNA fragments. Finally, this technique may be used for purposes other than cloning repeat-containing cDNA fragments. If only a partial sequence of a gene is known, our system, described here, provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating a fragment of the gene of interest. PMID:7536696

  2. XPB mediated retroviral cDNA degradation coincides with entry to the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, Kristine E.; Roddick, William; Hoellerbauer, Pia; Fishel, Richard

    2011-02-20

    Retroviruses must integrate their cDNA to a host chromosome, but a significant fraction of retroviral cDNA is degraded before integration. XPB and XPD are part of the TFIIH complex which mediates basal transcription and DNA nucleotide excision repair. Retroviral infection increases when XPB or XPD are mutant. Here we show that inhibition of mRNA or protein synthesis does not affect HIV cDNA accumulation suggesting that TFIIH transcription activity is not required for degradation. Other host factors implicated in the stability of cDNA are not components of the XPB and XPD degradation pathway. Although an increase of retroviral cDNA in XPB or XPD mutant cells correlates with an increase of integrated provirus, the integration efficiency of pre-integration complexes is unaffected. Finally, HIV and MMLV cDNA degradation appears to coincide with nuclear import. These results suggest that TFIIH mediated cDNA degradation is a nuclear host defense against retroviral infection.

  3. Identification and characterization of cDNA clones encoding hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase from tobacco.

    PubMed

    Farmer, M J; Czernic, P; Michael, A; Negrel, J

    1999-08-01

    The sequences of three cDNA clones that include the complete coding region of hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (THT) from tobacco are reported. The three cDNAs were isolated by antibody screening of a cDNA expression library produced from poly(A)+RNA purified from tobacco leaves (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Bottom Special), previously infiltrated with an incompatible strain of Ralstonia solanacearum. The identity of these clones was confirmed by the detection of THT activity in extracts of transformed Escherichia coli and by matching the translated polypeptides with tryptic enzyme sequences. cDNA clones tht4 and tht11 differ only by their 5' leader and 3' UTRs and therefore encode the same protein, whereas tht10 and tht11 exhibit 95 and 99% sequence identity at the DNA and deduced amino acid levels, respectively. The three clones encode proteins of 226 amino acids with calculated molecular masses of 26 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequences show no similarity with the sequence of anthranilate hydroxycinnamoyl/benzoyltransferase from Dianthus caryophyllus, the only enzyme exhibiting hydroxycinnamoyltransferase activity to be cloned so far in plants. In contrast, comparison of the THT amino acid sequence with protein sequence databases revealed substantial homology with mammalian diamine acetyltransferases. The THT clones hybridized to a 0.95-kb mRNA from elicited tobacco cell-suspension cultures and also to a mRNA of similar size from wound-healing potato tubers. The messengers for THT were also found to be expressed at relatively high levels in tobacco root tissues. Southern hybridization of tobacco genomic DNA with THT cDNA suggests that several copies of the THT gene occur in the tobacco genome. Inhibition experiments using amino-acid-specific reagents demonstrated that both histidyl and cysteyl residues are required for THT activity. In the course of these experiments THT was also found to be inhibited by (2-hydroxyphenyl) amino sulfinyl

  4. Construction of expression system of rabbit aldehyde oxidase cDNA for the clarification of species differences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Liang, Sun; Wang, Ben-Jie; Guo, Rui-Chen

    2009-01-01

    A remarkably large species difference in cinchonidine oxidation activity catalyzed by aldehyde oxidase (AO) has been known, in particular between rabbit and monkey. As the first step in clarifying the phenomenon from the view point of structures of the active site, we attempted to construct an expression system of rabbit AO cDNA. The nucleotide sequences of cloned full-length rabbit AO cDNA were determined and confirmed to agree completely with those of genome DNA. The expression system in Escherichia coli was constructed in reference to the previously established method for monkey AO. Both expressed rabbit and monkey AO proteins correctly reproduced the remarkable species differences observed in their liver cytosols towards cinchonidine and methotrexate. Namely, the expressed rabbit AO protein showed extremely high activities than did that of monkey AO. A difference in the structure of the active site might be responsible for the substrate-dependent species difference towards the relatively bulky molecules of cinchonidine and methotrexate. The use of molecular biology techniques will be very useful to verify the hypothesis.

  5. Genetic manipulation of porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus recovered from a full-length infectious cDNA clone.

    PubMed

    Jengarn, Juggragarn; Wongthida, Phonphimon; Wanasen, Nanchaya; Frantz, Phanramphoei Namprachan; Wanitchang, Asawin; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2015-08-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV) causes acute diarrhoea and dehydration in swine of all ages, with significant mortality in neonatal pigs. The recent rise of PEDV outbreaks in Asia and North America warrants an urgent search for effective vaccines. However, PEDV vaccine research has been hampered by difficulties in isolating and propagating the virus in mammalian cells, thereby complicating the recovery of infectious PEDV using a full-length infectious clone. Here, we engineered VeroE6 cells to stably express porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN) and used them as a platform to obtain a high-growth variant of PEDV, termed PEDVAVCT12. Subsequently, the full-length cDNA clone was constructed by assembling contiguous cDNA fragments encompassing the complete genome of PEDVAVCT12 in a bacterial artificial chromosome. Infectious PEDV could be recovered, and the rescued virus displayed phenotypic properties identical to the parental virus. Interestingly, we found that PEDVAVCT12 contained a C-terminal deletion of the spike gene, resulting in disruption of the ORF3 start codon. When a functional ORF3 gene was restored, the recombinant virus could not be rescued, suggesting that ORF3 could suppress PEDV replication in vitro. In addition, a high-growth and genetically stable recombinant PEDV expressing a foreign protein could be rescued by replacing the ORF3 gene with the mCherry gene. Together, the results of this study provide a means to generate genetically defined PEDV as a promising vaccine candidate. PMID:25979733

  6. Assessing the utility of the Oxford Nanopore MinION for snake venom gland cDNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Adam D; Mulley, John F

    2015-01-01

    Portable DNA sequencers such as the Oxford Nanopore MinION device have the potential to be truly disruptive technologies, facilitating new approaches and analyses and, in some cases, taking sequencing out of the lab and into the field. However, the capabilities of these technologies are still being revealed. Here we show that single-molecule cDNA sequencing using the MinION accurately characterises venom toxin-encoding genes in the painted saw-scaled viper, Echis coloratus. We find the raw sequencing error rate to be around 12%, improved to 0-2% with hybrid error correction and 3% with de novo error correction. Our corrected data provides full coding sequences and 5' and 3' UTRs for 29 of 33 candidate venom toxins detected, far superior to Illumina data (13/40 complete) and Sanger-based ESTs (15/29). We suggest that, should the current pace of improvement continue, the MinION will become the default approach for cDNA sequencing in a variety of species. PMID:26623194

  7. Assessing the utility of the Oxford Nanopore MinION for snake venom gland cDNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Adam D.

    2015-01-01

    Portable DNA sequencers such as the Oxford Nanopore MinION device have the potential to be truly disruptive technologies, facilitating new approaches and analyses and, in some cases, taking sequencing out of the lab and into the field. However, the capabilities of these technologies are still being revealed. Here we show that single-molecule cDNA sequencing using the MinION accurately characterises venom toxin-encoding genes in the painted saw-scaled viper, Echis coloratus. We find the raw sequencing error rate to be around 12%, improved to 0–2% with hybrid error correction and 3% with de novo error correction. Our corrected data provides full coding sequences and 5′ and 3′ UTRs for 29 of 33 candidate venom toxins detected, far superior to Illumina data (13/40 complete) and Sanger-based ESTs (15/29). We suggest that, should the current pace of improvement continue, the MinION will become the default approach for cDNA sequencing in a variety of species. PMID:26623194

  8. Mole ghrelin: cDNA cloning, gene expression, and diverse molecular forms in Mogera imaizumii.

    PubMed

    Satou, Motoyasu; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Akio; Kawada, Shin-Ichiro; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenji; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Here, we describe cDNA cloning and purification of the ghrelin gene sequences and ghrelin peptides from the Japanese true mole, Mogera imaizumii. The gene spans >2.9kbp, has four exons and three introns, and shares structural similarity with those of terrestrial animals. Mature mole ghrelin peptide was predicted to be 28 amino acids long (GSSFLSPEHQKVQQRKESKKPPSKPQPR) and processed from a prepropeptide of 116 amino acids. To further elucidate molecular characteristics, we purified ghrelin peptides from mole stomach. By mass spectrometry, we found that the mole ghrelin peptides had higher ratios of the odd-number fatty acids (C9 and C11 as much as C8) attached to the third serine residue than other vertebrate ghrelin. Truncated forms of ghrelins such as [1-27], [1-19], [1-16] and [1-15], and that lacked the 14th glutamine residue (des-Gln14 ghrelin) were produced in the stomach. Marked expression of ghrelin mRNA in lung was observed as in stomach and brain. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the branch of M. imaizumii has slightly higher dN/dS ratios (the nucleotide substitution rates at non-synonymous and synonymous sites) than did other eulipotyphlans. Peptide length was positively correlated with human ghrelin receptor activation, whereas the length of fatty-acyl chains showed no obvious functional correlation. The basal higher luciferase activities of the 5'-proximal promoter region of mole ghrelin were detected in ghrelin-negative C2C12 cells and hypoxic culture conditions impaired transcriptional activity. These results indicated that moles have acquired diverse species of ghrelin probably through distinctive fatty acid metabolism because of their food preferences. The results provide a gateway to understanding ghrelin metabolism in fossorial animals. PMID:27102942

  9. Molecular Characterization and Sex-Specific Tissue Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha (esr1), Estrogen Receptor Beta-a (esr2a) and Ovarian Aromatase (cyp19a1a) in Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) exhibit an estrogen-stimulated sexual size dimorphism (SSD) wherein females grow faster and larger than males. To aid in the examination of this phenomenon, the cDNA sequences encoding estrogen receptor-alpha (esr1), estrogen receptor-beta-a (esr2a) and ovarian aroma...

  10. Latino College Completion: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Latino College Completion: Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. Latino College Completion: Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  13. Latino College Completion: Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  14. Latino College Completion: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  15. Latino College Completion: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  16. Latino College Completion: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Cloning and sequencing of dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus, Coryphaenidae) growth hormone-encoding cDNA.

    PubMed

    Peduel, A D; Elizur, A; Knibb, W

    1994-01-01

    The cDNA encoding the preprotein growth hormone from the dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) has been cloned and sequenced. The cDNA was derived by reverse transcription of RNA from the pituitary of a young fish using the method known as Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). An oligonucleotide primer corresponding to the 5' region of Pagrus major and the universal RACE primer enabled amplification using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The dolphinfish and yellow-tail, Seriola quineqeradiata, are both members of the sub-order Percoidei (Perciforme) and their GH sequences show a high level of homology. PMID:7703505

  18. Molecular characterization of an. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.; Dewan Zeng; D'Angelo, D.D.; Tucker, A.L.; Zhihong Lu; Barber, C.M.; Lynch, K.R. )

    1990-02-26

    {alpha}{sub 2}-Adrenergic receptors comprise a heterogeneous population based on pharmacologic and molecular evidence. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone (pRNG{alpha}2) encoding a previously undescribed third subtype of an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor from a rat kidney cDNA library. The library was screened with an oligonucleotide encoding a highly conserved region found in all biogenic amine receptors described to date. The deduced amino acid sequence displays many features of G-protein coupled receptors with exception of the absence of the consensus N-linked glycosylation site at the amino terminus. Membranes prepared from COS-1 cells transfected with pRNG{alpha}2 display high affinity and saturable binding to {sup 3}H-rauwolscine (K{sub d}=2 nM).Competition curve data analysis shows that pRNG{alpha}2 protein binds to a variety of adrenergic drugs with the following rank order of potency: yohimbine {ge} cholorpromazine > prazosin {ge} clonidine > norepinephrine {ge} oxymetazoline. pRNG{alpha}2 RNA accumulates in both adult rat kidney and rat neonatal lung (predominant species is 4.0 kb). They conclude that pRNG{alpha}2 likely represents a cDNA for the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor.

  19. Molecular cloning, sequencing, and expression analysis of cDNA encoding metalloprotein II (MP II) induced by single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) in polychaeta Perinereis aibuhitensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dazuo; Zhou, Yibing; Zhao, Huan; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Sun, Na; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Xiutang

    2012-11-01

    We amplified and analyzed the complete cDNA of metalloprotein II (MP II) from the somatic muscle of the polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis, the full length cDNA is 904 bp encoding 119 amino acids. The MP II cDNA sequence was subjected to BLAST searching in NCBI and was found to share high homology with hemerythrin of other worms. MP II expression of P. aibuhitensis exposed to single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) was analyzed using real time-PCR. MP II mRNA expression increased at the start of Cu(II) exposure, then decreased and finally return to the normal level. Expression pattern of MP II under Cd(II) exposure was time- and dose-dependent. MP II expression induced by a combination of Cd(II) and Cu(II) was similar to that induced by Cd(II) alone.

  20. cDNA cloning and expression of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin binding 120 kDa aminopeptidase N from Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, K; Nakanishi, K; Kadotani, T; Imamura, M; Koizumi, N; Iwahana, H; Sato, R

    1999-01-18

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin binds to a 120 kDa putative receptor protein in the Bombyx mori midgut. Recently, this protein was purified and identified as glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored aminopeptidase N (APN). In this study, a full-length cDNA thought to encode this 120 kDa APN was isolated and sequenced. It has a 2958 bp ORF encoding 986 amino acids. In the deduced amino acid sequence, we identified GPI-anchor and zinc-metallopeptidase signals, which are the same as those of APNs of other insects that are reported to be putative Cry1 toxin receptors. The B. mori APN amino acid sequence also has a high similarity with those of the other APNs. Subsequently, the recombinant APN was expressed by Escherichia coli and its Cry1Aa toxin binding ability was analyzed. Ligand blotting showed that Cry1Aa toxin bound to the recombinant APN. PMID:9931470

  1. Pleiotrophin mediates the neurotrophic effect of cyclic AMP on dopaminergic neurons: analysis of suppression-subtracted cDNA libraries and confirmation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mourlevat, Sophie; Debeir, Thomas; Ferrario, Juan E; Delbe, Jean; Caruelle, Daniele; Lejeune, Olivier; Depienne, Christel; Courty, José; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Ruberg, Merle

    2005-07-01

    To better understand the particular vulnerability of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons to toxins or gene mutations causing parkinsonism, we have taken advantage of a primary cell culture system in which these neurons die selectively. Antimitotic agents, such as cytosine arabinoside or cAMP, prevent the death of the neurons by arresting astrocyte proliferation. To identify factors implicated in either the death of the dopaminergic neurons or in the neuroprotective effect of cAMP, we constructed cDNA libraries enriched by subtractive hybridization and suppressive PCR in transcripts that are preferentially expressed in either control or cAMP-treated cultures. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified by hybridization of the enriched cDNAs with a commercially available cDNA expression array. The proteoglycan receptors syndecan-3 and the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta/beta were found among the transcripts preferentially expressed under control conditions, and their ligand, the cytokine pleiotrophin, was highly represented in the cDNA libraries for both conditions. Since pleiotrophin is expressed during embryonic and perinatal neural development and following lesions in the adult brain, we investigated its role in our cell culture model. Pleiotrophin was not responsible for the death of dopaminergic neurons under control conditions, or for their survival in cAMP-treated cultures. It was, however, implicated in the initial and cAMP-dependent enhancement of the differentiation of the dopaminergic neurons in our cultures. In addition, our experiments have provided evidence for a cAMP-dependent regulatory pathway leading to protease activation, and the identification of pleiotrophin as a target of this pathway.

  2. Amino acid sequence and domain structure of entactin. Homology with epidermal growth factor precursor and low density lipoprotein receptor

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Entactin (nidogen), a 150-kD sulfated glycoprotein, is a major component of basement membranes and forms a highly stable noncovalent complex with laminin. The complete amino acid sequence of mouse entactin has been derived from sequencing of cDNA clones. The 5.9-kb cDNA contains a 3,735-bp open reading frame followed by a 3'- untranslated region of 2.2 kb. The open reading frame encodes a 1,245- residue polypeptide with an unglycosylated Mr of 136,500, a 28-residue signal peptide, two Asn-linked glycosylation sites, and two potential Ca2+-binding sites. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence predicts that the molecule consists of two globular domains of 70 and 36 kD separated by a cysteine-rich domain of 28 kD. The COOH-terminal globular domain shows homology to the EGF precursor and the low density lipoprotein receptor. Entactin contains six EGF-type cysteine-rich repeat units and one copy of a cysteine-repeat motif found in thyroglobulin. The Arg-Gly-Asp cell recognition sequence is present in one of the EGF-type repeats, and a synthetic peptide from the putative cell-binding site of entactin was found to promote the attachment of mouse mammary tumor cells. PMID:3264556

  3. Construction and characterization of a cDNA expression library from the endangered Hu sheep.

    PubMed

    Hu, P-F; Li, X-C; Liu, H-K; Guan, W-J; Ma, Y-H

    2014-01-01

    Hu sheep is one of the most important species in China; it is also listed as one of the 78 nationally protected domestic animals by the Chinese government in 2000. The construction of cDNA expression library of Hu sheep is of great significance for protecting individual genomes, generating transgenic sheep, and conducting clinical research using cDNA from Hu sheep. In this study, the total RNA from the ear tissue of Hu sheep was extracted, and a cDNA expression library was constructed using the SMART(TM) technique. The titer of amplified cDNA library was 1.09 x 10(10) PFU/mL, the rate of recombination was above 91.6%, and the average size of fragments was 1.1 kb. This study has an important significance for the preservation of Hu sheep resources at the genome level. PMID:25366792

  4. [Amplification, cloning and sequence analysis of spider dragline silk cDNA].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Shu; Ma, He-Wen; Lu, Yi-Ming; Zhang, Yu-Jing

    2002-09-01

    Spider dragline silk is synthesized in special gland named major ampulate (MA) gland. The MA glands were dissected from the abdomen of the spiders Nephila clavata and the total RNA was extracted by the TRIZOL. The cDNA of dragline silk was amplificated by RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction), multiplex PCR and cloned. PCR identification, restriction analysis and DNA sequence analysis were carried out to verify the recombinant plasmids. The codon usage frequencies of the cloned cDNA were added up, and the predicted amino acid sequence was compared with Spidroin2 of Nephila clavipes. Predicted secondary structure of the predicted amino-acid sequence was analysized by DNAStar software. All results showed that the cloned cDNA we got (GenBank Accession No. AF441245) was the very fragment of spider dragline silk Spidroin2 cDNA.

  5. Complete binasal hemianopia

    PubMed Central

    Pomeranz, Howard D.; Smith, Kyle H.

    2014-01-01

    Binasal hemianopia is a rarely encountered visual field defect. We examined two asymptomatic female patients, aged 17 and 83, with complete binasal hemianopia. Both patients had unremarkable eye exams except for the visual field deficits and minimally reduced visual acuity and color vision. Both patients had normal neuroimaging. These are the first reported cases of complete binasal visual field defects without an identifiable ocular or neurologic cause. PMID:25484511

  6. Construction of Infectious cDNA Clone of a Chrysanthemum stunt viroid Korean Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Cho, In-Sook; Choi, Gug-Seoun; Choi, Seung-Kook

    2014-01-01

    Chrysanthemum stunt viroid (CSVd), a noncoding infectious RNA molecule, causes seriously economic losses of chrysanthemum for 3 or 4 years after its first infection. Monomeric cDNA clones of CSVd isolate SK1 (CSVd-SK1) were constructed in the plasmids pGEM-T easy vector and pUC19 vector. Linear positive-sense transcripts synthesized in vitro from the full-length monomeric cDNA clones of CSVd-SK1 could infect systemically tomato seedlings and chrysanthemum plants, suggesting that the linear CSVd RNA transcribed from the cDNA clones could be replicated as efficiently as circular CSVd in host species. However, direct inoculation of plasmid cDNA clones containing full-length monomeric cDNA of CSVd-SK1 failed to infect tomato and chrysanthemum and linear negative-sense transcripts from the plasmid DNAs were not infectious in the two plant species. The cDNA sequences of progeny viroid in systemically infected tomato and chrysanthemum showed a few substitutions at a specific nucleotide position, but there were no deletions and insertions in the sequences of the CSVd progeny from tomato and chrysanthemum plants. PMID:25288987

  7. Purification of Single-Stranded cDNA Based on RNA Degradation Treatment and Adsorption Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Esquivel, Elías; Franco, Bernardo; Flores-Martínez, Alberto; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of gene expression is a common research tool to study networks controlling gene expression, the role of genes with unknown function, and environmentally induced responses of organisms. Most of the analytical tools used to analyze gene expression rely on accurate cDNA synthesis and quantification to obtain reproducible and quantifiable results. Thus far, most commercial kits for isolation and purification of cDNA target double-stranded molecules, which do not accurately represent the abundance of transcripts. In the present report, we provide a simple and fast method to purify single-stranded cDNA, exhibiting high purity and yield. This method is based on the treatment with RNase H and RNase A after cDNA synthesis, followed by separation in silica spin-columns and ethanol precipitation. In addition, our method avoids the use of DNase I to eliminate genomic DNA from RNA preparations, which improves cDNA yield. As a case report, our method proved to be useful in the purification of single-stranded cDNA from the pathogenic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. PMID:27352216

  8. Purification of Single-Stranded cDNA Based on RNA Degradation Treatment and Adsorption Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Esquivel, Elías; Franco, Bernardo; Flores-Martínez, Alberto; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of gene expression is a common research tool to study networks controlling gene expression, the role of genes with unknown function, and environmentally induced responses of organisms. Most of the analytical tools used to analyze gene expression rely on accurate cDNA synthesis and quantification to obtain reproducible and quantifiable results. Thus far, most commercial kits for isolation and purification of cDNA target double-stranded molecules, which do not accurately represent the abundance of transcripts. In the present report, we provide a simple and fast method to purify single-stranded cDNA, exhibiting high purity and yield. This method is based on the treatment with RNase H and RNase A after cDNA synthesis, followed by separation in silica spin-columns and ethanol precipitation. In addition, our method avoids the use of DNase I to eliminate genomic DNA from RNA preparations, which improves cDNA yield. As a case report, our method proved to be useful in the purification of single-stranded cDNA from the pathogenic fungus Sporothrix schenckii.

  9. Cloning and Expression of cDNA for Rat Heme Oxygenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibahara, Shigeki; Muller, Rita; Taguchi, Hayao; Yoshida, Tadashi

    1985-12-01

    Two cDNA clones for rat heme oxygenase have been isolated from a rat spleen cDNA library in λ gt11 by immunological screening using a specific polyclonal antibody. One of these clones has an insert of 1530 nucleotides that contains the entire protein-coding region. To confirm that the isolated cDNA encodes heme oxygenase, we transfected monkey kidney cells (COS-7) with the cDNA carried in a simian virus 40 vector. The heme oxygenase was highly expressed in endoplasmic reticulum of transfected cells. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned cDNA was determined and the primary structure of heme oxygenase was deduced. Heme oxygenase is composed of 289 amino acids and has one hydrophobic segment at its carboxyl terminus, which is probably important for the insertion of heme oxygenase into endoplasmic reticulum. The cloned cDNA was used to analyze the induction of heme oxygenase in rat liver by treatment with CoCl2 or with hemin. RNA blot analysis showed that both CoCl2 and hemin increased the amount of hybridizable mRNA, suggesting that these substances may act at the transcriptional level to increase the amount of heme oxygenase.

  10. The 5-HT4 receptor: molecular cloning and pharmacological characterization of two splice variants.

    PubMed Central

    Gerald, C; Adham, N; Kao, H T; Olsen, M A; Laz, T M; Schechter, L E; Bard, J A; Vaysse, P J; Hartig, P R; Branchek, T A

    1995-01-01

    Molecular cloning efforts have provided primary amino acid sequence and signal transduction data for a large collection of serotonin receptor subtypes. These include five 5-HT1-like receptors, three 5-HT2 receptors, one 5-HT3 receptor, two 5-HT5 receptors, one 5-HT6 receptor and one 5-HT7 receptor. Molecular biological information on the 5-HT4 receptor is notably absent from this list. We now report the cloning of the pharmacologically defined 5-HT4 receptor. Using degenerate oligonucleotide primers, we identified a rat brain PCR fragment which encoded a '5-HT receptor-like' amino acid sequence. The corresponding full length cDNA was isolated from a rat brain cDNA library. Transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, this receptor stimulates adenylyl cyclase activity and is sensitive to the benzamide derivative cisapride. The response is also blocked by ICS-205930. Interestingly, we isolated two splice variants of the receptor, 5-HT4L and 5-HT4S, differing in the length and sequence of their C-termini. In rat brain, the 5-HT4S transcripts are restricted to the striatum, but the 5-HT4L transcripts are expressed throughout the brain, except in the cerebellum where it was barely detectable. In peripheral tissues, differential expression was also observed in the atrium of the heart where only the 5-HT4S isoform was detectable. Images PMID:7796807

  11. Correction of sulfatide metabolism after transfer of prosaposin cDNA to cultured cells from a patient with SAP-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rafi, M A; Amini, S; Zhang, X L; Wenger, D A

    1992-06-01

    The lysosomal removal of the sulfate moiety from sulfatide requires the action of two proteins, arylsulfatase A and sphingolipid activator protein-1 (SAP-1). Recently, patients have been identified who have a variant form of metachromatic leukodystrophy which is characterized by mutations in the gene coding for SAP-1, which is also called "prosaposin." All of the mutations characterized in these patients result in (a) deficient mature SAP-1, as determined by immunoblotting after SDS-PAGE of tissue and cell extracts, and (b) decreased ability of cultured skin fibroblasts to metabolize endocytosed [14C]-sulfatide. We now report the insertion of the full-length prosaposin cDNA into the Moloney murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector, pLJ, and the infection of cultured skin fibroblasts from a newly diagnosed and molecularly characterized patient with SAP-1 deficiency. The cultured cells infected with the prosaposin cDNA construct now show both production of normal levels of mature SAP-1 and completely normal metabolism of endocytosed [14C]-sulfatide. These studies demonstrate that the virally transferred prosaposin cDNA is processed normally and is localized within lysosomes, where it is needed for interaction between sulfatide and arylsulfatase A. In addition, normal as well as mutant sequences can now be found by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization of PCR-amplified genomic DNA by using exonic sequences as primers.

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va from the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae).

    PubMed

    Ayala, Jorge; Dowdy, Alan K; Beeman, Richard W; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2003-10-01

    A cDNA encoding subunit Va of cytochrome c oxidase (EC 1.9.3.1) was cloned and characterized from a lesser grain borer (Rhyzopertha dominica) cDNA library. The complete cDNA consists of 693-bp and contains an open reading frame of 450-bp that encodes 150 amino acid residues. The sequence includes a 28-bp putative N-terminal and a 122-bp putative mature protein. The estimated molecular weight and pI for the predicted mature protein are 13,962 and 4.60, respectively. The cDNA-deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein shows 73% identity to that of a corresponding subunit of African malaria mosquito (Anopheles gambiae) and 59% identity to that of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster). In addition, 31% of all amino acid residues are conserved among six different animal species. Evolutionary distance analysis suggests that cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va from R. dominica is most similar to the corresponding subunit from the malaria mosquito. Northern analysis revealed a single 4.9-kb transcript that is much larger than that found in mammalian species.

  13. Brief report: genome sequence and construction of an infectious cDNA clone of Ribgrass mosaic virus from Chinese cabbage in Korea.

    PubMed

    Ryu, So-Young; Hong, Jin-Sung; Rhee, Sun-Ju; Lee, Gung Pyo

    2012-04-01

    Ribgrass mosaic virus (RMV) has severely decreased the production and lowered quality of Chinese cabbage co-infected with Turnip mosaic virus (63.4%) in Korea. The complete genome sequence of RMV isolated from Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis was determined. The full genome consisted of 6,304 nucleotides and showed sequence identities of 91.5-94.2% with the corresponding genome of other RMV strains. Full-length cDNA of RMV-Br was amplified by RT-PCR with a 5'-end primer harboring a T7 promoter sequence and a 3'-end RMV specific primer. Subsequently, the full-length cDNA was cloned into plasmid vectors. Capped transcripts synthesized from the cDNA clone were highly infectious and caused characteristic symptoms in B. rapa ssp. pekinensis and several indicator plants, similar to wild type RMV. Since there has not been found RMV resistant Chinese cabbage yet and the virus has been prevalent already throughout the natural fields of Korea, the identification of full sequence and development of infectious clone would help developing breeding program for RMV resistant crops.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone encoding the pokeweed antiviral protein II from Phytolacca americana and its expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Poyet, J L; Radom, J; Hoeveler, A

    1994-06-27

    Three distinct ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were isolated from pokeweed (Phytolacca americana). We identified and sequenced for the first time a complete cDNA encoding the pokeweed antiviral protein II (PAP II), which is expressed in the late summer leaves of pokeweed. The cDNA of PAP II consists of 1,187 nucleotides and encodes a mature protein of 285 amino acids. Its predicted amino acid sequence is only 33% similar to PAP and PAP-S. The NH2 terminal extrapeptide (25 amino acid residues) was similar but not identical to that of PAP's extrapeptide. The cDNA of PAP II was expressed in E. coli. The growth of the transformants was strongly inhibited after induction of the gene. Furthermore, PAP II, which was produced in E. coli, inhibited protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte translation system. Thus, recombinant PAP II would appear to be as functional as native PAP in inhibiting protein synthesis in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  15. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone lambdaHB''-1 from a phage lambdagt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone lambdaHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone lambdaHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the lambdaHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone lambdaHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens.

  16. Brief report: genome sequence and construction of an infectious cDNA clone of Ribgrass mosaic virus from Chinese cabbage in Korea.

    PubMed

    Ryu, So-Young; Hong, Jin-Sung; Rhee, Sun-Ju; Lee, Gung Pyo

    2012-04-01

    Ribgrass mosaic virus (RMV) has severely decreased the production and lowered quality of Chinese cabbage co-infected with Turnip mosaic virus (63.4%) in Korea. The complete genome sequence of RMV isolated from Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis was determined. The full genome consisted of 6,304 nucleotides and showed sequence identities of 91.5-94.2% with the corresponding genome of other RMV strains. Full-length cDNA of RMV-Br was amplified by RT-PCR with a 5'-end primer harboring a T7 promoter sequence and a 3'-end RMV specific primer. Subsequently, the full-length cDNA was cloned into plasmid vectors. Capped transcripts synthesized from the cDNA clone were highly infectious and caused characteristic symptoms in B. rapa ssp. pekinensis and several indicator plants, similar to wild type RMV. Since there has not been found RMV resistant Chinese cabbage yet and the virus has been prevalent already throughout the natural fields of Korea, the identification of full sequence and development of infectious clone would help developing breeding program for RMV resistant crops. PMID:22143325

  17. Expression of a full-length cDNA for the human MDR1 gene confers resistance to colchicine, doxorubicin, and vinblastine

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, K.; Cardarelli, C.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I.

    1987-05-01

    Intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) is an important problem in cancer therapy. MDR in human KB carcinoma cells selected for resistance to colchicine, vinblastine, or doxorubicin (former generic name adriamycin) is associated with overexpression of the MDR1 gene, which encodes P-glycoprotein. The authors previously have isolated an overlapping set of cDNA clones for the human MDR1 gene from multidrug-resistant KB cells. Here they report the construction of a full-length cDNA for the human MDR1 gene and show that this reconstructed cDNA, when inserted into a retroviral expression vector containing the long terminal repeats of Moloney leukemia virus or Harvey sarcoma virus, functions in mouse NIH 3T3 and human KB cells to confer the complete multidrug-resistance phenotype. These results suggest that the human MDR1 gene may be used as a positive selectable marker to introduce genes into human cells and to transform human cells to multidrug resistance without introducing nonhuman antigens.

  18. Identification of the mineralocorticoid receptor in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Cristina; Sticchi, Daniele; Pellati, Donatella; Forzan, Sante; Bonanni, Guglielmo; Bertoldo, Alessandro; Massironi, Michele; Calò, Lorenzo; Fassina, Ambrogio; Rossi, Gian Paolo; Armanini, Decio

    2006-10-01

    Aldosterone seems to play a role in the regulation of the electrolyte content of sperm and in the motility of spermatozoa. The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in human ejaculated spermatozoa. We have assayed MR on spermatozoa of freshly ejaculated sperm from healthy donors. The identification of MR was made by using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses, while MR mRNA expression was evaluated by real-time PCR assay. The immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses showed positive staining both in the midpiece and in the tail of the spermatozoa. Relative quantification of MR by using real-time PCR shows that the mRNA expression of MR in spermatozoa is lower than in mononuclear leukocytes (positive controls). Sequencing showed complete identity between the sequence obtained from spermatozoa and the human MR cDNA sequence. Further studies should be performed in order to elucidate a possible physiological role of aldosterone in regulating electrolyte concentration, and the pro-oxidant effect of excess aldosterone in this new target tissue. PMID:16964418

  19. Mutant U5A cells are complemented by an interferon-alpha beta receptor subunit generated by alternative processing of a new member of a cytokine receptor gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Lutfalla, G; Holland, S J; Cinato, E; Monneron, D; Reboul, J; Rogers, N C; Smith, J M; Stark, G R; Gardiner, K; Mogensen, K E

    1995-10-16

    The cellular receptor for the alpha/beta interferons contains at least two components that interact with interferon. The ifnar1 component is well characterized and a putative ifnar2 cDNA has recently been identified. We have cloned the gene for ifnar2 and show that it produces four different transcripts encoding three different polypeptides that are generated by exon skipping, alternative splicing and differential use of polyadenylation sites. One polypeptide is likely to be secreted and two are transmembrane proteins with identical extracellular and transmembrane domains but divergent cytoplasmic tails of 67 and 251 amino acids. A mutant cell line U5A, completely defective in IFN-alpha beta binding and response, has been isolated and characterized. Expression in U5A cells of the polypeptide with the long cytoplasmic domain reconstitutes a functional receptor that restores normal interferon binding, activation of the JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway, interferon-inducible gene expression and antiviral response. The IFNAR2 gene maps at 0.5 kb from the CRFB4 gene, establishing that together IFNAR2, CRFB4, IFNAR1 and AF1 form a cluster of class II cytokine receptor genes on human chromosome 21.

  20. Crustacean retinoid-X receptor isoforms: distinctive DNA binding and receptor-receptor interaction with a cognate ecdysteroid receptor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohui; Hopkins, Penny M; Palli, Subba R; Durica, David S

    2004-04-15

    We have identified cDNA clones that encode homologs of the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) and retinoid-X receptor (RXR)/USP classes of nuclear receptors from the fiddler crab Uca pugilator (UpEcR and UpRXR). Several UpRXR cDNA splicing variants were found in coding regions that could potentially influence function. A five-amino acid (aa) insertion/deletion is located in the "T" box in the hinge region. Another 33-aa insertion/deletion is found inside the ligand-binding domain (LBD), between helix 1 and helix 3. Ribonuclease protection assays (RPA) showed that four UpRXR transcripts [UpRXR(+5+33), UpRXR(-5+33), UpRXR(+5-33) and UpRXR(-5-33)] were present in regenerating limb buds. UpRXR(-5+33) was the most abundant transcript present in regenerating limb buds in both early blastema and late premolt growth stages. Expression vectors for these UpRXR variants and UpEcR were constructed, and the proteins expressed in E. coli and in vitro expression systems. The expressed crab nuclear receptors were then characterized by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull down experiments. EMSA results showed that UpEcR/UpRXR(-5+33) heterocomplexes bound with a series of hormone response elements (HREs) including eip28/29, IRper-1, DR-4, and IRhsp-1 with appreciable affinity. Competition EMSA also showed that the affinity decreased as sequence composition deviated from a perfect consensus element. Binding to IRper-1 HREs occurred only if the heterodimer partner UpRXR contained the 33-aa LBD insertion. UpRXR lacking both the 5-aa and 33-aa insertion bound to a DR-1G HRE in the absence of UpEcR. The results of GST-pull down experiments showed that UpEcR interacted only with UpRXR variants containing the 33-aa insertion, and not with those lacking the 33-aa insertion. These in vitro receptor protein-DNA and receptor protein-protein interactions occurred in the absence of hormone (20-hydroxyecdysone and 9-cis retinoid acid, 9-cis RA

  1. Molecular cloning of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha; ESR1) of the Japanese giant salamander, Andrias japonicus.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Kohno, Satomi; Oka, Tomohiro; Mitsui, Naoko; Tooi, Osamu; Santo, Noriaki; Urushitani, Hiroshi; Fukumoto, Yukio; Kuwabara, Kazushi; Ashikaga, Kazuhide; Minami, Shinji; Kato, Shigeaki; Ohta, Yasuhiko; Guillette, Louis J; Iguchi, Taisen

    2006-09-26

    Estrogens are essential for normal reproductive activity in females and males and for ovarian differentiation during a critical developmental stage in many vertebrates. To understand the molecular mechanisms of estrogen action and to evaluate estrogen receptor ligand interactions in the Japanese giant salamander (Andrias japonicus), we isolated cDNA encoding the estrogen receptor (ER) from the liver. A full-length Japanese giant salamander ER cDNA (jgsER) was obtained using 5' and 3' rapid amplification cDNA ends (RACE). The deduced amino acid sequence of the jgsER showed high identity to the Xenopus ERalpha (ESR1) (77.7%). We have applied both the conventional ERE-luciferase reporter assay system and the GAL4-transactivation system to characterize this receptor. In two different transient transfection assay systems using mammalian cells, the jgsER protein displayed estrogen-dependent activation of transcription. The GAL4-transactivation system showed about 10-fold greater activity of the estrogen receptor by hormone when compared to the conventional ERE-luciferase reporter assay system. Tissue distribution of ERalpha mRNA was examined and kidney, ovary and liver exhibited expression. This is the first isolation of an estrogen receptor from a salamander and also is the first functional cDNA obtained from the Japanese giant salamander, an endangered species considered a special natural monument of Japan.

  2. Nucleotide sequence and infectious transcripts from a full-length cDNA clone of the carmovirus Melon necrotic spot virus.

    PubMed

    Díaz, J A; Bernal, J J; Moriones, E; Aranda, M A

    2003-03-01

    We have studied the biological and molecular characteristics of a MNSV isolate collected in Spain (MNSV-Malpha5) and generated a full-length cDNA clone from which infectious RNA transcripts can be produced. The host range of MNSV-Malpha5 appeared to be limited to cucurbits and did not differ from that of MNSV-Dutch [4, 21]. However, differences were observed in the type of symptoms that both isolates could induce. A full-length cDNA of MNSV-Malpha5 was directly amplified by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using a 5'-end primer anchoring a T7 RNA promoter sequence and a 3'-end primer, and cloned. Uncapped RNAs transcribed from this cDNA clone were infectious and caused symptoms indistinguishable from those caused by viral RNA when mechanically inoculated onto melon, cucumber or watermelon plants. The complete genome sequence of MNSV-Malpha5 was deduced from the full length cDNA clone. It is 4271 nt long and, similarly to MNSV-Dutch, consists of 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) and five open reading frames (ORFs) coding for 29, 89, 42 and two small 7 kDa proteins. One notable difference between MNSV-Malpha5 and other sequenced MNSV isolates was found, as for MNSV-Malpha5 the first of the two small ORFs, which are contiguous in the genome, terminates with a genuine stop codon, whereas for MNSV-Dutch and other sequenced MNSV isolates it terminates with an amber codon. This suggested that the putative p14 readthrough protein that could be expressed from the MNSV-Dutch and other MNSV genomes could not be expressed from the MNSV-Malpha5 genome. Also, the nucleotide and amino acid sequences comparisons showed a distant relationship of MNSV-Malpha5 with other known MNSV isolates.

  3. Transcriptome and full-length cDNA resources for the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, a major insect pest of pine forests.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Christopher I; Henderson, Hannah; Li, Maria; Yuen, Mack; Clark, Erin L; Fraser, Jordie D; Huber, Dezene P W; Liao, Nancy Y; Docking, T Roderick; Birol, Inanc; Chan, Simon K; Taylor, Greg A; Palmquist, Diana; Jones, Steven J M; Bohlmann, Joerg

    2012-08-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) are major insect pests of many woody plants around the world. The mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a significant historical pest of western North American pine forests. It is currently devastating pine forests in western North America--particularly in British Columbia, Canada--and is beginning to expand its host range eastward into the Canadian boreal forest, which extends to the Atlantic coast of North America. Limited genomic resources are available for this and other bark beetle pests, restricting the use of genomics-based information to help monitor, predict, and manage the spread of these insects. To overcome these limitations, we generated comprehensive transcriptome resources from fourteen full-length enriched cDNA libraries through paired-end Sanger sequencing of 100,000 cDNA clones, and single-end Roche 454 pyrosequencing of three of these cDNA libraries. Hybrid de novo assembly of the 3.4 million sequences resulted in 20,571 isotigs in 14,410 isogroups and 246,848 singletons. In addition, over 2300 non-redundant full-length cDNA clones putatively containing complete open reading frames, including 47 cytochrome P450s, were sequenced fully to high quality. This first large-scale genomics resource for bark beetles provides the relevant sequence information for gene discovery; functional and population genomics; comparative analyses; and for future efforts to annotate the MPB genome. These resources permit the study of this beetle at the molecular level and will inform research in other Dendroctonus spp. and more generally in the Curculionidae and other Coleoptera.

  4. Targeting a complex transcriptome: the construction of the mouse full-length cDNA encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Carninci, Piero; Waki, Kazunori; Shiraki, Toshiyuki; Konno, Hideaki; Shibata, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Masayoshi; Aizawa, Katsunori; Arakawa, Takahiro; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Daisuke; Bono, Hidemasa; Kondo, Shinji; Sugahara, Yuichi; Saito, Rintaro; Osato, Naoki; Fukuda, Shiro; Sato, Kenjiro; Watahiki, Akira; Hirozane-Kishikawa, Tomoko; Nakamura, Mari; Shibata, Yuko; Yasunishi, Ayako; Kikuchi, Noriko; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Kusakabe, Moriaki; Gustincich, Stefano; Beisel, Kirk; Pavan, William; Aidinis, Vassilis; Nakagawara, Akira; Held, William A; Iwata, Hiroo; Kono, Tomohiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Lyons, Paul; Wells, Christine; Hume, David A; Fagiolini, Michela; Hensch, Takao K; Brinkmeier, Michelle; Camper, Sally; Hirota, Junji; Mombaerts, Peter; Muramatsu, Masami; Okazaki, Yasushi; Kawai, Jun; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-06-01

    We report the construction of the mouse full-length cDNA encyclopedia,the most extensive view of a complex transcriptome,on the basis of preparing and sequencing 246 libraries. Before cloning,cDNAs were enriched in full-length by Cap-Trapper,and in most cases,aggressively subtracted/normalized. We have produced 1,442,236 successful 3'-end sequences clustered into 171,144 groups, from which 60,770 clones were fully sequenced cDNAs annotated in the FANTOM-2 annotation. We have also produced 547,149 5' end reads,which clustered into 124,258 groups. Altogether, these cDNAs were further grouped in 70,000 transcriptional units (TU),which represent the best coverage of a transcriptome so far. By monitoring the extent of normalization/subtraction, we define the tentative equivalent coverage (TEC),which was estimated to be equivalent to >12,000,000 ESTs derived from standard libraries. High coverage explains discrepancies between the very large numbers of clusters (and TUs) of this project,which also include non-protein-coding RNAs,and the lower gene number estimation of genome annotations. Altogether,5'-end clusters identify regions that are potential promoters for 8637 known genes and 5'-end clusters suggest the presence of almost 63,000 transcriptional starting points. An estimate of the frequency of polyadenylation signals suggests that at least half of the singletons in the EST set represent real mRNAs. Clones accounting for about half of the predicted TUs await further sequencing. The continued high-discovery rate suggests that the task of transcriptome discovery is not yet complete.

  5. Cloning and characterization of goose interleukin-17A cDNA.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuangshi; Liu, Xiaomei; Gao, Mingchun; Zhang, Wenlong; Zhu, Yunhui; Ma, Bo; Wang, Junwei

    2014-02-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17 or IL-17A) is a proinflammatory cytokine produced by activated T cells. IL-17A plays important roles in inflammation and host defense. In this study, the cDNA of the goose IL-17A (GoIL-17A) gene was cloned from thymocytes. Recombinant GoIL-17A (rGoIL-17A) was expressed using a baculovirus expression system and then biologically characterized. The complete open reading frame (ORF) of GoIL-17A contains 510 base pairs that encode 169 amino acid residues, including a 29-amino acid signal peptide and a single potential N-linked glycosylation site. This protein has a molecular weight of 18.9kDa. The amino acid sequence showed 95.9%, 84.6%, 45.0% and 38.4% similarity with the corresponding duck, chicken, rat, and human IL-17A sequences, respectively. The six conserved cysteine residues were also observed in GoIL-17A. A recombinant, mature form of GoIL-17A was produced and its biological activities in goose embryonic fibroblasts were investigated. RT-PCR analysis revealed a marked up-regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression in goose embryonic fibroblasts treated with 1-50 μg of rGoIL-17A for 12h. The GoIL-17A gene sequence and the biologically active recombinant protein may be useful for understanding the role of IL-17A in immune regulation.

  6. Congenital complete atrioventricular block.

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, N J; Fenrich, A L; Friedman, R A

    1997-01-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular block is found in 1 of 22,000 live births. Over time, it has become apparent that these patients represent not a single distinct disease process, but several processes with the common manifestation of atrioventricular block. The evaluation of these patients to determine their risk of sudden death and need for pacing is not well defined. Images PMID:9456483

  7. Making College Completion Personal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Heather

    2011-01-01

    There are countless justifications for why young adults, faced with so many distractions, do not complete their educations. Many students fail to finish college because of a lack of information and understanding about healthy relationships and sex education. The author's own struggles and eventual successes as a student and mother compelled her to…

  8. Completing a Simple Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Timothy F.; Adams, Jeffrey P.; Brown, Thomas R.

    2000-01-01

    Students have problems successfully arranging an electric circuit to make the bulb produce light. Investigates the percentage of students able to complete a circuit with a given apparatus, and the effects of prior experience on student success. Recommends hands-on activities at the elementary and secondary school levels. (Contains 14 references.)…

  9. Beyond FASFA Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleman, Ben; Page, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)--which students must complete to qualify for most federal, state, and institutional financial aid--is a gateway to college through which many students must pass, particularly those from low- to moderate-income households (King, 2004; Kofoed, 2013). Yet given the complexity of the…

  10. Yeast phenotype classifies mammalian protein kinase C cDNA mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, H; Su, L; Hansen, H

    1993-01-01

    The phorbol ester receptor protein kinase C (PKC) gene family encodes essential mediators of eukaryotic cellular signals. Molecular dissection of their mechanisms of action has been limited in part by the lack of random mutagenesis approaches and by the complexity of signaling pathways in mammalian cells which involve multiple PKC isoforms. Here we present a rapid screen which permits the quantification of mammalian PKC activity phenotypically in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Bovine PKC alpha cDNA is functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae. This results in a phorbol ester response: a fourfold increase in the cell doubling time and a substantial decrease in yeast colony size on agar plates. We have expressed pools of bovine PKC alpha cDNAs mutagenized by Bal 31 deletion of internal, amino-terminal, or carboxyl-terminal sequences and have identified three classes of mutants on the basis of their distinct yeast phenotypes. Representatives of each class were analyzed. An internal deletion of amino acids (aa) 172 to 225 displayed ligand-dependent but reduced catalytic activity, an amino-terminal truncation of aa 1 to 153 displayed elevated and ligand-independent activity, and a carboxyl-terminal 26-aa truncation (aa 647 to 672) lacked activity under any conditions. Additional mutations confirmed the distinct functional characteristics of these classes. Our data show that deletion of the V1 and C1 regions results in elevated basal catalytic activity which is still Ca2+ responsive. Internal deletions in the V2 and C2 regions do not abolish phorbol ester or Ca2+ regulation of PKC activity, suggesting that most of the C2 domain is not essential for phorbol ester stimulation and most of the regulatory domain is dispensable for Ca2+ regulation of PKC activity. These distinct activities od the PKC mutants correlate with a specific and proportional yeast phenotype and are quantified on agar plates by yeast colony size. This provides a phenotypic screen which is suitable

  11. cDNA cloning and bacterial expression of a PL-14 alginate lyase from a herbivorous marine snail Littorina brevicula.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Matiur; Wang, Ling; Inoue, Akira; Ojima, Takao

    2012-10-01

    Herbivorous marine snails like Littorina species are known to possess alginate lyases in their digestive tracts. The Littorina enzymes have been identified as endolytic polymannuronate (poly(M)) lyases (EC 4.2.2.3); however, it is still unclear which polysaccharide-lyase family (PL) the Littorina enzymes belong to, since no complete primary structure of Littorina enzymes has been determined. Thus, in the present study, we analyzed the primary structure of LbAly28, a 28kDa alginate lyase isozyme of Littorina brevicula, by the cDNA method. LbAly28 cDNAs were amplified by PCR followed by 5'- and 3'-RACE PCRs from the L. brevicula hepatopancreas cDNA. A cDNA covering entire coding region of LbAly28 consisted of 1129bp and encoded an amino-acid sequence of 291 residues. The deduced amino-acid sequence comprised an initiation methionine, a putative signal peptide of 14 residues, a propeptide-like region of 16 residues, and a mature LbAly28 domain of 260 residues. The mature LbAly28 domain showed 43-53% amino-acid identities with other molluscan PL-14 enzymes. The catalytically important residues in PL-14 enzymes, which were identified in the Chlorella virus glucuronate-specific lyase vAL-1 and Aplysia poly(M) lyase AkAly30, were also conserved in LbAly28. Site-directed mutagenesis regarding these residues, that is, replacements of Lys94, Lys97, Thr121, Arg 123, Tyr135, and Tyr137 to Ala, decreased the activity of recombinant LbAly28 to various degrees. From these results we concluded that LbAly28 is a member of PL-14 alginate lyases. Besides the effects of above mutations, we noticed that the replacement of T121 by Ala changed the substrate preference of LbAly28. Namely, the activities toward sodium alginate and poly(MG)-block substrate increased and became comparable with the activity toward poly(M)-block substrate. This suggests that the region including T121 of LbAly28 closely relates to the recognition of poly(MG) region of alginate. PMID:22940178

  12. Human DNA ligase I cDNA: Cloning and functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.E.; Kodama, Kenichi; Tomkinson, A.E.; Lindahl, T.; Lasko, D.D. ); Johnston, L.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Human cDNA clones encoding the major DNA ligase activity in proliferating cells, DNA ligase I, were isolated by two independent methods. In one approach, a human cDNA library was screened by hybridization with oligonucleotides deduced from partial amino acid sequence of purified bovine DNA ligase I. In an alternative approach, a human cDNA library was screened for functional expression of a polypeptide able to complement a cdc9 temperature-sensitive DNA ligase mutant of Saccharomuces cerevisiae. The sequence of an apparently full-length cDNA encodes a 102-kDa protein, indistinguishable in size from authentic human DNA ligase I. The deduced amino acid sequence of the human DNA ligase I cDNA is 40% homologous to the smaller DNA ligases of S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, homology being confined to the carboxyl-terminal regions of the respective proteins. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is transcribed from a single-copy gene on chromosome 19.

  13. Infectious cDNA Clone of the Epidemic West Nile Virus from New York City

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Pei-Yong; Tilgner, Mark; Lo, Michael K.; Kent, Kim A.; Bernard, Kristen A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the first full-length infectious clone of the current epidemic, lineage I, strain of West Nile virus (WNV). The full-length cDNA was constructed from reverse transcription-PCR products of viral RNA from an isolate collected during the year 2000 outbreak in New York City. It was cloned into plasmid pBR322 under the control of a T7 promoter and stably amplified in Escherichia coli HB101. RNA transcribed from the full-length cDNA clone was highly infectious upon transfection into BHK-21 cells, resulting in progeny virus with titers of 1 × 109 to 5 × 109 PFU/ml. The cDNA clone was engineered to contain three silent nucleotide changes to create a StyI site (C to A and A to G at nucleotides [nt] 8859 and 8862, respectively) and to knock out an EcoRI site (A to G at nt 8880). These genetic markers were retained in the recovered progeny virus. Deletion of the 3′-terminal 199 nt of the cDNA transcript abolished the infectivity of the RNA. The plaque morphology, in vitro growth characteristics in mammalian and insect cells, and virulence in adult mice were indistinguishable for the parental and recombinant viruses. The stable infectious cDNA clone of the epidemic lineage I strain will provide a valuable experimental system to study the pathogenesis and replication of WNV. PMID:12021317

  14. Cloning of a putative G-protein-coupled receptor from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, L G; Rask, L

    1997-10-15

    We have cloned and characterized a cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana that most likely encodes a novel member of the vast superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptor proteins (GPCRs). By taking advantage of amino acid sequence similarities between plant expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and established G-protein-coupled receptor sequences, a probe was obtained which was used for the screening of an Arabidopsis cDNA library. The cDNA which was found is very infrequently represented in the cDNA library, suggesting a low and/or spatially restricted expression. A region of the translated sequence of the cDNA shows the highest similarity to cAMP receptors from the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The same region is also similar to that in members of the animal calcitonin family of receptors. Another region of the putative receptor, however, is similar to sequences of serotonin receptors and other receptors of the so-called rhodopsin family of GPCRs. The rhodopsin family has numerous members in higher vertebrate species. Alignments and phylogenetic analyses of the regions of similarity yielded results in accordance with other evolutionary considerations. Our cDNA thus occurred on a distinct major branch in relation to the rest of the rhodopsin family. In relation to the calcitonin family, our cDNA and cAMP receptors occurred together on a distinct major branch but appear to have diverged from each other shortly after their divergence from the rest of the calcitonin family. Other features further argue for a tentative identification of it as a GPCR. It displays seven discrete and strongly predicted transmembrane domains when analyzed in hydropathy plots. The preferred orientation is with the amino terminus towards the outside. It has one Cys residue in extracellular loop 1 and another in extracellular loop 2. Cys residues in these loops are known to form disulfide bridges in many other GPCRs. Finally, it has several fully conserved amino acids that belong to the most conserved

  15. Cloning and characterization of a Drosophila tyramine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Saudou, F; Amlaiky, N; Plassat, J L; Borrelli, E; Hen, R

    1990-01-01

    Receptors for biogenic amines such as dopamine, serotonin and epinephrine belong to the family of receptors that interact with G proteins and share a putative seven transmembrane domain structure. Using a strategy based on nucleotide sequence homology between the corresponding genes, we have isolated Drosophila cDNA clones encoding a new member of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This protein exhibits highest homology to the human alpha 2 adrenergic receptors, the human 5HT1A receptor and a recently cloned Drosophila serotonin receptor. The corresponding mRNA is found predominantly in adult Drosophila heads. Membranes from mammalian cells expressing this receptor displayed high affinity binding sites for [3H]yohimbine, an alpha 2 adrenergic receptor antagonist (Kd = 4.45 x 10(-9) M). Tyramine was the most efficient of the putative Drosophila neurotransmitters at displacing [3H]yohimbine binding (EC50 = 1.25 x 10(-6) M). Furthermore tyramine induced an inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in NIH 3T3 cells expressing this receptor. The Drosophila tyramine receptor that we have isolated might therefore be an invertebrate equivalent of the mammalian alpha 2 adrenergic receptors. Images Fig.2 Fig.5 PMID:2170118

  16. cDNA sequence and heterologous expression of monomeric spinach pullulanase: multiple isomeric forms arise from the same polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Renz, A; Schikora, S; Schmid, R; Kossmann, J; Beck, E

    1998-01-01

    The spinach pullulanase gene was cloned and sequenced using peptide sequences of the purified enzyme as a starting point and employing PCR techniques and cDNA library screening. Its open reading frame codes for a protein of 964 amino acids which represents a precursor of the pullulanase. The N-terminal transit peptide consists of 65 amino acids, and the mature protein, comprising 899 amino acids, has a calculated molecular mass of 99kDa. Pullulanase is a member of the alpha-amylase family. In addition to a characteristic catalytic (beta/alpha)8-barrel domain, it contains a domain, F, that is specific for branching and debranching enzymes. Pullulanase cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified protein was compared with the enzyme from spinach leaves. Identity of the two proteins was confirmed in terms of catalytic properties, N-terminal amino acid sequences and molecular masses. The pullulanase produced by E. coli showed the same microheterogeneity as the spinach leaf enzyme: it could be resolved into two substrate-induced forms by electrophoresis in amylopectin-containing polyacrylamide gels, and, in the absence of substrate, into several free forms (charge isomers) by isoelectric focusing or chromatofocusing. Rechromatofocusing of single free forms resulted in the originally observed pattern of molecular forms. However, heterogeneity of the protein disappeared on isoelectric focusing under completely denaturing conditions when only one protein band was observed. Post-translational modifications such as glycosylation and phosphorylation could be excluded as potential explanations for the protein heterogeneity. Therefore the microheterogeneity of spinach leaf pullulanase results from neither genetic variation nor post-translational modifications, but is a property of the single unmodified gene product. The different interconvertible forms of the pullulanase represent protein populations of different tertiary structure of the same polypeptide. PMID

  17. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding partial putative molt-inhibiting hormone from Penaeus chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zai-Zhao; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2002-09-01

    Total RNA was extracted from eyestalks of shrimp Penaeus chinensis. Eyestalk cDNA was obtained from total RNA by reverse transcription. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was initiated using eyestalk cDNA and degenerate primers designed from the amino acid sequence of molt-inhibiting hormone from shrimp Penaeus japonicus. A specific cDNA was obtained and cloned into a T vector for sequencing. The cDNA consisted of 201 base pairs and encoding for a peptide of 67 amino acid residues. The peptide of P. chinensis had the highest identity with molt-inhibiting hormones of P. japonicus. The cDNA could be a partial gene of molt-inhibiting hormones from P. chinensis. This paper reports for the first time cDNA encoding for neuropeptide of P. chinensis.

  18. Identification of a new mutant allele, Grm6(nob7), for complete congenital stationary night blindness.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haohua; Ji, Rui; Gregg, Ronald G; Peachey, Neal S

    2015-01-01

    Electroretinogram (ERG) studies identified a new mouse line with a normal a-wave but lacking the b-wave component. The ERG phenotype of this new allele, nob7, matched closely that of mouse mutants for Grm6, Lrit3, Trpm1, and Nyx, which encode for proteins expressed in depolarizing bipolar cells (DBCs). To identify the underlying mutation, we first crossed nob7 mice with Grm6 nob3 mutants and measured the ERGs in offspring. All the offspring lacked the b-wave, indicating that nob7 is a new allele for Grm6: Grm6 nob7 . Sequence analyses of Grm6 nob7 cDNAs identified a 28 base pair insertion between exons 8 and 9, which would result in a frameshift mutation in the open reading frame that encodes the metabotropic glutamate receptor 6 (Grm6). Sequencing both the cDNA and genomic DNA from exon 8 and intron 8, respectively, from the Grm6 nob7 mouse revealed a G to A transition at the last position in exon 8. This mutation disrupts splicing and the normal exon 8 is extended by 28 base pairs, because splicing occurs 28 base pairs downstream at a cryptic splice donor. Consistent with the impact of the resulting frameshift mutation, there is a loss of mGluR6 protein (encoded by Grm6) from the dendritic tips of DBCs in the Grm6 nob7 retina. These results indicate that Grm6 nob7 is a new model of the complete form of congenital stationary night blindness, a human condition that has been linked to mutations of GRM6. PMID:26241901

  19. MFR, a Putative Receptor Mediating the Fusion of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saginario, Charles; Sterling, Hyacinth; Beckers, Cornelius; Kobayashi, Ruji; Solimena, Michele; Ullu, Elisabetta; Vignery, Agnès

    1998-01-01

    We had previously identified a macrophage surface protein whose expression is highly induced, transient, and specific, as it is restricted to actively fusing macrophages in vitro and in vivo. This protein is recognized by monoclonal antibodies that block macrophage fusion. We have now purified this protein and cloned its corresponding cDNA. This protein belongs to the superfamily of immunoglobulins and is similar to immune antigen receptors such as the T-cell receptor, B-cell receptor, and viral receptors such as CD4. We have therefore named this protein macrophage fusion receptor (MFR). We show that the extracellular domain of MFR prevents fusion of macrophages in vitro and therefore propose that MFR belongs to the fusion machinery of macrophages. MFR is identical to SHPS-1 and BIT and is a homologue of P84, SIRPα, and MyD-1, all of which have been recently cloned and implicated in cell signaling and cell-cell interaction events. PMID:9774638

  20. Cloning and sequencing of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, J.; Garattini, E.; Hua, J.C.; Udenfriend, S.

    1987-02-01

    Partial protein sequence data obtained on intestinal alkaline phosphatase indicated a high degree of homology with the reported sequence of the placental isoenzyme. Accordingly, placental alkaline phosphatase cDNA was cloned and used as a probe to clone intestinal alkaline phosphatase cDNA. The latter is somewhat larger (3.1 kilobases) than the cDNA for the placental isozyme (2.8 kilobases). Although the 3' untranslated regions are quite different, there is almost 90% homology in the translated regions of the two isozymes. There are, however, significant differences at their amino and carboxyl termini and a substitution of an alanine in intestinal alkaline phosphatase for a glycine in the active site of the placental isozyme.

  1. Construction and analysis of full-length and normalized cDNA libraries from citrus.

    PubMed

    Marques, M Carmen; Perez-Amador, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an integrated method to generate a normalized cDNA collection enriched in full-length and rare transcripts from citrus, using different species and multiple tissues and developmental stages. Interpretation of ever-increasing raw sequence information generated by modern genome sequencing technologies faces multiple challenges, such as gene function analysis and genome annotation. In this regard, the availability of full-length cDNA clones facilitates functional analysis of the corresponding genes enabling manipulation of their expression and the generation of a variety of tagged versions of the native protein. The development of full-length cDNA sequences has the power to improve the quality of genome annotation, as well as provide tools for functional characterization of genes. PMID:22130983

  2. Construction of a cDNA microarray derived from the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Azumi, Kaoru; Takahashi, Hiroki; Miki, Yasufumi; Fujie, Manabu; Usami, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Hisayoshi; Kitayama, Atsusi; Satou, Yutaka; Ueno, Naoto; Satoh, Nori

    2003-10-01

    A cDNA microarray was constructed from a basal chordate, the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. The draft genome of Ciona has been read and inferred to contain approximately 16,000 protein-coding genes, and cDNAs for transcripts of 13,464 genes have been characterized and compiled as the "Ciona intestinalis Gene Collection Release I". In the present study, we constructed a cDNA microarray of these 13,464 Ciona genes. A preliminary experiment with Cy3- and Cy5-labeled probes showed extensive differential gene expression between fertilized eggs and larvae. In addition, there was a good correlation between results obtained by the present microarray analysis and those from previous EST analyses. This first microarray of a large collection of Ciona intestinalis cDNA clones should facilitate the analysis of global gene expression and gene networks during the embryogenesis of basal chordates.

  3. Identification of protein/target molecule interactions using yeast surface-displayed cDNA libraries

    PubMed Central

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel expression cloning method based on screening yeast surface-displayed human cDNA libraries by direct affinity interaction to identify cellular proteins binding to a broad spectrum of target molecules. Being a eukaryote, yeast protein expression pathways are similar to those found in mammalian cells, and therefore mammalian protein fragments displayed on the yeast cell wall are more likely to be properly folded and functional than proteins displayed using prokaryotic systems. Yeast surface displayed human cDNA libraries have been successfully used to screen for proteins that bind to post-translationally modified phosphorylated peptides, small signaling molecule phosphatidylinositides, and monoclonal antibodies. In this article we describe protocols for using yeast surface-displayed cDNA libraries, coupled with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), to select protein fragments with affinity for various target molecules including post-translationally modified peptides, small signaling molecules, monoclonal phage antibodies, and monoclonal IgG molecules. PMID:21365493

  4. A human oncogene of the RAS superfamily unmasked by expression cDNA cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, A M; Miki, T; Meyers, K A; Aaronson, S A

    1994-01-01

    As an approach to identify human oncogenes, we generated an expression cDNA library from an ovarian carcinoma line. A potent transforming gene was detected by transfection analysis and identified as TC21, a recently cloned member of the RAS gene superfamily. A single point mutation substituting glutamine for leucine at position 72 was shown to be responsible for activation of transforming properties. While the cDNA clone possessed high transforming activity, the ovarian tumor genomic DNA, which contained the mutated TC21 allele, failed to induce transformed foci. Thus, expression cDNA cloning made it possible to identify and isolate a human oncogene that has evaded detection by conventional approaches. Images PMID:8052619

  5. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone specific for avian vitellogenin II.

    PubMed

    Protter, A A; Wang, S Y; Shelness, G S; Ostapchuk, P; Williams, D L

    1982-08-25

    A clone for vitellogenin, a major avian, estrogen responsive egg yolk protein, was isolated from the cDNA library of estrogen-induced rooster liver. Two forms of plasma vitellogenin, vitellogenin I (VTG I) and vitellogenin II (VTG II), distinguishable on the basis of their unique partial proteolysis maps, have been characterized and their corresponding hepatic precursor forms identified. We have used this criterion to specifically characterize which vitellogenin protein had been cloned. Partial proteolysis maps of BTG I and VTG II standards, synthesized in vivo, were compared to maps of protein synthesized in vitro using RNA hybrid-selected by the vitellogenin plasmid. Eight major digest fragments were found common to the in vitro synthesized vitellogenin and the VTG II standard while no fragments were observed to correspond to the VTG I map. A restriction map of the VTG II cDNA clone permits comparison to previously described cDNA and genomic vitellogenin clones.

  6. Primary structure of rat cardiac beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors obtained by automated DNA sequence analysis: further evidence for a multigene family.

    PubMed Central

    Gocayne, J; Robinson, D A; FitzGerald, M G; Chung, F Z; Kerlavage, A R; Lentes, K U; Lai, J; Wang, C D; Fraser, C M; Venter, J C

    1987-01-01

    Two cDNA clones, lambda RHM-MF and lambda RHB-DAR, encoding the muscarinic cholinergic receptor and the beta-adrenergic receptor, respectively, have been isolated from a rat heart cDNA library. The cDNA clones were characterized by restriction mapping and automated DNA sequence analysis utilizing fluorescent dye primers. The rat heart muscarinic receptor consists of 466 amino acids and has a calculated molecular weight of 51,543. The rat heart beta-adrenergic receptor consists of 418 amino acids and has a calculated molecular weight of 46,890. The two cardiac receptors have substantial amino acid homology (27.2% identity, 50.6% with favored substitutions). The rat cardiac beta receptor has 88.0% homology (92.5% with favored substitutions) with the human brain beta receptor and the rat cardiac muscarinic receptor has 94.6% homology (97.6% with favored substitutions) with the porcine cardiac muscarinic receptor. The muscarinic cholinergic and beta-adrenergic receptors appear to be as conserved as hemoglobin and cytochrome c but less conserved than histones and are clearly members of a multigene family. These data support our hypothesis, based upon biochemical and immunological evidence, that suggests considerable structural homology and evolutionary conservation between adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors. To our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing automated DNA sequence analysis to determine the structure of a gene. Images PMID:2825184

  7. Improved coverage of cDNA-AFLP by sequential digestion of immobilized cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Weiberg, Arne; Pöhler, Dirk; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Karlovsky, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Background cDNA-AFLP is a transcriptomics technique which does not require prior sequence information and can therefore be used as a gene discovery tool. The method is based on selective amplification of cDNA fragments generated by restriction endonucleases, electrophoretic separation of the products and comparison of the band patterns between treated samples and controls. Unequal distribution of restriction sites used to generate cDNA fragments negatively affects the performance of cDNA-AFLP. Some transcripts are represented by more than one fragment while other escape detection, causing redundancy and reducing the coverage of the analysis, respectively. Results With the goal of improving the coverage of cDNA-AFLP without increasing its redundancy, we designed a modified cDNA-AFLP protocol. Immobilized cDNA is sequentially digested with several restriction endonucleases and the released DNA fragments are collected in mutually exclusive pools. To investigate the performance of the protocol, software tool MECS (Multiple Enzyme cDNA-AFLP Simulation) was written in Perl. cDNA-AFLP protocols described in the literatur and the new sequential digestion protocol were simulated on sets of cDNA sequences from mouse, human and Arabidopsis thaliana. The redundancy and coverage, the total number of PCR reactions, and the average fragment length were calculated for each protocol and cDNA set. Conclusion Simulation revealed that sequential digestion of immobilized cDNA followed by the partitioning of released fragments into mutually exclusive pools outperformed other cDNA-AFLP protocols in terms of coverage, redundancy, fragment length, and the total number of PCRs. Primers generating 30 to 70 amplicons per PCR provided the highest fraction of electrophoretically distinguishable fragments suitable for normalization. For A. thaliana, human and mice transcriptome, the use of two marking enzymes and three sequentially applied releasing enzymes for each of the marking enzymes is

  8. cDNA cloning of rat and human medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Y.; Kraus, J.P.; Rosenberg, L.E.; Tanaka, K.

    1986-05-01

    MCAD is one of three mitochondrial flavoenzymes which catalyze the first step in the ..beta..-oxidation of straight chain fatty acids. It is a tetramer with a subunit Mr of 45 kDa. MCAD is synthesized in the cytosol as a 49 kDa precursor polypeptide (pMCAD), imported into mitochondria, and cleaved to the mature form. Genetic deficiency of MCAD causes recurrent episodes of hypoglycemic coma accompanied by medium chain dicarboxylic aciduria. Employing a novel approach, the authors now report isolation of partial rat and human cDNA clones encoding pMCAD. mRNA encoding pMCAD was purified to near homogeneity by polysome immunoadsorption using polyclonal monospecific antibody. Single-stranded (/sup 32/P)labeled cDNA probe was synthesized using the enriched mRNA as template, and was used to screen directly 16,000 colonies from a total rat liver cDNA library constructed in pBR322. One clone (600 bp) was detected by in situ hybridization. Hybrid-selected translation with this cDNA yielded a 49 kDa polypeptide indistinguishable in size from rat pMCAD and immunoprecipitable with anti-MCAD antibody. Using the rat cDNA as probe, 43,000 colonies from a human liver cDNA library were screened. Four identical positive clones (400 bp) were isolated and positively identified by hybrid-selected translation and immunoprecipitation. The sizes of rat and human mRNAs encoding pMCAD were 2.2 kb and 2.4 kb, respectively, as determined by Northern blotting.

  9. A human cDNA expression library in yeast enriched for open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Holz, C; Lueking, A; Bovekamp, L; Gutjahr, C; Bolotina, N; Lehrach, H; Cahill, D J

    2001-10-01

    We developed a high-throughput technique for the generation of cDNA libraries in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae which enables the selection of cloned cDNA inserts containing open reading frames (ORFs). For direct screening of random-primed cDNA libraries, we have constructed a yeast shuttle/expression vector, the so-called ORF vector pYEXTSH3, which allows the enriched growth of protein expression clones. The selection system is based on the HIS3 marker gene fused to the C terminus of the cDNA insert. The cDNAs cloned in-frame result in histidine prototrophic yeast cells growing on minimal medium, whereas clones bearing the vector without insert or out-of-frame inserts should not grow on this medium. A randomly primed cDNA library from human fetal brain tissue was cloned in this novel vector, and using robot technology the selected clones were arrayed in microtiter plates and were analyzed by sequencing and for protein expression. In the constructed cDNA expression library, about 60% of clones bear an insert in the correct reading frame. In comparison to unselected libraries it was possible to increase the clones with inserts in the correct reading frame more than fourfold, from 14% to 60%. With the expression system described here, we could avoid time-consuming and costly techniques for identification of clones expressing protein by using antibody screening on high-density filters and subsequently rearraying the selected clones in a new "daughter" library. The advantage of this ORF vector is that, in a one-step screening procedure, it allows the generation of expression libraries enriched for clones with correct reading frames as sources of recombinant proteins.

  10. cDNA cloning of FRIL, a lectin from Dolichos lablab, that preserves hematopoietic progenitors in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Colucci, G; Moore, J G; Feldman, M; Chrispeels, M J

    1999-01-19

    Ex vivo culture of hematopoietic stem cells is limited by the inability of cytokines to maintain primitive cells without inducing proliferation, differentiation, and subsequent loss of repopulating capacity. We identified recently in extracts of kidney bean and hyacinth bean a mannose-binding lectin, called FRIL, and provide here evidence that this protein appears to satisfy properties of a stem cell preservation factor. FRIL was first identified based on its ability to stimulate NIH 3T3 cells transfected with Flt3, a tyrosine kinase receptor central to regulation of stem cells. Molecular characterization from polypeptide sequencing and identification of the cDNA of hyacinth bean FRIL shows 78% amino acid identity with a mannose-binding lectin of hyacinth beans. Treatment of primitive hematopoietic progenitors in suspension culture with purified hyacinth FRIL alone is able to preserve cells for 1 month without medium changes. In vitro progenitor assays for human hematopoietic cells cultured 3 weeks in FRIL displayed small blast-like colonies that were capable of serial replating and persisted even in the presence of cytokines known to induce differentiation. These results suggest that FRIL is capable of preserving primitive progenitors in suspension culture for prolonged periods. FRIL's clinical utility involving procedures for stem cell transplantation, tumor cell purging before autologous transplantation, and ex vivo cultures used for expansion and stem cell gene therapy currently are being explored. PMID:9892687

  11. cDNA cloning of FRIL, a lectin from Dolichos lablab, that preserves hematopoietic progenitors in suspension culture

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Gabriella; Moore, Jeffrey G.; Feldman, Michael; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1999-01-01

    Ex vivo culture of hematopoietic stem cells is limited by the inability of cytokines to maintain primitive cells without inducing proliferation, differentiation, and subsequent loss of repopulating capacity. We identified recently in extracts of kidney bean and hyacinth bean a mannose-binding lectin, called FRIL, and provide here evidence that this protein appears to satisfy properties of a stem cell preservation factor. FRIL was first identified based on its ability to stimulate NIH 3T3 cells transfected with Flt3, a tyrosine kinase receptor central to regulation of stem cells. Molecular characterization from polypeptide sequencing and identification of the cDNA of hyacinth bean FRIL shows 78% amino acid identity with a mannose-binding lectin of hyacinth beans. Treatment of primitive hematopoietic progenitors in suspension culture with purified hyacinth FRIL alone is able to preserve cells for 1 month without medium changes. In vitro progenitor assays for human hematopoietic cells cultured 3 weeks in FRIL displayed small blast-like colonies that were capable of serial replating and persisted even in the presence of cytokines known to induce differentiation. These results suggest that FRIL is capable of preserving primitive progenitors in suspension culture for prolonged periods. FRIL’s clinical utility involving procedures for stem cell transplantation, tumor cell purging before autologous transplantation, and ex vivo cultures used for expansion and stem cell gene therapy currently are being explored. PMID:9892687

  12. Expression of human epidermal growth factor precursor cDNA in transfected mouse NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mroczkowski, B; Reich, M; Whittaker, J; Bell, G I; Cohen, S

    1988-01-01

    Stable cell lines expressing the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) precursor have been prepared by transfection of mouse NIH 3T3 cells with a bovine papillomavirus-based vector in which the human kidney EGF precursor cDNA has been placed under the control of the inducible mouse metallothionein I promoter. Synthesis of the EGF precursor can be induced by culturing the cells in 5 mM butyric acid or 100 microM ZnCl2. The EGF precursor synthesized by these cells appears to be membrane associated; none is detectable in the cytoplasm. The size of the EGF precursor expressed by these cells is approximately 150-180 kDa, which is larger than expected from its amino acid sequence, suggesting that it is posttranslationally modified, presumably by glycosylation. The EGF precursor was also detected in the conditioned medium from these cells, indicating that some fraction of the EGF precursor synthesized by these transfected cells may be secreted. Preliminary data suggest that this soluble form of the EGF precursor may compete with 125I-labeled EGF for binding to the EGF receptor. These cell lines should be useful for studying the processing of the EGF precursor to EGF as well as determining the properties and possible functions of the EGF precursor itself. Images PMID:3257563

  13. Antagonistic effect of disulfide-rich peptide aptamers selected by cDNA display on interleukin-6-dependent cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Naoto; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Junichi; Ueno, Shingo; Machida, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Toshikatsu; Sakai, Takafumi

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibits IL-6-dependent cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide bond of peptide aptamer is essential for its affinity to IL-6R. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibitory effect of peptide depends on number and pattern of its disulfide bonds. -- Abstract: Several engineered protein scaffolds have been developed recently to circumvent particular disadvantages of antibodies such as their large size and complex composition, low stability, and high production costs. We previously identified peptide aptamers containing one or two disulfide-bonds as an alternative ligand to the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Peptide aptamers (32 amino acids in length) were screened from a random peptide library by in vitro peptide selection using the evolutionary molecular engineering method 'cDNA display'. In this report, the antagonistic activity of the peptide aptamers were examined by an in vitro competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an IL-6-dependent cell proliferation assay. The results revealed that a disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibited IL-6-dependent cell proliferation with similar efficacy to an anti-IL-6R monoclonal antibody.

  14. Expression of human epidermal growth factor pressures cDNA in transfected mouse NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mroczkowski, B.; Reich, M.; Whittaker, J.; Bell, G.I.; Cohen, S.

    1988-01-01

    Stable cell lines expressing the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) precursor have been prepared by transfection of mouse NIH 3T3 cells with a bovine papillomavirus-based vector in which the human kidney EGF precursor cDNA has been placed under the control of the inducible mouse metallothionein I promoter. Synthesis of the EGF precursor can be induced by culturing the cells in 5 mM butyric acid or 100 ..mu..M ZnCl/sub 2/. The EGF precursor synthesized by these cells appears to be membrane associated; none is detectable in the cytoplasm. The size of the EGF precursor expressed by these cells is approx. = 150-180 kDa, which is larger than expected from its amino acid sequence, suggesting that it is posttranslationally modified, presumably by glycosylation. The EGF precursor was also detected in the conditioned medium from these cells, indicating that some fraction of the EGF precursor synthesized by these transfected cells may be secreted. Preliminary data suggest that this soluble form of the EGF precursor may compete with /sup 125/I-labeled EGF for binding to the EGF receptor. These cell lines should be useful for studying the processing of the EGF precursor to EGF as well as determining the properties and possible functions of the EGF precursor itself.

  15. Cloning of the full length pig PIT1 (POU1F1) CDNA and a novel alternative PIT1 transcript, and functional studies of their encoded proteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, T P; Sun, H S; Wahls, S; Sanchez-Serrano, I; Rothschild, M F; Tuggle, C K

    2001-05-01

    PIT1 is an essential regulatory gene of growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL) and thyrotropin beta subunit (TSHbeta). Previously, a partial pig PIT1 cDNA and a genomic clone of the entire 3' end of the PIT1 gene was isolated, and polymorphisms at PIT1 were associated with several performance traits in the pig. In order to understand the biological function of the pig PIT1 gene and its possible application in swine genetics, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to complete the cloning of the full length cDNA for pig PIT1. The pig PIT1 cDNA and its deduced protein sequence have approximately 90% and 95% identity, respectively, with the PIT1 cDNA and protein of other mammals (human, bovine, sheep and rodents). Surprisingly, sequence comparison to other pig PIT1 sequences indicated only approximately 93% identity. Additional sequencing confirmed our sequence, and identified a new polymorphism in exon 4. Phylogenetic analysis of several mammalian PIT1 sequences indicates sequencing errors may account for the discrepancies observed in the other pig sequences reported. Several PIT1 alternative spliced forms were also identified by RT-PCR. They were the delta3PIT1 (missing entire exon 3), delta4PIT1 (missing entire exon 4) and PIT1beta (additional 26 amino acids inserted in front of exon 2) transcripts. The delta4PIT1 and PIT1beta transcripts have been found to encode functionally different proteins in rodents. The delta3PIT1 transcript is a novel isoform of PIT1. Potentially different functions between pig delta3PIT1 and PIT1 were analyzed by expressing these proteins in bacteria. The E. coli-expressed PIT1 and delta3PIT1 proteins were used with rat growth hormone (rGH) and rat prolactin (rPRL) promoter DNA in DNA mobility shift assays. The results showed that pig PIT1 can specifically bind rGH and rPRL promoter regions, but that the pig delta3PIT1 cannot, even at very high protein concentrations. Possible protein-protein interactions between

  16. Identification, expression pattern and potential role of variable lymphocyte receptor Aj-VLRA from Apostichopus japonicus in response to bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Yao, Feng; Ba, Huazhong; Qin, Tong; Luan, Hong; Li, Zhengmin; Hou, Lin; Zou, Xiangyang

    2015-08-01

    The variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) are found in jawless vertebrates (agnathans), and specifically recognize bacteria and viruses via their leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). VLRs are believed to be adaptive immune response molecules. Echinoderms do not have adaptive immune systems; however, in the present study, a VLR cDNA named Aj-VLRA was cloned and characterized from sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus. The complete cDNA of Aj-VLRA was 3072 bp, including a 1995 bp open reading frame encoding 664 amino acids comprising LRR domains, a predicted transmembrane helix and an N-terminal signal peptide. As determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Aj-VLRA transcripts are ubiquitously expressed in the body wall, longitudinal muscles, intestine and respiratory tree of A. japonicus. The expression level of Aj-VLRA was upregulated after challenge with four common marine bacteria. In situ hybridization showed that the expression of Aj-VLRA was widely distributed in the four tissues, particularly in the cytoplasm of epidermal cells. Recombinantly expressed Aj-VLRA (including the LRR domains) could bind to bacteria including Micrococcus lysodeikticus (Gram+) and Vibrio anguillarum (Gram-). Collectively, the results suggested that Aj-VLRA is related to an innate immune response of A. japonicus. PMID:25896798

  17. Insert tree completion system

    SciTech Connect

    Brands, K.W.; Ball, I.G.; Cegielski, E.J.; Gresham, J.S.; Saunders, D.N.

    1982-09-01

    This paper outlines the overall project for development and installation of a low-profile, caisson-installed subsea Christmas tree. After various design studies and laboratory and field tests of key components, a system for installation inside a 30-in. conductor was ordered in July 1978 from Cameron Iron Works Inc. The system is designed to have all critical-pressure-containing components below the mudline and, with the reduced profile (height) above seabed, provides for improved safety of satellite underwater wells from damage by anchors, trawl boards, and even icebergs. In addition to the innovative nature of the tree design, the completion includes improved 3 1/2-in. through flowline (TFL) pumpdown completion equipment with deep set safety valves and a dual detachable packer head for simplified workover capability. The all-hydraulic control system incorporates a new design of sequencing valve for both Christmas tree control and remote flowline connection. A semisubmersible drilling rig was used to initiate the first end flowline connection at the wellhead for subsequent tie-in to the prelaid, surface-towed, all-welded subsea pipeline bundle.

  18. Construction of cDNA libraries: focus on protists and fungi.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Teijeiro, Shona; Forget, Lise; Burger, Gertraud; Lang, B Franz

    2009-01-01

    Sequencing of cDNA libraries is an efficient and inexpensive approach to analyze the protein-coding portion of a genome. It is frequently used for surveying the genomes of poorly studied eukaryotes, and is particularly useful for species that are not easily amenable to genome sequencing, because they are nonaxenic and/or difficult to cultivate. In this chapter, we describe protocols that have been applied successfully to construct and normalize a variety of cDNA libraries from many different species of free-living protists and fungi, and that require only small quantities of cell material.

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of a calreticulin cDNA from the pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    PubMed

    Li, Xundong; Zhuo, Kan; Luo, Mei; Sun, Longhua; Liao, Jinling

    2011-06-01

    The cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding a calreticulin from the pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is described herein. The full-length cDNA (Bx-crt-1) contained a 1200 bp open reading frame that could be translated to a 399 amino acid polypeptide. The deduced protein contained highly conserved regions of a calreticulin gene and had 66.2-70.1% amino acid sequence identity to other calreticulin sequences from nematodes. RNAi, RT-PCR amplification, and southern blot suggest that Bx-crt-1 may be important for the development of B. xylophilus. PMID:21371475

  20. Molecular characterization of MHC-DRB cDNA in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Naskar, Soumen; Deb, Sitangsu M; Niranjan, Saket K; Kumar, Subodh; Sharma, Deepak; Sakaram, Durgam; Sharma, Arjava

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, water buffalo MHC (Bubu)-DRB cDNA was cloned and characterized. The 1022 base long-amplified cDNA product encompassed a single open reading frame of 801 bases that coded for 266 amino acids. The Bubu-DRB sequence showed maximum homology with the BoLA-DRB3*0101 allele of cattle. A total of seven amino acid residues were found to be unique for the Bubu-DRB sequence. The majority of amino acid substitutions was observed in the β(1) domain. Residues associated with important functions were mostly conserved. Water buffalo DRB was phylogenetically closer to goat DRB*A.

  1. The mouse glucocorticoid receptor: mapping of functional domains by cloning, sequencing and expression of wild-type and mutant receptor proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, M; Northrop, J P; Ringold, G M

    1986-01-01

    We have isolated mouse glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cDNAs which, when expressed in transfected mammalian cells, produce a fully functional GR protein. Sequence analysis reveals an open reading frame of 2349 bp which could encode a protein of approximately 86,000 daltons. We have also isolated two receptor cDNAs from mouse S49 nuclear transfer-deficient (nt-) cells which encode mutant forms of the receptor protein. One cDNA encodes a protein that is unable to bind hormone and represents the endogenous hormone binding deficient receptor recently discovered in S49 cells. The lesion in this receptor is due to a single amino acid substitution (Glu-546 to Gly). The second cDNA from nt- cells produces a receptor protein that is able to bind hormone but has reduced nuclear binding. This cDNA, therefore, encodes for the S49 nt- receptor which has been shown to have reduced affinity for DNA. The lesion maps to a single amino acid substitution (Arg-484 to His) located in a highly Cys, Lys, Arg-rich region of the protein previously implicated in DNA binding. Our studies provide unambiguous identification of receptor domains and specific amino acids critical for the hormone and DNA binding properties of this transcriptional regulatory protein. Contained within the first 106 amino acids of the mouse GR is a stretch of nine glutamines with two prolines which are related to the family of transcribed repetitive elements, opa, found in Drosophila melanogaster. A truncated receptor lacking these 106 amino acids is functionally indistinguishable from the wild-type receptor. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3780669

  2. Histamine 3 receptor activation reduces the expression of neuronal angiotensin II type 1 receptors in the heart.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Levi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    In severe myocardial ischemia, histamine 3 (H₃) receptor activation affords cardioprotection by preventing excessive norepinephrine release and arrhythmias; pivotal to this action is the inhibition of neuronal Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger (NHE). Conversely, angiotensin II, formed locally by mast cell-derived renin, stimulates NHE via angiotensin II type 1 (AT₁) receptors, facilitating norepinephrine release and arrhythmias. Thus, ischemic dysfunction may depend on a balance between the NHE-modulating effects of H₃ receptors and AT₁ receptors. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to elucidate the H₃/AT₁ receptor interaction in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. We found that H₃ receptor blockade with clobenpropit increased norepinephrine overflow and arrhythmias in Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. This coincided with increased neuronal AT₁ receptor expression. NHE inhibition with cariporide prevented both increases in norepinephrine release and AT₁ receptor expression. Moreover, norepinephrine release and AT₁ receptor expression were increased by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(G)-methyl-L-arginine and the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. H₃ receptor activation in differentiated sympathetic neuron-like PC12 cells permanently transfected with H₃ receptor cDNA caused a decrease in protein kinase C activity and AT₁ receptor protein abundance. Collectively, our findings suggest that neuronal H₃ receptor activation inhibits NHE by diminishing protein kinase C activity. Reduced NHE activity sequentially causes intracellular acidification, increased NO synthesis, and diminished AT₁ receptor expression. Thus, H₃ receptor-mediated NHE inhibition in ischemia/reperfusion not only opposes the angiotensin II-induced stimulation of NHE in cardiac sympathetic neurons, but also down-regulates AT₁ receptor expression. Cardioprotection ultimately results from the combined

  3. Histamine 3 Receptor Activation Reduces the Expression of Neuronal Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptors in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki

    2012-01-01

    In severe myocardial ischemia, histamine 3 (H3) receptor activation affords cardioprotection by preventing excessive norepinephrine release and arrhythmias; pivotal to this action is the inhibition of neuronal Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE). Conversely, angiotensin II, formed locally by mast cell-derived renin, stimulates NHE via angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptors, facilitating norepinephrine release and arrhythmias. Thus, ischemic dysfunction may depend on a balance between the NHE-modulating effects of H3 receptors and AT1 receptors. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to elucidate the H3/AT1 receptor interaction in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. We found that H3 receptor blockade with clobenpropit increased norepinephrine overflow and arrhythmias in Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. This coincided with increased neuronal AT1 receptor expression. NHE inhibition with cariporide prevented both increases in norepinephrine release and AT1 receptor expression. Moreover, norepinephrine release and AT1 receptor expression were increased by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor NG-methyl-l-arginine and the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. H3 receptor activation in differentiated sympathetic neuron-like PC12 cells permanently transfected with H3 receptor cDNA caused a decrease in protein kinase C activity and AT1 receptor protein abundance. Collectively, our findings suggest that neuronal H3 receptor activation inhibits NHE by diminishing protein kinase C activity. Reduced NHE activity sequentially causes intracellular acidification, increased NO synthesis, and diminished AT1 receptor expression. Thus, H3 receptor-mediated NHE inhibition in ischemia/reperfusion not only opposes the angiotensin II-induced stimulation of NHE in cardiac sympathetic neurons, but also down-regulates AT1 receptor expression. Cardioprotection ultimately results from the combined attenuation of angiotensin II and

  4. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  5. GeneOptimizer program-assisted cDNA reengineering enhances sRAGE autologous expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wen; Kim, Ji Min; Medina, Danny; Lakatta, Edward G; Lin, Li

    2014-03-01

    Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) is a secreted mammalian protein that functions as a decoy to counter-react RAGE signaling-resultant pathological conditions, and has high therapeutic potentials. Our prior studies showed that recombinant human sRAGE expressed in Chinese hamster, Ceanothus griseus, ovary (CHO) cells is modified by specific N-glycosylation, and exhibits higher bioactivity than that expressed in other host systems including insect Spodoptera frugiperda cells. Here, we show that GeneOptimizer software program-assisted, reengineered sRAGE cDNA enhances the recombinant protein expression in CHO cells. The cDNA sequence encoding human sRAGE was optimized for RNA structure, stability, and codon usages in CHO cells. We found that such optimization augmented sRAGE expression over 2 folds of its wild-type counterpart. We also studied how individual parameter impacted sRAGE autologous expression in CHO cells, and whether sRAGE bioactivity was compromised. We found that the enhanced expression appeared not to affect sRAGE N-glycosylation and bioactivity. Optimization of sRAGE expression provides a basis for future large-scale production of this protein to meet medical needs. PMID:24373844

  6. The human olfactory receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Sergey; Echeverri, Fernando; Nguyen, Trieu

    2001-01-01

    Background The mammalian olfactory apparatus is able to recognize and distinguish thousands of structurally diverse volatile chemicals. This chemosensory function is mediated by a very large family of seven-transmembrane olfactory (odorant) receptors encoded by approximately 1,000 genes, the majority of which are believed to be pseudogenes in humans. Results The strategy of our sequence database mining for full-length, functional candidate odorant receptor genes was based on the high overall sequence similarity and presence of a number of conserved sequence motifs in all known mammalian odorant receptors as well as the absence of introns in their coding sequences. We report here the identification and physical cloning of 347 putative human full-length odorant receptor genes. Comparative sequence analysis of the predicted gene products allowed us to identify and define a number of consensus sequence motifs and structural features of this vast family of receptors. A new nomenclature for human odorant receptors based on their chromosomal localization and phylogenetic analysis is proposed. We believe that these sequences represent the essentially complete repertoire of functional human odorant receptors. Conclusions The identification and cloning of all functional human odorant receptor genes is an important initial step in understanding receptor-ligand specificity and combinatorial encoding of odorant stimuli in human olfaction. PMID:11423007

  7. A third human retinoic acid receptor, hRAR-. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Krust, A.; Kastner, Ph.; Petkovich, M.; Zelent, A.; Chambon, P. )

    1989-07-01

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are retinoic acid (RA)-inducible enhancer factors belonging to the superfamily of steroid/thyroid nuclear receptors. The authors have previously characterized two human RAR (hRAR-{alpha} and hRAR-{beta}) cDNAs and have recently cloned their murine cognates (mRAR-{alpha} and mRAR-{beta}) together with a third RAR (mRAR-{gamma}) whose RNA was detected predominantly in skin, a well-known target for RA. mRAR-{gamma} cDNA was used here to clone its human counterpart (hRAR-{gamma}) from a T47D breast cancer cell cDNA library. Using a transient transfection assay in HeLa cells and a reporter gene harboring a synthetic RA responsive element, they demonstrate that hRAR-{gamma} cDNA indeed encodes a RA-inducible transcriptional trans-activator. Interestingly, comparisons of the amino acid sequences of all six human and mouse RARs indicate that the interspecies conservation of a given member of the RAR subfamily (either {alpha}, {beta}, or {gamma}) is much higher than the conservation of all three receptors within a given species. These observations indicate that RAR-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} may perform specific functions. They show also that hRAR-{gamma} RNA is the predominant RAR RNA species in human skin, which suggests that hRAR-{gamma} mediates some of the retinoid effects in this tissue.

  8. Completely bootstrapped tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. ); Boozer, A.H. )

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields have been developed using a mean-field Ohm's law. The Ohm's law is coupled to a {Delta}{prime} stabilty analysis and a magnetic island growth equation in order to simulate the behavior of tokamak plasmas that are subject to tearing modes. In one set of calculations, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-stable regime of the tokamak is examined via the construction of an {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} diagram. The results confirm previous calculations that show that tearing modes introduce a stability boundary into the {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} space. In another series of simulations, the interaction between tearing modes and the bootstrap current is investigated. The results indicate that a completely bootstrapped tokamak may be possible, even in the absence of any externally applied loop voltage or current drive.

  9. SCUBA 2 Nears Completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, I.; Holland, W.; Fairley, A.; MacIntosh, M.; Walton, A.; Parker, W.; Irwin, K.; Hilton, G.; Peter, A.; Halpern, M.; Fich, M.

    2005-12-01

    The second generation submillimetre camera for the JCMT, SCUBA-2, is now in the Assembly-Integration-Test phase in the lab at the UK ATC Edinburgh. The prototype 850 and 450 micron arrays have both been tested at Cardiff and are well within specification. The cryogenic performance of the instrument has been verified with sub 100mK performance achieved and the prototype arrays will receive first light in the instrument before Christmas 2005. The science grade arrays are currently under production from NIST, University of Edinburgh and Raytheon and the first devices will arrive in the UK in November 2005. Testing of the complete system with the Multi-Channel-Electronics from UBC will commence in January and SCUBA-2 will be delivered to the JCMT in August 2006.

  10. Beyond complete positivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominy, Jason M.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-04-01

    We provide a general and consistent formulation for linear subsystem quantum dynamical maps, developed from a minimal set of postulates, primary among which is a relaxation of the usual, restrictive assumption of uncorrelated initial system-bath states. We describe the space of possibilities admitted by this formulation, namely that, far from being limited to only completely positive (CP) maps, essentially any C-linear, Hermiticity-preserving, trace-preserving map can arise as a legitimate subsystem dynamical map from a joint unitary evolution of a system coupled to a bath. The price paid for this added generality is a trade-off between the set of admissible initial states and the allowed set of joint system-bath unitary evolutions. As an application, we present a simple example of a non-CP map constructed as a subsystem dynamical map that violates some fundamental inequalities in quantum information theory, such as the quantum data processing inequality.

  11. Identification and isolation of full-length cDNA sequences by sequencing and analysis of expressed sequence tags from guarana (Paullinia cupana).

    PubMed

    Figueirêdo, L C; Faria-Campos, A C; Astolfi-Filho, S; Azevedo, J L

    2011-01-01

    The current intense production of biological data, generated by sequencing techniques, has created an ever-growing volume of unanalyzed data. We reevaluated data produced by the guarana (Paullinia cupana) transcriptome sequencing project to identify cDNA clones with complete coding sequences (full-length clones) and complete sequences of genes of biotechnological interest, contributing to the knowledge of biological characteristics of this organism. We analyzed 15,490 ESTs of guarana in search of clones with complete coding regions. A total of 12,402 sequences were analyzed using BLAST, and 4697 full-length clones were identified, responsible for the production of 2297 different proteins. Eighty-four clones were identified as full-length for N-methyltransferase and 18 were sequenced in both directions to obtain the complete genome sequence, and confirm the search made in silico for full-length clones. Phylogenetic analyses were made with the complete genome sequences of three clones, which showed only 0.017% dissimilarity; these are phylogenetically close to the caffeine synthase of Theobroma cacao. The search for full-length clones allowed the identification of numerous clones that had the complete coding region, demonstrating this to be an efficient and useful tool in the process of biological data mining. The sequencing of the complete coding region of identified full-length clones corroborated the data from the in silico search, strengthening its efficiency and utility. PMID:21732283

  12. Identification and isolation of full-length cDNA sequences by sequencing and analysis of expressed sequence tags from guarana (Paullinia cupana).

    PubMed

    Figueirêdo, L C; Faria-Campos, A C; Astolfi-Filho, S; Azevedo, J L

    2011-06-21

    The current intense production of biological data, generated by sequencing techniques, has created an ever-growing volume of unanalyzed data. We reevaluated data produced by the guarana (Paullinia cupana) transcriptome sequencing project to identify cDNA clones with complete coding sequences (full-length clones) and complete sequences of genes of biotechnological interest, contributing to the knowledge of biological characteristics of this organism. We analyzed 15,490 ESTs of guarana in search of clones with complete coding regions. A total of 12,402 sequences were analyzed using BLAST, and 4697 full-length clones were identified, responsible for the production of 2297 different proteins. Eighty-four clones were identified as full-length for N-methyltransferase and 18 were sequenced in both directions to obtain the complete genome sequence, and confirm the search made in silico for full-length clones. Phylogenetic analyses were made with the complete genome sequences of three clones, which showed only 0.017% dissimilarity; these are phylogenetically close to the caffeine synthase of Theobroma cacao. The search for full-length clones allowed the identification of numerous clones that had the complete coding region, demonstrating this to be an efficient and useful tool in the process of biological data mining. The sequencing of the complete coding region of identified full-length clones corroborated the data from the in silico search, strengthening its efficiency and utility.

  13. Development of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Human Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor and Insulin Receptor Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Clare A; Rowzee, Anne M; Choe, Gina H; Saleh, Farrah L; Radford, Caitlin C; Taylor, Hugh S; Wood, Teresa L

    2016-04-01

    The biological activity of insulin and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) ligands, IGF-I and IGF-II, is based in part on the relative abundance and distribution of their target receptors: the insulin receptor (IR) splice variants A (IR-A) and B (IR-B) and IGF 1 receptor (IGF-1R). However, the relative quantity of all three receptors in human tissues has never been measured together on the same scale. Due to the high homology between insulin receptor (IR)-A and IR-B proteins and lack of antibodies that discern the two IR splice variants, their mRNA sequence is the most reliable means of distinguishing between the receptors. Hence, highly specific primers for IR-A, IR-B, and IGF-1R mRNA were designed to accurately detect all three receptors by quantitative RT-PCR and enable direct quantification of relative receptor expression levels. A standard concentration curve of cDNA from each receptor was performed. Assay specificity was tested using competition assays and postamplification analysis by gel electrophoresis and cloning. Forward and reverse primer concentrations were optimized to ensure equal efficiencies across primer pairs. This assay enables a specific molecular signature of IGF/insulin signaling receptors to be assayed in different tissues, cell types, or cancers. PMID:26862994

  14. Somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1985-01-01

    It is now well established that the biological actions of tetradecapeptide somatostatin (somatostatin-14, S-14) are receptor-mediated. These receptors were first quantified in GH4C pituitary tumor cells using [125I-Tyr1] S-14 as radioligand which was found to exhibit high non-specific binding to membrane receptor preparations from normal tissues. Our studies have shown that [125I-Tyr11] S-14 in which the radiolabel is situated away from the N-terminus exhibits significantly lower non-specific binding and therefore is more suitable for S-14 receptor studies. In the CNS, highest concentration of S-14 receptors was found in the cerebral cortex, followed by thalamus, hypothalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus while medulla-pons, cerebellum and spinal cord exhibited negligible binding. Outside the CNS membrane receptors for S-14 have been characterized in pituitary, adrenal cortex and pancreatic acini. In all these tissues a single class of high affinity binding sites for S-14 were present, the receptors in pancreatic acinar cells exhibiting significantly greater affinity for binding S-14 than in other tissues.

  15. A "dial-a-receptor" dynamic combinatorial library.

    PubMed

    Hamieh, Saleh; Saggiomo, Vittorio; Nowak, Piotr; Mattia, Elio; Ludlow, R Frederick; Otto, Sijbren

    2013-11-18

    Making receptors to order: A small dynamic combinatorial library (DCL), formed from two dithiols in water, provides a continuous range of six receptors of different sizes. The majority of the 30 tested amines and ammonium ions amplified receptors from this library, thus spanning the complete receptor-size range and showing that this DCL provides a generic platform for the development of receptors for this important class of compounds.

  16. Purification and cDNA Cloning of Isochorismate Synthase from Elicited Cell Cultures of Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    van Tegelen, Léon J.P.; Moreno, Paolo R.H.; Croes, Anton F.; Verpoorte, Robert; Wullems, George J.

    1999-01-01

    Isochorismate is an important metabolite formed at the end of the shikimate pathway, which is involved in the synthesis of both primary and secondary metabolites. It is synthesized from chorismate in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme isochorismate synthase (ICS; EC 5.4.99.6). We have purified ICS to homogeneity from elicited Catharanthus roseus cell cultures. Two isoforms with an apparent molecular mass of 64 kD were purified and characterized. The Km values for chorismate were 558 and 319 μm for isoforms I and II, respectively. The isoforms were not inhibited by aromatic amino acids and required Mg2+ for enzyme activity. Polymerase chain reaction on a cDNA library from elicited C. roseus cells with a degenerated primer based on the sequence of an internal peptide from isoform II resulted in an amplification product that was used to screen the cDNA library. This led to the first isolation, to our knowledge, of a plant ICS cDNA. The cDNA encodes a protein of 64 kD with an N-terminal chloroplast-targeting signal. The deduced amino acid sequence shares homology with bacterial ICS and also with anthranilate synthases from plants. Southern analysis indicates the existence of only one ICS gene in C. roseus. PMID:9952467

  17. Cloning and sequence analysis of cDNA for human argininosuccinate lyase.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, W E; McInnes, R; Kalumuck, K; Adcock, M

    1986-01-01

    Using antibodies specific for argininosuccinate lyase (EC 4.3.2.1), we isolated two cDNA clones by screening a human liver cDNA library constructed in the lambda gt11 expression vector. The identity of these isolates was confirmed by in vitro translation of plasmid-selected mRNA. One of these isolates was used to rescreen the cDNA library and a 1565-base-pair (bp) clone was identified. The entire nucleotide sequence of this clone was determined. An open reading frame was identified which encoded a protein of 463 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 51,663. The clone included 115 bp of 5' untranslated sequence and 46 bp of 3' untranslated sequence. A canonical poly(A) addition site was present in the 3' end, 16 bp from the beginning of the poly(A) tract. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the human enzyme with that of the yeast enzyme revealed a 56% homology, when conservative amino acid changes were taken into consideration. The yeast protein is also 463 amino acids long, with a molecular weight of 51,944. By use of a genomic DNA panel from human-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids, the human gene was mapped to chromosome 7. Another hybridizing region, corresponding to a portion of the 5' end of the cDNA, was found on chromosome 22. Images PMID:3463959

  18. FIELD VALIDATION OF A SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW ESTROGEN-RESPONSIVE CDNA MACROARRAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hemmer, Michael J., Iris Knoebl, Becky L. Hemmer, Patrick Larkin, Peggy S. Harris and Nancy D. Denslow. In press. Field Validation of a Sheepshead Minnow Estrogen-Responsive cDNA Macroarray (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portl...

  19. Purification, characterization, and cDNA cloning of opine dehydrogenases from the polychaete rockworm Marphysa sanguinea.

    PubMed

    Endo, Noriyuki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Nagahisa, Eizoh

    2007-06-01

    Alanopine dehydrogenase (AlDH) and three isoforms of strombine/alanopine dehydrogenase (St/AlDH) were purified from muscle tissue of the polychaete rockworm Marphysa sanguinea. The four enzymes, which can be distinguished by the isoelectric point, are monomeric 42 kDa proteins, possess similar pH-activity profiles, and display specificity for pyruvate and NAD(H). The three isoforms of St/AlDH show equivalent Km and Vmax for glycine and L-alanine and for D-strombine and meso-alanopine. Free amino acid levels in the muscle and D-strombine accumulation in vivo during muscle activity suggest that St/AlDHs function physiologically as StDH. AlDH shows specificity for L-alanine and meso-alanopine, but not for glycine or D-strombine. The amino acid sequences of AlDH and one of the St/AlDH isoforms were determined by a combination of amino acid sequence analysis and cDNA cloning. St/AlDH cDNA consisted of 1586 bp nucleotides that encode a 399-residue protein (43,346.70 Da), and AlDH cDNA consisted of 1587 bp nucleotides that encode a 399-residue protein (43,886.68 Da). The two amino acid sequences deduced from the cDNA displayed 67% amino acid identity, with greatest similarity to that of tauropine dehydrogenase from the polychaete Arabella iricolor. PMID:17350870

  20. cDNA Library Enrichment of Full Length Transcripts for SMRT Long Read Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Benjamin; Reinhardt, Richard; Schneeberger, Korbinian

    2016-01-01

    The utility of genome assemblies does not only rely on the quality of the assembled genome sequence, but also on the quality of the gene annotations. The Pacific Biosciences Iso-Seq technology is a powerful support for accurate eukaryotic gene model annotation as it allows for direct readout of full-length cDNA sequences without the need for noisy short read-based transcript assembly. We propose the implementation of the TeloPrime Full Length cDNA Amplification kit to the Pacific Biosciences Iso-Seq technology in order to enrich for genuine full-length transcripts in the cDNA libraries. We provide evidence that TeloPrime outperforms the commonly used SMARTer PCR cDNA Synthesis Kit in identifying transcription start and end sites in Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, we show that TeloPrime-based Pacific Biosciences Iso-Seq can be successfully applied to the polyploid genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) not only to efficiently annotate gene models, but also to identify novel transcription sites, gene homeologs, splicing isoforms and previously unidentified gene loci. PMID:27327613

  1. Molecular Cloning and Sequencing of Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, Cathepsin H and L cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cathepsin H and L, a lysosomal cysteine endopeptidase of the papain family, are ubiquitously expressed and involve in antigen processing. In this communication, the channel catfish cathepsin H and L transcripts were sequenced and analyzed. Total RNA from tissues was extracted and cDNA libraries we...

  2. Cloning and characterization of the lectin cDNA clones from onion, shallot and leek.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Engelborghs, I; Aelbers, H; Balzarini, J; Pusztai, A; van Leuven, F; Goldstein, I J; Peumans, W J

    1993-10-01

    Characterization of the lectins from onion (Allium cepa), shallot (A. ascalonicum) and leek (A. porrum) has shown that these lectins differ from previously isolated Alliaceae lectins not only in their molecular structure but also in their ability to inhibit retrovirus infection of target cells. cDNA libraries constructed from poly(A)-rich RNA isolated from young shoots of onion, shallot and leek were screened for lectin cDNA clones using colony hybridization. Sequence analysis of the lectin cDNA clones from these three species revealed a high degree of sequence similarity both at the nucleotide and at the amino acid level. Apparently the onion, shallot and leek lectins are translated from mRNAs of ca. 800 nucleotides. The primary translation products are preproproteins (ca. 19 kDa) which are converted into the mature lectin polypeptides (12.5-13 kDa) after post-translational modifications. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA has shown that the lectins are most probably encoded by a family of closely related genes which is in good agreement with the sequence heterogeneity found between different lectin cDNA clones of one species.

  3. GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN CDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN cDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    B.S. Pukazhenthi1, J. C. Rockett2, M. Ouyang3, D.J. Dix2, J.G. Howard1, P. Georgopoulos4, W.J. J. Welsh3 and D. E. Wildt1

    1Department of Reproductiv...

  4. Cloning and sequence analysis of a cDNA encoding rat preprocholecystokinin.

    PubMed Central

    Deschenes, R J; Lorenz, L J; Haun, R S; Roos, B A; Collier, K J; Dixon, J E

    1984-01-01

    Poly(A) RNA was isolated from a rat medullary thyroid carcinoma that exhibited high levels of immunoreactive cholecystokinin (CCK). Double-stranded cDNA was synthesized from the poly(A) RNA and inserted into the Pst I site of pBR322. Bacterial colonies containing CCK cDNA were identified using the hybridization probe d(T-C-C-A-T-C-C-A-N-C-C-C-A-T-G-T-A-G-T-C). The sequence of the probe was deduced from the known amino acid sequence of porcine CCK-8, Asp-Tyr-Met-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA complementary to the mRNA of rat preprocholecystokinin was determined. The cDNA contains 33 nucleotides in the 5'-noncoding region, 199 nucleotides in the 3'-noncoding region, and 345 nucleotides coding for a precursor to CCK, which is 115 amino acids (Mr, 12,826). Examination of the rat CCK gene revealed a suggested transcriptional control sequence analogous to the "TATA" sequence located 33 nucleotides upstream from a proposed transcriptional start site. The amino acid sequence of CCK-39 is flanked by both amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal extensions. Analysis of CCK mRNA showed that it is approximately equal to 750 nucleotides long. CCK mRNA of the rat brain and intestine appeared to be identical in size to the CCK mRNA of the carcinoma. Images PMID:6199787

  5. EXPRESSION PROFILING OF ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS USING A SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW CDNA MACROARRAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Larkin, Patrick, Leroy C. Folmar, Michael J. Hemmer, Arianna J. Poston and Nancy D. Denslow. 2003. Expression Profiling of Estrogenic Compounds Using a Sheepshead Minnow cDNA Macroarray. Environ. Health Perspect. 111(6):839-846. (ERL,GB 1171).

    A variety of anthropogenic c...

  6. Cloning and expression of human erythropoietin cDNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Huang, S

    1984-01-01

    Human erythropoietin (Ep) cDNA has been cloned in Escherichia coli by using pBR322 as a vector. Polyadenylylated RNA was isolated from selected human renal carcinomas with elevated Ep titers. The presence of Ep mRNA was detected by immunoprecipitation of in vitro translation products with monoclonal antibody to human Ep. Double-stranded cDNA was synthesized and inserted into the Pst I site of pBR322 by homopolymeric dG . dC tailing. The cDNA library was initially screened by colony hybridization with 32P-labeled cDNA synthesized from size-fractionated mRNA enriched in Ep message. Positive colonies were further screened immunologically by in situ radioimmunoassay with monoclonal antibody to human Ep. Three positive clones were identified that express the Ep gene sequences as a beta-lactamase fusion protein. These clones contain inserts of approximately 1400, 600, and 200 base pairs. Human renal Ep mRNA, of which the translation products immunoreact with anti-Ep on immunoblots, was hybrid-selected by plasmid DNA from these recombinants. Purified human Ep competes with 35S-labeled hybrid-selected translation products for antibody binding. Images PMID:6371819

  7. cDNA Library Enrichment of Full Length Transcripts for SMRT Long Read Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cartolano, Maria; Huettel, Bruno; Hartwig, Benjamin; Reinhardt, Richard; Schneeberger, Korbinian

    2016-01-01

    The utility of genome assemblies does not only rely on the quality of the assembled genome sequence, but also on the quality of the gene annotations. The Pacific Biosciences Iso-Seq technology is a powerful support for accurate eukaryotic gene model annotation as it allows for direct readout of full-length cDNA sequences without the need for noisy short read-based transcript assembly. We propose the implementation of the TeloPrime Full Length cDNA Amplification kit to the Pacific Biosciences Iso-Seq technology in order to enrich for genuine full-length transcripts in the cDNA libraries. We provide evidence that TeloPrime outperforms the commonly used SMARTer PCR cDNA Synthesis Kit in identifying transcription start and end sites in Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, we show that TeloPrime-based Pacific Biosciences Iso-Seq can be successfully applied to the polyploid genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) not only to efficiently annotate gene models, but also to identify novel transcription sites, gene homeologs, splicing isoforms and previously unidentified gene loci. PMID:27327613

  8. Purification and cDNA isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, M; Togasaki, R K

    1995-01-01

    Chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) was purified to homogeneity from a soluble fraction of chloroplasts of a cell-wall-deficient mutant strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (cw-15) using ammonium sulfate fractionation, Reactive Blue-72 column chromatography, and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PGK activity was attributed to a single polypeptide with a molecular mass of 42 kD. Relative purity and identity of the isolated enzyme was confirmed by N-terminal amino acid sequence determination. Antiserum against this enzyme was raised and a western blot analysis of whole-cell lysate from cw-15 cells using this anti-chloroplastic PGK serum detected a single polypeptide with a molecular mass of 42 kD. The cDNA clone corresponding to the Chlamydomonas chloroplastic PGK was isolated from a Chlamydomonas cDNA expression library using the anti-PGK serum. The cDNA sequence was determined and apparently codes for the entire precursor peptide, which consists of 461 codons. The results from Southern and northern blot analyses suggest that the chloroplastic PGK gene exists as a single copy in the nuclear genome of C. reinhardtii and is expressed as a 1.8-kb transcript. The C. reinhardtii chloroplastic PGK cDNA has 71 and 66% homology with wheat chloroplastic PGK and spinach chloroplastic PGK, respectively. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence, the chloroplastic PGK of C. reinhardtii has more similarity to plant PGKs than to other PGKs, having both prokaryotic and eukaryotic features. PMID:7724671

  9. Isolation and cDNA cloning of somatolactin in rabbitfish (Siganus guttatus).

    PubMed

    Ayson, F G; de Jesus, E G; Amemiya, Y; Moriyama, S; Hirano, T; Kawauchi, H

    1999-08-01

    We report the isolation and cDNA cloning of somatolactin (SL) from rabbitfish, Siganus guttatus. Rabbitfish SL was isolated from an alkaline extract of the pituitary glands by gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-100 and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. SL was monitored by immunoblotting with flounder SL antiserum. The preparation (yield: 0.86 mg/g wet tissues) contained two immunoreactive bands of 24 and 28 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Overlapping partial cDNA clones corresponding to teleost SLs were amplified by PCR from single-strand cDNA from pituitary glands. Excluding the poly(A) tail, rabbitfish SL cDNA is 1605 bp long. It contains a 693-bp open reading frame encoding a signal peptide of 24 amino acids (aa) and a mature protein of 207 aa. Rabbitfish SL has two possible N-glycosylation sites at positions 11 and 121 and seven half Cys residues. The deduced amino acid sequence shows over 80% identity with those of advanced teleosts like sea bream, red drum, and flounder, 76% with the salmonids, 57% with the eel, and 46% with the goldfish SL.

  10. DIFFERENTIATING THE TOXICITY OF CARCINOGENIC ALDEHYDES FROM NONCARCINOGENIC ALDEHYDES IN THE RAT NOSE USING CDNA ARRAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differentiating the Toxicity of Carcinogenic Aldehydes from Noncarcinogenic Aldehydes in the Rat Nose Using cDNA Arrays.

    Formaldehyde is a widely used aldehyde in many industrial settings, the tanning process, household products, and is a contaminant in cigarette smoke. H...

  11. Molecular cloning of cDNA coding for rat proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)/cyclin.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, K; Moriuchi, T; Koji, T; Nakane, P K

    1987-01-01

    The 'proliferating cell nuclear antigen' (PCNA), also known as cyclin, appears at the G1/S boundary in the cell cycle. Because of its possible relationship with cell proliferation, PCNA/cyclin has been receiving attention. PCNA/cyclin is a non-histone acidic nuclear protein with an apparent mol. wt of 33000-36000. The amino acid composition and the sequence of the first 25 amino acids of rabbit PCNA/cyclin are known. Using an oligonucleotide probe corresponding to the sequence of the first five amino acids, a cDNA clone for PCNA/cyclin was isolated from rat thymocyte cDNA library. The cDNA (1195 bases) contains an open reading frame of 813 nucleotides coding for 261 amino acids. The 3'-non-coding region is 312 nucleotides long and contains three putative polyadenylation signals. The mol. wt of rat PCNA/cyclin was calculated to be 28 748. The deduced amino acid sequence and composition of rat PCNA/cyclin are in excellent agreement with the published data. Using the cDNA probe, two species of mRNA (1.1 and 0.98 kb) were detected in rat thymocyte RNA. Southern blot analysis of total human genomic DNA suggests that there is a single gene coding for PCNA/cyclin. The deduced amino acid sequence of rat PCNA/cyclin has a similarity with that of herpes simplex virus type-1 DNA binding protein. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2884104

  12. Nucleotide sequence of the p53 cDNA of beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Xu, Ning; Shiraki, Takashi; Yamada, Tadasu; Nakajima, Masayuki; Gauthier, Julie M; Pfeiffer, Carl J; Sato, Shigeaki

    2002-04-17

    The cDNA (DNA complementary to RNA) of the p53 gene of the beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) was sequenced by the method of 5'- and 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) with the cDNA made for the RNA obtained from fresh peripheral blood leukocytes isolated from two animals. Primers for the RACE method were synthesized based on the sequence of the DNA of beluga whale corresponding to exon 5 of the human p53 gene, which was determined after amplification of the DNA isolated from the liver from a beluga whale by using a pair of primers for the human sequence. The sequenced cDNA had a 2150-nucleotide length and contained the whole region corresponding to human exons 1 through 11. The reading frame was 1164 bp (base pair) long and began in exon 2 and ended in exon 11, coding for a 387-amino acid protein. The nucleotide sequence of the reading frame showed high similarity over 85% with pig, sheep, cow, and human genes. The similarities with the former two animals at the amino acid level were also more than 85%. Lower similarity of the beluga whale p53 gene was also found with those of lower tetrapods, fish and invertebrates.

  13. Construction of a cDNA library for miniature pig mandibular deciduous molars

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The miniature pig provides an excellent experimental model for tooth morphogenesis because its diphyodont and heterodont dentition resembles that of humans. However, little information is available on the process of tooth development or the exact molecular mechanisms controlling tooth development in miniature pigs or humans. Thus, the analysis of gene expression related to each stage of tooth development is very important. Results In our study, after serial sections were made, the development of the crown of the miniature pigs’ mandibular deciduous molar could be divided into five main phases: dental lamina stage (E33-E35), bud stage (E35-E40), cap stage (E40-E50), early bell stage (E50-E60), and late bell stage (E60-E65). Total RNA was isolated from the tooth germ of miniature pig embryos at E35, E45, E50, and E60, and a cDNA library was constructed. Then, we identified cDNA sequences on a large scale screen for cDNA profiles in the developing mandibular deciduous molars (E35, E45, E50, and E60) of miniature pigs using Illumina Solexa deep sequencing. Microarray assay was used to detect the expression of genes. Lastly, through Unigene sequence analysis and cDNA expression pattern analysis at E45 and E60, we found that 12 up-regulated and 15 down-regulated genes during the four periods are highly conserved genes homologous with known Homo sapiens genes. Furthermore, there were 6 down-regulated and 2 up-regulated genes in the miniature pig that were highly homologous to Homo sapiens genes compared with those in the mouse. Conclusion Our results not only identify the specific transcriptome and cDNA profile in developing mandibular deciduous molars of the miniature pig, but also provide useful information for investigating the molecular mechanism of tooth development in the miniature pig. PMID:24750690

  14. Screening a cDNA Library for Protein–Protein Interactions Directly in Planta[W

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lan-Ying; Wu, Fu-Hui; Hsu, Chen-Tran; Shen, Shu-Chen; Yeh, Hsuan-Yu; Liao, De-Chih; Fang, Mei-Jane; Liu, Nien-Tze; Yen, Yu-Chen; Dokládal, Ladislav; Sýkorová, Eva; Gelvin, Stanton B.; Lin, Choun-Sea

    2012-01-01

    Screening cDNA libraries for genes encoding proteins that interact with a bait protein is usually performed in yeast. However, subcellular compartmentation and protein modification may differ in yeast and plant cells, resulting in misidentification of protein partners. We used bimolecular fluorescence complementation technology to screen a plant cDNA library against a bait protein directly in plants. As proof of concept, we used the N-terminal fragment of yellow fluorescent protein– or nVenus-tagged Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirE2 and VirD2 proteins and the C-terminal extension (CTE) domain of Arabidopsis thaliana telomerase reverse transcriptase as baits to screen an Arabidopsis cDNA library encoding proteins tagged with the C-terminal fragment of yellow fluorescent protein. A library of colonies representing ∼2 × 105 cDNAs was arrayed in 384-well plates. DNA was isolated from pools of 10 plates, individual plates, and individual rows and columns of the plates. Sequential screening of subsets of cDNAs in Arabidopsis leaf or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 protoplasts identified single cDNA clones encoding proteins that interact with either, or both, of the Agrobacterium bait proteins, or with CTE. T-DNA insertions in the genes represented by some cDNAs revealed five novel Arabidopsis proteins important for Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. We also used this cDNA library to confirm VirE2-interacting proteins in orchid (Phalaenopsis amabilis) flowers. Thus, this technology can be applied to several plant species. PMID:22623495

  15. Screening a cDNA library for protein-protein interactions directly in planta.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lan-Ying; Wu, Fu-Hui; Hsu, Chen-Tran; Shen, Shu-Chen; Yeh, Hsuan-Yu; Liao, De-Chih; Fang, Mei-Jane; Liu, Nien-Tze; Yen, Yu-Chen; Dokládal, Ladislav; Sykorová, Eva; Gelvin, Stanton B; Lin, Choun-Sea

    2012-05-01

    Screening cDNA libraries for genes encoding proteins that interact with a bait protein is usually performed in yeast. However, subcellular compartmentation and protein modification may differ in yeast and plant cells, resulting in misidentification of protein partners. We used bimolecular fluorescence complementation technology to screen a plant cDNA library against a bait protein directly in plants. As proof of concept, we used the N-terminal fragment of yellow fluorescent protein- or nVenus-tagged Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirE2 and VirD2 proteins and the C-terminal extension (CTE) domain of Arabidopsis thaliana telomerase reverse transcriptase as baits to screen an Arabidopsis cDNA library encoding proteins tagged with the C-terminal fragment of yellow fluorescent protein. A library of colonies representing ~2 × 10(5) cDNAs was arrayed in 384-well plates. DNA was isolated from pools of 10 plates, individual plates, and individual rows and columns of the plates. Sequential screening of subsets of cDNAs in Arabidopsis leaf or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 protoplasts identified single cDNA clones encoding proteins that interact with either, or both, of the Agrobacterium bait proteins, or with CTE. T-DNA insertions in the genes represented by some cDNAs revealed five novel Arabidopsis proteins important for Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. We also used this cDNA library to confirm VirE2-interacting proteins in orchid (Phalaenopsis amabilis) flowers. Thus, this technology can be applied to several plant species. PMID:22623495

  16. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Ritsu; Kallen, C.B.; Babalola, G.O.; Rennert, H.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Billheimer, J.T. )

    1991-01-15

    The authors report the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). The 1.3-kilobase (kb) cDNA contains an open reading frame which encompasses a 143-amino acid sequence which is 89% identical to the rat SCP{sub 2} amino acid sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence of the polypeptide reveals a 20-residue amino-terminal leader sequence in front of the mature polypeptide, which contains a carboxyl-terminal tripeptide (Ala-Lys-Leu) related to the peroxisome targeting sequence. The expressed cDNA in COS-7 cells yields a 15.3-kDa polypeptide and increased amounts of a 13.2-kDa polypeptide, both reacting with a specific rabbit antiserum to rat liver SCP{sub 2}. The cDNA insert hybridizes with 3.2- and 1.8-kb mRNA species in human liver poly(A){sup +} RNA. In human fibroblasts and placenta the 1.8-kb mRNA was most abundant. Southern blot analysis suggests either that there are multiple copies of the SCP{sub 2} gene in the human genome or that the SCP{sub 2} gene is very large. Coexpression of the SCP{sub 2} cDNA with expression vectors for cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme and adrenodoxin resulted in a 2.5-fold enhancement of progestin synthesis over that obtained with expression of the steroidogenic enzyme system alone. These findings are concordant with the notion that SCP{sub 2} plays a role in regulating steroidogenesis, among other possible functions.

  17. Sanfilippo syndrome type B: cDNA and gene encoding human {alpha}-N-acetylglucosaminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H.G.; Lopez, R.; Rennecker, J.

    1994-09-01

    Deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme {alpha}-N-acetlyglucosaminidase underlies the type B Sanfilippo syndrome (MPS III B), a mucopolysaccharide storage disease with profound neurologic deterioration. We are acquiring tools to study the molecular basis of the disorder. The enzyme was purified from bovine testis; after ConA-, DEAE- and phenyl-Sepharose chromatography, it was subjected to SDS-PAGE without preheating. Of two bands of activity detected on the gel, 170 kDa and 87 kDa, the larger one, which coincided with a well-defined Coomassie blue band, was selected for sequence analysis. Degenerate 17-base oligonucleotides, corresponding to the ends of an internal 23 amino acid sequence, were used for RT-PCR of RNA from human fibroblasts. A 41-mer was synthesized from the sequence of the RT-PCR product and used to screen a human testis cDNA library. A number of cDNA inserts were isolated, all lacking the 5{prime} end and none longer than 1.7 kb. An additional 300 bp segment has been obtained by RACE. The cDNA sequence accounts for 9 of 11 peptides, allowing for species difference. Northern analysis of fibroblast RNA with a 1.5 kb cDNA probe showed the presence of a 3 kb mRNA; marked deficiency of this mRNA in two MPS III B fibroblast lines confirmed the authenticity of the cloned cDNA. While no homologous amino acid sequence has been found in a search of GenBank, the nucleotide sequence (interrupted by 4 introns) is present in a flanking region upstream of an unrelated gene on chromosome 17q11-21 (human 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase). This must therefore be the chromosomal locus of the {alpha}-N-acetylglucosaminidase gene and of MPS III B.

  18. Analysis of hypertrophic and normal scar gene expression with cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tsou, R; Cole, J K; Nathens, A B; Isik, F F; Heimbach, D M; Engrav, L H; Gibran, N S

    2000-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one form of abnormal wound healing. Previous studies have suggested that hypertrophic scar formation results from altered gene expression of extracellular matrix molecules. A broadscale evaluation of gene expression in hypertrophic scars has not been reported. To better understand abnormalities in hypertrophic scar gene expression, we compared messenger RNA expression in hypertrophic scars, normal scars, and uninjured skin with the use of complementary (c)DNA microarrays. Total RNA was extracted from freshly excised human hypertrophic scars, normal scars, or uninjured skin and reverse transcribed into cDNA with the incorporation of [33P] deoxycytidine triphosphate. The resulting radioactive cDNA probes were hybridized onto cDNA microarrays of 4000 genes. Hybridization signals were normalized and analyzed. In the comparison of tissue samples, mean intensities were calculated for each gene within each group (hypertrophic scars, normal scars, and uninjured skin). Ratios of the mean intensities of hypertrophic scars to normal scars, hypertrophic scars to uninjured skin, and normal scars to uninjured skin were generated. A ratio that was greater than 1 indicated upregulation of any particular gene and a ratio that was less than 1 indicated downregulation of any particular gene. Our data indicated that 142 genes were overexpressed and 50 genes were underexpressed in normal scars compared with uninjured skin, 107 genes were overexpressed and 71 were underexpressed in hypertrophic scars compared with uninjured skin, and 44 genes were overexpressed and 124 were underexpressed in hypertrophic scars compared with normal scars. Our analysis of collagen, growth factor, and metalloproteinase gene expression confirmed that our molecular data were consistent with published biochemical and clinical observations of normal scars and hypertrophic scars. cDNA microarray analysis provides a powerful tool for the investigation of differential gene expression in

  19. Somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Srikant, C B

    1997-12-01

    The diverse biological effects of somatostatin (SRIF) are mediated by a family of G protein-coupled receptors (termed sst) that are encoded by five nonallelic genes located on separate chromosomes. The receptors can be further divided into two subfamilies: sst(2,3,5) react with octapeptide and hexapeptide SRIF analogues and belong to one subclass; sst(1,4) react poorly with these compounds and fall into another subclass. This review focuses on the molecular pharmacology and function of these receptors, with particular emphasis on the ligand-binding domain, subtype-selective analogues, agonist-dependent receptor regulation and desensitization responses, subtype-specific effector coupling, and signal transduction pathways responsible for inhibiting cell secretion and cell growth or induction of apoptosis.

  20. Identification of a novel V1-type AVP receptor based on the molecular recognition theory.

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, V. L.; Ruiz-Opazo, N.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The molecular recognition theory predicts that binding domains of peptide hormones and their corresponding receptor binding domains evolved from complementary strands of genomic DNA, and that a process of selective evolutionary mutational events within these primordial domains gave rise to the high affinity and high specificity of peptide hormone-receptor interactions observed today in different peptide hormone-receptor systems. Moreover, this theory has been broadened as a general hypothesis that could explain the evolution of intermolecular protein-protein and intramolecular peptide interactions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Applying a molecular cloning strategy based on the molecular recognition theory, we screened a rat kidney cDNA library with a vasopressin (AVP) antisense oligonucleotide probe, expecting to isolate potential AVP receptors. RESULTS: We isolated a rat kidney cDNA encoding a functional V1-type vasopressin receptor. Structural analysis identified a 135 amino acid-long polypeptide with a single transmembrane domain, quite distinct from the rhodopsin-based G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Functional analysis of the expressed V1-type receptor in Cos-1 cells revealed AVP-specific binding, AVP-specific coupling to Ca2+ mobilizing transduction system, and characteristic V1-type antagonist inhibition. CONCLUSIONS: This is the second AVP receptor cDNA isolated using AVP antipeptide-based oligonucleotide screening, thus providing compelling evidence in support of the molecular recognition theory as the basis of the evolution of this peptide hormone-receptor system, as well as adds molecular complexity and diversity to AVP receptor systems. PMID:11683375

  1. B-type receptor for platelet-derived growth factor mediates a chemotactic response by means of ligand-induced activation of the receptor protein-tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Westermark, B; Siegbahn, A; Heldin, C H; Claesson-Welsh, L

    1990-01-01

    Porcine aorta endothelial cells are devoid of receptors for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). We have transfected such cells with cDNA for the PDGF B-type receptor, both the wild-type receptor and a mutant form of the receptor (K634A), in which the putative nucleotide-binding lysine of the protein-tyrosine domain has been changed to alanine. Immunoprecipitation studies of metabolically labeled cells showed that both types of receptors were synthesized and processed to the mature form of Mr 190,000. In cells expressing the wild-type receptor, PDGF-BB, the natural ligand for the B-type receptor, induced membrane ruffling and reorganization of actin. Such a response has previously been seen in cells expressing the natural PDGF B-type receptor in response to PDGF-BB. No such effect was induced in nontransfected cells or in cells expressing the K634A mutant receptor. PDGF was also shown to be chemotactic for cells expressing the wild-type receptor, whereas no chemotactic response was elicited in control cells or in cells expressing the K634A mutant receptor. Our study thus provides formal evidence that the PDGF B-type receptor mediates a motility response including actin reorganization and chemotaxis. Furthermore, the results establish a role for the receptor-associated protein-tyrosine kinase in the transduction of the chemotactic signal. Images PMID:2153283

  2. Identification and Characterization of an Insulin-Like Receptor Involved in Crustacean Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, O; Manor, R; Weil, S; Aflalo, E D; Lezer, Y; Levy, T; Aizen, J; Ventura, T; Mather, P B; Khalaila, I; Sagi, A

    2016-02-01

    Sexual differentiation and maintenance of masculinity in crustaceans has been suggested as being regulated by a single androgenic gland (AG) insulin-like peptide (IAG). However, downstream elements involved in the signaling cascade remain unknown. Here we identified and characterized a gene encoding an insulin-like receptor in the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr-IR), the first such gene detected in a decapod crustacean. In mining for IRs and other insulin signaling-related genes, we constructed a comprehensive M. rosenbergii transcriptomic library from multiple sources. In parallel we sequenced the complete Mr-IR cDNA, confirmed in the wide transcriptomic library. Mr-IR expression was detected in most tissues in both males and females, including the AG and gonads. To study Mr-IR function, we performed long-term RNA interference (RNAi) silencing in young male prawns. Although having no effect on growth, Mr-IR silencing advanced the appearance of a male-specific secondary trait. The most noted effects of Mr-IR silencing were hypertrophy of the AG and the associated increased production of Mr-IAG, with an unusual abundance of immature sperm cells being seen in the distal sperm duct. A ligand blot assay using de novo recombinant Mr-IAG confirmed the existence of a ligand-receptor interaction. Whereas these results suggest a role for Mr-IR in the regulation of the AG, we did not see any sexual shift after silencing of Mr-IR, as occurred when the ligand-encoding Mr-IAG gene was silenced. This suggests that sexual differentiation in crustaceans involve more than a single Mr-IAG receptor, emphasizing the complexity of sexual differentiation and maintenance. PMID:26677879

  3. Lipoxin receptors.

    PubMed

    Romano, Mario; Recchia, Irene; Recchiuti, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO) and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL). In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1). This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed. PMID:17767357

  4. Isolation and mapping of human chromosome 21 cDNA: Progress in constructing a chromosome 21 expression map

    SciTech Connect

    Jan-Fang Cheng; Boyartchuk, V.; Zhu Y.

    1994-09-01

    We have isolated 175 cDNA clones from a fetal brain library by direct cDNA selection using genomic DNA isolated from pools of human chromosome 21 (HC21) cosmids. DNA sequences have revealed that 16 of these cDNA clones contain overlapping sequences. Of the other 159 cDNA sequences, 10 match previously identified HC21 genes, and 9 match previously determined cDNA sequences, including the Wilms tumor related transcript (QM), the human testican cDNA, the mammalian calponin cDNA, and 6 anonymous expressed sequence tags. All isolated cDNAs were hybridized to their corresponding cosmids, which suggests that they originated from HC21. We have localized 92 cDNA clones to previously reported HC21q YACs. The remaining unmapped cDNAs contain either sequences not included in the isolated HC21q YACs or sequences that hybridize to yeast DNA. The cDNAs not included in the YACs should be useful in isolating new YACs to bridge the gaps. PCR primers were derived from 4 novel cDNA sequences that had been mapped to the YACs in the suspected Down syndrome region and used in RT-PCR analysis. All 4 primer sequences amplified RNA fragments with the expected sizes, suggesting that these sequences could be used for expression analysis. The construction of a chromosome 21 cDNA map not only is important in the refinement of physical maps, but also will identify a set of genes in the disease regions for detailed characterization. 30 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Relevant genomics of neurotensin receptor in cancer.

    PubMed

    Elek, J; Pinzon, W; Park, K H; Narayanan, R

    2000-01-01

    The expressed sequence tag (EST) databases are an attractive starting point for gene discovery for diseases like cancer. Validation of gene targets from these sequences (both known and novel) in cancers requires a comprehensive expression profiling. We identified from the Cancer Gene Anatomy Project database (CGAP), a hit called neurotensin receptor (NT-r) that was expressed in the pancreatic cancer cDNA libraries. Neurotensin (NT), a neuroendocrine peptide, exerts trophic effects in vivo and stimulates the growth of cancer-derived cell lines in vitro. High affinity neurotensin receptors (NT-r) are expressed in cancer-derived cell lines and in some primary tumors. To date, a comprehensive expression profile of the NT-r in diverse cancers and normal tissues has not been reported. A cancer-selective expression of NT-r, if demonstrable, may provide a basis for a diagnostic and potential therapeutic utility. We demonstrate that the NT-r is expressed in a variety of cancer-derived cell lines as well as primary tumors, but only in a select few normal tissues. The expression of NT, on the other hand, was detected in many normal tissues, but not in the cancer-derived cell lines. The NT expression however, was detected in the primary tumors. We further demonstrate that NT expression is stimulated by androgen deprivation in the prostate cancer models. These results demonstrate the usefulness of a panel of cDNA repository for rapid validation of potential cancer targets.

  6. Cloning and sequence analysis of a full-length cDNA of SmPP1cb encoding turbot protein phosphatase 1 beta catalytic subunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Fei; Guo, Huarong; Wang, Jian

    2008-02-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by protein kinases and phosphatases, is an important and versatile mechanism by which eukaryotic cells regulate almost all the signaling processes. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is the first and well-characterized member of the protein serine/threonine phosphatase family. In the present study, a full-length cDNA encoding the beta isoform of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1(PP1cb), was for the first time isolated and sequenced from the skin tissue of flatfish turbot Scophthalmus maximus, designated SmPP1cb, by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. The cDNA sequence of SmPP1cb we obtained contains a 984 bp open reading frame (ORF), flanked by a complete 39 bp 5' untranslated region and 462 bp 3' untranslated region. The ORF encodes a putative 327 amino acid protein, and the N-terminal section of this protein is highly acidic, Met-Ala-Glu-Gly-Glu-Leu-Asp-Val-Asp, a common feature for PP1 catalytic subunit but absent in protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B). And its calculated molecular mass is 37 193 Da and pI 5.8. Sequence analysis indicated that, SmPP1cb is extremely conserved in both amino acid and nucleotide acid levels compared with the PP1cb of other vertebrates and invertebrates, and its Kozak motif contained in the 5'UTR around ATG start codon is GXXAXXGXX ATGG, which is different from mammalian in two positions A-6 and G-3, indicating the possibility of different initiation of translation in turbot, and also the 3'UTR of SmPP1cb is highly diverse in the sequence similarity and length compared with other animals, especially zebrafish. The cloning and sequencing of SmPP1cb gene lays a good foundation for the future work on the biological functions of PP1 in the flatfish turbot.

  7. Characterization of a wheat cDNA encoding mitochondrial ribosomal protein L11: qualitative and quantitative tissue-specific differences in its expression.

    PubMed

    Handa, H; Kobayashi-Uehara, A; Murayama, S

    2001-06-01

    We have cloned a cDNA for a ribosomal protein of wheat that is similar to the bacterial ribosomal protein L11 (RPL11). To determine the subcellular localization of the gene product, we fused the whole cDNA sequence to the coding sequence for Green Fluorescent Protein, and expressed the fusion product transiently in epidermal cells of pea hypocotyls or dayflower leaves. Localized fluorescence was detectable in mitochondria, indicating that this nuclear cDNA encodes a mitochondrial ribosomal protein L11 (MRPL11). In lower protists, mitochondrial RPL11 is encoded by the mitochondrial genome, but higher organisms, including animals, fungi and plants, do not have genes for RPL11 in their mitochondrial genomes, suggesting that transfer of the genetic information for RPL11 from the mitochondrial genome to the nucleus was a very early event in evolution. Transcripts of this wheat gene (TaMRPL11) for mitochondrial RPL11 were found in all tissues examined, although qualitative and quantitative differences in expression were noted. The transcript sizes were different in different plant tissues: 1.0 kb in flowers and roots, and 1.5 kb in shoots. Cold stress transiently increased the steady-state level of TaMRPL11 mRNA in shoots, but the transcription of TaMRPL11 was completely inhibited by cold treatment for longer periods. However, the transcript level in flowers decreased gradually on exposure to low temperature. On the other hand, the accumulation of TaMRPL11 transcripts in roots was not affected by low temperature. These results suggest that the expression of MRPL11 in wheat is regulated precisely, in a tissue-specific manner.

  8. Cloning and sequencing of Octopus dofleini hemocyanin cDNA: derived sequences of functional units Ode and Odf.

    PubMed

    Lang, W H; van Holde, K E

    1991-01-01

    A number of additional cDNA clones coding for portions of the very large polypeptide chain of Octopus dofleini hemocyanin were isolated and sequenced. These data reveal two very similar coding sequences, which we have denoted "A-type" and "G-type." We have obtained complete A-type sequences coding for functional units Ode and Odf; consequently a total of three such unit sequences are now known from a single subunit of one molluscan hemocyanin. This presents the opportunity to make sequence comparisons within one hemocyanin subunit. Domains within one subunit show on the average 42% identity in amino acid residues; corresponding functional units from hemocyanins of different species show degrees of identity of 53-75%. Therefore, molluscan hemocyanins already existed before the individual molluscan classes diverged in the early Cambrian. Sequence comparisons of molluscan hemocyanins with arthropodan hemocyanins and tyrosinases allow us to identify the ligands of the "Copper B" site with high probability. Possible ligands for the "Copper A" site are proposed, based on sequence comparisons between molluscan hemocyanins and tyrosinases. Besides two histidine side chains, a methionine side chain might be involved in binding of Copper A, a result not in conflict with spectroscopic studies. PMID:1898774

  9. Isolation of a polyphenol oxidase (PPO) cDNA from artichoke and expression analysis in wounded artichoke heads.

    PubMed

    Quarta, Angela; Mita, Giovanni; Durante, Miriana; Arlorio, Marco; De Paolis, Angelo

    2013-07-01

    The polyphenol oxidase (PPO) enzyme, which can catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, has been reported to be involved in undesirable browning in many plant foods. This phenomenon is particularly severe in artichoke heads wounded during the manufacturing process. A full-length cDNA encoding for a putative polyphenol oxidase (designated as CsPPO) along with a 1432 bp sequence upstream of the starting ATG codon was characterized for the first time from [Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus (L.) Fiori]. The 1764 bp CsPPO sequence encodes a putative protein of 587 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 65,327 Da and an isoelectric point of 5.50. Analysis of the promoter region revealed the presence of cis-acting elements, some of which are putatively involved in the response to light and wounds. Expression analysis of the gene in wounded capitula indicated that CsPPO was significantly induced after 48 h, even though the browning process had started earlier. This suggests that the early browning event observed in artichoke heads was not directly related to de novo mRNA synthesis. Finally, we provide the complete gene sequence encoding for polyphenol oxidase and the upstream regulative region in artichoke. PMID:23628925

  10. Analysis of sporadic tuberous sclerosis patients with the TSC2 cDNA reveals several gene rearrangements and deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.J.; Short, M.P.; Bove, C.

    1994-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hamartomas and hamartias in many organs including brain, skin, heart and kidneys. Two TSC genes have been localized through linkage analysis, TSC1 to 9q34 and TSC2 to 16p13.3. TSC2 was recently cloned. The distribution of sporadic TSC patients between TSC1 and TSC2 is at present unknown, but tests of genetic heterogeneity in families suggest that each is equally represented. Genetic heterogeneity may account for some of the variation in clinical expression; however, there is no evidence at present to support differences in clinical phenotypes between the 2 genetic loci. With the isolation of the TSC2 gene we have commenced mutation studies of our familial and sporadic TSC patients. Thus far six chromosome 16-linked families have been screened with the TSC2 cDNA and no detectable changes were observed using Southern analysis. In addition, 85 sporadic TSC patients were analyzed by Southern analysis. Using multiple restriction digests, nine patients revealed altered patterns, including three patients that appeared to have complete deletions. RT-PCR was performed on these patients confirming that the TSC2 gene was deleted. However, the remaining patients showed normal patterns, indicating that they either have TSC1 mutations or they possess more subtle small deletions or point mutations. At present we are designing an SSCP-based approach to determine the nature of the mutations in our 16 linked TSC families.

  11. Isolation of a polyphenol oxidase (PPO) cDNA from artichoke and expression analysis in wounded artichoke heads.

    PubMed

    Quarta, Angela; Mita, Giovanni; Durante, Miriana; Arlorio, Marco; De Paolis, Angelo

    2013-07-01

    The polyphenol oxidase (PPO) enzyme, which can catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, has been reported to be involved in undesirable browning in many plant foods. This phenomenon is particularly severe in artichoke heads wounded during the manufacturing process. A full-length cDNA encoding for a putative polyphenol oxidase (designated as CsPPO) along with a 1432 bp sequence upstream of the starting ATG codon was characterized for the first time from [Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus (L.) Fiori]. The 1764 bp CsPPO sequence encodes a putative protein of 587 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 65,327 Da and an isoelectric point of 5.50. Analysis of the promoter region revealed the presence of cis-acting elements, some of which are putatively involved in the response to light and wounds. Expression analysis of the gene in wounded capitula indicated that CsPPO was significantly induced after 48 h, even though the browning process had started earlier. This suggests that the early browning event observed in artichoke heads was not directly related to de novo mRNA synthesis. Finally, we provide the complete gene sequence encoding for polyphenol oxidase and the upstream regulative region in artichoke.

  12. Cloning and sequencing of Octopus dofleini hemocyanin cDNA: derived sequences of functional units Ode and Odf.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, W H; van Holde, K E

    1991-01-01

    A number of additional cDNA clones coding for portions of the very large polypeptide chain of Octopus dofleini hemocyanin were isolated and sequenced. These data reveal two very similar coding sequences, which we have denoted "A-type" and "G-type." We have obtained complete A-type sequences coding for functional units Ode and Odf; consequently a total of three such unit sequences are now known from a single subunit of one molluscan hemocyanin. This presents the opportunity to make sequence comparisons within one hemocyanin subunit. Domains within one subunit show on the average 42% identity in amino acid residues; corresponding functional units from hemocyanins of different species show degrees of identity of 53-75%. Therefore, molluscan hemocyanins already existed before the individual molluscan classes diverged in the early Cambrian. Sequence comparisons of molluscan hemocyanins with arthropodan hemocyanins and tyrosinases allow us to identify the ligands of the "Copper B" site with high probability. Possible ligands for the "Copper A" site are proposed, based on sequence comparisons between molluscan hemocyanins and tyrosinases. Besides two histidine side chains, a methionine side chain might be involved in binding of Copper A, a result not in conflict with spectroscopic studies. Images PMID:1898774

  13. cDNA isolation and characterization of two vitellogenin genes in the Chagas' disease vector Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera, Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Blariza, María J; Soria, Néstor W; Torres, Adrián G; Grosso, Carla G; García, Beatriz A

    2014-06-10

    Two vitellogenin genes (Vg1 and Vg2) were identified in the Chagas' disease vector Triatoma infestans. The putative coding sequence corresponding to Vg2 was found to be 5553bp long, encoding 1851 amino acids in a single open reading frame. The comparative analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences from Vg1 and Vg2 cDNA fragments of T. infestans revealed 58.94% of identity with 76.43% of homology. The phylogenetic tree based on the complete Vg amino acid sequences of hemimetabolous insects unambiguously supported two clusters, one consisting of Vg sequences from dictyopteran and the other containing Vg sequences of hemipteran. The Vg1 and Vg2 mRNAs were detected in fat bodies and ovaries of adult females with the highest levels of both Vg transcripts in the first tissue. Quantitative PCR showed low expression of Vg2 in head and muscle of adult females, while the Vg1 transcript was not present in these organs. Neither Vg1 nor Vg2 was expressed in fifth instar nymph fat bodies or in adult male fat bodies, heads, and muscles. PMID:24685521

  14. Characterization of a thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human kidney and other tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, A.; Seino, S.; Sakurai, A.; Szilak, I.; Bell, G.I.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1988-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a specific form of thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human liver, kidney, placenta, and brain was isolated from a human kidney library. Identical clones were found in human placenta and HepG2 cDNA libraries. The cDNA encodes a 490-amino acid protein. When expressed and translated in vitro, the protein products binds triiodothyronine with K/sub a/ of 2.3 /times/ 10/sup 9/ M/sup /minus/1/. This protein, designated human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 (hTR..cap alpha..2), has the same domain structure as other members of the v-erbA-related superfamily of receptor genes. It is similar to thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha.. described in chicken and rat and less similar to human thyroid hormone receptor type ..beta.. (formerly referred to as c-erbA..beta..) from placenta. However, it is distinguished from these receptors by an extension of the C-terminal hormone binding domain making it 80 amino acids longer than rat thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..1. Different sizes of mRNA found in liver and kidney suggest that there may be tissue-specific processing of the primary transcript of this gene. Identification of human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 indicates that two or more forms of thyroid hormone receptor exist in human tissues and may explain the normal variation in thyroid hormone responsiveness of various organs and the selective tissue abnormalities found in the thyroid hormone resistance syndromes.

  15. The first complete genome sequence of iris severe mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Deng, Congliang; Shang, Qiaoxia; Zhao, Xiaoli; Liu, Xingliang; Zhou, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The first complete genome sequence of ISMV was determined by deep sequencing of a small RNA library constructed from ISMV-infected samples and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR. The ISMV genome consists of 10,403 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and contains a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3316 amino acids. Putative proteolytic cleavage sites were identified by BLAST analysis. The ISMV polyprotein showed highest amino acid sequence identity to that encoded by onion yellow dwarf virus. Phylogenetic analysis of the polyprotein amino acid sequence confirmed that ISMV forms a cluster with shallot yellow stripe virus, Cyrtanthus elatus virus A, narcissus degeneration virus and onion yellow dwarf virus. These results confirm that ISMV is a distinct member of the genus Potyvirus.

  16. The first complete genome sequence of iris severe mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Deng, Congliang; Shang, Qiaoxia; Zhao, Xiaoli; Liu, Xingliang; Zhou, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The first complete genome sequence of ISMV was determined by deep sequencing of a small RNA library constructed from ISMV-infected samples and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR. The ISMV genome consists of 10,403 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and contains a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3316 amino acids. Putative proteolytic cleavage sites were identified by BLAST analysis. The ISMV polyprotein showed highest amino acid sequence identity to that encoded by onion yellow dwarf virus. Phylogenetic analysis of the polyprotein amino acid sequence confirmed that ISMV forms a cluster with shallot yellow stripe virus, Cyrtanthus elatus virus A, narcissus degeneration virus and onion yellow dwarf virus. These results confirm that ISMV is a distinct member of the genus Potyvirus. PMID:26729478

  17. Cloning and characterization of additional members of the G protein-coupled receptor family.

    PubMed

    Lee, D K; Lynch, K R; Nguyen, T; Im, D S; Cheng, R; Saldivia, V R; Liu, Y; Liu, I S; Heng, H H; Seeman, P; George, S R; O'Dowd, B F; Marchese, A

    2000-02-29

    A search of the expressed sequence tag (EST) database retrieved a human cDNA sequence which partially encoded a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) GPR26. A human genomic DNA fragment encoding a partial open reading frame (ORF) and a rat cDNA encoding the full length ORF of GPR26 were obtained by library screening. The rat GPR26 cDNA encoded a protein of 317 amino acids, most similar (albeit distantly related) to the serotonin 5-HT(5A) and gastrin releasing hormone BB2 receptors. GPR26 mRNA expression analysis revealed signals in the striatum, pons, cerebellum and cortex. HEK293 and Rh7777 cells transfected with GPR26 cDNA displayed high basal cAMP levels, slow growth rate of clonal populations and derangements of normal cell shape. We also used a sequence reported only in the patent literature encoding GPR57 (a.k.a. HNHCI32) to PCR amplify a DNA fragment which was used to screen a human genomic library. This resulted in the cloning of a genomic fragment containing a pseudogene, psiGPR57, with a 99.6% nucleotide identity to GPR57. Based on shared sequence identities, the receptor encoded by GPR57 was predicted to belong to a novel subfamily of GPCRs together with GPR58 (a.k.a. phBL5, reported only in the patent literature), putative neurotransmitter receptor (PNR) and a 5-HT(4) pseudogene. Analysis of this subfamily revealed greatest identities (approximately 56%) between the receptors encoded by GPR57 and GPR58, each with shared identities of approximately 40% with PNR. Furthermore, psiGPR57, GPR58, PNR and the 5-HT(4) pseudogene were mapped in a cluster localized to chromosome 6q22-24. PNR and GPR58 were expressed in COS cells, however no specific binding was observed for various serotonin receptor-specific ligands.

  18. Molecular characterization of the body site-specific human epidermal cytokeratin 9: cDNA cloning, amino acid sequence, and tissue specificity of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Langbein, L; Heid, H W; Moll, I; Franke, W W

    1993-12-01

    Differentiation of human plantar and palmar epidermis is characterized by the suprabasal synthesis of a major special intermediate-sized filament (IF) protein, the type I (acidic) cytokeratin 9 (CK 9). Using partial amino acid (aa) sequence information obtained by direct Edman sequencing of peptides resulting from proteolytic digestion of purified CK 9, we synthesized several redundant primers by 'back-translation'. Amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of cDNAs obtained by reverse transcription of mRNAs from human foot sole epidermis, including 5'-primer extension, resulted in multiple overlapping cDNA clones, from which the complete cDNA (2353 bp) could be constructed. This cDNA encoded the CK 9 polypeptide with a calculated molecular weight of 61,987 and an isoelectric point at about pH 5.0. The aa sequence deduced from cDNA was verified in several parts by comparison with the peptide sequences and showed the typical structure of type I CKs, with a head (153 aa), and alpha-helical coiled-coil-forming rod (306 aa), and a tail (163 aa) domain. The protein displayed the highest homology to human CK 10, not only in the highly conserved rod domain but also in large parts of the head and the tail domains. On the other hand, the aa sequence revealed some remarkable differences from CK 10 and other CKs, even in the most conserved segments of the rod domain. The nuclease digestion pattern seen on Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA indicated the existence of a unique CK 9 gene. Using CK 9-specific riboprobes for hybridization on Northern blots of RNAs from various epithelia, a mRNA of about 2.4 kb in length could be identified only in foot sole epidermis, and a weaker cross-hybridization signal was seen in RNA from bovine heel pad epidermis at about 2.0 kb. A large number of tissues and cell cultures were examined by PCR of mRNA-derived cDNAs, using CK 9-specific primers. But even with this very sensitive signal amplification, only palmar

  19. Molecular cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding the rabbit ileal villus cell basolateral membrane Na+/H+ exchanger.

    PubMed Central

    Tse, C M; Ma, A I; Yang, V W; Watson, A J; Levine, S; Montrose, M H; Potter, J; Sardet, C; Pouyssegur, J; Donowitz, M

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a rabbit ileal villus cell Na+/H+ exchanger was isolated and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. The cDNA is 4 kb long and contains 322 bp of 5'-untranslated region, 2451 bp of open reading frame and 1163 bp of 3'-untranslated area, with 70%, 91% and 40% identity to the human sequence, respectively. Amino acid sequence deduced from the longest open reading frame indicated a protein of 816 residues (predicted Mr 90,716) which exhibits 95% amino acid identity to the human Na+/H+ exchanger. The two putative glycosylation sites in the human Na+/H+ exchanger are conserved in this protein, suggesting that it is a glycoprotein. Stable transfection of the cDNA into an Na+/H+ exchanger deficient fibroblast cell line, established Na+/H+ exchange. The Na+/H+ exchanger was stimulated by serum and a phorbol ester but not by 8-Br-cAMP. In Northern blot analysis, the cDNA hybridized to a 4.8 kb message in rabbit ileal villus cells, kidney cortex, kidney medulla, adrenal gland, brain and descending colon and to a 5.2 kb message in cultured human colonic cancer cell lines, HT29-18 and Caco-2. In immunoblotting, a polyclonal antibody raised against a fusion protein of beta-galactosidase and the C-terminal 158 amino acids of the human Na+/H+ exchanger identified a rabbit ileal basolateral membrane protein of 94 kd and only weakly interacted with the ileal brush border membrane. In immunocytochemical studies using ileal villus and crypt epithelial cells, the same antibody identified basolateral and not brush border epitopes. Restriction analysis of genomic DNA with a 462 bp PstI-AccI fragment of the rabbit Na+/H+ exchanger strongly suggests the existence of closely related Na+/H+ exchanger genes. The near identity of the basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger and the human Na+/H+ exchanger plus the ubiquitous expression of this message suggests that the ileal basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger is the 'housekeeping' Na+/H+ exchanger. Images PMID:1712287

  20. Preparation of a high-quality cDNA library from a single-cell quantity of mRNA using chum-RNA.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Hiroshi; Tougan, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Unlike exponential amplification using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), linear RNA amplification using T7 RNA polymerase is advantageous for genome-wide analysis of gene expression and for cDNA library preparation from single-cell quantities of RNA. However, the use of RNA polymerase requires a large amount of RNA, as the optimum concentration of the substrate (mRNA), or the Michaelis constant (K(m)), is one millionfold higher than the single-cell amount of mRNA. To circumvent this K(m) problem, we designed a small mRNA-like dummy molecule, termed chum-RNA, which can be easily removed after the completion of the reaction. Chum-RNA allowed the preparation of a high-quality cDNA library from single-cell quantities of RNA after four rounds of T7-based linear amplification, without using PCR amplification. The use of chum-RNA may also facilitate quantitative reverse-transcription (qRT)-PCR from small quantities of substrate. PMID:21365481

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of two forms of trout growth hormone cDNA: expression and secretion of tGH-II by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rentier-Delrue, F; Swennen, D; Mercier, L; Lion, M; Benrubi, O; Martial, J A

    1989-03-01

    We constructed a cDNA library using mRNA isolated from rainbow trout pituitaries. Two types of cDNA clones encoding growth hormone (GH) were isolated and their complete nucleotide sequences determined. Twenty seven nucleotide substitutions in the coding region and 108 in the noncoding region distinguish the cDNAs of trout GH-I and II. Both cDNAs encode polypeptides of 210 amino acids, including a putative signal peptide of 22 amino acids, which differ by 12 residues. In both trout and salmon, GH-I mRNA is predominant, which suggests that the variation in the amount of secreted GH originates from a transcriptional event. Moreover, comparison of rainbow trout and chum salmon GH reveals that, in both cases, the predominant GH-I has mutated less than its GH-II counterpart. Mature tGH-II was expressed in Escherichia coli using the pIN-III-ompA-Hind secretion vector. PMID:2647438

  2. Characterization and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a protein related to the murine 102-kDa cadherin-associated protein ([alpha]-catenin)

    SciTech Connect

    Claverie, J.M. ); Hardelin, J.P.; Legouis, R.; Levilliers, J.; Petit, C. ); Bougueleret, L. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1993-01-01

    We report the characterization of a human cDNA encompassing the complete coding region of a 945-residue putative protein (CAP-R) 80% identical to the recently described murine 102-kDa [alpha]-catenin (CAP102). The CAP-R protein mostly differs from CAP102 by the presence of a 48-residue insert. This insert exhibits similarity with a segment of the type 1 neurofibromatosis gene product. The analysis of a publicly available human [open quote]expressed sequence tag[close quotes] collection revealed the existence of another human cDNA more closely related (89% identical) to CAP 102. This strongly suggests that CAP-R is not the human homologue of the murine 102- kDa [alpha]-catenin but a new closely related gene of the vinculin family. This is further supported by the computed mutation rates falling outside the range observed for mammalian orthologous genes. Using in situ hybridization, the CAP-R gene could be mapped to the pll.l-pl2 region of human chromosome 2 and to the homologous B3-D region of mouse chromosome 6. 32 refs., 4 fig.

  3. Survey of geothermal completion fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of oil field fluids companies indicates that there are no geothermal completion fluids on the market. It is recommended that development of a completion fluid and appropriate support testing be funded.

  4. Characterization of a cDNA from Beta maritima that confers nickel tolerance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Gonensin O; Kaya, Alaattin; Koc, Ahmet; Noll, Gundula A; Prüfer, Dirk; Karakaya, Hüseyin Caglar

    2014-04-01

    Nickel is an essential micronutrient due to its involvement in many enzymatic reactions as a cofactor. However, excess of this element is toxic to biological systems. Here, we constructed a cDNA library from Beta maritima and screened it in the yeast system to identify genes that confer resistance to toxic levels of nickel. A cDNA clone (NIC6), which encodes for a putative membrane protein with unknown function, was found to help yeast cells to tolerate toxic levels of nickel. A GFP fused form of Nic6 protein was localized to multivesicular structures in tobacco epidermal cells. Thus, our results suggest a possible role of Nic6 in nickel and intracellular ion homeostasis.

  5. Human cDNA clones for four species of G alpha s signal transduction protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, P; Carter, A; Simons, C; Guo, V; Puckett, C; Kamholz, J; Spiegel, A; Nirenberg, M

    1986-01-01

    lambda gt11 cDNA libraries derived from human brain were screened with oligonucleotide probes for recombinants that code for alpha subunits of G signal transduction proteins. Eleven alpha s clones were detected with both probes and characterized. Four types of alpha s cDNA were cloned that differ in nucleotide sequence in the region that corresponds to amino acid residues 71-88. The clones differ in the codon for alpha s amino acid residue 71 (glutamic acid or aspartic acid), the presence or absence of codons for the next 15 amino acid residues, and the presence or absence of an adjacent serine residue. S1 nuclease protection experiments revealed at least two forms of alpha s mRNA. A mechanism for generating four species of alpha s mRNA by alternative splicing of precursor RNA is proposed. Images PMID:3024154

  6. Biological activity of transcripts from cDNA of Pelargonium line pattern virus.

    PubMed

    Castaño, A; Hernández, C

    2007-01-01

    A set of cDNAs of Pelargonium line pattern virus (PLPV) was assembled under the control of T7 RNA polymerase promoter and ligated into the plasmid pUC18. Transcripts synthesized in vitro from cDNA were infectious on Chenopodium quinoa according to locally induced lesions and hybridization assay. The biological activity of the viral transcripts was particularly sensitive to the short 3' terminus extensions, whereas inclusion of the 3 extra bases at the 5' terminus did not substantially affect the infectivity. Inoculation of the transcripts on plants Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana clevelandii give rise to the systemic infection indistinguishable from that established by the parental isolate. This is the first report about the preparation of infectious RNA transcripts from a full-length cDNA clone of PLPV.

  7. Molecular cloning of a human histocompatibility antigen cDNA fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Ploegh, H L; Orr, H T; Strominger, J L

    1980-01-01

    A clone (pHLA-1) containing HLA-specific cDNA was constructed by reverse transcription of partially purified HLA mRNA from the human lymphoblastoid cell line LKT. The identity of pHLA-1 was established by its ability to hybridize to HLA heavy chain mRNA and by nucleotide sequence analysis. The pHLA-1 cDNA insert (approximately 525 base pairs) corresponds to the COOH-terminal 46 amino acids of an HLA-A, -B, or -C antigen (15 residues from the hydrophobic region and the remainder from the COOH-termial hydrophilic region), together with a portion of the 3' untranslated region of the mRNA. Images PMID:6934534

  8. Molecular cloning of Phaseolus vulgaris cDNA encoding proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, Wojciech; Ziemienowicz, Alicja

    2007-02-01

    A cDNA fragment encoding a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was isolated using rapid amplification of cDNA 3' end (3' RACE) method, cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of this clone contains an open reading frame of 798 nucleotides encoding a protein of 265 amino acids. Alignment of the common bean PCNA predicted sequence shows its high degree of identity with PCNA from other plant species. Analysis of PCNA content in the germinating embryos of common bean showed a decrease in the protein level after 60h of germination. Moreover, PCNA was not detected in the tested plant organs (root, stem, leaf and flower). The presence of PCNA in the germinating seeds and its absence from mature plants suggests that this protein plays a crucial role during early stages of plant development.

  9. Molecular cloning of cDNA for rat liver gap junction protein

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    An affinity-purified antibody directed against the 27-kD protein associated with isolated rat liver gap junctions was produced. Light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry showed that this antigen was localized specifically to the cytoplasmic surfaces of gap junctions. The antibody was used to select cDNA from a rat liver library in the expression vector lambda gt11. The largest cDNA selected contained 1,494 bp and coded for a protein with a calculated molecular mass of 32,007 daltons. Northern blot analysis indicated that brain, kidney, and stomach express an mRNA with similar size and homology to that expressed in liver, but that heart and lens express differently sized, less homologous mRNA. PMID:3013898

  10. Sequence analysis and expression of a cDNA clone encoding tropomysin in Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Song, Juanjuan; Li, Li; Liu, Zhigang; Li, Qiyuan; Ran, Pixin

    2009-02-01

    Shellfish can cause severe anaphylactic reactions. Tropomyosin has been assumed partly responsible for the cross-reactivity among shellfish and other invertebrates. In this study, cDNA of Sinonovacula constricta was amplified by RT-PCR and 3'-RACE from total RNA. The obtained tropomyosin cDNA included an open reading frame coding for 284 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein shared high identity with other allergenic tropomyosins. Expression of the recombinant tropomyosin was carried out in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) using vector PET28a and the purification of the recombinant protein was performed via affinity chromatography. IgE reactivity of recombinant tropomyosin was investigated by immunoblot and the sensized precentage was 36% which indicated that tropomyosin was the minor allergens in S. constricta. Moreover, the character of the purified protein was analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS.

  11. Stable transfection of protein kinase C alpha cDNA in hormone-dependent breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Tonetti, D A; Chisamore, M J; Grdina, W; Schurz, H; Jordan, V C

    2000-01-01

    An inverse relationship between protein kinase C (PKC) activity and oestrogen receptor (ER) expression in human breast cell lines and tumours has been firmly established over the past 10 years. To determine whether specific alterations in PKC expression accompany hormone-independence, we examined the expression of PKC isozymes in the hormone-independent human breast cancer cell clones MCF-7 5C and T47D:C42 compared with their hormone-dependent counterparts, MCF-7 A4, MCF-7 WS8 and T47D:A18 respectively. Both hormone-independent cell clones exhibit elevated PKCα expression and increased basal AP-1 activity compared with the hormone-dependent cell clones. To determine whether PKCα overexpression is sufficient to mediate the hormone-independent phenotype, we stably transfected an expression plasmid containing PKCα cDNA to the T47D:A18 and MCF-7 A4 cell lines. This is the first report of PKCα transfection in T47D cells. In contrast to MCF-7 cells, T47D has the propensity to lose the ER and more readily forms tamoxifen-stimulated tumours in athymic mice. We find that in T47D:A18/PKCα clones, there is concomitant up-regulation of PKC βI and δ, whereas in the MCF-7 A4/PKCα transfectants PKC ɛ is up-regulated. In T47D:A18, but not in MCF-7 A4, PKCα stable transfection is accompanied by down-regulation of ER function whilst basal AP-1 activity is elevated. Our results suggest PKCα overexpression may play a role in growth signalling during the shift from hormone dependent to hormone-independent breast cancers. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10952784

  12. Integrative Annotation of 21,037 Human Genes Validated by Full-Length cDNA Clones

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The human genome sequence defines our inherent biological potential; the realization of the biology encoded therein requires knowledge of the function of each gene. Currently, our knowledge in this area is still limited. Several lines of investigation have been used to elucidate the structure and function of the genes in the human genome. Even so, gene prediction remains a difficult task, as the varieties of transcripts of a gene may vary to a great extent. We thus performed an exhaustive integrative characterization of 41,118 full-length cDNAs that capture the gene transcripts as complete functional cassettes, providing an unequivocal report of structural and functional diversity at the gene level. Our international collaboration has validated 21,037 human gene candidates by analysis of high-quality full-length cDNA clones through curation using unified criteria. This led to the identification of 5,155 new gene candidates. It also manifested the most reliable way to control the quality of the cDNA clones. We have developed a human gene database, called the H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://www.h-invitational.jp/). It provides the following: integrative annotation of human genes, description of gene structures, details of novel alternative splicing isoforms, non-protein-coding RNAs, functional domains, subcellular localizations, metabolic pathways, predictions of protein three-dimensional structure, mapping of known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identification of polymorphic microsatellite repeats within human genes, and comparative results with mouse full-length cDNAs. The H-InvDB analysis has shown that up to 4% of the human genome sequence (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 34 assembly) may contain misassembled or missing regions. We found that 6.5% of the human gene candidates (1,377 loci) did not have a good protein-coding open reading frame, of which 296 loci are strong candidates for non-protein-coding RNA genes. In

  13. [Cloning and identification of recombinant cDNA to a rabbit oviductin "DPF-1"].

    PubMed

    Liu, C J; Shen, H; Gu, Z; Lu, J N; Cheng, G X; Tso, J K

    1996-12-01

    A recombinant cDNA library to polyA + RNA isolated from rabbit oviduct epithelial cells was constructed, and screened with a polyclonal antibody against DPF-1 (64 kDa). 4 immunopositive plaques (DPF-1.1, DPF-1.2, DPF-1.3 and DPF-1.4) were purified. The polyclonal antibodies were epitope-selected respectively against the fused proteins produced by these positive recombinant plaques. Identification of recombinant clones by epitope selection revealed that the epitope-selected antibodies from DPF-1.1, DPF-1.2 and DPF-1.3 could recognise not only DPF-1, but 44 kDa protein also (Fig. 2). By using EcoRI-Not1 digestion method, the insert cDNA fragment size of these three recombinants was revealed to be 0.8 kb, 1.2 kb and 1.2 kb respectively (Fig. 3). These cDNA fragments were then isolated and subcloned into pBluescriptKS, and recombinant plasmids (pDPF-1.1, pDPF-1.2 and pDPF-1.3) were constructed (Fig. 4). Dot blot hybridization with a 32p-labeled 1.2 Kb-insert of cDNA from pDPF-1.3 indicated that these recombinant plasmids could cross-hybridized (Fig. 5), further indicating that they all possessed a common nucleic acid sequence. Dot and Northern blotting analysis of total RNA prepared from eight different tissues (skeleton muscle, heart, kidney, oviduct, liver, spleen, lung and small intestine) showed that the gene encoding DPF-1 was expressed specifically in the oviduct tissue (Fig. 6, Fig. 7).

  14. Cloning and Sequencing of the cDNA Encoding the Rubber Elongation Factor of Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Goyvaerts, Elisabeth; Dennis, Mark; Light, David; Chua, Nam-Hai

    1991-01-01

    In Hevea brasiliensis, the rubber particle in the laticiferous vessel is the site of rubber (cis-1-4-polyisoprene) biosynthesis. A 14 kilodalton protein, rubber elongation factor (REF), is associated with the rubber particle in a ratio of one REF to one rubber molecule (Dennis M, Henzel W, Bell J, Kohr W, Light D [1989] J Biol Chem 264: 18618-18628; Dennis M, Light D [1989] J Biol Chem 264: 18608-18617). To obtain more information concerning the function of REF and its synthesis and assembly in the rubber particle, we isolated cDNA clones encoding REF. We used antibodies to REF to screen a Hevea leaf γgt11 cDNA expression library and obtained several positive clones. Sequence analysis of the REF cDNA clones showed that the REF mRNA contains 121 nucleotides of 5′-nontranslated sequences and a 205 nucleotide 3′-nontranslated region. The open reading frame encodes the entire 14 kilodalton REF protein without any extra amino acids (Dennis M, Henzel W, Bell J, Kohr W, Light D [1989] J Biol Chem 264: 18618-18628). The REF cDNA was subcloned in pGEM-3Z/-4Z and expressed in vitro. The translation product is a 14 kilodalton protein that can be immunoprecipitated with antibodies to REF. Addition of microsomal membranes to the in vitro translation product did not alter the mobility of the REF protein. This, and the sequence data, indicate that REF is not made as a preprotein. Our results suggest that REF is synthesized on free polysomes in the laticifer cytoplasm and that assembly of the rubber particles is likely to occur in the cytosol. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668388

  15. Molecular cloning and bacterial expression of cDNA encoding a plant cysteine synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, K; Miura, N; Yamazaki, M; Hirano, H; Murakoshi, I

    1992-01-01

    Cysteine synthase (CSase) [O-acetyl-L-serine acetate-lyase (adding hydrogen sulfide), EC 4.2.99.8] catalyzes the formation of L-cysteine, the key step in sulfur assimilation in plants, from O-acetyl-L-serine and hydrogen sulfide. We report here the isolation and characterization of cDNA clones encoding cysteine synthase from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Internal peptide sequences were obtained from V8 protease-digested fragments of purified CSase. A lambda gt10 cDNA library was constructed from poly(A)+ RNA of young green leaves of spinach. Screening with two synthetic mixed nucleotides encoding the partial peptide sequences revealed 19 positively hybridized clones among 2 x 10(5) clones. Nucleotide sequence analysis of two independent cDNA clones revealed a continuous open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 325 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 34,185 Da. Sequence comparison of the deduced amino acids revealed 53% identity with CSases of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Sequence homology was also observed with other metabolic enzymes for amino acids in bacteria and yeast and with rat hemoprotein H-450. A bacterial expression vector was constructed and could genetically complement an E. coli auxotroph that lacks CSases. The accumulation of functionally active spinach CSase in E. coli was also demonstrated by immunoblotting and assaying enzymatic activity. Southern hybridization analysis showed the presence of two to three copies of the cDNA sequence in the genome of spinach. RNA blot hybridization suggested constitutive expression in leaves and roots of spinach. Images PMID:1518833

  16. Cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Nirasawa, S; Nakaya, K; Kurihara, Y

    1995-08-19

    A cDNA clone encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin (MIR), was isolated and sequenced. The encoded precursor to MIR was composed of 220 amino acid (aa) residues, including a possible signal sequence of 29 aa. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA encoding MIR was already expressed in fruits of Richadella dulcifica at 3 weeks after pollination and was present specifically in the pulp. PMID:7665074

  17. The complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of pea streak virus (genus Carlavirus).

    PubMed

    Su, Li; Li, Zhengnan; Bernardy, Mike; Wiersma, Paul A; Cheng, Zhihui; Xiang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Pea streak virus (PeSV) is a member of the genus Carlavirus in the family Betaflexiviridae. Here, the first complete genome sequence of PeSV was determined by deep sequencing of a cDNA library constructed from dsRNA extracted from a PeSV-infected sample and Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) PCR. The PeSV genome consists of 8041 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and contains six open reading frames (ORFs). The putative peptide encoded by the PeSV ORF6 has an estimated molecular mass of 6.6 kDa and shows no similarity to any known proteins. This differs from typical carlaviruses, whose ORF6 encodes a 12- to 18-kDa cysteine-rich nucleic-acid-binding protein.

  18. Evolution of vertebrate opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dreborg, Susanne; Sundström, Görel; Larsson, Tomas A.; Larhammar, Dan

    2008-01-01

    The opioid peptides and receptors have prominent roles in pain transmission and reward mechanisms in mammals. The evolution of the opioid receptors has so far been little studied, with only a few reports on species other than tetrapods. We have investigated species representing a broader range of vertebrates and found that the four opioid receptor types (delta, kappa, mu, and NOP) are present in most of the species. The gene relationships were deduced by using both phylogenetic analyses and chromosomal location relative to 20 neighboring gene families in databases of assembled genomes. The combined results show that the vertebrate opioid receptor gene family arose by quadruplication of a large chromosomal block containing at least 14 other gene families. The quadruplication seems to coincide with, and, therefore, probably resulted from, the two proposed genome duplications in early vertebrate evolution. We conclude that the quartet of opioid receptors was already present at the origin of jawed vertebrates ≈450 million years ago. A few additional opioid receptor gene duplications have occurred in bony fishes. Interestingly, the ancestral receptor gene duplications coincide with the origin of the four opioid peptide precursor genes. Thus, the complete vertebrate opioid system was already established in the first jawed vertebrates. PMID:18832151

  19. 1,4-Benzoquinone reductase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium: cDNA cloning and regulation of expression

    SciTech Connect

    Akileswaran, L.; Brock, B.J.; Cereghino, J.L.; Gold, M.H.

    1999-02-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a quinone reductase (QR) from the white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium was isolated and sequenced. The cDNA consisted of 1,007 nucleotides and a poly(A) tail and encoded a deduced protein containing 271 amino acids. The experimentally determined eight-amino-acid N-germinal sequence of the purified QR protein from P. chrysosporium matched amino acids 72 to 79 of the predicted translation product of the cDNA. The M{sub r} of the predicted translation product, beginning with Pro-72, was essentially identical to the experimentally determined M{sub r} of one monomer of the QR dimer, and this finding suggested that QR is synthesized as a proenzyme. The results of in vitro transcription-translation experiments suggested that QR is synthesized as a proenzyme with a 71-amino-acid leader sequence. This leader sequence contains two potential KEX2 cleavage sites and numerous potential cleavage sites for dipeptidyl aminopeptidase. The QR activity in cultures of P. chrysosporium increased following the addition of 2-dimethoxybenzoquinone, vanillic acid, or several other aromatic compounds. An immunoblot analysis indicated that induction resulted in an increase in the amount of QR protein, and a Northern blot analysis indicated that this regulation occurs at the level of the qr mRNA.

  20. A two-step strategy for constructing specifically self-subtracted cDNA libraries

    PubMed Central

    Laveder, Paolo; De Pittà, Cristiano; Toppo, Stefano; Valle, Giorgio; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new strategy for producing subtracted cDNA libraries that is optimized for connective and epithelial tissues, where a few exceptionally abundant (super-prevalent) RNA species account for a large fraction of the total mRNA mass. Our method consists of a two-step subtraction of the most abundant mRNAs: the first step involves a novel use of oligo-directed RNase H digestion to lower the concentration of tissue-specific, super-prevalent RNAs. In the second step, a highly specific subtraction is achieved through hybridization with probes from a 3′-end ESTs collection. By applying this technique in skeletal muscle, we have constructed subtracted cDNA libraries that are effectively enriched for genes expressed at low levels. We further report on frequent premature termination of transcription in human muscle mitochondria and discuss the importance of this phenomenon in designing subtractive approaches. The tissue-specific collections of cDNA clones generated by our method are particularly well suited for expression profiling. PMID:11972353

  1. Effects of heavy metals on Drosophila larvae and a metallothionein cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, G.; Lastowski-Perry, D.; Otto, E.; Watson, D.

    1986-03-01

    Drosophila melanogaster larvae reared on food containing radioactive cadmium retained over 80% of it, mostly in the intestinal epithelium. The majority of this radioactivity was associated with a soluble protein of less than 10,000 molecular weight. Synthesis of this cadmium-binding protein was induced by the metal as demonstrated by incorporation of radioactive cysteine. Most copper ingested by larvae was also found to associate with a low molecular weight, inducible protein, but some of it was found in an insoluble fraction. A D. melanogaster cDNA clone was isolated based on its more intense hybridization to copies of RNA sequences from copper-fed larvae than from control larvae. This clone showed strong hybridization to mouse metallothionein-I cDNA at reduced stringency. Its nucleotide sequence includes an open-reading segment which codes for a 40 amino acid protein; this protein was identified as metallothionein based on its similarity to the amino-terminal portion of mammalian and crab metalloproteins. The ten cysteine residues present occur in five pairs of near-vicinal cysteines (Cys-X-Cys). This cDNA sequence hybridized to a 400-nucleotide polyadenylated RNA whose presence in the cells of the alimentary canal of larvae was stimulated by ingestion of cadmium or copper; in other tissues this RNA was present at much lower levels.

  2. Requirements in screening cDNA libraries for new genes and solutions offered by SBH technology

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Labat, I.; Stavropoulos, N.

    1993-12-31

    Under different assumptions about the total number of genes, the number of housekeeping and tissue-specific genes, and the difference in the number of mRNAs per cell for functional and nonfunctional genes, significantly different results can be expected from screening random cDNA clones. We have developed gene expression models as a guide for interpretation of experimental results. For statistical, biological, and technical reasons, the search for 100,000 plus genes and discrimination between nonfunctional, housekeeping, and tissue-specific genes requires the analysis of up to 10 million clones from 20 to 50 tissues. Oligonucleotide hybridization of dense clone blots is an inexpensive and fast way to screen such large clone sets. Our preliminary results on control clones and thousands of cDNA clones from an infant brain library demonstrate the feasibility of the method. We present several models of gene expression and analyze the main factors which can influence the hunt for new genes via the screening of random cDNA libraries. The basic steps in the preparation and use of dense DNA dot arrays are described, and some results that demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of gene inventorying by oligonucleotide hybridization are presented. Furthermore, partial SBH and single-pass gel sequencing are compared and a gene analysis scheme that combines the two approaches is discussed.

  3. CONSTRUCTION AND APPLICATIONS OF A MYCORRHIZAL ARBUSCULAR SPECIFIC cDNA LIBRARY.

    PubMed

    Isayenkov, S; Maathuis, F J M

    2016-01-01

    To exploit the potential benefits of mycorrhizas, we need to investigate the processes that occur in these symbiotic interactions, particularly in the arbuscular compartment where nutrients are exchanged between the plant and the fungus. Progress in this area is restricted due to the intricacy and complexity of this plant-fungus interface and many techniques that have been employed successfully in other plants and animal systems cannot be used. An effective approach to study processes in arbuscules is to examine transcript composition and dynamics. We applied laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate approximately 3000 arbuscules from Glomus intraradices colonised Me- dicago truncatula roots. Total RNA was extracted from microdissected arbuscules and subjected to T7 RNA polymerase-based linear amplification. Amplified RNA was then usedfor construction of a cDNA library. The presence and level of enrichment of mycorrhiza-specific transcripts was determined by quantitative Real-time and conventional PCR. To improve enrichment a cDNA library subtraction was performed. Complementation of yeast mutants deficient in the uptake of.potassium, phosphate, sulphate, amino acids, ammonium and of a Mn²⁺sensitive strain, demonstrates the functionality of our cDNA library.

  4. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hev ein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  5. Characterization and cDNA cloning of androgenic gland hormone of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare.

    PubMed

    Okuno, A; Hasegawa, Y; Ohira, T; Katakura, Y; Nagasawa, H

    1999-10-22

    The sex differentiation in crustaceans is known to be controlled by a peptide hormone called androgenic gland hormone (AGH). AGH was extracted and purified from the androgenic glands (AGs) of the male isopod Armadillidium vulgare by high-performance liquid chromatography. AGH consisted of two peptide chains and their N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined. A cDNA encoding AGH was cloned by PCR and sequenced. The cDNA had an open reading frame of 432 bp, which encoded a preproAGH consisting of a signal peptide (21 residues), B chain (44 residues), C peptide (46 residues), and A chain (29 residues). Through processing, the A and B chains might form a heterodimer interlinked by disulfide bonds. The A chain possessed a putative N-linked glycosylation site. A Northern blot analysis using the cDNA as a probe detected a hybridization signal with 0.8 kb in the RNA preparation only from the AGs. PMID:10529379

  6. Human alpha-L-iduronidase: cDNA isolation and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, H S; Anson, D S; Orsborn, A M; Nelson, P V; Clements, P R; Morris, C P; Hopwood, J J

    1991-01-01

    alpha-L-Iduronidase (IDUA; EC 3.2.1.76) is a lysosomal hydrolase in the metabolic pathway responsible for the degradation of the glycosaminoglycans heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate. A deficiency of IDUA in humans leads to the accumulation of these glycosaminoglycans and results in the lysosomal storage disorder mucopolysaccharidosis type I. We have isolated and sequenced cDNA clones containing part of the human IDUA coding region and used PCR from reverse-transcribed RNA to obtain the full IDUA sequence. Analysis of the predicted 653-amino acid precursor protein shows that IDUA has a 26-amino acid signal peptide that is cleaved immediately prior to the amino terminus of the 74-kDa polypeptide present in human liver IDUA. The protein sequence contains six potential N-glycosylation sites. Northern blot analysis with IDUA cDNA detected only a single 2.3-kilobase mRNA species in human placental RNA; however, PCR analysis of fibroblast, liver, kidney, and placental RNA showed the existence of alternatively spliced mRNA from the IDUA gene. Southern blot analysis failed to detect major deletions or gene rearrangements in any of the 40 mucopolysaccharidosis type I patients studied. Expression of a full-length IDUA cDNA construct in Chinese hamster ovary cells produced human IDUA protein at a level 13-fold higher than, and with a specific activity comparable to, IDUA present in normal human fibroblasts. Images PMID:1946389

  7. Cloning and expression of a cDNA for the T-cell-activating protein TAP.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Coligan, J; Palmer, E; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1988-01-01

    The T-cell-activating protein TAP is a murine phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein whose expression is controlled by the Ly-6 locus. Previous studies have suggested an important role for this protein in physiological T-cell activation. Using oligonucleotide probes, we have now isolated a cDNA clone whose predicted sequence would encode a protein with an NH2-terminal sequence identical to that of the TAP molecule. Further analysis of the predicted protein sequence revealed a cysteine-rich protein with a hydrophobic domain at the COOH terminus and without N-linked glycosylation sites--all features consistent with our previous analysis of the TAP protein. In Southern blot analysis, the Ly-6.2 cDNA clone detects a multigene family and a restriction fragment length polymorphism that maps precisely to the Ly-6 locus. Expression of the cDNA clone in COS cells demonstrates that it codes for TAP and clarifies the relationship between the epitopes recognized by various alpha Ly-6 monoclonal antibodies. Finally, we have studied the expression of Ly-6 mRNA in a variety of cell lineages. Ly-6 transcripts were detected in all organs examined, including spleen, kidney, lung, brain, and heart. This demonstrates that the Ly-6 locus is transcriptionally active in a wide range of organs and suggests that the role of TAP or TAP-like proteins might extend to other tissues. Images PMID:2895473

  8. Isolation of human cDNA clones of ski and the ski-related gene, sno.

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, N; Sasamoto, S; Ishii, S; Date, T; Matsui, M; Ishizaki, R

    1989-01-01

    cDNA clones of ski and the ski-related gene, sno, were obtained by screening human cDNA libraries. The predicted open reading frame of h-ski could encode a protein of 728 amino acid residues. The h-ski protein is highly homologous with the v-ski protein. The overall homology between h-ski and v-ski is 91% at the amino acid level. DNA sequencing analysis revealed two types of cDNA clones from the sno (ski-related novel gene) gene, possibly due to alternative splicing. The first type, named snoN (non Alu-containing), encoded a protein of 684 amino acid residues. The second type, named snoA (Alu-containing), encoded a protein of 415 amino acid residues. The first 366 amino acid residues of snoN and snoA are the same, but subsequent amino acids show divergence. Several transcripts of h-ski (6.0, 4.7, 3.8, 3.0, 2.1 and 1.8 kb) were detected. The mRNAs of h-sno were 6.2, 4.4 and 3.2kb. Images PMID:2762147

  9. Isolation of genomic and cDNA clones encoding bovine poly(A) binding protein II.

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, A; Krause, S; Blank, D; Jenny, A; Jenö, P; Lustig, A; Wahle, E

    1995-01-01

    cDNA clones for bovine poly(A) binding protein II (PAB II) were isolated. Their sequence predicts a protein of 32.8 kDa, revising earlier estimates of molecular mass. The protein contains one putative RNA-binding domain of the RNP type, an acidic N-terminal and a basic C-terminal domain. Analyses of authentic PAB II were in good agreement with all predictions from the cDNA sequence except that a number of arginine residues appeared to be post-translationally modified. Poly(A) binding protein II expressed in Escherichia coli was active in poly(A) binding and reconstitution of processive polyadenylation, including poly(A) tail length control. The cDNA clones showed a number of potential PAB II binding sites in the 3' untranslated sequence. Bovine poly(A)+RNA contained two mRNAs hybridizing to a PAB II-specific probe. Analysis of a genomic clone revealed six introns in the coding sequence. The revised molecular mass led to a demonstration of PAB II oligomer formation and a reinterpretation of earlier data concerning the protein's binding to poly(A). Images PMID:7479061

  10. Cloning and High-Level Expression of α-Galactosidase cDNA from Penicillium purpurogenum

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Hajime; Nagasaki, Hiroaki; Kaneko, Satoshi; Yoshida, Shigeki; Park, Gwi Gun; Kusakabe, Isao; Kobayashi, Hideyuki

    1998-01-01

    The cDNA coding for Penicillium purpurogenum α-galactosidase (αGal) was cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of the α-Gal cDNA showed that the mature enzyme consisted of 419 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 46,334 Da. The derived amino acid sequence of the enzyme showed similarity to eukaryotic αGals from plants, animals, yeasts, and filamentous fungi. The highest similarity observed (57% identity) was to Trichoderma reesei AGLI. The cDNA was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the control of the yeast GAL10 promoter. Almost all of the enzyme produced was secreted into the culture medium, and the expression level reached was approximately 0.2 g/liter. The recombinant enzyme purified to homogeneity was highly glycosylated, showed slightly higher specific activity, and exhibited properties almost identical to those of the native enzyme from P. purpurogenum in terms of the N-terminal amino acid sequence, thermoactivity, pH profile, and mode of action on galacto-oligosaccharides. PMID:9797312

  11. Isolation, cDNA cloning, and growth promoting activity of rabbitfish (Siganus guttatus) growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Ayson, F G; de Jesus, E G; Amemiya, Y; Moriyama, S; Hirano, T; Kawauchi, H

    2000-02-01

    We report the isolation, cDNA cloning, and growth promoting activity of rabbitfish (Siganus guttatus; Teleostei; Perciformes; Siganidae) growth hormone (GH). Rabbitfish GH was extracted from pituitary glands under alkaline conditions, fractionated by gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-100, and purified by high-performance liquid chromatography. The fractions containing GH were identified by immunoblotting with bonito GH antiserum. Under nonreducing conditions, the molecular weight of rabbitfish GH is about 19 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE. The purified hormone was potent in promoting growth in rabbitfish fry. Weekly intraperitoneal injections of the hormone significantly accelerated growth. This was evident 3 weeks after the start of the treatment, and its effect was still significant 2 weeks after the treatment was terminated. Rabbitfish GH cDNA was cloned to determine its nucleotide sequence. Excluding the poly (A) tail, rabbitfish GH cDNA is 860 base pairs (bp) long. It contained untranslated regions of 94 and 175 bp in the 5' and 3' ends, respectively. It has an open reading frame of 588 bp coding for a signal peptide of 18 amino acids and a mature protein of 178 amino acid residues. Rabbitfish GH has 4 cysteine residues. On the amino acid level, rabbitfish GH shows high identity (71-74%) with GHs of other perciforms, such as tuna, sea bass, yellow tail, bonito, and tilapia, and less (47-49%) identity with salmonid and carp GHs.

  12. A procedure for selective full length cDNA cloning of specific RNA species.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, A; Cattaneo, R; Billeter, M A

    1987-01-01

    A method allowing routine establishment of full length and functionally competent cDNA clones of particular mRNAs from small preparations of polyadenylated RNA is described. Pairs of synthetic primers are used for first and second strand synthesis. They include sequences complementary to the 3' terminal regions of the mRNAs and of the full length first cDNA strands, respectively and bear a few additional nucleotides at their 5' ends. After synthesis of both cDNA strands in one tube, they are precisely trimmed back with T4 DNA polymerase in presence of only two nucleoside triphosphates, to yield sticky ends fitting into a vector plasmid cleaved with two restriction endonucleases. The procedure was first applied to the simultaneous cloning of all five major measles virus (MV) mRNA species from a persistently infected cell line. Two thirds of all clones contained full length MV-specific cDNAs. Screening of less than 200 clones was sufficient to obtain several independent clones corresponding to each mRNA, except for gene F which was represented only once. Images PMID:2884622

  13. Isolation and characterization of cDNA clones for human erythrocyte. beta. -spectrin

    SciTech Connect

    Prchal, J.T.; Morley, B.J.; Yoon, S.H.; Coetzer, T.L.; Palek, J.; Conboy, J.G.; Kan, Y.W.

    1987-11-01

    Spectrin is an important structural component of the membrane skeleton that underlies and supports the erythrocyte plasma membrane. It is composed of nonidentical ..cap alpha.. (M/sub r/ 240,000) and ..beta.. (M/sub r/ 220,000) subunits, each of which contains multiple homologous 106-amino acid segments. The authors report here the isolation and characterization of a human erythroid-specific ..beta..-spectrin cDNA clone that encodes parts of the ..beta..-9 through ..beta..-12 repeat segments. This cDNA was used as a hybridization probe to assign the ..beta..-spectrin gene to human chromosome 14 and to begin molecular analysis of the gene and its mRNA transcripts. RNA transfer blot analysis showed that the reticulocyte ..beta..-spectrin mRNA is 7.8 kilobases in length. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA revealed the presence of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) within the ..beta..-spectrin gene locus. The isolation of human spectrin cDNA probes and the identification of closely linked RFLPs will facilitate analysis of mutant spectrin genes causing congenital hemolytic anemias associated with quantitative and qualitative spectrin abnormalities.

  14. Molecular cloning and functional identification of a plant ornithine decarboxylase cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Michael, A J; Furze, J M; Rhodes, M J; Burtin, D

    1996-01-01

    A cDNA for a plant ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), a key enzyme in putrescine and polyamine biosynthesis, has been isolated from root cultures of the solanaceous plant Datura stramonium. Reverse transcription-PCR employing degenerate oligonucleotide primers representing conserved motifs from other eukaryotic ODCs was used to isolate the cDNA. The longest open reading frame potentially encodes a peptide of 431 amino acids and exhibits similarity to other eukaryotic ODCs, prokaryotic and eukaryotic arginine decarboxylases (ADCs), prokaryotic meso-diaminopimelate decarboxylases and the product of the tabA gene of Pseudomonas syringae cv. tabaci. Residues involved at the active site of the mouse ODC are conserved in the plant enzyme. The plant ODC does not possess the C-terminal extension found in the mammalian enzyme, implicated in rapid turnover of the protein, suggesting that the plant ODC may have a longer half-life. Expression of the plant ODC in Escherichia coli and demonstration of ODC activity confirmed that the cDNA encodes an active ODC enzyme. This is the first description of the primary structure of a eukaryotic ODC isolated from an organism where the alternative ADC routine to putrescine is present. PMID:8660289

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of potato spindle tuber viroid cDNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Robert A.; Cress, Dean E.

    1980-01-01

    Double-stranded cDNA has been synthesized from a polyadenylylated potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTV) template and inserted in the Pst I endonuclease site of plasmid pBR322 by using the oligo(dC)·oligo(dG)-tailing procedure. Tetracycline-resistant ampicillin-sensitive transformants contained sequences complementary to PSTV [32P]cDNA, and one recombinant clone (pDC-29) contains a 460-base-pair insert. This cloned double-stranded PSTV cDNA contains the cleavage sites for six restriction endonucleases predicted by the published primary sequence of PSTV as well as one additional site each for Ava I, Hae III, Hpa II, and Sma I. The additional Ava I, Hpa II, and Sma I sites are explained by the presence of a second C-C-C-G-G-G sequence in the cloned double-stranded cDNA. The largest fragment released by Hae III digestion contains approximately 360 base pairs. These results suggest that we have cloned almost the entire sequence of PSTV, but the sequence cloned differs slightly from that published. Hybridization probes derived from pDC-29 insert have allowed detection and preliminary characterization of RNA molecules having the same size as PSTV but the opposite polarity. This RNA is present during PSTV replication in infected tomato cells. Images PMID:16592877

  16. Isolation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase cDNA and Basal Regulatory Region from Metroxylon sagu.

    PubMed

    Wee, Ching Ching; Roslan, Hairul Azman

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) is a versatile enzyme involved in many biochemical pathways in plants such as in germination and stress tolerance. Sago palm is plant with much importance to the state of Sarawak as one of the most important crops that bring revenue with the advantage of being able to withstand various biotic and abiotic stresses such as heat, pathogens, and water logging. Here we report the isolation of sago palm Adh cDNA and its putative promoter region via the use of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and genomic walking. The isolated cDNA was characterized and determined to be 1464 bp long encoding for 380 amino acids. BLAST analysis showed that the Adh is similar to the Adh1 group with 91% and 85% homology with Elaeis guineensis and Washingtonia robusta, respectively. The putative basal msAdh1 regulatory region was further determined to contain promoter signals of TATA and AGGA boxes and predicted amino acids analyses showed several Adh-specific motifs such as the two zinc-binding domains that bind to the adenosine ribose of the coenzyme and binding to alcohol substrate. A phylogenetic tree was also constructed using the predicted amino acid showed clear separation of Adh from bacteria and clustered within the plant Adh group.

  17. CTL responses to Leishmania mexicana gp63-cDNA vaccine in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Ali, S A; Rezvan, H; McArdle, S E; Khodadadi, A; Asteal, F A; Rees, R C

    2009-07-01

    Immunity to Leishmania is believed to be strongly dependent upon the activation of Th1 immune responses, although the exact role of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) has not yet been determined. The aims of this study were to establish a suitable cytotoxicity assay to measure CTL activity and to compare immunity induced by Leishmania mexicana gp63 cDNA via i.m. injection and gene gun immunization in the BALB/c mouse model. The CTL activity was evaluated by short-term (51)Cr-release cytotoxicity assays against CT26 tumour cells transfected with L. mexicana gp63 cDNA and dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA) as targets. The results clearly demonstrated that higher protection to L. mexicana infection was induced by gene gun DNA-immunization vs. i.m. injection. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity of splenocytes was observed in mice immunized either with L. mexicana gp63 cDNA or SLA and long-lived CTL activity was observed in immunized and/or re-challenged mice but not naïve mice infected with the parasite.

  18. Discovery of a novel member of the histamine receptor family.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T; Shapiro, D A; George, S R; Setola, V; Lee, D K; Cheng, R; Rauser, L; Lee, S P; Lynch, K R; Roth, B L; O'Dowd, B F

    2001-03-01

    We report the discovery, tissue distribution and pharmacological characterization of a novel receptor, which we have named H4. Like the three histamine receptors reported previously (H1, H2, and H3), the H4 receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor and is most closely related to the H3 receptor, sharing 58% identity in the transmembrane regions. The gene encoding the H4 receptor was discovered initially in a search of the GenBank databases as sequence fragments retrieved in a partially sequenced human genomic contig mapped to chromosome 18. These sequences were used to retrieve a partial cDNA clone and, in combination with genomic fragments, were used to determine the full-length open reading frame of 390 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed a 3.0-kb transcript in rat testis and intestine. Radioligand binding studies indicated that the H4 receptor has a unique pharmacology and binds [(3)H]histamine (K(d) = 44 nM) and [(3)H]pyrilamine (K(d) = 32 nM) and several psychoactive compounds (amitriptyline, chlorpromazine, cyproheptadine, mianserin) with moderate affinity (K(i) range of 33-750 nM). Additionally, histamine induced a rapid internalization of HA-tagged H4 receptors in transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells.

  19. Identification and expression analysis of a full-length cDNA encoding a Kandelia candel tonoplast intrinsic protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Fang, Xiao-Dong; Lin, Qi-Fen; Li, Guan-Yi; Zhao, Wen-Ming

    2003-03-01

    corresponding to the 5' end of this gene was obtained using the GSP2 primer. Two primers that flank the putative open reading frame (ORF) were designed to obtain the cDNA containing the complete ORF by RACE PCR reaction. The full-length cDNA of KCTIP1, containing a 756 bp open reading frame (ORF), was approximately 1.1 kb; the start codon was located at the nucleotides of 99-101 and stop codon at the nucleotides of 855-857 followed by a poly (A) tail. The KCTIP1 cDNA sequence in this research was released in GenBank with accession number AF521135. Using ExPASy Proteomics tools provided by EMBL, the isoelectric point and MWt of KCTIP1 are estimated as 5.77 and 26.3 kD respectively. Transmembrane prediction analysis revealed the deduced KCTIP1 protein sequence contains six transmembrane regions at amino acid residues of 20 - 42, 57 - 79, 86 - 108, 113 - 135, 142 - 164 and 217 - 239. Two highly conserved asparagine-proline-alanine (NPA) motifs were located at 85 - 87 and 199 - 201 amino acid residues respectively. KCTIP1 is also predicted to contain the Cys residue (Cys 118) that are shown to confer Hg-sensitivity in Arabidopsis gamma-TIP and delta-TIP. Similarity analysis showed that KCTIP1 shared 77% - 79% amino acid sequence identity with the TIPs from Vitis berlandieri, Brassica oleracea and Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression analyses indicated that KCTIP1 had different expression among species of Mangroves. Expressions of KCTIP1 in Kandelia candel, Rhizophora apoculata and Ceriops tagal were suppressed by salt, and were insensitive to salt stress in unknown species of Mangroves. Previous studied showed that salt conditions might result in large and rapid changes in extracellular water potential and serious disturbance to the cytoplasm. In order to compensate for this imbalance, the relative contribution of water channels to flow across the root could thus vary. K. candel is a species that is native to intertial zone of tropical and subtropical coast and is well-adapted to salt

  20. Identification and expression analysis of a full-length cDNA encoding a Kandelia candel tonoplast intrinsic protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Fang, Xiao-Dong; Lin, Qi-Fen; Li, Guan-Yi; Zhao, Wen-Ming

    2003-03-01

    corresponding to the 5' end of this gene was obtained using the GSP2 primer. Two primers that flank the putative open reading frame (ORF) were designed to obtain the cDNA containing the complete ORF by RACE PCR reaction. The full-length cDNA of KCTIP1, containing a 756 bp open reading frame (ORF), was approximately 1.1 kb; the start codon was located at the nucleotides of 99-101 and stop codon at the nucleotides of 855-857 followed by a poly (A) tail. The KCTIP1 cDNA sequence in this research was released in GenBank with accession number AF521135. Using ExPASy Proteomics tools provided by EMBL, the isoelectric point and MWt of KCTIP1 are estimated as 5.77 and 26.3 kD respectively. Transmembrane prediction analysis revealed the deduced KCTIP1 protein sequence contains six transmembrane regions at amino acid residues of 20 - 42, 57 - 79, 86 - 108, 113 - 135, 142 - 164 and 217 - 239. Two highly conserved asparagine-proline-alanine (NPA) motifs were located at 85 - 87 and 199 - 201 amino acid residues respectively. KCTIP1 is also predicted to contain the Cys residue (Cys 118) that are shown to confer Hg-sensitivity in Arabidopsis gamma-TIP and delta-TIP. Similarity analysis showed that KCTIP1 shared 77% - 79% amino acid sequence identity with the TIPs from Vitis berlandieri, Brassica oleracea and Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression analyses indicated that KCTIP1 had different expression among species of Mangroves. Expressions of KCTIP1 in Kandelia candel, Rhizophora apoculata and Ceriops tagal were suppressed by salt, and were insensitive to salt stress in unknown species of Mangroves. Previous studied showed that salt conditions might result in large and rapid changes in extracellular water potential and serious disturbance to the cytoplasm. In order to compensate for this imbalance, the relative contribution of water channels to flow across the root could thus vary. K. candel is a species that is native to intertial zone of tropical and subtropical coast and is well-adapted to salt

  1. Modulation of Glucagon Receptor Pharmacology by Receptor Activity-modifying Protein-2 (RAMP2)*

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Cathryn; Lu, Jing; Li, Naichang; Barkan, Kerry; Richards, Gareth O.; Roberts, David J.; Skerry, Timothy M.; Poyner, David; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Dowell, Simon J.; Willars, Gary B.; Ladds, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors play important, opposing roles in regulating blood glucose levels. Consequently, these receptors have been identified as targets for novel diabetes treatments. However, drugs acting at the GLP-1 receptor, although having clinical efficacy, have been associated with severe adverse side-effects, and targeting of the glucagon receptor has yet to be successful. Here we use a combination of yeast reporter assays and mammalian systems to provide a more complete understanding of glucagon receptor signaling, considering the effect of multiple ligands, association with the receptor-interacting protein receptor activity-modifying protein-2 (RAMP2), and the role of individual G protein α-subunits. We demonstrate that RAMP2 alters both ligand selectivity and G protein preference of the glucagon receptor. Importantly, we also uncover novel cross-reactivity of therapeutically used GLP-1 receptor ligands at the glucagon receptor that is abolished by RAMP2 interaction. This study reveals the glucagon receptor as a previously unidentified target for GLP-1 receptor agonists and highlights a role for RAMP2 in regulating its pharmacology. Such previously unrecognized functions of RAMPs highlight the need to consider all receptor-interacting proteins in future drug development. PMID:26198634

  2. Cloning, structure and expression of cDNA for mouse contrapsin and a related protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ohkubo, K; Ogata, S; Misumi, Y; Takami, N; Sinohara, H; Ikehara, Y

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA clone (lambda MC-2) for contrapsin, a serine-proteinase inhibitor, was isolated from a lambda ZAP mouse liver cDNA library. The 1.6 kb cDNA insert of lambda MC-2 contained an open reading frame that encodes a 418-residue polypeptide (46,970 Da), in which a signal peptide of 21 residues was identified by comparison with the N-terminal sequence of the purified protein. The predicted structure (MC-2) also contained other peptide sequences determined by Edman degradation. Four potential sites for N-linked glycosylation were found in the molecule, accounting for the difference in molecular mass between the predicted form and the purified protein (63 kDa). Further screening of the cDNA library with an EcoRI-EcoRI fragment (510 bp) of lambda MC-2 as a probe yielded another cDNA clone (lambda MC-7), which encodes a 418-residue polypeptide (MC-7) with a calculated mass of 47,010 Da. MC-2 showed 83% similarity at the amino acid level to MC-7, in contrast with 44% similarity to alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor. The possible reactive site (P1-P'1) for serine proteinase is suggested to be Lys-Ala for MC-2 and Ser-Arg for MC-7. Northern-blot analysis revealed that both MC-2 and MC-7 mRNAs have the same size of 1.8 kb and are markedly induced in response to acute inflammation. Construction of the expression plasmids pSVMC-2 and pSVMC-7 and their transfection into COS-1 cells demonstrated that pSVMC-2 directs the synthesis of a 63 kDa form whereas pSVMC-7 expresses a 56 kDa form. The difference in molecular mass between the two may be explained by the fact that the MC-7 sequence contains three potential sites for N-glycosylation, one site less than that of MC-2. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2049065

  3. NTMG (N-terminal Truncated Mutants Generator for cDNA): an automatic multiplex PCR assays design for generating various N-terminal truncated cDNA mutants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Fu; Chen, Rung-Ching; Tseng, Lin-Yu; Lin, Elong; Chan, Yung-Kuan; Pan, Ren-Hao

    2007-07-01

    The sequential deletion method is generally used to locate the functional domain of a protein. With this method, in order to find the various N-terminal truncated mutants, researchers have to investigate the ATG-like codons, to design various multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) forward primers and to do several PCR experiments. This web server (N-terminal Truncated Mutants Generator for cDNA) will automatically generate groups of forward PCR primers and the corresponding reverse PCR primers that can be used in a single batch of a multiplex PCR experiment to extract the various N-terminal truncated mutants. This saves much time and money for those who use the sequential deletion method in their research. This server is available at http://oblab.cs.nchu.edu.tw:8080/WebSDL/. PMID:17488836

  4. Thyroid hormone and retinoid X receptor function and expression during sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Manzon, Lori A; Youson, John H; Holzer, Guillaume; Staiano, Leopoldo; Laudet, Vincent; Manzon, Richard G

    2014-08-01

    Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) are members of the ancient class Agnatha and undergo a metamorphosis that transforms blind, sedentary, filter-feeding larvae into free-swimming, parasitic juveniles. Thyroid hormones (THs) appear to be important for lamprey metamorphosis, however, serum TH concentrations are elevated in the larval phase, decline rapidly during early metamorphosis and remain low until metamorphosis is complete; these TH fluctuations are contrary to those of other metamorphosing vertebrates. Moreover, thyroid hormone synthesis inhibitors (goitrogens) induce precocious metamorphosis and exogenous TH treatments disrupt natural metamorphosis in P. marinus. Given that THs exert their effects by binding to TH nuclear receptors (TRs) that often act as heterodimers with retinoid X receptors (RXRs), we cloned and characterized these receptors from P. marinus and examined their expression during metamorphosis. Two TRs (PmTR1 and PmTR2) and three RXRs (PmRXRs) were isolated from P. marinus cDNA. Phylogenetic analyses group the PmTRs together on a branch prior to the gnathostome TRα/β split. The three RXRs also group together, but our data indicated that these transcripts are most likely either allelic variants of the same gene locus, or the products of a lamprey-specific duplication event. Importantly, these P. marinus receptors more closely resemble vertebrate as opposed to invertebrate chordate receptors. Functional analysis revealed that PmTR1 and PmTR2 can activate transcription of TH-responsive genes when treated with nanomolar concentrations of TH and they have distinct pharmacological profiles reminiscent of vertebrate TRβ and TRα, respectively. Also similar to other metamorphosing vertebrates, expression patterns of the PmTRs during lamprey metamorphosis suggest that PmTR1 has a dynamic, tissue-specific expression pattern that correlates with tissue morphogenesis and biochemical changes and PmTR2 has a more uniform expression pattern. This TR

  5. The α6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit of Frankliniella occidentalis is not involved in resistance to spinosad.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wenjie; Liu, Qiulei; Tian, Lixia; Wu, Qingjun; Zhang, Youjun; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Miguel, Keri San; Funderburk, Joe; Scott, Jeffrey G

    2014-05-01

    Insects evolve resistance which constrains the sustainable use of insecticides. Spinosyns, a class of environmentally-friendly macrolide insecticides, is not an exception. The mode of inheritance and the mechanisms of resistance to spinosad (the most common spinosyn insecticide) in Frankliniella occidentalis (Western flower thrips, WFT) were investigated in this study. Resistance (170,000-fold) was autosomal and completely recessive. Recent studies showed that deletion of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α6 subunit gene resulted in strains of Drosophila melanogaster, Plutella xylostella and Bactrocera dorsalis that are resistant to spinosad, indicating that nAChRα6 subunit maybe important for the toxic action of this insecticide. Conversely, a G275E mutation of this subunit in F. occidentalis was recently proposed as the mechanism of resistance to spinosad. We cloned and characterized nAChRα6 from three susceptible and two spinosad resistant strains from China and the USA. The Foα6 cDNA is 1873bp and the open reading frame is 1458bp which encodes 485 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 53.5-kDa, the 5' and 3' UTRs are 121 and 294bp, respectively. There was no difference in the cDNA sequence between the resistant and susceptible thrips, suggesting the G275E mutation does not confer resistance in these populations. Ten isoforms of Foα6, arising from alternative splicing, were isolated and did not differ between the spinosad-susceptible and resistant strains. Quantitative real time PCR analysis showed Foα6 was highly expressed in the first instar larva, pupa and adult, and the expression levels were 3.67, 2.47, 1.38 times that of the second instar larva. The expression level was not significantly different between the susceptible and resistant strains. These results indicate that Foα6 is not involved in resistance to spinosad in F. occidentalis from China and the USA. PMID:24861935

  6. The α6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit of Frankliniella occidentalis is not involved in resistance to spinosad.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wenjie; Liu, Qiulei; Tian, Lixia; Wu, Qingjun; Zhang, Youjun; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Miguel, Keri San; Funderburk, Joe; Scott, Jeffrey G

    2014-05-01

    Insects evolve resistance which constrains the sustainable use of insecticides. Spinosyns, a class of environmentally-friendly macrolide insecticides, is not an exception. The mode of inheritance and the mechanisms of resistance to spinosad (the most common spinosyn insecticide) in Frankliniella occidentalis (Western flower thrips, WFT) were investigated in this study. Resistance (170,000-fold) was autosomal and completely recessive. Recent studies showed that deletion of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α6 subunit gene resulted in strains of Drosophila melanogaster, Plutella xylostella and Bactrocera dorsalis that are resistant to spinosad, indicating that nAChRα6 subunit maybe important for the toxic action of this insecticide. Conversely, a G275E mutation of this subunit in F. occidentalis was recently proposed as the mechanism of resistance to spinosad. We cloned and characterized nAChRα6 from three susceptible and two spinosad resistant strains from China and the USA. The Foα6 cDNA is 1873bp and the open reading frame is 1458bp which encodes 485 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 53.5-kDa, the 5' and 3' UTRs are 121 and 294bp, respectively. There was no difference in the cDNA sequence between the resistant and susceptible thrips, suggesting the G275E mutation does not confer resistance in these populations. Ten isoforms of Foα6, arising from alternative splicing, were isolated and did not differ between the spinosad-susceptible and resistant strains. Quantitative real time PCR analysis showed Foα6 was highly expressed in the first instar larva, pupa and adult, and the expression levels were 3.67, 2.47, 1.38 times that of the second instar larva. The expression level was not significantly different between the susceptible and resistant strains. These results indicate that Foα6 is not involved in resistance to spinosad in F. occidentalis from China and the USA.

  7. Functional domains of the poliovirus receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Satoshi; Ise, Iku; Nomoto, Akio )

    1991-05-15

    A number of mutant cDNAs of the human poliovirus receptor were constructed to identify essential regions of the molecule as the receptor. All mutant cDNAs carrying the sequence coding for the entire N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain (domain I) confer permissiveness for poliovirus to mouse L cells, but a mutant cDNA lacking the sequence for domain I does not. The transformants permissive for poliovirus were able to bind the virus and were also recognized by monoclonal antibody D171, which competes with poliovirus for the cellular receptor. These results strongly suggest that the poliovirus binding site resides in domain I of the receptor. Mutant cDNAs for the sequence encoding the intracellular peptide were also constructed and expressed in mouse L cells. Susceptibility of these cells to poliovirus revealed that the entire putative cytoplasmic domain is not essential for virus infection. Thus, the cytoplasmic domain of the molecule appears not to play a role in the penetration of poliovirus.

  8. Resistance to adenovirally induced hyperleptinemia in rats. Comparison of ventromedial hypothalamic lesions and mutated leptin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, K; Shimabukuro, M; Chen, G; Wang, M Y; Lee, Y; Kalra, P S; Dube, M G; Kalra, S P; Newgard, C B; Unger, R H

    1998-01-01

    Leptin regulates appetite and body weight via hypothalamic targets, but it can act directly on cultured pancreatic islets to regulate their fat metabolism. To obtain in vivo evidence that leptin may act peripherally as well as centrally, we compared the effect of adenovirally induced hyperleptinemia on food intake, body weight, and islet fat content in ventromedial hypothalamic-lesioned (VMHL) rats, sham-lesioned (SL) controls, and Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats in which the leptin receptor is mutated. Infusion with recombinant adenovirus containing the rat leptin cDNA increased plasma leptin by approximately 20 ng/ml in VMHL and ZDF rats but had no effect on their food intake, body weight, or fat tissue weight. Caloric matching of hyperphagic VMHL rats to SL controls did not reduce their resistance to hyperleptinemia. Whereas prediabetic ZDF rats had a fourfold elevation in islet fat, in VMHL rats islet fat was normal and none of them became diabetic. Isolated islets from ZDF rats were completely resistant to the lipopenic action of leptin, while VMHL islets exhibited 50% of the normal response; caloric matching of VMHL rats to SL controls increased leptin responsiveness of their islets to 92% of controls. We conclude that leptin regulation of adipocyte fat requires an intact VMH but that islet fat content is regulated independently of the VMH. PMID:9710441

  9. Rat kidney thromboxane receptor: molecular cloning, signal transduction, and intrarenal expression localization.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, T; Takeuchi, K; Takahashi, N; Tsutsumi, E; Taniyama, Y; Abe, K

    1995-01-01

    Thromboxane (TX) plays important roles in control of renal hemodynamics and water and electrolyte metabolism, and is involved in the pathophysiology of many renal diseases. The aim of the present study is to isolate a rat kidney cDNA encoding functional TX receptor, and to reveal its intrarenal expression localization. A clone (rTXR2) was isolated from a rat kidney cDNA library by a homology screening approach. rTXR2 was shown to encode the amino acid sequence containing seven transmembrane spanning domains representing rat (r) TX receptor. The membrane from COS-7 cells transiently transfected with rTXR2 cDNA was shown to be specifically bound by a thromboxane receptor antagonist, SQ29548. Either in Xenopus oocyte expression or in transfected COS-7 cells, rTX receptor was shown to be linked with Ca2+ messenger system. TX receptor-mediated increase in cytosolic Ca2+ was also observed in cultured glomerular mesangial cells. In situ hybridization showed that rTX receptor mRNA was detected in renal glomeruli, smooth muscle cells in renal arterioles, and transitional cell epithelium of renal pelvis. Reverse transcription linked to PCR applied to microdissected nephron segments indicated the presence of rTX receptor mRNA exclusively in the glomerulus. In conclusion, we have cloned a functional rat kidney TX receptor, which is expressed specifically in renal glomerulus, arterial smooth muscle cells, and transitional cell epithelium of renal pelvis. The present study will provide important insights into the etiology and pathophysiology of renal diseases with relation to TX metabolism. Images PMID:7635958

  10. The nucleotide sequence of the mouse embryonic beta-like y-globin messenger RNA as determined from cloned cDNA.

    PubMed

    Vanin, E F; Farace, M G; Gambari, R; Fantoni, A

    1981-12-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of two cloned cDNAs corresponding to the mRNA of mouse embryonic y2 globin. The combined overlapping sequences span a total of 480 bp, beginning at the codon corresponding to amino acido residue 21 and extending to the AATAAA sequence in the 3' untranslated region. Therefore, when the amino acid sequence encoded by the cDNA is combined with the available amino acid sequence, a complete y2 protein sequence can be obtained. Comparisons, at the nucleotide level, between the known beta- and beta-like globin sequences and the y2 sequence show that the embryonic, fetal-adult duplication occurred approx. 160 million years (MY) ago and that the embryonic-fetal duplication occurred approx. 100 MY ago.

  11. The alpha and beta subunits of phosphorylase kinase are homologous: cDNA cloning and primary structure of the beta subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Kilimann, M W; Zander, N F; Kuhn, C C; Crabb, J W; Meyer, H E; Heilmeyer, L M

    1988-01-01

    We have cloned cDNA molecules encoding the beta subunit of phosphorylase kinase (ATP:phosphorylase-b phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.38) from rabbit fast-twitch skeletal muscle and have determined the complete primary structure of the polypeptide by a combination of peptide and DNA sequencing. In the mature beta subunit, the initial methionine is replaced by an acetyl group. The subunit is composed of 1092 amino acids and has a calculated molecular mass of 125,205 Da. Alignment of its sequence with the alpha subunit of phosphorylase kinase reveals extensive regions of homology, but each molecule also possesses unique sequences. Two of the three phosphorylation sites known for the beta subunit and all seven phosphorylation sites known for the alpha subunit are located in these unique domains. Images PMID:3200826

  12. Characterization of bovine tracheobronchial phenol sulphotransferase cDNA and detection of mRNA regulation by cortisol.

    PubMed Central

    Schauss, S J; Henry, T; Palmatier, R; Halvorson, L; Dannenbring, R; Beckmann, J D

    1995-01-01

    Phenol sulphotransferases esterify both endogenous and foreign hydroxylated aromatic compounds with sulphate. Since these enzymes participate in both hormone and drug metabolism, elucidating their regulation at both the enzymic and molecular levels may provide new understanding in several metabolic pathways. The primary structure of a bovine phenol sulphotransferase has been determined by isolation of the corresponding cDNA. Two partial bovine cDNAs were first isolated by probing a tracheal epithelial cell lambda gt11 cDNA library with a rat phenol sulphotransferase cDNA. These clones provided the sequences of the 5' and 3' ends of the predicted coding region. A contiguous cDNA was subsequently isolated by PCR using 5' and 3' oligonucleotide primers and the cDNA library as the template. The sequence of the resulting approx. 1 kbp cDNA predicted an amino acid sequence that included sequences determined for several tryptic peptides of the purified protein. Antiserum directed to a synthetic N-terminal peptide predicted by the cDNA sequence showed reactivity with the purified enzyme. High-level Trc-promoter-driven expression of the recombinant bovine enzyme was achieved in Escherichia coli. The bovine cDNA was used to determine relative steady-state levels of phenol sulphotransferase transcripts in bovine lung tissues; distal lung parenchymal RNA levels were 6-10-fold greater than those in tracheobronchial epithelium. Using a bronchial epithelial cell culture model, however, cortisol was observed to increase mRNA levels by 5-fold in both a dose- and time-dependent manner; this corresponds to previously reported glucocorticoid stimulation of phenol sulphotransferase activity in this system [Beckmann, Illig and Bartzatt (1994) J. Cell Physiol. 160, 603-610]. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7575456

  13. Complete to Compete: Common College Completion Metrics. Technical Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Ryan; Reindl, Travis; Witham, Keith; Stanley, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Improved college completion rates are critical to the future of the United States, and states must have better data to understand the nature of the challenges they confront or target areas for policy change. The 2010-2011 National Governors Association (NGA) Chair's initiative, "Complete to Compete", recommends that all states collect data from…

  14. Efficient and simpler method to construct normalized cDNA libraries with improved representations of full-length cDNAs

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo Bento; Bonaldo, Maria de Fatima

    1998-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library comprising: (a) constructing a directionally cloned library containing cDNA inserts wherein the insert is capable of being amplified by polymerase chain reaction; (b) converting a double-stranded cDNA library into single-stranded DNA circles; (c) generating single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) by polymerase chain reaction with appropriate primers; (d) hybridizing the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) with the complementary single-stranded nucleic acid molecules generated in step (c) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; and (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded DNA circles from the hybridized DNA circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides a method to normalize a cDNA library wherein the generating of single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) is by excising cDNA inserts from the double-stranded cDNA library; purifying the cDNA inserts from cloning vectors; and digesting the cDNA inserts with an exonuclease. This invention further provides a method to construct a subtractive cDNA library following the steps described above. This invention further provides normalized and/or subtractive cDNA libraries generated by the above methods.

  15. Efficient and simpler method to construct normalized cDNA libraries with improved representations of full-length cDNAs

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Fatima Bonaldo, M. de

    1998-12-08

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library comprising: (a) constructing a directionally cloned library containing cDNA inserts wherein the insert is capable of being amplified by polymerase chain reaction; (b) converting a double-stranded cDNA library into single-stranded DNA circles; (c) generating single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) by polymerase chain reaction with appropriate primers; (d) hybridizing the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) with the complementary single-stranded nucleic acid molecules generated in step (c) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; and (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded DNA circles from the hybridized DNA circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides a method to normalize a cDNA library wherein the generating of single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) is by excising cDNA inserts from the double-stranded cDNA library; purifying the cDNA inserts from cloning vectors; and digesting the cDNA inserts with an exonuclease. This invention further provides a method to construct a subtractive cDNA library following the steps described above. This invention further provides normalized and/or subtractive cDNA libraries generated by the above methods. 25 figs.

  16. Identification of a Cryptic Bacterial Promoter in Mouse (mdr1a) P-Glycoprotein cDNA.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Kristen M; Esposito, Dominic; Moen, Janna K; Hall, Matthew D; Madigan, James P; Shukla, Suneet; Procter, Lauren V; Wall, Vanessa E; Schneider, Thomas D; Pringle, Ian; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Gill, Deborah R; Hyde, Steven C; Gottesman, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    The efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an important mediator of various pharmacokinetic parameters, being expressed at numerous physiological barriers and also in multidrug-resistant cancer cells. Molecular cloning of homologous cDNAs is an important tool for the characterization of functional differences in P-gp between species. However, plasmids containing mouse mdr1a cDNA display significant genetic instability during cloning in bacteria, indicating that mdr1a cDNA may be somehow toxic to bacteria, allowing only clones containing mutations that abrogate this toxicity to survive transformation. We demonstrate here the presence of a cryptic promoter in mouse mdr1a cDNA that causes mouse P-gp expression in bacteria. This expression may account for the observed toxicity of mdr1a DNA to bacteria. Sigma 70 binding site analysis and GFP reporter plasmids were used to identify sequences in the first 321 bps of mdr1a cDNA capable of initiating bacterial protein expression. An mdr1a M107L cDNA containing a single residue mutation at the proposed translational start site was shown to allow sub-cloning of mdr1a in E. coli while retaining transport properties similar to wild-type P-gp. This mutant mdr1a cDNA may prove useful for efficient cloning of mdr1a in E. coli.

  17. Large Scale Full-Length cDNA Sequencing Reveals a Unique Genomic Landscape in a Lepidopteran Model Insect, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Futahashi, Ryo; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Sasanuma, Shun-ichi; Narukawa, Junko; Ajimura, Masahiro; Jouraku, Akiya; Namiki, Nobukazu; Shimomura, Michihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Suzuki, Masataka G; Daimon, Takaaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Noda, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Masahiro; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Arunkumar, Kallare P.; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Goldsmith, Marian R.; Feng, Qili; Xia, Qingyou; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of a complete genomic sequence of silkworm, the model species of Lepidoptera, laid a foundation for its functional genomics. A more complete annotation of the genome will benefit functional and comparative studies and accelerate extensive industrial applications for this insect. To realize these goals, we embarked upon a large-scale full-length cDNA collection from 21 full-length cDNA libraries derived from 14 tissues of the domesticated silkworm and performed full sequencing by primer walking for 11,104 full-length cDNAs. The large average intron size was 1904 bp, resulting from a high accumulation of transposons. Using gene models predicted by GLEAN and published mRNAs, we identified 16,823 gene loci on the silkworm genome assembly. Orthology analysis of 153 species, including 11 insects, revealed that among three Lepidoptera including Monarch and Heliconius butterflies, the 403 largest silkworm-specific genes were composed mainly of protective immunity, hormone-related, and characteristic structural proteins. Analysis of testis-/ovary-specific genes revealed distinctive features of sexual dimorphism, including depletion of ovary-specific genes on the Z chromosome in contrast to an enrichment of testis-specific genes. More than 40% of genes expressed in specific tissues mapped in tissue-specific chromosomal clusters. The newly obtained FL-cDNA sequences enabled us to annotate the genome of this lepidopteran model insect more accurately, enhancing genomic and functional studies of Lepidoptera and comparative analyses with other insect orders, and yielding new insights into the evolution and organization of lepidopteran-specific genes. PMID:23821615

  18. Large scale full-length cDNA sequencing reveals a unique genomic landscape in a lepidopteran model insect, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Futahashi, Ryo; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Sasanuma, Shun-ichi; Narukawa, Junko; Ajimura, Masahiro; Jouraku, Akiya; Namiki, Nobukazu; Shimomura, Michihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Suzuki, Masataka G; Daimon, Takaaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Noda, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Masahiro; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Goldsmith, Marian R; Feng, Qili; Xia, Qingyou; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei

    2013-09-04

    The establishment of a complete genomic sequence of silkworm, the model species of Lepidoptera, laid a foundation for its functional genomics. A more complete annotation of the genome will benefit functional and comparative studies and accelerate extensive industrial applications for this insect. To realize these goals, we embarked upon a large-scale full-length cDNA collection from 21 full-length cDNA libraries derived from 14 tissues of the domesticated silkworm and performed full sequencing by primer walking for 11,104 full-length cDNAs. The large average intron size was 1904 bp, resulting from a high accumulation of transposons. Using gene models predicted by GLEAN and published mRNAs, we identified 16,823 gene loci on the silkworm genome assembly. Orthology analysis of 153 species, including 11 insects, revealed that among three Lepidoptera including Monarch and Heliconius butterflies, the 403 largest silkworm-specific genes were composed mainly of protective immunity, hormone-related, and characteristic structural proteins. Analysis of testis-/ovary-specific genes revealed distinctive features of sexual dimorphism, including depletion of ovary-specific genes on the Z chromosome in contrast to an enrichment of testis-specific genes. More than 40% of genes expressed in specific tissues mapped in tissue-specific chromosomal clusters. The newly obtained FL-cDNA sequences enabled us to annotate the genome of this lepidopteran model insect more accurately, enhancing genomic and functional studies of Lepidoptera and comparative analyses with other insect orders, and yielding new insights into the evolution and organization of lepidopteran-specific genes.

  19. Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors in human disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Brian A; Rott, Alena; Butcher, Eugene C

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of leukocyte attractant ligands and cognate heptahelical receptors specify the systemic recruitment of circulating cells by triggering integrin-dependent adhesion to endothelial cells, supporting extravasation, and directing specific intratissue localization via gradient-driven chemotaxis. Chemoattractant receptors also control leukocyte egress from lymphoid organs and peripheral tissues. In this article, we summarize the fundamental mechanics of leukocyte trafficking, from the evolution of multistep models of leukocyte recruitment and navigation to the regulation of chemoattractant availability and function by atypical heptahelical receptors. To provide a more complete picture of the migratory circuits involved in leukocyte trafficking, we integrate a number of nonchemokine chemoattractant receptors into our discussion. Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors play key roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, allergy, inflammatory disorders, and cancer. We review recent advances in our understanding of chemoattractant receptors in disease pathogenesis, with a focus on genome-wide association studies in humans and the translational implications of mechanistic studies in animal disease models.

  20. High School Completion Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    While Alberta enjoys proven high, world-class results in student achievement, raising high school completion rates is one of the top priorities in improving the provincial education system. The 2011-12 targeted high school completion rate is 82% five years after entering Grade 10--a 2.5% increase from the current average rate of 79.5%. The purpose…

  1. Latino College Completion: North Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  2. Latino College Completion: South Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  3. Latino College Completion: United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  4. Latino College Completion: West Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  5. Latino College Completion: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  6. Latino College Completion: New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  7. Latino College Completion: New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  8. Strictly homogeneous laterally complete modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilin, V. I.; Karimov, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Let A be a laterally complete commutative regular algebra and X be a laterally complete A-module. In this paper we introduce a notion of homogeneous and strictly homogeneous A-modules. It is proved that any homogeneous A-module is strictly homogeneous A-module, if the Boolean algebra of all idempotents in A is multi-σ-finite.

  9. Pure-state informationally complete and 'really' complete measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.

    2004-11-01

    I construct a positive-operator-valued measure (POVM) which has 2d rank-1 elements and which is informationally complete for generic pure states in d dimensions, thus confirming a conjecture made by Flammia, Silberfarb, and Caves (e-print quant-ph/0404137). I show that if a rank-1 POVM is required to be informationally complete for all pure states in d dimensions, it must have at least 3d-2 elements. I also show that, in a POVM which is informationally complete for all pure states in d dimensions, for any vector there must be at least 2d-1 POVM elements which do not annihilate that vector.

  10. The TGA codons are present in the open reading frame of selenoprotein P cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.E.; Lloyd, R.S.; Read, R.; Burk, R.F. )

    1991-03-11

    The TGA codon in DNA has been shown to direct incorporation of selenocysteine into protein. Several proteins from bacteria and animals contain selenocysteine in their primary structures. Each of the cDNA clones of these selenoproteins contains one TGA codon in the open reading frame which corresponds to the selenocysteine in the protein. A cDNA clone for selenoprotein P (SeP), obtained from a {gamma}ZAP rat liver library, was sequenced by the dideoxy termination method. The correct reading frame was determined by comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with the amino acid sequence of several peptides from SeP. Using SeP labelled with {sup 75}Se in vivo, the selenocysteine content of the peptides was verified by the collection of carboxymethylated {sup 77}Se-selenocysteine as it eluted from the amino acid analyzer and determination of the radioactivity contained in the collected samples. Ten TGA codons are present in the open reading frame of the cDNA. Peptide fragmentation studies and the deduced sequence indicate that selenium-rich regions are located close to the carboxy terminus. Nine of the 10 selenocysteines are located in the terminal 26% of the sequence with four in the terminal 15 amino acids. The deduced sequence codes for a protein of 385 amino acids. Cleavage of the signal peptide gives the mature protein with 366 amino acids and a calculated mol wt of 41,052 Da. Searches of PIR and SWISSPROT protein databases revealed no similarity with glutathione peroxidase or other selenoproteins.

  11. Cloning, characterization, and DNA sequence of a human cDNA encoding neuropeptide tyrosine.

    PubMed Central

    Minth, C D; Bloom, S R; Polak, J M; Dixon, J E

    1984-01-01

    In vitro translation of the RNA isolated from a human pheochromocytoma demonstrated that this tumor contained a mRNA encoding a 10.5-kDa protein, which was immunoprecipitated with antiserum raised against porcine neuropeptide Y. Double-stranded cDNA was synthesized from total RNA and inserted into the Pst I site of pUC8. Transformants containing the neuropeptide Y cDNA were identified using the mixed hybridization probe d[A-(A,G)-(A,G)-T-T-(A,G,T)-A-T-(A,G)-T-A-(A,G)-T-G]. The probe sequences were based on the known amino acid sequence, His-Tyr-Ile-Asn-Leu, found in porcine neuropeptide Y. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA was determined and contained 86 and 174 bases in the 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions, respectively. The coding sequence consisted of 291 bases, suggesting a precursor to neuropeptide Y that was 97 amino acids long (10,839 Da). The deduced amino acid sequence of the precursor suggested that there were at least two sites of proteolytic processing, which would generate three peptides having 28 (signal peptide), 36 (human neuropeptide Y), and 30 (COOH-terminal peptide) amino acid residues. A partial NH2-terminal sequence obtained by Edman degradation of the immunoprecipitated in vitro translation product identified the positions of methionine and leucine in the first 30 residues of the prepropeptide. A highly sensitive single-stranded complementary mRNA hybridization probe specific for neuropeptide Y mRNA was prepared using the bacteriophage SP6 promoter. This probe was used to identify a mRNA corresponding to neuropeptide Y of approximately 800 bases. Images PMID:6589611

  12. Hypoxically inducible barley lactate dehydrogenase: cDNA cloning and molecular analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hondred, D. ); Hanson, A.D. Univ. de Montreal, Quebec )

    1990-09-01

    In the roots of barley and other cereals, hypoxia induces a set of five isozymes of L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; (S)-lactate:NADH oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.27). Biochemical and genetic data indicate that the five LDH isozymes are tetramers that arise from random association of the products of two Ldh loci. To investigate this system, cDNA clones of LDH were isolated from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library derived from hypoxically treated barley roots. The library was screened with antiserum raised against barley LDH purified {approx}3,000-fold by an improved three-step procedure. Immunopositive clones were rescreened with a cDNA probe synthesized by the polymerase chain reaction using primers modeled from the amino acid sequences of two tryptic LDH peptides. Two types of LDH clones were found. Nucleotide sequence analysis of one representative insert of each type (respectively, 1,305 and 1,166 base pairs) revealed open reading framed encoding 10 peptide fragments of LDH. The 1,305-base-pair insert included the entire coding region of a 356-residue LDH monomer. The nucleotide sequences of the two LDH cDNAs were 92% identical in the coding region, but highly divergent in the 3{prime} noncoding region, and thus probably correspond to the two postulated Ldh loci. The deduced amino acid sequences of the two barley LDHs were 96% identical to each other and very similar to those from vertebrate and bacterial LDHs. RNA blot hybridization showed a single mRNA band of 1.5 kilobases whose level rose about 8-fold in roots during hypoxic induction, as did the level of translatable LDH message.

  13. Insights into corn genes derived from large-scale cDNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Nickolai N; Brover, Vyacheslav V; Freidin, Stanislav; Troukhan, Maxim E; Tatarinova, Tatiana V; Zhang, Hongyu; Swaller, Timothy J; Lu, Yu-Ping; Bouck, John; Flavell, Richard B; Feldmann, Kenneth A

    2009-01-01

    We present a large portion of the transcriptome of Zea mays, including ESTs representing 484,032 cDNA clones from 53 libraries and 36,565 fully sequenced cDNA clones, out of which 31,552 clones are non-redundant. These and other previously sequenced transcripts have been aligned with available genome sequences and have provided new insights into the characteristics of gene structures and promoters within this major crop species. We found that although the average number of introns per gene is about the same in corn and Arabidopsis, corn genes have more alternatively spliced isoforms. Examination of the nucleotide composition of coding regions reveals that corn genes, as well as genes of other Poaceae (Grass family), can be divided into two classes according to the GC content at the third position in the amino acid encoding codons. Many of the transcripts that have lower GC content at the third position have dicot homologs but the high GC content transcripts tend to be more specific to the grasses. The high GC content class is also enriched with intronless genes. Together this suggests that an identifiable class of genes in plants is associated with the Poaceae divergence. Furthermore, because many of these genes appear to be derived from ancestral genes that do not contain introns, this evolutionary divergence may be the result of horizontal gene transfer from species not only with different codon usage but possibly that did not have introns, perhaps outside of the plant kingdom. By comparing the cDNAs described herein with the non-redundant set of corn mRNAs in GenBank, we estimate that there are about 50,000 different protein coding genes in Zea. All of the sequence data from this study have been submitted to DDBJ/GenBank/EMBL under accession numbers EU940701-EU977132 (FLI cDNA) and FK944382-FL482108 (EST). PMID:18937034

  14. Dissection of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Transcriptome Using Genome-Wide cDNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background The differential pathophysiologic mechanisms that trigger and maintain the two forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are only partially understood. cDNA microarrays can be used to decipher gene regulation events at a genome-wide level and to identify novel unknown genes that might be involved in perpetuating inflammatory disease progression. Methods and Findings High-density cDNA microarrays representing 33,792 UniGene clusters were prepared. Biopsies were taken from the sigmoid colon of normal controls (n = 11), CD patients (n = 10) and UC patients (n = 10). 33P-radiolabeled cDNA from purified poly(A)+ RNA extracted from biopsies (unpooled) was hybridized to the arrays. We identified 500 and 272 transcripts differentially regulated in CD and UC, respectively. Interesting hits were independently verified by real-time PCR in a second sample of 100 individuals, and immunohistochemistry was used for exemplary localization. The main findings point to novel molecules important in abnormal immune regulation and the highly disturbed cell biology of colonic epithelial cells in IBD pathogenesis, e.g., CYLD (cylindromatosis, turban tumor syndrome) and CDH11 (cadherin 11, type 2). By the nature of the array setup, many of the genes identified were to our knowledge previously uncharacterized, and prediction of the putative function of a subsection of these genes indicate that some could be involved in early events in disease pathophysiology. Conclusion A comprehensive set of candidate genes not previously associated with IBD was revealed, which underlines the polygenic and complex nature of the disease. It points out substantial differences in pathophysiology between CD and UC. The multiple unknown genes identified may stimulate new research in the fields of barrier mechanisms and cell signalling in the context of IBD, and ultimately new therapeutic approaches. PMID:16107186

  15. An LRR-only protein representing a new type of pattern recognition receptor in Chlamys farreri.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Lingling; Guo, Ying; Yi, Qilin; Song, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-only proteins could mediate protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions and were involved in the immune response. In the present study, an LRR-only protein (designed as CfLRRop-1) was cloned from Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri. The complete cDNA sequence of CfLRRop-1 contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 1377 bp, which encoded a protein of 458 amino acids. An LRRNT motif, an LRR_7 motif and seven LRR motifs were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of CfLRRop-1. And these seven LRR motifs contained a conserved signature sequence LxxLxLxxNxL. The mRNA transcripts of CfLRRop-1 were constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues, including haemocytes, muscle, mantle, gill, hepatopancreas and gonad, with the highest expression level in hepatopancreas. After the stimulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), glucan (GLU) and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), the mRNA transcripts of CfLRRop-1 in haemocytes all increased firstly within the first 6 h and secondly during 12-24 h post stimulation. The mRNA expression level of CfLRRop-1 was continuously up-regulated, after the expression of CfTLR (previously identified Toll-like receptor in C. farreri) was suppressed via RNA interference (RNAi). The recombinant CfLRRop-1 protein could directly bind LPS, PGN, GLU and poly I:C, and induce the release of TNF-α in mixed primary cultured scallop haemocytes. These results collectively indicated that CfLRRop-1 would function as a powerful pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and play a pivotal role in the immune response of scallops.

  16. Infectious cDNA clones of the DA strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, R P; Stein, S; Ohara, Y; Fu, J L; Semler, B L

    1989-01-01

    The DA strain and other members of the TO subgroup of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis viruses cause a persistent demyelinating infection, whereas the GDVII strain and other GDVII subgroup strains cause an acute lethal polioencephalomyelitis. We generated an infectious DA cDNA clone inserted into a transcription vector. Virus derived from transfection of transcripts produced a demyelinating disease indistinguishable from that of wild-type virus. The infectious clone provides a critical reagent for the production of interstrain recombinant viruses to help identify genetic loci responsible for the biological activities of the strains. Images PMID:2555569

  17. Chimeric cDNA studies of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus neurovirulence.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Senkowski, A; Shim, B; Roos, R P

    1993-01-01

    Strain GDVII and other members of the GDVII subgroup of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus are highly neurovirulent and rapidly fatal, while strain DA and other members of the TO subgroup produce a chronic, demyelinating disease. GDVII/DA chimeric cDNA studies suggest that a major neurovirulence determinant is within the GDVII 1B through 1D capsid protein coding region, although the additional presence of upstream GDVII sequences, including the 5' untranslated region, contributes to full neurovirulence. Our studies indicate that there are limitations in precisely delineating neurovirulence determinants with chimeric cDNAs between evolutionarily diverged viruses, such as GDVII and DA. PMID:8510228

  18. Chimeric cDNA studies of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus neurovirulence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Senkowski, A; Shim, B; Roos, R P

    1993-07-01

    Strain GDVII and other members of the GDVII subgroup of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus are highly neurovirulent and rapidly fatal, while strain DA and other members of the TO subgroup produce a chronic, demyelinating disease. GDVII/DA chimeric cDNA studies suggest that a major neurovirulence determinant is within the GDVII 1B through 1D capsid protein coding region, although the additional presence of upstream GDVII sequences, including the 5' untranslated region, contributes to full neurovirulence. Our studies indicate that there are limitations in precisely delineating neurovirulence determinants with chimeric cDNAs between evolutionarily diverged viruses, such as GDVII and DA.

  19. Horse cDNA clones encoding two MHC class I genes

    SciTech Connect

    Barbis, D.P.; Maher, J.K.; Stanek, J.; Klaunberg, B.A.; Antczak, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    Two full-length clones encoding MHC class I genes were isolated by screening a horse cDNA library, using a probe encoding in human HLA-A2.2Y allele. The library was made in the pcDNA1 vector (Invitrogen, San Diego, CA), using mRNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from a Thoroughbred stallion (No. 0834) homozygous for a common horse MHC haplotype (ELA-A2, -B2, -D2; Antczak et al. 1984; Donaldson et al. 1988). The clones were sequenced, using SP6 and T7 universal primers and horse-specific oligonucleotides designed to extend previously determined sequences.

  20. Barcoded cDNA library preparation for small RNA profiling by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Markus; Renwick, Neil; Farazi, Thalia A; Mihailović, Aleksandra; Pena, John T G; Tuschl, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The characterization of post-transcriptional gene regulation by small regulatory (20-30 nt) RNAs, particularly miRNAs and piRNAs, has become a major focus of research in recent years. A prerequisite for characterizing small RNAs is their identification and quantification across different developmental stages, and in normal and disease tissues, as well as model cell lines. Here we present a step-by-step protocol for generating barcoded small RNA cDNA libraries compatible with Illumina HiSeq sequencing, thereby facilitating miRNA and other small RNA profiling of large sample collections.

  1. Molecular cloning and sequencing of the cDNA of cop1 gene from Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Zhao, L; Wang, C; Zhu, Y; Zhao, J; Wu, X

    1998-02-11

    Cop1 protein plays an important role in seedling development of higher plants. The cDNA of cop1 gene from pea (Pisum sativum) was cloned and sequenced. Cop1 protein of pea is predicted to have 672 amino acids and a molecular mass of 76 kDa. Sequence comparison between Cop1 proteins of pea and Arabidopsis thaliana revealed that the two Cop1 proteins were highly homologous in the regions with functional domains and at the C-terminus. Immunoblotting performed with polyclonal antibodies against recombinant Cop1 of pea showed that Cop1 protein was present in seedlings germinated both in light and darkness.

  2. Cloning and sequencing of Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) interleukin-3 cDNA.

    PubMed

    Thennarasu, S; Harishankar, M; Raj, G Dhinakar

    2012-06-01

    Full-length cDNA (435 bp) of the interleukin-3(IL-3) gene of the Indian water buffalo was amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. This sequence had 96% nucleotide identity and 92% amino acid identity with bovine IL-3. There are 10 amino acid substitutions in buffalo compared with that of bovine. The amino acid sequence of buffalo IL-3 also showed very high identity with that of other ruminants, indicating functional cross-reactivity. Structural homology modelling of buffalo IL-3 protein with human IL-3 showed the presence of five helical structures.

  3. Cloning and sequencing of Indian water buffalo interleukin-18 cDNA.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, P; Bera, B C

    2005-04-01

    Summary Full-length cDNA (582 bp) of the interleukin-18 (IL-18) gene of the Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) was amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence has 99% and 95% similarity with the IL-18 sequences of cattle and sheep, respectively. There are two amino acid substitutions at positions 132 and 182 in buffalo IL-18 compared with that of cattle. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the IL-18 sequence of fish forms a different lineage and is most divergent from that of cattle, buffalo, sheep, pig, dog, horse, human, monkey, mouse, rat and chicken.

  4. A catalog of human cDNA expression clones and its application to structural genomics

    PubMed Central

    Büssow, Konrad; Quedenau, Claudia; Sievert, Volker; Tischer, Janett; Scheich, Christoph; Seitz, Harald; Hieke, Brigitte; Niesen, Frank H; Götz, Frank; Harttig, Ulrich; Lehrach, Hans

    2004-01-01

    We describe here a systematic approach to the identification of human proteins and protein fragments that can be expressed as soluble proteins in Escherichia coli. A cDNA expression library of 10,825 clones was screened by small-scale expression and purification and 2,746 clones were identified. Sequence and protein-expression data were entered into a public database. A set of 163 clones was selected for structural analysis and 17 proteins were prepared for crystallization, leading to three new structures. PMID:15345055

  5. PNRC: a proline-rich nuclear receptor coregulatory protein that modulates transcriptional activation of multiple nuclear receptors including orphan receptors SF1 (steroidogenic factor 1) and ERRalpha1 (estrogen related receptor alpha-1).

    PubMed

    Zhou, D; Quach, K M; Yang, C; Lee, S Y; Pohajdak, B; Chen, S

    2000-07-01

    PNRC (proline-rich nuclear receptor coregulatory protein) was identified using bovine SF1 (steroidogenic factor 1) as the bait in a yeast two-hybrid screening of a human mammary gland cDNA expression library. PNRC is unique in that it has a molecular mass of 35 kDa, significantly smaller than most of the coregulatory proteins reported so far, and it is proline-rich. PNRC's nuclear localization was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses. In the yeast two-hybrid assays, PNRC interacted with the orphan receptors SF1 and ERRalpha1 in a ligand-independent manner. PNRC was also found to interact with the ligand-binding domains of all the nuclear receptors tested including estrogen receptor (ER), androgen receptor (AR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), progesterone receptor (PR), thyroid hormone receptor (TR), retinoic acid receptor (RAR), and retinoid X receptor (RXR) in a ligand-dependent manner. Functional AF2 domain is required for nuclear receptors to bind to PNRC. Furthermore, in vitro glutathione-S-transferase pull-down assay was performed to demonstrate a direct contact between PNRC and nuclear receptors such as SF1. Coimmunoprecipitation experiment using Hela cells that express PNRC and ER was performed to confirm the interaction of PNRC and nuclear receptors in vivo in a ligand-dependent manner. PNRC was found to function as a coactivator to enhance the transcriptional activation mediated by SF1, ERR1 (estrogen related receptor alpha-1), PR, and TR. By examining a series of deletion mutants of PNRC using the yeast two-hybrid assay, a 23-amino acid (aa) sequence in the carboxy-terminal region, aa 278-300, was shown to be critical and sufficient for the interaction with nuclear receptors. This region is proline rich and contains a SH3-binding motif, S-D-P-P-S-P-S. Results from the mutagenesis study demonstrated that the two conserved proline (P) residues in this motif are crucial for PNRC to interact with the nuclear receptors. The exact 23

  6. The mouse Muc5b mucin gene: cDNA and genomic structures, chromosomal localization and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Escande, Fabienne; Porchet, Nicole; Aubert, Jean-Pierre; Buisine, Marie-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    We report here the isolation and characterization of the mouse Muc5b mucin gene (mMuc5b). We determined its complete cDNA sequence, its genomic organization, and chromosomal localization. Moreover, we analyzed the expression of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR and in situ hybridization. The structure of the gene was determined from a genomic cosmid clone that encompasses the entire mMuc5b gene, including the 5'-flanking region. The mMuc5b gene spans approximately 36 kb and contains 49 exons. It is located on mouse distal chromosome 7. mMuc5b encodes at least two transcripts by alternative splicing of the second exon, the longest one being 14.9 kb in length. The deduced peptide contains 4782 amino acids. Its central region can be subdivided into 10 imperfect repeats, each composed of a cysteine-rich domain followed by a threonine, serine, and proline-rich mucin-type domain. It is flanked by cysteine-rich domains similar to cysteine-rich domains of pre-pro-von Willebrand factor. Comparison with its human homologue MUC5B revealed common features including high sequence similarities in the 5' and 3' regions, and the conservation of the genomic organization. In contrast, mMuc5b differs from its human homologue, since no highly tandemly repeated sequences could be identified within its central region. mMuc5b is expressed mainly in laryngeal mucous glands, and at a lesser extend in stomach and duodenum. PMID:11964160

  7. Cancer immunotherapy using novel tumor-associated antigenic peptides identified by genome-wide cDNA microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yasuharu; Tomita, Yusuke; Yuno, Akira; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Masanori

    2015-05-01

    Recent genome-wide cDNA microarray analysis of gene expression profiles in comprehensive tumor types coupled with isolation of cancer tissues by laser-microbeam microdissection have revealed ideal tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) that are frequently overexpressed in various cancers including head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and lung cancer, but not in most normal tissues except for testis, placenta, and fetal organs. Preclinical studies using HLA-transgenic mice and human T cells in vitro showed that TAA-derived CTL-epitope short peptides (SPs) are highly immunogenic and induce HLA-A2 or -A24-restricted CTLs. Based on the accumulated evidence, we carried out a phase II clinical trial of the TAA-SP vaccine in advanced 37 HNSCC patients. This study showed a significant induction of TAA-specific CTLs in the majority of patients without serious adverse effects. Importantly, clinical responses including a complete response were observed in this study. Another phase II clinical trial of therapeutic TAA-SP vaccine, designed to evaluate the ability of prevention of recurrence, is ongoing in HNSCC patients who have received curative operations. Further studies in human preclinical studies and in vivo studies using HLA class I transgenic mice showed TAA-derived long peptides (TAA-LPs) have the capacity to induce not only promiscuous HLA class II-restricted CD4(+) T helper type 1 cells but also tumor-specific CTLs through a cross-presentation mechanism. Moreover, we observed an augmentation of TAA-LP-specific T helper type 1 cell responses and tumor antigen-spreading in HNSCC patients vaccinated with TAA-SPs. This accumulated evidence suggests that therapeutic TAA-SPs and LPs vaccines may provide a promising cancer immunotherapy.

  8. [Biological review of completed suicide].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ikuo; Sora, Ichiro; Hishimoto, Akitoyo

    2016-06-01

    Family, twin and adoption studies have revealed genetic factors involved in suicide, while the accumulation of stress and mental illnesses are major contributing factors of suicide. Since higher lethality of suicidal behavior is considered to increase familial liability to suicidal behavior, we believe biological research of completed suicide is most important for a better understanding of the pathophysiology in suicide. Dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has gained a special interest in the neurobiology of suicide, mostly because of the findings using a dexamethasone suppression test (DST), in which DST non-suppressors show a nearly 10-fold higher risk of completed suicide than DST suppressors in a depressed cohort. Other data mainly from postmortem brain studies indicate abnormalities of the noradrenergic-locus coeruleus system, serotonergic system, endogenous opioid system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, inflammatory cytokines and omega-3 fatty acid in completed suicide. However, genetic research of complete suicide is behind other mental problems because it is extremely difficult to obtain tissue samples of completed suicide. Under the difficult situation, we now retain over 800 blood samples of suicide completers thanks to bereaved families' cooperation. We are actively working on the research of suicide, for instance, by performing a GWAS using 500 samples of suicide completers.

  9. [Biological review of completed suicide].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ikuo; Sora, Ichiro; Hishimoto, Akitoyo

    2016-06-01

    Family, twin and adoption studies have revealed genetic factors involved in suicide, while the accumulation of stress and mental illnesses are major contributing factors of suicide. Since higher lethality of suicidal behavior is considered to increase familial liability to suicidal behavior, we believe biological research of completed suicide is most important for a better understanding of the pathophysiology in suicide. Dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has gained a special interest in the neurobiology of suicide, mostly because of the findings using a dexamethasone suppression test (DST), in which DST non-suppressors show a nearly 10-fold higher risk of completed suicide than DST suppressors in a depressed cohort. Other data mainly from postmortem brain studies indicate abnormalities of the noradrenergic-locus coeruleus system, serotonergic system, endogenous opioid system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, inflammatory cytokines and omega-3 fatty acid in completed suicide. However, genetic research of complete suicide is behind other mental problems because it is extremely difficult to obtain tissue samples of completed suicide. Under the difficult situation, we now retain over 800 blood samples of suicide completers thanks to bereaved families' cooperation. We are actively working on the research of suicide, for instance, by performing a GWAS using 500 samples of suicide completers. PMID:27506081

  10. Complete hamster CAD protein and the carbamylphosphate synthetase domain of CAD complement mammalian cell mutants defective in de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Musmanno, L A; Jamison, R S; Barnett, R S; Buford, E; Davidson, J N

    1992-07-01

    The mammalian CAD gene codes for a 240-kDa multifunctional protein that catalyzes the first three steps of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Previously, the longest cDNA construct available was missing approximately 500 bp of coding sequence at the 5' end, thereby lacking the sequence to encode the entire carbamylphosphate synthetase (CPSase) domain. Here, a complete CAD hamster cDNA is constructed, placed into a mammalian expression vector, and transfected into hamster cells deficient in CAD. Transfectants show coordinately restored levels of all three enzyme activities and the presence of full-length CAD protein. A derivative construct of the CAD cDNA was generated that should encode only the CPSase domain. When transfected into mammalian cells, a protein was synthesized that had significant CPSase activity both in vivo and in vitro. The two constructs generated in this study will facilitate the study of CAD structure, function, and allosteric regulation. PMID:1359654

  11. Selective modulation of wild type receptor functions by mutants of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Le Gouill, C; Parent, J L; Caron, C A; Gaudreau, R; Volkov, L; Rola-Pleszczynski, M; Stanková, J

    1999-04-30

    Members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family are involved in most aspects of higher eukaryote biology, and mutations in their coding sequence have been linked to several diseases. In the present study, we report that mutant GPCR can affect the functional properties of the co-expressed wild type (WT) receptor. Mutants of the human platelet-activating factor receptor that fail to show any detectable ligand binding (N285I and K298stop) or coupling to a G-protein (D63N, D289A, and Y293A) were co-expressed with the WT receptor in Chinese hamster ovary and COS-7 cells. In this context, N285I and K298stop mutant receptors inhibited 3H-WEB2086 binding and surface expression. Co-transfection with D63N resulted in a constitutively active receptor phenotype. Platelet-activating factor-induced inositol phosphate production in cells transfected with a 1:1 ratio of WT:D63N was higher than with the WT cDNA alone but was abolished with a 1:3 ratio. We confirmed that these findings could be extended to other GPCRs by showing that co-expression of the WT C-C chemokine receptor 2b with a carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant (K311stop), resulted in a decreased affinity and responsiveness to MCP-1. A better understanding of this phenomenon could lead to important tools for the prevention or treatment of certain diseases. PMID:10212233

  12. Genotype imputation via matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Chi, Eric C; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  13. Is complete seizure control imperative?

    PubMed

    Andermann, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    Is complete control imperative? The answer depends on whether complete control is indeed possible, on the possibility of achieving modifications of lifestyle, and on the type of epilepsy, with particular reference to the presence of progressive dysfunction. This may be seen in patients with temporal lobe or other forms of focal epilepsy, in the epileptic encephalopathies such as West and Lennox Gastaut Syndromes and even in some patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Progressive memory changes and global cognitive problems are examples. Progressive language deterioration, secondary epileptogenesis and phenomena analogous to kindling are also important issues. How long treatment should be continued depends on many factors, not least the preference of the patient and of the family. Weighing the benefits of complete control versus the side effects and risks of medication or surgery is crucial. There are obvious benefits to complete control; it is imperative if these benefits are greater than the cost.

  14. JWST Primary Mirror Installation Complete

    NASA Video Gallery

    Completing the assembly of the primary mirror, which took place at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is a significant milestone and the culmination of over a decade of desi...

  15. Is complete seizure control imperative?

    PubMed

    Andermann, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    Is complete control imperative? The answer depends on whether complete control is indeed possible, on the possibility of achieving modifications of lifestyle, and on the type of epilepsy, with particular reference to the presence of progressive dysfunction. This may be seen in patients with temporal lobe or other forms of focal epilepsy, in the epileptic encephalopathies such as West and Lennox Gastaut Syndromes and even in some patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Progressive memory changes and global cognitive problems are examples. Progressive language deterioration, secondary epileptogenesis and phenomena analogous to kindling are also important issues. How long treatment should be continued depends on many factors, not least the preference of the patient and of the family. Weighing the benefits of complete control versus the side effects and risks of medication or surgery is crucial. There are obvious benefits to complete control; it is imperative if these benefits are greater than the cost. PMID:12143366

  16. Complete Blood Count (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... Metabolic Panel (BMP) Blood Test: Hemoglobin Basic Blood Chemistry Tests Word! Complete Blood Count (CBC) Medical Tests ...

  17. Potentiation of the ionotropic GABA receptor response by whiskey fragrance.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2002-11-01

    It is well-known that the target of most mood-defining compounds is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activity in the human brain. To study the effects of whiskey fragrance on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting rat whole brain mRNA or cRNA prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors. Most whiskey components such as phenol, ethoxy, and lactone derivatives potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors, especially ethyl phenylpropanoate (EPP), which strongly potentiated the response. When this compound was applied to mice through respiration, the convulsions induced by pentetrazole were delayed, suggesting that EPP was absorbed by the brain, where it could potentiate the GABA(A) receptor responses. The extract of other alcoholic drinks such as wine, sake, brandy, and shochu also potentiated the responses to varying degrees. Although these fragrant components are present in alcoholic drinks at low concentrations (extremely small quantities compared with ethanol), they may also modulate the mood or consciousness of the human through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic fragrant compounds are easily absorbed into the brain through the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response.

  18. Potentiation of the ionotropic GABA receptor response by whiskey fragrance.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2002-11-01

    It is well-known that the target of most mood-defining compounds is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activity in the human brain. To study the effects of whiskey fragrance on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting rat whole brain mRNA or cRNA prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors. Most whiskey components such as phenol, ethoxy, and lactone derivatives potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors, especially ethyl phenylpropanoate (EPP), which strongly potentiated the response. When this compound was applied to mice through respiration, the convulsions induced by pentetrazole were delayed, suggesting that EPP was absorbed by the brain, where it could potentiate the GABA(A) receptor responses. The extract of other alcoholic drinks such as wine, sake, brandy, and shochu also potentiated the responses to varying degrees. Although these fragrant components are present in alcoholic drinks at low concentrations (extremely small quantities compared with ethanol), they may also modulate the mood or consciousness of the human through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic fragrant compounds are easily absorbed into the brain through the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. PMID:12405783

  19. Structural features of cartilage matrix protein deduced from cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Argraves, W S; Deák, F; Sparks, K J; Kiss, I; Goetinck, P F

    1987-01-01

    cDNAs encoding the Mr 54,000 chicken cartilage matrix protein (CMP) were selected from a cartilage cDNA expression library by immunological means. Antibodies elicited against insert-encoded protein purified from one of the clones reacted specifically with chicken CMP in immunoblots of total cartilage extract, providing positive identification of the cDNA clones isolated. The cDNAs detect a 3.4-kilobase transcript that was present in sternal cartilage and in cartilaginous but not in precartilaginous embryonic limb tissues. The cDNAs code for 416 amino acids of the chicken CMP, including its COOH terminus. There are two striking features in the deduced CMP amino acid sequence: first, it contains a region with significant homologies to repeat sequences in the precursor for epidermal growth factor; and second, it is made up of two large homologous repeat sequences. These results provide the first detailed structural information on the CMP and establish it as a developmentally regulated marker of cartilage differentiation. Images PMID:3025875

  20. cDNA cloning of the Octopus dofleini hemocyanin: sequence of the carboxyl-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Lang, W H

    1988-09-20

    A cDNA library was constructed in pUC 19, using poly(A+) RNA purified from Octopus dofleini branchial gland, which is the site of hemocyanin biosynthesis in cephalopods. The library was screened with an oligonucleotide probe derived from a portion of the partially known sequence of the C-terminal domain of Paroctopus dofleini dofleini. The clone with the longest insert--called pHC1--was sequenced and used as a probe for Northern blotting. It hybridized to a 9.5-kb RNA species, which was also visible as a band after ethidium bromide staining. The cDNA insert (approximately 1200 bp) of pHC1 contained an open reading frame of 1071 bp coding for 357 amino acids. In this insert, a region coding for 42 amino acids from the N-terminal end of the C-terminal domain is missing. These were obtained by sequencing a cloned primer extension product. By comparing our sequence with Helix pomatia beta c-hemocyanin unit D, we found 42.9% identical and 11.5% similar residues. One putative copper binding site (site B) was identified by homology to Helix hemocyanin and arthropodan hemocyanin. The location of a second possible site was identified. PMID:3207675

  1. Cloning of habutobin cDNA and antithrombotic activity of recombinant protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sunagawa, Masanori Nakamura, Mariko; Kosugi, Tadayoshi

    2007-11-03

    The habutobin cDNA was cloned from total RNA extracted from venom glands of Trimeresurus flavoviridis (the habu snake). The conceptual translation of 1539 bp of habutobin cDNA consists of 236 amino acids and its molecular weight is 25.7 kDa. Histidine (His)-tagged recombinant habutobin fusion protein, pET-r-habutobin and AcNPV-r-habutobin, was purified by bacterial system and baculoviral system, respectively. After refolding pET-r-habutobin, there were two protein bands at about 32 kDa and 65 kDa, indicating that habutobin might be produced as a monomer protein and processed to form two concatenated protein. Purified AcNPV-r-habutobin dose-dependently increased fibrin forming activity and inhibited collagen-induced aggregation of rabbit washed platelets. Thus, AcNPV-r-habutobin produced by baculoviral system is very useful for study on structure-function relationship, which is necessary for developing an antithrombotic drug from habutobin.

  2. Construction and characterization of a normalized cDNA library of Nannochloropsis oculata (Eustigmatophyceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianzhong; Ma, Xiaolei; Pan, Kehou; Yang, Guanpin; Yu, Wengong

    2010-07-01

    We constructed and characterized a normalized cDNA library of Nannochloropsis oculata CS-179, and obtained 905 nonredundant sequences (NRSs) ranging from 431-1 756 bp in length. Among them, 496 were very similar to nonredundant ones in the GenBank ( E ≤1.0e-05), and 349 ESTs had significant hits with the clusters of eukaryotic orthologous groups (KOG). Bases G and/or C at the third position of codons of 14 amino acid residues suggested a strong bias in the conserved domain of 362 NRSs (>60%). We also identified the unigenes encoding phosphorus and nitrogen transporters, suggesting that N. oculata could efficiently transport and metabolize phosphorus and nitrogen, and recognized the unigenes that involved in biosynthesis and storage of both fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which will facilitate the demonstration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) biosynthesis pathway of N. oculata. In comparison with the original cDNA library, the normalized library significantly increased the efficiencies of random sequencing and rarely expressed genes discovering, and decreased the frequency of abundant gene sequences.

  3. Purification, characterisation and cDNA cloning of an antimicrobial peptide from Macadamia integrifolia.

    PubMed

    Marcus, J P; Goulter, K C; Green, J L; Harrison, S J; Manners, J M

    1997-03-15

    An antimicrobial peptide with no significant amino acid sequence similarity to previously described peptides has been isolated from the nut kernels of Macadcamia integrifolia. The peptide, termed MiAMP1, is highly basic with an estimated pI of 10.1, a mass of 8.1 kDa and contains 76 amino acids including 6 cysteine residues. A cDNA clone containing the entire coding region corresponding to the peptide was obtained. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA indicated a 26-amino-acid signal peptide at the N-terminus of the preprotein. Purified MiAMP1 inhibited the growth of a variety of fungal, oomycete and gram-positive bacterial phytopathogens in vitro. Some pathogens exhibited close to 100% inhibition in less than 1 microM peptide (5 microg/ml). Antimicrobial activity was diminished against most, but not all, microbes in the presence of calcium and potassium chloride salts (1 mM and 50 mM, respectively). MiAMP1 was active against bakers yeast, was inactive against Escherichia coli and was non-toxic to plant and mammalian cells. Analysis of genomic DNA indicated that MiAMP1 was encoded on a single copy gene containing no introns. The MiAMP1 gene may prove useful in genetic manipulations to increase disease resistance in transgenic plants.

  4. Characterization and cDNA cloning of aminopeptidase A from the venom of Gloydius blomhoffi brevicaudus.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yuko; Murayama, Nobuhiro; Fujita, Yoshiaki; Yanoshita, Ryohei

    2007-06-15

    The aminopeptidase activities of snake venoms from Gloydius blomhoffi brevicaudus, Gloydius halys blomhoffii, Trimeresurus flavoviridis, Bothrops jararaca and Crotalus atrox were investigated. Aminopeptidase A (APA), aminopeptidase B and aminopeptidase N activities were present in all snake venoms. The strongest APA activity was found in venom from G. blomhoffi brevicaudus. The susceptibility to metallopeptidase inhibitors and the pH optimum of the partially purified enzyme from G. blomhoffi brevicaudus venom were similar to those of known APAs from mammals. A G. blomhoffi brevicaudus venom gland cDNA library was screened to isolate cDNA clones using probes based on highly conserved amino acid sequences in known APAs. Molecular cloning of APA from G. blomhoffi brevicaudus venom predicted that it was a type II integral membrane protein containing 958 amino acid residues with 17 potential N-linked glycosylation sites. It possessed a His-Glu-Xaa-Xaa-His-(Xaa)(18)-Glu zinc binding motif that allowed the classification of this protein as a member of the M1 family of zinc-metallopeptidases, or gluzincins. The deduced amino acid sequence shows approximately 60% sequence identity to mammalian APA sequences. This is the first study to report the primary structure of APA from a reptile. PMID:17383704

  5. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding the human Sm-D autoantigen

    SciTech Connect

    Rokeach, L.A.; Haselby, J.A.; Hoch, S.O. )

    1988-07-01

    Antibodies to the Sm-D polypeptide antigen are closely associated with the rheumatic disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Sm-D exists in the cell as one of the core proteins of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes implicated in RNA processing. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone, D45-2, coding for the Sm-D human nuclear antigen by screening a human B-lymphocyte cDNA library with synthetic oligonucleotide probes. The 1633-base-pair clone contains an open reading frame (ORF) 357 nucleotides long, capable of encoding a 13,282-dalton polypeptide. The Sm-D coding region is initiated at an AUG codon downstream from a sequence with excellent match to the consensus for the eukaryotic ribosome-binding site. The Sm-D ORF is preceded by a 150-nucleotide-long untranslated leader and followed by a 1126-nucleotide-long untranslated region containing four putative poly(A) signals. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals a (Gly-Arg){sub 9} repeated motif at the C terminus, which may constitute one of the Sm-D immunoreactive determinants. Moreover, this C terminus shows interesting features: (i) a good homology to protamines as expected for a nucleic acid binding protein and (ii) a striking similarity to a region in the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen.

  6. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the alpha-galactosidase cDNA from Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (guar).

    PubMed

    Overbeeke, N; Fellinger, A J; Toonen, M Y; van Wassenaar, D; Verrips, C T

    1989-11-01

    Polyadenylated mRNA was purified from the aleurone cells of Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (guar) seeds germinated for 18 h and used for the construction of a cDNA library. Clones with the alpha-galactosidase encoding gene were identified using oligo-nucleotide mixed probes based on the NH2 terminal amino acid sequence and on the sequence of an internal peptide. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA clone showed that the enzyme is synthesized as a precursor with a 47 amino acid NH2 terminal extension. This pre-sequence most likely functions to target the protein outside the aleurone cells into the endosperm. Based upon structural features, it is proposed to divide the precursor into a pre-(signal sequence) part and a glycosylated pro-part comparable with those of the yeast mat A/alpha factor and killer factor. A comparison of the derived amino acid sequence of this alpha-galactosidase from plant origin revealed significant stretches of homology with respect to the amino acid sequences of the enzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and from human origin but only to a minor extent compared with the alpha-galactosidase from Escherichia coli.

  7. Human cDNA clones that modify radiomimetic sensitivity of Ataxia-telangiectasia (Group A) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ziv, Y.; Bar-Shira, A.; Sartiel, A.

    1995-03-01

    Genes responsible for genetic diseases with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents can be identified using complementation cloning. This strategy is based on in vitro complementation of the cellular sensitivity by gene transfer. Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a multisystem autosomal recessive disorder involving cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation and radiomimetic drugs. A-T is genetically heterogeneous, with four complementation groups. We attempted to identify cDNA clones that modify the radiomimetic sensitivity of A-T cells assigned to complementation group [A-T(A)]. The cells were transfected with human cDNA libraries clones in episomal vectors, and various protocols by radiomimetic selection were applied. Thirteen cDNAs rescued from survivor cells were found to confer various degrees of radiomimetic resistance to A-T(A) cells upon repeated introduction, and one of them also partially influenced another feature of the A-T phenotype, radioresistant DNA synthesis. None of the clones mapped to the A-T locus on chromosome 11q22-23. Nine of the clones were derived from known genes, some of which are involved in cellular stress responses. We concluded that a number of different genes, not necessarily associated with A-T, can influence the response of A-T cells to radiomimetic drugs, and hence the complementation cloning approach may be less applicable to A-T than to other diseases involving abnormal processing of DNA damage. 57 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Murine muscle-specific enolase: cDNA cloning, sequence, and developmental expression.

    PubMed Central

    Lamandé, N; Mazo, A M; Lucas, M; Montarras, D; Pinset, C; Gros, F; Legault-Demare, L; Lazar, M

    1989-01-01

    In vertebrates, the glycolytic enzyme enolase (EC 4.2.1.11) is present as homodimers and heterodimers formed from three distinct subunits of identical molecular weight, alpha, beta, and gamma. We report the cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the beta subunit of murine muscle-specific enolase. The corresponding amino acid sequence shows greater than 80% homology with the beta subunit from chicken obtained by protein sequencing and with alpha and gamma subunits from rat and mouse deduced from cloned cDNAs. In contrast, there is no homology between the 3' untranslated regions of mouse alpha, beta, and gamma enolase mRNAs, which also differ greatly in length. The short 3' untranslated region of beta enolase mRNA accounts for its distinct length, 1600 bases. It is known that a progressive transition from alpha alpha to beta beta enolase occurs in developing skeletal muscle. We show that this transition mainly results from a differential regulation of alpha and beta mRNA levels. Analysis of myogenic cell lines shows that beta enolase gene is expressed at the myoblast stage. Moreover, transfection of premyogenic C3H10T1/2 cells with MyoD1 cDNA shows that the initial expression of beta transcripts occurs during the very first steps of the myogenic pathway, suggesting that it could be a marker event of myogenic lineage determination. Images PMID:2734297

  9. Transcriptome profiling of Lilium longiflorum generative cells by cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L

    2007-07-01

    The generative cell, which is produced by asymmetric division of the unicellular microspore, undergoes further mitotic division to produce two sperm cells that take part in double fertilization. Expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of Lilium longiflorum (lily) generative cell cDNA library has shown that a diverse complement of genes is transcribed in these cells. Here we address the cell specificity of genes expressed in lily generative cell by using spotted cDNA microarray. Microarray slides were hybridized with labeled probes prepared from transcripts originating from generative cells and other tissues (mature pollen, uninucleate microspore, ovary, root tip, and shoot). The hierarchical clustering revealed that 356 of 430 gene transcripts (83%) of generative-cell genes were up regulated in generative cells. Thirty-eight percent of generative-cell-enriched transcripts were assigned their putative functions, with an abundance of genes involved in protein destination and signal transduction. These results suggest that the expression of a subset of flowering plant genes is tightly controlled and up-regulated in generative cells in order to implement their specialized function. These data thus represent a significant increase in the genes identified as being up-regulated in generative cells and would allow functional analysis of a large number of flowering plant male gamete expressed genes. PMID:17245599

  10. Establishment and characterization of a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T S; Xia, Y H

    2016-06-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease among swine that has an important economic impact worldwide. There are two important CSFV strains in China, Shimen and hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV). Shimen strain is highly virulent while HCLV, also referred to as C-strain, is a live attenuated vaccine strain considered to be one of the most effective and safest live vaccines. In this study, a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of CSFV named pT7SM-c was engineered by replacing the E(rns) genomic region of an infectious clone of CSFV Shimen strain, pT7SM, with the same region obtained from HCLV. RNA transcripts of pT7SM-c containing an engineered EcoRI site that served as a genetic marker were directly infectious in PK15 cells. The rescued virus vT7SM-c showed similar growth kinetics and cytopathic effect with the parental virus vT7SM in the cells. The chimeric infectious cDNA clone can be used as a practical tool for further studying of the virulence, protein function and pathogenesis of CSFV through genetic manipulation.

  11. Isolation and expression of cDNA clones encoding mammalian poly(A) polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Wahle, E; Martin, G; Schiltz, E; Keller, W

    1991-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding mammalian poly(A) polymerase were isolated with probes generated by the polymerase chain reaction based on amino acid sequences derived from the purified enzyme. A bovine cDNA clone was obtained encoding a protein of 82 kDa. Expression in Escherichia coli resulted in the appearance of a poly(A) polymerase activity that was dependent on the addition of the purified specificity factor CPF and the presence of the polyadenylation signal AAUAAA in the RNA substrate. The activity copurified with a polypeptide of the expected size. A second class of cDNAs encoded a polypeptide of 43 kDa which was closely related to the N-terminal half of the 82 kDa protein. Northern blots showed two mRNAs of 4.2 and 2.4 kb that probably correspond to the two classes of cDNAs, as well as a third band of 1.3 kb. The sequence of the N-terminal half of bovine poly(A) polymerase is 47% identical with the amino acid sequence of the corresponding part of yeast poly(A) polymerase. Homologies to other proteins are of uncertain significance. Images PMID:1756732

  12. Discovery of Phytophthora infestans Genes Expressed in Planta through Mining of cDNA Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Diego; Pinzón, Andrés; Grajales, Alejandro; Rojas, Alejandro; Mutis, Gabriel; Cárdenas, Martha; Burbano, Daniel; Jiménez, Pedro; Bernal, Adriana; Restrepo, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    Background Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary causes late blight of potato and tomato, and has a broad host range within the Solanaceae family. Most studies of the Phytophthora – Solanum pathosystem have focused on gene expression in the host and have not analyzed pathogen gene expression in planta. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe in detail an in silico approach to mine ESTs from inoculated host plants deposited in a database in order to identify particular pathogen sequences associated with disease. We identified candidate effector genes through mining of 22,795 ESTs corresponding to P. infestans cDNA libraries in compatible and incompatible interactions with hosts from the Solanaceae family. Conclusions/Significance We annotated genes of P. infestans expressed in planta associated with late blight using different approaches and assigned putative functions to 373 out of the 501 sequences found in the P. infestans genome draft, including putative secreted proteins, domains associated with pathogenicity and poorly characterized proteins ideal for further experimental studies. Our study provides a methodology for analyzing cDNA libraries and provides an understanding of the plant – oomycete pathosystems that is independent of the host, condition, or type of sample by identifying genes of the pathogen expressed in planta. PMID:20352100

  13. Cloning and expression of squalene synthase cDNA from hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Yoon, Yong-Hwi; Kim, Hak-Yoon; Shin, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Dal-Ung; Lee, In-Jung; Kim, Kil-Ung

    2002-06-30

    We isolated and artificially expressed a cDNA clone of the Capsicum annuum squalene synthase (CASS) gene to elucidate the pattern of alternatively regulated two-branch point enzymes. The 1,674-bp CASS cDNA contained an open reading frame of 411 amino acids, yielding a predicted molecular mass of about 45 kDa. A deduced amino acid sequence comparison to other squalene syntheses showed identities with Nicotiana tabacum (91%), Nicotiana benthamiana (90%), Arabidopsis thaliana (79%), and rats (40%). The artificially expressed soluble form of the CASS enzyme was identified by the enzyme activity that converted FPP to squalene and by SDS-PAGE. A Southern blot analysis indicated that at least two copies of the squalene synthase gene exist in the hot pepper genome. In hot pepper, the regulation of the branch point enzymes, squalene synthase and sesquiterpene cyclase was investigated in the UV-challenged leaves of Capsicum annuum. The transcript level and enzyme activity of the CASS were slightly reduced by UV. However, those of the CASC were rapidly induced within 24 h and slowly decreased thereafter. PMID:12132584

  14. Construction and biological activities of the first infectious cDNA clones of the genus Foveavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Baozhong; Venkataraman, Srividhya; Li, Caihong; Wang, Weizhou; Dayan-Glick, Cathy; Mawassi, Munir

    2013-01-20

    Grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus (GRSPaV, genus Foveavirus, family Betaflexiviridae) is one of the most prevalent viruses in grapevines and is associated with three distinct diseases: rupestris stem pitting, vein necrosis and Syrah decline. Little is known about the biology and pathological properties of GRSPaV. In this work, we engineered a full-length infectious cDNA clone for GRSPaV and a GFP-tagged variant, both under the transcriptional control of Cauliflower mosaic virus 35 S promoter. We demonstrated that these cDNA clones were infectious in grapevines and Nicotiana benthamiana through fluorescence microscopy, RT-PCR, Western blotting and immuno electron microscopy. Interestingly, GRSPaV does not cause systemic infection in four of the most commonly used herbaceous plants, even in the presence of the movement proteins of two other viruses which are known to complement numerous movement-defective viruses. These infectious clones are the first of members of Foveavirus which would allow further investigations into mechanisms governing different aspects of replication for GRSPaV and perhaps related viruses.

  15. Isolation and characterization of cDNA clones encoding jacalin isolectins.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Czapla, T H

    1993-03-15

    Four jacalin cDNA clones (pSKcJA1, pSKcJA3, pSKcJA15, and pSKcJA17) have been obtained from an Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit) seed cDNA library. These clones share over 94% sequence homology, and their deduced polypeptide sequences confirm the existence of multiple jacalin isolectins in jackfruit seeds. The deduced amino acid sequences show that jacalin appears to be initially synthesized as a prepropeptide with the following structure: N-signal (21 residues)-->propeptide (39 residues)-->beta-peptide (20 residues)-->linker region (4 residues)-->alpha-peptide (133 residues). These observations are supported by Western blot analysis of jackfruit seed extract and by immunoprecipitation of in vitro translated products of both pSKcJA3 transcript and jackfruit seed poly(A)+ RNA. Sequence analysis of the 39-residue propeptide reveals that it has the potential to facilitate proper folding of jacalin protein. The unusual primary structure of jacalin prepropeptide suggests a quite interesting processing of this lectin precursor into mature alpha- and beta-subunits.

  16. A Potato cDNA Encoding a Homologue of Mammalian Multidrug Resistant P-Glycoprotein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A homologue of the multidrug resistance (MDR) gene was obtained while screening a potato stolon tip cDNA expression library with S-15-labeled calmodulin. The mammalian MDR gene codes for a membrane-bound P-glycoprotein (170-180 kDa) which imparts multidrug resistance to cancerous cells. The potato cDNA (PMDR1) codes for a polypeptide of 1313 amino acid residues (ca. 144 kDa) and its structural features are very similar to the MDR P-glycoprotein. The N-terminal half of the PMDR1-encoded protein shares striking homology with its C-terminal half, and each half contains a conserved ATP-binding site and six putative transmembrane domains. Southern blot analysis indicated that potato has one or two MDR-like genes. PMDR1 mRNA is constitutively expressed in all organs studied with higher expression in the stem and stolon tip. The PMDR1 expression was highest during tuber initiation and decreased during tuber development.

  17. Human type VII collagen: cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Parente, M.G.; Chung, L.C.; Ryynaenen, J.; Monli Chu; Uitto, J. ); Woodley, D.T.; Wynn, K.C.; Bauer, E.A. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1991-08-15

    A human keratinocyte cDNA expression library in bacteriophage {lambda}gt11 was screened with the purified IgG fraction of serum from a patient with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, which had a high titer of anti-type VII collagen antibodies. Screening of {approx}3 {times} 10{sup 5} plaques identified 8 positive clones, the largest one (K-131) being {approx}1.9 kilobases in size. Dideoxynucleotide sequencing of K-131 indicated that it consisted of 1875 base pairs and contained an open reading frame coding for a putative N-terminal noncollagenous domain of 439 amino acids and a collagenous domain was characterized by repeating Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequences that were interrupted in several positions by insertions or deletions of 1-3 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence also revealed a peptide segment that had a high degree of identity with a published type VII collagen protein sequence. The results mapped the COL7A1 to the locus 3p21. The cDNA clones characterized in this study will be valuable for understanding the protein structure and gene expression of type VII collagen present in anchoring fibrils and its aberrations in the dystrophic forms of heritable epidermolysis bullosa.

  18. A cDNA encoding tyrosinase-related protein maps to the brown locus in mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, I J

    1988-01-01

    A mouse melanoma cDNA clone was isolated by virtue of its reactivity with two antisera raised against tyrosinase (EC 1.14.18.1) from two species, hamster and mouse. The cDNA (5A) cross-hybridizes with another, pMT4 [Shibahara, S., Tomita, V., Sakakura, T., Nager, C., Bhabatosh, C. & Muller, R. (1986) Nucleic Acids Res. 14, 2413-2427], previously thought to encode mouse tyrosinase. Two other cDNAs, one human and one mouse, have been reported recently [Kwon, B. S., Haq, A. K., Pomerantz, S. H. & Halaban, R. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 7473-7477; and Yamamoto, H., Takeuchi, S., Kudo, T., Makino, K., Nakata, A., Shinoda, T. & Takeuchi, T. (1987) Jpn. J. Genet. 62, 271-277] as candidates for tyrosinase, and they map at or very close to the mouse albino (c) locus. The proteins they encode are very similar to each other but are distinct from (although related to) the pMT4-encoded protein. Here I use recombinant inbred strains to localize pMT4 at or close to the mouse brown (b) locus. I suggest that the gene mapping to c is the authentic tyrosinase gene, whereas that mapping to b encodes a tyrosinase-related protein. All b mutations in laboratory strains are associated with the same diagnostic Taq I fragment, suggesting that all derive from the same original mutation. I discuss possible function(s) of the tyrosinase-related protein. Images PMID:3132713

  19. Isolation and analysis of a cDNA clone encoding an S. guttatum alternataive oxidase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, D.M.; McIntosh, L. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing )

    1990-05-01

    Antibodies that recognize the 35, 36, and 37 kilodalton (kDa) alternative oxidase proteins were used to isolate a cDNA proteins were used to isolate a cDNA clone of a nuclearly encoded protein of Sauromatum guttatum. The amino acid sequence deduced from clone pAOSG81 revealed a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 44 kDa, while a 42 kDa protein is immunoprecipitated from in vitro translation products made using S. guttatum poly A+ RNA. The protein contains a 60-65 amino acid transit peptide which is predicted to form amphiphilic helices. We have also identified regions of the mature 42 kDa protein which are likely to be membrane associated. Clone pAOSG81 is being used to screen a genomic library. The genomic clone encoding the 42 kDa protein will be used to investigate the salicylic-acid-controlled transcriptional regulation of the S. guttatum alternative oxidase proteins.

  20. Establishment and characterization of a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T S; Xia, Y H

    2016-06-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease among swine that has an important economic impact worldwide. There are two important CSFV strains in China, Shimen and hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV). Shimen strain is highly virulent while HCLV, also referred to as C-strain, is a live attenuated vaccine strain considered to be one of the most effective and safest live vaccines. In this study, a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of CSFV named pT7SM-c was engineered by replacing the E(rns) genomic region of an infectious clone of CSFV Shimen strain, pT7SM, with the same region obtained from HCLV. RNA transcripts of pT7SM-c containing an engineered EcoRI site that served as a genetic marker were directly infectious in PK15 cells. The rescued virus vT7SM-c showed similar growth kinetics and cytopathic effect with the parental virus vT7SM in the cells. The chimeric infectious cDNA clone can be used as a practical tool for further studying of the virulence, protein function and pathogenesis of CSFV through genetic manipulation. PMID:27265471