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Sample records for receptor expression level

  1. Genetic variation in 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter expression causes adaptive changes in 5-HT₄ receptor levels.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Katie Ann; Licht, Cecilie Löe; Bruce, Aynsley; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Sharp, Trevor

    2012-09-01

    Genetic variation in 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) expression is a key risk factor for psychiatric disorder and has been linked to changes in the expression of certain 5-HT receptor subtypes. This study investigated the effect of variation in 5-HTT expression on 5-HT₄ receptor levels in both 5-HTT knockout (KO) and overexpressing (OE) mice using autoradiography with the selective 5-HT₄ receptor radioligand, [³H]SB207145. Compared to wild-type (5-HTT⁺/⁺) controls, homozygous 5-HTT KO mice (5-HTT⁻/⁻) had reduced 5-HT₄ receptor binding site density in all brain regions examined (35-65% of 5-HTT⁺/⁺). In contrast, the density of 5-HT₄ receptor binding sites was not significantly different between heterozygous 5-HTT KO mice (5-HTT⁻/⁺) and 5-HTT⁺/⁺ mice. The 5-HT synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (250 mg/kg twice daily for 3 d) abolished the difference in 5-HT₄ binding between 5-HTT⁻/⁻ and 5-HTT⁺/⁺ mice in all brain regions. Compared to wild-type (WT) littermate controls, 5-HTT OE mice had increased 5-HT₄ binding density across all brain regions, except amygdala (118-164% of WT) and this difference between genotypes was reduced by the 5-HTT inhibitor, fluoxetine (20 mg/kg twice daily, 3 d). Together, these findings suggest that variation in 5-HTT expression causes adaptive changes in 5-HT₄ receptor levels which are directly linked to alterations in 5-HT availability.

  2. Androgen receptors in a cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni: structure, localization, and expression levels.

    PubMed

    Harbott, Lene K; Burmeister, Sabrina S; White, Richard B; Vagell, Mike; Fernald, Russell D

    2007-09-01

    Androgens are an important output of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis that controls reproduction in all vertebrates. In male teleosts two androgens, testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone, control sexual differentiation and development in juveniles and reproductive behavior in adults. Androgenic signals provide feedback at many levels of the HPG axis, including the hypothalamic neurons that synthesize and release gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1), but the precise cellular site of androgen action in the brain is not known. Here we describe two androgen receptor subtypes, ARalpha and ARbeta, in the cichlid Astatotilapia burtoni and show that these subtypes are differentially located throughout the adult brain in nuclei known to function in the control of reproduction. ARalpha was expressed in the ventral part of the ventral telencephalon, the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus and the ventral hypothalamus, whereas ARbeta was more widely expressed in the dorsal and ventral telencephalon, the POA, and the ventral and dorsal hypothalamus. We provide the first evidence in any vertebrate that the GnRH1-releasing neurons, which serve as the central control point of the HPG axis, express both subtypes of AR. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we show that A. burtoni AR subtypes have different expression levels in adult tissue, with ARalpha showing significantly higher expression than ARbeta in the pituitary, and ARbeta expressed at a higher level than ARalpha in the anterior and middle brain. These data provide important insight into the role of androgens in regulating the vertebrate reproductive axis.

  3. High-level expression of a full-length Eph receptor.

    PubMed

    Paavilainen, Sari; Grandy, David; Karelehto, Eveliina; Chang, Elizabeth; Susi, Petri; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Nikolov, Dimitar; Himanen, Juha

    2013-11-01

    Eph receptors are the largest family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases containing a single membrane-spanning segment. They are involved in a various developmental and cell-cell communication events. Although there is extensive structural information available on both the extra- and intracellular regions of Eph's in isolation, no structures are available for the entire receptor. To facilitate structural studies on functionally relevant Eph/ephrin complexes, we have developed an expression system for producing the full-length human EphA2 receptor. We successfully expressed milligram amounts of the receptor using baculovirus-based vector and insect cells. We were also able to extract the protein from the cell membranes and purify it to near homogeneity in two simple steps. The purified receptor was shown to retain its biological activity in terms of both binding to its functional ligands and being able to auto-phosphorylate the key tyrosine residues of the cytoplasmic kinase domain.

  4. Effect of opioid receptor antagonism on proopiomelanocortin peptide levels and gene expression in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, C E; Berkowitz, K M; Jaffe, S B; Wardlaw, S L

    1992-06-01

    In order to determine how brain beta-endorphin (beta-EP) and its precursor proopiomelanocortin (POMC) adapt to chronic opioid blockade we have examined the effects of treatment with the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (NTX) on POMC gene expression and peptide levels in the hypothalamus. Male rats were treated with NTX by daily injection or constant minipump infusion. RNA was isolated from the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) after an aliquot was removed for peptide RIA and the amount of POMC mRNA was measured by solution hybridization SI nuclease protection assay. beta-EP and several other POMC-derived peptides including alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP) or gamma(3)-MSH were measured in the MBH and anterior hypothalamus (AH) by RIA. In an initial experiment POMC peptide levels were measured after 7 days of NTX (4.8 mg/day) infusion. There was a marked fall in the concentrations of beta-EP, alpha-MSH, and CLIP; levels in the MBH declined by more than 60% (P < 0.001). In the next experiment NTX (1 mg) was injected daily and POMC peptides and mRNA were measured after 2 and 5 days of treatment. (beta-EP) and alpha-MSH levels fell progressively in the MBH and AH and were significantly less than those of the controls by 5 days of treatment (P < 0.02). POMC mRNA levels, however, did not change after 2 or 5 days. When NTX was infused for 3 weeks there was a decrease in the concentrations of beta-EP, alpha-MSH, and gamma(3)-MSH in the MBH (P < 0.001). The concentration of POMC mRNA in the MBH, however, was significantly higher in the NTX-treated animals, 0.99 +/- 0.06 pg/mug RNA vs 0.81 +/- 0.05 pg/mug RNA (P < 0.05). Since NTX can affect LH and testosterone release, the study was repeated in castrated rats. POMC peptide levels again fell after 3 weeks of NTX. POMC mRNA levels were higher in the castrated rats than in the intact rats, 1.14 +/- 0.06 pg/mug RNA vs 0.85 +/- 0.09 pg/mug RNA (P < 0

  5. TREM-2 Receptor Expression Increases with 25(OH)D Vitamin Serum Levels in Patients with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Bucova, Maria; Suchankova, Magda; Tibenska, Elena; Tedlova, Eva; Demian, Juraj; Majer, Ivan; Novosadova, Helena; Tedla, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    TREM-1 and TREM-2 molecules are members of the TREM transmembrane glycoproteins. In our previous study we identified increased expressions of TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptors in pulmonary sarcoidosis (PS). Only a few studies concerning the association between vitamin D and TREM receptor expression can be found. The aim of our current study was to determine the association between the levels of an inactive form of 25(OH)D vitamin and TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptor expressions. We have detected low levels of 25(OH)D vitamin in 79% of PS patients. Only 21% of patients had normal serum level of 25(OH)D vitamin with values clustered within the low-normal range. The most striking findings were the increased TREM-2 expressions on myeloid cells surfaces in BALF of PS patients with normal 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels compared with those with its decreased levels. The total number of TREM-2 positive cells was 5.7 times higher and the percentage of TREM-2 positive cells was also significantly increased in BALF of PS patients with normal compared to PS patients with low 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels. A significant correlation between total TREM-2 expression and vitamin D levels has been detected too. However, we have not detected similar differences in TREM-1expression and 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels.

  6. TREM-2 Receptor Expression Increases with 25(OH)D Vitamin Serum Levels in Patients with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Bucova, Maria; Suchankova, Magda; Tibenska, Elena; Tedlova, Eva; Demian, Juraj; Majer, Ivan; Novosadova, Helena; Tedla, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    TREM-1 and TREM-2 molecules are members of the TREM transmembrane glycoproteins. In our previous study we identified increased expressions of TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptors in pulmonary sarcoidosis (PS). Only a few studies concerning the association between vitamin D and TREM receptor expression can be found. The aim of our current study was to determine the association between the levels of an inactive form of 25(OH)D vitamin and TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptor expressions. We have detected low levels of 25(OH)D vitamin in 79% of PS patients. Only 21% of patients had normal serum level of 25(OH)D vitamin with values clustered within the low-normal range. The most striking findings were the increased TREM-2 expressions on myeloid cells surfaces in BALF of PS patients with normal 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels compared with those with its decreased levels. The total number of TREM-2 positive cells was 5.7 times higher and the percentage of TREM-2 positive cells was also significantly increased in BALF of PS patients with normal compared to PS patients with low 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels. A significant correlation between total TREM-2 expression and vitamin D levels has been detected too. However, we have not detected similar differences in TREM-1expression and 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels. PMID:26166951

  7. TREM-2 Receptor Expression Increases with 25(OH)D Vitamin Serum Levels in Patients with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Bucova, Maria; Suchankova, Magda; Tibenska, Elena; Tedlova, Eva; Demian, Juraj; Majer, Ivan; Novosadova, Helena; Tedla, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    TREM-1 and TREM-2 molecules are members of the TREM transmembrane glycoproteins. In our previous study we identified increased expressions of TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptors in pulmonary sarcoidosis (PS). Only a few studies concerning the association between vitamin D and TREM receptor expression can be found. The aim of our current study was to determine the association between the levels of an inactive form of 25(OH)D vitamin and TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptor expressions. We have detected low levels of 25(OH)D vitamin in 79% of PS patients. Only 21% of patients had normal serum level of 25(OH)D vitamin with values clustered within the low-normal range. The most striking findings were the increased TREM-2 expressions on myeloid cells surfaces in BALF of PS patients with normal 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels compared with those with its decreased levels. The total number of TREM-2 positive cells was 5.7 times higher and the percentage of TREM-2 positive cells was also significantly increased in BALF of PS patients with normal compared to PS patients with low 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels. A significant correlation between total TREM-2 expression and vitamin D levels has been detected too. However, we have not detected similar differences in TREM-1expression and 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels. PMID:26166951

  8. High-level stable expression of recombinant 5-HT1A 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Tancredi, A; Wootton, R; Strange, P G

    1992-01-01

    The human 5-hydroxytryptamine 5-HT1A receptor gene was transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells. A series of recombinant monoclonal cell lines expressing the receptor were isolated and the properties of one cell line that expressed receptors at a high level (2.8 pmol/mg) were studied in detail. In ligand binding assays with the selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 2-(NN-di[3H]propylamino)-8-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene ([3H]8-OH-DPAT) only a single class of saturable high-affinity binding sites was detected, with a pharmacological profile in competition experiments essentially identical to that of the 5-HT1A receptor of bovine hippocampus. [3H]8-OH-DPAT binding to the recombinant cell membranes was inhibited by GTP, showing that the receptors in the transfected cells couple to G-proteins. A series of 5-hydroxytryptamine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the cells and, despite the high level of receptor expression, their apparent efficacies were similar to those observed for inhibition of adenylate cyclase in brain. This recombinant cell line provides a complete model system for studying the 5-HT1A receptor and its transmembrane signalling system. The recombinant cells can also be grown in suspension culture for long periods but, whereas 5-HT1A receptor numbers and receptor regulation by guanine nucleotides are maintained in suspension-grown cells, the inhibition of adenylate cyclase by the 5-HT1A receptor is gradually lost. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1386736

  9. High-level expression, purification and characterization of a constitutively active thromboxane A2 receptor polymorphic variant.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bing; Chakraborty, Raja; Eilers, Markus; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; O'Neil, Joe D; Smith, Steven O; Bhullar, Rajinder P; Chelikani, Prashen

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exhibit some level of basal signaling even in the absence of a bound agonist. This basal or constitutive signaling can have important pathophysiological roles. In the past few years, a number of high resolution crystal structures of GPCRs have been reported, including two crystal structures of constitutively active mutants (CAM) of the dim-light receptor, rhodopsin. The structural characterizations of CAMs are impeded by the lack of proper expression systems. The thromboxane A2 receptor (TP) is a GPCR that mediates vasoconstriction and promotes thrombosis in response to the binding of thromboxane. Here, we report on the expression and purification of a genetic variant and CAM in TP, namely A160T, using tetracycline-inducible HEK293S-TetR and HEK293S (GnTI¯)-TetR cell lines. Expression of the TP and the A160T genes in these mammalian cell lines resulted in a 4-fold increase in expression to a level of 15.8 ±0.3 pmol of receptor/mg of membrane protein. The receptors expressed in the HEK293S (GnTI(-))-TetR cell line showed homogeneous glycosylation. The functional yield of the receptors using a single step affinity purification was 45 µg/10⁶ cells. Temperature- dependent secondary structure changes of the purified TP and A160T receptors were characterized using circular dichroism (CD) spectropolarimetry. The CD spectra shows that the loss of activity or thermal sensitivity that was previously observed for the A160T mutant, is not owing to large unfolding of the protein but rather to a more subtle effect. This is the first study to report on the successful high-level expression, purification, and biophysical characterization of a naturally occurring, diffusible ligand activated GPCR CAM. PMID:24086743

  10. High-level expression of human insulin receptor cDNA in mouse NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, J.; Okamoto, A.K.; Thys, R.; Bell, G.I.; Steiner, D.F.; Hofmann, C.A.

    1987-08-01

    In order to develop a simple, efficient system for the high-level expression of human insulin receptors in eukaryotic cells, a full-length human kidney insulin receptor cDNA was inserted into a bovine papilloma virus vector under the control of the mouse metallothionein promoter. After transfection of mouse NIH 3T3 cells with this construct, seven cell lines expressing insulin receptors were isolated; two cell lines had more than 10/sup 6/ receptors per cell. The cell line with the highest /sup 125/I-insulin binding (NIH 3T3 HIR3.5) had 6 x 10/sup 6/ receptors with a K/sub d/ of 10/sup -9/ M. This level was not dependent on exposure to metals but could be increased further to 2 x 10/sup 7/ receptors per cell by addition of sodium butyrate to the culture medium. The ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits had apparent molecular weights of 147,000 and 105,000, respectively (compared to 135,000 and 95,000 in IM-9 human lymphocytes), values identical to those of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of the insulin receptors of nontransformed NIH 3T3 cells. This size difference was due to altered carbohydrate composition, as N-glycanase digestion reduced the apparent receptor subunit size of the transfected cells and IM-9 lymphocytes to identical values. The alteration in N-linked oligosaccharide composition could not be ascribed to differences in the kinetics of posttranslational processing of the insulin receptors, which was comparable to that of other cells studied. The basal rate of glycogen synthesis in the cells overexpressing insulin receptors was increased 4- to 5-fold compared with controls. Low levels of added insulin (0.1 nM) caused a 50% increase in the rate of glycogen synthesis

  11. Polymorphisms in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Genes Affect the Expression Levels of Membrane-Bound Type I and Type II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sennikov, Sergey V.; Vasilyev, Filipp F.; Lopatnikova, Julia A.; Shkaruba, Nadezhda S.; Silkov, Alexander N.

    2014-01-01

    The level of TNF receptors on various cells of immune system and its association with the gene polymorphism were investigated. Determining the levels of membrane-bound TNFα receptors on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was performed by flow cytometry using BD QuantiBRITE calibration particles. Soluble TNFα receptor (sTNFRs) levels were determined by ELISA and genotyping was determined by PCR-RFLP. Homozygous TT individuals at SNP −609G/T TNFRI (rs4149570) showed lower levels of sTNFRI compared to GG genotype carriers. Homozygous carriers of CC genotype at SNP −1207G/C TNFRI (rs4149569) had lower expression densities of membrane-bound TNFRI on intact CD14+ monocytes compared to individuals with the GC genotype. The frequency differences in the CD3+ and CD19+ cells expressing TNFRII in relation to SNP −1709A/T TNFRII (rs652625) in healthy individuals were also determined. The genotype CC in SNP −3609C/T TNFRII (rs590368) was associated with a lower percentage of CD14+ cells expressing TNFRII compared to individuals with the CT genotype. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had no significant changes in the frequencies of genotypes. Reduced frequency was identified for the combination TNFRI −609GT + TNFRII −3609CC only. The polymorphisms in genes represent one of cell type-specific mechanisms affecting the expression levels of membrane-bound TNFα receptors and TNFα-mediated signaling. PMID:24782596

  12. Short-term sleep deprivation impairs spatial working memory and modulates expression levels of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meilan; Yan, Jie; He, Chao; Yang, Li; Tan, Gang; Li, Chao; Hu, Zhian; Wang, Jiali

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampus-dependent learning memory is sensitive to sleep deprivation (SD). Although the ionotropic glutamate receptors play a vital role in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory, however, whether the expression of these receptor subunits is modulated by sleep loss remains unclear. In the present study, western blotting was performed by probing with specific antibodies against the ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and against the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B. In hippocampus, down regulation of surface GluA1 and GluN2A surface expression were observed in both SD groups. However, surface expression level of GluA2, GluA3, GluN1 and GluN2B was significantly up-regulated in 8h-SD rats when compared to the 4h-SD rats. In parallel with the complex changes in AMPA and NMDA receptor subunit expressions, we found the 8h-SD impaired rat spatial working memory in 30-s-delay T-maze task, whereas no impairment of spatial learning was observed in 4h-SD rats. These results indicate that sleep loss alters the relative expression levels of the AMPA and NMDA receptors, thus affects the synaptic strength and capacity for plasticity and partially contributes to spatial memory impairment.

  13. Expression of NK1 receptor at the protein and mRNA level in the porcine female reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, R

    2014-01-01

    The presence and distribution of substance P (SP) receptor NK1 was studied in the ovary, the oviduct and the uterus (uterine horn and cervix) of the domestic pig using the methods of molecular biology (RT-PCR and immunoblot) and immunohistochemistry. The expression of NK1 receptor at mRNA level was confirmed with RT-PCR in all the studied parts of the porcine female reproductive system by the presence of 525 bp PCR product and at the protein level by the detection of 46 kDa protein band in immunoblot. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the cellular distribution of NK1 receptor protein. In the ovary NKI receptor was present in the wall of arterial blood vessels, as well as in ovarian follicles of different stages of development. In the tubular organs the NK1 receptor immunohistochemical stainings were observed in the wall of the arterial blood vessels, in the muscular membrane, as well as in the mucosal epithelium. The study confirmed the presence of NK1 receptor in the tissues of the porcine female reproductive tract which clearly points to the possibility that SP can influence porcine ovary, oviduct and uterus.

  14. Expression of VPAC1 receptor at the level of mRNA and protein in the porcine female reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, R; Wąsowicz, K

    2015-01-01

    The presence and distribution of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) receptor VPAC1 was studied in the ovary, oviduct and uterus (uterine horn and cervix) of the domestic pig using methods of molecular biology (RT-PCR and immunoblot) and immunohistochemistry. The expression of VPAC1 receptor at mRNA level was confirmed with RT-PCR in all the studied parts of the porcine female reproductive system by the presence of 525 bp PCR product and at the level of proteins by the detection of 46 kDa protein band in immunoblot. Immunohistochemical stainings revealed the cellular distribution of VPAC1 receptor protein. In the ovary it was present in the wall of arterial blood vessels, as well as in the ovarian follicles of different stages. In the tubular organs the VPAC1 receptor immunohistochemical stainings were observed in the wall of the arterial blood vessels, in the muscular membrane, as well as in the mucosal epithelium. The study confirmed the presence of VPAC1 receptor in the tissues of the porcine female reproductive tract what clearly shows the possibility of influence of VIP on the porcine ovary, oviduct and uterus. PMID:25928928

  15. Sex and estrogen receptor expression influence opioid peptide levels in the mouse hippocampal mossy fiber pathway

    PubMed Central

    Van Kempen, Tracey A.; Kahlid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D.; Spencer-Segal, Joanna L.; Tsuda, Mumeko C.; Ogawa, Sonoko; McEwen, Bruce S.; Waters, Elizabeth M.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2013-01-01

    The opioid peptides, dynorphin (DYN) and enkephalin (L-ENK) are contained in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway where they modulate synaptic plasticity. In rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK immunoreactivity (-ir) are increased when estrogen levels are elevated (Torres-Reveron et al. 2008 and 2009). Here, we used quantitative immunocytochemistry to examine whether opioid levels are similarly regulated in wildtype (WT) mice over the estrous cycle, and how these compared to males. Moreover, using estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta knockout mice (AERKO and BERKO, respectively), the present study examined the role of ERs in rapid, membrane-initiated (6 hr), or slower, nucleus-initiated (48 hr) estradiol effects on mossy fiber opioid levels. Unlike rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK-ir did not change over the estrous cycle. However, compared to males, females had higher levels of DYN-ir in CA3a and L-ENK-ir in CA3b. In WT and BERKO ovariectomized (OVX) mice, neither DYN- nor L-ENK-ir changed following 6 or 48 hrs estradiol benzoate (EB) administration. However, DYN-ir significantly increased 48 hours after EB in the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3b of AERKO mice only. These findings suggest that cyclic hormone levels regulate neither DYN nor L-ENK levels in the mouse mossy fiber pathway as they do in the rat. This may be due to species-specific differences in the mossy fiber pathway. However, in the mouse, DYN levels are regulated by exogenous EB in the absence of ERα possibly via an ERβ-mediated pathway requiring new gene transcription. PMID:23933204

  16. Sex and estrogen receptor expression influence opioid peptide levels in the mouse hippocampal mossy fiber pathway.

    PubMed

    Van Kempen, Tracey A; Kahlid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D; Spencer-Segal, Joanna L; Tsuda, Mumeko C; Ogawa, Sonoko; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M; Milner, Teresa A

    2013-09-27

    The opioid peptides, dynorphin (DYN) and enkephalin (L-ENK) are contained in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway where they modulate synaptic plasticity. In rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK immunoreactivity (-ir) are increased when estrogen levels are elevated (Torres-Reveron et al., 2008, 2009). Here, we used quantitative immunocytochemistry to examine whether opioid levels are similarly regulated in wildtype (WT) mice over the estrous cycle, and how these compared to males. Moreover, using estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta knock-out mice (AERKO and BERKO, respectively), the present study examined the role of ERs in rapid, membrane-initiated (6 h), or slower, nucleus-initiated (48 h) estradiol effects on mossy fiber opioid levels. Unlike rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK-ir did not change over the estrous cycle. However, compared to males, females had higher levels of DYN-ir in CA3a and L-ENK-ir in CA3b. In WT and BERKO ovariectomized (OVX) mice, neither DYN- nor L-ENK-ir changed following 6 or 48 h estradiol benzoate (EB) administration. However, DYN-ir significantly increased 48 h after EB in the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3b of AERKO mice only. These findings suggest that cyclic hormone levels regulate neither DYN nor L-ENK levels in the mouse mossy fiber pathway as they do in the rat. This may be due to species-specific differences in the mossy fiber pathway. However, in the mouse, DYN levels are regulated by exogenous EB in the absence of ERα possibly via an ERβ-mediated pathway requiring new gene transcription.

  17. Expression level of P2X7 receptor is a determinant of ATP-induced death of mouse cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, A; Keno, Y; Marumiya, A; Sudo, Y; Uda, Y; Matsuda, K; Morita, Y; Furuta, T; Nishida, K; Nagasawa, K

    2016-04-01

    Activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), a purinergic receptor, expressed by neurons is well-known to induce their death, but whether or not their sensitivity to ATP depends on its expression levels remains unclear. Here, we examined the effect of the expression level of P2X7Rs on cell viability using pure neuron cultures, co-cultures with astrocytes derived from SJL- and ddY-strain mice, and mouse P2X7R-expressing HEK293T cell systems. Treatment of pure neuron cultures with 5mM ATP for 2h, followed by 3-h incubation in fresh medium, resulted in death of both types of neurons, and their death was prevented by administration of P2X7R-specific antagonists. In both SJL- and ddY-neurons, ATP-induced neuronal death was inhibited by a mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor cyclosporine A, mitochondrial dysfunction being involved in their death. The ATP-induced neuronal death was greater for SJL-neurons than for ddY-ones, this being correlated with the expression level of P2X7R in them, and the same results were obtained for the HEK293T cell systems. Co-culture of neurons with astrocytes increased the ATP-induced neuronal death compared to the case of pure neuron cultures. Overall, we reveal that neuronal vulnerability to ATP depends on the expression level of P2X7R, and co-existence of astrocytes exacerbates ATP-induced neuronal death.

  18. High level expression of differentially localized BAG-1 isoforms in some oestrogen receptor-positive human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Brimmell, M; Burns, J S; Munson, P; McDonald, L; O’Hare, M J; Lakhani, S R; Packham, G

    1999-01-01

    Sensitivity to oestrogens and apoptosis are critical determinants of the development and progression of breast cancer and reflect closely linked pathways in breast epithelial cells. For example, induction of BCL-2 oncoprotein expression by oestrogen contributes to suppression of apoptosis and BCL-2 and oestrogen receptor (ER) are frequently co-expressed in tumours. BAG-1/HAP is a multifunctional protein which complexes with BCL-2 and steroid hormone receptors (including the ER), and can suppress apoptosis and influence steroid hormone-dependent transcription. Therefore, analysis of expression of BAG-1 in human breast cancer is of considerable interest. BAG-1 was readily detected by immunostaining in normal breast epithelial cells and most ER-positive tumours, but was undetectable or weakly expressed in ER-negative tumours. BAG-1 positive cells showed a predominantly cytoplasmic or cytoplasmic plus nuclear distribution of staining. A correlation between ER and BAG-1 was also evident in breast cancer derived cell lines, as all lines examined with functional ER expression also expressed high levels of BAG-1. In addition to the prototypical 36 kDa BAG-1 isoform, breast cancer cells expressed higher molecular weight isoforms and, in contrast to BCL-2, BAG-1 expression was independent of oestrogens. BAG-1 isoforms were differentially localized to the nucleus or cytoplasm and this was also independent of oestrogens. These results demonstrate a close association between BAG-1 and functional ER expression and suggest BAG-1 may be useful as a therapeutic target or prognostic marker in breast cancer. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10576663

  19. Vitamin D receptor expression levels determine the severity and complexity of disease progression among leprosy reaction patients

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, D.; Reja, A.H.H.; Biswas, N.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Patra, P.K.; Bhattacharya, B.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the roles of vitamin D and its receptor, VDR, in the progression of leprosy. The majority of individuals with leprosy from Kolkata, India, with a type 1 or type 2 reaction have low levels of vitamin D3 in serum samples. Interestingly, individuals with a type 2 reaction associated with neuritis/erythema nodosum leprosum had very low VDR mRNA expression levels, ranging from 5% to 10%, compared to that of healthy control subjects; these patients also had a high bacilli index, ranging from 3+ to 5+. This is the first report to indicate that VDR expression levels may determine the complexity and severity of the progression of leprosy. PMID:26106480

  20. Increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression levels in visceral adipose tissue, and serum CCL2 and interleukin-6 levels during visceral adipose tissue accumulation.

    PubMed

    Yogarajah, Thaneswary; Bee, Yvonne-Tee Get; Noordin, Rahmah; Yin, Khoo Boon

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the mRNA and protein expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in visceral adipose tissue, as well as serum adipokine levels, in Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were fed either a normal (control rats) or excessive (experimental rats) intake of food for 8 or 16 weeks, then sacrificed, at which time visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues, as well as blood samples, were collected. The mRNA and protein expression levels of PPARs in the visceral adipose tissues were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. In addition, the levels of adipokines in the serum samples were determined using commercial ELISA kits. The results revealed that at 8 weeks, the mass of subcutaneous adipose tissue was higher than that of the visceral adipose tissue in the experimental rats, but the reverse occurred at 16 weeks. Furthermore, at 16 weeks the experimental rats exhibited an upregulation of PPARγ mRNA and protein expression levels in the visceral adipose tissues, and significant increases in the serum levels of CCL2 and interleukin (IL)-6 were observed, compared with those measured at 8 weeks. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the PPARγ expression level was likely correlated with serum levels of CCL2 and IL-6, molecules that may facilitate visceral adipose tissue accumulation. In addition, the levels of the two adipokines in the serum may be useful as surrogate biomarkers for the expression levels of PPARγ in accumulated visceral adipose tissues.

  1. Relationship between expression levels and atherogenesis in scavenger receptor Class B, Type I Transgenics

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yukihiko; Gong, Elaine; Royer, Lori; Cooper, Philip N.; Francone, Omar L; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-03-15

    Both in vitro and in vivo studies of SR-BI have implicated it as a likely participant in the metabolism of HDL cholesterol. To investigate SR-BI's effect on atherogenesis we examined two lines of SR-BI transgenic mice with high (10-fold increases) and low (2-fold increases) in SR-BI expression in an inbred mouse background hemizygous for a human apo B transgene. Unlike non-HDL cholesterol levels which minimally differed in the various groups of animals, HDL cholesterol levels were inversely related to SR-BI expression. Mice with the low expression SR-BI transgene had a 50% reduction in HDL cholesterol while the high expression SR-BI transgene was associated with two-fold decreases in HDL as well as dramatic alterations in HDL composition and size including the near absence of a-migrating particles as determined by 2-dimensional electrophoresis. The low expression SR-BI/apo B transgenics had more than a two-fold decrease in the development of diet induced fatty streak lesions compared t o the apo B transgenics (4448{+-}1908 {mu}m2/aorta to 10133 {+-} 4035 {mu}m2/aorta; p<0.001), while the high expression SR-BI/apo B transgenics had an atherogenic response similar to that of the apo B transgenics (14692{+-}7238 {mu}m2/aorta) but three-fold greater than the low SR-BI/apo B mice (p<0.001). The prominent anti-atherogenic effect of moderate SR-BI expression provides in vivo support for the hypothesis that HDL functions to inhibit atherogenesis through its interactions with SR-BI in facilitating reverse cholesterol transport. The failure of the high SR-BI/apo B transgenics to have similar or even greater reductions in atherogenesis suggests that the changes resulting from extremely high SR-BI expression including dramatic changes in lipoproteins may have both pro- and anti-atherogenic consequences illustrating the complexity of the relationship between SR-BI and atherogenesis.

  2. Prostacyclin receptor expression on platelets of humans with type 2 diabetes is inversely correlated with hemoglobin A1c levels.

    PubMed

    Knebel, Stephanie M; Sprague, Randy S; Stephenson, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate platelet aggregation can result in thrombosis and tissue ischemia. When compared to healthy human platelets, those of humans with type 2 diabetes (DM2) exhibit increased aggregation when stimulated. Activation of the platelet prostacyclin receptor (IPR) results in cAMP accumulation and inhibition of platelet aggregation. We hypothesized that DM2 platelets express decreased IPR when compared to platelets of healthy humans, resulting in decreased IPR agonist-induced cAMP accumulation. We measured IPR expression with radioligand binding of [(3)H]-iloprost, a stable prostacyclin analog, and with Western blotting of the IPR protein. Iloprost-stimulated platelet cAMP levels were used to identify the functional response to IPR activation. IPR binding, expression of the IPR protein and the levels of cAMP in platelets incubated with iloprost were significantly decreased in DM2 platelets when compared to platelets of healthy humans. IPR expression decreased in platelets as glycemic control of the subjects worsened, as indicated by increased hemoglobin A1c levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that reduced IPR expression in DM2 platelets may contribute to platelet hyperactivity in humans with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25617843

  3. Neuromedin B and Its Receptor: Gene Cloning, Tissue Distribution and Expression Levels of the Reproductive Axis in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyu; Su, Juan; Guo, Tingting; Jin, Mengmeng; Li, Xiang; Lei, Zhihai; Hou, Yuanlong; Li, Xiaoliang; Jia, Cuicui; Zhang, Zheng; Ahmed, Ejlal

    2016-01-01

    Neuromedin B is one member of a family of bombesin-like peptides, which performs a variety of physiological functions via their receptor (NMBR) in most mammals. However, the genes encoding NMB and NMBR and their functions especially reproduction of the pigs are currently not fully understood. To research the physiological functions of NMB, we cloned and analyzed the NMB and NMBR genes, and systematically investigated the expression levels of NMB and NMBR mRNA using relative real-time PCR and the distribution of NMBR by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Experimental results show that the sequences of the amino acid and gene of NMB and NMBR were highly conservative and homology in many species, Significantly, the relative RT-PCR results revealed that NMB was mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), whereas NMBR is highly expressed in peripheral tissues and organs, such as endocrine tissues, glands and reproductive organs. The IHC results show that NMBR positive cells were widely distributed in the body, such as respiratory and circulatory system, digestive system, urogenital system, in lymphatic organs and in the endocrine system. We also systematically investigated expression levels of NMB and NMBR in the reproductive axis using relative real-time PCR. In sow estrous cycle, the hypothalamic levels of both NMB and NMBR mRAN were similar, but the expression levels of the pituitary were negatively correlated. Expression levels in the ovarian system are lowest in metestrus phases and highest in proestrus and estrus phases. In boar post-natal development stages, the hypothalamic, pituitary and testicular levels of NMB and NMBR mRNAs showed developmental changes on postnatal day 30, 60, 90 and 120. Taken together, this study provided molecular and morphological data necessary for further research of physiological function of NMB/NMBR system in the pigs.

  4. Neuromedin B and Its Receptor: Gene Cloning, Tissue Distribution and Expression Levels of the Reproductive Axis in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyu; Su, Juan; Guo, Tingting; Jin, Mengmeng; Li, Xiang; Lei, Zhihai; Hou, Yuanlong; Li, Xiaoliang; Jia, Cuicui; Zhang, Zheng; Ahmed, Ejlal

    2016-01-01

    Neuromedin B is one member of a family of bombesin-like peptides, which performs a variety of physiological functions via their receptor (NMBR) in most mammals. However, the genes encoding NMB and NMBR and their functions especially reproduction of the pigs are currently not fully understood. To research the physiological functions of NMB, we cloned and analyzed the NMB and NMBR genes, and systematically investigated the expression levels of NMB and NMBR mRNA using relative real-time PCR and the distribution of NMBR by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Experimental results show that the sequences of the amino acid and gene of NMB and NMBR were highly conservative and homology in many species, Significantly, the relative RT-PCR results revealed that NMB was mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), whereas NMBR is highly expressed in peripheral tissues and organs, such as endocrine tissues, glands and reproductive organs. The IHC results show that NMBR positive cells were widely distributed in the body, such as respiratory and circulatory system, digestive system, urogenital system, in lymphatic organs and in the endocrine system. We also systematically investigated expression levels of NMB and NMBR in the reproductive axis using relative real-time PCR. In sow estrous cycle, the hypothalamic levels of both NMB and NMBR mRAN were similar, but the expression levels of the pituitary were negatively correlated. Expression levels in the ovarian system are lowest in metestrus phases and highest in proestrus and estrus phases. In boar post-natal development stages, the hypothalamic, pituitary and testicular levels of NMB and NMBR mRNAs showed developmental changes on postnatal day 30, 60, 90 and 120. Taken together, this study provided molecular and morphological data necessary for further research of physiological function of NMB/NMBR system in the pigs. PMID:27010315

  5. Neuromedin B and Its Receptor: Gene Cloning, Tissue Distribution and Expression Levels of the Reproductive Axis in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiyu; Su, Juan; Guo, Tingting; Jin, Mengmeng; Li, Xiang; Lei, Zhihai; Hou, Yuanlong; Li, Xiaoliang; Jia, Cuicui; Zhang, Zheng; Ahmed, Ejlal

    2016-01-01

    Neuromedin B is one member of a family of bombesin-like peptides, which performs a variety of physiological functions via their receptor (NMBR) in most mammals. However, the genes encoding NMB and NMBR and their functions especially reproduction of the pigs are currently not fully understood. To research the physiological functions of NMB, we cloned and analyzed the NMB and NMBR genes, and systematically investigated the expression levels of NMB and NMBR mRNA using relative real-time PCR and the distribution of NMBR by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Experimental results show that the sequences of the amino acid and gene of NMB and NMBR were highly conservative and homology in many species, Significantly, the relative RT-PCR results revealed that NMB was mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), whereas NMBR is highly expressed in peripheral tissues and organs, such as endocrine tissues, glands and reproductive organs. The IHC results show that NMBR positive cells were widely distributed in the body, such as respiratory and circulatory system, digestive system, urogenital system, in lymphatic organs and in the endocrine system. We also systematically investigated expression levels of NMB and NMBR in the reproductive axis using relative real-time PCR. In sow estrous cycle, the hypothalamic levels of both NMB and NMBR mRAN were similar, but the expression levels of the pituitary were negatively correlated. Expression levels in the ovarian system are lowest in metestrus phases and highest in proestrus and estrus phases. In boar post-natal development stages, the hypothalamic, pituitary and testicular levels of NMB and NMBR mRNAs showed developmental changes on postnatal day 30, 60, 90 and 120. Taken together, this study provided molecular and morphological data necessary for further research of physiological function of NMB/NMBR system in the pigs. PMID:27010315

  6. Human α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) epithelial prostate stem cells express low levels of active androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Stuart C; Hepburn, Anastasia C; Wilson, Laura; Coffey, Kelly; Ryan-Munden, Claudia A; Pal, Deepali; Leung, Hing Y; Robson, Craig N; Heer, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are thought to be the cell of origin in malignant transformation in many tissues, but their role in human prostate carcinogenesis continues to be debated. One of the conflicts with this model is that cancer stem cells have been described to lack androgen receptor (AR) expression, which is of established importance in prostate cancer initiation and progression. We re-examined the expression patterns of AR within adult prostate epithelial differentiation using an optimised sensitive and specific approach examining transcript, protein and AR regulated gene expression. Highly enriched populations were isolated consisting of stem (α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE)), transiently amplifying (α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(-VE)) and terminally differentiated (α(2)β(1)(LOW) CD133(-VE)) cells. AR transcript and protein expression was confirmed in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) and CD133(-VE) progenitor cells. Flow cytometry confirmed that median (±SD) fraction of cells expressing AR were 77% (±6%) in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) stem cells and 68% (±12%) in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(-VE) transiently amplifying cells. However, 3-fold lower levels of total AR protein expression (peak and median immunofluorescence) were present in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) stem cells compared with differentiated cells. This finding was confirmed with dual immunostaining of prostate sections for AR and CD133, which again demonstrated low levels of AR within basal CD133(+VE) cells. Activity of the AR was confirmed in prostate progenitor cells by the expression of low levels of the AR regulated genes PSA, KLK2 and TMPRSS2. The confirmation of AR expression in prostate progenitor cells allows integration of the cancer stem cell theory with the established models of prostate cancer initiation based on a functional AR. Further study of specific AR functions in prostate stem and differentiated cells may highlight novel mechanisms of prostate homeostasis and insights into tumourigenesis.

  7. Effects of Cocaine-Kindling on the Expression of NMDA Receptors and Glutamate Levels in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Taltavull, Juan F.; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Lasoń, Władysław; Gasior, Maciej; Zapata, Agustin; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Witkin, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study we examined the effects of cocaine seizure kindling on the expression of NMDA receptors and levels of extracellular glutamate in mouse brain. Quantitative autoradiography did not reveal any changes in binding of [3H] MK-801 to NMDA receptors in several brain regions. Likewise, in situ hybridization and Western blotting revealed no alteration in expression of the NMDA receptor subunits, NR1 and NR2B. Basal overflow of glutamate in the ventral hippocampus determined by microdialysis in freely moving animals also did not differ between cocaine-kindled and control groups. Perfusion with the selective excitatory amino acid transporter inhibitor, pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (tPDC, 0.6 mM), increased glutamate overflow confirming transport inhibition. Importantly, KCl-evoked glutamate overflow under tPDC perfusion was significantly higher in cocaine-kindled mice than in control mice. These data suggest that enhancement of depolarization stimulated glutamate release may be one of the mechanisms underlying the development of increased seizure susceptibility after cocaine kindling. PMID:20927585

  8. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment.

    PubMed

    Sustarsic, Elahu G; Junnila, Riia K; Kopchick, John J

    2013-11-01

    Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute's NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on this data, GH could be a new therapeutic target in melanoma. PMID:24134847

  9. Quantification of epidermal growth factor receptor expression level and binding kinetics on cell surfaces by surface plasmon resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Shaopeng; Yin, Linliang; Yang, Yunze; Guan, Yan; Wang, Wei; Xu, Han; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, also known as ErbB-1 or HER-1) is a membrane bound protein that has been associated with a variety of solid tumors and the control of cell survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Quantification of the EGFR expression level in cell membranes and the interaction kinetics with drugs are thus important for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Here we report mapping of the distribution and interaction kinetics of EGFR in their native environment with the surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) technique. The monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody was used as a model drug in this study. The binding of the antibody to EGFR overexpressed A431 cells was monitored in real time, which was found to follow the first-order kinetics with an association rate constant (ka) and dissociation rate constant (kd) of (2.7 ± 0.6) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and (1.4 ± 0.5) × 10(-4) s(-1), respectively. The dissociation constant (KD) was determined to be 0.53 ± 0.26 nM with up to seven-fold variation among different individual A431 cells. In addition, the averaged A431 cell surface EGFR density was found to be 636/μm(2) with an estimation of 5 × 10(5) EGFR per cell. Additional measurement also revealed that different EGFR positive cell lines (A431, HeLa, and A549) show receptor density dependent anti-EGFR binding kinetics. The results demonstrate that SPRi is a valuable tool for direct quantification of membrane protein expression level and ligand binding kinetics at single cell resolution. Our findings show that the local environment affects the drug-receptor interactions, and in situ measurement of membrane protein binding kinetics is important.

  10. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sustarsic, Elahu G.; Junnila, Riia K.; Kopchick, John J.

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on

  11. Serum levels of sex hormones and expression of their receptors in thyroid tissue in female patients with various types of thyroid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Chen, Guang; Meng, Xian-Ying; Liu, Zhong-Hui; Dong, Su

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in thyroid cancer; however, little is known regarding the levels of estrogen, progesterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) in serum and the expression of ER, PR, FSH receptor (FSHR), and LH receptor (LHR) in thyroid tissues of patients with different types of thyroid neoplasms. Serum levels of estrogen, progesterone, FSH, and LH were measured by chemiluminescence, and expression of ER, PR, FSHR, and LHR in thyroid tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry in female patients with thyroid adenoma (n = 70), nodular goiter (n = 73), thyroid papillary cancer (n = 149), poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (n = 12), or undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (n = 8) and in normal controls (n = 60). The positive rates of serum estrogen level and ERα expression were significantly greater in patients with various types of thyroid neoplasms than in normal controls. The positive rates of ERβ expression were significantly less in various types of thyroid neoplasms than in normal thyroid tissues, especially in poorly differentiated carcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma. The negative rates of serum progesterone level and positive rates of PR expression in thyroid tissue were significantly greater in patients with thyroid adenoma, nodular goiter, or thyroid papillary cancer than in normal controls. The positive rates of serum FSH and LH levels and FSHR and LHR expression were significantly greater in the thyroid adenoma group than in other groups. Our findings suggest that thyroid neoplasms might be sex hormone-dependent. The positive expression of ERα and PR often indicates thyroid papillary carcinoma, and the ERβ expression status is important for the diagnosis of poorly differentiated carcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma. In addition, thyroid adenoma is often accompanied by an increase in serum FSH and LH levels, as well as

  12. Combined effects of levonorgestrel and quinestrol on reproductive hormone levels and receptor expression in females of the Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiaohui; Shi, Dazhao

    2012-01-01

    The effects of treatment with a combination of levonorgestrel and quinestrol (EP-1; ratio of 2:1) on reproductive hormone levels and the expression of their receptors in female Mongolian gerbils were examined. We show that serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) decreased, whereas serum estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) increased after EP-1 treatment. EP1 down-regulated mRNA expression of the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) and the estrogen receptor (ER) βin the ovary. EP-1 up-regulated the mRNA expression of the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and the progesterone receptor (PR) in the ovary as well as ERα and PR in the uterus of Mongolian gerbils. The effects were time-dependent and dose-dependent. EP-1 had no obvious effects on ERα mRNA expression in the ovary. The current study demonstrates that the effect of EP-1 on the expression of ER subtypes is tissue-specific in Mongolian gerbils. EP-1 disrupted the reproductive endocrinology of the Mongolian gerbil. These findings suggest that the effects of EP-1 on reproductive hormone levels and their receptor expression in Mongolian gerbils may be the result of synergistic actions of levonorgestrel and quinestrol, with quinestrol playing the major role. PMID:22233494

  13. Increased levels of prolactin receptor expression correlate with the early onset of lupus symptoms and increased numbers of transitional-1 B cells after prolactin treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prolactin is secreted from the pituitary gland and other organs, as well as by cells such as lymphocytes. Prolactin has an immunostimulatory effect and is associated with autoimmune diseases that are characterised by abnormal B cell activation, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our aim was to determine if different splenic B cell subsets express the prolactin receptor and if the presence of prolactin influences these B cell subsets and correlates with development of lupus. Results Using real-time PCR and flow cytometry, we found that different subsets of immature (transitional) and mature (follicular, marginal zone) B cells express different levels of the prolactin receptor and are differentially affected by hyperprolactinaemia. We found that transitional B cells express the prolactin receptor at higher levels compared to mature B cells in C57BL/6 mice and the lupus-prone MRL/lpr and MRL mouse strains. Transitional-1 (T1) B cells showed a higher level of prolactin receptor expression in both MRL/lpr and MRL mice compared to C57BL/6 mice. Hyperprolactinaemia was induced using metoclopramide, which resulted in the development of early symptoms of SLE. We found that T1 B cells are the main targets of prolactin and that prolactin augments the absolute number of T1 B cells, which reflects the finding that this B cell subpopulation expresses the highest level of the prolactin receptor. Conclusions We found that all B cell subsets express the prolactin receptor but that transitional B cells showed the highest prolactin receptor expression levels. Hyperprolactinaemia in mice susceptible to lupus accelerated the disease and increased the absolute numbers of T1 and T3 B cells but not of mature B cells, suggesting a primary effect of prolactin on the early stages of B cell maturation in the spleen and a role of prolactin in B cell differentiation, contributing to SLE onset. PMID:22404893

  14. Protein levels and gene expressions of the epidermal growth factor receptors, HER1, HER2, HER3 and HER4 in benign and malignant ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Jeppesen, Ulla; Knudsen, Hans Jørgen; Brandslund, Ivan; Jakobsen, Anders

    2008-07-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptors, HER1, HER2, HER3 and HER4 play a key role in the growth of malignant tumors. The receptors of the EGF receptor family are not cancer-specific proteins since these receptors are expressed to some extent in both normal and benign tissue, but this is not elucidated in detail in ovarian tissue. High tumor-to-normal-tissue concentration ratios would be favorable for molecular targeted anti-cancer treatment. The primary aim of the study was to analyze the potential differential protein content and gene expression of the four receptors in benign and malignant ovarian tumors. Tissue from 207 patients (101 malignant, 19 borderline, 64 benign ovarian tumors and 23 normal ovaries) were analyzed by quantitative ELISA for HER1-HER4 protein concentrations and by real-time PCR for HER1-HER4 gene expression. HER2 was also analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The HER2-4 receptor protein content and the median gene expression level was significantly higher in ovarian cancer patients compared to patients with benign ovarian tumors and normal ovaries (p<0.0000001). The protein content of the HER1 receptor was significantly lower in ovarian cancer compared to borderline tumors (p=0.012), benign ovarian tumors (p=0.049) and to normal ovaries (p=0.000069). A sound correlation between the protein levels and gene expressions was documented. In conclusion, decreased concentration of HER1 protein and increased HER2, HER3 and HER4 protein concentration were observed, as also elevated HER2-HER4 gene expression levels in ovarian cancer patients with barely any overlap of the HER3 and HER4 expression in malignant ovarian tumors compared to benign ovarian tissues.

  15. Dexamethasone inhibits human interleukin 2 but not interleukin 2 receptor gene expression in vitro at the level of nuclear transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Boumpas, D T; Anastassiou, E D; Older, S A; Tsokos, G C; Nelson, D L; Balow, J E

    1991-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids have an inhibitory effect on the expression of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) genes. To determine the mechanisms of this inhibition, human T lymphocytes were stimulated with mitogens in the presence of dexamethasone. Nuclear transcription run-off assays showed that high doses of dexamethasone inhibited the transcription of the IL-2 gene but not that of the IL-2R gene. Post-transcriptionally, high doses of dexamethasone (10(-4) M) were required to inhibit IL-2R mRNA levels by 50%, whereas lower doses (10(-6) M) inhibited by greater than 70% the accumulation of IL-2 mRNA. IL-2 mRNA half-life decreased in the presence of dexamethasone (10(-6) M) by approximately 50%. At the protein product level, dexamethasone inhibited both IL-2 production, as well as cell surface and soluble forms of IL-2R. IL-2R gene expression was inhibited for at least 72 h after exposure of cells to dexamethasone. In the presence of exogenous IL-2, dexamethasone failed to exert a significant effect on the production of IL-2R protein. These data indicate that dexamethasone has a greater effect on the expression of the IL-2 gene than on the IL-2R gene. Dexamethasone both inhibits transcription of the IL-2 gene and decreases the stability of IL-2 mRNA. The effect of dexamethasone on the IL-2R gene is post-transcriptional and may result indirectly from decreased IL-2 production. Images PMID:2022743

  16. Development of a quantitative diagnostic method of estrogen receptor expression levels by immunohistochemistry using organic fluorescent material-assembled nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gonda, Kohsuke; Miyashita, Minoru; Watanabe, Mika; Takahashi, Yayoi; Goda, Hideki; Okada, Hisatake; Nakano, Yasushi; Tada, Hiroshi; Amari, Masakazu; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2012-09-28

    The detection of estrogen receptors (ERs) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) is slightly weak as a prognostic marker, but it is essential to the application of endocrine therapy, such as antiestrogen tamoxifen-based therapy. IHC using DAB is a poor quantitative method because horseradish peroxidase (HRP) activity depends on reaction time, temperature and substrate concentration. However, IHC using fluorescent material provides an effective method to quantitatively use IHC because the signal intensity is proportional to the intensity of the photon excitation energy. However, the high level of autofluorescence has impeded the development of quantitative IHC using fluorescence. We developed organic fluorescent material (tetramethylrhodamine)-assembled nanoparticles for IHC. Tissue autofluorescence is comparable to the fluorescence intensity of quantum dots, which are the most representative fluorescent nanoparticles. The fluorescent intensity of our novel nanoparticles was 10.2-fold greater than quantum dots, and they did not bind non-specifically to breast cancer tissues due to the polyethylene glycol chain that coated their surfaces. Therefore, the fluorescent intensity of our nanoparticles significantly exceeded autofluorescence, which produced a significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio on IHC-imaged cancer tissues than previous methods. Moreover, immunostaining data from our nanoparticle fluorescent IHC and IHC with DAB were compared in the same region of adjacent tissues sections to quantitatively examine the two methods. The results demonstrated that our nanoparticle staining analyzed a wide range of ER expression levels with higher accuracy and quantitative sensitivity than DAB staining. This enhancement in the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity for ERs using our immunostaining method will improve the prediction of responses to therapies that target ERs and progesterone receptors that are induced by a downstream ER signal. PMID

  17. Development of a quantitative diagnostic method of estrogen receptor expression levels by immunohistochemistry using organic fluorescent material-assembled nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Gonda, Kohsuke; Miyashita, Minoru; Watanabe, Mika; Takahashi, Yayoi; Goda, Hideki; Okada, Hisatake; Nakano, Yasushi; Tada, Hiroshi; Amari, Masakazu; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic fluorescent material-assembled nanoparticles for IHC were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New nanoparticle fluorescent intensity was 10.2-fold greater than Qdot655. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticle staining analyzed a wide range of ER expression levels in tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticle staining enhanced the quantitative sensitivity for ER diagnosis. -- Abstract: The detection of estrogen receptors (ERs) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using 3,3 Prime -diaminobenzidine (DAB) is slightly weak as a prognostic marker, but it is essential to the application of endocrine therapy, such as antiestrogen tamoxifen-based therapy. IHC using DAB is a poor quantitative method because horseradish peroxidase (HRP) activity depends on reaction time, temperature and substrate concentration. However, IHC using fluorescent material provides an effective method to quantitatively use IHC because the signal intensity is proportional to the intensity of the photon excitation energy. However, the high level of autofluorescence has impeded the development of quantitative IHC using fluorescence. We developed organic fluorescent material (tetramethylrhodamine)-assembled nanoparticles for IHC. Tissue autofluorescence is comparable to the fluorescence intensity of quantum dots, which are the most representative fluorescent nanoparticles. The fluorescent intensity of our novel nanoparticles was 10.2-fold greater than quantum dots, and they did not bind non-specifically to breast cancer tissues due to the polyethylene glycol chain that coated their surfaces. Therefore, the fluorescent intensity of our nanoparticles significantly exceeded autofluorescence, which produced a significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio on IHC-imaged cancer tissues than previous methods. Moreover, immunostaining data from our nanoparticle fluorescent IHC and IHC with DAB were compared in the same region of adjacent tissues sections to

  18. Neuropeptide Receptor Transcript Expression Levels and Magnitude of Ionic Current Responses Show Cell Type-Specific Differences in a Small Motor Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Veronica J.; Daur, Nelly; Temporal, Simone; Schulz, David J.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the relationship between neuropeptide receptor transcript expression and current responses in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the crab, Cancer borealis. We identified a transcript with high sequence similarity to crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) receptors in insects and mammalian neuropeptide S receptors. This transcript was expressed throughout the nervous system, consistent with the role of CCAP in a range of different behaviors. In the STG, single-cell qPCR showed expression in only a subset of neurons. This subset had previously been shown to respond to CCAP with the activation of a modulator-activated inward current (IMI), with one exception. In the one cell type that showed expression but no IMI responses, we found CCAP modulation of synaptic currents. Expression levels within STG neuron types were fairly variable, but significantly different between some neuron types. We tested the magnitude and concentration dependence of IMI responses to CCAP application in two identified neurons, the lateral pyloric (LP) and the inferior cardiac (IC) neurons. LP had several-fold higher expression and showed larger current responses. It also was more sensitive to low CCAP concentrations and showed saturation at lower concentrations, as sigmoid fits showed smaller EC50 values and steeper slopes. In addition, occlusion experiments with proctolin, a different neuropeptide converging onto IMI, showed that saturating concentrations of CCAP activated all available IMI in LP, but only approximately two-thirds in IC, the neuron with lower receptor transcript expression. The implications of these findings for comodulation are discussed. PMID:25926455

  19. Dopamine receptor D1 and postsynaptic density gene variants associate with opiate abuse and striatal expression levels.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M M; Ökvist, A; Horvath, M; Keller, E; Bannon, M J; Morgello, S; Hurd, Y L

    2013-11-01

    Opioid drugs are highly addictive and their abuse has a strong genetic load. Dopamine-glutamate interactions are hypothesized to be important for regulating neural systems central for addiction vulnerability. Balanced dopamine-glutamate interaction is mediated through several functional associations, including a physical link between discs, large homolog 4 (Drosophila) (DLG4, PSD-95) and dopamine receptor 1 (DRD1) within the postsynaptic density to regulate DRD1 trafficking. To address whether genetic associations with heroin abuse exist in relation to dopamine and glutamate and their potential interactions, we evaluated single-nucleotide polymorphisms of key genes within these systems in three populations of opiate abusers and controls, totaling 489 individuals from Europe and the United States. Despite significant differences in racial makeup of the separate samples, polymorphisms of DRD1 and DLG4 were found to be associated with opiate abuse. In addition, a strong gene-gene interaction between homer 1 homolog (Drosophila) (HOMER1) and DRD1 was predicted to occur in Caucasian subjects. This interaction was further analyzed by evaluating DRD1 genotype in relation to HOMER1b/c protein expression in postmortem tissue from a subset of Caucasian subjects. DRD1 rs265973 genotype correlated with HOMER1b/c levels in the striatum, but not cortex or amygdala; the correlation was inversed in opiate abusers as compared with controls. Cumulatively, these results support the hypothesis that there may be significant, genetically influenced interactions between glutamatergic and dopaminergic pathways in opiate abusers.

  20. Dopamine receptor D1 and post-synaptic density gene variants associate with opiate abuse and striatal expression levels

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Michelle M.; Ökvist, Anna; Horvath, Monika; Keller, Eva; Bannon, Michael J.; Morgello, Susan; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2013-01-01

    Opioid drugs are highly addictive and their abuse has a strong genetic load. Dopamine-glutamate interactions are hypothesized to be important for regulating neural systems central for addiction vulnerability. Balanced dopamine-glutamate interaction is mediated through several functional associations, including a physical link between discs, large homolog 4 (Drosophila) (DLG4, PSD-95) and dopamine receptor 1 (DRD1) within the postsynaptic density to regulate DRD1 trafficking. To address whether genetic associations with heroin abuse exist in relation to dopamine and glutamate and their potential interactions, we evaluated single nucleotide polymorphisms of key genes within these systems in three populations of opiate abusers and controls, totaling 489 individuals from Europe and the USA. Despite significant differences in racial makeup of the separate samples, polymorphisms of DRD1 and DLG4 were found to be associated with opiate abuse. In addition, a strong gene-gene interaction between homer 1 homolog (Drosophila) (HOMER1) and DRD1 was predicted to occur in Caucasian subjects. This interaction was further analyzed by evaluating DRD1 genotype in relation to HOMER1b/c protein expression in postmortem tissue from a subset of Caucasian subjects. DRD1 rs265973 genotype correlated with HOMER1b/c levels in the striatum, but not cortex or amgydala; the correlation was inversed in opiate abusers as compared to controls. Cumulatively, these results support the hypothesis that there may be significant, genetically-influenced interactions between glutamatergic and dopaminergic pathways in opiate abusers. PMID:23044706

  1. Association of Serum Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells Levels in Malignant Febrile Neutropenic Patients with Bacteremia and Fungemia

    PubMed Central

    Arzanian, Mohammad-Taghi; Soltani, Babak; Fahimzad, Alireza; Shiva, Farideh; Shamshiri, Ahmad-Reza; Karimi, Abdollah

    2011-01-01

    Objective Infections are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in febrile neutropenic patients with malignancy. Rapid diagnostic tests are needed for prompt diagnosis and early treatment which is crucial for optimal management. We assessed the utility of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (sTREM-1) in the diagnosis of bacteremia and fungemia in febrile neutropenic patients. Methods Sixty-five febrile neutropenic children with malignancy hospitalized in Mofid Children's Hospital during a period of one year from January 2007 were recruited for this cross sectional study (mean age 66.2± 37 months; 35 females and 30 males). Thirty patients (46.2%) had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 2 (3.1%) acute myeloid leukemia, one (1.5%) lymphoma and 32 (49.2%) were under treatment for solid tumors. Simultaneous blood samples were collected for measurement of serum sTREM-1 levels and for blood cultures which were grown in BACTEC media. Gold standard for the presence of infection was a positive BACTEC culture as a more sensitive method compared to current blood culture techniques. Findings Blood cultures with BACTEC system were positive in 13(20%) patients (12 bacterial and one fungal culture). The mean serum sTREM-1 level in BACTEC positive patients was 948.2±592.9 pg/ml but in BACTEC negative cases it was 76.3±118.8 pg/ml (P<0.001). The optimal cut-off point of sTREM-1 for detecting patients with positive result of BACTEC was 525 pg/ml with sensitivity and specificity of 84.6% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion Our study revealed a significant association between serum sTREM-1 level and bacteremia and fungemia in febrile neutropenic patients suffering malignancy with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. PMID:23056805

  2. Expression of insect α6-like nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila melanogaster highlights a high level of conservation of the receptor:spinosyn interaction.

    PubMed

    Perry, Trent; Somers, Jason; Yang, Ying Ting; Batterham, Philip

    2015-09-01

    Insecticide research has often relied on model species for elucidating the resistance mechanisms present in the targeted pests. The accuracy and applicability of extrapolations of these laboratory findings to field conditions varies but, for target site resistance, conserved mechanisms are generally the rule rather than the exception (Perry et al., 2011). The spinosyn class of insecticides appear to fit this paradigm and are a pest control option with many uses in both crop and animal protection. Resistance to spinosyns has been identified in both laboratory-selected and field-collected pest insects. Studies using the model insect, Drosophila melanogaster, have identified the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit, Dα6 as an important target of the insecticide spinosad (Perry et al., 2007; Watson et al., 2010). Field-isolated resistant strains of several agricultural pest insects provide evidence that resistance cases are often associated with mutations in orthologues to Dα6 (Baxter et al., 2010; Puinean et al., 2013). The expression of these receptors is difficult in heterologous systems. In order to examine the biology of the Dα6 receptor subunit further, we used Drosophila as a model and developed an in vivo rescue system. This allowed us to express four different isoforms of Dα6 and show that each is able to rescue the response to spinosad. Regulatory sequences upstream of the Dα6 gene able to rescue the resistance phenotype were identified. Expression of other D. melanogaster subunits revealed that the rescue phenotype appears to be Dα6 specific. We also demonstrate that expression of pest insect orthologues of Dα6 from a variety of species are capable of rescuing the spinosad response phenotype, verifying the relevance of this receptor to resistance monitoring in the field. In the absence of a robust heterologous expression system, this study presents an in vivo model that will be useful in analysing many other aspects of these receptors and

  3. IMPAIRED NATURAL KILLER CELL LYSIS IN BREAST CANCER PATIENTS WITH HIGH LEVELS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS IS ASSOCIATED WITH ALTERED EXPRESSION OF KILLER IMMUNOGLOBULIN-LIKE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Varker, Kimberly A.; Terrell, Catherine E.; Welt, Marilyn; Suleiman, Samer; Thornton, Lisa; Andersen, Barbara L.; Carson, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Background We previously reported that cancer-related psychological stress is associated with reduced natural killer (NK) cell lysis. We hypothesized that reduced NK cell cytotoxicity in patients with increased levels of stress would correlate with alterations in the expression of inhibitory NK cell receptors (killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, or KIRs). The specific aim of this study was to examine KIR expression in patients with high or low levels of psychologic stress and correlate alterations in KIR expression with NK cell function. Materials and Methods 227 patients underwent baseline evaluation of cancer-related psychological stress and were randomized to psychosocial intervention versus observation. From this population, two groups were defined based on pre-treatment measurements of NK lytic activity, stress levels, and the availability of cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Group I (n = 9) had low stress by the Impact of Events Scale (IES), and high NK cell lysis at the 50:1 effector: target ratio (NK50 = 52–89%). Group II (n = 8) had high stress and low NK50 (27–52%). Lymphokine activated killer (LAK) activity, antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and expression of cytokine receptors, adhesion molecules, and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) were assessed in PBMC. Results Incubation of PBMC with NK-stimulatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-12, or IL-15) led to significant increases in cytotoxic activity regardless of IES/NK50 scores. There were no significant group differences in NK cell surface expression of the IL-2 receptor components CD25 and CD122, antibody-dependent lysis of HER2/neu-positive SKBr3 cells treated with an anti-HER2/neu monoclonal antibody, expression of adhesion molecules (CD2, CD11a, CD18) and markers of activation (CD69), or expression of the KIRs CD158a, NKG2a, NKB1, and CD161. However, levels of CD158b were significantly higher in Group I after incubation in media alone or with IL-2, and CD94

  4. Expression levels of a LAR-like receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase correlate with neuronal branching and arbor density in the medicinal leech.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael W; Macagno, Eduardo R

    2010-08-01

    LAR-like receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), which are reported to be highly expressed in the nervous systems of most bilaterian animals, have been implicated in the regulation of critical developmental processes, such as neuronal pathfinding, cell adhesion and synaptogenesis. Here we report that two LAR-like RPTPs in the medicinal leech, HmLAR1 and HmLAR2, play roles in regulating the size and density of neuronal arbors within the developing nervous system and in the body wall. Employing single-cell RNAi knockdown and transgene expression techniques, we demonstrate that the expression level of HmLAR1 is directly correlated with the density of an identified neuron's arborization. Knocking down HmLAR1 mRNA levels in the mechanosensory pressure (P) neurons produces a reduced central arbor and a smaller arbor in the peripheral body wall, with fewer terminal branches. By contrast, overexpression of this receptor in a P cell leads to extensive neuronal sprouting, including many supernumerary neurites and terminal branches as well as, in some instances, the normal monopolar morphology of the P cell becoming multipolar. We also report that induced neuronal sprouting requires the expression of the receptor's membrane tethered ectodomain, including the NH(2)-Ig domains, but not of the intracellular phosphatase domains of the receptor. Interestingly, sprouting could be elicited upon ectopic expression of HmLAR1 and the related RPTP, HmLAR2 in the P and other neurons, including those that do not normally express either RPTP, suggesting that the substrates involved in HmLAR-induced sprouting are present in most neurons irrespective of whether they normally express these LAR-like RPTPs. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the receptors' ectodomains promote an adhesive interaction that enhances the maintenance of new processes.

  5. Changes in Estrogen Receptor ERβ (ESR2) Expression without Changes in the Estradiol Levels in the Prostate of Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Morais-Santos, Mônica; Nunes, Aryane E. B.; Oliveira, André G.; Moura-Cordeiro, Júnia Dayrell; Mahecha, Germán A. B.; Avellar, Maria Christina W.; Oliveira, Cleida A.

    2015-01-01

    Although the prostate is androgen-dependent, it is also influenced by estrogens, which act via the estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ. In the prostate, ERβ is highly expressed in the epithelium and appears to participate in the regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. Evidence shows that ERβ is decreased in malignant prostate, suggesting that it plays an important role in protecting this tissue. Despite the relationship between reductions in ERβ and abnormal growth of the gland, little is known about the age-dependent variation of this receptor. Therefore, we aimed to investigate ERβ expression in the prostatic lobes of aging Wistar rats (3 to 24 months). Histopathological alterations, including hyperplasia, intraluminal concretions, nuclear atypia and prostate intraepithelial neoplasias (PIN), were observed in the prostates of aging rats. Epithelial proliferation led to cribriform architecture in some acini, especially in the ventral prostate (VP). In the VP, areas of epithelial atrophy were also observed. Furthermore, in the lateral prostate, there was frequent prostatitis. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression of ERβ is reduced in specific areas related to PIN, atrophic abnormalities and cellular atypia in the prostate epithelium of senile rats. Corroborating the involvement of the receptor with proliferative activity, the punctual reduction in ERβ paralleled the increase in cell proliferation especially in areas of PIN and nuclear atypies. The decrease in ERβ reactivity occurred in a hormonal milieu characterized by a constant concentration of estradiol and decreased plasmatic and tissue DHT. This paper is a pioneering study that reveals focal ERβ reduction in the prostate of aging rats and indicates a potential disorder in the ERβ pathway. These data corroborate previous data from humans and dogs that silencing of this receptor may be associated with premalignant or malignant conditions in the prostate. PMID:26147849

  6. Influence of type-I Interferon receptor expression level on the response to type-I Interferons in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Booy, Stephanie; van Eijck, Casper H J; Dogan, Fadime; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Hofland, Leo J

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Type-I interferons (e.g. IFN-α/-β) have several anti-tumour activities. Over the past few years, clinical studies evaluating the effect of adjuvant IFN-α therapy in pancreatic cancer yielded equivocal results. Although IFN-α and -β act via the type-I IFN receptor, the role of the number of receptors present on tumour cells is still unknown. Therefore, this study associated, for the first time, in a large panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines the effects of IFN-α/-β with the expression of type-I IFN receptors. The anti-tumour effects of IFN-α or IFN-β on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in 11 human pancreatic cell lines. Type-I IFN receptor expression was determined on both the mRNA and protein level. After 7 days of incubation, IFN-α significantly reduced cell growth in eight cell lines by 5-67%. IFN-β inhibited cell growth statistically significant in all cell lines by 43-100%. After 3 days of treatment, IFN-β induced significantly more apoptosis than IFN-α. The cell lines variably expressed the type-I IFN receptor. The maximal inhibitory effect of IFN-α was positively correlated with the IFNAR-1 mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.63), IFNAR-2c mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.69) and protein expression (P < 0.05, r = 0.65). Human pancreatic cancer cell lines variably respond to IFN-α and -β. The expression level of the type-I IFN receptor is of predictive value for the direct anti-tumour effects of IFN-α treatment. More importantly, IFN-β induces anti-tumour effects already at much lower concentrations, is less dependent on interferon receptor expression and seems, therefore, more promising than IFN-α.

  7. Cadmium-induced decrement of the LH receptor expression and cAMP levels in the testis of rats.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, David; Nordberg, Gunnar; Lundgren, Per; Selstam, Gunnar

    2003-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental pollutant, characterized by its ability to affect various organs. Adverse effect of Cd on the testis including decreased testosterone production are well-known phenomena, but the cellular events explaining these effects have not yet been established. In the present study the initial steps of gonadotropin mediated testosterone biosynthesis were examined in vivo in rats, in relation to Cd dose and time after injection. In the dose-response experiment Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a single subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of CdCl(2) (1, 5 or 10 micromol/kg body weight) and were sacrificed 48 h after injection. A statistically significant decrease in luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor mRNA level in the testicular tissue was demonstrated at the highest dose (10 micromol/kg). In the temporal-response experiment rats were given 10 micromol/kg of CdCl(2) s.c. and sacrificed 0.48, 4.8, 48 or 144 h after injection. LH receptor mRNA levels as well as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels were found to be significantly lowered at 48 and 144 h. These observations of the mechanisms whereby Cd exerts its effect on the initial steps of testosterone biosynthesis are the first from in vivo experiments. PMID:12504342

  8. BAG2 expression dictates a functional intracellular switch between the p38-dependent effects of nicotine on tau phosphorylation levels via the α7 nicotinic receptor.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Adriele Silva Alves; Santiago, Fernando Enrique; Balioni, Laiz Furlan; Ferrari, Merari de Fatima Ramires; Almeida, Maria Camila; Carrettiero, Daniel Carneiro

    2016-01-01

    The histopathological hallmarks present in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain are plaques of Aβ peptide, neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, and a reduction in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) levels. The role of nAChRs in AD is particularly controversial. Tau protein function is regulated by phosphorylation, and its hyperphosphorylated forms are significantly more abundant in AD brain. Little is known about the relationship between nAChR and phospho-tau degradation machinery. Activation of nAChRs has been reported to increase and decrease tau phosphorylation levels, and the mechanisms responsible for this discrepancy are not presently understood. The co-chaperone BAG2 is capable of regulating phospho-tau levels via protein degradation. In SH-SY5Y cell line and rat primary hippocampal cell culture low endogenous BAG2 levels constitute an intracellular environment conducive to nicotine-induced accumulation of phosphorylated tau protein. Further, nicotine treatment inhibited endogenous expression of BAG2, resulting in increased levels of phosphorylated tau indistinguishable from those induced by BAG2 knockdown. Conversely, overexpression of BAG2 is conducive to a nicotine-induced reduction in cellular levels of phosphorylated tau protein. In both cases the effect of nicotine was p38MAPK-dependent, while the α7 antagonist MLA was synthetic to nicotine treatment, either increasing levels of phospho-Tau in the absence of BAG2, or further decreasing the levels of phospho-Tau in the presence of BAG2. Taken together, these findings reconcile the apparently contradictory effects of nicotine on tau phosphorylation by suggesting a role for BAG2 as an important regulator of p38-dependent tau kinase activity and phospho-tau degradation in response to nicotinic receptor stimulation. Thus, we report that BAG2 expression dictates a functional intracellular switch between the p38-dependent functions of nicotine on tau phosphorylation levels via the α7

  9. 4-hydroxynonenal contributes to macrophage foam cell formation through increased expression of class A scavenger receptor at the level of translation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Mi R; Im, Dong S; Lee, Seung J; Woo, Joong W; Hong, Ki W; Bae, Sun S; Kim, Chi D

    2008-07-15

    4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is known to be atherogenic, but its mechanism of action in atherogenesis is not clear. Therefore, this study investigated the role of HNE in macrophage foam cell formation and the underlying mechanism involved in HNE-induced expression of scavenger receptors (SRs). In the aortic sinus of ApoE-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet, multiple plaque lesions were accompanied by increased accumulation of HNE adducts in the enhanced Mac-2 stained area. In an in vitro study, HNE exposure to J774A.1 macrophages led to increased expression of class A SR (SR-A) and CD36 at the protein level with a concomitant increase in endocytic uptake of oxLDL. In contrast to CD36 protein expression, which was associated with an increase in mRNA expression, the HNE-enhanced SR-A protein expression was neither accompanied by its mRNA expression nor affected by actinomycin D. HNE enhanced the incorporation rates of (35)S-Met/Cys into SR-A, and HNE-induced SR-A protein expression was effectively attenuated by translation inhibitors such as cycloheximide and rapamycin. Taken together, these data suggest that HNE contributes to macrophage foam cell formation through increased synthesis of SR-A at the level of mRNA translation, consequently leading to the progression of atherosclerosis.

  10. Monoallelic Expression of Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Kevin; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell collects vital information about the environment by detecting a multitude of chemical odorants. Breadth and sensitivity are provided by a huge number of chemosensory receptor proteins, including more than 1,400 olfactory receptors (ORs). Organizing the sensory information generated by these receptors so that it can be processed and evaluated by the central nervous system is a major challenge. This challenge is overcome by monogenic and monoallelic expression of OR genes. The single OR expressed by each olfactory sensory neuron determines the neuron’s odor sensitivity and the axonal connections it will make to downstream neurons in the olfactory bulb. The expression of a single OR per neuron is accomplished by coupling a slow chromatin-mediated activation process to a fast negative-feedback signal that prevents activation of additional ORs. Singular OR activation is likely orchestrated by a network of interchromosomal enhancer interactions and large-scale changes in nuclear architecture. PMID:26359778

  11. Social regulation of cortisol receptor gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Korzan, Wayne J.; Grone, Brian P.; Fernald, Russell D.

    2014-01-01

    In many social species, individuals influence the reproductive capacity of conspecifics. In a well-studied African cichlid fish species, Astatotilapia burtoni, males are either dominant (D) and reproductively competent or non-dominant (ND) and reproductively suppressed as evidenced by reduced gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH1) release, regressed gonads, lower levels of androgens and elevated levels of cortisol. Here, we asked whether androgen and cortisol levels might regulate this reproductive suppression. Astatotilapia burtoni has four glucocorticoid receptors (GR1a, GR1b, GR2 and MR), encoded by three genes, and two androgen receptors (ARα and ARβ), encoded by two genes. We previously showed that ARα and ARβ are expressed in GnRH1 neurons in the preoptic area (POA), which regulates reproduction, and that the mRNA levels of these receptors are regulated by social status. Here, we show that GR1, GR2 and MR mRNAs are also expressed in GnRH1 neurons in the POA, revealing potential mechanisms for both androgens and cortisol to influence reproductive capacity. We measured AR, MR and GR mRNA expression levels in a microdissected region of the POA containing GnRH1 neurons, comparing D and ND males. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), we found D males had higher mRNA levels of ARα, MR, total GR1a and GR2 in the POA compared with ND males. In contrast, ND males had significantly higher levels of GR1b mRNA, a receptor subtype with a reduced transcriptional response to cortisol. Through this novel regulation of receptor type, neurons in the POA of an ND male will be less affected by the higher levels of cortisol typical of low status, suggesting GR receptor type change as a potential adaptive mechanism to mediate high cortisol levels during social suppression. PMID:25013108

  12. Increased expression of mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors following low-level light treatment facilitates enhanced protoporphyrin IX production in glioma-derived cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisland, S. K.; Hassanali, N. S.; Johnson, C.; Wilson, B. C.

    2007-02-01

    This study investigates whether low level light treatment (LLLT) can enhance the expression of Peripheral-type mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) on the glioma-derived tumour cell line, CNS-1, and by doing so promote the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) and increase the photodynamic therapy (PDT)-induced cell kill using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The endogenous photosensitizer, (PpIX) and related metabolites including coproporphyrin III are known to traffic via the PBRs on the outer mitochondrial membrane on their passage into or out of the mitochondria. Astrocyte-derived cells within the brain express PBRs, while neurons express the central-type of benzodiazepine receptor. CNS-1 cells were exposed to a range of differing low-level light protocols immediately prior to PDT. LLLT involved using broad-spectrum light or monochromatic laser light specific to 635 or 905 nm wavelength. Cells (5μ10 5) were exposed to a range of LLLT doses (0, 1 or 5 J/cm2) using a fixed intensity of 10 mW/cm2 and subsequently harvested for cell viability, immunofluorescence or western blot analysis of PBR expression. The amount of PpIX within the cells was determined using chemical extraction techniques. Results confirm the induction of PBR following LLLT is dependent on the dose and wavelength of light used. Broadspectrum light provided the greatest cell kill following PDT, although LLLT with 635 nm or 905 nm also increased cell kill as compared to PDT alone. All LLLT regimens increased PBR expression compared to controls with corresponding increases in PpIX production. These data suggest that by selectively increasing PBR expression in tumour cells, LLLT may facilitate enhanced cell kill using ALA-PDT without damaging surrounding normal brain.

  13. rse, a novel receptor-type tyrosine kinase with homology to Axl/Ufo, is expressed at high levels in the brain.

    PubMed

    Mark, M R; Scadden, D T; Wang, Z; Gu, Q; Goddard, A; Godowski, P J

    1994-04-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones that encode the human and murine forms of a novel receptor-type tyrosine kinase termed Rse. Sequence analysis indicates that human Rse contains 890 amino acids, with an extracellular region composed of two immunoglobulin-like domains followed by two fibronectin type III domains. Murine Rse contains 880 amino acids and shares 90% amino acid identity with its human counterpart. Rse is structurally similar to the receptor-type tyrosine kinase Axl/Ufo, and the two proteins have 35 and 63% sequence identity in their extracellular and intracellular domains, respectively. To study the synthesis and activation of this putative receptor-type tyrosine kinase, we constructed a version of Rse (termed gD-Rse, where gD represents glycoprotein D) that contains an NH2-terminal epitope tag. NIH3T3 cells were engineered to express gD-Rse, which could be detected at the cell surface by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Moreover, gD-Rse was rapidly phosphorylated on tyrosine residues upon incubation of the cells with an antibody directed against the epitope tag, suggesting that rse encodes an active tyrosine kinase. In the human tissues we examined, the highest level of expression of rse mRNA was observed in the brain; rse mRNA was also detected in the premegakaryocytopoietic cell lines CMK11-5 and Dami. The gene for rse was localized to human chromosome 15.

  14. Distinct Transcript Isoforms of the Atypical Chemokine Receptor 1 (ACKR1)/Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) Gene Are Expressed in Lymphoblasts and Altered Isoform Levels Are Associated with Genetic Ancestry and the Duffy-Null Allele.

    PubMed

    Davis, Melissa B; Walens, Andrea; Hire, Rupali; Mumin, Kauthar; Brown, Andrea M; Ford, DeJuana; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Monteil, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atypical ChemoKine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) gene, better known as Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC or Duffy), is responsible for the Duffy Blood Group and plays a major role in regulating the circulating homeostatic levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines. Previous studies have shown that one common variant, the Duffy Null (Fy-) allele that is specific to African Ancestry groups, completely removes expression of the gene on erythrocytes; however, these individuals retain endothelial expression. Additional alleles are associated with a myriad of clinical outcomes related to immune responses and inflammation. In addition to allele variants, there are two distinct transcript isoforms of DARC which are expressed from separate promoters, and very little is known about the distinct transcriptional regulation or the distinct functionality of these protein isoforms. Our objective was to determine if the African specific Fy- allele alters the expression pattern of DARC isoforms and therefore could potentially result in a unique signature of the gene products, commonly referred to as antigens. Our work is the first to establish that there is expression of DARC on lymphoblasts. Our data indicates that people of African ancestry have distinct relative levels of DARC isoforms expressed in these cells. We conclude that the expression of both isoforms in combination with alternate alleles yields multiple Duffy antigens in ancestry groups, depending upon the haplotypes across the gene. Importantly, we hypothesize that DARC isoform expression patterns will translate into ancestry-specific inflammatory responses that are correlated with the axis of pro-inflammatory chemokine levels and distinct isoform-specific interactions with these chemokines. Ultimately, this work will increase knowledge of biological mechanisms underlying disparate clinical outcomes of inflammatory-related diseases among ethnic and geographic ancestry groups. PMID:26473357

  15. DECREASED EXPRESSION LEVEL OF APOPTOSIS-RELATED GENES AND/OR PROTEINS IN SKELETAL MUSCLES, BUT NOT IN HEARTS, OF GROWTH HORMONE RECEPTOR KNOCKOUT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Gesing, Adam; Masternak, Michal M.; Wang, Feiya; Lewinski, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Bartke, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The long-lived growth hormone (GH) receptor knockout (GHRKO; KO) mice are GH resistant due to targeted disruption of the GH receptor (Ghr) gene. Apoptosis is a physiological process in which cells play an active role in their own death and is a normal component of the development and health of multicellular organisms. Aging is associated with the progressive loss of strength of skeletal and heart muscles. Calorie restriction (CR) is a well known experimental model to delay aging and increase lifespan. The aim of the study was to examine the expression of the following apoptosis-related genes: caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, bax, bcl-2, Smac/DIABLO, p53 and cytochrome c1 (cyc1) in the skeletal muscles and hearts of female normal and GHRKO mice, fed ad libitum or subjected to 40% CR for 6 months, starting at 2 months of age. Moreover, skeletal muscle caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, bax, bcl-2, Smac/DIABLO, Apaf-1, bad, phospho-bad (pbad), phospho-p53 (pp53) and cytochrome c (cyc) protein expression levels were assessed. Results Expression of caspase-3, caspase-9, bax and Smac/DIABLO genes and proteins was decreased in GHRKO’s skeletal muscles. The Apaf-1 protein expression also was diminished in this tissue. In contrast, bcl-2 and pbad protein levels were increased in skeletal muscles in knockouts. No changes were demonstrated for the examined genes expression in GHRKO’s hearts except for the increased level of cyc1 mRNA. CR did not alter the expression of the examined genes and proteins in skeletal muscles of knockouts vs. normal (N) mice. In heart homogenates, CR increased caspase-3 mRNA level as compared to ad libitum (AL) mice. Conclusion decreased expression of certain pro-apoptotic genes and/or proteins may constitute the potential mechanism of prolonged longevity in GHRKO mice, protecting these animals from aging; this potential beneficial mechanism is not affected by calorie restriction. PMID:21321312

  16. Promoter-level expression clustering identifies time development of transcriptional regulatory cascades initiated by ErbB receptors in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mina, Marco; Magi, Shigeyuki; Jurman, Giuseppe; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Arner, Erik; Forrest, Alistair R R; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Daub, Carsten O; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Furlanello, Cesare

    2015-07-16

    The analysis of CAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) time-course has been proposed by the FANTOM5 Consortium to extend the understanding of the sequence of events facilitating cell state transition at the level of promoter regulation. To identify the most prominent transcriptional regulations induced by growth factors in human breast cancer, we apply here the Complexity Invariant Dynamic Time Warping motif EnRichment (CIDER) analysis approach to the CAGE time-course datasets of MCF-7 cells stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) or heregulin (HRG). We identify a multi-level cascade of regulations rooted by the Serum Response Factor (SRF) transcription factor, connecting the MAPK-mediated transduction of the HRG stimulus to the negative regulation of the MAPK pathway by the members of the DUSP family phosphatases. The finding confirms the known primary role of FOS and FOSL1, members of AP-1 family, in shaping gene expression in response to HRG induction. Moreover, we identify a new potential regulation of DUSP5 and RARA (known to antagonize the transcriptional regulation induced by the estrogen receptors) by the activity of the AP-1 complex, specific to HRG response. The results indicate that a divergence in AP-1 regulation determines cellular changes of breast cancer cells stimulated by ErbB receptors.

  17. Promoter-level expression clustering identifies time development of transcriptional regulatory cascades initiated by ErbB receptors in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Marco; Magi, Shigeyuki; Jurman, Giuseppe; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Arner, Erik; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Daub, Carsten O.; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Furlanello, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of CAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) time-course has been proposed by the FANTOM5 Consortium to extend the understanding of the sequence of events facilitating cell state transition at the level of promoter regulation. To identify the most prominent transcriptional regulations induced by growth factors in human breast cancer, we apply here the Complexity Invariant Dynamic Time Warping motif EnRichment (CIDER) analysis approach to the CAGE time-course datasets of MCF-7 cells stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) or heregulin (HRG). We identify a multi-level cascade of regulations rooted by the Serum Response Factor (SRF) transcription factor, connecting the MAPK-mediated transduction of the HRG stimulus to the negative regulation of the MAPK pathway by the members of the DUSP family phosphatases. The finding confirms the known primary role of FOS and FOSL1, members of AP-1 family, in shaping gene expression in response to HRG induction. Moreover, we identify a new potential regulation of DUSP5 and RARA (known to antagonize the transcriptional regulation induced by the estrogen receptors) by the activity of the AP-1 complex, specific to HRG response. The results indicate that a divergence in AP-1 regulation determines cellular changes of breast cancer cells stimulated by ErbB receptors. PMID:26179713

  18. High-level Expression Purification Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Crystallographic Studies of the Receptor Binding Domain of botulinum neurotoxin Serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhang; X Gao; G Buchko; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly toxic proteins for humans and animals that are responsible for the deadly neuroparalytic disease botulism. Here, details of the expression and purification of the receptor-binding domain (HCR) of BoNT/D in Escherichia coli are presented. Using a codon-optimized cDNA, BoNT/D{_}HCR was expressed at a high level (150-200 mg per litre of culture) in the soluble fraction. Following a three-step purification protocol, very pure (>98%) BoNT/D{_}HCR was obtained. The recombinant BoNT/D{_}HCR was crystallized and the crystals diffracted to 1.65 {angstrom} resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.8, b = 89.7, c = 93.9 {angstrom}. Preliminary crystallographic data analysis revealed the presence of one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  19. High-level expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the receptor-binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Robinson, H.; Gao, X.; Qin, L.; Buchko, G. W.; Varnum, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly toxic proteins for humans and animals that are responsible for the deadly neuroparalytic disease botulism. Here, details of the expression and purification of the receptor-binding domain (HCR) of BoNT/D in Escherichia coli are presented. Using a codon-optimized cDNA, BoNT/D{_}HCR was expressed at a high level (150-200 mg per litre of culture) in the soluble fraction. Following a three-step purification protocol, very pure (>98%) BoNT/D{_}HCR was obtained. The recombinant BoNT/D{_}HCR was crystallized and the crystals diffracted to 1.65 {angstrom} resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.8, b = 89.7, c = 93.9 {angstrom}. Preliminary crystallographic data analysis revealed the presence of one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  20. Variability of total and free IgE levels and IgE receptor expression in allergic subjects in and out of pollen season.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, M; Thorell, L; Sjölander, A; Larsson-Faria, S

    2015-04-01

    The inter- and intra-individual variability and seasonal variation of IgE, and high (FcεRI)- and low-affinity (CD23) IgE receptor expression in blood of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) subjects, is not well studied. Thirty-two otherwise healthy subjects with a history of SAR to birch pollen and a positive skin prick test to birch pollen were sampled three times out of the pollen season and three times during the pollen season. FcεRI and CD23 expressions were analysed using flow cytometry. Total IgE was analysed using ImmunoCAP(®) and free IgE was analysed with a novel customised research assay using an IgG-FcεRI-chimera protein coupled to ImmunoCAP as capture reagent, ImmunoCAP-specific IgE conjugate and ImmunoCAP IgE calibrators. The performance of the free IgE assay was compared well with the reference ImmunoCAP total IgE assay. The working range of the assay was 0.35-200 kU/l IgE. FcεRI expression on basophils and CD23 expression on B cells showed low intrasubject variability both in and out of the pollen season (<10% CV). There was a small seasonal difference with lower total IgE levels (120 versus 128 kU/l; P = 0.004) and FcεRI expression (283 versus 325 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI); P < 0.001) during the pollen season. IgE, FcεRI expression and CD23 expression fulfilled biomarker and assay requirements of variability, and allergen exposure affected the biomarkers only to a minor degree. The free IgE assay may be used for measurement of free IgE levels in patients after anti-IgE antibody treatment. PMID:25620574

  1. High-level expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli; Qin, Lin; Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2010-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly toxic proteins for humans and can cause neuroparalytic disease botulism. Due to the limitations of production and manipulation of holoenzymes, expressing non-toxic heavy chain receptor binding domains (HCR) has become a common strategy for vaccine and antibody development. Meanwhile, large quantities and highly purified soluble proteins are required for research areas such as antibody maturation and structural biology. We present high level expression and purification of the BoNT serotype D HCR in E. coli using a codon-optimized cDNA. By varying expression conditions, especially at low temperature, the protein was expressed at a high level with high solubility. About 150-200 mg protein was purified to >90% purity from 1 L cell culture. The recombinant D_HCR was crystallized and the crystals diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group P212121 with unit cell dimensions a = 60.8 Å, b = 89.7 Å, c = 93.9 Å. Preliminary crystallographic data analysis revealed one molecule in asymmetric unit.

  2. TNF-α Up-Regulates Protein Level and Cell Surface Expression of the Leptin Receptor by Stimulating Its Export via a PKC-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lixia; Guo, Kaiying; Cremona, Maria Laura; McGraw, Timothy E.; Leibel, Rudolph L.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation/cytokines may modulate hypothalamic responses to leptin, which is a key regulator of energy homeostasis and inflammatory/stress responses. We investigated a possible role of TNF-α, a key early mediator of inflammation, in regulating the expression and trafficking of the long-isoform leptin receptor (LEPRb), the primary mediator of leptin signaling, in cultured cells. We found that TNF-α in a wide range of concentrations up-regulated LEPRb protein level and soluble LEPR (sLEPR) release via ectodomain shedding of LEPRb in multiple cell types, including neuronal cells. TNF-α also acutely increased LEPRb cell surface expression and leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. In contrast, TNF-α had no significant effects on the protein level or cell surface expression of several other transmembrane proteins, including the transferrin receptor and cadherin. The stimulatory effects of TNF-α on LEPRb cell surface expression and sLEPR release were not dependent on de novo protein synthesis or functional lysosomes but were blocked by brefeldin A, suggesting that an intact Golgi or continuous endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport of newly synthesized proteins is required for these effects. However, TNF-α did not increase the half-life of cell surface LEPRb. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X abrogated the effects of TNF-α, whereas the pan-PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate mimicked the TNF-α effects. Taken together, our results suggest that TNF-α, via activation of PKC, regulates anterograde trafficking and/or degradation of LEPRb in the biosynthetic pathway, leading to concomitant increases in LEPRb protein level, cell surface expression, and sLEPR production. The finding that LEPRb cell surface expression and sLEPR production, key modulators of leptin sensitivity and bioavailability, are direct targets of TNF-α signaling could have a potentially important implication in the regulation of leptin

  3. Expression of androgen and progesterone receptors in primary human meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, M; Galanopoulos, T; Neville-Golden, J; Antoniades, H N

    1993-03-01

    Meningiomas are common brain tumors that show a predilection for females and become more aggressive during pregnancy and menses. The existence of gender-specific hormone receptors in meningiomas has long been a matter of controversy; the recent cloning of androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors has facilitated their direct evaluation. The authors have demonstrated the expression of androgen and progesterone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid and protein product in nine primary human meningiomas by Northern blot analysis. Cellular localization was achieved by in situ hybridization analysis. Estrogen receptor expression was not detected. Normal adult meninges were shown to express very low levels of both androgen and progesterone receptors.

  4. Leptin receptor null mice with reexpression of LepR in GnRHR expressing cells display elevated FSH levels but remain in a prepubertal state.

    PubMed

    Allen, Susan J; Garcia-Galiano, David; Borges, Beatriz C; Burger, Laura L; Boehm, Ulrich; Elias, Carol F

    2016-06-01

    Leptin signals energy sufficiency to the reproductive hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Studies using genetic models have demonstrated that hypothalamic neurons are major players mediating these effects. Leptin receptor (LepR) is also expressed in the pituitary gland and in the gonads, but the physiological effects of leptin in these sites are still unclear. Female mice with selective deletion of LepR in a subset of gonadotropes show normal pubertal development but impaired fertility. Conditional deletion approaches, however, often result in redundancy or developmental adaptations, which may compromise the assessment of leptin's action in gonadotropes for pubertal maturation. To circumvent these issues, we adopted a complementary genetic approach and assessed if selective reexpression of LepR only in gonadotropes is sufficient to enable puberty and improve fertility of LepR null female mice. We initially assessed the colocalization of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) and LepR in the HPG axis using GnRHR-IRES-Cre (GRIC) and LepR-Cre reporter (tdTomato or enhanced green fluorescent protein) mice. We found that GRIC and leptin-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 are expressed in distinct hypothalamic neurons. Whereas LepR-Cre was observed in theca cells, GRIC expression was rarely found in the ovarian parenchyma. In contrast, a subpopulation of gonadotropes expressed the LepR-Cre reporter gene (tdTomato). We then crossed the GRIC mice with the LepR null reactivable (LepR(loxTB)) mice. These mice showed an increase in FSH levels, but they remained in a prepubertal state. Together with previous findings, our data indicate that leptin-selective action in gonadotropes serves a role in adult reproductive physiology but is not sufficient to allow pubertal maturation in mice.

  5. Effects of Starvation on Brain Short Neuropeptide F-1, -2, and -3 Levels and Short Neuropeptide F Receptor Expression Levels of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Shinji; Matsumoto, Sumihiro; Nakane, Tomohiro; Ohara, Ayako; Morooka, Nobukatsu; Konuma, Takahiro; Nagai, Chiaki; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2012-01-01

    In our previous report, we demonstrated the possibility that various regulatory neuropeptides influence feeding behavior in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Among these feeding-related neuropeptides, short neuropeptide F (sNPF) exhibited feeding-accelerating activity when injected into B. mori larvae. Like other insect sNPFs, the deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA encoding the sNPF precursor appears to produce multiple sNPF and sNPF-related peptides in B. mori. The presence of three sNPFs, sNPF-1, sNPF-2, and sNPF-3, in the brain of B. mori larvae was confirmed by direct MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric profiling. In addition, all three sNPFs are present in other larval ganglia. The presence of sNPF mRNA in the central nervous system (CNS) was also confirmed by Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Semi-quantitative analyses of sNPFs in the larval brain using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry further revealed that brain sNPF levels decrease in response to starvation, and that they recover with the resumption of feeding. These data suggest that sNPFs were depleted by the starvation process. Furthermore, food deprivation decreased the transcriptional levels of the sNPF receptor (BNGR-A10) in the brain and CNS, suggesting that the sNPF system is dependent on the feeding state of the insect and that the sNPF system may be linked to locomotor activity associated with foraging behavior. Since the injection of sNPFs accelerated the onset of feeding in B. mori larvae, we concluded that sNPFs are strongly related to feeding behavior. In addition, semi-quantitative MS analyses revealed that allatostatin, which is present in the larval brain, is also reduced in response to starvation, whereas the peptide level of Bommyosuppressin was not affected by different feeding states. PMID:22649403

  6. A link between high serum levels of human chorionic gonadotrophin and chorionic expression of its mature functional receptor (LHCGR) in Down's syndrome pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Subhasis; Smallwood, Alan; Chambers, Anne E; Papageorghiou, Aris; Loosfelt, Hugues; Spencer, Kevin; Campbell, Stuart; Nicolaides, Kypros

    2005-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) is released from placental trophoblasts and is involved in establishing pregnancy by maintaining progesterone secretion from the corpus luteum. Serum hCG is detected in the maternal circulation within the first 2–3 wks of gestation and peaks at the end of the first trimester before declining. In Down's syndrome (DS) pregnancies, serum hCG remains significantly high compared to gestation age-matched uncompromised pregnancies. It has been proposed that increased serum hCG levels could be due to transcriptional hyper-activation of the CGB (hCG beta) gene, or an increased half life of glycosylated hCG hormone, or both. Another possibility is that serum hCG levels remain high due to reduced availability of the hormone's cognate receptor, LHCGR, leading to lack of hormone utilization. We have tested this hypothesis by quantifying the expression of the hCG beta (CGB) RNA, LHCGR RNA and LHCGR proteins in chorionic villous samples. We demonstrate that chorionic expression of hCG beta (CGB) mRNA directly correlates with high serum hCG levels. The steady-state synthesis of LHCGR mRNA (exons 1–5) in DS pregnancies was significantly higher than that of controls, but the expression of full-length LHCGR mRNA (exons 1–11) in DS was comparable to that of uncompromised pregnancies. However, the synthesis of high molecular weight mature LHCGR proteins was significantly reduced in DS compared to uncompromised pregnancies, suggesting a lack of utilization of circulating hCG in DS pregnancies. PMID:15969756

  7. Expression of pattern recognition receptors in cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Yun; Park, Moon Suh; Byun, Jae Yong; Kim, Young Il; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2014-02-01

    Although many immunologic mechanisms have been investigated in studies of the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma, the role of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) has not been fully determined. Therefore, we assessed innate immune responses in patients with cholesteatoma. We prospectively evaluated 21 patients with acquired cholesteatoma between August 2010 and July 2012. Cholesteatoma specimens were obtained during surgery, and skin from the external meatus of each patient was used as a control. RNA was extracted from these tissue samples, followed by real-time PCR to quantitatively assess the relative expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs), NOD-like receptors (NLRs), retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I, NO synthase (NOS) and cytokines. The levels of TLR-2, -3, -4, -6, -7, and -10, NOD-2, and IL-1 and -8 mRNAs were significantly higher in the cholesteatoma than in the skin specimens (p < .05). The expression levels of TLR-2 and -3, RIG-I, IL-6, and TNF-α mRNAs were significantly higher in cholesteatomas from women than from men. The levels of TLR-8, NOD-2, IL-12, and TNF-α mRNAs were significantly higher in recurrent than in initial cholesteatoma specimens (p < .05). Hearing level did not correlate with the levels of expression of mRNAs encoding TLRs, NLRs, NOS, RIG-I and related cytokines (p > .05). In conclusion, alterations in innate immunity triggered by PRRs are important in the pathophysiology of cholesteatoma. Gender differences and frequency of surgery may affect the expression of PRRs in cholesteatomas.

  8. 5-HT1A receptor gene silencers Freud-1 and Freud-2 are differently expressed in the brain of rats with genetically determined high level of fear-induced aggression or its absence.

    PubMed

    Kondaurova, Elena M; Ilchibaeva, Tatiana V; Tsybko, Anton S; Kozhemyakina, Rimma V; Popova, Nina K; Naumenko, Vladimir S

    2016-09-01

    Serotonin 5-HT1A receptor is known to play a crucial role in the mechanisms of genetically defined aggression. In its turn, 5-HT1A receptor functional state is under control of multiple factors. Among others, transcriptional factors Freud-1 and Freud-2 are known to be involved in the repression of 5-HT1A receptor gene expression. However, implication of these factors in the regulation of behavior is unclear. Here, we investigated the expression of 5-HT1A receptor and silencers Freud-1 and Freud-2 in the brain of rats selectively bred for 85 generations for either high level of fear-induced aggression or its absence. It was shown that Freud-1 and Freud-2 levels were different in aggressive and nonaggressive animals. Freud-1 protein level was decreased in the hippocampus, whereas Freud-2 protein level was increased in the frontal cortex of highly aggressive rats. There no differences in 5-HT1A receptor gene expression were found in the brains of highly aggressive and nonaggressive rats. However, 5-HT1A receptor protein level was decreased in the midbrain and increased in the hippocampus of highly aggressive rats. These data showed the involvement of Freud-1 and Freud-2 in the regulation of genetically defined fear-induced aggression. However, these silencers do not affect transcription of the 5-HT1A receptor gene in the investigated rats. Our data indicate the implication of posttranscriptional rather than transcriptional regulation of 5-HT1A receptor functional state in the mechanisms of genetically determined aggressive behavior. On the other hand, the implication of other transcriptional regulators for 5-HT1A receptor gene in the mechanisms of genetically defined aggression could be suggested.

  9. Expression of insulin-like growth factor I receptors at mRNA and protein levels during metamorphosis of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junling; Shi, Zhiyi; Cheng, Qi; Chen, Xiaowu

    2011-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is an important regulator of fish growth and development, and its biological actions are initiated by binding to IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR). Our previous study has revealed that IGF-I could play an important role during metamorphosis of Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. The analysis of IGF-IR expression thus helps further elucidate the IGF-I regulation of metamorphic processes. In this study, the spatial-temporal expression of two distinct IGF-IR mRNAs was investigated by real-time RT-PCR. The spatial distribution of two IGF-IR mRNAs in adult tissues is largely overlapped, but they exhibit distinct temporal expression patterns during larval development. A remarkable decrease in IGF-IR-2 mRNA was detected during metamorphosis. In contrast, a significant increase in IGF-IR-1 mRNA was determined from pre-metamorphosis to metamorphic completion. These indicate that they may play different function roles during the flounder metamorphosis. The levels and localization of IGF-IR proteins during larval development were further studied by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Immunoreactive IGF-IRs were detected throughout larval development, and the IGF-IR proteins displayed a relatively abundant expression during metamorphosis. Moreover, the IGF-IR proteins appeared in key tissues, such as thickened skin beneath the migrating eye, developing intestine, gills and kidney during metamorphosis. These results further suggest that the IGF-I system may be involved in metamorphic development of Japanese flounder.

  10. Increased Expression of Kindlin 2 in Luteinized Granulosa Cells Correlates With Androgen Receptor Level in Patients With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Having Hyperandrogenemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Du, Juan; Lu, Danyu; Ren, Caixia; Shen, Huan; Qiao, Jie; Zhang, Hongquan

    2014-01-01

    Hyperandrogenemia is the leading defect in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and considered to be involved in the ovulation dysfunction of PCOS. During the process of ovulation, granulosa cells (GCs) undergo epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), and integrin-interacting protein kindlin 2 is a well-known regulator in EMT. Therefore, our objective here was to compare the expression levels of kindlin 2 in luteinized GCs between patients with PCOS and control women and the relationship between kindlin 2 and PCOS pathogenesis. In this study, kindlin 2 expression was significantly increased in luteinized GCs from patients with PCOS, and kindlin 2 could be induced by testosterone both in vitro and in vivo. Meanwhile, kindlin 2 was positively correlated with androgen receptor (AR) in PCOS GCs. Taken together, kindlin 2 may play a role in luteinized GCs, especially in the case of excess androgen. Further studies are required to assess the specific role of kindlin 2 in follicular development and PCOS pathogenesis. PMID:24336678

  11. The alpaca melanocortin 1 receptor: gene mutations, transcripts, and relative levels of expression in ventral skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Chandramohan, Bathrachalam; Renieri, Carlo; La Manna, Vincenzo; La Terza, Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to characterize the MC1R gene, its transcripts and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with coat color in alpaca. Full length cDNA amplification revealed the presence of two transcripts, named as F1 and F2, differing only in the length of their 5'-terminal untranslated region (UTR) sequences and presenting a color specific expression. Whereas the F1 transcript was common to white and colored (black and brown) alpaca phenotypes, the shorter F2 transcript was specific to white alpaca. Further sequencing of the MC1R gene in white and colored alpaca identified a total of twelve SNPs; among those nine (four silent mutations (c.126C>A, c.354T>C, c.618G>A, and c.933G>A); five missense mutations (c.82A>G, c.92C>T, c.259A>G, c.376A>G, and c.901C>T)) were observed in coding region and three in the 3'UTR. A 4 bp deletion (c.224 227del) was also identified in the coding region. Molecular segregation analysis uncovered that the combinatory mutations in the MC1R locus could cause eumelanin and pheomelanin synthesis in alpaca. Overall, our data refine what is known about the MC1R gene and provides additional information on its role in alpaca pigmentation.

  12. Age-Dependent Modifications of AMPA Receptor Subunit Expression Levels and Related Cognitive Effects in 3xTg-AD Mice.

    PubMed

    Cantanelli, Pamela; Sperduti, Samantha; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Stuppia, Liborio; Gatta, Valentina; Sensi, Stefano Luca

    2014-01-01

    GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4 are the constitutive subunits of amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs), the major mediators of fast excitatory transmission in the mammalian central nervous system. Most AMPARs are Ca(2+)-impermeable because of the presence of the GluA2 subunit. GluA2 mRNA undergoes an editing process that results in a Q-R substitution, a key factor in the regulation of AMPAR Ca(2+)-permeability. AMPARs lacking GluA2 or containing the unedited subunit are permeable to Ca(2+) and Zn(2+). The phenomenon physiologically modulates synaptic plasticity while, in pathologic conditions, leads to increased vulnerability to excitotoxic neuronal death. Given the importance of these subunits, we have therefore evaluated possible associations between changes in expression levels of AMPAR subunits and development of cognitive deficits in 3xTg-AD mice, a widely investigated transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). With quantitative real-time PCR analysis, we assayed hippocampal mRNA expression levels of GluA1-4 subunits occurring in young [3 months of age (m.o.a.)] and old (12 m.o.a) Tg-AD mice and made comparisons with levels found in age-matched wild type (WT) mice. Efficiency of GluA2 RNA editing was also analyzed. All animals were cognitively tested for learning short- and long-term spatial memory with the Morris Water Maze (MWM) navigation task. 3xTg-AD mice showed age-dependent decreases of mRNA levels for all the AMPAR subunits, with the exception of GluA2. Editing remained fully efficient with aging in 3xTg-AD and WT mice. A one-to-one correlation analysis between MWM performances and GluA1-4 mRNA expression profiles showed negative correlations between GluA2 levels and MWM performances in young 3xTg-AD mice. On the contrary, positive correlations between GluA2 mRNA and MWM performances were found in young WT mice. Our data suggest that increases of AMPARs that contain GluA1, GluA3, and GluA4 subunits may help in

  13. Adenosine Receptors: Expression, Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Sandeep; Brito, Rafael; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) comprise a group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) which mediate the physiological actions of adenosine. To date, four AR subtypes have been cloned and identified in different tissues. These receptors have distinct localization, signal transduction pathways and different means of regulation upon exposure to agonists. This review will describe the biochemical characteristics and signaling cascade associated with each receptor and provide insight into how these receptors are regulated in response to agonists. A key property of some of these receptors is their ability to serve as sensors of cellular oxidative stress, which is transmitted by transcription factors, such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB, to regulate the expression of ARs. Recent observations of oligomerization of these receptors into homo- and heterodimers will be discussed. In addition, the importance of these receptors in the regulation of normal and pathological processes such as sleep, the development of cancers and in protection against hearing loss will be examined. PMID:24477263

  14. Androgen receptor expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors in a large series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Clinical and pathologic data were reviewed in 427 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and the expression of such hormone receptors was investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray technique. All tumors were negative for estrogen receptor expression. Progesterone and androgen receptors expression was observed in 5.4% and 17.6% of tumors, respectively. We found the higher average age at diagnosis, the lower frequency of tumors located in the small intestine, and the higher frequency of extragastrointestinal tumors to be statistically significant in the group of tumors with androgen receptor expression in contrast to the group showing no androgen receptor expression. There was no statistic difference between such groups regarding sex, tumor size, mitotic count, cell morphology, and risk of aggressive behavior. Considering that the expression of androgen receptors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors is not negligible, further studies are encouraged to establish the role of androgen deprivation therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  15. Alteration at translational but not transcriptional level of transferrin receptor expression following manganese exposure at the blood-CSF barrier in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G. Jane; Zhao Qiuqu; Zheng Wei . E-mail: wzheng@purdue.edu

    2005-06-01

    Manganese exposure alters iron homeostasis in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), possibly by acting on iron transport mechanisms localized at the blood-brain barrier and/or blood-CSF barrier. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that manganese exposure may change the binding affinity of iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) to mRNAs encoding transferrin receptor (TfR), thereby influencing iron transport at the blood-CSF barrier. A primary culture of choroidal epithelial cells was adapted to grow on a permeable membrane sandwiched between two culture chambers to mimic blood-CSF barrier. Trace {sup 59}Fe was used to determine the transepithelial transport of iron. Following manganese treatment (100 {mu}M for 24 h), the initial flux rate constant (K {sub i}) of iron was increased by 34%, whereas the storage of iron in cells was reduced by 58%, as compared to controls. A gel shift assay demonstrated that manganese exposure increased the binding of IRP1 and IRP2 to the stem loop-containing mRNAs. Consequently, the cellular concentrations of TfR proteins were increased by 84% in comparison to controls. Assays utilizing RT-PCR, quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR, and nuclear run off techniques showed that manganese treatment did not affect the level of heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) encoding TfR, nor did it affect the level of nascent TfR mRNA. However, manganese exposure resulted in a significantly increased level of TfR mRNA and reduced levels of ferritin mRNA. Taken together, these results suggest that manganese exposure increases iron transport at the blood-CSF barrier; the effect is likely due to manganese action on translational events relevant to the production of TfR, but not due to its action on transcriptional, gene expression of TfR. The disrupted protein-TfR mRNA interaction in the choroidal epithelial cells may explain the toxicity of manganese at the blood-CSF barrier.

  16. Expression levels of the α4 subunit of the GABAA receptor in differentiated neuroblastoma cells are correlated with GABA-gated current

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangping; Smith, Sheryl S.

    2009-01-01

    The α4 subunit of the GABAA receptor (GABAR) is capable of rapid plasticity, increased by chronic exposure to positive GABA modulators, such as the neurosteroid 3α-OH-5α[β]-pregnan-20-one (THP). Here, we show that 48 h exposure of differentiated neuroblastoma cells (IMR-32) to 100 nM THP increases α4 expression, without changing the current density or the concentration-response curve. Increased expression of α4-containing GABAR was verified by a relative insensitivity of GABA (EC20)-gated current to modulation by the benzodiazepine (BZ) lorazepam (0.01 – 100 μM), and potentiation of current by flumazenil and RO15-4513, characteristic of α4βγ2 pharmacology. In contrast to THP, compounds which decrease GABA-gated current, such as the BZ inverse agonist DMCM, the GABAR antagonist gabazine and the open channel blocker penicillin, decreased α4 expression after a 48 h exposure, without changing BZ responsiveness. However, pentobarbital, another positive GABA modulator, increased α4 expression, while the BZ antagonist flumazenil had no effect. In order to test whether changes in current were responsible for increased α4 expression, decreases in the Cl− driving force were produced by chronic exposure to the NKCC1 blocker bumetanide (10 μM). When applied under these conditions of reduced GABA-gated current, THP failed to increase α4 expression. The results of this study suggest that α4 expression is correlated with changes in GABA-gated current, rather than simply through ligand-receptor interactions. These findings have relevance for GABAR subunit plasticity produced by fluctuations in endogenous steroids across the menstrual cycle, when altered BZ sensitivity is reported. PMID:19285093

  17. Prostaglandin F receptor expression in intrauterine tissues of pregnant rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanca, Halit; Yar, Atiye Seda; Helvacioğlu, Fatma; Menevşe, Sevda; Çalgüner, Engin; Erdoğan, Deniz

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, we studied the expression and localization of rat prostaglandin F (FP) receptor in uterine tissues of rats on gestational Days 10, 15, 18, 20, 21, 21.5 and postpartal Days 1 and 3 using Western blotting analysis, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry. A high level of immunoreactivity was observed on gestational Days 20, 21, and 21.5 with the most significant signals found on Day 20. FP receptor protein was expressed starting on gestational Day 15, and a fluctuating unsteady increase was observed until delivery. Uterine FP receptor mRNA levels were low between Days 10 and 18 of gestation (p < 0.05). The transcript level increased significantly on Day 20 and peaked on Day 21.5 just before labor (p < 0.05). There was a positive correlation between FP receptor mRNA expression and serum estradiol levels (rs = 0.78; p < 0.01) along with serum estradiol/progesterone ratios (rs = 0.79; p < 0.01). In summary, we observed an increase FP receptor expression in rat uterus with advancing gestation, a marked elevation of expression at term, and a concominant decrease during the postpartum period. These findings indicate a role for uterine FP receptors in the mediation of uterine contractility at term. PMID:24136214

  18. Receptor sequestration in response to β-arrestin-2 phosphorylation by ERK1/2 governs steady-state levels of GPCR cell-surface expression

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, Justine S.; Ly, Stevenson; Blondel-Tepaz, Élodie; Galan, Jacob A.; Beautrait, Alexandre; Scott, Mark G. H.; Enslen, Hervé; Marullo, Stefano; Roux, Philippe P.; Bouvier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    MAPKs are activated in response to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation and play essential roles in regulating cellular processes downstream of these receptors. However, very little is known about the reciprocal effect of MAPK activation on GPCRs. To investigate possible crosstalk between the MAPK and GPCRs, we assessed the effect of ERK1/2 on the activity of several GPCR family members. We found that ERK1/2 activation leads to a reduction in the steady-state cell-surface expression of many GPCRs because of their intracellular sequestration. This subcellular redistribution resulted in a global dampening of cell responsiveness, as illustrated by reduced ligand-mediated G-protein activation and second-messenger generation as well as blunted GPCR kinases and β-arrestin recruitment. This ERK1/2-mediated regulatory process was observed for GPCRs that can interact with β-arrestins, such as type-2 vasopressin, type-1 angiotensin, and CXC type-4 chemokine receptors, but not for the prostaglandin F receptor that cannot interact with β-arrestin, implicating this scaffolding protein in the receptor’s subcellular redistribution. Complementation experiments in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking β-arrestins combined with in vitro kinase assays revealed that β-arrestin-2 phosphorylation on Ser14 and Thr276 is essential for the ERK1/2-promoted GPCR sequestration. This previously unidentified regulatory mechanism was observed after constitutive activation as well as after receptor tyrosine kinase- or GPCR-mediated activation of ERK1/2, suggesting that it is a central node in the tonic regulation of cell responsiveness to GPCR stimulation, acting both as an effector and a negative regulator. PMID:26324936

  19. Correlation between erythropoietin receptor(s) and estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in different breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Trošt, Nina; Hevir, Neli; Rižner, Tea Lanišnik; Debeljak, Nataša

    2013-03-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) receptor (EPOR) expression in breast cancer has been shown to correlate with the expression of estrogen receptor (ESR) and progesterone receptor (PGR) and to be associated with the response to tamoxifen in ESR+/PGR+ tumors but not in ESR- tumors. In addition, the correlation between EPOR and G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 [GPER; also known as G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30)] has been reported, suggesting the prognostic potential of EPOR expression. Moreover, the involvement of colony stimulating factor 2 receptor, β, low‑affinity (CSF2RB) and ephrin type-B receptor 4 (EPHB4) as EPOR potential receptor partners in cancer has been indicated. This study analyzed the correlation between the expression of genes for EPO, EPOR, CSF2RB, EPHB4, ESR, PGR and GPER in the MCF-7, MDA-MB-361, T-47D, MDA-MB-231, Hs578Bst, SKBR3, MCF-10A and Hs578T cell lines. The cell lines were also treated with recombinant human EPO (rHuEPO) in order to determine its ability to activate the Jak/STAT5, MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways and modify cell growth characteristics. Expression analysis stratified the cell lines in 2 main clusters, hormone-dependent cell lines expressing ESR and PGR and a hormone-independent cluster. A significant correlation was observed between the expression levels of ESR and PGR and their expression was also associated with that of GPER. Furthermore, the expression of GPER was associated with that of EPOR, suggesting the connection between this orphan G protein and EPO signaling. A negative correlation between EPOR and CSF2RB expression was observed, questioning the involvement of these two receptors in the hetero-receptor formation. rHuEPO treatment only influenced the hormone-independent cell lines, since only the MDA-MB-231, SKBR3 and Hs578T cells responded to the treatment. The correlation between the expression of the analyzed receptors suggests that the receptors may interact in order to activate signaling pathways

  20. Sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines to the novel insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) inhibitor NVP-AEW541 is dependent on the level of IRS-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Mukohara, Toru; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Ogasawara, Naomi; Wanikawa, Ryoko; Shimomura, Manami; Nakatsura, Tetsuya; Ishii, Genichiro; Park, Joon Oh; Jänne, Pasi A; Saijo, Nagahiro; Minami, Hironobu

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the potential value of targeting insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) in breast cancer, we examined the effects of NVP-AEW541, a selective small-molecule inhibitor of the IGF-1R tyrosine kinase, in a panel of 16 breast cancer cell lines. All cell lines expressed IGF-1R, but MCF-7 expressed much higher levels of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) than the others. NVP-AEW541 was more potent at inhibiting growth of MCF-7 cells as compared to the others (IC(50), 1 microM vs. approximately 7 microM). Comparing MCF-7 to T47D cells, which express IGF-1R at a level identical to MCF-7 but have less than 1/30 the amount of IRS-1, NVP-AEW541 caused cell-cycle arrest at the G1-S boundary, reduced in vitro cell migration, and enhanced the cytotoxic effects of vinorelbine and paclitaxel in MCF-7, but not in T47D. While NVP-AEW541 decreased the phosphorylation of IGF-1R in both cell lines, it inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and disrupted the IRS-1/PI3K complex only in MCF-7. These findings suggest that inhibiting IGF-1R may be an effective therapeutic strategy for breast cancers that co-express IGF-1R and IRS-1 at high levels.

  1. Cognitive performance and peripheral endocannabinoid system receptor expression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ferretjans, Rodrigo; de Campos, Salvina Maria; Ribeiro-Santos, Rafael; Guimarães, Fernanda Carneiro; de Oliveira, Keliane; Cardoso, Ana Cecília Alves; Araújo, Marcio Sobreira; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andrea; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Teixeira, Antonio L; Salgado, João V

    2014-07-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic psychiatric syndrome characterized by generalized cognitive deficits that are associated with functional impairment. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) modulates neurotransmission and neuronal plasticity and is important for cognitive functioning. Evidence points to the involvement of this neuromodulatory system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and that alteration of the ECS on peripheral lymphocytes could reflect central changes. The objective of this study was to compare levels of peripheral endocannabinoid receptor expression in patients with schizophrenia and healthy subjects and find evidence of association between peripheral expression of those receptors and cognitive performance. Patients with stabilized schizophrenia (N=53) and controls (N=22) underwent clinical and cognitive evaluation, and assessment of cannabinoid receptor expression on the surface of peripheral immune cells (lymphocytes, natural killer cells and monocytes) by flow cytometry. Patients with schizophrenia had lower levels of cannabinoid receptor expression on total T lymphocytes, but after controlling for possible confounders this difference did not remain significant. In patients, increased cannabinoid receptor expression on lymphocytes and monocytes was significantly correlated with worst cognitive performance. These data provide additional evidence of the involvement of the ECS in the pathophysiology of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  2. Repertoire of Chemokine Receptor Expression in the Female Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Bruce K.; Landay, Alan; Andersson, Jan; Brown, Clark; Behbahani, Homira; Jiyamapa, Dan; Burki, Zareefa; Stanislawski, Donna; Czerniewski, Mary Ann; Garcia, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases, genital ulcer disease, and progesterone therapy increase susceptibility to lentivirus transmission. Infection of cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is dependent on expression of specific chemokine receptors known to function as HIV co-receptors. Quantitative kinetic reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was developed to determine the in vivo expression levels of CCR5, CXCR4, CCR3, CCR2b, and the cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cervical biopsies from 12 women with and without sexually transmitted diseases, genital ulcer disease, and progesterone-predominant conditions. Our data indicate that CCR5 is the major HIV co-receptor expressed in the female genital tract, and CXCR4 is the predominantly expressed HIV co-receptor in peripheral blood. CCR5 mRNA expression in the ectocervix was 10-fold greater than CXCR4, 20-fold greater than CCR2b, and 100-fold greater than CCR3. In peripheral blood, CXCR4 expression was 1.5-fold greater than CCR5, 10-fold greater than CCR2b, and 15-fold greater than CCR3. US28 was not expressed in cervical tissue despite expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from five individuals. CCR5 was significantly increased (p < 0.02) in biopsies from women with sexually transmitted diseases and others who were progesterone predominant. In vitro studies demonstrate that progesterone increases CCR5, CXCR4, and CCR3 expression and decreases CCR2b expression in lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Characterization of chemokine receptors at the tissue level provides important information in identifying host determinants of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:9708808

  3. Functional expression of purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential channels by the human urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Shabir, Saqib; Cross, William; Kirkwood, Lisa A.; Pearson, Joanna F.; Appleby, Peter A.; Walker, Dawn; Eardley, Ian

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its role as a physical barrier, the urothelium is considered to play an active role in mechanosensation. A key mechanism is the release of transient mediators that activate purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to effect changes in intracellular Ca2+. Despite the implied importance of these receptors and channels in urothelial tissue homeostasis and dysfunctional bladder disease, little is known about their functional expression by the human urothelium. To evaluate the expression and function of P2X and P2Y receptors and TRP channels, the human ureter and bladder were used to separate urothelial and stromal tissues for RNA isolation and cell culture. RT-PCR using stringently designed primer sets was used to establish which P2 and TRP species were expressed at the transcript level, and selective agonists/antagonists were used to confirm functional expression by monitoring changes in intracellular Ca2+ and in a scratch repair assay. The results confirmed the functional expression of P2Y4 receptors and excluded nonexpressed receptors/channels (P2X1, P2X3, P2X6, P2Y6, P2Y11, TRPV5, and TRPM8), while a dearth of specific agonists confounded the functional validation of expressed P2X2, P2X4, P2Y1, P2Y2, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV6 and TRPM7 receptors/channels. Although a conventional response was elicited in control stromal-derived cells, the urothelial cell response to well-characterized TRPV1 and TRPV4 agonists/antagonists revealed unexpected anomalies. In addition, agonists that invoked an increase in intracellular Ca2+ promoted urothelial scratch repair, presumably through the release of ATP. The study raises important questions about the ligand selectivity of receptor/channel targets expressed by the urothelium. These pathways are important in urothelial tissue homeostasis, and this opens the possibility of selective drug targeting. PMID:23720349

  4. Cellular and Tumor Radiosensitivity is Correlated to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Protein Expression Level in Tumors Without EGFR Amplification;Epidermal growth factor receptor; Radiotherapy; Squamous cell carcinoma; Biomarker; Local tumor control

    SciTech Connect

    Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Saker, Jarob; Eicheler, Wolfgang; Krause, Mechthild; Yaromina, Ala; Meyer-Staeckling, Soenke; Scherkl, Benjamin; Kriegs, Malte; Brandt, Burkhard; Grenman, Reidar; Petersen, Cordula; Baumann, Michael; Dikomey, Ekkehard

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: There is conflicting evidence for whether the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor in human tumors can be used as a marker of radioresponse. Therefore, this association was studied in a systematic manner using squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell lines grown as cell cultures and xenografts. Methods and Materials: The study was performed with 24 tumor cell lines of different tumor types, including 10 SCC lines, which were also investigated as xenografts on nude mice. Egfr gene dose and the length of CA-repeats in intron 1 were determined by polymerase chain reaction, protein expression in vitro by Western blot and in vivo by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and radiosensitivity in vitro by colony formation. Data were correlated with previously published tumor control dose 50% data after fractionated irradiation of xenografts of the 10 SCC. Results: EGFR protein expression varies considerably, with most tumor cell lines showing moderate and only few showing pronounced upregulation. EGFR upregulation could only be attributed to massive gene amplification in the latter. In the case of little or no amplification, in vitro EGFR expression correlated with both cellular and tumor radioresponse. In vivo EGFR expression did not show this correlation. Conclusions: Local tumor control after the fractionated irradiation of tumors with little or no gene amplification seems to be dependent on in vitro EGFR via its effect on cellular radiosensitivity.

  5. Expression of groups I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors in the rat brain during aging.

    PubMed

    Simonyi, Agnes; Ngomba, Richard T; Storto, Marianna; Catania, Maria V; Miller, Laura A; Youngs, Brian; DiGiorgi-Gerevini, Valeria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Sun, Grace Y

    2005-05-10

    Age-dependent changes in the expression of group I and II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors were studied by in situ hybridization, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Male Fisher 344 rats of three ages (3, 12 and 25 months) were tested. Age-related increases in mGlu1 receptor mRNA levels were found in several areas (thalamic nuclei, hippocampal CA3) with parallel increases in mGlu1a receptor protein expression. However, a slight decrease in mGlu1a receptor mRNA expression in individual Purkinje neurons and a decline in cerebellar mGlu1a receptor protein levels were detected in aged animals. In contrast, mGlu1b receptor mRNA levels increased in the cerebellar granule cell layer. Although mGlu5 receptor mRNA expression decreased in many regions, its protein expression remained unchanged during aging. Compared to the small changes in mGlu2 receptor mRNA levels, mGlu3 receptor mRNA levels showed substantial age differences. An increased mGlu2/3 receptor protein expression was found in the frontal cortex, thalamus, hippocampus and corpus callosum in aged animals. These results demonstrate region- and subtype-specific, including splice variant specific changes in the expression of mGlu receptors in the brain with increasing age. PMID:15862522

  6. Expression of Angiotensin II Receptor-1 in Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yuki; Matsuo, Kosuke; Murata, Minako; Yudoh, Kazuo; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Inaba, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Kato, Tomohiro; Masuko, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Besides its involvement in the cardiovascular system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAS) system has also been suggested to play an important role in inflammation. To explore the role of this system in cartilage damage in arthritis, we investigated the expression of angiotensin II receptors in chondrocytes. Methods. Articular cartilage was obtained from patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and traumatic fractures who were undergoing arthroplasty. Chondrocytes were isolated and cultured in vitro with or without interleukin (IL-1). The expression of angiotensin II receptor types 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R) mRNA by the chondrocytes was analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AT1R expression in cartilage tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The effect of IL-1 on AT1R/AT2R expression in the chondrocytes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry. Results. Chondrocytes from all patient types expressed AT1R/AT2R mRNA, though considerable variation was found between samples. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed AT1R expression at the protein level. Stimulation with IL-1 enhanced the expression of AT1R/AT2R mRNA in OA and RA chondrocytes. Conclusions. Human articular chondrocytes, at least partially, express angiotensin II receptors, and IL-1 stimulation induced AT1R/AT2R mRNA expression significantly. PMID:23346400

  7. High-Level Expression of Toll-Like Receptors on Dendritic Cells in Adult Patients with Burns on ≥90% of Total Body Surface Area (TBSA)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Na; Meng, Yan; Zhang, Renjing; Bian, Jinjun; Yao, Ying; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Background As a serious clinical problem, severe burn injury disturbs the immune system, resulting in progressive suppression of immune response. TLRs are associated with immune system activation, but the effect of TLRs levels on circulating cDCs of severe burn injury patients has not been fully assessed. Material/Methods Ten patients with total body surface area (TBSA) burned >90% admitted to our institution were enrolled in this study. We analyzed TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 expression on the circulating cDCs by using multicolor flow cytometric analysis in patients at 14 days to 28 days after burn injury according to mortality, and We also assessed Demographics, clinical outcomes, organ function, and inflammatory and acute-phase responses. Results No difference in TBSA, sex, age, or number of operations before the first 14 days after injury were observed between surviving and non-surviving burn patients. The levels of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 in circulating cDCs were significantly and consistently elevated in all patients compared to age-matched healthy volunteers, and survivors exhibited higher TLR2 and TLR4 values than non-survivors. Of the survivors, TLR2 and TLR4 levels were higher at 28 days than at 14 days after injury, while the difference in TLR9 levels was not significant. TLR2 levels of non-survivors at 28 days after injury decreased, and the TLR4 and TLR9 levels showed no significant difference. Conclusions TLRs levels in circulating cDCs are highly activated in severe burn injury patients up to 28 days after injury. The low expression of TLR2 in cDCs may be useful as a potential marker predicting the poor prognosis of severe burn patients. PMID:27686145

  8. Expression of adiponectin receptors in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, Ilham; Rasschaert, Joanne; Eizirik, Décio L; Cnop, Miriam

    2003-12-26

    Pancreatic beta cell dysfunction is an early and crucial pathogenic factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFA) and adipokines released from adipose tissues lead to both the development of insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction. Adiponectin is a novel adipokine with antidiabetic properties. Its circulating concentrations are reduced in subjects with increased visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, or type 2 diabetes. Very recently, the cloning of two adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 was reported. AdipoR1 is abundantly expressed in muscle, while AdipoR2 is predominantly expressed in liver. Here we report the marked expression of mRNAs for the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 in human and rat pancreatic beta cells, at levels similar to liver and greater than muscle. Adiponectin receptor expression is increased by beta cell exposure to the unsaturated FFA oleate, and treatment of insulin-producing cells with globular adiponectin induces lipoprotein lipase expression. Regulated adiponectin receptor expression on pancreatic beta cells might be a novel mechanism modulating the effects of circulating adiponectin. PMID:14651988

  9. Ovarian expression of insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) and its receptor (RXFP2) during development of bovine antral follicles and corpora lutea and measurement of circulating INSL3 levels during synchronized estrous cycles.

    PubMed

    Satchell, Leanne; Glister, Claire; Bleach, Emma C; Glencross, Richard G; Bicknell, Andrew B; Dai, Yanzhenzi; Anand-Ivell, Ravinder; Ivell, Richard; Knight, Philip G

    2013-05-01

    Insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3), a major product of testicular Leydig cells, is also expressed by the ovary, but its functional role remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified expression of INSL3 and its receptor RXFP2 in theca interna cell (TIC) and granulosa cell compartments of developing bovine antral follicles and in corpora lutea (CL). INSL3 and RXFP2 mRNA levels were much higher in TIC than granulosa cell and increased progressively during follicle maturation with INSL3 peaking in large (11-18 mm) estrogen-active follicles and RXFP2 peaking in 9- to 10-mm follicles before declining in larger (11-18 mm) follicles. Expression of both INSL3 and RXFP2 in CL was much lower than in TIC. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry confirmed abundant expression of INSL3 mRNA and protein in TIC. These observations indicate follicular TIC rather than CL as the primary site of both INSL3 production and action, implying a predominantly autocrine/paracrine role in TIC. To corroborate the above findings, we showed that in vitro exposure of TIC to a luteinizing concentration of LH greatly attenuated expression of both INSL3 and its receptor while increasing progesterone secretion and expression of STAR and CYP11A1. Moreover, in vivo, a significant cyclic variation in plasma INSL3 was observed during synchronized estrous cycles. INSL3 and estradiol-17β followed a similar pattern, both increasing after luteolysis, before falling sharply after the LH surge. Thus, theca-derived INSL3, likely from the dominant preovulatory follicle, is detectable in peripheral blood of cattle, and expression is down-regulated during luteinization induced by the preovulatory LH surge. Collectively, these findings underscore the likely role of INSL3 as an important intrafollicular modulator of TIC function/steroidogenesis, while raising doubts about its potential contribution to CL function. PMID:23546605

  10. Expression of chemokine receptors in vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    El-Asrar, A.; Struyf, S.; Al-Mosallam, A.; Missotten, L.; Van Damme, J.; Geboes, K.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Chemokines are small peptides which are potent activators and chemoattractants for leucocyte subpopulations. Their action is mediated by a family of seven transmembrane spanning G-protein coupled receptors. The aims of this study were to examine the expression of the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR3, CCR5, CXCR3, and CXCR4 in the conjunctiva of patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) and to investigate the phenotype of inflammatory cells expressing these chemokine receptors.
METHODS—Conjunctival biopsy specimens from 16 patients with active VKC, and eight control subjects were studied by immunohistochemical techniques using a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against human CCR1, CCR3, CCR5, CXCR3, and CXCR4. The phenotype of inflammatory cells expressing chemokine receptors was examined by double immunohistochemistry.
RESULTS—In the normal conjunctiva, few inflammatory cells expressed CXCR3 in five of eight specimens. There was no immunoreactivity for CCR1, CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4. In VKC specimens, membranous immunoreactivity for CXCR3 was noted on inflammatory cells in all specimens. Compared with control specimens, VKC specimens showed significantly more inflammatory cells expressing CXCR3 (54.3 (SD 34.3) v 3.3 (5.0); p<0.001). Few CCR1+, CCR3+, CCR5+, and CXCR4+ inflammatory cells were observed in only three of 16 specimens. Double immunohistochemistry revealed that all CXCR3 positive inflammatory cells were CD3 positive T lymphocytes and that 61.7% (3.7%) of the infiltrating T lymphocytes were reactive for CXCR3.
CONCLUSIONS—CXCR3 is the predominant chemokine receptor and is expressed abundantly on T lymphocytes in the conjunctiva of patients with active VKC. These data suggest a potential role for CXCR3 receptors in the regulation of lymphocyte recruitment within conjunctiva of VKC patients. New therapeutic strategies that block CXCR3 may inhibit T lymphocyte recruitment and suppress adverse inflammatory reactions

  11. Effect of neonatal or adult heat acclimation on plasma fT3 level, testicular thyroid receptors expression in male rats and testicular steroidogenesis in vitro in response to triiodothyronine treatment.

    PubMed

    Kurowicka, B; Chrusciel, M; Zmijewska, A; Kotwica, G

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of heat acclimation of neonatal and adult rats on their testes response to in vitro treatment with triiodothyronine (T3). Four groups of rats were housed from birth as: 1) control (CR) at 20°C for 90 days, 2) neonatal heat-acclimated (NHA) at 34°C for 90 days, 3) adult heat-acclimated (AHA) at 20°C for 45 days followed by 45 days at 34°C and 4) de-acclimated (DA) at 34°C for 45 days followed by 45 days at 20°C. Blood plasma and both testes were harvested from 90-day old rats. Testicular slices were then submitted to in vitro treatment with T3 (100 ng/ml) for 8 h. Plasma fT3 level was lower in AHA, NHA and DA groups than in CR group. Basal thyroid hormone receptor α1 (Thra1) expression was higher in testes of NHA and DA and β1 receptor (Thrb1) in DA rats vs. other groups. In the in vitro experiment, T3: 1) decreased Thra1 expression in all groups and Thrb1 in DA group, 2) increased Star expression in CR, NHA and DA groups, and Hsd17b3 expression in NHA group, 3) decreased the expression of Cyp11a1 in NHA and DA groups, and Cyp19a1 in all the groups, 4) did not affect the activity of steroidogenic enzymes and steroid secretion (A4, T, E2) in all the groups. These results indicate, that heat acclimation of rats, depending on their age, mainly affects the testicular expression of steroidogenic enzymes in response to short-lasting treatment with T3. PMID:27487513

  12. Estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor genes are expressed differentially in mouse embryos during preimplantation development.

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Q; Gorski, J

    1993-01-01

    Estrogen and progesterone play an important role in the development and implantation of preimplantation embryos. However, it is controversial whether these hormones act directly on the embryos. The effects of these hormones depend on the existence of their specific receptors. To determine whether estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor genes are expressed in mouse preimplantation embryos, we examined RNA from embryos at different stages of preimplantation development by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction techniques. ER mRNA was found in oocytes and fertilized eggs. The message level began to decline at the two-cell stage and reached its lowest level at the five- to eight-cell stage. ER mRNA was not detectable at the morula stage but reappeared at the blastocyst stage. Progesterone receptor mRNA was not detectable until the blastocyst stage. The embryonic expression of ER and progesterone receptor genes in the blastocyst suggests a possible functional requirement for ER and progesterone receptor at this stage of development. These results provide a basis for determining the direct role of estrogen and progesterone in preimplantation embryos. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8415723

  13. Detection of CXCR2 cytokine receptor surface expression using immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Lam, Clarissa; Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Valentino, Victoria; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8) chemokine, also known as the neutrophil chemotactic factor, is a cytokine that plays a key role in inflammatory response, cell proliferation, migration, and survival. IL-8 expression is increased not only in inflammatory disorders, but also in many types of cancer, including prostate cancer. IL-8 acts as a ligand for the C-X-C chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2) protein present on the cell plasma membrane. Binding of the IL-8 ligand to the CXCR2 receptor results in an intracellular signaling pathway mediated by GTP binding proteins coupled to the receptor itself. Knowledge of the CXCR2 expression levels facilitates the understanding of the role and function of IL-8. In this chapter, we describe a protocol that uses the immunofluorescence method and confocal microscopy to analyze the CXCR2 surface expression in human prostate cancer cells. However, this protocol is easily adaptable to analyze the surface expression of other cytokine receptors in different cell types. PMID:24908306

  14. Detection of CXCR2 cytokine receptor surface expression using immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Lam, Clarissa; Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Valentino, Victoria; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8) chemokine, also known as the neutrophil chemotactic factor, is a cytokine that plays a key role in inflammatory response, cell proliferation, migration, and survival. IL-8 expression is increased not only in inflammatory disorders, but also in many types of cancer, including prostate cancer. IL-8 acts as a ligand for the C-X-C chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2) protein present on the cell plasma membrane. Binding of the IL-8 ligand to the CXCR2 receptor results in an intracellular signaling pathway mediated by GTP binding proteins coupled to the receptor itself. Knowledge of the CXCR2 expression levels facilitates the understanding of the role and function of IL-8. In this chapter, we describe a protocol that uses the immunofluorescence method and confocal microscopy to analyze the CXCR2 surface expression in human prostate cancer cells. However, this protocol is easily adaptable to analyze the surface expression of other cytokine receptors in different cell types.

  15. Expression of Hepcidin and Ferroportin in the Placenta, and Ferritin and Transferrin Receptor 1 Levels in Maternal and Umbilical Cord Blood in Pregnant Women with and without Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Anqiang; Zhao, Jun; Lu, Minhua; Gu, Ying; Zhu, Yunlong; Chen, Daozhen; Fu, Jinyan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Regulation of iron transfer from mother to fetus via the placenta is not fully understood and the relationship between stored iron status in the mothers’ serum and gestational diabetes (GDM) in case–control studies is controversial. The present study aimed to detect circulating soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and ferritin levels in maternal and umbilical cord blood. We also examined the expression of hepcidin (Hep), transferrin receptor (TfR1), and ferroportin (FPN) in the placenta in pregnant women with and without GDM at full term. Methods: Eighty-two women participated (42 with GDM and 40 without GDM [controls]). Maternal samples were collected at 37–39 weeks’ gestation. Umbilical cord blood was collected at birth. Ferritin and sTfR levels in maternal serum and umbilical cord blood, and Hep, TfR1, and FPN protein expression in plac enta were compared between the GDM and non-GDM groups. Serum ferritin (SF) was measured by electrochemiluminescence assay and sTfR was measured by ELISA. Hep, TfR1, and FPN expression was measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: Maternal serum sTfR levels were significantly elevated in the GDM group compared with the non-GDM group (p = 0.003). SF levels in cord blood in the GDM group were significantly higher than those in the non-GDM group (p = 0.003). However, maternal hemoglobin and SF, and umbilical cord sTfR levels were not different between the groups. In placental tissue, FPN expression was higher and hepcidin expression was lower in the GDM group compared with the non-GDM group (p = 0.000 and p = 0.044, respectively). There was no significant difference in TfR1 between the groups (p = 0.898). Conclusions: Women with GDM transport iron more actively than those without GDM at term pregnancy. Maternal iron metabolism in GDM may play a role in fetal/placental iron demand and in the overall outcome of pregnancy. PMID:27483296

  16. Effects of chromium-enriched Bacillus subtilis KT260179 supplementation on growth performance, caecal microbiology, tissue chromium level, insulin receptor expression and plasma biochemical profile of mice under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiajun; Xu, Yayuan; Qian, Kun; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Dong; Wang, Chonglong

    2016-03-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of providing supplementary Cr-enriched Bacillus subtilis (CEBS) to mice with regard to their growth performance, caecal microbiology, tissue Cr concentration, insulin receptor (IR) expression and plasma biochemical profile. A total of ninety-six Kunming strain mice were allocated to four different groups: control, CEBS, inorganic Cr and B. subtilis. After 15 d of treatment, mice that received CEBS or normal B. subtilis had higher body weights than control mice, and after 30 d mice given either CEBS or B. subtilis had greater body weights than control mice or those given inorganic Cr. The concentration of Cr in tissues (heart, liver, spleen, kidney and skeletal muscle) increased after CEBS supplementation. B. subtilis and CEBS supplementation caused a significant increase in the numbers of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in the caecum, whereas the numbers of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus decreased significantly compared with the control. The levels of IR RNA and protein in skeletal muscles increased significantly. Plasma glucose, total cholesterol, TAG and LDL-cholesterol levels declined significantly in the CEBS group compared with the control group, whereas plasma insulin and HDL-cholesterol levels increased significantly. In conclusion, CEBS supplementation enhanced the regulation of body growth, increased tissue organic Cr concentrations, altered caecal microbiota and enhanced IR expression to produce significant changes in plasma biochemistry.

  17. Oocytes in sheep homozygous for a mutation in bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1B express lower mRNA levels of bone morphogenetic protein 15 but not growth differentiation factor 9.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Janet L; Heath, Derek A; Reader, Karen L; Quirke, Laurel D; Hudson, Norma L; Juengel, Jennifer L; McNatty, Kenneth P

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the high ovulation rate in ewes (BB) homozygous for a mutation in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1B (BMPR1B) gene is linked to lower BMP15 and/or GDF9 mRNA in oocytes compared with those in wild-type (++) ewes. Cumulus cell-oocyte complexes (COC) and granulosa cells (GC) were recovered from ≥1 mm diameter follicles of BB and ++ ewes during a prostaglandin-induced follicular phase. Expression levels of GDF9 and BMP15 were measured by multiplex qPCR from individual COC. The gonadotropin-induced cAMP responses of the GC from each non-atretic follicle were measured following treatment with FSH or human chorionic gonadotropin. In a separate validation experiment, GDF9 and BMP15 expression was present only in oocytes and not in cumulus cells. There was no effect of follicular diameter on oocyte-derived GDF9 or BMP15 mRNA levels. The mean expression levels of BMP15, but not GDF9, were significantly lower in all non-atretic follicles, including the subsets containing either FSH- or LH-responsive GC in BB, compared with ++, ewes. No genotype effects were noted for FSH-induced cAMP production by GC either with respect to dose of, or number of follicles responding to, FSH. However, ovaries from BB ewes contained significantly more follicles responsive to LH, with respect to cAMP production in GC. We propose that these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the higher ovulation rate in BB sheep is due, at least in part, to lower oocyte-derived BMP15 mRNA levels together with the earlier onset of LH-responsiveness in GC.

  18. Cell-Free Expression of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Segers, Kenneth; Masure, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The large-scale production of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the major bottlenecks that hamper functional and structural studies of this important class of integral membrane proteins. Heterologous overexpression of GPCRs often results in low yields of active protein, usually due to a combination of several factors, such as low expression levels, protein insolubility, host cell toxicity, and the need to use harsh and often denaturing detergents (e.g., SDS, LDAO, OG, and DDM, among others) to extract the recombinant receptor from the host cell membrane. Many of these problematic issues are inherently linked to cell-based expression systems and can therefore be circumvented by the use of cell-free systems. In this unit, we provide a range of protocols for the production of GPCRs in a cell-free expression system. Using this system, we typically obtain GPCR expression levels of ∼1 mg per ml of reaction mixture in the continuous-exchange configuration. Although the protocols in this unit have been optimized for the cell-free expression of GPCRs, they should provide a good starting point for the production of other classes of membrane proteins, such as ion channels, aquaporins, carrier proteins, membrane-bound enzymes, and even large molecular complexes.

  19. Dopamine Receptors in Human Adipocytes: Expression and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Borcherding, Dana C.; Hugo, Eric R.; Idelman, Gila; De Silva, Anuradha; Richtand, Nathan W.; Loftus, Jean; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Dopamine (DA) binds to five receptors (DAR), classified by their ability to increase (D1R-like) or decrease (D2R-like) cAMP. In humans, most DA circulates as dopamine sulfate (DA-S), which can be de-conjugated to bioactive DA by arylsulfatase A (ARSA). The objective was to examine expression of DAR and ARSA in human adipose tissue and determine whether DA regulates prolactin (PRL) and adipokine expression and release. Methods DAR were analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting in explants, primary adipocytes and two human adipocyte cell lines, LS14 and SW872. ARSA expression and activity were determined by qPCR and enzymatic assay. PRL expression and release were determined by luciferase reporter and Nb2 bioassay. Analysis of cAMP, cGMP, leptin, adiponectin and interleukin 6 (IL-6) was done by ELISA. Activation of MAPK and PI3 kinase/Akt was determined by Western blotting. Results DAR are variably expressed at the mRNA and protein levels in adipose tissue and adipocytes during adipogenesis. ARSA activity in adipocyte increases after differentiation. DA at nM concentrations suppresses cAMP, stimulates cGMP, and activates MAPK in adipocytes. Acting via D2R-like receptors, DA and DA-S inhibit PRL gene expression and release. Acting via D1R/D5R receptors, DA suppresses leptin and stimulates adiponectin and IL-6 release. Conclusions This is the first report that human adipocytes express functional DAR and ARSA, suggesting a regulatory role for peripheral DA in adipose functions. We speculate that the propensity of some DAR-activating antipsychotics to increase weight and alter metabolic homeostasis is due, in part, to their direct action on adipose tissue. PMID:21966540

  20. Corticosteroid receptor gene expression is related to sex and social behaviour in a social fish.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Constance M; Rodela, Tammy M; Mileva, Viktoria R; Balshine, Sigal; Gilmour, Kathleen M

    2013-03-01

    Circulating corticosteroids have been related to social status in a variety of species. However, our understanding of corticosteroid receptor expression and its relationship with sociality is still in its infancy. Knowledge of variation in receptor expression is critical to understand the physiological relevance of differences in circulating corticosteroid concentrations. In this study, we examined corticosteroid receptor gene expression in relation to dominance rank, sex, and social behaviour in the highly social cichlid fish, Neolamprologus pulcher. We examined the relative gene expression of the three known teleost corticosteroid receptors: glucocorticoid receptor 1 (GR1), glucocorticoid receptor 2 (GR2), and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in liver and brain tissue of dominant and subordinate N. pulcher males and females. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the N. pulcher gene originally described as GR2, clustered with other teleost GR1 genes, while the originally-described N. pulcher GR1 gene clustered with the GR2 genes of other teleosts. Therefore we propose a change in the original nomenclature of the N. pulcher GRs: GR1 (formerly GR2) and GR2 (formerly GR1) and adopt this new nomenclature throughout this manuscript. Liver MR transcript levels were higher in males than females, and positively related to submissive behaviour. Liver GR2 (formerly GR1) transcript levels were also higher in males than females. Collectively, the results demonstrate sex differences in corticosteroid receptor abundance, and suggest tissue- and receptor-specific roles for corticosteroid receptors in mediating aspects of social behaviour.

  1. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist, AZD4619, induces alanine aminotransferase-1 gene and protein expression in human, but not in rat hepatocytes: Correlation with serum ALT levels.

    PubMed

    Thulin, Petra; Bamberg, Krister; Buler, Marcin; Dahl, Björn; Glinghammar, Björn

    2016-09-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in serum is the standard biomarker for liver injury. We have previously described a clinical trial with a novel selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist (AZD4619), which unexpectedly caused increased serum levels of ALT in treated individuals without any other evidence of liver injury. We pinpointed a plausible mechanism through which AZD4619 could increase serum ALT levels; namely through the PPARα-specific activation of the human ALT1 gene at the transcriptional level. In the present study, we present data from the preceding rat toxicity study, demonstrating that AZD4619 had no effect on rat serum ALT activity levels, and further experiments were performed to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for this species-related difference. Our results revealed that AZD4619 increased ALT1 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner in human, but not in rat primary hepatocytes. Cloning of the human and rat ALT1 promoters into luciferase vectors confirmed that AZD4619 induced only the human, but not the rat ALT1 gene promoter in a dose-dependent manner. In PPARα-GAL4 reporter gene assays, AZD4619 was >100-fold more potent on the human vs. rat PPARα levels, explaining the differences in induction of the ALT1 gene between the species at the concentration range tested. These data demonstrate the usefulness of the human and rat ALT1 reporter gene assays for testing future drug candidates at the preclinical stage. In drug discovery projects, these assays elucidate whether elevations in ALT levels observed in vivo or in the clinic are due to metabolic effects rather than a toxic event in the liver. PMID:27430334

  2. Substance P receptor binding sites are expressed by glia in vivo after neuronal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Mantyh, P.W.; Johnson, D.J.; Boehmer, C.G.; Catton, M.D.; Vinters, H.V.; Maggio, J.E.; Too, Hengphon; Vigna, S.R. )

    1989-07-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that glia can express functional receptors for a variety of neurotransmitters. To determine whether similar neurotransmitter receptors are also expressed by glia in vivo, the authors examined the glial scar in the transected optic nerve of the albino rabbit by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Receptor binding sites for radiolabeled calcitonin gene-related peptide, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were examined. Specific receptor binding sites for each of these neurotransmitters were identified in the rabbit forebrain but were not detected in the normal optic nerve or tract. In the transected optic nerve and tract, only receptor binding sites for substance P were expressed at detectable levels. The density of substance P receptor binding sites observed in this glial scar is among the highest observed in the rabbit forebrain. Ligand displacement and saturation experiments indicate that the substance P receptor binding site expressed by the glial scar has pharmacological characteristics similar to those of substance P receptors in the rabbit striatum, rat brain, and rat and canine gut. The present study demonstrates that glial cells in vivo express high concentrations of substance P receptor binding sites after transection of retinal ganglion cell axons. Because substance P has been shown to regulate inflammatory and immune responses in peripheral tissues, substance P may also, by analogy, be involved in regulating the glial response to injury in the central nervous system.

  3. Relationship between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and serum cyclooxygenase-2 Level, and the synergistic effect of celecoxib and gefitinib on EGFR expression in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Li, Huanhuan; Su, Fan; Li, Jing; Ma, Xiaoping; Gong, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations occur mostly in patients with lung adenocarcinoma; such patients are also more likely to express cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), indicating a possible relationship between EGFR mutation and COX-2. The COX-2 and EGFR pathways mutually enhance their procarcinogenic effects in different tumor types. Therefore, simultaneous EGFR and COX-2 inhibition may be a promising therapeutic approach for patients with lung adenocarcinoma. We obtained tissue and serum samples from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to detect the relationship between EGFR mutation and serum COX-2 level. Subsequently, gefitinib was combined with celecoxib to investigate the efficacy of inhibition in vitro in two NSCLC cell lines: HCC827 (del E746-A750) and A549 (wild-type EGFR). The cells were treated with gefitinib or celecoxib alone or with gefitinib plus celecoxib. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed and correlated with expression of COX-2 and phosphorylated (p)-EGFR. The EGFR mutation rate of the high-COX-2 patients was significantly higher than that in the low-COX-2 patients. Multivariate analysis showed that high COX-2 levels were independently associated with EGFR mutation. Celecoxib and gefitinib inhibited cell growth in both cell lines. At sufficiently high concentrations, celecoxib plus gefitinib significantly mutually enhanced their anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects in both cell lines. At low concentrations, the combination had no additional effects on A549 cells. There was increased down regulation of COX-2 and p-EGFR when both cell lines were treated with high-concentration celecoxib plus gefitinib compared to either agent alone. This study demonstrates that high serum COX-2 levels may indicate EGFR mutations and that the efficacy of combined celecoxib and gefitinib is significantly greater in NSCLC cells with EGFR mutations; at high concentrations, the combination is efficacious in wild-type NSCLC cells.

  4. Elevated Resistin Gene Expression in African American Estrogen and Progesterone Receptor Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vallega, Karin A.; Liu, NingNing; Myers, Jennifer S.; Yu, Kaixian; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction African American (AA) women diagnosed with breast cancer are more likely to have aggressive subtypes. Investigating differentially expressed genes between patient populations may help explain racial health disparities. Resistin, one such gene, is linked to inflammation, obesity, and breast cancer risk. Previous studies indicated that resistin expression is higher in serum and tissue of AA breast cancer patients compared to Caucasian American (CA) patients. However, resistin expression levels have not been compared between AA and CA patients in a stage- and subtype-specific context. Breast cancer prognosis and treatments vary by subtype. This work investigates differential resistin gene expression in human breast cancer tissues of specific stages, receptor subtypes, and menopause statuses in AA and CA women. Methods Differential gene expression analysis was performed using human breast cancer gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We performed inter-race resistin gene expression level comparisons looking at receptor status and stage-specific data between AA and CA samples. DESeq was run to test for differentially expressed resistin values. Results Resistin RNA was higher in AA women overall, with highest values in receptor negative subtypes. Estrogen-, progesterone-, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative groups showed statistically significant elevated resistin levels in Stage I and II AA women compared to CA women. In inter-racial comparisons, AA women had significantly higher levels of resistin regardless of menopause status. In whole population comparisons, resistin expression was higher among Stage I and III estrogen receptor negative cases. In comparisons of molecular subtypes, resistin levels were significant higher in triple negative than in luminal A breast cancer. Conclusion Resistin gene expression levels were significantly higher in receptor negative subtypes, especially estrogen receptor negative cases in AA

  5. Toll-Like Receptor Gene Expression during Trichinella spiralis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sin; Park, Mi Kyung; Yu, Hak Sun

    2015-01-01

    In Trichinella spiralis infection, type 2 helper T (Th2) cell-related and regulatory T (Treg) cell-related immune responses are the most important immune events. In order to clarify which Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are closely associated with these responses, we analyzed the expression of mouse TLR genes in the small intestine and muscle tissue during T. spiralis infection. In addition, the expression of several chemokine- and cytokine-encoding genes, which are related to Th2 and Treg cell mediated immune responses, were analyzed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/TIR-associated proteins (TIRAP) and Toll receptor-associated activator of interferons (TRIF) adapter protein deficient and wild type (WT) mice. The results showed significantly increased TLR4 and TLR9 gene expression in the small intestine after 2 weeks of T. spiralis infection. In the muscle, TLR1, TLR2, TLR5, and TLR9 gene expression significantly increased after 4 weeks of infection. Only the expression of the TLR4 and TLR9 genes was significantly elevated in WT MEF cells after treatment with excretory-secretory (ES) proteins. Gene expression for Th2 chemokine genes were highly enhanced by ES proteins in WT MEF cells, while this elevation was slightly reduced in MyD88/TIRAP-/- MEF cells, and quite substantially decreased in TRIF-/- MEF cells. In contrast, IL-10 and TGF-β expression levels were not elevated in MyD88/TIRAP-/- MEF cells. In conclusion, we suggest that TLR4 and TLR9 might be closely linked to Th2 cell and Treg cell mediated immune responses, although additional data are needed to convincingly prove this observation. PMID:26323841

  6. An Expression Refinement Process Ensures Singular Odorant Receptor Gene Choice.

    PubMed

    Abdus-Saboor, Ishmail; Al Nufal, Mohammed J; Agha, Maha V; Ruinart de Brimont, Marion; Fleischmann, Alexander; Shykind, Benjamin M

    2016-04-25

    Odorant receptor (OR) gene choice in mammals is a paradigmatic example of monogenic and monoallelic transcriptional selection, in which each olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) chooses to express one OR allele from over 1,000 encoded in the genome [1-3]. This process, critical for generation of the circuit from nose to brain [4-6], is thought to occur in two steps: a slow initial phase that randomly activates a single OR allele, followed by a rapid feedback that halts subsequent expression [7-14]. Inherent in this model is a finite failure rate wherein multiple OR alleles may be activated prior to feedback suppression [15, 16]. Confronted with more than one receptor, the neuron would need to activate a refinement mechanism to eliminate multigenic OR expression and resolve unique neuronal identity [16], critical to the generation of the circuit from nose to olfactory bulb. Here we used a genetic approach in mice to reveal a new facet of OR regulation that corrects adventitious activation of multiple OR alleles, restoring monogenic OR expression and unique neuronal identity. Using the tetM71tg model system, in which the M71 OR is expressed in >95% of mature OSNs and potently suppresses the expression of the endogenous OR repertoire [10], we provide clear evidence of a post-selection refinement (PSR) process that winnows down the number of ORs. We further demonstrate that PSR efficiency is linked to OR expression level, suggesting an underlying competitive process and shedding light on OR gene switching and the fundamental mechanism of singular OR choice. PMID:27040780

  7. Parathyroid receptor gene expression by epiphyseal growth plates in rickets and tibial dyschondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Ben-Bassat, S; Genina, O; Lavelin, I; Leach, R M; Pines, M

    1999-03-25

    PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression was evaluated in situ in avian epiphyseal growth plates taken from normal, rachitic and tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) afflicted chicks induced by thiram or by genetic selection. In the normal growth plates, PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression was localized to the maturation zone as demonstrated by the expression of collagen type II (col II), osteopontin (OPN) genes and alkaline phosphatase activity (AP). In TD, either induced by thiram or by genetic selection, normal levels of PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression were observed up to 21 days post-hatch. In rickets, on the other hand, no PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression was observed in the growth plate from day 8 of a vitamin D-deficient diet. In cultured chondrocytes, PTH caused time-dependent down-regulation of its own receptor. These results suggest that alterations in the PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression are associated with rickets but not with TD. The reduction in the PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression in rickets may be due to the high plasma levels of PTH.

  8. Farnesoid X receptor represses hepatic lipase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sirvent, Audrey; Verhoeven, Adrie J M; Jansen, Hans; Kosykh, Vladimir; Darteil, Raphaël J; Hum, Dean W; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart

    2004-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates gene expression in response to bile acids (BAs). FXR plays a central role in BA, cholesterol, and lipoprotein metabolism. Here, we identify HL, an enzyme involved in the metabolism of remnant and high density lipoproteins, as a novel FXR-regulated gene. The natural FXR ligand, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), downregulates HL gene expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. The nonsteroidal synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 also decreases HL mRNA levels in HepG2 cells and in primary human hepatocytes. Moreover, the decrease of HL mRNA levels after treatment with FXR agonists was associated with a significant decrease in secreted enzymatic activity. In addition, FXR-specific gene silencing using small interfering RNAs demonstrated that CDCA- and GW4064-mediated downregulation of HL transcript levels occurs via an FXR-dependent mechanism. Finally, using transient transfection experiments, it is shown that FXR represses transcriptional activity of a reporter driven by the -698/+13 bp human HL promoter. Taken together, these results identify HL as a new FXR-regulated gene in human liver cells. In view of the role of HL in plasma lipoprotein metabolism, our results further emphasize the central role of FXR in lipid homeostasis.

  9. Epigenetic regulation of olfactory receptor gene expression by the Myb-MuvB/dREAM complex.

    PubMed

    Sim, Choon Kiat; Perry, Sarah; Tharadra, Sana Khalid; Lipsick, Joseph S; Ray, Anandasankar

    2012-11-15

    In both mammals and insects, an olfactory neuron will usually select a single olfactory receptor and repress remaining members of large receptor families. Here we show that a conserved multiprotein complex, Myb-MuvB (MMB)/dREAM, plays an important role in mediating neuron-specific expression of the carbon dioxide (CO(2)) receptor genes (Gr63a/Gr21a) in Drosophila. Activity of Myb in the complex is required for expression of Gr63a/Gr21a and acts in opposition to the histone methyltransferase Su(var)3-9. Consistent with this, we observed repressive dimethylated H3K9 modifications at the receptor gene loci, suggesting a mechanism for silencing receptor gene expression. Conversely, other complex members, Mip120 (Myb-interacting protein 120) and E2F2, are required for repression of Gr63a in inappropriate neurons. Misexpression in mutants is accompanied by an increase in the H3K4me3 mark of active chromatin at the receptor gene locus. Nuclei of CO(2) receptor-expressing neurons contain reduced levels of the repressive subunit Mip120 compared with surrounding neurons and increased levels of Myb, suggesting that activity of the complex can be regulated in a cell-specific manner. Our evidence suggests a model in which olfactory receptors are regulated epigenetically and the MMB/dREAM complex plays a critical role in specifying, maintaining, and modulating the receptor-to-neuron map.

  10. The expression of leptin receptor in the ovary of the queen: leptin receptor expression in queen ovary.

    PubMed

    Albrizio, M; Roscino, M T; Trisolini, C; Binetti, F; Rizzo, A; Sciorsci, R L

    2013-10-01

    Leptin is a Ob gene product secreted mainly by adipose tissue. Several reports showed leptin production by other tissue including the ovary. The action of leptin is mediated upon binding to its receptor widely expressed in reproductive tissues in different species. In fact, there are growing evidences that leptin plays an important role in the modulation of reproductive functions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate in the queen, the expression of leptin receptor during the functional ovarian cycle and pregnancy. We found that the ovaries of the queen express leptin receptor in all the examined phases. The highest leptin receptor expression was found in the luteal phase (pseudopregnancy, pregnancy) compared to other phases of the cycle (anestrus, proestrus, estrus). The variations in the expression of leptin receptor suggest a likely implication of leptin in the modulation of ovarian activity, in the examined species.

  11. Expression of the Endocannabinoid Receptors in Human Fascial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fede, C.; Albertin, G.; Petrelli, L.; Sfriso, M.M.; Biz, C.; Caro, R. De; Stecco, C.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1) and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2) in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies) and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation. PMID:27349320

  12. Molecular Cooperativity Governs Diverse and Monoallelic Olfactory Receptor Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Jianhua; Tian, Xiaojun; Zhang, Hang; Sannerud, Jens

    Multiple-objective optimization is common in biological systems. In the mammalian olfactory system, each sensory neuron stochastically expresses only one out of up to thousands of olfactory receptor (OR) gene alleles; at organism level the types of expressed ORs need to be maximized. The molecular mechanism of this Nobel-Prize winning puzzle remains unresolved after decades of extensive studies. Existing models focus only on monoallele activation, and cannot explain recent observations in mutants, especially the reduced global diversity of expressed ORs in G9a/GLP knockouts. In this work we integrated existing information on OR expression, and proposed an evolutionarily optimized three-layer regulation mechanism, which includes zonal segregation, epigenetic and enhancer competition coupled to a negative feedback loop. This model not only recapitulates monoallelic OR expression, but also elucidates how the olfactory system maximizes and maintains the diversity of OR expression. The model is validated by several experimental results, and particularly underscores cooperativity and synergy as a general design principle of multi-objective optimization in biology. The work is supported by the NIGMS/DMS Mathematical Biology program.

  13. Class A scavenger receptor promotes osteoclast differentiation via the enhanced expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK)

    SciTech Connect

    Takemura, Kenichi; Sakashita, Naomi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Lei, XiaoFeng; Ohnishi, Koji; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2010-01-22

    Osteoclasts originate from bone marrow monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, and their differentiation depends on macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) ligand. Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) is one of the principal functional molecules of macrophages, and its level of expression declines during osteoclast differentiation. To investigate the role of SR-A in osteoclastogenesis, we examined pathological changes in femoral bone and the expression levels of osteoclastogenesis-related molecules in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. The femoral osseous density of SR-A{sup -/-} mice was higher than that of SR-A{sup +/+} mice, and the number of multinucleated osteoclasts was significantly decreased. An in vitro differentiation assay revealed that the differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts from bone marrow-derived progenitor cells is impaired in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. Elimination of SR-A did not alter the expression level of the M-CSF receptor, c-fms; however, the expression levels of RANK and RANK-related osteoclast-differentiation molecules such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) significantly decreased. Furthermore, acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL), an SR-A ligand, significantly increased the expression level of RANK and MITF during osteoclast differentiation. These data indicate that SR-A promotes osteoclastogenesis via augmentation of the expression level of RANK and its related molecules.

  14. Bacterial expression of functional, biotinylated peripheral cannabinoid receptor CB2.

    PubMed

    Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Wong, Karen; Gawrisch, Klaus; Yeliseev, Alexei

    2006-09-01

    A biotin-protein ligase recognition site (BRS) was inserted into a polypeptide comprised of the maltose-binding protein, the peripheral cannabinoid receptor (CB2), thioredoxin A, and a polyhistidine tag at the carboxy terminus. Expression levels of the recombinant receptor in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells were approximately 1mg per liter of bacterial culture. The biotinylated CB2-fusion fully retained its ligand-binding capacity. Introduction of the BRS at the C-terminus of the CB2 fusion protein (construct CB2-109) resulted in its complete in vivo biotinylation; the biotinylated protein was streptavidin-binding competent. Positioning of the BRS near the N-terminus of CB2 (CB2-112) resulted in a very low level of biotinylation in vivo. However, the detergent solubilized and purified CB2-112 fusion protein were successfully biotinylated in vitro by action of a BirA biotin-protein ligase. The biotinylated CB2-112 fusion protein was cleaved by the tobacco etch virus protease at specifically inserted sites, and deposited onto monomeric avidin agarose beads. Biotinylation of the recombinant CB2 receptor enabled not only purification but also immobilization of the GPCR on a solid support in homogeneous orientation which is beneficial for subsequent structural characterization.

  15. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  16. Melanocortin 4 Receptor and Dopamine D2 Receptor Expression in Brain Areas Involved in Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ye Ran

    2015-01-01

    Background The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) is involved in the regulation of homeostatic energy balance by the hypothalamus. Recent reports showed that MC4R can also control the motivation for food in association with a brain reward system, such as dopamine. We investigated the expression levels of MC4R and the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), which is known to be related to food rewards, in both the hypothalamus and brain regions involved in food rewards. Methods We examined the expression levels of D2R and MC4R by dual immunofluorescence histochemistry in hypothalamic regions and in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), the central amygdala, and the ventral tegmental area of transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of the D2R gene. Results In the hypothalamic area, significant coexpression of MC4R and D2R was observed in the arcuate nucleus. We observed a significant coexpression of D2R and MC4R in the BNST, which has been suggested to be an important site for food reward. Conclusion We suggest that MC4R and D2R function in the hypothalamus for control of energy homeostasis and that within the brain regions related with rewards, such as the BNST, the melanocortin system works synergistically with dopamine for the integration of food motivation in the control of feeding behaviors. PMID:26790386

  17. Glutamate receptor subunit expression in primary neuronal and secondary glial cultures.

    PubMed

    Janssens, N; Lesage, A S

    2001-06-01

    We report on the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in primary neuronal cultures from rat cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum and of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor subtypes in these neuronal cultures as well as in cortical astroglial cultures. We found that the NMDA receptor (NR) subunits NR1, NR2A and NR2B were expressed in all three cultures. Each of the three cultures showed also expression of the four AMPA receptor subunits. Although RT-PCR detected mRNA of all kainate (KA) subunits in the three cultures, western blot showed only expression of Glu6 and KA2 receptor subunits. The expression analysis of mGlu receptors indicated the presence of all mGlu receptor subtype mRNAs in the three neuronal cultures, except for mGlu2 receptor mRNA, which was not detected in the cortical and cerebellar culture. mGlu1a/alpha, -2/3 and -5 receptor proteins were present in all three cultures, whereas mGlu4a and mGlu8a receptor proteins were not detected. Astroglial cultures were grown in either serum-containing or chemically defined medium. Only mGlu5 receptor protein was found in astroglial cultures grown in serum-containing medium. When astrocytes were cultured in chemically defined medium, mGlu3, -5 and -8 receptor mRNAs were detected, but at the protein level, still only mGlu5 receptor was found. PMID:11413230

  18. Androgen receptor transcriptionally regulates μ-opioid receptor expression in rat trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki Seok; Zhang, Youping; Asgar, Jamila; Auh, Q-Schick; Chung, Man-Kyo; Ro, Jin Y

    2016-09-01

    The involvement of testosterone in pain, inflammation, and analgesia has been reported, but the role of androgen receptor (AR), a steroid receptor for testosterone, is not well understood. We have previously shown that peripheral inflammation upregulates μ-opioid receptor (MOR) in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) in a testosterone-dependent manner. In this study, we hypothesized that testosterone regulates MOR expression via transcriptional activities of AR in TG. We first examined whether AR is co-expressed with MOR in TG neurons. Our immunohistochemical experiment revealed that AR staining is detected in neurons of all sizes in TG and that a subset of AR is expressed in MOR as well as in TRPV1-positive neurons. We identified the promoter region of the rat MOR gene contains putative AR binding sites. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrated that AR directly binds to these sites in TG extracts. We confirmed with luciferase reporter assay that AR activated the MOR promoter in response to androgens in a human neuroblastoma cell line (5H-5YSY). These data demonstrated that AR functions as a transcriptional regulator of the MOR gene activity. Finally, we showed that flutamide, a specific AR antagonist, prevents complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced upregulation of MOR mRNA in TG, and that flutamide dose-dependently blocks the efficacy of DAMGO, a specific MOR agonist, on CFA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Our results expand the knowledge regarding the role of androgens and their receptor in pain and analgesia and have important clinical implications, particularly for inflammatory pain patients with low or compromised plasma testosterone levels. PMID:27320211

  19. A second trigeminal CGRP receptor: function and expression of the AMY1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher S; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Bower, Rebekah L; Wilderman, Andrea; Insel, Paul A; Edvinsson, Lars; Waldvogel, Henry J; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Russo, Andrew F; Hay, Debbie L

    2015-01-01

    Objective The trigeminovascular system plays a central role in migraine, a condition in need of new treatments. The neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is proposed as causative in migraine and is the subject of intensive drug discovery efforts. This study explores the expression and functionality of two CGRP receptor candidates in the sensory trigeminal system. Methods Receptor expression was determined using Taqman G protein-coupled receptor arrays and immunohistochemistry in trigeminal ganglia (TG) and the spinal trigeminal complex of the brainstem in rat and human. Receptor pharmacology was quantified using sensitive signaling assays in primary rat TG neurons. Results mRNA and histological expression analysis in rat and human samples revealed the presence of two CGRP-responsive receptors (AMY1: calcitonin receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein 1 [RAMP1]) and the CGRP receptor (calcitonin receptor-like receptor/RAMP1). In support of this finding, quantification of agonist and antagonist potencies revealed a dual population of functional CGRP-responsive receptors in primary rat TG neurons. Interpretation The unexpected presence of a functional non-canonical CGRP receptor (AMY1) at neural sites important for craniofacial pain has important implications for targeting the CGRP axis in migraine. PMID:26125036

  20. The Relevance of Group II Glutamate Receptors Expression to Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ravid, Jonathan D; Mostofsky, David I

    2016-01-01

    The interface of receptor-mediated regulation of cellular signaling and neurological outputs remains an active field of investigation. The metabotropic G protein-coupled glutamate receptors, and in particular, the group II cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP)-lowering metabotropic glutamate receptors 2 and 3 (mGlu2/3 glutamate receptors), have gained interest as therapeutic targets in different forms of neurological disorders. This review explores mGlu2/3 glutamate receptors expression, pharmacological activation, and signaling links to anxiety, as assessed in animal models and in clinical trials. PMID:27650988

  1. Cannabinoid, melanocortin and opioid receptor expression on DRD1 and DRD2 subpopulations in rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Oude Ophuis, Ralph J. A.; Boender, Arjen J.; van Rozen, Andrea J.; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2014-01-01

    The striatum harbors two neuronal populations that enable action selection. One population represents the striatonigral pathway, expresses the dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1) and promotes the execution of motor programs, while the other population represents the striatopallidal pathway, expresses the dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) and suppresses voluntary activity. The two populations integrate distinct sensorimotor, cognitive, and emotional information streams and their combined activity enables the selection of adaptive behaviors. Characterization of these populations is critical to the understanding of their role in action selection, because it aids the identification of the molecular mechanisms that separate them. To that end, we used fluorescent in situ hybridization to quantify the percentage of striatal cells that (co)express dopaminergic receptors and receptors of the cannabinoid, melanocortin or opioid neurotransmitters systems. Our main findings are that the cannabinoid 1 receptor is equally expressed on both populations with a gradient from dorsal to ventral striatum, that the opioid receptors have a preference for expression with either the DRD1 or DRD2 and that the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) is predominantly expressed in ventral parts of the striatum. In addition, we find that the level of MC4R expression determines its localization to either the DRD1 or the DRD2 population. Thereby, we provide insight into the sensitivity of the two dopaminoceptive populations to these neurotransmitters and progress the understanding of the mechanisms that enable action selection. PMID:24723856

  2. Enhanced Tumor Trafficking of GD2 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells by Expression of the Chemokine Receptor CCR2b

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, John A; Lu, An; Bear, Adham; Pule, Martin; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Foster, Aaron E

    2010-01-01

    For adoptive T cell therapy to be effective against solid tumors, tumor-specific T cells must be able to migrate to the tumor site. One requirement for efficient migration is that the effector cells express chemokine receptors that match the chemokines produced either by tumor or tumor-associated cells. In this study, we investigated whether the tumor trafficking of activated T cells (ATCs) bearing a chimeric antigen receptor specific for the tumor antigen GD2 (GD2-CAR) could be enhanced by forced co-expression of the chemokine receptor CCR2b, since this receptor directs migration towards CCL2, a chemokine produced by many tumors, including neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-AS) and primary tumor cells isolated from six patients all secreted high levels of CCL2, but GD2-CAR transduced ATCs lacked expression of CCR2 (<5%) and migrated poorly to recombinant CCL2 or tumor supernatants. Following retroviral transduction, however, ATCs expressed high levels of CCR2b (>60%) and migrated well in vitro. We expressed firefly luciferase in CCR2b-expressing ATCs and observed improved homing (>10-fold) to CCL2-secreting neuroblastoma compared to CCR2 negative ATCs. As a result, ATCs co-modified with both CCR2b and GD2-CAR had greater anti-tumor activity in vivo. PMID:20842059

  3. Post-transcriptional regulation of dopamine D1 receptor expression in caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized mice.

    PubMed

    Tobón, Krishna E; Catuzzi, Jennifer E; Cote, Samantha R; Sonaike, Adenike; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2015-07-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor is centrally involved in mediating the effects of cocaine and is essential for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Changes in D1 receptor expression have been reported in various models of cocaine addiction; however, the mechanisms that mediate these changes in D1 receptor expression are not well understood. Using preadolescent drd1a-EGFP mice and a binge cocaine treatment protocol we demonstrate that the D1 receptor is post-transcriptionally regulated in the caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized animal. While cocaine-sensitized mice express high levels of steady-state D1 receptor mRNA, the expression of D1 receptor protein is not elevated. We determined that the post-transcriptional regulation of D1 receptor mRNA is rapidly attenuated and D1 receptor protein levels increase within 30 min when the sensitized mice are challenged with cocaine. The rapid increase in D1 receptor protein levels requires de novo protein synthesis and correlates with the cocaine-induced hyperlocomotor activity in the cocaine-sensitized mice. The increase in D1 receptor protein levels in the caudate-putamen inversely correlated with the levels of microRNA 142-3p and 382, both of which regulate D1 receptor protein expression. The levels of these two microRNAs decreased significantly within 5 min of cocaine challenge in sensitized mice. The results provide novel insights into the previously unknown rapid kinetics of D1 receptor protein expression which occurs in a time scale that is comparable to the expression of immediate early genes. Furthermore, the results suggest a potential novel role for inherently labile microRNAs in regulating the rapid expression of D1 receptor protein in cocaine-sensitized animals. PMID:25900179

  4. Post-transcriptional regulation of dopamine D1 receptor expression in caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized mice

    PubMed Central

    Tobón, Krishna E.; Catuzzi, Jennifer E.; Cote, Samantha R.; Sonaike, Adenike; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V.

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor is centrally involved in mediating the effects of cocaine and is essential for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Changes in D1 receptor expression has been reported in various models of cocaine addiction; however, the mechanisms that mediate these changes in D1 receptor expression are not well understood. Using preadolescent drd1a-EGFP mice and a binge cocaine treatment protocol we demonstrate that the D1 receptor is post-transcriptionally regulated in the caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized animal. While cocaine-sensitized mice express high levels of steady state D1 receptor mRNA, the expression of D1 receptor protein is not elevated. We determined that the post-transcriptional regulation of D1 receptor mRNA is rapidly attenuated and D1 receptor protein levels increase within thirty minutes when the sensitized mice are challenged with cocaine. The rapid increase in D1 receptor protein levels requires de novo protein synthesis and correlates with the cocaine-induced hyperlocomotor activity in the cocaine-sensitized mice. The increase in D1 receptor protein levels in the caudate-putamen inversely correlated to the levels of microRNA 142-3p and 382, both of which regulate D1 receptor protein expression. The levels of these two microRNAs decreased significantly within five minutes of cocaine challenge in sensitized mice. The results provide novel insights into the previously unknown rapid kinetics of D1 receptor protein expression which occurs in a time scale that is comparable to the expression of immediate early genes. Furthermore, the results suggests a potential novel role for inherently labile microRNAs in regulating the rapid expression of D1 receptor protein in cocaine-sensitized animals. PMID:25900179

  5. Identification of Neuropeptide Receptors Expressed by Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Gregory S.; Wang, Lien; Wang, Zhiwei; Civelli, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating Hormone (MCH) is a 19 amino acid cyclic neuropeptide that acts in rodents via the MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) to regulate a wide variety of physiological functions. MCH is produced by a distinct population of neurons located in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) and zona incerta (ZI) but MCHR1 mRNA is widely expressed throughout the brain. The physiological responses and behaviors regulated by the MCH system have been investigated, but less is known about how MCH neurons are regulated. The effects of most classical neurotransmitters on MCH neurons have been studied, but those of neuropeptides are poorly understood. In order to gain insight into how neuropeptides regulate the MCH system, we investigated which neuropeptide receptors are expressed by MCH neurons using double in situ hybridization. In all, twenty receptors, selected based upon either a suspected interaction with the MCH system or demonstrated high expression levels in the LH and ZI, were tested to determine whether they are expressed by MCH neurons. Overall, eleven neuropeptide receptors were found to exhibit significant colocalization with MCH neurons: Nociceptin / Orphanin FQ Opioid receptor (NOP), MCHR1, both Orexin receptors (ORX), Somatostatin receptor 1 and 2 (SSTR1, SSTR2), the Kisspeptin receotor (KissR1), Neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1), Neuropeptide S receptor (NPSR), Cholecystokinin receptor A (CCKAR) and the κ-opioid receptor (KOR). Of these receptors, six have never before been linked to the MCH system. Surprisingly, several receptors thought to regulate MCH neurons displayed minimal colocalization with MCH, suggesting that they may not directly regulate the MCH system. PMID:24978951

  6. The histaminergic system in human thalamus: correlation of innervation to receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Jin, C Y; Kalimo, H; Panula, Pertti

    2002-04-01

    The mRNA expression of three histamine receptors (H1, H2 and H3) and H1 and H3 receptor binding were mapped and quantified in normal human thalamus by in situ hybridization and receptor binding autoradiography, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was applied to study the distribution of histaminergic fibres and terminals in the normal human thalamus. mRNAs for all three histamine receptors were detected mainly in the dorsal thalamus, but the expression intensities were different. Briefly, H1 and H3 receptor mRNAs were relatively enriched in the anterior, medial, and part of the lateral nuclei regions; whereas the expression level was much lower in the ventral and posterior parts of the thalamus, and the reticular nucleus. H2 receptor mRNA displayed in general very low expression intensity with slightly higher expression level in the anterior and lateropolar regions. H1 receptor binding was mainly detected in the mediodorsal, ventroposterolateral nuclei, and the pulvinar. H3 receptor binding was detected mainly in the dorsal thalamus, predominantly the periventricular, mediodorsal, and posterior regions. Very high or high histaminergic fibre densities were observed in the midline nuclear region and other nuclei next to the third ventricle, ventroposterior lateral nucleus and medial geniculate nucleus. In most of the core structures of the thalamus, the fibre density was very low or absent. The results suggest that histamine in human brain regulates tactile and proprioceptory thalamocortical functions through multiple receptors. Also, other, e.g. visual areas and those not making cortical connections expressed histamine receptors and contained histaminergic nerve fibres.

  7. Expression of functional leptin receptors in rodent Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Caprio, M; Isidori, A M; Carta, A R; Moretti, C; Dufau, M L; Fabbri, A

    1999-11-01

    Several studies indicate that the size of body fat stores and the circulating levels of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin are able to influence the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The leptin-hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal interactions have been mainly studied at the level of the central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the possibility that leptin may have direct effects on the rodent Leydig cell function. To probe this hypothesis, we first analyzed the expression of leptin receptors (OB-R) in rodent Leydig cells in culture. RT-PCR studies showed that rat Leydig cells express both the long (OB-Rb) and short isoform (OB-Ra) of leptin receptor, whereas MLTC-1 cells (a murine Leydig tumor cell line) express only the long isoform. Short-term (30-90 min) incubation of rat Leydig cells with increasing concentrations ofleptin (2-500 ng/ml) led to a significant and dose-dependent inhibition of human (h)CG-stimulated testosterone (T) production (approximately 60% reduction, IC50 = 20 ng/ml) but no change in basal androgen release. Also, leptin (150 ng/ml) amplified hCG-induced intracellular cAMP formation (1- to 2-fold) without modifying basal cAMP levels. Subsequent experiments showed that leptin inhibited 8Br-cAMP-stimulated T production, indicating that leptin's effect is exerted beyond cAMP. The inhibitory effect of leptin on hCG-induced T secretion was accompanied by a significant reduction of androstenedione and a concomitant rise of the precursor metabolites pregnenolone, progesterone, and 17-OH-progesterone, conceivable with a leptin-induced lesion of 17,20 lyase activity. Separate experiments performed with the MLTC-1 cells (not expressing cytochrome P450-17alpha) showed that leptin, though amplifying hCG-stimulated cAMP production, did not modify hCG-stimulated pregnenolone and progesterone release. These results further indicate that leptin action on steroidogenesis occurs downstream of progesterone synthesis. Northern Blot

  8. Heterologous expression of G-protein-coupled receptors in yeast.

    PubMed

    Bertheleme, Nicolas; Singh, Shweta; Dowell, Simon; Byrne, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Heterologous yeast expression systems have been successfully used for the production of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for both structural and functional studies. Yeast combine comparatively low cost and short culture times with straightforward generation of expression clones. They also perform some key posttranslational modifications not possible in bacterial systems. There are two major yeast expression systems, Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, both of which have been used for the production of GPCRs. P. pastoris has a proven track record for the production of large amounts of GPCR for structural studies. High-resolution crystal structures of both the adenosine A2A and the histamine H1 receptors have been obtained using protein expressed in this system. S. cerevisiae is relatively easy to engineer and this has resulted in the development of sophisticated tools for the functional characterization of GPCRs. In this chapter, we provide protocols for both large-scale receptor expression in P. pastoris for structural studies and small-scale receptor expression in S. cerevisiae for functional characterization. In both cases, the receptor used is the human adenosine A2A receptor. The results that both we and others have obtained using these protocols show the wide utility of the yeast expression systems for the production of GPCRs.

  9. mRNA expression of dopamine receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes of computer game addicts.

    PubMed

    Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarei, Seyed Zeinolabedin; Sadat-Shirazi, Mitra-Sadat; Eghbali, Fatemeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Excessive playing of computer games like some other behaviors could lead to addiction. Addictive behaviors may induce their reinforcing effects through stimulation of the brain dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway. The status of dopamine receptors in the brain may be parallel to their homologous receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Here, we have investigated the mRNA expression of dopamine D3, D4 and D5 receptors in PBLs of computer game addicts (n = 20) in comparison to normal subjects (n = 20), using a real-time PCR method. The results showed that the expression level of D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts were not statistically different from the control group. However, the expression of the mRNA of D5 dopamine receptor was significantly down-regulated in PBLs of computer game addicts and reached 0.42 the amount of the control group. It is concluded that unlike with drug addiction, the expression levels of the D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts are not altered compared to the control group. However, reduced level of the D5 dopamine receptor in computer game addicts may serve as a peripheral marker in studies where the confounding effects of abused drugs are unwanted.

  10. Cocaine decreases expression of neurogranin via alterations in thyroid receptor/retinoid X receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kovalevich, Jane; Corley, Gladys; Yen, William; Kim, Jae; Rawls, Scott M.; Langford, Dianne

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests a potential link between cocaine abuse, disruptions in hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis signaling, and neuroplasticity, but molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Neurogranin (Ng) is a gene containing a thyroid hormone-responsive element within its first intron that is involved in synaptic plasticity. Transcriptional activation requires heterodimerization of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) bound by their respective ligands, tri-iodothryonine and 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA), and subsequent binding of this complex to the thyroid hormone-responsive element of the Ng gene. In this study, the effects of chronic cocaine abuse on Ng expression in euthyroid and hypothyroid mice were assessed. In cocaine-treated mice, decreased Ng expression was observed in the absence of changes in levels of thyroid hormones or other hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid signaling factors. Therefore, we hypothesized that cocaine decreases Ng expression via alterations in 9-cis-RA availability and TR/RXR signaling. In support of this hypothesis, RXR-γ was significantly decreased in brains of cocaine-treated mice while CYP26A1, the main enzyme responsible for neuronal RA degradation, was significantly increased. Results from this study provide the first evidence for a direct effect of cocaine abuse on TR/RXR signaling, RA metabolism, and transcriptional regulation of Ng, a gene essential for adult neuroplasticity. PMID:22300446

  11. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ.

    PubMed

    Słoniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides

  12. Expression of the human ABCC6 gene is induced by retinoids through the retinoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ratajewski, Marcin; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Pulaski, Lukasz . E-mail: lpulaski@cbm.pan.pl

    2006-12-01

    Mutations in the human ABCC6 gene are responsible for the disease pseudoxanthoma elasticum, although Physiological function or substrate of the gene product (an ABC transporter known also as MRP6) is not known. We found that the expression of this gene in cells of hepatic origin (where this gene is predominantly expressed in the body) is significantly upregulated by retinoids, acting as agonists of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) rather than the retinoid A receptor (RAR). The direct involvement of this nuclear receptor in the transcriptional regulation of ABCC6 gene expression was confirmed by transient transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This constitutes the first direct proof of previously suggested involvement of nuclear hormone receptors in ABCC6 gene expression and the first identification of a transcription factor which may be relevant to regulation of ABCC6 level in tissues and in some PXE patients.

  13. Concerted Gene Expression of Hippocampal Steroid Receptors during Spatial Learning in Male Wistar Rats: A Correlation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lubec, Gert; Korz, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal and gonadal steroid receptor activities are significantly involved and interact in the regulation of learning, memory and stress. Thus, a coordinated expression of steroid receptor genes during a learning task can be expected. Although coexpression of steroid receptors in response to behavioral tasks has been reported the correlative connection is unclear. According to the inverted U-shape model of the impact of stress upon learning and memory we hypothesized that glucocorticoid (GR) receptor expression should be correlated to corticosterone levels in a linear or higher order manner. Other cognition modulating steroid receptors like estrogen receptors (ER) should be correlated to GR receptors in a quadratic manner, which describes a parabola and thus a U-shaped connection. Therefore, we performed a correlational meta-analyis of data of a previous study (Meyer and Korz, 2013a) of steroid receptor gene expressions during spatial learning, which provides a sufficient data basis in order to perform such correlational connections. In that study male rats of different ages were trained in a spatial holeboard or remained untrained and the hippocampal gene expression of different steroid receptors as well as serum corticosterone levels were measured. Expressions of mineralocorticoid (MR) and GR receptors were positively and linearly correlated with blood serum corticosterone levels in spatially trained but not in untrained animals. Training induced a cubic (best fit) relationship between mRNA levels of estrogen receptor α (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR) with MR mRNA. GR gene expression was linearly correlated with MR expression under both conditions. ERα m RNA levels were negatively and linearily and MR and GR gene expressions were cubicely correlated with reference memory errors (RME). Due to only three age classes correlations with age could not be performed. The findings support the U-shape theory of steroid receptor interaction, however the cubic fit

  14. High expression of NPY receptors in the human testis.

    PubMed

    Körner, Meike; Waser, Beatriche; Thalmann, George N; Reubii, Jean Claude

    2011-04-30

    NPY receptors represent novel molecular therapeutic targets in cancer and obesity. However, the extent of NPY receptor expression in normal human tissues is poorly investigated. Based on the role of NPY in reproductive functions, the NPY receptor expression was studied in 25 normal human testes and, additionally, 24 testicular tumors using NPY receptor autoradiography. In the normal testis, Leydig cells strongly expressed NPY receptor subtype Y2, and small arterial blood vessels Y1. Y2 receptors were found to be functional with agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding autoradiography. Full functional integrity of the NPY system was further suggested by the immunohistochemical detection of NPY peptide in nerve fibers directly adjacent to Leydig cells and arteries. Germ cell tumors expressed Y1 and Y2 on tumor cells in 33% and Y1 on intratumoral blood vessels in 50%. Based on its strong NPY receptor expression in Leydig cells and blood vessels, the normal human testis represents a potentially important physiological and pharmalogical NPY target.

  15. Myoglobin expression in prostate cancer is correlated to androgen receptor expression and markers of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Meller, Sebastian; Bicker, Anne; Montani, Matteo; Ikenberg, Kristian; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Sailer, Verena; Wild, Peter; Dietrich, Dimo; Uhl, Barbara; Sulser, Tullio; Moch, Holger; Gorr, Thomas A; Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Klaus; Hankeln, Thomas; Kristiansen, Glen

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies identified unexpected expression and transcriptional complexity of the hemoprotein myoglobin (MB) in human breast cancer but its role in prostate cancer is still unclear. Expression of MB was immunohistochemically analyzed in three independent cohorts of radical prostatectomy specimens (n = 409, n = 625, and n = 237). MB expression data were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and molecular parameters of androgen and hypoxia signaling. Expression levels of novel tumor-associated MB transcript variants and the VEGF gene as a hypoxia marker were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Fifty-three percent of the prostate cancer cases were MB positive and significantly correlated with androgen receptor (AR) expression (p < 0.001). The positive correlation with CAIX (p < 0.001) and FASN (p = 0.008) as well as the paralleled increased expression of the tumor-associated MB transcript variants and VEGF suggest that hypoxia participates in MB expression regulation. Analogous to breast cancer, MB expression in prostate cancer is associated with steroid hormone signaling and markers of hypoxia. Further studies must elucidate the novel functional roles of MB in human carcinomas, which probably extend beyond its classic intramuscular function in oxygen storage. PMID:25172328

  16. Cardiac microvascular endothelial cells express a functional Ca+ -sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Berra Romani, Roberto; Raqeeb, Abdul; Laforenza, Umberto; Scaffino, Manuela Federica; Moccia, Francesco; Avelino-Cruz, Josè Everardo; Oldani, Amanda; Coltrini, Daniela; Milesi, Veronica; Taglietti, Vanni; Tanzi, Franco

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism whereby extracellular Ca(2+) exerts the endothelium-dependent control of vascular tone is still unclear. In this study, we assessed whether cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMEC) express a functional extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) using a variety of techniques. CaSR mRNA was detected using RT-PCR, and CaSR protein was identified by immunocytochemical analysis. In order to assess the functionality of the receptor, CMEC were loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorochrome, Fura-2/AM. A number of CaSR agonists, such as spermine, Gd(3+), La(3+) and neomycin, elicited a heterogeneous intracellular Ca(2+) signal, which was abolished by disruption of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) signaling and by depletion of intracellular stores with cyclopiazonic acid. The inhibition of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger upon substitution of extracellular Na(+) unmasked the Ca(2+) signal triggered by an increase in extracellular Ca(2+) levels. Finally, aromatic amino acids, which function as allosteric activators of CaSR, potentiated the Ca(2+) response to the CaSR agonist La(3+). These data provide evidence that CMEC express CaSR, which is able to respond to physiological agonists by mobilizing Ca(2+) from intracellular InsP(3)-sensitive stores.

  17. Analysis of the cell surface expression of cytokine receptors using the surface protein biotinylation method.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Lam, Clarissa; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Singh, Gurpreet; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are pleiotropic, low-molecular-weight proteins that regulate the immune responses to infection and inflammation. They stimulate the immune responses by binding to cytokine receptors on the cell plasma membrane. Thus, knowledge of the expression level of particular cytokine receptors on cell surface is crucial for understanding the cytokine function and regulation. One of the techniques to explore the membrane embedded cytokine receptors is cell surface biotinylation. Biotinylated surface proteins can be rapidly purified through the strong interaction between biotin and streptavidin. Here, we describe the procedure for surface biotinylation and purification of biotinylated cytokine receptors for further downstream analysis. PMID:24908305

  18. Analysis of the cell surface expression of cytokine receptors using the surface protein biotinylation method.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Lam, Clarissa; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Singh, Gurpreet; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are pleiotropic, low-molecular-weight proteins that regulate the immune responses to infection and inflammation. They stimulate the immune responses by binding to cytokine receptors on the cell plasma membrane. Thus, knowledge of the expression level of particular cytokine receptors on cell surface is crucial for understanding the cytokine function and regulation. One of the techniques to explore the membrane embedded cytokine receptors is cell surface biotinylation. Biotinylated surface proteins can be rapidly purified through the strong interaction between biotin and streptavidin. Here, we describe the procedure for surface biotinylation and purification of biotinylated cytokine receptors for further downstream analysis.

  19. Obtaining anti-type 1 melatonin receptor antibodies by immunization with melatonin receptor-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Nelia; Wijkhuisen, Anne; Savatier, Alexandra; Moulharat, Natacha; Ferry, Gilles; Léonetti, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies (Abs) specific to cell-surface receptors are attractive tools for studying the physiological role of such receptors or for controlling their activity. We sought to obtain such antibodies against the type 1 receptor for melatonin (MT1). For this, we injected mice with CHO cells transfected with a plasmid encoding human MT1 (CHO-MT1-h), in the presence or absence of an adjuvant mixture containing Alum and CpG1018. As we previously observed that the immune response to a protein antigen is increased when it is coupled to a fusion protein, called ZZTat101, we also investigated if the association of ZZTat101 with CHO-MT1-h cells provides an immunogenic advantage. We measured similar levels of anti-CHO and anti-MT1-h Ab responses in animals injected with either CHO-MT1-h cells or ZZTat101/CHO-MT1-h cells, with or without adjuvant, indicating that neither the adjuvant mixture nor ZZTat101 increased the anti-cell immune response. Then, we investigated whether the antisera also recognized murine MT1 (MT1-m). Using cloned CHO cells transfected with a plasmid encoding MT1-m, we found that antisera raised against CHO-MT1-h cells also bound the mouse receptor. Altogether our studies indicate that immunizing approaches based on MT1-h-expressing CHO cells allow the production of polyclonal antibodies against MT1 receptors of different origins. This paves the way to preparation of MT1-specific monoclonal antibodies.

  20. Expression, binding, and signaling properties of CRF2(a) receptors endogenously expressed in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells: passage-dependent regulation of functional receptors.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Hauger, Richard L; Van der Linden, Ilse; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2008-02-01

    Endogenous expression of the corticotropin-releasing factor type 2a receptor [CRF2(a)] but not CRF2(b) and CRF2(c) was observed in higher passage cultures of human Y79 retinoblastoma cells. Functional studies further demonstrated an increase in CRF2(a) mRNA and protein levels with higher passage numbers (> 20 passages). Although the CRF1 receptor was expressed at higher levels than the CRF2(a) receptor, both receptors were easily distinguishable from one another by selective receptor ligands. CRF(1)-preferring or non-selective agonists such as CRF, urocortin 1 (UCN1), and sauvagine stimulated cAMP production in Y79 to maximal responses of approximately 100 pmoles/10(5) cells, whereas the exclusive CRF2 receptor-selective agonists UCN2 and 3 stimulated cAMP production to maximal responses of approximately 25-30 pmoles/10(5) cells. UCN2 and 3-mediated cAMP stimulation was potently blocked by the approximately 300-fold selective CRF2 antagonist antisauvagine (IC50 = 6.5 +/- 1.6 nmol/L), whereas the CRF(1)-selective antagonist NBI27914 only blocked cAMP responses at concentrations > 10 microL. When the CRF(1)-preferring agonist ovine CRF was used to activate cAMP signaling, NBI27914 (IC50 = 38.4 +/- 3.6 nmol/L) was a more potent inhibitor than antisauvagine (IC50 = 2.04 +/- 0.2 microL). Finally, UCN2 and 3 treatment potently and rapidly desensitized the CRF2 receptor responses in Y79 cells. These data demonstrate that Y79 cells express functional CRF1 and CRF2a receptors and that the CRF2(a) receptor protein is up-regulated during prolonged culture. PMID:17976162

  1. Enhanced tumor trafficking of GD2 chimeric antigen receptor T cells by expression of the chemokine receptor CCR2b.

    PubMed

    Craddock, John A; Lu, An; Bear, Adham; Pule, Martin; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Foster, Aaron E

    2010-10-01

    For adoptive T-cell therapy to be effective against solid tumors, tumor-specific T cells must be able to migrate to the tumor site. One requirement for efficient migration is that the effector cells express chemokine receptors that match the chemokines produced either by tumor or tumor-associated cells. In this study, we investigated whether the tumor trafficking of activated T cells (ATCs) bearing a chimeric antigen receptor specific for the tumor antigen GD2 (GD2-CAR) could be enhanced by forced coexpression of the chemokine receptor CCR2b, as this receptor directs migration toward CCL2, a chemokine produced by many tumors, including neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-AS) and primary tumor cells isolated from 6 patients all secreted high levels of CCL2, but GD2-CAR transduced ATCs lacked expression of CCR2 (<5%) and migrated poorly to recombinant CCL2 or tumor supernatants. After retroviral transduction, however, ATCs expressed high levels of CCR2b (>60%) and migrated well in vitro. We expressed firefly luciferase in CCR2b-expressing ATCs and observed improved homing (>10-fold) to CCL2-secreting neuroblastoma compared with CCR2-negative ATCs. As a result, ATCs co-modified with both CCR2b and GD2-CAR had greater antitumor activity in vivo.

  2. Interleukin-1 receptors are differentially expressed in normal and psoriatic T cells.

    PubMed

    Bebes, Attila; Kovács-Sólyom, Ferenc; Prihoda, Judit; Kui, Róbert; Kemény, Lajos; Gyulai, Rolland

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine the possible role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) in the functional insufficiency of regulatory T cells in psoriasis, by comparing the expression of IL-1 receptors on healthy control and psoriatic T cells. Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and healthy volunteers, matched in age and sex, were selected for all experiments. CD4(+)CD25(-) effector and CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low) regulatory T cells were separated and used for the experiments. Expression of the mRNA of IL-1 receptors (IL-1R1, IL-1R2, and sIL-1R2) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell surface IL-1 receptor expression was assessed by flow cytometry. Relative expression of the signal transmitting IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) mRNA is higher in resting psoriatic effector and regulatory T cells, and activation induces higher IL-1R1 protein expression in psoriatic T cells than in healthy cells. Psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells express increased mRNA levels of the decoy IL-1 receptors (IL-1R2 and sIL-1R2) upon activation compared to healthy counterparts. Psoriatic T cells release slightly more sIL-1R2 into their surrounding than healthy T cells. In conclusion, changes in the expression of IL-1 receptors in psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  3. Reduced Glucocorticoid Receptor Expression Predicts Bladder Tumor Recurrence and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Kawahara, Takashi; Zheng, Yichun; Netto, George J.; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression in bladder tumors because the status and its prognostic value remain largely unknown. Methods We immunohistochemically stained for GR in bladder tumor and matched non-neoplastic bladder tissue specimens. Results Overall, GR was positive in 129 (87%) of 149 urothelial tumors, which was significantly (P = .026) lower than in non-neoplastic urothelium (90 [96%] of 94). Forty-two (79%) of 53 low-grade tumors vs 45 (47%) of 96 high-grade carcinomas (P < .001) and 61 (73%) of 84 non–muscle-invasive (NMI) tumors vs 26 (40%) of 65 muscle-invasive (MI) carcinomas (P < .001) were moderately to strongly immunoreactive for GR. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests revealed that loss or weak positivity of GR significantly or marginally correlated with recurrence of NMI tumors (P = .025), progression of MI tumors (P = .082), and cancer-specific survival of MI tumors (P = .067). Multivariate analysis identified low GR expression as a strong predictor for recurrence of NMI tumors (P = .034). Conclusions GR expression was downregulated in bladder tumors compared with nonneoplastic bladder tumors and in high-grade/MI tumors compared with low-grade/NMI tumors. Decreased expression of GR, as an independent prognosticator, predicted recurrence of NMI tumors. These results support experimental evidence suggesting an inhibitory role of GR signals in bladder cancer outgrowth. PMID:25015855

  4. The Estrogen ReceptorExpression in De Quervain's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shen, Po-Chuan; Wang, Ping-Hui; Wu, Po-Ting; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Hsieh, Jeng-Long; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist (a.k.a. de Quervain's disease) is common but how estrogen is involved is still unknown. We previously reported that inflammation was involved in the pathogenesis of this ailment. In the present study, we extended our investigation of estrogen receptor (ER)-β expression to determine whether estrogen is involved in the pathogenesis of de Quervain's. Intraoperative retinaculum samples were collected from 16 patients with the ailment. Specimens were histologically graded by collagen structure and immunohistochemically evaluated by quantifying the expression of ER-β, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 (inflammatory cytokines), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 (an inflammatory enzyme), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Von Willebrand's factor (vWF). De Quervain's occurs primarily in women. The female:male ratio in our study was 7:1. We found that ER-β expression in the retinaculum was positively correlated with disease grade and patient age. Additionally, disease severity was associated with inflammatory factors--IL-1β and IL-6, COX-2, and VEGF and vWF in tenosynovial tissue. The greater the levels of ER-β expression, tissue inflammation, and angiogenesis are, the more severe de Quervain's disease is. ER-β might be a useful target for novel de Quervain's disease therapy. PMID:26556342

  5. Mistargeting hippocampal axons by expression of a truncated Eph receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yong; Chen, Zhi-Yong; Gale, Nick W.; Blair-Flynn, Jan; Hu, Tian-Jing; Yue, Xin; Cooper, Margaret; Crockett, David P.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Tessarollo, Lino; Zhou, Renping

    2002-01-01

    Topographic mapping of axon terminals is a general principle of neural architecture that underlies the interconnections among many neural structures. The Eph family tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands, the ephrins, have been implicated in the formation of topographic projection maps. We show that multiple Eph receptors and ligands are expressed in the hippocampus and its major subcortical projection target, the lateral septum, and that expression of a truncated Eph receptor in the mouse brain results in a pronounced alteration of the hippocamposeptal topographic map. Our observations provide strong support for a critical role of Eph family guidance factors in regulating ontogeny of hippocampal projections. PMID:12124402

  6. Expression of notch receptors and ligands in the adult gut.

    PubMed

    Sander, Guy R; Powell, Barry C

    2004-04-01

    The Notch signaling pathway has become recognized as a vitally important pathway in regulating proliferative/differentiative decisions and cell fate. To explore the involvement of the Notch pathway in adult gut, we investigated the expression of Notch receptors and their ligands by Northern blotting and in situ hybridization. Notch receptors and ligands were expressed in both proliferative and post-mitotic cells throughout adult rat gut, variously in epithelial, immune, and endothelial cells. Expression of Notch1, Jagged1, and Jagged2 frequently overlapped, whereas Notch2 expression was restricted to specific crypt cells, the lamina propria of the large intestine, and Peyer's patch lymphocytes. We propose that the expression of multiple Notch receptors and ligands in a range of different intestinal cell types indicates that this signaling pathway underpins many of the processes involved in the maintenance and function of the adult gut.

  7. Comparison of albumin receptors expressed on bovine and human group G streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Raeder, R; Otten, R A; Boyle, M D

    1991-01-01

    The albumin receptor expressed by bovine group G streptococci was extracted and affinity purified. The protein was characterized for species reactivity, and monospecific antibodies were prepared to the purified receptor. The bovine group G albumin receptor was compared functionally, antigenically, and for DNA homology with the albumin-binding protein expressed by human group G streptococci. In agreement with previous reports, the albumin-binding activity of human strains was mediated by a unique domain of the type III immunoglobulin G-Fc-binding molecule, protein G. The albumin receptor expressed by bovine group G strains was found to lack any immunoglobulin G-binding potential but displayed a wider profile of species albumin reactivity than protein G. Both albumin receptors could inhibit the binding of the other to immobilized human serum albumin, and each displayed similar binding properties. Antigenic comparison of the two albumin receptors demonstrated a low level of cross-reactivity; however comparison at the DNA level, using an oligonucleotide probe specific for the albumin-binding region of protein G, demonstrated that the two albumin receptors expressed by human and bovine group G streptococcal strains do not display significant homology. Images PMID:1846128

  8. Estrogen receptor alpha and androgen receptor are commonly expressed in well-differentiated liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Liposarcoma (LS) is the second-most common type of soft-tissue sarcoma. Despite advances in knowledge and treatment of this disease, there remains a need for more effective LS therapy. Steroid hormone receptors regulate metabolism in adipocytes. Estrogen receptor alpha (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and androgen receptor (AR) have been implicated in the pathophysiology of other cancer types. We sought to comprehensively determine temporal expression patterns of these receptors in LS. Methods We analyzed 561 histologically subtyped LS specimens from 354 patients for expression of ER, PR, and AR by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using diagnostic-grade reagents and protocols. The fractions of positively stained tumor cells were scored within each specimen. IHC scores were compared across LS subtypes using the Kruskal-Wallis test, and subtypes were compared using Dunn’s post-hoc test. Ages of patients with receptor-positive vs. -negative LS were compared by t-test. Genders and races were compared for hormone receptor positivity using Fisher’s exact test and Chi-square analysis, respectively. Recurrence-free survival was compared between receptor-positive and negative patients by log-rank test. p< 0.05 was considered significant. Results ER and AR were frequently expressed in LS, while few tumors expressed PR. Most of the ER + and AR + samples were of the well-differentiated LS subtype. A smaller fraction of de-differentiated LS expressed ER or AR, but expression was common within well-differentiated regions of tumors histologically classified as de-differentiated LS. In LS specimens from patients who underwent multiple surgeries over time, receptor expression frequently changed over time, which may be attributable in part to intratumor heterogeneity, varying degrees of de-differentiation, and biopsy bias. ER and AR were frequently co-expressed. Receptor status was not significantly associated with gender or race, but AR and PR expression were

  9. The binding site of a steroid hormone receptor-like protein within the Drosophila Adh adult enhancer is required for high levels of tissue-specific alcohol dehydrogenase expression.

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, S; Benyajati, C

    1992-01-01

    Developmental and tissue-specific transcription from the Adh distal promoter is regulated in part by the Adh adult enhancer, located 450 to 600 bp upstream from the distal RNA start site. We have characterized four proteins (DEP1 to DEP4), present in Drosophila tissue culture cell nuclear extracts, which bind to this enhancer. DEP1 and DEP2 bind to a positive cis-acting element (-492 to -481) and share nucleotide contacts. A small linker replacement deletion mutation, which disrupts the overlapping DEP1- and DEP2-binding sites, reduces Adh distal transcription in an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-expressing cultured cell line, in the adult fat body (the major tissue of ADH expression), as well as in some but not all adult tissues where ADH is normally expressed. This enhancer element contains an imperfect palindromic sequence similar to steroid hormone receptor superfamily response elements. Binding-site screening of a lambda gt11 expression library has identified the steroid receptor superfamily member fushi tarazu factor 1 (FTZ-F1) as a protein that binds to this site. Anti-FTZ-F1 antibodies have identified DEP1 as FTZ-F1. DEP2 also binds to the FTZ-F1 site from the fushi tarazu zebra element, suggesting that DEP2 may also be a steroid receptor superfamily member. Our results raise the possibility that Adh regulation in certain adult tissues involves a hormone-mediated pathway. Because DEP1 (FTZ-F1) and DEP2 contact some of the same nucleotides within the positive cis element, it is unlikely that they can bind simultaneously. Such alternative binding may play a role in the tissue-specific and developmental transcription of Adh. Images PMID:1732738

  10. Identification and Expression Analysis of Putative Chemosensory Receptor Genes in Microplitis mediator by Antennal Transcriptome Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Ning; Peng, Yong; Lu, Zi-Yun; Dhiloo, Khalid Hussain; Gu, Shao-Hua; Li, Rui-Jun; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Guo, Yu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Host-seeking, ovipositional behavior and mating of insects are controlled mainly by odor perception through sensory organs such as antennae. Antennal chemoreception is extremely important for insect survival. Several antennal chemosensory receptors are involved in mediating the odor detection in insects, especially the odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), to ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In the present study, we identified the chemosensory receptor gene repertoire of the parasitoid wasp Microplitis mediator, a generalist endoparasitoid that infests more than 40 types of Lepidopterous larvae and is widely distributed in the Palaearctic region. By transcriptome sequencing of male and female antennae we identified 60 candidate odorant receptors, six candidate ionotropic receptors and two gustatory receptors in M. mediator. The full-length sequences of these putative chemosensory receptor genes were obtained by using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR (RACE-PCR) method. We also conducted reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) combined with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for investigating the expression profiles of these chemosensory receptor genes in olfactory and non-olfactory tissues. The tissue- and sex-biased expression patterns may provide insights into the roles of the chemosensory receptor in M. mediator. Our findings support possible future study of the chemosensory behavior of M. mediator at the molecular level. PMID:26078716

  11. The farnesoid X receptor is expressed in breast cancer and regulates apoptosis and aromatase expression.

    PubMed

    Swales, Karen E; Korbonits, Márta; Carpenter, Robert; Walsh, Desmond T; Warner, Timothy D; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2006-10-15

    Bile acids are present at high concentrations in breast cysts and in the plasma of postmenopausal women with breast cancer. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that regulates bile acid homeostasis. FXR was detected in normal and tumor breast tissue, with a high level of expression in ductal epithelial cells of normal breast and infiltrating ductal carcinoma cells. FXR was also present in the human breast carcinoma cells, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468. Activation of FXR by high concentrations of ligands induced MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 apoptosis. At lower concentrations that had no direct effect on viability, the FXR agonist GW4064 induced expression of mRNA for the FXR target genes, small heterodimer partner (SHP), intestinal bile acid binding protein, and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP-2), and repressed the expression of the SHP target gene aromatase. In contrast to MRP-2, mRNA for the breast cancer target genes MDR-3, MRP-1, and solute carrier transporter 7A5 were decreased. Although multidrug resistance transporters were regulated and are known FXR target genes, GW4064 had no effect on the cell death induced by the anticancer drug paclitaxel. Our findings show for the first time that FXR is expressed in breast cancer tissue and has multiple properties that could be used for the treatment of breast cancer.

  12. Dilated cardiomyopathy alters the expression patterns of CAR and other adenoviral receptors in human heart.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Raine; Mäyränpää, Mikko I; Kovanen, Petri T; Savontaus, Mikko

    2010-03-01

    Gene therapy trials for heart failure have demonstrated the key role of efficient gene transfer in achieving therapeutic efficacy. An attractive approach to improve adenoviral gene transfer is to use alternative virus serotypes with modified tropism. We performed a detailed analysis of cardiac expression of receptors for several adenovirus serotypes with a focus on differential expression of CAR and CD46, as adenoviruses targeting these receptors have been used in various applications. Explanted hearts from patients with DCM and healthy donors were analyzed using Q-RT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Q-RT-PCR and Western analyses revealed robust expression of all receptors except CD80 in normal hearts with lower expression levels in DCM. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that CD46 expression was somewhat higher than CAR both in normal and DCM hearts with highest levels of expression in intramyocardial coronary vessels. Total CAR expression was upregulated in DCM. Triple staining on these vessels demonstrated that both CAR and CD46 were confined to the subendothelial layer in normal hearts. The situation was clearly different in DCM, where both CAR and CD46 were expressed by endothelial cells. The induction of expression of CAR and CD46 by endothelial cells in DCM suggests that viruses targeting these receptors could more easily gain entry to heart cells after intravascular administration. This finding thus has potential implications for the development of targeted gene therapy for heart failure.

  13. Control of TGF-beta receptor expression in bone.

    PubMed

    Centrella, M; Ji, C; McCarthy, T L

    1998-01-15

    Bone growth and remodeling are controlled by local and systemic growth factors. The first local bone growth factor purified to homogeneity was transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta). On skeletal cells, TGF-beta has multiple effects mediated through at least three distinct cell surface receptors. More recent evidence demonstrated hormone and growth factor dependent alterations in TGF-beta receptor expression on osteoblasts in vitro. Indeed, certain biological responses appear to depend on the proportional expression of the type I TGF-beta receptor. Studies defining the type I TGF-beta receptor gene promoter then revealed that it contained several binding sequences for a nuclear factor that varies in parallel with expression of the osteoblast phenotype. New observations linking these events appear to enhance our understanding of this pivotal growth factor during osteogenesis and systemic bone disease.

  14. Coordinated expression of tyro3, axl, and mer receptors in macrophage ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Malawista, Anna; Wang, Xiaomei; Trentalange, Mark; Allore, Heather G.; Montgomery, Ruth R.

    2016-01-01

    The TAM receptors (Tyro3, Axl, and Mer) are a family of homologous receptor-tyrosine kinases that inhibit Toll-like receptor signaling to regulate downstream pathways and restore homeostasis. TAM triple mutant mice (Tyro3−/−, Axl−/−, Mer−/−) have elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and are prone to developing lymphoproliferative disorders and autoimmunity. Understanding differential expression of TAM receptors among human subjects is critical to harnessing this pathway for therapeutic interventions. We have quantified changes in TAM expression during the ontogeny of human macrophages using paired samples of monocytes and macrophages to take advantage of characteristic expression within an individual. No significant differences in levels of Tyro3 were found between monocytes and macrophages (flow cytometry: p=0.652, immunoblot: p=0.231, qPCR: p=0.389). Protein levels of Axl were reduced (flow cytometry: p=0.049, immunoblot: p<0.001) when monocytes matured to macrophages. No significant differences in the levels of Axl mRNA transcripts were found (qPCR: p=0.082), however, Tyro3 and Axl were proportionate. The most striking difference was upregulation of expression of Mer with both protein and mRNA being significantly increased when monocytes developed into macrophages (flow cytometry: p<0.001, immunoblot: p<0.001, qPCR: p=0.004). A fuller characterization of TAM receptor expression in macrophage ontogeny informs our understanding of their function and potential therapeutic interventions.

  15. Organization, structure, and expression of the gene encoding the rat substance P receptor.

    PubMed

    Hershey, A D; Dykema, P E; Krause, J E

    1991-03-01

    The gene for the rat substance P receptor has been cloned, its genomic structure determined, and the patterns of mRNA expression extensively analyzed. Unlike many genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors, the protein-coding region of this gene is divided into five exons consisting of 965, 195, 151, 197, and 2,010 base pairs. The substance P receptor gene extends more than 45 kilobases in length, and the splice sites for the exons occur at the borders of the sequences encoding putative membrane-spanning domains. The transcription initiation site has been defined by solution hybridization-nuclease protection and nucleotide sequence analyses, and lies downstream of a conventional TATA sequence. Substance P receptor mRNA levels in various tissues have been quantitated using solution hybridization-nuclease protection assays and were found to comprise from 0.00008 to 0.0016% of total RNA levels. Relatively high levels of substance P receptor mRNA are seen in the urinary bladder and the sublingual salivary gland, whereas moderate levels are observed for the submandibular salivary gland, striatum, hippocampus, midbrain, and olfactory bulb with lower levels in the remainder of the central nervous system and alimentary canal. These results are discussed in relation to the evolutionary role of multiple exons for a G protein-coupled receptor and with regard to the locations and mechanisms of substance P receptor gene expression.

  16. Deregulated Fcγ receptor expression in patients with CIDP

    PubMed Central

    Quast, Isaak; Cueni, Flavio; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Tackenberg, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the expression of activating and inhibitory Fc-gamma receptors (FcγRs) before and during clinically effective therapy with IV immunoglobulin (IVIg) in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Methods: Peripheral blood leukocyte subsets, including classical CD14highCD16− and nonclassical inflammatory CD14lowCD16+ monocytes as well as naive CD19+CD27− and memory CD19+CD27+ B cells, were obtained at baseline and monitored at 2 and 4–8 weeks after initiation of IVIg therapy. Results: Compared with healthy donors matched by age and sex, patients with CIDP showed increased expression levels of the activating high-affinity FcγR1 on CD14highCD16− (p < 0.001) and CD14lowCD16+ monocytes (p < 0.001). Expression of the activating low-affinity FcγRIIA was increased on CD14lowCD16+ monocytes (p = 0.023). Conversely, expression of the inhibitory FcγRIIB was reduced on naive (p = 0.009) and memory (p = 0.002) B cells as well as on CD14highCD16− monocytes (p = 0.046). Clinically effective IVIg therapy partially restored deregulated FcγR expression on B cell subsets and monocytes. Conclusions: The FcγR regulatory system is disturbed in patients with CIDP. Balancing activating vs inhibitory FcγR expression might provide a clinical benefit for patients with CIDP. PMID:26380354

  17. Expression of retinoic acid receptors in human endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kojiro; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Tamura, Mitsutoshi; Niikura, Hitoshi; Takano, Tadao; Yoshinaga, Kohsuke; Nagase, Satoru; Suzuki, Takashi; Ito, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyo; Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-02-01

    The retinoids (vitamin A and its biologically active derivatives) are essential for the health and survival of the individual. Several studies have reported a strong rationale for the use of retinoids in cancer treatment and chemoprevention. It has been discovered that expression of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) beta is frequently silenced in epithelial carcinogenesis, which has led to the hypothesis that RAR beta could act as a tumor suppressor. However, the status of RAR beta in human endometrial carcinoma has not been examined. In the present study, we initially studied the effects of retinoic acid on cell proliferation and the expression of RAR alpha, RAR beta, and RAR gamma using AM580 (a RAR-specific agonist) in the Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line. We also examined the expression of RAR in human eutopic endometrium (30 cases), endometrial hyperplasia (28 cases), and endometrial carcinoma (103 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Finally, we correlated these findings with the clinicopathological parameters. In vitro, cell growth was inhibited and RAR beta and RAR gamma mRNA was significantly induced by AM580, compared with vehicle controls, whereas RAR alpha mRNA was significantly attenuated by AM580, compared with vehicle. RAR beta was detected predominantly in endometrial hyperplasia, compared with endometrial carcinoma. No statistically significant correlation was obtained between the expression of any other RAR subtypes and clinicopathological parameters in human endometrial carcinoma. The results of our study demonstrate that AM580 inhibits cell growth and induces RAR beta mRNA expression in the Ishikawa cell line, and the expression level of RAR beta in endometrial carcinoma is significantly lower than that in endometrial hyperplasia. AM580 might therefore be considered as a potential treatment for endometrial carcinoma.

  18. Expression patterns of chemokine receptors on circulating T cells from myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Sand, Kristoffer Evebø; Rye, Kristin Paulsen; Mannsåker, Bård; Bruserud, Oystein; Kittang, Astrid Olsnes

    2013-02-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are involved in the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. Recently, chemokine expression signatures have been reported to convey a prognostic value in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients. In the present study, we investigated the chemokine receptor repertoire on fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes from 31 (22 low-risk and 9 high-risk) patients affected by MDS. Chemokine receptor expression was studied in defined T-cell subsets using eight-color flow cytometry. MDS patients exhibited quantitative differences in peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations. In addition, T cells obtained from MDS patients expressed a chemokine receptor pattern suggesting a dominance of mature and activated T cells. This is illustrated by increased levels of CCR3, CCR5, CX3CR1 and/or by a decreased abundance of CCR7 in defined T-cell subsets. The T-cell subset distribution appears to differ between the peripheral blood and the bone marrow of MDS patients, suggesting a preferential recruitment of specific T-cell subsets to the latter compartment. Alteration in chemokine receptor expression can develop over time even in patients that are considered clinically stable. Elevated expression levels of CXCR4 by CD8(+) cells were associated with prolonged patient survival and reduced numbers of bone marrow blasts. We conclude that immunological abnormalities in MDS also involve chemokine receptors on different subsets of T cells, and that these changes may have a prognostic value.

  19. Age and stage dependency of estrogen receptor expression by lymphocyte precursors

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Hideya; Kouro, Taku; Yokota, Takafumi; Comp, Phillip C.; Kincade, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Sex steroids negatively regulate B lymphopoiesis in adult mice. Paradoxically, lymphocytes arise during fetal life, when estrogen levels are high and maternal lymphopoiesis is suppressed. Here we demonstrate that embryonic B lymphopoiesis was unaffected by estrogen, but sensitive to glucocorticoids. Both fetal and adult precursors contained glucocorticoid receptor transcripts, but only adult precursors expressed estrogen receptor α and β together with the androgen receptor. Fetal hematopoietic cells did not efficiently acquire functional estrogen receptors after transplantation to irradiated adult mice. Sex steroid receptors were also expressed in a stage- and developmental age-dependent fashion in human precursors. A developmental switch in responsiveness of hematopoietic cells to sex steroids may be essential for formation of the immune system. PMID:11752459

  20. PKCε and allopregnanolone: functional cross-talk at the GABAA receptor level

    PubMed Central

    Puia, Giulia; Ravazzini, Federica; Castelnovo, Luca Franco; Magnaghi, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Changes in GABAergic inhibition occur during physiological processes, during response to drugs and in various pathologies. These changes can be achieved through direct allosteric modifications at the γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) type A (GABAA) receptor protein level, or by altering the synthesis, trafficking and stability of the receptor. Neurosteroids (NSs) and protein kinase C (PKC) are potent modulators of GABAA receptors and their effects are presumably intermingled, even though evidence for this hypothesis is only partially explored. However, several PKC isoforms are able to phosphorylate the GABAA receptor, producing different functional effects. We focused on the ε isoform, that has been correlated to the sensitivity of the GABAA receptor to allosteric modulators and whose expression may be regulated in peripheral sensory neurons by NSs. The cross-talk between PKC-ε and NSs, leading to changes in GABAA receptor functionality, is considered and discussed in this perspective. PMID:25852476

  1. Expression and localization of the omega-3 fatty acid receptor GPR120 in human term placenta.

    PubMed

    Lager, S; Ramirez, V I; Gaccioli, F; Jansson, T; Powell, T L

    2014-07-01

    Fatty acids can function as signaling molecules, acting through receptors in the cytosol or on the cell surface. G-Protein Receptor (GPR)120 is a membrane-bound receptor mediating anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects of the omega-3 fatty acid docohexaenoic acid (DHA). GPR120 dysfunction is associated with obesity in humans. Cellular localization of GPR120 and the influence of maternal obesity on GPR120 protein expression in the placenta are unknown. Herein we demonstrate that GPR120 is predominantly expressed in the microvillous membrane (MVM) of human placenta and that the expression level of this receptor in MVM is not altered by maternal body mass index (BMI).

  2. Profiling neurotransmitter receptor expression in the Ambystoma mexicanum brain.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Limon, Agenor; Korn, Matthew J; Nakamura, Paul A; Shirkey, Nicole J; Wong, Jamie K; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-03-22

    Ability to regenerate limbs and central nervous system (CNS) is unique to few vertebrates, most notably the axolotl (Ambystoma sp.). However, despite the fact the neurotransmitter receptors are involved in axonal regeneration, little is known regarding its expression profile. In this project, RT-PCR and qPCR were performed to gain insight into the neurotransmitter receptors present in Ambystoma. Its functional ability was studied by expressing axolotl receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes by either injection of mRNA or by direct microtransplantation of brain membranes. Oocytes injected with axolotl mRNA expressed ionotropic receptors activated by GABA, aspartate+glycine and kainate, as well as metabotropic receptors activated by acetylcholine and glutamate. Interestingly, we did not see responses following the application of serotonin. Membranes from the axolotl brain were efficiently microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes and two types of native GABA receptors that differed in the temporal course of their responses and affinities to GABA were observed. Results of this study are necessary for further characterization of axolotl neurotransmitter receptors and may be useful for guiding experiments aimed at understanding activity-dependant limb and CNS regeneration.

  3. Disuse atrophy, plasma corticosterone, and muscle glucocorticoid receptor levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of whole-body suspension on the time course and the extent of plasma corticosterone changes and the tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids were investigated in rats subjected to seven days of whole-body suspension. Plasma corticosterone increased significantly on the first and the third days of suspension, but returned to control levels by day seven. Muscle glucocorticoid receptors exhibited a characteristic hormonal specificity (evaluated in competitive-displacement experiments). In controls, receptor site concentration in the slow-twitch soleus was comparable to that in the fast-twitch gastrocnemius and plantaris, but was significantly less than in the extensor; seven days of suspension resulted in significant differential effects on muscle receptor levels. The largest increase in receptor concentration was observed in the soleus in which it remained elevated after the receptor levels in other muscles returned to normal.

  4. Controlling ethylene responses in flowers at the receptor level.

    PubMed

    Serek, M; Woltering, E J; Sisler, E C; Frello, S; Sriskandarajah, S

    2006-01-01

    For a vast number of ornamental species, blocking the plant's response to ethylene is an efficient strategy to enhance the longevity of the flowers. The most effective ways to conduct such interference will be reviewed in this paper. A large number of chemical compounds have been evaluated for their effects on ethylene production and perception. Among these are a range of strained olefines. This has resulted in the discovery that cyclopropenes, among them 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and a number of other substituted cyclopropenes effectively block ethylene responses at the receptor level. A lot of testing remains to be done to uncover the full potential of these compounds, but they do offer promising new ways to extend the postharvest life of ornamentals. Also genetic modification appears to be a very effective way in controlling of ethylene synthesis and perception. Attempts to use both a reduced endogenous ethylene production and a reduced sensitivity to ethylene will be reviewed. Among these the use of the mutant ethylene receptor gene, etr1-1, from Arabidopsis seems most promising, especially when it is expressed under the control of a flower specific promoter.

  5. Ultraviolet B irradiation increases endothelin-1 and endothelin receptor expression in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, R; Sato, C; Oshita, Y; Hama, H; Sakurai, T; Goto, K; Ogawa, H

    1995-09-01

    The effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation on endothelin-1 (ET-1) and ET receptor expression was examined using cultured normal human keratinocytes. Keratinocytes secreted ET-1 in the medium at a level of 2.1 pg/day/10(5) cells. UVB irradiation up to 10 mJ/cm2 increased ET-1 secretion 3-fold, and potentiated expression of mRNA for ET-1. Both ETA and ETB receptor mRNAs were detected in keratinocytes, and their expression was up-regulated by 5 mJ/cm2 UVB irradiation.

  6. Development of glutamatergic synapses in the rat retina: the postnatal expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Hack, Iris; Koulen, Peter; Peichl, Leo; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut

    2002-01-01

    We examined the distribution of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunits GluR1 to GluR4, of the kainate receptor subunits GluR6/7 and KA2, and of the glutamate receptor subunits delta1/2, during postnatal development of the rat retina by immunocytochemistry and light microscopy using receptor subunit specific antisera. The various ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits were expressed early in postnatal rat retina, and most of the subunits, with the exception of delta1/2. were found in both synaptic layers of rat retina. The glutamate receptor subunits studied showed differences in their time of appearance, their spatial distribution patterns, and in their expression levels in the developing rat retina. Interestingly, most of the AMPA receptor subunits were expressed earlier than the kainate receptor subunits in the two synaptic layers of the retina, indicating that AMPA glutamate receptors play an important role in early postnatal glutamatergic synaptic transmission. We also studied the ultrastructural localization of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunits GluR1 to GluR4 by immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy in the inner plexiform layer of the mature rat retina. Most of the subunits were found postsynaptic to the ribbon synapses of OFF-cone, ON-cone, and rod bipolar cells. The results of this study suggest an involvement of ionotropic glutamate receptors in processes of synaptic maturation and the formation of synaptic circuitries in the developing plexiform layers of the retina. Furthermore, AMPA and kainate receptors play a role in synaptic processing and in the development of both the scotopic and photopic pathways in the rat retina.

  7. Differential expression of androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lingmin; Shen, Wenhao; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Qiwu; Wang, Yongquan; Zhou, Zhansong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the differential expression levels of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ), and progesterone receptor (PGR) between normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The combination of immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay was used to identify the distribution and differential expression of these receptors at the immunoactive biomarker, transcriptional, and protein levels between 5 normal human prostate tissues and 40 BPH tissues. The results were then validated in a rat model of BPH induced by testosterone propionate and estradiol benzoate. In both human and rat prostate tissues, AR was localized mainly to epithelial and stromal cell nuclei; ERα was distributed mainly to stromal cells, but not exclusively; ERβ was interspersed in the basal layer of epithelium, but sporadically in epithelial and stromal cells; PGR was expressed abundantly in cytoplasm of epithelial and stromal cells. There were decreased expression of ERα and increased expression of PGR, but no difference in the expression of ERβ in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of both human and rat. Increased expression of AR in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of human was observed, however, the expression of AR in the rat prostate tissue was decreased. This study identified the activation of AR and PGR and repression of ERα in BPH, which indicate a promoting role of AR and PGR and an inhibitory role of ERα in the pathogenesis of BPH.

  8. Differential expression of androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Song, Lingmin; Shen, Wenhao; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Qiwu; Wang, Yongquan; Zhou, Zhansong

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to identify the differential expression levels of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ), and progesterone receptor (PGR) between normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The combination of immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay was used to identify the distribution and differential expression of these receptors at the immunoactive biomarker, transcriptional, and protein levels between 5 normal human prostate tissues and 40 BPH tissues. The results were then validated in a rat model of BPH induced by testosterone propionate and estradiol benzoate. In both human and rat prostate tissues, AR was localized mainly to epithelial and stromal cell nuclei; ERα was distributed mainly to stromal cells, but not exclusively; ERβ was interspersed in the basal layer of epithelium, but sporadically in epithelial and stromal cells; PGR was expressed abundantly in cytoplasm of epithelial and stromal cells. There were decreased expression of ERα and increased expression of PGR, but no difference in the expression of ERβ in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of both human and rat. Increased expression of AR in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of human was observed, however, the expression of AR in the rat prostate tissue was decreased. This study identified the activation of AR and PGR and repression of ERα in BPH, which indicate a promoting role of AR and PGR and an inhibitory role of ERα in the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27483178

  9. Characterization of the Olfactory Receptors Expressed in Human Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Caroline; Vogel, Felix; Hofreuter, Adrian; Schreiner, Benjamin S. P.; Osthold, Sandra; Veitinger, Sophie; Becker, Christian; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; Muschol, Michael; Wennemuth, Gunther; Altmüller, Janine; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The detection of external cues is fundamental for human spermatozoa to locate the oocyte in the female reproductive tract. This task requires a specific chemoreceptor repertoire that is expressed on the surface of human spermatozoa, which is not fully identified to date. Olfactory receptors (ORs) are candidate molecules and have been attributed to be involved in sperm chemotaxis and chemokinesis, indicating an important role in mammalian spermatozoa. An increasing importance has been suggested for spermatozoal RNA, which led us to investigate the expression of all 387 OR genes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of OR transcripts in human spermatozoa of several individuals by RNA-Seq. We detected 91 different transcripts in the spermatozoa samples that could be aligned to annotated OR genes. Using stranded mRNA-Seq, we detected a class of these putative OR transcripts in an antisense orientation, indicating a different function, rather than coding for a functional OR protein. Nevertheless, we were able to detect OR proteins in various compartments of human spermatozoa, indicating distinct functions in human sperm. A panel of various OR ligands induced Ca2+ signals in human spermatozoa, which could be inhibited by mibefradil. This study indicates that a variety of ORs are expressed at the mRNA and protein level in human spermatozoa. PMID:26779489

  10. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is associated with initiation of hepatocellular carcinoma, while prostaglandin receptor-1 expression predicts survival

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hao-Jie; Jiang, Jing-Hang; Yang, Yu-Ting; Yang, Xiang-Di; Guo, Zhe; Qi, Ya-Peng; Zeng, Feng-Hua; Zhang, Ke-Lan; Chen, Neng-Zhi; Xiang, Bang-De; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E1 receptor (EP1) contribute to disease and whether they help predict prognosis. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed the records of 116 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who underwent surgery between 2008 and 2011 at our hospital. Expression of COX-2 and EP1 receptor was examined by immunohistochemistry of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using polyclonal antibodies. Possible associations between immunohistochemical scores and survival were determined. RESULTS Factors associated with poor overall survival (OS) were alpha-fetoprotein > 400 ng/mL, tumor size ≥ 5 cm, and high EP1 receptor expression, but not high COX-2 expression. Disease-free survival was not significantly different between patients with low or high levels of COX-2 or EP1. COX-2 immunoreactivity was significantly higher in well-differentiated HCC tissues (Edmondson grade I-II) than in poorly differentiated tissues (Edmondson grade III-IV) (P = 0.003). EP1 receptor immunoreactivity was significantly higher in poorly differentiated tissue than in well-differentiated tissue (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION COX-2 expression appears to be linked to early HCC events (initiation), while EP1 receptor expression may participate in tumor progression and predict survival.

  11. Primary structure and functional expression of a guinea pig kappa opioid (dynorphin) receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, G X; Meng, F; Mansour, A; Thompson, R C; Hoversten, M T; Goldstein, A; Watson, S J; Akil, H

    1994-01-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding the guinea pig kappa opioid (dynorphin) receptor has been isolated. The deduced protein contains 380 aa and seven hydrophobic alpha-helices characteristic of the G protein-coupled receptors. This receptor is 90% identical to the mouse and rat kappa receptors, with the greatest level of divergence in the N-terminal region. When expressed in COS-7 cells, the receptor displays high affinity and stereospecificity toward dynorphin peptides and other kappa-selective opioid ligands such as U50, 488. It does not bind the mu- and delta-selective opioid ligands. The expressed receptor is functionally coupled to G protein(s) to inhibit adenylyl cyclase and Ca2+ channels. The guinea pig kappa receptor mRNA is expressed in many brain areas, including the cerebellum, a pattern that agrees well with autoradiographic maps of classical guinea pig kappa binding sites. Species differences in the pharmacology and mRNA distribution between the cloned guinea pig and rat kappa receptors may be worthy of further examination. Images PMID:8170987

  12. Cloning and expression pattern of the ecdysone receptor and retinoid X receptor from the centipede Lithobius peregrinus (Chilopoda, Lithobiomorpha).

    PubMed

    Bortolin, Francesca; Piulachs, Maria-Dolors; Congiu, Leonardo; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2011-10-01

    In arthropods, molting events are mediated by the binding of the ecdysone hormone to a heterodimer of two nuclear receptors: the ecdysone receptor (EcR) and the retinoid X receptor (RXR), a homolog of ultraspiracle (USP). We have cloned partial sequences of several isoforms for EcR and RXR genes from the centipede Lithobius peregrinus, and studied their expression profile during the second post-embryonic stage. LpEcR and LpRXR inferred amino acid sequences are very similar to other arthropod orthologs, especially to those of chelicerates and hemimetabolous insects, and their expression levels are significantly higher during the 48 h that precede the molt. Results obtained in this study represent the first data on the genetic basis of the ecdysone signal pathway for a myriapod, and in particular for an animal that, through a stereotyped developmental schedule paced by the molt cycle, completes trunk segmentation during post-embryonic life.

  13. Differential brain angiotensin-II type I receptor expression in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Braga, Valdir A

    2011-09-01

    Blood-borne angiotensin-II (Ang-II) has profound effects in the brain. We tested the hypothesis that Ang-II-dependent hypertension involves differential Ang-II type I (AT(1)) receptors expression in the subfornical organ (SFO) and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Male Wistar rats were implanted with 14-day osmotic minipump filled with Ang-II (150 ng/kg/min) or saline. AT(1) receptor mRNA levels were detected in the SFO and RVLM by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Ang-II caused hypertension (134 ± 10 mmHg vs. 98 ± 9 mmHg, n = 9, p < 0.05). RT-PCR revealed that Ang-II infusion induced increased AT(1) receptor mRNA levels in RVLM and decreased in SFO. Our data suggest that Ang-II-induced hypertension involves differential expression of brain AT(1) receptors. PMID:21897104

  14. Increased G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase (GRK) Expression in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Adam J.; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H.; McCullumsmith, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Current pharmacological treatments for schizophrenia target G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including dopamine receptors. Ligand bound GPCRs are regulated by a family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), members of which uncouple the receptor from heterotrimeric G proteins, desensitize the receptor, and induce receptor internalization via the arrestin family of scaffolding and signaling molecules. GRKs initiate the activation of downstream signaling pathways, can regulate receptors and signaling molecules independent of GPCR phosphorylation, and modulate epigenetic regulators like histone deacetylases (HDACs). We hypothesize that expression of GRK proteins are altered in schizophrenia, consistent with previous findings of alterations up and downstream from this family of molecules that facilitate intracellular signaling processes. Methods In this study we measured protein expression via Western blot analysis for GRKs 2, 3, 5, and 6 in the anterior cingulate cortex of patients with schizophrenia (N = 36) and a comparison group (N = 33). To control for antipsychotic treatment we measured these same targets in haloperidol treated vs. untreated rats (N = 10 for both). Results We found increased levels of GRK5 in schizophrenia. No changes were detected in GRK protein expression in rats treated with haloperidol decanoate for 9 months. Conclusion These data suggest that increased GRK5 expression may contribute the the pathophysiology of schizophrenia via abnormal regulation of the cytoskeleton, endocytosis, signaling, GPCRs, and histone modification. PMID:25153362

  15. Regulation of fibrinogen receptor expression on human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Shattil, S.J.; Motulsky, H.J.; Insel, P.A.; Brass, L.F.

    1986-03-01

    Platelet aggregation requires the binding of fibrinogen to specific receptors on the plasma membrane glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. Although the IIb-IIIa complex is identifiable on the surface of resting platelets, the fibrinogen receptor is expressed only after platelet activation. The authors have developed a monoclonal anti-IIb-IIIa antibody (PAC-1) that binds only to stimulated platelets and only in the presence of Ca. In order to better understand the steps leading to platelet aggregation, the authors used radiolabeled PAC-1 and fibrinogen to examine the effect of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist, epinephrine, on the expression and function of the fibrinogen receptor. The addition of epinephrine to unstirred platelets caused and immediate increase in PAC-1 and fibrinogen binding that was associated with platelet aggregation once the platelets were stirred. Even after prolonged incubation of the platelets with epinephrine, fibrinogen receptor expression could be reversed by adding EGTA, PGl/sub 2/, or the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic antagonist, phentolamine. When unstirred platelets were exposed to epinephrine for more than 10 min, the extent of aggregation caused by subsequent stirring was decreased by 70%. Surprisingly, these desensitized platelets bound PAC-1 and fibrinogen normally, indicating that the loss of aggregation was not due to a decrease in fibrinogen receptor expression or function. These studies demonstrate that: (1) fibrinogen receptor expression is dependent on extracellular CA; (2) induction of the fibrinogen receptor by epinephrine requires the continued presence of the agonist; and (3) prolonged stimulation of the platelet by epinephrine can lead to a reduced aggregation response by a mechanism that does not involve a loss of either fibrinogen recepor expression or fibrinogen binding.

  16. Expression patterns of FGF receptors in the developing mammalian cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Toshinori; Ray, Catherine A.; Younkins, Christa; Bermingham-McDonogh, Olivia

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have shown the importance of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of factors in the development of the mammalian cochlea. There are four fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR1-4) and all four are expressed in the cochlea during development. While there are examples in the literature of expression patterns of some of the receptors at specific stages of cochlear development there has been no systematic study. We have assembled a full analysis of the patterns of receptor expression during cochlear development for all four Fgfrs using in situ hybridization. We have analyzed the expression patterns from E13.5 through post-natal ages. We find that Fgfr1, 2 and 3 are expressed in the epithelium of the cochlear duct and Fgfr4 is limited in its expression to the mesenchyme surrounding the duct. We compare the receptor expression pattern to markers of the sensory domain (p27kip1) and the early hair cells (math1). PMID:20131355

  17. Effects of exposure to low-level lead on spatial learning and memory and the expression of mGluR1, NMDA receptor in different developmental stages of rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Mei; Liu, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Yi-Kai

    2013-09-01

    The effect of different periods of lead exposure on deficits of learning and memory is still unclear. In this study, we conduct in vivo experiment to investigate the critical stages when lead induced neurotoxicity in rats and its underlying mechanisms in some critical stages. Rats were exposed to 0.2% mg/ml lead acetate solution via drinking water during gestation, lactation and ablactation periods. Behavior deficits were found in gestation and lactation. N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit 2A (NR2A) increased during gestation both in hippocampus and cerebral cortex compared to the control group; in all treatment groups NR2B decreased in hippocampus and in cerebral cortex during the lactation period. Meanwhile, in hippocampus metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) decreased during gestation and lactation periods but increased during the ablactation period. These observations suggest that exposure to lead in gestation and lactation periods could cause neurobehavioral deficits which extend to adulthood, and lactation was a more sensitive period for lead exposure. Furthermore, the abnormal expression of NMDA receptor 2 (NMDAR 2) subunits and mGluR1 are likely to be associated with the impairment.

  18. Regulation of vitamin D receptor expression by retinoic acid receptor alpha in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Marchwicka, Aleksandra; Cebrat, Małgorzata; Łaszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Śnieżewski, Łukasz; Brown, Geoffrey; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by an accumulation of malignant immature myeloid precursors. A very promising way to treat AML is differentiation therapy using either all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), or the use of both these differentiation-inducing agents. However, the effect of combination treatment varies in different AML cell lines, and this is due to ATRA either down- or up-regulating transcription of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the cells examined. The mechanism of transcriptional regulation of VDR in response to ATRA has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) is responsible for regulating VDR transcription in AML cells. We have shown that a VDR transcriptional variant, originating in exon 1a, is regulated by RARα agonists in AML cells. Moreover, in cells with a high basal level of RARα protein, the VDR gene is transcriptionally repressed as long as RARα agonist is absent. In these cells down-regulation of the level of RARα leads to increased expression of VDR. We consider that our findings provide a mechanistic background to explain the different outcomes from treating AML cell lines with a combination of ATRA and 1,25D. PMID:26969398

  19. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer

    PubMed Central

    Biegner, Thorsten; Teriete, Peter; Hoefert, Sebastian; Krimmel, Michael; Munz, Adelheid; Reinert, Siegmar

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Material and Methods Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. Results ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. Conclusions ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, hormone receptor. PMID:27475696

  20. Chronic exposure to morphine decreases the expression of EAAT3 via opioid receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingyan; Cao, Dexiong; Zhu, Siyu; Fu, Ganglan; Wu, Qiang; Liang, Jianjun; Cao, Minghui

    2015-12-01

    Alterations in glutamate transporter expression are closely related to opiate addition behavior, but the role of opioid receptors is unclear. In this study, we used primary cultures of hippocampal neurons from neonatal rats to study the effects of chronic exposure to morphine on excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) expression and the roles of µ opioid receptor (MOR), δ opioid receptor (DOR), and κ opioid receptor (KOR) in the morphine-dependent alterations in EAAT3 expression. The results showed that the EAAT3 protein and mRNA expression levels decreased significantly after chronic exposure to morphine (10μmol/L) for 48h, whereas the concentration of extracellular glutamate increased. In addition, we found that both the MOR inhibitor CTOP and the DOR inhibitor naltrindole could reverse the decreased expression of EAAT3 after exposure to morphine, whereas the MOR activator DAMGO and the DOR activator DPDPE significantly decreased EAAT3 expression. The KOR inhibitor had no effect on the expression of EAAT3, whereas its activator increased EAAT3 expression. These results suggest that the down-regulation of morphine-dependent EAAT3 expression in primary rat hippocampal cultures may be mediated by MOR and DOR and that KOR may not contribute significantly to this effect.

  1. GABAA receptor subunit gene expression in human prefrontal cortex: comparison of schizophrenics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akbarian, S.; Huntsman, M. M.; Kim, J. J.; Tafazzoli, A.; Potkin, S. G.; Bunney, W. E. Jr; Jones, E. G.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics is hypoactive and displays changes related to inhibitory, GABAergic neurons, and GABAergic synapses. These changes include decreased levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme for GABA synthesis, upregulation of muscimol binding, and downregulation of benzodiazepine binding to GABAA receptors. Studies in the visual cortex of nonhuman primates have demonstrated that gene expression for GAD and for several GABAA receptor subunit polypeptides is under control of neuronal activity, raising the possibility that similar mechanisms in the hypoactive prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics may explain the abnormalities in GAD and in GABAA receptor regulation. In the present study, which is the first of its type on human cerebral cortex, levels of mRNAs for six GABAA receptor subunits (alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 2) and their laminar expression patterns were analyzed in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics and matched controls, using in situ hybridization histochemistry and densitometry. Three types of laminar expression pattern were observed: mRNAs for the alpha 1, beta 2, and gamma 2 subunits, which are the predominant receptor subunits expressed in the mature cortex, were expressed at comparatively high levels by cells of all six cortical layers, but most intensely by cells in lower layer III and layer IV. mRNAs for the alpha 2, alpha 5, and beta 1 subunits were expressed at lower levels; alpha 2 and beta 1 were expressed predominantly by cells in layers II, III, and IV; alpha 5 was expressed predominantly in layers IV, V, and VI. There were no significant changes in overall mRNA levels for any of the receptor subunits in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics, and the laminar expression pattern of all six receptor subunit mRNAs did not differ between schizophrenics and controls. Because gene expression for GABAA receptor subunits is not consistently altered in the prefrontal cortex of

  2. Expression of plasma membrane receptor genes during megakaryocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sijie; Wang, Wenjing; Latchman, Yvette; Gao, Dayong; Aronow, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Megakaryocyte (MK) development is critically informed by plasma membrane-localized receptors that integrate a multiplicity of environmental cues. Given that the current understanding about receptors and ligands involved in megakaryocytopoiesis is based on single targets, we performed a genome-wide search to identify a plasma membrane receptome for developing MKs. We identified 40 transmembrane receptor genes as being upregulated during MK development. Seven of the 40 receptor-associated genes were selected to validate the dataset. These genes included: interleukin-9 receptor (IL9R), transforming growth factor, β receptor II (TGFBR2), interleukin-4 receptor (IL4R), colony stimulating factor-2 receptor-beta (CSFR2B), adiponectin receptor (ADIPOR2), thrombin receptor (F2R), and interleukin-21 receptor (IL21R). RNA and protein analyses confirmed their expression in primary human MKs. Matched ligands to IL9R, TGFBR2, IL4R, CSFR2B, and ADIPOR2 affected megakaryocytopoiesis. IL9 was unique in its ability to increase the number of MKs formed. In contrast, MK colony formation was inhibited by adiponectin, TGF-β, IL4, and GM-CSF. The thrombin-F2R axis affected platelet function, but not MK development, while IL21 had no apparent detectable effects. ADP-induced platelet aggregation was suppressed by IL9, TGF-β, IL4, and adiponectin. Overall, six of seven of the plasma membrane receptors were confirmed to have functional roles in MK and platelet biology. Also, results show for the first time that adiponectin plays a regulatory role in MK development. Together these data support a strong likelihood that the 40 transmembrane genes identified as being upregulated during MK development will be an important resource to the research community for deciphering the complex repertoire of environmental cues regulating megakaryocytopoiesis and/or platelet function. PMID:23321270

  3. Acetylcholine receptor-inducing factor from chicken brain increases the level of mRNA encoding the receptor. alpha. subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.A.; Falls, D.L.; Dill-Devor, R.M.; Fischbach, G.D. )

    1988-03-01

    A 42-kDa glycoprotein isolated from chicken brain, referred to as acetylcholine receptor-inducing activity (ARIA), that stimulates the rate of incorporation of acetylcholine receptors into the surface of chicken myotubes may play a role in the nerve-induced accumulation of receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses. Using nuclease-protection assays, the authors have found that ARIA causes a 2- to 16-fold increase in the level of mRNA encoding the {alpha} subunit of the receptor, with little or no change in the levels of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit messengers. ARIA also increases the amount of a putative nuclear precursor of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, consistent with an activation of gene transcription. These results suggest that the concentration of {alpha} subunit may limit the rate of biosynthesis of the acetylcholine receptors in chicken myotubes. They also indicate that neuronal factors can regulate the expression of receptor subunit genes in a selective manner. Tetrodotoxin, 8-bromo-cAMP, and forskolin also increase the amount of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, with little change in the amount of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit mRNAs. Unlike ARIA, however, these agents have little effect on the concentration of the {alpha}-subunit nuclear precursor.

  4. Developmental changes in NMDA receptor expression in the platyfish brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, K. M.; Schreibman, M. P.; Magliulo-Cepriano, L.

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the brain of a freshwater teleost using an antibody against the R1 subunit of the receptor (NMDAR1). The primary site of localization was the nucleus olfactoretinalis (NOR), a significant gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)-containing brain nucleus. The number of cells expressing NMDAR1 in this nucleus was dependent upon developmental stage, with pubescent and mature animals displaying significantly more stained cells than immature and senescent animals. This is the first reported observation of age- and maturity-related NMDA receptor association with GnRH-containing brain areas.

  5. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase expression by the farnesoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Savkur, Rajesh S.; Bramlett, Kelli S.; Michael, Laura F.; Burris, Thomas P. . E-mail: burris_thomas_p@lilly.com

    2005-04-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) functions as an important junction in intermediary metabolism by influencing the utilization of fat versus carbohydrate as a source of fuel. Activation of PDC is achieved by phosphatases, whereas, inactivation is catalyzed by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs). The expression of PDK4 is highly regulated by the glucocorticoid and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. We demonstrate that the farnesoid X receptor (FXR; NR1H4), which regulates a variety of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism, also regulates the expression of PDK4. Treatment of rat hepatoma cells as well as human primary hepatocytes with FXR agonists stimulates the expression of PDK4 to levels comparable to those obtained with glucocorticoids. In addition, treatment of mice with an FXR agonist significantly increased hepatic PDK4 expression, while concomitantly decreasing plasma triglyceride levels. Thus, activation of FXR may suppress glycolysis and enhance oxidation of fatty acids via inactivation of the PDC by increasing PDK4 expression.

  6. Development of neural crest cells expressing nerve growth factor receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The present study examines the ontogeny of the nerve growth factor receptor of neural crest cells in vitro and the phenotypic nature of the neural crest cells expressing this receptor. /sup 125/I-NGF binding assays and autoradiographic and immunofluorescence techniques have demonstrated the presence of a subpopulation of quail neural crest cells that express specific NGF receptors after 3-4 days in vitro. This subpopulations represents approximately 28% of the cells in 5-day primary cultures and 30-35% of the cells in secondary cultures; these cells generally exhibited a flattened, phase-dark morphology. Approximately one-third of these cells also labeled with a 2 hr pulse of /sup 3/H thymidine. Catecholamine-containing neural crest cells generally lacked NGF receptors. NGF receptor-positive cells also failed to demonstrate somatostatin-, neuron-specific enolase-, or S-100-like immunoreactivity. Melanocytes do not appear to express NGF receptors. Exogenous nerve growth factor did not influence the morphology or mitotic status of the cells in culture.

  7. Multiple melanocortin receptors are expressed in bone cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Qing; Sridhar, Supriya; Ruan, Ling; Ding, Ke-Hong; Xie, Ding; Insogna, Karl; Kang, Baolin; Xu, Jianrui; Bollag, Roni J.; Isales, Carlos M.

    2005-01-01

    Melanocortin receptors belong to the seven transmembrane domain, G-protein coupled family of receptors. There are five members of this receptor family labeled MC1R-MC5R. These receptors are activated by fragments derived from a larger molecule, proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and include ACTH, alpha beta and gamma-MSH and beta-endorphin. Because of in vitro and in vivo data suggesting direct effects of these POMC molecules on bone and bone turnover, we examined bone and bone derived cells for the presence of the various members of the melanocortin receptor family. We report that the five known melanocortin receptors are expressed to varying degrees in osteoblast-like and osteoclastic cells. POMC fragments increased proliferation and expression of a variety of genes in osteoblastic cells. Furthermore, POMC mRNA was detected in osteoclastic cells. These data demonstrate that POMC-derived peptide hormones acting through high affinity melanocortin receptors have specific effects on bone cells. Thus, in addition to the indirect effects of POMC-derived hormones on bone turnover through their modulation of steroid hormone secretion, POMC fragments may have direct and specific effects on bone cell subpopulations.

  8. Dopamine receptor gene expression by enkephalin neurons in rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Le Moine, C.; Normand, E.; Guitteny, A.F.; Fouque, B.; Teoule, R.; Bloch, B. )

    1990-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed with brain sections from normal, control and haloperidol-treated rats to identify and map the cells expressing the D2 dopamine receptor gene. D2 receptor mRNA was detected with radioactive or biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. D2 receptor mRNA was present in glandular cells of the pituitary intermediate lobe and in neurons of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and forebrain, especially in caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex. Hybridization with D2 and preproenkephalin A probes in adjacent sections, as well as combined hybridization with the two probes in the same sections, demonstrated that all detectable enkephalin neurons in the striatum contained the D2 receptor mRNA. Large neurons in caudate putamen, which were unlabeled with the preproenkephalin A probe and which may have been cholinergic, also expressed the D2 receptor gene. Haloperidol treatment (14 or 21 days) provoked an increase in mRNA content for D2 receptor and preproenkephalin A in the striatum. This suggests that the increase in D2 receptor number observed after haloperidol treatment is due to increased activity of the D2 gene. These results indicate that in the striatum, the enkephalin neurons are direct targets for dopamine liberated from mesostriatal neurons.

  9. A membrane-bound Fas decoy receptor expressed by human thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M; Keir, M; McCune, J M

    2000-03-17

    Human thymocytes at several stages of maturation express Fas, yet resist apoptosis induction through its ligation. A proximal step in apoptotic signaling through Fas is implicated in this resistance, as these cells undergo normal levels of apoptosis induction after exposure to tumor necrosis factor-alpha. We studied the Fas receptors expressed in human thymocytes to search for mechanisms of receptor-mediated inhibition of Fas signaling in these cells. We describe here a unique, membrane-bound form of Fas receptor that contained a complete extracellular domain of Fas but that lacked a death domain due to alternative splicing of exon 7. This Fas decoy receptor (FDR) was shown to have nearly wild-type ability to bind native human Fas ligand and was expressed predominantly at the plasma membrane. Unlike soluble forms of Fas receptor, FDR dominantly inhibited apoptosis induction by Fas ligand in transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Titration of FDR in Fas-expressing cells suggests that FDR may operate through the formation of mixed receptor complexes. FDR also dominantly inhibited Fas-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T cells. In mixing experiments with wild-type Fas, FDR was capable of inhibiting death signaling at molar ratios less than 0.5, and this relative level of FDR:wild type message was observed in at least some thymocytes tested. The data suggest that Fas signal pathways in primary human cells may be regulated by expression of a membrane-bound decoy receptor, analogous to the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis by decoy receptors.

  10. Cloning and olfactory expression of progestin receptors in the Chinese black sleeper Bostrichthys sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Ting; Liu, Dong Teng; Zhu, Yong; Chen, Shi Xi; Hong, Wan Shu

    2016-05-01

    Our previous studies suggested that 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP), an oocyte maturation inducing progestin, also acts as a sex pheromone in Chinese black sleeper Bostrichthys sinensis, a fish species that inhabits intertidal zones and mates and spawns inside a muddy burrow. The electro-olfactogram response to DHP increased during the breeding season. In the present study, we cloned the cDNAs of the nine progestin receptors (pgr, paqr5, 6, 7(a, b), 8, 9, pgrmc1, 2) from B. sinensis, analyzed their tissue distribution, and determined the expression in the olfactory rosette during the reproductive cycle in female and male fish. The deduced amino acid sequences of the nine progestin receptors share high sequence identities with those of other fish species and relatively lower homology with their mammalian counterparts, and phylogenetic analyses classified the nine B. sinensis progestin receptors into their respective progestin receptor groups. Tissue distribution of B. sinensis progestin receptors showed differential expression patterns, but all these nine genes were expressed in the olfactory rosette. Interestingly, paqr5 mRNA was found in the intermediate and basal parts of the olfactory epithelium but not in the central core using in situ hybridization, and its expression level was the highest in the olfactory rosette among the tissues examined. These results suggested Paqr5 may have an important role for transmitting progestin signaling in the olfactory system. The expression levels of paqr7a and paqr7b, pgr and pgrmc2 mRNA peaked around the mid meiotic stage, and that of paqr8 peaked at late meiotic stage in the olfactory rosette in males, while the olfactory expression of paqr5 decreased gradually as spermatogenesis progressed. In contrast, the expression of the progestin receptors did not change significantly during the development of the ovary in the olfactory rosette in females, except that of pgr. Interestingly, the changes of paqr8 expression in

  11. Analysis of CC chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in solid ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Scotton, C; Milliken, D; Wilson, J; Raju, S; Balkwill, F

    2001-01-01

    To understand the chemokine network in a tissue, both chemokine and chemokine receptor expression should be studied. Human epithelial ovarian tumours express a range of chemokines but little is known about the expression and localisation of chemokine receptors. With the aim of understanding chemokine action in this cancer, we investigated receptors for CC–chemokines and their ligands in 25 biopsies of human ovarian cancer. CC–chemokine receptor mRNA was generally absent from solid tumours, the exception being CCR1 which was detected in samples from 75% of patients. CCR1 mRNA localised to macrophages and lymphocytes and there was a correlation between numbers of CD8+ and CCR1 expressing cells (P = 0.031). mRNA for 6 CC-chemokines was expressed in a majority of tumour samples. In a monocytic cell line in vitro, we found that CCR1 mRNA expression was increased 5-fold by hypoxia. We suggest that the CC-chemokine network in ovarian cancer is controlled at the level of CC-chemokine receptors and this may account for the phenotypes of infiltrating cells found in these tumours. The leukocyte infiltrate may contribute to tumour growth and spread by providing growth survival factors and matrix metalloproteases. Thus, CCR1 may be a novel therapeutic target in ovarian cancer. http://www.bjcancer.com © 2001 Cancer Research Campaignhttp://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11556842

  12. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression.

    PubMed

    Hendy, Geoffrey N; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2-7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes-promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation-as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the "tumor suppressor" activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2-the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR-the calciostat-is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level. PMID:27679579

  13. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hendy, Geoffrey N.; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2–7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes—promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation—as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the “tumor suppressor” activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2—the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR—the calciostat—is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level. PMID:27679579

  14. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene: Regulation of Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hendy, Geoffrey N.; Canaff, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR) has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2–7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes—promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation—as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2) have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the “tumor suppressor” activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2—the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR—the calciostat—is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level.

  15. The expression of histamine H4 receptor mRNA in the skin and other tissues of normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Eisenschenk, Melissa N C; Torres, Sheila M F; Oliveira, Simone; Been, Clint S

    2011-10-01

    The histamine 4 (H(4)) receptor was first cloned and characterized in 2000 using the human H(3) receptor DNA sequence. The H(4) receptor has been shown to participate in various aspects of inflammation, such as chemotaxis, upregulation of adhesion molecule expression and modulation of cytokine secretion. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether H(4) receptor mRNA is expressed in normal canine skin by performing an RT-PCR. An additional goal was to determine the expression of this receptor in the colon, liver, spleen and kidney. Tissues were collected from five healthy, young-adult pit bull dogs. Samples were immediately placed in RNAlater(®) solution and stored at -20°C until processed. The amplified products in all skin samples in addition to the colon, liver, spleen and kidney (variable expression) had the expected size of 400-500 bp. The sequenced amplicons matched the National Center for Biotechnology Information published sequence for the canine H(4) receptor. The study results showed that canine normal skin expresses the H(4) receptor mRNA. Further studies using immunohistochemistry should be conducted to demonstrate the expression of the H(4) receptor at the protein level and to localize the expression of this receptor in the skin. PMID:21392139

  16. Differential Expression of Functional Fc-Receptors and Additional Immune Complex Receptors on Mouse Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suwanichkul, Adisak; Wenderfer, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which circulating immune complexes accumulate in the kidney to form deposits in glomerulonephritis are not well understood. In particular, the role of resident cells within glomeruli of the kidney has been widely debated. Immune complexes have been shown to bind one glomerular cell type (mesangial cells) leading to functional responses such as pro-inflammatory cytokine production. To further assess the presence of functional immunoreceptors on resident glomerular cells, cultured mouse renal epithelial, endothelial, and mesangial cells were treated with heat-aggregated mouse IgG or preformed murine immune complexes. Mesangial and renal endothelial cells were found to bind IgG complexes, whereas glomerular epithelial cell binding was minimal. A blocking antibody for Fc-gamma receptors reduced binding to mesangial cells but not renal endothelial cells, suggesting differential immunoreceptor utilization. RT-PCR and immunostaining based screening of cultured renal endothelial cells showed limited low-level expression of known Fc-receptors and Igbinding proteins. The interaction between mesangial cells and renal endothelial cells and immune complexes resulted in distinct, cell-specific patterns of chemokine and cytokine production. This novel pathway involving renal endothelial cells likely contributes to the predilection of circulating immune complex accumulation within the kidney and to the inflammatory responses that drive kidney injury. PMID:23911392

  17. Antibodies to probe endogenous G protein-coupled receptor heteromer expression, regulation, and function

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ivone; Gupta, Achla; Bushlin, Ittai; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade an increasing number of studies have focused on the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to form heteromers and explored how receptor heteromerization modulates the binding, signaling and trafficking properties of individual receptors. Most of these studies were carried out in heterologous cells expressing epitope tagged receptors. Very little information is available about the in vivo physiological role of G protein-coupled receptor heteromers due to a lack of tools to detect their presence in endogenous tissue. Recent advances such as the generation of mouse models expressing fluorescently labeled receptors, of TAT based peptides that can disrupt a given heteromer pair, or of heteromer-selective antibodies that recognize the heteromer in endogenous tissue have begun to elucidate the physiological and pathological roles of receptor heteromers. In this review we have focused on heteromer-selective antibodies and describe how a subtractive immunization strategy can be successfully used to generate antibodies that selectively recognize a desired heteromer pair. We also describe the uses of these antibodies to detect the presence of heteromers, to study their properties in endogenous tissues, and to monitor changes in heteromer levels under pathological conditions. Together, these findings suggest that G protein-coupled receptor heteromers represent unique targets for the development of drugs with reduced side-effects. PMID:25520661

  18. Expression of somatostatin receptor genes and acetylcholine receptor development in rat skeletal muscle during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Peng, M; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1998-05-01

    Our laboratory reported previously that somatostatin (SST) is transiently expressed in rat motoneurons during the first 14 days after birth. We investigated the possibility that the SST receptor (SSTR) is expressed in skeletal muscle. We found that two of the five subtypes of SSTR (SSTR3 and SSTR4) are expressed in skeletal muscle with a time course that correlates with the transient expression of SST in motoneurons. In addition, SSTR2A is expressed from birth to adulthood in skeletal muscle. Both SSTR2A and SSTR4 are also expressed in L6 cells, a skeletal muscle cell line. Somatostatin acting through its receptors has been shown to stimulate tyrosine phosphatase activity in a number of different tissues. We found that several proteins (50, 65, 90, 140, 180 and 200 kDa) exhibited a reduced degree of tyrosine phosphorylation following SST treatment. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase activity with sodium orthovanadate increased expression of the nicotinic acetyl-choline receptor (nAChR) epsilon subunit mRNA by three fold. Somatostatin reversed the elevated epsilon mRNA following orthovanadate treatment. These findings show that SSTR is expressed in skeletal muscle and that SST acting via the SSTR regulates tyrosine phosphorylation and expression of the epsilon subunit of the AChR in the rat skeletal muscle. PMID:9852305

  19. Ontogeny of the expression of leptin and its receptor in the murine fetus and placenta.

    PubMed

    Hoggard, N; Hunter, L; Lea, R G; Trayhurn, P; Mercer, J G

    2000-03-01

    Leptin is a 167-amino acid protein that is secreted from adipose cells and expressed in placental tissues. It is important nutritionally in the regulation of energy balance, but also has other functions such as a role in reproduction. To investigate the function of the leptin system in fetal development we examined, primarily by in-situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, the expression (both mRNA and protein) of leptin and its receptor (including the signalling splice variant) in tissues from 11.5, 13.5, 16.5 and 18.5 d postcoitus murine fetuses and associated placentas. We detected leptin mRNA (at low levels) and protein predominantly in the cytotrophoblasts of the labyrinth part of the placenta, an area of nutrient exchange between the developing fetus and the placenta, and in the trophoblast giant cells situated in the junctional zone at the maternal interface. In addition, leptin was strongly expressed in the fetal cartilage-bone and at a lower level in the hair follicles, heart, and liver of the murine fetus at differing stages of development. The leptin receptor, including the signalling splice variant, was also identified in specific fetal tissues. The physiological importance of expression of both leptin and the leptin receptor (OB-R and OB-Rb) in the placenta remains to be determined. In addition, the high levels of expression of leptin and its receptor in discrete areas of the murine fetus suggest that leptin has a critical role in fetal development.

  20. Regulation of retinoid X receptor gamma expression by fed state in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Ko, Eun Hee; Kim, Jae-woo

    2015-02-27

    Glucose metabolism is balanced by glycolysis and gluconeogenesis with precise control in the liver. The expression of genes related to glucose metabolism is regulated primarily by glucose and insulin at transcriptional level. Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating the gene expression of glucose metabolism at transcriptional level. Some of these nuclear receptors form heterodimers with RXRs to bind to their specific regulatory elements on the target promoters. To date, three isotypes of RXRs have been identified; RXRα, RXRβ and RXRγ. However, their involvement in the interactions with other nuclear receptors in the liver remains unclear. In this study, we found RXRγ is rapidly induced after feeding in the mouse liver, indicating a potential role of RXRγ in controlling glucose or lipid metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. In addition, RXRγ expression was upregulated by glucose in primary hepatocytes. This implies that glucose metabolism governed by RXRγ in conjunction with other nuclear receptors. The luciferase reporter assay showed that RXRγ as well as RXRα increased SREBP-1c promoter activity in hepatocytes. These results suggest that RXRγ may play an important role in tight control of glucose metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. - Highlights: • Refeeding increases the RXRγ expression level in mouse liver. • RXRγ expression is induced by high glucose condition in primary hepatocytes. • RXRγ and LXRα have synergistic effect on SREBP-1c promoter activity. • RXRγ binds to LXRE(-299/-280) located within SREBP-1c promoter region and interacts with LXRα.

  1. Nicotinic receptor Alpha7 expression during mouse adrenal gland development.

    PubMed

    Gahring, Lorise C; Myers, Elizabeth; Palumbos, Sierra; Rogers, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 (α7) is a ligand-activated ion channel that contributes to a diversity of cellular processes involved in development, neurotransmission and inflammation. In this report the expression of α7 was examined in the mouse developing and adult adrenal gland that expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter as a bi-cistronic extension of the endogenous α7 transcript (α7(G)). At embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) α7(G) expression was associated with the suprarenal ganglion and precursor cells of the adrenal gland. The α7(G) cells are catecholaminergic chromaffin cells as reflected by their progressive increase in the co-expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that is complete by E18.5. In the adult, α7(G) expression is limited to a subset of chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla that cluster near the border with the adrenal cortex. These chromaffin cells co-express α7(G), TH and DBH, but they lack phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) consistent with only norepinephrine (NE) synthesis. These cell groups appear to be preferentially innervated by pre-ganglionic afferents identified by the neurotrophin receptor p75. No afferents identified by beta-III tubulin, neurofilament proteins or p75 co-expressed α7(G). Occasional α7(G) cells in the pre-E14.5 embryos express neuronal markers consistent with intrinsic ganglion cells and in the adult some α7(G) cells co-express glutamic acid decarboxylase. The transient expression of α7 during adrenal gland development and its prominent co-expression by a subset of NE chromaffin cells in the adult suggests that the α7 receptor contributes to multiple aspects of adrenal gland development and function that persist into adulthood. PMID:25093893

  2. Nicotinic receptor Alpha7 expression during mouse adrenal gland development.

    PubMed

    Gahring, Lorise C; Myers, Elizabeth; Palumbos, Sierra; Rogers, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 (α7) is a ligand-activated ion channel that contributes to a diversity of cellular processes involved in development, neurotransmission and inflammation. In this report the expression of α7 was examined in the mouse developing and adult adrenal gland that expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter as a bi-cistronic extension of the endogenous α7 transcript (α7(G)). At embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) α7(G) expression was associated with the suprarenal ganglion and precursor cells of the adrenal gland. The α7(G) cells are catecholaminergic chromaffin cells as reflected by their progressive increase in the co-expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that is complete by E18.5. In the adult, α7(G) expression is limited to a subset of chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla that cluster near the border with the adrenal cortex. These chromaffin cells co-express α7(G), TH and DBH, but they lack phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) consistent with only norepinephrine (NE) synthesis. These cell groups appear to be preferentially innervated by pre-ganglionic afferents identified by the neurotrophin receptor p75. No afferents identified by beta-III tubulin, neurofilament proteins or p75 co-expressed α7(G). Occasional α7(G) cells in the pre-E14.5 embryos express neuronal markers consistent with intrinsic ganglion cells and in the adult some α7(G) cells co-express glutamic acid decarboxylase. The transient expression of α7 during adrenal gland development and its prominent co-expression by a subset of NE chromaffin cells in the adult suggests that the α7 receptor contributes to multiple aspects of adrenal gland development and function that persist into adulthood.

  3. Nicotinic Receptor Alpha7 Expression during Mouse Adrenal Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    Gahring, Lorise C.; Myers, Elizabeth; Palumbos, Sierra; Rogers, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 (α7) is a ligand-activated ion channel that contributes to a diversity of cellular processes involved in development, neurotransmission and inflammation. In this report the expression of α7 was examined in the mouse developing and adult adrenal gland that expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter as a bi-cistronic extension of the endogenous α7 transcript (α7G). At embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) α7G expression was associated with the suprarenal ganglion and precursor cells of the adrenal gland. The α7G cells are catecholaminergic chromaffin cells as reflected by their progressive increase in the co-expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that is complete by E18.5. In the adult, α7G expression is limited to a subset of chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla that cluster near the border with the adrenal cortex. These chromaffin cells co-express α7G, TH and DBH, but they lack phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) consistent with only norepinephrine (NE) synthesis. These cell groups appear to be preferentially innervated by pre-ganglionic afferents identified by the neurotrophin receptor p75. No afferents identified by beta-III tubulin, neurofilament proteins or p75 co-expressed α7G. Occasional α7G cells in the pre-E14.5 embryos express neuronal markers consistent with intrinsic ganglion cells and in the adult some α7G cells co-express glutamic acid decarboxylase. The transient expression of α7 during adrenal gland development and its prominent co-expression by a subset of NE chromaffin cells in the adult suggests that the α7 receptor contributes to multiple aspects of adrenal gland development and function that persist into adulthood. PMID:25093893

  4. Aberrant expression and function of death receptor-3 and death decoy receptor-3 in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    GE, ZHICHENG; SANDERS, ANDREW J.; YE, LIN; JIANG, WEN G.

    2011-01-01

    Death receptor-3 (DR3) and death decoy receptor-3 (DcR3) are both members of the tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily. The TNFR superfamily contains eight death domain-containing receptors, including TNFR1 (also called DR1), Fas (also called DR2), DR3, DR4, DR5, DR6, NGFR and EDAR. Upon the binding of these receptors with their corresponding ligands, the death domain recruits various proteins that mediate both the death and proliferation of cells. Receptor function is negatively regulated by decoy receptors (DcR1, DcR2, DcR3 and OPG). DR3/DcR3 are a pair of positive and negative players with which vascular endothelial growth inhibitor (VEGI) interacts. VEGI has been suggested to be a potential tumour suppressor. The inhibitory effects of VEGI on cancer are manifested in three main areas: a direct effect on cancer cells, an anti-angiogenic effect on endothelial cells, and the stimulation of dendritic cell maturation. A recent study indicated that DR3 may be a new receptor for E-selectin, which has been reported to be associated with cancer metastasis. DcR3 is a soluble receptor, highly expressed in various tumours, which lacks an apparent transmembrane segment, prevents cytokine response through ligand binding and neutralization, and is an inhibitor of apoptosis. DcR3 serves as a decoy receptor for FasL, LIGHT and VEGI. The cytokine LIGHT activates various anti-tumour functions and is expected to be a promising candidate for cancer therapy. Certain tumours may escape FasL-dependent immune-cytotoxic attack by expressing DcR3, which blocks FasL function. DR3/DcR3 play profound roles in regulating cell death and proliferation in cancer. The present review briefly discusses DR3/DcR3 and attempts to elucidate the role of these negative and positive players in cancer. PMID:22977485

  5. Population-level control of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Adams, Rhys; van Itallie, Elizabeth; Bennett, Matthew; Balazsi, Gabor

    2011-03-01

    Gene expression is the process that translates genetic information into proteins, that determine the way cells live, function and even die. It was demonstrated that cells with identical genomes exposed to the same environment can differ in their protein composition and therefore phenotypes. Protein levels can vary between cells due to the stochastic nature of intracellular biochemical events, indicating that the genotype-phenotype connection is not deterministic at the cellular level. We asked whether genomes could encode isogenic cell populations more reliably than single cells. To address this question, we built two gene circuits to control three cell population-level characteristics: gene expression mean, coefficient of variation and non-genetic memory of previous expression states. Indeed, we found that these population-level characteristics were more predictable than the gene expression of single cells in a well-controlled environment. This research was supported by the NIH Director's New Innovator Award 1DP2 OD006481-01 and Welch Foundation Grant C-1729.

  6. Early Expression of Odorant Receptors Distorts the Olfactory Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Q.; Marks, Carolyn A.; Belluscio, Leonardo; Ryba, Nicholas J. P.

    2010-01-01

    The odor response properties of a mammalian olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) are determined by the tightly regulated expression of a single member of a very large family of odorant receptors (ORs). The OR also plays an important role in focusing the central projections of all OSNs expressing that particular receptor to a pair of stereotypic locations (glomeruli) in each olfactory bulb (OB), thus creating a spatial map of odor responses in the brain. Here we show that when initiated late in neural development, transgenic expression of one OR in almost all OSNs has little influence on the architecture of the OB. In contrast, early OR-transgene expression (mediated by the Gγ8-promoter) in 50–70% of OSNs grossly distorts the morphology of glomeruli and alters the projection patterns of many residual OSNs not expressing the transgene. Interestingly, this disruption of targeting persists in adult animals despite down-regulation of Gγ8 and transgenic OR expression that occurs as olfactory neurogenesis declines. Indeed, functional imaging studies reveal a dramatic decrease in the complexity of responses to odorants in adult Gγ8-transgenic OR mice. Thus, we show that initiation of transgenic OR-expression early in the development of OSNs, rather than just the extent of transgene expression, determines its effectiveness at modifying OB anatomy and function. Taken together these data imply that OR-expression timing needs to be very tightly controlled to achieve the precise wiring and function of the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:20610762

  7. Genes involved in Drosophila glutamate receptor expression and localization

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Faith LW; Featherstone, David E

    2005-01-01

    Background A clear picture of the mechanisms controlling glutamate receptor expression, localization, and stability remains elusive, possibly due to an incomplete understanding of the proteins involved. We screened transposon mutants generated by the ongoing Drosophila Gene Disruption Project in an effort to identify the different types of genes required for glutamate receptor cluster development. Results To enrich for non-silent insertions with severe disruptions in glutamate receptor clustering, we identified and focused on homozygous lethal mutants in a collection of 2185 BG and KG transposon mutants generated by the BDGP Gene Disruption Project. 202 lethal mutant lines were individually dissected to expose glutamatergic neuromuscular junctions, stained using antibodies that recognize neuronal membrane and the glutamate receptor subunit GluRIIA, and viewed using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. We identified 57 mutants with qualitative differences in GluRIIA expression and/or localization. 84% of mutants showed loss of receptors and/or clusters; 16% of mutants showed an increase in receptors. Insertion loci encode a variety of protein types, including cytoskeleton proteins and regulators, kinases, phosphatases, ubiquitin ligases, mucins, cell adhesion proteins, transporters, proteins controlling gene expression and protein translation, and proteins of unknown/novel function. Expression pattern analyses and complementation tests, however, suggest that any single mutant – even if a mutant gene is uniquely tagged – must be interpreted with caution until the mutation is validated genetically and phenotypically. Conclusion Our study identified 57 transposon mutants with qualitative differences in glutamate receptor expression and localization. Despite transposon tagging of every insertion locus, extensive validation is needed before one can have confidence in the role of any individual gene. Alternatively, one can focus on the types of genes identified, rather

  8. Effect of Hyperoxia on Retinoid Metabolism and Retinoid Receptor Expression in the Lungs of Newborn Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsing-Jin; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2015-01-01

    Background Preterm newborns that receive oxygen therapy often develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which is abnormal lung development characterized by impaired alveologenesis. Oxygen-mediated injury is thought to disrupt normal lung growth and development. However, the mechanism of hyperoxia-induced BPD has not been extensively investigated. We established a neonatal mouse model to investigate the effects of normobaric hyperoxia on retinoid metabolism and retinoid receptor expression. Methods Newborn mice were exposed to hyperoxic or normoxic conditions for 15 days. The concentration of retinol and retinyl palmitate in the lung was measured by HPLC to gauge retinoid metabolism. Retinoid receptor mRNA levels were assessed by real-time PCR. Proliferation and retinoid receptor expression in A549 cells were assessed in the presence and absence of exogenous vitamin A. Results Hyperoxia significantly reduced the body and lung weight of neonatal mice. Hyperoxia also downregulated expression of RARα, RARγ, and RXRγ in the lungs of neonatal mice. In vitro, hyperoxia inhibited proliferation and expression of retinoid receptors in A549 cells. Conclusion Hyperoxia disrupted retinoid receptor expression in neonatal mice. PMID:26509921

  9. Altered expression of neuropeptide Y receptors caused by focal cortical dysplasia in human intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hanjiang; Guan, Yuguang; Zhou, Jian; Qi, Xueling; Li, Tianfu; Xu, Zhiqing David; Luan, Guo-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is a common cause of pharmacologically-intractable epilepsy, however, the precise mechanisms underlying the epileptogenicity of FCD remains to be determined. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), an endogenous anticonvulsant in the central nervous system, plays an important role in the regulation of neuronal excitability. Increased expression of NPY and its receptors has been identified in the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, presumed to act as an endogenous anticonvulsant mechanism. Therefore, we investigated whether expression changes in NPY receptors occurs in patients with FCD. We specifically investigated the expression of seizure-related NPY receptor subtypes Y1, Y2, and Y5 in patients with FCD versus autopsy controls. We found that Y1R and Y2R were up-regulated at the mRNA and protein levels in the temporal and frontal lobes in FCD lesions. By contrast, there was no significant change in either receptor detected in parietal lesions. Notably, overexpression of Y5R was consistently observed in all FCD lesions. Our results demonstrate the altered expression of Y1R, Y2R and Y5R occurs in FCD lesions within the temporal, frontal and parietal lobe. Abnormal NPY receptor subtype expression may be associated with the onset and progression of epileptic activity and may act as a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of refractory epilepsy caused by FCD. PMID:26943580

  10. Problem-Solving Test: Expression Cloning of the Erythropoietin Receptor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: cytokines, cytokine receptors, cDNA library, cDNA synthesis, poly(A)[superscript +] RNA, primer, template, reverse transcriptase, restriction endonucleases, cohesive ends, expression vector, promoter, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, poly(A) signal, DNA helicase, DNA ligase, topoisomerases,…

  11. Gene Expression Control by Glucocorticoid Receptors during Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Andre Machado; Anunciato, Aparecida Kataryna Olimpio; Rosenstock, Tatiana Rosado; Glezer, Isaias

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent anti-inflammatory compounds that have been extensively used in clinical practice for several decades. GC’s effects on inflammation are generally mediated through GC receptors (GRs). Signal transduction through these nuclear receptors leads to dramatic changes in gene expression programs in different cell types, typically due to GR binding to DNA or to transcription modulators. During the last decade, the view of GCs as exclusive anti-inflammatory molecules has been challenged. GR negative interference in pro-inflammatory gene expression was a landmark in terms of molecular mechanisms that suppress immune activity. In fact, GR can induce varied inhibitory molecules, including a negative regulator of Toll-like receptors pathway, or subject key transcription factors, such as NF-κB and AP-1, to a repressor mechanism. In contrast, the expression of some acute-phase proteins and other players of innate immunity generally requires GR signaling. Consequently, GRs must operate context-dependent inhibitory, permissive, or stimulatory effects on host defense signaling triggered by pathogens or tissue damage. This review aims to disclose how contradictory or comparable effects on inflammatory gene expression can depend on pharmacological approach (including selective GC receptor modulators; SEGRMs), cell culture, animal treatment, or transgenic strategies used as models. Although the current view of GR-signaling integrated many advances in the field, some answers to important questions remain elusive. PMID:27148162

  12. Claudin 4 expression in triple-negative breast cancer: correlation with androgen receptors and Ki-67 expression.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elazeem, Mona A; Abd-Elazeem, Marwa A

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an important phenotype of breast cancer that accounts for a relatively small number of breast cancer cases but still represent a focus of increasing interest at the clinical, biological, and epidemiological level. Claudins are the major component of the tight junction, and only a few studies have addressed the role of claudins in breast cancer, especially TNBC. Androgen receptors (ARs), as members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, are known to be involved in a complex network of signaling pathways that collectively regulate cell proliferation. However, roles of AR in breast cancer development and progression have not been very clearly understood. The proliferation marker Ki-67 has been confirmed as an independent predictive and prognostic factor in early breast cancer. The aims of this study are to identify the clinicopathologic associations and prognostic value of claudin 4 expression in TNBC and to correlate claudin 4 expression with AR status and Ki-67 expression. Paraffin blocks obtained from 56 female patients with triple-negative primary invasive ductal breast carcinomas were analyzed for claudin 4, AR, and Ki-67 immunohistochemical expression. High levels of claudin 4 expression were detected in 66.1% of TNBC cases. There was a significant positive correlation with age, tumor size, grade, nodal status, metastasis, and Ki-67 expression (all P < .05) and negative correlation with AR status (P < .001). Androgen receptor showed positivity in 29 cases (51.78%). There was a statistical negative correlation with the all the studied clinicopathologic parameters, claudin 4 and Ki-67 expression. High claudin 4 expression, negative AR expression, and high Ki-67 index would provide a strong prognostic power to differentiate the patients with worse outcome among TNBC patients. Moreover, target treatment for TNBC cells

  13. Human Toll like receptor 4 gene expression of PBMCs in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Z; Kiani, Z; Nasiri, A A; Mashhadi, M A; Javadian, F; Haghighi, A; Kohan, F; Bahari, A; Sargazi, A

    2015-07-31

    Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) is one of the most pivotal pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immune systems. In this study, we evaluate the expression of the TLR4 in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) in comparison to healthy controls. Expression of TLR4 in 32 human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with DM2 and 20 control samples was assessed using Real—Time PCR technique. For each patient, body mass index (BMI) and blood glucose levels were measured. The results of Real—Time PCR showed a 5—folds increase in expression of TLR4 on the PBMCs of DM2 patients in comparison to controls. No correlation was observed between the TLR4 expression and sex or BMI. Our results confirmed that DM2 can increase TLR4 expression independent from sex, blood glucose concentrations and BMI.

  14. Cloning and expression of the rabbit prostaglandin EP2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Youfei; Stillman, Brett A; Zhang, Yahua; Schneider, André; Saito, Osamu; Davis, Linda S; Redha, Reyadh; Breyer, Richard M; Breyer, Matthew D

    2002-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has multiple physiologic roles mediated by G protein coupled receptors designated E-prostanoid, or "EP" receptors. Evidence supports an important role for the EP2 receptor in regulating fertility, vascular tone and renal function. Results The full-length rabbit EP2 receptor cDNA was cloned. The encoded polypeptide contains 361 amino acid residues with seven hydrophobic domains. COS-1 cells expressing the cloned rabbit EP2 exhibited specific [3H]PGE2 binding with a Kd of 19.1± 1.7 nM. [3H]PGE2 was displaced by unlabeled ligands in the following order: PGE2>>PGD2=PGF2α=iloprost. Binding of [3H]PGE2 was also displaced by EP receptor subtype selective agonists with a rank order of affinity consistent with the EP2 receptor (butaprost>AH13205>misoprostol>sulprostone). Butaprost free acid produced a concentration-dependent increase in cAMP accumulation in rabbit EP2 transfected COS-1 cells with a half-maximal effective concentration of 480 nM. RNase protection assay revealed high expression in the ileum, spleen, and liver with lower expression in the kidney, lung, heart, uterus, adrenal gland and skeletal muscle. In situ hybridization localized EP2 mRNA to the uterine endometrium, but showed no distinct localization in the kidney. EP2 mRNA expression along the nephron was determined by RT-PCR and its expression was present in glomeruli, MCD, tDL and CCD. In cultured cells EP2 receptor was not detected in collecting ducts but was detected in renal interstitial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. EP2 mRNA was also detected in arteries, veins, and preglomerular vessels of the kidney. Conclusion EP2 expression pattern is consistent with the known functional roles for cAMP coupled PGE2 effects in reproductive and vascular tissues and renal interstitial cells. It remains uncertain whether it is also expressed in renal tubules. PMID:12097143

  15. Expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jalali-Nadoushan, Mohammad-Reza; Amirtouri, Reza; Davati, Ali; Askari, Samaneh; Siadati, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), occurs mostly in women and sex hormones may play a role in the pathogenesis and clinical course. The objective of this study was to determine the status and prevalence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in PTC with regard to age, gender, tumor size and lymph node involvement. Methods: Immunohistochemical stains were performed on 92 tissue blocks of PTC for estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression in tumor cells. Chi-square test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to determine statistical difference using statistical software SPSS. Results: The mean age of patients was 39.32±1.7 years (range 13-80) with 79(85.9%) women and 13 (14.1%) men. Lymph node involvement was seen in 76.1% of patients. The average tumor size was 3.6±2.21 cm. The rate of ER and PR expression were 46.75% and 5.6%, respectively. ER expression for females was higher than males (P=0.014), but no relation was found between males and females in PR expression (P=0.7). Also there was no statistical difference between ER and PR expression with respect to age, lymph node involvement and tumor size. Conclusion: Our study showed higher ER expression in females than males with PTC. No relation was found between the expression of these receptors and age of presentation, lymph node involvement and tumor size. Further investigation is required to determine the prognostic importance of ER and PR in PTC.

  16. Evaluation of leptin receptor expression on buffalo leukocytes.

    PubMed

    De Matteis, Giovanna; Grandoni, Francesco; Scatà, Maria Carmela; Catizone, Angela; Reale, Anna; Crisà, Alessandra; Moioli, Bianca

    2016-09-01

    Experimental evidences support a direct role for leptin in immunity. Besides controlling food intake and energy expenditure, leptin was reported to be involved in the regulation of the immune system in ruminants. The aim of this work was to highlight the expression of leptin receptor (LEPR) on Bubalus bubalis immune cells using a multi-approach assessment: flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and gene expression analysis. Flow cytometric analysis of LEPR expression showed that peripheral blood monocytes were the predominant cells expressing LEPR. This result was corroborated by confocal microscopy and RT-PCR analysis. Moreover, among lymphocytes, LEPR was mainly expressed by B lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells. Evidence of LEPR expression on buffalo blood leukocytes showed to be a good indicator of the responsivity of these cells to leptin, so confirming the involvement of leptin in buffalo immune response. PMID:27436440

  17. Insulin receptor gene expression in normal and diseased bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, G W; Zhang, Z G; Wang, J G; Wang, Z; Xu, C; Zhu, X L

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare insulin receptor (IR) gene expression in normal bovine liver (n=7) with samples of liver from cows in the perinatal period with ketosis (n=7) and cows with fatty liver (n=7). Gene expression was determined by internally controlled reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of IR mRNA in the liver of ketotic dairy cows was higher than in cows with fatty liver, but in both disease groups the expression was substantially lower than that in normal liver. Reduced expression of IR mRNA in fatty liver indicates that responses to insulin are markedly decreased, which might be due to insulin resistance. The relatively lower IR mRNA expression in the liver tissue of dairy cows with ketosis might enhance gluconeogenesis and lipid mobilization to relieve energy negative balance.

  18. Elevated Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Serum Levels and Altered Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression, Nitric Oxide, and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Production in Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Denise Maciel; Garcia, Fernanda Gonçalves; Terra, Ana Paula Sarreta; Lopes Tosta, Ana Cristina; Silva, Luciana de Almeida; Castellano, Lúcio Roberto; Silva Teixeira, David Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    Background. During dengue virus (DV) infection, monocytes produce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) which might be critical to immunopathogenesis. Since intensity of DV replication may determine clinical outcomes, it is important to know the effects of viral nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) on innate immune parameters of infected patients. The present study investigates the relationships between dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) serum levels and innate immune response (TLR4 expression and TNF-α/NO production) of DV infected patients presenting different clinical outcomes. Methodology/Principal Findings. We evaluated NO, NS1 serum levels (ELISA), TNF-α production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and TLR4 expression on CD14+ cells from 37 dengue patients and 20 healthy controls. Early in infection, increased expression of TLR4 in monocytes of patients with dengue fever (DF) was detected compared to patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Moreover, PBMCs of DHF patients showed higher NS1 and lower NO serum levels during the acute febrile phase and a reduced response to TLR4 stimulation by LPS (with a reduced TNF-α production) when compared to DF patients. Conclusions/Significance. During DV infection in humans, some innate immune parameters change, depending on the NS1 serum levels, and phase and severity of the disease which may contribute to development of different clinical outcomes. PMID:25580138

  19. Expression and function of a novel variant of estrogen receptor-α36 in murine airways.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuping; Zhang, Xintian; He, David Z Z; Segal, Manav; Berro, Abdo; Gerson, Trevor; Wang, Zhaoyi; Casale, Thomas B

    2011-11-01

    Evidence suggests that estrogen signaling is involved in sex differences in the prevalence rates and control of asthma, but the expression patterns of estrogen receptor variants and estrogen function in the lung are not well established. We investigated the expression of major estrogen receptor variants occurring naturally and after the development of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity in a murine model of allergic asthma, along with the role of estrogen signaling in small-airway ciliary motion and smooth muscle contraction. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin, and estrogen receptor expression patterns were examined by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Time-lapse video and photodiode-based displacement measurement systems were used to assess the effects of estrogen signaling on airway ciliary beat frequency and smooth muscle contraction. We found that a novel variant of estrogen receptor (ER)-α, ER-α36, is expressed in airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. ER-α36 was predominately localized on the plasma membranes of airway cells. After sensitization to allergen, the expression levels of ER-α36 increased significantly (P < 0.01), whereas the expression of ER-β and ER-α66 did not significantly change. Estrogen treatment in vitro resulted in a rapid increase in airway cilia motion in a dose-dependent fashion, but did not exert any effect on airway smooth muscle contraction. We speculate that the up-regulation of estrogen receptor expression associated with allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness may constitute a protective mechanism to facilitate the clearance of mucus. The identification and localization of specific estrogen receptor subtypes in the lung could lead to newer therapeutic avenues aimed at addressing sex differences of asthma susceptibility. PMID:21642591

  20. Interleukin-1 Receptors Are Differentially Expressed in Normal and Psoriatic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kovács-Sólyom, Ferenc; Prihoda, Judit; Kui, Róbert; Kemény, Lajos; Gyulai, Rolland

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine the possible role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) in the functional insufficiency of regulatory T cells in psoriasis, by comparing the expression of IL-1 receptors on healthy control and psoriatic T cells. Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and healthy volunteers, matched in age and sex, were selected for all experiments. CD4+CD25− effector and CD4+CD25+CD127low regulatory T cells were separated and used for the experiments. Expression of the mRNA of IL-1 receptors (IL-1R1, IL-1R2, and sIL-1R2) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell surface IL-1 receptor expression was assessed by flow cytometry. Relative expression of the signal transmitting IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) mRNA is higher in resting psoriatic effector and regulatory T cells, and activation induces higher IL-1R1 protein expression in psoriatic T cells than in healthy cells. Psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells express increased mRNA levels of the decoy IL-1 receptors (IL-1R2 and sIL-1R2) upon activation compared to healthy counterparts. Psoriatic T cells release slightly more sIL-1R2 into their surrounding than healthy T cells. In conclusion, changes in the expression of IL-1 receptors in psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:24665164

  1. Glycine receptors are functionally expressed on bullfrog retinal cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Ge, L-H; Lee, S-C; Liu, J; Yang, X-L

    2007-04-25

    Using immunocytochemical and whole cell recording techniques, we examined expression of glycine receptors on bullfrog retinal cone photoreceptors. Immunofluorescence double labeling experiments conducted on retinal sections and isolated cell preparations showed that terminals and inner segments of cones were immunoreactive to both alpha1 and beta subunits of glycine receptors. Moreover, application of glycine induced a sustained inward current from isolated cones, which increased in amplitude in a dose-dependent manner, with an EC50 (concentration of glycine producing half-maximal response) of 67.3+/-4.9 microM, and the current was blocked by the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine, but not 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid (DCKA) of 200 microM, a blocker of the glycine recognition site at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. The glycine-induced current reversed in polarity at a potential close to the calculated chloride equilibrium potential, and the reversal potential was changed as a function of the extracellular chloride concentration. These results suggest that strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors are functionally expressed in bullfrog cones, which may mediate signal feedback from glycinergic interplexiform cells to cones in the outer retina. PMID:17346892

  2. Expression of serotonin receptor genes in cranial ganglia.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Naohiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Yamamoto, Kurumi; Kurokawa, Azusa; Narukawa, Masataka; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Misaka, Takumi; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Abe, Keiko

    2016-03-23

    Taste cells release neurotransmitters to gustatory neurons to transmit chemical information they received. Sweet, umami, and bitter taste cells use ATP as a neurotransmitter. However, ATP release from sour taste cells has not been observed so far. Instead, they release serotonin when they are activated by sour/acid stimuli. Thus it is still controversial whether sour taste cells use ATP, serotonin, or both. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subsequent in situ hybridization (ISH) analyses, we revealed that of 14 serotonin receptor genes only 5-HT3A and 5-HT3B showed significant/clear signals in a subset of neurons of cranial sensory ganglia in which gustatory neurons reside. Double-fluorescent labeling analyses of ISH for serotonin receptor genes with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) in cranial sensory ganglia of pkd1l3-WGA mice whose sour neural pathway is visualized by the distribution of WGA originating from sour taste cells in the posterior region of the tongue revealed that WGA-positive cranial sensory neurons rarely express either of serotonin receptor gene. These results suggest that serotonin receptors expressed in cranial sensory neurons do not play any role as neurotransmitter receptor from sour taste cells. PMID:26854841

  3. Leptin and leptin receptor mRNA and protein expression in the murine fetus and placenta.

    PubMed

    Hoggard, N; Hunter, L; Duncan, J S; Williams, L M; Trayhurn, P; Mercer, J G

    1997-09-30

    Leptin is a 167-aa protein that is secreted from adipose tissue and is important in the regulation of energy balance. It also functions in hematopoiesis and reproduction. To assess whether leptin is involved in fetal growth and development we have examined the distribution of mRNAs encoding leptin and the leptin receptor (which has at least six splice variants) in the 14.5-day postcoitus mouse fetus and in the placenta using reverse transcription-PCR and in situ hybridization. High levels of gene expression for leptin, the leptin receptor, and the long splice variant of the leptin receptor with an intracellular signaling domain were observed in the placenta, fetal cartilage/bone, and hair follicles. Receptor expression also was detected in the lung, as well as the leptomeninges and choroid plexus of the fetal brain. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry, using specific antibodies, demonstrated the presence of leptin and leptin receptor protein in these tissues. These results suggest that leptin may play a role in the growth and development of the fetus, both through placental and fetal expression of the leptin and leptin receptor genes. In the fetus, leptin may be multifunctional and have both paracrine and endocrine effects.

  4. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a brain-specific somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, J F; Xu, Y; Song, J; Berelowitz, M

    1992-01-01

    The PCR and conventional library screening were used to clone the brain-specific somatostatin receptor rSSTR-4 from a rat genomic library. The deduced amino acid sequence encodes a protein of 384 amino acids and displays structural and sequence homologies with members of the G protein-receptor superfamily. The amino acid sequence of rSSTR-4 is 60% and 48% identical to that of somatostatin receptors SSTR-1 and SSTR-2, respectively, two recently cloned subtypes. Competition curve analysis of the binding properties of the receptor transiently expressed in COS-1 cells revealed a higher apparent affinity for somatostatin 14 than for somatostatin 28. In contrast, the somatostatin analogs SMS 201-995, IM 4-28, and MK-678 failed to displace specific binding in transfected cells. These characteristics resemble the pharmacological binding properties of the previously described brain-specific somatostatin-receptor subtype. Examination of the tissue distribution of mRNA for rSSTR-4 revealed expression limited to various brain regions with highest levels in the cortex and hippocampus. Thus, based on the pharmacology and tissue localization of this receptor, we conclude that rSSTR-4 represents a brain-specific somatostatin receptor. Images PMID:1360663

  5. Prognostic Relevance of Cytokine Receptor Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Interleukin-2 Receptor α-Chain (CD25) Expression Predicts a Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Kazunori; Kita, Kenkichi; Kyo, Taiichi; Ueda, Takanori; Tanaka, Isao; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    A variety of cytokine/cytokine receptor systems affect the biological behavior of acute leukemia cells. However, little is known about the clinical relevance of cytokine receptor expression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We quantitatively examined the expression of interleukin-2 receptor α-chain (IL-2Rα, also known as CD25), IL-2Rβ, IL-3Rα, IL-4Rα, IL-5Rα, IL-6Rα, IL-7Rα, the common β-chain (βc), γc, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)Rα, G-CSFR, c-fms, c-mpl, c-kit, FLT3, and GP130 in leukemia cells from 767 adult patients with AML by flow cytometry and determined their prevalence and clinical significance. All cytokine receptors examined were expressed at varying levels, whereas the levels of IL-3Rα, GM-CSFRα, IL-2Rα, γc, c-kit, and G-CSFR exhibited a wide spectrum of ≥10,000 sites/cell. In terms of their French-American-British classification types, GM-CSFRα and c-fms were preferentially expressed in M4/M5 patients, G-CSF in M3 patients, and IL-2Rα in non-M3 patients. Elevated levels of IL-3Rα, GM-CSFRα, and IL-2Rα correlated with leukocytosis. In patients ≤60 years old, higher levels of these 3 receptors correlated with poor responses to conventional chemotherapy, but only IL-2Rα was associated with a shorter overall survival. By incorporating IL-2Rα status into cytogenetic risk stratification, we could sort out a significantly adverse-risk cohort from the cytogenetically intermediate-risk group. Analyses with various phenotypical risk markers revealed the expression of IL-2Rα as an independent prognostic indicator in patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics. These findings were not observed in patients >60 years old. Our results indicate that several cytokine receptors were associated with certain cellular and clinical features, but IL-2Rα alone had prognostic value that provides an additional marker to improve current risk evaluation in AML patients ≤60 years old. PMID:26375984

  6. Molecular cloning and expression of the human interleukin 5 receptor

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Human interleukin 5 (IL-5) plays an important role in proliferation and differentiation of human eosinophils. We report the isolation of cDNA clones from cDNA libraries of human eosinophils by using murine IL-5 receptor alpha chain cDNA as a probe. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence indicated that the human IL-5 receptor has approximately 70% amino acid sequence homology with the murine IL-5 receptor and retains features common to the cytokine receptor superfamily. One cDNA clone encodes a glycoprotein of 420 amino acids (Mr 47,670) with an NH2- terminal hydrophobic region (20 amino acids), a glycosylated extracellular domain (324 amino acids), a transmembrane domain (21 amino acids), and a cytoplasmic domain (55 amino acids). Another cDNA encodes only the extracellular domain of this receptor molecule. Other cDNA clones encode molecules having diversified cytoplasmic domains. COS7 cells transfected with the cDNA expressed a approximately 60-kD protein and bound IL-5 with a single class of affinity (Kd = 250-590 pM). The Kd values were similar to that observed in normal human eosinophils. In contrast to the murine 60-kD alpha chain, which binds IL-5 with low affinity (Kd = approximately 10 nM), the human alpha chain homologue can bind IL-5 with much higher affinity by itself. RNA blot analysis of human cells demonstrated two transcripts (approximately 5.3 and 1.4 kb). Both of them were expressed in normal human eosinophils and in erythroleukemic cell line TF-1, which responds to IL-5. The human IL-5 receptor characterized in this paper is essential for signal transduction, because expression of this molecule in murine IL-3-dependent cell line FDC-P1 allowed these cells to proliferate in response to IL-5. PMID:1732409

  7. Local receptors as novel regulators for peripheral clock expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Changhao; Sui, Guiping; Archer, Simon N.; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Aitken, Karen; Bagli, Darius; Chen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian circadian control is determined by a central clock in the brain suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and synchronized peripheral clocks in other tissues. Increasing evidence suggests that SCN-independent regulation of peripheral clocks also occurs. We examined how activation of excitatory receptors influences the clock protein PERIOD 2 (PER2) in a contractile organ, the urinary bladder. PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE-knock-in mice were used to report real-time PER2 circadian dynamics in the bladder tissue. Rhythmic PER2 activities occurred in the bladder wall with a cycle of ∼24 h and peak at ∼12 h. Activation of the muscarinic and purinergic receptors by agonists shifted the peak to an earlier time (7.2±2.0 and 7.2±0.9 h, respectively). PER2 expression was also sensitive to mechanical stimulation. Aging significantly dampened PER2 expression and its response to the agonists. Finally, muscarinic agonist-induced smooth muscle contraction also exhibited circadian rhythm. These data identified novel regulators, endogenous receptors, in determining local clock activity, in addition to mediating the central control. Furthermore, the local clock appears to reciprocally align receptor activity to circadian rhythm for muscle contraction. The interaction between receptors and peripheral clock represents an important mechanism for maintaining physiological functions and its dysregulation may contribute to age-related organ disorders.—Wu, C., Sui, G., Archer, S. N., Sassone-Corsi, P., Aitken, K., Bagli, D., Chen, Y. Local receptors as novel regulators for peripheral clock expression. PMID:25145629

  8. Identification and Differential Expression of a Candidate Sex Pheromone Receptor in Natural Populations of Spodoptera litura

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xinda; Zhang, Qinhui; Wu, Zhongnan; Du, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction is primarily mediated by highly specific olfactory receptors (ORs), a subfamily of which are the pheromone receptors that play a key role in sexual communication and can contribute to reproductive isolation. Here we cloned and identified an olfactory receptor, SlituOR3 (Genbank NO. JN835270), from Spodoptera litura, to be the candidate pheromone receptor. It exhibited male-biased expression in the antennae, where they were localized at the base of sensilla trichoidea. Conserved orthologues of these receptors were found amongst known pheromone receptors within the Lepidoptera, and SlituOR3 were placed amongst a clade of candidate pheromone receptors in a phylogeny tree of insect ORs. SlituOR3 is required for the EAG responses to both Z9E11-14:OAc and Z9E12-14:OAc SlituOR3 showed differential expression in S. litura populations attracted to traps baited with a series of sex pheromone blends composed of different ratios of (9Z,11E)-tetradecadienyl acetate (Z9E11-14:OAc) and (9Z,12E)-tetradecadienyl acetate (Z9E12-14:OAc). The changes in the expression level of SlitOR3 and antennal responses after SlitOR3 silencing suggested that SlitOR3 is required for the sex pheromone signaling. We infer that variation in transcription levels of olfactory receptors may modulate sex pheromone perception in male moths and could affect both of pest control and monitoring efficiency by pheromone application after long time mass trapping with one particular ratio of blend in the field. PMID:26126192

  9. Direct reduction of antigen receptor expression in polyclonal B cell populations developing in vivo results in light chain receptor editing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shixue; Manser, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Secondary Ab V region gene segment rearrangement, termed receptor editing, is a major mechanism contributing to B lymphocyte self-tolerance. However, the parameters that determine whether a B cell undergoes editing are a current subject of debate. We tested the role that the level of BCR expression plays in the regulation of receptor editing in a polyclonal population of B cells differentiating in vivo. Expression of a short hairpin RNA for κ L chain RNA in B cells resulted in reduction in levels of this RNA and surface BCRs. Strikingly, fully mature and functional B cells that developed in vivo and efficiently expressed the short hairpin RNA predominantly expressed BCRs containing λ light chains. This shift in L chain repertoire was accompanied by inhibition of development, increased Rag gene expression, and increased λ V gene segment-cleavage events at the immature B cell stage. These data demonstrated that reducing the translation of BCRs that are members of the natural repertoire at the immature B cell stage is sufficient to promote editing.

  10. Perturbing the Cellular Levels of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 Impairs Murine Endometrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Szwarc, Maria M.; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Wu, San-Pin; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer; O’Malley, Bert W.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.

    2014-01-01

    As pleiotropic coregulators, members of the p160/steroid receptor coactivator (SRC) family control a broad spectrum of transcriptional responses that underpin a diverse array of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Because of their potent coregulator properties, strict controls on SRC expression levels are required to maintain normal tissue functionality. Accordingly, an unwarranted increase in the cellular levels of SRC members has been causally linked to the initiation and/or progression of a number of clinical disorders. Although knockout mouse models have underscored the critical non-redundant roles for each SRC member in vivo, there are surprisingly few mouse models that have been engineered to overexpress SRCs. This deficiency is significant since SRC involvement in many of these disorders is based on unscheduled increases in the levels (rather than the absence) of SRC expression. To address this deficiency, we used recent mouse technology that allows for the targeted expression of human SRC-2 in cells which express the progesterone receptor. Through cre-loxP recombination driven by the endogenous progesterone receptor promoter, a marked elevation in expression levels of human SRC-2 was achieved in endometrial cells that are positive for the progesterone receptor. As a result of this increase in coregulator expression, female mice are severely subfertile due to a dysfunctional uterus, which exhibits a hypersensitivity to estrogen exposure. Our findings strongly support the proposal from clinical observations that increased levels of SRC-2 are causal for a number of endometrial disorders which compromise fertility. Future studies will use this mouse model to decipher the molecular mechanisms that underpin the endometrial defect. We believe such mechanistic insight may provide new molecular descriptors for diagnosis, prognosis, and/or therapy in the clinical management of female infertility. PMID:24905738

  11. Nuclear Receptor Expression and Function in Human Lung Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jihye; Sato, Mitsuo; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Larsen, Jill E.; Minna, John D.; Cha, Jeong-Heon; Jeong, Yangsik

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is caused by combinations of diverse genetic mutations. Here, to understand the relevance of nuclear receptors (NRs) in the oncogene-associated lung cancer pathogenesis, we investigated the expression profile of the entire 48 NR members by using QPCR analysis in a panel of human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) that included precancerous and tumorigenic HBECs harboring oncogenic K-rasV12 and/or p53 alterations. The analysis of the profile revealed that oncogenic alterations accompanied transcriptional changes in the expression of 19 NRs in precancerous HBECs and 15 NRs according to the malignant progression of HBECs. Amongst these, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a NR chosen as a proof-of-principle study, showed increased expression in precancerous HBECs, which was surprisingly reversed when these HBECs acquired full in vivo tumorigenicity. Notably, PPARγ activation by thiazolidinedione (TZD) treatment reversed the increased expression of pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) in precancerous HBECs. In fully tumorigenic HBECs with inducible expression of PPARγ, TZD treatments inhibited tumor cell growth, clonogenecity, and cell migration in a PPARγ-sumoylation dependent manner. Mechanistically, the sumoylation of liganded-PPARγ decreased COX2 expression and increased 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression. This suggests that ligand-mediated sumoylation of PPARγ plays an important role in lung cancer pathogenesis by modulating prostaglandin metabolism. PMID:26244663

  12. Developmental regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate- and kainate-type glutamate receptor expression in the rat spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegenga, S. L.; Kalb, R. G.

    2001-01-01

    Spinal motor neurons undergo experience-dependent development during a critical period in early postnatal life. It has been suggested that the repertoire of glutamate receptor subunits differs between young and mature motor neurons and contributes to this activity-dependent development. In the present study we examined the expression patterns of N-methyl-D-aspartate- and kainate-type glutamate receptor subunits during the postnatal maturation of the spinal cord. Young motor neurons express much higher levels of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 than do adult motor neurons. Although there are eight potential splice variants of NR1, only a subgroup is expressed by motor neurons. With respect to NR2 receptor subunits, young motor neurons express NR2A and C, while adult motor neurons express only NR2A. Young motor neurons express kainate receptor subunits GluR5, 6 and KA2 but we are unable to detect these or any other kainate receptor subunits in the adult spinal cord. Other spinal cord regions display a distinct pattern of developmental regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate receptor subunit expression in comparison to motor neurons. Our findings indicate a precise spatio-temporal regulation of individual subunit expression in the developing spinal cord. Specific combinations of subunits in developing neurons influence their excitable properties and could participate in the emergence of adult neuronal form and function.

  13. Comparative expression of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in the mouse, rat, and human kidney.

    PubMed

    Graca, J A Z; Schepelmann, M; Brennan, S C; Reens, J; Chang, W; Yan, P; Toka, H; Riccardi, D; Price, S A

    2016-03-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) was cloned over 20 years ago and functionally demonstrated to regulate circulating levels of parathyroid hormone by maintaining physiological serum ionized calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]). The receptor is highly expressed in the kidney; however, intrarenal and intraspecies distribution remains controversial. Recently, additional functions of the CaSR receptor in the kidney have emerged, including parathyroid hormone-independent effects. It is therefore critical to establish unequivocally the localization of the CaSR in the kidney to relate this to its proposed physiological roles. In this study, we determined CaSR expression in mouse, rat, and human kidneys using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry (using 8 different commercially available and custom-made antibodies), and proximity ligation assays. Negative results in mice with kidney-specific CaSR ablation confirmed the specificity of the immunohistochemistry signal. Both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed CaSR expression in the thick ascending limb, distal tubule, and collecting duct of all species, with the thick ascending limb showing the highest levels. Within the collecting ducts, there was significant heterogeneity of expression between cell types. In the proximal tubule, lower levels of immunoreactivity were detected by immunohistochemistry and proximity ligation assays. Proximity ligation assays were the only technique to demonstrate expression within glomeruli. This study demonstrated CaSR expression throughout the kidney with minimal discrepancy between species but with significant variation in the levels of expression between cell and tubule types. These findings clarify the intrarenal distribution of the CaSR and enable elucidation of the full physiological roles of the receptor within this organ.

  14. High basal levels of functional toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and noncanonical Wnt5a are expressed in papillary thyroid cancer and are coordinately decreased by phenylmethimazole together with cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    McCall, Kelly D; Harii, Norikazu; Lewis, Christopher J; Malgor, Ramiro; Kim, Won Bae; Saji, Motoyasu; Kohn, Aimee D; Moon, Randall T; Kohn, Leonard D

    2007-09-01

    High basal levels of TLR3 and Wnt5a RNA are present in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cell lines consistent with their overexpression and colocalization in PTC cells in vivo. This is not the case in thyrocytes from normal tissue and in follicular carcinoma (FC) or anaplastic carcinoma (AC) cells or tissues. The basally expressed TLR3 are functional in PTC cells as evidenced by the ability of double-strand RNA (polyinosine-polycytidylic acid) to significantly increase the activity of transfected NF-kappaB and IFN-beta luciferase reporter genes and the levels of two end products of TLR3 signaling, IFN-beta and CXCL10. Phenylmethimazole (C10), a drug that decreases TLR3 expression and signaling in FRTL-5 thyrocytes, decreases TLR3 levels and signaling in PTC cells in a concentration-dependent manner. C10 also decreased Wnt5a RNA levels coordinate with decreases in TLR3. E-cadherin RNA levels, whose suppression may be associated with high Wnt5a, increased with C10 treatment. C10 simultaneously decreased PTC proliferation and cell migration but had no effect on the growth and migration of FC, AC, or FRTL-5 cells. C10 decreases high basal phosphorylation of Tyr705 and Ser727 on Stat3 in PTC cells and inhibits IL-6-induced Stat3 phosphorylation. IL-6-induced Stat3 phosphorylation is important both in up-regulating Wnt5a levels and in cell growth. In sum, high Wnt5a levels in PTC cells may be related to high TLR3 levels and signaling; and the ability of phenylmethimazole (C10) to decrease growth and migration of PTC cells may be related to its suppressive effect on TLR3 and Wnt5a signaling, particularly Stat3 activation. PMID:17525119

  15. Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 Expression in Brain and Physical Associations with Steroid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yore, Mackensie A.; Im, DaEun; Webb, Lena K.; Zhao, Yingxin; Chadwick, Joseph G.; Molenda-Figueira, Heather A.; Haidacher, Sigmund J.; Denner, Larry; Tetel, Marc J.

    2010-01-01

    Estradiol and progesterone bind to their respective receptors in the hypothalamus and hippocampus to influence a variety of behavioral and physiological functions, including reproduction and cognition. Work from our lab and others has shown that the nuclear receptor coactivators, steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and SRC-2, are essential for efficient estrogen receptor (ER) and progestin receptor (PR) transcriptional activity in brain and for hormone-dependent behaviors. While the expression of SRC-1 in brain has been studied extensively, little is known about the expression of SRC-2 in brain. In the present studies, we found that SRC-2 was highly expressed throughout the hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus, including the medial preoptic area (MPOA), ventral medial nucleus (VMN), arcuate nucleus (ARC), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, supraoptic nucleus and suprachiasmatic nucleus. In order for coactivators to function with steroid receptors, they must be expressed in the same cells. Indeed, SRC-2 and ERα were coexpressed in many cells in the MPOA, VMN and ARC, all brain regions known to be involved in female reproductive behavior and physiology. While in vitro studies indicate that SRC-2 physically associates with ER and PR, very little is known about receptor-coactivator interactions in brain. Therefore, we used pull-down assays to test the hypotheses that SRC-2 from hypothalamic and hippocampal tissue physically associate with ER and PR subtypes in a ligand-dependent manner. SRC-2 from both brain regions interacted with ERα bound to agonist, but not in the absence of ligand or in the presence of the selective ER modulator, tamoxifen. Analysis by mass spectrometry confirmed these ligand-dependent interactions between ERα and SRC-2 from brain. In dramatic contrast, SRC-2 from brain showed little to no interaction with ERβ. Interestingly, SRC-2 from both brain regions interacted with PR-B, but not PR-A, in a ligand-dependent manner. Taken together

  16. INCREASED EXPRESSION OF AT2 RECEPTORS IN THE SOLITARY-VAGAL COMPLEX BLUNTS RENOVASCULAR HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Blanch, Graziela Torres; Freiria-Oliveira, André Henrique; Speretta, Guilherme Fina Fleury; Carrera, Eduardo J.; Li, Hongwei; Speth, Robert C.; Colombari, Eduardo; Sumners, Colin; Colombari, Débora S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II increases and decreases arterial pressure by acting at angiotensin type 1 and type 2 receptors respectively. Renovascular hypertensive rats exhibit a high level of activity of the peripheral and central renin-angiotensin system. Therefore, in the present study we evaluated the effect of increasing the expression of angiotensin type 2 receptors in the solitary-vagal complex [nucleus of the solitary tract/dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus], a key brainstem region for cardiovascular regulation, on the development of renovascular hypertension. Holtzman normotensive rats were implanted with a silver clip around the left renal artery to induce 2 kidney-1 clip renovascular hypertension. Three weeks later, rats were microinjected in the solitary-vagal complex with either an adeno-associated virus to increase the expression of angiotensin type 2 receptors, or with a control vector. We observed that increasing angiotensin type 2 receptor expression in the solitary-vagal complex attenuated the development of renovascular hypertension and also reversed the impairment of the baroreflex and the increase in the low frequency component of systolic blood pressure observed in renovascular hypertensive rats. Further, an observed decrease in mRNA levels of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 in the solitary-vagal complex of renovascular hypertensive rats was restored to control levels following viral-mediated increases in angiotensin type 2 receptors at this site. Collectively, these data demonstrate specific and beneficial effects of angiotensin type 2 receptors via the brain of hypertensive rats, and suggest that central angiotensin type 2 receptors may be a potential target for therapeutics in renovascular hypertension. PMID:24958505

  17. Surface expression of NMDA receptor changes during memory consolidation in the crab Neohelice granulata.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Yanil; Salles, Angeles; Carbo-Tano, Martin; Pedreira, Maria Eugenia; Freudenthal, Ramiro

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the surface expression of the NMDA-like receptors during the consolidation of contextual learning in the crab Neohelice granulata Memory storage is based on alterations in the strength of synaptic connections between neurons. The glutamatergic synapses undergo various forms of N-methyl-D aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent changes in strength, a process that affects the abundance of other receptors at the synapse and underlies some forms of learning and memory. Here we propose a direct regulation of the NMDAR. Changes in NMDAR's functionality might be induced by the modification of the subunit's expression or cellular trafficking. This trafficking does not only include NMDAR's movement between synaptic and extra-synaptic localizations but also the cycling between intracellular compartments and the plasma membrane, a process called surface expression. Consolidation of contextual learning affects the surface expression of the receptor without affecting its general expression. The surface expression of the GluN1 subunit of the NMDAR is down-regulated immediately after training, up-regulated 3 h after training and returns to naïve and control levels 24 h after training. The changes in NMDAR surface expression observed in the central brain are not seen in the thoracic ganglion. A similar increment in surface expression of GluN1 in the central brain is observed 3 h after administration of the competitive GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline. These consolidation changes are part of a plasticity event that first, during the down-regulation, stabilizes the trace and later, at 3-h post-training, changes the threshold for synapse activation.

  18. Surface expression of NMDA receptor changes during memory consolidation in the crab Neohelice granulata.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Yanil; Salles, Angeles; Carbo-Tano, Martin; Pedreira, Maria Eugenia; Freudenthal, Ramiro

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the surface expression of the NMDA-like receptors during the consolidation of contextual learning in the crab Neohelice granulata Memory storage is based on alterations in the strength of synaptic connections between neurons. The glutamatergic synapses undergo various forms of N-methyl-D aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent changes in strength, a process that affects the abundance of other receptors at the synapse and underlies some forms of learning and memory. Here we propose a direct regulation of the NMDAR. Changes in NMDAR's functionality might be induced by the modification of the subunit's expression or cellular trafficking. This trafficking does not only include NMDAR's movement between synaptic and extra-synaptic localizations but also the cycling between intracellular compartments and the plasma membrane, a process called surface expression. Consolidation of contextual learning affects the surface expression of the receptor without affecting its general expression. The surface expression of the GluN1 subunit of the NMDAR is down-regulated immediately after training, up-regulated 3 h after training and returns to naïve and control levels 24 h after training. The changes in NMDAR surface expression observed in the central brain are not seen in the thoracic ganglion. A similar increment in surface expression of GluN1 in the central brain is observed 3 h after administration of the competitive GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline. These consolidation changes are part of a plasticity event that first, during the down-regulation, stabilizes the trace and later, at 3-h post-training, changes the threshold for synapse activation. PMID:27421895

  19. Urokinase receptor is a multifunctional protein: influence of receptor occupancy on macrophage gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, N K; Shi, G P; Chapman, H A

    1995-01-01

    Binding of urokinase to the glycolipid-anchored urokinase receptor (uPAR) has been implicated in macrophage differentiation. However, no biochemical markers of differentiation have yet been directly linked to uPAR occupancy. As extensive changes in proteolytic profile characterize monocytic differentiation, we have examined the role of uPAR occupancy on protease expression by differentiating phagocytes. Antibodies to either urokinase or to uPAR that prevent receptor binding inhibited induction of cathepsin B in cultured monocytes and both cathepsin B and 92-kD gelatinase mRNA and protein in phorbol diester-stimulated myeloid cells. Mannosamine, an inhibitor of glycolipid anchor assembly, also blocked protease expression. Anti-catalytic urokinase antibodies, excess inactive urokinase, or aprotinin had no effect, indicating that receptor occupancy per se regulated protease expression. Antibodies to the integrins CD11a and CD29 or to the glycolipid-anchored proteins CD14 and CD55 also had no effect. Protease induction was independent of matrix attachment. Antibodies to urokinase or uPAR affected neither the decrease in cathepsin G nor the increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha in phorbol ester-stimulated cells. These data establish that uPAR is a multifunctional receptor, not only promoting pericellular proteolysis and matrix attachment, but also effecting cysteine- and metallo-protease expression during macrophage differentiation. Images PMID:7615819

  20. Lipoproteins modulate expression of the macrophage scavenger receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Han, J.; Nicholson, A. C.

    1998-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors (MSR) bind and internalize oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL), a modified lipoprotein that is thought to be the proximal source of lipids that accumulate within cells of atherosclerotic lesions. The role of lipoproteins in modulating MSR expression are undetermined. We studied the effect of lipoproteins, native and modified LDL (acetylated LDL (AcLDL) and OxLDL) on the expression of the MSR in RAW cells, a murine macrophage cell line. Exposure to lipoproteins resulted in a marked induction of MSR mRNA expression (12- to 17-fold) with OxLDL and AcLDL having the greatest effects. Maximum induction occurred 1 hour after treatment with OxLDL and LDL. AcLDL induced a fourfold increase at 1 hour followed by a return to baseline and peak expression (sixfold) at 14 hours. Scavenger receptor function, as measured by 125I-AcLDL binding, was only modestly increased in response to lipoproteins. Incubation of macrophages with a cholesterol acceptor particle resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in MSR mRNA expression, which paralleled cholesterol loss from the cells. OxLDL did not affect MSR mRNA stability, implying that MSR mRNA was transcriptionally regulated by lipoproteins. Finally, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from mice following intraperitoneal injection of lipoproteins. Macrophage expression of MSR mRNA was significantly (16-fold) increased by LDL, AcLDL, or OxLDL relative to mice infused with phosphate-buffered saline. This demonstration that exposure to lipoproteins increases expression of the macrophage scavenger receptor implies that lipoproteins can further contribute to foam cell development in atherosclerosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9626069

  1. Parkin expression profile in dopamine d3 receptor knock-out mice brains.

    PubMed

    D'Agata, Velia; Tiralongo, Adriana; Castorina, Alessandro; Leggio, Gian Marco; Micale, Vincenzo; Carnazza, Maria Luisa; Drago, Filippo

    2009-02-01

    Patients affected by autosomic recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP) exhibit parkin gene mutations with brain decrease in dopamine D2/D3 binding sites. To date, there are no data indicating whether the reduction in dopamine D3 receptors (DRD3) may be associated with the expression of specific parkin variants. In the present study we investigated parkin expression profile in DRD3 knock-out mice brains. RT-PCR analysis was performed to assess qualitative changes in parkin isoforms' distribution pattern and in exons' expression both in wild type controls and dopamine D3 receptor's knock-out mice. Real-time PCR was performed to quantify single exons mRNA. Results demonstrated that exons 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, were more expressed in wild type compared to dopamine D3 receptor KO mice brains while some other (3, 9, 10) were lower expressed. The expression levels of exons 5, 11 and 12 did not change in both animal groups. Our analysis was confirmed by western blot, which showed that parkin protein levels were influenced by the absence of DRD3.

  2. Engineering Receptor Expression on Natural Killer Cells Through Trogocytosis.

    PubMed

    Somanchi, Anitha; Lee, Dean A; Somanchi, Srinivas S

    2016-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a rapid contact-dependent process by which lymphocytes acquire membrane patches from the target cells ('donor' cells) with which they interact and this phenomenon has been shown to occur in various immune cells. The surface molecules acquired through trogocytosis are functionally incorporated in the 'acceptor' cells transiently. We had previously demonstrated that trogocytosis can be utilized in place of gene transfer to engineer surface receptor expression on NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy applications. In this chapter, we describe detailed protocol for trogocytosis-co-culture of NK cell with the donor cell line, phenotypic assessment of receptor uptake and persistence, and assessment of NK cell function (migration) following receptor acquisition. PMID:27177672

  3. Identification of Type II Interferon Receptors in Geese: Gene Structure, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Qi, Yulin; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) and IFNGR2 are two cell membrane molecules belonging to class II cytokines, which play important roles in the IFN-mediated antiviral signaling pathway. Here, goose IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were cloned and identified for the first time. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that relatively high levels of goose IFNγ mRNA transcripts were detected in immune tissues, including the harderian gland, cecal tonsil, cecum, and thymus. Relatively high expression levels of both IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were detected in the cecal tonsil, which implicated an important role of IFNγ in the secondary immune system of geese. No specific correlation between IFNγ, IFNGR1, and IFNGR2 expression levels was observed in the same tissues of healthy geese. IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed different expression profiles, although they appeared to maintain a relatively balanced state. Furthermore, the agonist R848 led to the upregulation of goose IFNγ but did not affect the expression of goose IFNGR1 or IFNGR2. In summary, trends in expression of goose IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed tissue specificity, as well as an age-related dependency. These findings may help us to better understand the age-related susceptibility to pathogens in birds. PMID:26345454

  4. Identification of Type II Interferon Receptors in Geese: Gene Structure, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Expression Patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Qi, Yulin; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) and IFNGR2 are two cell membrane molecules belonging to class II cytokines, which play important roles in the IFN-mediated antiviral signaling pathway. Here, goose IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were cloned and identified for the first time. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that relatively high levels of goose IFNγ mRNA transcripts were detected in immune tissues, including the harderian gland, cecal tonsil, cecum, and thymus. Relatively high expression levels of both IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were detected in the cecal tonsil, which implicated an important role of IFNγ in the secondary immune system of geese. No specific correlation between IFNγ, IFNGR1, and IFNGR2 expression levels was observed in the same tissues of healthy geese. IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed different expression profiles, although they appeared to maintain a relatively balanced state. Furthermore, the agonist R848 led to the upregulation of goose IFNγ but did not affect the expression of goose IFNGR1 or IFNGR2. In summary, trends in expression of goose IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed tissue specificity, as well as an age-related dependency. These findings may help us to better understand the age-related susceptibility to pathogens in birds.

  5. Acupuncture improves locomotor function by enhancing GABA receptor expression in transient focal cerebral ischemia rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Yang, Jing-Wen; Cao, Yan; Zhang, Li-Wen; Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Li, Fang; Du, Si-Qi; Wang, Lin-Peng; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-02-19

    Stroke is the major cause of long-term disability among adults. Recent studies have found that GABAergic inhibitory neurotransmission plays a vital role in ameliorate locomotor damage after ischemic injury. Acupuncture has been widely used to improve locomotor function. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The present study is designed to investigate whether GABA and GABA receptors are involved in the mechanism underlying acupuncture treatment in rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). One week after acupuncture at JiaJi acupoint, the locomotor function and infarct volumes were tested. Then level of GABA and the expressions of GABAAγ2 and GABABR2 were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Compared with normal group, GABAAγ2 and GABABR2 expressions were decreased in striatum and spinal cord of the MCAO group. After acupuncture, the expressions of the two receptors were increased, but levels of GABA and trafficking protein, kinesin binding 1 (TRAK1), which plays a role in the intracellular transport of GABA receptors, were unchanged. The present study suggests that acupuncture could reverse locomotor function by modulating the expressions of GABA receptors in MCAO rats. PMID:25556683

  6. Increased hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptor gene expression and effects of pharmacologic 5-HT2A receptor inactivation in obese A{sup y} mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nonogaki, Katsunori . E-mail: knonogaki-tky@umin.ac.jp; Nozue, Kana; Oka, Yoshitomo

    2006-12-29

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) 2A receptors contribute to the effects of 5-HT on platelet aggregation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, and are reportedly involved in decreases in plasma levels of adiponectin, an adipokine, in diabetic subjects. Here, we report that systemic administration of sarpogrelate, a 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, suppressed appetite and increased hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, corticotropin releasing hormone, 5-HT2C, and 5-HT1B receptor gene expression. A{sup y} mice, which have ectopic expression of the agouti protein, significantly increased hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptor gene expression in association with obesity compared with wild-type mice matched for age. Systemic administration of sarpogrelate suppressed overfeeding, body weight gain, and hyperglycemia in obese A{sup y} mice, whereas it did not increase plasma adiponectin levels. These results suggest that obesity increases hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptor gene expression, and pharmacologic inactivation of 5-HT2A receptors inhibits overfeeding and obesity in A{sup y} mice, but did not increase plasma adiponectin levels.

  7. Decreased expression of thyroid receptor-associated protein 220 in temporal lobe tissue of patients with refractory epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jinmei . E-mail: jinmeimery@Yahoo.com.cn; Wang Xuefeng . E-mail: rengang68@vip.sina.com; Xi Zhiqin; Gong Yun; Liu Fengying; Sun Jijun; Wu Yuan; Luan Guoming; Wang Yuping; Li Yunlin; Zhang Jianguo; Lu Yong; Li Hongwei

    2006-10-06

    Purpose: TRAP220 (thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein) functions as a coactivator for nuclear receptors and stimulates transcription by recruiting the TRAP mediator complex to hormone responsive promoter regions. Thus, TRAP220 enhances the function of thyroid/steroid hormone receptors such as thyroid hormone and oestrogen receptors. This study investigated the expression of TRAP220 mRNA and protein level in epileptic brains comparing with human control. Methods: We examined the expression of TRAP220 mRNA and protein levels in temporal lobes from patients with chronic pharmacoresistant epilepsy who have undergone surgery. Results: Expression of TRAP220 mRNA and protein was shown to be decreased significantly in the temporal cortex of the patients with epilepsy. Conclusions: Our work showed that a decrease in TRAP220 mRNA and protein levels may be involved in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and may be associated with impairment of the brain caused by frequent seizures.

  8. Influence of minor thermal injury on expression of complement receptor CR3 on human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R. D.; Hasslen, S. R.; Ahrenholz, D. H.; Haus, E.; Solem, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal injury is well known to inhibit functions of the circulating neutrophil related to its role in host defense against infection, but the mechanism(s) of this phenomenon are not fully understood. To gain further clues to these mechanisms, the authors have studied patients with thermal injury in terms of altered expression of neutrophil cell membrane receptors for the opsonic complement-derived ligand C3bi--complement receptor Type 3, or CR3. CR3 expression was selected for study because an increase in the number of receptors on the cell surface can be stimulated by products of complement activation known to accumulate after thermal injury and because of the role of CR3 in phagocytic and adherence functions of the neutrophil. Expression of CR3 was monitored semiquantitatively by flow cytometry with the use of a murine monoclonal antibody (OKM1) specific for an antigen (CD11) associated with this receptor. Patients evaluated were limited in this study to those with minor degrees of thermal injury (second-degree burn involving less than 20% of total body surface area) so that possible confounding effects of major injury and its complications could be eliminated. It was observed that patient neutrophil CR3 becomes significantly up-regulated during the first week, as early as 1 day after injury. The maximum level of expression of CR3 averaged greater than 150% (range, 70-314%) of the respective minimum level observed for each patient. The minimum levels of expression of CR3 on patient neutrophils, reached 11-37 days after injury for 7 of 8 patients, were comparable to the level of expression of CR3 on unstimulated control neutrophils. Such temporal up-regulation of patient neutrophil CR3 suggests the early generation of stimuli of CR3 mobilization in response to thermal injury. Increased numbers of CR3 on patient neutrophils may augment microbicidal function and enhance or inhibit delivery of cells to the burn site. PMID:3541642

  9. Retinoid X receptor alpha controls innate inflammatory responses through the up-regulation of chemokine expression.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Vanessa; Alameda, Daniel; Rico, Daniel; Mota, Rubén; Gonzalo, Pilar; Cedenilla, Marta; Fischer, Thierry; Boscá, Lisardo; Glass, Christopher K; Arroyo, Alicia G; Ricote, Mercedes

    2010-06-01

    The retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha) plays a central role in the regulation of many intracellular receptor signaling pathways and can mediate ligand-dependent transcription by forming homodimers or heterodimers with other nuclear receptors. Although several members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily have emerged as important regulators of macrophage gene expression, the existence in vivo of an RXR signaling pathway in macrophages has not been established. Here, we provide evidence that RXRalpha regulates the transcription of the chemokines Ccl6 and Ccl9 in macrophages independently of heterodimeric partners. Mice lacking RXRalpha in myeloid cells exhibit reduced levels of CCL6 and CCL9, impaired recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation, and lower susceptibility to sepsis. These studies demonstrate that macrophage RXRalpha plays key roles in the regulation of innate immunity and represents a potential target for immunotherapy of sepsis.

  10. Inflammatory Eicosanoids Increase Amyloid Precursor Protein Expression via Activation of Multiple Neuronal Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Herbst-Robinson, Katie J.; Liu, Li; James, Michael; Yao, Yuemang; Xie, Sharon X.; Brunden, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Senile plaques comprised of Aβ peptides are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain, as are activated glia that release inflammatory molecules, including eicosanoids. Previous studies have demonstrated that amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Aβ levels can be increased through activation of thromboxane A2-prostanoid (TP) receptors on neurons. We demonstrate that TP receptor regulation of APP expression depends on Gαq-signaling and conventional protein kinase C isoforms. Importantly, we discovered that Gαq-linked prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene D4 receptors also regulate APP expression. Prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane A2, as well as total APP levels, were found to be elevated in the brains of aged 5XFAD transgenic mice harboring Aβ plaques and activated glia, suggesting that increased APP expression resulted from eicosanoid binding to Gαq-linked neuronal receptors. Notably, inhibition of eicosanoid synthesis significantly lowered brain APP protein levels in aged 5XFAD mice. These results provide new insights into potential AD therapeutic strategies. PMID:26672557

  11. The role of cannabinoid 1 receptor expressing interneurons in behavior.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jacquelyn A; Horváth, Szatmár; Garbett, Krassimira A; Schmidt, Martin J; Everheart, Monika; Gellért, Levente; Ebert, Philip; Mirnics, Károly

    2014-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population. Reduced expression of the 67-kDa protein isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) is a hallmark of the disease and is encoded by the GAD1 gene. In schizophrenia, GAD67 downregulation occurs in multiple interneuronal subpopulations, including the cannabinoid receptor type 1 positive (CNR1+) cells, but the functional consequences of these disturbances are not well understood. To investigate the role of the CNR1-positive GABA-ergic interneurons in behavioral and molecular processes, we employed a novel, miRNA-mediated transgenic mouse approach. We silenced the Gad1 transcript using a miRNA engineered to specifically target Gad1 mRNA under the control of Cnr1 bacterial artificial chromosome. Behavioral characterization of our transgenic mice showed elevated and persistent conditioned fear associated with an auditory cue and a significantly altered response to an amphetamine challenge. These deficits could not be attributed to sensory deficits or changes in baseline learning and memory. Furthermore, HPLC analyses revealed that Cnr1/Gad1 mice have enhanced serotonin levels, but not dopamine levels in response to amphetamine. Our findings demonstrate that dysfunction of a small subset of interneurons can have a profound effect on behavior and that the GABA-ergic, monoamine, and cannabinoid systems are functionally interconnected. The results also suggest that understanding the function of various interneuronal subclasses might be essential to develop knowledge-based treatment strategies for various mental disorders including schizophrenia and substance abuse.

  12. The role of cannabinoid 1 receptor expressing interneurons in behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A.; Horváth, Szatmár; Garbett, Krassimira; Schmidt, Martin J.; Everheart, Monika; Gellért, Levente; Ebert, Philip; Mirnics, Károly

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population. Reduced expression of the 67-kD a protein isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), is a hallmark of the disease, and is encoded by the GAD1 gene. In schizophrenia, GAD67 downregulation occurs in multiple interneuronal subpopulations, including the cannabinoid receptor type 1 positive (CNR1+) cells, but the functional consequences of these disturbances are not well understood. To investigate the role of the CNR1-positive GABA-ergic interneurons in behavioral and molecular processes, we employed a novel, miRNA-mediated transgenic mouse approach. We silenced the Gad1 transcript using a miRNA engineered to specifically target Gad1 mRNA under the control of Cnr1 bacterial artificial chromosome. Behavioral characterization of our transgenic mice showed elevated and persistent conditioned fear associated with an auditory cue and a significantly altered response to an amphetamine challenge. These deficits could not be attributed to sensory deficits or changes in baseline learning and memory. Furthermore, HPLC analyses revealed that Cnr1/Gad1 mice have enhanced serotonin levels, but not dopamine levels in response to amphetamine. Our findings demonstrate that dysfunction of a small subset of interneurons can have a profound effect on behavior and that the GABA-ergic, monoamine, and cannabinoid systems are functionally interconnected. The results also suggest that understanding the function of various interneuronal subclasses might be essential to develop knowledge-based treatment strategies for various mental disorders including schizophrenia and substance abuse. PMID:24239560

  13. Cloning and Expression of Ecdysone Receptor and Retinoid X Receptor from Procambarus clarkii: Induction by Eyestalk Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tian-Hao; Sserwadda, Ali; Song, Kun; Zang, Ya-Nan; Shen, Huai-Shun

    2016-01-01

    Ecdysone receptor and retinoid X receptor are key regulators in molting. Here, full length ecdysone receptor (PcEcR) and retinoid X receptor (PcRXR) cDNAs from Procambarus clarkii were cloned. Full length cDNA of PcEcR has 2500 bp, encoding 576 amino acid proteins, and full length cDNA of PcRXR has 2593 bp, in which a 15 bp and a 204 bp insert/deletion splice variant regions in DNA binding domain and hinge domain were identified. The two splice variant regions in PcRXR result four isoforms: PcRXR1-4, encoding 525, 520, 457 and 452 amino acids respectively. PcEcR was highly expressed in the hepatopancreas and eyestalk and PcRXR was highly expressed in the eyestalk among eight examined tissues. Both PcEcR and PcRXR had induced expression after eyestalk ablation (ESA) in the three examined tissues. In muscle, PcEcR and PcRXR were upregulated after ESA, PcEcR reached the highest level on day 3 after ESA and increased 33.5-fold relative to day 0, and PcRXR reached highest the level on day 1 after ESA and increased 2.7-fold relative to day 0. In the hepatopancreas, PcEcR and PcRXR dEcReased continuously after ESA, and the expression levels of PcEcR and PcRXR were only 0.7% and 1.7% on day 7 after ESA relative to day 0, respectively. In the ovaries, PcEcR was upregulated after ESA, reached the highest level on day 3 after ESA, increased 3.0-fold relative to day 0, and the expression level of PcRXR changed insignificantly after ESA (p > 0.05). The different responses of PcEcR and PcRXR after ESA indicates that different tissues play different roles (and coordinates their functions) in molting. PMID:27763563

  14. Hypothalamic expression of oestrogen receptor α and androgen receptor is sex-, age- and region-dependent in mice.

    PubMed

    Brock, O; De Mees, C; Bakker, J

    2015-04-01

    Sex steroid hormones act on developing neural circuits regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and are involved in hormone-sensitive behaviours. These hormones act mainly via nuclear receptors, such as oestrogen receptor (ER)-α and androgen receptor (AR). By using immunohistochemistry, we analysed the expression level of ERα and AR throughout perinatal life [at embryonic (E) day 19 and postnatal (P) days 5, 15 and 25] and in adulthood in several hypothalamic nuclei controlling reproduction in both wild-type and aromatase knockout (ArKO) (i.e. which cannot convert testosterone into oestradiol) mice to determine whether there are sex differences in hypothalamic ERα and AR expression and, if so, whether these are established by the action of oestradiol. As early as E19, ERα immunoreactivity (-IR) was observed at same expression levels in both sexes in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPv), the medial preoptic area (MPOA), the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BnST), the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and the arcuate nucleus (ARC). Sex differences (female > male) in ERα-IR were observed not only during the prepubertal period in the BnST (P5 to P25) and the MPOA (P15), but also in adulthood in these two brain regions. Sex differences in AR-IR (male > female) were observed at P5 in the AVPv and ARC, and at P25 in the MPOA and ARC, as well as in adulthood in all hypothalamic regions analysed. In adulthood, gonadectomy and hormonal treatment (oestradiol or dihydrotestosterone) also strongly modulated ERα-IR and AR, respectively. Taken together, sex differences in ERα-IR and AR-IR were observed in all hypothalamic regions analysed, although they most likely do not reflect the action of oestradiol because ArKO mice of both sexes showed expression levels very similar to wild-type mice throughout perinatal development.

  15. Association of haemolytic uraemic syndrome with dysregulation of chemokine receptor expression in circulating monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Maria Victoria; Ruggieri, Matias; Panek, Analia Cecilia; Mejias, Maria Pilar; Fernandez-Brando, Romina Jimena; Abrey-Recalde, Maria Jimena; Exeni, Andrea; Barilari, Catalina; Exeni, Ramon; Palermo, Marina Sandra

    2015-08-01

    Haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is the major complication of Escherichia coli gastrointestinal infections that are Shiga toxin (Stx) producing. Monocytes contribute to HUS evolution by producing cytokines that sensitize endothelial cells to Stx action and migration to the injured kidney. As CC chemokine receptors (CCRs) are involved in monocyte recruitment to injured tissue, we analysed the contribution of these receptors to the pathogenesis of HUS. We analysed CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 expression in peripheral monocytes from HUS patients during the acute period, with healthy children as controls. We observed an increased expression of CCRs per cell in monocytes from HUS patients, accompanied by an increase in the absolute number of monocytes CCR1+, CCR2+ and CCR5+. It is interesting that prospective analysis confirmed that CCR1 expression positively correlated with HUS severity. The evaluation of chemokine levels in plasma showed that regulated on activation of normal T-cell-expressed and -secreted (RANTES) protein was reduced in plasma from patients with severe HUS, and this decrease correlated with thrombocytopenia. Finally, the expression of the higher CCRs was accompanied by a loss of functionality which could be due to a mechanism for desensitization to compensate for altered receptor expression. The increase in CCR expression correlates with HUS severity, suggesting that the dysregulation of these receptors might contribute to an increased risk of renal damage. Activated monocytes could be recruited by chemokines and then receptors could be dysregulated. The dysregulation of CCRs and their ligands observed during the acute period suggests that a chemokine pathway would participate in HUS development.

  16. Cholangiocarcinomas express Fas ligand and disable the Fas receptor.

    PubMed

    Que, F G; Phan, V A; Phan, V H; Celli, A; Batts, K; LaRusso, N F; Gores, G J

    1999-12-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a highly-malignant adenocarcinoma originating from cholangiocytes. Current concepts support escape from immune surveillance using aberrant expression of Fas ligand (FasL) and dysregulation of receptor (FasR) signaling as a potential mechanism for tumor progression. Our aims were to determine if altered expression of FasR and FasL or changes in expression of FLICE inhibitor (I-FLICE) allow cholangiocarcinoma cells to escape immune surveillance. Human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines were evaluated for the functional expression of FasR and FasL by (1) quantitating apoptosis after incubation of cells with agonistic antibodies and (2) an in vitro cell death assay involving coculture of cholangiocarcinoma cells with Fas-sensitive thymocytes. I-FLICE antisense treatment was performed by stable transfection with complementary DNA (cDNA) for I-FLICE in the reverse orientation. We found that normal cholangiocytes in vivo express FasL. Human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines express both FasL and FasR and I-FLICE. FasL expressed by cholangiocarcinomas in vitro induced lymphocyte cell death (70% after 24 hours). Despite the expression of FasR, exposure of the cells to agonistic antibodies (500 ng/mL) induced only minimal apoptosis in the Jurkat cells. Antisense treatment of cholangiocarcinomas in vitro with I-FLICE reduced protein expression of I-FLICE by 90% to 95% and increased Fas-mediated apoptosis 2-fold. We concluded that cholangiocarcinomas escape immune surveillance either by disabling FasR signaling through the expression of I-FLICE and/or increased FasL expression to induce apoptosis of invading T cells. Reduction of I-FLICE expression in cholangiocarcinoma cells restored Fas-mediated apoptosis. Therapeutic maneuvers to inhibit expression of I-FLICE may aid in the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma.

  17. Peripheral Sensitization Increases Opioid Receptor Expression and Activation by Crotalphine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zambelli, Vanessa Olzon; Fernandes, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Gutierrez, Vanessa Pacciari; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Cury, Yara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation enhances the peripheral analgesic efficacy of opioid drugs, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. Crotalphine (CRP), a peptide that was first isolated from South American rattlesnake C.d. terrificus venom, induces a potent and long-lasting anti-nociceptive effect that is mediated by the activation of peripheral opioid receptors. Because the high efficacy of CRP is only observed in the presence of inflammation, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the CRP anti-nociceptive effect induced by inflammation. Using real-time RT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA assays, we demonstrate that the intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases the mRNA and protein levels of the µ- and κ-opioid receptors in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and paw tissue of rats within 3 h of the injection. Using conformation state-sensitive antibodies that recognize activated opioid receptors, we show that PGE2, alone does not increase the activation of these opioid receptors but that in the presence of PGE2, the activation of specific opioid receptors by CRP and selective µ- and κ-opioid receptor agonists (positive controls) increases. Furthermore, PGE2 down-regulated the expression and activation of the δ-opioid receptor. CRP increased the level of activated mitogen-activated protein kinases in cultured DRG neurons, and this increase was dependent on the activation of protein kinase Cζ. This CRP effect was much more prominent when the cells were pretreated with PGE2. These results indicate that the expression and activation of peripheral opioid receptors by opioid-like drugs can be up- or down-regulated in the presence of an acute injury and that acute tissue injury enhances the efficacy of peripheral opioids. PMID:24594607

  18. Peripheral sensitization increases opioid receptor expression and activation by crotalphine in rats.

    PubMed

    Zambelli, Vanessa Olzon; Fernandes, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Gutierrez, Vanessa Pacciari; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Cury, Yara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation enhances the peripheral analgesic efficacy of opioid drugs, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. Crotalphine (CRP), a peptide that was first isolated from South American rattlesnake C.d. terrificus venom, induces a potent and long-lasting anti-nociceptive effect that is mediated by the activation of peripheral opioid receptors. Because the high efficacy of CRP is only observed in the presence of inflammation, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the CRP anti-nociceptive effect induced by inflammation. Using real-time RT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA assays, we demonstrate that the intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases the mRNA and protein levels of the µ- and κ-opioid receptors in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and paw tissue of rats within 3 h of the injection. Using conformation state-sensitive antibodies that recognize activated opioid receptors, we show that PGE2, alone does not increase the activation of these opioid receptors but that in the presence of PGE2, the activation of specific opioid receptors by CRP and selective µ- and κ-opioid receptor agonists (positive controls) increases. Furthermore, PGE2 down-regulated the expression and activation of the δ-opioid receptor. CRP increased the level of activated mitogen-activated protein kinases in cultured DRG neurons, and this increase was dependent on the activation of protein kinase Cζ. This CRP effect was much more prominent when the cells were pretreated with PGE2. These results indicate that the expression and activation of peripheral opioid receptors by opioid-like drugs can be up- or down-regulated in the presence of an acute injury and that acute tissue injury enhances the efficacy of peripheral opioids.

  19. Comparison of synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors and their gene expression in response to feeding in Ixodes scapularis (Ixodidae) vs. Ornithodoros turicata (Argasidae).

    PubMed

    Egekwu, N; Sonenshine, D E; Garman, H; Barshis, D J; Cox, N; Bissinger, B W; Zhu, J; M Roe, R

    2016-02-01

    Illumina GAII high-throughput sequencing was used to compare expressed genes for female synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors of the soft tick Ornithodoros turicata with the hard tick Ixodes scapularis. Gene ontology molecular level three mapping revealed no significant differences amongst the same categories represented in O. turicata and I. scapularis. Transcripts predicting 22 neuropeptides or their receptors in the O. turicata synganglion were similar to annotations for 23 neuropeptides or receptors previously identified from I scapularis, with minor exceptions. A transcript predicting ecdysis triggering hormone receptor was identified in O. turicata; transcripts encoding for proprotein convertase and glycoprotein B were identified in both species. Transcripts predicting the same neurotransmitter receptors were found in the synganglion of both species. Gene expression of the transcripts showed numerous differences in response to feeding. Major differences were observed in expression of genes believed important in regulating slow vs. rapid feeding, blood water elimination, cuticle synthesis plasticity and in signalling reproductive activity. Although the glutamate receptor was strongly upregulated in both species, the gamma aminobutyric acid receptor, which inhibits glutamate, was upregulated significantly only in I. scapularis. These differences are consistent with the slow vs. rapid action of the pharyngeal pump in the two species.

  20. Comparison of synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors and their gene expression in response to feeding in Ixodes scapularis (Ixodidae) vs. Ornithodoros turicata (Argasidae).

    PubMed

    Egekwu, N; Sonenshine, D E; Garman, H; Barshis, D J; Cox, N; Bissinger, B W; Zhu, J; M Roe, R

    2016-02-01

    Illumina GAII high-throughput sequencing was used to compare expressed genes for female synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors of the soft tick Ornithodoros turicata with the hard tick Ixodes scapularis. Gene ontology molecular level three mapping revealed no significant differences amongst the same categories represented in O. turicata and I. scapularis. Transcripts predicting 22 neuropeptides or their receptors in the O. turicata synganglion were similar to annotations for 23 neuropeptides or receptors previously identified from I scapularis, with minor exceptions. A transcript predicting ecdysis triggering hormone receptor was identified in O. turicata; transcripts encoding for proprotein convertase and glycoprotein B were identified in both species. Transcripts predicting the same neurotransmitter receptors were found in the synganglion of both species. Gene expression of the transcripts showed numerous differences in response to feeding. Major differences were observed in expression of genes believed important in regulating slow vs. rapid feeding, blood water elimination, cuticle synthesis plasticity and in signalling reproductive activity. Although the glutamate receptor was strongly upregulated in both species, the gamma aminobutyric acid receptor, which inhibits glutamate, was upregulated significantly only in I. scapularis. These differences are consistent with the slow vs. rapid action of the pharyngeal pump in the two species. PMID:26783017

  1. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in human skin: the relationship with epidermal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stoebner, P E; Carayon, P; Penarier, G; Fréchin, N; Barnéon, G; Casellas, P; Cano, J P; Meynadier, J; Meunier, L

    1999-06-01

    The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands. PBR is part of a heteromeric receptor complex involved in the formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores and in the early events of apoptosis. PBR may function as an oxygen-dependent signal generator; recent data indicate that these receptors may preserve the mitochondria of haematopoietic cell lines from damage caused by oxygen radicals. To identify PBRs in human skin, we used a specific monoclonal antibody directed against the C-terminus fragment of the human receptor. PBR immunoreactivity was found in keratinocytes, Langerhans cells, hair follicles and dermal vascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, confocal microscopic examination of skin sections revealed that PBR expression was strongly upregulated in the superficial differentiated layers of the epidermis. Ultrastructurally, PBRs were distributed throughout the cytoplasm but were selectively expressed on the mitochondrial membranes of epidermal cells. The elevated level of PBRs in the spinous layer was not associated with an increased number of mitochondria nor with an increased amount of mRNA as assessed by in situ hybridization on microautoradiographed skin sections. The present work provides, for the first time, evidence of PBR immunoreactivity in human skin. This mitochondrial receptor may modulate apoptosis in the epidermis; its increased expression in differentiated epidermal layers may represent a novel mechanism of natural skin protection against free radical damage generated by ultraviolet exposure. PMID:10354064

  2. Cognitive deficits and changes in gene expression of NMDA receptors after prenatal methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Baraldi, Mario; Zanoli, Paola; Tascedda, Fabio; Blom, Joan M C; Brunello, Nicoletta

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies showed learning and memory deficit in adult rats that were prenatally exposed to methylmercury chloride (MMC) in an advanced stage of pregnancy (15 days). Under these conditions, the cognitive deficits found at 60 days of age paralleled particularly changes in the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor characteristics. In the present study, we report the behavioral effects of a single oral dose of MMC (8 mg/kg) administered earlier at gestational day 8. The use of different learning and memory tests (passive avoidance, object recognition, water maze) showed a general cognitive impairment in the in utero-exposed rats tested at 60 days of age compared with matched controls. Considering the importance of the glutamatergic receptor system and its endogenous ligands in learning and memory process regulation, we surmised that MMC could affect the gene expression of NMDA receptor subtypes. The use of a sensitive RNase protection assay allowed the evaluation of gene expression of two families of NMDA receptors (NR-1 and NR-2 subtypes). The result obtained in 60-day-old rats prenatally exposed to MMC, showed increased mRNA levels of the NR-2B subunit in the hippocampus but not in the frontal cortex. The data suggest that the behavioral abnormalities of MMC-exposed rats might be ascribed to a neurotoxic effect of the metal that alters the gene expression of a specific NMDA receptor subunit in the hippocampus. PMID:12426146

  3. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinases and growth factors in human brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Kaipainen, A.; Mentula, P.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1995-01-01

    Key growth factor-receptor interactions involved in angiogenesis are possible targets for therapy of CNS tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific endothelial cell mitogen that has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, a requirement for solid tumor growth. The expression of VEGF, the closely related placental growth factor (PIGF), the newly cloned endothelial high affinity VEGF receptors KDR and FLT1, and the endothelial orphan receptors FLT4 and Tie were analyzed by in situ hybridization in normal human brain tissue and in the following CNS tumors: gliomas, grades II, III, IV; meningiomas, grades I and II; and melanoma metastases to the cerebrum. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in the majority of low grade tumors studied and was highly expressed in cells of malignant gliomas. Significantly elevated levels of Tie, KDR, and FLT1 mRNAs, but not FLT4 mRNA, were observed in malignant tumor endothelia, as well as in endothelia of tissues directly adjacent to the tumor margin. In comparison, there was little or no receptor expression in normal brain vasculature. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that these endothelial receptors are induced during tumor progression and may play a role in tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7856749

  4. Distribution of angiotensin type-1 receptor messenger RNA expression in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lenkei, Z; Palkovits, M; Corvol, P; Llorens-Cortes, C

    1998-02-01

    Angiotensin II and angiotensin III in the brain exert their various effects by acting on two pharmacologically well-defined receptors, the type-1 (AT1) and the type-2 (AT2) receptors. Receptor binding autoradiography has revealed the dominant presence of AT1 in brain nuclei involved in cardiovascular, body fluid and neuroendocrine control. The cloning of the AT1 complementary DNA has revealed the existence of two receptor subtypes in rodents, AT1A and AT1B. Using specific riboprobes for in situ hybridization, we have previously shown that the AT1A messenger RNA is predominantly expressed in the rat forebrain; in contrast the AT1B subtype predominates in the anterior pituitary. Using a similar technical approach, the aim of the present study was to establish the precise anatomical localization of cells synthetising the AT1A receptor in the adult rat brain. High AT1A messenger RNA expression was found in the vascular organ of the lamina terminalis, the median preoptic nucleus, the subfornical organ, the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus, the parvocellular parts of the paraventricular nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract and the area postrema, in agreement with previous autoradiographic studies, describing a high density of AT1 binding sites in these nuclei. In addition, AT1A messenger RNA expression was detected in several brain areas, where no AT1 binding was reported previously. Thus, we identify strong expression of AT1A messenger RNA expression in scattered cells of the lateral parts of the preoptic region, the lateral hypothalamus and several brainstem nuclei. In none of these structures was the AT1B messenger RNA detectable at the microscopic level. In conclusion, it is suggested that angiotensins may exert their central effects on body fluid and cardiovascular homeostasis mainly via the AT1A receptor subtype. PMID:9483539

  5. Bile acid receptor agonist GW4064 regulates PPARγ coactivator-1α expression through estrogen receptor-related receptor α.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Shailendra Kumar Dhar; Singh, Nidhi; Kumari, Rashmi; Mishra, Jay Sharan; Tripathi, Sarita; Banerjee, Priyam; Shah, Priyanka; Kukshal, Vandana; Tyagi, Abdul Malik; Gaikwad, Anil Nilkanth; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Mishra, Durga Prasad; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Sanyal, Somali; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Ramachandran, Ravishankar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Bandyopadhyay, Arun; Arora, Ashish; Lundåsen, Thomas; Anakk, Sayee Priyadarshini; Moore, David D; Sanyal, Sabyasachi

    2011-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is induced in energy-starved conditions and is a key regulator of energy homeostasis. This makes PGC-1α an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In our effort to identify new regulators of PGC-1α expression, we found that GW4064, a widely used synthetic agonist for the nuclear bile acid receptor [farnesoid X receptor (FXR)] strongly enhances PGC-1α promoter reporter activity, mRNA, and protein expression. This induction in PGC-1α concomitantly enhances mitochondrial mass and expression of several PGC-1α target genes involved in mitochondrial function. Using FXR-rich or FXR-nonexpressing cell lines and tissues, we found that this effect of GW4064 is not mediated directly by FXR but occurs via activation of estrogen receptor-related receptor α (ERRα). Cell-based, biochemical and biophysical assays indicate GW4064 as an agonist of ERR proteins. Interestingly, FXR disruption alters GW4064 induction of PGC-1α mRNA in a tissue-dependent manner. Using FXR-null [FXR knockout (FXRKO)] mice, we determined that GW4064 induction of PGC-1α expression is not affected in oxidative soleus muscles of FXRKO mice but is compromised in the FXRKO liver. Mechanistic studies to explain these differences revealed that FXR physically interacts with ERR and protects them from repression by the atypical corepressor, small heterodimer partner in liver. Together, this interplay between ERRα-FXR-PGC-1α and small heterodimer partner offers new insights into the biological functions of ERRα and FXR, thus providing a knowledge base for therapeutics in energy balance-related pathophysiology.

  6. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE.

    PubMed

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4(+) T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4(+) T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 1% of CD4(+) T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4(+) T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6(+) and CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8(+) T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4(+) T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6(+) cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE.

  7. Histamine 3 receptor activation reduces the expression of neuronal angiotensin II type 1 receptors in the heart.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Levi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    In severe myocardial ischemia, histamine 3 (H₃) receptor activation affords cardioprotection by preventing excessive norepinephrine release and arrhythmias; pivotal to this action is the inhibition of neuronal Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger (NHE). Conversely, angiotensin II, formed locally by mast cell-derived renin, stimulates NHE via angiotensin II type 1 (AT₁) receptors, facilitating norepinephrine release and arrhythmias. Thus, ischemic dysfunction may depend on a balance between the NHE-modulating effects of H₃ receptors and AT₁ receptors. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to elucidate the H₃/AT₁ receptor interaction in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. We found that H₃ receptor blockade with clobenpropit increased norepinephrine overflow and arrhythmias in Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. This coincided with increased neuronal AT₁ receptor expression. NHE inhibition with cariporide prevented both increases in norepinephrine release and AT₁ receptor expression. Moreover, norepinephrine release and AT₁ receptor expression were increased by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(G)-methyl-L-arginine and the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. H₃ receptor activation in differentiated sympathetic neuron-like PC12 cells permanently transfected with H₃ receptor cDNA caused a decrease in protein kinase C activity and AT₁ receptor protein abundance. Collectively, our findings suggest that neuronal H₃ receptor activation inhibits NHE by diminishing protein kinase C activity. Reduced NHE activity sequentially causes intracellular acidification, increased NO synthesis, and diminished AT₁ receptor expression. Thus, H₃ receptor-mediated NHE inhibition in ischemia/reperfusion not only opposes the angiotensin II-induced stimulation of NHE in cardiac sympathetic neurons, but also down-regulates AT₁ receptor expression. Cardioprotection ultimately results from the combined

  8. Histamine 3 Receptor Activation Reduces the Expression of Neuronal Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptors in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki

    2012-01-01

    In severe myocardial ischemia, histamine 3 (H3) receptor activation affords cardioprotection by preventing excessive norepinephrine release and arrhythmias; pivotal to this action is the inhibition of neuronal Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE). Conversely, angiotensin II, formed locally by mast cell-derived renin, stimulates NHE via angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptors, facilitating norepinephrine release and arrhythmias. Thus, ischemic dysfunction may depend on a balance between the NHE-modulating effects of H3 receptors and AT1 receptors. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to elucidate the H3/AT1 receptor interaction in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. We found that H3 receptor blockade with clobenpropit increased norepinephrine overflow and arrhythmias in Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. This coincided with increased neuronal AT1 receptor expression. NHE inhibition with cariporide prevented both increases in norepinephrine release and AT1 receptor expression. Moreover, norepinephrine release and AT1 receptor expression were increased by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor NG-methyl-l-arginine and the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. H3 receptor activation in differentiated sympathetic neuron-like PC12 cells permanently transfected with H3 receptor cDNA caused a decrease in protein kinase C activity and AT1 receptor protein abundance. Collectively, our findings suggest that neuronal H3 receptor activation inhibits NHE by diminishing protein kinase C activity. Reduced NHE activity sequentially causes intracellular acidification, increased NO synthesis, and diminished AT1 receptor expression. Thus, H3 receptor-mediated NHE inhibition in ischemia/reperfusion not only opposes the angiotensin II-induced stimulation of NHE in cardiac sympathetic neurons, but also down-regulates AT1 receptor expression. Cardioprotection ultimately results from the combined attenuation of angiotensin II and

  9. Development of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays to quantify insulin-like growth factor receptor and insulin receptor expression in equine tissue.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephen B; Quan, Melvyn; Guthrie, Alan; Schulman, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor system (insulin-like growth factor 1, insulin-like growth factor 2, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor and six insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins) and insulin are essential to muscle metabolism and most aspects of male and female reproduction. Insulin-like growth factor and insulin play important roles in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation and the maintenance of cell differentiation in mammals. In order to better understand the local factors that regulate equine physiology, such as muscle metabolism and reproduction (e.g., germ cell development and fertilisation), real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for quantification of equine insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and insulin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid were developed. The assays were sensitive: 192 copies/μL and 891 copies/μL for insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, messenger ribonucleic acid and insulin receptor respectively (95% limit of detection), and efficient: 1.01 for the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor assay and 0.95 for the insulin receptor assay. The assays had a broad linear range of detection (seven logs for insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and six logs for insulin receptor). This allowed for analysis of very small amounts of messenger ribonucleic acid. Low concentrations of both insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and insulin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid were detected in endometrium, lung and spleen samples, whilst high concentrations were detected in heart, muscle and kidney samples, this was most likely due to the high level of glucose metabolism and glucose utilisation by these tissues. The assays developed for insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and insulin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression have been shown to work on equine tissue and will contribute to the understanding of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor

  10. Spatiotemporal expression of Nogo-66 receptor after focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Dong, Ya-xian; Xu, Jie; Chu, Guo-liang; Yang, Zhi-hua; Liu, Yan-ming

    2016-01-01

    NgR, the receptor for the neurite outgrowth inhibitor Nogo-66, plays a critical role in the plasticity and regeneration of the nervous system after injury such as ischemic stroke. In the present study, we used immunohistochemistry to investigate the regional expression of NgR in rat brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). NgR protein expression was not observed in the center of the lesion, but was elevated in the marginal zone compared with control and sham-operated rats. The cerebral cortex and hippocampus (CA1, CA2, and CA3) showed the greatest expression of NgR. Furthermore, NgR expression was higher in the ipsilesional hemisphere than on the control side in the same coronal section. Although time-dependent changes in NgR expression across brain regions had their own characteristics, the overall trend complied with the following rules: NgR expression changes with time showed two peaks and one trough; the first peak in expression appeared between 1 and 3 days after MCAO; expression declined at 5 days; and the second peak occurred at 28 days. PMID:26981102

  11. Fighting experience alters brain androgen receptor expression dependent on testosterone status

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Earley, Ryan L.; Huang, Shu-Ping; Hsu, Yuying

    2014-01-01

    Contest decisions are influenced by the outcomes of recent fights (winner–loser effects). Steroid hormones and serotonin are closely associated with aggression and therefore probably also play important roles in mediating winner–loser effects. In mangrove rivulus fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus, individuals with higher testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone and cortisol levels are more capable of winning, but titres of these hormones do not directly mediate winner–loser effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of winning/losing experiences on brain expression levels of the receptor genes for androgen (AR), oestrogen α/β (ERα/β), glucocorticoid (GR) and serotonin (5-HT1AR). The effect of contest experience on AR gene expression depended on T levels: repeated losses decreased, whereas repeated wins increased AR gene expression in individuals with low T but not in individuals with medium or high T levels. These results lend strong support for AR being involved in mediating winner–loser effects, which, in previous studies, were more detectable in individuals with lower T. Furthermore, the expression levels of ERα/β, 5-HT1AR and GR genes were higher in individuals that initiated contests against larger opponents than in those that did not. Overall, contest experience, underlying endocrine state and hormone and serotonin receptor expression patterns interacted to modulate contest decisions jointly. PMID:25320171

  12. Naringin promotes differentiation of bone marrow stem cells into osteoblasts by upregulating the expression levels of microRNA-20a and downregulating the expression levels of PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jifeng; Li, Jie; Fan, Qinbo

    2015-09-01

    Naringin is a dihydrotestosterone flavonoid compound that significantly inhibits bone loss, improves bone density, and enhances biomechanical anti‑compression performance. Previous studies have demonstrated that naringin improves the activity levels of osteocalcin (OC) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in MC3T3‑E1 osteoblast precursor cells. The present study investigated the effects of naringin on osteoblastic differentiation and inhibition of adipocyte formation in bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs). The levels of osteogenesis were modulated via upregulation of the expression levels of microRNA (miR)‑20a, and downregulation of the expression levels of peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor γ (PPARγ). The results indicated that naringin significantly enhanced BMSC proliferation in a dose‑dependent manner. In addition, naringin significantly increased the mRNA expression levels of OC, ALP, and collagen type I. Furthermore, naringin decreased the protein expression levels of PPARγ, and increased the expression levels of miR‑20a in the BMSCs. These results suggested that miR‑20a may regulate the expression of PPARγ in BMSCs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report naringin‑induced osteogenesis via upregulation of the expression levels of miR‑20a, and downregulation of the expression levels of PPARγ. These results indicated the important role of naringin in BMSC differentiation.

  13. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K.; Vaughn, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through the bAR. Since the signal generated by the bAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of bAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 uM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the bAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 uM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in (beta)AR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 uM. This increase in (beta)AR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of (beta)AR population. Clenbuterol and isoproterenol gave similar effects on bAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc was observed at 0.2 UM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of mhc back to control levels.

  14. The p75 neurotrophin receptor localization in blood-CSF barrier: expression in choroid plexus epithelium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The presence of neurotrophins and their receptors Trk family has been reported in the choroid plexus. High levels of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and TrkB receptor were detected, while nothing was know about p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In neurons, p75NTR receptor has a dual function: promoting survival together with TrkA in response to NGF, and inducing apoptotic signaling through p75NTR. We postulated that p75NTR may also affect the survival pathways in the choroid plexus and also undergoes regulated proteolysis with metalloproteases. Results Here, we demonstrated the presence of p75NTR receptor in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. The p75NTR receptor would be involved in cell death mechanisms and in the damaged induced by amyloid beta (Aβ) in the choroid plexus and finally, we propose an essential role of p75NTR in the Aβ transcytosis through out choroid plexus barrier. Conclusions The presence analysis reveals the new localization of p75NTR in the choroid plexus and, the distribution mainly in the cytoplasm and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) side of the epithelial cells. We propose that p75NTR receptor plays a role in the survival pathways and Aβ-induced cell death. These data suggest that p75NTR dysfunction play an important role in the pathogenesis of brain diseases. The importance and novelty of this expression expands a new role of p75NTR. PMID:21569322

  15. Prolactinoma ErbB receptor expression and targeted therapy for aggressive tumors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Odelia; Mamelak, Adam; Bannykh, Serguei; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien; Lim, Stephen; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Ben-Shlomo, Anat

    2014-06-01

    As ErbB signaling is a determinant of prolactin synthesis, role of ErbB receptors was tested for prolactinoma outcomes and therapy. The objective of this study was to characterize ErbB receptor expression in prolactinomas and then perform a pilot study treating resistant prolactinomas with a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Retrospective analysis of prolactinomas and pilot study for dopamine agonist resistant prolactinomas in tertiary referral center. We performed immunofluorescent staining of a tissue array of 29 resected prolactinoma tissues for EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 correlated with clinical features. Two patients with aggressive resistant prolactinomas enrolled and completed trial. They received lapatinib 1,250 mg daily for 6 months with tumor and hormone assessments. Main outcome measures were positive tumor staining of respective ErbB receptors, therapeutic reduction of prolactin levels and tumor shrinkage. Treated PRL levels and tumor volumes were suppressed in both subjects treated with TKI. EGFR expression was positive in 82 % of adenomas, ErbB2 in 92 %, ErbB3 in 25 %, and ErbB4 in 71 %, with ErbB2 score > EGFR > ErbB4 > ErbB3. Higher ErbB3 expression was associated with optic chiasm compression (p = 0.03), suprasellar extension (p = 0.04), and carotid artery encasement (p = 0.01). Higher DA response rates were observed in tumors with higher ErbB3 expression. Prolactinoma expression of specific ErbB receptors is associated with tumor invasion, symptoms, and response to dopamine agonists. Targeting ErbB receptors may be effective therapy in patients with resistant prolactinomas.

  16. Neurotrophin Receptor Activation and Expression in Human Postmortem Brain: Effect of Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Yogesh; Rizavi, Hooriyah S.; Zhang, Hui; Mondal, Amal C.; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Conley, Robert R.; Pandey, Ghanshyam N.

    2009-01-01

    Background The physiological functions of neurotrophins occur through binding to two different receptors: pan75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) and a family of tropomysin receptor kinases (Trks A, B, and C). Recently, we reported that expression of neurotrophins and TrkB were reduced in brains of suicide subjects. Present study examines whether expression and activation of Trk receptors and expression of p75NTR are altered in brain of these subjects. Methods Expression levels of TrkA, B, C, and of p75NTR were measured by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of suicide and normal control subjects. The activation of Trks was determined by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting using phosphotyrosine antibody. Results In hippocampus, lower mRNA levels of TrkA and TrkC were observed in suicide subjects. In the PFC, the mRNA level of TrkA was decreased, without any change in TrkC. On the other hand, the mRNA level of p75NTR was increased in both PFC and hippocampus. Immunolabeling studies showed similar results as observed for the mRNAs. In addition, phosphorylation of all Trks was decreased in hippocampus, but in PFC, decreased phosphorylation was noted only for TrkA and B. Increased expression ratios of p75NTR to Trks were also observed in PFC and hippocampus of suicide subjects. Conclusions Our results suggest not only reduced functioning of Trks in brains of suicide subjects but that increased ratios of p75NTR to Trks indicate possible activation of pathways that are apoptotic in nature. These findings may be crucial in the pathophysiology of suicide. PMID:18930453

  17. Heterologous expression of functional G-protein-coupled receptors in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Salom, David; Cao, Pengxiu; Sun, Wenyu; Kramp, Kristopher; Jastrzebska, Beata; Jin, Hui; Feng, Zhaoyang; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    New strategies for expression, purification, functional characterization, and structural determination of membrane-spanning G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are constantly being developed because of their importance to human health. Here, we report a Caenorhabditis elegans heterologous expression system able to produce milligram amounts of functional native and engineered GPCRs. Both bovine opsin [(b)opsin] and human adenosine A2A subtype receptor [(h)A2AR] expressed in neurons or muscles of C. elegans were localized to cell membranes. Worms expressing these GPCRs manifested changes in motor behavior in response to light and ligands, respectively. With a newly devised protocol, 0.6–1 mg of purified homogenous 9-cis-retinal-bound bovine isorhodopsin [(b)isoRho] and ligand-bound (h)A2AR were obtained from C. elegans from one 10-L fermentation at low cost. Purified recombinant (b)isoRho exhibited its signature absorbance spectrum and activated its cognate G-protein transducin in vitro at a rate similar to native rhodopsin (Rho) obtained from bovine retina. Generally high expression levels of 11 native and mutant GPCRs demonstrated the potential of this C. elegans system to produce milligram quantities of high-quality GPCRs and possibly other membrane proteins suitable for detailed characterization.—Salom, D., Cao, P., Sun, W., Kramp, K., Jastrzebska, B., Jin, H., Feng, Z., Palczewski, K. Heterologous expression of functional G-protein-coupled receptors in Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:22090314

  18. Efficient silkworm expression of human GPCR (nociceptin receptor) by a Bombyx mori bacmid DNA system

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Mizuho; Sasaki, Kaori; Wakimoto, Yoshitaro; Toyooka, Masaru; Motohashi, Tomoko; Shimojima, Tsukasa; Takeda, Shigeki; Park, Enoch Y.; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2009-07-31

    Guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequently expressed by a baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS). We recently established a novel BEVS using the bacmid system of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), which is directly applicable for protein expression in silkworms. Here, we report the first example of GPCR expression in silkworms by the simple injection of BmNPV bacmid DNA. Human nociceptin receptor, an inhibitory GPCR, and its fusion protein with inhibitory G protein alpha subunit (G{sub i}{alpha}) were both successfully expressed in the fat bodies of silkworm larvae as well as in the BmNPV viral fraction. Its yield was much higher than that from Sf9 cells. The microsomal fractions including the nociceptin receptor fusion, which are easily prepared by only centrifugation steps, exhibited [{sup 35}S]GTP{gamma}S-binding activity upon specific stimulation by nociceptin. Therefore, this rapid method is easy-to-use and has a high expression level, and thus will be an important tool for human GPCR production.

  19. Effects of suspension on tissue levels of glucocorticoid receptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Differential muscle responses can be simulated by hypokinetic/hypodynamic (H/H) suspension of rats with complete unloading of the hindlimb muscles. Since mechanism(s) underlying these atrophic effects were not clearly elucidated, experiments were initiated to investigate a possible role for glucocorticoids in the physiological and biochemical responses to H/H. The principal objective was to assess the potential for alterations in peripheral responsiveness to glucocorticoids in response to H/H. Studies have initially focused on the determination of tissue levels of glucocorticoid receptors as one index of hormonal sensitivity at the cellular level. Four hindlimb muscles (soleus, gastrocnemius, plantaris and EDL), previously demonstrated to exhibit differential responses to H/H, were investigated. Receptor levels in other glucocorticoid sensitive tissues (heart, liver, and kidney) were determined. Male rats (180-200g) were suspended for 7 or 14 days, sacrificed by cervical dislocation, and the tissues excised.

  20. Biological effects of insulin and its analogs on cancer cells with different insulin family receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Sciacca, Laura; Cassarino, Maria Francesca; Genua, Marco; Vigneri, Paolo; Giovanna Pennisi, Maria; Malandrino, Pasqualino; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Pezzino, Vincenzo; Vigneri, Riccardo

    2014-11-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is a likely cause of the increased cancer incidence and mortality in diabetic patients, but its role is difficult to define in vivo. Previous in vitro studies testing the mitogenic potential of insulin and its analogs provided incomplete and sometimes contradictory results. To better evaluate cancer cell responsiveness to insulin, to its analogs and to IGF-I, we measured under identical experimental conditions cell proliferation, invasiveness, and foci formation in six cancer cell lines with different insulin receptor family expression levels. The cancer cells studied have a different expression of insulin receptor (IR), its isoforms (IR-A and IR-B), and of the IGF-I receptor. The data indicate that insulin stimulates proliferation in all cancer cell lines, invasiveness in some, and foci formation in none. Cancer cell responses to insulin (and IGF-I) are not related to receptor expression levels; moreover, hormone-stimulated proliferation and invasiveness are not correlated. IGF-I is a more potent stimulator than insulin in most but not all cancer cell lines. Insulin analogs including M1 and M2 Glargine metabolites stimulate cancer cells similar to insulin. However, exceptions occur for specific analogs in particular cancer cells. In conclusion, in vitro insulin is an effective growth factor for all cancer cells but the biological response to insulin cannot be predicted on the basis of receptor expression levels. In the clinical setting, these observations should be taken in account when deciding treatment for diabetic patients who are at risk of undiscovered cancer or survivors of oncological diseases.

  1. Site-specific circadian expression of leptin and its receptor in human adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Abellán, P. Gómez; Santos, C. Gómez; Madrid, J. A.; Milagro, F. I.; Campion, J.; Martínez, J. A.; Luján, J. A.; Ordovás, J. M.; Garaulet, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Circadian variability of circulating leptin levels has been well established over the last decade. However, the circadian behavior of leptin in human adipose tissue remains unknown. This also applies to the soluble leptin receptor. Objective We investigated the ex vivo circadian behavior of leptin and its receptor expression in human adipose tissue (AT). Subjects and methods Visceral and subcutaneous abdominal AT biopsies (n = 6) were obtained from morbid obese women (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2). Anthropometric variables and fasting plasma glucose, leptin, lipids and lipoprotein concentrations were determined. In order to investigate rhythmic expression pattern of leptin and its receptor, AT explants were cultured during 24-h and gene expression was analyzed at the following times: 08:00, 14:00, 20:00, 02:00 h, using quantitative real-time PCR. Results Leptin expression showed an oscillatory pattern that was consistent with circadian rhythm in cultured AT. Similar patterns were noted for the leptin receptor. Leptin showed its achrophase (maximum expression) during the night, which might be associated to a lower degree of fat accumulation and higher mobilization. When comparing both fat depots, visceral AT anticipated its expression towards afternoon and evening hours. Interestingly, leptin plasma values were associated with decreased amplitude of LEP rhythm. This association was lost when adjusting for waist circumference. Conclusion Circadian rhythmicity has been demonstrated in leptin and its receptor in human AT cultures in a site-specific manner. This new knowledge paves the way for a better understanding of the autocrine/paracrine role of leptin in human AT. PMID:22411388

  2. Altered sensitivity to excitotoxic cell death and glutamate receptor expression between two commonly studied mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Rozzy; Kovács, Attila D.; Pearce, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in glutamatergic synapse function have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many different neurological disorders including ischemia, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. While studying glutamate receptor function in juvenile Batten disease on the C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEv mouse backgrounds, we noticed differences unlikely to be due to mutation difference alone. We report here that primary cerebellar granule cell cultures from C57BL/6J mice are more sensitive to NMDA-mediated cell death. Moreover, sensitivity to AMPA-mediated excitotoxicity is more variable and is dependent upon the treatment conditions and age of the cultures. Glutamate receptor surface expression levels examined in vitro by in situ ELISA and in vivo by Western blot in surface cross-linked cerebellar samples indicated that these differences in sensitivity are likely due to strain-dependent differences in cell surface receptor expression levels. We propose that differences in glutamate receptor expression and in excitotoxic vulnerability should be taken into consideration in the context of characterizing disease models on the C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEv mouse backgrounds. PMID:20544821

  3. Hepatic Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Attenuates Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Expression.

    PubMed

    Girer, Nathaniel G; Murray, Iain A; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Perdew, Gary H

    2016-07-15

    The Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in many physiological processes. Several studies indicate that AHR is also involved in energy homeostasis. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an important regulator of the fasting and feeding responses. When administered to various genetic and diet-induced mouse models of obesity, FGF21 can attenuate obesity-associated morbidities. Here, we explore the role of AHR in hepatic Fgf21 expression through the use of a conditional, hepatocyte-targeted AHR knock-out mouse model (Cre(Alb)Ahr(Fx/Fx)). Compared with the congenic parental strain (Ahr(Fx/Fx)), non-fasted Cre(Alb)Ahr(Fx/Fx) mice exhibit a 4-fold increase in hepatic Fgf21 expression, as well as elevated expression of the FGF21-target gene Igfbp1 Furthermore, in vivo agonist activation of AHR reduces hepatic Fgf21 expression during a fast. The Fgf21 promoter contains several putative dioxin response elements (DREs). Using EMSA, we demonstrate that the AHR-ARNT heterodimer binds to a specific DRE that overlaps binding sequences for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP), and cAMP response element-binding protein, hepatocyte specific (CREBH). In addition, we reveal that agonist-activated AHR impairs PPARα-, ChREBP-, and CREBH-mediated promoter activity in Hepa-1 cells. Accordingly, agonist treatment in Hepa-1 cells ablates potent ER stress-driven Fgf21 expression, and pre-treatment with AHR antagonist blocks this effect. Finally, we show that pre-treatment of primary human hepatocytes with AHR agonist diminishes PPARα-, glucose-, and ER stress-driven induction of FGF21 expression, indicating the effect is not mouse-specific. Together, our data show that AHR contributes to hepatic energy homeostasis, partly through the regulation of FGF21 expression and signaling. PMID:27226639

  4. Progesterone receptor expression declines in the guinea pig uterus during functional progesterone withdrawal and in response to prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Toni N; Hirst, Jonathan J; Palliser, Hannah; Zakar, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone withdrawal is essential for parturition, but the mechanism of this pivotal hormonal change is unclear in women and other mammals that give birth without a pre-labor drop in maternal progesterone levels. One possibility suggested by uterine tissue analyses and cell culture models is that progesterone receptor levels change at term decreasing the progesterone responsiveness of the myometrium, which causes progesterone withdrawal at the functional level and results in estrogen dominance enhancing uterine contractility. In this investigation we have explored whether receptor mediated functional progesterone withdrawal occurs during late pregnancy and labor in vivo. We have also determined whether prostaglandins that induce labor cause functional progesterone withdrawal by altering myometrial progesterone receptor expression. Pregnant guinea pigs were used, since this animal loses progesterone responsiveness at term and gives birth in the presence of high maternal progesterone level similarly to primates. We found that progesterone receptor mRNA and protein A and B expression decreased in the guinea pig uterus during the last third of gestation and in labor. Prostaglandin administration reduced while prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor treatment increased progesterone receptor A protein abundance. Estrogen receptor-1 protein levels remained unchanged during late gestation, in labor and after prostaglandin or prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor administration. Steroid receptor levels were higher in the non-pregnant than in the pregnant uterine horns. We conclude that the decreasing expression of both progesterone receptors A and B is a physiological mechanism of functional progesterone withdrawal in the guinea pig during late pregnancy and in labor. Further, prostaglandins administered exogenously or produced endogenously stimulate labor in part by suppressing uterine progesterone receptor A expression, which may cause functional progesterone withdrawal, promote

  5. Distinct expression profiles of three melatonin receptors during early development and metamorphosis in the flatfish Solea senegalensis.

    PubMed

    Lan-Chow-Wing, Olivier; Confente, Francesca; Herrera-Pérez, Patricia; Isorna, Esther; Chereguini, Olvido; Rendón, Maria del Carmen; Falcón, Jack; Muñoz-Cueto, José A

    2014-11-13

    Melatonin actions are mediated through G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, mt1, mt2, and mel1c melatonin receptors were cloned in the Senegalese sole. Here, their day-night and developmental expressions were analyzed by quantitative PCR. These results revealed distinct expression patterns of each receptor through development. mel1c transcripts were more abundant in unfertilized ovulated oocytes and declined during embryonic development. mt1 and mt2 expression was higher at the earliest stages (2-6 days post-fertilization), decreasing before (mt2) or during (mt1) metamorphosis. Only mt1 and mel1c expression exhibited day-night variations, with higher nocturnal mRNA levels. These results suggest different roles and transcriptional regulation of these melatonin receptors during flatfish development and metamorphosis.

  6. Distinct Expression Profiles of Three Melatonin Receptors during Early Development and Metamorphosis in the Flatfish Solea senegalensis

    PubMed Central

    Lan-Chow-Wing, Olivier; Confente, Francesca; Herrera-Pérez, Patricia; Isorna, Esther; Chereguini, Olvido; Rendón, Maria del Carmen; Falcón, Jack; Muñoz-Cueto, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin actions are mediated through G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, mt1, mt2, and mel1c melatonin receptors were cloned in the Senegalese sole. Here, their day-night and developmental expressions were analyzed by quantitative PCR. These results revealed distinct expression patterns of each receptor through development. mel1c transcripts were more abundant in unfertilized ovulated oocytes and declined during embryonic development. mt1 and mt2 expression was higher at the earliest stages (2–6 days post-fertilization), decreasing before (mt2) or during (mt1) metamorphosis. Only mt1 and mel1c expression exhibited day-night variations, with higher nocturnal mRNA levels. These results suggest different roles and transcriptional regulation of these melatonin receptors during flatfish development and metamorphosis. PMID:25402642

  7. Clinical Relevance of VPAC1 Receptor Expression in Early Arthritis: Association with IL-6 and Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Iria V.; Ortiz, Ana M.; Piris, Lorena; Lamana, Amalia; Juarranz, Yasmina; García-Vicuña, Rosario; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Gomariz, Rosa P.; Martínez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Background The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 mediate anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Data on the expression of these receptors could complement clinical assessment in the management of RA. Our goal was to investigate the correlation between expression of both receptors and the 28-Joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with early arthritis (EA). We also measured expression of IL-6 to evaluate the association between VIP receptors and systemic inflammation. Methods We analyzed 250 blood samples collected at any of the 5 scheduled follow-up visits from 125 patients enrolled in the Princesa Early Arthritis Register Longitudinal study. Samples from 22 healthy donors were also analyzed. Sociodemographic, clinical, and therapeutic data were systematically recorded. mRNA expression levels were determined using real-time PCR. Then, longitudinal multivariate analyses were performed. Results PBMCs from EA patients showed significantly higher expression of VPAC2 receptors at baseline compared to healthy donors (p<0.001). With time, however, VPAC2 expression tended to be significantly lower while VPAC1 receptor expression increased in correlation with a reduction in DAS28 index. Our results reveal that more severe inflammation, based on high levels of IL-6, is associated with lower expression of VPAC1 (p<0.001) and conversely with increased expression of VPAC2 (p<0.001). A major finding of this study is that expression of VPAC1 is lower in patients with increased disease activity (p = 0.001), thus making it possible to differentiate between patients with various degrees of clinical disease activity. Conclusion Patients with more severe inflammation and higher disease activity show lower levels of VPAC1 expression, which is associated with patient-reported impairment. Therefore, VPAC1 is a biological marker in EA. PMID:26881970

  8. Expression of cloned α6* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are ACh-gated ion channels formed from five homologous subunits in subtypes defined by their subunit composition and stoichiometry. Some subtypes readily produce functional AChRs in Xenopus oocytes and transfected cell lines. α6β2β3* AChRs (subtypes formed from these subunits and perhaps others) are not easily expressed. This may be because the types of neurons in which they are expressed (typically dopaminergic neurons) have unique chaperones for assembling α6β2β3* AChRs, especially in the presence of the other AChR subtypes. Because these relatively minor brain AChR subtypes are of major importance in addiction to nicotine, it is important for drug development as well as investigation of their functional properties to be able to efficiently express human α6β2β3* AChRs. We review the issues and progress in expressing α6* AChRs. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'.

  9. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian; Rask-Madsen, Christian; He, Pingnian; Mizutani, Koji; Katagiri, Sayaka; Maeda, Yasutaka; Wu, I-Hsien; Khamaisi, Mogher; Preil, Simone Rordam; Sørensen, Ditte; Huang, Paul L.; King, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) in the endothelia of Apoe–/– mice (Irs1/Apoe–/–) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE–/– mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin’s enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca2+]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1 overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE–/– mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway. Finally EDNRB deletion in EC of Ldlr–/– and Irs1/Ldlr–/– mice decreased NO production and accelerated atherosclerosis, compared with Ldlr–/– mice. Accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes may be reduced by improving insulin signaling selectively via IRS1/Akt in the EC by inducing EDNRB expression and NO production. PMID:27200419

  10. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian; Rask-Madsen, Christian; He, Pingnian; Mizutani, Koji; Katagiri, Sayaka; Maeda, Yasutaka; Wu, I-Hsien; Khamaisi, Mogher; Preil, Simone Rordam; Maddaloni, Ernesto; Sørensen, Ditte; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Huang, Paul L.; King, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) in the endothelia of Apoe−/− mice (Irs1/Apoe−/−) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE−/− mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin’s enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca2+]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1 overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE−/− mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway. Finally EDNRB deletion in EC of Ldlr−/− and Irs1/Ldlr−/− mice decreased NO production and accelerated atherosclerosis, compared with Ldlr−/− mice. Accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes may be reduced by improving insulin signaling selectively via IRS1/Akt in the EC by inducing EDNRB expression and NO production. PMID:27200419

  11. Modeling the effects of HER/ErbB1-3 co-expression on receptor dimerization and biological response

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H. S.; Resat, Haluk

    2006-06-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER/ErbB) system comprises the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1) and three other homologues viz. HER2-4. This receptor system plays a critical role in cell proliferation and differentiation and receptor over-expression can be associated with poor prognosis in cancers of the epithelium. Here, we examine the effect of co-expressing varying levels of HER1-3 on the receptor dimerization patterns using a detailed kinetic model for ErbB heterodimerization and trafficking. Our results indicate that co-expression of EGFR with HER2 or HER3 biases signaling to the cell surface and retards signal down-regulation. In addition, simultaneous co-expression of HER1-3 leads to preferential formation of HER2-HER3 heterodimers, which are known to be potent inducers of cell growth and transformation. Analysis of the parameter dependencies in the model reveals that measurements of HER3 phosphorylation and HER2 internalization ratio may prove to be especially useful for the estimation of critical model parameters. Further, we examined the effect of receptor dimerization patterns on cell phenotype using a simple phenomenological model. Results indicate that co-expression of EGFR with HER2 and HER3 at low to moderate levels may enable cells to match the phenotype of a high HER2 expresser.

  12. Human neural progenitors express functional lysophospholipid receptors that regulate cell growth and morphology

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Jillian H; Mumaw, Jennifer; Machacek, David W; Sturkie, Carla; Callihan, Phillip; Stice, Steve L; Hooks, Shelley B

    2008-01-01

    Background Lysophospholipids regulate the morphology and growth of neurons, neural cell lines, and neural progenitors. A stable human neural progenitor cell line is not currently available in which to study the role of lysophospholipids in human neural development. We recently established a stable, adherent human embryonic stem cell-derived neuroepithelial (hES-NEP) cell line which recapitulates morphological and phenotypic features of neural progenitor cells isolated from fetal tissue. The goal of this study was to determine if hES-NEP cells express functional lysophospholipid receptors, and if activation of these receptors mediates cellular responses critical for neural development. Results Our results demonstrate that Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) and Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors are functionally expressed in hES-NEP cells and are coupled to multiple cellular signaling pathways. We have shown that transcript levels for S1P1 receptor increased significantly in the transition from embryonic stem cell to hES-NEP. hES-NEP cells express LPA and S1P receptors coupled to Gi/o G-proteins that inhibit adenylyl cyclase and to Gq-like phospholipase C activity. LPA and S1P also induce p44/42 ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation in these cells and stimulate cell proliferation via Gi/o coupled receptors in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)- and ERK-dependent pathway. In contrast, LPA and S1P stimulate transient cell rounding and aggregation that is independent of EGFR and ERK, but dependent on the Rho effector p160 ROCK. Conclusion Thus, lysophospholipids regulate neural progenitor growth and morphology through distinct mechanisms. These findings establish human ES cell-derived NEP cells as a model system for studying the role of lysophospholipids in neural progenitors. PMID:19077254

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonist-induced down-regulation of hepatic glucocorticoid receptor expression in SD rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiang; Li Ming; Sun Weiping; Bi Yan; Cai Mengyin; Liang Hua; Yu Qiuqiong; He Xiaoying; Weng Jianping

    2008-04-18

    It was reported that glucocorticoid production was inhibited by fenofibrate through suppression of type-1 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene expression in liver. The inhibition might be a negative-feedback regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}), which is quickly induced by glucocorticoid in the liver. However, it is not clear if GR expression is changed by fenofibrate-induced PPAR{alpha} activation. In this study, we tested this possibility in the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. GR expression was reduced by fenofibrate in a time- and does-dependent manner. The inhibition was observed in liver, but not in fat and muscle. The corticosterone level in the blood was increased significantly by fenofibrate. These effects of fenofibrate were abolished by PPAR{alpha} inhibitor MK886, suggesting that fenofibrate activated through PPAR{alpha}. In conclusion, inhibition of GR expression may represent a new molecular mechanism for the negative feedback regulation of GR activity by PPAR{alpha}.

  14. The farnesoid X receptor induces very low density lipoprotein receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sirvent, Audrey; Claudel, Thierry; Martin, Geneviève; Brozek, John; Kosykh, Vladimir; Darteil, Raphaël; Hum, Dean W; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart

    2004-05-21

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor activated by bile acids (BAs). In response to ligand-binding, FXR regulates many genes involved in BA, lipid, and lipoprotein metabolism. To identify new FXR target genes, microarray technology was used to profile total RNA extracted from HepG2 cells treated with the natural FXR agonist chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Interestingly, a significant increase of transcript level of the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) was observed. Our data, resulting from selective FXR activation, FXR RNA silencing and FXR-deficient mice, clearly demonstrate that BAs up-regulate VLDLR transcript levels via a FXR-dependent mechanism in vitro in human and in vivo in mouse liver cells.

  15. Targeting the expression of integrin receptors in tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Sharon; Liang, Kexian; Dorshow, Richard B.; Ye, Yunpeng; Achilefu, Samuel I.

    2004-06-01

    Expression of integrin αvβ3 is upregulated in a number of cancers including colon, pancreas, lung and breast. Additionally, αvβ3 integrin expression has been linked to tumor metastasis and targeting this cell surface protein could provide a viable approach to image and evaluate the metastatic potential of tumors. Accordingly, we evaluated the selective retention of some near infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes in nude mice bearing A549 lung cancer xenograft that express αvβ3 integrin. Our preliminary results indicate that a novel NIR probe designed to target this integrin selectively accumulated in A549 tumor while other non-integrin specific probes were not retained in the tumor. Blocking studies show that tumor uptake of the probe is mediated by αvβ3 integrin receptor.

  16. Recombinant interleukin-16 selectively modulates surface receptor expression and cytokine release in macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, E; Darcissac, E; Idziorek, T; Capron, A; Bahr, G M

    1999-01-01

    Interleukin-16 (IL-16), a natural ligand for the CD4 receptor, has been found to modulate T-lymphocyte function and to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Antigen-presenting cells (APC), including macrophages and dendritic cells, are known to express functional surface CD4 molecules, to be susceptible to HIV-1 infection and to play a critical role in different immune processes. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of recombinant IL-16 (rIL-16) to regulate receptor expression and cytokine release in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). Recombinant IL-16 was found to up-regulate CD25 and CD80 but to down-regulate CD4 and CD86 surface expression in MDM cultures. However, no change could be observed on the level of CD4, CD80 and CD86 expression in IL-16-stimulated MDDC, although a significant up-regulation of CD25 and CD83 was consistently detected. Furthermore, the level of gene expression of the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 was significantly reduced in rIL-16-treated MDM and costimulation with IL-2 did not modify the activity of the recombinant cytokine. The effects on chemokine receptor gene expression were less evident in MDDC and only a transient down-regulation of weak intensity could be detected following stimulation with rIL-16. Analysis of supernatants from rIL-16-stimulatedcultures revealed a different profile of released cytokines/chemokines among the two cell populations studied. These findings establish an important role for IL-16 in modulating the activity of APC and may have relevance regarding the protection of reservoir cells against HIV-1 infection. PMID:10447738

  17. Inflammation stimulates niacin receptor (GPR109A/HCA2) expression in adipose tissue and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Kenneth R.; Moser, Arthur; Shigenaga, Judy K.; Grunfeld, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Many of the beneficial and adverse effects of niacin are mediated via a G protein receptor, G protein-coupled receptor 109A/hydroxycarboxylic acid 2 receptor (GPR109A/HCA2), which is highly expressed in adipose tissue and macrophages. Here we demonstrate that immune activation increases GPR109A/HCA2 expression. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), TNF, and interleukin (IL) 1 increase GPR109A/HCA2 expression 3- to 5-fold in adipose tissue. LPS also increased GPR109A/HCA2 mRNA levels 5.6-fold in spleen, a tissue rich in macrophages. In peritoneal macrophages and RAW cells, LPS increased GPR109A/HCA2 mRNA levels 20- to 80-fold. Zymosan, lipoteichoic acid, and polyinosine-polycytidylic acid, other Toll-like receptor activators, and TNF and IL-1 also increased GPR109A/HCA2 in macrophages. Inhibition of the myeloid differentiation factor 88 or TIR-domain-containing adaptor protein inducing IFNβ pathways both resulted in partial inhibition of LPS stimulation of GPR109A/HCA2, suggesting that LPS signals an increase in GPR109A/HCA2 expression by both pathways. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB reduced the ability of LPS to increase GPR109A/HCA2 expression by ∼50% suggesting that both NF-κB and non-NF-κB pathways mediate the LPS effect. Finally, preventing the LPS-induced increase in GPR109A/HCA2 resulted in an increase in TG accumulation and the expression of enzymes that catalyze TG synthesis. These studies demonstrate that inflammation stimulates GPR109A/HCA2 and there are multiple intracellular signaling pathways that mediate this effect. The increase in GPR109A/HCA2 that accompanies macrophage activation inhibits the TG accumulation stimulated by macrophage activation. PMID:25320346

  18. Expression of Nogo receptor 1 in microglia during development and following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gaoxiang; Ni, Jie; Mao, Lei; Yan, Ming; Pang, Tao; Liao, Hong

    2015-11-19

    As the receptor of myelin associated inhibitory factors Nogo receptor 1 (NgR1) plays an important role in central nervous system (CNS) injury and regeneration. It is found that NgR1 complex acts in neurons to transduce the signals intracelluarly including induction of growth cone collapse, inhibition of axonal regeneration and regulation of nerve inflammation. In recent studies, NgR1 has also been found to be expressed in the microglia. However, NgR1 expressed in microglia in the developing nervous systems and following CNS injury have not been widely investigated. In this study, we detected the expression and cellular localization of NgR1 in microglia during development and following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice. The results showed that NgR1 was mainly expressed in microglia during embryonic and postnatal periods. The expression levels peaked at P4 and decreased thereafter into adulthood, while increased significantly with aging representatively at 17 mo. On the other hand, there was no significant difference in the number of double positive NgR1(+)Iba1(+) cells between normal and TBI group. In summary, we first detected the expression of NgR1 in microglia during development and found that NgR1 protein expression increased significantly in microglia with aging. These findings will contribute to make a foundation for subsequent study about the role of NgR1 expressed in microglia on the CNS disorders.

  19. Nutritional status alters saccharin intake and sweet receptor mRNA expression in rat taste buds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Yan, Jianqun; Suo, Yi; Li, Jinrong; Wang, Qian; Lv, Bo

    2010-04-14

    Sweet taste usually signifies the presence of caloric food. It is commonly accepted that a close association exists among sweet taste perception, preference, and nutritional status. However, the mechanisms involved remain unknown. To investigate whether nutritional status affects the preference for palatable solutions and alters sweet taste receptor gene expression in rats, we measured saccharin intake and preference using a two-bottle preference test, and changes in body weight, plasma leptin levels, and gene expression for the sweet taste receptor in taste buds in high-fat diet-induced obese rats and chronically diet-restricted rats. We found that the consumption and preference ratios for 0.01 and 0.04 M saccharin were significantly lower in the high-fat diet-induced obese rats than in the normal diet rats, while the serum leptin levels were markedly increased in obese rats. Consistent with the changes in saccharin intake, the gene expression level of the sweet taste receptor T1R3 was significantly decreased in the high-fat diet-induced obese rats compared with the control rats. By contrast, the chronically diet-restricted rats showed remarkably enhanced consumption and preference for 0.04 M saccharin. The serum leptin concentration was decreased, and the gene expression of the leptin receptor was markedly increased in the taste buds. In conclusion, our results suggest that nutritional status alters saccharin preference and the expression of T1R3 in taste buds. These processes may be involved in the mechanisms underlying the modulation of peripheral sweet taste sensitivity, in which leptin plays a role.

  20. Activation of neurokinin-1 receptors up-regulates substance P and neurokinin-1 receptor expression in murine pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yung-Hua; Moochhala, Shabbir; Bhatia, Madhav

    2012-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) has been associated with an up-regulation of substance P (SP) and neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) in the pancreas. Increased SP-NK1R interaction was suggested to be pro-inflammatory during AP. Previously, we showed that caerulein treatment increased SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, but the effect of SP treatment was not evaluated. Pancreatic acinar cells were obtained from pancreas of male swiss mice (25-30 g). We measured mRNA expression of preprotachykinin-A (PPTA) and NK1R following treatment of SP (10(-6) M). SP treatment increased PPTA and NK1R expression in isolated pancreatic acinar cells, which was abolished by pretreatment of a selective NK1R antagonist, CP96,345. SP also time dependently increased protein expression of NK1R. Treatment of cells with a specific NK1R agonist, GR73,632, up-regulated SP protein levels in the cells. Using previously established concentrations, pre-treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with Gö6976 (10 nM), rottlerin (5 μM), PD98059 (30 μM), SP600125 (30 μM) or Bay11-7082 (30 μM) significantly inhibited up-regulation of SP and NK1R. These observations suggested that the PKC-ERK/JNK-NF-κB pathway is necessary for the modulation of expression levels. In comparison, pre-treatment of CP96,345 reversed gene expression in SP-induced cells, but not in caerulein-treated cells. Overall, the findings in this study suggested a possible auto-regulatory mechanism of SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, via activation of NK1R. Elevated SP levels during AP might increase the occurrence of a positive feedback loop that contributes to abnormally high expression of SP and NK1R.

  1. Activation of neurokinin-1 receptors up-regulates substance P and neurokinin-1 receptor expression in murine pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Yung-Hua; Moochhala, Shabbir; Bhatia, Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Acute pancreatitis (AP) has been associated with an up-regulation of substance P (SP) and neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) in the pancreas. Increased SP-NK1R interaction was suggested to be pro-inflammatory during AP. Previously, we showed that caerulein treatment increased SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, but the effect of SP treatment was not evaluated. Pancreatic acinar cells were obtained from pancreas of male swiss mice (25–30 g). We measured mRNA expression of preprotachykinin-A (PPTA) and NK1R following treatment of SP (10−6M). SP treatment increased PPTA and NK1R expression in isolated pancreatic acinar cells, which was abolished by pretreatment of a selective NK1R antagonist, CP96,345. SP also time dependently increased protein expression of NK1R. Treatment of cells with a specific NK1R agonist, GR73,632, up-regulated SP protein levels in the cells. Using previously established concentrations, pre-treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with Gö6976 (10 nM), rottlerin (5 μM), PD98059 (30 μM), SP600125 (30 μM) or Bay11-7082 (30 μM) significantly inhibited up-regulation of SP and NK1R. These observations suggested that the PKC-ERK/JNK-NF-κB pathway is necessary for the modulation of expression levels. In comparison, pre-treatment of CP96,345 reversed gene expression in SP-induced cells, but not in caerulein-treated cells. Overall, the findings in this study suggested a possible auto-regulatory mechanism of SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, via activation of NK1R. Elevated SP levels during AP might increase the occurrence of a positive feedback loop that contributes to abnormally high expression of SP and NK1R. PMID:22040127

  2. Telomerase activity, estrogen receptors (α, β), Bcl-2 expression in human breast cancer and treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Ortiz, Blanca; Astudillo-De la Vega, Horacio; Castillo-Medina, Sebastian; Malacara, JM; Benitez-Bribiesca, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Background The mechanism for maintaining telomere integrity is controlled by telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that specifically restores telomere sequences, lost during replication by means of an intrinsic RNA component as a template for polymerization. Among the telomerase subunits, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) is expressed concomitantly with the activation of telomerase. The role of estrogens and their receptors in the transcriptional regulation of hTERT has been demonstrated. The current study determines the possible association between telomerase activity, the expression of both molecular forms of estrogen receptor (ERα and ERβ) and the protein bcl-2, and their relative associations with clinical parameters. Methods Tissue samples from 44 patients with breast cancer were used to assess telomerase activity using the TRAP method and the expression of ERα, ERβ and bcl-2 by means of immunocytochemical techniques. Results Telomerase activity was detected in 59% of the 44 breast tumors examined. Telomerase activity ranged from 0 to 49.93 units of total product generated (TPG). A correlation was found between telomerase activity and differentiation grade (p = 0.03). The only significant independent marker of response to treatment was clinical stage. We found differences between the frequency of expression of ERα (88%) and ERβ (36%) (p = 0.007); bcl-2 was expressed in 79.5% of invasive breast carcinomas. We also found a significant correlation between low levels of telomerase activity and a lack of ERβ expression (p = 0.03). Conclusion Lower telomerase activity was found among tumors that did not express estrogen receptor beta. This is the first published study demonstrating that the absence of expression of ERβ is associated with low levels of telomerase activity. PMID:16911782

  3. Differential expression of glutamate receptors in avian neural pathways for learned vocalization.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kazuhiro; Sakaguchi, Hironobu; Jarvis, Erich D; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2004-08-01

    Learned vocalization, the substrate for human language, is a rare trait. It is found in three distantly related groups of birds-parrots, hummingbirds, and songbirds. These three groups contain cerebral vocal nuclei for learned vocalization not found in their more closely related vocal nonlearning relatives. Here, we cloned 21 receptor subunits/subtypes of all four glutamate receptor families (AMPA, kainate, NMDA, and metabotropic) and examined their expression in vocal nuclei of songbirds. We also examined expression of a subset of these receptors in vocal nuclei of hummingbirds and parrots, as well as in the brains of dove species as examples of close vocal nonlearning relatives. Among the 21 subunits/subtypes, 19 showed higher and/or lower prominent differential expression in songbird vocal nuclei relative to the surrounding brain subdivisions in which the vocal nuclei are located. This included relatively lower levels of all four AMPA subunits in lMAN, strikingly higher levels of the kainite subunit GluR5 in the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), higher and lower levels respectively of the NMDA subunits NR2A and NR2B in most vocal nuclei and lower levels of the metabotropic group I subtypes (mGluR1 and -5) in most vocal nuclei and the group II subtype (mGluR2), showing a unique expression pattern of very low levels in RA and very high levels in HVC. The splice variants of AMPA subunits showed further differential expression in vocal nuclei. Some of the receptor subunits/subtypes also showed differential expression in hummingbird and parrot vocal nuclei. The magnitude of differential expression in vocal nuclei of all three vocal learners was unique compared with the smaller magnitude of differences found for nonvocal areas of vocal learners and vocal nonlearners. Our results suggest that evolution of vocal learning was accompanied by differential expression of a conserved gene family for synaptic transmission and plasticity in vocal nuclei. They also suggest

  4. Human Gastroenteropancreatic Expression of Melatonin and Its Receptors MT1 and MT2

    PubMed Central

    Söderquist, Fanny; Hellström, Per M.; Cunningham, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim The largest source of melatonin, according to animal studies, is the gastrointestinal (GI) tract but this is not yet thoroughly characterized in humans. This study aims to map the expression of melatonin and its two receptors in human GI tract and pancreas using microarray analysis and immunohistochemistry. Method Gene expression data from normal intestine and pancreas and inflamed colon tissue due to ulcerative colitis were analyzed for expression of enzymes relevant for serotonin and melatonin production and their receptors. Sections from paraffin-embedded normal tissue from 42 individuals, representing the different parts of the GI tract (n=39) and pancreas (n=3) were studied with immunohistochemistry using antibodies with specificity for melatonin, MT1 and MT2 receptors and serotonin. Results Enzymes needed for production of melatonin are expressed in both GI tract and pancreas tissue. Strong melatonin immunoreactivity (IR) was seen in enterochromaffin (EC) cells partially co-localized with serotonin IR. Melatonin IR was also seen in pancreas islets. MT1 and MT2 IR were both found in the intestinal epithelium, in the submucosal and myenteric plexus, and in vessels in the GI tract as well as in pancreatic islets. MT1 and MT2 IR was strongest in the epithelium of the large intestine. In the other cell types, both MT2 gene expression and IR were generally elevated compared to MT1. Strong MT2, IR was noted in EC cells but not MT1 IR. Changes in gene expression that may result in reduced levels of melatonin were seen in relation to inflammation. Conclusion Widespread gastroenteropancreatic expression of melatonin and its receptors in the GI tract and pancreas is in agreement with the multiple roles ascribed to melatonin, which include regulation of gastrointestinal motility, epithelial permeability as well as enteropancreatic cross-talk with plausible impact on metabolic control. PMID:25822611

  5. Cloning, pharmacological characterization and expression analysis of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, L.) nuclear progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi X; Almeida, Fernanda F L; Andersson, Eva; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Schmidt, Ruben; Schulz, Rüdiger W; Bogerd, Jan

    2012-10-01

    To better understand the role(s) of progesterone in fish spermatogenesis, we cloned the nuclear progesterone receptor (Pgr) of Atlantic cod. The open-reading frame of the cod pgr consists of 2076 bp, coding for a 691-amino acids-long protein that shows the highest similarity with other piscine Pgr proteins. Functional characterization of the receptor expressed in mammalian cells revealed that the cod Pgr exhibited progesterone-specific, dose-dependent induction of reporter gene expression, with 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP), a typical piscine progesterone, showing the highest potency in activating the receptor. During ontogenesis, the pgr mRNA was undetectable in embryo's 24 h after fertilization, but became detectable 4 days after fertilization. During the larval stage, the expression levels increased steadily with the development of the larvae. In adult fish, pgr was predominantly expressed in gonads of both sexes. During the onset of puberty, testicular pgr transcript levels started to increase during rapid spermatogonial proliferation, and peaked when spermiation started. In situ hybridization studies using testis tissue during the rapid growth phase containing all germ cell stages indicated that in cod, pgr mRNA is predominantly located in Sertoli cells that are in contact with proliferating spermatogonia. Taken together, our data suggests that the Pgr is involved in mediating progestagen stimulation of the mitotic expansion of spermatogonia, and in processes associated with the spermiation/spawning period in Atlantic cod. PMID:22885560

  6. Downregulation of transferrin receptor surface expression by intracellular antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Jilin; Wu Sha; Zhao Xiaoping; Wang Min; Li Wenhan; Shen Xin; Liu Jing; Lei Ping; Zhu Huifen; Shen Guanxin . E-mail: guanxin_shen@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-03-23

    To deplete cellular iron uptake, and consequently inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells, we attempt to block surface expression of transferrin receptor (TfR) by intracellular antibody technology. We constructed two expression plasmids (scFv-HAK and scFv-HA) coding for intracellular single-chain antibody against TfR with or without endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal, respectively. Then they were transfected tumor cells MCF-7 by liposome. Applying RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscope experiments, we insure that scFv-HAK intrabody was successfully expressed and retained in ER contrasted to the secreted expression of scFv-HA. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the TfR surface expression was markedly decreased approximately 83.4 {+-} 2.5% in scFv-HAK transfected cells, while there was not significantly decrease in scFv-HA transfected cells. Further cell growth and apoptosis characteristics were evaluated by cell cycle analysis, nuclei staining and MTT assay. Results indicated that expression of scFv-HAK can dramatically induce cell cycle G1 phase arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells, and consequently significantly suppress proliferation of tumor cells compared with other control groups. For First time this study demonstrates the potential usage of anti-TfR scFv-intrabody as a growth inhibitor of TfR overexpressing tumors.

  7. Hypothyroidism Stimulates D2 Receptor-mediated Breathing in Response to Acute Hypoxia and alters D2 Receptors Levels in Carotid Bodies & Brain

    PubMed Central

    Schlenker, Evelyn H.; Schultz, Harold D.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothyroidism can depress breathing and alter dopamine D2 receptor expression and function. We hypothesized that relative to euthyroid hamsters (EH), hypothyroid hamsters (HH) contain increased D2 receptors in brain regions associated with breathing and carotid bodies (CB), and that stimulation of D2 receptors would decease ventilation more in the HH compared to the EH. Hamsters were treated with vehicle, carmoxirile (peripherally acting D2 receptor agonist), or bromocriptine (central and peripherally acting D2 receptor agonist) and breathing was evaluated during exposure to air, hypoxia, and then air. HH exhibited increased D2 receptor protein levels in the striatum and CB’s, but decreased levels in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Relative to vehicle, carmoxirole and bromocriptine stimulated ventilation in the HH during and following exposure to hypoxia. Only bromocriptine depressed ventilation in the EH during and after exposure to hypoxia. Thus,, hypothyroidism impacts the expression of D2 receptors in the carotid body, PVN and striatum, and D2 stimulation affects ventilation remarkably differently than in EH. PMID:22051191

  8. Pravastatin and C reactive protein modulate protease- activated receptor-1 expression in vitro blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Chu, L-X; Zhou, S-X; Yang, F; Qin, Y-Q; Liang, Z-S; Mo, C-G; Wang, X-D; Xie, J; He, L-P

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) plays an important role in mediating activation of human platelets by thrombin. However, mechanism of statin in ADP-induced platelet PAR-1 expression is also unknown. Aggregometry, flow cytometry, immunoblotting and ELISA were used to determine role of pravastatin participating in ADP-induced platelet activation and PAR-1 expression. ADP stimulation significantly increased PAR-1 expression on platelets. PAR-1 antagonist SCH-79797 inhibited platelet aggregation as well as decreased platelet P-selectin expression induced by ADP. CRP inhibited PAR-1 expression induced by ADP in a concentration-dependent manner. Pravastatin treatment reduced PAR-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination treatment of CRP and Pravastatin significantly reduced platelet PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. By western-blot analysis, pravastatin treatment did not influence total PAR-1 after ADP treatment. CRP decreased platelet total PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. Pravastatin and CRP reduced TXB2 formation by ADP significantly. CRP decreased thrombin fragment F1+2 level with ADP treatment. Pravastatin, in contrast, did not influence F1+2 level. Upon treatment with Pravastatin reduced platelet LOX-1 expression induced by ADP. In conclusion, PAR-1 served as a critical mechanism to relay platelet activation process induced by ADP. CRP and pravastatin reduce PAR-1 expression in platelet by ADP pathway. PMID:26950455

  9. Vocal area-related expression of the androgen receptor in the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) brain.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2008-05-01

    The androgen receptor is a steroid hormone receptor widely expressed in the vocal control nuclei in songbirds. Here, we analysed androgen receptor expression in the brains of juvenile and adult budgerigars. With a species-specific probe for budgerigar androgen receptor mRNA, we found that the androgen receptor was expressed in the vocal areas, such as the central nucleus of the lateral nidopallium, the anterior arcopallium, the oval nucleus of the mesopallium, the oval nucleus of the anterior nidopallium and the tracheosyringeal hypoglossal nucleus. With the present data, together with previous reports, it turned out that the androgen receptor expression in telencephalic vocal control areas is similar amongst three groups of vocal learners--songbirds, hummingbirds and parrots, suggesting the possibility that the androgen receptor might play a role in vocal development and that the molecular mechanism regulating the androgen receptor expression in the vocal areas might be important in the evolution of vocal learning.

  10. G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy. Results Our study found that medulloblastoma tumors fall into distinct clusters based solely on GPCR expression patterns. Normal cerebellum clustered separately from the tumor samples. Further, two of the tumor clusters correspond with high fidelity to the WNT and SHH subgroups of medulloblastoma. Distinct over-expressed GPCRs emerge; for example, LGR5 and GPR64 are significantly and uniquely over-expressed in the WNT subgroup of tumors, while PTGER4 is over-expressed in the SHH subgroup. Uniquely under-expressed GPCRs were also observed. Our key findings were independently validated using a large international dataset. Conclusions Our results identify GPCRs with potential to act as imaging and therapeutic targets. Elucidating tumorigenic pathways

  11. Axon-to-Glia Interaction Regulates GABAA Receptor Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Rogelio O; Sánchez-Gómez, María Victoria; Alberdi, Elena; Canedo-Antelo, Manuel; Chara, Juan Carlos; Palomino, Aitor; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Myelination requires oligodendrocyte-neuron communication, and both neurotransmitters and contact interactions are essential for this process. Oligodendrocytes are endowed with neurotransmitter receptors whose expression levels and properties may change during myelination. However, only scant information is available about the extent and timing of these changes or how they are regulated by oligodendrocyte-neuron interactions. Here, we used electrophysiology to study the expression of ionotropic GABA, glutamate, and ATP receptors in oligodendrocytes derived from the optic nerve and forebrain cultured either alone or in the presence of dorsal root ganglion neurons. We observed that oligodendrocytes from both regions responded to these transmitters at 1 day in culture. After the first day in culture, however, GABA sensitivity diminished drastically to less than 10%, while that of glutamate and ATP remained constant. In contrast, the GABA response amplitude was sustained and remained stable in oligodendrocytes cocultured with dorsal root ganglion neurons. Immunochemistry and pharmacological properties of the responses indicated that they were mediated by distinctive GABAA receptors and that in coculture with neurons, the oligodendrocytes bearing the receptors were those in direct contact with axons. These results reveal that GABAA receptor regulation in oligodendrocytes is driven by axonal cues and that GABA signaling may play a role in myelination and/or during axon-glia recognition.

  12. Differential expression of TRAIL and its receptors relative to calcification in AAA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xun . E-mail: mpscrs@bath.ac.uk; Winrow, Vivienne R.; Horrocks, Michael; Stevens, Cliff R.

    2007-06-22

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is commonly associated with atherosclerosis. Human AAA tissue displays cells undergoing all stages of apoptosis. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in tumour cells but not in normal cells. It has death receptors and decoy receptors. An inhibitor of TRAIL, osteoprotegerin (OPG), is involved in osteogenesis and vascular calcification. We investigated TRAIL and its receptors in AAA compared within normal aorta (NA). Both qualitative and quantitative analyses of calcification in AAA walls were determined using Von Kossa staining and pre-operation computer tomography (CT) scans. There was a significant difference in calcification level at different locations in the AAA wall (p < 0.05). Apoptosis was confirmed in AAA by TUNEL assay. A significant difference in TRAIL and its receptor expression was observed between normal aortae and AAA (p < 0.05). Significant differences were also observed between tissues displaying different extents of calcification for TRAIL mRNA (p < 0.05) by RT-PCR examination and OPG protein (p < 0.01) by protein blotting examination. We propose that this pattern of expression of TRAIL and its receptors may contribute to AAA formation and calcification in the AAA wall.

  13. Expression of the Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 4 in Intact and Inflamed Pulmonary Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Varecza, Zoltán; Elekes, Krisztián; László, Terézia; Perkecz, Anikó; Pintér, Erika; Sándor, Zoltán; Szolcsányi, János; Keszthelyi, Dániel; Szabó, Árpád; Sándor, Katalin; Molnár, Tamás F.; Szántó, Zalán; Pongrácz, Judit E.; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2009-01-01

    Somatostatin released from capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves of the lung during endotoxin-induced murine pneumonitis inhibits inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, presumably via somatostatin receptor subtype 4 (sst4). The goal of the present study was to identify sst4 receptors in mouse and human lungs and to reveal its inflammation-induced alterations with real-time quantitative PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. In non-inflamed mouse and human lungs, mRNA expression and immunolocalization of sst4 are very similar. They are present on bronchial epithelial, vascular endothelial, and smooth-muscle cells. The sst4 receptor protein in the mouse lung significantly increases 24 hr after intranasal endotoxin administration as well as in response to 3 months of whole-body cigarette smoke exposure, owing to the infiltrating sst4-positivite mononuclear cells and neutrophils. In the chronically inflamed human lung, the large number of activated macrophages markedly elevate sst4 mRNA levels, although there is no change in acute purulent pneumonia, in which granulocytes accumulate. Despite mouse granulocytes, human neutrophils do not show sst4 immunopositivity. We provide the first evidence for the expression, localization, and inflammation-induced alterations of sst4 receptors in murine and human lungs. Inasmuch as tissue distribution of this receptor is highly similar, extrapolation of murine experimental results to human conditions might be possible. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:1127–1137, 2009) PMID:19687471

  14. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function.

  15. Developmental expression of cerebellar GABAA-receptor subunit mRNAs. Nature versus nurture.

    PubMed

    Siegel, R E

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that many of the mRNAs encoding GABAA-receptor subunits in the cerebellum exhibit distinct temporal profiles of expression. The levels of six of these subunit transcripts increase severalfold in the second week of postnatal ontogeny. Findings from a variety of experimental systems suggest that the onset and increases in subunit mRNA expression are mediated by the interaction of genetic and epigenetic programs. The initiation of subunit mRNA expression occurs relatively early in cellular maturation and may be directed by intrinsic mechanisms. However, the levels of expression attained in adult animals may be controlled by extrinsic signals received by neurons during the postnatal maturation process. PMID:9777637

  16. Regulation of microRNA expression and function by nuclear receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA transcripts that affect various cellular pathways by serving as regulators of gene expression at the translational and transcriptional level. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate gene transcription by binding to the promoter region or by interacting with other transcription factors. NRs can regulate miRNA expression either at the transcriptional level, or through posttranscriptional maturation by interacting with miRNA processing factors. This review will summarize recent advances in knowledge of the modulation of miRNA expression by NRs. Increased understanding of the molecular basis of miRNA expression may enable new therapeutic interventions that modulate miRNA activities through NR-mediated signaling. PMID:21936947

  17. Targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression induces apoptosis and inhibits prostate tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, Indira; Thirugnanam, Sivasakthivel; Chen, Aoshuang; Zheng, Guoxing; Bosland, Maarten C.; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Gnanasekar, Munirathinam

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting RAGE by RNAi induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing RAGE expression abrogates rHMGB1 mediated cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of RAGE by RNAi inhibits PSA secretion of prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knock down of RAGE abrogates prostate tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of RAGE expression in prostate tumor activates death receptors. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a key role in the progression of prostate cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of targeting RAGE expression in prostate cancer is not yet evaluated. Therefore in this study, we have investigated the effects of silencing the expression of RAGE by RNAi approach both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study showed that down regulation of RAGE expression by RNAi inhibited the cell proliferation of androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (DU-145) prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, targeting RAGE expression resulted in apoptotic elimination of these prostate cancer cells by activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 death signaling. Of note, the levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) were also reduced in LNCaP cells transfected with RAGE RNAi constructs. Importantly, the RAGE RNAi constructs when administered in nude mice bearing prostate tumors, inhibited the tumor growth by targeting the expression of RAGE, and its physiological ligand, HMGB1 and by up regulating death receptors DR4 and DR5 expression. Collectively, the results of this study for the first time show that targeting RAGE by RNAi may be a promising alternative therapeutic strategy for treating prostate cancer.

  18. Macrophage polarization phenotype regulates adiponectin receptor expression and adiponectin anti-inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    van Stijn, Caroline M. W.; Kim, Jason; Lusis, Aldons J.; Barish, Grant D.; Tangirala, Rajendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin (APN), a pleiotropic adipokine that exerts anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and antiatherogenic effects through its receptors (AdipoRs), AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, is an important therapeutic target. Factors regulating AdipoR expression in monocyte/macrophages are poorly understood, and the significance of polarized macrophage activation in controlling AdipoR expression and the APN-mediated inflammatory response has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the macrophage polarization phenotype controls the AdipoR expression and APN-mediated inflammatory response. With the use of mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophages, we demonstrate that classical activation (M1) of macrophages suppressed (40–60% of control) AdipoR expression, whereas alternative activation (M2) preserved it. Remarkably, the macrophage polarization phenotypes produced contrasting inflammatory responses to APN (EC50 5 µg/ml). In M1 macrophages, APN induced proinflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12 (>10-fold of control) and AdipoR levels. In contrast, in M2 macrophages, APN induced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 without altering AdipoR expression. Furthermore, M1 macrophages adapt to a cytokine environment by reversing AdipoR expression. APN induced AdipoR mRNA and protein expression by up-regulating liver X receptor-α (LXRα) in macrophages. These results provide the first evidence that macrophage polarization is a key determinant regulating AdipoR expression and differential APN-mediated macrophage inflammatory responses, which can profoundly influence their pathogenic role in inflammatory and metabolic disorders.—van Stijn, C. M. W., Kim, J., Lusis, A. J., Barish, G.D., Tangirala, R. K. Macrophage polarization phenotype regulates adiponectin receptor expression and adiponectin anti-inflammatory response. PMID:25392268

  19. The Dtk receptor tyrosine kinase, which binds protein S, is expressed during hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Crosier, P S; Freeman, S A; Orlic, D; Bodine, D M; Crosier, K E

    1996-02-01

    Dtk (Tyro 3/Sky/Rse/Brt/Tif) belongs to a recently recognized subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that also includes Ufo (Axl/Ark) and Mer (Eyk). Ligands for Dtk and Ufo have been identified as protein S and the related molecule Gas6, respectively. This study examined expression of Dtk during ontogeny of the hematopoietic system and compared the pattern of expression with that of Ufo. Both receptors were abundantly expressed in differentiating embryonic stem cells, yolk sac blood islands, para-aortic splanchnopleural mesoderm, fractionated AA4+ fetal liver cells, and fetal thymus from day 14 until birth. Although Ufo was expressed at moderate levels in adult bone marrow, expression of Dtk in this tissue was barely detectable. In adult bone marrow subpopulations fractionated using counterflow centrifugal elutriation, immunomagnetic bead selection for lineage-depletion and FACS sorting for c-kit expression, very low levels of Dtk and/or Ufo were detected in some cell fractions. These results suggest that Dtk and Ufo are likely to be involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis, particularly during the embryonic stages of blood cell development.

  20. CD46 measles virus receptor polymorphisms influence receptor protein expression and primary measles vaccine responses in naive Australian children.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Holly D; Hayden, Catherine M; Khoo, Siew-Kim; Zhang, Guicheng; Le Souëf, Peter N; Richmond, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Despite the availability of measles vaccines, infants continue to die from measles. Measles vaccine responses vary between individuals, and poor immunogenicity is likely to preclude protection against measles. CD46 is a ubiquitously expressed specific receptor for vaccine strains of measles virus. CD46 polymorphisms have not been functionally investigated but may affect CD46 protein expression, which in turn may mediate primary measles antibody responses in infants. In a cohort of children aged 12 to 14 months from Perth, Australia (n = 137), after their first dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, CD46 polymorphisms were genotyped, and postvaccination measles IgG and CD46 protein expression before and after measles lysate stimulation of cells were measured. Three CD46 variants (rs7144, rs11118580, and rs2724384) were significantly associated with measles virus-specific IgG levels (P = 0.008, P = 0.026, and P = 0.018, respectively). There were significant differences between CD46 rs7144 genotypes and CD46 protein expression on T cells, as well as the downregulation of CD46 and T-cell frequency after measles lysate stimulation. We show that CD46 polymorphisms were associated with primary measles antibody responses in naive infants. We also report the first association of a measles virus receptor polymorphism with functional effects on the receptor, suggesting a possible mechanism through which antibody responses are altered. Elucidating all of the interconnecting genetic factors that alter primary measles vaccine responses may be important for identifying children at risk of poor immunogenicity or vaccine failure and for the future design of vaccine strategies to help these children.

  1. Developmental changes of melatonin receptor expression in the spleen of the chicken, Gallus domesticus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingyun; Dong, Yulan; Cao, Jing; Wang, Zixu; Zhang, Ziqiang; Chen, Yaoxing

    2015-07-01

    Melatonin plays an essential role in development and immunoregulation of the avian spleen through its receptors; however, the variations in the expression of the melatonin receptor subtypes in the developing avian spleen are still unclear. The objective of the present study was not only to investigate the distribution patterns and development changes of the expression of the melatonin receptor subtypes (Mel1a, Mel1b and Mel1c) in the chicken spleen but also to identify the correlation between the plasma melatonin concentration and the expression of the melatonin receptor subtypes. The immunohistochemical results indicated that Mel1a was mainly distributed in the red pulp and capillaries, Mel1b was predominantly distributed in the periarterial lymphatic sheath (PALS) and splenic nodule, and Mel1c was widely located in the red pulp, PALS and splenic nodule. From P0 to P21, the mRNA and protein expressions of Mel1a, Mel1b and Mel1c in the spleen were increased (P<0.05); however, a slight increase in the expression of the three melatonin receptor subtypes was observed after P21 (P>0.05). Furthermore, the mRNA levels of Mel1b and Mel1c between P0 and P14 raised more quickly than Mel1a. The plasma melatonin concentration increased in an age-dependent manner in the chicken from P0 to P42 (P<0.05), and this increasing change was linear after P14 (P<0.05). The melatonin level in the plasma is strongly correlated with the protein expressions of Mel1a (r=0.938, P=0.005), Mel1b (r=0.912, P=0.011), and Mel1c (r=0.906, P=0.012) in the chicken spleen. These results suggest the existence of age-related and region-specific changes in the expression of the melatonin receptor subtypes within the spleen of the chicken, and this characteristic pattern may be involved in the development and functional maturation of the avian spleen.

  2. Regulation of FSHbeta and GnRH receptor gene expression in activin receptor II knockout male mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T Rajendra; Agno, Julio; Janovick, Jo Ann; Conn, P Michael; Matzuk, Martin M

    2003-12-30

    To examine in vivo, the local effects of inhibins and activins within the anterior pituitary, independent of their endocrine effects exerted from the gonad, in mediating FSH homeostasis, we used castrated knockout mice lacking either inhibin alpha or activin receptor II (ACVR2) alone or in combination. Compared to castrated wild-type (WT) mice, FSHbeta mRNA levels in the pituitaries of Acvr2 null mice were significantly downregulated in the absence of gonadal feedback. FSHbeta mRNA levels were not significantly higher in the pituitaries of castrated inhibin alpha null mice compared to those in Acvr2 null mice and remained the same in the pituitaries of castrated double mutant mice lacking both inhibin and ACVR2. In contrast to FSHbeta mRNA expression changes, pituitary FSH content was significantly reduced in Acvr2 null mice whereas it was only slightly upregulated in inhibin alpha null mice. Combined absence of both ACVR2 signaling and inhibins caused a decrease in FSH content compared to that in the absence of inhibins alone. These changes in pituitary content were in parallel to those in serum FSH levels in these three groups of castrated mice, suggesting that the unopposed actions of locally produced inhibins are dominant over those effects mediated by ACVR2 signaling to regulate FSH biosynthesis and secretion. Thus, our in vivo results demonstrate that within the pituitary, locally produced activins and inhibins exert their actions at distinct phases of FSH homeostasis. In an independent set of experiments, we tested whether in vivo signaling via ACVR2 is necessary for hypothalamic GnRH biosynthesis and for GnRH receptor expression. Our results demonstrate that in contrast to previous in vitro studies, signaling through ACVR2 is neither required for hypothalamic synthesis of GnRH peptide nor for expression of GnRH receptors in the anterior pituitary. We conclude that within the hypothalamic-pituitary short loop, ACVR2 signaling is critical only for FSH

  3. Functional characterization of an allatotropin receptor expressed in the corpora allata of mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Nouzova, Marcela; Brockhoff, Anne; Mayoral, Jaime G.; Goodwin, Marianne; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Noriega, Fernando G.

    2011-01-01

    Allatotropin is an insect neuropeptide with pleiotropic actions on a variety of different tissues. In the present work we describe the identification, cloning and functional and molecular characterization of an Aedes aegypti allatotropin receptor (AeATr) and provide a detailed quantitative study of the expression of the AeATr gene in the adult mosquito. Analysis of the tissue distribution of AeATr mRNA in adult female revealed high transcript levels in the nervous system (brain, abdominal, thoracic and ventral ganglia), corpora allata-corpora cardiaca complex and ovary. The receptor is also expressed in heart, hindgut and male testis and accessory glands. Separation of the corpora allata (CA) and corpora cardiaca followed by analysis of gene expression in the isolated glands revealed expression of the AeATr primarily in the CA. In the female CA, the AeATr mRNA levels were low in the early pupae, started increasing 6 hours before adult eclosion and reached a maximum 24 hours after female emergence. Blood feeding resulted in a decrease in transcript levels. The pattern of changes of AeATr mRNA resembles the changes in JH biosynthesis. Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader recordings of calcium transients in HEK293 cells expressing the AeATr showed a selective response to A. aegypti allatotropin stimulation in the low nanomolar concentration range. Our studies suggest that the AeATr play a role in the regulation of JH synthesis in mosquitoes. PMID:21839791

  4. Expression of FSH receptor in the hamster ovary during perinatal development

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Prabuddha; Roy, Shyamal K.

    2014-01-01

    FSH plays an important role in ovarian follicular development, and it functions via the G-protein coupled FSH receptor. The objectives of the present study were to determine if full-length FSHR mRNA and corresponding protein were expressed in fetal through postnatal hamster ovaries to explain the FSH-induced primordial follicle formation, and if FSH or estrogen (E) would affect the expression. A full-length and two alternately spliced FSHR transcripts were expressed from E14 through P20. The level of the full-length FSHR mRNA increased markedly through P7 before stabilizing at a lower level with the formation and activation of primordial follicles. A predicted 87kDa FSHR protein band was detected in fetal through P4 ovaries, but additional bands appeared as ovary developed. FSHR immunosignal was present in undifferentiated somatic cells and oocytes in early postnatal ovaries, but was granulosa cells specific after follicles formed. Both eCG and E significantly up-regulated full-length FSHR mRNA levels. Therefore, FSHR is expressed in the hamster ovary from the fetal life to account for FSH-induced primordial follicle formation and cAMP production. Further, FSH or E regulates the receptor expression. PMID:25462586

  5. Gene Expression Switching of Receptor Subunits in Human Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Shira, Ossnat; Maor, Ronnie; Chechik, Gal

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic receptors in the human brain consist of multiple protein subunits, many of which have multiple variants, coded by different genes, and are differentially expressed across brain regions and developmental stages. The brain can tune the electrophysiological properties of synapses to regulate plasticity and information processing by switching from one protein variant to another. Such condition-dependent variant switch during development has been demonstrated in several neurotransmitter systems including NMDA and GABA. Here we systematically detect pairs of receptor-subunit variants that switch during the lifetime of the human brain by analyzing postmortem expression data collected in a population of donors at various ages and brain regions measured using microarray and RNA-seq. To further detect variant pairs that co-vary across subjects, we present a method to quantify age-corrected expression correlation in face of strong temporal trends. This is achieved by computing the correlations in the residual expression beyond a cubic-spline model of the population temporal trend, and can be seen as a nonlinear version of partial correlations. Using these methods, we detect multiple new pairs of context dependent variants. For instance, we find a switch from GLRA2 to GLRA3 that differs from the known switch in the rat. We also detect an early switch from HTR1A to HTR5A whose trends are negatively correlated and find that their age-corrected expression is strongly positively correlated. Finally, we observe that GRIN2B switch to GRIN2A occurs mostly during embryonic development, presumably earlier than observed in rodents. These results provide a systematic map of developmental switching in the neurotransmitter systems of the human brain. PMID:26636753

  6. Gene Expression Switching of Receptor Subunits in Human Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shira, Ossnat; Maor, Ronnie; Chechik, Gal

    2015-12-01

    Synaptic receptors in the human brain consist of multiple protein subunits, many of which have multiple variants, coded by different genes, and are differentially expressed across brain regions and developmental stages. The brain can tune the electrophysiological properties of synapses to regulate plasticity and information processing by switching from one protein variant to another. Such condition-dependent variant switch during development has been demonstrated in several neurotransmitter systems including NMDA and GABA. Here we systematically detect pairs of receptor-subunit variants that switch during the lifetime of the human brain by analyzing postmortem expression data collected in a population of donors at various ages and brain regions measured using microarray and RNA-seq. To further detect variant pairs that co-vary across subjects, we present a method to quantify age-corrected expression correlation in face of strong temporal trends. This is achieved by computing the correlations in the residual expression beyond a cubic-spline model of the population temporal trend, and can be seen as a nonlinear version of partial correlations. Using these methods, we detect multiple new pairs of context dependent variants. For instance, we find a switch from GLRA2 to GLRA3 that differs from the known switch in the rat. We also detect an early switch from HTR1A to HTR5A whose trends are negatively correlated and find that their age-corrected expression is strongly positively correlated. Finally, we observe that GRIN2B switch to GRIN2A occurs mostly during embryonic development, presumably earlier than observed in rodents. These results provide a systematic map of developmental switching in the neurotransmitter systems of the human brain.

  7. Estrogen Receptor Alpha Distribution and Expression in the Social Neural Network of Monogamous and Polygynous Peromyscus.

    PubMed

    Cushing, Bruce S

    2016-01-01

    In microtine and dwarf hamsters low levels of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) and medial amygdala (MeA) play a critical role in the expression of social monogamy in males, which is characterized by high levels of affiliation and low levels of aggression. In contrast, monogamous Peromyscus males display high levels of aggression and affiliative behavior with high levels of testosterone and aromatase activity. Suggesting the hypothesis that in Peromyscus ERα expression will be positively correlated with high levels of male prosocial behavior and aggression. ERα expression was compared within the social neural network, including the posterior medial BST, MeA posterodorsal, medial preoptic area (MPOA), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), and arcuate nucleus in two monogamous species, P. californicus and P. polionotus, and two polygynous species, P. leucopus and P. maniculatus. The results supported the prediction, with male P. polionotus and P. californicus expressing higher levels of ERα in the BST than their polygynous counter parts, and ERα expression was sexually dimorphic in the polygynous species, with females expressing significantly more than males in the BST in both polygynous species and in the MeA in P. leucopus. Peromyscus ERα expression also differed from rats, mice and microtines as in neither the MPOA nor the VMH was ERα sexually dimorphic. The results supported the hypothesis that higher levels of ERα are associated with monogamy in Peromyscus and that differential expression of ERα occurs in the same regions of the brains regardless of whether high or low expression is associated with social monogamy. Also discussed are possible mechanisms regulating this differential relationship. PMID:26959827

  8. Estrogen Receptor Alpha Distribution and Expression in the Social Neural Network of Monogamous and Polygynous Peromyscus.

    PubMed

    Cushing, Bruce S

    2016-01-01

    In microtine and dwarf hamsters low levels of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) and medial amygdala (MeA) play a critical role in the expression of social monogamy in males, which is characterized by high levels of affiliation and low levels of aggression. In contrast, monogamous Peromyscus males display high levels of aggression and affiliative behavior with high levels of testosterone and aromatase activity. Suggesting the hypothesis that in Peromyscus ERα expression will be positively correlated with high levels of male prosocial behavior and aggression. ERα expression was compared within the social neural network, including the posterior medial BST, MeA posterodorsal, medial preoptic area (MPOA), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), and arcuate nucleus in two monogamous species, P. californicus and P. polionotus, and two polygynous species, P. leucopus and P. maniculatus. The results supported the prediction, with male P. polionotus and P. californicus expressing higher levels of ERα in the BST than their polygynous counter parts, and ERα expression was sexually dimorphic in the polygynous species, with females expressing significantly more than males in the BST in both polygynous species and in the MeA in P. leucopus. Peromyscus ERα expression also differed from rats, mice and microtines as in neither the MPOA nor the VMH was ERα sexually dimorphic. The results supported the hypothesis that higher levels of ERα are associated with monogamy in Peromyscus and that differential expression of ERα occurs in the same regions of the brains regardless of whether high or low expression is associated with social monogamy. Also discussed are possible mechanisms regulating this differential relationship.

  9. Estrogen Receptor Alpha Distribution and Expression in the Social Neural Network of Monogamous and Polygynous Peromyscus

    PubMed Central

    Cushing, Bruce S.

    2016-01-01

    In microtine and dwarf hamsters low levels of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) and medial amygdala (MeA) play a critical role in the expression of social monogamy in males, which is characterized by high levels of affiliation and low levels of aggression. In contrast, monogamous Peromyscus males display high levels of aggression and affiliative behavior with high levels of testosterone and aromatase activity. Suggesting the hypothesis that in Peromyscus ERα expression will be positively correlated with high levels of male prosocial behavior and aggression. ERα expression was compared within the social neural network, including the posterior medial BST, MeA posterodorsal, medial preoptic area (MPOA), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), and arcuate nucleus in two monogamous species, P. californicus and P. polionotus, and two polygynous species, P. leucopus and P. maniculatus. The results supported the prediction, with male P. polionotus and P. californicus expressing higher levels of ERα in the BST than their polygynous counter parts, and ERα expression was sexually dimorphic in the polygynous species, with females expressing significantly more than males in the BST in both polygynous species and in the MeA in P. leucopus. Peromyscus ERα expression also differed from rats, mice and microtines as in neither the MPOA nor the VMH was ERα sexually dimorphic. The results supported the hypothesis that higher levels of ERα are associated with monogamy in Peromyscus and that differential expression of ERα occurs in the same regions of the brains regardless of whether high or low expression is associated with social monogamy. Also discussed are possible mechanisms regulating this differential relationship. PMID:26959827

  10. Analysis of the Expression of Tachykinins and Tachykinin Receptors in the Rat Uterus During Early Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Francisco M; Bello, Aixa R; Gallardo-Castro, Manuel; Valladares, Francisco; Almeida, Teresa A; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Candenas, Luz

    2015-08-01

    The peptides of the tachykinin family participate in the regulation of reproductive function acting at both central and peripheral levels. Our previous data showed that treatment of rats with a tachykinin NK3R antagonist caused a reduction of litter size. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of tachykinins and tachykinin receptors in the rat uterus during early pregnancy. Uterine samples were obtained from early pregnant rats (Days 1-9 of pregnancy) and from nonpregnant rats during the proestrus stage of the ovarian cycle, and real-time quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot studies were used to investigate the pattern of expression of tachykinins and tachykinin receptors. We found that all tachykinins and tachykinin receptors were locally synthesized in the uterus of early pregnant rats. The expression of substance P, neurokinin B, and the tachykinin receptors NK1R and NK3R mRNAs and proteins underwent major changes during the days around implantation and they were widely distributed in implantation sites, being particularly abundant in decidual cells. These findings support the involvement of the tachykinin system in the series of uterine events that occur around embryo implantation in the rat.

  11. The chemosensory receptors of codling moth Cydia pomonella–expression in larvae and adults

    PubMed Central

    Walker, William B.; Gonzalez, Francisco; Garczynski, Stephen F.; Witzgall, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Olfaction and gustation play critical roles in the life history of insects, mediating vital behaviors such as food, mate and host seeking. Chemosensory receptor proteins, including odorant receptors (ORs), gustatory receptors (GRs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs) function to interface the insect with its chemical environment. Codling moth, Cydia pomonella, is a worldwide pest of apple, pear and walnut, and behavior-modifying semiochemicals are used for environmentally safe control. We produced an Illumina-based transcriptome from antennae of males and females as well as neonate head tissue, affording a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the codling moth chemosensory receptor repertoire. We identified 58 ORs, 20 GRs and 21 IRs, and provide a revised nomenclature that is consistent with homologous sequences in related species. Importantly, we have identified several OR transcripts displaying sex-biased expression in adults, as well as larval-enriched transcripts. Our analyses have expanded annotations of the chemosensory receptor gene families, and provide first-time transcript abundance estimates for codling moth. The results presented here provide a strong foundation for future work on codling moth behavioral physiology and ecology at the molecular level, and may lead to the development of more precise biorational control strategies. PMID:27006164

  12. Tumor expression of adiponectin receptor 2 and lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Kelly, Rachel; Gerke, Travis; Jordahl, Kristina; Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Loda, Massimo; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Finn, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) in aggressive prostate cancer we used immunohistochemistry to characterize AdipoR2 protein expression in tumor tissue for 866 men with prostate cancer from the Physicians’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. AdipoR2 tumor expression was not associated with measures of obesity, pathological tumor stage or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at diagnosis. However, AdipoR2 expression was positively associated with proliferation as measured by Ki-67 expression quartiles (P-trend < 0.0001), with expression of fatty acid synthase (P-trend = 0.001), and with two measures of angiogenesis (P-trend < 0.1). An inverse association was observed with apoptosis as assessed by the TUNEL assay (P-trend = 0.006). Using Cox proportional hazards regression and controlling for age at diagnosis, Gleason score, year of diagnosis category, cohort and baseline BMI, we identified a statistically significant trend for the association between quartile of AdipoR2 expression and lethal prostate cancer (P-trend = 0.02). The hazard ratio for lethal prostate cancer for the two highest quartiles, as compared to the two lowest quartiles, of AdipoR2 expression was 1.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–3.0). Results were similar when additionally controlling for categories of PSA at diagnosis and Ki-67 expression quartiles. These results strengthen the evidence for the role of AdipoR2 in prostate cancer progression. PMID:25863129

  13. Cranial irradiation modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and corticosteroid receptor expression in the hippocampus of juvenile rat.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, Natasa; Djordjevic, Ana; Drakulic, Dunja; Stanojevic, Ivana; Secerov, Bojana; Horvat, Anica

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, essential for normal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, exert their action on the hippocampus through two types of corticosteroid receptors: the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). Recent studies report that exposure of juvenile rats to cranial irradiation adversely affects HPA axis stability leading to its activation along with radiation- induced inflammation. This study was aimed to examine the acute effects of radiation on HPA axis activity and hippocampal corticosteroid receptor expression in 18-day-old rats. Since immobilization was part of irradiation procedure, both irradiated and sham-irradiated animals were exposed to this unavoidable stress. Our results demonstrate that the irradiated rats exhibited different pattern of corticosteroid receptor expression and hormone levels compared to respective controls. These differences included upregulation of GR protein in the hippocampus with a concomitant elevation of GR mRNA and an increase in circulating level of corticosterone. In addition, the expression of MR, both at the level of protein and gene expression, was not altered. Taken together, this study demonstrates that cranial irradiation in juvenile rats leads to enhanced HPA axis activity and increased relative GR/MR ratio in hippocampus. The present paper intends to show that neuroendocrine response of normal brain tissue to localized irradiation comprise both activation of HPA axis and altered corticosteroid receptor balance, probably as consequence of innate immune activation.

  14. Neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions lead to opposing changes in the levels of dopamine receptors and their messenger RNAs.

    PubMed

    Frohna, P A; Neal-Beliveau, B S; Joyce, J N

    1995-09-01

    Previous studies have established that selective damage to the early-developing components of the mesostriatal dopamine system produces profound changes in dopamine D1 receptor-mediated behaviors, while decreasing D1 receptor density. In order to better understand the effects of early intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions, we studied the ontogenetic expression (postnatal days 7, 14, 35 and 90) of D1 and D2 receptors, and their corresponding messenger RNAs, in rats that had received intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine or vehicle lesions on postnatal day 1. Using receptor autoradiography, significant (P < 0.05) decreases in [3H]SCH 23390 binding to D1 receptors in the rostral and caudal dorsomedial and ventromedial caudate of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned animals were evident by postnatal day 7, and remained depressed at all future time points. A significant decrease in D1 receptor concentration occurred in the dorsolateral caudate at later time points (postnatal days 35 and 90). [3H]Spiperone binding to D2 receptor sites was unchanged throughout the entire study. In situ hybridization for D1 and D2 messenger RNA expression showed contrasting results. 6-Hydroxydopamine induced significant decreases of D1 messenger RNA levels in the dorsolateral and dorsomedial caudate by postnatal day 7. By postnatal day 14, messenger RNA expression was significantly elevated in the dorsomedial and ventromedial caudate of the 6-hydroxydopamine group, and remained elevated thereafter. D1 messenger RNA levels became elevated in the lateral caudate at later time points (postnatal days 35 and 90). The opposing changes in D1 receptor concentrations and the messenger RNA encoding the protein did not occur as a consequence of increased transport of D1 receptors to striatonigral terminals. D2 messenger RNA levels in the dorsal caudate were significantly decreased on postnatal day 7, and became higher than controls at postnatal day 14, but were unchanged from controls at later time points

  15. Characterization, expression analysis and localization pattern of toll-like receptor 1 (tlr1) and toll-like receptor 2 (tlr2) genes in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella.

    PubMed

    He, L B; Wang, H; Luo, L F; Jiang, S H; Liu, L Y; Li, Y M; Huang, R; Liao, L J; Zhu, Z Y; Wang, Y P

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the toll-like receptor 1 (tlr1) and toll-like receptor 2 (tlr2) genes of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella were cloned and characterized. tlr1 and tlr2 were found to be highly expressed in immune system organs such as spleen, middle kidney and heart kidney. The expression level of tlr1 and tlr2 was found to be up-regulated at the later stage of viral challenge process. Moreover, subcellular localization indicated that Tlr1 and Tlr2 shared similar localization pattern and both of them may locate in the plasma membrane of transfected cells. PMID:27221024

  16. Interferon enhances the expression of Fc gamma receptors.

    PubMed

    Fridman, W H; Gresser, I; Bandu, M T; Aguet, M; Neauport-Sautes, C

    1980-05-01

    Murine T2D4 cells derived from a T cell hybrid line were incubated with partially purified or electrophoretically pure mouse interferon and tested for the expression of Fc gamma R as assessed by a) counting the number of cells forming rosettes with IgG-sensitized sheep erythrocytes, and b) incubating the cells with heat-aggregated rabbit IgG and then determining either the number of cells stained with fluorescein conjugated goat anti-rabbit IgG or the extent of labeling by using radioactive iodinated staphylococcus protein A. Although interferon induced a rapid increase in Fc gamma R expression on the Fc gamma R-positive T2D4 cells, it did not induce either Fc gamma R on the Fc gamma R negative BW5147 cells or Fc gamma R on either cell line. Human leukocyte interferon enhanced the expression of Fc gamma R on human Burkitt cells (Daudi) but did not affect the expression of Fc gamma R on mouse cells. We suggest that interferon may influence several effector functions of the immune system by modulating Fc receptor expression. PMID:6154103

  17. Platelets deficient in glycoprotein I have normal Fc receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Pfueller, S L; de Rosbo, N K; Bilston, R A

    1984-04-01

    Platelet glycoprotein I (GPI) is known to be required for the interaction of platelets with ristocetin and factor VIII:von Willebrand factor (VIII:vWf). However, its role as Fc receptor is not clear. Some studies have shown that enzymatic removal of GPI destroys the ability of platelets to react with VIII:vWf but not their ability to bind Ig G (IgG). Others have shown that IgG immune complexes which block the Fc receptor also inhibit VIII:vWf interaction with platelets. This subject has been re-examined by testing the ability of platelets with reduced amounts of GPI to aggregate and undergo the release reaction in response to stimuli which act at the platelet Fc receptor. Platelets from two patients with Bernard-Soulier syndrome, congenitally deficient in GPI, both aggregated and released 14C-serotonin normally when exposed to latex particles coated with IgG. Levels of GPI were decreased experimentally in normal platelets by treating them with chymotrypsin. Platelets treated in this manner did not aggregate or release [14C]serotonin in response to ristocetin-VIII:vWf. They did, however, both aggregate and release when incubated with heat-aggregated IgG, antigen-antibody complexes or latex particles coated with IgG. Thus the presence of GPI is not a prerequisite for platelet stimulation via the Fc receptor. PMID:6231945

  18. Regulation of thyrotropin receptor gene expression in rat FRTL-5 thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Saji, M; Akamizu, T; Sanchez, M; Obici, S; Avvedimento, E; Gottesman, M E; Kohn, L D

    1992-01-01

    TSH receptor mRNA levels in FRTL-5 thyroid cells are autoregulated at a transcriptional level by the same hormones required for the growth and function of the cells: TSH, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Thus, the ability of TSH, via its cAMP signal, to down-regulate steady state receptor mRNA levels is preceded by the action of TSH to decrease pre-mRNA levels in nuclear run-on assays to the same quantitative level as evident in Northern analyses. In contrast, the receptor mRNA half-life is shown not to change when down-regulation is reversed by withdrawing TSH in the presence or absence of actinomycin-D. Evidence is additionally provided that TSH receptor mRNA levels are increased by insulin, IGF-I, or calf serum in both Northern and run-on assays. This action cannot be duplicated by hydrocortisone and is evident at more than 20-fold lower concentrations of IGF-I than insulin. Moreover, insulin, IGF-I, and/or calf serum are required for the autoregulatory negative transcriptional regulation of the TSH receptor by TSH/cAMP, as is the case for thyroglobulin. This occurs despite the opposite actions of TSH/cAMP on the two genes, positive in the case of thyroglobulin and negative with TSH receptor. The positive and negative regulatory actions, respectively, of insulin/IGF-I and TSH on receptor gene expression are associated with coincident increases or decreases in cell surface receptors measured by [125I]TSH binding. The autoregulation additionally involves the interplay of a second cAMP-modulated regulatory factor, one which up-regulates TSH receptor mRNA levels rather than causing down-regulation. Thus, cycloheximide inhibits the transcriptional action of both TSH/cAMP and insulin/IGF-I/serum within 4 h, i.e. a rapidly synthesized protein is an intermediate in both cases. The presence of cycloheximide for as little as 1 h, however, uncovers the ability of TSH/cAMP to increase TSH receptor mRNA levels. This activity is the result of the action of a

  19. Cloning, ligand-binding, and temporal expression of ecdysteroid receptors in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), is a devastating pest of cruciferous crops worldwide, and has developed resistance to a wide range of insecticides, including diacylhydrazine-based ecdysone agonists, a highly selective group of molt-accelerating biopesticides targeting the ecdysone receptors. Result In this study, we cloned and characterized the ecdysone receptors from P. xylostella, including the two isoforms of EcR and a USP. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis showed striking conservations among insect ecdysone receptors, especially between P. xylostella and other lepidopterans. The binding affinity of ecdysteroids to in vitro-translated receptor proteins indicated that PxEcRB isoform bound specifically to ponasterone A, and the binding affinity was enhanced by co-incubation with PxUSP (Kd =3.0±1.7 nM). In contrast, PxEcRA did not bind to ponasterone A, even in the presence of PxUSP. The expression of PxEcRB were consistently higher than that of PxEcRA across each and every developmental stage, while the pattern of PxUSP expression is more or less ubiquitous. Conclusions Target site insensitivity, in which the altered binding of insecticides (ecdysone agonists) to their targets (ecdysone receptors) leads to an adaptive response (resistance), is one of the underlying mechanisms of diacylhydrazine resistance. Given the distinct differences at expression level and the ligand-binding capacity, we hypothesis that PxEcRB is the ecdysone receptor that controls the remodeling events during metamorphosis. More importantly, PxEcRB is the potential target site which is modified in the ecdysone agonist-resistant P. xylostella. PMID:23078528

  20. Dopamine, vesicular transporters, and dopamine receptor expression in rat major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Traini, Enea; Mancini, Manuele; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Mahdi, Syed Sarosh; Amenta, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    The localization of dopamine stores and the expression and localization of dopamine (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT) type-1 and -2 and of dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptor subtypes were investigated in rat submandibular, sublingual, and parotid salivary glands by HPLC with electrochemical detection, as well as immunochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. Male Wistar rats of 2 mo of age were used. The highest dopamine levels were measured in the parotid gland, followed by the submandibular and sublingual glands. Western blot analysis revealed DAT, VMAT-1, VMAT-2, and dopamine receptors immunoreactivity in membrane preparations obtained from the three glands investigated. Immunostaining for dopamine and transporters was developed within striated ducts. Salivary glands processed for dopamine receptors immunohistochemistry developed an immunoreaction primarily in striated and excretory ducts. In the submandibular gland, acinar cells displayed strong immunoreactivity for the D2 receptor, while cells of the convoluted granular tubules were negative for both D1-like and D2-like receptors. Parotid glands acinar cells displayed the highest immunoreactivity for both D1 and D2 receptors compared with other salivary glands. The above localization of dopamine and dopaminergic markers investigated did not correspond closely with neuron-specific enolase (NSE) localization. This indicates that at least in part, catecholamine stores and dopaminergic markers are independent from glandular innervation. These findings suggest that rat major salivary glands express a dopaminergic system probably involved in salivary secretion. The stronger immunoreactivity for dopamine transporters and receptors in striated duct cells suggests that the dopaminergic system could regulate not only quality, but also volume and ionic concentration of saliva.

  1. Expression of the Mas receptor is upregulated in skeletal muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Morales, María Gabriela; Abrigo, Johanna; Meneses, Carla; Cisternas, Franco; Simon, Felipe; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy during sepsis, immobilization, and chronic diseases is characterized by an increase in expression and activity of the muscle-specific ubiquitin 3 ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. The classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS), by high level of circulating angiotensin II (AngII) is directly involved in skeletal muscle wasting associated with cardiac and renal failure. Ang (1-7), a peptide belonging to the non-classical RAS system, produces effects that are opposite to AngII. The actions of Ang (1-7) are mediated by its binding and signalling through the Mas receptor. Our purpose is to assess the effects of atrophic stimuli AngII, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and immobilization on the expression of the Mas receptor in skeletal muscle. For that we used gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles of C57BL10 mice treated with AngII, LPS or subjected to unilateral hindlimb immobilization by casting. In addition, we used C2C12 myotubes incubated with AngII or LPS. We evaluated Mas expression by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot immunohistochemical analysis. Skeletal muscle atrophy was corroborated by the expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 and the fibre diameter. Our results show that Mas receptor expression was increased by AngII or LPS in vitro and in vivo, and upregulated by immobilization. The increase of the Mas expression was concomitantly with the upregulation of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 and the reduction of the fibre diameter. These results from studies in vitro and in vivo demonstrate for the first time that the Mas receptor is increased under atrophic stimulus and suggest that the non-classical RAS system could have an important role in muscle wasting.

  2. Expression and regulation of progestin membrane receptors in the rat corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zailong; Stocco, Carlos

    2005-12-01

    Despite evidence strongly supporting progesterone's autocrine actions in the rat corpus luteum (CL), classical progesterone receptors (PR) have not been detected in this gland. Alternatively, in several other systems, progestins have been reported to activate nongenomic pathways via putative progestin membrane receptors (PMRs). The aim of this investigation was to determine whether rat CL membranes bind progestins and contain PMR homologs and whether these proteins are expressed during CL development in a manner that parallels luteal function. We found that luteal cell membranes specifically bind progesterone. Low levels of progesterone and 20alpha-dihydroprogesterone decreased binding of [(3)H]progesterone, whereas androstenedione, 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, and pregnenolone were less potent. Other steroids, including corticosterone, mifepristone, and estradiol, were ineffective. We found that the rat CL expresses five genes previously postulated to encode for putative PMRs: PMRalpha, PMRbeta, PMRgamma, PR membrane component 1 (PRMC1), and Rda288. Pmralpha, Pmrgamma, and Prmc1 transcripts rose steadily during pregnancy whereas Pmrbeta and Rda288 remained constant. Just before parturition, concomitant with falling progesterone levels, Pmralpha, Pmrbeta, and Prmc1 decreased. Luteal PMRalpha and PRMC1 protein levels were lower in samples taken at the end of pregnancy compared with midpregnancy samples. Ergocriptine, which inhibits the secretion of prolactin, the primary luteotrophic hormone in the rat CL, reduced Pmralpha, Pmrbeta, and Prmc1 expression significantly. Ergocriptine effects were prevented by coadministration of prolactin. These findings provide evidence for the expression and regulation of putative membrane-bound progestin-binding proteins in the rat CL, a tissue that does not express detectable levels of nuclear progesterone receptors. PMID:16123161

  3. The generation of knock-in mice expressing fluorescently tagged galanin receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Niall; Holmes, Fiona E.; Hobson, Sally-Ann; Vanderplank, Penny; Leard, Alan; Balthasar, Nina; Wynick, David

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin has diverse roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems, by activating the G protein-coupled receptors Gal1, Gal2 and the less studied Gal3 (GalR1–3 gene products). There is a wealth of data on expression of Gal1–3 at the mRNA level, but not at the protein level due to the lack of specificity of currently available antibodies. Here we report the generation of knock-in mice expressing Gal1 or Gal2 receptor fluorescently tagged at the C-terminus with, respectively, mCherry or hrGFP (humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein). In dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons expressing the highest levels of Gal1-mCherry, localization to the somatic cell membrane was detected by live-cell fluorescence and immunohistochemistry, and that fluorescence decreased upon addition of galanin. In spinal cord, abundant Gal1-mCherry immunoreactive processes were detected in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn, and highly expressing intrinsic neurons of the lamina III/IV border showed both somatic cell membrane localization and outward transport of receptor from the cell body, detected as puncta within cell processes. In brain, high levels of Gal1-mCherry immunofluorescence were detected within thalamus, hypothalamus and amygdala, with a high density of nerve endings in the external zone of the median eminence, and regions with lesser immunoreactivity included the dorsal raphe nucleus. Gal2-hrGFP mRNA was detected in DRG, but live-cell fluorescence was at the limits of detection, drawing attention to both the much lower mRNA expression than to Gal1 in mice and the previously unrecognized potential for translational control by upstream open reading frames (uORFs). PMID:26292267

  4. Directed evolution of G protein-coupled receptors in yeast for higher functional production in eukaryotic expression hosts.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marco; Schöppe, Jendrik; Sedlák, Erik; Hillenbrand, Matthias; Nagy-Davidescu, Gabriela; Ehrenmann, Janosch; Klenk, Christoph; Egloff, Pascal; Kummer, Lutz; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-02-25

    Despite recent successes, many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remained refractory to detailed molecular studies due to insufficient production yields, even in the most sophisticated eukaryotic expression systems. Here we introduce a robust method employing directed evolution of GPCRs in yeast that allows fast and efficient generation of receptor variants which show strongly increased functional production levels in eukaryotic expression hosts. Shown by evolving three different receptors in this study, the method is widely applicable, even for GPCRs which are very difficult to express. The evolved variants showed up to a 26-fold increase of functional production in insect cells compared to the wild-type receptors. Next to the increased production, the obtained variants exhibited improved biophysical properties, while functional properties remained largely unaffected. Thus, the presented method broadens the portfolio of GPCRs accessible for detailed investigations. Interestingly, the functional production of GPCRs in yeast can be further increased by induced host adaptation.

  5. Directed evolution of G protein-coupled receptors in yeast for higher functional production in eukaryotic expression hosts

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Marco; Schöppe, Jendrik; Sedlák, Erik; Hillenbrand, Matthias; Nagy-Davidescu, Gabriela; Ehrenmann, Janosch; Klenk, Christoph; Egloff, Pascal; Kummer, Lutz; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent successes, many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remained refractory to detailed molecular studies due to insufficient production yields, even in the most sophisticated eukaryotic expression systems. Here we introduce a robust method employing directed evolution of GPCRs in yeast that allows fast and efficient generation of receptor variants which show strongly increased functional production levels in eukaryotic expression hosts. Shown by evolving three different receptors in this study, the method is widely applicable, even for GPCRs which are very difficult to express. The evolved variants showed up to a 26-fold increase of functional production in insect cells compared to the wild-type receptors. Next to the increased production, the obtained variants exhibited improved biophysical properties, while functional properties remained largely unaffected. Thus, the presented method broadens the portfolio of GPCRs accessible for detailed investigations. Interestingly, the functional production of GPCRs in yeast can be further increased by induced host adaptation. PMID:26911446

  6. Directed evolution of G protein-coupled receptors in yeast for higher functional production in eukaryotic expression hosts.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marco; Schöppe, Jendrik; Sedlák, Erik; Hillenbrand, Matthias; Nagy-Davidescu, Gabriela; Ehrenmann, Janosch; Klenk, Christoph; Egloff, Pascal; Kummer, Lutz; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent successes, many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remained refractory to detailed molecular studies due to insufficient production yields, even in the most sophisticated eukaryotic expression systems. Here we introduce a robust method employing directed evolution of GPCRs in yeast that allows fast and efficient generation of receptor variants which show strongly increased functional production levels in eukaryotic expression hosts. Shown by evolving three different receptors in this study, the method is widely applicable, even for GPCRs which are very difficult to express. The evolved variants showed up to a 26-fold increase of functional production in insect cells compared to the wild-type receptors. Next to the increased production, the obtained variants exhibited improved biophysical properties, while functional properties remained largely unaffected. Thus, the presented method broadens the portfolio of GPCRs accessible for detailed investigations. Interestingly, the functional production of GPCRs in yeast can be further increased by induced host adaptation. PMID:26911446

  7. Ionotropic glutamate receptor expression in human white matter.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Pia Crone; Samadi-Bahrami, Zahra; Pavlov, Vlady; Stys, Peter K; Moore, G R Wayne

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate is the key excitatory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system (CNS). Its role in human grey matter transmission is well understood, but this is less clear in white matter (WM). Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluR) are found on both neuronal cell bodies and glia as well as on myelinated axons in rodents, and rodent WM tissue is capable of glutamate release. Thus, rodent WM expresses many of the components of the traditional grey matter neuron-to-neuron synapse, but to date this has not been shown for human WM. We demonstrate the presence of iGluRs in human WM by immunofluorescence employing high-resolution spectral confocal imaging. We found that the obligatory N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunit GluN1 and the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit GluA4 co-localized with myelin, oligodendroglial cell bodies and processes. Additionally, GluA4 colocalized with axons, often in distinct clusters. These findings may explain why human WM is vulnerable to excitotoxic events following acute insults such as stroke and traumatic brain injury and in more chronic inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Further exploration of human WM glutamate signalling could pave the way for developing future therapies modulating the glutamate-mediated damage in these and other CNS disorders. PMID:27443784

  8. Transferrin receptor expression by stimulated cells in mixed lymphocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, M; Bacon, P A; Symmons, D P; Walton, K W

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TRFr) expression by cells in mixed lymphocyte culture increases steadily for the first 5 days, but then reaches a plateau. By the sixth day in culture, about 20% of viable cells express TRFr in two-way mixed lymphocyte reactions. This subpopulation of TRFr-positive cells represents the proliferating population; it is heterogeneous, containing T-cell blasts and smaller cells which are a mixture of T and non-T cells. A small group of non-T cells have phenotypic similarity to natural killer (NK) cells. T cells appear to divide earlier in the course of the response than non-T cells. The biphasic nature of this response and the slower non-T reactivity may be due to a secondary stimulation of non-T cells by factors released from activated T cells (such as interleukin-2). PMID:2982734

  9. Bisphenol a influences blastocyst implantation via regulating integrin β3 and trophinin expression levels

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xiyan; Wang, Zhengchao; Wang, Xuenan; Dou, Zhaohua; Li, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to investigate effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on the blastocyst implantation in endometrium. Methods: Pregnant mice were orally administered with BPA. Implantation sites were examined, and serum estrogen level was assayed with ELISA. Protein expression levels were detected with immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. Results: High doses (400 and 600 mg/kg/day) of BPA remarkably reduced the implantation sites in the pregnant mice. No significant differences were observed in the serum estrogen level across the groups. Moreover, high doses (400 and 600 mg/kg/day) of BPA significantly declined the expression level of endometrial estrogen receptor α (ERα) in the pregnant mice. In addition, high doses (400 and 600 mg/kg/day) of BPA significantly declined the expression levels of integrin β3 and trophinin in the endometrium and blastocysts. Conclusion: BPA declines ERα expression in endometrium, and inhibits adhesion protein expression in endometrium and blastocysts, causing the adhesion failure of blastocyst implantation. PMID:26884915

  10. Enhanced epithelial proliferation due to elevated levels of interleukin-1 receptors in middle ear cholesteatomas.

    PubMed

    Bujia, J; Kim, C; Ostos-Aumente, P; Lopez-Villarejo, J; Kastenbauer, E

    1997-01-01

    Middle ear cholesteatoma epithelium is a rich source of interleukin-1-alpha (IL-1-alpha), being involved in both keratinocyte hyperproliferation and bone destruction. IL-1-alpha exerts its effects by binding to two distinct IL-1 receptors (IL-1-R). In this study, we have examined the expression of IL-1-R type II (IL-1-R-II) in cholesteatoma samples and have quantified these levels with computer-assisted image analysis. Normal aural skin was used as control. Immunostaining demonstrated the presence of IL-1-R-II in both epidermis and cholesteatoma keratinocytes. The receptors were 3 times higher than those in normal epidermis. The presence of IL-1-alpha in cholesteatoma epithelium coupled with the induced expression of IL-1-R-II indicates the existence of a highly regulated system of autocrine stimulation of cholesteatoma keratinocytes by IL-1.

  11. Melatonin receptors in a pleuronectiform species, Solea senegalensis: Cloning, tissue expression, day-night and seasonal variations.

    PubMed

    Confente, Francesca; Rendón, María Carmen; Besseau, Laurence; Falcón, Jack; Muñoz-Cueto, José A

    2010-06-01

    Melatonin receptors are expressed in neural and peripheral tissues and mediate melatonin actions on the synchronization of circadian and circannual rhythms. In this study we have cloned three melatonin receptor subtypes (MT1, MT2 and Mel1c) in the Senegalese sole and analyzed their central and peripheral tissue distribution. The full-length MT1 (1452 nt), MT2 (1728 nt) and Mel1c (1980 nt) cDNAs encode different proteins of 345, 373, 355 amino acids, respectively. They were mainly expressed in retina, brain and pituitary, but MT1 was also expressed in gill, liver, intestine, kidney, spleen, heart and skin. At peripheral level, MT2 expression was only evident in gill, kidney and skin whereas Mel1c expression was restricted to the muscle and skin. This pattern of expression was not markedly different between sexes or among the times of day analyzed. The real-time quantitative PCR analyses showed that MT1 displayed higher expression at night than during the day in the retina and optic tectum. Seasonal MT1 expression was characterized by higher mRNA levels in spring and autumn equinoxes for the retina, and in winter and summer solstices for the optic tectum. An almost similar expression profile was found for MT2, but differences were less conspicuous. No day-night differences in MT1 and MT2 expression were observed in the pituitary but a seasonal variation was detected, being mRNA levels higher in summer for both receptors. Mel1c expression did not exhibit significant day-night variation in retina and optic tectum but showed seasonal variations, with higher transcript levels in summer (optic tectum) and autumn (retina). Our results suggest that day-night and seasonal variations in melatonin receptor expression could also be mediating circadian and circannual rhythms in sole.

  12. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) affects hormone receptor activity, steroidogenesis, and expression of endocrine-related genes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Du, Guizhen; Hu, Jialei; Huang, Hongyu; Qin, Yufeng; Han, Xiumei; Wu, Di; Song, Ling; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru

    2013-02-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a widespread and persistent chemical in the environment. We investigated the endocrine-disrupting effects of PFOS using a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays. Reporter gene assays were used to detect receptor-mediated (anti-)estrogenic, (anti-)androgenic, and (anti-)thyroid hormone activities. The effect of PFOS on steroidogenesis was assessed both at hormone levels in the supernatant and at expression levels of hormone-induced genes in the H295R cell. A zebrafish-based short-term screening method was developed to detect the effect of PFOS on endocrine function in vivo. The results indicate that PFOS can act as an estrogen receptor agonist and thyroid hormone receptor antagonist. Exposure to PFOS decreased supernatant testosterone (T), increased estradiol (E2) concentrations in H295R cell medium and altered the expression of several genes involved in steroidogenesis. In addition, PFOS increased early thyroid development gene (hhex and pax8) expression in a concentration-dependent manner, decreased steroidogenic enzyme gene (CYP17, CYP19a, CYP19b) expression, and changed the expression pattern of estrogen receptor production genes (esr1, esr2b) after 500 µg/L PFOS treatment in zebrafish embryos. These results indicate that PFOS has the ability to act as an endocrine disruptor both in vitro and in vivo by disrupting the function of nuclear hormone receptors, interfering with steroidogenesis, and altering the expression of endocrine-related genes in zebrafish embryo.

  13. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) affects hormone receptor activity, steroidogenesis, and expression of endocrine-related genes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Du, Guizhen; Hu, Jialei; Huang, Hongyu; Qin, Yufeng; Han, Xiumei; Wu, Di; Song, Ling; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru

    2013-02-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a widespread and persistent chemical in the environment. We investigated the endocrine-disrupting effects of PFOS using a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays. Reporter gene assays were used to detect receptor-mediated (anti-)estrogenic, (anti-)androgenic, and (anti-)thyroid hormone activities. The effect of PFOS on steroidogenesis was assessed both at hormone levels in the supernatant and at expression levels of hormone-induced genes in the H295R cell. A zebrafish-based short-term screening method was developed to detect the effect of PFOS on endocrine function in vivo. The results indicate that PFOS can act as an estrogen receptor agonist and thyroid hormone receptor antagonist. Exposure to PFOS decreased supernatant testosterone (T), increased estradiol (E2) concentrations in H295R cell medium and altered the expression of several genes involved in steroidogenesis. In addition, PFOS increased early thyroid development gene (hhex and pax8) expression in a concentration-dependent manner, decreased steroidogenic enzyme gene (CYP17, CYP19a, CYP19b) expression, and changed the expression pattern of estrogen receptor production genes (esr1, esr2b) after 500 µg/L PFOS treatment in zebrafish embryos. These results indicate that PFOS has the ability to act as an endocrine disruptor both in vitro and in vivo by disrupting the function of nuclear hormone receptors, interfering with steroidogenesis, and altering the expression of endocrine-related genes in zebrafish embryo. PMID:23074026

  14. Altered hippocampal expression of glutamate receptors and transporters in GRM2 and GRM3 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Louisa; Kew, James N C; Corti, Corrado; Harrison, Paul J; Burnet, Philip W J

    2008-11-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2 and mGluR3, also called mGlu2 and mGlu3, encoded by GRM2 and GRM3, respectively) are therapeutic targets for several psychiatric disorders. GRM3 may also be a schizophrenia susceptibility gene. mGluR2-/- and mGluR3-/- mice provide the only unequivocal means to differentiate between these receptors, yet interpretation of in vivo findings may be complicated by secondary effects on expression of other genes. To address this issue, we examined the expression of NMDA receptor subunits (NR1, NR2A, NR2B) and glutamate transporters (EAAT1-3), as well as the remaining group II mGluR, in the hippocampus of mGluR2-/- and mGluR3-/- mice, compared with wild-type controls. mGluR2 mRNA was increased in mGluR3-/- mice, and vice versa. NR2A mRNA was increased in both knockout mice. EAAT1 (GLAST) mRNA and protein, and EAAT2 (GLT-1) protein, were reduced in mGluR3-/- mice, whereas EAAT3 (EAAC1) mRNA was decreased in mGluR2-/- mice. Transcripts for NR1 and NR2B were unchanged. The findings show a compensatory upregulation of the remaining group II metabotropic glutamate receptor in the knockout mice. Upregulation of NR2A expression suggests modified NMDA receptor signaling in mGluR2-/- and mGluR3-/- mice, and downregulation of glutamate transporter expression suggests a response to altered synaptic glutamate levels. The results show a mutual interplay between mGluR2 and mGluR3, and also provide a context in which to interpret behavioral and electrophysiological results in these mice. PMID:18720515

  15. Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor by metal-ligand complexes decreases levels of extracellular amyloid beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Price, Katherine A; Filiz, Gulay; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Du, Tai; Laughton, Katrina M; Masters, Colin L; Sharples, Robyn A; Hill, Andrew F; Li, Qiao-Xin; Donnelly, Paul S; Barnham, Kevin J; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2008-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in a range of tissues and cell-types. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor by a number of ligands induces downstream signalling that modulates critical cell functions including growth, survival and differentiation. Abnormal epidermal growth factor receptor expression and activation is also involved in a number of cancers. In addition to its cognate ligands, the epidermal growth factor receptor can be activated by metals such as zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu). Due to the important role of these metals in a number of diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, therapeutic approaches are being developed based on the use of lipid permeable metal-complexing molecules. While these agents are showing promising results in animal models and clinical trials, little is known about the effects of metal-ligand complexes on cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated the effects of clioquinol (CQ)-metal complexes on activation of epidermal growth factor receptor. We show here that CQ-Cu complexes induced potent epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation resulting in downstream activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Similar levels of epidermal growth factor receptor activation were observed with alternative lipid permeable metal-ligands including neocuproine and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. We found that CQ-Cu complexes induced a significant reduction in the level of extracellular Abeta1-40 in cell culture. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor activation by PD153035 blocked extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and restored Abeta1-40 levels. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor by CQ-Cu was mediated through up-regulation of src kinase activity by a cognate ligand-independent process involving membrane integrins. These findings provide the first evidence that metal-ligand complexes can activate the epidermal growth

  16. Heterogeneous expression of Drosophila gustatory receptors in enteroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Ho; Kwon, Jae Young

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is emerging as a major site of chemosensation in mammalian studies. Enteroendocrine cells are chemosensory cells in the gut which produce regulatory peptides in response to luminal contents to regulate gut physiology, food intake, and glucose homeostasis, among other possible functions. Increasing evidence shows that mammalian taste receptors and taste signaling molecules are expressed in enteroendocrine cells in the gut. Invertebrate models such as Drosophila can provide a simple and genetically tractable system to study the chemosensory functions of enteroendocrine cells in vivo. To establish Drosophila enteroendocrine cells as a model for studying gut chemosensation, we used the GAL4/UAS system to examine the expression of all 68 Gustatory receptors (Grs) in the intestine. We find that 12 Gr-GAL4 drivers label subsets of enteroendocrine cells in the midgut, and examine colocalization of these drivers with the regulatory peptides neuropeptide F (NPF), locustatachykinin (LTK), and diuretic hormone 31 (DH31). RT-PCR analysis provides additional evidence for the presence of Gr transcripts in the gut. Our results suggest that the Drosophila Grs have chemosensory roles in the intestine to regulate physiological functions such as food uptake, nutrient absorption, or sugar homeostasis. PMID:22194978

  17. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligand cytotoxicity unrelated to PBR expression.

    PubMed

    Hans, Gregory; Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Lallemend, François; Robe, Pierre; Rogister, Bernard; Belachew, Shibeshih; Nguyen, Laurent; Malgrange, Brigitte; Moonen, Gustave; Rigo, Jean-Michel

    2005-03-01

    Some synthetic ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), an 18 kDa protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane, are cytotoxic for several tumor cell lines and arise as promising chemotherapeutic candidates. However, conflicting results were reported regarding the actual effect of these drugs on cellular survival ranging from protection to toxicity. Moreover, the concentrations needed to observe such a toxicity were usually high, far above the affinity range for their receptor, hence questioning its specificity. In the present study, we have shown that micromolar concentrations of FGIN-1-27 and Ro 5-4864, two chemically unrelated PBR ligands are toxic for both PBR-expressing SK-N-BE neuroblastoma cells and PBR-deficient Jurkat lymphoma cells. We have thereby demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of these drugs is unrelated to their PBR-binding activity. Moreover, Ro 5-4864-induced cell death differed strikingly between both cell types, being apoptotic in Jurkat cells while necrotic in SK-N-BE cells. Again, this did not seem to be related to PBR expression since Ro 5-4864-induced death of PBR-transfected Jurkat cells remained apoptotic. Taken together, our results show that PBR is unlikely to mediate all the effects of these PBR ligands. They however confirm that some of these ligands are very effective cytotoxic drugs towards various cancer cells, even for reputed chemoresistant tumors such as neuroblastoma, and, surprisingly, also for PBR-lacking tumor cells.

  18. Tamoxifen impairs prepubertal mammary development and alters expression of estrogen receptor α (ESR1) and progesterone receptors (PGR).

    PubMed

    Tucker, H L M; Parsons, C L M; Ellis, S; Rhoads, M L; Akers, R M

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that prepubertal heifers experience allometric mammary growth that is influenced by the ovaries. Our purpose was to determine the role of estrogen in prepubertal mammary gland development. Sixteen Holstein calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups: tamoxifen-injected (TAM) or control (CON). Calves were administered the antiestrogen tamoxifen (0.3 mg kg(1) d(1)) or placebo from 28 to 120 d of age. At 120 d, calves were euthanized and udders removed. Weight and DNA content of trimmed parenchymal tissue were halved (P ≤ 0.0001) in TAM compared with CON calves. Parenchymal samples from 3 zones of the left rear mammary gland (lower, middle, and outer regions) were processed for immunohistochemical staining for estrogen receptor α (ESR1) and progesterone receptor (PGR), Ki67-positive cells, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine label retaining cells (LRCs). Overall, neither the percentage nor location within the epithelial tissue layer of either ESR1- or PGR-positive cells was impacted by TAM treatment. However, image analysis indicated a 6.2-fold lower (P = 0.0001) level of ESR1 protein expression in TAM calves. Similarly, messenger RNA expression of ESR1 was also reduced (P = 0.0001) in TAM heifers. In contrast, expression of PGR protein was greater by 43% (P = 0.03) in TAM calves, but messenger RNA expression did not differ between treatments. Overall, TAM calves had a higher (P ≤ 0.03) percentage and density (cells per tissue area) of Ki67-positive cells. Irrespective of treatment, there were also more Ki67-labeled cells in the outer zones of the mammary gland (P ≤ 0.001). We were able to effectively use multispectral imaging to identify positive cells and quantify the expression of ESR1 and PGR protein. We also identified and counted the proportion of label retaining cells (LCR) (putative epithelial stem cells). We noted an overall 2.9-fold greater number of LRCs in TAM heifers and more LRCs in the outer sampling zones. This suggests

  19. Rapamycin down-regulates LDL-receptor expression independently of SREBP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Laura J.; Brown, Andrew J.

    2008-09-05

    As a key regulator of cholesterol homeostasis, sterol-regulatory element binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) up-regulates expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis (e.g., 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) Reductase) and uptake (the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor). Previously, we showed that Akt, a critical kinase in cell growth and proliferation, contributes to SREBP-2 activation. However, the specific Akt target involved is unknown. A potential candidate is the mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR. Rapamycin can cause hyperlipidaemia clinically, and we hypothesised that this may be mediated via an effect of mTOR on SREBP-2. Herein, we found that SREBP-2 activation and HMG-CoA Reductase gene expression were unaffected by rapamycin treatment. However, LDL-receptor gene expression was decreased by rapamycin, suggesting that this may contribute to the hyperlipidaemia observed in rapamycin-treated patients. Rapamycin did not affect mRNA stability, so the decrease in LDL-receptor gene expression is likely to be occurring at the transcriptional level, although independently of SREBP-2.

  20. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  1. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression profiles of androgen receptors in spotted scat (Scatophagus argus).

    PubMed

    Chen, H P; Deng, S P; Dai, M L; Zhu, C H; Li, G L

    2016-01-01

    Androgen plays critical roles in vertebrate reproductive systems via androgen receptors (ARs). In the present study, the full-length spotted scat (Scatophagus argus) androgen receptor (sAR) cDNA sequence was cloned from testis. The sAR cDNA measured 2448 bp in length with an open-reading frame of 2289 bp, encoding 763 amino acids. Amino acid alignment analyses showed that the sARs exhibited highly evolutionary conserved functional domains. Phylogenetically, the sARs clustered within the ARβ common vertebrate group. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that sAR expression varied in level and distribution throughout the tissues of both females and males. sAR expression was detected during testicular development by quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that the highest transcription of sARs was observed in the mid-testicular stage, and remained at a high expression level until the late-testicular stage. In addition, the effects of 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) and estrogen (E2) on the expression of sARs in ovaries were determined using quantitative RT-PCR. sAR expression increased at 12 and 24 h post-MT treatment and decreased with E2 treatment. The present study provides preliminary evidence indicating gonadal plasticity of spotted scat under exogenous steroidal hormone treatments. It also provides a theoretical basis for sex reversal and production of artificial pseudo-males for female monosex breeding. PMID:27173207

  2. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression profiles of androgen receptors in spotted scat (Scatophagus argus).

    PubMed

    Chen, H P; Deng, S P; Dai, M L; Zhu, C H; Li, G L

    2016-01-01

    Androgen plays critical roles in vertebrate reproductive systems via androgen receptors (ARs). In the present study, the full-length spotted scat (Scatophagus argus) androgen receptor (sAR) cDNA sequence was cloned from testis. The sAR cDNA measured 2448 bp in length with an open-reading frame of 2289 bp, encoding 763 amino acids. Amino acid alignment analyses showed that the sARs exhibited highly evolutionary conserved functional domains. Phylogenetically, the sARs clustered within the ARβ common vertebrate group. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that sAR expression varied in level and distribution throughout the tissues of both females and males. sAR expression was detected during testicular development by quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that the highest transcription of sARs was observed in the mid-testicular stage, and remained at a high expression level until the late-testicular stage. In addition, the effects of 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) and estrogen (E2) on the expression of sARs in ovaries were determined using quantitative RT-PCR. sAR expression increased at 12 and 24 h post-MT treatment and decreased with E2 treatment. The present study provides preliminary evidence indicating gonadal plasticity of spotted scat under exogenous steroidal hormone treatments. It also provides a theoretical basis for sex reversal and production of artificial pseudo-males for female monosex breeding.

  3. LH-Receptor Gene Expression in Human Granulosa and Cumulus Cells from Antral and Preovulatory Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, Janni Vikkelsø; Kristensen, Stine Gry; Nielsen, Maria Eilsø; Humaidan, Peter; Dal Canto, Maria; Fadini, Rubens; Schmidt, Kirsten T.; Ernst, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Context: Human granulosa cells (GC) acquire LH receptor (LHR) expression during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Currently, the precise follicular stage is unknown, and specific roles of LH in the follicular development are not fully understood. Objective: Our objective was to measure LHR gene expression on GC and cumulus cells (CC) from normal human follicles with diameters form 3–20 mm. Design, Setting, and Patients: At a university hospital, GC, CC, and the corresponding follicular fluid (FF) were collected from patients undergoing fertility preservation by having one ovary frozen and patients undergoing infertility treatment. Interventions: Cells and fluids were isolated from surgically excised ovaries or from aspirated preovulatory follicles. Main Outcome Measures: We evaluated gene expression of LHR, FSHR, androgen receptor (AR), aromatase (CYP19a1), and AMHR2 normalized to the GAPDH expression and associated with FF levels of anti-Mullerian hormone, inhibin-B, and steroids. Results: LHR expression was maximal in GC from preovulatory follicles before ovulation induction. A majority of 150 antral follicles (3–10 mm in diameter) showed LHR expression at approximately 10% of the maximum, and LHR expression showed significant associations with FSHR, AR, CYP19a1, and AMHR2 and with FF estradiol and progesterone. Levels of FSHR continued to decline in GC as the follicular diameter increased. Conclusions: The LHR gene is expressed in GC of human antral follicles throughout the follicular phase and is significantly associated with expression of the CYP19a1 gene and with the corresponding FF concentrations of estradiol and progesterone. LH appears to affect human follicular development during most the follicular phase in normal women. PMID:22659248

  4. Expression of melatonin receptor MT1 in cells of human invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jablonska, Karolina; Pula, Bartosz; Zemla, Agata; Owczarek, Tomasz; Wojnar, Andrzej; Rys, Janusz; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena; Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    In humans, two main types of membrane melatonin receptors have been identified, MT1 and MT2. Expression of MT1 in neoplastic cells seems to increase the efficacy of melatonin's oncostatic activity. The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution and the intensity of MT1 expression in breast cancer cells and to correlate it with clinicopathological factors. Immunohistochemical studies (IHC) were conducted on 190 cases of invasive ductal breast carcinomas (IDC) and molecular studies were performed on 29 cases of frozen tumor fragments and selected breast cancer cell lines. Most of the studied tumors manifested a membranous/cytoplasmic IHC expression of MT1. In IDC, the MT1 expression was higher than in fibrocystic breast disease. MT1 expression was higher in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and HER2 positive (HER2+) tumors. Triple negative tumors (TN) manifested the lowest MT1 expression level. The lowest MT1 protein expression level was noted in the TN breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 compared with ER+ cell lines MCF-7 and SK-BR-3. MT1 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the malignancy grade of the studied IDC cases. Moreover, higher MT1 expression was associated with patients' longer overall survival (OS) in the group of ER+ breast cancers and treated with tamoxifen. Multivariate analysis indicated that MT1 was an independent prognostic factor in the ER+ tumors for OS and event-free survival in the ER+ tumors. The results of this study may point to a potential prognostic and therapeutic significance of MT1 in IDC.

  5. Molecular expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, prokineticin receptor-1 and other biomarkers in infiltrating canalicular carcinoma of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Angélica; Morimoto, Sumiko; Vilchis, Felipe; Taniyama, Natsuko; Bautista, Claudia J.; Robles, Carlos; Bargalló, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is important in the growth and metastasis of cancer cells. In 2001, another angiogenic factor, endocrine gland-derived VEGF (EG-VEGF), was characterized and sequenced. EG-VEGF activity appears to be restricted to endothelial cells derived from endocrine glands. At the molecular level, its expression is regulated by hypoxia and steroid hormones. Although VEGF and EG-VEGF are structurally different, they function in a coordinated fashion. Since the majority of mammary tumors are hormone-dependent, it was hypothesized that EG-VEGF would be expressed in these tumors, and therefore, represent a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of VEGF, EG-VEGF and its receptor (prokineticin receptor-1), as well as that of breast cancer resistant protein, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, in 50 breast samples of infiltrating canalicular carcinoma (ICC) and their correlation with tumor staging. The samples were analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Both angiogenic growth factors were identified in all samples. However, in 90% of the samples, the expression level of VEGF was significantly higher than that of EG-VEGF (P=0.024). There was no association between the expression of VEGF, EG-VEGF or its receptor with tumor stage. In ICC, the predominant angiogenic factor expressed was VEGF. The expression level of either factor was not correlated with the tumor-node-metastasis stage. Although ICC is derived from endothelial cells, EG-VEGF expression was not the predominant angiogenic/growth factor in ICC. PMID:27703528

  6. Tumor necrosis factor: receptor binding and expression of receptors in cultured mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Adamson, G M; Billings, R E

    1994-04-01

    Recombinant murine tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) was labeled with 125I and used to determine the binding characteristics, internalization and intracellular degradation in cultured mouse hepatocytes. [125I]TNF-alpha bound specifically to hepatocytes and Scatchard analysis of the data indicated binding to both a low-affinity (Kd = 20 nM) high capacity (51225 sites/cell) component and high-affinity component (Kd = 4 pM), with low capacity (290 sites/cell). The extent of TNF-alpha binding to hepatocytes correlated closely with its biological activity in hepatocytes, as indexed by depletion of intracellular ATP. At concentrations lower than 0.06 nM there was minimal binding and no effect on cellular ATP, whereas maximal binding at concentrations greater than 45 nM caused 80% depletion (in comparison to controls) of hepatocyte ATP. Incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in rapid uptake, internalization and degradation of [125I]TNF-alpha. This was followed by release of degraded material from hepatocytes. Examination, by reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction technology, of hepatocyte RNA extracted after the 4-hr adherence period revealed that mouse hepatocytes expressed mRNA for both TNF-alpha receptor 1 and TNF-alpha receptor 2, and that the relative abundance of TNF-alpha receptor 1 was approximately 7-fold greater than that for TNF-alpha receptor 2. Because it has been shown that these receptors have different affinities for TNF-alpha, this may explain the high- and low-affinity binding sites present on cultured mouse hepatocytes.

  7. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  8. Effects of long-term restricted feeding on plasma leptin, hepatic leptin expression and leptin receptor expression in juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Trombley, Susanne; Maugars, Gersende; Kling, Peter; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur; Schmitz, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone and plays a key role in body weight regulation, energy homeostasis and lipid store utilization in mammals. In this study, we investigated the effect of feed-restriction on leptin genes (lepa1 and lepa2), leptin receptor (lepr) gene expression and plasma leptin levels in juvenile Atlantic salmon parr. Feed restriction was performed from late April to mid-June, in order to gain insight into the role of the leptin system in energy balance regulation and adiposity in juvenile salmon. A significant increase in lepa1 expression as well as higher levels of plasma leptin was found in feed-restricted fish in June compared to fully fed controls, while lepa2 gene expression decreased in both groups during the treatment period. Lepa2 was, however significantly higher in the feed-restricted group in June. Leptin receptor expression was up regulated during the period of enhanced growth and lipid deposition in the fully fed control, indicating a seasonal effect on the receptor expression in the brain. Both lepa1 and lepa2 genes very mainly expressed in the liver in juvenile salmon, while lepr was expressed in the brain but showed also considerable expression in various peripheral tissues. The study provides evidence that the leptin system is sensitive to the metabolic status of the fish as both season and restricted feeding affect lepa1 and lepa2 gene expression in the liver and brain leptin receptor expression, however, for lepa1 expression and leptin plasma level in an opposite way as that observed in the mammalian system.

  9. Increased expression of estrogen-related receptor β during adaptation of adult cardiomyocytes to sustained hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Kathryn F; Beeson, Gyda C; Beeson, Craig C; McDermott, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related Receptors (ERR) are members of the steroid hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors that regulate expression of genes required for energy metabolism including mitochondrial biogenesis, fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation. While ERRα and EPPγ isoforms are known to share a wide array of target genes in the adult myocardium, the function of ERRβ has not been characterized in cardiomyocytes. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of ERRβ in regulating energy metabolism in adult cardiomyocytes in primary culture. Adult feline cardiomyocytes were electrically stimulated to contract in either hypoxia (0.5% O2) or normoxia (21% O2). As compared to baseline values measured in normoxia, ERRβ mRNA levels increased significantly after 8 hours of hypoxia and remained elevated over 24 h. Conversely, ERRβ mRNA decreased to normoxic levels after 4 hours of reoxygenation. Hypoxia increased expression of the α and β isoforms of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Coactivator-1 (PGC-1) mRNA by 6-fold and 3-fold, respectively. Knockdown of ERRβ expression via adenoviral-mediated delivery of ERRβ shRNA blocked hypoxia-induced increases in PGC-1β mRNA, but not PGC-1α mRNA. Loss of ERRβ had no effect on mtDNA content as measured after 24 h of hypoxia. To determine whether loss of ERRβ affected mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption rates (OCR) were measured in contracting versus quiescent cardiomyocytes in normoxia. OCR was significantly lower in contracting cardiomyocytes expressing ERRβ shRNA than scrambled shRNA controls. Maximal OCR also was reduced by ERRβ knockdown. In conclusion: 1) hypoxia increases in ERRβ mRNA expression in contracting cardiomyocytes; 2) ERRβ is required for induction of the PGC-1β isoform in response to hypoxia; 3) ERRβ expression is required to sustain OCR in normoxic conditions. PMID:27335690

  10. Alteration in contractile G-protein coupled receptor expression by moist snus and nicotine in rat cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, Hardip; Xu Cangbao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2011-04-15

    The cardiovascular risk for users of use of Swedish snus/American snuff (moist tobacco) has been debated for a long time. The present study was designed to examine the effects of water- or lipid-soluble (DMSO-soluble) snus and nicotine, the most important substance in tobacco, on the expression of vasocontractile G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), such as endothelin ET{sub B}, serotonin 5-HT{sub 1B}, and thromboxane A{sub 2} TP receptors, in rat cerebral arteries. Studies show that these vasocontractile GPCR show alterations by lipid-soluble cigarette smoke particles via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). However, the effects of moist tobacco on the expression of GPCR are less studied. Rat middle cerebral arteries were isolated and organ cultured in serum-free medium for 24 h in the presence of water-soluble snus (WSS), DMSO-soluble snus (DSS), or nicotine. The dose of snus and nicotine was kept at plasma level of snus users (25 ng nicotine/ml). A high dose (250 ng nicotine/ml) was also included due to the previous results showing alteration in the GPCR expression by nicotine at this concentration. Contractile responses to the ET{sub B} receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c, 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine, and TP receptor agonist U46619 were investigated by a sensitive myograph. The expression of ET{sub B}, 5-HT{sub 1B}, and TP receptors was studied at mRNA and protein levels using quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Organ culture with WSS or DSS (25 ng nicotine/ml) lowered the 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor-mediated contraction. Furthermore, DSS shifted the TP receptor-mediated contraction curve left-wards with a stronger contraction. High dose of nicotine (250 ng nicotine/ml) increased the ET{sub B} receptor-mediated contraction. The combined 5-HT{sub 1B} and 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor-mediated contraction was increased, and both the 5-CT and TxA2 induced contractions were left-ward shifted by WSS, DSS, or

  11. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI; Roskams, Tania; Oben, Jude A.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha expression in rat liver during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Panadero, M; Herrera, E; Bocos, C

    2000-08-01

    The expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) as well as of some related genes was studied in rat liver at different stages of development (from 19-day-old fetuses to 1 month-old rats). The level of PPARalpha mRNA appeared higher in neonates than in fetuses or 1 month-old rats. Whereas the pattern for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA level was similar to that of PPARalpha, the mRNA level of both acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) and apolipoprotein CIII (apo CIII) showed diverse profiles. Western blotting analysis also revealed an increased level of PPARalpha protein in liver of suckling rats. Similarities of mRNA PEPCK and PPARalpha expression indicate a common control mechanism, where both nutritional and hormonal factors may be involved. PMID:11018288

  13. Cannabinoid receptor 1-expressing neurons in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Winters, Bradley D; Krüger, Juliane M; Huang, Xiaojie; Gallaher, Zachary R; Ishikawa, Masago; Czaja, Krzysztof; Krueger, James M; Huang, Yanhua H; Schlüter, Oliver M; Dong, Yan

    2012-10-01

    Endocannabinoid signaling critically regulates emotional and motivational states via activation of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the brain. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) functions to gate emotional and motivational responses. Although expression of CB1 in the NAc is low, manipulation of CB1 signaling within the NAc triggers robust emotional/motivational alterations related to drug addiction and other psychiatric disorders, and these effects cannot be exclusively attributed to CB1 located at afferents to the NAc. Rather, CB1-expressing neurons in the NAc, although sparse, appear to be critical for emotional and motivational responses. However, the cellular properties of these neurons remain largely unknown. Here, we generated a knock-in mouse line in which CB1-expressing neurons expressed the fluorescent protein td-Tomato (tdT). Using these mice, we demonstrated that tdT-positive neurons within the NAc were exclusively fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs). These FSIs were electrically coupled with each other, and thus may help synchronize populations/ensembles of NAc neurons. CB1-expressing FSIs also form GABAergic synapses on adjacent medium spiny neurons (MSNs), providing feed-forward inhibition of NAc output. Furthermore, the membrane excitability of tdT-positive FSIs in the NAc was up-regulated after withdrawal from cocaine exposure, an effect that might increase FSI-to-MSN inhibition. Taken together with our previous findings that the membrane excitability of NAc MSNs is decreased during cocaine withdrawal, the present findings suggest that the basal functional output of the NAc is inhibited during cocaine withdrawal by multiple mechanisms. As such, CB1-expressing FSIs are targeted by cocaine exposure to influence the overall functional output of the NAc. PMID:23012412

  14. Expression of the human muscarinic receptor gene m2 in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Voith, G.; Dingermann, T.

    1995-11-01

    We have expressed a functional human muscarinic M2 receptor, under the control of the homologous discoidin I{gamma} promoter, in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The use of a contact site A leader peptide ensured insertion of the newly synthesized receptor protein into the plasma membrane. Due to the characteristics of the discoidin I{gamma} promoter, the M2 receptor is expressed during late growth and early development. The heterologously expressed M2 receptors show binding characteristics similar to authentic receptors. Membranes as well as whole cells can be used in ligand binding assays. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Expression of the human muscarinic receptor gene m2 in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Voith, G; Dingermann, T

    1995-11-01

    We have expressed a functional human muscarinic M2 receptor, under the control of the homologous discoidin I gamma promoter, in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The use of a contact site A leader peptide ensured insertion of the newly synthesized receptor protein into the plasma membrane. Due to the characteristics of the discoidin I gamma promoter, the M2 receptor is expressed during late growth and early development. The heterologously expressed M2 receptors show binding characteristics similar to authentic receptors. Membranes as well as whole cells can be used in ligand binding assays. PMID:9636297

  16. Expression of NRG1 and its receptors in human bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forster, J A; Paul, A B; Harnden, P; Knowles, M A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Therapies targeting ERBB2 have shown success in the clinic. However, response is not determined solely by expression of ERBB2. Levels of ERBB3, its preferred heterodimerisation partner and ERBB ligands may also have a role. Methods: We measured NRG1 expression by real-time quantitative RT–PCR and ERBB receptors by western blotting and immunohistochemistry in bladder tumours and cell lines. Results: NRG1α and NRG1β showed significant coordinate expression. NRG1β was upregulated in 78% of cell lines. In tumours, there was a greater range of expression with a trend towards increased NRG1α with higher stage and grade. Increased expression of ERBB proteins was detected in 15% (EGFR), 20% (ERBB2), 41% (ERBB3) and 0% (ERBB4) of cell lines. High EGFR expression was detected in 28% of tumours, associated with grade and stage (P=0.05; P=0.04). Moderate or high expression of ERBB2 was detected in 22% and was associated with stage (P=0.025). Cytoplasmic ERBB3 was associated with high tumour grade (P=0.01) and with ERBB2 positivity. In cell lines, NRG1β expression was significantly inversely related to ERBB3, but this was not confirmed in tumours. Conclusion: There is a wide spectrum of NRG1 and ERBB receptor expression in bladder cancer. In advanced tumours, EGFR, ERBB2 and ERBB3 upregulation is common and there is a relationship between expression of ERBB2 and ERBB3 but not the NRG1 ligand. PMID:21364580

  17. Receptor and enzyme expression for prostanoid metabolism in colorectal cancer related to tumor tissue PGE2.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Annika; Andersson, Marianne; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Lönnroth, Christina; Nordgren, Svante; Lundholm, Kent

    2010-02-01

    Prostaglandins support progression of colorectal cancer by several mechanisms. This conclusion is based on epidemiological and drug intervention long-term studies or retrieved from animal and cell culture experiments. The aim of the present study was to map receptor and enzyme expression for prostanoid metabolism in the presence of high or low PGE2 content within colon cancer tissue at primary tumor operation and after short-term preoperative provision of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Twenty-three unselected patients with colon cancer were randomly selected to receive indomethacin (NSAID) or sham treatment for 3 days before surgery. Normal colon and tumor tissue were collected at operation for RNA extraction. Tissue PGE2 levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Gene expression was quantified by microarray and real-time PCR. COX-1 expression increased proportionally to COX-2 expression in colon cancer tissue from untreated patients. Indomethacin reduced PGE2 content in normal and tumor tissue with subsequently decreased IP, HPGD and PPARgamma receptor expression in both tumor and normal colon tissue, while subtype EP1-4 receptors were not significantly influenced by indomethacin treatment. MPGES-1 expression was not related to overall PGE2 content in tumor and colon tissue, but decreased significantly in normal tissue during indomethacin exposure. Reduction of tumor tissue PGE2 was related to significant alteration in expression of several hundred genes indicating decreased cell cycling and increased apoptosis during indomethacin treatment, probably related to upregulation of acute phase reactants in tumor tissue. Increased prostanoid activity in colon cancer tissue is related to cross-talk between tumor and stroma cells. PMID:20043083

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection. PMID:12709027

  20. LY354740 is a potent and highly selective group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist in cells expressing human glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Schoepp, D D; Johnson, B G; Wright, R A; Salhoff, C R; Mayne, N G; Wu, S; Cockerman, S L; Burnett, J P; Belegaje, R; Bleakman, D; Monn, J A

    1997-01-01

    The novel compound LY354740 is a conformationally constrained analog of glutamate, which was designed for interaction at metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. In this paper the selectivity of LY354740 for recombinant human mGlu receptor subtypes expressed in non-neuronal (RGT) cells is described. At human mGlu2 receptors, LY354740 produced > 90% suppression of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation with an EC50 of 5.1 +/- 0.3 nM. LY354740 was six-fold less potent in activating human mGlu3 receptors (EC50 = 24.3 +/- 0.5 nM). LY354740 inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation in human mGlu2 receptor-expressing cells was blocked by competitive mGlu receptor antagonists, including (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG) and LY307452 ((2S,4S)-2-amino-4-(4,4-diphenylbut-1-yl)-pentane-1,5-dioic acid). LY354740 had no agonist or antagonist activities at cells expressing human mGlu4 or mGlu7 (group III mGlu receptors) (EC50 > 100,000 nM). When tested at group I phosphoinositide-coupled human mGlu receptors (mGlu1a and mGlu5a), LY354740 did not activate or inhibit mGlu receptor agonist-evoked phosphoinositide hydrolysis at up to 100,000 nM. Electrophysiological experiments also demonstrated that LY354740 also had no appreciable activity in cells expressing human recombinant AMPA (GluR4) and kainate (GluR6) receptors. Thus, LY354740 is a highly potent, efficacious and selective group II (mGlu2/3) receptor agonist, useful to explore the functions of these receptors in situ. PMID:9144636

  1. Heterologous expression of rat epitope-tagged histamine H2 receptors in insect Sf9 cells

    PubMed Central

    Beukers, M W; Klaassen, C H W; De Grip, W J; Verzijl, D; Timmerman, H; Leurs, R

    1997-01-01

    Rat histamine H2 receptors were epitope-tagged with six histidine residues at the C-terminus to allow immunological detection of the receptor. Recombinant baculoviruses containing the epitope-tagged H2 receptor were prepared and were used to infect insect Sf9 cells. The His-tagged H2 receptors expressed in insect Sf9 cells showed typical H2 receptor characteristics as determined with [125I]-aminopotentidine (APT) binding studies. In Sf9 cells expressing the His-tagged H2 receptor histamine was able to stimulate cyclic AMP production 9 fold (EC50=2.1±0.1 μM) by use of the endogenous signalling pathway. The classical antagonists cimetidine, ranitidine and tiotidine inhibited histamine induced cyclic AMP production with Ki values of 0.60±0.43 μM, 0.25±0.15 μM and 28±7 nM, respectively (mean±s.e.mean, n=3). The expression of the His-tagged H2 receptors in infected Sf9 cells reached functional levels of 6.6±0.6 pmol mg−1 protein (mean±s.e.mean, n=3) after 3 days of infection. This represents about 2×106 copies of receptor/cell. Preincubation of the cells with 0.03 mM cholesterol-β-cyclodextrin complex resulted in an increase of [125I]-APT binding up to 169±5% (mean±s.e.mean, n=3). The addition of 0.03 mM cholesterol-β-cyclodextrin complex did not affect histamine-induced cyclic AMP production. The EC50 value of histamine was 3.1±1.7 μM in the absence of cholesterol-β-cyclodextrin complex and 11.1±5.5 μM in the presence of cholesterol-β-cyclodextrin complex (mean±s.e.mean, n=3). Also, the amount of cyclic AMP produced in the presence of 100 μM histamine was identical, 85±18 pmol/106 cells in the absence and 81±11 pmol/106 cells in the presence of 0.03 mM cholesterol-β-cyclodextrin complex (mean±s.e.mean, n=3). Immunofluorescence studies with an antibody against the His-tag revealed that the majority of the His-tagged H2 receptors was localized inside the insect Sf9 cells, although plasma membrane labelling could be

  2. Homologous upregulation of sst2 somatostatin receptor expression in the rat arcuate nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Turner, J; Guo, F; Videau, C; Epelbaum, J; Beaudet, A

    2001-07-01

    In vitro studies using various cell systems have provided conflicting results regarding homologous regulation of somatostatin (SRIH) receptors, and information on whether SRIH regulates the expression of its own receptors in vivo is lacking. In the present study we examined, by in situ hybridization, the effects of pretreatment with the sst2-preferring SRIH analog, octreotide, in vivo, on mRNA levels of two SRIH receptor subtypes, sst1 and sst2, in rat brain and pituitary. (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding was also measured in these regions. Three hours after the iv injection of 50 microg octreotide to conscious adult male rats, there was a 46% increase (p < 0.01) in the labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus compared to normal saline-pretreated controls, but not in any of the other brain regions examined. Computer-assisted image analysis revealed that 3 h exposure to octreotide significantly (p < 0.01) augmented both the number and labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus, compared to those in saline-treated controls. By contrast, within the anterior pituitary gland, in vivo exposure to octreotide did not affect the expression of sst2 mRNA. No changes in sst1 mRNA-expressing cells were observed after octreotide treatment in any of the regions measured, indicating that the observed effects were homologous, i.e. specific of the receptor subtype stimulated. Octreotide pretreatment was also without effect on the density of (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding in either the arcuate nucleus or pituitary. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that SRIH preexposure in vivo upregulates the expression of a subtype of its own receptors, sst2, within the central nervous system. They further suggest that pretreatment with SRIH in vivo does not cause sst2 receptor desensitization in arcuate nucleus and pituitary. Such homologous regulatory mechanisms may play an important role in the neuroendocrine control

  3. Homologous upregulation of sst2 somatostatin receptor expression in the rat arcuate nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Turner, J; Guo, F; Videau, C; Epelbaum, J; Beaudet, A

    2001-07-01

    In vitro studies using various cell systems have provided conflicting results regarding homologous regulation of somatostatin (SRIH) receptors, and information on whether SRIH regulates the expression of its own receptors in vivo is lacking. In the present study we examined, by in situ hybridization, the effects of pretreatment with the sst2-preferring SRIH analog, octreotide, in vivo, on mRNA levels of two SRIH receptor subtypes, sst1 and sst2, in rat brain and pituitary. (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding was also measured in these regions. Three hours after the iv injection of 50 microg octreotide to conscious adult male rats, there was a 46% increase (p < 0.01) in the labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus compared to normal saline-pretreated controls, but not in any of the other brain regions examined. Computer-assisted image analysis revealed that 3 h exposure to octreotide significantly (p < 0.01) augmented both the number and labeling density of sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus, compared to those in saline-treated controls. By contrast, within the anterior pituitary gland, in vivo exposure to octreotide did not affect the expression of sst2 mRNA. No changes in sst1 mRNA-expressing cells were observed after octreotide treatment in any of the regions measured, indicating that the observed effects were homologous, i.e. specific of the receptor subtype stimulated. Octreotide pretreatment was also without effect on the density of (125)I-[DTrp(8)]-SRIH binding in either the arcuate nucleus or pituitary. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that SRIH preexposure in vivo upregulates the expression of a subtype of its own receptors, sst2, within the central nervous system. They further suggest that pretreatment with SRIH in vivo does not cause sst2 receptor desensitization in arcuate nucleus and pituitary. Such homologous regulatory mechanisms may play an important role in the neuroendocrine control

  4. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 enhances the growth hormone receptor expression in tendon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsun; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Ya-Hui; Pang, Jong-Hwei Su

    2014-01-01

    BPC 157, a pentadecapeptide derived from human gastric juice, has been demonstrated to promote the healing of different tissues, including skin, muscle, bone, ligament and tendon in many animal studies. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully clarified. The present study aimed to explore the effect of BPC 157 on tendon fibroblasts isolated from Achilles tendon of male Sprague-Dawley rat. From the result of cDNA microarray analysis, growth hormone receptor was revealed as one of the most abundantly up-regulated genes in tendon fibroblasts by BPC 157. BPC 157 dose- and time-dependently increased the expression of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts at both the mRNA and protein levels as measured by RT/real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The addition of growth hormone to BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts dose- and time-dependently increased the cell proliferation as determined by MTT assay and PCNA expression by RT/real-time PCR. Janus kinase 2, the downstream signal pathway of growth hormone receptor, was activated time-dependently by stimulating the BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts with growth hormone. In conclusion, the BPC 157-induced increase of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts may potentiate the proliferation-promoting effect of growth hormone and contribute to the healing of tendon. PMID:25415472

  5. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Complex and the Control of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Beischlag, Timothy V.; Morales, J. Luis; Hollingshead, Brett D.; Perdew, Gary H.

    2008-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that controls the expression of a diverse set of genes. The toxicity of the potent AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is almost exclusively mediated through this receptor. However, the key alterations in gene expression that mediate toxicity are poorly understood. It has been established through characterization of AhR-null mice that the AhR has a required physiological function, yet how endogenous mediators regulate this orphan receptor remains to be established. A picture as to how the AhR/ARNT heterodimer actually mediates gene transcription is starting to emerge. The AhR/ARNT complex can alter transcription both by binding to its cognate response element and through tethering to other transcription factors. In addition, many of the coregulatory proteins necessary for AhR-mediated transcription have been identified. Cross talk between the estrogen receptor and the AhR at the promoter of target genes appears to be an important mode of regulation. Inflammatory signaling pathways and the AhR also appear to be another important site of cross talk at the level of transcription. A major focus of this review is to highlight experimental efforts to characterize nonclassical mechanisms of AhR-mediated modulation of gene transcription. PMID:18540824

  6. A study protocol for quantitative targeted absolute proteomics (QTAP) by LC-MS/MS: application for inter-strain differences in protein expression levels of transporters, receptors, claudin-5, and marker proteins at the blood–brain barrier in ddY, FVB, and C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteomics has opened a new horizon in biological sciences. Global proteomic analysis is a promising technology for the discovery of thousands of proteins, post-translational modifications, polymorphisms, and molecular interactions in a variety of biological systems. The activities and roles of the identified proteins must also be elucidated, but this is complicated by the inability of conventional proteomic methods to yield quantitative information for protein expression. Thus, a variety of biological systems remain “black boxes”. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics (QTAP) enables the determination of absolute expression levels (mol) of any target protein, including low-abundance functional proteins, such as transporters and receptors. Therefore, QTAP will be useful for understanding the activities and roles of individual proteins and their differences, including normal/disease, human/animal, or in vitro/in vivo. Here, we describe the study protocols and precautions for QTAP experiments including in silico target peptide selection, determination of peptide concentration by amino acid analysis, setup of selected/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) analysis in liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry, preparation of protein samples (brain capillaries and plasma membrane fractions) followed by the preparation of peptide samples, simultaneous absolute quantification of target proteins by SRM/MRM analysis, data analysis, and troubleshooting. An application of QTAP in biological sciences was introduced that utilizes data from inter-strain differences in the protein expression levels of transporters, receptors, tight junction proteins and marker proteins at the blood–brain barrier in ddY, FVB, and C57BL/6J mice. Among 18 molecules, 13 (abcb1a/mdr1a/P-gp, abcc4/mrp4, abcg2/bcrp, slc2a1/glut1, slc7a5/lat1, slc16a1/mct1, slc22a8/oat3, insr, lrp1, tfr1, claudin-5, Na+/K+-ATPase, and γ-gtp) were detected in the isolated brain capillaries, and their

  7. Regulation of the surface expression of the platelet-activating factor receptor in IC-21 peritoneal macrophages. Effects of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1992-10-15

    The effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the expression of the receptor for platelet-activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; AGEPC) was examined in cultured IC-21 peritoneal macrophages. AGEPC binding to its receptors reached saturation within 20 min at 25 degrees C and was reversible. Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of AGEPC receptors with a Bmax of approximately 170 fmol/mg cellular protein and a Kd of 0.25 nM. Preincubation of IC-21 cells with LPS (0.01-1,000 ng/ml) induced an increase in the surface expression of AGEPC receptors in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. The maximal effect of LPS on the AGEPC receptor was observed between 5 and 8 h, with a typical increase between 150 and 200%. Scatchard analysis indicated that LPS treatment of IC-21 cells increased the number of AGEPC receptors on the cell surface without any apparent change in the affinity of the receptor for the ligand. The effect of LPS on the surface expression of the AGEPC receptor was nearly abolished by cycloheximide (0.1 mM) and by actinomycin D (3 microM), suggesting the involvement of enhanced receptor protein synthesis and mRNA production in this event. Moreover, LPS treatment increased the capability of the IC-21 cell to respond to AGEPC addition by elevating intracellular free Ca2+ without causing an increase in the basal level of intracellular Ca2+. The present study demonstrates that IC-21 peritoneal macrophages possess high affinity AGEPC receptors and provides the evidence that the number of functional AGEPC receptors on a cell can be increased significantly upon exposure to LPS. PMID:1328211

  8. High Cell Surface Death Receptor Expression Determines Type I Versus Type II Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xue Wei; Peterson, Kevin L.; Dai, Haiming; Schneider, Paula; Lee, Sun-Hee; Zhang, Jin-San; Koenig, Alexander; Bronk, Steve; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Gores, Gregory J.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that there are two signaling pathways leading from ligation of the Fas receptor to induction of apoptosis. Type I signaling involves Fas ligand-induced recruitment of large amounts of FADD (FAS-associated death domain protein) and procaspase 8, leading to direct activation of caspase 3, whereas type II signaling involves Bid-mediated mitochondrial perturbation to amplify a more modest death receptor-initiated signal. The biochemical basis for this dichotomy has previously been unclear. Here we show that type I cells have a longer half-life for Fas message and express higher amounts of cell surface Fas, explaining the increased recruitment of FADD and subsequent signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate that cells with type II Fas signaling (Jurkat or HCT-15) can signal through a type I pathway upon forced receptor overexpression and that shRNA-mediated Fas down-regulation converts cells with type I signaling (A498) to type II signaling. Importantly, the same cells can exhibit type I signaling for Fas and type II signaling for TRAIL (TNF-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), indicating that the choice of signaling pathway is related to the specific receptor, not some other cellular feature. Additional experiments revealed that up-regulation of cell surface death receptor 5 levels by treatment with 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin converted TRAIL signaling in HCT116 cells from type II to type I. Collectively, these results suggest that the type I/type II dichotomy reflects differences in cell surface death receptor expression. PMID:21865165

  9. Modulation of Mannose and Asialoglycoprotein Receptor Expression Determines Glycoprotein Hormone Half-life at Critical Points in the Reproductive Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Yiling; Lin, Angela; Fiete, Dorothy; Steirer, Lindsay; Baenziger, Jacques U.

    2014-01-01

    The rate at which glycoproteins are cleared from the circulation has a critical impact on their biologic activity in vivo. We have shown that clearance rates for glycoproteins such as luteinizing hormone (LH) that undergo regulated release into the circulation determine their potency. Two highly abundant, carbohydrate-specific, endocytic receptors, the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGR) and the mannose receptor (ManR) are expressed in the liver by parenchymal and sinusoidal endothelial cells, respectively. We demonstrate that the ManR mediates the clearance of glycoproteins such as LH that bear N-linked glycans terminating with β1,4-linked GalNAc-4-SO4, as well as glycoproteins bearing glycans that terminate with Man. Steady state levels of mRNA encoding the ASGR and the ManR are regulated by progesterone in pregnant mice, reaching maximal levels on day 12.5 of pregnancy. Protein expression and glycan-specific binding activity also increase in the livers of pregnant mice. In contrast, ManR mRNA, but not ASGR mRNA, decreases in male mice at the time of sexual maturation. We show that levels of ManR and ASGR expression control the clearance rate for glycoproteins bearing recognized glycans. Thus, reduced expression of the ManR at the time of sexual maturation will increase the potency of LH in vivo, whereas increased expression during pregnancy will reduce LH potency until progesterone and receptor levels fall prior to parturition. PMID:24619407

  10. Modulation of mannose and asialoglycoprotein receptor expression determines glycoprotein hormone half-life at critical points in the reproductive cycle.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yiling; Lin, Angela; Fiete, Dorothy; Steirer, Lindsay; Baenziger, Jacques U

    2014-04-25

    The rate at which glycoproteins are cleared from the circulation has a critical impact on their biologic activity in vivo. We have shown that clearance rates for glycoproteins such as luteinizing hormone (LH) that undergo regulated release into the circulation determine their potency. Two highly abundant, carbohydrate-specific, endocytic receptors, the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGR) and the mannose receptor (ManR) are expressed in the liver by parenchymal and sinusoidal endothelial cells, respectively. We demonstrate that the ManR mediates the clearance of glycoproteins such as LH that bear N-linked glycans terminating with β1,4-linked GalNAc-4-SO4, as well as glycoproteins bearing glycans that terminate with Man. Steady state levels of mRNA encoding the ASGR and the ManR are regulated by progesterone in pregnant mice, reaching maximal levels on day 12.5 of pregnancy. Protein expression and glycan-specific binding activity also increase in the livers of pregnant mice. In contrast, ManR mRNA, but not ASGR mRNA, decreases in male mice at the time of sexual maturation. We show that levels of ManR and ASGR expression control the clearance rate for glycoproteins bearing recognized glycans. Thus, reduced expression of the ManR at the time of sexual maturation will increase the potency of LH in vivo, whereas increased expression during pregnancy will reduce LH potency until progesterone and receptor levels fall prior to parturition.

  11. Hypergravity modulates vitamin D receptor target gene mRNA expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, Michiyasu; Iwasaki, Ken-Ichi; Kato, Shigeaki; Makishima, Makoto

    2009-09-01

    The possibility of pathological calcium metabolism is a critical health concern introduced by long-term space travel. Because vitamin D plays an important role in calcium homeostasis, we evaluated the effects of hypergravity on the expression of genes involved in vitamin D and calcium metabolism in ICR mice. When exposed to 2G hypergravity for 2 days, the mRNA expression of renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D 24-hydroxylase (Cyp24a1) was increased and that of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp27b1) was decreased. Although hypergravity decreased food intake and increased the expression of starvation-induced genes, the changes in Cyp24a1 and Cyp27b1 expression were not due to starvation, suggesting that hypergravity affects these genes directly. Hypergravity decreased plasma 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) levels in ICR mice, suggesting a consequence of decreased Cyp27b1 and increased Cyp24a1 expression. Although 1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D(3) [1alpha(OH)D(3)] treatment induced the expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR) target genes in the kidney of 2G-exposed ICR mice to similar levels as controls, 1alpha(OH)D(3) increased the intestinal expression of Cyp24a1 in ICR mice. Hypergravity-dependent changes of Cyp24a1 and Cyp27b1 expression were diminished in mice exposed to hypergravity for 14 days, which may represent an adaptation to hypergravity stress. Hypergravity exposure also increased Cyp24a1 expression in the kidney of C57BL/6J mice. We examined the effects of hypergravity on VDR-null mice and found that renal Cyp27b1 expression in VDR-null mice was decreased by hypergravity while renal Cyp24a1 expression was not detected in VDR-null mice. Thus hypergravity modifies the expression of genes involved in vitamin D metabolism.

  12. Differential relationships between D1 and D2 dopamine receptor expression in the medial preoptic nucleus and sexually-motivated song in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    DeVries, M S; Cordes, M A; Stevenson, S A; Riters, L V

    2015-08-20

    Converging data in songbirds support a central role for the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) in motivational aspects of vocal production. Recent data suggest that dopamine in the POM plays a complex modulatory role in the production of sexually-motivated song and that an optimal level of dopamine D1 receptor stimulation is required to facilitate singing behavior. To further explore this possibility, we used quantitative real-time PCR to examine relationships between mRNA expression of D1 as well as D2 receptors in the POM (and also the lateral septum and Area X) and sexually-motivated singing behavior in male European starlings. Results showed that both males with the highest and lowest D1 expression in the POM sang significantly less than males with intermediate levels of expression. Furthermore, singing behavior rose linearly in association with increasing levels of D1 expression in POM but dropped abruptly, such that individuals with D1 expression values higher than the mean sang very little. Analysis of birds with low and intermediate levels of D1 expression in POM revealed strong positive correlations between D1 expression and song but negative relationships between D2 receptor expression and song. These findings support prior work suggesting an optimal level of POM D1 receptor stimulation best facilitates sexually-motivated singing behavior. Results also suggest that D2 receptors may work in opposition to D1 receptors in POM to modify vocal production. PMID:26079111

  13. Differential relationships between D1 and D2 dopamine receptor expression in the medial preoptic nucleus and sexually-motivated song in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    DeVries, M. S.; Cordes, M.A.; Stevenson, S.A.; Riters, L.V.

    2015-01-01

    Converging data in songbirds support a central role for the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) in motivational aspects of vocal production. Recent data suggest that dopamine in the POM plays a complex modulatory role in the production of sexually-motivated song and that an optimal level of dopamine D1 receptor stimulation is required to facilitate singing behavior. To further explore this possibility, we used quantitative real time PCR to examine relationships between mRNA expression of D1 as well as D2 receptors in the POM (and also the lateral septum and Area X) and sexually-motivated singing behavior in male European starlings. Results showed that both males with the highest and lowest D1 expression in the POM sang significantly less than males with intermediate levels of expression. Furthermore, singing behavior rose linearly in association with increasing levels of D1 expression in POM but dropped abruptly, such that individuals with D1 expression values higher than the mean sang very little. Analysis of birds with low and intermediate levels of D1 expression in POM revealed strong positive correlations between D1 expression and song but negative relationships between D2 receptor expression and song. These findings support prior work suggesting an optimal level of POM D1 receptor stimulation best facilitates sexually-motivated singing behavior. Results also suggest that D2 receptors may work in opposition to D1 receptors in POM to modify vocal production. PMID:26079111

  14. The Expression Pattern of Melatonin Receptor 1a Gene during Early Life Stages in the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ye Hwa; Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kwon, Joon Yeong

    2013-01-01

    The action of melatonin within the body of animals is known to be mediated by melatonin receptors. Three different types of melatonin receptors have been identified so far in fish. However, which of these are specifically involved in puberty onset is not known in fish. We cloned and analyzed the sequence of melatonin receptor 1a (mel 1a) gene in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. In addition, we examined the tissue distribution of gene expressions for three types of receptors, mel 1a, 1b and lc and investigated which of them is involved in the onset of puberty by comparing their expression with that of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor I (GnRHr I) gene using quantitative real-time PCR from 1 week post hatch (wph) to 24 wph. The mel 1a gene of Nile tilapia consisted of two exons and one bulky intron between them. Mel 1a gene was found to be highly conserved gene showing high homology with the corresponding genes from different teleost. All three types of melatonin receptor genes were expressed in the brain, eyes and ovary in common. Expression of mel 1a gene was the most abundant and ubiquitous among 3 receptors in the brain, liver, gill, ovary, muscle, eye, heart, intestine, spleen and kidney. Mel 1b and mel 1c genes were, however, expressed in fewer tissues at low level. During the development post hatch, expressions of both mel 1a and GnRHr I genes significantly increased at 13 wph which was close to the putative timing of puberty onset in this species. These results suggest that among three types of receptors mel 1a is most likely associated with the action of melatonin in the onset of puberty in Nile tilapia. PMID:25949120

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor exhibits sexually dimorphic expression in the medaka brain.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yukiko; Hosono, Kohei; Yamashita, Junpei; Kawabata, Yukika; Okubo, Kataaki

    2015-11-01

    The differential impact of stress on brain functions of males and females has been widely observed in vertebrates. Recent evidence suggests that stress-induced glucocorticoid signaling affects sexual differentiation and sex changes in teleost fish. These facts led us to postulate that there were sex differences in glucocorticoid signaling in the teleost brain that underlie some sex differences in their physiological and behavioral traits. Here we found sexually dimorphic expression of a glucocorticoid receptor gene (gr1) in the brain of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes), with females having greater expression in several preoptic and thalamic nuclei. Further, gr1 exhibits female-biased expression in neurons of the anterior parvocellular preoptic nucleus that produce the neuropeptides vasotocin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (these neuropeptides have been implicated in the regulation of neuroendocrine and behavioral functions). These findings suggest that glucocorticoids have a greater influence on physiology and behavior mediated by these neuropeptides in females than in males, which may contribute to sex differences in the brain's response to stress. PMID:26433060

  16. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression Analysis of an Ecdysone Receptor Homolog in Teleogryllus emma (Orthoptera: Gryllidae)

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui; Xi, Gengsi; Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Ecdysteroids are steroid hormones that play important roles in the regulation of Arthropoda animal growth development, larvae ecdysis, and reproduction. The effect of ecdysteroids is mediated by ecdysteroid receptor (EcR). The ecdysone receptor (EcR) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NRs) that are ligand-dependent transcription factors. Ecdysone receptor is present only in invertebrates and plays a critical role in regulating the expression of a series of genes during development and reproduction. Here, we isolated and characterized cDNA of the cricket Teleopgryllus emma (Ohmachi & Matsuura) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) and studied mRNA expression pattern using real time-polymerase chain reaction. The full-length cDNA of T. emma EcR, termed TeEcR, is 2,558 bp and contains a 5′-untranslated region of 555 bp and a 3′-untranslated region of 407 bp. The open reading frame of TeEcR encodes deduced 531-amino acid peptides with a predicted molecular mass of 60.7 kDa. The amino acid sequence of T. emma EcR was similar to that of known EcR especially in the ligand-binding domain of insect EcR. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to compare TeEcR mRNA expression level at the whole body and gonad during T. emma development. The data revealed that TeEcR mRNA is differentially expressed during T. emma development, with the highest expression level in late-instar larvae of the body and lowest in third instar. The levels of TeEcR transcripts also vary among gonads development, and levels in ovaries were higher than in testes at every developmental stage. These results suggest that TeEcR may have potential significance to regulate the morphological structure and gonad development of T. emma, due to its expression in different developmental periods. PMID:25797799

  17. Thyroid hormone and retinoid X receptor function and expression during sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Manzon, Lori A; Youson, John H; Holzer, Guillaume; Staiano, Leopoldo; Laudet, Vincent; Manzon, Richard G

    2014-08-01

    Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) are members of the ancient class Agnatha and undergo a metamorphosis that transforms blind, sedentary, filter-feeding larvae into free-swimming, parasitic juveniles. Thyroid hormones (THs) appear to be important for lamprey metamorphosis, however, serum TH concentrations are elevated in the larval phase, decline rapidly during early metamorphosis and remain low until metamorphosis is complete; these TH fluctuations are contrary to those of other metamorphosing vertebrates. Moreover, thyroid hormone synthesis inhibitors (goitrogens) induce precocious metamorphosis and exogenous TH treatments disrupt natural metamorphosis in P. marinus. Given that THs exert their effects by binding to TH nuclear receptors (TRs) that often act as heterodimers with retinoid X receptors (RXRs), we cloned and characterized these receptors from P. marinus and examined their expression during metamorphosis. Two TRs (PmTR1 and PmTR2) and three RXRs (PmRXRs) were isolated from P. marinus cDNA. Phylogenetic analyses group the PmTRs together on a branch prior to the gnathostome TRα/β split. The three RXRs also group together, but our data indicated that these transcripts are most likely either allelic variants of the same gene locus, or the products of a lamprey-specific duplication event. Importantly, these P. marinus receptors more closely resemble vertebrate as opposed to invertebrate chordate receptors. Functional analysis revealed that PmTR1 and PmTR2 can activate transcription of TH-responsive genes when treated with nanomolar concentrations of TH and they have distinct pharmacological profiles reminiscent of vertebrate TRβ and TRα, respectively. Also similar to other metamorphosing vertebrates, expression patterns of the PmTRs during lamprey metamorphosis suggest that PmTR1 has a dynamic, tissue-specific expression pattern that correlates with tissue morphogenesis and biochemical changes and PmTR2 has a more uniform expression pattern. This TR

  18. Functional expression of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors in neonatal rat trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Aya; Sato, Masaki; Kimura, Maki; Yamazaki, Takaki; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Tazaki, Masakazu; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Bradykinin (BK) and its receptors (B1 and B2 receptors) play important roles in inflammatory nociception. However, the patterns of expression and physiological/pathological functions of B1 and B2 receptors in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons remain to be fully elucidated. We investigated the functional expression of BK receptors in rat TG neurons. We observed intense immunoreactivity of B2 receptors in TG neurons, while B1 receptors showed weak immunoreactivity. Expression of the B2 receptor colocalized with immunoreactivities against the pan-neuronal marker, neurofilament H, substance P, isolectin B4, and tropomyosin receptor kinase A antibodies. Both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]o), BK application increased the concentration of intracellular free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i). The amplitudes of BK-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase in the absence of [Ca(2+)]o were significantly smaller than those in the presence of Ca(2+). In the absence of [Ca(2+)]o, BK-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases were sensitive to B2 receptor antagonists, but not to a B1 receptor antagonist. However, B1 receptor agonist, Lys-[Des-Arg(9)]BK, transiently increased [Ca(2+)]i in primary cultured TG neurons, and these increases were sensitive to a B1 receptor antagonist in the presence of [Ca(2+)]o. These results indicated that B2 receptors were constitutively expressed and their activation induced the mobilization of [Ca(2+)]i from intracellular stores with partial Ca(2+) influx by BK. Although constitutive B1 receptor expression could not be clearly observed immunohistochemically in the TG cryosection, cultured TG neurons functionally expressed B1 receptors, suggesting that both B1 and B2 receptors involve pathological and physiological nociceptive functions.

  19. Imaging of G protein-coupled receptors in solid-supported planar membranes at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märki, Iwan; Leutenegger, Marcel; Geissbuehler, Matthias; Robelek, Rudolf; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Lasser, Theo

    2008-02-01

    Odorant receptors are an excellent example of natural superiority in specifically binding specific, small and hydrophobic molecules. They are of particular interest in the development of a sensor platform for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Odorant receptors (OR5) of Rattus norvegicus were incorporated into model membranes by in vitro synthesis and vectorial incorporation for achieving natural receptor function. The vectorial insertion of OR5 into the planar membrane and their lateral distribution, their interactions and their mobility within the membrane are of great importance for ligand-receptor interaction. We applied total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and image analysis to assess the insertion and the OR5 distribution as well as the lateral mobility of these receptors at the single molecule level. The vectorial incorporation of OR5 into planar lipid membranes was investigated with TIRF microscopy and image segmentation. With increasing expression time, the OR5 incorporation density and aggregation increased linearly by about 0.02μm -2min -1. The expression and incorporations of single OR5s were completed within about 8 minutes. The mobility of the incorporated receptors was measured with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP). These measurements revealed that the incorporated receptors were immobilized with this class of lipid membranes.

  20. Prognostic Value of Sex-Hormone Receptor Expression in Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Woo; Lee, Sang Don; Chung, Moon Kee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We investigated sex-hormone receptor expression as predicting factor of recurrence and progression in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Materials and Methods We retrospectively evaluated tumor specimens from patients treated for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder at our institution between January 2006 and January 2011. Performing immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal androgen receptor antibody and monoclonal estrogen receptor-beta antibody on paraffin-embedded tissue sections, we assessed the relationship of immunohistochemistry results and prognostic factors such as recurrence and progression. Results A total of 169 patients with bladder cancer were evaluated in this study. Sixty-threepatients had expressed androgen receptors and 52 patients had estrogen receptor beta. On univariable analysis, androgen receptor expression was significant lower in recurrence rates (p=0.001), and estrogen receptor beta expression was significant higher in progression rates (p=0.004). On multivariable analysis, significant association was found between androgen receptor expression and lower recurrence rates (hazard ratio=0.500; 95% confidence interval, 0.294 to 0.852; p=0.011), but estrogen receptor beta expression was not significantly associated with progression rates. Conclusion We concluded that the possibility of recurrence was low when the androgen receptor was expressed in the bladder cancer specimen and it could be the predicting factor of the stage, number of tumors, carcinoma in situ lesion and recurrence. PMID:25048477

  1. Expression of melatonin receptors in arteries involved in thermoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, M.; Laitinen, J.T.; Saavedra, J.M. )

    1990-08-01

    Melatonin binding sites were localized and characterized in the vasculature of the rat by using the melatonin analogue 2-(125I)iodomelatonin (125I-melatonin) and quantitative in vitro autoradiography. The expression of these sites was restricted to the caudal artery and to the arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. The arterial 125I-melatonin binding was stable, saturable, and reversible. Saturation studies revealed that the binding represented a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 3.4 x 10(-11) M in the anterior cerebral artery and 1.05 x 10(-10) M in the caudal artery. The binding capacities (Bmax) in these arteries were 19 and 15 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. The relative order of potency of indoles for inhibition of 125I-melatonin binding at these sites was typical of a melatonin receptor: 2-iodomelatonin greater than melatonin greater than N-acetylserotonin much much greater than 5-hydroxytryptamine. Norepinephrine-induced contraction of the caudal artery in vitro was significantly prolonged and potentiated by melatonin in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that these arterial binding sites are functional melatonin receptors. Neither primary steps in smooth muscle contraction (inositol phospholipid hydrolysis) nor relaxation (adenylate cyclase activation) were affected by melatonin. Melatonin, through its action on the tone of these arteries, may cause circulatory adjustments in these arteries, which are believed to be involved in thermoregulation.

  2. Genetic modification of cytotoxic T lymphocytes to express cytokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Perna, Serena K; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) or antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) is safe and can be effective in cancer patients. Achievement of clinical responses in these patients is associated with the in vivo expansion and persistence of the transferred T lymphocytes. For this reason, recombinant human interleukin-2 (IL-2) is frequently used to support the in vivo survival of T lymphocytes infused into patients. However, IL-2 also causes important side effects. Thus, alternative strategies are highly demanded to limit cytokine-related off-target effects and to redirect the responsiveness of specific T-cell subsets to selected cytokines. Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a promising alternative cytokine as it possesses the above mentioned properties. However, because its receptor is downregulated in ex vivo-expanded T cells, methods are required to restore their responsiveness to this homeostatic cytokine. In this chapter, we describe the methodology to obtain the ectopic expression of IL-7 receptor alpha (IL-7Rα) in antigen-specific CTL, using Epstein-Barr virus-specific CTL (EBV-CTL), as a model.

  3. Odorant receptor gene expression changes during the parr-smolt transformation in Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Dukes, J P; Deaville, R; Bruford, M W; Youngson, A F; Jordan, W C

    2004-09-01

    The ability of salmon to home accurately to their natal stream to spawn has long intrigued biologists and has important consequences for the maintenance of population structure in these species. It is known that olfaction is crucial to homing, and that the transition from the freshwater to the marine environment (the parr-smolt transformation; PST) is a period of increased olfactory sensitivity and learning, resulting in a permanent memory of natal site odours that is retained, at least in part, in peripheral sensory neurones. These odours are then used as cues by sexually maturing fish on their homeward migration. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction techniques to demonstrate transient increases in expression of odorant receptor transcripts (of up to fifty-fold over pre-PST levels) coincident with PST. Both olfactory (SORB) and vomeronasal receptors (SVRA and SVRC) are involved, which suggests that the fish learn both environmental odours and semiochemicals (pheromones). Receptor expression varies between families and changes over time indicating both genetic differences in odour stimuli and multiple periods of olfactory sensitivity. We suggest that changes in OR gene expression may have a role in homing behaviour and thus the maintenance of population structure in Atlantic salmon.

  4. Transcriptional activity and expression of liver X receptor in the ascidian Halocynthia roretzi.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Ahmed Ahmed; Lee, Jung Hwan; Shin, Jihye; Shin, Yun Kyung; Sohn, Young Chang

    2013-09-01

    Liver X receptors, LXRs, are ligand-activated transcription factors that belong to the group H nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily. In this study, an LXR (HrLXR) cDNA was cloned from the ascidian Halocynthia roretzi hepatopancreas and characterized to examine the functional conservation of ancestral LXRs in chordates. A phylogenetic analysis of HrLXR showed that it belongs to the tunicate (urochordate) LXR subgroup, which is distinct from vertebrate LXRs. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that HrLXR mRNA was expressed predominantly in the gills, and highly expressed in unfertilized eggs followed by decrease at later embryonic and larval stages. Unexpectedly, HrLXR was not activated by GW3965, whereas a synthetic ligand for a farnesoid X receptor, GW4064, activated HrLXR. This activation was abolished by the deletion of 51 amino acids from the N-terminus. In a mammalian two-hybrid system, HrLXR interacted with HrRXR in the presence of GW4064 or 9-cis retinoic acid. The injection of GW3965 and GW4064 in vivo increased the ATPbinding cassette sub-family G member 4 and HrLXR mRNA levels in the hepatopancreas and gills. These results suggest that the mRNA expression and transcriptional properties of HrLXR are different from those of vertebrate LXRs, although HrLXR is likely responsive to the related NR ligand, GW4064.

  5. The transcription factor RUNX2 regulates receptor tyrosine kinase expression in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Boregowda, Rajeev K.; Medina, Daniel J.; Markert, Elke; Bryan, Michael A.; Chen, Wenjin; Chen, Suzie; Rabkin, Anna; Vido, Michael J.; Gunderson, Samuel I.; Chekmareva, Marina; Foran, David J.; Lasfar, Ahmed; Goydos, James S.; Cohen-Solal, Karine A.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases-based autocrine loops largely contribute to activate the MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways in melanoma. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in generating these autocrine loops are still largely unknown. In the present study, we examine the role of the transcription factor RUNX2 in the regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) expression in melanoma. We have demonstrated that RUNX2-deficient melanoma cells display a significant decrease in three receptor tyrosine kinases, EGFR, IGF-1R and PDGFRβ. In addition, we found co-expression of RUNX2 and another RTK, AXL, in both melanoma cells and melanoma patient samples. We observed a decrease in phosphoAKT2 (S474) and phosphoAKT (T308) levels when RUNX2 knock down resulted in significant RTK down regulation. Finally, we showed a dramatic up regulation of RUNX2 expression with concomitant up-regulation of EGFR, IGF-1R and AXL in melanoma cells resistant to the BRAF V600E inhibitor PLX4720. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that RUNX2 might be a key player in RTK-based autocrine loops and a mediator of resistance to BRAF V600E inhibitors involving RTK up regulation in melanoma. PMID:27102439

  6. Malaria inhibits surface expression of complement receptor-1 in monocyte/macrophages causing decreased immunecomplex internalization

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Arias, Cristina; Lopez, Jean Pierre; Hernandez-Perez, Jean Nikolae; Bautista-Ojeda, Maria Dolores; Branch, OraLee; Rodriguez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) expressed on the surface of phagocytic cells binds complement-bound IC playing an important role in the clearance of circulating immunecomplexes (IC). This receptor is critical to prevent accumulation of IC, which can contribute to inflammatory pathology. Accumulation of circulating IC is frequently observed during malaria, although the factors contributing to this accumulation are not clearly understood. We have observed that the surface expression of CR1 on monocyte/macrophages and B cells is strongly reduced in mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria model. Monocyte/macrophages from these infected mice present a specific inhibition of complement-mediated internalization of IC caused by the decreased CR1 expression. Accordingly, mice show accumulation of circulating IC and deposition of IC in the kidneys that inversely correlates with the decrease in CR1 surface expression. Our results indicate that malaria induces a significant decrease on surface CR1 expression in the monocyte/macrophage population that results in deficient internalization of IC by monocyte/macrophages. To determine whether this phenomenon is found in human malaria patients, we have analyzed 92 patients infected with either P. falciparum (22) or P. vivax (70), the most prevalent human malaria parasites. The levels of surface CR1 on peripheral monocyte/macrophages and B cells of these patients show a significant decrease compared to uninfected control individuals in the same area. We propose that this decrease in CR1 plays an essential role in impaired IC clearance during malaria. PMID:23440418

  7. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  8. The effect of TAK-778 on gene expression of osteoblastic cells is mediated through estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Bellesini, Larissa S; Beloti, Marcio M; Crippa, Grasiele E; Bombonato-Prado, Karina F; Junta, Cristina M; Marques, Marcia M; Passos,