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Sample records for receptor inhibits calmodulin

  1. A novel role for calmodulin: Ca2+-independent inhibition of type-1 inositol trisphosphate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Cardy, T J; Taylor, C W

    1998-01-01

    Calmodulin inhibits both inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) binding to, and IP3-evoked Ca2+ release by, cerebellar IP3 receptors [Patel, Morris, Adkins, O'Beirne and Taylor (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S.A. 94, 11627-11632]. In the present study, full-length rat type-1 and -3 IP3 receptors were expressed at high levels in insect Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells and the effects of calmodulin were examined. In the absence of Ca2+, calmodulin caused a concentration-dependent and reversible inhibition of [3H]IP3 binding to type-1 IP3 receptors by decreasing their apparent affinity for IP3. The effect was not reproduced by high concentrations of troponin C, parvalbumin or S-100. Increasing the medium free [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]m) inhibited [3H]IP3 binding to type-1 receptors, but the further inhibition caused by a submaximal concentration of calmodulin was similar at each [Ca2+]m. In the absence of Ca2+, 125I-calmodulin bound to a single site on each type-1 receptor subunit and to an additional site in the presence of Ca2+. There was no detectable binding of 125I-calmodulin to type-3 receptors and binding of [3H]IP3 was insensitive to calmodulin at all [Ca2+]m. Both peptide and conventional Ca2+-calmodulin antagonists affected neither [3H]IP3 binding directly nor the inhibitory effect of calmodulin in the absence of Ca2+, but each caused a [Ca2+]m-dependent reversal of the inhibition of [3H]IP3 binding caused by calmodulin. Camstatin, a peptide that binds to calmodulin equally well in the presence or absence of Ca2+, reversed the inhibitory effects of calmodulin on [3H]IP3 binding at all [Ca2+]m. We conclude that calmodulin specifically inhibits [3H]IP3 binding to type-1 IP3 receptors: the first example of a protein regulated by calmodulin in an entirely Ca2+-independent manner. Inhibition of type-1 IP3 receptors by calmodulin may dynamically regulate their sensitivity to IP3 in response to the changes in cytosolic free calmodulin concentration thought to accompany stimulation

  2. Hepatocyte insulin receptor is a calmodulin binding protein and is functionally inhibited by calmidazolium

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, T.P.; Pollet, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Insulin-induced autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor and changes in intracellular Ca/sup + +/ have been proposed as possible mediators of insulin action in target tissues. The authors have investigated the association of the 17kD calcium binding protein calmodulin with the insulin receptor solubilized from rat liver plasma membranes. Insulin receptors solubilized in 0.1% Triton X-100 exhibited strong binding to calmodulin-agarose affinity columns in the presence of 100..mu..M calcium and could be eluded with 100..mu..M ethelene glycol-bis (amino ethel ether) Tetra Acetic Acid (EGTA) with an 80% yield in insulin binding activity. In addition, /sup 125/I-Calmodulin was shown to bind to wheat germ agglutinin purified solubilized receptors, was specifically inhibited by EGTA (100 ..mu..M) and/or calmidazolium (10 ..mu..M) and was found to be insulin-dependent (max 10/sup -10/ M insulin). SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis data suggests that /sup 125/I-calmodulin may be associated with the 92 kD beta-subunit of the insulin receptor, consistent with the cytoplasmic domain of this subunit. While they have confirmed previous reports that the addition of calcium and calmodulin to solubilized insulin receptors preparations produces no demonstrable change in receptor phosphorylation, the addition of the calmodulin inhibitor calmidazolium did show more than 50% inhibition of insulin stimulated receptor phosphorylation, suggesting that a domain of the calmodulin molecule may be very tightly associated with the insulin receptor. These results indicate that calmodulin binds tightly and specifically to the insulin receptor of the hepatocyte and is insulin dependent. The findings also suggest that this interaction may be functionally significant in mediating insulin-induced receptor phosphorylation as well as other insulin actions. Thus, calmodulin may play a major role as an intracellular contributor to insulin action.

  3. B-cell receptor activation inhibits AID expression through calmodulin inhibition of E-proteins.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Jannek; Sveshnikova, Natalia; Wallenius, Anders; Baradaran, Sanna; Saarikettu, Juha; Grundström, Thomas

    2008-01-29

    Upon encountering antigens, B-lymphocytes can adapt to produce a highly specific and potent antibody response. Somatic hypermutation, which introduces point mutations in the variable regions of antibody genes, can increase the affinity for antigen, and antibody effector functions can be altered by class switch recombination (CSR), which changes the expressed constant region exons. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is the mutagenic antibody diversification enzyme that is essential for both somatic hypermutation and CSR. The mutagenic AID enzyme has to be tightly controlled. Here, we show that engagement of the membrane-bound antibodies of the B-cell receptor (BCR), which signals that good antibody affinity has been reached, inhibits AID gene expression and that calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling is essential for this inhibition. Moreover, we show that overexpression of the Ca(2+) sensor protein calmodulin inhibits AID gene expression, and that the transcription factor E2A is required for regulation of the AID gene by the BCR. E2A mutated in the binding site for calmodulin, and thus showing calmodulin-resistant DNA binding, makes AID expression resistant to the inhibition through BCR activation. Thus, BCR activation inhibits AID gene expression through Ca(2+)/calmodulin inhibition of E2A.

  4. Ca2+-dependent inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Haga, K; Tsuga, H; Haga, T

    1997-02-11

    Agonist- or light-dependent phosphorylation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) or rhodopsin by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) was found to be inhibited by calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The phosphorylation was fully inhibited in the absence of G protein betagamma subunits and partially inhibited in the presence of betagamma subunits. The dose-response curve for stimulation by betagamma subunits of the m2 and rhodopsin phosphorylation was shifted to the higher concentration of betagamma subunits by addition of Ca2+-calmodulin. The phosphorylation by GRK2 of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing a peptide corresponding to the central part of the third intracellular loop of m2 receptors (I3-GST) was not affected by Ca2+-calmodulin in the presence or absence of betagamma subunits, but the agonist-dependent stimulation of I3-GST phosphorylation by an I3-deleted m2 receptor mutant in the presence of betagamma subunits was suppressed by Ca2+-calmodulin. These results indicate that Ca2+-calmodulin does not directly interact with the catalytic site of GRK2 but inhibits the kinase activity of GRK2 by interfering with the activation of GRK2 by agonist-bound m2 receptors and G protein betagamma subunits. In agreement with the assumption that GRK2 activity is suppressed by the increase in intracellular Ca2+, the sequestration of m2 receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was found to be attenuated by the treatment with a Ca2+ ionophore, A23187.

  5. Competitive inhibition of TRPV1-calmodulin interaction by vanilloids.

    PubMed

    Hetényi, Anasztázia; Németh, Lukács; Wéber, Edit; Szakonyi, Gerda; Winter, Zoltán; Jósvay, Katalin; Bartus, Éva; Oláh, Zoltán; Martinek, Tamás A

    2016-08-01

    There is enormous interest toward vanilloid agonists of the pain receptor TRPV1 in analgesic therapy, but the mechanisms of their sensory neuron-blocking effects at high or repeated doses are still a matter of debate. Our results have demonstrated that capsaicin and resiniferatoxin form nanomolar complexes with calmodulin, and competitively inhibit TRPV1-calmodulin interaction. These interactions involve the protein recognition interface of calmodulin, which is responsible for all of the cell-regulatory calmodulin-protein interactions. These results draw attention to a previously unknown vanilloid target, which may contribute to the explanation of the paradoxical pain-modulating behavior of these important pharmacons.

  6. The Arrhythmogenic Calmodulin p.Phe142Leu Mutation Impairs C-domain Ca2+ Binding but Not Calmodulin-dependent Inhibition of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Mads Toft; Liu, Yingjie; Larsen, Kamilla Taunsig; Nani, Alma; Tian, Xixi; Holt, Christian; Wang, Ruiwu; Wimmer, Reinhard; Van Petegem, Filip; Fill, Michael; Chen, S R Wayne; Overgaard, Michael Toft

    2017-01-27

    A number of point mutations in the intracellular Ca(2+)-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) are arrhythmogenic, yet their underlying mechanisms are not clear. These mutations generally decrease Ca(2+) binding to CaM and impair inhibition of CaM-regulated Ca(2+) channels like the cardiac Ca(2+) release channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR2), and it appears that attenuated CaM Ca(2+) binding correlates with impaired CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Here, we investigated the RyR2 inhibitory action of the CaM p.Phe142Leu mutation (F142L; numbered including the start-Met), which markedly reduces CaM Ca(2+) binding. Surprisingly, CaM-F142L had little to no aberrant effect on RyR2-mediated store overload-induced Ca(2+) release in HEK293 cells compared with CaM-WT. Furthermore, CaM-F142L enhanced CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition at the single channel level compared with CaM-WT. This is in stark contrast to the actions of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations N54I, D96V, N98S, and D130G, which all diminish CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Thermodynamic analysis showed that apoCaM-F142L converts an endothermal interaction between CaM and the CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) of RyR2 into an exothermal one. Moreover, NMR spectra revealed that the CaM-F142L-CaMBD interaction is structurally different from that of CaM-WT at low Ca(2+) These data indicate a distinct interaction between CaM-F142L and the RyR2 CaMBD, which may explain the stronger CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition by CaM-F142L, despite its reduced Ca(2+) binding. Collectively, these results add to our understanding of CaM-dependent regulation of RyR2 as well as the mechanistic effects of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations. The unique properties of the CaM-F142L mutation may provide novel clues on how to suppress excessive RyR2 Ca(2+) release by manipulating the CaM-RyR2 interaction. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. The Arrhythmogenic Calmodulin p.Phe142Leu Mutation Impairs C-domain Ca2+ Binding but Not Calmodulin-dependent Inhibition of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingjie; Larsen, Kamilla Taunsig; Nani, Alma; Tian, Xixi; Holt, Christian; Wang, Ruiwu; Fill, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A number of point mutations in the intracellular Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) are arrhythmogenic, yet their underlying mechanisms are not clear. These mutations generally decrease Ca2+ binding to CaM and impair inhibition of CaM-regulated Ca2+ channels like the cardiac Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR2), and it appears that attenuated CaM Ca2+ binding correlates with impaired CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Here, we investigated the RyR2 inhibitory action of the CaM p.Phe142Leu mutation (F142L; numbered including the start-Met), which markedly reduces CaM Ca2+ binding. Surprisingly, CaM-F142L had little to no aberrant effect on RyR2-mediated store overload-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells compared with CaM-WT. Furthermore, CaM-F142L enhanced CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition at the single channel level compared with CaM-WT. This is in stark contrast to the actions of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations N54I, D96V, N98S, and D130G, which all diminish CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Thermodynamic analysis showed that apoCaM-F142L converts an endothermal interaction between CaM and the CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) of RyR2 into an exothermal one. Moreover, NMR spectra revealed that the CaM-F142L-CaMBD interaction is structurally different from that of CaM-WT at low Ca2+. These data indicate a distinct interaction between CaM-F142L and the RyR2 CaMBD, which may explain the stronger CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition by CaM-F142L, despite its reduced Ca2+ binding. Collectively, these results add to our understanding of CaM-dependent regulation of RyR2 as well as the mechanistic effects of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations. The unique properties of the CaM-F142L mutation may provide novel clues on how to suppress excessive RyR2 Ca2+ release by manipulating the CaM-RyR2 interaction. PMID:27927985

  8. Calcium Occupancy of N-terminal Sites within Calmodulin Induces Inhibition of the Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2007-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulates calcium release from intracellular stores in skeletal muscle through its association with the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) calcium release channel, where CaM association enhances channel opening at resting calcium levels and its closing at micromolar calcium levels associated with muscle contraction. A high-affinity CaM-binding sequence (RyRp) has been identified in RyR1, which corresponds to a 30-residue sequence (i.e., K3614 – N3643) located within the central portion of the primary sequence. However, it is currently unclear whether the identified CaM-binding sequence a) senses calcium over the physiological range of calcium-concentrations associated with RyR1 regulation or b) plays a structural role unrelated to the calcium-dependent modulation of RyR1 function. Therefore, we have measured the calcium-dependent activation of the individual domains of CaM in association with RyRp and their relationship to the CaM-dependent regulation of RyR1. These measurements utilize an engineered CaM, permitting the site-specific incorporation of N-(1-pyrene) maleimide at either T34C (PyN-CaM) or T110C (PyC-CaM) in the N- and C-domains, respectively. Consistent with prior measurements, we observe a high-affinity association between both apo- and calcium-activated CaM and RyRp. Upon association with RyRp, fluorescence changes in PyN-CaM or PyC-CaM permit the measurement of the calcium-activation of these individual domains. Fluorescence changes upon calcium-activation of PyC-CaM in association with RyRp are indicative of high-affinity calcium-dependent activation of the C-terminal domain of CaM bound to RyRp at resting calcium levels and the activation of the N-terminal domain at levels of calcium associated cellular activation. In comparison, occupancy of calcium-binding sites in the N-domain of CaM mirrors the calcium-dependence of RyR1 inhibition observed at activating calcium levels, where [Ca]1/2 = 4.3 0.4 μM, suggesting a direct regulation of Ry

  9. Calcium occupancy of N-terminal sites within calmodulin induces inhibition of the ryanodine receptor calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2007-09-18

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulates calcium release from intracellular stores in skeletal muscle through its association with the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) calcium release channel, where CaM association enhances channel opening at resting calcium levels and its closing at micromolar calcium levels associated with muscle contraction. A high-affinity CaM-binding sequence (RyRp) has been identified in RyR1, which corresponds to a 30-residue sequence (i.e., K3614-N3643) located within the central portion of the primary sequence. However, it is presently unclear whether the identified CaM-binding sequence in association with CaM (a) senses calcium over the physiological range of calcium concentrations associated with RyR1 regulation or alternatively, (b) plays a structural role unrelated to the calcium-dependent modulation of RyR1 function. Therefore, we have measured the calcium-dependent activation of the individual domains of CaM in association with RyRp and their relationship to the CaM-dependent regulation of RyR1. These measurements utilize an engineered CaM, permitting the site-specific incorporation of N-(1-pyrene)maleimide at either T34C (PyN-CaM) or T110C (PyC-CaM) in the N- and C-domains, respectively. Consistent with prior measurements, we observe a high-affinity association of both apo-CaM and calcium-activated CaM with RyRp. Upon association with RyRp, fluorescence changes in PyN-CaM or PyC-CaM permit the measurement of the calcium-dependent activation of these individual domains. Fluorescence changes upon calcium activation of PyC-CaM in association with RyRp are indicative of high-affinity calcium-dependent activation of the C-terminal domain of CaM at resting calcium levels; at calcium levels associated with muscle contraction, activation of the N-terminal domain occurs with concomitant increases in the fluorescence intensity of PyC-CaM that is associated with structural changes within the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1. Occupancy of calcium-binding sites in the N

  10. Tyrosine-specific phosphorylation of calmodulin by the insulin receptor kinase purified from human placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, D B; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Y; Gale, R D; McDonald, J M

    1989-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that calmodulin can be phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo by both tyrosine-specific and serine/threonine protein kinase. We demonstrate here that the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase purified from human placenta phosphorylates calmodulin. The highly purified receptors (prepared by insulin-Sepharose chromatography) were 5-10 times more effective in catalysing the phosphorylation of calmodulin than an equal number of partially purified receptors (prepared by wheat-germ agglutinin-Sepharose chromatography). Phosphorylation occurred exclusively on tyrosine residues, up to a maximum of 1 mol [0.90 +/- 0.14 (n = 5)] of phosphate incorporated/mol of calmodulin. Phosphorylation of calmodulin was dependent on the presence of certain basic proteins and divalent cations. Some of these basic proteins, i.e. polylysine, polyarginine, polyornithine, protamine sulphate and histones H1 and H2B, were also able to stimulate the phosphorylation of calmodulin via an insulin-independent activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase. Addition of insulin further increased incorporation of 32P into calmodulin. The magnitude of the effect of insulin was dependent on the concentration and type of basic protein used, ranging from 0.5- to 9.0-fold stimulation. Maximal phosphorylation of calmodulin was obtained at an insulin concentration of 10(-10) M, with half-maximal effect at 10(-11) M. Either Mg2+ or Mn2+ was necessary to obtain phosphorylation, but Mg2+ was far more effective than Mn2+. In contrast, maximal phosphorylation of calmodulin was observed in the absence of Ca2+. Inhibition of phosphorylation was observed as free Ca2+ concentration exceeded 0.1 microM, with almost complete inhibition at 30 microM free Ca2+. The Km for calmodulin was approx. 0.1 microM. To gain further insight into the effects of basic proteins in this system, we examined the binding of calmodulin to the insulin receptor and the polylysine. Calmodulin binds to the insulin

  11. Calcium/calmodulin kinase inhibitors and immunosuppressant macrolides rapamycin and FK506 inhibit progestin- and glucocorticosteroid receptor-mediated transcription in human breast cancer T47D cells.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, S; Marsaud, V; Mercier-Bodard, C; Baulieu, E E; Mader, S; White, J H; Renoir, J M

    1998-07-01

    The effects of immunosuppressants and inhibitors of specific calcium/calmodulin kinase (CaMK) of types II and IV on progestin/glucocorticosteroid-induced transcription were studied in two human stably transfected breast cancer T47D cell lines. The lines contain the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene under control either of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter (T47D-MMTV-CAT), or the minimal promoter containing five glucocorticosteroid/progestin hormone response elements [T47D-(GRE)5-CAT]. Progestin- and triamcinolone acetonide (TA)-induced CAT gene expression was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in both lines by preincubation with rapamycin (Rap) and, to a lesser extent, with FK506, but not with cyclosporin A. CaMK II and/or IV inhibitors KN62 and KN93 also inhibited progestin- and TA-stimulated transcription in both lines. None of these drugs had any effect on basal transcription. The antagonist RU486 inhibited all the effects of both progestin and TA, suggesting that progesterone receptor (PR)-, as well as glucocorticosteroid receptor (GR)- mediated transactivation are targets of immunosuppressants and CaMKs in T47D cells. Indeed, Northern analysis showed that Rap, KN62, and, to a lesser degree, FK506 inhibited progestin stimulation of Cyclin D1 mRNA levels, but not those of the non-steroid-regulated glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene. Addition of Rap or KN62 after exposure of cells to progesterone agonist Org 2058 had no effect on induction of CAT activity. Taken together, these data indicate that Rap and FK506, as well as CaMK inhibitors, inhibit steroid-induced activities of exogenous, as well as of some endogenous, steroid receptor-regulated genes by a mechanism preceding hormone-induced receptor activation. Rap appeared to stabilize a 9S form of [3H]Org 2058-PR complexes isolated from T47D (GRE)5CAT cell nuclei. By contrast, the progesterone receptor (PR) was isolated from cells treated with KN62 as a 5S entity

  12. Differential inhibition of calmodulin-sensitive phosphodiesterase and Ca++-adenosine triphosphatase by chlorpromazine-linked calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Prozialeck, W.C.; Wallace, T.L.; Weiss, B.

    1987-10-01

    Upon irradiation with UV light, chlorpromazine binds irreversibly to calmodulin and inactivates it. To determine whether this chlorpromazine-calmodulin (CPZ-CaM) complex can inhibit the actions of native calmodulin, we examined its effects on the activity of calmodulin-sensitive cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase from rat brain and on the Ca++-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) of human erythrocyte membranes. The CPZ-CaM complex was prepared by irradiating purified bovine brain calmodulin in the presence of chlorpromazine and Ca++. The sample was then dialyzed extensively to remove reversibly bound chlorpromazine and then assayed for its ability to activate calmodulin-sensitive phosphodiesterase and Ca++-ATPase, and for its ability to block the stimulatory effects of native calmodulin on these enzymes. The CPZ-CaM complex had no effect on the basal activity of either enzyme; it neither activated nor inhibited the enzymes when assayed in the absence of calmodulin. However, it affected differentially the activation of the two enzymes by native calmodulin. The CPZ-CaM complex totally inhibited calmodulin-stimulated phosphodiesterase but had no effect on the activation of the ATPase by calmodulin. Other studies showed that CPZ-CaM increased the activation constant (Ka) for the interaction of calmodulin with phosphodiesterase but did not affect the maximal activation (Vmax) of the enzyme by calmodulin. Neither calmodulin nor CPZ-CaM altered the Km for the interaction between phosphodiesterase and cyclic AMP. These results suggest that CPZ-CaM inhibits the calmodulin-induced activation of phosphodiesterase by competing with calmodulin for regulatory sites on the enzyme and not by interacting with calmodulin itself or by blocking the interaction of cyclic AMP with the enzyme.

  13. Calmodulin antagonists inhibit secretion in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Secretion in Paramecium is Ca2+-dependent and involves exocytic release of the content of the secretory organelle, known as the trichocyst. The content, called the trichocyst matrix, undergoes a Ca2+-induced reordering of its paracrystalline structure during release, and we have defined three stages in this expansion process. The stage I, or fully condensed trichocyst, is the 4 microns-long membrane-bounded form existing prior to stimulation. Stage II, the partially expanded trichocyst, we define as an intermediate stage in the transition, preceding stage III, the fully expanded extruded form which is a 20-40 microns-long needlelike structure. These stages have been used to assay the effects of trifluoperazine (TFP) and W-7, calmodulin (CaM) antagonists, on trichocyst matrix expansion in vivo. TFP and W-7 are shown to reversibly block matrix release induced by picric acid. Ultra- structural examination reveals that one effect of this inhibition is reflected in the organelles themselves, which are prevented from undergoing the stage I-stage II transition by preincubation in 14 microM TFP or 35 microM W-7 before fixation. This inhibition of expansion by TFP can be moderated but not abolished by high extracellular Ca2+ (5 mM). The moderation by high Ca2+ can be eliminated by raising TFP concentration to 20 microM. A possible explanation for the ability to titrate the inhibition in this manner is that TFP is acting to block expansion by binding to the Ca2+-CaM complex. Brief exposure of cells to the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 and 5 mM Ca2+ following TFP treatment promotes matrix expansion, although in 14 microM TFP a residual level of inhibition remains. These results suggest that, following stimulation, CaM regulates secretion in Paramecium, possibly by controlling the Ca2+-dependent matrix expansion which accompanies exocytosis in these cells. PMID:6403556

  14. Acute inhibition of corticosteroidogenesis by inhibitors of calmodulin action.

    PubMed

    Carsia, R V; Moyle, W R; Wolff, D J; Malamed, S

    1982-11-01

    To identify the possible role of calmodulin in ACTH function, we tested the ability of chlorpromazine (CP) and other calmodulin antagonists to inhibit steroidogenesis of isolated adrenocortical cells of the rat. CP reversibly inhibited maximal ACTH-induced corticosterone (B) production. The presence of the drug did not alter the ED50 of ACTH stimulation (3.2 X 10(3) pg/ml), suggesting that it inhibited ACTH-induced steroidogenesis in a noncompetitive manner. The CP concentration required for half-maximal inhibition was 8.2 microM, a value close to the dissociation constant of the CP-calmodulin complex (5.3 microM). Concentrations greater than 40 microM resulted in complete inhibition. Similar concentrations of CP inhibited ACTH-induced cAMP accumulation in a dose-dependent manner, indicating an effect of the drug on early events in ACTH action. In addition, CP also apparently acted at a site distal to the point of cAMP formation, as shown by the finding that it inhibited cAMP-induced B production. CP inhibition of ACTH-induced B production was independent of the Ca2+ concentration, suggesting that the drug did not compete with Ca2+ directly. Concentrations of CP greater than 20 microM inhibited protein synthesis as measured by leucine incorporation into cellular proteins. Thus, although the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of CP on steroidogenesis might be explained by an effect on protein synthesis, the inhibition seen at 10 microM appeared to be independent of protein synthesis. Other antagonists of calmodulin action inhibited maximal ACTH-induced B production with the following relative potencies: trifluoperazine greater than CP greater than haloperidol greater than chlordiazepoxide. This order is similar to that reported for inhibition of calmodulin-activated phosphodiesterase and for binding to calmodulin. These findings suggest that calmodulin may modulate the effect of ACTH on steroidogenesis at multiple sites.

  15. Calmodulin Affects Sensitization of Drosophila melanogaster Odorant Receptors.

    PubMed

    Mukunda, Latha; Miazzi, Fabio; Sargsyan, Vardanush; Hansson, Bill S; Wicher, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Flying insects have developed a remarkably sensitive olfactory system to detect faint and turbulent odor traces. This ability is linked to the olfactory receptors class of odorant receptors (ORs), occurring exclusively in winged insects. ORs form heteromeric complexes of an odorant specific receptor protein (OrX) and a highly conserved co-receptor protein (Orco). The ORs form ligand gated ion channels that are tuned by intracellular signaling systems. Repetitive subthreshold odor stimulation of olfactory sensory neurons sensitizes insect ORs. This OR sensitization process requires Orco activity. In the present study we first asked whether OR sensitization can be monitored with heterologously expressed OR proteins. Using electrophysiological and calcium imaging methods we demonstrate that D. melanogaster OR proteins expressed in CHO cells show sensitization upon repeated weak stimulation. This was found for OR channels formed by Orco as well as by Or22a or Or56a and Orco. Moreover, we show that inhibition of calmodulin (CaM) action on OR proteins, expressed in CHO cells, abolishes any sensitization. Finally, we investigated the sensitization phenomenon using an ex vivo preparation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) expressing Or22a inside the fly's antenna. Using calcium imaging, we observed sensitization in the dendrites as well as in the soma. Inhibition of calmodulin with W7 disrupted the sensitization within the outer dendritic shaft, whereas the sensitization remained in the other OSN compartments. Taken together, our results suggest that CaM action is involved in sensitizing the OR complex and that this mechanisms accounts for the sensitization in the outer dendrites, whereas further mechanisms contribute to the sensitization observed in the other OSN compartments. The use of heterologously expressed OR proteins appears to be suitable for further investigations on the mechanistic basis of OR sensitization, while investigations on native neurons are required

  16. Phosphorylation of GRK2 by protein kinase C abolishes its inhibition by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Krasel, C; Dammeier, S; Winstel, R; Brockmann, J; Mischak, H; Lohse, M J

    2001-01-19

    G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are important regulators of G-protein-coupled receptor function. Two members of this family L, GRK2 and GRK5 L, have been shown to be substrates for protein kinase C (PKC). Whereas PKC-mediated phosphorylation results in inhibition of GRK5, it increases the activity of GRK2 toward its substrates probably through increased affinity for receptor-containing membranes. We show here that this increase in activity may be caused by relieving a tonic inhibition of GRK2 by calmodulin. In vitro, GRK2 was preferentially phosphorylated by PKC isoforms alpha, gamma, and delta. Two-dimensional peptide mapping of PKCalpha-phosphorylated GRK2 showed a single site of phosphorylation, which was identified as serine 29 by HPLC-MS. A S29A mutant of GRK2 was not phosphorylated by PKC in vitro and showed no phorbol ester-stimulated phosphorylation when transfected into human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells. Serine 29 is located in the calmodulin-binding region of GRK2, and binding of calmodulin to GRK2 results in inhibition of kinase activity. This inhibition was almost completely abolished in vitro when GRK2 was phosphorylated by PKC. These data suggest that calmodulin may be an inhibitor of GRK2 whose effects can be abolished with PKC-mediated phosphorylation of GRK2.

  17. Calmodulin regulation and identification of calmodulin binding region of type-3 ryanodine receptor calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Xu, Le; Pasek, Daniel A; Evans, Kelly E; Chen, S R Wayne; Meissner, Gerhard

    2005-11-15

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a family of intracellular Ca(2+) channels that are regulated by calmodulin (CaM). At low Ca(2+) concentrations (<1 microM), CaM activates RyR1 and RyR3 and inhibits RyR2. At elevated Ca(2+) concentrations (>1 microM), CaM inhibits all three RyR isoforms. Here we report that the regulation of recombinant RyR3 by CaM is sensitive to redox regulation. RyR3 in the presence of reduced glutathione binds CaM with 10-15-fold higher affinity, at low and high Ca(2+) concentrations, compared to in the presence of oxidized glutathione. However, compared to RyR1 assayed at low Ca(2+) concentrations under both reducing and oxidizing conditions, CaM binds RyR3 with reduced affinity but activates RyR3 to a greater extent. Under reducing conditions, RyR1 and RyR3 activities are inhibited with a similar affinity at [Ca(2+)] > 1 microM. Mutagenesis studies demonstrate that RyR3 contains a single conserved CaM binding site. Corresponding amino acid substitutions in the CaM binding site differentially affect CaM binding and CaM regulation of RyR3 and those of the two other isoforms. The results support the suggestion that other isoform dependent regions have a major role in the regulation of RyRs by CaM [Yamaguchi et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 36433-36439].

  18. Dopamine binds calmodulin during autoregulation of dopaminergic D2 receptor signaling through CaMKIIα-calmodulin complex.

    PubMed

    Laoye, B J; Okurumeh, O A; Obagaye, O V; Olagunju, M O; Bankole, O O; Olubiyi, O O; Ogundele, O M

    2016-01-01

    The role of dopaminergic D2 receptor (D2R) autoregulation in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission cannot be overemphasized in cause and progression of disorders associated with complex behaviors. Although previous studies have shown that D2R is structurally and physiologically linked with calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKIIα), however, the role of calmodulin in the CaMKIIα complex in D2R regulation remains elusive. In this study, using structural biology modeling softwares (iGEMDOCK and CueMol), we have shown the interaction between D2R, CaMKIIα, calmodulin, and DA under varying conditions. The outcomes of this study suggest that CaMKIIα causes a change in DA binding affinity to the D2R receptive site while the detached DA binds to calmodulin to stop the activity of D2R in the D2R-dopaminergic D1 receptor (D1R) heteromer. Ultimately, we concluded that D2R autoregulates to stop its heteromeric combination with D1R. D2R interacts with D1R to facilitate calcium movement that activates calmodulin, then CaMKIIα. The CaMKIIα-calmodulin complex changes the affinity of DA-D2R causing DA to break free and bind with calmodulin.

  19. Glucose-independent inhibition of yeast plasma-membrane H+-ATPase by calmodulin antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, I; Maldonado, A M; Eraso, P

    1997-01-01

    Glucose metabolism causes activation of the yeast plasma-membrane H+-ATPase. The molecular mechanism of this regulation is not known, but it is probably mediated by phosphorylation of the enzyme. The involvement in this process of several kinases has been suggested but their actual role has not been proved. The physiological role of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in glucose-induced activation was investigated by studying the effect of specific calmodulin antagonists on the glucose-induced ATPase kinetic changes in wild-type and two mutant strains affected in the glucose regulation of the enzyme. Preincubation of the cells with calmidazolium or compound 48/80 impeded the increase in ATPase activity by reducing the Vmax of the enzyme without modifying the apparent affinity for ATP in the three strains. In one mutant, pma1-T912A, the putative calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-phosphorylatable Thr-912 was eliminated, and in the other, pma1-P536L, H+-ATPase was constitutively activated, suggesting that the antagonistic effect was not mediated by a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and not related to glucose regulation. This was corroborated when the in vitro effect of the calmodulin antagonists on H+-ATPase activity was tested. Purified plasma membranes from glucose-starved or glucose-fermenting cells from both pma1-P890X, another constitutively activated ATPase mutant, and wild-type strains were preincubated with calmidazolium or melittin. In all cases, ATP hydrolysis was inhibited with an IC50 of approximately 1 microM. This inhibition was reversed by calmodulin. Analysis of the calmodulin-binding protein pattern in the plasma-membrane fraction eliminates ATPase as the calmodulin target protein. We conclude that H+-ATPase inhibition by calmodulin antagonists is mediated by an as yet unidentified calmodulin-dependent membrane protein. PMID:9148755

  20. Insulin phosphorylates calmodulin in preparations of solubilized rat hepatocyte insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, D.B.; McDonald, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    It has previously been shown that insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of calmodulin in adipocyte insulin receptor preparations. Here they demonstrate that insulin also stimulates the phosphorylation of calmodulin in wheat germ lectin-enriched insulin receptor preparations obtained from rat hepatocytes. Standard phosphorylation assays were performed at 30C in the presence of 50mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.5), 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100, 1mM EGTA, 50 M (el-TSP)ATP, 5mM MgCl2, 0.25 M polylysine, 1.2 M calmodulin and various CaS and insulin concentrations. The phosphorylation of calmodulin was determined by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Phosphorylation of calmodulin had an absolute requirement for insulin receptors, insulin and certain basic proteins. Phosphorylation was maximal above 13 nM insulin and at submicromolar CaS concentrations, whereas supramicromolar CaS concentrations were inhibitory. As was observed in the adipocyte insulin receptor system, calmodulin phosphorylation was dependent upon the presence of co-factors, such as polylysine, histone H/sub f/2b and protamine sulfate. The role played by these co-factors has not yet been established. These data suggest that both CaS and calmodulin participate in post receptor insulin events in hepatocytes.

  1. Calmodulin interacts with angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) and inhibits shedding of its ectodomain.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Daniel W; Clarke, Nicola E; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2008-01-23

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) is a regulatory protein of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and a receptor for the causative agent of severe-acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), the SARS-coronavirus. We have previously shown that ACE2 can be shed from the cell surface in response to phorbol esters by a process involving TNF-alpha converting enzyme (TACE; ADAM17). In this study, we demonstrate that inhibitors of calmodulin also stimulate shedding of the ACE2 ectodomain, a process at least partially mediated by a metalloproteinase. We also show that calmodulin associates with ACE2 and that this interaction is decreased by calmodulin inhibitors.

  2. Essential Role of Calmodulin in RyR Inhibition by Dantrolene

    PubMed Central

    Oo, Ye Win; Gomez-Hurtado, Nieves; Walweel, Kafa; van Helden, Dirk F.; Imtiaz, Mohammad S.; Knollmann, Bjorn C.

    2015-01-01

    Dantrolene is the first line therapy of malignant hyperthermia. Animal studies suggest that dantrolene also protects against heart failure and arrhythmias caused by spontaneous Ca2+ release. Although dantrolene inhibits Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal and cardiac muscle preparations, its mechanism of action has remained controversial, because dantrolene does not inhibit single ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ release channels in lipid bilayers. Here we test the hypothesis that calmodulin (CaM), a physiologic RyR binding partner that is lost during incorporation into lipid bilayers, is required for dantrolene inhibition of RyR channels. In single channel recordings (100 nM cytoplasmic [Ca2+] + 2 mM ATP), dantrolene caused inhibition of RyR1 (rabbit skeletal muscle) and RyR2 (sheep) with a maximal inhibition of Po (Emax) to 52 ± 4% of control only after adding physiologic [CaM] = 100 nM. Dantrolene inhibited RyR2 with an IC50 of 0.16 ± 0.03 µM. Mutant N98S-CaM facilitated dantrolene inhibition with an IC50 = 5.9 ± 0.3 nM. In mouse cardiomyocytes, dantrolene had no effect on cardiac Ca2+ release in the absence of CaM, but reduced Ca2+ wave frequency (IC50 = 0.42 ± 0.18 µM, Emax = 47 ± 4%) and amplitude (IC50 = 0.19 ± 0.04 µM, Emax = 66 ± 4%) in the presence of 100 nM CaM. We conclude that CaM is essential for dantrolene inhibition of RyR1 and RyR2. Its absence explains why dantrolene inhibition of single RyR channels has not been previously observed. PMID:25920678

  3. Direct detection of calmodulin tuning by ryanodine receptor channel targets using a Ca2+-sensitive acrylodan-labeled calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Fruen, Bradley R; Balog, Edward M; Schafer, Janet; Nitu, Florentin R; Thomas, David D; Cornea, Razvan L

    2005-01-11

    Calmodulin (CaM) activates the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) at nanomolar Ca(2+) concentrations but inhibits it at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, indicating that binding of Ca(2+) to CaM may provide a molecular switch for modulating RyR1 channel activity. To directly examine the Ca(2+) sensitivity of RyR1-complexed CaM, we used an environment-sensitive acrylodan adduct of CaM. The resulting (ACR)CaM probe displayed high-affinity binding to, and Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of, RyR1 similar to that of unlabeled wild-type (WT) CaM. Upon addition of Ca(2+), (ACR)CaM exhibited a substantial (>50%) decrease in fluorescence (K(Ca) = 2.7 +/- 0.8 microM). A peptide derived from the RyR1 CaM binding domain (RyR1(3614)(-)(43)) caused an even more pronounced Ca(2+)-dependent fluorescence decrease, and a >or=10-fold leftward shift in its K(Ca) (0.2 +/- 0.1 microM). In the presence of intact RyR1 channels in SR vesicles, (ACR)CaM fluorescence spectra were distinct from those in the presence of RyR1(3614)(-)(43), although a Ca(2+)-dependent decrease in fluorescence was still observed. The K(Ca) for (ACR)CaM fluorescence in the presence of SR (0.8 +/- 0.4 microM) was greater than in the presence of RyR1(3614)(-)(43) but was consistent with functional determinations showing the conversion of (ACR)CaM from channel activator (apoCaM) to inhibitor (Ca(2+)CaM) at Ca(2+) concentrations between 0.3 and 1 microM. These results indicate that binding to RyR1 targets evokes significant changes in the CaM structure and Ca(2+) sensitivity (i.e., CaM tuning). However, changes resulting from binding of CaM to the full-length, tetrameric channels are clearly distinct from changes caused by the RyR1-derived peptide. We suggest that the Ca(2+) sensitivity of CaM when in complex with full-length channels may be tuned to respond to physiologically relevant changes in Ca(2+).

  4. Calmodulin and immunophilin are required as functional partners of a ryanodine receptor in ascidian oocytes at fertilization.

    PubMed

    Albrieux, M; Moutin, M J; Grunwald, D; Villaz, M

    2000-09-01

    Fertilization of oocytes incites numerous changes relying on Ca(2+) signaling. In inseminated ascidian eggs, an increase in the egg surface membrane, monitored by a change in electrical capacitance, is recorded at the onset of meiosis resumption. This membrane addition to the cell surface is controlled by calcium release through a ryanodine receptor (RyR), sensitive to cyclic ADP-ribose. Using confocal microscopy analysis of ascidian oocytes immunostained with anti-RyR antibody, we show here that this calcium channel is asymmetrically located in the vegetal cortical zone. Interestingly, the increase in cell capacitance occurring at fertilization is correlated with a fluorescent signal, imaged by the marker of vesicle trafficking FM 1-43, located close to the RyR region. Two putative partners of RyR, namely an FKBP-like protein and a calmodulin, are identified in these oocyte extracts by detection of enzyme activity and PCR amplification. Both are necessary to sustain ryanodine receptor activity in these oocytes since the membrane insertion triggered by fertilization is inhibited by the FKBP ligand rapamycin and by a calmodulin antagonist peptide. These findings suggest that exocytosis in ascidian eggs is triggered at fertilization by a functional Ca(2+) release unit operating as a complex of several proteins, including a calmodulin and an immunophilin, around the intracellular calcium channel itself. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Calmodulin physically interacts with the erythropoietin receptor and enhances Jak2-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Masahide; Iiyama, Mitsuko; Miura, Osamu . E-mail: miura.hema@tmd.ac.jp

    2005-09-23

    Stimulation of the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) induces a transient increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} level as well as activation of the Jak2 tyrosine kinase to stimulate various downstream signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that the universal Ca{sup 2+} receptor calmodulin (CaM) binds EpoR in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner in vitro. Binding studies using various EpoR mutants in hematopoietic cells showed that CaM binds the membrane-proximal 65-amino-acid cytoplasmic region (amino acids 258-312) of EpoR that is critical for activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling. Structurally unrelated CaM antagonists, W-13 and CMZ, inhibited activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling pathways, whereas W-12, a W-13 analog, did not show any significant inhibitory effect. Moreover, overexpression of CaM augmented Epo-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the EpoR. W-13, but not W-12, also inhibited Epo-induced proliferation and survival. Together, these results indicate that CaM binds to the membrane-proximal EpoR cytoplasmic region and plays an essential role in activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling.

  6. Barbiturates directly inhibit the calmodulin/calcineurin complex: a novel mechanism of inhibition of nuclear factor of activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Humar, Matjaz; Pischke, Soeren E; Loop, Torsten; Hoetzel, Alexander; Schmidt, Rene; Klaas, Christoph; Pahl, Heike L; Geiger, Klaus K; Pannen, Benedikt H J

    2004-02-01

    Barbiturates are frequently used for the treatment of intracranial hypertension after brain injury but their application is associated with a profound increase in the infection rate. The mechanism of barbiturate-induced failure of protective immunity is still unknown. We provide evidence that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), an essential transcription factor in T cell activation, is a target of barbiturate-mediated immunosuppression in human T lymphocytes. Treatment of primary CD3+ lymphocytes with barbiturates inhibited the PMA and ionomycin induced increase in DNA binding of NFAT, whereas the activity of other transcription factors, such as Oct-1, SP-1, or the cAMP response element-binding protein, remained unaffected. Moreover, barbiturates suppressed the expression of a luciferase reporter gene under control of NFAT (stably transfected Jurkat T cells), and of the cytokine genes interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma that contain functional binding motifs for NFAT within their regulatory promotor domains (human peripheral blood CD3+ lymphocytes). Neither GABA receptor-initiated signaling nor direct interactions of barbiturates with nuclear proteins affected the activity of NFAT. In contrast, barbiturates suppressed the calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation of NFAT in intact T cells and also inhibited the enzymatic activity of calcineurin in a cell-free system, excluding upstream regulation. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel mechanism of direct inhibition of the calcineurin/calmodulin complex that may explain some of the known immunosuppressive effects associated with barbiturate treatment.

  7. Gangliosides stimulate bradykinin B2 receptors to promote calmodulin kinase II-mediated neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kanatsu, Yoshinori; Chen, Nai Hong; Mitoma, Junya; Nakagawa, Tetsuto; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Higashi, Hideyoshi

    2012-07-01

    Gangliosides mediate neuronal differentiation and maturation and are indispensable for the maintenance of brain function and survival. As part of our ongoing efforts to understand signaling pathways related to ganglioside function, we recently demonstrated that neuronal cells react to exogenous gangliosides GT1b and GD1b. Both of these gangliosides are enriched in the synapse-forming area of the brain and induce Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and activation of cdc42 to promote reorganization of cytoskeletal actin and dendritic differentiation. Here, we show that bradykinin B2 receptors transduce these reactions as a mediator for ganglioside glycan signals. The B2 antagonist Hoe140 inhibited ganglioside-induced CaMKII activation, actin reorganization and early development of axon- and dendrite-like processes of primary cultured hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we confirmed by yeast reporter assay that major b-series gangliosides, GT1b, GD1b and GD3, stimulated B2 bradykinin receptors. We hypothesize that this B2 receptor-mediated ganglioside signal transduction pathway is one mechanism that modulates neuronal differentiation and maturation.

  8. Regulation of the Ligand-dependent Activation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor by Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongbing; Panina, Svetlana; Kaur, Amandeep; Ruano, María J.; Sánchez-González, Pablo; la Cour, Jonas M.; Stephan, Alexander; Olesen, Uffe H.; Berchtold, Martin W.; Villalobo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is the major component of calcium signaling pathways mediating the action of various effectors. Transient increases in the intracellular calcium level triggered by a variety of stimuli lead to the formation of Ca2+/CaM complexes, which interact with and activate target proteins. In the present study the role of Ca2+/CaM in the regulation of the ligand-dependent activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been examined in living cells. We show that addition of different cell permeable CaM antagonists to cultured cells or loading cells with a Ca2+ chelator inhibited ligand-dependent EGFR auto(trans)phosphorylation. This occurred also in the presence of inhibitors of protein kinase C, CaM-dependent protein kinase II and calcineurin, which are known Ca2+- and/or Ca2+/CaM-dependent EGFR regulators, pointing to a direct effect of Ca2+/CaM on the receptor. Furthermore, we demonstrate that down-regulation of CaM in conditional CaM knock out cells stably transfected with the human EGFR decreased its ligand-dependent phosphorylation. Substitution of six basic amino acid residues within the CaM-binding domain (CaM-BD) of the EGFR by alanine resulted in a decreased phosphorylation of the receptor and of its downstream substrate phospholipase Cγ1. These results support the hypothesis that Ca2+/CaM regulates the EGFR activity by directly interacting with the CaM-BD of the receptor located at its cytosolic juxtamembrane region. PMID:22157759

  9. Reduced Arrhythmia Inducibility with Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Inhibition in Heart Failure Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hoeker, Gregory S.; Hanafy, Mohamed A.; Oster, Robert A.; Bers, Donald M.; Pogwizd, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is activated in heart failure (HF) and can contribute to arrhythmias induced by β-adrenergic receptor-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak. Objective To evaluate the effect of CaMKII inhibition on ventricular tachycardia (VT) induction in conscious HF and naïve rabbits. Methods and Results Nonischemic HF was induced by aortic insufficiency and constriction. Electrocardiograms were recorded in rabbits pretreated with vehicle (saline) or the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (300 μg/kg); VT was induced by infusion of increasing doses of norepinephrine (NE, 1.56-25 μg/kg/min) in naïve (n = 8) and HF (n = 7) rabbits. With saline, median VT dose threshold in HF was 6.25 versus 12.5 μg/kg/min NE in naïve rabbits (p = 0.06). Pretreatment with KN-93 significantly increased VT threshold in HF and naïve rabbits (median = 25 μg/kg/min, p < 0.05 versus saline for both groups). Mean cycle length of VT initiation was shorter in HF (221 ± 20 ms) than naïve (296 ± 23 ms, p < 0.05) rabbits with saline; this difference was not significant after treatment with KN-93. Conclusions KN-93 significantly reduced arrhythmia inducibility and slowed initiation of VT, suggesting that CaMKII inhibition may have antiarrhythmic effects in the failing human heart. PMID:26650851

  10. Structural and biophysical characterization of the interactions between the death domain of Fas receptor and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Timothy F; Samal, Alexandra B; Bedwell, Gregory J; Chen, Yabing; Saad, Jamil S

    2013-07-26

    The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by cell surface death receptors such as Fas. Engagement of Fas by Fas ligand triggers a conformational change that allows Fas to interact with adaptor protein Fas-associated death domain (FADD) via the death domain, which recruits downstream signaling proteins to form the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). Previous studies have shown that calmodulin (CaM) is recruited into the DISC in cholangiocarcinoma cells, suggesting a novel role of CaM in Fas-mediated signaling. CaM antagonists induce apoptosis through a Fas-related mechanism in cholangiocarcinoma and other cancer cell lines possibly by inhibiting Fas-CaM interactions. The structural determinants of Fas-CaM interaction and the underlying molecular mechanisms of inhibition, however, are unknown. Here we employed NMR and biophysical techniques to elucidate these mechanisms. Our data show that CaM binds to the death domain of Fas (FasDD) with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of ~2 μM and 2:1 CaM:FasDD stoichiometry. The interactions between FasDD and CaM are endothermic and entropically driven, suggesting that hydrophobic contacts are critical for binding. We also show that both the N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM are important for binding. NMR and surface plasmon resonance data show that three CaM antagonists (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide, tamoxifen, and trifluoperazine) greatly inhibit Fas-CaM interactions by blocking the Fas-binding site on CaM. Our findings provide the first structural evidence for Fas-CaM interactions and mechanism of inhibition and provide new insight into the molecular basis for a novel role of CaM in regulating Fas-mediated apoptosis.

  11. Structural and Biophysical Characterization of the Interactions between the Death Domain of Fas Receptor and Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Timothy F.; Samal, Alexandra B.; Bedwell, Gregory J.; Chen, Yabing; Saad, Jamil S.

    2013-01-01

    The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by cell surface death receptors such as Fas. Engagement of Fas by Fas ligand triggers a conformational change that allows Fas to interact with adaptor protein Fas-associated death domain (FADD) via the death domain, which recruits downstream signaling proteins to form the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). Previous studies have shown that calmodulin (CaM) is recruited into the DISC in cholangiocarcinoma cells, suggesting a novel role of CaM in Fas-mediated signaling. CaM antagonists induce apoptosis through a Fas-related mechanism in cholangiocarcinoma and other cancer cell lines possibly by inhibiting Fas-CaM interactions. The structural determinants of Fas-CaM interaction and the underlying molecular mechanisms of inhibition, however, are unknown. Here we employed NMR and biophysical techniques to elucidate these mechanisms. Our data show that CaM binds to the death domain of Fas (FasDD) with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of ∼2 μm and 2:1 CaM:FasDD stoichiometry. The interactions between FasDD and CaM are endothermic and entropically driven, suggesting that hydrophobic contacts are critical for binding. We also show that both the N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM are important for binding. NMR and surface plasmon resonance data show that three CaM antagonists (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide, tamoxifen, and trifluoperazine) greatly inhibit Fas-CaM interactions by blocking the Fas-binding site on CaM. Our findings provide the first structural evidence for Fas-CaM interactions and mechanism of inhibition and provide new insight into the molecular basis for a novel role of CaM in regulating Fas-mediated apoptosis. PMID:23760276

  12. Fluorescence probe study of Ca2+-dependent interactions of calmodulin with calmodulin-binding peptides of the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Grabarek, Zenon; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2004-10-22

    We have used a highly environment-sensitive fluorescent probe 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (badan) to study the interaction between calmodulin (CaM) and a CaM-binding peptide of the ryanodine receptor (CaMBP) and its sub-fragments F1 and F4. Badan was attached to the Thr34Cys mutant of CaM (CaM-badan). Ca(2+) increase in a physiological range of Ca(2+) (0.1-2 microM) produced about 40 times increase in the badan fluorescence. Upon binding to CaMBP, the badan fluorescence of apo-CaM showed a small increase at a slow rate; whereas that of Ca-CaM showed a large decrease at a very fast rate. Upon binding of CaM to the badan-labeled CaMBP, the badan fluorescence showed a small and slow increase at low Ca(2+), and a large and fast increase at high Ca(2+). Thus, the badan probe attached to CaM Cys(34) can be used to monitor conformational changes occurring not only in CaM, but also those in the CaM-CaMBP interface. Based on our results we propose that both the interaction interface and the global conformation of the CaM-CaMBP complex are altered by calcium.

  13. Phospholipids and calmodulin modulate the inhibition of PMCA activity by tau.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, María; Corbacho, Isaac; Sepulveda, M Rosario; Gutierrez-Merino, Carlos; Mata, Ana M

    2017-06-01

    The disruption of Ca(2+) signaling in neurons, together with a failure to keep optimal intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations, have been proposed as significant factors for neuronal dysfunction in the Ca(2+) hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau is a protein that plays an essential role in axonal transport and can form abnormal structures such as neurofibrillary tangles that constitute one of the hallmarks of AD. We have recently shown that plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), a key enzyme in the maintenance of optimal cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in cells, is inhibited by tau in membrane vesicles. In the present study we show that tau inhibits synaptosomal PMCA purified from pig cerebrum, and reconstituted in phosphatidylserine-containing lipid bilayers, with a Ki value of 1.5±0.2nM tau. Noteworthy, the inhibitory effect of tau is dependent on the charge of the phospholipid used for PMCA reconstitution. In addition, nanomolar concentrations of calmodulin, the major endogenous activator of PMCA, protects against inhibition of the Ca(2+)-ATPase activity by tau. Our results in a cellular model such as SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells yielded an inhibition of PMCA by nanomolar tau concentrations and protection by calmodulin against this inhibition similar to those obtained with purified synaptosomal PMCA. Functional studies were also performed with native and truncated versions of human cerebral PMCA4b, an isoform that has been showed to be functionally regulated by amyloid peptides, whose aggregates constitutes another hallmark of AD. Kinetic assays point out that tau binds to the C-terminal tail of PMCA, at a site distinct but close to the calmodulin binding domain. In conclusion, PMCA can be seen as a molecular target for tau-induced cytosolic calcium dysregulation in synaptic terminals. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: ECS Meeting edited by Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs and Jacques Haiech. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Suramin and the suramin analogue NF307 discriminate among calmodulin-binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, M; Bofill-Cardona, E; Mayer, B; Nanoff, C; Freissmuth, M; Hohenegger, M

    2001-01-01

    Calmodulin-binding sites on target proteins show considerable variation in primary sequence; hence compounds that block the access of calmodulin to these binding sites may be more selective than compounds that inactivate calmodulin. Suramin and its analogue NF307 inhibit the interaction of calmodulin with the ryanodine receptor. We have investigated whether inhibition of calmodulin binding to target proteins is a general property of these compounds. Suramin inhibited binding of [(125)I]calmodulin to porcine brain membranes and to sarcoplasmic reticulum from skeletal muscle (IC(50)=4.9+/-1.2 microM and 19.9+/-1.8 microM, respectively) and blocked the cross-linking of [(125)I]calmodulin to some, but not all, target proteins in brain membranes by [(125)I]calmodulin. Four calmodulin-binding proteins were purified [ryanodine receptor-1 (RyR1) from rabbit skeletal muscle, neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) from Sf9 cells, G-protein betagamma dimers (Gbetagamma) from porcine brain and a glutathione S-transferase-fusion protein comprising the C-terminal calmodulin-binding domain of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 7A (GST-CmGluR7A) from bacterial lysates]. Three of the proteins employed (Gbetagamma, GST-CmGluR7A and RyR1) display a comparable affinity for calmodulin (in the range of 50-70 nM). Nevertheless, suramin and NF307 only blocked the binding of Gbetagamma and RyR1 to calmodulin-Sepharose. In contrast, the association of GST-CmGluR7A and nNOS was not impaired, whereas excess calmodulin uniformly displaced all proteins from the matrix. Thus suramin and NF307 are prototypes of a new class of calmodulin antagonists that do not interact directly with calmodulin but with calmodulin-recognition sites. In addition, these compounds discriminate among calmodulin-binding motifs. PMID:11311147

  15. Quantitation of chlorpromazine-bound calmodulin during chlorpromazine inhibition of gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.; Biro, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM), controls the activity of a plasma membrane localized ATPase in plants which serves to pump calcium out of cells. Recent data are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of this pump is one of the early steps necessary for gravitropism. Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a CaM antagonist, reversibly inhibits gravitropism in oat coleoptiles at concentrations which permit normal growth rates. C-14-labeled CPZ was used to photo-affinity label endogenous CaM in vivo to learn whether the drug is actually binding to some portion of endogenous CaM when it inhibits gravitropism. Under conditions in which CPZ inhibits gravitropism for over an hour, at least 11% of the CaM in gravitropically stimulated coleoptiles is bound to CPZ. In a given CPZ experiment the degree of inhibition of gravitropism correlates well with the amount of CaM bound to CPZ.

  16. Quantitation of chlorpromazine-bound calmodulin during chlorpromazine inhibition of gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.; Biro, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM), controls the activity of a plasma membrane localized ATPase in plants which serves to pump calcium out of cells. Recent data are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of this pump is one of the early steps necessary for gravitropism. Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a CaM antagonist, reversibly inhibits gravitropism in oat coleoptiles at concentrations which permit normal growth rates. C-14-labeled CPZ was used to photo-affinity label endogenous CaM in vivo to learn whether the drug is actually binding to some portion of endogenous CaM when it inhibits gravitropism. Under conditions in which CPZ inhibits gravitropism for over an hour, at least 11% of the CaM in gravitropically stimulated coleoptiles is bound to CPZ. In a given CPZ experiment the degree of inhibition of gravitropism correlates well with the amount of CaM bound to CPZ.

  17. Cardiac calcium signalling pathologies associated with defective calmodulin regulation of type 2 ryanodine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Arnáiz-Cot, Juan José; Damon, Brooke James; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Cleemann, Lars; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Meissner, Gerhard; Morad, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a homotetramer of 560 kDa polypeptides regulated by calmodulin (CaM), which decreases its open probability at diastolic and systolic Ca2+ concentrations. Point mutations in the CaM-binding domain of RyR2 (W3587A/L3591D/F3603A, RyR2ADA) in mice result in severe cardiac hypertrophy, poor left ventricle contraction and death by postnatal day 16, suggesting that CaM inhibition of RyR2 is required for normal cardiac function. Here, we report on Ca2+ signalling properties of enzymatically isolated, Fluo-4 dialysed whole cell clamped cardiac myocytes from 10–15-day-old wild-type (WT) and homozygous Ryr2ADA/ADA mice. Spontaneously occurring Ca2+ spark frequency, measured at −80 mV, was 14-fold lower in mutant compared to WT myocytes. ICa, though significantly smaller in mutant myocytes, triggered Ca2+ transients that were of comparable size to those of WT myocytes, but with slower activation and decay kinetics. Caffeine-triggered Ca2+ transients were about three times larger in mutant myocytes, generating three- to four-fold bigger Na+-Ca2+ exchanger NCX currents (INCX). Mutant myocytes often exhibited Ca2+ transients of variable size and duration that were accompanied by similarly alternating and slowly activating INCX. The data suggest that RyR2ADA mutation produces significant reduction in ICa density and ICa-triggered Ca2+ release gain, longer but infrequently occurring Ca2+ sparks, larger sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ loads, and spontaneous Ca2+ releases accompanied by activation of large and potentially arrhythmogenic inward INCX. PMID:23836685

  18. Endothelial thrombomodulin induces Ca2+ signals and nitric oxide synthesis through epidermal growth factor receptor kinase and calmodulin kinase II.

    PubMed

    David-Dufilho, Monique; Millanvoye-Van Brussel, Elisabeth; Topal, Gokce; Walch, Laurence; Brunet, Annie; Rendu, Francine

    2005-10-28

    Endothelial membrane-bound thrombomodulin is a high affinity receptor for thrombin to inhibit coagulation. We previously demonstrated that the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex restrains cell proliferation mediated through protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1. We have now tested the hypothesis that thrombomodulin transduces a signal to activate the endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (NOS3) and to modulate G protein-coupled receptor signaling. Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with thrombin or a mutant of thrombin that binds to thrombomodulin and has no catalytic activity on PAR-1. Thrombin and its mutant dose dependently activated NO release at cell surface. Pretreatment with anti-thrombomodulin antibody suppressed NO response to the mutant and to low thrombin concentration and reduced by half response to high concentration. Thrombin receptor-activating peptide that only activates PAR-1 and high thrombin concentration induced marked biphasic Ca2+ signals with rapid phosphorylation of PLC(beta3) and NOS3 at both serine 1177 and threonine 495. The mutant thrombin evoked a Ca2+ spark and progressive phosphorylation of Src family kinases at tyrosine 416 and NOS3 only at threonine 495. It activated rapid phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-dependent NO synthesis and phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and calmodulin kinase II. Complete epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition only partly reduced the activation of phospholipase Cgamma1 and NOS3. Prestimulation of thrombomodulin did not affect NO release but reduced Ca2+ responses to thrombin and histamine, suggesting cross-talks between thrombomodulin and G protein-coupled receptors. This is the first demonstration of an outside-in signal mediated by the cell surface thrombomodulin receptor to activate NOS3 through tyrosine kinase-dependent pathway. This signaling may contribute to thrombomodulin function in thrombosis, inflammation, and atherosclerosis.

  19. Dopaminergic denervation switches dopamine D3 receptor signaling and disrupts its Ca(2+) dependent modulation by CaMKII and calmodulin in striatonigral projections of the rat.

    PubMed

    Avalos-Fuentes, Arturo; Albarrán-Bravo, Sacnité; Loya-Lopéz, Santiago; Cortés, Hernán; Recillas-Morales, Sergio; Magaña, Jonathan J; Paz-Bermúdez, Francisco; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Aceves, Jorge; Erlij, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-02-01

    In striatonigral projections activation of dopamine D3 receptors (D3Rs) potentiates the stimulation of GABA release and cAMP production caused by activation of dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs). Cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)] in the terminals controls this response by modulating CaMKII, an enzyme that depresses D3R action. To examine the effects of dopamine deprivation on D3R signaling we investigated their function in striatonigral terminals of hemiparkinsonian rats. Denervation switched the signaling cascade initiated by D3R activation. In the non-lesioned side activation of D3R potentiated the stimulatory effects of D1R activation on cAMP production and K(+)-depolarization induced [(3)H] GABA release. In contrast, in the denervated side the stimulatory effects of both D1R activation and forskolin administration were blocked by D3R activation. In non-lesioned slices, D3R responses were inhibited by the activation of CaMKII produced by K(+)-depolarization (via increased Ca(2+) entry). The CaMKII-induced inhibition was blocked by the selective inhibitor KN-62. In denervated tissues the response to D3R stimulation was not modified either by K(+) depolarization or by blocking CaMKII with KN-62. Immunoblotting studies showed that depolarization-induced CaMKII binding to the D3 receptor and CaMKII phosphorylation were suppressed in denervated tissues. We also determined calmodulin expression with PCR and immunoblot techniques. Both techniques showed that calmodulin expression was depressed in the lesioned side. In sum, our studies show that dopaminergic denervation switches the D3R signaling cascade and depresses CaMKII signaling through a process that appears to involve reduced calmodulin levels. Since calmodulin is a major cytoplasmic Ca(2+) buffer our findings suggest that abnormal Ca(2+) buffering may be an important component of the abnormalities observed during dopaminergic denervation.

  20. Molecular Insights into the Mechanism of Calmodulin Inhibition of the EAG1 Potassium Channel.

    PubMed

    Marques-Carvalho, Maria João; Oppermann, Johannes; Muñoz, Eva; Fernandes, Andreia S; Gabant, Guillaume; Cadene, Martine; Heinemann, Stefan H; Schönherr, Roland; Morais-Cabral, João Henrique

    2016-10-04

    The human EAG1 potassium channel belongs to the superfamily of KCNH voltage-gated potassium channels that have roles in cardiac repolarization and neuronal excitability. EAG1 is strongly inhibited by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) through a mechanism that is not understood. We determined the binding properties of CaM with each one of three previously identified binding sites (BDN, BDC1, and BDC2), analyzed binding to protein stretches that include more than one site, and determined the effect of neighboring globular domains on the binding properties. The determination of the crystal structure of CaM bound to BDC2 shows the channel fragment interacting with only the C lobe of calmodulin and adopting an unusual bent conformation. Based on this structure and on a functional and biochemical analysis of mutants, we propose a model for the mechanism of inhibition whereby the local conformational change induced by CaM binding at BDC2 lies at the basis of channel modulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of the Calmodulin-Binding Domains of Fas Death Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bliss J.; Samal, Alexandra B.; Vlach, Jiri; Fernandez, Timothy F.; Brooke, Dewey; Prevelige, Peter E.; Saad, Jamil S.

    2016-01-01

    The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by binding of a Fas ligand to the ectodomain of the surface death receptor Fas protein. Subsequently, the intracellular death domain of Fas (FasDD) and that of the Fas-associated protein (FADD) interact to form the core of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), a crucial step for activation of caspases that induce cell death. Previous studies have shown that calmodulin (CaM) is recruited into the DISC in cholangiocarcinoma cells and specifically interacts with FasDD to regulate the apoptotic/survival signaling pathway. Inhibition of CaM activity in DISC stimulates apoptosis significantly. We have recently shown that CaM forms a ternary complex with FasDD (2:1 CaM:FasDD). However, the molecular mechanism by which CaM binds to two distinct FasDD motifs is not fully understood. Here, we employed mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), biophysical, and biochemical methods to identify the binding regions of FasDD and provide a molecular basis for the role of CaM in Fas–mediated apoptosis. Proteolytic digestion and mass spectrometry data revealed that peptides spanning residues 209–239 (Fas-Pep1) and 251–288 (Fas-Pep2) constitute the two CaM-binding regions of FasDD. To determine the molecular mechanism of interaction, we have characterized the binding of recombinant/synthetic Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 peptides with CaM. Our data show that both peptides engage the N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM simultaneously. Binding of Fas-Pep1 to CaM is entropically driven while that of Fas-Pep2 to CaM is enthalpically driven, indicating that a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces contribute to the stabilization of the FasDD–CaM complex. Our data suggest that because Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 are involved in extensive intermolecular contacts with the death domain of FADD, binding of CaM to these regions may hinder its ability to bind to FADD, thus greatly inhibiting the initiation of apoptotic signaling

  2. Distinct functions of calmodulin are required for the uptake step of receptor-mediated endocytosis in yeast: the type I myosin Myo5p is one of the calmodulin targets.

    PubMed Central

    Geli, M I; Wesp, A; Riezman, H

    1998-01-01

    The uptake step of receptor-mediated endocytosis in yeast is dependent on the calcium binding protein calmodulin (Cmd1p). In order to understand the role that Cmd1p plays, a search was carried out for possible targets among the genes required for the internalization process. Co-immunoprecipitation, two-hybrid and overlay assays demonstrated that Cmd1p interacts with Myo5p, a type I unconventional myosin. Analysis of the endocytic phenotype and the Cmd1p-Myo5p interaction in thermosensitive cmd1 mutants indicated that the Cmd1p-Myo5p interaction is required for endocytosis in vivo. However, the Cmd1p-Myo5p interaction requirement was partially overcome by deleting the calmodulin binding sites (IQ motifs) from Myo5p, suggesting that these motifs inhibit Myo5p function. Additionally, genetic and biochemical evidence obtained with a collection of cmd1 mutant alleles strongly suggests that Cmd1p plays an additional role in the internalization step of receptor-mediated endocytosis in yeast. PMID:9450989

  3. Distinct functions of calmodulin are required for the uptake step of receptor-mediated endocytosis in yeast: the type I myosin Myo5p is one of the calmodulin targets.

    PubMed

    Geli, M I; Wesp, A; Riezman, H

    1998-02-02

    The uptake step of receptor-mediated endocytosis in yeast is dependent on the calcium binding protein calmodulin (Cmd1p). In order to understand the role that Cmd1p plays, a search was carried out for possible targets among the genes required for the internalization process. Co-immunoprecipitation, two-hybrid and overlay assays demonstrated that Cmd1p interacts with Myo5p, a type I unconventional myosin. Analysis of the endocytic phenotype and the Cmd1p-Myo5p interaction in thermosensitive cmd1 mutants indicated that the Cmd1p-Myo5p interaction is required for endocytosis in vivo. However, the Cmd1p-Myo5p interaction requirement was partially overcome by deleting the calmodulin binding sites (IQ motifs) from Myo5p, suggesting that these motifs inhibit Myo5p function. Additionally, genetic and biochemical evidence obtained with a collection of cmd1 mutant alleles strongly suggests that Cmd1p plays an additional role in the internalization step of receptor-mediated endocytosis in yeast.

  4. Calmodulin inhibition contributes to sensitize TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Mi-kyung; Min, Yong Ki; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2009-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially triggers apoptosis in tumor cells versus normal cells. However, TRAIL alone is not effective in treating TRAIL-resistant tumors. We evaluated the effect of 180 enzyme inhibitors on TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells, and found fluphenazine-N-2-chloroethane (a calmodulin (CaM) antagonist) sensitized TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, in the presence of TRAIL, it increased caspase-8 binding to the Fas-associated death domain (FADD), but decreased binding of FADD-like interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme inhibitory proteins (FLIPs). Additionally, its combination with TRAIL inhibited Akt phosphorylation. These results were consistently observed in cells treated with CaM siRNA. We suggested the blockade of CaM could sensitize lung cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in at least 2 ways: (i) it can activate death-inducing signaling complex mediated apoptosis by inhibiting TRAIL-induced binding of FLIP and TRAIL-enhanced binding of caspase-8 to FADD; (ii) it can inhibit Akt phosphorylation, consequently leading to decreased expression of anti-apoptotic molecules such as FLIP and members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family. This study suggests the combination of CaM antagonists with TRAIL may have the therapeutic potential to overcome the resistance of lung cancers to apoptosis.

  5. A new and potent calmodulin antagonist, HF-2035, which inhibits vascular relaxation induced by nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Win, N H; Ishikawa, T; Saito, N; Kato, M; Yokokura, H; Watanabe, Y; Iida, Y; Hidaka, H

    1996-03-28

    HF-2035, 2-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2,4,5-trichlorobenzenesulfonyl)] amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine, was synthesized and its effects on calmodulin-dependent enzymes were investigated. HF-2035 inhibited calmodulin kinase I, calmodulin kinase II and myosin light-chain kinase with IC50 values of 1.3 microM, 1.6 microM and 68 microM, respectively. HF-2035 also inhibited the activity of recombinant rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase, one of the calmodulin-dependent enzymes, with a Ki of 0.78 microM. Partially purified nitric oxide synthase of rat brain was also inhibited by HF-2035 with an IC50 of 3.2 microM. Kinetic analysis indicated that this inhibitory effect of HF-2035 was competitive with respect to calmodulin. We examined the effects of HF-2035 on constitutive nitric oxide synthase in a bioassay using vascular strips of rabbit carotid artery with and without endothelium. HF-2035 inhibited acetylcholine- and calcium ionophore, A23187 (6S-[6 alpha (2S*,3S*),8 beta (R*),9 beta, 11 alpha]-5- (methylamino)-2-[[3,9,11-trimethyl-8-[1-methyl-2-oxo-2-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)- ethyl]-1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undec-2-yl]methyl]-4-benzoxazol ecarboxylic acid)-induced relaxation of endothelium-intact strips with an ED50 of 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM and 2.8 +/- 1 microM, respectively. This compound, however, did not inhibit N-nitroso-N-morpholinoaminoacetonitrile (SIN-1A), an exogenous nitric oxide donor, -induced relaxation of endothelium-denuded strips. W-7 (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1- naphthalenesulfonamide) inhibited acetylcholine-induced relaxation with an ED50 of 46 +/- 7 microM, which was 30-fold less potent than HF-2035. HF-2035 was unable to inhibit the activity of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase in isolated thoracic aorta of rat treated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. These findings suggest that HF-2035 is a new and potent calmodulin antagonist, and may be used as a mother compound to develop more selective inhibitors of constitutive nitric oxide

  6. Diabetic HDL-associated myristic acid inhibits acetylcholine-induced nitric oxide generation by preventing the association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase with calmodulin.

    PubMed

    White, James; Guerin, Theresa; Swanson, Hollie; Post, Steven; Zhu, Haining; Gong, Ming; Liu, Jun; Everson, William V; Li, Xiang-An; Graf, Gregory A; Ballard, Hubert O; Ross, Stuart A; Smart, Eric J

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, we examined whether diabetes affected the ability of HDL to stimulate nitric oxide (NO) production. Using HDL isolated from both diabetic humans and diabetic mouse models, we found that female HDL no longer induced NO synthesis, despite containing equivalent amounts of estrogen as nondiabetic controls. Furthermore, HDL isolated from diabetic females and males prevented acetylcholine-induced stimulation of NO generation. Analyses of both the human and mouse diabetic HDL particles showed that the HDLs contained increased levels of myristic acid. To determine whether myristic acid associated with HDL particles was responsible for the decrease in NO generation, myristic acid was added to HDL isolated from nondiabetic humans and mice. Myristic acid-associated HDL inhibited the generation of NO in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, diabetic HDL did not alter the levels of endothelial NO synthase or acetylcholine receptors associated with the cells. Surprisingly, diabetic HDL inhibited ionomycin-induced stimulation of NO production without affecting ionomycin-induced increases in intracellular calcium. Further analysis indicated that diabetic HDL prevented calmodulin from interacting with endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) but did not affect the activation of calmodulin kinase or calcium-independent mechanisms for stimulating eNOS. These studies are the first to show that a specific fatty acid associated with HDL inhibits the stimulation of NO generation. These findings have important implications regarding cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients.

  7. DISPLACEMENT OF α-ACTININ FROM THE NMDA RECEPTOR NR1 C0 DOMAIN BY Ca2+/CALMODULIN PROMOTES CAMKII BINDING

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Michelle A.; Malik, Zulfiqar; Akyol, Zeynep; Bartos, Jason A.; Leonard, A. Soren; Hudmon, Andy; Shea, Madeline A.; Hell, Johannes W.

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+ influx through the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor triggers activation and postsynaptic accumulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). CaMKII, calmodulin, and α-actinin directly bind to the short membrane proximal C0 domain of the C-terminal region of the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit. In a negative feedback loop, calmodulin mediates Ca2+-dependent inactivation of the NMDA receptor by displacing α-actinin from NR1 C0 upon Ca2+ influx. We show that Ca2+-depleted calmodulin and α-actinin simultaneously bind to NR1 C0. Upon addition of Ca2+, calmodulin dislodges α-actinin. Either the N- or C-terminal half of calmodulin is sufficient for Ca2+-induced displacement of α-actinin. While α-actinin directly antagonizes CaMKII binding to NR1 C0, the addition of Ca2+/calmodulin shifts binding of NR1 C0 toward CaMKII by displacing α-actinin. Displacement of α-actinin results in the simultaneous binding of calmodulin and CaMKII to NR1 C0. Our results reveal an intricate mechanism whereby Ca2+ functions to govern the complex interactions between the two most prevalent signaling molecules in synaptic plasticity, the NMDA receptor and CaMKII. PMID:17602661

  8. A novel calmodulin-β-PIX interaction and its implication in receptor tyrosine kinase regulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinay K; Munro, Kim; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-09-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, regulates numerous cellular processes, primarily in response to calcium flux. We have identified and characterized a novel interaction between CaM and β-p21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor (β-PIX), a putative guanine exchange factor implicated in cell signaling, using affinity pull-down assays, co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization and circular dichroism studies. Fluorescence-based titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments revealed a Ca(2+)-dependent binding mechanism (K(D)≤10μM). Further, we show that CaM participates in a multi-protein complex involving β-PIX and E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl (casitas B-cell lymphoma), which may play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase regulation and downstream signaling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pre-synaptic kainate receptor-mediated facilitation of glutamate release involves PKA and Ca(2+) -calmodulin at thalamocortical synapses.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Duque-Feria, Paloma; Sihra, Talvinder S; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms underlying the facilitatory modulation mediated by kainate receptor (KAR) activation in the cortex, using isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and slice preparations. In cortical nerve terminals, kainate (KA, 100 μM) produced an increase in 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-evoked glutamate release. In thalamocortical slices, KA (1 μM) produced an increase in the amplitude of evoked excitatory post-synaptic currents (eEPSCs) at synapses established between thalamic axon terminals from the ventrobasal nucleus onto stellate neurons of L4 of the somatosensory cortex. In both, synaptosomes and slices, the effect of KA was antagonized by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, and persisted after pre-treatment with a cocktail of antagonists of other receptors whose activation could potentially have produced facilitation of release indirectly. Mechanistically, the observed effects of KA appear to be congruent in synaptosomal and slice preparations. Thus, the facilitation by KA of synaptosomal glutamate release and thalamocortical synaptic transmission were suppressed by the inhibition of protein kinase A and occluded by the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. Dissecting this G-protein-independent regulation further in thalamocortical slices, the KAR-mediated facilitation of synaptic transmission was found to be sensitive to the block of Ca(2+) permeant KARs by philanthotoxin. Intriguingly, the synaptic facilitation was abrogated by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores by thapsigargin, or inhibition of Ca(2+) -induced Ca(2+) -release by ryanodine. Thus, the KA-mediated modulation was contingent on both Ca(2+) entry through Ca(2+) -permeable KARs and liberation of intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Finally, sensitivity to W-7 indicated that the increased cytosolic [Ca(2+) ] underpinning KAR-mediated regulation of synaptic transmission at thalamocortical synapses, requires downstream activation of calmodulin. We conclude that neocortical pre

  10. Human Adenosine A2A Receptor Binds Calmodulin with High Affinity in a Calcium-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Piirainen, Henni; Hellman, Maarit; Tossavainen, Helena; Permi, Perttu; Kursula, Petri; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how ligands bind to G-protein-coupled receptors and how binding changes receptor structure to affect signaling is critical for developing a complete picture of the signal transduction process. The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a particularly interesting example, as it has an exceptionally long intracellular carboxyl terminus, which is predicted to be mainly disordered. Experimental data on the structure of the A2AR C-terminus is lacking, because published structures of A2AR do not include the C-terminus. Calmodulin has been reported to bind to the A2AR C-terminus, with a possible binding site on helix 8, next to the membrane. The biological meaning of the interaction as well as its calcium dependence, thermodynamic parameters, and organization of the proteins in the complex are unclear. Here, we characterized the structure of the A2AR C-terminus and the A2AR C-terminus-calmodulin complex using different biophysical methods, including native gel and analytical gel filtration, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. We found that the C-terminus is disordered and flexible, and it binds with high affinity (Kd = 98 nM) to calmodulin without major conformational changes in the domain. Calmodulin binds to helix 8 of the A2AR in a calcium-dependent manner that can displace binding of A2AR to lipid vesicles. We also predicted and classified putative calmodulin-binding sites in a larger group of G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:25692595

  11. W-7 inhibits voltage-dependent K(+) channels independent of calmodulin activity in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Choi, Il-Whan; Hong, Da Hye; Son, Youn Kyoung; Na, Sung Hun; Jung, Won-Kyo; Firth, Amy L; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Park, Won Sun

    2015-03-05

    We investigated the effect of W-7, a calmodulin inhibitor, on voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels in freshly isolated coronary arterial smooth muscle cells using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. The amplitude of Kv currents was inhibited by W-7 in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 3.38±0.47μM and a Hill coefficient of 0.84±0.10. W-7 shifted the activation curve to a more positive potential but had no significant effect on the inactivation curve, which indicated that W-7 inhibited the Kv current in a closed state of the Kv channel. Another calmodulin inhibitor, W-13, had no significant effect on Kv currents and did not change the inhibitory effect of W-7 on Kv channels. From these results, we conclude that W-7 inhibited the Kv current in a dose-dependent manner, but this inhibition occurred independent of calmodulin activity and in a closed (inactivated) state of the Kv channels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Calmodulin binding proteins of the cholinergic electromotor synapse: synaptosomes, synaptic vesicles, receptor-enriched membranes, and cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Walker, J H; Stadler, H; Witzemann, V

    1984-02-01

    Calmodulin binding proteins (CBPs) have been identified using a gel overlay technique for fractions isolated from Torpedo electromotor nerve endings. Different fractions possessed characteristic patterns of CBPs. Synaptosomes showed five major CBPs--Mr 220,000, 160,000, 125,000, 55,000, and 51,000. Polypeptides of Mr 55,000 and 51,000 were found in the cytoplasm and the others are membrane-associated. The Triton X-100-insoluble cytoskeleton of synaptosomes was isolated in the presence or absence of calcium. The major CBPs had Mr of 19,000, 18,000, and 16,000. In the presence of calcium, no other CBPs were seen. In the absence of calcium, an Mr 160,000 polypeptide was present in the Triton cytoskeleton. Synaptic vesicles showed CBPs of Mr 160,000, 25,000, and 20,000. Membrane fragments enriched in acetylcholine receptors contained two major CBPs, Mr 160,000 and 125,000, together with a less prominent protein at Mr 26,000. A protein of Mr similar to that of fodrin was present in synaptosomes and acetylcholine receptor membrane fragments, but only in small amounts relative to the other polypeptides observed. The heavy and light chains of clathrin-coated vesicles from pig brain did not bind calmodulin, although strong labelling of an Mr 47,000 polypeptide was found. Results showed that calelectrin does not bind calmodulin. The possible identity of the calmodulin binding proteins is discussed.

  13. Intracerebroventricular administration of morphine confers remote cardioprotection--role of opioid receptors and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Irwin, Michael G; Lu, Yao; Mei, Bin; Zuo, You-Mei; Chen, Zhi-Wu; Wong, Tak-Ming

    2011-04-10

    The current study aimed to delineate the mechanism of remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine (RMPC) against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intracerebroventricular morphine injection before myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. Ischemia-reperfusion injury was achieved by 30min of left coronary artery occlusion followed by 120min of reperfusion. The effects of remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine preconditioning were also determined upon selective blockade of the δ, κ or μ-opioid receptors, or calmodulin (CaM). The infarct size, as a percentage of the area at risk, was determined by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium staining. Remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine reduced infarct size in the ischemic/reperfused myocardium, and the effect was abolished by the selective blockade of any one of the three δ, κ and μ opioid receptors or CaM. Furthermore, remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine increased the expression of CaM in the hippocampus and the plasma level of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The results of the present study provide evidence that the cardioprotection of remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine involves not only all three types of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, but also CaM, which releases CGRP, one of the mediators of remote preconditioning.

  14. A calcium/calmodulin-regulated member of the receptor-like kinase family confers cold tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianbao; Chaudhuri, Shubho; Yang, Lihua; Du, Liqun; Poovaiah, B W

    2010-03-05

    Cold is a limiting environmental factor that adversely affects plant growth and productivity. Calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is believed to play a pivotal role in plant response to cold stress, but its exact role is not clearly understood. Here, we report that CRLK1, a novel calcium/calmodulin-regulated receptor-like kinase, is crucial for cold tolerance in plants. CRLK1 has two calmodulin-binding sites with different affinities as follows: one located at residues 369-390 with a K(d) of 25 nm, and the other located at residues 28-112 with a K(d) of 160 nm. Calcium/calmodulin stimulated the kinase activity, but the addition of chlorpromazine, a calmodulin antagonist, blocked its stimulation. CRLK1 is mainly localized in the plasma membrane, and its expression is stimulated by cold and hydrogen peroxide treatments. Under normal growth conditions, there is no noticeable phenotypic difference between wild-type and crlk1 knock-out mutant plants. However, as compared with wild-type plants, the crlk1 knock-out mutants exhibited an increased sensitivity to chilling and freezing temperatures. Northern analysis showed that the induction of cold-responsive genes, including CBF1, RD29A, COR15a, and KIN1 in crlk1 mutants, is delayed as compared with wild-type plants. These results indicate that CRLK1 is a positive regulator of cold tolerance in plants. Furthermore, our results suggest that CRLK1 plays a role in bridging calcium/calmodulin signaling and cold signaling.

  15. The ErbB2/Neu/HER2 receptor is a new calmodulin-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein. To establish whether or not the related receptor ErbB2/Neu/HER2 also binds CaM, we used human breast adenocarcinoma SK-BR-3 cells, because these cells overexpress this receptor thus facilitating the detection of this interaction. In the present paper, we show that ErbB2 could be pulled-down using CaM–agarose beads in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as detected by Western blot analysis using an anti-ErbB2 antibody. ErbB2 was also isolated by Ca2+-dependent CaM-affinity chromatography. We also demonstrate using an overlay technique with biotinylated CaM that CaM binds directly to the immunoprecipitated ErbB2. The binding of biotinylated CaM to ErbB2 depends strictly on the presence of Ca2+, since it was prevented by the presence of EGTA. Moreover, the addition of an excess of free CaM prevents the binding of its biotinylated form, demonstrating that this was a specific process. We excluded any interference with the EGFR, as SK-BR-3 cells express considerably lower levels of this receptor, and no detectable EGFR signal was observed by Western blot analysis in the immunoprecipitated ErbB2 preparations used to perform the overlay assays with biotinylated CaM. We also demonstrate that treating living cells with W7 [N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulphonamide], a cell-permeant CaM antagonist, down-regulates ErbB2 phosphorylation, and show that W7 does not interfere non-specifically with the activity of ErbB tyrosine kinases. We also show that W7 inhibits the phosphorylation (activation) of both ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2) and Akt/PKB (protein kinase B), in accordance with the inhibition observed in ErbB2 phosphorylation. In contrast, W7 treatment increased the phosphorylation (activation) of CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein) and ATF1 (activating transcription factor-1), two Ca2+-sensitive transcription factors

  16. Characterization of a Central Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase IIα/β Binding Domain in Densin That Selectively Modulates Glutamate Receptor Subunit Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yuxia; Jalan-Sakrikar, Nidhi; Robison, A. J.; Baucum, Anthony J.; Bass, Martha A.; Colbran, Roger J.

    2011-01-01

    The densin C-terminal domain can target Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) in cells. Although the C-terminal domain selectively binds CaMKIIα in vitro, full-length densin associates with CaMKIIα or CaMKIIβ in brain extracts and in transfected HEK293 cells. This interaction requires a second central CaMKII binding site, the densin-IN domain, and an “open” activated CaMKII conformation caused by Ca2+/calmodulin binding, autophosphorylation at Thr-286/287, or mutation of Thr-286/287 to Asp. Mutations in the densin-IN domain (L815E) or in the CaMKIIα/β catalytic domain (I205/206K) disrupt the interaction. The amino acid sequence of the densin-IN domain is similar to the CaMKII inhibitor protein, CaMKIIN, and a CaMKIIN peptide competitively blocks CaMKII binding to densin. CaMKII is inhibited by both CaMKIIN and the densin-IN domain, but the inhibition by densin is substrate-selective. Phosphorylation of a model peptide substrate, syntide-2, or of Ser-831 in AMPA receptor GluA1 subunits is fully inhibited by densin. However, CaMKII phosphorylation of Ser-1303 in NMDA receptor GluN2B subunits is not effectively inhibited by densin in vitro or in intact cells. Thus, densin can target multiple CaMKII isoforms to differentially modulate phosphorylation of physiologically relevant downstream targets. PMID:21610080

  17. The octopamine receptor OAMB mediates ovulation via Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the Drosophila oviduct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Rohila, Suman; Han, Kyung-An

    2009-01-01

    Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine), is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3) with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg transfer from

  18. The Octopamine Receptor OAMB Mediates Ovulation via Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in the Drosophila Oviduct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Rohila, Suman; Han, Kyung-An

    2009-01-01

    Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine), is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3) with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg transfer from

  19. Differential modulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity by regulated interactions with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR2B subunits and alpha-actinin.

    PubMed

    Robison, A J; Bartlett, Ryan K; Bass, Martha A; Colbran, Roger J

    2005-11-25

    Neuronal Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) interacts with several prominent dendritic spine proteins, which have been termed CaMKII-associated proteins. The NR2B subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor, densin-180, and alpha-actinin bind comparable, approximately stoichiometric amounts of Thr(286)-autophosphorylated CaMKIIalpha, forming a ternary complex (Robison, A. J., Bass, M. A., Jiao, Y., Macmillan, L. B., Carmody, L. C., Bartlett, R. K., and Colbran, R. J. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 35329-35336), but their impacts on CaMKII function are poorly understood. Here we show that these interactions are differentially regulated and exert distinct effects on CaMKII activity. Nonphosphorylated and Thr(286)-autophosphorylated CaMKII bind to alpha-actinin with similar efficacy, but autophosphorylation at Thr(305/306) or Ca(2+)/calmodulin binding significantly reduce this binding. Moreover, alpha-actinin antagonizes CaMKII activation by Ca(2+)/calmodulin, as assessed by autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of a peptide substrate. CaMKII binding to densin (1247-1542) is partially independent of Thr(286) autophosphorylation and is unaffected by Ca(2+)-independent autophosphorylation or Ca(2+)/calmodulin. In addition, the CaMKII binding domain of densin-180 has little effect on CaMKII activity. In contrast, the interaction of CaMKIIalpha with NR2B requires either Thr(286) autophosphorylation or the binding of both Ca(2+)/calmodulin and adenine nucleotides. NR2B inhibits both the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent and autonomous activities of CaMKII by a mechanism that is competitive with autocamtide-2 substrate, non-competitive with syntide-2 substrate, and uncompetitive with respect to ATP. In combination, these data suggest that dynamically regulated interactions with CaMKII-associated proteins could play pleiotropic roles in finetuning CaMKII signaling in defined subcellular compartments.

  20. Inhibition of Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 stimulates osteoblast formation and inhibits osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cary, Rachel L; Waddell, Seid; Racioppi, Luigi; Long, Fanxin; Novack, Deborah V; Voor, Michael J; Sankar, Uma

    2013-07-01

    Bone remodeling, a physiological process characterized by bone formation by osteoblasts (OBs) and resorption of preexisting bone matrix by osteoclasts (OCs), is vital for the maintenance of healthy bone tissue in adult humans. Imbalances in this vital process result in pathological conditions including osteoporosis. Owing to its initial asymptomatic nature, osteoporosis is often detected only after the patient has sustained significant bone loss or a fracture. Hence, anabolic therapeutics that stimulate bone accrual is in high clinical demand. Here we identify Ca²⁺/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) as a potential target for such therapeutics because its inhibition enhances OB differentiation and bone growth and suppresses OC differentiation. Mice null for CaMKK2 possess higher trabecular bone mass in their long bones, along with significantly more OBs and fewer multinuclear OCs. In vitro, although Camkk2⁻/⁻ mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) yield significantly higher numbers of OBs, bone marrow cells from Camkk2⁻/⁻ mice produce fewer multinuclear OCs. Acute inhibition of CaMKK2 by its selective, cell-permeable pharmacological inhibitor STO-609 also results in increased OB and diminished OC formation. Further, we find phospho-protein kinase A (PKA) and Ser¹³³ phosphorylated form of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (pCREB) to be markedly elevated in OB progenitors deficient in CaMKK2. On the other hand, genetic ablation of CaMKK2 or its pharmacological inhibition in OC progenitors results in reduced pCREB as well as significantly reduced levels of its transcriptional target, nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic (NFATc1). Moreover, in vivo administration of STO-609 results in increased OBs and diminished OCs, conferring significant protection from ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis in adult mice. Overall, our findings reveal a novel function for CaMKK2 in bone remodeling and

  1. A receptor-like kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana is a calmodulin-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Charpenteau, Martine; Jaworski, Krzysztof; Ramirez, Bertha C; Tretyn, Andrzej; Ranjeva, Raoul; Ranty, Benoît

    2004-01-01

    Screening a cDNA expression library with a radiolabelled calmodulin (CaM) probe led to the isolation of AtCaMRLK, a receptor-like kinase (RLK) of Arabidopsis thaliana. AtCaMRLK polypeptide sequence shows a modular organization consisting of the four distinctive domains characteristic of receptor kinases: an amino terminal signal sequence, a domain containing seven leucine-rich repeats, a single putative membrane-spanning segment and a protein kinase domain. Using truncated versions of the protein and a synthetic peptide, we demonstrated that a region of 23 amino acids, located near the kinase domain of AtCaMRLK, binds CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Real-time binding experiments showed that AtCaMRLK interacted in vitro with AtCaM1, a canonical CaM, but not with AtCaM8, a divergent isoform of the Ca2+ sensor. The bacterially expressed kinase domain of the protein was able to autophosphorylate and to phosphorylate the myelin basic protein, using Mn2+ preferentially to Mg2+ as an ion activator. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved lysine residue (Lys423) to alanine, in the kinase subdomain II, resulted in a complete loss of kinase activity. CaM had no influence on the autophosphorylation activity of AtCaMRLK. AtCaMRLK was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of A. thaliana, except in leaves. Disruption in the AtCaMRLK coding sequence by insertion of a DsG transposable element in an Arabidopsis mutant did not generate a discernible phenotype. The CaM-binding motif of AtCaMRLK was found to be conserved in several other members of the plant RLK family, suggesting a role for Ca2+/CaM in the regulation of RLK-mediated pathways. PMID:14720124

  2. Presynaptic kainate receptor-mediated facilitation of glutamate release involves Ca2+ -calmodulin at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Duque-Feria, Paloma; Negrete-Díaz, José Vicente; Sihra, Talvinder S; Flores, Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs) modulate the release of glutamate at synapses established between mossy fibers (MF) and CA3 pyramidal cells in the hippocampus. The activation of KAR by low, nanomolar, kainate concentrations facilitates glutamate release. KAR-mediated facilitation of glutamate release involves the activation of an adenylate cyclase/cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A cascade at MF-CA3 synapses. Here, we studied the mechanisms by which KAR activation produces this facilitation of glutamate release in slices and synaptosomes. We find that the facilitation of glutamate release mediated by KAR activation requires an increase in Ca(2+) levels in the cytosol and the formation of a Ca(2+) -calmodulin complex to activate adenylate cyclase. The increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) underpinning this modulation is achieved, both, by Ca(2+) entering via Ca(2+) -permeable KARs and, by the mobilization of intraterminal Ca(2+) stores. Finally, we find that, congruent with the Ca(2+) -calmodulin support of KAR-mediated facilitation of glutamate release, induction of long-term potentiation at MF-CA3 synapses has an obligate requirement for Ca(2+) -calmodulin activity. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Enhanced binding of calmodulin to the ryanodine receptor corrects contractile dysfunction in failing hearts.

    PubMed

    Hino, Akihiro; Yano, Masafumi; Kato, Takayoshi; Fukuda, Masakazu; Suetomi, Takeshi; Ono, Makoto; Murakami, Wakako; Susa, Takehisa; Okuda, Shinichi; Doi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Koseki, Noritaka; Kyushiki, Hiroyuki; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Matsuzaki, Masunori

    2012-12-01

    The channel function of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is modulated by calmodulin (CaM). However, the involvement of CaM in aberrant Ca(2+) release in diseased hearts remains unclear. Here, we investigated the pathogenic role of defective CaM binding to the RyR2 in the channel dysfunction associated with heart failure. The involvement of CaM in aberrant Ca(2+) release was assessed in normal and pacing-induced failing canine hearts. The apparent affinity of CaM for RyR2 was considerably lower in failing sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) compared with normal SR. Thus, the amount of CaM bound to RyR2 was markedly decreased in failing myocytes. Expression of the CaM isoform Gly-Ser-His-CaM (GSH-CaM), which has much higher binding affinity than wild-type CaM for RyR1, restored normal CaM binding to RyR2 in both SR and myocytes of failing hearts. The Ca(2+) spark frequency (SpF) was markedly higher and the SR Ca(2+) content was lower in failing myocytes compared with normal myocytes. The incorporation of GSH-CaM into the failing myocytes corrected the aberrant SpF and SR Ca(2+) content to normal levels. Reduced CaM binding to RyR2 seems to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of aberrant Ca(2+) release in failing hearts. Correction of the reduced CaM binding to RyR2 stabilizes the RyR2 channel function and thereby restores normal Ca(2+) handling and contractile function to failing hearts.

  4. A calcium-dependent protein kinase can inhibit a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump (ACA2) located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The magnitude and duration of a cytosolic Ca(2+) release can potentially be altered by changing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux. In plant cells, Ca(2+) efflux from the cytoplasm is mediated by H(+)/Ca(2+)-antiporters and two types of Ca(2+)-ATPases. ACA2 was recently identified as a calmodulin-regulated Ca(2+)-pump located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that phosphorylation of its N-terminal regulatory domain by a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK isoform CPK1), inhibits both basal activity ( approximately 10%) and calmodulin stimulation ( approximately 75%), as shown by Ca(2+)-transport assays with recombinant enzyme expressed in yeast. A CDPK phosphorylation site was mapped to Ser(45) near a calmodulin binding site, using a fusion protein containing the N-terminal domain as an in vitro substrate for a recombinant CPK1. In a full-length enzyme, an Ala substitution for Ser(45) (S45/A) completely blocked the observed CDPK inhibition of both basal and calmodulin-stimulated activities. An Asp substitution (S45/D) mimicked phosphoinhibition, indicating that a negative charge at this position is sufficient to account for phosphoinhibition. Interestingly, prior binding of calmodulin blocked phosphorylation. This suggests that, once ACA2 binds calmodulin, its activation state becomes resistant to phosphoinhibition. These results support the hypothesis that ACA2 activity is regulated as the balance between the initial kinetics of calmodulin stimulation and CDPK inhibition, providing an example in plants for a potential point of crosstalk between two different Ca(2+)-signaling pathways.

  5. A calcium-dependent protein kinase can inhibit a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump (ACA2) located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The magnitude and duration of a cytosolic Ca(2+) release can potentially be altered by changing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux. In plant cells, Ca(2+) efflux from the cytoplasm is mediated by H(+)/Ca(2+)-antiporters and two types of Ca(2+)-ATPases. ACA2 was recently identified as a calmodulin-regulated Ca(2+)-pump located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that phosphorylation of its N-terminal regulatory domain by a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK isoform CPK1), inhibits both basal activity ( approximately 10%) and calmodulin stimulation ( approximately 75%), as shown by Ca(2+)-transport assays with recombinant enzyme expressed in yeast. A CDPK phosphorylation site was mapped to Ser(45) near a calmodulin binding site, using a fusion protein containing the N-terminal domain as an in vitro substrate for a recombinant CPK1. In a full-length enzyme, an Ala substitution for Ser(45) (S45/A) completely blocked the observed CDPK inhibition of both basal and calmodulin-stimulated activities. An Asp substitution (S45/D) mimicked phosphoinhibition, indicating that a negative charge at this position is sufficient to account for phosphoinhibition. Interestingly, prior binding of calmodulin blocked phosphorylation. This suggests that, once ACA2 binds calmodulin, its activation state becomes resistant to phosphoinhibition. These results support the hypothesis that ACA2 activity is regulated as the balance between the initial kinetics of calmodulin stimulation and CDPK inhibition, providing an example in plants for a potential point of crosstalk between two different Ca(2+)-signaling pathways.

  6. GsCBRLK, a calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase, is a positive regulator of plant tolerance to salt and ABA stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Ji, Wei; Zhu, Yanming; Gao, Peng; Li, Yong; Cai, Hua; Bai, Xi; Guo, Dianjing

    2010-05-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases play vital roles in protein phosphorylation in eukaryotes, yet little is known about the phosphorylation process of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and its role in stress signal transduction in plants. A novel plant-specific calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase (GsCBRLK) has been isolated from Glycine soja. A subcellular localization study using GFP fusion protein indicated that GsCBRLK is localized in the plasma membrane. Binding assays demonstrated that calmodulin binds to GsCBRLK with an affinity of 25.9 nM in a calcium-dependent manner and the binding motif lies between amino acids 147 to169 within subdomain II of the kinase domain. GsCBRLK undergoes autophosphorylation and Myelin Basis Protein phosphorylation in the presence of calcium. It was also found that calcium/calmodulin positively regulates GsCBRLK kinase activity through direct interaction between the calmodulin-binding domain and calmodulin. So, it is likely that GsCBRLK responds to an environmental stimulus in two ways: by increasing the protein expression level and by regulating its kinase activity through the calcium/calmodulin complex. Furthermore, cold, salinity, drought, and ABA stress induce GsCBRLK gene transcripts. Over-expression of GsCBRLK in transgenic Arabidopsis resulted in enhanced plant tolerance to high salinity and ABA and increased the expression pattern of a number of stress gene markers in response to ABA and high salt. These results identify GsCBRLK as a molecular link between the stress- and ABA-induced calcium/calmodulin signal and gene expression in plant cells.

  7. A calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump in plasma-membrane vesicles from Trypanosoma brucei; selective inhibition by pentamidine.

    PubMed Central

    Benaim, G; Lopez-Estraño, C; Docampo, R; Moreno, S N

    1993-01-01

    Despite previous reports [McLaughlin (1985) Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 15, 189-201; Ghosh, Ray, Sarkar and Bhaduri (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 11345-11351; Mazumder, Mukherjee, Ghosh, Ray and Bhaduri (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 18440-18446] that the plasma membrane of different trypanosomatids only contains Ca(2+)-ATPase that does not show any demonstrable dependence on Mg2+, a high-affinity (Ca(2+)-Mg2+)-ATPase was demonstrated in the plasma membrane of Trypanosoma brucei. The enzyme became saturated with micromolar amounts of Ca2+, reaching a Vmax. of 3.45 +/- 0.66 nmol of ATP/min per mg of protein. The Km,app. for Ca2+ was 0.52 +/- 0.03 microM. This was decreased to 0.23 +/- 0.05 microM, and the Vmax. was increased to 6.36 +/- 0.22 nmol of ATP/min per mg of protein (about 85%), when calmodulin was present. T. brucei plasma-membrane vesicles accumulated Ca2+ on addition of ATP only when Mg2+ was present, and released it to addition of the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. In addition, this Ca2+ transport was stimulated by calmodulin. Addition of NaCl to Ca(2+)-loaded T. brucei plasma-membrane vesicles did not result in Ca2+ release, thus suggesting the absence of a Na+/Ca2+ exchanger in these parasites. Therefore the (Ca(2+)-Mg2+)-ATPase would be the only mechanism so far described that is responsible for the long-term fine tuning of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of these parasites. The trypanocidal drug pentamidine inhibited the T. brucei plasma-membrane (Ca(2+)-Mg2+)-ATPase and Ca2+ transport at concentrations that had no effect on the Ca(2+)-ATPase activity of human or pig erythrocytes. In this latter case, pentamidine behaved as a weak calmodulin antagonist, since it inhibited the stimulation of the erythrocyte Ca(2+)-ATPase by calmodulin. PMID:8280074

  8. Loss of the Calmodulin-Dependent Inhibition of RyR1 Calcium Release Channel Upon Oxidation of Methionines in Calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Boschek, Curt B.; Jones, Terry E.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2008-01-08

    The oxidation of methionines in calmodulin (CaM) can affect the activity of calcium pumps and channels to modulate the amplitude and duration of calcium signals. We have therefore investigated the possible oxidation of CaM in skeletal muscle and its affect on the CaM-dependent regulation of the RyR1 calcium release channel. Taking advantage of characteristic reductions in electrophoretic mobility by SDS-PAGE, we find that approximately two methionines are oxidized in CaM from skeletal muscle. The functional effect of CaM oxidation on the open probability of the RyR1 calcium release channel was assessed through measurements of 3[H]-ryanodine binding using a heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum preparation enriched in RyR1. There is a biphasic regulation of RyR1 by unoxidized CaM, where calcium-activated CaM acts to enhance the calcium-sensitivity of channel closure, while apo-CaM functions to enhance channel activity at resting calcium levels. We find that physiological levels of CaM oxidation preferentially diminish the CaM-dependent inhibition of the RyR1 calcium release channel observed at activating micromolar levels of calcium. In contrast, the oxidation of CaM resulted in a minimal functional changes in the CaM-dependent activation of RyR1 at resting nanomolar calcium levels. Oxidation does not affect the high-affinity binding of calcium-activated CaM to the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1; rather, methionine oxidation disrupts interdomain interactions between the opposing domains of CaM in complex with the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1 that normally function as a conformational switch associated with RyR1 inhibition. These results suggest that the oxidation of CaM can contribute to observed elevations in intracellular calcium levels in response to conditions of oxidative stress. We suggest that the sensitivity of RyR1 channel activity to CaM oxidation may function as part of an adaptive cellular response to enhance the duration of calcium transients to promote enhanced

  9. Loss of the calmodulin-dependent inhibition of the RyR1 calcium release channel upon oxidation of methionines in calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Smallwood, Heather S; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2008-01-08

    The oxidation of methionines in calmodulin (CaM) can affect the activity of calcium pumps and channels to modulate the amplitude and duration of calcium signals. We have therefore investigated the possible oxidation of CaM in skeletal muscle and its effect on the CaM-dependent regulation of the RyR1 calcium release channel. Taking advantage of characteristic reductions in electrophoretic mobility determined by SDS-PAGE, we find that approximately two methionines are oxidized in CaM from skeletal muscle. The functional effect of CaM oxidation on the open probability of the RyR1 calcium release channel was assessed through measurements of [3H]ryanodine binding using a heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum preparation enriched in RyR1. There is a biphasic regulation of RyR1 by unoxidized CaM, in which calcium-activated CaM acts to enhance the calcium sensitivity of channel closure, while apo-CaM functions to enhance channel activity at resting calcium levels. We find that physiological levels of CaM oxidation preferentially weaken the CaM-dependent inhibition of the RyR1 calcium release channel observed at activating micromolar levels of calcium. In contrast, the oxidation of CaM resulted in minimal functional changes in the CaM-dependent activation of RyR1 at resting nanomolar calcium levels. Oxidation does not significantly affect the high-affinity binding of calcium-activated CaM to the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1; rather, methionine oxidation disrupts interdomain interactions between the opposing domains of CaM in complex with the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1 that normally function as part of a conformational switch associated with RyR1 inhibition. These results suggest that the oxidation of CaM can contribute to observed elevations in intracellular calcium levels in response to conditions of oxidative stress observed during biological aging. We suggest that the sensitivity of RyR1 channel activity to CaM oxidation may function as part of an adaptive cellular response

  10. The bell-shaped Ca2+ dependence of the inositol 1,4, 5-trisphosphate-induced Ca2+ release is modulated by Ca2+/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Missiaen, L; Parys, J B; Weidema, A F; Sipma, H; Vanlingen, S; De Smet, P; Callewaert, G; De Smedt, H

    1999-05-14

    Calmodulin inhibits inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) binding to the IP3 receptor in both a Ca2+-dependent and a Ca2+-independent way. Because there are no functional data on the modulation of the IP3-induced Ca2+ release by calmodulin at various Ca2+ concentrations, we have studied how cytosolic Ca2+ and Sr2+ interfere with the effects of calmodulin on the IP3-induced Ca2+ release in permeabilized A7r5 cells. We now report that calmodulin inhibited Ca2+ release through the IP3 receptor with an IC50 of 4.6 microM if the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration was 0.3 microM or higher. This inhibition was particularly pronounced at low IP3 concentrations. In contrast, calmodulin did not affect IP3-induced Ca2+ release if the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration was below 0.3 microM. Calmodulin also inhibited Ca2+ release through the IP3 receptor in the presence of at least 10 microM Sr2+. We conclude that cytosolic Ca2+ or Sr2+ are absolutely required for the calmodulin-induced inhibition of the IP3-induced Ca2+ release and that this dependence represents the formation of the Ca2+/calmodulin or Sr2+/calmodulin complex.

  11. IP3 receptor binds to and sensitizes TRPV4 channel to osmotic stimuli via a calmodulin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Elias, Anna; Lorenzo, Ivan M; Vicente, Rubén; Valverde, Miguel A

    2008-11-14

    Activation of the non-selective cation channel TRPV4 by mechanical and osmotic stimuli requires the involvement of phospholipase A2 and the subsequent production of the arachidonic acid metabolites, epoxieicosatrienoic acids (EET). Previous studies have shown that inositol trisphosphate (IP3) sensitizes TRPV4 to mechanical, osmotic, and direct EET stimulation. We now search for the IP3 receptor-binding site on TRPV4 and its relevance to IP3-mediated sensitization. Three putative sites involved in protein-protein interactions were evaluated: a proline-rich domain (PRD), a calmodulin (CaM)-binding site, and the last four amino acids (DAPL) that show a PDZ-binding motif-like. TRPV4-DeltaCaM-(Delta812-831) channels preserved activation by hypotonicity, 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, and EET but lost their physical interaction with IP3 receptor 3 and IP3-mediated sensitization. Deletion of a PDZ-binding motif-like (TRPV4-DeltaDAPL) did not affect channel activity or IP3-mediated sensitization, whereas TRPV4-DeltaPRD-(Delta132-144) resulted in loss of channel function despite correct trafficking. We conclude that IP3-mediated sensitization requires IP3 receptor binding to a TRPV4 C-terminal domain that overlaps with a previously described calmodulin-binding site.

  12. Calcium modulates calmodulin/α-actinin 1 interaction with and agonist-dependent internalization of the adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Piirainen, Henni; Taura, Jaume; Kursula, Petri; Ciruela, Francisco; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2017-04-01

    Adenosine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that sense extracellular adenosine to transmit intracellular signals. One of the four adenosine receptor subtypes, the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), has an exceptionally long intracellular C terminus (A2AR-ct) that mediates interactions with a large array of proteins, including calmodulin and α-actinin. Here, we aimed to ascertain the α-actinin 1/calmodulin interplay whilst binding to A2AR and the role of Ca(2+) in this process. First, we studied the A2AR-α-actinin 1 interaction by means of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance, using purified recombinant proteins. α-Actinin 1 binds the A2AR-ct through its distal calmodulin-like domain in a Ca(2+)-independent manner with a dissociation constant of 5-12μM, thus showing an ~100 times lower affinity compared to the A2AR-calmodulin/Ca(2+) complex. Importantly, calmodulin displaced α-actinin 1 from the A2AR-ct in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, disrupting the A2AR-α-actinin 1 complex. Finally, we assessed the impact of Ca(2+) on A2AR internalization in living cells, a function operated by the A2AR-α-actinin 1 complex. Interestingly, while Ca(2+) influx did not affect constitutive A2AR endocytosis, it abolished agonist-dependent internalization. In addition, we demonstrated that the A2AR/α-actinin interaction plays a pivotal role in receptor internalization and function. Overall, our results suggest that the interplay of A2AR with calmodulin and α-actinin 1 is fine-tuned by Ca(2+), a fact that might power agonist-mediated receptor internalization and function.

  13. Site-specific modification of calmodulin Ca²(+) affinity tunes the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor activation profile.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jie; Zhou, Yubin; Zou, Jin; Chen, Yanyi; Patel, Priya; Yang, Jenny J; Balog, Edward M

    2010-11-15

    The skeletal muscle isoform of the ryanodine receptor Ca²(+)-release channel (RyR1) is regulated by Ca²(+) and CaM (calmodulin). CaM shifts the biphasic Ca²(+)-dependence of RyR1 activation leftward, effectively increasing channel opening at low Ca²(+) and decreasing channel opening at high Ca²(+). The conversion of CaM from a RyR1 activator into an inhibitor is due to the binding of Ca²(+) to CaM; however, which of CaM's four Ca²(+)-binding sites serves as the switch for this conversion is unclear. We engineered a series of mutant CaMs designed to individually increase the Ca²(+) affinity of each of CaM's EF-hands by increasing the number of acidic residues in Ca²(+)-chelating positions. Domain-specific Ca²(+) affinities of each CaM variant were determined by equilibrium fluorescence titration. Mutations in sites I (T26D) or II (N60D) in CaM's N-terminal domain had little effect on CaM Ca²(+) affinity and regulation of RyR1. However, the site III mutation N97D increased the Ca²(+)-binding affinity of CaM's C-terminal domain and caused CaM to inhibit RyR1 at a lower Ca²(+) concentration than wild-type CaM. Conversely, the site IV mutation Q135D decreased the Ca²(+)-binding affinity of CaM's C-terminal domain and caused CaM to inhibit RyR1 at higher Ca²(+) concentrations. These results support the hypothesis that Ca²(+) binding to CaM's C-terminal acts as the switch converting CaM from a RyR1 activator into a channel inhibitor. These results indicate further that targeting CaM's Ca²(+) affinity may be a valid strategy to tune the activation profile of CaM-regulated ion channels.

  14. Effects of opiates on synaptosomal calmodulin and calcium uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Hoss, W.; Formaniak, M.

    1983-02-01

    Acute opiate administration in vivo increases the level of cytoplasmic calmodulin in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. These synaptosomes do not, however, display decreased K/sup +/-stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake in vitro. Opiates affect neither cytoplasmic calmodulin nor Ca uptake after incubation of synaptosomes with the drugs in vitro. In contrast to the interpretation of electrophysiological data, these results suggest that the observed inhibition by opiates of the release of several transmitters may not be mediated by presynaptic opiate receptors that inhibit Ca uptake.

  15. Discovery of a small molecule that inhibits the interaction of anthrax edema factor with its cellular activator, calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sam; Bergson, Pamela; He, Wei Song; Mrksich, Milan; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2004-08-01

    The catalytic efficiency of adenylyl cyclase activity of edema factor (EF) from Bacillus anthracis is enhanced by approximately 1000-fold upon its binding to mammalian protein calmodulin (CaM). A tandem cell-based and protein binding-based screen of a 10,000 member library identified a molecule that inhibits the EF-CaM interaction and therefore the adenylyl cyclase activity. A combination of fluorescence spectroscopy and photolabeling studies showed that the molecule targets the CaM binding region of EF. A series of related compounds were synthesized and evaluated to identify one compound, 4-[4-(4-nitrophenyl)-thiazolylamino]-benzenesulfonamide, that maintained activity against EF but showed minimal toxicity to two cultured cell lines. This compound represents an important reagent to study the role of EF in anthrax pathology and may represent a drug lead against anthrax infection.

  16. Protein Kinase Cδ and Calmodulin Regulate Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Recycling from Early Endosomes through Arp2/3 Complex and Cortactin

    PubMed Central

    Lladó, Anna; Timpson, Paul; Vilà de Muga, Sandra; Moretó, Jemina; Pol, Albert; Grewal, Thomas; Daly, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The intracellular trafficking of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is regulated by a cross-talk between calmodulin (CaM) and protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ). On inhibition of CaM, PKCδ promotes the formation of enlarged early endosomes and blocks EGFR recycling and degradation. Here, we show that PKCδ impairs EGFR trafficking due to the formation of an F-actin coat surrounding early endosomes. The PKCδ-induced polymerization of actin is orchestrated by the Arp2/3 complex and requires the interaction of cortactin with PKCδ. Accordingly, inhibition of actin polymerization by using cytochalasin D or by overexpression of active cofilin, restored the normal morphology of the organelle and the recycling of EGFR. Similar results were obtained after down-regulation of cortactin and the sequestration of the Arp2/3 complex. Furthermore we demonstrate an interaction of cortactin with CaM and PKCδ, the latter being dependent on CaM inhibition. In summary, this study provides the first evidence that CaM and PKCδ organize actin dynamics in the early endosomal compartment, thereby regulating the intracellular trafficking of EGFR. PMID:17959830

  17. Mechanistic Basis of Calmodulin Mediated Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activation and Antiestrogen Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    cancers . Calmodulin (CaM) is an obligatory ERa activator. Moreover, antiestrogens (tamoxifen) bind tightly to CaM, and some therapeutic benefits of...antiestrogens for breast cancers are hypothesized to derive from this interaction. The purpose and scope of the research is to define the structural...antiestrogens, including the most widely used chemotherapeutic agent for estrogen-dependent breast cancers , tamoxifen (TAM). The therapeutic effects of

  18. Mechanistic Basis of Calmodulin Mediated Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activation and Antiestrogen Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    2002) Calmodulin in action : diversity in target recognition and activation mechanisms , Cell 108, 739-742. 7. Yap, K. L., Kim, J., Truong, K., Sherman... Mechanism of Malic Enzyme Using (2R,3R)-erythro-Fluoromalate as a Slow Alternate Substrate. Biochemistry 37, 18018-18025. Urbauer, J. L., Bradshaw, D. E...Proteins. J. Biomol. NMR 9, 437-440. Edens, W. A., Urbauer, J. L., and Cleland, W. W. (1997) Determination of the Chemical Mechanism of Malic Enzyme

  19. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is associated with the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A. Soren; Lim, Indra A.; Hemsworth, Daniel E.; Horne, Mary C.; Hell, Johannes W.

    1999-01-01

    The molecular basis of long-term potentiation (LTP), a long-lasting change in synaptic transmission, is of fundamental interest because of its implication in learning. Usually LTP depends on Ca2+ influx through postsynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors and subsequent activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). For a molecular understanding of LTP it is crucial to know how CaMKII is localized to its postsynaptic targets because protein kinases often are targeted to their substrates by adapter proteins. Here we show that CaMKII directly binds to the NMDA receptor subunits NR1 and NR2B. Moreover, activation of CaMKIIα by stimulation of NMDA receptors in forebrain slices increase this association. This interaction places CaMKII not only proximal to a major source of Ca2+ influx but also close to α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors, which become phosphorylated upon stimulation of NMDA receptors in these forebrain slices. Identification of the postsynaptic adapter for CaMKII fills a critical gap in the understanding of LTP because CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of AMPA receptors is an important step during LTP. PMID:10077668

  20. Molecular analysis of the graviperception signal transduction in the flagellate Euglena gracilis: Involvement of a transient receptor potential-like channel and a calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, Donat-Peter; Richter, Peter R.; Schuster, Martin; Daiker, Viktor; Lebert, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Euglena gracilis, a unicellular, photosynthetic flagellate is a model system for environmentally controlled behavior responses. The organism shows pronounced negative gravitaxis. This movement is based on physiological mechanisms, which in the past had been only indirectly assessed. It was shown that mechano-sensitive calcium channels are involved in the gravitaxis response. Recent studies have demonstrated that members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family function as mechano-sensitive channels in several different cell types. We have sequenced part of a TRP gene in Euglena and applied RNA interference (RNAi) to confirm that these channels are involved in graviperception. It was found that RNAi against the putative TRP channel abolished gravitaxis. The genes of three calmodulins were sequences in Euglena, one of which was previously known in its protein structure (cal 1). The other two were unknown (cal 2 and cal 3). Cal 2 has been analyzed in detail. The biosynthesis of the corresponding proteins of cal 1 and cal 2 was inhibited by means of RNA interference to see whether this blockage impairs gravitaxis. RNAi of cal 1 leads to a long-term loss of free swimming in the cells (while euglenoid movement persists). It induced pronounced cell form aberrations and the division of cells was hampered. After recovery from RNAi the cell showed precise negative gravitaxis again. Thus cal 1 does not seem to be involved in gravitaxis. In contrast, the blockage of cal 2 has no pronounced influence on motility and cell form but leads to a complete loss of gravitactic orientation for more than 30 days showing that this calmodulin is an element in the signal transduction chain. The data are discussed in the context of the current model of the gravitaxis signal transduction chain in Euglena gracilis.

  1. Wenxin-Keli Regulates the Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Signal Transduction Pathway and Inhibits Cardiac Arrhythmia in Rats with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yanwei; Gao, Yonghong; Chen, Jianxin; Zhu, Haiyan; Wu, Aiming; Yang, Qing; Teng, Fei; Zhang, Dong-mei; Xing, Yanhui; Gao, Kuo; He, Qingyong; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Wang, Jie; Shang, Hongcai

    2013-01-01

    Wenxin-Keli (WXKL) is a Chinese herbal compound reported to be of benefit in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia, cardiac inflammation, and heart failure. Amiodarone is a noncompetitive inhibitor of the α- and β-adrenergic receptors and prevents calcium influx in the slow-response cells of the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes. Overexpression of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in transgenic mice results in heart failure and arrhythmias. We hypothesised that administration of WXKL and amiodarone can reduce the incidence of arrhythmias by regulating CaMKII signal transduction. A total of 100 healthy Sprague Dawley rats were used in the study. The rats were randomly divided into four groups (a sham group, a myocardial infarction (MI) group, a WXKL-treated group, and an amiodarone-treated group). A myocardial infarction model was established in these rats by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery for 4 weeks. Western blotting was used to assess CaMKII, p-CaMKII (Thr-286), PLB, p-PLB (Thr-17), RYR2, and FK binding protein 12.6 (FKBP12.6) levels. The Ca2+ content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the calcium transient amplitude were studied by confocal imaging using the fluorescent indicator Fura-4. In conclusion, WXKL may inhibit heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias by regulating the CaMKII signal transduction pathway similar to amiodarone. PMID:23781262

  2. Wenxin-Keli Regulates the Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Signal Transduction Pathway and Inhibits Cardiac Arrhythmia in Rats with Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yanwei; Gao, Yonghong; Chen, Jianxin; Zhu, Haiyan; Wu, Aiming; Yang, Qing; Teng, Fei; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Xing, Yanhui; Gao, Kuo; He, Qingyong; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Wang, Jie; Shang, Hongcai

    2013-01-01

    Wenxin-Keli (WXKL) is a Chinese herbal compound reported to be of benefit in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia, cardiac inflammation, and heart failure. Amiodarone is a noncompetitive inhibitor of the α - and β -adrenergic receptors and prevents calcium influx in the slow-response cells of the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes. Overexpression of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in transgenic mice results in heart failure and arrhythmias. We hypothesised that administration of WXKL and amiodarone can reduce the incidence of arrhythmias by regulating CaMKII signal transduction. A total of 100 healthy Sprague Dawley rats were used in the study. The rats were randomly divided into four groups (a sham group, a myocardial infarction (MI) group, a WXKL-treated group, and an amiodarone-treated group). A myocardial infarction model was established in these rats by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery for 4 weeks. Western blotting was used to assess CaMKII, p-CaMKII (Thr-286), PLB, p-PLB (Thr-17), RYR2, and FK binding protein 12.6 (FKBP12.6) levels. The Ca(2+) content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the calcium transient amplitude were studied by confocal imaging using the fluorescent indicator Fura-4. In conclusion, WXKL may inhibit heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias by regulating the CaMKII signal transduction pathway similar to amiodarone.

  3. Dityrosine formation in calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Malencik, D.A.; Anderson, S.R.

    1987-02-10

    Ultraviolet (280-nm) irradiation of bovine brain calmodulin results in calcium-dependent changes in its fluorescence emission spectrum. These consist of a decline in the intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence of the protein and the appearance of a new emission maximum at 400 nm. Chromatography of irradiated calmodulin, using Ultrogel AcA 54 and phenyl-agarose columns, yields several distinctive fractions. One of these, representing 2.8% of the total recovered protein and 53% of the total fluorescence emission at 400 nm, was selected for detailed characterization. Analyses performed on acid hydrolysates reveal the presence of dityrosine, a derivative of tyrosine known for its fluorescence near 400 nm, at the level of 0.59-0.89 mol per 16,700 g of protein. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis experiments demonstrate two components of apparent molecular weights 14,000 (80%) and 16,000 (20%). Observations on the effects of UV irradiation on the thrombic fragments of calmodulin and on related calcium binding proteins (rabbit skeletal muscle troponin C, bovine cardiac troponin C, and parvalbumin) support the interpretation that dityrosine formation in calmodulin results from the intramolecular cross-linking of Tyr-99 and Tyr-138. The dityrosine-containing photoproduct of calmodulin is unable to stimulate the p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity of calcineurin under standard assay conditions. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase binds the derivative about 280-fold less effectively than it binds native calmodulin. Of several metal ions tested, only Cd/sup 2 +/ approaches Ca/sup 2 +/ in its ability to promote the appearance of the 400-nm emission band during UV irradiation of calmodulin. Mn/sup 2 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ appear to inhibit dityrosine formation.

  4. MicroRNA-30 inhibits neointimal hyperplasia by targeting Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong Feng; Spinelli, Amy; Sun, Li-Yan; Jiang, Miao; Singer, Diane V.; Ginnan, Roman; Saddouk, Fatima Z.; Van Riper, Dee; Singer, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II δ-isoform (CaMKIIδ) promotes vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, migration, and injury-induced vascular wall neointima formation. The objective of this study was to test if microRNA-30 (miR-30) family members are endogenous regulators of CaMKIIδ expression following vascular injury and whether ectopic expression of miR-30 can inhibit CaMKIIδ-dependent VSM cell function and neointimal VSM hyperplasia induced by vascular injury. The CaMKIIδ 3′UTR contains a consensus miR-30 binding sequence that is highly conserved across species. A significant decrease in miR-30 family members and increase in CaMKIIδ2 protein expression, with no change in CaMKIIδ mRNA expression, was observed in medial layers of VSM 7 days post-injury. In vitro, overexpression of miR-30c or miR-30e inhibited CaMKIIδ2 protein expression by ~50% in cultured rat aortic VSM cells, and inhibited VSM cell proliferation and migration. In vivo, lenti-viral delivery of miR-30c into injured rat carotid arteries prevented the injury-induced increase in CaMKIIδ2. Furthermore, neointima formation was dramatically inhibited by lenti-viral delivery of miR-30c in the injured medial smooth muscle. These studies define a novel mechanism for regulating CaMKIIδ expression in VSM and provide a new potential therapeutic strategy to reduce progression of vascular proliferative diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:27199283

  5. MicroRNA-30 inhibits neointimal hyperplasia by targeting Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong Feng; Spinelli, Amy; Sun, Li-Yan; Jiang, Miao; Singer, Diane V; Ginnan, Roman; Saddouk, Fatima Z; Van Riper, Dee; Singer, Harold A

    2016-05-20

    The multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II δ-isoform (CaMKIIδ) promotes vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, migration, and injury-induced vascular wall neointima formation. The objective of this study was to test if microRNA-30 (miR-30) family members are endogenous regulators of CaMKIIδ expression following vascular injury and whether ectopic expression of miR-30 can inhibit CaMKIIδ-dependent VSM cell function and neointimal VSM hyperplasia induced by vascular injury. The CaMKIIδ 3'UTR contains a consensus miR-30 binding sequence that is highly conserved across species. A significant decrease in miR-30 family members and increase in CaMKIIδ2 protein expression, with no change in CaMKIIδ mRNA expression, was observed in medial layers of VSM 7 days post-injury. In vitro, overexpression of miR-30c or miR-30e inhibited CaMKIIδ2 protein expression by ~50% in cultured rat aortic VSM cells, and inhibited VSM cell proliferation and migration. In vivo, lenti-viral delivery of miR-30c into injured rat carotid arteries prevented the injury-induced increase in CaMKIIδ2. Furthermore, neointima formation was dramatically inhibited by lenti-viral delivery of miR-30c in the injured medial smooth muscle. These studies define a novel mechanism for regulating CaMKIIδ expression in VSM and provide a new potential therapeutic strategy to reduce progression of vascular proliferative diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis.

  6. Inhibition of apoplastic calmodulin impairs calcium homeostasis and cell wall modeling during Cedrus deodara pollen tube growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Lv, Xueqin; Li, Hong; Zhang, Min; Wang, Hong; Jin, Biao; Chen, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is one of the most well-studied Ca(2+) transducers in eukaryotic cells. It is known to regulate the activity of numerous proteins with diverse cellular functions; however, the functions of apoplastic CaM in plant cells are still poorly understood. By combining pharmacological analysis and microscopic techniques, we investigated the involvement of apoplastic CaM in pollen tube growth of Cedrus deodara (Roxb.) Loud. It was found that the tip-focused calcium gradient was rapidly disturbed as one of the early events after application of pharmacological agents, while the cytoplasmic organization was not significantly affected. The deposition and distribution of acidic pectins and esterified pectins were also dramatically changed, further perturbing the normal modeling of the cell wall. Several protein candidates from different functional categories may be involved in the responses to inhibition of apoplastic CaM. These results revealed that apoplastic CaM functions to maintain the tip-focused calcium gradient and to modulate the distribution/transformation of pectins during pollen tube growth.

  7. Curcumin Attenuates Opioid Tolerance and Dependence by Inhibiting Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II α Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Fang; Szymusiak, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic use of opioid analgesics has been hindered by the development of opioid addiction and tolerance. We have reported that curcumin, a natural flavonoid from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, attenuated opioid tolerance, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin may inhibit Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα), a protein kinase that has been previously proposed to be critical for opioid tolerance and dependence. In this study, we used state-of-the-art polymeric formulation technology to produce poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-curcumin nanoparticles (nanocurcumin) to overcome the drug’s poor solubility and bioavailability, which has made it extremely difficult for studying in vivo pharmacological actions of curcumin. We found that PLGA-curcumin nanoparticles reduced the dose requirement by 11- to 33-fold. Pretreatment with PLGA-curcumin (by mouth) prevented the development of opioid tolerance and dependence in a dose-dependent manner, with ED50 values of 3.9 and 3.2 mg/kg, respectively. PLGA-curcumin dose-dependently attenuated already-established opioid tolerance (ED50 = 12.6 mg/kg p.o.) and dependence (ED50 = 3.1 mg/kg p.o.). Curcumin or PLGA-curcumin did not produce antinociception by itself or affect morphine (1–10 mg/kg) antinociception. Moreover, we found that the behavioral effects of curcumin on opioid tolerance and dependence correlated with its inhibition of morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the brain. These results suggest that curcumin may attenuate opioid tolerance and dependence by suppressing CaMKIIα activity. PMID:25515789

  8. The calmodulin inhibitor CGS 9343B inhibits voltage-dependent K{sup +} channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongliang; Hong, Da Hye; Kim, Han Sol; Kim, Hye Won; Jung, Won-Kyo; Na, Sung Hun; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Won Sun

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the effects of the calmodulin inhibitor CGS 9343B on voltage-dependent K{sup +} (Kv) channels using whole-cell patch clamp technique in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells. CGS 9343B inhibited Kv currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) value of 0.81 μM. The decay rate of Kv channel inactivation was accelerated by CGS 9343B. The rate constants of association and dissociation for CGS 9343B were 2.77 ± 0.04 μM{sup −1} s{sup −1} and 2.55 ± 1.50 s{sup −1}, respectively. CGS 9343B did not affect the steady-state activation curve, but shifted the inactivation curve toward to a more negative potential. Train pulses (1 or 2 Hz) application progressively increased the CGS 9343B-induced Kv channel inhibition. In addition, the inactivation recovery time constant was increased in the presence of CGS 9343B, suggesting that CGS 9343B-induced inhibition of Kv channel was use-dependent. Another calmodulin inhibitor, W-13, did not affect Kv currents, and did not change the inhibitory effect of CGS 9343B on Kv current. Our results demonstrated that CGS 9343B inhibited Kv currents in a state-, time-, and use-dependent manner, independent of calmodulin inhibition. - Highlights: • We investigated the effects of CGS 9394B on Kv channels. • CGS 9394B inhibited Kv current in a state-, time-, and use-dependent manner. • Caution is required when using CGS 9394B in vascular function studies.

  9. The inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II KN93 attenuates bone cancer pain via inhibition of KIF17/NR2B trafficking in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Liang, Ying; Hou, Bailing; Liu, Ming; Yang, Xuli; Liu, Chenglong; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2014-09-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) containing subunit 2B (NR2B) is critical for the regulation of nociception in bone cancer pain, although the precise molecular mechanisms remain unclear. KIF17, a kinesin motor, plays a key role in the dendritic transport of NR2B. The up-regulation of NR2B and KIF17 transcription results from an increase in phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), which is activated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In this study, we hypothesized that CaMKII-mediated KIF17/NR2B trafficking may contribute to bone cancer pain. Osteosarcoma cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of the right femurs of C3H/HeJ mice to induce progressive bone cancer-related pain behaviors. The expression of spinal t-CaMKII, p-CaMKII, NR2B and KIF17 after inoculation was also evaluated. These results showed that inoculation of osteosarcoma cells induced progressive bone cancer pain and resulted in a significant up-regulation of p-CaMKII, NR2B and KIF17 expression after inoculation. Intrathecal administration of KN93, a CaMKII inhibitor, down-regulated these three proteins and attenuated bone cancer pain in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These findings indicated that CaMKII-mediated KIF17/NR2B trafficking may contribute to bone cancer pain, and inhibition of CaMKII may be a useful alternative or adjunct therapy for relieving cancer pain.

  10. Trifluoperazine, a Well-Known Antipsychotic, Inhibits Glioblastoma Invasion by Binding to Calmodulin and Disinhibiting Calcium Release Channel IP3R.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seokmin; Hong, Jinpyo; Lee, Jung Moo; Moon, Hyo Eun; Jeon, Borami; Choi, Jungil; Yoon, Nal Ae; Paek, Sun Ha; Roh, Eun Joo; Lee, C Justin; Kang, Sang Soo

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling is an important signaling process, implicated in cancer cell proliferation and motility of the deadly glioblastomas that aggressively invade neighboring brain tissue. We have previously demonstrated that caffeine blocks glioblastoma invasion and extends survival by inhibiting Ca(2+) release channel inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) subtype 3. Trifluoperazine (TFP) is an FDA-approved antipsychotic drug for schizophrenia. Interestingly, TFP has been recently reported to show a strong anticancer effect on lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and T-cell lymphoma. However, the possible anticancer effect of TFP on glioblastoma has not been tested. Here, we report that TFP potently suppresses proliferation, motility, and invasion of glioblastoma cells in vitro, and tumor growth in in vivo xenograft mouse model. Unlike caffeine, TFP triggers massive and irreversible release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores by IP3R subtype 1 and 2 by directly interacting at the TFP-binding site of a Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin subtype 2 (CaM2). TFP binding to CaM2 causes a dissociation of CaM2 from IP3R and subsequent opening of IP3R. Compared with the control neural stem cells, various glioblastoma cell lines showed enhanced expression of CaM2 and thus enhanced sensitivity to TFP. On the basis of these findings, we propose TFP as a potential therapeutic drug for glioblastoma by aberrantly and irreversibly increasing Ca(2+) in glioblastoma cells. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(1); 217-27. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Calmodulin inhibitor ameliorates cognitive dysfunction via inhibiting nitrosative stress and NLRP3 signaling in mice with bilateral carotid artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Yin, Yi-Xuan; Mahmood, Qaisar; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Gao, Yin-Ping; Gou, Guo-Jing; Ahmed, Muhammad Masood; Kohji, Fukunag; Du, Yong-Zhong; Han, Feng

    2017-10-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a heterogeneous brain disorder for which there are no effective approved pharmacological treatments available. We aimed to evaluate the effect of calmodulin inhibitor, DY-9836, and its loaded nanodrug carrier system on cognitive impairment and gain a better understanding of the protective mechanisms in mice with bilateral carotid artery stenosis (BCAS). DY-9836 (0.5 or 1 mg/kg) or DY-9836 (0.25 mg/kg)-encapsulated polysialic acid-octadecylamine (PSA-ODA) micelles (PSA-ODA/DY) were given to BCAS mice for 4 weeks. Administration of DY-9836 or PSA-ODA/DY reduced escape latency in space exploration and working memory test compared with vehicle group. Vehicle-treated mice showed reduced phospho-CaMKII (Thr286/287) levels in the hippocampus, whereas partially restored by DY-9836 (1 mg/kg) or PSA-ODA/DY (0.25 mg/kg) treatment. In accordance with the pharmacological profile of DY-9836 observed during behavioral studies, experimental molecular and biochemical markers induced by BCAS, such as protein tyrosine nitration, Nod-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3), caspase-1, and interleukin-1β, were reduced by DY-9836 and PSA-ODA/DY treatment. These data disclose novel findings about the therapeutic potential of DY-9836, and its encapsulated nanodrug delivery system significantly enhanced the cognitive function via inhibitory effect on nitrosative stress and NLRP3 signaling in VaD mice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Resveratrol Inhibits Neuronal Apoptosis and Elevated Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Activity in Diabetic Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hee; Kim, Yoon-Sook; Kang, Sang-Soo; Cho, Gyeong-Jae; Choi, Wan-Sung

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigated the effects of resveratrol, a natural polyphenol with neuroprotective properties, on retinal neuronal cell death mediated by diabetes-induced activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Diabetes was induced in C57BL/6 mice by five consecutive intraperitoneal injections of 55 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ). Control mice received buffer. All mice were killed 2 months after the injections, and the extent of neuronal cell death, CaMKII, and phospho-CaMKII protein expression levels and CaMKII kinase activity were examined in the retinas. To assess the role of CaMKII in the death of retinal neurons, a small-interfering RNA (siRNA) or specific inhibitor of CaMKII was injected into the right vitreous humor, and vehicle only was injected into the left vitreous humor, 2 days before death. Resveratrol (20 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage daily for 4 weeks, beginning 1 month after the fifth injection of either STZ or buffer. RESULTS The death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), CaMKII, phospho-CaMKII protein levels, and CaMKII activity were all greatly increased in the retinas of diabetic mice compared with controls, 2 months after induction of diabetes. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive signals co-localized with CaMKII- and phospho-CaMKII immunoreactive RGCs. However, in addition to CaMKII knockdown and inhibition by siRNA or a specific inhibitor, respectively, resveratrol provided complete protection from diabetes-induced retinal cell death. CONCLUSIONS In the present study, resveratrol prevented diabetes-induced RGC death via CaMKII downregulation, implying that resveratrol may have potential therapeutic applications for prevention of diabetes-induced visual dysfunction. PMID:20424226

  13. The NMDA Receptor NR1 C1 Region Bound to Calmodulin: Structural Insights into Functional Differences between Homologous Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ataman, Zeynep Akyol; Gakhar, Lokesh; Sorensen, Brenda R.; Hell, Johannes W.; Shea, Madeline A.

    2008-09-17

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulates tetrameric N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) by binding tightly to the C0 and C1 regions of its NR1 subunit. A crystal structure (2HQW; 1.96 {angstrom}) of calcium-saturated CaM bound to NR1C1 (peptide spanning 875-898) showed that NR1 S890, whose phosphorylation regulates membrane localization, was solvent protected, whereas the endoplasmic reticulum retention motif was solvent exposed. NR1 F880 filled the CaM C-domain pocket, whereas T886 was closest to the N-domain pocket. This 1-7 pattern was most similar to that in the CaM-MARCKS complex. Comparison of CaM-ligand wrap-around conformations identified a core tetrad of CaM C-domain residues (FLMM{sub C}) that contacted all ligands consistently. An identical tetrad of N-domain residues (FLMM{sub N}) made variable sets of contacts with ligands. This CaM-NR1C1 structure provides a foundation for designing mutants to test the role of CaM in NR1 trafficking as well as insights into how the homologous CaM domains have different roles in molecular recognition.

  14. Inhibitory effects of calmodulin antagonists on urinary enzyme excretion in rats after nephrotoxic doses of mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S.D. Jr.; Cox, J.L.; Giles, R.C. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    Prochlorperazine, a phenothiazine antiemetic, has been reported to protect rats against mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/)-induced nephrotoxicity. Mercuric ion and 12 other divalent metal ions of toxicologic importance inhibit the activity of calmodulin, a ubiquitous intracellular calcium receptor and regulatory protein, at physiologically relevant concentrations. Phenothiazines, including prochlorperazine, are reversible calmodulin antagonists, and as such they interact with divalent calcium at the level of calmodulin. It was of interest therefore to evaluate the comparative effects of several phenothiazines on HgCl/sub 2/-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

  15. Application of Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy to the Analysis of the Interaction Between the Estrogen Receptor Alpha and Coactivators: The Case of Calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Miclet, Emeric; Bourgoin-Voillard, Sandrine; Byrne, Cillian; Jacquot, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor α ligand-binding domain (ERα-LBD) binds the natural hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) to induce transcription and cell proliferation. This process occurs with the contribution of protein and peptide partners (also called coactivators) that can modulate the structure of ERα, and therefore its specificity of action. As with most transcription factors, ERα exhibits a high content of α helix, making it difficult to routinely run spectroscopic studies capable of deciphering the secondary structure of the different partners under binding conditions. Ca(2+)-calmodulin, a protein also highly structured in α-helix, is a key coactivator for ERα activity. Here, we show how circular dichroism can be used to study the interaction of ERα with Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Our approach allows the determination not only of the conformational changes induced upon complex formation but also the dissociation constant (K d) of this interaction.

  16. Calcium-dependent energetics of calmodulin domain interactions with regulatory regions of the Ryanodine Receptor Type 1 (RyR1).

    PubMed

    Newman, Rhonda A; Sorensen, Brenda R; Kilpatrick, Adina M; Shea, Madeline A

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) allosterically regulates the homo-tetrameric human Ryanodine Receptor Type 1 (hRyR1): apo CaM activates the channel, while (Ca(2+))4-CaM inhibits it. CaM-binding RyR1 residues 1975-1999 and 3614-3643 were proposed to allow CaM to bridge adjacent RyR1 subunits. Fluorescence anisotropy titrations monitored the binding of CaM and its domains to peptides encompassing hRyR(11975-1999) or hRyR1(3614-3643). Both CaM and its C-domain associated in a calcium-independent manner with hRyR1(3614-3643) while N-domain required calcium and bound ~250-fold more weakly. Association with hRyR1(11975-1999) was weak. Both hRyR1 peptides increased the calcium-binding affinity of both CaM domains, while maintaining differences between them. These energetics support the CaM C-domain association with hRyR1(3614-3643) at low calcium, positioning CaM to respond to calcium efflux. However, the CaM N-domain affinity for hRyR(11975-1999) alone was insufficient to support CaM bridging adjacent RyR1 subunits. Other proteins or elements of the hRyR1 structure must contribute to the energetics of CaM-mediated regulation.

  17. Developmental differences in posttranslational calmodulin methylation in pea plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-05-01

    A calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used to analyze the degree of lysine-115 methylation of pea calmodulin. Calmodulin was isolated from segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of {sup 3}H-methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The methylation of these calmodulin samples occurs specifically at lysine 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position were not methylated and competitively inhibited methylation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in NAD kinase activation by methylated and unmethylated calmodulins, raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation could affect calmodulin action.

  18. Multiple Modes of Ryanodine Receptor 2 Inhibition by Flecainide

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, D.; Imtiaz, M. S.; van Helden, D. F.; Knollmann, B. C.

    2014-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) causes sudden cardiac death due to mutations in cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2), calsequestrin, or calmodulin. Flecainide, a class I antiarrhythmic drug, inhibits Na+ and RyR2 channels and prevents CPVT. The purpose of this study is to identify inhibitory mechanisms of flecainide on RyR2. RyR2 were isolated from sheep heart, incorporated into lipid bilayers, and investigated by single-channel recording under various activating conditions, including the presence of cytoplasmic ATP (2 mM) and a range of cytoplasmic [Ca2+], [Mg2+], pH, and [caffeine]. Flecainide applied to either the cytoplasmic or luminal sides of the membrane inhibited RyR2 by two distinct modes: 1) a fast block consisting of brief substate and closed events with a mean duration of ∼1 ms, and 2) a slow block consisting of closed events with a mean duration of ∼1 second. Both inhibition modes were alleviated by increasing cytoplasmic pH from 7.4 to 9.5 but were unaffected by luminal pH. The slow block was potentiated in RyR2 channels that had relatively low open probability, whereas the fast block was unaffected by RyR2 activation. These results show that these two modes are independent mechanisms for RyR2 inhibition, both having a cytoplasmic site of action. The slow mode is a closed-channel block, whereas the fast mode blocks RyR2 in the open state. At diastolic cytoplasmic [Ca2+] (100 nM), flecainide possesses an additional inhibitory mechanism that reduces RyR2 burst duration. Hence, multiple modes of action underlie RyR2 inhibition by flecainide. PMID:25274603

  19. A novel Glycine soja cysteine proteinase inhibitor GsCPI14, interacting with the calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase GsCBRLK, regulated plant tolerance to alkali stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Yang, Shanshan; Sun, Mingzhe; Wang, Sunting; Ding, Xiaodong; Zhu, Dan; Ji, Wei; Cai, Hua; Zhao, Chaoyue; Wang, Xuedong; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-05-01

    It has been well demonstrated that cystatins regulated plant stress tolerance through inhibiting the cysteine proteinase activity under environmental stress. However, there was limited information about the role of cystatins in plant alkali stress response, especially in wild soybean. Here, in this study, we focused on the biological characterization of a novel Glycine soja cystatin protein GsCPI14, which interacted with the calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase GsCBRLK and positively regulated plant alkali stress tolerance. The protein-protein interaction between GsCBRLK and GsCPI14 was confirmed by using split-ubiquitin based membrane yeast two-hybrid analysis and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. Expression of GsCPI14 was greatly induced by salt, ABA and alkali stress in G. soja, and GsCBRLK overexpression (OX) in Glycine max promoted the stress induction of GmCPI14 expression under stress conditions. Furthermore, we found that GsCPI14-eGFP fusion protein localized in the entire Arabidopsis protoplast and onion epidermal cell, and GsCPI14 showed ubiquitous expression in different tissues of G. soja. In addition, we gave evidence that the GST-GsCPI14 fusion protein inhibited the proteolytic activity of papain in vitro. At last, we demonstrated that OX of GsCPI14 in Arabidopsis promoted the seed germination under alkali stress, as evidenced by higher germination rates. GsCPI14 transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings also displayed better growth performance and physiological index under alkali stress. Taken together, results presented in this study demonstrated that the G. soja cysteine proteinase inhibitor GsCPI14 interacted with the calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase GsCBRLK and regulated plant tolerance to alkali stress.

  20. Calmodulin Regulates Ca2+-sensing Receptor-mediated Ca2+ Signaling and Its Cell Surface Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun; Zhou, Yubin; Wong, Hing-Cheung; Castiblanco, Adriana; Chen, Yanyi; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a member of family C of the GPCRs responsible for sensing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]o) levels, maintaining extracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and transducing Ca2+ signaling from the extracellular milieu to the intracellular environment. In the present study, we have demonstrated a Ca2+-dependent, stoichiometric interaction between CaM and a CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) located within the C terminus of CaSR (residues 871–898). Our studies suggest a wrapping around 1–14-like mode of interaction that involves global conformational changes in both lobes of CaM with concomitant formation of a helical structure in the CaMBD. More importantly, the Ca2+-dependent association between CaM and the C terminus of CaSR is critical for maintaining proper responsiveness of intracellular Ca2+ responses to changes in extracellular Ca2+ and regulating cell surface expression of the receptor. PMID:20826781

  1. Toxicity of heavy metals: 1. Correlation of metal toxicity with in vitro calmodulin inhibition. 2. Interactions of inorganic mercury with red blood cells: Control vs. amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, J.L.C.

    1989-01-01

    The toxic effects of metals are examined in two separate in vitro systems. In the first system, the correlation between published mouse LD{sub 50} values and experimentally derived values for calmodulin inhibition was determined. Calmodulin activity was defined as stimulated phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. The basal PDE activity was determined with each cation and was unaffected by any of the concentrations utilized. The IC{sub 50} was determined from a plot of the log of the cation concentration vs. stimulated PDE activity for each cation. A very strong correlation was obtained when the IC{sub 50} vs. mouse LD{sub 50} curve was examined (p < 0.001). Calmodulin regulates many enzyme systems and processes that affect or are affected by calcium. This study was examined in light of the possible role of calcium in cell damage and death. In the second study, the interactions of erythrocytes (RBCs) and inorganic mercury (Hg) were examined. A broad range of Hg concentrations were utilized to explore the nature of the interactions. Two different mechanisms of RBC Hg accumulation and retention were evident. At lower Hg concentrations (0.001-0.1 {mu}M), the RBC accumulation/retention of Hg was constant (52% of available Hg), reversible, and temperature sensitive. At higher concentrations (1-100 {mu}M), the accumulation increased with Hg concentration, was not reversible, and was not temperature sensitive. A relationship between Hg and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is suggested by several reports in the literature. The accumulation/ retention of Hg by RBCs from control and ALS patients were compared. The RBCs from ALS patients released far more Hg during a two hr incubation 37C at 10 and 100 {mu}M Hg compared to controls.

  2. Modulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle expressing ryanodine receptor impaired in regulation by calmodulin and S100A1.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Prosser, Benjamin L; Ghassemi, Farshid; Xu, Le; Pasek, Daniel A; Eu, Jerry P; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Cannon, Brian R; Wilder, Paul T; Lovering, Richard M; Weber, David; Melzer, Werner; Schneider, Martin F; Meissner, Gerhard

    2011-05-01

    In vitro, calmodulin (CaM) and S100A1 activate the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor ion channel (RyR1) at submicromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, whereas at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, CaM inhibits RyR1. One amino acid substitution (RyR1-L3625D) has previously been demonstrated to impair CaM binding and regulation of RyR1. Here we show that the RyR1-L3625D substitution also abolishes S100A1 binding. To determine the physiological relevance of these findings, mutant mice were generated with the RyR1-L3625D substitution in exon 74, which encodes the CaM and S100A1 binding domain of RyR1. Homozygous mutant mice (Ryr1(D/D)) were viable and appeared normal. However, single RyR1 channel recordings from Ryr1(D/D) mice exhibited impaired activation by CaM and S100A1 and impaired CaCaM inhibition. Isolated flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers from Ryr1(D/D) mice had depressed Ca(2+) transients when stimulated by a single action potential. However, during repetitive stimulation, the mutant fibers demonstrated greater relative summation of the Ca(2+) transients. Consistently, in vivo stimulation of tibialis anterior muscles in Ryr1(D/D) mice demonstrated reduced twitch force in response to a single action potential, but greater summation of force during high-frequency stimulation. During repetitive stimulation, Ryr1(D/D) fibers exhibited slowed inactivation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release flux, consistent with increased summation of the Ca(2+) transient and contractile force. Peak Ca(2+) release flux was suppressed at all voltages in voltage-clamped Ryr1(D/D) fibers. The results suggest that the RyR1-L3625D mutation removes both an early activating effect of S100A1 and CaM and delayed suppressing effect of CaCaM on RyR1 Ca(2+) release, providing new insights into CaM and S100A1 regulation of skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling.

  3. Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II Inhibitors Disrupt AKAP79-dependent PKC Signaling to GluA1 AMPA Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Ian M.; Tavalin, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    GluA1 (formerly GluR1) AMPA receptor subunit phosphorylation at Ser-831 is an early biochemical marker for long-term potentiation and learning. This site is a substrate for Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and protein kinase C (PKC). By directing PKC to GluA1, A-kinase anchoring protein 79 (AKAP79) facilitates Ser-831 phosphorylation and makes PKC a more potent regulator of GluA1 than CaMKII. PKC and CaM bind to residues 31–52 of AKAP79 in a competitive manner. Here, we demonstrate that common CaMKII inhibitors alter PKC and CaM interactions with AKAP79(31–52). Most notably, the classical CaMKII inhibitors KN-93 and KN-62 potently enhanced the association of CaM to AKAP79(31–52) in the absence (apoCaM) but not the presence of Ca2+. In contrast, apoCaM association to AKAP79(31–52) was unaffected by the control compound KN-92 or a mechanistically distinct CaMKII inhibitor (CaMKIINtide). In vitro studies demonstrated that KN-62 and KN-93, but not the other compounds, led to apoCaM-dependent displacement of PKC from AKAP79(31–52). In the absence of CaMKII activation, complementary cellular studies revealed that KN-62 and KN-93, but not KN-92 or CaMKIINtide, inhibited PKC-mediated phosphorylation of GluA1 in hippocampal neurons as well as AKAP79-dependent PKC-mediated augmentation of recombinant GluA1 currents. Buffering cellular CaM attenuated the ability of KN-62 and KN-93 to inhibit AKAP79-anchored PKC regulation of GluA1. Therefore, by favoring apoCaM binding to AKAP79, KN-62 and KN-93 derail the ability of AKAP79 to efficiently recruit PKC for regulation of GluA1. Thus, AKAP79 endows PKC with a pharmacological profile that overlaps with CaMKII. PMID:21156788

  4. Direct interaction between the catalytic subunit of the calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase from bovine brain with /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin and /sup 125/I-labeled calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Minocherhomjee, A.M.; Selfe, S.; Flowers, N.J.; Storm, D.R.

    1987-07-14

    A calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase has been purified to apparent homogeneity from bovine cerebral cortex using calmodulin-Sepharose followed by forskolin-Sepharose and wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose. The final product appeared as one major polypeptide of approximately 135,000 daltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. This polypeptide was a major component of the protein purified through calmodulin-Sepharose. The catalytic subunit was stimulated 3-4-fold by calmodulin (CaM) with a turnover number greater than 1000 min/sup -1/ and was directly inhibited by adenosine. The catalytic subunit of the enzyme interacted directly with /sup 125/I-CaM on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel overlay system, and this interaction was Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration dependent. In addition, the catalytic subunit was shown to directly bind /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin using a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel overlay technique, and N-acetylglucosamine inhibited binding of the lectin to the catalytic subunit. Calmodulin did not inhibit binding of wheat germ agglutinin to the catalytic subunit, and the binding of calmodulin was unaffected by wheat germ agglutinin. These data illustrate that the catalytic subunit of the calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase is a glycoprotein which interacts directly with calmodulin and that adenosine can inhibit the enzyme without intervening receptors or G coupling proteins. It is concluded that the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase is a transmembrane protein with a domain accessible from the outer surface of the cell.

  5. Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase Mediates the Synergistic Signalling between TLR9 and the B Cell Receptor by Regulating Calcium and Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Elaine F.; Quinn, Susan R.; Doyle, Sarah L.; Vink, Paul M.; van Eenennaam, Hans; O’Neill, Luke A. J.

    2013-01-01

    B cells signal through both the B cell receptor (BCR) which binds antigens and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) including TLR9 which recognises CpG DNA. Activation of TLR9 synergises with BCR signalling when the BCR and TLR9 co-localise within an auto-phagosome-like compartment. Here we report that Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) is required for synergistic IL6 production and up-regulation of surface expression of MHC-class-II, CD69 and CD86 in primary murine and human B cells. We show that BTK is essential for co-localisation of the BCR and TLR9 within a potential auto-phagosome-like compartment in the Namalwa human B cell line. Downstream of BTK we find that calcium acting via calmodulin is required for this process. These data provide new insights into the role of BTK, an important target for autoimmune diseases, in B cell activation. PMID:23967355

  6. Inhibition among olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Van der Goes van Naters, Wynand

    2013-01-01

    Often assumed to be epiphenomena of a cell’s activity, extracellular currents and resulting potential changes are increasingly recognized to influence the function of other cells in the vicinity. Experimental evidence shows that even small electric fields can modulate spike timing in neurons. Moreover, when neurons are brought close together experimentally or in pathological conditions, activity in one neuron can excite its neighbors. Inhibitory ephaptic mechanisms, however, may depend on more specialized coupling among cells. Recent studies in the Drosophila olfactory system have shown that excitation of a sensory neuron can inhibit its neighbor, and it was speculated that this interaction was ephaptic. Here we give an overview of ephaptic interactions that effect changes in spike timing, excitation or inhibition in diverse systems with potential relevance to human neuroscience. We examine the mechanism of the inhibitory interaction in the Drosophila system and that of the well-studied ephaptic inhibition of the Mauthner cell in more detail. We note that both current towards and current away from the local extracellular environment of a neuron can inhibit it, but the mechanism depends on the specific architecture of each system. PMID:24167484

  7. Autophosphorylation-based Calcium (Ca2+) Sensitivity Priming and Ca2+/Calmodulin Inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana Ca2+-dependent Protein Kinase 28 (CPK28)*♦

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, R. Kevin; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Derbyshire, Paul; Menke, Frank L. H.; Zipfel, Cyril; Goshe, Michael B.; Zielinski, Raymond E.; Huber, Steven C.

    2017-01-01

    Plant calcium (Ca2+)-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) represent the primary Ca2+-dependent protein kinase activities in plant systems. CPKs are composed of a dual specificity (Ser/Thr and Tyr) kinase domain tethered to a calmodulin-like domain (CLD) via an autoinhibitory junction (J). Although regulation of CPKs by Ca2+ has been extensively studied, the contribution of autophosphorylation in controlling CPK activity is less well understood. Furthermore, whether calmodulin (CaM) contributes to CPK regulation, as is the case for Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinases outside the plant lineage, remains an open question. We therefore screened a subset of plant CPKs for CaM binding and found that CPK28 is a high affinity Ca2+/CaM-binding protein. Using synthetic peptides and native gel electrophoresis, we coarsely mapped the CaM-binding domain to a site within the CPK28 J domain that overlaps with the known site of intramolecular interaction between the J domain and the CLD. Peptide kinase activity of fully dephosphorylated CPK28 was Ca2+-responsive and was inhibited by Ca2+/CaM. Using in situ autophosphorylated protein, we expand on the known set of CPK28 autophosphorylation sites, and we demonstrate that, unexpectedly, autophosphorylated CPK28 had enhanced kinase activity at physiological concentrations of Ca2+ compared with the dephosphorylated protein, suggesting that autophosphorylation functions to prime CPK28 for Ca2+ activation and might also allow CPK28 to remain active when Ca2+ levels are low. Furthermore, CPK28 autophosphorylation substantially reduced sensitivity of the kinase to Ca2+/CaM inhibition. Overall, our analyses uncover new complexities in the control of CPK28 and provide mechanistic support for Ca2+ signaling specificity through Ca2+ sensor priming. PMID:28154194

  8. Dopamine D4 receptor transmission in the prefrontal cortex controls the salience of emotional memory via modulation of calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase II.

    PubMed

    Lauzon, Nicole M; Ahmad, Tasha; Laviolette, Steven R

    2012-11-01

    Dopamine (DA) signaling in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a critical role in the processing of emotional information and memory encoding. Activation of DA D4 receptors within the prelimbic (PLC) division of the mPFC bidirectionally modulates emotional memory by strongly potentiating the salience of normally nonsalient emotional memories but blocking the acquisition of suprathreshold emotionally salient fear memories. Previous in vitro studies have shown that activation of cortical DA D4 receptors can bidirectionally modulate levels of α-calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase II (α-CaMKII), a molecule essential for learning and memory. Using an olfactory fear conditioning procedure in rats combined with microinfusions into the mPFC, we examined the potential role of D4 receptor-mediated control of emotional memory salience through signaling via CaMKII, cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA), and protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) signaling. We report that CaMKII blockade prevents the ability of intra-mPFC DA D4 receptor activation to potentiate the salience of subthreshold fear memory. In contrast, blockade of either cAMP/PKA or PP1 signaling pathways rescued the blockade of suprathreshold fear memory via intra-mPFC D4 receptor activation. Our results demonstrate that modulation of emotional memory salience via intra-mPFC DA D4 receptor transmission depends upon downstream signaling via CaMKII, cAMP/PKA, and PP1 substrates.

  9. Characterization of the Interactions between Calmodulin and Death Receptor 5 in Triple-negative and Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer Cells: AN INTEGRATED EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Fancy, Romone M; Wang, Lingyun; Schmid, Thomas; Zeng, Qinghua; Wang, Hong; Zhou, Tong; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Song, Yuhua

    2016-06-10

    Activation of death receptor-5 (DR5) leads to the formation of death inducing signaling complex (DISC) for apoptotic signaling. Targeting DR5 to induce breast cancer apoptosis is a promising strategy to circumvent drug resistance and present a target for breast cancer treatment. Calmodulin (CaM) has been shown to regulate DR5-mediated apoptotic signaling, however, its mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we characterized CaM and DR5 interactions in breast cancer cells with integrated experimental and computational approaches. Results show that CaM directly binds to DR5 in a calcium dependent manner in breast cancer cells. The direct interaction of CaM with DR5 is localized at DR5 death domain. We have predicted and verified the CaM-binding site in DR5 being (354)WEPLMRKLGL(363) that is located at the α2 helix and the loop between α2 helix and α3 helix of DR5 DD. The residues of Trp-354, Arg-359, Glu-355, Leu-363, and Glu-367 in DR5 death domain that are important for DR5 recruitment of FADD and caspase-8 for DISC formation to signal apoptosis also play an important role for CaM-DR5 binding. The changed electrostatic potential distribution in the CaM-binding site in DR5 DD by the point mutations of W354A, E355K, R359A, L363N, or E367K in DR5 DD could directly contribute to the experimentally observed decreased CaM-DR5 binding by the point mutations of the key residues in DR5 DD. Results from this study provide a key step for the further investigation of the role of CaM-DR5 binding in DR5-mediated DISC formation for apoptosis in breast cancer cells. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Inhibits γ-Aminobutyric Acid-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhiwen; Tian, Yujing; Qi, Mengwen; Li, Yingchun; Du, Yimei; Chen, Lei; Liu, Wentao; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is crucial for the modulation of neuronal excitability in the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to enhance the response of hippocampal glutamate receptors, but whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter system can be regulated by TRPV4 remains unknown. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Here, we show that application of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) synthetic (GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD) or endogenous agonist (5,6-EET) inhibited GABA-activated current (IGABA) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was blocked by specific antagonists of TRPV4 and of GABAA receptors. GSK1016790A increased the phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and decreased the phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt) protein levels, which was attenuated by removing extracellular calcium or by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β antagonist. GSK1016790A-induced decrease of p-Akt protein level was sensitive to an AMPK antagonist. GSK1016790A-inhibited IGABA was blocked by an AMPK antagonist or a phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) agonist. GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of IGABA was also significantly attenuated by a protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist but was unaffected by protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II antagonist. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 inhibits GABAA receptor, which may be mediated by activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling and activation of PKC signaling. Inhibition of GABAA receptors may account for the neuronal hyperexcitability caused by TRPV4 activation. PMID:27616980

  11. Muscarinic Stimulation Facilitates Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca Release by Modulating Ryanodine Receptor 2 Phosphorylation Through Protein Kinase G and Ca/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Belevych, Andriy E; Liu, Bin; Bonilla, Ingrid M; Radwański, Przemysław B; Kubasov, Igor V; Valdivia, Héctor H; Schober, Karsten; Carnes, Cynthia A; Györke, Sándor

    2016-11-01

    Although the effects and the underlying mechanism of sympathetic stimulation on cardiac Ca handling are relatively well established both in health and disease, the modes of action and mechanisms of parasympathetic modulation are poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that parasympathetic stimulation initiates a novel mode of excitation-contraction coupling that enhances the efficiency of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca store utilization. This efficient mode of excitation-contraction coupling involves reciprocal changes in the phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor 2 at Ser-2808 and Ser-2814. Specifically, Ser-2808 phosphorylation was mediated by muscarinic receptor subtype 2 and activation of PKG (protein kinase G), whereas dephosphorylation of Ser-2814 involved activation of muscarinic receptor subtype 3 and decreased reactive oxygen species-dependent activation of CaMKII (Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II). The overall effect of these changes in phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor 2 is an increase in systolic Ca release at the low sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca content and a paradoxical reduction in aberrant Ca leak. Accordingly, cholinergic stimulation of cardiomyocytes isolated from failing hearts improved Ca cycling efficiency by restoring altered ryanodine receptor 2 phosphorylation balance. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. The opposing effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate, and pertussis toxin on phorbol ester induced inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor stimulated guanylate cyclase in SK-NEP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, M.; Frohlich, E.D.; Cole, F.E. )

    1991-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (ATP) and pertussis toxin (PT) on phorbol ester (PMA) induced inhibition of ANF-stimulated cyclic GMP formation in cells from the human renal cell line, SK-NEP-1. PMA inhibited ANF-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity in particulate membranes by about 65%. Calmodulin reversed this inhibition in a dose dependent manner. ATP potentiated Mg++ but not Mn++ supported guanylate cyclase activity. In PMA treated membranes, ATP potentiating effects were abolished. PMA also inhibited ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation, but pretreatment with PT prevented this PMA inhibition. PT did not affect basal or ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that PMA inhibited ANF stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase in opposition to the activating effects of calmodulin or ATP in SK-NEP-1 cells. The protein kinase C inhibitory effects appeared to be mediated via a PT-sensitive G protein.

  13. Calcium/calmodulin-mediated signal network in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2003-01-01

    Various extracellular stimuli elicit specific calcium signatures that can be recognized by different calcium sensors. Calmodulin, the predominant calcium receptor, is one of the best-characterized calcium sensors in eukaryotes. In recent years, completion of the Arabidopsis genome project and advances in functional genomics have helped to identify and characterize numerous calmodulin-binding proteins in plants. There are some similarities in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling in plants and animals. However, plants possess multiple calmodulin genes and many calmodulin target proteins, including unique protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these proteins are likely to act as "hubs" during calcium signal transduction. Hence, a better understanding of the function of these calmodulin target proteins should help in deciphering the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signal network and its role in plant growth, development and response to environmental stimuli.

  14. Calcium/calmodulin-mediated signal network in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2003-01-01

    Various extracellular stimuli elicit specific calcium signatures that can be recognized by different calcium sensors. Calmodulin, the predominant calcium receptor, is one of the best-characterized calcium sensors in eukaryotes. In recent years, completion of the Arabidopsis genome project and advances in functional genomics have helped to identify and characterize numerous calmodulin-binding proteins in plants. There are some similarities in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling in plants and animals. However, plants possess multiple calmodulin genes and many calmodulin target proteins, including unique protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these proteins are likely to act as "hubs" during calcium signal transduction. Hence, a better understanding of the function of these calmodulin target proteins should help in deciphering the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signal network and its role in plant growth, development and response to environmental stimuli.

  15. Effects of selective inhibition of protein kinase C, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase on neurite development in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Cabell, L; Audesirk, G

    1993-06-01

    A variety of experimental evidence suggests that calmodulin and protein kinases, especially protein kinase C, may participate in regulating neurite development in cultured neurons, particularly neurite initiation. However, the results are somewhat contradictory. Further, the roles of calmodulin and protein kinases on many aspects of neurite development, such as branching or elongation of axons vs dendrites, have not been extensively studied. Cultured embryonic rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons develop readily identifiable axons and dendrites. We used this culture system and the new generation of highly specific protein kinase inhibitors to investigate the roles of protein kinases and calmodulin in neurite development. Neurons were cultured for 2 days in the continuous presence of calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C), KT5720 (inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase), KN62 (inhibitor of Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II), or calmidazolium (inhibitor of calmodulin), each at concentrations from approximately 1 to 10 times the concentration reported in the literature to inhibit each kinase by 50%. The effects of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (an activator of protein kinase C) and 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (an inactive phorbol ester) were also tested. At concentrations that had no effect on neuronal viability, calphostin C reduced neurite initiation and axon branching without significantly affecting the number of dendrites per neuron, dendrite branching, dendrite length, or axon length. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased axon branching and the number of dendrites per cell, compared to the inactive 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate. KT5720 inhibited only axon branching. KN62 reduced axon length, the number of dendrites per neuron, and both axon and dendrite branching. At low concentrations, calmidazolium had no effect on any aspect of neurite development, but at high concentrations, calmidazolium inhibited every

  16. Type III Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor Drives Cardiac Hypertrophy Through β-Arrestin2-Dependent Activation of Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Song, Shu-Ying; Li, Yan-Chao; Sun, Fei; Ding, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Chang-Jiang; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Mei-Tong; Dong, Chang-Jiang; Ji, Yong; Li, Hongliang; Chu, Wenfeng; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-09-01

    The role of type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRIII) in the pathogenesis of heart diseases remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated the functional role and molecular mechanisms of TβRIII in the development of myocardial hypertrophy. Western blot and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the expression of TβRIII was significantly elevated in human cardiac hypertrophic samples. Consistently, TβRIII expression was substantially increased in transverse aortic constriction (TAC)- and isoproterenol-induced mouse cardiac hypertrophy in vivo and in isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Overexpression of TβRIII resulted in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was greatly attenuated by knockdown of TβRIII in vitro. Cardiac-specific transgenic expression of TβRIII independently led to cardiac hypertrophy in mice, which was further aggravated by isoproterenol and TAC treatment. Cardiac contractile function of the mice was not altered in TβRIII transgenic mice; however, TAC led to significantly decreased cardiac contractile function in TβRIII transgenic mice compared with control mice. Conversely, isoproterenol- and TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and TAC-induced cardiac contractile function impairment were partially reversed by suppression of TβRIII in vivo. Our data suggest that TβRIII mediates stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy through activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which requires a physical interaction of β-arrestin2 with both TβRIII and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Our findings indicate that stress-induced increase in TβRIII expression results in cardiac hypertrophy through β-arrestin2-dependent activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and that transforming growth factor-β and β-adrenergic receptor signaling are not involved in spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy in cardiac

  17. Inhibition of SRY-calmodulin complex formation induces ectopic expression of ovarian cell markers in developing XY gonads.

    PubMed

    Sim, Helena; Argentaro, Anthony; Czech, Daniel P; Bagheri-Fam, Stefan; Sinclair, Andrew H; Koopman, Peter; Boizet-Bonhoure, Brigitte; Poulat, Francis; Harley, Vincent R

    2011-07-01

    The transcription factor sex-determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY) plays a key role in human sex determination, because mutations in SRY cause disorders of sex development in XY individuals. During gonadal development, Sry in pre-Sertoli cells activates Sox9 gene transcription, committing the fate of the bipotential gonad to become a testis rather than an ovary. The high-mobility group domain of human SRY contains two independent nuclear localization signals, one bound by calmodulin (CaM) and the other by importin-β. Although XY females carry SRY mutations in these nuclear localization signals that affect SRY nuclear import in transfected cells, it is not known whether these transport mechanisms are essential for gonadal development and sex determination. Here, we show that mouse Sry protein binds CaM and that a CaM antagonist reduces CaM binding, nuclear accumulation, and transcriptional activity of Sry in transfected cells. CaM antagonist treatment of cultured, sexually indifferent XY mouse fetal gonads led to reduced expression of the Sry target gene Sox9, defects in testicular cord formation, and ectopic expression of the ovarian markers Rspondin1 and forkhead box L2. These results indicate the importance of CaM for SRY nuclear import, transcriptional activity, testis differentiation, and sex determination.

  18. 5-Hydroxytryptamine type 2A receptors regulate cyclic AMP accumulation in a neuronal cell line by protein kinase C-dependent and calcium/calmodulin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Berg, K A; Clarke, W P; Chen, Y; Ebersole, B J; McKay, R D; Maayani, S

    1994-05-01

    The effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A receptor activation on cAMP formation were studied in a cell line derived from embryonic rat cortex (A1A1). 5-HT (EC50 = 0.87 microM) amplified the amount of cAMP formed in response to 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (an adenosine A2 receptor agonist), cholera toxin, and forskolin after 15 min of coincubation in the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram. This effect of 5-HT was blocked by 10 nM ketanserin as well as by 10 nM spiperone, indicating a response mediated by the 5-HT2A receptor subtype. Similarly, cAMP accumulation was enhanced by coincubation with the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and the calcium ionophore A23187. After exposure to PMA for 24 hr (PKC-depleted cells), 5-HT and A23187 still enhanced cAMP formed in response to forskolin and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, whereas the amplifying effects of PMA were abolished. Analysis by Western blots and PKC activity measurements revealed that, of three PKC isoforms detected in A1A1 cells (alpha, delta, and epsilon), only the calcium-independent isoform PKC-epsilon remained in membrane fractions after long term PMA treatment. In PKC-depleted cells, 5-HT-mediated amplification was greatly reduced after treatment with the calcium chelator 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (acetoxymethyl)-ester or the calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-napthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride. In addition, 5-HT-mediated amplification of cAMP accumulation was reduced by the PKC inhibitor staurosporine in normal cells but was unaffected in PKC-depleted cells. In conclusion, these data suggest that 5-HT2A receptor activation can amplify cAMP formation in A1A1 cells by two distinct pathways coupled to the hydrolysis of inositol phosphates, i.e., PKC and calcium/calmodulin.

  19. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  20. Inosine induces presynaptic inhibition of acetylcholine release by activation of A3 adenosine receptors at the mouse neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Cinalli, A R; Guarracino, J F; Fernandez, V; Roquel, L I; Losavio, A S

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The role of inosine at the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ) has not been clearly defined. Moreover, inosine was classically considered to be the inactive metabolite of adenosine. Hence, we investigated the effect of inosine on spontaneous and evoked ACh release, the mechanism underlying its modulatory action and the receptor type and signal transduction pathway involved. Experimental Approach End-plate potentials (EPPs) and miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs) were recorded from the mouse phrenic-nerve diaphragm preparations using conventional intracellular electrophysiological techniques. Key Results Inosine (100 μM) reduced MEPP frequency and the amplitude and quantal content of EPPs; effects inhibited by the selective A3 receptor antagonist MRS-1191. Immunohistochemical assays confirmed the presence of A3 receptors at mammalian NMJ. The voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blocker Cd2+, the removal of extracellular Ca2+ and the L-type and P/Q-type VGCC antagonists, nitrendipine and ω-agatoxin IVA, respectively, all prevented inosine-induced inhibition. In the absence of endogenous adenosine, inosine decreased the hypertonic response. The effects of inosine on ACh release were prevented by the Gi/o protein inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide, PKC antagonist chelerytrine and calmodulin antagonist W-7, but not by PKA antagonists, H-89 and KT-5720, or the inhibitor of CaMKII KN-62. Conclusion and Implications Our results suggest that, at motor nerve terminals, inosine induces presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous and evoked ACh release by activating A3 receptors through a mechanism that involves L-type and P/Q-type VGCCs and the secretory machinery downstream of calcium influx. A3 receptors appear to be coupled to Gi/o protein. PKC and calmodulin may be involved in these effects of inosine. PMID:23731236

  1. Calmodulin independence of human duodenal adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J A; Griffin, M; Mireylees, S E; Long, R G

    1991-01-01

    The calmodulin and calcium dependence of human adenylate cyclase from the second part of the duodenum was assessed in washed particulate preparations of biopsy specimens by investigating (a) the concentration dependent effects of free [Ca2+] on enzyme activity, (b) the effects of exogenous calmodulin on enzyme activity in ethylene glycol bis (b-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) washed particulate preparations, and (c) the effects of calmodulin antagonists on enzyme activity. Both basal (IC50 = 193.75 (57.5) nmol/l (mean (SEM)) and NaF stimulated (IC50 = 188.0 (44.0) nmol/l) adenylate cyclase activity was strongly inhibited by free [Ca2+] greater than 90 nmol/l. Free [Ca2+] less than 90 nmol/l had no effect on adenylate cyclase activity. NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by 50% at 2.5 mmol/l EGTA. This inhibition could not be reversed by free Ca2+. The addition of exogenous calmodulin to EGTA (5 mmol/l) washed particulate preparations failed to stimulate adenylate cyclase activity. Trifluoperazine and N-(8-aminohexyl)-5-IODO-1-naphthalene-sulphonamide (IODO 8) did not significantly inhibit basal and NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity when measured at concentrations of up to 100 mumol/l. These results suggest that human duodenal adenylate cyclase activity is calmodulin independent but is affected by changes in free [Ca2+]. PMID:1752461

  2. The Year in Basic Science: calmodulin kinase cascades.

    PubMed

    Means, Anthony R

    2008-12-01

    This article highlights studies published during the past year that represent significant scientific achievements in the world of calmodulin kinase cascades. Calmodulin is the primary receptor for calcium present in all cells. The binding of its calcium ligand results in a conformational change in calmodulin, which allows the calcium-calmodulin complex to interact with many different targets. In the studies to be summarized in this review, the particular calmodulin cascade involved is shown to be the pathway responsible for important biological responses, including long-term memory formation, dendritic cell survival, hypercapnia, neuronal migration, synapse formation, autophagy, fatty acid oxidation, and energy balance. In some cases, the pathway was previously unknown, and the identification of the calmodulin cascade represents the definition of roles. In other cases, manipulating the cascade has suggested therapeutic approaches to certain diseases, most significantly, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  3. Presynaptic inhibition of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors by noradrenaline in nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Elvezio, Vincent; Kaczocha, Martin; Rebecchi, Mario; Puopolo, Michelino

    2017-04-15

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor is a polymodal molecular integrator in the pain pathway expressed in Aδ- and C-fibre nociceptors and is responsible for the thermal hyperalgesia associated with inflammatory pain. Noradrenaline strongly inhibited the activity of TRPV1 channels in dorsal root ganglia neurons. The effect of noradrenaline was reproduced by clonidine and antagonized by yohimbine, consistent with contribution of α2 adrenergic receptors. The inhibitory effect of noradrenaline on TRPV1 channels was dependent on calcium influx and linked to calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. In spinal cord slices, clonidine reduced the frequency of capsaicin-induced miniature EPSCs in the presence of tetrodotoxin and ω-conotoxin-MVIIC, consistent with inhibition of presynaptic TRPV1 channels by α2 adrenergic receptors. We suggest that modulation of presynaptic TRPV1 channels in nociceptive neurons by descending noradrenergic inputs may constitute a mechanism for noradrenaline to modulate incoming noxious stimuli in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor is a well-known contributor to nociceptor excitability. To address whether noradrenaline can down-regulate TRPV1 channel activity in nociceptors and reduce their synaptic transmission, the effects of noradrenaline and clonidine were tested on the capsaicin-activated current recorded from acutely dissociated small diameter (<27 μm) dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and on miniature (m)EPSCs recorded from large lamina I neurons in horizontal spinal cord slices. Noradrenaline or clonidine inhibited the capsaicin-activated current by ∼60%, and the effect was reversed by yohimbine, confirming that it was mediated by activation of α2 adrenergic receptors. Similarly, clonidine reduced the frequency of capsaicin-induced mEPSCs by ∼60%. Inhibition of capsaicin-activated current by noradrenaline was mediated by GTP

  4. Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) interacts with neurofilament L and inhibits its filament association

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, Hana; Katoh, Tsuyoshi; Nakagawa, Ryoko; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu; Taniguchi, Takanobu; Hirano, Tetsuo; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Ishida, Atsuhiko

    2016-09-02

    Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) is a Ser/Thr phosphatase that belongs to the PPM family. Growing evidence suggests that PPM phosphatases including CaMKP act as a complex with other proteins to regulate cellular functions. In this study, using the two-dimensional far-western blotting technique with digoxigenin-labeled CaMKP as a probe, in conjunction with peptide mass fingerprinting analysis, we identified neurofilament L (NFL) as a CaMKP-binding protein in a Triton-insoluble fraction of rat brain. We confirmed binding of fluorescein-labeled CaMKP (F-CaMKP) to NFL in solution by fluorescence polarization. The analysis showed that the dissociation constant of F-CaMKP for NFL is 73 ± 17 nM (n = 3). Co-immunoprecipitation assay using a cytosolic fraction of NGF-differentiated PC12 cells showed that endogenous CaMKP and NFL form a complex in cells. Furthermore, the effect of CaMKP on self-assembly of NFL was examined. Electron microscopy revealed that CaMKP markedly prevented NFL from forming large filamentous aggregates, suggesting that CaMKP-binding to NFL inhibits its filament association. These findings may provide new insights into a novel mechanism for regulating network formation of neurofilaments during neuronal differentiation. - Highlights: • NFL was identified as a CaMKP-binding protein in an insoluble fraction of rat brain. • CaMKP bound to NFL in solution with a K{sub d} value of 73 ± 17 nM. • A CaMKP-NFL complex was found in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. • CaMKP-binding to NFL inhibited its filament association. • CaMKP may regulate network formation of neurofilaments in neurons.

  5. AMPA receptor inhibition by synaptically released zinc

    PubMed Central

    Kalappa, Bopanna I.; Anderson, Charles T.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    The vast amount of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system is mediated by AMPA-subtype glutamate receptors (AMPARs). As a result, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission is implicated in nearly all aspects of brain development, function, and plasticity. Despite the central role of AMPARs in neurobiology, the fine-tuning of synaptic AMPA responses by endogenous modulators remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that endogenous zinc, released by single presynaptic action potentials, inhibits synaptic AMPA currents in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and hippocampus. Exposure to loud sound reduces presynaptic zinc levels in the DCN and abolishes zinc inhibition, implicating zinc in experience-dependent AMPAR synaptic plasticity. Our results establish zinc as an activity-dependent, endogenous modulator of AMPARs that tunes fast excitatory neurotransmission and plasticity in glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26647187

  6. Antibodies to calmodulin during experimental Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infections in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Ruben, L; Patton, C L

    1985-01-01

    Calmodulin is an intracellular Ca2+ receptor protein which regulates a wide variety of enzymatic processes in eukaryotic cells examined in detail. Native calmodulin is not antigenic in rabbits because of its small size, high degree of amino acid sequence conservation and hydrophobicity. African trypanosomes contain a novel calmodulin which is structurally distinct from bovine brain and Tetrahymena calmodulins. In the present study, we examine the antibody response towards these calmodulins during chronic Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infections. Injection of purified trypanosome calmodulin into rabbits stimulates the production of specific IgG antibodies which recognize trypanosome, but not bovine brain or Tetrahymena calmodulins. By contrast, during chronic T. brucei infections in rabbits, antibodies (IgG + IgM + IgA) that recognize trypanosome, Tetrahymena and mammalian calmodulins arise. When only IgG antibodies are evaluated from infection sera, the major response is against mammalian and Tetrahymena calmodulins. Significantly fewer IgG antibodies are measured in the infection sera which recognize trypanosome calmodulin, while the non-specific control protein, chicken ovalbumin, is not recognized. Peak IgG antibody responses against calmodulin occur between Days 30-34 post-infection. Competition assays indicate that Tetrahymena and mammalian calmodulins are recognized at identical epitopes which are distinct from epitopes on trypanosome calmodulin. We conclude that, in the context of chronic T. brucei infections in rabbits, antibodies arise which are able to recognize mammalian host calmodulin. Images Figure 1 PMID:2414212

  7. Moderate Alcohol Drinking and the Amygdala Proteome: Identification and Validation of Calcium/Calmodulin Dependent Kinase II and AMPA Receptor Activity as Novel Molecular Mechanisms of the Positive Reinforcing Effects of Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Salling, Michael C.; Faccidomo, Sara P.; Li, Chia; Psilos, Kelly; Galunas, Christina; Spanos, Marina; Agoglia, Abigail E.; Kash, Thomas L.; Hodge, Clyde W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite worldwide consumption of moderate amounts of alcohol, the neural mechanisms that mediate the transition from use to abuse are not fully understood. METHODS Here, we conducted a high-through put screen of the amygdala proteome in mice after moderate alcohol drinking (n = 12/group) followed by behavioral studies (n = 6–8/group) to uncover novel molecular mechanisms of the positive reinforcing properties of alcohol that strongly influence the development of addiction. RESULTS Two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization tandem time-of-flight identified 29 differentially expressed proteins in the amygdala of nondependent C57BL/6J mice following 24 days of alcohol drinking. Alcohol-sensitive proteins included calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (CaMKIIα) and a network of functionally linked proteins that regulate neural plasticity and glutamate-mediated synaptic activity. Accordingly, alcohol drinking increased α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isooxazole receptor (AMPAR) in central amygdala (CeA) and phosphorylation of AMPAR GluA1 subunit at a CaMKII locus (GluA1-Ser831) in CeA and lateral amygdala. Further, CaMKIIα-Thr286 and GluA1-Ser831 phosphorylation was increased in CeA and lateral amygdala of mice that lever-pressed for alcohol versus the nondrug reinforcer sucrose. Mechanistic studies showed that targeted pharmacologic inhibition of amygdala CaMKII or AMPAR activity specifically inhibited the positive reinforcing properties of alcohol but not sucrose. CONCLUSIONS Moderate alcohol drinking increases the activity and function of plasticity-linked protein networks in the amygdala that regulate the positive reinforcing effects of the drug. Given the prominence of positive reinforcement in the etiology of addiction, we propose that alcohol-induced adaptations in CaMKIIα and AMPAR signaling in the amygdala may serve as a molecular gateway from use to abuse. PMID:25579851

  8. Jieduquyuziyin prescription suppresses IL-17 production and Th17 activity in MRL/lpr mice by inhibiting expression of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-4.

    PubMed

    Shui, Bingjie; Xia, Weibiao; Wen, Chengping; Ding, Xinghong

    2015-07-01

    Jieduquyuziyin prescription (JP) is a traditional Chinese medicinal (TCM) formula which has been demonstrated to be effective for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment as an approved hospital prescription for many years in China. But its mechanism of action in combating this disease is largely unknown. Our previous studies showed that JP can slow disease progression without producing significant toxic side effects. We treated MRL/lpr mice with JP to ascertain if JP could improve SLE by the suppression of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-4 (CaMK4) expression. We investigated the role of JP in a model of SLE in MRL/lpr mice, and identified the possible mechanism of action. Mice were divided randomly into four groups: control, model, and two treatment groups. Sections of renal tissue were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Histopathologic changes in the kidney were evaluated by light microscopy. T-helper (Th)17 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. mRNA levels of interleukin (IL)-17, CaMK4, and RORγt were measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). CaMK4 expression was assessed by Western blotting. The results showed that the percentages of Th17, IL-17, and RORγt in mice treated with JP were decreased remarkably compared to the model group (p < 0.05). Interestingly, a high CaMK4 expression was observed in the SLE mice, which was inhibited by JP. These results suggest that CaMK4 activity was increased in T cells from MRL/lpr mice compared with the control group. Our findings support the conclusion that the effects of JP on MRL/lpr mice may involve the regulation of CaMK4 overexpression in MRL/lpr mice.

  9. Propofol attenuates pancreatic cancer malignant potential via inhibition of NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangyuan; Wu, Qichao; You, Li; Chen, Sisi; Zhu, Minmin; Miao, Changhong

    2017-01-15

    Propofol is a commonly used intravenous anesthetic, and could attenuate cancer cells malignant potential via inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression. However, the mechanism is still inclusive. In the present study, we mainly focus on the mechanism by which propofol down-regulated HIF-1α expression and malignant potential in pancreatic cancer cells. Human pancreatic cancer cells (Miapaca-2 and Panc-1) in vitro and murine pancreatic cancer cell (Panc02) in vivo were used to assess the effect of propofol on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Propofol inhibited cells migration, expression of VEGF and HIF-1α, phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK), AKT, Ca(2+)/calmodulin dependent protein kinases II (CaMK II), and Ca(2+) concentration in a concentration-dependent manner (5, 25, 50, 100μM). Furthermore, MK801, an inhibitor of NMDA receptor, and KN93, an inhibitor of CaMK II, could inhibit the expression of VEGF, HIF-1a, p-AKT, p-ERK, p-CaMK II in vitro, growth of tumor and VEGF expression in vivo, which were similar to the effect of propofol. In addition, the anti-tumor effect of propofol could be counteracted by rapastinel, an activator of NMDA receptor. Our study indicated that propofol suppressed VEGF expression and migration ability of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, probably via inhibiting NMDA receptor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Epinephrine inhibits analgesic tolerance to intrathecal administrated morphine and increases the expression of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha.

    PubMed

    Satarian, Leila; Javan, Mohammad; Fathollahi, Yaghoub

    2008-01-17

    Activation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis inhibits development of morphine tolerance. Also, the expression of CaMKIIalpha is increased following chronic administration of morphine. In the current study, we tried to examine the effect of epinephrine, on the development of morphine tolerance; and also evaluate the expression of CaMKIIalpha as a molecular index for tolerance development. Analgesic tolerance was induced by intrathecal (i.t.) injection of morphine 15 microg/rat, twice a day for 5 days. To study the effect of epinephrine on development or reversal of morphine tolerance, epinephrine was administrated 20 min before morphine injections. Analgesia was assessed using tail flick test. Gene expression assays were done using RT-PCR. Following 5 days of combined administration of morphine and epinephrine (2, 5 or 10 microg/rat), in day 6, morphine produced potent analgesia. Administration of saline and morphine during days 1-5, caused reduced analgesic effect of morphine on day 6. After tolerance induction during 5 days, co-administration of epinephrine and morphine for another 5 days, significantly reversed the tolerance. Both morphine and epinephrine increased the expression of CaMKIIalpha. The expression of CaMKIIalpha was highly increased following combined administration of epinephrine and morphine. Our results showed the inhibition and reversal of analgesic tolerance to local administrated morphine by epinephrine. We observed the increased expression of CaMKIIalpha without development of morphine tolerance in animals treated with combined epinephrine and morphine.

  11. Peroxisomal plant nitric oxide synthase (NOS) protein is imported by peroxisomal targeting signal type 2 (PTS2) in a process that depends on the cytosolic receptor PEX7 and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2014-06-05

    Nitric oxide (NO) production in plant peroxisomes by l-arginine-dependent NO synthase activity has been proven. The PEX5 and PEX7 PTS receptors, which recognize PTS1- and PTS2-containing proteins, are localized in the cytosol. Using AtPex5p and AtPex7p knockdown in Arabidopsis by RNA interference (RNAi) designated as pex5i and pex7i, we found that the l-arginine-dependent protein responsible for NO generation in peroxisomes appears to be imported through an N-terminal PTS2. Pharmacological analyzes using a calcium channel blocker and calmodulin (CaM) antagonist show that the import of the peroxisomal NOS protein also depends on calcium and calmodulin.

  12. Calmodulin-like protein 3 is an estrogen receptor alpha coregulator for gene expression and drug response in a SNP, estrogen, and SERM-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sisi; Ingle, James N; Liu, Mohan; Yu, Jia; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Kubo, Michiaki; Weinshilboum, Richard M; Wang, Liewei

    2017-08-18

    We previously performed a case-control genome-wide association study in women treated with selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) for breast cancer prevention and identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ZNF423 as potential biomarkers for response to SERM therapy. The ZNF423rs9940645 SNP, which is approximately 200 bp away from the estrogen response elements, resulted in the SNP, estrogen, and SERM-dependent regulation of ZNF423 expression and, "downstream", that of BRCA1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay-mass spectrometry was performed to identify proteins binding to the ZNF423 SNP and coordinating with estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome editing was applied to generate ZR75-1 breast cancer cells with different ZNF423 SNP genotypes. Both cultured cells and mouse xenograft models with different ZNF423 SNP genotypes were used to study the cellular responses to SERMs and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. We identified calmodulin-like protein 3 (CALML3) as a key sensor of this SNP and a coregulator of ERα, which contributes to differential gene transcription regulation in an estrogen and SERM-dependent fashion. Furthermore, using CRISPR/Cas9-engineered ZR75-1 breast cancer cells with different ZNF423 SNP genotypes, striking differences in cellular responses to SERMs and PARP inhibitors, alone or in combination, were observed not only in cells but also in a mouse xenograft model. Our results have demonstrated the mechanism by which the ZNF423 rs9940645 SNP might regulate gene expression and drug response as well as its potential role in achieving more highly individualized breast cancer therapy.

  13. Hydrazinobenzoylcurcumin inhibits androgen receptor activity and growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Kim, Sahn-Ho; Datta, Indrani; Levin, Albert; Dyson, Gregory; Li, Jing; Kaypee, Stephanie; Swamy, M. Mahadeva; Gupta, Nilesh; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Menon, Mani; Kundu, Tapas K.; Reddy, G. Prem-Veer

    2015-01-01

    There is a critical need for therapeutic agents that can target the amino-terminal domain (NTD) of androgen receptor (AR) for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Calmodulin (CaM) binds to the AR NTD and regulates AR activity. We discovered that Hydrazinobenzoylcurcumin (HBC), which binds exclusively to CaM, inhibited AR activity. HBC abrogated AR interaction with CaM, suppressed phosphorylation of AR Serine81, and blocked the binding of AR to androgen-response elements. RNA-Seq analysis identified 57 androgen-regulated genes whose expression was significantly (p ≤ 0.002) altered in HBC treated cells as compared to controls. Oncomine analysis revealed that genes repressed by HBC are those that are usually overexpressed in prostate cancer (PCa) and genes stimulated by HBC are those that are often down-regulated in PCa, suggesting a reversing effect of HBC on androgen-regulated gene expression associated with PCa. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed a role of HBC affected genes in cellular functions associated with proliferation and survival. HBC was readily absorbed into the systemic circulation and inhibited the growth of xenografted CRPC tumors in nude mice. These observations demonstrate that HBC inhibits AR activity by targeting the AR NTD and suggest potential usefulness of HBC for effective treatment of CRPC. PMID:25704883

  14. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Antagonism and Neprilysin Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hubers, Scott A.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure affects approximately 5.7 million people in the United States alone. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists have improved mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, but mortality remains high. In July 2015, the FDA approved the first of a new class of drugs for the treatment of heart failure; valsartan/sacubitril (formerly known as LCZ696 and currently marketed by Novartis as Entresto) combines the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan and the neprilysin inhibitor prodrug sacubitril in a 1:1 ratio in a sodium supramolecular complex. Sacubitril is converted by esterases to LBQ657, which inhibits neprilysin, the enzyme responsible for the degradation of the natriuretic peptides and many other vasoactive peptides. Thus, this combined angiotensin receptor antagonist and neprilysin inhibitor addresses two of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of heart failure - activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and decreased sensitivity to natriuretic peptides. In the Prospective comparison of ARNI with ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial, valsartan/sacubitril significantly reduced mortality and hospitalization for heart failure, as well as blood pressure, compared to enalapril in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction, and an elevated circulating level of brain natriuretic peptide or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the role of valsartan/sacubitril in the treatment of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and hypertension. We review here the mechanisms of action of valsartan/sacubitril, the pharmacologic properties of the drug, and its efficacy and safety in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension. PMID:26976916

  15. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Antagonism and Neprilysin Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hubers, Scott A; Brown, Nancy J

    2016-03-15

    Heart failure affects ≈5.7 million people in the United States alone. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, β-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists have improved mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, but mortality remains high. In July 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the first of a new class of drugs for the treatment of heart failure: Valsartan/sacubitril (formerly known as LCZ696 and currently marketed by Novartis as Entresto) combines the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan and the neprilysin inhibitor prodrug sacubitril in a 1:1 ratio in a sodium supramolecular complex. Sacubitril is converted by esterases to LBQ657, which inhibits neprilysin, the enzyme responsible for the degradation of the natriuretic peptides and many other vasoactive peptides. Thus, this combined angiotensin receptor antagonist and neprilysin inhibitor addresses 2 of the pathophysiological mechanisms of heart failure: activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and decreased sensitivity to natriuretic peptides. In the Prospective Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial, valsartan/sacubitril significantly reduced mortality and hospitalization for heart failure, as well as blood pressure, compared with enalapril in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction, and an elevated circulating level of brain natriuretic peptide or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the role of valsartan/sacubitril in the treatment of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and hypertension. We review here the mechanisms of action of valsartan/sacubitril, the pharmacological properties of the drug, and its efficacy and safety in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension.

  16. Estrogen Enhances Linkage in the Vascular Endothelial Calmodulin Network via a Feedforward Mechanism at the G Protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Tran, Quang-Kim; Firkins, Rachel; Giles, Jennifer; Francis, Sarah; Matnishian, Vahe; Tran, Phuong; VerMeer, Mark; Jasurda, Jake; Burgard, Michelle Ann; Gebert-Oberle, Briana

    2016-05-13

    Estrogen exerts many effects on the vascular endothelium. Calmodulin (CaM) is the transducer of Ca(2+) signals and is a limiting factor in cardiovascular tissues. It is unknown whether and how estrogen modifies endothelial functions via the network of CaM-dependent proteins. Here we show that 17β-estradiol (E2) up-regulates total CaM level in endothelial cells. Concurrent measurement of Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-CaM indicated that E2 also increases free Ca(2+)-CaM. Pharmacological studies, gene silencing, and receptor expression-specific cell studies indicated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER/GPR30) mediates these effects via transactivation of EGFR and subsequent MAPK activation. The outcomes were then examined on four distinct members of the intracellular CaM target network, including GPER/GPR30 itself and estrogen receptor α, the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), and endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS). E2 substantially increases CaM binding to estrogen receptor α and GPER/GPR30. Mutations that reduced CaM binding to GPER/GPR30 in separate binding domains do not affect GPER/GPR30-Gβγ preassociation but decrease GPER/GPR30-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. E2 increases CaM-PMCA association, but the expected stimulation of Ca(2+) efflux is reversed by E2-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of PMCA. These effects sustain Ca(2+) signals and promote Ca(2+)-dependent CaM interactions with other CaM targets. Consequently, E2 doubles CaM-eNOS interaction and also promotes dual phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser-617 and Ser-1179. Calculations using in-cell and in vitro data revealed substantial individual and combined contribution of these effects to total eNOS activity. Taken together, E2 generates a feedforward loop via GPER/GPR30, which enhances Ca(2+)/CaM signals and functional linkage in the endothelial CaM target network.

  17. Purification and partial characterization of a novel calcium-binding protein from Bacillus cereus T spores and inhibition of germination by calmodulin antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Y.

    1989-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding protein has been purified from the dormant spores of Bacillus cereus T. B. cereus T spores were extensively washed, broken, and heated at 90{degree}C for 2 min. Using calcium-dependent hydrophobic interaction chromatography plus DEAE-cellulose and hydroxylapatite columns, a single protein was obtained which possessed calcium-binding capacity and some characteristics of calmodulin. This heat-stable protein was retained by hydrophobic matrices or a calmodulin antagonist in a calcium-dependent manner. The crude spore extract displaced bovine brain calmodulin from its antibody in a radioimmunoassay and the immunoreactive specific activity of the partially purified fraction which eluted from phenyl-Sepharose was ca. 200-fold greater than the crude spore extract. Purity of this protein was verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyarcylamide gel electrophoresis and reversed-phase HPLC. Calcium-binding ability was verified with a competitive calcium binding assay using Chelex-100 resin and {sup 45}Ca autoradiography. SDS-PAGE and amino acid composition indicated the molecular weight of the protein was 24-kDa. The effects of two calmodulin antagonists, trifluoperazine (TFP) and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7) on L-alanine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus T spores were examined by measuring commitment to germination, loss of heat resistance, release of calcium, decrease in optical density at 660 nm and phase-contrast microscopy.

  18. Autophosphorylation-based calcium (Ca2+) sensitivity priming and Ca2+/Calmodulin inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana Ca2+-dependent protein kinase 28 (CPK28)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant calcium (Ca2+) dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are composed of a dual specificity (Ser/Thr and Tyr) kinase domain tethered to a Calmodulin-like domain (CLD) via an autoinhibitory junction (J) and represent the primary Ca2+-dependent protein kinase activities in plant systems. While regulation...

  19. Role of calmodulin in thyroid hormone stimulation in vitro of human erythrocyte Ca2+-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Davis, F B; Davis, P J; Blas, S D

    1983-03-01

    Because human erythrocyte membrane Ca2+-ATPase is a calmodulin-dependent enzyme, and because physiological levels of thyroid hormone stimulate this enzyme system in vitro, we have studied the role of calmodulin in this model of extranuclear thyroid hormone action. Ca2+-ATPase activity in the absence of thyroid hormone ("basal activity") was increased by inclusion in the preassay incubation mixture of purified calmodulin or hypothyroid erythrocyte hemolysate that contained calmodulin (39 micrograms calmodulin/ml packed cells, determined by radioimmunoassay); addition of L-thyroxine or 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (10(-10)M) significantly enhanced (P less than 0.001) enzyme activity in the presence of calmodulin or hemolysate. The stimulatory effects of thyroid hormone, calmodulin, and hemolysate were additive. At 5-10 microM, trifluoperazine, an antagonist of calmodulin, inhibited thyroid hormone stimulation of Ca2+-ATPase activity. Higher concentrations of trifluoperazine (50-100 microM) inhibited basal and hormone-stimulated enzyme activity, with or without added calmodulin. Anti-calmodulin antibody (10-50 micrograms antibody/mg membrane protein) inhibited basal, calmodulin-stimulated and thyroid hormone-stimulated Ca2+-ATPase activity. Membrane preparations were shown by radioimmunoassay to contain residual endogenous calmodulin (0.27 +/- 0.02 micrograms/mg membrane protein). The latter accounts for the effect of trifluoperazine and calmodulin antibody on membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity in the absence of added purified calmodulin. These results support the conclusion that the in vitro action of physiological levels of iodothyronines on human erythrocyte Ca2+-ATPase activity requires the presence of calmodulin.

  20. Fas Binding to Calmodulin Regulates Apoptosis in Osteoclasts*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaojun; Ahn, Eun-Young; McKenna, Margaret A.; Yeo, Hyeonju; McDonald, Jay M.

    2005-01-01

    Promotion of osteoclast apoptosis is one therapeutic approach to osteoporosis. Calmodulin, the major intracellular Ca2+ receptor, modulates both osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. The calmodulin antagonist, trifluoperazine, rescues bone loss in ovariectomized mice (Zhang, L., Feng, X., and McDonald, J. M. (2003) Endocrinology 144, 4536–4543). We show here that a 3-h treatment of mouse osteoclasts with either of the calmodulin antagonists, tamoxifen or trifluoperazine, induces osteoclast apoptosis dose-dependently. Tamoxifen, 10 μm, and trifluoperazine, 10 μm, induce 7.3 ± 1.8-fold and 5.3 ± 0.9-fold increases in osteoclast apoptosis, respectively. In Jurkat cells, calmodulin binds to Fas, the death receptor, and this binding is regulated during Fas-mediated apoptosis (Ahn, E. Y., Lim, S. T., Cook, W. J., and McDonald, J. M. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 5661–5666). In osteoclasts, calmodulin also binds Fas. When osteoclasts are treated with 10 μm trifluoperazine, the binding between Fas and calmodulin is dramatically decreased at 15 min and gradually recovers by 60 min. A point mutation of the Fas death domain in the Lpr−cg mouse renders Fas inactive. Using glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins, the human Fas cytoplasmic domain is shown to bind calmodulin, whereas a point mutation (V254N) comparable with the Lpr−cg mutation in mice has markedly reduced calmodulin binding. Osteoclasts derived from Lpr−cg mice have diminished calmodulin/Fas binding and are more sensitive to calmodulin antagonist-induced apoptosis than those from wild-type mice. Both tamoxifen- and trifluoperazine-induced apoptosis are increased 1.6 ± 0.2-fold in Lpr−cg-derived osteoclasts compared with osteoclasts derived from wild-type mice. In summary, calmodulin antagonists induce apoptosis in osteoclasts by a mechanism involving interference with calmodulin binding to Fas. The effects of calmodulin/Fas binding on calmodulin antagonist-induced apoptosis may open a new

  1. pH-Dependent Inhibition of Kainate Receptors by Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Mott, David D.; Benveniste, Morris; Dingledine, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Kainate receptors contribute to synaptic plasticity and rhythmic oscillatory firing of neurons in corticolimbic circuits including hippocampal area CA3. We use zinc chelators and mice deficient in zinc transporters to show that synaptically released zinc inhibits postsynaptic kainate receptors at mossy fiber synapses and limits frequency facilitation of kainate, but not AMPA EPSCs during thetapattern stimulation. Exogenous zinc also inhibits the facilitatory modulation of mossy fiber axon excitability by kainate but does not suppress the depressive effect of kainate on CA3 axons. Recombinant kainate receptors are inhibited in a subunit-dependent manner by physiologically relevant concentrations of zinc, with receptors containing the KA1 subunit being sensitive to submicromolar concentrations of zinc. Zinc inhibition does not alter receptor desensitization nor apparent agonist affinity and is only weakly voltage dependent, which points to an allosteric mechanism. Zinc inhibition is reduced at acidic pH. Thus, in the presence of zinc, a fall in pH potentiates kainate receptors by relieving zinc inhibition. Acidification of the extracellular space, as occurs during repetitive activity, may therefore serve to unmask kainate receptor neurotransmission. We conclude that zinc modulation of kainate receptors serves an important role in shaping kainate neurotransmission in the CA3 region. PMID:18272686

  2. Glycinergic inhibition in thalamus revealed by synaptic receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Ghavanini, Ahmad A; Mathers, David A; Puil, Ernest

    2005-09-01

    Using juvenile rat brain slices, we examined the possibility that strychnine-sensitive receptors for glycine-like amino acids contributed to synaptic inhibition in ventrobasal thalamus, where gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) is the prevalent inhibitory transmitter. Ventrobasal nuclei showed staining for antibodies against alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of the glycine receptor. Exogenously applied glycine, taurine and beta-alanine increased membrane conductance, effects antagonized by strychnine, indicative of functional glycine receptors. Using glutamate receptor antagonists, we isolated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials and currents (IPSPs and IPSCs) evoked by high-threshold stimulation of medial lemniscus. Like the responses to glycine agonists, these synaptic responses reversed near E(Cl). In comparative tests with GABA receptor antagonists, strychnine attenuated inhibition in a majority of neurons, but did not alter slow, GABA(B) inhibition. For complete blockade, the majority of fast IPSPs required co-application of strychnine with bicuculline or gabazine, GABA(A) receptor antagonists. Strychnine acting with an IC50 approximately = 33 nM, eliminated residual fast inhibition during selective GABA(A) receptor blockade with gabazine. The latency of onset for IPSPs was compatible with polysynaptic pathways or prolonged axonal propagation time. Strychnine lacked effects on monosynaptic, GABAergic IPSPs from zona incerta. The specific actions of strychnine implicated a glycine receptor contribution to fast inhibition in somatosensory thalamus.

  3. Beta 2 subunit-containing nicotinic receptors mediate acute nicotine-induced activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-dependent pathways in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K J; Walters, C L; Damaj, M I

    2009-08-01

    Nicotine is the addictive component of tobacco, and successful smoking cessation therapies must address the various processes that contribute to nicotine addiction. Thus, understanding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes and subsequent molecular cascades activated after nicotine exposure is of the utmost importance in understanding the progression of nicotine dependence. One possible candidate is the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) pathway. Substrates of this kinase include the vesicle-associated protein synapsin I and the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). The goal of these studies was to examine these postreceptor mechanisms after acute nicotine treatment in vivo. We first show that administration of nicotine increases CaMKII activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and amygdala. In beta2 nAChR knockout (KO) mice, nicotine does not induce an increase in kinase activity, phosphorylated (p)Synapsin I, or pCREB. In contrast, alpha7 nAChR KO mice show nicotine-induced increases in CaMKII activity and pCREB, similar to their wild-type littermates. Moreover, we show that when animals are pretreated with the CaMKII inhibitors 4-[(2S)-2-[(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl) methylamino]-3-oxo-3-(4-phenyl-1-piperazinyl)propyl]phenyl isoquinolinesulfonic acid ester (KN-62) and N-[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2 propenyl]methylamino]methyl]phenyl]-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methoxybenzenesulphonamide (KN-93), nicotine-induced increase in the kinase activity and pCREB was attenuated in the VTA and NAc, whereas pretreatment with (2-[N-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine, phosphate) (KN-92), the inactive analog, did not alter the nicotine-induced increase in pCREB. Taken together, these data suggest that the nicotine-induced increase in CaMKII activity may correlate with the nicotine-induced increase in pSynapsin I and pCREB in the VTA and NAc via beta2

  4. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on calcium pump of ram spermatozoa plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, H; Rubinstein, S

    1988-01-01

    Plasma membranes isolated from ram spermatozoa contain calmodulin, which represents approximately 0.03% of the total sperm calmodulin and 0.025% of the membrane protein. When membranes were isolated in the presence of ethylene glycol (beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), the amount of calmodulin associated with the plasma membranes was reduced by only 20%. The ATP-dependent calcium transport activity of the isolated plasma membranes is not enhanced by adding calmodulin and not inhibited by the calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazinc (TFP), compound 48/80, or calmidazolium. In fact, there is an enhancement of calcium uptake by the calmodulin antagonists and this enhancement can be blocked by the Ca2+-channel blocker D-600. It is suggested that the ATP-dependent calcium transport activity in the plasma membrane of ram spermatozoa is not regulated by calmodulin.

  5. Suppression of calcium-sensing receptor ameliorates cardiac hypertrophy through inhibition of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LEI; WANG, CHAO; LIN, YAN; XI, YUHUI; LI, HONG; SHI, SA; LI, HONGZHU; ZHANG, WEIHUA; ZHAO, YAJUN; TIAN, YE; XU, CHANGQING; WANG, LINA

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) releases intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) by accumulating inositol phosphate. Changes in [Ca2+]i initiate myocardial hypertrophy. Furthermore, autophagy associated with [Ca2+]i. Autophagy has previously been demonstrated to participate in the hypertrophic process. The current study investigated whether suppression of CaSR affects the hypertrophic response via modulating autophagy. Isoproterenol (ISO) was used to induce cardiac hypertrophy in Wistar rats. Hypertrophic status was determined by echocardiographic assessment, hematoxylin and eosin, and Masson's staining. The protein expression levels of CaSR and autophagy level were observed. Changes of hypertrophy and autophagy indicators were observed following intravenous injection of a CaSR inhibitor. An ISO-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy model was established and used determine the involvement of GdCl3. [Ca2+]i was determined using Fluo-4/AM dye followed by confocal microscopy. The expression levels of various active proteins were analyzed by western blotting. The size of the heart, expression levels of CaSR and autophagy level were markedly increased in hypertrophic myocardium. In addition, the present study demonstrated that the indicators of hypertrophy and autophagy were effectively suppressed by CaSR inhibitor. Furthermore, similar effects were demonstrated in neonatal rat hypertrophic cardiomyocytes treated with ISO. It was also observed that CaSR regulates the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway induced by ISO in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the AMPK inhibition significantly reduced the autophagy level following CaSR stimulation (P<0.05). The results of the present demonstrated that inhibition of CaSR may ameliorate cardiac hypertrophy induced by ISO and the effect may be associated with the inhibition of autophagy and suppression of the Ca

  6. Stimulation of β₂-adrenergic receptors inhibits calcineurin activity in CD4(+) T cells via PKA-AKAP interaction.

    PubMed

    Riether, Carsten; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Wirth, Timo; Pacheco-López, Gustavo; Doenlen, Raphael; Willemen, Hanneke; Heijnen, Cobi J; Schedlowski, Manfred; Engler, Harald

    2011-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is able to modulate immune functions via adrenoceptor-dependent mechanisms. Activation of β₂-adrenergic receptors (AR) on CD4(+) T lymphocytes has been shown to inhibit Th1-cytokine production and cell proliferation. Here, we investigated the role of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), a key element of the T cell receptor (TCR)-signaling pathway, in β₂-AR-mediated suppression of T cell function. Purified rat splenic CD4(+) T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 in presence or absence of the β₂-AR agonist terbutaline (TERB). Treatment with TERB induced a dose-dependent inhibition of cellular CaN activity, along with a reduction in IL-2 and IFN-γ production, and T cell proliferation. Co-administration of the β-AR antagonist nadolol abolished these effects. Blockade of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) with the inhibitor H-89 completely prevented TERB-induced CaN inhibition. However, a receptor-independent rise in the second messenger cAMP was not sufficient to suppress CaN activity. Disruption of the interaction between PKA and A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) by the inhibitor peptide St-Ht31 fully blocked TERB-induced CaN inhibition, demonstrating that PKA-AKAP interaction is essential for the β₂-AR-mediated CaN inhibition. Taken together, this study provides evidence for a link between the β₂-AR and TCR signaling pathways since expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ in activated T cells largely depends on dephosphorylation of the transcription factor NFAT by CaN, and identifies a novel intracellular mechanism that can lead to downregulation of T cell function after SNS activation.

  7. Calmodulin Binds HER2 and Modulates HER2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    White, Colin D.; Li, Zhigang; Sacks, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases, has defined roles in neoplastic transformation and tumor progression. Overexpression of HER2 is an adverse prognostic factor in several human neoplasms and, particularly in breast cancer, correlates strongly with a decrease in overall patient survival. HER2 stimulates breast tumorigenesis by forming protein-protein interactions with a diverse array of intracellular signaling molecules, and evidence suggests that manipulation of these associations holds therapeutic potential. To modulate specific HER2 interactions, the region(s) of HER2 to which each target binds must be accurately identified. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitously expressed Ca2+ binding protein, interacts with multiple intracellular substrates. Interestingly, CaM binds the juxtamembrane region of the epidermal growth factor receptor, a HER2 homolog. Here, we show that CaM interacts, in a Ca2+-regulated manner, with two distinct sites on the N-terminal portion of the HER2 intracellular domain. Deletion of residues 676–689 and 714–732 from HER2 prevented CaM-HER2 binding. Inhibition of CaM function or deletion of the CaM binding sites from HER2 significantly decreased both HER2 phosphorylation and HER2-stimulated cell growth. Collectively, these data suggest that inhibition of CaM-HER2 interaction may represent a rational therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with breast cancer. PMID:21185879

  8. SIGIRR inhibits interleukin-1 receptor- and toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling through different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jinzhong; Qian, Youcun; Yao, Jianhong; Grace, Cui; Li, Xiaoxia

    2005-07-01

    The Toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing orphan receptor SIGIRR (single immunoglobulin interleukin-1 receptor-related protein) acts as a negative regulator of interleukin (IL)-1 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling. Endogenous SIGIRR transiently interacted with IL-1 receptor and the receptor-proximal signaling components (MyD88, IRAK, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6) upon IL-1 stimulation, indicating that SIGIRR interacts with the IL-1 receptor complex in a ligand-dependent manner. Similar interaction was also observed between SIGIRR and Toll-like receptor 4 receptor complex upon LPS stimulation. To identify the domains of SIGIRR required for its interaction with the Toll-like receptor 4 and IL-1 receptor complexes, several SIGIRR deletion mutants were generated, including DeltaN (lacking the extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig) domain with deletion of amino acids 1-119), DeltaC (lacking the C-terminal domain with deletion of amino acids 313-410), and DeltaTIR (lacking the TIR domain with deletion of amino acids 161-313). Whereas both the extracellular Ig domain and the intracellular TIR domains are important for SIGIRR to inhibit IL-1 signaling, only the TIR domain is necessary for SIGIRR to inhibit LPS signaling. The extracellular Ig domain exerts its inhibitory role in IL-1 signaling by interfering with the heterodimerization of IL-1 receptor and IL-1RAcP, whereas the intracellular TIR domain inhibits both IL-1 and LPS signaling by attenuating the recruitment of receptor-proximal signaling components to the receptor. These results indicate that SIGIRR inhibits IL-1 and LPS signaling pathways through differential mechanisms.

  9. Cannabinoid receptors and cholecystokinin in feeding inhibition.

    PubMed

    Alén, Francisco; Ramírez-López, M Teresa; Gómez de Heras, Raquel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Orio, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system functions as a potent regulator of feeding behavior and energy balance through complex central and peripheral mechanisms. Recent findings have demonstrated the existence of cooperation between peripheral cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the satiety hormone cholecystokinin (CCK). The two systems have opposing actions in the modulation of feeding: while endocannabinoids such as anandamide promote feeding, CCK controls gastrointestinal motility and appetite suppression. In this review, we examine the individual contribution of endocannabinoids and CCK in the modulation of appetite and explore the interaction between the two systems. We also highlight the potential benefits of simultaneously targeting peripheral CB1 and CCK1 receptors to design new therapies to fight obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Menthol Binding and Inhibition of α7-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C.; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Al Kury, Lina; Shuba, Yaroslav; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Howarth, Frank C.; Sadek, Bassem; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca2+-free bathing solution containing Ba2+. Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [125I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca2+ transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner. PMID:23935840

  11. Ketamine's antidepressant action: beyond NMDA receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-11-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine is one of the most attractive antidepressants since this drug causes rapid-onset and sustained antidepressant effects in treatment resistant patients with depression. There are unanswered questions about how ketamine induces its rapid and sustained antidepressant actions. This key article suggests that (2R,6R)-HNK (hydroxynorketamine), a major metabolite of (R)-ketamine, shows antidepressant effects in rodent models of depression, indicating that the metabolism of (R)-ketamine to (2R,6R)-HNK is pivotal in its antidepressant action. Here these findings are put into context and their significance is discussed.

  12. Analysis of the state of posttranslational calmodulin methylation in developing pea plants. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-07-01

    A specific calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used in a radiometric assay to analyze the degree of methylation of lysine-115 in pea (Pisum sativum) plants. Calmodulin was isolated from dissected segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by incubation with the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of ({sup 3}H)methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. By this approach, the presence of unmethylated calmodulins were demonstrated in pea tissues, and the levels of methylation varied depending on the developmental state of the tissue tested. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments of both etiolated and green plants, and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The incorporation of methyl groups into these calmodulin samples appears to be specific for position 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position competitively inhibited methyl group incorporation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in the ability of methylated and unmethylated calmodulins to activate pea NAD kinase raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation of calmodulin could be another mechanism for regulating calmodulin activity.

  13. Cocaine Inhibits Dopamine D2 Receptor Signaling via Sigma-1-D2 Receptor Heteromers

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Moreno, Estefania; Bonaventura, Jordi; Brugarolas, Marc; Farré, Daniel; Aguinaga, David; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carmen; Ferre, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Under normal conditions the brain maintains a delicate balance between inputs of reward seeking controlled by neurons containing the D1-like family of dopamine receptors and inputs of aversion coming from neurons containing the D2-like family of dopamine receptors. Cocaine is able to subvert these balanced inputs by altering the cell signaling of these two pathways such that D1 reward seeking pathway dominates. Here, we provide an explanation at the cellular and biochemical level how cocaine may achieve this. Exploring the effect of cocaine on dopamine D2 receptors function, we present evidence of σ1 receptor molecular and functional interaction with dopamine D2 receptors. Using biophysical, biochemical, and cell biology approaches, we discovered that D2 receptors (the long isoform of the D2 receptor) can complex with σ1 receptors, a result that is specific to D2 receptors, as D3 and D4 receptors did not form heteromers. We demonstrate that the σ1-D2 receptor heteromers consist of higher order oligomers, are found in mouse striatum and that cocaine, by binding to σ1 -D2 receptor heteromers, inhibits downstream signaling in both cultured cells and in mouse striatum. In contrast, in striatum from σ1 knockout animals these complexes are not found and this inhibition is not seen. Taken together, these data illuminate the mechanism by which the initial exposure to cocaine can inhibit signaling via D2 receptor containing neurons, destabilizing the delicate signaling balance influencing drug seeking that emanates from the D1 and D2 receptor containing neurons in the brain. PMID:23637801

  14. Inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by neuronal P2Y receptors

    PubMed Central

    Unterberger, Ursula; Moskvina, Eugenia; Scholze, Thomas; Freissmuth, Michael; Boehm, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    P2Y receptors inhibiting adenylyl cyclase have been found in blood platelets, glioma cells, and endothelial cells. In platelets and glioma cells, these receptors were identified as P2Y12. Here, we have used PC12 cells to search for adenylyl cyclase inhibiting P2Y receptors in a neuronal cellular environment.ADP and ATP (0.1 – 100 μM) left basal cyclic AMP accumulation unaltered, but reduced cyclic AMP synthesis stimulated by activation of endogenous A2A or recombinant β2 receptors. Forskolin-dependent cyclic AMP production was reduced by ⩽1 μM and enhanced by 10 – 100 μM ADP; this latter effect was turned into an inhibition when A2A receptors were blocked.The nucleotide inhibition of cyclic AMP synthesis was not altered when P2X receptors were blocked, but abolished by pertussis toxin.The rank order of agonist potencies for the reduction of cyclic AMP was (IC50 values): 2-methylthio-ADP (0.12 nM)=2-methylthio-ATP (0.13 nM)>ADPβS (71 nM)>ATP (164 nM)=ADP (244 nM). The inhibition by ADP was not antagonized by suramin, pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulphonic acid, or adenosine-3′-phosphate-5′-phosphate, but attenuated by reactive blue 2, ATPαS, and 2-methylthio-AMP.RT – PCR demonstrated the expression of P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, and P2Y12, but not P2Y1, receptors in PC12 cells. In Northern blots, only P2Y2 and P2Y12 were detectable. Differentiation with NGF did not alter these hybridization signals and left the nucleotide inhibition of adenylyl cyclase unchanged.We conclude that P2Y12 receptors are expressed in neuronal cells and inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity. PMID:11834615

  15. Oxidation inhibits PTH receptor signaling and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Ardura, Juan A; Alonso, Verónica; Esbrit, Pedro; Friedman, Peter A

    2017-01-22

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) increase during aging, potentially affecting many tissues including brain, heart, and bone. ROS alter signaling pathways and constitute potential therapeutic targets to limit oxidative damaging effects in aging-associated diseases. Parathyroid hormone receptors (PTHR) are widely expressed and PTH is the only anabolic therapy for osteoporosis. The effects of oxidative stress on PTHR signaling and trafficking have not been elucidated. Here, we used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based cAMP, ERK, and calcium fluorescent biosensors to analyze the effects of ROS on PTHR signaling and trafficking by live-cell imaging. PTHR internalization and recycling were measured in HEK-293 cells stably transfected with HA-PTHR. PTH increased cAMP production, ERK phosphorylation, and elevated intracellular calcium. Pre-incubation with H2O2 reduced all PTH-dependent signaling pathways. These inhibitory effects were not a result of PTH oxidation since PTH incubated with H2O2 triggered similar responses. PTH promoted internalization and recycling of the PTHR. Both events were significantly reduced by H2O2 pre-incubation. These findings highlight the role of oxidation on PTHR signaling and trafficking, and suggest the relevance of ROS as a putative target in diseases associated with oxidative stress such as age-related osteoporosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Curcumin Inhibits Neuronal Loss in the Retina and Elevates Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Activity in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peipei; Zhu, Yanxia; Chen, Zhen; Shi, Tianyan; Lei, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To determine whether curcumin offers neuroprotection to minimize the apoptosis of neural cells in the retina of diabetic rats. Methods: Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and control rats were used in this study. A subgroup of STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated with curcumin for 12 weeks. Retinal histology, apoptosis of neural cells in the retina, electroretinograms, and retinal glutamate content were evaluated after 12 weeks. Retinal levels of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), phospho-CaMKII (p-CaMKII), and cleaved caspase-3 were determined by Western blot analysis. Results: The amplitudes a-wave, b-wave, and oscillatory potential were reduced by diabetes, but curcumin treatment suppressed this reduction of amplitudes. Curcumin also prevented cell loss from the outer nuclear, inner nuclear, and ganglion cell layers. Apoptosis of retinal neurons was detected in diabetic rats. The concentration of glutamate in the retina was higher in diabetic rats, but was significantly reduced in the curcumin-treated group. Furthermore, p-CaMKII and cleaved caspase-3 expression were upregulated in the diabetic retina, but reduced in curcumin-treated rats. Conclusions: Curcumin attenuated diabetes-induced apoptosis in retinal neurons by reducing the glutamate level and downregulating CaMKII. Thus, curcumin might be used to prevent neuronal damage in the retina of patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26207889

  17. Menthol inhibits 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents.

    PubMed

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Shuba, Yaroslav; Al Kury, Lina; Sadek, Bassem; Howarth, Frank C; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-11-01

    The effects of alcohol monoterpene menthol, a major active ingredient of the peppermint plant, were tested on the function of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. 5-HT (1 μM)-evoked currents recorded by two-electrode voltage-clamp technique were reversibly inhibited by menthol in a concentration-dependent (IC50 = 163 μM) manner. The effects of menthol developed gradually, reaching a steady-state level within 10-15 minutes and did not involve G-proteins, since GTPγS activity remained unaltered and the effect of menthol was not sensitive to pertussis toxin pretreatment. The actions of menthol were not stereoselective as (-), (+), and racemic menthol inhibited 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents to the same extent. Menthol inhibition was not altered by intracellular 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid injections and transmembrane potential changes. The maximum inhibition observed for menthol was not reversed by increasing concentrations of 5-HT. Furthermore, specific binding of the 5-HT3 antagonist [(3)H]GR65630 was not altered in the presence of menthol (up to 1 mM), indicating that menthol acts as a noncompetitive antagonist of the 5-HT3 receptor. Finally, 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents in acutely dissociated nodose ganglion neurons were also inhibited by menthol (100 μM). These data demonstrate that menthol, at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, is an allosteric inhibitor of 5-HT3 receptors.

  18. Insulin-receptor phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    King, M J; Sale, G J

    1988-01-01

    Calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase has been proposed to be an important phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase. The ability of the enzyme to attack autophosphorylated insulin receptor was examined and compared with the known ability of the enzyme to act on autophosphorylated epidermal-growth-factor (EGF) receptor. Purified calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase was shown to catalyse the complete dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosyl-(insulin receptor). When compared at similar concentrations, 32P-labelled EGF receptor was dephosphorylated at greater than 3 times the rate of 32P-labelled insulin receptor; both dephosphorylations exhibited similar dependence on metal ions and calmodulin. Native phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatases in cell extracts were also characterized. With rat liver, heart or brain, most (75%) of the native phosphatase activity against both 32P-labelled insulin and EGF receptors was recovered in the particulate fraction of the cell, with only 25% in the soluble fraction. This subcellular distribution contrasts with results of previous studies using artificial substrates, which found most of the phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity in the soluble fraction of the cell. Properties of particulate and soluble phosphatase activity against 32P-labelled insulin and EGF receptors are reported. The contribution of calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase activity to phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity in cell fractions was determined by utilizing the unique metal-ion dependence of calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase. Whereas Ni2+ (1 mM) markedly activated the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, it was found to inhibit potently both particulate and soluble phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity. In fractions from rat liver, brain and heart, total phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity against both 32P-labelled receptors was inhibited by 99.5 +/- 6% (mean +/- S.E.M., 30 observations) by Ni2+. Results of Ni2+ inhibition

  19. Mechanism of TGFbeta receptor inhibition by FKBP12.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y G; Liu, F; Massague, J

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) signaling requires phosphorylation of the type I receptor TbetaR-I by TbetaR-II. Although TGFbeta promotes the association of TbetaR-I with TbetaR-II, these receptor components have affinity for each other which can lead to their ligand-independent activation. The immunophilin FKBP12 binds to TbetaR-I and inhibits its signaling function. We investigated the mechanism and functional significance of this effect. FKBP12 binding to TbetaR-I involves the rapamycin/Leu-Pro binding pocket of FKBP12 and a Leu-Pro sequence located next to the activating phosphorylation sites in TbetaR-I. Mutations in the binding sites of FKBP12 or TbetaR-I abolish the interaction between these proteins, leading to receptor activation in the absence of added ligand. FKBP12 does not inhibit TbetaR-I association with TbetaR-II, but inhibits TbetaR-I phosphorylation by TbetaR-II. Rapamycin, which blocks FKBP12 binding to TbetaR-I, reverses the inhibitory effect of FKBP12 on TbetaR-I phosphorylation. By impeding the activation of TGFbeta receptor complexes formed in the absence of ligand, FKBP12 may provide a safeguard against leaky signaling resulting from the innate tendency of TbetaR-I and TbetaR-II to interact with each other. PMID:9233797

  20. Melatonin inhibits glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation in mouse thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Presman, Diego M; Hoijman, Esteban; Ceballos, Nora R; Galigniana, Mario D; Pecci, Adali

    2006-11-01

    The antiapoptotic effect of melatonin (MEL) has been described in several systems. In particular, MEL inhibits glucocorticoid-mediated apoptosis. Our group previously demonstrated that in the thymus, MEL inhibits the release of Cytochrome C from mitochondria and the dexamethasone-dependent increase of bax mRNA levels. In this study we analyzed the ability of MEL to regulate the activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in mouse thymocytes. We found that even though the methoxyindole does not affect the ligand binding capacity of the receptor, it impairs the steroid-dependent nuclear translocation of the GR and also prevents transformation by blocking the dissociation of the 90-kDa heat shock protein. Coincubation of the methoxyindole with dexamethasone did not affect the expression of a reporter gene in GR-transfected Cos-7 cells or HC11 and L929 mouse cell lines that express Mel-1a and retinoid-related orphan receptor-alpha (RORalpha) receptors. Therefore, the antagonistic effect of MEL seems to be specific for thymocytes, in a Mel 1a- and RORalpha-independent manner. In summary, the present results suggest a novel mechanism for the antagonistic action of MEL on GR-mediated effects, which involves the inhibition of 90-kDa heat shock protein dissociation and the cytoplasmic retention of the GR.

  1. Gβ promotes pheromone receptor polarization and yeast chemotropism by inhibiting receptor phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ismael, Amber; Tian, Wei; Waszczak, Nicholas; Wang, Xin; Cao, Youfang; Suchkov, Dmitry; Bar, Eli; Metodiev, Metodi V.; Liang, Jie; Arkowitz, Robert; Stone, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Gradient-directed cell migration (chemotaxis) and growth (chemotropism) are universal processes, which are essential to the development and life cycles of all species. Cells use surface receptors to sense the shallow chemical gradients that elicit chemotaxis and chemotropism. Slight asymmetries in receptor activation are amplified by downstream signaling systems, which ultimately induce dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton. During the mating response of budding yeast, a model chemotropic system, the pheromone receptor on the plasma membrane polarizes to the side of the cell closest to the stimulus. Although receptor polarization occurs before and independently of actin-cable dependent vesicle delivery (directed secretion), it requires receptor internalization. Phosphorylation of pheromone receptors by yeast casein kinase 1 or 2 (Yck1/2) stimulates their internalization. We showed that the pheromone-responsive Gβγ dimer promotes the polarization of the pheromone receptor by interacting with Yck1/2 and locally inhibiting receptor phosphorylation. We also found that receptor phosphorylation is essential for chemotropism, independent of its role in inducing receptor internalization. A mathematical model supports the idea that the interaction between Gβγ and Yck1/2 results in differential phosphorylation and internalization of the pheromone receptor and accounts for its polarization before the initiation of directed secretion. PMID:27072657

  2. Gβ promotes pheromone receptor polarization and yeast chemotropism by inhibiting receptor phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ismael, Amber; Tian, Wei; Waszczak, Nicholas; Wang, Xin; Cao, Youfang; Suchkov, Dmitry; Bar, Eli; Metodiev, Metodi V; Liang, Jie; Arkowitz, Robert A; Stone, David E

    2016-04-12

    Gradient-directed cell migration (chemotaxis) and growth (chemotropism) are processes that are essential to the development and life cycles of all species. Cells use surface receptors to sense the shallow chemical gradients that elicit chemotaxis and chemotropism. Slight asymmetries in receptor activation are amplified by downstream signaling systems, which ultimately induce dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton. During the mating response of budding yeast, a model chemotropic system, the pheromone receptors on the plasma membrane polarize to the side of the cell closest to the stimulus. Although receptor polarization occurs before and independently of actin cable-dependent delivery of vesicles to the plasma membrane (directed secretion), it requires receptor internalization. Phosphorylation of pheromone receptors by yeast casein kinase 1 or 2 (Yck1/2) stimulates their internalization. We showed that the pheromone-responsive Gβγ dimer promotes the polarization of the pheromone receptor by interacting with Yck1/2 and locally inhibiting receptor phosphorylation. We also found that receptor phosphorylation is essential for chemotropism, independently of its role in inducing receptor internalization. A mathematical model supports the idea that the interaction between Gβγ and Yck1/2 results in differential phosphorylation and internalization of the pheromone receptor and accounts for its polarization before the initiation of directed secretion.

  3. Caffeine inhibits antinociception by acetaminophen in the formalin test by inhibiting spinal adenosine A₁ receptors.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, Jana; Reid, Allison R

    2012-01-15

    The present study examined effects of caffeine on antinociception by acetaminophen in the formalin test in mice. It demonstrates that caffeine 10mg/kg inhibits antinociception produced by acetaminophen 300 mg/kg i.p. against phase 2 flinches. Chronic administration of caffeine in the drinking water (0.1, 0.3g/l) for 8 days also inhibits the action of acetaminophen. The selective adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist DPCPX 1mg/kg i.p. mimics the action of caffeine, but the selective adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist SCH58261 3mg/kg i.p. does not. While acetaminophen produced the same effect in mice that were +/+, +/- and -/- for adenosine A(1) receptors, inhibition of antinociception by caffeine was seen only in +/+ and +/- mice. A higher dose of caffeine, 40 mg/kg, produced an intrinsic antinociception against formalin-evoked flinches, an effect also seen when caffeine was administered intrathecally. SCH58261 30 nmol, but not DPCPX 10 nmol, also produced antinociception when administered intrathecally indicating involvement of adenosine A(2A) receptors in spinal antinociception. Caffeine reversal of acetaminophen results from actions in the spinal cord, as intrathecal DPCPX 10 nmol inhibited antinociception by systemic acetaminophen; this was also observed in +/+ but not in -/- adenosine A(1) receptor mice. We propose that spinal adenosine A(1) receptors contribute to the action of acetaminophen secondarily to involvement of descending serotonin pathways and release of adenosine within the spinal cord. Inhibition of acetaminophen antinociception by doses of caffeine relevant to dietary human intake levels suggests a more detailed consideration of acetaminophen-caffeine interactions in humans is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The fine-structural distribution of G-protein receptor kinase 3, beta-arrestin-2, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and phosphodiesterase PDE1C2, and a Cl(-)-cotransporter in rodent olfactory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Menco, Bert Ph M

    2005-03-01

    The sequentially activated molecules of olfactory signal-onset are mostly concentrated in the long, thin distal parts of olfactory epithelial receptor cell cilia. Is this also true for molecules of olfactory signal-termination and -regulation? G-protein receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) supposedly aids in signal desensitization at the level of odor receptors, whereas beta-arrestin-2, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) PDE1C2 are thought to do so at the level of the adenylyl cyclase, ACIII. The Na+, K(+)-2Cl(-)-cotransporter NKCC1 regulates Cl(-)-channel activity. In an attempt to localize the subcellular sites olfactory signal-termination and -regulation we used four antibodies to GRK3, two to beta-arrestin-2, five to CaMKII (one to both the alpha and beta form, and two each specific to CaMKII alpha and beta), two to PDE1C2, and three to Cl(-)-cotransporters. Only antibodies to Cl(-)-cotransporters labeled cytoplasmic compartments of, especially, supporting cells but also those of receptor cells. For all other antibodies, immunoreactivity was mostly restricted to the olfactory epithelial luminal border, confirming light microscopic studies that had shown that antibodies to GRK3, beta- arrestin-2, CaMKII, and PDE1C2 labeled this region. Labeling did indeed include receptor cell cilia but occurred in microvilli of neighboring supporting cells as well. Apical parts of microvillous cells that are distinct from supporting cells, and also of ciliated respiratory cells, immunoreacted slightly with most antibodies. When peptides were available, antibody preabsorption with an excess of peptide reduced labeling intensities. Though some of the antibodies did label apices and microvilli of vomeronasal (VNO) supporting cells, none immunoreacted with VNO sensory structures.

  5. Targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling inhibits prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shu; Shao, Longjiang; Yu, Wendong; Gavine, Paul; Ittmann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Extensive correlative studies in human prostate cancer (PCa) as well as studies in vitro and in mouse models indicate that FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling plays an important role in PCa progression. In this study, we employed a probe compound for an FGFR inhibitor which potently inhibits FGFR1-3 and significantly inhibits FGFR-4. The purpose of this study is to determine if targeting FGFR signaling from all four FGFRs will have in vitro activities consistent with inhibition of tumor progression and will inhibit tumor progression in vivo. Experimental Design Effects of AZ8010 on FGFR signaling and invasion were analyzed using immortalized normal prostate epithelial (PNT1a) cells and PNT1a overexpressing FGFR-1 or FGFR-4. The effect of AZ8010 on invasion and proliferation in vitro was also evaluated in PCa cell lines. Finally, the impact of AZ8010 on tumor progression in vivo was evaluated using a VCaP xenograft model. Results AZ8010 completely inhibits FGFR-1 and significantly inhibits FGFR-4 signaling at 100 nM, which is an achievable in vivo concentration. These results in marked inhibition of ERK phosphorylation and invasion in PNT1a cells expressing FGFR-1 and FGFR-4 and all PCa cell lines tested. Treatment in vivo completely inhibited VCaP tumor growth and significantly inhibited angiogenesis and proliferation and increased cell death in treated tumors. This was associated with marked inhibition of ERK phosphorylation in treated tumors. Conclusions Targeting FGFR signaling is a promising new approach to treating aggressive PCa. PMID:22573348

  6. Colloidal Aggregation Causes Inhibition of G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal aggregation is the dominant mechanism for artifactual inhibition of soluble proteins, and controls against it are now widely deployed. Conversely, investigating this mechanism for membrane-bound receptors has proven difficult. Here we investigate the activity of four well-characterized aggregators against three G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) recognizing peptide and protein ligands. Each of the aggregators was active at micromolar concentrations against the three GPCRs in cell-based assays. This activity could be attenuated by either centrifugation of the inhibitor stock solution or by addition of Tween-80 detergent. In the absence of agonist, the aggregators acted as inverse agonists, consistent with a direct receptor interaction. Meanwhile, several literature GPCR ligands that resemble aggregators themselves formed colloids, by both physical and enzymological tests. These observations suggest that some GPCRs may be artifactually antagonized by colloidal aggregates, an effect that merits the attention of investigators in this field. PMID:23437772

  7. Beta2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-II and synapsin I protein levels in the nucleus accumbens after nicotine withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kia J; Imad Damaj, M

    2013-02-15

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are calcium-permeable and the initial targets for nicotine. Studies suggest that calcium-dependent mechanisms mediate some behavioral responses to nicotine; however, the post-receptor calcium-dependent mechanisms associated with chronic nicotine and nicotine withdrawal remain unclear. The proteins calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and synapsin I are essential for neurotransmitter release and were shown to be involved in drug dependence. In the current study, using pharmacological techniques, we sought to (a) complement previously published behavioral findings from our lab indicating a role for calcium-dependent signaling in nicotine dependence and (b) expand on previously published acute biochemical and pharmacological findings indicating the relevance of calcium-dependent mechanisms in acute nicotine responses by evaluating the function of CaMKII and synapsin I after chronic nicotine and withdrawal in the nucleus accumbens, a brain region implicated in drug dependence. Male mice were chronically infused with nicotine for 14 days, and treated with the β2-selective antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE), or the α7 antagonist, methyllycaconitine citrate (MLA) 20min prior to dissection of the nucleus accumbens. Results show that phosphorylated and total CaMKII and synapsin I protein levels were significantly increased in the nucleus accumbens after chronic nicotine infusion, and reduced after treatment with DHβE, but not MLA. A spontaneous nicotine withdrawal assessment also revealed significant reductions in phosphorylated CaMKII and synapsin I levels 24h after cessation of nicotine treatment. Our findings suggest that post-receptor calcium-dependent mechanisms associated with nicotine withdrawal are mediated through β2-containing nicotinic receptors.

  8. Ethanol inhibits neuritogenesis induced by astrocyte muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Guizzetti, Marina; Moore, Nadia H; Giordano, Gennaro; VanDeMark, Kathryn L; Costa, Lucio G

    2010-09-01

    In utero alcohol exposure can lead to fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, characterized by cognitive and behavioral deficits. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that ethanol alters neuronal development. We have recently shown that stimulation of M(3) muscarinic receptors in astrocytes increases the synthesis and release of fibronectin, laminin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, causing neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. As M(3) muscarinic receptor signaling in astroglial cells is strongly inhibited by ethanol, we hypothesized that ethanol may also inhibit neuritogenesis in hippocampal neurons induced by carbachol-stimulated astrocytes. In the present study, we report that the effect of carbachol-stimulated astrocytes on hippocampal neuron neurite outgrowth was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner (25-100 mM) by ethanol. This effect was because of the inhibition of the release of fibronectin, laminin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Similar effects on neuritogenesis and on the release of astrocyte extracellular proteins were observed after the incubation of astrocytes with carbachol in the presence of 1-butanol, another short-chain alcohol, which like ethanol is a competitive substrate for phospholipase D, but not by tert-butanol, its analog that is not a substrate for this enzyme. This study identifies a potential novel mechanism involved in the developmental effects of ethanol mediated by the interaction of ethanol with cell signaling in astrocytes, leading to an impairment in neuron-astrocyte communication.

  9. Lead inhibition of NMDA channels in native and recombinant receptors.

    PubMed

    Gavazzo, P; Gazzoli, A; Mazzolini, M; Marchetti, C

    2001-10-08

    NMDA channels are key targets for lead (Pb2+) neurotoxicity and Pb2+-induced inhibition of NMDA current is age- and subunit-dependent. In rat cerebellar granule cells maintained in high KCl, glycine affinity as well as sensitivity to ifenprodil change significantly with the days in vitro, indicating a reduction of NR2B subunit expression. Pb2+ blocked NMDA current with IC50 approximately 4 microM and this effect decreased significantly during the second week in vitro. In Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing recombinant NR1-NR2A, NR1-NR2B or NR1-NR2C receptors, Pb2+ inhibited glutamate-activated currents with IC50 of 3.3, 2.5 and 4.7 microM respectively. These data indicate that Pb2+ action is dependent on subunit composition and suggest that down-regulation of the NR2B subunit is correlated to a diminished sensitivity to Pb2+ inhibition.

  10. Studies on a novel macrophage-specific calmodulin binding glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Orlow, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The murine macrophage-like cell line J774 and peritoneal exudate cells elicited with thioglycollate or starch contain a major calmodulin-binding protein which is absent in trifluoperazine-resistant variants of J774, resident peritoneal macrophages and these elicited with concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, proteose peptone or Bacillus Clamette Guerin. Resident murine peritoneal cells maintained in tissue culture for 3 days begin to accumulate this protein as do human peripheral blood monocytes after 7 days of culture. A specific competitive displacement radioimmunoassay was developed using a rabbit antiserum raised to the partially purified calmodulin binding protein and (/sup 125/I) calmodulin covalently crosslinked to the principal calmodulin binding protein in the preparation. The radioimmunoassay confirmed the unique cellular distribution of this protein suggesting that it may be a marker for certain stages of macrophage differentiation. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared and one of these was used to further purify the protein by immunoaffinity chromatography. A protein of molecular weight 50,000 to 60,000 was isolated. It could be selectively adsorbed to wheat germ agglutinin agarose and subsequently eluted with N-acetyl glucosamine. This property plus its sensitivity to endoglycosidase F led to the conclusion that it is a glycoprotein. The cellular distribution, subcellular localization and evidence of glycosylation suggest that this protein may be a macrophage-specific receptor with a high affinity for calcium-calmodulin.

  11. LSD and DOB: interaction with 5-HT2A receptors to inhibit NMDA receptor-mediated transmission in the rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Arvanov, V L; Liang, X; Russo, A; Wang, R Y

    1999-09-01

    Both the phenethylamine hallucinogen (-)-1-2, 5-dimethoxy-4-bromophenyl-2-aminopropane (DOB), a selective serotonin 5-HT2A,2C receptor agonist, and the indoleamine hallucinogen D-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD, which binds to 5-HT1A, 1B, 1D, 1E, 1F, 2A, 2C, 5, 6, 7, dopamine D1 and D2, and alpha1 and alpha2 adrenergic receptors), but not their non-hallucinogenic congeners, inhibited N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced inward current and NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses evoked by electrical stimulation of the forceps minor in pyramidal cells of the prefrontal cortical slices. The inhibitory effect of hallucinogens was mimicked by 5-HT in the presence of selective 5-HT1A and 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. The inhibitory action of DOB, LSD and 5-HT on the NMDA transmission was blocked by the 5-HT2A receptor antagonists R-(+)-alpha-(2, 3-dimethoxyphenil)-1-[4-fluorophenylethyl]-4-piperidineme thanol (M100907) and ketanserin. However, at low concentrations, when both LSD and DOB by themselves only partially depressed the NMDA response, they blocked the inhibitory effect of 5-HT, suggesting a partial agonist action. Whereas N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulphonamide (W-7, a calmodulin antagonist) and N-[2-[[[3-(4'-chlorophenyl)- 2-propenyl]methylamino]methyl]phenyl]-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4'-methoxy-b enzenesulphonamide phosphate (KN-93, a Ca2+/CaM-KII inhibitor), but not the negative control 2-[N-4'methoxybenzenesulphonyl]amino-N-(4'-chlorophenyl)-2-propeny l-N -methylbenzylamine phosphate (KN-92), blocked the inhibitory action of LSD and DOB, the selective protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine was without any effect. We conclude that phenethylamine and indoleamine hallucinogens may exert their hallucinogenic effect by interacting with 5-HT2A receptors via a Ca2+/CaM-KII-dependent signal transduction pathway as partial agonists and modulating the NMDA receptors-mediated sensory, perceptual, affective and cognitive processes.

  12. Inhibition of oxytocin receptor function by direct binding of progesterone.

    PubMed

    Grazzini, E; Guillon, G; Mouillac, B; Zingg, H H

    1998-04-02

    The steroid hormone progesterone (P4) is essential for establishing and maintaining pregnancy in mammals. One of its functions includes maintenance of uterine quiescence by decreasing uterine sensitivity to the uterotonic peptide hormone oxytocin. Although it is generally held that steroid hormones such as P4 act at a genomic level by binding to nuclear receptors and modulating the expression of specific target genes, we show here that the effect of P4 on uterine sensitivity to oxytocin involves direct, non-genomic action of P4 on the uterine oxytocin receptor (OTR), a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. P4 inhibits oxytocin binding to OTR-containing membranes in vitro, binds with high affinity to recombinant rat OTR expressed in CHO cells, and suppresses oxytocin-induced inositol phosphate production and calcium mobilization. These effects are highly steroid- and receptor-specific, because binding and signalling functions of the closely related human OTR are not affected by P4 itself but by the P4 metabolite 5beta-dihydroprogesterone. Our findings provide the first evidence for a direct interaction between a steroid hormone and a G-protein-coupled receptor and define a new level of crosstalk between the peptide- and steroid-hormone signalling pathways.

  13. IGF-1 receptor inhibition by picropodophyllin in medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima-Hosoyama, Sachiko; Hosoyama, Tohru; Nelon, Laura D.; Keller, Charles

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Igf1r is overexpressed and activated in a Sonic Hedgehog driven model of medulloblastoma. {yields} Picropodophyllin targets and abrogates IGF signaling in medulloblastoma. {yields} Picropodophyllin inhibits medulloblastoma tumor cell growth by induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (Igf1r) is a multifunctional membrane-associated tyrosine kinase associated with regulation of transformation, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Increased IGF pathway activity has been reported in human and murine medulloblastoma. Tumors from our genetically-engineered medulloblastoma mouse model over-express Igf1r, and thus this mouse model is a good platform with which to study the role of Igf1r in tumor progression. We hypothesize that inhibition of IGF pathway in medulloblastoma can slow or inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. To test our hypothesis, we tested the role of IGF in tumor growth in vitro by treatment with the tyrosine kinase small molecule inhibitor, picropodophyllin (PPP), which strongly inhibits the IGF pathway. Our results demonstrate that PPP-mediated downregulation of the IGF pathway inhibits mouse tumor cell growth and induces apoptotic cell death in vitro in primary medulloblastoma cultures that are most reflective of tumor cell behavior in vivo.

  14. [MET receptor inhibition: Hope against resistance to targeted therapies?

    PubMed

    Hochart, Audrey; Leblond, Pierre; Le Bourhis, Xuefen; Meignan, Samuel; Tulasne, David

    2017-02-01

    Overcoming the drug resistance remains a crucial issue in cancer treatment. For refractory patients, the use of MET receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors seems to be hopeful. Indeed, important mechanisms underlying drug resistance argue for association of MET inhibitors with targeted therapies, both on first-line to prevent a primary resistance and on the second line to overcoming acquired resistance. Indeed, met gene amplification is the second most common alteration involved in acquired resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapies in non-small cells lung cancer (NSCLC). Hypoxia, for its part, can activate MET transcription and amplifies HGF signaling resulting in MET activation, which could be involved in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors escape. In HER2 positive breast cancers, MET amplification may also induce tumor cells a hatch escape, resulting in secondary resistance. Finally, some patients with BRAF mutated melanoma exhibit primary resistance to BRAF inhibition by stromal HGF (ligand of MET) secretion resulting in MET receptor activation. Experimental data highlight the role of MET in primary and secondary resistance and encourage combined treatments including MET inhibitors. In this context, several promising clinical trials are in progress in numerous cancers (NSCLC, melanoma, breast cancer, glioblastoma…) using combination of anti-MET and other specific therapies targeting EGFR, BRAF, VEGF or HER2. This review summarizes the potential benefits that MET inhibition should provide to patients with cancer refractory to targeted therapies.

  15. Intramuscular ketorolac inhibits activation of rat peripheral NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Brian E; Dong, Xu-Dong; Wong, Hayes; Svensson, Peter

    2012-06-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac has local anesthetic-like and peripheral N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist characteristics when administered at higher concentrations to masticatory muscle. It is not known if the ability to inhibit NMDA receptors is unique to diclofenac or shared by other NSAIDs. This study was undertaken to determine whether intramuscular injection of ketorolac or naproxen at concentrations that do not induce local anesthetic-like effects could attenuate jaw-closer muscle nociceptor discharge in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. It was found that ketorolac (5 mM) inhibited hypertonic saline-evoked nociceptor discharge, which suggests that at this concentration, ketorolac has local anesthetic-like properties. A lower concentration of ketorolac (0.5 mM), which did not affect hypertonic saline-evoked discharge, did inhibit nociceptor discharge evoked by NMDA. In contrast, naproxen (5 mM) did not alter hypertonic saline- or NMDA-evoked nociceptor discharge. Subsequent experiments revealed that ketorolac (0.5 mM) had no effect on nociceptor discharge evoked by αβ-methylene ATP, 5-hydroxytryptamine, or AMPA. The inhibitory effect of ketorolac did not appear to be related to cyclooxygenase inhibition, because the concentration of prostaglandin E(2) in the masticatory muscles 10 min after injection of either NSAID was not significantly decreased. The present study indicates that in vivo, ketorolac, but not naproxen, can antagonize NMDA-evoked nociceptor discharge similarly to diclofenac. We speculate that structural similarities between ketorolac and diclofenac could account for the ability of these NSAIDs to inhibit NMDA-evoked nociceptor discharge. These properties may partly explain the analgesic effect of intramuscularly injected ketorolac in the clinic.

  16. Dual Regulation of a Chimeric Plant Serine/Threonine Kinase by Calcium and Calcium/Calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Ramachandiran, S.; Paranjape, V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene characterized by a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain was recently cloned from plants. The Escherichia coli-expressed CCaMK phosphorylates various protein and peptide substrates in a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent manner. The calmodulin-binding region of CCAMK has similarity to the calmodulin-binding region of the alpha-subunit of multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII). CCaMK exhibits basal autophosphorylation at the threonine residue(s) (0.098 mol of P-32/mol) that is stimulated 3.4-fold by Ca(2+) (0.339 mol of P-32/mol), while calmodulin inhibits Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation to the basal level. A deletion mutant lacking the visinin-like domain did not show Ca(2+)-simulated autophosphorylation activity but retained Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity at a reduced level. Ca(2+)-dependent mobility shift assays using E.coli-expressed protein from residues 358-520 revealed that Ca(2+) binds to the visinin-like domain. Studies with site-directed mutants of the visinin-like domain indicated that EF-hands II and III are crucial for Ca(2+)-induced conformational changes in the visinin-like domain. Autophosphorylation of CCaMK increases Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity by about 5-fold, whereas it did not affect its C(2+)-independent activity. This report provides evidence for the existence of a protein kinase in plants that is modulated by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain in CCaMK adds an additional Ca(2+)-sensing mechanism not previously known to exist in the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling cascade in plants.

  17. Receptor-mediated stimulation of lipid signalling pathways in CHO cells elicits the rapid transient induction of the PDE1B isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated cAMP phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Spence, S; Rena, G; Sullivan, M; Erdogan, S; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells) do not exhibit any Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE1) activity. Challenge of CHO cells with agonists for endogenous P2-purinoceptors, lysophosphatidic acid receptors and thrombin receptors caused a similar rapid transient induction of PDE1 activity in each instance. This was also evident on noradrenaline challenge of a cloned CHO cell line transfected so as to overexpress alpha 1B-adrenoceptors. This novel PDE1 activity appeared within about 15 min of exposure to ligands, rose to a maximum value within 30 min to 1 h and then rapidly decreased. In each case, the expression of novel PDE1 activity was blocked by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D. Challenge with insulin of either native CHO cells or a CHO cell line transfected so as to overexpress the human insulin receptor failed to induce PDE1 activity. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses, using degenerate primers able to detect the PDE1C isoform, did not amplify any fragment from RNA preparations of CHO cells expressing PDE1 activity, although they did so from the human thyroid carcinoma FTC133 cell line. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses, using degenerate primers able to detect the PDE1A and PDE1B isoforms, successfully amplified a fragment of the predicted size from RNA preparations of both CHO cells expressing PDE1 activity and human Jurkat T-cells. Sequencing of the PCR products, generated using the PDE1A/B primers, yielded a novel sequence which, by analogy with sequences reported for bovine and murine PDE1B forms, suggests that the PDE1 species induced in CHO cells through protein kinase C activation and that expressed in Jurkat T-cells are PDE1B forms.

  18. Calmodulin is responsible for Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of TRPA1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Raquibul; Leeson-Payne, Alasdair T S; Jaggar, Jonathan H; Zhang, Xuming

    2017-03-23

    TRPA1 is a Ca(2+)-permeable ion channel involved in many sensory disorders such as pain, itch and neuropathy. Notably, the function of TRPA1 depends on Ca(2+), with low Ca(2+) potentiating and high Ca(2+) inactivating TRPA1. However, it remains unknown how Ca(2+) exerts such contrasting effects. Here, we show that Ca(2+) regulates TRPA1 through calmodulin, which binds to TRPA1 in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Calmodulin binding enhanced TRPA1 sensitivity and Ca(2+)-evoked potentiation of TRPA1 at low Ca(2+), but inhibited TRPA1 sensitivity and promoted TRPA1 desensitization at high Ca(2+). Ca(2+)-dependent potentiation and inactivation of TRPA1 were selectively prevented by disrupting the interaction of the carboxy-lobe of calmodulin with a calmodulin-binding domain in the C-terminus of TRPA1. Calmodulin is thus a critical Ca(2+) sensor enabling TRPA1 to respond to diverse Ca(2+) signals distinctly.

  19. Reflex inhibition of canine inspiratory intercostals by diaphragmatic tension receptors

    PubMed Central

    De Troyer, André; Brunko, Eric; Leduc, Dimitri; Jammes, Yves

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of phrenic afferent fibres in the dog elicits a reflex inhibition of efferent activity to the inspiratory intercostal muscles. However, electrical stimulation has a poor selectivity, so the sensory receptors responsible for this inhibition were not identified.In the present studies, cranial forces were applied during spontaneous inspiration to the abdominal surface of the central, tendinous portion of the canine diaphragm to activate tension mechanoreceptors in the muscle. Vagal afferent inputs were eliminated by vagotomy.The application of force to the central tendon caused a graded, reflex reduction in inspiratory intercostal activity, especially in external intercostal activity. This reduction was commonly associated with a decrease in inspiratory duration and was invariably attenuated after section of the cervical dorsal roots.In contrast, no change in inspiratory intercostal activity was seen when high frequency mechanical vibration was applied to the central tendon to stimulate diaphragmatic muscle spindles.These observations provide strong evidence that tension receptors in the diaphragm, but not muscle spindles, induce reflex inhibition of inspiratory intercostal activity. The expression of this reflex probably involves supraspinal structures. PMID:9831731

  20. GABAA receptor inhibition triggers a nicotinic neuroprotective mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ferchmin, P. A; Pérez, Dinely; Alvarez, William Castro; Penzo, Mario A.; Maldonado, Héctor M.; Eterovic, Vesna A.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated neuroprotection has been implicated in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and hypoxic ischemic events, as well as other diseases hallmarked by excitotoxic and apoptotic neuronal death. Several modalities of nicotinic neuroprotection have been reported. However, although this process generally involves α4β2 and α7 subtypes, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Interestingly, both activation and inhibition of α7 nAChRs have been reported to be neuroprotective. We have shown that inhibition of α7 nAChRs protects the function of acute hippocampal slices against excitotoxicity in a α4β2-dependent manner. Neuroprotection was assessed as the prevention of the NMDA-dependent loss of the area of population spikes (PSs) in the CA1 area of acute hippocampal slices. Our results support a model in which α7 AChRs control the release of GABA. Blocking either α7 or GABAA receptors reduces the inhibitory tone on cholinergic terminals, thereby promoting α4β2 activation, which in turn mediates neuroprotection. These results shed light on how α7 nAChR inhibition can be neuroprotective through a mechanism mediated by activation of α4β2 nAChRs. PMID:23280428

  1. Identification of spectrin as a calmodulin-binding component in the pituitary gonadotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Wooge, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide which stimulates the release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) from the pituitary. Ca{sup 2+} fulfills the requirements of a second messenger for this system. Inhibition of calmodulin will inhibit GnRH stimulated LH release. The aim of the present studies has been to identify the locus of action of calmodulin within the pituitary. By use of an {sup 125}I-calmodulin gel overlayer assay, five major Ca{sup 2+}-dependent {sup 125}I-calmodulin labelled components of subunit M{sub r} > 205,000; 200,000; 135,000; 60,000; and 52,000 have been identified. This labeling was found to be phenothiazine-sensitive. Ca{sup 2+}-independent binding that was observed appears to be due to hydrophobic interactions of calmodulin with acid-soluble proteins, principally histones. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent calmodulin-binding components are localized primarily in the cytosolic fraction. Separation of dispersed anterior pituitary cells through a linear Metrizamide gradient yielded gonadotrope-enriched fractions, which were found to contain all five {sup 125}I-calmodulin binding components corresponding to the major bands in the pituitary homogenate. The calmodulin-binding component levels do not appear to be differentially regulated by steroids. The calmodulin binding component with a M{sub r} > 205,000 has been identified as spectrin. Spectrin-like immunoreactivity and {sup 125}I-calmodulin-binding activity in pituitary tissue homogenates co-migrated in various percentage acrylamide gels with avian erythrocyte spectrin. Spectrin was detected in a gonadotrope-enriched fraction by immunoblotting, and confirmed in gonadotropes by indirect immunofluorescence of cultured pituitary cells in which spectrin- and LH-immunoreactivity co-localized.

  2. Influence of neurotropic compounds on the calmodulin- and troponin C-dependent processes

    SciTech Connect

    Baldenkov, G.N.; Men'shikov, M.Yu.; Feoktistov, I.A.; Tkachuk, V.A.

    1986-01-20

    An analysis was made of the effects of neurotropic compounds on the Ca-binding proteins - calmodulin and troponin C. It was shown that most of the neuroleptics of the phenothiazine group interact effectively both with calmodulin and with troponin C and also inhibit the calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase of cyclic nucleotides and calcium-activated actomyosin ATPase. Neuroleptics of the butyrophenone group, as well as imipramine and diphenhydramine, are capable of a low-efficiency interaction only with calmodulin. It was found that one of the phenothiazines - methophenazine, which is an effective inhibitor of calmodulin and calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase - does not affect troponin C and Ca-dependent actomyosin ATPase. As a result of this, methophenazine can serve as a convenient tool for studying processes regulated by these Ca-binding proteins. It was concluded that troponin C possesses Ca-dependent binding sites for drugs structurally similar to those of calmodulin but binding the drugs less effectively and exhibiting selectivity with respect to certain preparations. It was shown that despite the homology of the two Ca-binding proteins, calmodulin and troponin C, a selective action on the processes regulated by them is possible.

  3. Insulin-induced myosin light-chain phosphorylation during receptor capping in IM-9 human B-lymphoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Majercik, M H; Bourguignon, L Y

    1988-01-01

    We have examined further the interaction between insulin surface receptors and the cytoskeleton of IM-9 human lymphoblasts. Using immunocytochemical techniques, we determined that actin, myosin, calmodulin and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) are all accumulated directly underneath insulin-receptor caps. In addition, we have now established that the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ (as measured by fura-2 fluorescence) increases just before insulin-induced receptor capping. Most importantly, we found that the binding of insulin to its receptor induces phosphorylation of myosin light chain in vivo. Furthermore, a number of drugs known to abolish the activation properties of calmodulin, such as trifluoperazine (TFP) or W-7, strongly inhibit insulin-receptor capping and myosin light-chain phosphorylation. These data imply that an actomyosin cytoskeletal contraction, regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin and MLCK, is involved in insulin-receptor capping. Biochemical analysis in vitro has revealed that IM-9 insulin receptors are physically associated with actin and myosin; and most interestingly, the binding of insulin-receptor/cytoskeletal complex significantly enhances the phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chain. This insulin-induced phosphorylation is inhibited by calmodulin antagonists (e.g. TFP and W-7), suggesting that the phosphorylation is catalysed by MLCK. Together, these results strongly suggest that MLCK-mediated myosin light-chain phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the membrane-associated actomyosin contraction required for the collection of insulin receptors into caps. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:3048249

  4. Functional expression of chicken calmodulin in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Y; Anraku, Y

    1989-01-31

    The coding region of a chicken calmodulin cDNA was fused to a galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter, and an expression system was constructed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of calmodulin was demonstrated by purifying the heterologously expressed protein and analyzing its biochemical properties. When the expression plasmid was introduced into a calmodulin gene (cmd1)-disrupted strain of yeast, the cells grew in galactose medium, showing that chicken calmodulin could complement the lesion of yeast calmodulin functionally. Repression of chicken calmodulin in the (cmd1)-disrupted strain caused cell cycle arrest with a G2/M nucleus, as observed previously with a conditional-lethal mutant of yeast calmodulin. These results suggest that the essential function of calmodulin for cell proliferation is conserved in cells ranging from yeast to vertebrate cells.

  5. Alpha-2 adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition of thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Christopher J.; Tupone, Domenico; Cano, Georgina; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha2-adrenergic receptor (α2-AR) agonists have been use as anti-hypertensive agents, in the management of drug withdrawal, and as sedative analgesics. Since α2-AR agonists also influence the regulation of body temperature, we explored their potential as antipyretic agents. This study delineates the central neural substrate for the inhibition of rat brown adipose tissue (BAT) and shivering thermogenesis by α2-AR agonists. Nanoinjection of the α2-AR agonist, clonidine (1.2 nmol), into the rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa) inhibited BAT sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and BAT thermogenesis. Subsequent nanoinjection of the α2-AR antagonist, idazoxan (6nmol) into the rRPa reversed the clonidine-evoked inhibition of BAT SNA and BAT thermogenesis. Systemic administration of the α2-AR agonists, dexmedetomidine (25ug/kg, iv) or clonidine (100ug/kg, iv) inhibited shivering EMGs, BAT SNA and BAT thermogenesis effects that were reversed by nanoinjection of idazoxan (6nmol) into the rRPa. Dexmedetomidine (100µg/kg, ip) prevented and reversed lipopolysaccharide (10µg/kg ip)-evoked thermogenesis in free-behaving rats. Cholera toxin subunit b retrograde tracing from rRPa and pseudorabies virus transynaptic retrograde tracing from BAT combined with immunohistochemistry for catecholaminergic biosynthetic enzymes revealed the ventrolateral medulla as the source of catecholaminergic input to the rRPa and demonstrated that these catecholaminergic neurons are synaptically connected to BAT. Photostimulation of VLM neurons expressing of the PRSx8-ChR2-mCherry lentiviral vector inhibited BAT SNA via activation of α2-ARs in the rRPa. These results indicate a potent inhibition of BAT and shivering thermogenesis by α2-AR activation in the rRPa, and suggest a therapeutic potential of α2-AR agonists for reducing potentially-lethal elevations in body temperature during excessive fever. PMID:23365239

  6. Dopamine D1 receptor involvement in latent inhibition and overshadowing.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Andrew J D; Thur, Karen E; Cassaday, Helen J

    2012-11-01

    Latent inhibition (LI) manifests as poorer conditioning to a stimulus that has previously been experienced without consequence. There is good evidence of dopaminergic modulation of LI, as the effect is reliably disrupted by the indirect dopamine (DA) agonist amphetamine. The disruptive effects of amphetamine on LI are reversed by both typical and atypical antipsychotics, which on their own are able to facilitate LI. However, the contribution of different DA receptors to these effects is poorly understood. Amphetamine effects on another stimulus selection procedure, overshadowing, have been suggested to be D1-mediated. Thus, in the current experiments, we systematically investigated the role of D1 receptors in LI. First, we tested the ability of the full D1 agonist SKF 81297 to abolish LI and compared the effects of this drug on LI and overshadowing. Subsequently, we examined whether the D1 antagonist SCH 23390 can lead to the emergence of LI under conditions that do not produce the effect in normal animals (weak pre-exposure). Finally, we tested the ability of SCH 23390 to block amphetamine-induced disruption of LI. We found little evidence that direct stimulation of D1 receptors abolishes LI (although there was some attenuation of LI at 0.4 mg/kg SKF 81297). Similarly, SCH 23390 failed to enhance LI. However, SCH 23390 did block amphetamine-induced disruption of LI. These data indicate that, while LI may be unaffected by selective manipulation of activity at D1 receptors, the effects of amphetamine on LI are to some extent dependent on actions at D1 receptors.

  7. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    SciTech Connect

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  8. Uptake and binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Elgavish, A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the interaction of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) using an experimental protocol which allows us to distinguish between ligand binding to the outside of the vesicles vs. uptake and possible binding to the vesicle interior. By examining the association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with BBV as a function of medium osmolarity (300-1100 mosm) to alter intravesicular space, virtually all ligand interaction with BBV was found to represent uptake of intact /sup 125/I-calmodulin into the intravesicular space. Uptake appeared specific by the following criteria: (1) it was largely calcium dependent (2) it was inhibited in a dose dependent fashion by calmodulin and the homologous protein troponin C, but not by unrelated proteins (lysozyme, cytochrome C, insulin) (3) it was inhibited by known calmodulin antagonists (calmidazolium, mellitin, trifluoperazine). Calmodulin uptake may be followed by binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin to intravesicular BBV proteins; calmodulin-binding proteins in BBV with molecular weights of 143K, 118K, 50K, 47.5K, 46.5K and 35K were identified by Western blotting techniques. The specific association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated BBV is of interest in regard to the possible role of this calcium regulatory protein in the protein reabsorptive and ion transport functions of this renal tubular membrane fraction.

  9. Role of Calmodulin in Cell Proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafouleas, J.

    1983-01-01

    Calmodulin levels were found to increase as cells enter plateau. The data suggest that the cells are exiting the cell cycle late in the G sub 1 phase, or that the calmodulin levels in plateau cells are uncoupled to progression into S phase in plateau cells. Upon release, calmodulin levels rapidly decrease. Following this decrease, there is a increase prior to S phase.

  10. Discoidin domain receptor 2 inhibits fibrillogenesis of collagen type 1.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Cosmin; Iscru, Daniel F; Druhan, Lawrence J; Elton, Terry S; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2006-09-01

    Discoidin domain receptors (DDR1 and DDR2) are widely expressed cell-surface receptors, which bind to and are activated by collagens, including collagen type 1. Activation of DDRs and the resulting downstream signaling is known to regulate the extracellular matrix. However, little is known about how DDRs interact with collagen and its direct impact on collagen regulation. Here, we have established that by binding to collagen, the extracellular domain (ECD) of DDR2 inhibits collagen fibrillogenesis and alters the morphology of collagen type 1 fibers. Our in vitro assays utilized DDR2-Fc fusion proteins, which contain only the ECD of DDR2. Using surface plasmon resonance, we confirmed that further oligomerization of DDR2-Fc (by means of anti-Fc antibody) greatly enhances its binding to immobilized collagen type 1. Collagen turbidity measurements and biochemical assays indicated that DDR2 delays the formation of collagen fibrils. Atomic force microscopy of soluble collagen revealed that a predominately monomeric state of collagen was present with DDR2, while control solutions had an abundance of polymeric collagen. Transmission electron microscopy of collagen fibers, showed that the native periodic banded structure of collagen fibers was weakened and nearly absent in the presence of DDR2. Further, using a cell-based assay we demonstrate that overexpression of full length DDR2 inhibits fibrillogenesis of collagen type 1. Our results demonstrate a novel and important functional role of the DDR2 ECD that may contribute to collagen regulation via modulation of fibrillogenesis.

  11. Argos inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor signalling by ligand sequestration.

    PubMed

    Klein, Daryl E; Nappi, Valerie M; Reeves, Gregory T; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Lemmon, Mark A

    2004-08-26

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has critical functions in development and in many human cancers. During development, the spatial extent of EGFR signalling is regulated by feedback loops comprising both well-understood activators and less well-characterized inhibitors. In Drosophila melanogaster the secreted protein Argos functions as the only known extracellular inhibitor of EGFR, with clearly identified roles in multiple stages of development. Argos is only expressed when the Drosophila EGFR (DER) is activated at high levels, and downregulates further DER signalling. Although there is ample genetic evidence that Argos inhibits DER activation, the biochemical mechanism has not been established. Here we show that Argos inhibits DER signalling without interacting directly with the receptor, but instead by sequestering the DER-activating ligand Spitz. Argos binds tightly to the EGF motif of Spitz and forms a 1:1 (Spitz:Argos) complex that does not bind DER in vitro or at the cell surface. Our results provide an insight into the mechanism of Argos function, and suggest new strategies for EGFR inhibitor design.

  12. Inhibition of vitamin d receptor translocation by cigarette smoking extracts.

    PubMed

    Uh, Soo-Taek; Koo, So-My; Kim, Yang Ki; Kim, Ki Up; Park, Sung Woo; Jang, An Soo; Kim, Do Jin; Kim, Yong Hoon; Park, Choon Sik

    2012-11-01

    Vitamin D can translocate a vitamin D receptor (VDR) from the nucleus to the cell membranes. The meaning of this translocation is not elucidated in terms of a role in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) till now. VDR deficient mice are prone to develop emphysema, suggesting that abnormal function of VDR might influence a generation of COPD. The blood levels of vitamin D have known to be well correlated with that of lung function in patients with COPD, and smoking is the most important risk factor in development of COPD. This study was performed to investigate whether cigarette smoke extracts (CSE) can inhibit the translocation of VDR and whether mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are involved in this inhibition. Human alveolar basal epithelial cell line (A549) was used in this study. 1,25-(OH(2))D(3) and/or MAPKs inhibitors and antioxidants were pre-incubated before stimulation with 10% CSE, and then nucleus and microsomal proteins were extracted for a Western blot of VDR. Five minutes treatment of 1,25-(OH(2))D(3) induced translocation of VDR from nucleus to microsomes by a dose-dependent manner. CSE inhibited 1,25-(OH(2))D(3)-induced translocation of VDR in both concentrations of 10% and 20%. All MAPKs inhibitors did not suppress the inhibitory effects of CSE on the 1,25-(OH(2))D(3)-induced translocation of VDR. Quercetin suppressed the inhibitory effects of CSE on the 1,25-(OH(2))D(3)-induced translocation of VDR, but not in n-acetylcysteine. CSE has an ability to inhibit vitamin D-induced VDR translocation, but MAPKs are not involved in this inhibition.

  13. Heparin blocks /sup 125/I-calmodulin internalization by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Elgavish, A.; Roden, L.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-03-05

    /sup 125/I-Calmodulin is internalized by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) in a time, temperature and calcium dependent manner. Internalization of /sup 125/I-calmodulin into the osmotically sensitive space of BBV was distinguished from binding of the ligand to the outer BBV surface by examining the interaction of ligand and BBV at different medium osmolarities (300-1100 mosm), uptake was inversely proportional to medium osmolarity. Internalized /sup 125/I-calmodulin was intact and Western blots of solubilized BBV with /sup 125/I-calmodulin demonstrated the presence of several calmodulin-binding proteins of 143, 118, 50, 47.5, 46.5 and 35 kilodaltons which could represent potential intravesicular binding sites for the ligand. Heparin and the related glycosaminoglycan heparin sulfate both showed a dose-dependent inhibition (0.5-50 ..mu..g/ml) of /sup 125/I-calmodulin uptake by BBV, but other sulfated and nonsulfated glycosaminoglycans including chondroitin sulfates, keratan sulfate and hyaluronic acid showed little or no inhibitory effect. Desulfation of heparin virtually abolished the inhibition of uptake while depolymerization reduced it. Heparin did not block the binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin to BBV proteins as assessed by Western blotting technique suggesting its effect was on internalization of the ligand rather than on its association with internal membrane proteins.

  14. Inhibition of D4 Dopamine Receptors on Insulin Receptor Expression and Effect in Renal Proximal Tubule Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Ren, Hongmei; Lu, Xi; He, Duofen; Han, Yu; Wang, Hongyong; Zeng, Chunyu; Shi, Weibin

    2016-04-22

    Ion transport in the renal proximal tubule (RPT), which is increased in essential hypertension, is regulated by numerous hormones and humoral factors, including insulin and dopamine. Activation of dopamine receptor inhibits sodium reabsorption, whereas activation of insulin receptor increases sodium reabsorption in RPTs, and hyperinsulinemic animals and patients have defective renal dopaminergic system. We presume that there is an inhibition of D4 receptor on insulin receptor expression and effect, and the regulation is lost in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Insulin receptor expression was determined by immunoblotting, and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity was detected in both Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and SHR RPT cells. Stimulation of D4 receptor with PD168077 decreased expression of insulin receptors, which was blocked in the presence of the calcium-channel blocker, nicardipine (10(-6) mol/L per 24 hours), in cell culture medium without calcium or in the presence of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor blocker (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate [2-ADB]; 10(-6) mol/L per 24 hours), indicating that extracellular calcium entry and calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum were involved in the signal pathway. Stimulation of the insulin receptor stimulated Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, whereas pretreatment with PD168077 for 24 hours decreased the inhibitory effects of insulin receptor on Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in WKY cells. However, in SHR cells, inhibition of D4 receptor on insulin receptor expression and effect were lost. Activation of D4 receptor inhibits insulin receptor expression in RPT cells from WKY rats. The aberrant inhibition of D4 receptor on insulin receptor expression and effect might be involved in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  15. Inhibition of Rotavirus Infectivity by a Neoglycolipid Receptor Mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Bergner, Daniel W.; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B.; Hanafin, William P.; Firkins, Lawrence D.; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses are a major cause of diarrhea in the young of many mammalian species. In rotavirus infected piglets mortality can be as high as 60%. Previous research in this laboratory has identified a porcine intestinal GM3 ganglioside receptor that is required for sialic acid-dependent rotavirus recognition of host cells. In addition, we previously demonstrated exogenously added GM3 can competitively inhibit porcine rotavirus binding and infectivity of host cells in vitro. Sialyllactose, the carbohydrate moiety of GM3, is approximately 3 orders of magnitude less effective than GM3 at inhibiting rotavirus binding to cells. Furthermore, production of therapeutic quantities of GM3 ganglioside for use as an oral carbomimetic in swine is cost prohibitive. In an effort to circumvent these problems, a sialyllactose-containing neoglycolipid was synthesized and evaluated for its ability to inhibit rotavirus binding and infectivity of host cells. Sialyllactose was coupled to dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (PE) by reductive amination and the product (SLPE) purified by HPLC. Characterization of the product showed a single primulin (lipid) and resorcinol (sialic acid) positive band by thin layer chromatography and quantification of phosphate and sialic acid yielded a 1:1 molar ratio. Mass spectroscopy confirmed a molecular weight coinciding with SLPE. Concentration-dependent binding of rotavirus to SLPE was demonstrated using a thin-layer overlay assay. Using concentrations comparable to GM3, SLPE was also shown to inhibit rotavirus binding to host cells by 80%. Furthermore, SLPE was shown to decrease rotavirus infection of host cells by over 90%. Finally, preliminary results of in vivo animal challenge studies using newborn piglets in their natural environment, demonstrated SLPE afforded complete protection from rotavirus disease. The efficacy of SLPE in inhibiting rotavirus binding and infection in vitro and in vivo, coupled with its relatively low-cost, large

  16. Purification and characterization of calmodulin (lysine 115) N-methyltransferase from Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Pech, L L; Nelson, D L

    1994-03-02

    Calmodulin (lysine 115) N-methyltransferase was purified from the cytosolic fraction of Paramecium tetraurelia by sequential dialysis, cellulose phosphate chromatography, Reactive Red 120 agarose chromatography, and calmodulin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The enzyme was purified 6800-fold with a 15% yield. SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified enzyme invariably revealed a major protein of 37 kDa that was reproducibly obtained and minor proteins of 35 and 28 kDa that were sometimes obtained in variable yields. The enzyme formed a mixture of mono-, di-, and trimethyllysine residues at lysine 115 of calmodulin in vitro, had a Km for the methyl donor, S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet), of about 1 microM and a pH optimum of about 7.5. The purified enzyme had an absolute requirement for the reductant DTT for activity, whereas the enzyme in crude fractions did not. The enzyme is a monomer with an estimated molecular mass of 33 kDa. Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, and Ni2+ stimulated calmodulin N-methyltransferase activity but Zn2+ did not. Calmodulin N-methyltransferase was inhibited by its reaction product S-adenosyl homocysteine (SAH), but not by sinefungin and tubercidin. The calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium and mellitin were inhibitory but W7 was not. The enzyme was not stimulated by Triton X-100 nor by NaCl. Only calmodulins with an unmethylated lysine at residue 115, including cam2 calmodulin, were substrates. Histones and calcium-binding proteins from Paramecium other than calmodulin did not act as substrates for the purified calmodulin N-methyltransferase and no other substrates in the cytosolic fraction were observed.

  17. Psychotropic and Nonpsychotropic Cannabis Derivatives Inhibit Human 5-HT3A receptors through a Receptor Desensitization-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Morton, Russell; Zhang, Li

    2011-01-01

    Δ9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the principal psychoactive and non-psychoactive components of cannabis. While most THC-induced behavioral effects are thought to depend on endogenous cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors, the molecular targets for CBD remain unclear. Here, we report that CBD and THC inhibited the function of human 5-HT3A receptors (h5-HT3ARs) expressed in HEK 293 cells. The magnitude of THC and CBD inhibition was maximal 5 min after a continuous incubation with cannabinoids. The EC50 values for CBD and THC-induced inhibition were 110 nM and 322 nM respectively in HEK 293 cells expressing h5-HT3ARs. In these cells, CBD and THC did not stimulate specific [35S]-GTP-γs binding in membranes, suggesting that the inhibition by cannabinoids is unlikely mediated by a G-protein dependent mechanism. On the other hand, both CBD and THC accelerated receptor desensitization kinetics without significantly changing activation time. The extent of cannabinoid inhibition appeared to depend on receptor desensitization. Reducing receptor desensitization by nocodazole, 5-hydroxyindole and a point-mutation in the large cytoplasmic domain of the receptor significantly decreased CBD-induced inhibition. Similarly, the magnitude of THC and CBD-induced inhibition varied with the apparent desensitization rate of h5-HT3ARs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. For instance, with increasing amount of h5-HT3AR cRNA injected into the oocytes, the receptor desensitization rate at steady state decreased. THC and CBD-induced inhibition was correlated with the change in the receptor desensitization rate. Thus, CBD and THC inhibit h5-HT3A receptors through a mechanism that is dependent on receptor desensitization. PMID:21477640

  18. Energetics of Calmodulin Domain Interactions with the Calmodulin Binding Domain of CaMKII

    PubMed Central

    Evans, T. Idil Apak; Shea, Madeline A.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential eukaryotic calcium receptor that regulates many kinases, including CaMKII. Calcium-depleted CaM does not bind to CaMKII under physiological conditions. However, binding of (Ca2+)4-CaM to a basic amphipathic helix in CaMKII releases auto-inhibition of the kinase. The crystal structure of CaM bound to CaMKIIp, a peptide representing the CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) of CaMKII, shows an anti-parallel interface: the C-domain of CaM primarily contacts the N-terminal half of the CaMBD. The two domains of calcium-saturated CaM are believed to play distinct roles in releasing auto-inhibition. To investigate the underlying mechanism of activation, calcium-dependent titrations of isolated domains of CaM binding to CaMKIIp were monitored using fluorescence anisotropy. The binding affinity of CaMKIIp for the domains of CaM increased upon saturation with calcium, with a 35-fold greater increase observed for the C-domain than the N-domain. Because the interdomain linker of CaM regulates calcium-binding affinity and contribute to conformational change, the role of each CaM domain was explored further by investigating effects of CaMKIIp on site-knockout mutants affecting the calcium-binding sites of a single domain. Investigation of the thermodynamic linkage between saturation of individual calcium-binding sites and CaM-domain binding to CaMKIIp showed that calcium binding to sites III and IV was sufficient to recapitulate the behavior of (Ca2+)4-CaM. The magnitude of favorable interdomain cooperativity varied depending on which of the four calcium-binding sites were mutated, emphasizing differential regulatory roles for the domains of CaM, despite the high degree of homology among the four EF-hands of CaM. PMID:19089983

  19. Secreted calmodulin-like skin protein ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaaki; Tajima, Hirohisa; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2014-06-18

    Humanin, a short bioactive peptide, inhibits cell death in a variety of cell-based death models through Humanin receptors in vitro. In vivo, Humanin ameliorates both muscarinic receptor antagonist-induced memory impairment in normal mice and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-relevant mouse models including aged transgenic mice expressing a familial AD-linked gene. Recently, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP) has been shown to be secreted from skin tissues, contain a region minimally similar to the core region of Humanin, and inhibit AD-related neuronal death through the heterotrimeric Humanin receptor on the cell surface in vitro. As CLSP is much more potent than Humanin and efficiently transported through blood circulation across the blood-brain barrier to the central nervous system, CLSP is considered as a physiological agonist that binds to the heterotrimeric Humanin receptor and triggers the Humanin-induced signals in central nervous system. However, it remains unknown whether CLSP ameliorates memory impairment in mouse dementia models as Humanin does. In this study, we show that recombinant CLSP, administered intracerebroventricularly or intraperitoneally, ameliorates scopolamine-induced dementia in mice.

  20. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Werthwein, S; Zentner, J

    1999-01-01

    Stimulation-evoked 3H-noradrenaline release in human cerebrocortical slices was inhibited by histamine (in a manner sensitive to clobenpropit) and by imetit, suggesting H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in human brain.

  1. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Yang, Yong

    2014-10-03

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers.

  2. Targeting of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Colbran, Roger J

    2004-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has diverse roles in virtually all cell types and it is regulated by a plethora of mechanisms. Local changes in Ca2+ concentration drive calmodulin binding and CaMKII activation. Activity is controlled further by autophosphorylation at multiple sites, which can generate an autonomously active form of the kinase (Thr286) or can block Ca2+/calmodulin binding (Thr305/306). The regulated actions of protein phosphatases at these sites also modulate downstream signalling from CaMKII. In addition, CaMKII targeting to specific subcellular microdomains appears to be necessary to account for the known signalling specificity, and targeting is regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin and autophosphorylation. The present review focuses on recent studies revealing the diversity of CaMKII interactions with proteins localized to neuronal dendrites. Interactions with various subunits of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) subtype of glutamate receptor have attracted the most attention, but binding of CaMKII to cytoskeletal and several other regulatory proteins has also been reported. Recent reports describing the molecular basis of each interaction and their potential role in the normal regulation of synaptic transmission and in pathological situations are discussed. These studies have revealed fundamental regulatory mechanisms that are probably important for controlling CaMKII functions in many cell types. PMID:14653781

  3. Hereditary Angioedema Therapy: Kallikrein Inhibition and Bradykinin Receptor Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Current strategies for the treatment of hereditary angioedema (HAE) include targeted inhibition or antagonism of the contact system, which is dysregulated in HAE patients by a C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency. Ecallantide, a plasma kallikrein inhibitor, and icatibant, a selective bradykinin-2 receptor antagonist, have recently been evaluated in clinical studies for the treatment of acute HAE attacks. Both drugs have demonstrated evidence of efficacy and safety in treating acute HAE episodes, with ecallantide approved for use in the United States and icatibant approved for use in Europe. As therapeutic options for HAE expand for both for prophylactic and acute treatment strategies, a number of patient-specific and drug-specific factors have emerged as important considerations when developing individualized HAE management plans. Optimization of HAE therapy will require further integration of new therapies into the current treatment paradigm. PMID:23282868

  4. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor SHP Inhibits Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 and Retinoid X Receptor Transactivation: Two Mechanisms for Repression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon-Kwang; Dell, Helen; Dowhan, Dennis H.; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita; Moore, David D.

    2000-01-01

    The orphan nuclear hormone receptor SHP interacts with a number of other nuclear hormone receptors and inhibits their transcriptional activity. Several mechanisms have been suggested to account for this inhibition. Here we show that SHP inhibits transactivation by the orphan receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) and the retinoid X receptor (RXR) by at least two mechanisms. SHP interacts with the same HNF-4 surface recognized by transcriptional coactivators and competes with them for binding in vivo. The minimal SHP sequences previously found to be required for interaction with other receptors are sufficient for interaction with HNF-4, although deletion results indicate that additional C-terminal sequences are necessary for full binding and coactivator competition. These additional sequences include those associated with direct transcriptional repressor activity of SHP. SHP also competes with coactivators for binding to ligand-activated RXR, and based on the ligand-dependent interaction with other nuclear receptors, it is likely that coactivator competition is a general feature of SHP-mediated repression. The minimal receptor interaction domain of SHP is sufficient for full interaction with RXR, as previously described. This domain is also sufficient for full coactivator competition. Functionally, however, full inhibition of RXR transactivation requires the presence of the C-terminal repressor domain, with only weak inhibition associated with this receptor interaction domain. Overall, these results suggest that SHP represses nuclear hormone receptor-mediated transactivation via two separate steps: first by competition with coactivators and then by direct effects of its transcriptional repressor function. PMID:10594021

  5. Oxidation of calmodulin alters activation and regulation of CaMKII.

    PubMed

    Robison, A J; Winder, Danny G; Colbran, Roger J; Bartlett, Ryan K

    2007-04-27

    Increases in reactive oxygen species and mis-regulation of calcium homeostasis are associated with various physiological conditions and disease states including aging, ischemia, exposure to drugs of abuse, and neurodegenerative diseases. In aged animals, this is accompanied by a reduction in oxidative repair mechanisms resulting in increased methionine oxidation of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin in the brain. Here, we show that oxidation of calmodulin results in an inability to: (1) activate CaMKII; (2) support Thr(286) autophosphorylation of CaMKII; (3) prevent Thr(305/6) autophosphorylation of CaMKII; (4) support binding of CaMKII to the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor; and (5) compete with alpha-actinin for binding to CaMKII. Moreover, oxidized calmodulin does not efficiently bind calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in rat brain lysates or in vitro. These observations contrast from past experiments performed with oxidized calmodulin and the plasma membrane calcium ATPase, where oxidized calmodulin binds to, and partially activates the PMCA. When taken together, these data suggest that oxidative stress may perturb neuronal and cardiac function via a decreased ability of oxidized calmodulin to bind, activate, and regulate the interactions of CaMKII.

  6. Food restriction increases NMDA receptor-mediated calcium-calmodulin kinase II and NMDA receptor/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2-mediated cyclic amp response element-binding protein phosphorylation in nucleus accumbens upon D-1 dopamine receptor stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Haberny, S L; Carr, K D

    2005-01-01

    Biological drive states exert homeostatic control in part by increasing the reinforcing effects of environmental incentive stimuli. An apparent by-product of this adaptive response is the enhanced acquisition of drug self-administration behavior in food-restricted (FR) animals. While previous research has demonstrated increased central sensitivity to rewarding effects of abused drugs and direct dopamine (DA) receptor agonists in FR subjects, the underlying neurobiology is not well understood. Recently, it was demonstrated that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of the D-1 DA receptor agonist, SKF-82958 produces a stronger activation of striatal extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in FR relative to ad libitum (AL) fed rats. The main purpose of the present study was to characterize the involvement and mechanisms of interaction between NMDA receptor function and the augmented cellular responses to D-1 DA receptor stimulation in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of FR rats. In experiment 1, Western immunoblotting was used to demonstrate that i.c.v. injection of SKF-82958 (20 microg) produces greater phosphorylation of the NMDA NR1 subunit and calcium-calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II) in NAc of FR as compared with AL rats. In experiment 2, pretreatment of subjects with the NMDA antagonist, MK-801 (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased SKF-82958-induced activation of CaMK II, ERK1/2 and CREB, and reversed the augmenting effect of FR on activation of all three proteins. In experiment 3, pretreatment with the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor SL-327 (60 mg/kg, i.p.) suppressed SKF-82958- induced activation of ERK1/2 and reversed the augmenting effect of FR on CREB activation. These results point to specific neuroadaptations in the NAc of FR rats whereby D-1 DA receptor stimulation leads to increased NMDA NR1 subunit phosphorylation and consequent increases in NMDA receptor-dependent CaMK II and ERK1

  7. Morphine inhibits an alpha9-acetylcholine nicotinic receptor-mediated response by a mechanism which does not involve opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Lioudyno, M I; Verbitsky, M; Holt, J C; Elgoyhen, A B; Guth, P S

    2000-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors are known to be targets for modulation by a number of substances, including the opiates. It is known that acetylcholine (ACh) coexists with opioid peptides in cochlear efferent neurons, and such a colocalization has been proposed for the vestibular system. In the present study we test the hypothesis that morphine, an opioid receptor agonist with a broad spectrum of selectivity, modulates alpha9nACh receptor-mediated responses in frog vestibular hair cells. Morphine dose-dependently and reversibly inhibited ACh-induced currents as recorded by the perforated patch-clamp method. In the presence of morphine the ACh dose-response curve was shifted to the right in a parallel fashion, suggesting a competitive interaction. However, naloxone did not antagonize the inhibition produced by morphine. To test the hypothesis that morphine could interact with the alpha9nACh receptor without the involvement of opioid receptors, experiments were performed using Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with the alpha9nACh receptor cRNA. The currents activated by ACh in Xenopus oocytes, a system that lacks opioid receptors, were also dose-dependently inhibited by morphine. We conclude that morphine inhibits the alpha9nACh receptor-mediated response in hair cells and Xenopus oocytes through a mechanism which does not involve opioid receptors but may be a direct block of the alpha9nACh receptor.

  8. Human Diversity in a Cell Surface Receptor that Inhibits Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Anu; Leite, Mara; Kulasekara, Bridget R; Altura, Melissa A; Ogahara, Cassandra; Weiss, Eli; Fu, Wenqing; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; O'Keeffe, Michael; Terhorst, Cox; Akey, Joshua M; Miller, Samuel I

    2016-07-25

    Mutations in genes encoding autophagy proteins have been associated with human autoimmune diseases, suggesting that diversity in autophagy responses could be associated with disease susceptibility or severity. A cellular genome-wide association study (GWAS) screen was performed to explore normal human diversity in responses to rapamycin, a microbial product that induces autophagy. Cells from several human populations demonstrated variability in expression of a cell surface receptor, CD244 (SlamF4, 2B4), that correlated with changes in rapamycin-induced autophagy. High expression of CD244 and receptor activation with its endogenous ligand CD48 inhibited starvation- and rapamycin-induced autophagy by promoting association of CD244 with the autophagy complex proteins Vps34 and Beclin-1. The association of CD244 with this complex reduced Vps34 lipid kinase activity. Lack of CD244 is associated with auto-antibody production in mice, and lower expression of human CD244 has previously been implicated in severity of human rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, indicating that increased autophagy as a result of low levels of CD244 may alter disease outcomes.

  9. Solubilized placental membrane protein inhibits insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Strout, H.V. Jr.; Slater, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    Regulation of insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase (TK) activity may be important in modulating insulin action. Utilizing an assay which measures IR phosphorylation of angiotensin II (AII), the authors investigated whether fractions of TX-100 solubilized human placental membranes inhibited IR dependent AII phosphorylation. Autophosphorylated IR was incubated with membrane fractions before the addition of AII, and kinase inhibition measured by the loss of TSP incorporated in AII. An inhibitory activity was detected which was dose, time, and temperature dependent. The inhibitor was purified 200-fold by sequential chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin, DEAE, and hydroxyapatite. This inhibitory activity was found to correlate with an 80 KD protein which was electroeluted from preparative slab gels and rabbit antiserum raised. Incubation of membrane fractions with antiserum before the IRTK assay immunoprecipitated the inhibitor. Protein immunoblots of crude or purified fractions revealed only the 80 KD protein. Since IR autophosphorylation is crucial to IRTK activity, the authors investigated the state of IR autophosphorylation after treatment with inhibitor; no change was detected by phosphoamino acid analysis.

  10. Evidence of a role for calmodulin in the regulation of calcium release from skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, G.

    1986-01-14

    The effect of calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors on the Ca2+ release channel of heavy skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles was investigated. SR vesicles were passively loaded with 45Ca2+ in the presence of calmodulin and its inhibitors, followed by measurement of 45Ca2+ release rates by means of a rapid-quench-Millipore filtration method. Calmodulin at a concentration of 2-10 microM reduced 45Ca2+ efflux rates from passively loaded vesicles by a factor of 2-3 in media containing 10(-6)-10(-3) M Ca2+. At 10(-9) M Ca2+, calmodulin was without effect. 45Ca2+ release rates were varied 1000-fold (k1 approximately equal to 0.1-100 s-1) by using 10(-5) M Ca2+ with either Mg2+ or the ATP analogue adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-methylenetriphosphate) in the release medium. In all instances, a similar 2-3-fold reduction in release rates was observed. At 10(-5) M Ca2+, 45Ca2+ release was half-maximally inhibited by about 2 X 10(-7) M calmodulin, and this inhibition was reversible. Heavy SR vesicle fractions contained 0.1-02 micrograms of endogenous calmodulin/mg of vesicle protein. However, the calmodulin inhibitors trifluoperazine, calmidazolium, and compound 48/80 were without significant effect on 45Ca2+ release at concentrations which inhibit calmodulin-mediated reactions in other systems. Studies with actively loaded vesicles also suggested that heavy SR vesicles contain a Ca2+ permeation system that is inhibited by calmodulin.

  11. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition by regorafenib/sorafenib inhibits growth and invasion of meningioma cells.

    PubMed

    Tuchen, Marcus; Wilisch-Neumann, Annette; Daniel, Evelyn A; Baldauf, Lisa; Pachow, Doreen; Scholz, Johannes; Angenstein, Frank; Stork, Oliver; Kirches, Elmar; Mawrin, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Systemic chemotherapeutic treatment for unresectable and/or aggressive meningiomas is still unsatisfying. PDGF receptor (PDGFR)-mediated activation of mitogenic signalling has been shown to be active in meningiomas. Therefore, we evaluate in vitro and in vivo the effects of inhibiting PDGFR using the clinically well-characterised tyrosine kinase inhibitors sorafenib or regorafenib in meningioma models. IOMM-Lee meningioma cells were used to assess cytotoxic effects, inhibition of proliferation, induction of apoptosis, as well as inhibition of migration and motility by sorafenib and regorafenib. Using an orthotopic mouse xenograft model, growth inhibition as monitored by magnetic resonance imaging, and overall survival of sorafenib- or regorafenib-treated mice compared with control animals was determined. Treatment of malignant IOMM-Lee cells resulted in significantly reduced cell survival and induction of apoptosis following regorafenib and sorafenib treatment. Western blots showed that both drugs target phosphorylation of p44/42 ERK via downregulation of the PDGFR. Both drugs additionally showed significant inhibition of cell motility and invasion. In vivo, mice with orthotopic meningioma xenografts showed a reduced volume (n.s.) of signal enhancement in MRI (mainly tumour) following sorafenib and regorafenib treatment. This was translated in a significantly increased overall survival time (p ≤ 0.05) for regorafenib-treated mice. Analyses of in vivo-grown tumours demonstrated again reduced PDGFR expression and expression/phosphorylation of p44/42. Sorafenib and regorafenib show antitumour activity in vitro and in vivo by targeting PDGFR and p44/42 ERK signalling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Trace amines inhibit insect odorant receptor function through antagonism of the co-receptor subunit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sisi; Luetje, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Many insect behaviors are driven by olfaction, making insect olfactory receptors (ORs) appealing targets for insect control.  Insect ORs are odorant-gated ion channels, with each receptor thought to be composed of a representative from a large, variable family of odorant binding subunits and a highly conserved co-receptor subunit (Orco), assembled in an unknown stoichiometry.  Synthetic Orco directed agonists and antagonists have recently been identified.  Several Orco antagonists have been shown to act via an allosteric mechanism to inhibit OR activation by odorants.  The high degree of conservation of Orco across insect species results in Orco antagonists having broad activity at ORs from a variety of insect species and suggests that the binding site for Orco ligands may serve as a modulatory site for compounds endogenous to insects or may be a target of exogenous compounds, such as those produced by plants.  To test this idea, we screened a series of biogenic and trace amines, identifying several as Orco antagonists.  Of particular interest were tryptamine, a plant-produced amine, and tyramine, an amine endogenous to the insect nervous system.  Tryptamine was found to be a potent antagonist of Orco, able to block Orco activation by an Orco agonist and to allosterically inhibit activation of ORs by odorants.  Tyramine had effects similar to those of tryptamine, but was less potent.  Importantly, both tryptamine and tyramine displayed broad activity, inhibiting odorant activation of ORs of species from three different insect orders (Diptera, Lepidoptera and Coleoptera), as well as odorant activation of six diverse ORs from a single species (the human malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae).  Our results suggest that endogenous and exogenous natural compounds serve as Orco ligands modulating insect olfaction and that Orco can be an important target for the development of novel insect repellants. PMID:25075297

  13. 5-hydroxytryptamine2C receptor activation inhibits 5-hydroxytryptamine1B-like receptor function via arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Berg, K A; Maayani, S; Clarke, W P

    1996-10-01

    We previously reported that in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1B-like (CHO/5-HT1B) receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation is inhibited by activation of transfected human 5-HT2C receptors but not 5-HT2A receptors. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism involved in the regulation of receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase as a means to further elucidate differences between the signal transduction cascades of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor subtypes. Activation of 5-HT2C receptors with 5-HT or (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane increased release of arachidonic acid via a phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-dependent mechanism. Incubation with (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (1 microM) abolished 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5 nM)-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, which was blocked by the PLA2 inhibitor mepacrine (100 microM) and the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (2 microM). Furthermore, purinergic receptor-mediated PLA2 activation as well as direct activation of PLA2 with melittin reduced CHO/5-HT1B responsiveness. These data indicate that activation of the PLA2/arachidonic acid signaling cascade mediates 5-HT2C receptor regulation of the CHO/5-HT1B receptor pathway. Consistent with our previous report and in contrast to activation of 5-HT2C or purinergic receptors, activation of 5-HT2A receptors had no effect on CHO/5-HT1B receptor function, although 5-HT2A receptor-mediated activation of PLA2 was measured. Interestingly, purinergic receptor-mediated inhibition of CHO/5-HT1B receptor function was blocked when 5-HT2A receptors were activated simultaneously. These data suggest that the lack of 5-HT2A mediated regulation of CHO/5-HT1B receptors may be due to activation of a third pathway (in addition to PLC and PLA2 pathways), which results in the inhibition of the production or the actions of a cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonic

  14. A1 adenosine receptors inhibit chloride transport in the shark rectal gland. Dissociation of inhibition and cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, G G; Poeschla, E M; Barron, H V; Forrest, J N

    1990-01-01

    In the in vitro perfused rectal gland of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias), the adenosine analogue 2-chloroadenosine (2Clado) completely and reversibly inhibited forskolin-stimulated chloride secretion with an IC50 of 5 nM. Other A1 receptor agonists including cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine (NECA) and R-phenylisopropyl-adenosine (R-PIA) also completely inhibited forskolin stimulated chloride secretion. The "S" stereoisomer of PIA (S-PIA) was a less potent inhibitor of forskolin stimulated chloride secretion, consistent with the affinity profile of PIA stereoisomers for an A1 receptor. The adenosine receptor antagonists 8-phenyltheophylline and 8-cyclopentyltheophylline completely blocked the effect of 2Clado to inhibit forskolin-stimulated chloride secretion. When chloride secretion and tissue cyclic (c)AMP content were determined simultaneously in perfused glands, 2Clado completely inhibited secretion but only inhibited forskolin stimulated cAMP accumulation by 34-40%, indicating that the mechanism of inhibition of secretion by 2Clado is at least partially cAMP independent. Consistent with these results, A1 receptor agonists only modestly inhibited (9-15%) forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and 2Clado markedly inhibited chloride secretion stimulated by a permeant cAMP analogue, 8-chlorophenylthio cAMP (8CPT cAMP). These findings provide the first evidence for a high affinity A1 adenosine receptor that inhibits hormone stimulated ion transport in a model epithelia. A major portion of this inhibition occurs by a mechanism that is independent of the cAMP messenger system. PMID:1970583

  15. Purification of calmodulin from rice bran and activation of glutamate decarboxylase by Ca2+/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Min; Lv, Ying Guo; Zhang, Hui

    2010-03-15

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bioactive regulator, and its biosynthesis is primarily through the alpha-decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). In plants, it was verified that the production of GABA is regulated, in part, via Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). Our preliminary studies showed that rice bran GAD is probably also a Ca(2+)/CaM dependent enzyme; hence, in the current investigation, we purified calmodulin from rice bran, and studied the effect of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin complex on the activity of rice bran GAD in vitro. CaM was purified to homogeneity from the rice bran by a combined protocol involving TCA precipitation, heat treatment, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, with the purification fold and recovery of 851.7 and 55.6%, respectively. This protein had similar amino acid composition as the CaMs from other higher plants. The rice bran GAD was found to be quite sensitive to the Ca(2+)/CaM complex at pH 7.0, and addition of exogenous EGTA or TFP efficiently inhibited the stimulatory effect of Ca(2+)/CaM complex. At a separate concentration of Ca(2+) and CaM of 200 micromol L(-1) and 150 nmol L(-1), the rice bran GAD was significantly enhanced 3-fold. Moreover, upon binding Ca(2+), CaM underwent a conformational change that facilitated a more obvious emergency of phenylalanine and tyrosine residues. This investigation provided preliminary information for the development of a GABA-based, cost-effective rice bran GAD-related functional food.

  16. Role of calmodulin and calcineurin in regulating flagellar motility and wave polarity in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Aakash Gautam; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2017-09-07

    We have previously reported the involvement of cyclic AMP in regulating flagellar waveforms in Leishmania. Here, we investigated the roles of calcium, calmodulin, and calcineurin in flagellar motility regulation in L. donovani. Using high-speed videomicroscopy, we show that calcium-independent calmodulin and calcineurin activity is necessary for motility in Leishmania. Inhibition of calmodulin and calcineurin induced ciliary beats interrupting flagellar beating in both live (in vivo) and ATP-reactivated (in vitro) parasites. Our results indicate that signaling mediated by calmodulin and calcineurin operates antagonistically to cAMP signaling in regulating the waveforms of Leishmania flagellum. These two pathways are possibly involved in maintaining the balance between the two waveforms, essential for responding to environmental cues, survival, and infectivity.

  17. Honokiol inhibits androgen receptor activity in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Karlsson, A Isabella; Bonner, Michael Y; Arbiser, Jack L; Singh, Shivendra V

    2014-04-01

    We have shown previously that honokiol (HNK), a bioactive component of the medicinal plant Magnolia officinalis, inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the effect of HNK on androgen receptor (AR) signaling has not been studied. LNCaP, C4-2, and TRAMP-C1 cells were used for various assays. Trypan blue dye exclusion assay or clonogenic assay was performed for determination of cell viability. The effects of HNK and/or its analogs on protein levels of AR and its target gene product prostate specific antigen (PSA) were determined by western blotting. RNA interference of p53 was achieved by transient transfection. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed for mRNA expression of AR. Nuclear level of AR was visualized by microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by DNA fragmentation assay or flow cytometry after Annexin V-propidium iodide staining. HNK and its dichloroacetate analog (HDCA) were relatively more effective in suppressing cell viability and AR protein level than honokiol epoxide or biseugenol. Nuclear translocation of AR stimulated by a synthetic androgen (R1881) was markedly suppressed in the presence of HNK. Downregulation of AR protein resulting from HNK exposure was attributable to transcriptional repression as well as proteasomal degradation. HNK-mediated suppression of AR protein was maintained in LNCaP cells after knockdown of p53 protein. HNK-induced apoptosis was not affected by R1881 treatment. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that HNK inhibits activity of AR in prostate cancer cells regardless of the p53 status. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Receptor 5 Inhibits B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Antibody Response1

    PubMed Central

    Shotts, Kristin; Donovan, Erin E.; Strauch, Pamela; Pujanauski, Lindsey M.; Victorino, Francisco; Al-Shami, Amin; Fujiwara, Yuko; Tigyi, Gabor; Oravecz, Tamas; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids have emerged as biologically important chemoattractants capable of directing lymphocyte development, trafficking and localization. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a major lysophospholipid found systemically and whose levels are elevated in certain pathological settings such as cancer and infections. Here, we demonstrate that BCR signal transduction by mature murine B cells is inhibited upon LPA engagement of the LPA5 (GPR92) receptor via a Gα12/13 – Arhgef1 pathway. The inhibition of BCR signaling by LPA5 manifests by impaired intracellular calcium store release and most likely by interfering with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity. We further show that LPA5 also limits antigen-specific induction of CD69 and CD86 expression and that LPA5-deficient B cells display enhanced antibody responses. Thus, these data show that LPA5 negatively regulates BCR signaling, B cell activation and immune response. Our findings extend the influence of lysophospholipids on immune function and suggest that alterations in LPA levels likely influence adaptive humoral immunity. PMID:24890721

  19. Calmodulin regulates KCNQ2 function in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuhong; Zhuang, Fei; Li, Hong; Zheng, Kun; Hong, Ze; Feng, Weijing; Zhou, Wendi; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is linked to mutations in KCNQ channels. KCNQ channels including KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 are enriched in neurons, regulating action potential generation and modulation. Here, we showed that properties of KCNQ2 channel in rat hippocampal cultured neurons are regulated by ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin. We analyzed calmodulin function on the KCNQ2 channel in both HEK293 cells and neurons. We used shRNAs to suppress expression of calmodulin protein. On the other hand, we used cDNA to over-express calmodulin in HEK293 and neuron cells. In wild type and mis-sense mutations of KCNQ2 proteins, calmodulin over-expression enhanced outward K+ current and decreased neuronal activity. Meanwhile, calmodulin knockdown reduced KCNQ2 current and increased neuronal activity, showing that hippocampal neuronal excitability is regulated by expression level of calmodulin protein. Our data suggest that calmodulin performs a major function in regulating KCNQ2 properties via direct binding to KCNQ2 protein, indicating that calmodulin could be a target of as gene therapy in epilepsy. PMID:28078031

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibits Glucocorticoid Receptor Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Tom; Vandevyver, Sofie; Dejager, Lien; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Pinheiro, Iris; Petta, Ioanna; Engblom, David; Kleyman, Anna; Schütz, Günther; Tuckermann, Jan; Libert, Claude

    2011-01-01

    As glucocorticoid resistance (GCR) and the concomitant burden pose a worldwide problem, there is an urgent need for a more effective glucocorticoid therapy, for which insights into the molecular mechanisms of GCR are essential. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis that TNFα, a strong pro-inflammatory mediator in numerous inflammatory diseases, compromises the protective function of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) against TNFα-induced lethal inflammation. Indeed, protection of mice by dexamethasone against TNFα lethality was completely abolished when it was administered after TNFα stimulation, indicating compromised GR function upon TNFα challenge. TNFα-induced GCR was further demonstrated by impaired GR-dependent gene expression in the liver. Furthermore, TNFα down-regulates the levels of both GR mRNA and protein. However, this down-regulation seems to occur independently of GC production, as TNFα also resulted in down-regulation of GR levels in adrenalectomized mice. These findings suggest that the decreased amount of GR determines the GR response and outcome of TNFα-induced shock, as supported by our studies with GR heterozygous mice. We propose that by inducing GCR, TNFα inhibits a major brake on inflammation and thereby amplifies the pro-inflammatory response. Our findings might prove helpful in understanding GCR in inflammatory diseases in which TNFα is intimately involved. PMID:21646349

  1. Cinnamaldehyde suppresses toll-like receptor 4 activation mediated through the inhibition of receptor oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyung S; Lee, Jun K; Choi, Yong J; Saitoh, Shin I; Miyake, Kensuke; Hwang, Daniel H; Lee, Joo Y

    2008-01-15

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a critical role in induction of innate immune and inflammatory responses by recognizing invading pathogens or non-microbial endogenous molecules. TLRs have two major downstream signaling pathways, MyD88- and TRIF-dependent pathways leading to the activation of NFkappaB and IRF3 and the expression of inflammatory mediators. Deregulation of TLR activation is known to be closely linked to the increased risk of many chronic diseases. Cinnamaldehyde (3-phenyl-2-propenal) has been reported to inhibit NFkappaB activation induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli and to exert anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial effects. However, the underlying mechanism has not been clearly identified. Our results showed that cinnamaldehyde suppressed the activation of NFkappaB and IRF3 induced by LPS, a TLR4 agonist, leading to the decreased expression of target genes such as COX-2 and IFNbeta in macrophages (RAW264.7). Cinnamaldehyde did not inhibit the activation of NFkappaB or IRF3 induced by MyD88-dependent (MyD88, IKKbeta) or TRIF-dependent (TRIF, TBK1) downstream signaling components. However, oligomerization of TLR4 induced by LPS was suppressed by cinnamaldehyde resulting in the downregulation of NFkappaB activation. Further, cinnamaldehyde inhibited ligand-independent NFkappaB activation induced by constitutively active TLR4 or wild-type TLR4. Our results demonstrated that the molecular target of cinnamaldehyde in TLR4 signaling is oligomerization process of receptor, but not downstream signaling molecules suggesting a novel mechanism for anti-inflammatory activity of cinnamaldehyde.

  2. Cloning and expression of the gene for a novel protein from Mycobacterium smegmatis with functional similarity to eukaryotic calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Prasad T; Prasad, C Rama; Reddy, P Hemalatha; Reeder, Dennis; McKenney, Keith; Jaffe, Howard; Dimitrova, Mariana N; Ginsburg, Ann; Peterkofsky, Alan; Murthy, P Suryanarayana

    2003-09-01

    A calmodulin-like protein (CAMLP) from Mycobacterium smegmatis was purified to homogeneity and partially sequenced; these data were used to produce a full-length clone, whose DNA sequence contained a 55-amino-acid open reading frame. M. smegmatis CAMLP, expressed in Escherichia coli, exhibited properties characteristic of eukaryotic calmodulin: calcium-dependent stimulation of eukaryotic phosphodiesterase, which was inhibited by the calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine, and reaction with anti-bovine brain calmodulin antibodies. Consistent with the presence of nine acidic amino acids (16%) in M. smegmatis CAMLP, there is one putative calcium-binding domain in this CAMLP, compared to four such domains for eukaryotic calmodulin, reflecting the smaller molecular size (approximately 6 kDa) of M. smegmatis CAMLP. Ultracentrifugation and mass spectral studies excluded the possibility that calcium promotes oligomerization of purified M. smegmatis CAMLP.

  3. Science Signaling Podcast for 20 December 2016: Trans-inhibition by Fc receptors.

    PubMed

    Daëron, Marc; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2016-12-20

    This Podcast features an interview with Marc Daëron, author of a Research Article that appears in the 20 December 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about a mechanism by which an Fc receptor can inhibit signaling by other receptors without aggregating with those other receptors. Engagement of Fc receptors on basophils and mast cells can either activate these cells, which promotes autoimmune and allergic inflammation, or prevent these cells from being activated. Whether these cells are activated depends upon which Fc receptors are present in clusters, because some Fc receptors can inhibit signaling by other Fc receptors that are present in the same signalosome, a phenomenon known as cis-inhibition. Malbec et al. identified a mechanism whereby inhibitory Fc receptors limit signaling by activating Fc receptors without being present in the same signalosome. This mechanism of trans-inhibition also allowed inhibitory Fc receptors to limit signaling by growth factor receptors in mast cells and oncogene-induced proliferation in mastocytoma cells.Listen to Podcast. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Minimal RNA aptamer sequences that can inhibit or alleviate noncompetitive inhibition of the muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Sivaprakasam, Kannan; Pagán, Oné R; Hess, George P

    2010-02-01

    Combinatorially synthesized nucleotide polymers have been used during the last decade to find ligands that bind to specific sites on biological molecules, including membrane-bound proteins such as the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The neurotransmitter receptors belong to a group of four structurally related proteins that regulate signal transmission between ~10(11) neurons of the mammalian nervous system. The nAChRs are inhibited by compounds such as the anticonvulsant MK-801 [(+)-dizocilpine] and abused drugs such as cocaine. Based on predictions arising from the mechanism of receptor inhibition by MK-801 and cocaine, we developed two classes of RNA aptamers: class I members, which inhibit the nAChR, and class II members, which alleviate inhibition of the receptor by MK-801 and cocaine. The systematic evolution of ligands by the exponential enrichment (SELEX) method was used to obtain these compounds. Here, we report that we have truncated RNA aptamers in each class to determine the minimal nucleic acid sequence that retains the characteristic function for which the aptamer was originally selected. We demonstrate that a truncated class I aptamer containing a sequence of seven nucleotides inhibits the nAChR and that a truncated class II aptamer containing a sequence of only four nucleotides can alleviate MK-801 inhibition.

  5. Influence of cadmium on isolated peritoneal macrophage populations: cadmium inhibits Fc receptor internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro experiments were performed to examine the effect of cadmium on adherent phagocytic cell populations. The authors were able to demonstrate, in vitro, a phagocytic defect that was originally observed in an in vivo system. Using in vitro methodologies, cadmium was found to inhibit opsonin-dependent but not opsonin-independent phagocytosis in two different populations of macrophages. The receptors through which the opsonized /sup 51/Cr-ElgG were internalized were characterized as Fc receptors. They were able to demonstrate that cadmium could reversibly inhibit internalization of Fc receptors. This mechanism, rather than an alteration of the receptors' binding capabilities, was responsible for the observed inhibition of Fc mediated (opsonin-dependent) phagocytosis in both populations of macrophages tested. The defect was not specific for cadmium per se. Zinc treatment caused a similar inhibition of Fc receptor mediated phagocytosis.

  6. Phenobarbital indirectly activates the constitutive active androstane receptor (CAR) by inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mutoh, Shingo; Sobhany, Mack; Moore, Rick; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee; Sueyoshi, Tatsuya; Negishi, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Phenobarbital is a central nervous system depressant that also indirectly activates nuclear receptor constitutive active androstane receptor (CAR), which promotes drug and energy metabolism, as well as cell growth (and death), in the liver. We found that phenobarbital activated CAR by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Phenobarbital bound to EGFR and potently inhibited the binding of EGF, which prevented the activation of EGFR. This abrogation of EGFR signaling induced the dephosphorylation of receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) at Tyr52, which then promoted the dephosphorylation of CAR at Thr38 by the catalytic core subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. The findings demonstrated that the phenobarbital-induced mechanism of CAR dephosphorylation and activation is mediated through its direct interaction with and inhibition of EGFR. PMID:23652203

  7. Phenobarbital indirectly activates the constitutive active androstane receptor (CAR) by inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Shingo; Sobhany, Mack; Moore, Rick; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee; Sueyoshi, Tatsuya; Negishi, Masahiko

    2013-05-07

    Phenobarbital is a central nervous system depressant that also indirectly activates nuclear receptor constitutive active androstane receptor (CAR), which promotes drug and energy metabolism, as well as cell growth (and death), in the liver. We found that phenobarbital activated CAR by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Phenobarbital bound to EGFR and potently inhibited the binding of EGF, which prevented the activation of EGFR. This abrogation of EGFR signaling induced the dephosphorylation of receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) at Tyr(52), which then promoted the dephosphorylation of CAR at Thr(38) by the catalytic core subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. The findings demonstrated that the phenobarbital-induced mechanism of CAR dephosphorylation and activation is mediated through its direct interaction with and inhibition of EGFR.

  8. Purification and biochemical properties of calmodulin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Y; Uno, I; Ishikawa, T; Anraku, Y

    1987-10-01

    Calmodulin from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified to complete homogeneity by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and HPLC gel filtration. The biochemical properties of the purified protein as calmodulin were examined under various criteria and its similarity and dissimilarity to other calmodulins have been described. Like other calmodulins, yeast calmodulin activated bovine phosphodiesterase and pea NAD kinase in a Ca2+-dependent manner, but its concentration for half-maximal activation was 8-10 times that of bovine calmodulin. The amino acid composition of yeast calmodulin was different from those of calmodulins from other lower eukaryotes in that it contained no tyrosine, but more leucine and had a high ratio of serine to threonine. Yeast calmodulin did not contain tryptophanyl or tyrosyl residues, so its ultraviolet spectrum reflected the absorbance of phenylalanyl residues, and had a molar absorption coefficient at 259 nm of 1900 M-1 cm-1. Ca2+ ions changed the secondary structure of yeast calmodulin, causing a 3% decrease in the alpha-helical content, unlike its effect on other calmodulins. Antibody against yeast calmodulin did not cross-react with bovine calmodulin, and antibody against bovine calmodulin did not cross-react with yeast calmodulin, presumably due to differences in the amino acid sequences of the antigenic sites. It is concluded that the molecular structure of yeast calmodulin differs from those of calmodulins from other sources, but that its Ca2+-dependent regulatory functions are highly conserved and essentially similar to those of calmodulins of higher eukaryotes.

  9. Inhibition of angiogenesis by selective estrogen receptor modulators through blockade of cholesterol trafficking rather than estrogen receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong Sup; Li, Ruo-Jing; Lv, Junfang; Head, Sarah A; Yang, Eun Ju; Liu, Jun O

    2015-06-28

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM) including tamoxifen are known to inhibit angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism, which is independent of their action on the estrogen receptor (ER), has remained largely unknown. In the present study, we found that tamoxifen and other SERM inhibited cholesterol trafficking in endothelial cells, causing a hyper-accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes/lysosomes. Inhibition of cholesterol trafficking by tamoxifen was accompanied by abnormal subcellular distribution of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) and inhibition of the terminal glycosylation of the receptor. Tamoxifen also caused perinuclear positioning of lysosomes, which in turn trapped the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the perinuclear region of endothelial cells. Abnormal distribution of VEGFR2 and mTOR and inhibition of VEGFR2 and mTOR activities by tamoxifen were significantly reversed by addition of cholesterol-cyclodextrin complex to the culture media of endothelial cells. Moreover, high concentrations of tamoxifen inhibited endothelial and breast cancer cell proliferation in a cholesterol-dependent, but ER-independent, manner. Together, these results unraveled a previously unrecognized mechanism of angiogenesis inhibition by tamoxifen and other SERM, implicating cholesterol trafficking as an attractive therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  10. Effect of dopamine and serotonin receptor antagonists on fencamfamine-induced abolition of latent inhibition.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Cilene Rejane Ramos Alves; de Aguiar, Marlison José Lima; DeLucia, Roberto; Silva, Maria Teresa Araujo

    2013-01-05

    The purpose of this investigation was to verify the role of dopamine and serotonin receptors in the effect of fencamfamine (FCF) on latent inhibition. FCF is a psychomotor stimulant with an indirect dopaminergic action. Latent inhibition is a model of attention. Latent inhibition is blocked by dopaminergic agents and facilitated by dopamine receptor agonists. FCF has been shown to abolish latent inhibition. The serotonergic system may also participate in the neurochemical mediation of latent inhibition. The selective dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (7-chloro-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1,2,4,5-tetrahydro-3-benzazepin-8-ol), D(2) receptor antagonists pimozide (PIM) and methoclopramide (METH), and serotonin 5-HT(2A/C) receptor antagonist ritanserin (RIT) were used in the present study. Latent inhibition was evaluated using a conditioned emotional response procedure. Male Wistar rats that were water-restricted were subjected to a three-phase procedure: preexposure to a tone, tone-shock conditioning, and a test of the effect of the tone on licking frequency. All of the drugs were administered before the preexposure and conditioning phases. The results showed that FCF abolished latent inhibition, and this effect was clearly antagonized by PIM and METH and moderately attenuated by SCH 23390. At the doses used in the present study, RIT pretreatment did not affect latent inhibition and did not eliminate the effect of FCF, suggesting that the FCF-induced abolition of latent inhibition is not mediated by serotonin 5-HT(2A/C) receptors. These results suggest that the effect of FCF on latent inhibition is predominantly related to dopamine D(2) receptors and that dopamine D(2) receptors participate in attention processes.

  11. Differential recognition of calmodulin-enzyme complexes by a conformation-specific anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, R.S.; Beavo, J.A.

    1986-11-05

    An anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody having an absolute requirement for Ca/sup 2 +/ has been produced from mice immunized with a mixture of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins. Radioimmune assays were developed for the determination of its specificity. The epitope for this antibody resides on the COOH-terminal half of the mammalian protein. Plant calmodulin or toponin C had little reactivity. The apparent affinity of the antibody for calmodulin was increased approximately 60-fold in the presence of heart calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase. The presence of heart phosphodiesterase in the radioimmune assay greatly enhanced the sensitivity for calmodulin. The intrinsic calmodulin subunit of phosphorylase kinase and calmodulin which was bound to brain phosphodiesterases was also recognized with high affinity by the antibody. In direct binding experiments, most of the calmodulin-binding proteins studied were unreactive with the antibody. This selectivity allowed purification of heart and two brain calmodulin-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isozymes on immobilized antibody affinity columns. The data suggest that the binding of ligands to Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin induce conformation changes in calmodulin which alter reactivity with the anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody. The differential antibody reactivity toward calmodulin-enzyme complexes indicates that target proteins either induce very different conformations in calmodulin and/or interact with different geometries relative to the antibody binding site. The anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody should be useful for the purification of other calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterases as well as isozymes of phosphorylase kinase.

  12. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor inhibits prostate carcinogenesis in TRAMP mice.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Wayne A; Lin, Tien-Min; Cardiff, Robert D; Peterson, Richard E

    2007-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor that mediates the inhibitory effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on prostate growth and also modulates normal prostate development. This is evidenced by AhR null mice (Ahr-/-) having smaller dorsolateral and anterior prostates, even though all prostate lobes remain histologically normal. To test the hypothesis that loss of the AhR increases the rate of prostate carcinogenesis, the incidence of macroscopic prostate tumors was determined in Ahr+/+, Ahr+/- and Ahr-/- C57BL/6J transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice at 35, 70, 105, 140, 175 and 210 days of age. From 140 days, prostate tumor incidence was greater in Ahr-/- (60%) and Ahr+/- (43%) mice than in Ahr+/+ mice (16%). Allele quantification did not indicate a loss of the wild-type Ahr allele in heterozygous TRAMP tumors, suggesting that tumor formation in these mice was not due to a loss of Ahr heterozygosity. Prostatic SV40 large T antigen mRNA expression and protein localization were comparable in TRAMP mice of each Ahr genotype. Prostates from all mice of each Ahr genotype were histologically indistinguishable, exhibiting diffuse epithelial hyperplasia by 105 days of age. mRNA expression and protein localization for molecular markers of neuroendocrine differentiation, including chromogranin A and neuropilin-1, were elevated in prostate tumors compared to tumor-free ventral prostates, regardless of Ahr genotype or age. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the Ahr inhibits prostate carcinogenesis in C57BL/6J TRAMP mice by interfering with neuroendocrine differentiation.

  13. Metabotropic glutamate receptors differentially regulate GABAergic inhibition in thalamus.

    PubMed

    Govindaiah, G; Cox, Charles L

    2006-12-27

    Thalamic interneurons and thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) neurons provide inhibitory innervation of thalamocortical cells that significantly influence thalamic gating. The local interneurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) give rise to two distinct synaptic outputs: classical axonal and dendrodendritic. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) by agonists or optic tract stimulation increases the output of these presynaptic dendrites leading to increased inhibition of thalamocortical neurons. The present study was aimed to evaluate the actions of specific mGluRs on inhibitory GABA-mediated signaling. We found that the group I mGluR (mGluR(1,5)) agonist (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) or optic tract stimulation produced a robust increase in spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs) in thalamocortical neurons that was attenuated by the selective mGluR(5) antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP). In contrast, the group II mGluR (mGluR(2,3)) agonists (2R, 4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (APDC) or (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2'3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) suppressed the frequency of sIPSCs. In addition, mGluR(1,5) agonist DHPG produced depolarizations and mGluR(2/3) agonists APDC or L-CCG-I [(2S,1'S,2'S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine] produced hyperpolarizations in dLGN interneurons. Furthermore, the enhanced sIPSC activity by optic tract stimulation was reduced when paired with corticothalamic fiber stimulation. The present data indicate that activation of specific mGluR subtypes differentially regulates inhibitory activity via different synaptic pathways. Our results suggest that activation of specific mGluR subtypes can upregulate or downregulate inhibitory activity in thalamic relay neurons, and these actions likely shape excitatory synaptic integration and thus regulate information transfer through thalamocortical circuits.

  14. One aptamer, two functions: the full-length aptamer inhibits AMPA receptors, while the short one inhibits both AMPA and kainate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, William J.; Huang, Zhen; Wen, Wei; Wu, Andrew; Karl, Nicholas; Niu, Li

    2017-01-01

    AMPA and kainate receptors, along with NMDA receptors, are distinct subtypes of glutamate ion channels. Excessive activity of AMPA and kainate receptors has been implicated in neurological diseases, such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Antagonists that block their activities are therefore potential drug candidates. In a recent article in the Journal of Biological Chemistry by Jaremko et al. 2017, we have reported on the discovery and molecular characterization of an RNA aptamer of a dual functionality: the full-length RNA (101 nucleotide) inhibits AMPA receptors while the truncated or the short (55 nucleotide) RNA inhibits both the AMPA and kainate receptors. The full-length RNA aptamer was isolated through a specially designed, systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) using only a single type of AMPA receptors expressed in HEK-293 cells. The design feature and the results of our recent article are highlighted here, as they demonstrate the utility of the SELEX approach and the potential of using a single AMPA receptor type to develop potent, novel RNA aptamers targeting multiple subunits and AMPA/kainate receptor subtypes with length-dependent functionalities. PMID:28804757

  15. Add-on angiotensin receptor blockade with maximized ACE inhibition.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, R

    2001-06-01

    Prolonged angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor therapy leads to angiotensin I (Ang I) accumulation, which may "escape" ACE inhibition, generate Ang II, stimulate the Ang II subtype 1 (AT1) receptor, and exert deleterious renal effects in patients with chronic renal diseases. We tested the hypothesis that losartan therapy added to a background of chronic (>3 months) maximal ACE inhibitor therapy (lisinopril 40 mg q.d.) will result in additional Ang II antagonism in patients with proteinuric chronic renal failure with hypertension. Sixteen patients with proteinuric moderately advanced chronic renal failure completed a two-period, crossover, randomized controlled trial. Each period was one month with a two-week washout between periods. In one period, patients received lisinopril 40 mg q.d. along with other antihypertensive therapy, and in the other, losartan 50 mg q.d. was added to the previously mentioned regimen. Hemodynamic measurements included ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABP; Spacelabs 90207), glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with iothalamate clearances and cardiac outputs by acetylene helium rebreathing technique. Supine plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone and 24-hour urine protein were measured in all patients. Twelve patients had diabetic nephropathy, and four had chronic glomerulonephritis. The mean age (+/- SD) was 53 +/- 9 years. The body mass index was 38 +/- 5.7 kg/m(2), and all except two patients were males. Seated cuff blood pressure was 156 +/- 18/88 +/- 12 mm Hg. The pulse rate was 77 +/- 11 per min, and the cardiac index was 2.9 +/- 0.5 L/min/m(2). Mean log 24-hour protein excretion/g creatinine or overall ABPs did not change. Mean placebo subtracted, losartan-attributable change in protein excretion was +1% (95% CI, -20% to 28%, P = 0.89). Similarly, the change in systolic ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) was 4.6 mm Hg (-5.7 to 14.9, P = 0.95), and diastolic ABP was 1.5 mm Hg (-4.5 to 7.6, P = 0.59). No change was seen in

  16. Phosphorylation of rat liver heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2 and C can be modulated by calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Bosser, R; Faura, M; Serratosa, J; Renau-Piqueras, J; Pruschy, M; Bachs, O

    1995-01-01

    It was previously reported that the phosphorylation of three proteins of 36, 40 to 42, and 50 kDa by casein kinase 2 is inhibited by calmodulin in nuclear extracts from rat liver cells (R. Bosser, R. Aligué, D. Guerini, N. Agell, E. Carafoli, and O. Bachs, J. Biol. Chem. 268:15477-15483, 1993). By immunoblotting, peptide mapping, and endogenous phosphorylation experiments, the 36- and 40- to 42-kDa proteins have been identified as the A2 and C proteins, respectively, of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. To better understand the mechanism by which calmodulin inhibits the phosphorylation of these proteins, they were purified by using single-stranded DNA chromatography, and the effect of calmodulin on their phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 was analyzed. Results revealed that whereas calmodulin inhibited the phosphorylation of purified A2 and C proteins in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, it did not affect the casein kinase 2 phosphorylation of a different protein substrate, i.e., beta-casein. These results indicate that the effect of calmodulin was not on casein kinase 2 activity but on specific protein substrates. The finding that the A2 and C proteins can bind to a calmodulin-Sepharose column in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner suggests that this association could prevent the phosphorylation of the proteins by casein kinase 2. Immunoelectron microscopy studies have revealed that such interactions could also occur in vivo, since calmodulin and A2 and C proteins colocalize on the ribonucleoprotein particles in rat liver cell nuclei. PMID:7823935

  17. Methylene blue inhibits GABAA receptors by interaction with GABA binding site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenglan; Liu, Ran; Yang, Shao-Hua; Dillon, Glenn H; Huang, Renqi

    2017-06-01

    Methylene blue (MB) is commonly used in diagnostic procedures and is also used to treat various medical conditions. Neurological effects of MB have been reported in clinical observations and experimental studies. Thus the modulation of GABAA receptor function by MB was investigated. Whole-cell GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK293 cells expressing various GABAA receptor subunit configurations. MB inhibition of GABA currents was apparent at 3 μM, and it had an IC50 of 31 μM in human α1β2γ2 receptors. The MB action was rapid and reversible. MB inhibition was not mediated via the picrotoxin site, as a mutation (T6'F of the β2 subunit) known to confer resistance to picrotoxin had no effect on MB-induced inhibition. Blockade of GABAA receptors by MB was demonstrated across a range of receptors expressing varying subunits, including those expressed at extrasynaptic sites. The sensitivity of α1β2 receptors to MB was similar to that observed in α1β2γ2 receptors, indicating that MB's action via the benzodiazepine or Zn(2+) site is unlikely. MB-induced inhibition of GABA response was competitive with respect to GABA. Furthermore, mutation of α1 F64 to A and β2 Y205 to F in the extracellular N-terminus, both residues which are known to comprise GABA binding pocket, remarkably diminished MB inhibition of GABA currents. These data suggest that MB inhibits GABAA receptor function by direct or allosteric interaction with the GABA binding site. Finally, in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, MB inhibited GABA-activated currents as well as GABAergic IPSCs. We demonstrate that MB directly inhibits GABAA receptor function, which may underlie some of the effects of MB on the CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Ca2+ (calmodulin)-dependent phosphorylation of plasma membranes of pig myometrium].

    PubMed

    Prishchepa, L A; Kondratiuk, T P; Kurskiĭ, M D

    1989-01-01

    The high-purified vesicles of pig myometrium sarcolemma closed, mainly, so that the cytoplasmatic side is outside possess the Ca2+ (calmodulin)-dependent protein kinase activity. The initial rate of the endogenic phosphorylation without exogenic calmodulin is 6.3 and with its presence--10.7 pmol of 32Pi 1 min per 1 mg of protein. Km for ATP is equal to 164 microM, and Vmax--0.27 nmol of 32Pi 1 min per 1 mg of protein. Exogenic calmodulin increases the affinity to ATP (50 microM), Vmax being unchanged. Under optimal concentrations of calmodulin (10(-7)-10(-6) M) and 10(-4) M Ca2+ the protein kinase activity is 0.132 nmol of 32Pi min per 1 mg of protein. Electrophoresis in DS-PAAG has shown that membrane proteins with molecular weight of 105, 58, 25, 12 and 2 kDa are basic substrates of Ca2+ (calmodulin)-dependent phosphorylation. Trifluoperazine++ in the concentration of 40 microM inhibits phosphorylation of all five proteins. Ca2+ (calmodulin)-dependent phosphorylation is supposed to be a regulator of Ca2+-transport processes of sarcolemma.

  19. CALMODULIN ANTAGONISTS EFFECT ON Ca2+ LEVEL IN THE MITOCHONDRIA AND CYTOPLASM OF MYOMETRIUM CELLS.

    PubMed

    Shlykov, S G; Babich, L G; Yevtushenko, M E; Karakhim, S O; Kosterin, S O

    2015-01-01

    It is known that Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of this cation exchange in mitochondria is carried out with participation of calmodulin. We had shown in a previous work using two experimental models: isolated mitochondria and intact myometrium cells, that calmodulin antagonists reduce the level of mitochondrial membrane polarization. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of calmodulin antagonists on the level of ionized Ca in mitochondria and cytoplasm of uterine smooth muscle cells using spectrofluorometry and confocal microscopy. It was shown that myometrium mitochondria, in the presence of ATP and MgCl2 in the incubation medium, accumulate Ca ions in the matrix. Incubation of mitochondria in the presence of CCCP inhibited cation accumulation, but did not cease it. Calmodulin antagonist such as trifluoperazine (100 μm) considerably increased the level of ionized Ca in the mitochondrial matrix. Preliminary incubation of mitochondria with 100 μM Ca2+, before adding trifluoperazine to the incubation medium, partly prevented influence of the latter on the cation level in the matrix. Incubation of myometrium cells (primary culture) with another calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium (10 μM was accompanied by depolarization of mitochondrial membrane and an increase in the concentration of ionized Ca in cytoplasm. Thus, using two models, namely, isolated mitochondria and intact myometrium cells, it has been shown that calmodulin antagonists cause depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and an increase of the ionized Ca concentration in both the mitochondrial matrix and the cell cytoplasm.

  20. Transcriptional Corepressor SMILE Recruits SIRT1 to Inhibit Nuclear Receptor Estrogen Receptor-related Receptor γ Transactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan-Bin; Park, Jeong-Hoh; Kim, Don-Kyu; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Oh, Sangmi; Park, Seung Bum; Shong, Minho; Lee, In-Kyu; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2009-01-01

    SMILE (small heterodimer partner interacting leucine zipper protein) has been identified as a corepressor of the glucocorticoid receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α. Here we show that SMILE also represses estrogen receptor-related receptor γ (ERRγ) transactivation. Knockdown of SMILE gene expression increases ERRγ activity. SMILE directly interacts with ERRγ in vitro and in vivo. Domain mapping analysis showed that SMILE binds to the AF2 domain of ERRγ. SMILE represses ERRγ transactivation partially through competition with coactivators PGC-1α, PGC-1β, and GRIP1. Interestingly, the repression of SMILE on ERRγ is released by SIRT1 inhibitors, a catalytically inactive SIRT1 mutant, and SIRT1 small interfering RNA but not by histone protein deacetylase inhibitor. In vivo glutathione S-transferase pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation assays validated that SMILE physically interacts with SIRT1. Furthermore, the ERRγ inverse agonist GSK5182 enhances the interaction of SMILE with ERRγ and SMILE-mediated repression. Knockdown of SMILE or SIRT1 blocks the repressive effect of GSK5182. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that GSK5182 augments the association of SMILE and SIRT1 on the promoter of the ERRγ target PDK4. GSK5182 and adenoviral overexpression of SMILE cooperate to repress ERRγ-induced PDK4 gene expression, and this repression is released by overexpression of a catalytically defective SIRT1 mutant. Finally, we demonstrated that ERRγ regulates SMILE gene expression, which in turn inhibits ERRγ. Overall, these findings implicate SMILE as a novel corepressor of ERRγ and recruitment of SIRT1 as a novel repressive mechanism for SMILE and ERRγ inverse agonist. PMID:19690166

  1. Inhibition of the NMDA and AMPA receptor channels by antidepressants and antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Barygin, Oleg I; Nagaeva, Elina I; Tikhonov, Denis B; Belinskaya, Darya A; Vanchakova, Nina P; Shestakova, Natalia N

    2017-04-01

    It is known that some antidepressants and antipsychotics directly inhibit NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. In this study we systematically studied action of seven drugs (Fluoxetine, Citalopram, Desipramine, Amitriptyline, Atomoxetine, Chlorpromazine, and Clozapine) on NMDA receptors and Ca(2+)-permeable and -impermeable AMPA receptors in rat brain neurons by whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Except for weak effect of fluoxetine, all drugs were virtually inactive against Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPA receptors. Fluoxetine and desipramine significantly inhibited Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors (IC50=43±7 and 105±12µM, respectively). Desipramine, atomoxetine and chlorpromazine inhibited NMDA receptors in clinically relevant low micromolar concentrations, while citalopram had only weak effect. All tested medicines have been clustered into two groups by their action on NMDA receptors: desipramine, amitriptyline, chlorpromazine, and atomoxetine display voltage- and magnesium-dependent open channel blocking mechanism. Action of fluoxetine and clozapine was found to be voltage- and magnesium-independent. All voltage-dependent compounds could be trapped in closed NMDA receptor channels. Possible contribution of NMDA receptor inhibition by certain antidepressants and antipsychotics to their analgesic effects in neuropathic pain is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Competitive inhibition of (TH)dexamethasone binding to mammary glucocorticoid receptor by leupeptin

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, L.C.C.; Su, C.; Markland, F.S. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    The inhibitory effect of leupeptin on (TH)dexamethasone binding to the glucocorticoid receptor from lactating goat mammary cytosol has been studied. Leupeptin (10 mM) caused a significant (about 35%) inhibition of (TH)dexamethasone binding to glucocorticoid receptor. Binding inhibition is further increased following filtration of unlabeled cytosolic receptor through a Bio-Gel A 0.5-m column. Binding inhibition was partially reversed by monothioglycerol at 10 mM concentration. A double reciprocal plot revealed that leupeptin appears to be a competitive inhibitor of (TH)dexamethasone binding to the glucocorticoid receptor. Low salt sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed that the leupeptin-treated sample formed a slightly larger (approximately 9 S) receptor complex (leupeptin-free complex sediments at 8 S).

  3. Metformin (Glucophage) inhibits tyrosine phosphatase activity to stimulate the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Holland, William; Morrison, Thomas; Chang, Ying; Wiernsperger, Nicholas; Stith, Bradley J

    2004-06-01

    Metformin is a commonly used anti-diabetic but whether its mechanism involves action on the insulin receptor or on downstream events is still controversial. With a time course that was slow compared with insulin action, metformin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the regulatory domain of the insulin receptor (specifically, tyrosine residues 1150 and 1151). In a direct action, therapeutic levels of metformin stimulated the tyrosine kinase activity of the soluble intracellular portion of the beta subunit of the human insulin receptor toward a substrate derived from the insulin receptor regulatory domain. However, metformin did not alter the order of substrate phosphorylation by the insulin receptor kinase. Using a Xenopus oocyte preparation, we simultaneously recorded tyrosine kinase and phosphatase activities that regulate the insulin receptor by measuring the tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of peptides derived from the regulatory domain of the human insulin receptor. In an indirect stimulation of the insulin receptor, metformin inhibited endogenous tyrosine phosphatases and purified human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B that dephosphorylate and inhibit the insulin receptor kinase. Thus, there was evidence that metformin acted directly upon the insulin receptor and indirectly through inhibition of tyrosine phosphatases.

  4. Immuno-detection of aluminium and aluminium induced conformational changes in calmodulin--implications in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Levi, R; Wolf, T; Fleminger, G; Solomon, B

    1998-12-01

    Binding of calcium to calmodulin (CAM) induces specific structural rearrangements in the whole protein molecule. Ca2+ organizes and stabilizes the four-domains structure of calmodulin in a helical, active conformation that can bind to its target proteins; the central helix remaining flexible is an essential condition for their bio-recognition. The conformation of calmodulin, and its efficacy to interact with target proteins, is profoundly altered when bound to metal ions other than calcium. As recently reported, the local structural changes of CaM, which occur upon aluminium binding, lead to the impairment of protein flexibility and to the loss of its ability to interact with several other proteins, which may decrease or inhibit the regulatory character of calmodulin. In this study we followed conformational changes occurring in the calmodulin molecule after aluminium binding using highly specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) able to differentiate between the conformational states of calmodulin, as well as mAbs which recognize aluminium free or bound to proteins. Under the same experimental conditions, mAb CAM-1, a Ca2+ conformation sensitive antibody raised against calmodulin, fails to recognize the calmodulin-aluminium complex, despite the presence of Ca2+, while the anti-Al antibodies show a maximal binding pattern towards their antigen. These data suggest that Al3+ ions bind to calmodulin in the presence of Ca2+ ions, leading to an inactive, reversible conformation, instead of its physiological active form. Alteration of the conformation of calmodulin imposed by Al binding may have possible implications in the neurotoxicity mechanism related to Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Appetite suppression based on selective inhibition of NPY receptors.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, S; Della-Zuana, O; Fauchère, J-L; Félétou, M; Galizzi, J-P; Levens, N

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this review is to critically assess available evidence that blockade of the actions of NPY at one of the five NPY receptor subtypes represents an attractive new drug discovery target for the development of an appetite suppressant drug. Blockade of the central actions of NPY using anti-NPY antibodies, antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against NPY and NPY receptor antagonists results in a decrease in food intake in energy-deprived animals. These results appear to show that endogenous NPY plays a role in the control of appetite. The fact that NPY receptors exist as at least five different subtypes raises the possibility that the actions of endogenous NPY on food intake can be adequately dissociated from other effects of the peptide. Current drug discovery has produced a number of highly selective NPY receptor antagonists which have been used to establish the NPY Y(1) receptor subtype as the most critical in regulating short-term food intake. However, additional studies are now needed to more clearly define the relative contribution of NPY acting through the NPY Y2 and NPY Y5 receptors in the complex sequence of physiological and behavioral events that underlie the long-term control of appetite. Blockade of the NPY receptor may produce appetite-suppressing drugs. However, it is too early to state with certainty whether a single subtype selective drug used alone or a combination of NPY receptor selective antagonists used in combination will be necessary to adequately influence appetite regulation.

  6. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by surface-localised pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) is a key component of plant innate immunity. Most known plant PRRs are receptor kinases and initiation of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) signalling requires phosphorylation of the PR...

  7. Structural determinants for activation or inhibition of ryanodine receptors by basic residues in the dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop.

    PubMed Central

    Casarotto, M G; Green, D; Pace, S M; Curtis, S M; Dulhunty, A F

    2001-01-01

    The structures of peptide A, and six other 7-20 amino acid peptides corresponding to sequences in the A region (Thr671- Leu690) of the skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop have been examined, and are correlated with the ability of the peptides to activate or inhibit skeletal ryanodine receptor calcium release channels. The peptides adopted either random coil or nascent helix-like structures, which depended upon the polarity of the terminal residues as well as the presence and ionisation state of two glutamate residues. Enhanced activation of Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, and activation of current flow through single ryanodine receptor channels (at -40 mV), was seen with peptides containing the basic residues 681Arg Lys Arg Arg Lys685, and was strongest when the residues were a part of an alpha-helix. Inhibition of channels (at +40 mV) was also seen with peptides containing the five positively charged residues, but was not enhanced in helical peptides. These results confirm the hypothesis that activation of ryanodine receptor channels by the II-III loop peptides requires both the basic residues and their participation in helical structure, and show for the first time that inhibition requires the basic residues, but is not structure-dependent. These findings imply that activation and inhibition result from peptide binding to separate sites on the ryanodine receptor. PMID:11371447

  8. Insulin Action is Blocked by a Monoclonal Antibody That Inhibits the Insulin Receptor Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David O.; Ho, Lisa; Korn, Laurence J.; Roth, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor β subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens, and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor β subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin.

  9. Insulin action is blocked by a monoclonal antibody that inhibits insulin receptor kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.O.; Ho, L.; Korn, L.J.; Roth, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor ..beta.. subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor ..beta.. subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin.

  10. Extracellular calmodulin regulates growth and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Danton H.; Huber, Robert J.; Suarez, Andres

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin is present throughout growth and development in Dictyostelium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin localizes within the ECM during development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin inhibits cell proliferation and increases chemotaxis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin exists in eukaryotic microbes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin may be functionally as important as intracellular calmodulin. -- Abstract: The existence of extracellular calmodulin (CaM) has had a long and controversial history. CaM is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that has been found in every eukaryotic cell system. Calcium-free apo-CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM exert their effects by binding to and regulating the activity of CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Most of the research done to date on CaM and its CaMBPs has focused on their intracellular functions. The presence of extracellular CaM is well established in a number of plants where it functions in proliferation, cell wall regeneration, gene regulation and germination. While CaM has been detected extracellularly in several animal species, including frog, rat, rabbit and human, its extracellular localization and functions are less well established. In contrast the study of extracellular CaM in eukaryotic microbes remains to be done. Here we show that CaM is constitutively expressed and secreted throughout asexual development in Dictyostelium where the presence of extracellular CaM dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation but increases cAMP mediated chemotaxis. During development, extracellular CaM localizes within the slime sheath where it coexists with at least one CaMBP, the matricellular CaM-binding protein CyrA. Coupled with previous research, this work provides direct evidence for the existence of extracellular CaM in the Dictyostelium and provides insight into its functions in this model amoebozoan.

  11. Calcium-dependent but calmodulin-independent protein kinase from soybean. [Glycine max

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Putnam-Evans, C.; Cormier, M.J.

    1987-04-01

    A calcium-dependent protein kinase activity from suspension-cultured soybean cells (Glycine max L. Wayne) was shown to be dependent on calcium but not calmodulin. The concentrations of free calcium required for half-maximal histone H1 phosphorylation and autophosphorylation were similar (greater than or equal to 2 micromolar). The protein kinase activity was stimulated 100-fold by greater than or equal to 10 micromolar-free calcium. When exogenous soybean or bovine brain calmodulin was added in high concentration (1 micromolar) to the purified kinase, calcium-dependent and -independent activities were weakly stimulated (less than or equal to 2-fold). Bovine serum albumin had a similar effect on both activities. The kinase was separated from a small amount of contaminating calmodulin by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After renaturation the protein kinase autophosphorylated and phosphorylated histone H1 in a calcium-dependent manner. Following electroblotting onto nitrocellulose, the kinase bound /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in the presence of KCl and MgCl/sub 2/, which indicated that the kinase itself is a high-affinity calcium-binding protein. Also, the mobility of one of two kinase bands in SDS gels was dependent on the presence of calcium. Autophosphorylation of the calmodulin-free kinase was inhibited by the calmodulin-binding compound N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7), showing that the inhibition of activity by W-7 is independent of calmodulin. These results show that soybean calcium-dependent protein kinase represents a new class of protein kinase which requires calcium but not calmodulin for activity.

  12. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  13. Nongenomic signaling of the retinoid X receptor through binding and inhibiting Gq in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Leonardo A.; Swales, Karen E.; Wray, Jessica A.; Damazo, Amilcar; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Warner, Timothy D.

    2007-01-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are important transcriptional nuclear hormone receptors, acting as either homodimers or the binding partner for at least one fourth of all the known human nuclear receptors. Functional nongenomic effects of nuclear receptors are poorly understood; however, recently peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, PPARβ, and the glucocorticoid receptor have all been found active in human platelets. Human platelets express RXRα and RXRβ. RXR ligands inhibit platelet aggregation and TXA2 release to ADP and the TXA2 receptors, but only weakly to collagen. ADP and TXA2 both signal via the G protein, Gq. RXR rapidly binds Gq but not Gi/z/o/t/gust in a ligand-dependent manner and inhibits Gq-induced Rac activation and intracellular calcium release. We propose that RXR ligands may have beneficial clinical actions through inhibition of platelet activation. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a novel nongenomic mode for nuclear receptor action and a functional cross-talk between G-protein and nuclear receptor signaling families. PMID:17213293

  14. Prostaglandin E₂ inhibits human lung fibroblast chemotaxis through disparate actions on different E-prostanoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Ji; Wang, Xing-Qi; Sato, Tadashi; Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Nakanishi, Masanori; Kim, Miok; Michalski, Joel; Nelson, Amy J; Sun, Jian-Hong; Farid, Maha; Basma, Hesham; Patil, Amol; Toews, Myron L; Liu, Xiangde; Rennard, Stephen I

    2011-01-01

    The migration of fibroblasts is believed to play a key role in both normal wound repair and abnormal tissue remodeling. Prostaglandin E (PGE)(2), a mediator that can inhibit many fibroblast functions including chemotaxis, was reported to be mediated by the E-prostanoid (EP) receptor EP2. PGE(2), however, can act on four receptors. This study was designed to determine if EP receptors, in addition to EP2, can modulate fibroblast chemotaxis. Using human fetal lung fibroblasts, the expression of all four EP receptors was demonstrated by Western blotting. EP2-selective and EP4-selective agonists inhibited both chemotaxis toward fibronectin in the blindwell assay and migration in a wound-closure assay. In contrast, EP1-selective and EP3-selective agonists stimulated cell migration in both assay systems. These results were confirmed using EP-selective antagonists. The role of both EP2 and EP4 receptors in mediating the PGE(2) inhibition of chemotaxis was also confirmed by small interfering RNA suppression. Furthermore, the role of EP receptors was confirmed by blocking the expected signaling pathways. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PGE(2) can act on multiple EP receptors in human lung fibroblasts, to exert disparate effects. Alterations in EP receptor expression may have the potential to alter PGE(2) action. Targeting specific EP receptors may offer therapeutic opportunities in conditions characterized by abnormal tissue repair and remodeling.

  15. Increased NMDA receptor inhibition at an increased Sevoflurane MAC

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sevoflurane potently enhances glycine receptor currents and more modestly decreases NMDA receptor currents, each of which may contribute to immobility. This modest NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane at a minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) could be reciprocally related to large potentiation of other inhibitory ion channels. If so, then reduced glycine receptor potency should increase NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane at MAC. Methods Indwelling lumbar subarachnoid catheters were surgically placed in 14 anesthetized rats. Rats were anesthetized with sevoflurane the next day, and a pre-infusion sevoflurane MAC was measured in duplicate using a tail clamp method. Artificial CSF (aCSF) containing either 0 or 4 mg/mL strychnine was then infused intrathecally at 4 μL/min, and the post-infusion baseline sevoflurane MAC was measured. Finally, aCSF containing strychnine (either 0 or 4 mg/mL) plus 0.4 mg/mL dizocilpine (MK-801) was administered intrathecally at 4 μL/min, and the post-dizocilpine sevoflurane MAC was measured. Results Pre-infusion sevoflurane MAC was 2.26%. Intrathecal aCSF alone did not affect MAC, but intrathecal strychnine significantly increased sevoflurane requirement. Addition of dizocilpine significantly decreased MAC in all rats, but this decrease was two times larger in rats without intrathecal strychnine compared to rats with intrathecal strychnine, a statistically significant (P < 0.005) difference that is consistent with increased NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane in rats receiving strychnine. Conclusions Glycine receptor antagonism increases NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane at MAC. The magnitude of anesthetic effects on a given ion channel may therefore depend on the magnitude of its effects on other receptors that modulate neuronal excitability. PMID:22672766

  16. Increased NMDA receptor inhibition at an increased Sevoflurane MAC.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Robert J; Thiesen, Roberto

    2012-06-06

    Sevoflurane potently enhances glycine receptor currents and more modestly decreases NMDA receptor currents, each of which may contribute to immobility. This modest NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane at a minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) could be reciprocally related to large potentiation of other inhibitory ion channels. If so, then reduced glycine receptor potency should increase NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane at MAC. Indwelling lumbar subarachnoid catheters were surgically placed in 14 anesthetized rats. Rats were anesthetized with sevoflurane the next day, and a pre-infusion sevoflurane MAC was measured in duplicate using a tail clamp method. Artificial CSF (aCSF) containing either 0 or 4 mg/mL strychnine was then infused intrathecally at 4 μL/min, and the post-infusion baseline sevoflurane MAC was measured. Finally, aCSF containing strychnine (either 0 or 4 mg/mL) plus 0.4 mg/mL dizocilpine (MK-801) was administered intrathecally at 4 μL/min, and the post-dizocilpine sevoflurane MAC was measured. Pre-infusion sevoflurane MAC was 2.26%. Intrathecal aCSF alone did not affect MAC, but intrathecal strychnine significantly increased sevoflurane requirement. Addition of dizocilpine significantly decreased MAC in all rats, but this decrease was two times larger in rats without intrathecal strychnine compared to rats with intrathecal strychnine, a statistically significant (P < 0.005) difference that is consistent with increased NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane in rats receiving strychnine. Glycine receptor antagonism increases NMDA receptor antagonism by sevoflurane at MAC. The magnitude of anesthetic effects on a given ion channel may therefore depend on the magnitude of its effects on other receptors that modulate neuronal excitability.

  17. Inhibition of opioid release in the rat spinal cord by α2C adrenergic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Song, Bingbing; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2008-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors that control the release of opioid peptides in the spinal cord may play an important role in pain modulation. Norepinephrine, released by a descending pathway originating in the brainstem, is a powerful inducer of analgesia in the spinal cord. Adrenergic α2C receptors are present in opioid-containing terminals in the dorsal horn, where they could modulate opioid release. The goal of this study was to investigate this possibility. Opioid release was evoked from rat spinal cord slices by incubating them with the sodium channel opener veratridine in the presence of peptidase inhibitors (actinonin, captopril and thiorphan), and was measured in situ through the internalization of μ-opioid receptors in dorsal horn neurons. Veratridine produced internalization in 70% of these neurons. The α2 receptor agonists clonidine, guanfacine, medetomidine and UK-14304 inhibited the evoked μ-opioid receptor internalization with IC50s of 1.7 μM, 248 nM, 0.3 nM and 22 nM, respectively. However, inhibition by medetomidine was only partial, and inhibition by UK-14304 reversed itself at concentrations higher than 50 nM. None of these agonists inhibited μ-opioid receptor internalization produced by endomorphin-2, showing that they inhibited opioid release and not the internalization itself. The inhibition produced by clonidine, guanfacine or UK-14304 was completely reversed by the selective α2C antagonist JP-1203. In contrast, inhibition by guanfacine was not prevented by the α2A antagonist BRL-44408. These results show that α2C receptors inhibit the release of opioids in the dorsal horn. This action may serve to shut down the opioid system when the adrenergic system is active. PMID:18343461

  18. Inhibition of IGF receptor signaling and hepatoma cell growth by an antibody to ligand oligopeptide of receptor.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Diao, Zhenyu; Deng, Xiaozhao

    2008-02-01

    Research on insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system have shown it to be potent mitogen for hepatoma cells and made it an attractive therapeutic target. But little strategy has been reported to date on targeting and sequestrating IGF against hepatoma. This study is based on the capability of ligand oligopeptide (LOP) to recognize IGF receptor with high efficiency, which is over-expressed on some hepatoma cells. We have been hypothesizing that antibody to LOP would mimic the extracellular ligand-binding domain of IGF receptor and inhibit receptor signaling and cell proliferation. Gene encoding for LOP [E5 (EPFRSPDLALETYG)] of IGF receptor was inserted into HBc carrier for expression in Escherichia coli. The monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific LOP potently inhibited signal transduction mediated by the IGF-IR interaction with IGF-I. Furthermore, it exhibited 47% inhibitory rate of soft agar colony formation and also induced apoptosis. These results indicate an anti-hepatoma potential of the mAb to an LOP of IGF receptor could block the activation of receptor and downstream signaling pathways, and suppress the biological effects mediated by receptor.

  19. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention.

  20. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention. PMID:27040077

  1. Inhibition of calcium channels by neurokinin receptor and signal transduction in hamster submandibular ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Endoh, T; Suzuki, T

    1999-04-16

    Both substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) are known as neurotransmitters of the submandibular ganglion (SMG) neurons. SP released from collaterals of the sensory nerves also regulates the excitability of SMG neurons. It has recently been shown that neurokinins (NK) inhibit calcium channels in various neurons. In this study, the effects of NK on voltage-dependent calcium channel current (I(Ca)) in SMG cells were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp recording method. NK-1 receptor agonist and SP caused inhibition of I(Ca) in SMG cells in a dose-dependent manner. NK-1 receptor agonist inhibited L-, N- and P/Q-type I(Ca) components. GDP-beta-S included in the pipette solution reduced the NK-1 receptor agonist-induced inhibition of I(Ca). In addition, NK-1 receptor agonist-induced inhibition of I(Ca) was reduced by stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) but not cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The results provided evidence for a signal transduction pathway in which calcium channel inhibition by NK receptors required activation of G-protein and PKC-affected step phosphorylation in SMG neurons.

  2. CysLT1 leukotriene receptor antagonists inhibit the effects of nucleotides acting at P2Y receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mamedova, Liaman; Capra, Valérie; Accomazzo, Maria Rosa; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Ferrario, Silvia; Fumagalli, Marta; Abbracchio, Maria P.; Rovati, G. Enrico; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Montelukast and pranlukast are orally active leukotriene receptor antagonists selective for the CysLT1 receptor. Conversely, the hP2Y1,2,4,6,11,12,13,14 receptors represent a large family of GPCRs responding to either adenine or uracil nucleotides, or to sugar-nucleotides. Montelukast and pranlukast were found to inhibit nucleotide-induced calcium mobilization in a human monocyte-macrophage like cell line, DMSO-differentiated U937 (dU937). Montelukast and pranlukast inhibited the effects of UTP with IC50 values of 7.7 and 4.3 μM, respectively, and inhibited the effects of UDP with IC50 values of 4.5 and 1.6 μM, respectively, in an insurmountable manner. Furthermore, ligand binding studies using [3H]LTD4 excluded the possibility of orthosteric nucleotide binding to the CysLT1 receptor. dU937 cells were shown to express P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y11, P2Y13 and P2Y14 receptors. Therefore, these antagonists were studied functionally in a heterologous expression system for the human P2Y receptors. In 1321N1 astrocytoma cells stably expressing human P2Y1,2,4,6 receptors, CysLT1 antagonists inhibited both the P2Y agonist-induced activation of phospholipase C and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. IC50 values at P2Y1 and P2Y6 receptors were <1 μM. In control astrocytoma cells expressing an endogenous M3 muscarinic receptor, 10 μM montelukast had no effect on the carbachol-induced rise in intracellular Ca2+. These data demonstrated that CysLT1 receptor antagonists interact functionally with signaling pathways of P2Y receptors, and this should foster the study of possible implications for the clinical use of these compounds in asthma or in other inflammatory conditions. PMID:16280122

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Calcium- and Phosphorylation-dependentCalmodulin Complexes in Mammalian Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Wang, Daojing

    2006-05-26

    Protein conformational changes due to cofactor binding (e.g. metal ions, heme) and/or posttranslational modifications (e.g. phosphorylation) modulate dynamic protein complexes. Calmodulin (CaM) plays an essential role in regulating calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) signaling and homeostasis. No systematic approach on the identification of phosphorylation-dependent Ca{sup 2+}/CaM binding proteins has been published. Herein, we report a proteome-wide study of phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins from mammalian cells. This method, termed 'Dynamic Phosphoprotein Complex Trapping', 'DPPC Trapping' for short, utilizes a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays. The basic strategy is to drastically shift the equilibrium towards endogenous phosphorylation of Ser, Thr, and Tyr at the global scale by inhibiting corresponding phosphatases in vivo. The phosphorylation-dependent calmodulin-binding proteins are then trapped in vitro in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner by CaM-Sepharose chromatography. Finally, the isolated calmodulin-binding proteins are separated by SDS-PAGE and identified by LC/MS/MS. In parallel, the phosphorylation-dependent binding is visualized by silver staining and/or Western blotting. Using this method, we selectively identified over 120 CaM-associated proteins including many previously uncharacterized. We verified ubiquitin-protein ligase EDD1, inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 (IP{sub 3}R1), and ATP-dependent RNA helicase DEAD box protein 3 (DDX3), as phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins. To demonstrate the utilities of our method in understanding biological pathways, we showed that pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 in vivo by staurosporine-sensitive kinase(s), but not by PKA/PKG/PKC, significantly reduced the affinity of its Ca{sup 2+}-dependent CaM binding. However, pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 did not substantially affect its Ca{sup 2+}-independent CaM binding. We further showed that phosphatase PP1, but not PP2A or PP2B, plays a critical role in

  4. Activation of histamine H3 receptors in human nasal mucosa inhibits sympathetic vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Varty, LoriAnn M; Gustafson, Eric; Laverty, Maureen; Hey, John A

    2004-01-19

    The peripheral histamine H3 receptor is a presynaptic heterologous receptor located on postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers innervating sympathetic effector systems such as blood vessels and the heart. An extensive body of evidence shows that activation of the histamine H3 receptor attenuates sympathetic tone by presynaptic inhibition of noradrenaline release. It is proposed that this sympathoinhibitory action, in vivo, leads to reduced vasoconstriction, thereby eliciting a vasodilatory effect. In humans, the peripheral histamine H3 receptor has also been shown to exert a sympathoinhibitory function on specific peripheral autonomic effector systems. For example, human saphenous vein and heart possess functional presynaptic histamine H3 receptors on the sympathetic nerve terminals that upon activation decrease the sympathetic tone to these respective organs. The present studies were conducted to define the role of histamine H3 receptors on neurogenic sympathetic vasoconstrictor responses in human nasal turbinate mucosa. Contractility studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of histamine H3 receptor activation on sympathetic vasoconstriction in surgically isolated human nasal turbinate mucosa. We found that the histamine H3 receptor agonist, (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (30 and 300 nM), inhibited electrical field stimulation-induced (neurogenic) sympathetic vasoconstriction in a concentration-dependent fashion. Pretreatment with the selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, clobenpropit (100 nM), blocked the sympathoinhibitory effect of (R)-alpha-methylhistamine on the neurogenic sympathetic vasoconstriction. In addition, analysis of Taqman mRNA expression studies showed a specific, high level of distribution of the histamine H3 receptor localized in the human nasal mucosa. Taken together, these studies indicate that histamine H3 receptors modulate vascular contractile responses in human nasal mucosa most likely by inhibiting noradrenaline release from

  5. Cloned M1 muscarinic receptors mediate both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, R; Pinkas-Kramarski, R; Sokolovsky, M

    1988-01-01

    The rat M1 muscarinic receptor gene was cloned and expressed in a rat cell line lacking endogenous muscarinic receptors. Assignment of the cloned receptors to the M1 class was pharmacologically confirmed by their high affinity for the M1-selective muscarinic antagonist pirenzepine and low affinity for the M2-selective antagonist AF-DX-116. Guanylyl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] converted agonist binding sites on the receptor, from high-affinity to the low-affinity state, thus indicating that the cloned receptors couple to endogenous G-proteins. The cloned receptors mediated both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide hydrolysis, but by different mechanisms. Pertussis toxin blocked the inhibition of adenylate cyclase (indicating coupling of the receptor to inhibitory G-protein), but did not affect phosphoinositide turnover. Furthermore, the stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis was less efficient than the inhibition of adenylate cyclase. These findings demonstrate that cloned M1 receptors are capable of mediating multiple responses in the cell by coupling to different effectors, possibly to different G-proteins. Images PMID:2846274

  6. Structure and mechanism of activity-based inhibition of the EGF-Receptor by Mig6

    PubMed Central

    Ficarro, Scott B.; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Byung Il; Cho, Ahye; Kim, Kihong; Park, Angela K.J.; Park, Woong-Yang; Murray, Bradley; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Marto, Jarrod A.; Cho, Jeonghee; Eck, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Mig6 is a feedback inhibitor that directly binds, inhibits and drives internalization of ErbB-family receptors. Mig6 selectivity targets activated receptors. Here we find that the EGF receptor phosphorylates Mig6 on Tyr394, and that this phosphorylation is primed by prior phosphorylation of an adjacent residue, Tyr395, by Src. Crystal structures of human EGFR–Mig6 complexes reveal the structural basis for enhanced phosphorylation of primed Mig6 and show how Mig6 rearranges after phosphorylation by EGFR to effectively irreversibly inhibit the same receptor that catalyzed its phosphorylation. This dual phosphorylation site allows Mig6 to inactivate EGFR in a manner that requires activation of the target receptor and can be modulated by Src. Loss of Mig6 is a driving event in human cancer; analysis of 1057 gliomas reveals frequent focal deletions of ERRFI, the gene that encodes Mig6, in EGFR-amplified glioblastomas. PMID:26280531

  7. Stimulation and inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by distinct 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors.

    PubMed

    De Vivo, M; Maayani, S

    1990-10-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) stimulates basal adenylyl cyclase activity in membranes from guinea pig or rat hippocampi, but 5-HT inhibits forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in these same membranes. The opposing effects of 5-HT on adenylyl cyclase activity indicate that distinct 5-HT receptors, positively and negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase, are present in these membranes. Stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity is mediated by two distinct 5-HT receptors. The receptor with lower affinity for 5-HT, designated as RL, is apparently homologous with a 5-HT receptor present in rat collicular membranes, but it is not homologous with the stimulatory receptor characterized in neuroblastoma hybrid cell (NCB-20) membranes. The receptor with higher affinity for 5-HT is homologous with the 5-HT1A binding site. The magnitude of stimulation by 5-HT1A receptors is variable with respect to stimulation by RL and is sometimes completely absent. Inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity, in membranes from either rat or guinea pig hippocampus or rat cortex, is a functional correlate of the 5-HT1A binding site. This inhibitory response was used to determine the pharmacological characteristics of drugs that reportedly have high affinity for 5-HT1A binding sites, such as 1-[2-(4-aminophenyl)ethyl]-4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazine (PAPP) and (-)pindolol. PAPP inhibited adenylyl cyclase activity in guinea pig hippocampal membranes with an EC50 value of 27 +/- 3 nM. (-)Pindolol was a partial agonist in inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity in guinea pig and rat hippocampal membranes. Because of the low intrinsic activity of (-)pindolol, it was tested as an antagonist of the inhibition produced by 5-HT1A receptor agonists in rat hippocampal membranes. The Kb of (-)pindolol was 40 nM as measured by a Schild plot. (-)Propranolol was a simple competitive antagonist at the rat hippocampal receptor with a Kb value of 550 nM. In summary, guinea pig

  8. CD44 Antibody Inhibition of Macrophage Phagocytosis Targets Fcγ Receptor- and Complement Receptor 3-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Amash, Alaa; Wang, Lin; Wang, Yawen; Bhakta, Varsha; Fairn, Gregory D; Hou, Ming; Peng, Jun; Sheffield, William P; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-04-15

    Targeting CD44, a major leukocyte adhesion molecule, using specific Abs has been shown beneficial in several models of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The mechanisms contributing to the anti-inflammatory effects of CD44 Abs, however, remain poorly understood. Phagocytosis is a key component of immune system function and can play a pivotal role in autoimmune states where CD44 Abs have shown to be effective. In this study, we show that the well-known anti-inflammatory CD44 Ab IM7 can inhibit murine macrophage phagocytosis of RBCs. We assessed three selected macrophage phagocytic receptor systems: Fcγ receptors (FcγRs), complement receptor 3 (CR3), and dectin-1. Treatment of macrophages with IM7 resulted in significant inhibition of FcγR-mediated phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized RBCs. The inhibition of FcγR-mediated phagocytosis was at an early stage in the phagocytic process involving both inhibition of the binding of the target RBC to the macrophages and postbinding events. This CD44 Ab also inhibited CR3-mediated phagocytosis of C3bi-opsonized RBCs, but it did not affect the phagocytosis of zymosan particles, known to be mediated by the C-type lectin dectin-1. Other CD44 Abs known to have less broad anti-inflammatory activity, including KM114, KM81, and KM201, did not inhibit FcγR-mediated phagocytosis of RBCs. Taken together, these findings demonstrate selective inhibition of FcγR and CR3-mediated phagocytosis by IM7 and suggest that this broadly anti-inflammatory CD44 Ab inhibits these selected macrophage phagocytic pathways. The understanding of the immune-regulatory effects of CD44 Abs is important in the development and optimization of therapeutic strategies for the potential treatment of autoimmune conditions.

  9. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Brutus, Alexandre; Segonzac, Cécile; Roy, Sonali; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Oh, Man-Ho; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Menke, Frank L; Huber, Steven C; He, Sheng Yang; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-03-28

    Innate immunity relies on the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the host cell's surface. Many plant PRRs are kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), which perceives the elf18 peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor Tu, is activated upon ligand binding by phosphorylation on its tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of a single tyrosine residue, Y836, is required for activation of EFR and downstream immunity to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. A tyrosine phosphatase, HopAO1, secreted by P. syringae, reduces EFR phosphorylation and prevents subsequent immune responses. Thus, host and pathogen compete to take control of PRR tyrosine phosphorylation used to initiate antibacterial immunity.

  10. Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.T. )

    1991-08-01

    The effect of Ca2+ and calmodulin on phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins was studied. Secretory granules were incubated in a phosphorylation reaction mixture containing (32P)ATP and test reagents. The 32P-labeled proteins were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 32P content was visualized by autoradiography, and the relative intensities of specific bands were quantitated. When the reaction mixture contained EGTA and no added Ca2+, 32P was incorporated into two proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 13,000. When 10(-4) M Ca2+ was added without EGTA, two additional proteins (58,000 and 48,000 Mr) were phosphorylated, and the 13,000-Mr protein was absent. The addition of 2.4 microM calmodulin markedly enhanced the phosphorylation of the 58,000- and 48,000-Mr proteins and resulted in the phosphorylation of a major protein whose molecular weight (64,000 Mr) is identical to that of one of the calmodulin binding proteins located on the granule surface. Calmodulin had no effect on phosphorylation in the absence of Ca2+ but was effective in the presence of calcium between 10 nM and 50 microM. Trifluoperazine and calmidazolium, calmodulin antagonists, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the calmodulin effect. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, a phorbol ester that activates protein kinase C, produced no increase in phosphorylation, and 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methyl piperazine dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, had no effect. These results indicate that Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and endogenous substrates are present in islet secretory granules.

  11. Two PTP receptors mediate CSPG inhibition by convergent and divergent signaling pathways in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ohtake, Yosuke; Wong, Daniella; Abdul-Muneer, P. M.; Selzer, Michael E.; Li, Shuxin

    2016-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (PTPσ) and its subfamily member LAR act as transmembrane receptors that mediate growth inhibition of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Inhibition of either receptor increases axon growth into and beyond scar tissues after CNS injury. However, it is unclear why neurons express two similar CSPG receptors, nor whether they use the same or different intracellular pathways. We have now studied the signaling pathways of these two receptors using N2A cells and primary neurons derived from knockout mice. We demonstrate that both receptors share certain signaling pathways (RhoA, Akt and Erk), but also use distinct signals to mediate CSPG actions. Activation of PTPσ by CSPGs selectively inactivated CRMP2, APC, S6 kinase and CREB. By contrast LAR activation inactivated PKCζ, cofilin and LKB1. For the first time, we propose a model of the signaling pathways downstream of these two CSPG receptors. We also demonstrate that deleting both receptors exhibits additive enhancement of axon growth in adult neuronal cultures in vitro. Our findings elucidate the novel downstream pathways of CSPGs and suggest potential synergy of blocking their two PTP receptors. PMID:27849007

  12. Calmodulin as a downstream gene of octopamine-OAR α1 signalling mediates olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Li, L; Yang, P; Ma, Z

    2017-02-01

    The migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) shows aggregative traits in nymph marching bands and swarm formations through mutual olfactory attraction of conspecifics. However, olfactory preference in different nymph stages in gregarious locusts is not sufficiently explored. In this study, we found that the nymph olfactory preference for gregarious volatiles exhibited obvious variations at different developmental stages. The gregarious locusts show attractive response to conspecific volatiles from the third stadium. Transcriptome comparison between third- and fourth-stadium nymphs showed that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) pathways are significantly enriched. Amongst the genes present in GPCR pathways, the expression level of calmodulin in locust brains significantly increased from the third- to the fourth-stadium nymphs. Amongst the four octopamine receptors (OARs) belonging to the GPCR family, only OAR α1 showed similar expression patterns to those of calmodulin, and knockdown of OAR α1 reduced the expression level of calmodulin. RNA interference of calmodulin decreased locomotion and induced the loss of olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts. Moreover, the activation of OAR α1 in calmodulin-knockdown locusts did not induce olfactory attraction of the nymphs to gregarious volatiles. Thus, calmodulin as a downstream gene of octopamine-OAR α1 (OA-OAR α1) signalling mediates olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts. Overall, this study provides novel insights into the mechanism of OA-OAR α1 signalling involved in olfactory attraction of gregarious locusts.

  13. agr receptor mutants reveal distinct modes of inhibition by staphylococcal autoinducing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Geisinger, Edward; Muir, Tom W.; Novick, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Through the agr quorum-sensing system, staphylococci secrete unique autoinducing peptides (AIPs) and detect their concentration via the AgrC transmembrane receptor, coordinating local bacterial population density with global changes in gene expression. Unique AIP and AgrC variants exist within and between species, and although autologous interactions lead to agr activation, heterologous interactions usually lead to cross-inhibition, resulting in natural quorum-sensing interference. To gain insight into the mechanisms responsible for these phenomena at the level of the receptor, we used random mutagenesis to isolate variants of Staphylococcus aureus AgrC-I with constitutive activity. Constitutive mutations in the sensor domain of the receptor were localized to the last transmembrane helix, whereas those in the histidine kinase domain were mostly clustered to a region near the phosphorylation site histidine. Analysis of these mutants with a range of noncognate AIPs revealed that inhibition is manifested by inverse agonism in certain heterologous pairings and by neutral antagonism in others. In addition, we isolated and characterized an AgrC sensor domain mutant with dramatically broadened activation specificity and reduced sensitivity to inhibition, identifying a single amino acid as a critical determinant of ligand-mediated inhibition. These results suggest that certain noncognate AIPs stabilize an inhibitory receptor conformation that may be a critical feature of the ligand–receptor interaction not initially appreciated in previous analyses of agr inhibition. PMID:19147840

  14. Chemical Modification and Irreversible Inhibition of Striatal A2a Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    JACOBSON, KENNETH A.; STILES, GARY L.; JI, XIAO-DUO

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The ligand recognition site of A2a-adenosine receptors in rabbit striatal membranes was probed using non-site-directed labeling reagents and specific affinity labels. Exposure of membranes to diethylpyrocarbonate at a concentration of 2.5 mm, followed by washing, was found to inhibit the binding of [3H]CGS 21680 and [3H]xanthine amine congener to A2a receptors, by 86 and 30%, respectively. Protection from diethylpyrocarbonate inactivation by an adenosine receptor agonist, 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, and an antagonist, theophylline, suggested the presence of two histidyl residues on the receptor, one associated with agonist binding and the other with antagonist binding. Binding of [3H]CGS 21680 or [3H]xanthine amine congener was partially restored after incubation with 250 mm hydroxylamine, further supporting histidine as the modification site. Preincubation with disulfide-reactive reagents, dithiothreitol or sodium dithionite, at >5 mm inhibited radioligand binding, indicating the presence of essential disulfide bridges in A2a receptors, whereas the concentration of mercaptoethanol required to inhibit binding was >50 mm. A number of isothiocyanate-bearing affinity labels derived from the A2a-selective agonist 2-[(2-aminoethylamino)carbonylethylphenylethylamino]-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (APEC) were synthesized and found to inhibit A2a receptor binding in rabbit and bovine striatal membranes. Binding to rabbit A1 receptors was not inhibited. Preincubation with the affinity label 4-isothiocyanatophenylaminothiocarbonyl-APEC (100 nm) diminished the Bmax for [3H]CGS 21680 binding by 71%, and the Kd was unaffected, suggesting a direct modification of the ligand binding site. Reversal of 4-isothiocyanatophenylaminothiocarbonyl-APEC inhibition of [3H]CGS 21680 binding with hydroxylamine suggested that the site of modification by the isothiocyanate is a cysteine residue. A bromoacetyl derivative of APEC was ineffective as an affinity label at

  15. Allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhuang; Li, Linlang; Zheng, Long-Tai; Xu, Zhihong; Guo, Lin; Zhen, Xuechu

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that sigma-1 receptor orthodox agonists can inhibit neuroinflammation. SKF83959 (3-methyl-6-chloro-7,8-hydroxy-1-[3-methylphenyl]-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine), an atypical dopamine receptor-1 agonist, has been recently identified as a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of SKF83959 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia. Our results indicated that SKF83959 significantly suppressed the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species. All of these responses were blocked by selective sigma-1 receptor antagonists (BD1047 or BD1063) and by ketoconazole (an inhibitor of enzyme cytochrome c17 to inhibit the synthesis of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA). Additionally, we found that SKF83959 promoted the binding activity of DHEA with sigma-1 receptors, and enhanced the inhibitory effects of DHEA on LPS-induced microglia activation in a synergic manner. Furthermore, in a microglia-conditioned media system, SKF83959 inhibited the cytotoxicity of conditioned medium generated by LPS-activated microglia toward HT-22 neuroblastoma cells. Taken together, our study provides the first evidence that allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation. SKF83959 is a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Our results indicated that SKF83959 enhanced the activity of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in a synergic manner, and inhibited the activation of BV2 microglia and the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).

  16. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Azadirachtin interacts with retinoic acid receptors and inhibits retinoic acid-mediated biological responses.

    PubMed

    Thoh, Maikho; Babajan, Banaganapalli; Raghavendra, Pongali B; Sureshkumar, Chitta; Manna, Sunil K

    2011-02-11

    Considering the role of retinoids in regulation of more than 500 genes involved in cell cycle and growth arrest, a detailed understanding of the mechanism and its regulation is useful for therapy. The extract of the medicinal plant Neem (Azadirachta indica) is used against several ailments especially for anti-inflammatory, anti-itching, spermicidal, anticancer, and insecticidal activities. In this report we prove the detailed mechanism on the regulation of retinoic acid-mediated cell signaling by azadirachtin, active components of neem extract. Azadirachtin repressed all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA)-mediated nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) activation, not the DNA binding but the NF-κB-dependent gene expression. It did not inhibit IκBα degradation, IκBα kinase activity, or p65 phosphorylation and its nuclear translocation but inhibited NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression. Azadirachtin inhibited TRAF6-mediated, but not TRAF2-mediated NF-κB activation. It inhibited ATRA-induced Sp1 and CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) DNA binding. Azadirachtin inhibited ATRA binding with retinoid receptors, which is supported by biochemical and in silico evidences. Azadirachtin showed strong interaction with retinoid receptors. It suppressed ATRA-mediated removal of retinoid receptors, bound with DNA by inhibiting ATRA binding to its receptors. Overall, our data suggest that azadirachtin interacts with retinoic acid receptors and suppresses ATRA binding, inhibits falling off the receptors, and activates transcription factors like CREB, Sp1, NF-κB, etc. Thus, azadirachtin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-metastatic responses by a novel pathway that would be beneficial for further anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer therapies.

  18. Potent and long-lasting inhibition of human P2X2 receptors by copper

    PubMed Central

    Punthambaker, Sukanya; Hume, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    P2X receptors are ion channels gated by ATP. In rodents these channels are modulated by zinc and copper. Zinc is co-released with neurotransmitter at some synapses and can modulate neuronal activity, but the role of copper in the brain is unclear. Rat P2X2 receptors show potentiation by 2–100 µM zinc or copper in the presence of a submaximal concentration of ATP but are inhibited by zinc or copper at concentrations above 100 µM. In contrast, human P2X2 (hP2X2) receptors show no potentiation and are strongly inhibited by zinc over the range of 2–100 µM. The effect of copper on hP2X2 is of interest because there are human brain disorders in which copper concentration is altered. We found that hP2X2 receptors are potently inhibited by copper (IC50 = 40 nM). ATP responsiveness recovered extremely slowly after copper washout, with full recovery requiring over 1 h. ATP binding facilitated copper binding but not unbinding from this inhibitory site. A mutant receptor in which the first six extracellular cysteines were deleted, C(1–6)S, showed normal copper inhibition, however reducing agents dramatically accelerated recovery from copper inhibition in wild type hP2X2 and the C(1–6)S mutant, indicating that the final two disulfide bonds are required to maintain the high affinity copper binding site. Three histidine residues required for normal zinc inhibition were also required for normal copper inhibition. Humans with untreated Wilson’s disease have excess amounts of copper in the brain. The high copper sensitivity of hP2X2 receptors suggests that they are non-functional in these patients. PMID:24067922

  19. Relationship between muscarinic receptor occupancy and adenylate cyclase inhibition in the rabbit myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlert, F.J.

    1985-11-01

    The muscarinic receptor-binding properties of a series of muscarinic drugs were compared with their effects on adenylate cyclase in membranes of the rabbit myocardium. When measured by competitive inhibition of (TH)-N-methylscopolamine binding, the competition curves of the various agonists were adequately described by the ternary complex model. This model assumes that the receptor can bind reversibly with a guanine nucleotide binding protein in the membrane and that the affinity of the agonist for the receptor-guanine nucleotide-binding protein complex is higher than that for the free receptor. A satisfactory fit of the ternary complex model to the data could only be achieved assuming that very little receptor is precoupled with the guanine nucleotide-binding protein in the absence of agonist. There was good agreement between the efficacy of each agonist as measured by inhibition of adenylate cyclase and the estimate of the positive cooperativity between the binding of the agonist receptor complex and the guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate (0.1 mM) had no significant effect on the binding of (TH)N-methylscopolamine but caused an increase in the concentration of the various agonists required for half-maximal receptor occupancy. There was good correlation between efficacy as measured by inhibition of adenylate cyclase and the influence of guanosine 5'-triphosphate on binding properties.

  20. Manipulation of receptor oligomerization as a strategy to inhibit signaling by TNF superfamily members.

    PubMed

    Warren, Julia T; Nelson, Christopher A; Decker, Corinne E; Zou, Wei; Fremont, Daved H; Teitelbaum, Steven L

    2014-08-19

    Signaling by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) in response to its ligand RANKL, which is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily of cytokines, stimulates osteoclast formation and bone resorption. Thus, this ligand-receptor pair is a therapeutic target for various disorders, such as osteoporosis and metastasis of cancer to bone. RANKL exists as a physiological homotrimer, with each monomer recognizing a single molecule of RANK or the decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG), which inhibits osteoclastogenesis. We engineered a RANKL protein in which all three monomers of RANKL were encoded as a single polypeptide chain, which enabled us to independently control receptor binding at each binding interface. To generate an effective RANK inhibitor, we used an unbiased forward genetic approach to identify mutations in RANKL that had a 500-fold increased affinity for RANK but had decreased affinity for the decoy receptor OPG. Incorporating mutations that blocked receptor binding into this high-affinity RANKL variant generated a mutant RANKL that completely inhibited wild-type RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and bone resorption in mice. Our approach may be generalized to enable the inhibition of other TNF receptor signaling systems, which are implicated in a wide range of pathological conditions.

  1. Heterogeneity of prejunctional NPY receptor-mediated inhibition of cardiac neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Serone, Adrian P; Wright, Christine E; Angus, James A

    1999-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been proposed as the candidate inhibitory peptide mediating interactions between sympathetic and vagal neurotransmission in several species, including man. Here, we have defined the NPY receptors involved in modulation of cardiac autonomic neurotransmission using receptor-selective agonists and antagonists in the rabbit and guinea-pig isolated right atria.In isolated atrial preparations, sympathetically-mediated tachycardia (ST; with atropine 1 μM) or vagally-mediated bradycardia (VB; with propranolol 0.1–1 μM) in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1–4 pulses) were tested 0–30 min after incubation with single concentrations of vehicle, NPY (0.01–10 μM), the Y2 receptor agonist N-Acetyl-[Leu28,31]NPY(24–36) (termed N-A[L]NPY(24–36)) or the Y1 receptor agonist [Leu31,Pro34]NPY (LP). The effect of NPY on the concentration-chronotropic response curves to isoprenaline and bethanechol were also assessed.Guinea-pig atria: NPY and N-A[L]NPY(24–36) caused concentration-dependent inhibition of VB and ST to EFS. Both peptides caused maximal inhibition of VB and ST within 10 min incubation and this remained constant. LP caused a concentration-dependent, transient inhibition of ST which was antagonized by the Y1-receptor antagonist GR231118 (0.3 μM), with apparent competitive kinetics. Rabbit atria: NPY (1 or 10 μM) had no effect on VB at any time point, but both NPY and LP caused a transient (∼10 min) inhibition of sympathetic tachycardia. This inhibition could be prevented by 0.3 μM GR231118. N-A[L]NPY(24–36) had no effect on ST. NPY had no effect on the response to β-adrenoceptor stimulation by isoprenaline nor muscarinic-receptor stimulation by bethanechol in either species.Thus, in the guinea-pig, NPY causes a stable inhibition of both VB and ST to EFS via Y2 receptors and transient inhibition of ST via Y1 receptors. In contrast in the rabbit, NPY has no effect on the cardiac vagus and

  2. Hypothermia increases aquaporin 4 (AQP4) plasma membrane abundance in human primary cortical astrocytes via a calcium/ transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4)- and calmodulin-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Salman, Mootaz M; Kitchen, Philip; Woodroofe, M Nicola; Brown, James E; Bill, Roslyn M; Conner, Alex C; Conner, Matthew T

    2017-09-19

    Human aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is the primary water channel protein in brain astrocytes. Hypothermia is known to cause astrocyte swelling in culture, but the precise role of AQP4 in this process is unknown. Primary human cortical astrocytes were cultured under hypothermic (32°C) or normothermic (37°C) conditions. AQP4 transcript, total protein and surface localized protein were quantified using RT-qPCR, sandwich ELISA with whole cell lysates, or cell-surface biotinylation followed by ELISA analysis of the surface-localized protein, respectively. Four-hour mild hypothermic treatment increased the surface localization of AQP4 in human astrocytes to 155 ± 4% of normothermic controls, despite no change in total protein expression levels. The hypothermia-mediated increase in AQP4 surface abundance on human astrocytes was blocked using either calmodulin antagonist (trifluoperazine; TFP); TRPV4 antagonist, HC-067047 or calcium chelation using EGTA-AM. The TRPV4 agonist (GSK1016790A) mimicked the effect of hypothermia compared with untreated normothermic astrocytes. Hypothermia led to an increase in surface localization of AQP4 in human astrocytes through a mechanism likely dependent on the TRPV4 calcium channel and calmodulin activation. Understanding the effects of hypothermia on astrocytic AQP4 cell-surface expression may help develop new treatments for brain swelling based on an in-depth mechanistic understanding of AQP4 translocation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Calmodulin and calcium interplay in the modulation of TRPC5 channel activity. Identification of a novel C-terminal domain for calcium/calmodulin-mediated facilitation.

    PubMed

    Ordaz, Benito; Tang, Jisen; Xiao, Rui; Salgado, Alfonso; Sampieri, Alicia; Zhu, Michael X; Vaca, Luis

    2005-09-02

    TRPC5 forms Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channels important for neurite outgrowth and growth cone morphology of hippocampal neurons. Here we studied the activation of mouse TRPC5 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary and human embryonic kidney 293 cells by agonist stimulation of several receptors that couple to the phosphoinositide signaling cascade and the role of calmodulin (CaM) on the activation. We showed that exogenous application of 10 microM CaM through patch pipette accelerated the agonist-induced channel activation by 2.8-fold, with the time constant for half-activation reduced from 4.25 +/- 0.4 to 1.56 +/- 0.85 min. We identified a novel CaM-binding site located at the C terminus of TRPC5, 95 amino acids downstream from the previously determined common CaM/IP3R-binding (CIRB) domain for all TRPC proteins. Deletion of the novel CaM-binding site attenuated the acceleration in channel activation induced by CaM. However, disruption of the CIRB domain from TRPC5 rendered the channel irresponsive to agonist stimulation without affecting the cell surface expression of the channel protein. Furthermore, we showed that high (>5 microM) intracellular free Ca2+ inhibited the current density without affecting the time course of TRPC5 activation by receptor agonists. These results demonstrated that intracellular Ca2+ has dual and opposite effects on the activation of TRPC5. The novel CaM-binding site is important for the Ca2+/CaM-mediated facilitation, whereas the CIRB domain is critical for the overall response of receptor-induced TRPC5 channel activation.

  4. Calmodulin is responsible for Ca2+-dependent regulation of TRPA1 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Raquibul; Leeson-Payne, Alasdair T. S.; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Zhang, Xuming

    2017-01-01

    TRPA1 is a Ca2+-permeable ion channel involved in many sensory disorders such as pain, itch and neuropathy. Notably, the function of TRPA1 depends on Ca2+, with low Ca2+ potentiating and high Ca2+ inactivating TRPA1. However, it remains unknown how Ca2+ exerts such contrasting effects. Here, we show that Ca2+ regulates TRPA1 through calmodulin, which binds to TRPA1 in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Calmodulin binding enhanced TRPA1 sensitivity and Ca2+-evoked potentiation of TRPA1 at low Ca2+, but inhibited TRPA1 sensitivity and promoted TRPA1 desensitization at high Ca2+. Ca2+-dependent potentiation and inactivation of TRPA1 were selectively prevented by disrupting the interaction of the carboxy-lobe of calmodulin with a calmodulin-binding domain in the C-terminus of TRPA1. Calmodulin is thus a critical Ca2+ sensor enabling TRPA1 to respond to diverse Ca2+ signals distinctly. PMID:28332600

  5. Inhibiting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a widely distributed cell surface receptor that responds to several extracellular signaling molecules through an intracellular tyrosine kinase, which phosphorylates target enzymes to trigger a downstream molecular cascade. Since the discovery that EGFR mutations and amplifications are critical in a number of cancers, efforts have been under way to develop and use targeted EGFR inhibitors. These efforts have met with some spectacular successes, but many patients have not responded as expected, have subsequently developed drug-resistant tumors, or have suffered serious side effects from the therapies to date. CCR Investigators are studying EGFR from multiple vantage points with the goal of developing even better strategies to defeat EGFR-related cancers.

  6. Use-dependent inhibition of P2X3 receptors by nanomolar agonist.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Emily B; Brink, Thaddeus S; Bergson, Pamela; Voigt, Mark M; Cook, Sean P

    2005-08-10

    P2X3 receptors desensitize within 100 ms of channel activation, yet recovery from desensitization requires several minutes. The molecular basis for this slow rate of recovery is unknown. We designed experiments to test the hypothesis that this slow recovery is attributable to the high affinity (< 1 nM) of desensitized P2X3 receptors for agonist. We found that agonist binding to the desensitized state provided a mechanism for potent inhibition of P2X3 current. Sustained applications of 0.5 nM ATP inhibited > 50% of current to repetitive applications of P2X3 agonist. Inhibition occurred at 1000-fold lower agonist concentrations than required for channel activation and showed strong use dependence. No inhibition occurred without previous activation and desensitization. Our data are consistent with a model whereby inhibition of P2X3 by nanomolar [agonist] occurs by the rebinding of agonist to desensitized channels before recovery from desensitization. For several ATP analogs, the concentration required to inhibit P2X3 current inversely correlated with the rate of recovery from desensitization. This indicates that the affinity of the desensitized state and recovery rate primarily depend on the rate of agonist unbinding. Consistent with this hypothesis, unbinding of [32P]ATP from desensitized P2X3 receptors mirrored the rate of recovery from desensitization. As expected, disruption of agonist binding by site-directed mutagenesis increased the IC50 for inhibition and increased the rate of recovery.

  7. Mapping a molecular link between allosteric inhibition and activation of the glycine receptor.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul S; Topf, Maya; Smart, Trevor G

    2008-10-01

    Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels mediate rapid neurotransmission throughout the central nervous system. They possess agonist recognition sites and allosteric sites where modulators regulate ion channel function. Using strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors, we identified a scaffold of hydrophobic residues enabling allosteric communication between glycine-agonist binding loops A and D, and the Zn(2+)-inhibition site. Mutating these hydrophobic residues disrupted Zn(2+) inhibition, generating novel Zn(2+)-activated receptors and spontaneous channel activity. Homology modeling and electrophysiology revealed that these phenomena are caused by disruption to three residues on the '-' loop face of the Zn(2+)-inhibition site, and to D84 and D86, on a neighboring beta3 strand, forming a Zn(2+)-activation site. We provide a new view for the activation of a Cys-loop receptor where, following agonist binding, the hydrophobic core and interfacial loops reorganize in a concerted fashion to induce downstream gating.

  8. Cannabinoid receptor type 1- and 2-mediated increase in cyclic AMP inhibits T cell receptor-triggered signaling.

    PubMed

    Börner, Christine; Smida, Michal; Höllt, Volker; Schraven, Burkhart; Kraus, Jürgen

    2009-12-18

    The aim of this study was to characterize inhibitory mechanisms on T cell receptor signaling mediated by the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Both receptors are coupled to G(i/o) proteins, which are associated with inhibition of cyclic AMP formation. In human primary and Jurkat T lymphocytes, activation of CB1 by R(+)-methanandamide, CB2 by JWH015, and both by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol induced a short decrease in cyclic AMP lasting less than 1 h. However, this decrease was followed by a massive (up to 10-fold) and sustained (at least up to 48 h) increase in cyclic AMP. Mediated by the cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase A and C-terminal Src kinase, the cannabinoids induced a stable phosphorylation of the inhibitory Tyr-505 of the leukocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck). By thus arresting Lck in its inhibited form, the cannabinoids prevented the dephosphorylation of Lck at Tyr-505 in response to T cell receptor activation, which is necessary for the subsequent initiation of T cell receptor signaling. In this way the cannabinoids inhibited the T cell receptor-triggered signaling, i.e. the activation of the zeta-chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kDa, the linker for activation of T cells, MAPK, the induction of interleukin-2, and T cell proliferation. All of the effects of the cannabinoids were blocked by the CB1 and CB2 antagonists AM281 and AM630. These findings help to better understand the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids and explain the beneficial effects of these drugs in the treatment of T cell-mediated autoimmune disorders like multiple sclerosis.

  9. Opiate receptor blockade on human granulosa cells inhibits VEGF release.

    PubMed

    Lunger, Fabian; Vehmas, Anni P; Fürnrohr, Barbara G; Sopper, Sieghart; Wildt, Ludwig; Seeber, Beata

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether the main opioid receptor (OPRM1) is present on human granulosa cells and if exogenous opiates and their antagonists can influence granulosa cell vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production via OPRM1. Granulosa cells were isolated from women undergoing oocyte retrieval for IVF. Complementary to the primary cells, experiments were conducted using COV434, a well-characterized human granulosa cell line. Identification and localization of opiate receptor subtypes was carried out using Western blot and flow cytometry. The effect of opiate antagonist on granulosa cell VEGF secretion was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For the first time, the presence of OPRM1 on human granulosa cells is reported. Blocking of opiate signalling using naloxone, a specific OPRM1 antagonist, significantly reduced granulosa cell-derived VEGF levels in both COV434 and granulosa-luteal cells (P < 0.01). The presence of opiate receptors and opiate signalling in granulosa cells suggest a possible role in VEGF production. Targeting this signalling pathway could prove promising as a new clinical option in the prevention and treatment of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

  10. Nuclear receptor TLX inhibits TGF-β signaling in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Erik; Zhai, Qiwei; Zeng, Zhao-Jun; Yoshida, Takeshi; Funa, Keiko

    2016-05-01

    TLX (also called NR2E1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that maintains stemness of neuronal stem cells. TLX is highly expressed in the most malignant form of glioma, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and is important for the proliferation and maintenance of the stem/progenitor cells of the tumor. Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) is a cytokine regulating many different cellular processes such as differentiation, migration, adhesion, cell death and proliferation. TGF-β has an important function in cancer where it can work as either a tumor suppressor or oncogene, depending on the cancer type and stage of tumor development. Since glioblastoma often have dysfunctional TGF-β signaling we wanted to find out if there is any interaction between TLX and TGF-β in glioblastoma cells. We demonstrate that knockdown of TLX enhances the canonical TGF-β signaling response in glioblastoma cell lines. TLX physically interacts with and stabilizes Smurf1, which can ubiquitinate and target TGF-β receptor II for degradation, whereas knockdown of TLX leads to stabilization of TGF-β receptor II, increased nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and enhanced expression of TGF-β target genes. The interaction between TLX and TGF-β may play an important role in the regulation of proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of glioblastoma cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Cannabidiol inhibits human glioma cell migration through a cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vaccani, Angelo; Massi, Paola; Colombo, Arianna; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of cannabidiol (CBD) to impair the migration of tumor cells stimulated by conditioned medium. CBD caused concentration-dependent inhibition of the migration of U87 glioma cells, quantified in a Boyden chamber. Since these cells express both cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors in the membrane, we also evaluated their engagement in the antimigratory effect of CBD. The inhibition of cell was not antagonized either by the selective cannabinoid receptor antagonists SR141716 (CB1) and SR144528 (CB2) or by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, indicating no involvement of classical cannabinoid receptors and/or receptors coupled to Gi/o proteins. These results reinforce the evidence of antitumoral properties of CBD, demonstrating its ability to limit tumor invasion, although the mechanism of its pharmacological effects remains to be clarified. PMID:15700028

  12. Transient activation and delayed inhibition of Na+,K+,Cl- cotransport in ATP-treated C11-MDCK cells involve distinct P2Y receptor subtypes and signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Akimova, Olga A; Grygorczyk, Alexandra; Bundey, Richard A; Bourcier, Nathalie; Gekle, Michael; Insel, Paul A; Orlov, Sergei N

    2006-10-20

    In C11-MDCK cells, which resemble intercalated cells from collecting ducts of the canine kidney, P2Y agonists promote transient activation of the Na+,K+,Cl- cotransporter (NKCC), followed by its sustained inhibition. We designed this study to identify P2Y receptor subtypes involved in dual regulation of this carrier. Real time polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that C11-MDCK cells express abundant P2Y1 and P2Y2 mRNA compared with that of other P2Y receptor subtypes. The rank order of potency of agents (ATP approximately UTP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP (2MeSATP); adenosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate (ADPbetaS) inactive) indicated that P2Y2 rather than P2Y1 receptors mediate a 3-4-fold activation of NKCC within the first 5-10 min of nucleotide addition. NKCC activation in ATP-treated cells was abolished by the intracellular calcium chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, calmodulin (CaM) antagonists trifluoroperazine and W-7, and KN-62, an inhibitor of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase II. By contrast with the transient activation, 30-min incubation with nucleotides produced up to 4-5-fold inhibition of NKCC, and this inhibition exhibited a rank order of potency (2MeSATP > ADPbetaS > ATP > UTP) typical of P2Y1 receptors. Unlike the early response, delayed inhibition of NKCC occurred in 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-loaded cells and was completely abolished by the P2Y1 antagonists MRS2179 and MRS2500. Transient activation and delayed inhibition of NKCC in C11 cell monolayers were observed after the addition of ATP to mucosal and serosal solutions, respectively. NKCC inhibition triggered by basolateral application of ADPbetaS was abolished by MRS2500. Our results thus show that transient activation and delayed inhibition of NKCC in ATP-treated C11-MDCK cells is mediated by Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase II- and Ca2+-independent signaling triggered by apical P2Y2 and basolateral P2Y1 receptors, respectively.

  13. Hydrophobic interactions drive ligand-receptor recognition for activation and inhibition of staphylococcal quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jesse S; Lyon, Gholson J; George, Elizabeth A; Muir, Tom W; Novick, Richard P

    2004-11-16

    Two-component systems represent the most widely used signaling paradigm in living organisms. Encoding the prototypical two-component system in Gram-positive bacteria, the staphylococcal agr (accessory gene regulator) operon uses a polytopic receptor, AgrC, activated by an autoinducing peptide (AIP), to coordinate quorum sensing with the global synthesis of virulence factors. The agr locus has undergone evolutionary divergence, resulting in the formation of several distinct inter- and intraspecies specificity groups, such that most cross-group AIP-receptor interactions are mutually inhibitory. We have exploited this natural diversity by constructing and analyzing AgrC chimeras generated by exchange of intradomain segments between receptors of different agr groups. Functional chimeras fell into three general classes: receptors with broadened specificity, receptors with tightened specificity, and receptors that lack activation specificity. Testing of these chimeric receptors against a battery of AIP analogs localized the primary ligand recognition site to the receptor distal subdomain and revealed that the AIPs bind primarily to a putative hydrophobic pocket in the receptor. This binding is mediated by a highly conserved hydrophobic patch on the AIPs and is an absolute requirement for interactions in self-activation and cross-inhibition of the receptors. It is suggested that this recognition scheme provides the fundamental basis for agr activation and interference.

  14. Cannabinoids induce pancreatic β-cell death by directly inhibiting insulin receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wook; Lao, Qizong; Shin, Yu-Kyong; Carlson, Olga D; Lee, Eun Kyung; Gorospe, Myriam; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Egan, Josephine M

    2012-03-20

    Cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors have been previously detected in pancreatic β cells, where they attenuate insulin action. We now report that CB1 receptors form a heteromeric complex with insulin receptors and the heterotrimeric guanosine triphosphate-binding protein α subunit Gα(i). Gα(i) inhibited the kinase activity of the insulin receptor in β cells by directly binding to the activation loop in the tyrosine kinase domain of the receptor. Consequently, phosphorylation of proapoptotic protein Bad was reduced and its apoptotic activity was stimulated, leading to β-cell death. Pharmacological blockade or genetic deficiency of CB1 receptors enhanced insulin receptor signaling after injury, leading to reduced blood glucose concentrations and activation of Bad, which increased β-cell survival. These findings provide direct evidence of physical and functional interactions between CB1 and insulin receptors and suggest a mechanism whereby peripherally acting CB1 receptor antagonists improve insulin action in insulin-sensitive tissues independent of the other metabolic effects of CB1 receptors.

  15. Dopamine inhibits somatolactin gene expression in tilapia pituitary cells through the dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Quan; Lian, Anji; He, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Dopamine (DA) is an important neurotransmitter in the central nervous system of vertebrates and possesses key hypophysiotropic functions. Early studies have shown that DA has a potent inhibitory effect on somatolactin (SL) release in fish. However, the mechanisms responsible for DA inhibition of SL gene expression are largely unknown. To this end, tilapia DA type-1 (D1) and type-2 (D2) receptor transcripts were examined in the neurointermediate lobe (NIL) of the tilapia pituitary by real-time PCR. In tilapia, DA not only was effective in inhibiting SL mRNA levels in vivo and in vitro, but also could abolish pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)- and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH)-stimulated SL gene expression at the pituitary level. In parallel studies, the specific D2 receptor agonists quinpirole and bromocriptine could mimic the DA-inhibited SL gene expression. Furthermore, the D2 receptor antagonists domperidone and (-)-sulpiride could abolish the SL response to DA or the D2 agonist quinpirole, whereas D1 receptor antagonists SCH23390 and SKF83566 were not effective in this respect. In primary cultures of tilapia NIL cells, D2 agonist quinpirole-inhibited cAMP production could be blocked by co-treatment with the D2 antagonist domperidone and the ability of forskolin to increase cAMP production was also inhibited by quinpirole. Using a pharmacological approach, the AC/cAMP pathway was shown to be involved in quinpirole-inhibited SL mRNA expression. These results provide evidence that DA can directly inhibit SL gene expression at the tilapia pituitary level via D2 receptor through the AC/cAMP-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of GABAA Receptor γ2-Subunit Regulates Tonic and Phasic Inhibition in the Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Nani, Francesca; Bright, Damian P.; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Tretter, Verena; Moss, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    GABA-mediated tonic and phasic inhibition of thalamic relay neurons of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) was studied after ablating tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation of receptor γ2-subunits. As phosphorylation of γ2 Y365 and Y367 reduces receptor internalization, to understand their importance for inhibition we created a knock-in mouse in which these residues are replaced by phenylalanines. On comparing wild-type (WT) and γ2Y365/367F+/− (HT) animals (homozygotes are not viable in utero), the expression levels of GABAA receptor α4-subunits were increased in the thalamus of female, but not male mice. Raised δ-subunit expression levels were also observed in female γ2Y365/367F +/− thalamus. Electrophysiological analyses revealed no difference in the level of inhibition in male WT and HT dLGN, while both the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic activity and the tonic current were significantly augmented in female HT relay cells. The sensitivity of tonic currents to the δ-subunit superagonist THIP, and the blocker Zn2+, were higher in female HT relay cells. This is consistent with upregulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors containing α4- and δ-subunits to enhance tonic inhibition. In contrast, the sensitivity of GABAA receptors mediating inhibition in the female γ2Y356/367F +/− to neurosteroids was markedly reduced compared with WT. We conclude that disrupting tyrosine phosphorylation of the γ2-subunit activates a sex-specific increase in tonic inhibition, and this most likely reflects a genomic-based compensation mechanism for the reduced neurosteroid sensitivity of inhibition measured in female HT relay neurons. PMID:23904608

  17. Tyrosine phosphorylation of GABAA receptor γ2-subunit regulates tonic and phasic inhibition in the thalamus.

    PubMed

    Nani, Francesca; Bright, Damian P; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Tretter, Verena; Moss, Stephen J; Smart, Trevor G

    2013-07-31

    GABA-mediated tonic and phasic inhibition of thalamic relay neurons of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) was studied after ablating tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation of receptor γ2-subunits. As phosphorylation of γ2 Y365 and Y367 reduces receptor internalization, to understand their importance for inhibition we created a knock-in mouse in which these residues are replaced by phenylalanines. On comparing wild-type (WT) and γ2(Y365/367F)+/- (HT) animals (homozygotes are not viable in utero), the expression levels of GABAA receptor α4-subunits were increased in the thalamus of female, but not male mice. Raised δ-subunit expression levels were also observed in female γ2(Y365/367F) +/- thalamus. Electrophysiological analyses revealed no difference in the level of inhibition in male WT and HT dLGN, while both the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic activity and the tonic current were significantly augmented in female HT relay cells. The sensitivity of tonic currents to the δ-subunit superagonist THIP, and the blocker Zn(2+), were higher in female HT relay cells. This is consistent with upregulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors containing α4- and δ-subunits to enhance tonic inhibition. In contrast, the sensitivity of GABAA receptors mediating inhibition in the female γ2(Y356/367F) +/- to neurosteroids was markedly reduced compared with WT. We conclude that disrupting tyrosine phosphorylation of the γ2-subunit activates a sex-specific increase in tonic inhibition, and this most likely reflects a genomic-based compensation mechanism for the reduced neurosteroid sensitivity of inhibition measured in female HT relay neurons.

  18. Ca2+ and Calmodulin Dynamics during Photopolarization in Fucus serratus Zygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Love, J.; Brownlee, C.; Trewavas, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    The role of Ca2+ in zygote polarization in fucoid algae (Fucus, Ascophyllum, and Pelvetia species) zygote polarization is controversial. Using a local source of Fucus serratus, we established that zygotes form a polar axis relative to unilateral light (photopolarization) between 8 and 14 h after fertilization (AF), and become committed to this polarity at approximately 15 to 18 h AF. We investigated the role of Ca2+, calmodulin, and actin during photopolarization by simultaneously exposing F. serratus zygotes to polarizing light and various inhibitors. Neither removal of Ca2+ from the culture medium or high concentrations of EGTA and LaCl3 had any effect on photopolarization. Bepridil, 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylamino) octyl ester, nifedipine, and verapamil, all of which block intracellular Ca2 release, reduced photopolarization from 75 to 30%. The calmodulin antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-L-naphthalenesulfonamide and trifluoperazine inhibited photopolarization in all zygotes, whereas N-(6-aminohexyl)-L-naphthalenesulfonamide had no effect. Cytochalasin B, cytochalasin D, and latrunculin B, all of which inhibit actin polymerization, had no effect on photopolarization, but arrested polar axis fixation. The role of calmodulin during polarization was investigated further. Calmodulin mRNA from the closely related brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera was cloned and the protein was expressed in bacteria. Photopolarization was enhanced following microinjections of this recombinant calmodulin into developing zygotes. Confocal imaging of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled recombinant calmodulin in photopolarized zygotes showed a homogenous signal distribution at 13 h AF, which localized to the presumptive rhizoid site at 15 h AF. PMID:12223805

  19. Lidocaine preferentially inhibits the function of purinergic P2X7 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Okura, Dan; Horishita, Takafumi; Ueno, Susumu; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Sudo, Yuka; Uezono, Yasuhito; Minami, Tomoko; Kawasaki, Takashi; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2015-03-01

    Lidocaine has been widely used to relieve acute pain and chronic refractory pain effectively by both systemic and local administration. Numerous studies reported that lidocaine affects several pain signaling pathways as well as voltage-gated sodium channels, suggesting the existence of multiple mechanisms underlying pain relief by lidocaine. Some extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) receptor subunits are thought to play a role in chronic pain mechanisms, but there have been few studies on the effects of lidocaine on ATP receptors. We studied the effects of lidocaine on purinergic P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7 receptors to explore the mechanisms underlying pain-relieving effects of lidocaine. We investigated the effects of lidocaine on ATP-induced currents in ATP receptor subunits, P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7 expressed in Xenopus oocytes, by using whole-cell, two-electrode, voltage-clamp techniques. Lidocaine inhibited ATP-induced currents in P2X7, but not in P2X3 or P2X4 subunits, in a concentration-dependent manner. The half maximal inhibitory concentration for lidocaine inhibition was 282 ± 45 μmol/L. By contrast, mepivacaine, ropivacaine, and bupivacaine exerted only limited effects on the P2X7 receptor. Lidocaine inhibited the ATP concentration-response curve for the P2X7 receptor via noncompetitive inhibition. Intracellular and extracellular N-(2,6-dimethylphenylcarbamoylmethyl) triethylammonium bromide (QX-314) and benzocaine suppressed ATP-induced currents in the P2X7 receptor in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, repetitive ATP treatments at 5-minute intervals in the continuous presence of lidocaine revealed that lidocaine inhibition was use-dependent. Finally, the selective P2X7 receptor antagonists Brilliant Blue G and AZ11645373 did not affect the inhibitory actions of lidocaine on the P2X7 receptor. Lidocaine selectively inhibited the function of the P2X7 receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes. This effect may be caused by acting on sites in the ion

  20. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways: potential mediators of skeletal muscle growth and development.

    PubMed

    Al-Shanti, Nasser; Stewart, Claire E

    2009-11-01

    The loss of muscle mass with age and disuse has a significant impact on the physiological and social well-being of the aged; this is an increasingly important problem as the population becomes skewed towards older age. Exercise has psychological benefits but it also impacts on muscle protein synthesis and degradation, increasing muscle tissue volume in both young and older individuals. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy involves an increase in muscle mass and cross-sectional area and associated increased myofibrillar protein content. Attempts to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie muscle growth, development and maintenance, have focused on characterising the molecular pathways that initiate, maintain and regenerate skeletal muscle. Such understanding may aid in improving targeted interventional therapies for age-related muscle loss and muscle wasting associated with diseases. Two major routes through which skeletal muscle development and growth are regulated are insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways. Many reviews have focused on understanding the signalling pathways of IGF-I and its receptor, which govern skeletal muscle hypertrophy. However, alternative molecular signalling pathways such as the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways should also be considered as potential mediators of muscle growth. These latter pathways have received relatively little attention and the purpose herein is to highlight the progress being made in the understanding of these pathways and associated molecules: calmodulin, calmodulin kinases (CaMKs), calcineurin and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), which are involved in skeletal muscle regulation. We describe: (1) how conformational changes in the Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin result in the exposure of binding pockets for the target proteins (CaMKs and calcineurin). (2) How Calmodulin consequently activates either the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases

  1. Model for capping derived from inhibition of surface receptor capping by free fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Klausner, R D; Bhalla, D K; Dragsten, P; Hoover, R L; Karnovsky, M J

    1980-01-01

    When low concentrations (2-5 mole %) of cis unsaturated free fatty acids (group A) are intercalated into lymphocyte plasma membrane, capping is inhibited. No effect is seen with trans unsaturated or saturated fatty acids (group B). The capping inhibition is reversible with increasing doses of extracellular calcium. Fluorescence photobleaching recovery has shown that the group A free fatty acids do not inhibit the receptor immobilization associated with patch formation, but inhibit the final energy-dependent movement of the patched receptors into a cap. We have also shown that the group A free fatty acids cause a shift in membrane-bound calcium to the lipid phase from probable protein-associated sites. We have incorporated these findings into a model for capping and membrane-cytoskeletal interactions. Images PMID:6928636

  2. Prejunctional inhibition of sympathetically evoked pupillary dilation in cats by activation of histamine H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Koss, M C; Hey, J A

    1993-08-01

    Frequency-dependent pupillary dilations were evoked by electrical stimulation of the pre- or post-ganglionic cervical sympathetic nerve (sympatho-excitation) or the hypothalamus (parasympatho-inhibition) in sympathectomized anesthetized cats. Systemic administration of the selective histamine H3 receptor agonist (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (R alpha MeHA) produced a dose-dependent depression of mydriasis due to direct neural sympathetic activation but had no effect on responses elicited by parasympathetic withdrawal. The histamine H2 receptor agonist, dimaprit, was inactive. R alpha MeHA was much more effective in depressing sympathetic responses obtained at lower frequencies when compared to higher frequencies of stimulation. Responses evoked both pre- and postganglionically were inhibited by R alpha MeHA. This peripheral sympatho-inhibitory action of R alpha MeHA was antagonized by the histamine H3 receptor blocker thioperamide but not by intravenous pretreatment with the histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine. Histamine H2 receptor blockers cimetidine and ranitidine were also without effect. R alpha MeHA did not depress pupillary responses elicited by i.v. (-)-adrenaline. The results demonstrate that histamine H3 receptors modulate sympathetic activation of the iris at a site proximal to the iris dilator muscle. The predominant mechanism of action appears to the prejunctional inhibition of noradrenaline release from postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings. However, a concomitant ganglionic inhibitory action cannot be excluded.

  3. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization. PMID:28280410

  4. Salicylate, an aspirin metabolite, specifically inhibits the current mediated by glycine receptors containing α1-subunits

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y-G; Tang, Z-Q; Ye, Z-Y; Wang, H-T; Huang, Y-N; Zhou, K-Q; Zhang, M; Xu, T-L; Chen, L

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Aspirin or its metabolite sodium salicylate is widely prescribed and has many side effects. Previous studies suggest that targeting neuronal receptors/ion channels is one of the pathways by which salicylate causes side effects in the nervous system. The present study aimed to investigate the functional action of salicylate on glycine receptors at a molecular level. Experimental approach: Whole-cell patch-clamp and site-directed mutagenesis were deployed to examine the effects of salicylate on the currents mediated by native glycine receptors in cultured neurones of rat inferior colliculus and by glycine receptors expressed in HEK293T cells. Key results: Salicylate effectively inhibited the maximal current mediated by native glycine receptors without altering the EC50 and the Hill coefficient, demonstrating a non-competitive action of salicylate. Only when applied simultaneously with glycine and extracellularly, could salicylate produce this antagonism. In HEK293T cells transfected with either α1-, α2-, α3-, α1β-, α2β- or α3β-glycine receptors, salicylate only inhibited the current mediated by those receptors that contained the α1-subunit. A single site mutation of I240V in the α1-subunit abolished inhibition by salicylate. Conclusions and implications: Salicylate is a non-competitive antagonist specifically on glycine receptors containing α1-subunits. This action critically involves the isoleucine-240 in the first transmembrane segment of the α1-subunit. Our findings may increase our understanding of the receptors involved in the side effects of salicylate on the central nervous system, such as seizures and tinnitus. PMID:19594751

  5. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun; Sung, Ki-Wug

    2017-03-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization.

  6. Regulation of RYR1 activity by Ca(2+) and calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodney, G. G.; Williams, B. Y.; Strasburg, G. M.; Beckingham, K.; Hamilton, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The skeletal muscle calcium release channel (RYR1) is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that is regulated by another Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. The functional consequences of calmodulin's interaction with RYR1 are dependent on Ca(2+) concentration. At nanomolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an activator, but at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an inhibitor of RYR1. This raises the question of whether the Ca(2+)-dependent effects of calmodulin on RYR1 function are due to Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin, RYR1, or both. To distinguish the effects of Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin from those of Ca(2+) binding to RYR1, a mutant calmodulin that cannot bind Ca(2+) was used to evaluate the effects of Ca(2+)-free calmodulin on Ca(2+)-bound RYR1. We demonstrate that Ca(2+)-free calmodulin enhances the affinity of RYR1 for Ca(2+) while Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin converts calmodulin from an activator to an inhibitor. Furthermore, Ca(2+) binding to RYR1 enhances its affinity for both Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin.

  7. Regulation of RYR1 activity by Ca(2+) and calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodney, G. G.; Williams, B. Y.; Strasburg, G. M.; Beckingham, K.; Hamilton, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The skeletal muscle calcium release channel (RYR1) is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that is regulated by another Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. The functional consequences of calmodulin's interaction with RYR1 are dependent on Ca(2+) concentration. At nanomolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an activator, but at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an inhibitor of RYR1. This raises the question of whether the Ca(2+)-dependent effects of calmodulin on RYR1 function are due to Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin, RYR1, or both. To distinguish the effects of Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin from those of Ca(2+) binding to RYR1, a mutant calmodulin that cannot bind Ca(2+) was used to evaluate the effects of Ca(2+)-free calmodulin on Ca(2+)-bound RYR1. We demonstrate that Ca(2+)-free calmodulin enhances the affinity of RYR1 for Ca(2+) while Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin converts calmodulin from an activator to an inhibitor. Furthermore, Ca(2+) binding to RYR1 enhances its affinity for both Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin.

  8. Inhibition of radiation-induced polyuria by histamine receptor antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Donlon, M.A.; Melia, J.A.; Helgeson, E.A.; Wolfe, W.W.

    1986-03-01

    In previous studies the authors have demonstrated that gamma radiation results in polyuria, which is preceded by polydypsia. This suggests that the increased thirst elicited by radiation causes increased urinary volume (UV). Histamine, which is released following radiation exposure, also elicits drinking by nonirradiated rats when administered exogenously. In this study the authors have investigated both the role of water deprivation and the effect of histamine receptor antagonists (HRA) on radiation-induced polyuria. Sprague-Dawley rats were housed individually in metabolic cages. Water was allowed ad libitum except in deprivation experiments where water was removed for 24 hr immediately following radiation. Cimetidine (CIM), an H2 HRA, and dexbromopheniramine (DXB), an H1 HRA, were administered i.p. (16 and 1 mg/kg, respectively) 30 min prior to irradiation (950 rads from a cobalt source). UV was determined at 24-hr intervals for 3 days preceding irradiation and 24 hr postirradiation. UV in DXB treated rats was significantly reduced 24 hr postirradiation (CON = 427 +/- 54%; DXB = 247 +/- 39% of preirradiated CON) compared to postirradiation control values. CIM did not affect postirradiation UV. These data suggest that radiation-induced polyuria is caused by polydypsia which is, in part, mediated by histamine induced by an H1 receptor.

  9. Antisense Inhibition of the Nr Gene Restores Normal Ripening to the Tomato Never-ripe Mutant, Consistent with the Ethylene Receptor- Inhibition Model1

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Rachel M.; Ho, Chin-Wen; Lin, Zhefeng; Foote, Humphrey C.C.; Fray, Rupert G.; Grierson, Don

    2000-01-01

    The hormone ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development, including fruit ripening. In transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants, antisense inhibition of ethylene biosynthetic genes results in inhibited or delayed ripening. The dominant tomato mutant, Never-ripe (Nr), is insensitive to ethylene and fruit fail to ripen. The Nr phenotype results from mutation of the ethylene receptor encoded by the NR gene, such that it can no longer bind the hormone. NR has homology to the Arabidopsis ethylene receptors. Studies on ethylene perception in Arabidopsis have demonstrated that receptors operate by a “receptor inhibition” mode of action, in which they actively repress ethylene responses in the absence of the hormone, and are inactive when bound to ethylene. In ripening tomato fruit, expression of NR is highly regulated, increasing in expression at the onset of ripening, coincident with increased ethylene production. This expression suggests a requirement for the NR gene product during the ripening process, and implies that ethylene signaling via the tomato NR receptor might not operate by receptor inhibition. We used antisense inhibition to investigate the role of NR in ripening tomato fruit and determine its mode of action. We demonstrate restoration of normal ripening in Nr fruit by inhibition of the mutant Nr gene, indicating that this receptor is not required for normal ripening, and confirming receptor inhibition as the mode of action of the NR protein. PMID:11080285

  10. M2muscarinic receptors inhibit cell proliferation and migration in urothelial bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pacini, Luca; De Falco, Elena; Di Bari, Maria; Coccia, Andrea; Siciliano, Camilla; Ponti, Donatella; Pastore, Antonio Luigi; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Carbone, Antonio; Tata, Ada Maria; Calogero, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The role of muscarinic receptors in several diseases including cancer has recently emerged. To evaluate the hypothesis that muscarinic acetylcholine receptors may play a role in bladder cancer as well as in other tumor types, we investigated their expression in bladder tumor specimens. All examined samples expressed the M1, M2 and M3 receptor subtypes. We also found that the level of M2 transcripts, but not those of M1 or M3, significantly increased with the tumor histologic grade. In view of these results, we proceeded to investigate whether the M2 agonist Arecaidine had any effect on in vitro cell growth and migration of T24 cells, a bladder tumor cell line expressing the muscarinic receptors, including the M2 subtype. We observed that Arecaidine significantly reduced T24 and 5637 cell proliferation and migration in a concentration dependent manner. The silencing of M2 receptor by siRNA in T24 and 5637 cell lines showed the inability of Arecaidine (100 μM) to inhibit cell proliferation after 48 hours, whereas the use of M1 and M3 antagonists in T24 appeared not to counteract the Arecaidine effect, suggesting that the inhibition of cell proliferation was directly dependent on M2 receptor activation. These data suggest that M2 muscarinic receptors may play a relevant role in bladder cancer and represent a new attractive therapeutic target. PMID:25482946

  11. AMPA-Kainate Receptor Inhibition Promotes Neurologic Recovery in Premature Rabbits with Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dohare, Preeti; Zia, Muhammad T.; Ahmed, Ehsan; Ahmed, Asad; Yadala, Vivek; Schober, Alexandra L.; Ortega, Juan Alberto; Kayton, Robert; Ungvari, Zoltan; Mongin, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in preterm infants leads to cerebral inflammation, reduced myelination of the white matter, and neurological deficits. No therapeutic strategy exists against the IVH-induced white matter injury. AMPA-kainate receptor induced excitotoxicity contributes to oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) damage and hypomyelination in both neonatal and adult models of brain injury. Here, we hypothesized that IVH damages white matter via AMPA receptor activation, and that AMPA-kainate receptor inhibition suppresses inflammation and restores OPC maturation, myelination, and neurologic recovery in preterm newborns with IVH. We tested these hypotheses in a rabbit model of glycerol-induced IVH and evaluated the expression of AMPA receptors in autopsy samples from human preterm infants. GluR1-GluR4 expressions were comparable between preterm humans and rabbits with and without IVH. However, GluR1 and GluR2 levels were significantly lower in the embryonic white matter and germinal matrix relative to the neocortex in both infants with and without IVH. Pharmacological blockade of AMPA-kainate receptors with systemic NBQX, or selective AMPA receptor inhibition by intramuscular perampanel restored myelination and neurologic recovery in rabbits with IVH. NBQX administration also reduced the population of apoptotic OPCs, levels of several cytokines (TNFα, IL-β, IL-6, LIF), and the density of Iba1+ microglia in pups with IVH. Additionally, NBQX treatment inhibited STAT-3 phosphorylation, but not astrogliosis or transcription factors regulating gliosis. Our data suggest that AMPA-kainate receptor inhibition alleviates OPC loss and IVH-induced inflammation and restores myelination and neurologic recovery in preterm rabbits with IVH. Therapeutic use of FDA-approved perampanel treatment might enhance neurologic outcome in premature infants with IVH. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a major complication of prematurity and a large number

  12. AMPA-Kainate Receptor Inhibition Promotes Neurologic Recovery in Premature Rabbits with Intraventricular Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Dohare, Preeti; Zia, Muhammad T; Ahmed, Ehsan; Ahmed, Asad; Yadala, Vivek; Schober, Alexandra L; Ortega, Juan Alberto; Kayton, Robert; Ungvari, Zoltan; Mongin, Alexander A; Ballabh, Praveen

    2016-03-16

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in preterm infants leads to cerebral inflammation, reduced myelination of the white matter, and neurological deficits. No therapeutic strategy exists against the IVH-induced white matter injury. AMPA-kainate receptor induced excitotoxicity contributes to oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) damage and hypomyelination in both neonatal and adult models of brain injury. Here, we hypothesized that IVH damages white matter via AMPA receptor activation, and that AMPA-kainate receptor inhibition suppresses inflammation and restores OPC maturation, myelination, and neurologic recovery in preterm newborns with IVH. We tested these hypotheses in a rabbit model of glycerol-induced IVH and evaluated the expression of AMPA receptors in autopsy samples from human preterm infants. GluR1-GluR4 expressions were comparable between preterm humans and rabbits with and without IVH. However, GluR1 and GluR2 levels were significantly lower in the embryonic white matter and germinal matrix relative to the neocortex in both infants with and without IVH. Pharmacological blockade of AMPA-kainate receptors with systemic NBQX, or selective AMPA receptor inhibition by intramuscular perampanel restored myelination and neurologic recovery in rabbits with IVH. NBQX administration also reduced the population of apoptotic OPCs, levels of several cytokines (TNFα, IL-β, IL-6, LIF), and the density of Iba1(+) microglia in pups with IVH. Additionally, NBQX treatment inhibited STAT-3 phosphorylation, but not astrogliosis or transcription factors regulating gliosis. Our data suggest that AMPA-kainate receptor inhibition alleviates OPC loss and IVH-induced inflammation and restores myelination and neurologic recovery in preterm rabbits with IVH. Therapeutic use of FDA-approved perampanel treatment might enhance neurologic outcome in premature infants with IVH. Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a major complication of prematurity and a large number of survivors with

  13. Presynaptic Inhibition at Inhibitory Nerve Terminals. A New Synapse in the Crayfish Stretch Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yasuko; Tisdale, Ann D.; Henkart, Maryanna P.

    1973-01-01

    Previous physiological evidence has shown that the receptor neuron of the slowly adapting stretch receptor organ of crayfish receives synapses from three inhibitory axons, while the receptor muscle is innervated by both excitatory and inhibitory axons. Fine structural studies have indicated that after certain preparative procedures synaptic vesicles in the inhibitory terminals on dendrites of the receptor neuron appear small and elongate, while those in the excitatory terminals on the receptor muscle are round and larger. This study describes a new synapse between two inhibitory nerve endings on the receptor neuron. One axon, containing small elongate vesicles, forms a presynaptic chemical contact with another morphologically similar axon that, itself, presumably releases inhibitory transmitter onto the receptor neuron. A second type of presynaptic axo-axonic synapse, analogous to one previously described in another crustacean muscle, was also found between presumed inhibitory and excitatory nerve terminals on the receptor muscle. Thus, the stretch receptor has a relatively complex organization with a morphological basis for two types of presynaptic inhibition: one on excitatory terminals and the other on inhibitory terminals. Images PMID:4365382

  14. Structure and dynamics of calmodulin in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Wriggers, W; Mehler, E; Pitici, F; Weinstein, H; Schulten, K

    1998-01-01

    To characterize the dynamic behavior of calmodulin in solution, we have carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Ca2+-loaded structure. The crystal structure of calmodulin was placed in a solvent sphere of radius 44 A, and 6 Cl- and 22 Na+ ions were included to neutralize the system and to model a 150 mM salt concentration. The total number of atoms was 32,867. During the 3-ns simulation, the structure exhibits large conformational changes on the nanosecond time scale. The central alpha-helix, which has been shown to unwind locally upon binding of calmodulin to target proteins, bends and unwinds near residue Arg74. We interpret this result as a preparative step in the more extensive structural transition observed in the "flexible linker" region 74-82 of the central helix upon complex formation. The major structural change is a reorientation of the two Ca2+-binding domains with respect to each other and a rearrangement of alpha-helices in the N-terminus domain that makes the hydrophobic target peptide binding site more accessible. This structural rearrangement brings the domains to a more favorable position for target binding, poised to achieve the orientation observed in the complex of calmodulin with myosin light-chain kinase. Analysis of solvent structure reveals an inhomogeneity in the mobility of water in the vicinity of the protein, which is attributable to the hydrophobic effect exerted by calmodulin's binding sites for target peptides. PMID:9545028

  15. Pre-synaptic adenosine A2A receptors control cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Martire, Alberto; Tebano, Maria Teresa; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferreira, Samira G; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Köfalvi, Attila; Popoli, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    An interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) Rs) and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors (CB(1) Rs) has been consistently reported to occur in the striatum, although the precise mechanisms are not completely understood. As both receptors control striatal glutamatergic transmission, we now probed the putative interaction between pre-synaptic CB(1) R and A(2A) R in the striatum. In extracellular field potentials recordings in corticostriatal slices from Wistar rats, A(2A) R activation by CGS21680 inhibited CB(1) R-mediated effects (depression of synaptic response and increase in paired-pulse facilitation). Moreover, in superfused rat striatal nerve terminals, A(2A) R activation prevented, while A(2A) R inhibition facilitated, the CB(1) R-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release. In summary, the present study provides converging neurochemical and electrophysiological support for the occurrence of a tight control of CB(1) R function by A(2A) Rs in glutamatergic terminals of the striatum. In view of the key role of glutamate to trigger the recruitment of striatal circuits, this pre-synaptic interaction between CB(1) R and A(2A) R may be of relevance for the pathogenesis and the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia.

  16. Voltage-dependent inhibition of recombinant NMDA receptor-mediated currents by 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Kloda, Anna; Adams, David J

    2005-01-01

    The effect of 5-HT and related indolealkylamines on heteromeric recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes was investigated using the two-electrode voltage-clamp recording technique. In the absence of external Mg2+ ions, 5-HT inhibited NMDA receptor-mediated currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of 5-HT was independent of the NR1a and NR2 subunit combination. The inhibition of glutamate-evoked currents by 5-HT was use- and voltage-dependent. The voltage sensitivity of inhibition for NR1a+NR2 subunit combinations by 5-HT was similar, exhibiting an e-fold change per ∼20 mV, indicating that 5-HT binds to a site deep within the membrane electric field. The inhibition of the open NMDA receptor by external Mg2+ and 5-HT was not additive, suggesting competition between Mg2+ and 5-HT for a binding site in the NMDA receptor channel. The concentration-dependence curves for 5-HT and 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MeOT) inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated currents are shifted to the right in the presence of external Mg2+. The related indolealkylamines inhibited glutamate-evoked currents with the following order of inhibitory potency: 5-MeOT=5-methyltryptamine>tryptamine>7-methyltryptamine>5-HT≫tryptophan=melatonin. Taken together, these data suggest that 5-HT and related compounds can attenuate glutamate-mediated excitatory synaptic responses and may provide a basis for drug treatment of excitoxic neurodegeneration. PMID:15655527

  17. Cannabinoids Inhibit Insulin Receptor Signaling in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wook; Doyle, Máire E.; Liu, Zhuo; Lao, Qizong; Shin, Yu-Kyong; Carlson, Olga D.; Kim, Hee Seung; Thomas, Sam; Napora, Joshua K.; Lee, Eun Kyung; Moaddel, Ruin; Wang, Yan; Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Egan, Josephine M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Optimal glucose homeostasis requires exquisitely precise adaptation of the number of insulin-secreting β-cells in the islets of Langerhans. Insulin itself positively regulates β-cell proliferation in an autocrine manner through the insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway. It is now coming to light that cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) agonism/antagonism influences insulin action in insulin-sensitive tissues. However, the cells on which the CB1Rs are expressed and their function in islets have not been firmly established. We undertook the current study to investigate if intraislet endogenous cannabinoids (ECs) regulate β-cell proliferation and if they influence insulin action. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We measured EC production in isolated human and mouse islets and β-cell line in response to glucose and KCl. We evaluated human and mouse islets, several β-cell lines, and CB1R-null (CB1R−/−) mice for the presence of a fully functioning EC system. We investigated if ECs influence β-cell physiology through regulating insulin action and demonstrated the therapeutic potential of manipulation of the EC system in diabetic (db/db) mice. RESULTS ECs are generated within β-cells, which also express CB1Rs that are fully functioning when activated by ligands. Genetic and pharmacologic blockade of CB1R results in enhanced IR signaling through the insulin receptor substrate 2-AKT pathway in β-cells and leads to increased β-cell proliferation and mass. CB1R antagonism in db/db mice results in reduced blood glucose and increased β-cell proliferation and mass, coupled with enhanced IR signaling in β-cells. Furthermore, CB1R activation impedes insulin-stimulated IR autophosphorylation on β-cells in a Gαi-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS These findings provide direct evidence for a functional interaction between CB1R and IR signaling involved in the regulation of β-cell proliferation and will serve as a basis for developing new therapeutic interventions to

  18. Isolated dorsal root ganglion neurones inhibit receptor-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity in associated glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ng, KY; Yeung, BHS; Wong, YH; Wise, H

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyper-nociceptive PGE2 EP4 receptors and prostacyclin (IP) receptors are present in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones and glial cells in culture. The present study has investigated the cell-specific expression of two other Gs-protein coupled hyper-nociceptive receptor systems: β-adrenoceptors and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors in isolated DRG cells and has examined the influence of neurone–glial cell interactions in regulating adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Experimental Approach Agonist-stimulated AC activity was determined in mixed DRG cell cultures from adult rats and compared with activity in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures and pure DRG glial cell cultures. Key Results Pharmacological analysis showed the presence of Gs-coupled β2-adrenoceptors and CGRP receptors, but not β1-adrenoceptors, in all three DRG cell preparations. Agonist-stimulated AC activity was weakest in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures. DRG neurones inhibited IP receptor-stimulated glial cell AC activity by a process dependent on both cell–cell contact and neurone-derived soluble factors, but this is unlikely to involve purine or glutamine receptor activation. Conclusions and Implications Gs-coupled hyper-nociceptive receptors are readily expressed on DRG glial cells in isolated cell cultures and the activity of CGRP, EP4 and IP receptors, but not β2-adrenoceptors, in glial cells is inhibited by DRG neurones. Studies using isolated DRG cells should be aware that hyper-nociceptive ligands may stimulate receptors on glial cells in addition to neurones, and that variable numbers of neurones and glial cells will influence absolute measures of AC activity and affect downstream functional responses. PMID:22924655

  19. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone signalling downstream of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Melamed, P; Savulescu, D; Lim, S; Wijeweera, A; Luo, Z; Luo, M; Pnueli, L

    2012-12-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) regulates reproduction via binding a G-protein coupled receptor on the surface of the gonadotroph, through which it transmits signals, mostly via the mitogen-activated protein (MAPK) cascade, to increase synthesis of the gonadotrophin hormones: luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Activation of the MAPK cascade requires an elevation in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, which is a result of both calcium influx and mobilisation from intracellular stores. However, Ca(2+) also transmits signals via an MAPK-independent pathway, through binding calmodulin (CaM), which is then able to bind a number of proteins to impart diverse downstream effects. Although the ability of GnRH to activate CaM was recognised over 20 years ago, only recently have some of the downstream effects been elucidated. GnRH was shown to activate the CaM-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, which targets gonadotrophin gene expression both directly and indirectly via transcription factors such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells and Nur77, the Transducer of Regulated CREB (TORC) co-activators and also the prolyl isomerase, Pin1. Gonadotrophin gene expression is also regulated by GnRH-induced CaM-dependent kinases (CaMKs); CaMKI is able to derepress the histone deacetylase-inhibition of β-subunit gene expression, whereas CaMKII appears to be essential for the GnRH-activation of all three subunit genes. Asides from activating gonadotrophin gene expression, GnRH also exerts additional effects on gonadotroph function, some of which clearly occur via CaM, including the proliferation of immature gonadotrophs, which is dependent on calcineurin. In this review, we summarise these pathways, and discuss the additional functions that have been proposed for CaM with respect to modifying GnRH-induced signalling pathways via the regulation of the small GTP-binding protein, Gem, and/or the regulator of G-protein signalling protein 2.

  20. Calmodulin kinase II is required for fight or flight sinoatrial node physiology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuejin; Gao, Zhan; Chen, Biyi; Koval, Olha M; Singh, Madhu V; Guan, Xiaoqun; Hund, Thomas J; Kutschke, William; Sarma, Satyam; Grumbach, Isabella M; Wehrens, Xander H T; Mohler, Peter J; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2009-04-07

    The best understood "fight or flight" mechanism for increasing heart rate (HR) involves activation of a cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel (HCN4) by beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) agonist stimulation. HCN4 conducts an inward "pacemaker" current (I(f)) that increases the sinoatrial nodal (SAN) cell membrane diastolic depolarization rate (DDR), leading to faster SAN action potential generation. Surprisingly, HCN4 knockout mice were recently shown to retain physiological HR increases with isoproterenol (ISO), suggesting that other I(f)-independent pathways are critical to SAN fight or flight responses. The multifunctional Ca(2+) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a downstream signal in the betaAR pathway that activates Ca(2+) homeostatic proteins in ventricular myocardium. Mice with genetic, myocardial and SAN cell CaMKII inhibition have significantly slower HRs than controls during stress, leading us to hypothesize that CaMKII actions on SAN Ca(2+) homeostasis are critical for betaAR agonist responses in SAN. Here we show that CaMKII mediates ISO HR increases by targeting SAN cell Ca(2+) homeostasis. CaMKII inhibition prevents ISO effects on SAN Ca(2+) uptake and release from intracellular sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores that are necessary for increasing DDR. CaMKII inhibition has no effect on the ISO response in SAN cells when SR Ca(2+) release is disabled and CaMKII inhibition is only effective at slowing HRs during betaAR stimulation. These studies show the tightly coupled, but previously unanticipated, relationship of CaMKII to the betaAR pathway in fight or flight physiology and establish CaMKII as a critical signaling molecule for physiological HR responses to catecholamines.

  1. Noradrenaline release-inhibiting receptors on PC12 cells devoid of alpha(2(-)) and CB(1) receptors: similarities to presynaptic imidazoline and edg receptors.

    PubMed

    Molderings, G J; Bönisch, H; Hammermann, R; Göthert, M; Brüss, M

    2002-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to classify release-inhibiting receptors on rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Veratridine-evoked [3H]noradrenaline release from PC12 cells was inhibited by micromolar concentrations of the imidazoline and guanidine derivatives cirazoline, clonidine, aganodine, 1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine, BDF6143 and agmatine, and of the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (R(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo-[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-yl](1-naphthalenyl)methanone mesylate), but not by noradrenaline. The inhibitory effect of clonidine was antagonized by micromolar concentrations of rauwolscine and SR141716A (N-[piperidin-1-yl]-5-[4-chlorophenyl]-1-[2,4-dichlorophenyl]-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide). The potencies of the agonists and antagonists were compatible with an action at previously characterized presynaptic imidazoline receptors. 1-Oleoyl-lysophosphatidic acid, but not sphingosine-1-phosphate, produced an inhibition of release that was antagonized by 30 microM rauwolscine, 1 microM SR141716A and 10 microM LY320135 as well as by pretreatment of the cells with 100 microM clonidine for 72 h. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments on cDNA from PC12 mRNA suggest mRNA expression of lysophospholipid receptors encoded by the genes edg2, edg3, edg5 and edg7, but not of receptors encoded by edg1, edg4, edg6 and edg8, and not of alpha(2A(-))nd CB(1) receptors. In conclusion, PC12 cells are not endowed with alpha(2)-adrenoceptors and CB(1) cannabinoid receptors, but with an inhibitory receptor recognizing imidazolines, guanidines and WIN55,212-2 similar to that on sympathetic nerves. The PCR results and the ability of 1-oleoyl-LPA to mimic these drugs (also with respect to their susceptibility to antagonists) suggest that the release-inhibiting receptor may be an edg-encoded lysophospholipid receptor.

  2. Inhibition of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by the abused solvent, toluene

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Ambuja S; Smothers, Corigan T; Woodward, John J

    2002-01-01

    Toluene is a representative example of a class of industrial solvents that are voluntarily inhaled as drugs of abuse. Previous data from this lab and others has shown that toluene modulates the function of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine receptors at concentrations that do not affect non-NMDA receptors. We utilized two-electrode voltage-clamp and whole cell patch-clamp techniques to assess the effects of toluene on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in oocytes and cultured hippocampal neurons. Toluene (50 μM to 10 mM) produced a reversible, concentration-dependent inhibition of acetylcholine-induced current in Xenopus oocytes expressing various nicotinic receptor subtypes. The α4β2 and α3β2 subunit combinations were significantly more sensitive to toluene inhibition than the α4β4, α3β4 and α7 receptors. Receptors composed of α4 and β2(V253F) subunits showed α4β4-like toluene sensitivity while those containing α4 and β4(F255V) subunits showed α4β2-like sensitivity. In hippocampal neurons, toluene (50 μM to 10 mM) dose-dependently inhibited ACh-mediated responses with an IC50 of 1.1 mM. Taken together, these results suggest that nicotinic receptors, like NMDA receptors, show a subunit-dependent sensitivity to toluene and may represent an important site of action for some of the neurobehavioural effects of toluene. PMID:12237258

  3. Lymphocyte activation and capping of hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, L Y; Jy, W; Majercik, M H; Bourguignon, G J

    1988-06-01

    In this study both a ligand-dependent treatment [concanavalin A (Con A)] and a ligand-independent treatment [high-voltage pulsed galvanic stimulation (HVPGS)] have been used to initiate lymphocyte activation via a transmembrane signaling process. Our results show that both treatments cause the exposure of two different hormone [insulin and interleukin-2 (IL-2)] receptors within the first 5 min of stimulation. When either insulin or IL-2 is present in the culture medium, the stimulated lymphocytes undergo the following responses: (1) increased free intracellular Ca2+ activity; (2) aggregation of insulin or IL-2 receptors into patch/cap structures; (3) tyrosine-kinase-specific phosphorylation of a 32-kd membrane protein; and finally (4) induction of DNA synthesis. Further analysis indicates that hormone receptor capping is inhibited by (1) cytochalasin D, suggesting the involvement of microfilaments; (2) sodium azide, indicating a requirement for ATP production; and (3) W-5, W-7, and W-12 drugs, implying a need for Ca2+/calmodulin activity. Treatment with these metabolic or cytoskeletal inhibitors also prevents both the tyrosine-kinase-specific protein phosphorylation and DNA synthesis which normally follow hormone receptor capping. Double immunofluorescence staining shows that actomyosin, Ca2+/calmodulin, and myosin light-chain kinase are all closely associated with the insulin and IL-2 receptor cap structures. These findings strongly suggest that an actomyosin-mediated contractile system (regulated by Ca2+, calmodulin, and myosin light-chain kinase in an energy-dependent manner) is required not only for the collection of insulin and IL-2 receptors into patch and cap structures but also for the subsequent activation of tyrosine kinase and the initiation of DNA synthesis. We, therefore, propose that the exposure and subsequent patching/capping of at least one hormone receptor are required for the activation of mouse splenic T-lymphocytes.

  4. Molecular determinants of glycine receptor αβ subunit sensitivities to Zn2+-mediated inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul S; Beato, Marco; Harvey, Robert J; Smart, Trevor G

    2005-01-01

    Glycine receptors exhibit a biphasic sensitivity profile in response to Zn2+-mediated modulation, with low Zn2+ concentrations potentiating (< 10 μm), and higher Zn2+ concentrations inhibiting submaximal responses to glycine. Here, a substantial 30-fold increase in sensitivity to Zn2+-mediated inhibition was apparent for the homomeric glycine receptor (GlyR) α1 subunit compared to either GlyR α2 or α3 subtypes. Swapping the divergent histidine (H107) residue in GlyR α1, which together with the conserved H109 forms part of an intersubunit Zn2+-binding site, for the equivalent asparagine residue present in GlyR α2 and α3, reversed this phenotype. Co-expression of heteromeric GlyR α1 or α2 with the ancillary β subunit yielded receptors that maintained their distinctive sensitivities to Zn2+ inhibition. However, GlyR α2β heteromers were consistently 2-fold more sensitive to inhibition compared to the GlyR α2 homomer. Comparative studies to elucidate the specific residue in the β subunit responsible for this differential sensitivity revealed instead threonine 133 in the α1 subunit as a new vital component for Zn2+-mediated inhibition. Further studies on heteromeric receptors demonstrated that a mutated β subunit could indeed affect Zn2+-mediated inhibition but only from one side of the intersubunit Zn2+-binding site, equivalent to the GlyR α1 H107 face. This strongly suggests that the α subunit is responsible for Zn2+-mediated inhibition and that this is effectively transduced, asymmetrically, from the side of the Zn2+-binding site where H109 and T133 are located. PMID:15905212

  5. Atypical effect of dopamine in modulating the functional inhibition of NMDA receptors of cultured retina cells.

    PubMed

    Do Nascimento, J L; Kubrusly, R C; Reis, R A; De Mello, M C; De Mello, F G

    1998-02-05

    Cultured retina cells released accumulated [3H]GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) when stimulated by L-glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and kainate. In the absence of Mg2+, dopamine at 200 microM (IC50 60 microM), inhibited in more than 50% the release of [3H]GABA induced by L-glutamate and NMDA, but not by kainate. This effect was not blocked by the D1-like dopamine receptor antagonist, R-(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl- -phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro- H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride (SCH 23390), neither by haloperidol nor spiroperidol (dopamine D2-like receptor antagonists). The dopamine D1-like receptor agonist R(+)-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-(1H)-3-benzazepine-7,diol hydrochloride (SKF 38393) at 50 microM, but not its enantiomer, also inhibited the release of [3H]GABA induced by NMDA, but not by kainate; an effect that was not prevented by the antagonists mentioned above. (+/-)-6-Chloro-7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepin e hydrobromide (SKF 812497) had no effect. Neither 8BrcAMP (5 mM) nor forskolin (10 microM) inhibited the release of [3H]GABA. Our results suggest that dopamine and (+)-SKF 38393 inhibit the glutamate and NMDA-evoked [3H]GABA release through mechanisms that seem not to involve known dopaminergic receptor systems.

  6. Garlic (Allium sativum) Extracts Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toll-Like Receptor 4 Dimerization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Garlic has been used as a folk medicine for a long history. Numerous studies demonstrated that garlic extracts and its sulfur-containing compounds inhibit nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) activation induced by various receptor agonist including lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These effects suggest that garl...

  7. Rapid auxin-induced root growth inhibition requires the TIR and AFB auxin receptors.

    PubMed

    Scheitz, Katharina; Lüthen, Hartwig; Schenck, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the relation between auxin-induced gene expression and the rapid auxin-induced growth inhibition in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. The natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced a strong activation of gene expression as visualized by the DR5rev::GFP reporter gene technique. This effect was specific for active auxins and was abolished in knockout mutants of the F-box auxin receptors. We measured the IAA-induced growth inhibition at high time resolution and show that the F-box auxin receptor mutants failed to display this effect. We conclude that the F-box auxin receptors are needed for the response. In hypocotyls, auxin induces an increase in elongation growth, and this effect has been earlier shown to be independent of the F-box receptors. Based on these findings, we discuss differences in the growth control modes in roots and shoots. We demonstrate that the rapid auxin-induced root growth inhibition, unlike the induction of growth in hypocotyls, requires the presence of the F-box auxin receptors.

  8. Characterization of the secondary structure of calmodulin in complex with a calmodulin-binding domain peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, S.M.; Schneider, D.M.; Strobel, L.A.; Wand, A.J. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana ); Van Berkum, M.F.A.; Means, A.R. )

    1992-02-11

    The interaction between calcium-saturated chicken calmodulin and a peptide corresponding to the calmodulin-binding domain of the chicken smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase has been studied by multinuclear and multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance methods. Extensive {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonance assignments of calmodulin in the complex have been obtained from the analysis of two- and three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. The assignment of calmodulin in the complex was facilitated by the use of selective labeling of the protein with {alpha}-{sup 15}N-labeled valine, alanine, lysine, leucine, and glycine. These provided reference points during the main-chain-directed analysis of three-dimensional spectra of complexes prepared with uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled calmodulin. The pattern of nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) seen among main-chain amide NH, C{sub {alpha}}H, and C{sub {beta}}H hydrogens indicates that the secondary structure of the globular domains of calmodulin in the complex closely corresponds to that observed in the calcium-saturated state of the protein in the absence of bound peptide. However, the backbone conformation of residues 76-84 adopts an extended chain conformation upon binding of the peptide in contrast to its helical conformation in the absence of peptide. A sufficient number of NOEs between the globular domains of calmodulin and the bound peptide have been found to indicate that the N- and C-terminal regions of the peptide interact with the C- and N-terminal domains of calmodulin, respectively. The significance of these results are discussed in terms of recently proposed models for the structure of calmodulin-peptide complexes.

  9. Tamoxifen and its active metabolites inhibit dopamine transporter function independently of the estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Mikelman, Sarah R; Guptaroy, Bipasha; Gnegy, Margaret E

    2017-04-01

    As one of the primary mechanisms by which dopamine signaling is regulated, the dopamine transporter (DAT) is an attractive pharmacological target for the treatment of diseases based in dopaminergic dysfunction. In this work we demonstrate for the first time that the commonly prescribed breast cancer therapeutic tamoxifen and its major metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen and endoxifen, inhibit DAT function. Tamoxifen inhibits [(3) H]dopamine uptake into human DAT (hDAT)-N2A cells via an uncompetitive or mixed mechanism. Endoxifen, an active metabolite of tamoxifen, asymmetrically inhibits DAT function in hDAT-N2A cells, showing a preference for the inhibition of amphetamine-stimulated dopamine efflux as compared to dopamine uptake. Importantly, we demonstrate that the effects of tamoxifen and its metabolites on the DAT occur independently of its activity as selective estrogen receptor modulators. This work suggests that tamoxifen is inhibiting DAT function through a previously unidentified mechanism. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Activation and inhibition of erythropoietin receptor function: role of receptor dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Watowich, S S; Hilton, D J; Lodish, H F

    1994-01-01

    Members of the cytokine receptor superfamily have structurally similar extracellular ligand-binding domains yet diverse cytoplasmic regions lacking any obvious catalytic domains. Many of these receptors form ligand-induced oligomers which are likely to participate in transmembrane signaling. A constitutively active (factor-independent) mutant of the erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R), R129C in the exoplasmic domain, forms disulfide-linked homodimers, suggesting that the wild-type EPO-R is activated by ligand-induced homodimerization. Here, we have taken two approaches to probe the role EPO-R dimerization plays in signal transduction. First, on the basis of the crystal structure of the ligand-bound, homodimeric growth hormone receptor (GH-R) and sequence alignment between the GH-R and EPO-R, we identified residues of the EPO-R which may be involved in intersubunit contacts in an EPO-R homodimer. Residue 129 of the EPO-R corresponds to a residue localized to the GH-R dimer interface region. Alanine or cysteine substitutions were introduced at four other residues of the EPO-R predicted to be in the dimer interface region. Substitution of residue E-132 or E-133 with cysteine renders the EPO-R constitutively active. Like the arginine-to-cysteine mutation at position 129 in the exoplasmic domain (R129C), E132C and E133C form disulfide-linked homodimers, suggesting that constitutive activity is due to covalent dimerization. In the second approach, we have coexpressed the wild-type EPO-R with inactive mutants of the receptor missing all or part of the cytosolic domain. These truncated receptors have a dominant inhibitory effect on the proliferative action of the wild-type receptor. Taken together, these results strengthen the hypothesis that an initial step in EPO- and EPO-R-mediated signal transduction is ligand-induced receptor dimerization. Images PMID:8196600

  11. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide inhibition of gastric mucosal laminin receptor: effect of sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Czajkowski, A; Yotsumoto, F; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1993-11-01

    1. The effect of cell-wall lipopolysaccharide from Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium implicated in the etiology of gastric disease, on the gastric mucosal laminin-receptor was investigated. 2. The receptor, isolated from gastric epithelial cell membrane by affinity chromatography on laminin-coupled Sepharose, was radioiodinated and incorporated into liposomes which exhibited specific affinity towards laminin-coated surface. 3. The binding of liposomal receptor to laminin-coated surface was inhibited by H. pylori lipopolysaccharide, which at 50 micrograms/ml caused a nearly complete (97%) inhibition in binding. 4. The inhibitory effect of the lipopolysaccharide was prevented by a cytoprotective agent, sulglycotide, that evoked a 92% restoration in binding at 40 micrograms/ml. 5. The results demonstrate that through its lipopolysaccharide H. pylori is capable of disrupting the gastric mucosal integrity and that this detrimental effect could be successfully countered by sulglycotide.

  12. Activation of GABA(A) receptors in subthalamic neurons in vitro: properties of native receptors and inhibition mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baufreton, J; Garret, M; Dovero, S; Dufy, B; Bioulac, B; Taupignon, A

    2001-07-01

    all intact neurons. In neurons held in whole cell configuration, membrane potential hyperpolarized by -10 mV whilst input resistance decreased by 50%, indicating powerful membrane shunting. Muscimol never induced burst firing, even in neurons that exhibited the capacity of switching from regular- to burst-firing mode. These molecular and functional data indicate that native subthalamic GABA(A) receptors do not contain the epsilon protein and activation of GABA(A) receptors induces membrane shunting, which is essential for firing inhibition but prevents switching to burst-firing. They suggest that the STN, like many other parts of the brain, has the physiological and structural features of the widely expressed GABA(A) receptors consisting of alphabetagamma subunits.

  13. Cross-Linking Proteins To Show Complex Formation: A Laboratory That Visually Demonstrates Calmodulin Binding to Calmodulin Kinase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment demonstrating the binding of calcium/calmodulin to calmodulin kinase II, which is important in the metabolic and physiological activities of the cell. Uses SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). (YDS)

  14. Cross-Linking Proteins To Show Complex Formation: A Laboratory That Visually Demonstrates Calmodulin Binding to Calmodulin Kinase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment demonstrating the binding of calcium/calmodulin to calmodulin kinase II, which is important in the metabolic and physiological activities of the cell. Uses SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). (YDS)

  15. Muscarinic inhibition of hippocampal and striatal adenylyl cyclase is mainly due to the M(4) receptor.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Gonzalo; Colettis, Natalia; Vázquez, Pablo; Cerveñansky, Carlos; Aguirre, Alejandra; Quillfeldt, Jorge A; Jerusalinsky, Diana; Kornisiuk, Edgar

    2009-08-01

    The five muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M(1)-M(5)) are differentially expressed in the brain. M(2) and M(4) are coupled to inhibition of stimulated adenylyl cyclase, while M(1), M(3) and M(5) are mainly coupled to the phosphoinositide pathway. We studied the muscarinic receptor regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity in the rat hippocampus, compared to the striatum and amygdala. Basal and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity was higher in the striatum but the muscarinic inhibition was much lower. Highly selective muscarinic toxins MT1 and MT2-affinity order M(1) > or = M(4) > others-and MT3-highly selective M(4) antagonist-did not show significant effects on basal or forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production but, like scopolamine, counteracted oxotremorine inhibition. Since MTs have negligible affinity for M(2), M(4) would be the main subtype responsible for muscarinic inhibition of forskolin-stimulated enzyme. Dopamine stimulated a small fraction of the enzyme (3.1% in striatum, 1.3% in the hippocampus). Since MT3 fully blocked muscarinic inhibition of dopamine-stimulated enzyme, M(4) receptor would be responsible for this regulation.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits pre-osteoblast differentiation through its type-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sabiha; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Clohisy, John C; Abu-Amer, Yousef

    2003-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine with a profound role in many skeletal diseases. The cytokine has been described as a mediator of bone loss in osteolysis and other inflammatory bone diseases. In addition to its known bone resorptive action, TNF reduces bone formation by inhibiting osteoblast differentiation. Using primary and transformed osteoblastic cells, we first document that TNF inhibits expression of alkaline phosphatase and matrix deposition, both considered markers of osteoblast differentiation. The effects are dose- and time-dependent. Core-binding factor A1 (cbfa1) is a transcription factor critical for osteoblast differentiation, and we show here that it is activated by the osteoblast differentiation agent, beta-glycerophosphate. Therefore, we investigated whether the inhibitory effects of TNF were associated with altered activity of this transcription factor. Using retardation assays, we show that TNF significantly inhibits cbfal activation by beta-glycerophosphate, manifested by reduced DNA-binding activity. Next, we turned to determine the signaling pathway by which TNF inhibits osteoblast differentiation. Utilizing animals lacking individual TNF receptors, we document that TNFr1 is required for transmitting the cytokine's inhibitory effect. In the absence of this receptor, TNF failed to impact all osteoblast differentiation markers tested. In summary, TNF blocks expression of osteoblast differentiation markers and inhibits beta-glycerophosphate-induced activation of the osteoblast differentiation factor cbfa1. Importantly, these effects are mediated via a mechanism requiring the TNF type-1 receptor.

  17. Protein kinase C regulates tonic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the hippocampus and thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Damian P; Smart, Trevor G

    2013-01-01

    Tonic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) is an important regulator of neuronal excitability. Phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) provides a key mode of regulation for synaptic GABAARs underlying phasic inhibition; however, less attention has been focused on the plasticity of tonic inhibition and whether this can also be modulated by receptor phosphorylation. To address this issue, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording in acute murine brain slices at both room and physiological temperatures to examine the effects of PKC-mediated phosphorylation on tonic inhibition. Recordings from dentate gyrus granule cells in the hippocampus and dorsal lateral geniculate relay neurons in the thalamus demonstrated that PKC activation caused downregulation of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. Conversely, inhibition of PKC resulted in an increase in tonic GABAAR activity. These findings were corroborated by experiments on human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing recombinant α4β2δ GABAARs, which represent a key extrasynaptic GABAAR isoform in the hippocampus and thalamus. Using bath application of low GABA concentrations to mimic activation by ambient neurotransmitter, we demonstrated a similar inhibition of receptor function following PKC activation at physiological temperature. Live cell imaging revealed that this was correlated with a loss of cell surface GABAARs. The inhibitory effects of PKC activation on α4β2δ GABAAR activity appeared to be mediated by direct phosphorylation at a previously identified site on the β2 subunit, serine 410. These results indicate that PKC-mediated phosphorylation can be an important physiological regulator of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. PMID:24102973

  18. Inhibition of endogenous heat shock protein 70 attenuates inducible nitric oxide synthase induction via disruption of heat shock protein 70/Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1-Ca(2+) -calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1-nuclear factor-κB signals in BV-2 microglia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Lu, Xu; Wang, Jia; Tong, Lijuan; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) critically contributes to inflammation and host defense. The inhibition of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) prevents iNOS induction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. However, the role and mechanism of endogenous Hsp70 in iNOS induction in microglia remains unclear. This study addresses this issue in BV-2 microglia, showing that Hsp70 inhibition or knockdown prevents LPS-induced iNOS protein expression and nitric oxide production. Real-time PCR experiments showed that LPS-induced iNOS mRNA transcription was blocked by Hsp70 inhibition. Further studies revealed that the inhibition of Hsp70 attenuated LPS-stimulated nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB as well as the degradation of inhibitor of κB (IκB)-α and phosphorylation of IκB kinase β (IKKβ). This prevention effect of Hsp70 inhibition on IKKβ-NF-κB activation was found to be dependent on the Ca(2+) /calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) signals based on the following observations: 1) chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) or inhibition of CaMKII reduced LPS-induced increases in TAK1 phosphorylation and 2) Hsp70 inhibition reduced LPS-induced increases in CaMKII/TAK1 phosphorylation, intracellular pH value, [Ca(2+) ]i , and CaMKII/TAK1 association. Mechanistic studies showed that Hsp70 inhibition disrupted the association between Hsp70 and Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), which is an important exchanger responsible for Ca(2+) influx in LPS-stimulated cells. These studies demonstrate that the inhibition of endogenous Hsp70 attenuates the induction of iNOS, which likely occurs through the disruption of NHE1/Hsp70-Ca(2+) -CaMKII/TAK1-NF-κB signals in BV-2 microglia, providing further insight into the functions of Hsp70 in the CNS.

  19. Physico-chemical pathways in radioprotective action of calmodulin antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Rajeev; Kale, R. K.

    1996-04-01

    Ghost membranes prepared from erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice were irradiated with gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.9 Gy/s. The fluidity of membrane decreased with radiation dose and in the presence of calmodulin antagonists (CA) like chlorpromazine (CPZ), promethazine (PMZ) and trimeprazine (TMZ) it increased. Radiation induced release of Ca 2+ from membranes. This release was inhibited by CA mainly by CPZ and PMZ. Being Ca 2+ dependent, the changes in the activity of acetylcholine estrase (AchE) following irradiation was also studied. Radiation decreased the activity of AchE in dose dependent manner. Presence of CPZ and PMZ diminished the radiation induced inhibition of AchE but not in the presence of TMZ at the lower concentration tested. It is suggested that apart from scavenging of free radicals, CA perhaps exert their euxoic radioprotective effect through Ca 2+ dependent processes.

  20. Possible role of calmodulin in excystation of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Bernal, R M; Tovar, R; Santos, J I; Muñoz, M L

    1998-09-01

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia initiates infection when trophozoites emerge from a cyst in the hosts by the excystation process. Although this process is crucial to the initiation of infection by G. lamblia, little is known about its regulation. To study the possible involvement of calmodulin (CaM) in excystation we tested the effect of several CaM antagonists (TFP, W-7, and W-5) on this cellular function. Except for W-5 the rest of these compounds inhibited excystation. The protein kinase C inhibitor H-7 had no effect on excystation, suggesting that CaM antagonists acted by selectively inhibiting CaM. Furthermore, CaM was redistributed after the induction of excystation and there was an increase in its fluorescence and activity. These results suggest that a CaM-dependent process is involved in G. lamblia excystation.

  1. Histamine H3A receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the mouse brain cortex.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Behling, A; Lümmen, G; Göthert, M

    1992-04-01

    Mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline were superfused with physiological salt solution containing desipramine plus a drug with alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist properties, and the effects of histamine receptor ligands on the electrically (0.3 Hz) evoked tritium overflow were studied. The evoked overflow (from slices superfused with phentolamine) was inhibited by histamine (pIC35 6.53), the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (7.47) and its S-(+)-enantiomer (5.82) but not influenced by the H1 receptor agonist 2-(2-thiazolyl)-ethylamine 3.2 mumol/l and the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit 10 mumol/l. The inhibitory effect of histamine was not affected by the H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene 1 mumol/l and the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine 10 mumol/l. The concentration-response curve of histamine (determined in the presence of rauwolscine) was shifted to the right by the H3 receptor antagonists thioperamide (apparent pA2 8.67), impromidine (7.30) and burimamide (6.82) as well as by dimaprit (6.16). The pA2 values of the four drugs were compared with their affinities for H3A and H3B binding sites in rat brain membranes (West et al. 1990 Mol Pharmacol 38:610); a significant correlation was obtained for the H3A, but not for the H3B sites. The results suggest that noradrenaline release in the mouse brain cortex is inhibited by histamine via H3A receptors and that dimaprit is an H3 receptor antagonist of moderate potency.

  2. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit platelet adhesion and aggregation by nitric oxide release.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Leszek; Matys, Tomasz; Chabielska, Ewa; Buczko, Włodzimierz; Malinski, Tadeusz

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the process of nitric oxide (NO) release from platelets after stimulation with different angiotensin II type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonists and its effect on platelet adhesion and aggregation. Angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets was compared with that in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by using a highly sensitive porphyrinic microsensor. In vitro and ex vivo effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on platelet adhesion to collagen and thromboxane A2 analog U46619-induced aggregation were evaluated. Losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan alone caused NO release from platelets and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner in the range of 0.01 to 100 micro mol/L, which was attenuated by NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. The angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists had more than 70% greater potency in NO release in platelets than in endothelial cells. The degree of inhibition of platelet adhesion (collagen-stimulated) and aggregation (U46619-stimulated) elicited by losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan, either in vitro or ex vivo, closely correlated with the NO levels produced by each of these drugs alone. The inhibiting effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on collagen-stimulated adhesion and U46619-stimulated aggregation of platelets were significantly reduced by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Neither the AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319, the cyclooxygenase synthase inhibitor indomethacin, nor the selective thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist SQ29,548 had any effect on angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets and endothelial cells. The presented studies clearly indicate a crucial role of NO in the arterial antithrombotic effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists.

  3. Angiotensin receptor blockers and the kidney: possible advantages over ACE inhibition?

    PubMed

    Cooper, M E; Webb, R L; de Gasparo, M

    2001-01-01

    This review deals with similarities and differences between the effects of ACE inhibitors and AT1-receptor blockers in the kidney. Specific receptor blockade has demonstrated that the beneficial effects of AT1 blockers arise from two mechanisms: the reduction of the AT1 receptor mediated response and the increase in plasma levels of Ang II through the AT1-receptor blockade, which leads to increased stimulation of the AT2 receptor (the so-called yin-yang effect). Both ACE inhibition and AT1-receptor blockade provide significant renal protection in the majority of experimental animal models of kidney diseases. AT1 receptor blockade may offer additional clinical benefits over ACE inhibitor treatment, particularly in the kidney, where AT1-receptor blockade does not cause the fall in glomerular filtration rate seen with ACE inhibitor treatment. A number of long-term clinical studies currently running should show the real value of this new class of compounds in the management of hypertension and associated cardiorenal diseases.

  4. Heterologous desensitization of opioid receptors by chemokines inhibits chemotaxis and enhances the perception of pain.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Imre; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Xin, Li; Adler, Martin W; Howard, O M Z; Oppenheim, Joost J; Rogers, Thomas J

    2002-08-06

    The chemokines use G protein-coupled receptors to regulate the migratory and proadhesive responses of leukocytes. Based on observations that G protein-coupled receptors undergo heterologous desensitization, we have examined the ability of chemokines to also influence the perception of pain by cross-desensitizing opioid G protein-coupled receptors function in vitro and in vivo. We find that the chemotactic activities of both mu- and delta-opioid receptors are desensitized following activation of the chemokine receptors CCR5, CCR2, CCR7, and CXCR4 but not of the CXCR1 or CXCR2 receptors. Furthermore, we also find that pretreatment with RANTES/CCL5, the ligand for CCR1, and CCR5 or SDF-1alpha/CXCL12, the ligand for CXCR4, followed by opioid administration into the periaqueductal gray matter of the brain results in an increased rat tail flick response to a painful stimulus. Because chemokine administration into the periaqueductal gray matter inhibits opioid-induced analgesia, we propose that the activation of proinflammatory chemokine receptors down-regulates the analgesic functions of opioid receptors, and this enhances the perception of pain at inflammatory sites.

  5. Pre-synaptic GABA receptors inhibit glutamate release through GIRK channels in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ladera, Carolina; del Carmen Godino, María; José Cabañero, María; Torres, Magdalena; Watanabe, Masahiko; Luján, Rafael; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2008-12-01

    Neuronal G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels mediate the slow inhibitory effects of many neurotransmitters post-synaptically. However, no evidence exists that supports that GIRK channels play any role in the inhibition of glutamate release by GABA(B) receptors. In this study, we show for the first time that GABA(B) receptors operate through two mechanisms in nerve terminals from the cerebral cortex. As shown previously, GABA(B) receptors reduces glutamate release and the Ca(2+) influx mediated by N-type Ca(2+) channels in a mode insensitive to the GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q and consistent with direct inhibition of this voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel. However, by means of weak stimulation protocols, we reveal that GABA(B) receptors also reduce glutamate release mediated by P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, and that these responses are reversed by the GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q. Consistent with the functional interaction between GABA(B) receptors and GIRK channels at nerve terminals we demonstrate by immunogold electron immunohistochemistry that pre-synaptic boutons of asymmetric synapses co-express GABA(B) receptors and GIRK channels, thus suggesting that the functional interaction of these two proteins, found at the post-synaptic level, also occurs at glutamatergic nerve terminals.

  6. Activation of Gi-coupled receptors releases a tonic state of inhibited platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Maayani, S; Schwarz, T; Martinez, R; Tagliente, T M

    2001-03-01

    Single-receptor pharmacology does not satisfactorily explain the physiology of the ADP-induced platelet aggregation response. It has been shown that, in addition to Gq-coupled receptor activation, one Gi-coupled receptor, either the ADP P2T or the alpha2-adrenoceptor, is required for elicitation of aggregation. The underlying mechanism of this action, however, has not been elucidated. By systematically assaying the entire time course of the aggregation and its fade using two methods of aggregometry, we have investigated the role of graded activation of these two Gi-coupled receptors. We demonstrate that constant activation of either of two Gq-coupled receptors, the ADP P2Y1 or the 5-HT2A, and incremental activation of either of the two Gi-coupled receptors, tightly regulates the aggregation response in vitro, through the apparent release of a tonic inhibition of platelet aggregation. This tightly regulated release of inhibition, which appears analogous to the phenomena of disinhibition observed in the central nervous system, may be instrumental for the continuous adaptation of the aggregation response to variable physiological conditions.

  7. Manganese inhibits NMDA receptor channel function: implications to psychiatric and cognitive effects.

    PubMed

    Guilarte, Tomás R; Chen, Ming-Kai

    2007-11-01

    Humans exposed to excess levels of manganese (Mn(2+)) express psychiatric problems and deficits in attention and learning and memory. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on molecular mechanisms by which Mn(2+) produces such effects. We now report that Mn(2+) is a potent inhibitor of [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor channel in rat neuronal membrane preparations. The inhibition of [(3)H]-MK-801 to the NMDA receptor channel by Mn(2+) was activity-dependent since Mn(2+) was a more potent inhibitor in the presence of the NMDA receptor co-agonists glutamate and glycine (K(i)=35.9+/-3.1 microM) than in their absence (K(i)=157.1+/-6.5 microM). We also show that Mn(2+) is a NMDA receptor channel blocker since its inhibition of [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor channel is competitive in nature. That is, Mn(2+) significantly increased the affinity constant (K(d)) with no significant effect on the maximal number of [(3)H]-MK-801 binding sites (B(max)). Under stimulating conditions, Mn(2+) was equipotent in inhibiting [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors expressed in neuronal membrane preparations from different brain regions. However, under basal, non-stimulated conditions, Mn(2+) was more potent in inhibiting NMDA receptors in the cerebellum than other brain regions. We have previously shown that chronic Mn(2+) exposure in non-human primates increases Cu(2+), but not zinc or iron concentrations in the basal ganglia [Guilarte TR, Chen M-K, McGlothan JL, Verina T, Wong DF, Zhou Y, Alexander M, Rohde CA, Syversen T, Decamp E, Koser AJ, Fritz S, Gonczi H, Anderson DW, Schneider JS. Nigrostriatal dopamine system dysfunction and subtle motor deficits in manganese-exposed non-human primates. Exp Neurol 2006a;202:381-90]. Therefore, we also tested the inhibitory effects of Cu(2+) on [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor channel. The data shows that Cu(2+) in the presence of glutamate and glycine is a more potent inhibitor of the NMDA receptor than Mn(2

  8. Histamine H3 receptor activation inhibits neurogenic sympathetic vasoconstriction in porcine nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Varty, LoriAnn M; Hey, John A

    2002-10-11

    Histamine release from mast cells is a primary mediator of rhinorrhea, nasal mucosal swelling, increased secretion, sneezing, pruritus and congestion that occur in allergic rhinitis. It is well known that histamine H(1) receptor antagonists inhibit the itch and rhinorhea, but do not block the allergic nasal congestion. A growing body of evidence shows that in addition to histamine H(1) receptors, activation of H(3) receptors may contribute to the procongestant nasal actions of histamine. Activation of the prejunctional histamine H(3) receptor modulates sympathetic control of nasal vascular tone and resistance. The present study was conducted to further characterize the role of histamine H(3) receptors on neurogenic sympathetic vascular contractile responses in isolated porcine nasal turbinate mucosa. We presently found that the histamine H(3) receptor agonist, (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (10-1000 nM), inhibited electrical field stimulation-induced sympathetic vasomotor contractions in a concentration-dependent fashion. Pretreatment with either of the selective histamine H(3) receptor antagonists, thioperamide and clobenpropit, blocked the sympathoinhibitory effect of (R)-alpha-methylhistamine in porcine turbinate mucosa. The effect of compound 48/80, an agent that elicits the release of endogenous histamine from mast cells on nasal sympathetic contractile responses, was also tested. The action of compound 48/80 to release mast cell-derived histamine in the nose mimics many of the nasal responses associated with allergic rhinitis, extravascular leakage and decreased nasal patency. We presently found that compound 48/80 also inhibited the electrical field stimulation-induced sympathetic response. Pretreatment with the H(3) receptor antagonist clobenpropit blocked the sympathoinhibitory action of compound 48/80 on sympathetic contractile responses in nasal mucosa. Taken together, these studies indicate that histamine H(3) receptors modulate vascular contractile

  9. Polarized Axonal Surface Expression of Neuronal KCNQ Potassium Channels Is Regulated by Calmodulin Interaction with KCNQ2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwan Young; Kim, Edward H.; Issema, Rodal S.; Chung, Hee Jung

    2014-01-01

    KCNQ potassium channels composed of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 subunits give rise to the M-current, a slow-activating and non-inactivating voltage-dependent potassium current that limits repetitive firing of action potentials. KCNQ channels are enriched at the surface of axons and axonal initial segments, the sites for action potential generation and modulation. Their enrichment at the axonal surface is impaired by mutations in KCNQ2 carboxy-terminal tail that cause benign familial neonatal convulsion and myokymia, suggesting that their correct surface distribution and density at the axon is crucial for control of neuronal excitability. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for regulating enrichment of KCNQ channels at the neuronal axon remain elusive. Here, we show that enrichment of KCNQ channels at the axonal surface of dissociated rat hippocampal cultured neurons is regulated by ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin. Using immunocytochemistry and the cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) membrane protein as a trafficking reporter, we demonstrate that fusion of KCNQ2 carboxy-terminal tail is sufficient to target CD4 protein to the axonal surface whereas inhibition of calmodulin binding to KCNQ2 abolishes axonal surface expression of CD4 fusion proteins by retaining them in the endoplasmic reticulum. Disruption of calmodulin binding to KCNQ2 also impairs enrichment of heteromeric KCNQ2/KCNQ3 channels at the axonal surface by blocking their trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the axon. Consistently, hippocampal neuronal excitability is dampened by transient expression of wild-type KCNQ2 but not mutant KCNQ2 deficient in calmodulin binding. Furthermore, coexpression of mutant calmodulin, which can interact with KCNQ2/KCNQ3 channels but not calcium, reduces but does not abolish their enrichment at the axonal surface, suggesting that apo calmodulin but not calcium-bound calmodulin is necessary for their preferential targeting to the axonal surface. These findings

  10. Feed-forward inhibition of androgen receptor activity by glucocorticoid action in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Sean M; He, Bin; Newberg, Justin Y; Ochsner, Scott A; Loose, David S; Lanz, Rainer B; McKenna, Neil J; Buehrer, Benjamin M; McGuire, Sean E; Marcelli, Marco; Mancini, Michael A

    2012-09-21

    We compared transcriptomes of terminally differentiated mouse 3T3-L1 and human adipocytes to identify cell-specific differences. Gene expression and high content analysis (HCA) data identified the androgen receptor (AR) as both expressed and functional, exclusively during early human adipocyte differentiation. The AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) inhibited human adipocyte maturation by downregulation of adipocyte marker genes, but not in 3T3-L1. It is interesting that AR induction corresponded with dexamethasone activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR); however, when exposed to the differentiation cocktail required for adipocyte maturation, AR adopted an antagonist conformation and was transcriptionally repressed. To further explore effectors within the cocktail, we applied an image-based support vector machine (SVM) classification scheme to show that adipocyte differentiation components inhibit AR action. The results demonstrate human adipocyte differentiation, via GR activation, upregulates AR but also inhibits AR transcriptional activity.

  11. Macroautophagy inhibition maintains fragmented mitochondria to foster T cell receptor-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Mauro; Mariotti, Francesca R; Trapani, Laura; Taraborrelli, Lucia; Nazio, Francesca; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Schrepfer, Emilie; Cecconi, Francesco; Scorrano, Luca; Campello, Silvia

    2016-08-15

    Mitochondrial dynamics and functionality are linked to the autophagic degradative pathway under several stress conditions. However, the interplay between mitochondria and autophagy upon cell death signalling remains unclear. The T-cell receptor pathway signals the so-called activation-induced cell death (AICD) essential for immune tolerance regulation. Here, we show that this apoptotic pathway requires the inhibition of macroautophagy. Protein kinase-A activation downstream of T-cell receptor signalling inhibits macroautophagy upon AICD induction. This leads to the accumulation of damaged mitochondria, which are fragmented, display remodelled cristae and release cytochrome c, thereby driving apoptosis. Autophagy-forced reactivation that clears the Parkin-decorated mitochondria is as effective in inhibiting apoptosis as genetic interference with cristae remodelling and cytochrome c release. Thus, upon AICD induction regulation of macroautophagy, rather than selective mitophagy, ensures apoptotic progression. © 2016 The Authors.

  12. Orphan Nuclear Receptor DAX-1 Acts as a Novel Corepressor of Liver X Receptor α and Inhibits Hepatic Lipogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Nedumaran, Balachandar; Kim, Gwang Sik; Hong, Sungpyo; Yoon, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Young Chul; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2010-01-01

    DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on X chromosome, gene 1) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that can repress diverse nuclear receptors and has a key role in adreno-gonadal development. Our previous report has demonstrated that DAX-1 can inhibit hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α transactivity and negatively regulate gluconeogenic gene expression (Nedumaran, B., Hong, S., Xie, Y. B., Kim, Y. H., Seo, W. Y., Lee, M. W., Lee, C. H., Koo, S. H., and Choi, H. S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 27511–27523). Here, we further expand the role of DAX-1 in hepatic energy metabolism. Transfection assays have demonstrated that DAX-1 can inhibit the transcriptional activity of nuclear receptor liver X receptor α (LXRα). Physical interaction between DAX-1 and LXRα was confirmed Immunofluorescent staining in mouse liver shows that LXRα and DAX-1 are colocalized in the nucleus. Domain mapping analysis shows that the entire region of DAX-1 is involved in the interaction with the ligand binding domain region of LXRα. Competition analyses demonstrate that DAX-1 competes with the coactivator SRC-1 for repressing LXRα transactivity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that endogenous DAX-1 recruitment on the SREBP-1c gene promoter was decreased in the presence of LXRα agonist. Overexpression of DAX-1 inhibits T7-induced LXRα target gene expression, whereas knockdown of endogenous DAX-1 significantly increases T7-induced LXRα target gene expression in HepG2 cells. Finally, overexpression of DAX-1 in mouse liver decreases T7-induced LXRα target gene expression, liver triglyceride level, and lipid accumulation. Overall, this study suggests that DAX-1, a novel corepressor of LXRα, functions as a negative regulator of lipogenic enzyme gene expression in liver. PMID:20080977

  13. Sigma receptor ligand N,N'-di-(ortho-tolyl)guanidine inhibits release of acetylcholine in the guinea pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Cambell, B G; Keana, J F; Weber, E

    1991-11-26

    The inhibition of stimulated contractions of the guinea pig ileum longitudinal muscle/myenteric plexus preparation by sigma receptor ligands has been previously described. In this study, the stimulated release of [3H]acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve terminals in this same preparation was monitored in the presence and absence of sigma receptor ligands. N,N'-Di-(orthotolyl)guanidine (DTG) and other compounds selective for the sigma receptor inhibited stimulated [3H]acetylcholine release. These results suggest that their inhibition of stimulated contractions in this preparation was mediated by inhibition of acetylcholine release.

  14. Inhibition of glycine receptor function of native neurons by aliphatic n-alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Liang; Ye, Jiang Hong

    2002-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of n-alcohols (methanol to dodecanol) on glycine-activated currents were studied in neurons freshly dissociated from the ventral tegmental area of neonatal rats using whole-cell patch-clamp recording technique.Ethanol enhanced and depressed glycine-activated currents in 35% and 45%, respectively, of neurons of ventral tegmental area of neonatal rats. In this report, we extended our focus of ethanol-induced inhibition of glycine currents to other straight-chain alcohols.Aliphatic n-alcohols, which have carbon numbers less than nine, suppressed glycine currents in 45% (71/158) of the neurons. All results from this study are obtained from the 45% of cells displaying inhibition; the other 55% of the neurons were not studied.Alcohol potency increased as the number of carbon atoms increased from one to five, and was at a maximal plateau from five to nine; alcohols with 10 or more carbons did not inhibit glycine-activated currents. Thus, a ‘cutoff' point in their potency for inhibition of glycine receptor function occurred at about decanol.A coapplication of dodecanol with ethanol eliminated the inhibition resulting from ethanol. Thus, dodecanol may bind to the receptor silently and compete with ethanol.These observations indicate that straight-chain n-alcohols exhibit a ‘cutoff' point in their potency for inhibition of the glycine receptor function between nine and 10 carbon atoms. The inability of longer alcohols to change the activation properties of the receptors may contribute to the cutoff effect. PMID:12055142

  15. Nitric oxide reversibly inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, C; Gómez, C; Martín-Nieto, J; De Frutos, T; Jiménez, A; Villalobo, A

    1997-01-01

    Although it has been demonstrated that NO inhibits the proliferation of different cell types, the mechanisms of its anti-mitotic action are not well understood. In this work we have studied the possible interaction of NO with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), using transfected fibroblasts which overexpress the human EGFR. The NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), 1,1-diethyl-2-hydroxy-2-nitrosohydrazine (DEA-NO) and N-¿4-[1-(3-aminopropyl)-2-hydroxy-2-nitrosohydrazino]butyl¿propane -1, 3-diamine (DETA-NO) inhibited DNA synthesis of fibroblasts growing in the presence of fetal calf serum, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or EGF plus insulin, as assessed by [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation. Neither 8-bromo-cGMP nor the cGMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast mimicked this effect, suggesting that NO is unlikely to inhibit cell proliferation via a cGMP-dependent pathway. SNAP, DEA-NO and DETA-NO also inhibited the transphosphorylation of the EGFR and its tyrosine kinase activity toward the exogenous substrate poly-l-(Glu-Tyr), as measured in permeabilized cells using [gamma-32P]ATP as phosphate donor. In contrast, 3-[morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride] (SIN-1), a peroxynitrite-forming compound, did not significantly inhibit either DNA synthesis or the EGFR tyrosine kinase activity. The inhibitory action of DEA-NO on the EGFR tyrosine kinase was prevented by haemoglobin, an NO scavenger, but not by superoxide dismutase, and was reversed by dithiothreitol. The binding of EGF to its receptor was unaffected by DEA-NO. The inhibitory action of DEA-NO on the EGF-dependent transphosphorylation of the receptor was also demonstrated in intact cells by immunoblot analysis using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Taken together, these results suggest that NO, but not peroxynitrite, inhibits in a reversible manner the EGFR tyrosine kinase activity by S-nitrosylation of the receptor. PMID:9291107

  16. Sigma receptor activation inhibits voltage-gated sodium channels in rat intracardiac ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongling; Katnik, Christopher; Cuevas, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Sigma (σ) receptors have been shown to regulate multiple ion channel types in intracardiac ganglion neurons, including voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels. However, the inhibition of these channels alone cannot fully account for σ receptor-induced changes in neuronal excitability previously reported. Whole-cell patch clamp experiments were conducted under current-clamp mode in isolated intracardiac neurons from neonatal rats to assess the effects of σ receptor activation on the active membrane properties of these cells. Bath application of the pan-selective σ receptor agonist, 1,3-Di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), and the σ-1-selective agonist, (+)-pentazocine, significantly increased the action potential latency and decreased action potential overshoot in response to depolarizing current ramps, which suggests inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels. Whole-cell voltage clamp experiments showed that these σ agonists reversibly decrease depolarization-activated Na+ currents in these cells at all potentials tested. The peak currents generated by membrane depolarizations were decreased in a dose dependent manner with IC50 values for DTG and (+)-pentazocine of 32 μM and 49 μM, respectively. The σ-1 receptor-selective antagonist, BD 1063 (100 nM), inhibited DTG (30 μM) block of Na+ currents by ∼ 50%, suggesting that the effects are mediated by activation of σ-1 receptors. DTG also shifted the steady-state inactivation curve of Na+ channels to more negative potentials, with the membrane potential of half-activation shifting from -49 mV to -63 mV in the absence and presence of 30 μM DTG, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that σ-1 receptor activation decreases intracardiac ganglion neuron excitability by modulating voltage-gated Na+ channels. PMID:21383893

  17. The melanocortin MC1 receptor agonist BMS-470539 inhibits leucocyte trafficking in the inflamed vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, G; Voisin, M-B; Carlson, K; Getting, SJ; Nourshargh, S; Perretti, M

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Over three decades of research evaluating the biology of melanocortin (MC) hormones and synthetic peptides, activation of the MC type 1 (MC1) receptor has been identified as a viable target for the development of novel anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents. Here, we have tested a recently described selective agonist of MC1 receptors, BMS-470539, on leucocyte/post-capillary venule interactions in murine microvascular beds. Experimental approach: Intravital microscopy of two murine microcirculations were utilized, applying two distinct modes of promoting inflammation. The specificity of the effects of BMS-470539 was assessed using mice bearing mutant inactive MC1 receptors (the recessive yellow e/e colony). Key results: BMS-470539, given before an ischaemia–reperfusion protocol, inhibited cell adhesion and emigration with no effect on cell rolling, as assessed 90 min into the reperfusion phase. These properties were paralleled by inhibition of tissue expression of both CXCL1 and CCL2. Confocal investigations of inflamed post-capillary venules revealed immunostaining for MC1 receptors on adherent and emigrated leucocytes. Congruently, the anti-inflammatory properties of BMS-470539 were lost in mesenteries of mice bearing the inactive mutant MC1 receptors. Therapeutic administration of BMS-470539 stopped cell emigration, but did not affect cell adhesion in the cremasteric microcirculation inflamed by superfusion with platelet-activating factor. Conclusions and implications: Activation of MC1 receptors inhibited leucocyte adhesion and emigration. Development of new chemical entities directed at MC1 receptors could be a viable approach in the development of novel anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents with potential application to post-ischaemic conditions. PMID:20331604

  18. Involvement of calcium and calmodulin in the regulation of ovarian steroidogenesis in Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus) and modulation by Aroclor 1254.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Abby D; Thomas, Peter

    2005-12-01

    The involvement of calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways in the regulation of ovarian steroidogenesis was investigated in Atlantic croaker. Treatment with the calcium ionophores A23187 and ionomycin caused a 2- to 5-fold increase in basal steroid accumulation by croaker ovarian tissue in vitro. A23187 potentiated human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced testosterone (T) accumulation, whereas it inhibited accumulation of estradiol-17beta (E(2)) and the conversion of T to E(2), suggesting that intracellular calcium modulates aromatase enzyme activity. Gonadotropin stimulation of ovarian steroidogenesis was decreased in the presence of EGTA and inhibitors of voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate-receptors (IP(3)Rs), indicating that releases of calcium from both intracellular and extracellular stores are components of the signal transduction pathways initiated by gonadotropin. Calmodulin is also involved in the regulation of ovarian steroidogenesis in croaker, since the calmodulin inhibitors W-7 and trifluoperazine (TFP) attenuated hCG-stimulated T and E(2) accumulation. These results are broadly similar to those reported previously in goldfish and suggest that the major calcium-dependent signaling pathways involved in gonadotropin stimulation of ovarian steroidogenesis in tetrapods are also present in teleosts. In addition, the involvement of calcium in the regulation of aromatase activity was demonstrated for the first time in a vertebrate ovary. Finally, acute exposure to 0.001-1 ppm Aroclor 1254 induced up to a 5-fold increase in hCG-stimulated E(2) accumulation, and this effect was attenuated by co-treatment with inhibitors of VSCCs and calmodulin, suggesting the existence of a novel mechanism of endocrine disruption by an environmental contaminant involving alteration of calcium-dependent signaling pathways regulating steroidogenesis.

  19. Ca2+ channel inhibition by endomorphins via the cloned mu-opioid receptor expressed in NG108-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Mima, H; Morikawa, H; Fukuda, K; Kato, S; Shoda, T; Mori, K

    1997-12-11

    Endomorphin-1 and -2, recently isolated endogenous peptides specific for the mu-opioid receptor, inhibited Ca2+ channel currents with EC50 of 6 and 9 nM, respectively, in NG108-15 cells transformed to express the cloned rat mu-opioid receptor. On the other hand, they elicited no response in nontransfected NG108-15 cells. It is concluded that endomorphin-1 and -2 induce Ca2+ channel inhibition by selectively activating the mu-opioid receptor.

  20. Intracellular Ca2+ and Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase II Mediate Acute Potentiation of Neurotransmitter Release by Neurotrophin-3

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang-ping; Yang, Feng; Xie, Zuo-ping; Lu, Bai

    2000-01-01

    Neurotrophins have been shown to acutely modulate synaptic transmission in a variety of systems, but the underlying signaling mechanisms remain unclear. Here we provide evidence for an unusual mechanism that mediates synaptic potentiation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) induced by neurotrophin-3 (NT3), using Xenopus nerve–muscle co-culture. Unlike brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which requires Ca2+ influx for its acute effect, NT3 rapidly enhances spontaneous transmitter release at the developing NMJ even when Ca2+ influx is completely blocked, suggesting that the NT3 effect is independent of extracellular Ca2+. Depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores, or blockade of inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate (IP3) or ryanodine receptors, prevents the NT3-induced synaptic potentiation. Blockade of IP3 receptors can not prevent BDNF-induced potentiation, suggesting that BDNF and NT3 use different mechanisms to potentiate transmitter release. Inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) completely blocks the acute effect of NT3. Furthermore, the NT3-induced potentiation requires a continuous activation of CaMKII, because application of the CaMKII inhibitor KN62 reverses the previously established NT3 effect. Thus, NT3 potentiates neurotransmitter secretion by stimulating Ca2+ release from intracellular stores through IP3 and/or ryanodine receptors, leading to an activation of CaMKII. PMID:10811820

  1. Prostacyclin receptor-independent inhibition of phospholipase C activity by non-prostanoid prostacyclin mimetics

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Kevin B S; Wong, Yung H; Wise, Helen

    2001-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were transiently transfected with the mouse prostacyclin (mIP) receptor to examine IP agonist-mediated stimulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP and [3H]-inositol phosphate production.The prostacyclin analogues, cicaprost, iloprost, carbacyclin and prostaglandin E1, stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity with EC50 values of 5, 6, 25 and 95 nM, respectively. These IP agonists also stimulated the phospholipase C pathway with 10 – 40 fold lower potency than stimulation of adenylyl cyclase.The non-prostanoid prostacyclin mimetics, octimibate, BMY 42393 and BMY 45778, also stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity, with EC50 values of 219, 166 and 398 nM, respectively, but failed to stimulate [3H]-inositol phosphate production.Octimibate, BMY 42393 and BMY 45778 inhibited iloprost-stimulated [3H]-inositol phosphate production in a non-competitive manner.Activation of the endogenously-expressed P2 purinergic receptor by ATP led to an increase in [3H]-inositol phosphate production which was inhibited by the non-prostanoid prostacyclin mimetics in non-transfected CHO cells. Prostacyclin analogues and other prostanoid receptor ligands failed to inhibit ATP-stimulated [3H]-inositol phosphate production.A comparison between the IP receptor-specific non-prostanoid ONO-1310 and the structurally-related EP3 receptor-specific agonist ONO-AP-324, indicated that the inhibitory effect of non-prostanoids was specific for those compounds known to activate IP receptors.The non-prostanoid prostacyclin mimetics also inhibited phospholipase C activity when stimulated by constitutively-active mutant GαqRC, Gα14RC and Gα16QL transiently expressed in CHO cells. These drugs did not inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity when stimulated by the constitutively-active mutant GαsQL.These results suggest that non-prostanoid prostacyclin mimetics can specifically inhibit [3H]-inositol phosphate production by targeting Gq/11 and/or phospholipase C in CHO cells, and

  2. Ethanol-Induced Motor Impairment Mediated by Inhibition of α7 Nicotinic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McDaid, John; Abburi, Chandrika; Wolfman, Shannon L.; Gallagher, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine and ethanol (EtOH) are among the most widely co-abused substances, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) contribute to the behavioral effects of both drugs. Along with their role in addiction, nAChRs also contribute to motor control circuitry. The α7 nAChR subtype is highly expressed in the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg), a brainstem cholinergic center that contributes to motor performance through its projections to thalamic motor relay centers, including the mediodorsal thalamus. We demonstrate that EtOH concentrations just above the legal limits for intoxication in humans can inhibit α7 nAChRs in LDTg neurons from rats. This EtOH-induced inhibition is mediated by a decrease in cAMP/PKA signaling. The α7 nAChR-positive allosteric modulator PNU120596 [N-(5-chloro-2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-N′-(5-methyl-3-isoxazolyl)-urea], which interferes with receptor desensitization, completely eliminated EtOH modulation of these receptors. These data suggest that EtOH inhibits α7 responses through a PKA-dependent enhancement of receptor desensitization. EtOH also inhibited the effects of nicotine at presynaptic α7 nAChRs on glutamate terminals in the mediodorsal thalamus. In vivo administration of PNU120596 either into the cerebral ventricles or directly into the mediodorsal thalamus attenuated EtOH-induced motor impairment. Thus, α7 nAChRs are likely important mediators of the motor impairing effects of moderate EtOH consumption. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The motor-impairing effects of ethanol contribute to intoxication-related injury and death. Here we explore the cellular and neural circuit mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced motor impairment. Physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol inhibit activity of a nicotinic receptor subtype that is expressed in brain areas associated with motor control. That receptor inhibition is mediated by decreased receptor phosphorylation, suggesting an indirect modulation of cell signaling pathways to achieve

  3. Muscarinic receptor-mediated excitation of rat intracardiac ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Michiko; Ogata, Masanori; Kawamata, Tomoyuki; Ishibashi, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    Modulation of the membrane excitability of rat parasympathetic intracardiac ganglion neurons by muscarinic receptors was studied using an amphotericin B-perforated patch-clamp recording configuration. Activation of muscarinic receptors by oxotremorine-M (OxoM) depolarized the membrane, accompanied by repetitive action potentials. OxoM evoked inward currents under voltage-clamp conditions at a holding potential of -60 mV. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) markedly increased the OxoM-induced current (IOxoM). The inward IOxoM in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) was fully inhibited by removal of extracellular Na(+), indicating the involvement of non-selective cation channels. The IOxoM was inhibited by organic cation channel antagonists including SKF-96365 and ML-204. The IOxoM was antagonized by muscarinic receptor antagonists with the following potency: 4-DAMP > pirenzepine = darifenacin > methoctramine. Muscarinic toxin 7 (MT-7), a highly selective inhibitor for M1 receptor, produced partial inhibition of the IOxoM. In the presence of MT-7, concentration-inhibition curve of the M3-preferring antagonist darifenacin was shifted to the left. These results suggest the contribution of M1 and M3 receptors to the OxoM response. The IOxoM was inhibited by U-73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor. The membrane-permeable IP3 receptor blocker xestospongin C also inhibited the IOxoM. Furthermore, pretreatment with thapsigargin and BAPTA-AM inhibited the IOxoM, while KN-62, a blocker of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, had no effect. These results suggest that the activation mechanism involves a PLC pathway, release of Ca(2+) from intracellular Ca(2+) stores and calmodulin. The cation channels activated by muscarinic receptors may play an important role in neuronal membrane depolarization in rat intracardiac ganglion neurons.

  4. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated responses in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Oz, Murat; Ravindran, Arippa; Diaz-Ruiz, Oscar; Zhang, Li; Morales, Marisela

    2003-09-01

    The effect of the endogenous cannabinoid ligand anandamide on the function of the cloned alpha7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes was investigated by using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Anandamide reversibly inhibited nicotine (10 microM) induced-currents in a concentration-dependent manner (10 nM to 30 microM), with an IC50 value of 229.7 +/- 20.4 nM. The effect of anandamide was neither dependent on the membrane potential nor meditated by endogenous Ca2+ dependent Cl- channels since it was unaffected by intracellularly injected BAPTA and perfusion with Ca2+-free bathing solution containing 2 mM Ba2+. Anandamide decreased the maximal nicotine-induced responses without significantly affecting its potency, indicating that it acts as a noncompetitive antagonist on nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) alpha7 receptors. This effect was not mediated by CB1 or CB2 receptors, as neither the selective CB1 receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboximide hydrochloride (SR 141716A) nor CB2 receptor antagonist N-((1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethyl-bicyclo-heptan-2-yl]-5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR 144528) reduced the inhibition by anandamide. In addition, inhibition of nicotinic responses by anandamide was not sensitive to either pertussis toxin treatment or to the membrane permeable cAMP analog 8-Br-cAMP (0.2 mM). Inhibitors of enzymes involved in anandamide metabolism including phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, superoxide dismutase, and indomethacin, or the anandamide transport inhibitor AM404 did not prevent anandamide inhibition of nicotinic responses, suggesting that anandamide itself acted on nicotinic receptors. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits the function of nACh alpha7 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes in a cannabinoid receptor-independent and

  5. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1

  6. Receptor kinase complex transmits RALF peptide signal to inhibit root growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Changqing; Li, Xiushan; Chen, Jia; Chen, Weijun; Li, Bin; Li, Chiyu; Wang, Long; Li, Jianglin; Zhao, Xiaoying; Lin, Jianzhong; Liu, Xuanming; Luan, Sheng; Yu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A number of hormones work together to control plant cell growth. Rapid Alkalinization Factor 1 (RALF1), a plant-derived small regulatory peptide, inhibits cell elongation through suppression of rhizosphere acidification in plants. Although a receptor-like kinase, FERONIA (FER), has been shown to act as a receptor for RALF1, the signaling mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we identified a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase (RPM1-induced protein kinase, RIPK), a plasma membrane-associated member of the RLCK-VII subfamily, that is recruited to the receptor complex through interacting with FER in response to RALF1. RALF1 triggers the phosphorylation of both FER and RIPK in a mutually dependent manner. Genetic analysis of the fer-4 and ripk mutants reveals RIPK, as well as FER, to be required for RALF1 response in roots. The RALF1–FER–RIPK interactions may thus represent a mechanism for peptide signaling in plants. PMID:27930296

  7. TGF-beta receptor mediated telomerase inhibition, telomere shortening and breast cancer cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Cassar, Lucy; Nicholls, Craig; Pinto, Alex R; Chen, Ruping; Wang, Lihui; Li, He; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) plays a central role in telomere lengthening for continuous cell proliferation, but it remains unclear how extracellular cues regulate telomerase lengthening of telomeres. Here we report that the cytokine bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) induces the hTERT gene repression in a BMPRII receptor- and Smad3-dependent manner in human breast cancer cells. Chonic exposure of human breast cancer cells to BMP7 results in short telomeres, cell senescence and apoptosis. Mutation of the BMPRII receptor, but not TGFbRII, ACTRIIA or ACTRIIB receptor, inhibits BMP7-induced repression of the hTERT gene promoter activity, leading to increased telomerase activity, lengthened telomeres and continued cell proliferation. Expression of hTERT prevents BMP7-induced breast cancer cell senescence and apoptosis. Thus, our data suggest that BMP7 induces breast cancer cell aging by a mechanism involving BMPRII receptor- and Smad3-mediated repression of the hTERT gene.

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor endocytic traffic perturbation by phosphatidate phosphohydrolase inhibition: new strategy against cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Ronan; Retamal, Claudio; Oyanadel, Claudia; Norambuena, Andrés; López, Alejandro; Bravo-Zehnder, Marcela; Montecino, Fabian J; Metz, Claudia; Soza, Andrea; González, Alfonso

    2014-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exaggerated (oncogenic) function is currently targeted in cancer treatment with drugs that block receptor ligand binding or tyrosine kinase activity. Because endocytic trafficking is a crucial regulator of EGFR function, its pharmacological perturbation might provide a new anti-tumoral strategy. Inhibition of phosphatidic acid (PA) phosphohydrolase (PAP) activity has been shown to trigger PA signaling towards type 4 phosphodiesterase (PDE4) activation and protein kinase A inhibition, leading to internalization of empty/inactive EGFR. Here, we used propranolol, its l- and d- isomers and desipramine as PAP inhibitors to further explore the effects of PAP inhibition on EGFR endocytic trafficking and its consequences on EGFR-dependent cancer cell line models. PAP inhibition not only made EGFR inaccessible to stimuli but also prolonged the signaling lifetime of ligand-activated EGFR in recycling endosomes. Strikingly, such endocytic perturbations applied in acute/intermittent PAP inhibitor treatments selectively impaired cell proliferation/viability sustained by an exaggerated EGFR function. Phospholipase D inhibition with FIPI (5-fluoro-2-indolyl des-chlorohalopemide) and PDE4 inhibition with rolipram abrogated both the anti-tumoral and endocytic effects of PAP inhibition. Prolonged treatments with a low concentration of PAP inhibitors, although without detectable endocytic effects, still counteracted cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and decreased anchorage-independent growth of cells bearing EGFR oncogenic influences. Overall, our results show that PAP inhibitors can counteract EGFR oncogenic traits, including receptor overexpression or activating mutations resistant to current tyrosine kinase inhibitors, perturbing EGFR endocytic trafficking and perhaps other as yet unknown processes, depending on treatment conditions. This puts PAP activity forward as a new suitable target against EGFR-driven malignancy.

  9. Potentiation of morphine-induced mechanical antinociception by σ₁ receptor inhibition: role of peripheral σ₁ receptors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fernández, Cristina; Nieto, Francisco Rafael; González-Cano, Rafael; Artacho-Cordón, Antonia; Romero, Lucía; Montilla-García, Ángeles; Zamanillo, Daniel; Baeyens, José Manuel; Entrena, José Manuel; Cobos, Enrique José

    2013-07-01

    We studied the modulation of morphine-induced mechanical antinociception and side effects by σ₁ receptor inhibition. Both wild-type (WT) and σ₁ receptor knockout (σ₁-KO) mice showed similar responses to paw pressure (100-600 g). The systemic (subcutaneous) or local (intraplantar) administration of σ₁ antagonists (BD-1063, BD-1047, NE-100 and S1RA) was devoid of antinociceptive effects in WT mice. However, σ₁-KO mice exhibited an enhanced mechanical antinociception in response to systemic morphine (1-16 mg/kg). Similarly, systemic treatment of WT mice with σ₁ antagonists markedly potentiated morphine-induced antinociception, and its effects were reversed by the selective σ₁ agonist PRE-084. Although the local administration of morphine (50-200 μg) was devoid of antinociceptive effects in WT mice, it induced dose-dependent antinociception in σ₁-KO mice. This effect was limited to the injected paw. Enhancement of peripheral morphine antinociception was replicated in WT mice locally co-administered with σ₁ antagonists and the opioid. None of the σ₁ antagonists tested enhanced morphine-antinociception in σ₁-KO mice, confirming a σ₁-mediated action. Morphine-induced side-effects (hyperlocomotion and inhibition of gastrointestinal transit) were unaltered in σ₁-KO mice. These results cannot be explained by a direct interaction of σ₁ ligands with μ-opioid receptors or adaptive changes of μ-receptors in σ₁-KO mice, given that [(3)H]DAMGO binding in forebrain, spinal cord, and hind-paw skin membranes was unaltered in mutant mice, and none of the σ₁ drugs tested bound to μ-opioid receptors. These results show that σ₁ receptor inhibition potentiates morphine-induced mechanical analgesia but not its acute side effects, and that this enhanced analgesia can be induced at peripheral level.

  10. RETRACTED: Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand-receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Yang, Yong

    2014-10-03

    Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand-receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of cortical acetylcholine release and cognitive performance by histamine H3 receptor activation in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Blandina, P.; Giorgetti, M.; Bartolini, L.; Cecchi, M.; Timmerman, H.; Leurs, R.; Pepeu, G.; Giovannini, M. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of histamine and agents at histamine receptors on spontaneous and 100 mM K(+)-evoked release of acetylcholine, measured by microdialysis from the cortex of freely moving, rats, and on cognitive tests are described. 2. Local administration of histamine (0.1-100 microM) failed to affect spontaneous but inhibited 100 mM K(+)-stimulated release of acetylcholine up to about 50%. The H3 receptor agonists (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (RAMH) (0.1-10 microM), imetit (0.01-10 microM) and immepip (0.01-10 microM) mimicked the effect of histamine. 3. Neither 2-thiazolylethylamine (TEA), an agonist showing some selectivity for H1 receptors, nor the H2 receptor agonist, dimaprit, modified 100 mM K(+)-evoked release of acetylcholine. 4. The inhibitory effect of 100 microM histamine was completely prevented by the highly selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, clobenpropit but was resistant to antagonism by triprolidine and cimetidine, antagonists at histamine H1 and H2 but not H3 receptors. 5. The H3 receptor-induced inhibition of K(+)-evoked release of acetylcholine was fully sensitive to tetrodotoxin (TTX). 6. The effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of imetit (5 mg kg-1) and RAMH (5 mg kg-1) were tested on acetylcholine release and short term memory paradigms. Both drugs reduced 100 mM K(+)-evoked release of cortical acetylcholine, and impaired object recognition and a passive avoidance response. 7. These observations provide the first evidence of a regulatory role of histamine H3 receptors on cortical acetylcholine release in vivo. Moreover, they suggest a role for histamine in learning and memory and may have implications for the treatment of degenerative disorders associated with impaired cholinergic function. PMID:8982515

  12. Inhibition of lysophosphatidic acid receptors 1 and 3 attenuates atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Kritikou, Eva; van Puijvelde, Gijs H. M.; van der Heijden, Thomas; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Swart, Maarten; Schaftenaar, Frank H.; Kröner, Mara J.; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural lysophospholipid present at high concentrations within lipid-rich atherosclerotic plaques. Upon local accumulation in the damaged vessels, LPA can act as a potent activator for various types of immune cells through its specific membrane receptors LPA1/3. LPA elicits chemotactic, pro-inflammatory and apoptotic effects that lead to atherosclerotic plaque progression. In this study we aimed to inhibit LPA signaling by means of LPA1/3 antagonism using the small molecule Ki16425. We show that LPA1/3 inhibition significantly impaired atherosclerosis progression. Treatment with Ki16425 also resulted in reduced CCL2 production and secretion, which led to less monocyte and neutrophil infiltration. Furthermore, we provide evidence that LPA1/3 blockade enhanced the percentage of non-inflammatory, Ly6Clow monocytes and CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells. Finally, we demonstrate that LPA1/3 antagonism mildly reduced plasma LDL cholesterol levels. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of LPA1/3 receptors may prove a promising approach to diminish atherosclerosis development. PMID:27883026

  13. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Eun Hyang; Jang, Soon Young; Cho, In-Hye; Hong, Darong; Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-08-07

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Hispolon decreased ERα expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Hispolon decreased ERα transcriptional activity. • Hispolon treatment inhibited expression of ERα target gene pS2. • Shikonin is a candidate chemotherapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  14. Inhibition of lysophosphatidic acid receptors 1 and 3 attenuates atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kritikou, Eva; van Puijvelde, Gijs H M; van der Heijden, Thomas; van Santbrink, Peter J; Swart, Maarten; Schaftenaar, Frank H; Kröner, Mara J; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2016-11-24

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural lysophospholipid present at high concentrations within lipid-rich atherosclerotic plaques. Upon local accumulation in the damaged vessels, LPA can act as a potent activator for various types of immune cells through its specific membrane receptors LPA1/3. LPA elicits chemotactic, pro-inflammatory and apoptotic effects that lead to atherosclerotic plaque progression. In this study we aimed to inhibit LPA signaling by means of LPA1/3 antagonism using the small molecule Ki16425. We show that LPA1/3 inhibition significantly impaired atherosclerosis progression. Treatment with Ki16425 also resulted in reduced CCL2 production and secretion, which led to less monocyte and neutrophil infiltration. Furthermore, we provide evidence that LPA1/3 blockade enhanced the percentage of non-inflammatory, Ly6C(low) monocytes and CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T-regulatory cells. Finally, we demonstrate that LPA1/3 antagonism mildly reduced plasma LDL cholesterol levels. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of LPA1/3 receptors may prove a promising approach to diminish atherosclerosis development.

  15. Pyridophens: binary pyridostigmine-aprophen prodrugs with differential inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, and muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Leader, Haim; Wolfe, Alan David; Chiang, Peter K; Gordon, Richard K

    2002-02-14

    A series of "binary prodrugs" called carbaphens,(1) carbamylated derivatives on one or both of the aromatic rings of the muscarinic receptor antagonist aprophen [(N,N-diethylamino)ethyl 2,2-diphenylpropionate], were synthesized to develop binary prophylactic agents against organophosphorus intoxication. As a group, the carbaphens retained the muscarinic receptor antagonist properties of aprophen but also preferentially inhibited butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in contrast to acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Therefore, a new series of compounds named pyridophens were designed and synthesized to achieve binary prodrugs to preferentially inhibit AChE over BChE, while still retaining the muscarinic receptor antagonism of aprophen. The pyridophens consist of the basic pyridostigmine skeleton combined with the 2,2-diphenylpropionate portion of aprophen by replacement of the diethylamino group. Three compounds, 9 (a tertiary pyridine), 10 (a quaternary pyridine), and 12 (a tertiary tetrahydropyridine), were found to be effective inhibitors of both BChE and AChE. However, 10, N-methyl-3-[[(dimethylamino)carbonyl]oxy]-2-(2'2'-diphenylpropionoxy-methyl)pyridinium iodide, inhibited AChE selectively over BChE, with a bimolecular rate constant similar to pyridostigmine. In contrast to their potent cholinesterase inhibitory activity, all of the pyridophen analogues were less potent antagonists of the muscarinic receptor than aprophen.

  16. Antipsychotic clozapine inhibits the function of alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sachin K; Zhang, Li; Morales, Marisela; Oz, Murat

    2007-02-01

    The effects of the antipsychotic clozapine on the function of the cloned alpha(7) subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes was investigated by using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Clozapine reversibly inhibited nicotine (10 microM)-induced currents in a concentration-dependent manner (300 nM to 90 microM), with an IC(50) value of 3.2+/-0.4 microM. The effect of clozapine was not dependent on the membrane potential. Clozapine did not affect the activity of endogenous Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels since the inhibition by clozapine was unaltered by the intracellularly injected Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca(2+)-free bathing solution containing 2mM Ba(2+). Clozapine decreased the maximal nicotine-induced responses without significantly affecting its potency, indicating that it acts as a noncompetitive antagonist on alpha(7)-nACh receptors. In hippocampal slices, the whole-cell recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons indicated that the increases in the frequency and amplitudes of the GABA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents induced by bath application of 2 mM choline, a specific agonist for alpha(7)-nACh receptors, were abolished after 10 min application of 5 microM clozapine. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that clozapine inhibits the function of alpha(7)-nACh receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and in hippocampal neurons.

  17. Reversal of gastric somatostatin receptor inhibition by Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide with ebrotidine and sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Skrodzka, D; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1997-05-01

    1. Among the consequences of H. pylori infection is an increase in gastric acid secretion due to the impairement in feedback inhibition by somatostatin. Here, we show that lipopolysaccharide from H. pylori inhibits the binding of somatostatin to gastric mucosal receptor, and that antiulcer agents, ebrotidine and sulglycotide, are capable of countering this effect. 2. The somatostatin receptor was prepared from the solubilized gastric mucosal epithelial cell membranes by affinity chromatography on Affi-Gel-bound [D-Tryp8] SRIF-14 and used in the binding assays for 125I-labeled somatostatin in the presence of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide and antiulcer agents. 3. The assays revealed a dose-dependent inhibition in the receptor-somatostatin binding by the lipopolysaccharide which reached a maximum of 94.1%. The effect of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide was countered by ebrotidine and sulglycotide, which at their optimal doses produced 94.9% and 84% restoration in somatostatin-receptor binding, respectively. 4. The results demonstrate that the antiulcer agents, ebrotidine and sulglycotide, possess the ability to counteract the H. pylori interference with somatostatin regulatory effect on gastric acid secretion.

  18. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  19. Cell-permeable iron inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 signaling and tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kir, Devika; Saluja, Manju; Modi, Shrey; Venkatachalam, Annapoorna; Schnettler, Erica; Roy, Sabita; Ramakrishnan, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is important for tumor growth and metastasis. Hypoxia in tumors drives this angiogenic response by stabilizing Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIF) and target genes like Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). HIF stability is regulated by Prolylhydroxylases (PHD)-mediated modification. Iron is an important cofactor in regulating the enzymatic activity of PHDs. Reducing intracellular iron, for instance, mimics hypoxia and induces a pro-angiogenic response. It is hypothesized that increasing the intracellular iron levels will have an opposite, anti-angiogenic effect. We tested this hypothesis by perturbing iron homeostasis in endothelial cells using a unique form of iron, Ferric Ammonium Citrate (FAC). FAC is a cell-permeable form of iron, which can passively enter into cells bypassing the transferrin receptor mediated uptake of transferrin-bound iron. Our studies show that FAC does not decrease the levels of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in endothelial cells but inhibits the autocrine stimulation of VEGF-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) system by blocking receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation. FAC inhibits VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration, tube formation and sprouting. Finally, systemic administration of FAC inhibits VEGF and tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, our studies show that cell-permeable iron attenuates VEGFR-2 mediated signaling and inhibits tumor angiogenesis. PMID:27589831

  20. The Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Raloxifene Inhibits Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Roxana; Döhrmann, Simon; Schaal, Christina; Hakkim, Abdul; Nizet, Victor; Corriden, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator typically prescribed for the prevention/treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Although raloxifene is known to have anti-inflammatory properties, its effects on human neutrophils, the primary phagocytic leukocytes of the immune system, remain poorly understood. Here, through a screen of pharmacologically active small molecules, we find that raloxifene prevents neutrophil cell death in response to the classical activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a compound known to induce formation of DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Inhibition of PMA-induced NET production by raloxifene was confirmed using quantitative and imaging-based assays. Human neutrophils from both male and female donors express the nuclear estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ, known targets of raloxifene. Similar to raloxifene, selective antagonists of these receptors inhibit PMA-induced NET production. Furthermore, raloxifene inhibited PMA-induced ERK phosphorylation, but not reactive oxygen species production, pathways known to be key modulators of NET production. Finally, we found that raloxifene inhibited PMA-induced, NET-based killing of the leading human bacterial pathogen, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Our results reveal that raloxifene is a potent modulator of neutrophil function and NET production. PMID:28003814

  1. Cell-permeable iron inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 signaling and tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kir, Devika; Saluja, Manju; Modi, Shrey; Venkatachalam, Annapoorna; Schnettler, Erica; Roy, Sabita; Ramakrishnan, Sundaram

    2016-10-04

    Angiogenesis is important for tumor growth and metastasis. Hypoxia in tumors drives this angiogenic response by stabilizing Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIF) and target genes like Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). HIF stability is regulated by Prolylhydroxylases (PHD)-mediated modification. Iron is an important cofactor in regulating the enzymatic activity of PHDs. Reducing intracellular iron, for instance, mimics hypoxia and induces a pro-angiogenic response. It is hypothesized that increasing the intracellular iron levels will have an opposite, anti-angiogenic effect. We tested this hypothesis by perturbing iron homeostasis in endothelial cells using a unique form of iron, Ferric Ammonium Citrate (FAC). FAC is a cell-permeable form of iron, which can passively enter into cells bypassing the transferrin receptor mediated uptake of transferrin-bound iron. Our studies show that FAC does not decrease the levels of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in endothelial cells but inhibits the autocrine stimulation of VEGF-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) system by blocking receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation. FAC inhibits VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration, tube formation and sprouting. Finally, systemic administration of FAC inhibits VEGF and tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, our studies show that cell-permeable iron attenuates VEGFR-2 mediated signaling and inhibits tumor angiogenesis.

  2. Modafinil inhibits rat midbrain dopaminergic neurons through D2-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Korotkova, T M; Klyuch, B P; Ponomarenko, A A; Lin, J S; Haas, H L; Sergeeva, O A

    2007-02-01

    Modafinil is a well-tolerated medication for excessive sleepiness, attention-deficit disorder, cocaine dependence and as an adjunct to antidepressants with low propensity for abuse. We investigated the modafinil action on identified dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN) of rat brain slices. Modafinil (20 microM) inhibited the firing of dopaminergic, but not GABAergic neurons. This inhibition was maintained in the presence of tetrodotoxin and was accompanied by hyperpolarization. Sulpiride (10 microM), a D2-receptor antagonist, but not prazosine (20 microM, an alpha1-adrenoreceptor blocker) abolished the modafinil action. Inhibition of dopamine reuptake with a low dose of nomifensine (1 microM) reduced the firing of DA neurons in a sulpiride-dependent manner and blunted the effect of modafinil. On acutely isolated neurons, modafinil evoked D2-receptor-mediated outward currents in tyrosine-hydroxylase positive cells, identified by single-cell RT-PCR, which reversed polarity near the K(+) equilibrium potential and were unchanged in the presence of nomifensine. Thus modafinil directly inhibits DA neurons through D2 receptors.

  3. Possible intermolecular interaction between quinolones and biphenylacetic acid inhibits gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor sites.

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, K; Kimura, Y; Tsutomi, Y; Hayakawa, I

    1994-01-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterial agents with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA), a metabolite of fenbufen, is known to specifically induce functional blockade of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. The mechanisms of these drug interactions were further examined. Scatchard analysis of [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain plasma membranes in the presence of enoxacin and BPAA revealed that a significant decrease in the number of muscimol binding sites was produced without affecting the affinity of binding to the receptors. In the presence of norfloxacin, BPAA inhibited muscimol binding the most potently of the six BPAA-related compounds tested. Fenbufen and 9,10-dihydro-gamma-oxo-2-phenanthrenebutyric acid also inhibited the binding, and 4-biphenylcarboxylic acid and methyl 4-biphenylacetate inhibited it slightly, but 3-benzoylpropionic acid exhibited no competitive inhibition. Accordingly, hybrid molecules of norfloxacin and BPAA were synthesized for stereochemical analysis of these drug interactions. A hybrid with a -CONH(CH2)3- chain between norfloxacin and BPAA (flexible structure) inhibited muscimol binding, and intracisternal injection of this hybrid caused clonic convulsions in mice more potently than the combination of norfloxacin and BPAA did. In contrast, a hybrid linked by -CONH- (stretched structure) showed almost no such inhibitory effect. 1H NMR analysis indicated the presence of intramolecular attraction at the quinoline ring of the hybrid exhibiting the antagonistic activity. These results suggest the possibility that quinolones and BPAA interact with the GABA receptor at nearby sites and that the binding affinity of quinolones to the GABA receptors is largely enhanced by the intermolecular interaction with BPAA. PMID:7840564

  4. Aggregation of macrophages and fibroblasts is inhibited by a monoclonal antibody to the hyaluronate receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Green, S.J.; Underhill, C.B. ); Tarone, G. )

    1988-10-01

    To examine the role of the hyaluronate receptor in cell to cell adhesion, the authors have employed the K-3 monoclonal antibody (MAb) which specifically binds to the hyaluronate receptor and blocks its ability to interact with hyaluronate. In the first set of experiments, they investigated the spontaneous aggregation of SV-3T3 cells, which involves two distinct mechanisms, one of which is dependent upon the presence of divalent cation and the other is independent. The divalent cation-independent aggregation was found to be completely inhibited by both intact and Fab fragments of the K-3 MAb. In contrast, the K-3 MAb had no effect on the divalent cation-dependent aggregation of cells. In a second set of experiments, we examined alveolar macrophages. The presence of hyaluronate receptors on alveolar macrophages was demonstrated by the fact that detergent extracts of these cells could bind ({sup 3})hyaluronate, and this binding was blocked by the K-3 MAb. Immunoblot analysis of alveolar macrophages showed that the hyaluronate receptor had a M{sub r} of 99,500, which is considerably larger than the 85,000 M{sub r} for that on BHK cells. When hyaluronate was added to suspensions of alveolar macrophages, the cells were induced to aggregate. This effect was inhibited by the K-3 MAb, suggesting that the hyaluronate-induced aggregation was mediated by the receptor.

  5. Oral administration of protease inhibits enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli receptor activity in piglet small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Mynott, T L; Luke, R K; Chandler, D S

    1996-01-01

    The virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is attributed to their ability to adhere via fimbrial adhesins to specific receptors located on the intestinal mucosa. A novel approach to preventing ETEC induced diarrhoea would be to prevent attachment of ETEC to intestine by proteolytically modifying the receptor attachment sites. This study aimed to examine the effect of bromelain, a proteolytic extract obtained from pineapple stems, on ETEC receptor activity in porcine small intestine. Bromelain was administered orally to piglets and K88+ ETEC attachment to small intestine was measured at 50 cm intervals using an enzyme immunoassay. K88+ ETEC attachment to intestinal sections that were not treated with bromelain varied appreciably between sampling sites. Variability in receptor activity along the intestinal surface is though to be caused by the localised effects of endogenous proteases. Oral administration of exogenous protease inhibited K88+ ETEC attachment to pig small intestine in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.05). Attachment of K88+ ETEC was negligible after treatment, resembling the levels of attachment of K88 to piglets of the genetically determined non-adhesive phenotype, which are resistant to K88+ ETEC infection. Serum biochemical analysis and histopathological examination of treated piglets showed no adverse effects of the bromelain treatment. It is concluded that administration of bromelain can inhibit ETEC receptor activity in vivo and may therefore be useful for prevention of K88+ ETEC induced diarrhoea. PMID:8566855

  6. Buprenorphine is a weak partial agonist that inhibits opioid receptor desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Michael S.; Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Birdsong, William T.; Williams, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a weak partial agonist at mu-opioid receptors that is used for treatment of pain and addiction. Intracellular and whole cell recordings were made from locus coeruleus (LC) neurons in rat brain slices to characterize the actions of buprenorphine. Acute application of buprenorphine caused a hyperpolarization that was prevented by previous treatment of slices with the irreversible opioid antagonist, β-chlornaltrexamine (β-CNA), but was not reversed by a saturating concentration of naloxone. As expected for a partial agonist, sub-saturating concentrations of buprenorphine decreased the [Met]5 enkephalin (ME) induced hyperpolarization or outward current. When the ME induced current was decreased below a critical value, desensitization and internalization of μ-opioid receptors (MOR) was eliminated. The inhibition of desensitization by buprenorphine was not the result of prior desensitization, slow dissociation from the receptor, or elimination of receptor reserve. Treatment of slices with sub-saturating concentrations of etorphine, methadone, oxymorphone or β-CNA also reduced the current induced by ME but did not block ME-induced desensitization. Treatment of animals with buprenorphine for a week resulted in the inhibition of the current induced by ME and a block of desensitization that was not different from the acute application of buprenorphine to brain slices. These observations show the unique characteristics of buprenorphine and further demonstrate the range of agonist selective actions that are possible through G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:19494155

  7. N alpha-methylhistamine inhibits intestinal transit in mice by central histamine H1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Oishi, R; Adachi, N; Saeki, K

    1993-06-24

    The effects of (R)alpha-methylhistamine and N alpha-methylhistamine on intestinal transit were examined in mice. The passage of a charcoal meal in the gastrointestinal tract was dose dependently inhibited by N alpha-methylhistamine (1-20 mg/kg i.p.), but not by a selective H3 receptor agonist (R)alpha-methyl-histamine (1-50 mg/kg i.p.). The inhibitory effect of N alpha-methylhistamine (20 mg/kg) was attenuated by pretreatment with H1 receptor antagonists (mepyramine 5 mg/kg i.p. or 5 micrograms i.c.v. and triprolidine 5 mg/kg i.p.), but not by cimetidine (10 mg/kg i.p.), zolantidine (5 mg/kg i.p.), a brain-penetrating H2 receptor antagonist, or thioperamide (5 mg/kg i.p.), a selective H3 receptor antagonist. The effect of N alpha-methylhistamine was also attenuated by combined treatment with phentolamine and propranolol (5 and 15 mg/kg s.c., respectively) and by pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine (20 mg/kg i.p., 2 days before). N alpha-Methylhistamine markedly decreased histamine turnover in the mouse brain. These findings suggest that intestinal transit is inhibited by N alpha-methylhistamine via stimulation of central H1 but not H3 receptors and that stimulation of the sympathetic system is involved in this effect.

  8. Cannabinoids inhibit cholinergic contraction in human airways through prejunctional CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Grassin-Delyle, S; Naline, E; Buenestado, A; Faisy, C; Alvarez, J-C; Salvator, H; Abrial, C; Advenier, C; Zemoura, L; Devillier, P

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Marijuana smoking is widespread in many countries, and the use of smoked synthetic cannabinoids is increasing. Smoking a marijuana joint leads to bronchodilation in both healthy subjects and asthmatics. The effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and synthetic cannabinoids on human bronchus reactivity have not previously been investigated. Here, we sought to assess the effects of natural and synthetic cannabinoids on cholinergic bronchial contraction. Experimental Approach Human bronchi isolated from 88 patients were suspended in an organ bath and contracted by electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the presence of the phytocannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the endogenous 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the synthetic dual CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940, the synthetic, CB2-receptor-selective agonist JWH-133 or the selective GPR55 agonist O-1602. The receptors involved in the response were characterized by using selective CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists (SR141716 and SR144528 respectively). Key Results Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940 induced concentration-dependent inhibition of cholinergic contractions, with maximum inhibitions of 39, 76 and 77% respectively. JWH-133 only had an effect at high concentrations. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol and O-1602 were devoid of any effect. Only CB1 receptors were involved in the response because the effects of cannabinoids were antagonized by SR141716, but not by SR144528. The cannabinoids did not alter basal tone or contractions induced by exogenous Ach. Conclusions and Implications Activation of prejunctional CB1 receptors mediates the inhibition of EFS-evoked cholinergic contraction in human bronchus. This mechanism may explain the acute bronchodilation produced by marijuana smoking. PMID:24467410

  9. Inhibition of Adult Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells by D1-type Dopamine Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Yuki; Rodríguez, Carolina Varela; Ogata, Genki; Partida, Gloria J.; Oi, Hanako; Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Lee, Sherwin C.; Colado, Anselmo Felipe; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    The spike output of neural pathways can be regulated by modulating output neuron excitability and/or their synaptic inputs. Dopaminergic interneurons synapse onto cells that route signals to mammalian retinal ganglion cells, but it is unknown whether dopamine can activate receptors in these ganglion cells and, if it does, how this affects their excitability. Here, we show D1a-receptor-like immunoreactivity in ganglion cells identified in adult rats by retrogradely transported dextran, and that dopamine, D1-type receptor agonists, and cAMP analogs inhibit spiking in ganglion cells dissociated from adult rats. These ligands curtailed repetitive spiking during constant current injections, and reduced the number and rate of rise of spikes elicited by fluctuating current injections without significantly altering the timing of the remaining spikes. Consistent with mediation by D1-type receptors, SCH-23390 reversed the effects of dopamine on spikes. Contrary to a recent report, spike inhibition by dopamine was not precluded by blocking Ih. Consistent with the reduced rate of spike rise, dopamine reduced voltage-gated Na+ current (INa) amplitude and tetrodotoxin, at doses that reduced INa as moderately as dopamine, also inhibited spiking. These results provide the first direct evidence that D1-type dopamine receptor activation can alter mammalian retinal ganglion cell excitability, and demonstrate that dopamine can modulate spikes in these cells by a mechanism different from the pre- and postsynaptic means proposed by previous studies. To our knowledge, our results also provide the first evidence that dopamine receptor activation can reduce excitability without altering the temporal precision of spike firing. PMID:19940196

  10. Cannabinoids inhibit cholinergic contraction in human airways through prejunctional CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Grassin-Delyle, S; Naline, E; Buenestado, A; Faisy, C; Alvarez, J-C; Salvator, H; Abrial, C; Advenier, C; Zemoura, L; Devillier, P

    2014-06-01

    Marijuana smoking is widespread in many countries, and the use of smoked synthetic cannabinoids is increasing. Smoking a marijuana joint leads to bronchodilation in both healthy subjects and asthmatics. The effects of Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol and synthetic cannabinoids on human bronchus reactivity have not previously been investigated. Here, we sought to assess the effects of natural and synthetic cannabinoids on cholinergic bronchial contraction. Human bronchi isolated from 88 patients were suspended in an organ bath and contracted by electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the presence of the phytocannabinoid Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol, the endogenous 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the synthetic dual CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940, the synthetic, CB2 -receptor-selective agonist JWH-133 or the selective GPR55 agonist O-1602. The receptors involved in the response were characterized by using selective CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists (SR141716 and SR144528 respectively). Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol, WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940 induced concentration-dependent inhibition of cholinergic contractions, with maximum inhibitions of 39, 76 and 77% respectively. JWH-133 only had an effect at high concentrations. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol and O-1602 were devoid of any effect. Only CB1 receptors were involved in the response because the effects of cannabinoids were antagonized by SR141716, but not by SR144528. The cannabinoids did not alter basal tone or contractions induced by exogenous Ach. Activation of prejunctional CB1 receptors mediates the inhibition of EFS-evoked cholinergic contraction in human bronchus. This mechanism may explain the acute bronchodilation produced by marijuana smoking. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Carboxylmethylation of calmodulin in cultured pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P.L.; Siegel, F.L.

    1986-05-01

    It has previously been shown that calmodulin (CaM) is a substrate for protein carboxyl methyltransferase (PCM) and that carboxylmethylation of calmodulin reduces it biological activity. Carboxylmethylation has been postulated to underwrite the repair of isomerized protein and the modulation of neurotransmitter release. The repair hypothesis indicates that proteins become substrates for carboxylmethylation only following deamidation caused by heat or exposure to basic conditions. The carboxyl-methylation of calmodulin had not been previously demonstrated to take place in situ - they have shown that in rat pituitary GH/sub 3/ cells calmodulin is carboxylmethylated by endogenous PCM. Cells were incubated with (methyl-/sup 3/)H L-methionine, rapidly frozen, lysed and fractionated by sequential chromatography on Mono-Q (FPLC) Superose (FPLC) and C3 reverse-phase HPLC. Two major and five minor carboxylmethylated proteins were identified; CaM showed the second highest incorporation of carboxylmethyl groups. The identity of CaM was confirmed by co-elution with authentic CaM and by a characteristic EGTA shift on RP-HPLC. The methods developed for demonstration of carboxylmethylation in this system will be useful to approach the study of the biological significance of this reaction.

  12. Electroacupuncture Inhibition of Hyperalgesia in Rats with Adjuvant Arthritis: Involvement of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Dopamine Receptor Subtypes in Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yin; Yang, Yang; Xu, Ming-Shu; Zhao, Ying-Qian; Ge, Lin-Bao; Zhang, Bi-Meng

    2013-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been regarded as an alternative treatment for inflammatory pain for several decades. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effect of EA have not been thoroughly clarified. Previous studies have shown that cannabinoid CB1 receptors are related to pain relief. Accumulating evidence has shown that the CB1 and dopamine systems sometimes interact and may operate synergistically in rat striatum. To our knowledge, dopamine D1/D2 receptors are involved in EA analgesia. In this study, we found that repeated EA at Zusanli (ST36) and Kunlun (BL60) acupoints resulted in marked improvements in thermal hyperalgesia. Both western blot assays and FQ-PCR analysis results showed that the levels of CB1 expression in the repeated-EA group were much higher than those in any other group (P = 0.001). The CB1-selective antagonist AM251 inhibited the effects of repeated EA by attenuating the increases in CB1 expression. The two kinds of dopamine receptors imparted different actions on the EA-induced CB1 upregulation in AA rat model. These results suggested that the strong activation of the CB1 receptor after repeated EA resulted in the concomitant phenomenon of the upregulation of D1 and D2 levels of gene expression. PMID:23762129

  13. Deletion of striatal adenosine A(2A) receptor spares latent inhibition and prepulse inhibition but impairs active avoidance learning.

    PubMed

    Singer, Philipp; Wei, Catherine J; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Boison, Detlev; Yee, Benjamin K

    2013-04-01

    Following early clinical leads, the adenosine A(2A)R receptor (A(2A)R) has continued to attract attention as a potential novel target for treating schizophrenia, especially against the negative and cognitive symptoms of the disease because of A(2A)R's unique modulatory action over glutamatergic in addition to dopaminergic signaling. Through (i) the antagonistic interaction with the dopamine D(2) receptor, and (ii) the regulation of glutamate release and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function, striatal A(2A)R is ideally positioned to fine-tune the dopamine-glutamate balance, the disturbance of which is implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the precise function of striatal A(2A)Rs in the regulation of schizophrenia-relevant behavior is poorly understood. Here, we tested the impact of conditional striatum-specific A(2A)R knockout (st-A(2A)R-KO) on latent inhibition (LI) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) - behavior that is tightly regulated by striatal dopamine and glutamate. These are two common cross-species translational tests for the assessment of selective attention and sensorimotor gating deficits reported in schizophrenia patients; and enhanced performance in these tests is associated with antipsychotic drug action. We found that neither LI nor PPI was significantly affected in st-A(2A)R-KO mice, although a deficit in active avoidance learning was identified in these animals. The latter phenotype, however, was not replicated in another form of aversive conditioning - namely, conditioned taste aversion. Hence, the present study shows that neither learned inattention (as measured by LI) nor sensory gating (as indexed by PPI) requires the integrity of striatal A(2A)Rs - a finding that may undermine the hypothesized importance of A(2A)R in the genesis and/or treatment of schizophrenia.

  14. Aquaporin 6 binds calmodulin in a calcium-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Rabaud, Nicole E; Song, Linhua; Wang, Yiding; Agre, Peter; Yasui, Masato; Carbrey, Jennifer M

    2009-05-22

    Aquaporin 6 (AQP6) is an anion channel that is expressed primarily in acid secreting alpha-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct. In addition, AQP6 anion channel permeability is gated by low pH. Inspection of the N-terminus of AQP6 revealed a putative calmodulin binding site. AQP6-expressing CHO-K1 cell lysates were mixed with calmodulin beads and AQP6 was pulled down in the presence of calcium. Mutagenesis of the N-terminal calmodulin binding site in full length mouse AQP6 resulted in a loss of calmodulin binding activity. Mouse and human AQP6 calmodulin binding site peptides bound dansyl-calmodulin with a dissociation constant of approximately 1microM. The binding of AQP6 to calmodulin may be an important key to determining the physiological role of AQP6 in the kidney.

  15. Aquaporin 6 binds calmodulin in a calcium dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Rabaud, Nicole E.; Song, Linhua; Wang, Yiding; Agre, Peter; Yasui, Masato; Carbrey, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporin 6 (AQP6) is an anion channel that is expressed primarily in acid secreting α-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct. In addition, AQP6 anion channel permeability is gated by low pH. Inspection of the N-terminus of AQP6 revealed a putative calmodulin binding site. AQP6-expressing CHO-K1 cell lysates were mixed with calmodulin beads and AQP6 was pulled down in the presence of calcium. Mutagenesis of the N-terminal calmodulin binding site in full length mouse AQP6 resulted in a loss of calmodulin binding activity. Mouse and human AQP6 calmodulin binding site peptides bound dansyl-calmodulin with a dissociation constant of approximately 1 μM. The binding of AQP6 to calmodulin may be an important key to determining the physiological role of AQP6 in the kidney. PMID:19336226

  16. Inhibition of the receptor-mediated virion attachment to a lipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2012-10-01

    The forefront of the anti-viral defence is sometimes aimed at virion attachment to a host membrane. This step or, more specifically, virion contacts with cellular membrane receptors (or, e.g., glycolipids) can be inhibited by antibodies (or specially chosen or designed compounds) via their association with virions. In this case, the full-scale attachment of virions to a host membrane occurs via a subtle interplay of the formation and rupture of multiple virion-inhibitor and virion-receptor bonds. We present a kinetic model describing this interplay and illustrating general trends in the process under consideration.

  17. Novel triple neurokinin receptor antagonist CS-003 inhibits respiratory disease models in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Sakiko; Nosaka, Emi; Kuraya, Takako; Yamashita, Makoto; Morimoto, Kiyoshi

    2008-10-31

    Neurokinins are known to induce neurogenic inflammation related to respiratory diseases. The effects of CS-003 ([1-{2-[(2R)-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl)morpholin-2-yl]ethyl}spiro[benzo[c]thiophene-1(3H),4'-piperidine]-(2S)-oxide hydrochloride]), a novel triple neurokinin receptor antagonist, on several respiratory disease models were evaluated in guinea pigs. As we have already shown that CS-003 is intravenously effective, we first determined if CS-003 was orally effective. CS-003 dose-dependently inhibited substance P-induced tracheal vascular hyperpermeability, neurokinin A- and neurokinin B-induced bronchoconstriction with ID(50) values of 3.6, 1.3 and 0.89 mg/kg (p.o.), respectively. CS-003 (10 mg/kg, p.o.) inhibited the number of coughs induced by capsaicin aerosol (P<0.01) and the antitussive effect was comparable to that of codeine. CS-003 (10 mg/kg, p.o.) also inhibited airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine chloride in ovalbumin-induced asthma models (P<0.01), a milder one and a severer one. On the other hand, montelukast (10 mg/kg, p.o.), a leukotriene receptor antagonist, significantly inhibited the hyperresponsiveness only in the milder model (P<0.05). In an ovalbumin-induced rhinitis model, oral administration of CS-003 inhibited nasal blockade in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory effect was comparable to that of dexamethasone (10 mg/kg, p.o.). CS-003 (i.v.) also dose-dependently inhibited cigarette smoke-induced bronchoconstriction, tracheal vascular hyperpermeability and mucus secretion. These data show that CS-003, a potent orally active triple neurokinin receptor antagonist, may be useful for the treatment of respiratory diseases associated with neurokinins, such as allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cough.

  18. Rapid Glucocorticoid Feedback Inhibition of ACTH Secretion Involves Ligand-Dependent Membrane Association of Glucocorticoid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Qiong; Riquelme, Denise; Trinh, Loc; Low, Malcolm J.; Tomić, Melanija; Stojilkovic, Stanko

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that rapid glucocorticoid inhibition of pituitary ACTH secretion mediates a feedforward/feedback mechanism responsible for the hourly glucocorticoid pulsatility was tested in cultured pituitary cells. Perifusion with 30 pM CRH caused sustained the elevation of ACTH secretion. Superimposed corticosterone pulses inhibited CRH-stimulated ACTH release, depending on prior glucocorticoid clearance. When CRH perifusion started after 2 hours of glucocorticoid-free medium, corticosterone levels in the stress range (1 μM) caused a delayed (25 min) and prolonged inhibition of CRH-stimulated ACTH secretion, up to 60 minutes after corticosterone withdrawal. In contrast, after 6 hours of glucocorticoid-free medium, basal corticosterone levels inhibited CRH-stimulated ACTH within 5 minutes, after rapid recovery 5 minutes after corticosterone withdrawal. The latter effect was insensitive to actinomycin D but was prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU486, suggesting nongenomic effects of the classical glucocorticoid receptor. In hypothalamic-derived 4B cells, 10 nM corticosterone increased immunoreactive glucocorticoid receptor content in membrane fractions, with association and clearance rates paralleling the effects on ACTH secretion from corticotrophs. Corticosterone did not affect CRH-stimulated calcium influx, but in AtT-20 cells, it had biphasic effects on CRH-stimulated Src phosphorylation, with early inhibition and late stimulation, suggesting a role for Src phosphorylation on the rapid glucocorticoid feedback. The data suggest that the nongenomic/membrane effects of classical GR mediate rapid and reversible glucocorticoid feedback inhibition at the pituitary corticotrophs downstream of calcium influx. The sensitivity and kinetics of these effects is consistent with the hypothesis that pituitary glucocorticoid feedback is part of the mechanism for adrenocortical ultradian pulse generation. PMID:26121342

  19. Farnesyl pyrophosphate inhibits epithelialization and wound healing through the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Vukelic, Sasa; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Pastar, Irena; Vouthounis, Constantinos; Krzyzanowska, Agata; Das, Sharmistha; Samuels, Herbert H; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2010-01-15

    Farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), a key intermediate in the mevalonate pathway and protein farnesylation, can act as an agonist for several nuclear hormone receptors. Here we show a novel mechanism by which FPP inhibits wound healing acting as an agonist for glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Elevation of endogenous FPP by the squalene synthetase inhibitor zaragozic acid A (ZGA) or addition of FPP to the cell culture medium results in activation and nuclear translocation of the GR, a known wound healing inhibitor. We used functional studies to evaluate the effects of FPP on wound healing. Both FPP and ZGA inhibited keratinocyte migration and epithelialization in vitro and ex vivo. These effects were independent of farnesylation and indicate that modulation of FPP levels in skin may be beneficial for wound healing. FPP inhibition of keratinocyte migration and wound healing proceeds, in part, by repression of the keratin 6 gene. Furthermore, we show that the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA-reductase inhibitor mevastatin, which blocks FPP formation, not only promotes epithelialization in acute wounds but also reverses the effect of ZGA on activation of the GR and inhibition of epithelialization. We conclude that FPP inhibits wound healing by acting as a GR agonist. Of special interest is that FPP is naturally present in cells prior to glucocorticoid synthesis and that FPP levels can be further altered by the statins. Therefore, our findings may provide a better understanding of the pleiotropic effects of statins as well as molecular mechanisms by which they may accelerate wound healing.

  20. EphA4 Receptor Forward Signaling Inhibits Glucagon Secretion From α-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hutchens, Troy

    2015-01-01

    The loss of inhibition of glucagon secretion exacerbates hyperglycemia in type 1 and 2 diabetes. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate glucagon secretion in unaffected and diabetic states remain relatively unexplained. We present evidence supporting a new model of juxtacrine-mediated regulation of glucagon secretion where neighboring islet cells negatively regulate glucagon secretion through tonic stimulation of α-cell EphA receptors. Primarily through EphA4 receptors, this stimulation correlates with maintenance of a dense F-actin network. In islets, additional stimulation and inhibition of endogenous EphA forward signaling result in inhibition and enhancement, respectively, of glucagon secretion, accompanied by an increase and decrease, respectively, in α-cell F-actin density. Sorted α-cells lack endogenous stimulation of EphA forward signaling from neighboring cells, resulting in enhanced basal glucagon secretion as compared with islets and the elimination of glucose inhibition of glucagon secretion. Restoration of EphA forward signaling in sorted α-cells recapitulates both normal basal glucagon secretion and glucose inhibition of glucagon secretion. Additionally, α-cell–specific EphA4−/− mice exhibit abnormal glucagon dynamics, and EphA4−/− α-cells contain less dense F-actin networks than EphA4+/+ α-cells. This juxtacrine-mediated model provides insight into the functional and dysfunctional regulation of glucagon secretion and opens up new therapeutic strategies for the clinical management of diabetes. PMID:26251403

  1. Neurites regrowth of cortical neurons by GSK3beta inhibition independently of Nogo receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Seira, Oscar; Gavín, Rosalina; Gil, Vanessa; Llorens, Franc; Rangel, Alejandra; Soriano, Eduardo; del Río, José Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Lesioned axons do not regenerate in the adult mammalian CNS, owing to the over-expression of inhibitory molecules such as myelin-derived proteins or chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans. In order to overcome axon inhibition, strategies based on extrinsic and intrinsic treatments have been developed. For myelin-associated inhibition, blockage with NEP1-40, receptor bodies or IN-1 antibodies has been used. In addition, endogenous blockage of cell signalling mechanisms induced by myelin-associated proteins is a potential tool for overcoming axon inhibitory signals. We examined the participation of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) and extracellular-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 in axon regeneration failure in lesioned cortical neurons. We also investigated whether pharmacological blockage of GSK3beta and ERK1/2 activities facilitates regeneration after myelin-directed inhibition in two models: (i) cerebellar granule cells and (ii) lesioned entorhino-hippocampal pathway in slice cultures, and whether the regenerative effects are mediated by Nogo Receptor 1 (NgR1). We demonstrate that, in contrast to ERK1/2 inhibition, the pharmacological treatment of GSK3beta inhibition strongly facilitated regrowth of cerebellar granule neurons over myelin independently of NgR1. Finally, these regenerative effects were corroborated in the lesioned entorhino-hippocampal pathway in NgR1-/- mutant mice. These results provide new findings for the development of new assays and strategies to enhance axon regeneration in injured cortical connections.

  2. Inhibition of noradrenaline release in the rat brain cortex via presynaptic H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Fink, K; Hinterthaner, M; Göthert, M

    1989-12-01

    The effects of histamine and related drugs on the evoked tritium overflow from superfused rat brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline were determined. Tritium overflow was stimulated electrically (3 Hz; slices superfused with normal physiological salt solution) or by introduction of CaCl2 1.3 mmol/l (slices superfused with Ca2(+)-free medium containing K+ 20 mmol/l). Histamine slightly decreased the electrically evoked 3H overflow in slices superfused in the presence of desipramine. The degree of inhibition obtained with histamine was doubled when both desipramine and phentolamine were present in the superfusion medium (pIC15 6.46). Under the latter condition, the evoked overflow was inhibited by the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine and its S-(+) enantiomer (pIC15 7.36 and 5.09, respectively), but was not affected by the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit and the H1 receptor agonist 2-thiazolylethylamine (both at up to 32 mumols/l). The concentration-response curve of histamine was shifted to the right by the H3 receptor antagonists thioperamide, impromidine and burimamide (apparent pA2 8.37, 6.86 and 7.05, respectively), by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (apparent pA2 4.27) and was not affected by the H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene (32 mumols/l). The inhibitory effect of R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine on the evoked overflow was also counteracted by thioperamide. Given alone, none of the five histamine receptor antagonists affected the evoked overflow. In the absence of desipramine plus phentolamine, impromidine and burimamide facilitated the electrically evoked 3H overflow whereas thioperamide had no effect. The facilitatory effects of impromidine and burimamide were abolished by phentolamine, but not affected by desipramine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Extracellular nucleotides inhibit growth of human oesophageal cancer cells via P2Y2-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Maaser, K; Höpfner, M; Kap, H; Sutter, A P; Barthel, B; von Lampe, B; Zeitz, M; Scherübl, H

    2002-01-01

    Extracellular ATP is known to inhibit growth of various tumours by activating specific purinergic receptors (P2-receptors). Since the therapy of advanced oesophageal cancer is unsatisfying, new therapeutic approaches are mandatory. Here, we investigated the functional expression and potential antiproliferative effects of P2-purinergic receptors in human oesophageal cancer cells. Prolonged incubation of primary cell cultures of human oesophageal cancers as well as of the squamous oesophageal cancer cell line Kyse-140 with ATP or its stable analogue ATPγS dose-dependently inhibited cell proliferation. This was due to both an induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. The expression of P2-receptors was examined by RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and [Ca2+]i-imaging. Application of various extracellular nucleotides dose-dependently increased [Ca2+]i. The rank order of potency was ATP=UTP>ATPγS>ADP=UDP. 2-methylthio-ATP and α,β-methylene-ATP had no effects on [Ca2+]i. Complete cross-desensitization between ATP and UTP was observed. Moreover, the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 dose-dependently reduced the ATP triggered [Ca2+]i signal. The pharmacological features strongly suggest the functional expression of G-protein coupled P2Y2-receptors in oesophageal squamous cancer cells. P2Y2-receptors are involved in the antiproliferative actions of extracellular nucleotides. Thus, P2Y2-receptors are promising target proteins for innovative approaches in oesophageal cancer therapy. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 636–644. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600100 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11870549

  4. Inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by 5-HT receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Devivo, M; Maayani, S

    1985-12-17

    We measured the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in guinea pig hippocampal membranes by 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (CAT) and 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (PAT). Low concentrations of these agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner. The antagonist spiperone shifted the concentration-response curve to CAT to the right in a parallel manner. The EC50 values of CAT, PAT and 5-HT and the KB of spiperone suggest that this receptor may correspond to the 5-HT1A binding site.

  5. Diterpenes from Cryptomeria japonica inhibit androgen receptor transcriptional activity in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wei-Chun; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Lin, Feng-Min; Chen, Li-Ru; Chiu, Chih-Yang; Hsiao, Pei-Wen

    2007-10-01

    We identified eight diterpenes from Cryptomeria japonica (Taxodiaceae), which inhibit the activity of the androgen receptor (AR) in human prostate cancer (PCa) 22Rv1-derived 103E cells. The compounds 6,12-dihydroxyabieta-5,8,11,13-tetraen-7-one ( 2), sugiol ( 3), ferruginol ( 4), and 5-epixanthoperol ( 7) have near 100 % AR inhibition efficacy at concentrations of 10, 5, 25, and 25 microM, respectively. Because these compounds have very similar structures, analysis of their differential activity may aid in the design of inhibitors for PCa treatment.

  6. Activation of Adenosine A2A Receptors Inhibits Neutrophil Transuroepithelial Migration ▿

    PubMed Central

    Säve, Susanne; Mohlin, Camilla; Vumma, Ravi; Persson, Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine has been identified as a significant inhibitor of inflammation by acting on adenosine A2A receptors. In this study, we examined the role of adenosine and A2A receptors in the transmigration of human neutrophils across an in vitro model of the transitional bladder urothelium. Human uroepithelial cells (UROtsa) were grown on transwell inserts; uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and neutrophils were added to the transwell system; and the number of migrating neutrophils was evaluated. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry were used to investigate the expression of adenosine receptors, the epithelial adhesion molecule ICAM-1, and the neutrophil integrin CD11b. Levels of proinflammatory interleukin-8 (IL-8) and phosphorylated IκBα were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and Luminex assays, respectively. The neutrophils expressed all four adenosine receptor subtypes (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptors), but A3 receptors were not expressed by UROtsa cells. UPEC stimulated neutrophil transuroepithelial migration, which was significantly decreased in response to the specific A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680. The inhibitory effect of CGS 21680 on neutrophil migration was reversed by the A2A receptor antagonist SCH 58261. The production of chemotactic IL-8 and the expression of the adhesion molecule ICAM-1 or CD11b were not significantly affected by CGS 21680. However, a significant decrease in the level of phosporylated IκBα was revealed in response to CGS 21680. In conclusion, UPEC infection in vitro evoked neutrophil migration through a multilayered human uroepithelium. The UPEC-evoked neutrophil transmigration decreased in response to A2A receptor activation, possibly through inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:21646447

  7. Rivastigmine improves isolation rearing-induced prepulse inhibition deficits via muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Kosuke; Ago, Yukio; Umeki, Takahiro; Hasebe, Shigeru; Onaka, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2016-02-01

    The acetylcholinesterase inhibitors donepezil, galantamine, and rivastigmine are used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. We previously demonstrated that donepezil and galantamine differentially affect isolation rearing-induced prepulse inhibition (PPI) deficits and that this might be due to differential effects on brain muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor function in mice. We examined the effects of rivastigmine on isolation rearing-induced PPI deficits, brain ACh levels, and mACh receptor function in mice. Acoustic startle responses were measured in a startle chamber. Microdialysis was performed, and the levels of dopamine and ACh in the prefrontal cortex were measured. Rivastigmine (0.3 mg/kg) improved PPI deficits, and this improvement was antagonized by the mACh receptor antagonist telenzepine but not by the nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist mecamylamine. Rivastigmine increased extracellular ACh levels by approximately 2-3-fold, less than the increase produced by galantamine. Rivastigmine enhanced the effect of the mACh receptor agonist N-desmethylclozapine on prefrontal dopamine release, a marker of mACh receptor function, and this increase was blocked by telenzepine. In contrast, galantamine did not affect N-desmethylclozapine-induced dopamine release. Furthermore, rivastigmine did not affect cortical dopamine release induced by the serotonin1A receptor agonist osemozotan, suggesting that the effect of rivastigmine has specificity for mACh receptors. Taken together with our previous finding that marked increases in ACh levels are required for the PPI deficit improvement induced by galantamine, our present results suggest that rivastigmine improves isolation rearing-induced PPI deficits by increasing ACh levels and by concomitantly enhancing mACh receptor function.

  8. Evidence for inhibition mediated by coassembly of GABAA and GABAC receptor subunits in native central neurons.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Carol J; Buckley, Noel J; Garret, Maurice; Deuchars, Jim; Deuchars, Susan A

    2004-08-18

    Fast inhibition in the nervous system is commonly mediated by GABA(A) receptors comprised of 2alpha/2beta/1gamma subunits. In contrast, GABA(C) receptors containing only rho subunits (rho1-rho3) have been predominantly detected in the retina. However, here using reverse transcription-PCR and in situ hybridization we show that mRNA encoding the rho1 subunit is highly expressed in brainstem neurons. Immunohistochemistry localized the rho1 subunit to neurons at light and electron microscopic levels, where it was detected at synaptic junctions. Application of the GABA(C) receptor agonist cis-4-aminocrotonic acid (100-800 microM) requires the rho1 subunit to elicit responses, which surprisingly are blocked independently by antagonists to GABA(A) (bicuculline, 10 microM) and GABA(C) [(1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA); 40-160 microM] receptors. Responses to GABA(C) agonists were also enhanced by the GABA(A) receptor modulator pentobarbitone (300 microM). Spontaneous and evoked IPSPs were reduced in amplitude but never abolished by TPMPA, but were completely blocked by bicuculline. We therefore tested the hypothesis that GABA(A) and GABA(C) subunits formed a heteromeric receptor. Immunohistochemistry indicated that rho1 and alpha1 subunits were colocalized at light and electron microscopic levels. Electrophysiology revealed that responses to GABA(C) receptor agonists were enhanced by the GABA(A) receptor modulator zolpidem (500 nm), which acts on the alpha1 subunit when the gamma2 subunit is also present. Finally, coimmunoprecipitation indicated that the rho1 subunit formed complexes that also containedalpha1 and gamma2 subunits. Taken together these separate lines of evidence suggest that the effects of GABA in central neurons can be mediated by heteromeric complexes of GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptor subunits.

  9. CH5137291, an androgen receptor nuclear translocation-inhibiting compound, inhibits the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Nobuyuki; Kawata, Hiromitsu; Nishimoto, Ayako; Nakamura, Ryo; Tsunenari, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Miho; Tachibana, Kazutaka; Shiraishi, Takuya; Yoshino, Hitoshi; Honma, Akie; Emura, Takashi; Ohta, Masateru; Nakagawa, Toshito; Houjo, Takao; Corey, Eva; Vessella, Robert L; Aoki, Yuko; Sato, Haruhiko

    2015-04-01

    Resistance of prostate cancer to castration is currently an unavoidable problem. The major mechanisms underlying such resistance are androgen receptor (AR) overexpression, androgen-independent activation of AR, and AR mutation. To address this problem, we developed an AR pure antagonist, CH5137291, with AR nuclear translocation-inhibiting activity, and compared its activity and characteristics with that of bicalutamide. Cell lines corresponding to the mechanisms of castration resistance were used: LNCaP-BC2 having AR overexpression and LNCaP-CS10 having androgen-independent AR activation. VCaP and LNCaP were used as hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cells. In vitro functional assay clearly showed that CH5137291 inhibited the nuclear translocation of wild-type ARs as well as W741C- and T877A-mutant ARs. In addition, it acted as a pure antagonist on the transcriptional activity of these types of ARs. In contrast, bicalutamide did not inhibit the nuclear translocation of these ARs, and showed a partial/full agonistic effect on the transcriptional activity. CH5137291 inhibited cell growth more strongly than bicalutamide in VCaP and LNCaP cells as well as in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 cells in vitro. In xenograft models, CH5137291 strongly inhibited the tumor growth of LNCaP, LNCaP-BC2, and LNCaP-CS10, whereas bicalutamide showed a weaker effect in LNCaP and almost no effect in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 xenografts. Levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in plasma correlated well with the antitumor effect of both agents. CH5137291 inhibited the growth of LNCaP tumors that had become resistant to bicalutamide treatment. A docking model suggested that CH5137291 intensively collided with the M895 residue of helix 12, and therefore strongly inhibited the folding of helix 12, a cause of AR agonist activity, in wild-type and W741C-mutant ARs. In cynomolgus monkeys, the serum concentration of CH5137291 increased dose-dependently and PSA level decreased 80% at 100 mg/kg. CH

  10. Neurosteroid interactions with synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAa receptors: regulation of subunit plasticity, phasic and tonic inhibition, and neuronal network excitability

    PubMed Central

    Chase Matthew, Carver; Doodipala Samba, Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Neurosteroids are steroids synthesized within the brain with rapid effects on neuronal excitability. Allopregnanolone, allotetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone, and androstanediol are three widely explored prototype endogenous neurosteroids. They have very different targets and functions compared to conventional steroid hormones. Neuronal GABAa receptors are one of the prime molecular targets of neurosteroids. Objective This review provides a critical appraisal of recent advances in the pharmacology of endogenous neurosteroids that interact with GABAa receptors in the brain. Neurosteroids possess distinct, characteristic effects on the membrane potential and current conductance of the neuron, mainly via potentiation of GABAa receptors at low concentrations and direct activation of receptor chloride channel at higher concentrations. The GABAa receptor mediates two types of inhibition, now characterized as synaptic (phasic) and extrasynaptic (tonic) inhibition. Synaptic release of GABA results in the activation of low-affinity γ2-containing synaptic receptors, while high-affinity δ-containing extrasynaptic receptors are persistently activated by the ambient GABA present in the extracellular fluid. Neurosteroids are potent positive allosteric modulators of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAa receptors and therefore enhance both phasic and tonic inhibition. Tonic inhibition is specifically more sensitive to neurosteroids. The resulting tonic conductance generates a form of shunting inhibition that controls neuronal network excitability, seizure susceptibility, and behavior. Conclusion The growing understanding of the mechanisms of neurosteroid regulation of the structure and function of the synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAa receptors provide many opportunities to create improved therapies for sleep, anxiety, stress, epilepsy, and other neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:24071826

  11. Highly chlorinated PCBs inhibit the human xenobiotic response mediated by the steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR).

    PubMed Central

    Tabb, Michelle M; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Grün, Felix; Zhou, Changcheng; Welsh, William J; Blumberg, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a family of persistent organic contaminants suspected to cause adverse effects in wildlife and humans. In rodents, PCBs bind to the aryl hydrocarbon (AhR) and pregnane X receptors (PXR) inducing the expression of catabolic cytochrome p450 enzymes of the CYP1A and 3A families. We found that certain highly chlorinated PCBs are potent activators of rodent PXR but antagonize its human ortholog, the steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR), inhibiting target gene induction. Thus, exposure to PCBs may blunt the human xenobiotic response, inhibiting the detoxification of steroids, bioactive dietary compounds, and xenobiotics normally mediated by SXR. The antagonistic PCBs are among the most stable and abundant in human tissues. These findings have important implications for understanding the biologic effects of PCB exposure and the use of animal models to predict the attendant risk. PMID:14754570

  12. Highly chlorinated PCBs inhibit the human xenobiotic response mediated by the steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR).

    PubMed

    Tabb, Michelle M; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Grün, Felix; Zhou, Changcheng; Welsh, William J; Blumberg, Bruce

    2004-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a family of persistent organic contaminants suspected to cause adverse effects in wildlife and humans. In rodents, PCBs bind to the aryl hydrocarbon (AhR) and pregnane X receptors (PXR) inducing the expression of catabolic cytochrome p450 enzymes of the CYP1A and 3A families. We found that certain highly chlorinated PCBs are potent activators of rodent PXR but antagonize its human ortholog, the steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR), inhibiting target gene induction. Thus, exposure to PCBs may blunt the human xenobiotic response, inhibiting the detoxification of steroids, bioactive dietary compounds, and xenobiotics normally mediated by SXR. The antagonistic PCBs are among the most stable and abundant in human tissues. These findings have important implications for understanding the biologic effects of PCB exposure and the use of animal models to predict the attendant risk.

  13. The P2Y6 Receptor Inhibits Effector T Cell Activation in Allergic Pulmonary Inflammation1

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Giorgio; Ohta, Shin; Boyce, Joshua R.; Xing, Wei; Balestrieri, Barbara; Boyce, Joshua A.

    2011-01-01

    We show that the P2Y6 receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor with high affinity for the nucleotide uridine diphosphate, is an important endogenous inhibitor of T cell function in allergic pulmonary inflammation. Mice conditionally deficient in P2Y6 receptors [p2ry6 (flox/flox);cre/+ mice] exhibited severe airway and tissue pathology relative to P2Y6-sufficient [p2ry6 (flox/flox)] littermates (+/+ mice) when treated intranasally with an extract (Df) of the dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae. P2Y6 receptors were inducibly expressed by lung, lymph node and splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of Df-treated +/+ mice. Df-restimulated P2Y6-deficient lymph node cells produced higher levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, and polyclonally-stimulated P2Y6-deficient CD4+ T cells proliferated faster than comparably stimulated P2Y6-sufficient cells. The absence of P2Y6 receptors on CD4+ cells, but not antigen presenting cells, was sufficient to amplify cytokine generation. Thus, P2Y6 receptors protect the lung against exuberant allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation by inhibiting the activation of effector T cells. PMID:21724990

  14. Inhibition of gastric mucosal mucin receptor by Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide: effect of sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Majka, J; Murty, V L; Czajkowski, A; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1994-09-01

    1. A receptor for mucin was isolated from the solubilized gastric epithelial cell membrane by affinity chromatography on Sepharose-bound wheat germ agglutinin. 2. The receptor protein displayed a molecular weight of 97 kDa and exhibited specific affinity towards mucin-coated surfaces. The optimum for mucin binding occurred at 60-100 micrograms/ml, while the values for the receptor were 2.0-3.1 micrograms/ml. 3. The mucin binding to the receptor was susceptible to Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide which caused maximum inhibition of 91% at 30 mu/ml. This inhibitory effect of the lipopolysaccharide was abolished by a gastroprotective agent, sulglycotide. 4. The effect of sulglycotide was dose dependent and at 50 micrograms/ml produced a 94% restoration in receptor-mucin binding. Furthermore, sulglycotide was also capable of enhancing (97%) the mucin binding to its receptor in the absence of the lipopolysaccharide. 5. The results demonstrate that H. pylori through its lipopolysaccharide interferes in the interaction of mucin with gastric epithelial surfaces and that a gastroprotective agent, sulglycotide, counteracts this effect, and hence is capable of preventing the loss of mucin coat continuity occurring with H. pylori infection.

  15. Glycine Transporter-1 Inhibition Promotes Striatal Axon Sprouting via NMDA Receptors in Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Castagna, Candace; Mrejeru, Ana; Lizardi-Ortiz, José E.; Klein, Zoe; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptor activity is involved in shaping synaptic connections throughout development and adulthood. We recently reported that brief activation of NMDA receptors on cultured ventral midbrain dopamine neurons enhanced their axon growth rate and induced axonal branching. To test whether this mechanism was relevant to axon regrowth in adult animals, we examined the reinnervation of dorsal striatum following nigral dopamine neuron loss induced by unilateral intrastriatal injections of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine. We used a pharmacological approach to enhance NMDA receptor-dependent signaling by treatment with an inhibitor of glycine transporter-1 that elevates levels of extracellular glycine, a coagonist required for NMDA receptor activation. All mice displayed sprouting of dopaminergic axons from spared fibers in the ventral striatum to the denervated dorsal striatum at 7 weeks post-lesion, but the reinnervation in mice treated for 4 weeks with glycine uptake inhibitor was approximately twice as dense as in untreated mice. The treated mice also displayed higher levels of striatal dopamine and a complete recovery from lateralization in a test of sensorimotor behavior. We confirmed that the actions of glycine uptake inhibition on reinnervation and behavioral recovery required NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons using targeted deletion of the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit in dopamine neurons. Glycine transport inhibitors promote functionally relevant sprouting of surviving dopamine axons and could provide clinical treatment for disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:24133278

  16. The G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor Agonist G-1 Inhibits Nuclear Estrogen Receptor Activity and Stimulates Novel Phosphoproteomic Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L. Cody; Ralston-Hooper, Kimberly J.; Ferguson, P. Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen exerts cellular effects through both nuclear (ESR1 and ESR2) and membrane-bound estrogen receptors (G-protein coupled estrogen receptor, GPER); however, it is unclear if they act independently or engage in crosstalk to influence hormonal responses. To investigate each receptor’s role in proliferation, transcriptional activation, and protein phosphorylation in breast cancer cells (MCF-7), we employed selective agonists for ESR1 propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT), ESR2 diarylpropionitrile (DPN), and GPER (G-1) and also determined the impact of xenoestrogens bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein on these effects. As anticipated, 17β-estradiol (E2), PPT, DPN, BPA, and genistein each enhanced proliferation and activation of an ERE-driven reporter gene whereas G-1 had no significant impact. However, G-1 significantly reduced E2-, PPT-, DPN-, BPA-, and genistein-induced proliferation and ERE activation at doses greater than 500 nM indicating that G-1 mediated inhibition is not ESR isotype specific. As membrane receptors initiate cascades of phosphorylation events, we performed a global phosphoproteomic analysis on cells exposed to E2 or G-1 to identify potential targets of receptor crosstalk via do