Science.gov

Sample records for receptor potential vanilloid-1

  1. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, E; Dabrowski, M; Horoszok, L; Terp, G E; Tytgat, J

    2008-04-01

    Over the last couple of years, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1(TRPV1) channels have been a hot topic in ion channel research. Since this research field is still rather new, there is not much known about the working mechanism of TRPV1 and its ligands. Nevertheless, the important physiological role and therapeutic potential are promising. Therefore, extensive research is going on and a lot of natural as well as synthetic compounds are already described. In this review, we briefly give an overview of capsaicin's history and the current knowledge of its working mechanism and physiological role. We discuss the best known plant molecules acting on TRPV1 and highlight the latest discovery in TRPV1 research: animal venoms and toxins acting on TRPV1 channels. In an effort to give the complete image of TRPV1 ligands known today, the most promising synthetic compounds are presented. Finally, we present a novel pharmacophore model describing putative ligand binding domains.

  2. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation by the Cannabinoid Receptor (CB1) and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Induces Differential Responses in Corneal Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by the cannabinoid receptor (CB1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) induces...Available online 7 July 2010 Keywords: cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR...release of endogenous metabolites that are cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) agonists. We determined

  3. Estradiol Sensitizes the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Receptor in Pain Responses.

    PubMed

    Payrits, Maja; Sághy, Éva; Cseko, Kata; Pohóczky, Krisztina; Bölcskei, Kata; Ernszt, Dávid; Barabás, Klaudia; Szolcsányi, János; Ábrahám, István M; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Szoke, Éva

    2017-10-01

    Sex differences exist in chronic pain pathologies, and gonadal estradiol (E2) alters the pain sensation. The nocisensor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor plays a critical role in triggering pain. Here we examined the impact of E2 on the function of TRPV1 receptor in mice sensory neurons in vitro and in vivo. Both mechano- and thermonociceptive thresholds of the plantar surface of the paw of female mice were significantly lower in proestrus compared with the estrus phase. These thresholds were higher in ovariectomized (OVX) mice and significantly lower in sham-operated mice in proestrus compared with the sham-operated mice in estrus phase. This difference was absent in TRPV1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, E2 potentiated the TRPV1 receptor activation-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in OVX mice. Long pretreatment (14 hours) with E2 induced a significant increase in TRPV1 receptor messenger RNA expression and abolished the capsaicin-induced TRPV1 receptor desensitization in primary sensory neurons. The short E2 incubation (10 minutes) also prevented the desensitization, which reverted after coadministration of E2 and the tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) receptor inhibitor. Our study provides in vivo and in vitro evidence for E2-induced TRPV1 receptor upregulation and sensitization mediated by TrkAR via E2-induced genomic and nongenomic mechanisms. The sensitization and upregulation of TRPV1 receptor by E2 in sensory neurons may explain the greater pain sensitivity in female mice. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  4. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 by lipoxygenase metabolites depends on PKC phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Hazan, Adina; Geron, Matan; Steinberg, Rebbeca; Livni, Lital; Matzner, Henry; Priel, Avi

    2017-03-01

    Peripheral neuronal activation by inflammatory mediators is a multifaceted physiological response that involves a multitude of regulated cellular functions. One key pathway that has been shown to be involved in inflammatory pain is Gq/GPCR, whose activation by inflammatory mediators is followed by the regulated response of the cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). However, the mechanism that underlies TRPV1 activation downstream of the Gq/GPCR pathway has yet to be fully defined. In this study, we employ pharmacological and molecular biology tools to dissect this activation mechanism via perforated-patch recordings and calcium imaging of both neurons and a heterologous system. We showed that TRPV1 activity downstream of Gq/GPCR activation only produced a subdued current, which was noticeably different from the robust current that is typical of TRPV1 activation by exogenous stimuli. Moreover, we specifically demonstrated that 2 pathways downstream of Gq/GPCR signaling, namely endovanilloid production by lipoxygenases and channel phosphorylation by PKC, converge on TRPV1 to evoke a tightly regulated response. Of importance, we show that only when both pathways are acting on TRPV1 is the inflammatory-mediated response achieved. We propose that the requirement of multiple signaling events allows subdued TRPV1 activation to evoke regulated neuronal response during inflammation.-Kumar R., Hazan, A., Geron, M., Steinberg, R., Livni, L., Matzner, H., Priel, A. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 by lipoxygenase metabolites depends on PKC phosphorylation.

  5. Structure-Driven Pharmacology of Transient Receptor Potential Channel Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Caceres-Molina, Javier; Sepulveda, Romina V; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramon

    2016-09-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal receptor that mediates the flux of cations across the membrane in response to several stimuli, including heat, voltage, and ligands. The best known agonist of TRPV1 channels is capsaicin, the pungent component of "hot" chili peppers. In addition, peptides found in the venom of poisonous animals, along with the lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate, lysophosphatidic acid, and cholesterol, bind to TRPV1 with high affinity to modulate channel gating. Here, we discuss the functional evidence regarding ligand-dependent activation of TRPV1 channels in light of structural data recently obtained by cryoelectron microscopy. This review focuses on the mechanistic insights into ligand binding and allosteric gating of TRPV1 channels and the relevance of accurate polymodal receptor biophysical characterization for drug design in novel pain therapies.

  6. Sensing of blood pressure increase by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors on baroreceptors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, De-Pei; Chen, Shao-Rui; Hittelman, Walter N; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2009-12-01

    The arterial baroreceptor is critically involved in the autonomic regulation of homoeostasis. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor is expressed on both somatic and visceral sensory neurons. Here, we examined the TRPV1 innervation of baroreceptive pathways and its functional significance in the baroreflex. Resiniferatoxin (RTX), an ultrapotent analog of capsaicin, was used to ablate TRPV1-expressing afferent neurons and fibers in adult rats. Immunofluorescence labeling revealed that TRPV1 immunoreactivity was present on nerve fibers and terminals in the adventitia of the ascending aorta and aortic arch, the nodose ganglion neurons, and afferent fibers in the solitary tract of the brainstem. RTX treatment eliminated TRPV1 immunoreactivities in the aorta, nodose ganglion, and solitary tract. Renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate were recorded in anesthetized rats. The baroreflex was triggered by lowering and raising blood pressure through intravenous infusion of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine, respectively. Inhibition of sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate by the phenylephrine-induced increase in blood pressure was largely impaired in RTX-treated rats. The maximum gain of the baroreflex function was significantly lower in RTX-treated than vehicle-treated rats. Furthermore, blocking of TRPV1 receptors significantly blunted the baroreflex and decreased the maximum gain of baroreflex function in the high blood pressure range. Our findings provide important new information that TRPV1 is expressed along the entire baroreceptive afferent pathway. TRPV1 receptors expressed on baroreceptive nerve endings can function as mechanoreceptors to detect the increase in blood pressure and maintain the homoeostasis.

  7. [Study on relations between transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and pungent property of traditional Chinese medicines].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Wang, Yun; Ren, Zhen-Zhen; Bao, Hong-Juan; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

    2014-07-01

    The five-flavor theory of traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) and the flavor efficacy generation mechanism has long been focuses and difficulties in studies on traditional Chinese medicinal properties. In this paper, by using the pharmacophore-based virtual screening technique, the authors discussed the relations between the pungent property and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) by studying the TCM components' role in regulating TRPV1 ion channel. The results showed that the matching relationship between TRPV1 agonist pharmacophore model and TCM chemical components could identify the active ingredients from pungent herbs. Therefore, the authors proposed that TRPV1 is one of the potential targets for efficient pungent herbs. The pungent property of TCMs is decided by its chemical components, and consistent with the inherited and additive characteristics.

  8. Design and synthesis of peripherally restricted transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Nuria; Liao, Hongyu; Stec, Markian M; Wang, Xianghong; Chakrabarti, Partha; Retz, Dan; Doherty, Elizabeth M; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Tamir, Rami; Bannon, Anthony W; Gavva, Narender R; Norman, Mark H

    2008-05-08

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel antagonists may have clinical utility for the treatment of chronic nociceptive and neuropathic pain. We recently advanced a TRPV1 antagonist, 3 (AMG 517), into clinical trials as a new therapy for the treatment of pain. However, in addition to the desired analgesic effects, this TRPV1 antagonist significantly increased body core temperature following oral administration in rodents. Here, we report one of our approaches to eliminate or minimize the on-target hyperthermic effect observed with this and other TRPV1 antagonists. Through modifications of our clinical candidate, 3 a series of potent and peripherally restricted TRPV1 antagonists have been prepared. These analogues demonstrated on-target coverage in vivo but caused increases in body core temperature, suggesting that peripheral restriction was not sufficient to separate antagonism mediated antihyperalgesia from hyperthermia. Furthermore, these studies demonstrate that the site of action for TRPV1 blockade elicited hyperthermia is outside the blood-brain barrier.

  9. Novel Radiolabeled Vanilloid with Enhanced Specificity for Human Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1).

    PubMed

    Pearce, Larry V; Ann, Jihyae; Jung, Aeran; Thorat, Shivaji A; Herold, Brienna K A; Habtemichael, Amelework D; Blumberg, Peter M; Lee, Jeewoo

    2017-09-21

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) has emerged as a promising therapeutic target. While radiolabeled resiniferatoxin (RTX) has provided a powerful tool for characterization of vanilloid binding to TRPV1, TRPV1 shows 20-fold weaker binding to the human TRPV1 than to the rodent TRPV1. We now describe a tritium radiolabeled synthetic vanilloid antagonist, 1-((2-(4-(methyl-[(3)H])piperidin-1-yl-4-[(3)H])-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-3-yl)methyl)-3-(3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]oxazin-8-yl)urea ([(3)H]MPOU), that embodies improved absolute affinity for human TRPV1 and improved synthetic accessibility.

  10. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Regulates Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Myocardial Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Carl M; Lu, Yao; Stary, Creed M; Piplani, Honit; Small, Bryce A; Urban, Travis J; Qvit, Nir; Gross, Garrett J; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Gross, Eric R

    2016-09-26

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) mediates cellular responses to pain, heat, or noxious stimuli by calcium influx; however, the cellular localization and function of TRPV1 in the cardiomyocyte is largely unknown. We studied whether myocardial injury is regulated by TRPV1 and whether we could mitigate reperfusion injury by limiting the calcineurin interaction with TRPV1. In primary cardiomyocytes, confocal and electron microscopy demonstrates that TRPV1 is localized to the mitochondria. Capsaicin, the specific TRPV1 agonist, dose-dependently reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and was blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine or the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine. Using in silico analysis, we discovered an interaction site for TRPV1 with calcineurin. We synthesized a peptide, V1-cal, to inhibit the interaction between TRPV1 and calcineurin. In an in vivo rat myocardial infarction model, V1-cal given just prior to reperfusion substantially mitigated myocardial infarct size compared with vehicle, capsaicin, or cyclosporine (24±3% versus 61±2%, 45±1%, and 49±2%, respectively; n=6 per group; P<0.01 versus all groups). Infarct size reduction by V1-cal was also not seen in TRPV1 knockout rats. TRPV1 is localized at the mitochondria in cardiomyocytes and regulates mitochondrial membrane potential through an interaction with calcineurin. We developed a novel therapeutic, V1-cal, that substantially reduces reperfusion injury by inhibiting the interaction of calcineurin with TRPV1. These data suggest that TRPV1 is an end-effector of cardioprotection and that modulating the TRPV1 protein interaction with calcineurin limits reperfusion injury. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  11. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in inflammation and sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Devesa, Isabel; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; González-Ros, José Manuel; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia

    2011-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a thermoreceptor that responds to noxious temperatures, as well as to chemical agonists, such as vanilloids and protons. In addition, its channel activity is notably potentiated by proinflammatory mediators released upon tissue damage. The TRPV1 contribution to sensory neuron sensitization by proalgesic agents has signaled this receptor as a prime target for analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug intervention. However, TRPV1 antagonists have notably failed in clinical and preclinical studies because of their unwanted side effects. Recent reports have unveiled previously unrecognized anti-inflammatory and protective functions of TRPV1 in several diseases. For instance, this channel has been suggested to play an anti-inflammatory role in sepsis. Therefore, the use of potent TRPV1 antagonists as a general strategy to treat inflammation must be cautiously considered, given the deleterious effects that may arise from inhibiting the population of channels that have a protective function. The use of TRPV1 antagonists may be limited to treating those pathologies where enhanced receptor activity contributes to the inflamed state. Alternatively, therapeutic paradigms, such as reduction of inflammatory-mediated increase of receptor expression in the cell surface, may be a better strategy to prevent abrogation of the TRPV1 subpopulation involved in anti-inflammatory and protective processes. PMID:22096371

  12. β-Arrestin-2 Desensitizes the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Por, Elaine D.; Bierbower, Sonya M.; Berg, Kelly A.; Gomez, Ruben; Akopian, Armen N.; Wetsel, William C.; Jeske, Nathaniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel activated by multiple stimuli and is implicated in a variety of pain disorders. Dynamic sensitization of TRPV1 activity by A-kinase anchoring protein 150 demonstrates a critical role for scaffolding proteins in nociception, yet few studies have investigated scaffolding proteins capable of mediating receptor desensitization. In this study, we identify β-arrestin-2 as a scaffolding protein that regulates TRPV1 receptor activity. We report β-arrestin-2 association with TRPV1 in multiple cell models. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of β-arrestin-2 in primary cultures resulted in a significant increase in both initial and repeated responses to capsaicin. Electrophysiological analysis further revealed significant deficits in TRPV1 desensitization in primary cultures from β-arrestin-2 knock-out mice compared with wild type. In addition, we found that β-arrestin-2 scaffolding of phosphodiesterase PDE4D5 to the plasma membrane was required for TRPV1 desensitization. Importantly, inhibition of PDE4D5 activity reversed β-arrestin-2 desensitization of TRPV1. Together, these results identify a new endogenous scaffolding mechanism that regulates TRPV1 ligand binding and activation. PMID:22952227

  13. β-Arrestin-2 desensitizes the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel.

    PubMed

    Por, Elaine D; Bierbower, Sonya M; Berg, Kelly A; Gomez, Ruben; Akopian, Armen N; Wetsel, William C; Jeske, Nathaniel A

    2012-10-26

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel activated by multiple stimuli and is implicated in a variety of pain disorders. Dynamic sensitization of TRPV1 activity by A-kinase anchoring protein 150 demonstrates a critical role for scaffolding proteins in nociception, yet few studies have investigated scaffolding proteins capable of mediating receptor desensitization. In this study, we identify β-arrestin-2 as a scaffolding protein that regulates TRPV1 receptor activity. We report β-arrestin-2 association with TRPV1 in multiple cell models. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of β-arrestin-2 in primary cultures resulted in a significant increase in both initial and repeated responses to capsaicin. Electrophysiological analysis further revealed significant deficits in TRPV1 desensitization in primary cultures from β-arrestin-2 knock-out mice compared with wild type. In addition, we found that β-arrestin-2 scaffolding of phosphodiesterase PDE4D5 to the plasma membrane was required for TRPV1 desensitization. Importantly, inhibition of PDE4D5 activity reversed β-arrestin-2 desensitization of TRPV1. Together, these results identify a new endogenous scaffolding mechanism that regulates TRPV1 ligand binding and activation.

  14. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in Myoblast Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Mitsutoshi; Ogura, Yuji; Funabashi, Toshiya; Akema, Tatsuo

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the complex process of muscle regeneration after injury remain unknown. Transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in several cell types, including skeletal muscle, and is activated by high temperature and by certain molecules secreted during tissue inflammation. Severe inflammation and local temperature perturbations are induced during muscle regeneration, which suggests that TRPV1 might be activated and involved in the process. The aim of this study, was to clarify the role of TRPV1 in the myogenic potential of satellite cells responsible for muscle regeneration. We found that mRNA and protein levels of TRPV1 increased during regeneration after cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury in mice. Using isolated mouse satellite cells (i.e., myoblasts), we observed that activation of TRPV1 by its agonist capsaicin (CAP) augmented myogenin protein levels. Whereas CAP did not alter myoblast proliferation, it facilitated myoblast fusion (evaluated using myonucleii number per myotube and fusion index). In contrast, suppression of TRPV1 by siRNA impaired myoblast fusion. Using mice, we also demonstrated that intramuscular injection of CAP facilitated muscle repair after CTX-induced muscle injury. Moreover, we showed that these roles of TRPV1 might be mediated by interleukin-4 and calcium signaling during myoblast fusion. Collectively, these results suggest that TRPV1 underlies normal myogenesis through promotion of myoblast fusion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2275-2285, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 signaling as a regulator of human sebocyte biology.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Balázs I; Géczy, Tamás; Griger, Zoltán; Dózsa, Anikó; Seltmann, Holger; Kovács, László; Nagy, László; Zouboulis, Christos C; Paus, Ralf; Bíró, Tamás

    2009-02-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1), originally described as a central integrator of nociception, is expressed on human epidermal and hair follicle keratinocytes and is involved in regulation of cell growth and death. In human pilosebaceous units, we had shown that TRPV1 stimulation inhibits hair shaft elongation and matrix keratinocyte proliferation, and induces premature hair follicle regression and keratinocyte apoptosis. In the current study, we have explored the role of TRPV1-mediated signaling in sebaceous gland (SG) biology, using a human sebocyte cell culture model (SZ95 sebocytes). Demonstrating that human skin SG in situ and SZ95 sebocytes in vitro express TRPV1, we show that the prototypic TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, selectively inhibits basal and arachidonic acid-induced lipid synthesis in a dose-, time-, and extracellular calcium-dependent and a TRPV1-specific manner. Low-dose capsaicin stimulates cellular proliferation via TRPV1, whereas higher concentrations inhibit sebocyte growth and induce cell death independent of TRPV1. Moreover, capsaicin suppresses the expression of genes involved in lipid homeostasis and of selected proinflammatory cytokines. Collectively, these findings support the concept that TRPV1 signaling is a significant, previously unreported player in human sebocyte biology and identify TRPV1 as a promising target in the clinical management of inflammatory SG disorders (for example, acne vulgaris).

  16. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 in Epidermal Keratinocytes May Contribute to Acute Pain in Herpes Zoster.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Bum; Kim, Hyeree; Cho, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jeong Deuk; Chung, Jin Ho; Kim, Hei Sung

    2016-03-01

    The role of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) in the initiation of neurogenic inflammation and transduction of pain is well established. In this study 33 patients with herpes zoster (HZ) were recruited from a single centre and underwent a questionnaire interview at their first visit. Punch biopsies from the HZ lesions and the contralateral unaffected skin were performed to localize and quantify the expression of TRPV1. Immunofluorescent staining for TRPV1 was most prominent in the epidermal keratinocytes. Both TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in the HZ epidermis than in control epidermis (relative ratio 1.62 ± 0.27, p = 0.033 and 2.55 ± 0.51, p = 0.005, respectively). Protein TRPV1 ratio (HZ lesion/control) correlated with the degree of pain (measured on a visual analogue scale; VAS) (p = 0.017) and was significantly lower in patients who had taken either HZ medication or painkillers prior to their visit. These results suggest that non-neuronal TRPV1 may contribute to acute pain in herpes zoster.

  17. Tacrolimus Triggers Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1-Dependent Relapse of Pancreatitis-Related Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yuka; Tsubota, Maho; Sugo, Hiiragi; Wakitani, Kohei; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Wada, Kyoichi; Takada, Mitsutaka; Oita, Akira; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2017-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) expressed in nociceptors is directly phosphorylated and activated by protein kinase C, and involved in the signaling of pancreatic pain. On the other hand, Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels expressed in nociceptors are functionally upregulated by phosphorylation with protein kinase A and also play a role in pancreatitis-related pain. Calcineurin, a phosphatase, negatively regulates various channel functions including TRPV1, and calcineurin inhibitor-induced pain syndrome by tacrolimus, a calcineurin inhibitor, used as an immunosuppressant, has been a clinical problem. We thus examined the effect of tacrolimus on pancreatitis-related pain in mice. Repeated treatment with cerulein caused referred hyperalgesia accompanying acute pancreatitis, which was unaffected by tacrolimus. Pancreatitis-related symptoms disappeared in 24 h, whereas the referred hyperalgesia recurred following the administration of tacrolimus, which was abolished by the blockers of TRPV1 but not T-type Ca2+ channels. Thus, tacrolimus appears to cause the TRPV1-dependent relapse of pancreatitis-related pain, suggesting the involvement of calcineurin in the termination of pancreatic pain.

  18. Vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathic pain and expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in rat.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Terumasa; Oka, Yusuke; Sashida, Hiroya; Kanbe, Toshie; Abe, Kenji; Utsunomiya, Iku; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2017-03-30

    The clinical anti-cancer efficacy of vincristine is limited by the development of dose-dependent peripheral neuropathy. Up-regulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is correlated with peripheral neuropathy following anti-cancer drug treatment. To analyze the contribution of TRPV1 to the development of vincristine-induced mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia, TRPV1 expression in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was analyzed after vincristine treatment. Mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia was tested with von Frey filaments 14 days after intraperitoneal administration of 0.1 mg/kg vincristine in rats. TRPV1 expression in DRGs following vincristine treatment was assessed with western blot analysis and in situ hybridization histochemistry. Vincristine-induced mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia after day 14 was significantly inhibited by the TRP antagonist ruthenium red (3 mg/kg, s.c.) and the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (30 mg/kg, s.c.). Vincristine treatment increased the expression of TRPV1 protein in DRG neurons. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that most of the TRPV1 mRNA-labeled neurons in the DRG were small in size. Immunohistochemistry showed that isolectin B4-positive small DRG neurons co-expressed TRPV1 protein 14 days after treatment. These results suggest that vincristine treatment increases TRPV1 expression in small DRG neurons. TRPV1 expression may contribute to the development of vincristine-induced painful peripheral neuropathy.

  19. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-immunoreactive signals in murine enteric glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nishiyama, Mitsue; Iizuka, Seiichi; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Suzuki, Norihiro; Aiso, Sadakazu; Nakahara, Jin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the possible involvement of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in maturation of enteric glial cells (EGCs). METHODS Immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical techniques were used to analyze EGC markers in myenteric plexus (MP) as well as cultured MP cells and EGCs using TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice. RESULTS We detected TRPV1-immunoreactive signals in EGC in the MP of wild-type (WT) but not KO mice. Expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactive signals was lower at postnatal day (PD) 6 in KO mice, though the difference was not clear at PD 13 and PD 21. When MP cells were isolated and cultured from isolated longitudinal muscle-MP preparation from WT and KO mice, the yield of KO EGC was lower than that of WT EGC, while the yield of KO and WT smooth muscle cells showed no difference. Addition of BCTC, a TRPV1 antagonist, to enriched EGC culture resulted in a decrease in the protein ratio of GFAP to S100B, another EGC/astrocyte-specific marker. CONCLUSION These results address the possibility that TRPV1 may be involved in the maturation of EGC, though further studies are necessary to validate this possibility. PMID:27956799

  20. Effect of paclitaxel on transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in rat dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Hara, Tomomi; Chiba, Terumasa; Abe, Kenji; Makabe, Akiko; Ikeno, Souichi; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Utsunomiya, Iku; Hama, Toshihiro; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common adverse effect of paclitaxel treatment. To analyze the contribution of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the development of paclitaxel-induced thermal hyperalgesia, TRPV1 expression in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was analyzed after paclitaxel treatment. Behavioral assessment using the tail-flick test showed that intraperitoneal administration of 2 and 4 mg/kg paclitaxel induced thermal hyperalgesia after days 7, 14, and 21. Paclitaxel-induced thermal hyperalgesia after day 14 was significantly inhibited by the TRP antagonist ruthenium red (3 mg/kg, s.c.) and the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (30 mg/kg, s.c.). Paclitaxel (2 and 4 mg/kg) treatment increased the expression of TRPV1 mRNA and protein in DRG neurons. Immunohistochemistry showed that paclitaxel (4 mg/kg) treatment increased TRPV1 protein expression in small and medium DRG neurons 14 days after treatment. Antibody double labeling revealed that isolectin B4-positive small DRG neurons co-expressed TRPV1. TRPV1 immunostaining was up-regulated in paw skin day 14 after paclitaxel treatment. Moreover, in situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that most of the TRPV1 mRNA-labeled neurons in the DRG were small or medium in size. These results suggest that paclitaxel treatment increases TRPV1 expression in DRG neurons and may contribute to functional peripheral neuropathic pain.

  1. Mechanisms of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 activation and sensitization by allyl isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Gees, Maarten; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Boonen, Brett; Sanchez, Alicia; Everaerts, Wouter; Segal, Andrei; Xue, Fenqin; Janssens, Annelies; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas; Talavera, Karel

    2013-09-01

    Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC; aka, mustard oil) is a powerful irritant produced by Brassica plants as a defensive trait against herbivores and confers pungency to mustard and wasabi. AITC is widely used experimentally as an inducer of acute pain and neurogenic inflammation, which are largely mediated by the activation of nociceptive cation channels transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). Although it is generally accepted that electrophilic agents activate these channels through covalent modification of cytosolic cysteine residues, the mechanism underlying TRPV1 activation by AITC remains unknown. Here we show that, surprisingly, AITC-induced activation of TRPV1 does not require interaction with cysteine residues, but is largely dependent on S513, a residue that is involved in capsaicin binding. Furthermore, AITC acts in a membrane-delimited manner and induces a shift of the voltage dependence of activation toward negative voltages, which is reminiscent of capsaicin effects. These data indicate that AITC acts through reversible interactions with the capsaicin binding site. In addition, we show that TRPV1 is a locus for cross-sensitization between AITC and acidosis in nociceptive neurons. Furthermore, we show that residue F660, which is known to determine the stimulation by low pH in human TRPV1, is also essential for the cross-sensitization of the effects of AITC and low pH. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that not all reactive electrophiles stimulate TRPV1 via cysteine modification and help understanding the molecular bases underlying the surprisingly large role of this channel as mediator of the algesic properties of AITC.

  2. The role of endogenous molecules in modulating pain through transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1).

    PubMed

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Simon, Sidney A; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2013-07-01

    Pain is a physiological response to a noxious stimulus that decreases the quality of life of those sufferring from it. Research aimed at finding new therapeutic targets for the treatment of several maladies, including pain, has led to the discovery of numerous molecular regulators of ion channels in primary afferent nociceptive neurons. Among these receptors is TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1), a member of the TRP family of ion channels. TRPV1 is a calcium-permeable channel, which is activated or modulated by diverse exogenous noxious stimuli such as high temperatures, changes in pH, and irritant and pungent compounds, and by selected molecules released during tissue damage and inflammatory processes. During the last decade the number of endogenous regulators of TRPV1's activity has increased to include lipids that can negatively regulate TRPV1, as is the case for cholesterol and PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate) while, in contrast, other lipids produced in response to tissue injury and ischaemic processes are known to positively regulate TRPV1. Among the latter, lysophosphatidic acid activates TRPV1 while amines such as N-acyl-ethanolamines and N-acyl-dopamines can sensitize or directly activate TRPV1. It has also been found that nucleotides such as ATP act as mediators of chemically induced nociception and pain and gases, such as hydrogen sulphide and nitric oxide, lead to TRPV1 activation. Finally, the products of lipoxygenases and omega-3 fatty acids among other molecules, such as divalent cations, have also been shown to endogenously regulate TRPV1 activity. Here we provide a comprehensive review of endogenous small molecules that regulate the function of TRPV1. Acting through mechanisms that lead to sensitization and desensitization of TRPV1, these molecules regulate pathways involved in pain and nociception. Understanding how these compounds modify TRPV1 activity will allow us to comprehend how some pathologies are associated with

  3. The role of endogenous molecules in modulating pain through transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Simon, Sidney A; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a physiological response to a noxious stimulus that decreases the quality of life of those sufferring from it. Research aimed at finding new therapeutic targets for the treatment of several maladies, including pain, has led to the discovery of numerous molecular regulators of ion channels in primary afferent nociceptive neurons. Among these receptors is TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1), a member of the TRP family of ion channels. TRPV1 is a calcium-permeable channel, which is activated or modulated by diverse exogenous noxious stimuli such as high temperatures, changes in pH, and irritant and pungent compounds, and by selected molecules released during tissue damage and inflammatory processes. During the last decade the number of endogenous regulators of TRPV1's activity has increased to include lipids that can negatively regulate TRPV1, as is the case for cholesterol and PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate) while, in contrast, other lipids produced in response to tissue injury and ischaemic processes are known to positively regulate TRPV1. Among the latter, lysophosphatidic acid activates TRPV1 while amines such as N-acyl-ethanolamines and N-acyl-dopamines can sensitize or directly activate TRPV1. It has also been found that nucleotides such as ATP act as mediators of chemically induced nociception and pain and gases, such as hydrogen sulphide and nitric oxide, lead to TRPV1 activation. Finally, the products of lipoxygenases and omega-3 fatty acids among other molecules, such as divalent cations, have also been shown to endogenously regulate TRPV1 activity. Here we provide a comprehensive review of endogenous small molecules that regulate the function of TRPV1. Acting through mechanisms that lead to sensitization and desensitization of TRPV1, these molecules regulate pathways involved in pain and nociception. Understanding how these compounds modify TRPV1 activity will allow us to comprehend how some pathologies are associated with

  4. The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 Channel in Thermoregulation: A Thermosensor It Is Not

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Maria C.; Garami, Andras; Steiner, Alexandre A.; Norman, Mark H.; Morrison, Shaun F.; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Burmeister, Jeffrey J.; Nucci, Tatiane B.

    2009-01-01

    The development of antagonists of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel as pain therapeutics has revealed that these compounds cause hyperthermia in humans. This undesirable on-target side effect has triggered a surge of interest in the role of TRPV1 in thermoregulation and revived the hypothesis that TRPV1 channels serve as thermosensors. We review literature data on the distribution of TRPV1 channels in the body and on thermoregulatory responses to TRPV1 agonists and antagonists. We propose that two principal populations of TRPV1-expressing cells have connections with efferent thermoeffector pathways: 1) first-order sensory (polymodal), glutamatergic dorsal-root (and possibly nodose) ganglia neurons that innervate the abdominal viscera and 2) higher-order sensory, glutamatergic neurons presumably located in the median preoptic hypothalamic nucleus. We further hypothesize that all thermoregulatory responses to TRPV1 agonists and antagonists and thermoregulatory manifestations of TRPV1 desensitization stem from primary actions on these two neuronal populations. Agonists act primarily centrally on population 2; antagonists act primarily peripherally on population 1. We analyze what roles TRPV1 might play in thermoregulation and conclude that this channel does not serve as a thermosensor, at least not under physiological conditions. In the hypothalamus, TRPV1 channels are inactive at common brain temperatures. In the abdomen, TRPV1 channels are tonically activated, but not by temperature. However, tonic activation of visceral TRPV1 by nonthermal factors suppresses autonomic cold-defense effectors and, consequently, body temperature. Blockade of this activation by TRPV1 antagonists disinhibits thermoeffectors and causes hyperthermia. Strategies for creating hyperthermia-free TRPV1 antagonists are outlined. The potential physiological and pathological significance of TRPV1-mediated thermoregulatory effects is discussed. PMID:19749171

  5. Coarse Architecture of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Ion Channel Determined by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer*

    PubMed Central

    De-la-Rosa, Víctor; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E.; Ladrón-de-Guevara, Ernesto; Rosenbaum, Tamara; Islas, León D.

    2013-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ion channel is responsible for the perception of high temperatures and low extracellular pH, and it is also involved in the response to some pungent compounds. Importantly, it is also associated with the perception of pain and noxious stimuli. Here, we attempt to discern the molecular organization and location of the N and C termini of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ion channel by measuring FRET between genetically attached enhanced yellow and cyan fluorescent protein to the N or C terminus of the channel protein, expressed in transfected HEK 293 cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes. The static measurements of the domain organization were mapped into an available cryo-electron microscopy density of the channel with good agreement. These measurements also provide novel insights into the organization of terminal domains and their proximity to the plasma membrane. PMID:23965996

  6. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-Immunoreactive Innervation Increases in Fractured Rat Femur

    PubMed Central

    Kawarai, Yuya; Suzuki, Miyako; Yoshino, Kensuke; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Kubota, Go; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Nakamura, Junichi; Takaso, Masashi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pain from vertebral or femoral neck fractures is a particularly important problem in clinical orthopaedics. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a ligand-gated nonselective cation channel, and there are recent reports on an association between bone pain and TRPV1. However, an increase in TRPV1 activity has not been reported following femoral fracture. Materials and Methods We applied a neurotracer [Fluoro-gold (FG)] onto femur to detect dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) innervating the cortex of the femur in 30 Sprague Dawley rats. Seven days after application, a closed mid-diaphyseal fracture of the femur was performed. FG labeled TRPV1-immunoreactive (ir) DRGs innervating the femur were examined in nonfractured controls, and 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after fracture. We evaluated bone healing of the femur and compared the ratio of TRPV1-ir DRG neurons innervating the femur at the time points. Results Four weeks after fracture, complete bone union was observed. There was no significant difference in the ratio of FG labeled DRG neurons to total DRG neurons at each time point. The percentages of TRPV1-ir neurons in DRGs innervating the femur at 3 days and 1 week after fracture were significantly higher than those in control, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after fracture (p<0.05). Conclusion Fracture induced an increase of TRPV1-ir neurons in DRGs innervating the fractured femur within 3 days, and decreased during bone healing over 4 weeks. These findings show that TRPV1 may play a role in sensory sensation of bone fracture pain. PMID:24339305

  7. Intact Microtubules Preserve Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Functionality through Receptor Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Storti, Barbara; Bizzarri, Ranieri; Cardarelli, Francesco; Beltram, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) is a protein currently under scrutiny as a pharmacological target for pain management therapies. Recently, the role of TRPV1-microtubule interaction in transducing nociception stimuli to cells by cytoskeletal rearrangement was proposed. In this work, we investigate TRPV1-microtubule interaction in living cells under the resting or activated state of TRPV1, as well as in presence of structurally intact or depolymerized cytoskeletal microtubules. We combined a toolbox of high resolution/high sensitivity fluorescence imaging techniques (such as FRET, correlation spectroscopy, and fluorescence anisotropy) to monitor TRPV1 aggregation status, membrane mobility, and interaction with microtubules. We found that TRPV1 is a dimeric membrane protein characterized by two populations with different diffusion properties in basal condition. After stimulation with resiniferatoxin, TRPV1 dimers tetramerize. The tetramers and the slower population of TRPV1 dimers bind dynamically to intact microtubules but not to tubulin dimers. Upon microtubule disassembly, the interaction with TRPV1 is lost thereby inducing receptor self-aggregation with partial loss of functionality. Intact microtubules play an essential role in maintaining TRPV1 functionality toward activation stimuli. This previously undisclosed property mirrors the recently reported role of TRPV1 in modulating microtubule assembly/disassembly and suggests the participation of these two players in a feedback cycle linking nociception and cytoskeletal remodeling. PMID:22262838

  8. Potentiation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel contributes to pruritogenesis in a rat model of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Belghiti, Majedeline; Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Giménez-Garzó, Carla; González-Usano, Alba; Montoliu, Carmina; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Felipo, Vicente; Planells-Cases, Rosa

    2013-04-05

    Persistent pruritus is a common disabling dermatologic symptom associated with different etiologic factors. These include primary skin conditions, as well as neuropathic, psychogenic, or systemic disorders like chronic liver disease. Defective clearance of potential pruritogenic substances that activate itch-specific neurons innervating the skin is thought to contribute to cholestatic pruritus. However, because the underlying disease-specific pruritogens and itch-specific neuronal pathways and mechanism(s) are unknown, symptomatic therapeutic intervention often leads to no or only limited success. In the current study, we aimed to first validate rats with bile duct ligation (BDL) as a model for hepatic pruritus and then to evaluate the contribution of inflammation, peripheral neuronal sensitization, and specific signaling pathways and subpopulations of itch-responsive neurons to scratching behavior and thermal hypersensitivity. Chronic BDL rats displayed enhanced scratching behavior and thermal hyperalgesia indicative of peripheral neuroinflammation. BDL-induced itch and hypersensitivity involved a minor contribution of histaminergic/serotonergic receptors, but significant activation of protein-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) receptors, prostaglandin PGE2 formation, and potentiation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel activity. The sensitization of dorsal root ganglion nociceptors in BDL rats was associated with increased surface expression of PAR2 and TRPV1 proteins and an increase in the number of PAR2- and TRPV1-expressing peptidergic neurons together with a shift of TRPV1 receptor expression to medium sized dorsal root ganglion neurons. These results suggest that pruritus and hyperalgesia in chronic cholestatic BDL rats are associated with neuroinflammation and involve PAR2-induced TRPV1 sensitization. Thus, pharmacological modulation of PAR2 and/or TRPV1 may be a valuable therapeutic approach for patients with chronic liver pruritus

  9. The sympathetic nervous system is controlled by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in the regulation of body temperature

    PubMed Central

    Alawi, Khadija M.; Aubdool, Aisah A.; Liang, Lihuan; Wilde, Elena; Vepa, Abhinav; Psefteli, Maria-Paraskevi; Brain, Susan D.; Keeble, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is involved in sensory nerve nociceptive signaling. Recently, it has been discovered that TRPV1 receptors also regulate basal body temperature in multiple species from mice to humans. In the present study, we investigated whether TRPV1 modulates basal sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. C57BL6/J wild-type (WT) mice and TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice were implanted with radiotelemetry probes for measurement of core body temperature. AMG9810 (50 mg/kg) or vehicle (2% DMSO/5% Tween 80/10 ml/kg saline) was injected intraperitoneally. Adrenoceptor antagonists or vehicle (5 ml/kg saline) was injected subcutaneously. In WT mice, the TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, caused significant hyperthermia, associated with increased noradrenaline concentrations in brown adipose tissue. The hyperthermia was significantly attenuated by the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol, the mixed α-/β-adrenoceptor antagonist labetalol, and the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin. TRPV1 KO mice have a normal basal body temperature, indicative of developmental compensation. d-Amphetamine (potent sympathomimetic) caused hyperthermia in WT mice, which was reduced in TRPV1 KO mice, suggesting a decreased sympathetic drive in KOs. This study provides new evidence that TRPV1 controls thermoregulation upstream of the SNS, providing a potential therapeutic target for sympathetic hyperactivity thermoregulatory disorders.—Alawi, K. M., Aubdool, A. A., Liang, L., Wilde, E., Vepa, A., Psefteli, M.-P., Brain, S. D., Keeble, J. E. The sympathetic nervous system is controlled by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in the regulation of body temperature. PMID:26136480

  10. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 expression and function in splenic dendritic cells: a potential role in immune homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Assas, Bakri M; Wakid, Majed H; Zakai, Haytham A; Miyan, Jaleel A; Pennock, Joanne L

    2016-03-01

    Neuro-immune interactions, particularly those driven by neuropeptides, are increasingly implicated in immune responses. For instance, triggering calcium-channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) on sensory nerves induces the release of calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide known to moderate dendritic cell activation and T helper cell type 1 polarization. Despite observations that CGRP is not confined to the nervous system, few studies have addressed the possibility that immune cells can respond to well-documented 'neural' ligands independently of peripheral nerves. Here we have identified functionally relevant TRPV1 on primary antigen-presenting cells of the spleen and have demonstrated both calcium influx and CGRP release in three separate strains of mice using natural agonists. Furthermore, we have shown down-regulation of activation markers CD80/86 on dendritic cells, and up-regulation of interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in response to CGRP treatment. We suggest that dendritic cell responses to neural ligands can amplify neuropeptide release, but more importantly that variability in CGRP release across individuals may have important implications for immune cell homeostasis.

  11. The degradation of airway tight junction protein under acidic conditions is probably mediated by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Li, Qi; Zhou, Jia; Zhou, Xiang-dong; Perelman, Juliy M; Kolosov, Victor P

    2013-10-31

    Acidic airway microenvironment is one of the representative pathophysiological features of chronic inflammatory respiratory diseases. Epithelial barrier function is maintained by TJs (tight junctions), which act as the first physical barrier against the inhaled substances and pathogens of airway. As previous studies described, acid stress caused impaired epithelial barriers and led the hyperpermeability of epithelium. However, the specific mechanism is still unclear. We have showed previously the existence of TRPV (transient receptor potential vanilloid) 1 channel in airway epithelium, as well as its activation by acidic stress in 16HBE cells. In this study, we explored the acidic stress on airway barrier function and TJ proteins in vitro with 16HBE cell lines. Airway epithelial barrier function was determined by measuring by TER (trans-epithelial electrical resistance). TJ-related protein [claudin-1, claudin-3, claudin-4, claudin-5, claudin-7 and ZO-1 (zonula occluden 1)] expression was examined by western blotting of insoluble fractions of cell extraction. The localization of TJ proteins were visualized by immunofluorescent staining. Interestingly, stimulation by pH 6.0 for 8 h slightly increased the epithelial resistance in 16HBE cells insignificantly. However, higher concentration of hydrochloric acid (lower than pH 5.0) did reduce the airway epithelial TER of 16HBE cells. The decline of epithelial barrier function induced by acidic stress exhibited a TRPV1-[Ca2+]i-dependent pathway. Of the TJ proteins, claudin-3 and claudin-4 seemed to be sensitive to acidic stress. The degradation of claudin-3 and claudin-4 induced by acidic stress could be attenuated by the specific TRPV1 blocker or intracellular Ca2+ chelator BAPTA/AM [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester)].

  12. Cannabinoid 1 and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Receptors Discretely Modulate Evoked Glutamate Separately from Spontaneous Glutamate Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E.; Andresen, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Action potentials trigger synaptic terminals to synchronously release vesicles, but some vesicles release spontaneously. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can modulate both of these processes. At cranial primary afferent terminals, the GPCR cannabinoid 1 (CB1) is often coexpressed with transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a nonselective cation channel present on most afferents. Here we tested whether CB1 activation modulates synchronous, action potential-evoked (eEPSCs) and/or spontaneous (sEPSCs) EPSCs at solitary tract nucleus neurons. In rat horizontal brainstem slices, activation of solitary tract (ST) primary afferents generated ST-eEPSCs that were rapidly and reversibly inhibited from most afferents by activation of CB1 with arachidonyl-2′-chloroethylamide (ACEA) or WIN 55,212-2 [R-(+)-(2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl)(1-naphthalenyl) methanone monomethanesulfonate]. The CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 [N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide] blocked these responses. Despite profound depression of ST-eEPSCs during CB1 activation, sEPSCs in these same neurons were unaltered. Changes in temperature changed sEPSC frequency only from TRPV1+ afferents (i.e., thermal sEPSC responses only occurred in TRPV1+ afferents). CB1 activation failed to alter these thermal sEPSC responses. However, the endogenous arachidonate metabolite N-arachidonyldopamine (NADA) promiscuously activated both CB1 and TRPV1 receptors. NADA inhibited ST-eEPSCs while simultaneously increasing sEPSC frequency, and thermally triggered sEPSC increases in neurons with TRPV1+ afferents. We found no evidence for CB1/TRPV1 interactions suggesting independent regulation of two separate vesicle pools. Together, these data demonstrate that action potential-evoked synchronous glutamate release is modulated separately from TRPV1-mediated glutamate release despite coexistence in

  13. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1-mediated calcium responses are inhibited by the alkylamine antihistamines dexbrompheniramine and chlorpheniramine.

    PubMed

    Sadofsky, Laura R; Campi, Barbara; Trevisani, Marcello; Compton, Steven J; Morice, Alyn H

    2008-12-01

    American guidelines, unlike European guidelines, support the use of antihistamines as a first line of treatment for some causes of chronic cough. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel activated by the tussive agents capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and protons. It is predominantly expressed by C-fiber and some Adelta -fiber sensory neurons and is thought to be a cough receptor. By measuring increases in intracellular calcium as an indicator of TRPV1 activation, the authors sought to determine whether antihistamines could antagonise TRPV1 permanently expressed in HEK and Pro5 cells and TRPV1 endogenously expressed in rat dorsal root ganglia neurons. In human TRPV1-expressing HEK cells (hTRPV1-HEK), diphenhydramine and fexofenadine failed to inhibit capsaicin-triggered calcium responses. However, both dexbrompheniramine and chlorpheniramine significantly inhibited capsaicin-evoked responses in hTRPV1-HEK. Dexbrompheniramine also inhibited activation of rat TRPV1 expressed in HEK and Pro5 cells, without interfering with TRPA1 and proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) activation. Finally, in rat dorsal root ganglia neuron preparations, dexbrompheniramine dose-dependently inhibited capsaicin-evoked calcium responses. Thus, the inhibition of TRPV1 activation by dexbrompheniramine may provide one potential mechanism whereby this antihistamine exerts its therapeutic effect in chronic cough.

  14. Direct activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1(TRPV1) by Diacylglycerol (DAG)

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Dong Ho; Jung, Sung Jun; Zhu, Mei Hong; Park, Chul-Kyu; Kim, Yong Ho; Oh, Seog Bae; Lee, C Justin

    2008-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor, known as transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), is activated by a wide range of noxious stimulants and putative ligands such as capsaicin, heat, pH, anandamide, and phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC). However, the identity of endogenous activators for TRPV1 under physiological condition is still debated. Here, we report that diacylglycerol (DAG) directly activates TRPV1 channel in a membrane-delimited manner in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), a membrane-permeable DAG analog, elicited intracellular Ca2+ transients, cationic currents and cobalt uptake that were blocked by TRPV1-selective antagonists, but not by inhibitors of PKC and DAG lipase in rat DRG neurons or HEK 293 cells heterologously expressing TRPV1. OAG induced responses were about one fifth of capsaicin induced signals, suggesting that OAG displays partial agonism. We also found that endogenously produced DAG can activate rat TRPV1 channels. Mutagenesis of rat TRPV1 revealed that DAG-binding site is at Y511, the same site for capsaicin binding, and PtdIns(4,5)P2binding site may not be critical for the activation of rat TRPV1 by DAG in heterologous system. We propose that DAG serves as an endogenous ligand for rat TRPV1, acting as an integrator of Gq/11-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases that are linked to phospholipase C. PMID:18826653

  15. The sympathetic nervous system is controlled by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in the regulation of body temperature.

    PubMed

    Alawi, Khadija M; Aubdool, Aisah A; Liang, Lihuan; Wilde, Elena; Vepa, Abhinav; Psefteli, Maria-Paraskevi; Brain, Susan D; Keeble, Julie E

    2015-10-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is involved in sensory nerve nociceptive signaling. Recently, it has been discovered that TRPV1 receptors also regulate basal body temperature in multiple species from mice to humans. In the present study, we investigated whether TRPV1 modulates basal sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. C57BL6/J wild-type (WT) mice and TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice were implanted with radiotelemetry probes for measurement of core body temperature. AMG9810 (50 mg/kg) or vehicle (2% DMSO/5% Tween 80/10 ml/kg saline) was injected intraperitoneally. Adrenoceptor antagonists or vehicle (5 ml/kg saline) was injected subcutaneously. In WT mice, the TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, caused significant hyperthermia, associated with increased noradrenaline concentrations in brown adipose tissue. The hyperthermia was significantly attenuated by the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol, the mixed α-/β-adrenoceptor antagonist labetalol, and the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin. TRPV1 KO mice have a normal basal body temperature, indicative of developmental compensation. d-Amphetamine (potent sympathomimetic) caused hyperthermia in WT mice, which was reduced in TRPV1 KO mice, suggesting a decreased sympathetic drive in KOs. This study provides new evidence that TRPV1 controls thermoregulation upstream of the SNS, providing a potential therapeutic target for sympathetic hyperactivity thermoregulatory disorders. © FASEB.

  16. Conjugated polymers mediate effective activation of the Mammalian Ion Channel Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Lodola, F; Martino, N; Tullii, G; Lanzani, G; Antognazza, M R

    2017-08-16

    Selective and rapid regulation of ionic channels is pivotal to the understanding of physiological processes and has a crucial impact in developing novel therapeutic strategies. Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels are emerging as essential cellular switches that allow animals to respond to their environment. In particular, the Vanilloid Receptor 1 (TRPV1), besides being involved in the body temperature regulation and in the response to pain, has important roles in several neuronal functions, as cytoskeleton dynamics, injured neurons regeneration, synaptic plasticity. Currently available tools to modulate TRPV1 activity suffer from limited spatial selectivity, do not allow for temporally precise control, and are usually not reversible, thus limiting their application potential. The use of optical excitation would allow for overcoming all these limitations. Here, we propose a novel strategy, based on the use of light-sensitive, conjugated polymers. We demonstrate that illumination of a polymer thin film leads to reliable, robust and temporally precise control of TRPV1 channels. Interestingly, the activation of the channel is due to the combination of two different, locally confined effects, namely the release of thermal energy from the polymer surface and the variation of the local ionic concentration at the cell/polymer interface, both mediated by the polymer photoexcitation.

  17. Sensory nerves and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels in CO(2) regulation of cerebrovascular tone.

    PubMed

    Yoon, SeongHun; Zuccarello, Mario; Rapoport, Robert M

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the involvement of sensory nerves and, in particular, neuronal transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 channels, in the CO(2)-mediated regulation of cerebrovascular tone. Basilar artery diameter and blood flow velocity in the ventral midbrain were determined in a rat cranial window preparation by digital imaging and laser-Doppler flowmetry, respectively. Superfusion of the basilar artery with capsaicin, a selective TRPV1 receptor agonist, caused a transient relaxation, consistent with acute desensitization of neuronal TRPV1 channels. Constriction to respiratory hypocapnia remained unaffected following capsaicin superfusion. Denervation of sensory nerves by repeated capsaicin injection of neonates also did not reduce the respiratory hypocapnia constriction of the basilar artery as well as the decreased flow velocity in the ventral midbrain in adults. These findings suggest that sensory nerves and, in particular, neuronal TRPV1 channels, do not play a role in respiratory hypocapnia constriction and decreased flow, at least in rat basilar artery and ventral midbrain. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Forsythoside A exerts antipyretic effect on yeast-induced pyrexia mice via inhibiting transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuiling; Su, Hongchang; Wan, Hongye; Qin, Qingxia; Wu, Xuan; Kong, Xiangying; Lin, Na

    2017-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel gated by noxious heat, playing major roles in thermoregulation. Forsythoside A (FT-A) is the most abundant phenylethanoid glycosides in Fructus Forsythiae, which has been prescribed as a medicinal herb for treating fever in China for a long history. However, how FT-A affects pyrexia and what is the underlying molecular mechanism remain largely unknown. Here we found that FT-A exerted apparent antipyretic effect through decreasing the levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and interleukin 8 (IL-8) in a dose-dependent fashion on the yeast induced pyrexia mice. Interestingly, FT-A significantly downregulated TRPV1 expression in the hypothalamus and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of the yeast induced pyrexia mice. Moreover, FT-A inhibited IL-8 and PGE2 secretions, and calcium influx in the HEK 293T-TRPV1 cells after stimulated with capsaicin, the specific TRPV1 agonist. Further investigation of the molecular mechanisms revealed that FT-A treatment rapidly inhibited phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 in both yeast induced pyrexia mice and HEK 293T-TRPV1 cells. These results suggest that FT-A may serve as a potential antipyretic agent and the therapeutic action of Fructus Forsythiae on pyretic related disease is, in part, due to the FT-A activities. PMID:28123347

  19. Pharmacology of modality-specific transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 antagonists that do not alter body temperature.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Regina M; McDonald, Heath A; Puttfarcken, Pamela S; Joshi, Shailen K; Lewis, LaGeisha; Pai, Madhavi; Franklin, Pamela H; Segreti, Jason A; Neelands, Torben R; Han, Ping; Chen, Jun; Mantyh, Patrick W; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Turner, Teresa M; Voight, Eric A; Daanen, Jerome F; Schmidt, Robert G; Gomtsyan, Arthur; Kort, Michael E; Faltynek, Connie R; Kym, Philip R

    2012-08-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel is involved in the development and maintenance of pain and participates in the regulation of temperature. The channel is activated by diverse agents, including capsaicin, noxious heat (≥ 43°C), acidic pH (< 6), and endogenous lipids including N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA). Antagonists that block all modes of TRPV1 activation elicit hyperthermia. To identify efficacious TRPV1 antagonists that do not affect temperature antagonists representing multiple TRPV1 pharmacophores were evaluated at recombinant rat and human TRPV1 channels with Ca(2+) flux assays, and two classes of antagonists were identified based on their differential ability to inhibit acid activation. Although both classes of antagonists completely blocked capsaicin- and NADA-induced activation of TRPV1, select compounds only partially inhibited activation of the channel by protons. Electrophysiology and calcitonin gene-related peptide release studies confirmed the differential pharmacology of these antagonists at native TRPV1 channels in the rat. Comparison of the in vitro pharmacological properties of these TRPV1 antagonists with their in vivo effects on core body temperature confirms and expands earlier observations that acid-sparing TRPV1 antagonists do not significantly increase core body temperature. Although both classes of compounds elicit equivalent analgesia in a rat model of knee joint pain, the acid-sparing antagonist tested is not effective in a mouse model of bone cancer pain.

  20. The transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 is localized at excitatory synapses in the mouse dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Puente, Nagore; Reguero, Leire; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Canduela, Miren-Josune; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Ramos-Uriarte, Almudena; Fernández-Espejo, Emilio; Grandes, Pedro

    2015-03-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel that plays an important role in pain perception and modulates neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity in the brain. TRPV1 function must lay on its anatomical distribution in the peripheral and central nervous system regions involved in the physiological roles of the channel. However, the anatomical localization of TRPV1 is well established in the periphery, but in the brain it is a matter of debate. While some studies support the presence of TRPV1 in several brain regions, recent evidences suggest a restricted distribution of the channel in the central nervous system. To investigate to what extent central TRPV1 function stands on a precise brain distribution of the channel, we examined the mouse hippocampal dentate molecular layer (ML) where TRPV1 mediates long-term synaptic plasticity. Using pre-embedding immunocytochemistry for high resolution electron microscopy, we show that TRPV1 immunoparticles are highly concentrated in postsynaptic dendritic spines to asymmetric perforant path synapses in the outer 2/3 of the ML. However, TRPV1 is poorly expressed at the excitatory hilar mossy cell synapses in the inner 1/3 of this layer. Importantly, the TRPV1 pattern distribution disappeared in the ML of TRPV1-knockout mice. Taken together, these findings support the notion of the presence of TRPV1 in a brain region where the channel has been shown to have a functional role, such as the perforant path synapses in the hippocampal dentate ML.

  1. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the Modulation of Airway Smooth Muscle Tone and Calcium Handling.

    PubMed

    Yocum, Gene T; Chen, Jun; Choi, Christine H; Townsend, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Dingbang; Fu, Xiao Wen; Sanderson, Michael J; Emala, Charles W

    2017-03-23

    Asthma is a common disorder characterized, in part, by airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperresponsiveness. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed on airway nerve fibers that modulates afferent signals resulting in cough, and potentially bronchoconstriction. In the present study, the TRPV1 transcript was detected by RT-PCR in primary cultured human ASM cells, and the TRPV1 protein was detected in ASM of human trachea by immunohistochemistry. Proximity ligation assays suggest that TRPV1 is expressed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane of human ASM cells in close association with sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2. In guinea pig tracheal ring organ bath experiments, the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin led to ASM contraction, but this contraction was significantly attenuated by the sodium-channel inhibitor bupivicaine (N=4, p<0.05) and the NK-2 receptor antagonist GR 159897 (N=4, p<0.05), suggesting that this contraction is neurally-mediated. However, pretreatment of guinea pig and human ASM in organ bath experiments with the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine inhibited the maintenance phase of an acetylcholine-induced contraction (N=4, p<0.01 for both species). Similarly, capsazepine inhibited methacholine-induced contraction of peripheral airways in mouse precision-cut lung slice (PCLS) experiments (N=4-5, p<0.05). Although capsazepine did not inhibit store-operated calicum entry in mouse ASM cells in PCLS (N=4-7, p=NS), it did inhibit calcium oscillations (N=3, p<0.001). These studies suggest that TRPV1 is expressed on ASM, including the SR, but that ASM TRPV1 activation does not play a significant role in initiation of ASM contraction. However, capsazepine does inhibit maintenance of contraction, likely by inhibiting calcium oscillation.

  2. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Inhibitors Block Laparotomy- and Opioid-induced Infarct Size Reduction in Rats.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Helen M; Wu, Yun; Lu, Yao; Qvit, Nir; Gross, Garrett J; Gross, Eric R

    2017-10-05

    In light of the opioid epidemic, physicians are increasingly prescribing non-opioid analgesics to surgical patients. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) inhibitors are potentially alternative pain therapeutics for surgery. Here we examined in rodents whether cardioprotection conferred by two occurrences during surgery, a laparotomy or morphine delivery, is mediated by TRPV1. We further tested whether an experimental analgesic peptide (known as P5) targeted against the TRPV1 C-terminus region interferes with laparotomy- or morphine-induced cardioprotection. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 30 minutes coronary occlusion followed by 120 minutes reperfusion. Before ischaemia, a laparotomy with or without capsaicin application (0.1% cream, a TRPV1 activator) was performed. Additional rats were given morphine (0.3mg·kg(-1) ) with or without capsaicin. Further, capsazepine (3mg·kg(-1) , a classical TRPV1 inhibitor), or P5 (3mg·kg(-1) , a peptide analgesic and TRPV1 inhibitor), were given either alone or prior to a laparotomy or morphine administration. Myocardial infarct size was determined. A laparotomy, in addition to combining a laparotomy with capsaicin cream, reduced infarct size versus control (44±2*%, 40±2*%, vs. 66±1%, n=6, *P < 0.01). Morphine, in addition to combining morphine administration with capsaicin cream, also reduced infarct size versus control (37±3*%, 43±3*%, vs. 61±2%, n=6, *P < 0.01). When TRPV1 inhibitors capsazepine or P5 were given, either TRPV1 inhibitor abolished the infarct size reduction afforded by a laparotomy or morphine. Inhibiting TRPV1 blocks laparotomy- or morphine-induced cardioprotection. Impaired organ protection may be a potential pitfall of using TRPV1 inhibitors for pain control. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 on cough hypersensitivity induced by particulate matter 2.5.

    PubMed

    Lv, Haining; Yue, Jianliang; Chen, Zhe; Chai, Senlin; Cao, Xu; Zhan, Jie; Ji, Zhenjun; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Rong; Lai, Kefang

    2016-04-15

    The mechanism of cough hypersensitivity induced by particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) remains elusive. The current study was designed to explore the effect of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) on cough hypersensitivity in airway and central nervous system. The PM2.5-induced chronic cough model of guinea pig was established by exposure to different doses of PM2.5 for three weeks. After exposure, the animals were microinjected with TRPV1 agonist capsaicine, antagonist capsazepine in the dorsal vagal complex respectively. Cough sensitivity was measured by determining the provocative concentration of citric acid inducing 5 or more coughs (C5). Airway inflammation was detected by hematoxylin eosin (HE) staining and Evans blue fluorescence, and substance P (SP) and TRPV1 expressions in airway were observed by immunohistochemical staining. TRPV1 expressions in the dorsal vagal complex were observed by immunofluorescence. Retrograde tracing by pseudorabies virus-Bartha (PRV-Bartha) was conducted to confirm the regulatory pathway between airway and central nervous system. PM2.5 induced TRPV1 expressions in both of airway and dorsal vagal complex and airway neurogenic inflammation. Airway vascular permeability increased after being exposed to PM2.5. The expressions of SP in the airway and airway inflammation was increased after microinjecting TRPV1 agonist, and decreased after microinjecting TRPV1 antagonist. PRV infected neurons in medulla oblongata mainly located in the dorsal vagal complex. These findings show that TRPV1 in the dorsal vagal complex could promote airway neurogenic inflammation and cough reflex sensitivity through neural pathways of vagal complex-airways, which indicate the therapeutic potential of specific inhibition of TRPV1 for chronic cough induced by PM2.5. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ca(2+) and Calpain Mediate Capsaicin-induced Ablation of Axonal Terminals Expressing Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Wang, Sen; Asgar, Jamila; Joseph, John; Ro, Jin Y; Wei, Feng; Campbell, James N; Chung, Man-Kyo

    2017-03-30

    Capsaicin is an ingredient in spicy peppers that produces burning pain by activating transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a Ca2+-permeable ion channel in nociceptors. Capsaicin also has been used as an analgesic, and its topical administration is approved for the treatment of certain pain conditions. The mechanisms underlying capsaicin-induced analgesia likely involve reversible ablation of nociceptor terminals. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not well understood. To visualize TRPV1-lineage axons, a genetically engineered mouse model was used in which a fluorophore is expressed under TRPV1 promoter. Using a combination of these TRPV1-lineage reporter mice and primary afferent cultures, we monitored capsaicin-induced effects on afferent terminals in real time. We found that Ca2+ influx through TRPV1 is necessary for capsaicin-induced ablation of nociceptive terminals. Although capsaicin-induced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was TRPV1-dependent, dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibition of the mitochondrial transition permeability pore and scavengers of reactive oxygen species did not attenuate capsaicin-induced ablation. In contrast, MDL28170, an inhibitor of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain diminished ablation. Furthermore, overexpression of calpastatin, an endogenous inhibitor of calpain, or knockdown of calpain2 also decreased the ablation. Quantitative assessment of TRPV1-lineage afferents in the epidermis of the hind paws of the reporter mice showed that EGTA and MDL28170 diminished capsaicin-induced ablation. Moreover, MDL28170 prevented capsaicin-induced thermal hypoalgesia. These results suggest that TRPV1/Ca2+/calpain-dependent signaling plays a dominant role in capsaicin-induced ablation of nociceptive terminals and further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying effects of capsaicin on nociceptors.

  5. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) Is a Mediator of Lung Toxicity for Coal Fly Ash Particulate Material

    PubMed Central

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E.; Johansen, Mark E.; Roberts, Jessica K.; Thomas, Karen C.; Romero, Erin G.; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S.; Veranth, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental particulate matter (PM) pollutants adversely affect human health, but the molecular basis is poorly understood. The ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) has been implicated as a sensor for environmental PM and a mediator of adverse events in the respiratory tract. The objectives of this study were to determine whether TRPV1 can distinguish chemically and physically unique PM that represents important sources of air pollution; to elucidate the molecular basis of TRPV1 activation by PM; and to ascertain the contributions of TRPV1 to human lung cell and mouse lung tissue responses exposed to an insoluble PM agonist, coal fly ash (CFA1). The major findings of this study are that TRPV1 is activated by some, but not all of the prototype PM materials evaluated, with rank-ordered responses of CFA1 > diesel exhaust PM > crystalline silica; TRP melastatin-8 is also robustly activated by CFA1, whereas other TRP channels expressed by airway sensory neurons and lung epithelial cells that may also be activated by CFA1, including TRPs ankyrin 1 (A1), canonical 4α (C4α), M2, V2, V3, and V4, were either slightly (TRPA1) or not activated by CFA1; activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 occurs via cell surface interactions between the solid components of CFA1 and specific amino acid residues of TRPV1 that are localized in the putative pore-loop region; and activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 is not exclusive in mouse lungs but represents a pathway by which CFA1 affects the expression of selected genes in lung epithelial cells and airway tissue. PMID:22155782

  6. Low-Level Blast Exposure Increases Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Expression in the Rat Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Por, Elaine D.; Choi, Jae-Hyek; Lund, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Blast-related ocular injuries sustained by military personnel have led to rigorous efforts to elucidate the effects of blast exposure on neurosensory function. Recent studies have provided some insight into cognitive and visual deficits sustained following blast exposure; however, limited data are available on the effects of blast on pain and inflammatory processes. Investigation of these secondary effects of blast exposure is necessary to fully comprehend the complex pathophysiology of blast-related injuries. The overall purpose of this study is to determine the effects of single and repeated blast exposure on pain and inflammatory mediators in ocular tissues. Methods: A compressed air shock tube was used to deliver a single or repeated blast (68.0 ± 2.7 kPa) to anesthetized rats daily for 5 days. Immunohistochemistry was performed on ocular tissues to determine the expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and endothelin-1 (ET-1) following single and repeated blast exposure. Neutrophil infiltration and myeloperoxidase (MPO) expression were also assessed in blast tissues via immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis, respectively. Results: TRPV1 expression was increased in rat corneas exposed to both single and repeated blast. Increased secretion of CGRP, SP, and ET-1 was also detected in rat corneas as compared to control. Moreover, repeated blast exposure resulted in neutrophil infiltration in the cornea and stromal layer as compared to control animals. Conclusion: Single and repeated blast exposure resulted in increased expression of TRPV1, CGRP, SP, and ET-1 as well as neutrophil infiltration. Collectively, these findings provide novel insight into the activation of pain and inflammation signaling mediators following blast exposure. PMID:27049881

  7. Role of the Outer Pore Domain in Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Dynamic Permeability to Large Cations*

    PubMed Central

    Munns, Clare H.; Chung, Man-Kyo; Sanchez, Yuly E.; Amzel, L. Mario; Caterina, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) has been shown to alter its ionic selectivity profile in a time- and agonist-dependent manner. One hallmark of this dynamic process is an increased permeability to large cations such as N-methyl-d-glucamine (NMDG). In this study, we mutated residues throughout the TRPV1 pore domain to identify loci that contribute to dynamic large cation permeability. Using resiniferatoxin (RTX) as the agonist, we identified multiple gain-of-function substitutions within the TRPV1 pore turret (N628P and S629A), pore helix (F638A), and selectivity filter (M644A) domains. In all of these mutants, maximum NMDG permeability was substantially greater than that recorded in wild type TRPV1, despite similar or even reduced sodium current density. Two additional mutants, located in the pore turret (G618W) and selectivity filter (M644I), resulted in significantly reduced maximum NMDG permeability. M644A and M644I also showed increased and decreased minimum NMDG permeability, respectively. The phenotypes of this panel of mutants were confirmed by imaging the RTX-evoked uptake of the large cationic fluorescent dye YO-PRO1. Whereas none of the mutations selectively altered capsaicin-induced changes in NMDG permeability, the loss-of-function phenotypes seen with RTX stimulation of G618W and M644I were recapitulated in the capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake assay. Curiously, the M644A substitution resulted in a loss, rather than a gain, in capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake. Modeling of our mutations onto the recently determined TRPV1 structure revealed several plausible mechanisms for the phenotypes observed. We conclude that side chain interactions at a few specific loci within the TRPV1 pore contribute to the dynamic process of ionic selectivity. PMID:25568328

  8. Low-Level Blast Exposure Increases Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Expression in the Rat Cornea.

    PubMed

    Por, Elaine D; Choi, Jae-Hyek; Lund, Brian J

    2016-10-01

    Blast-related ocular injuries sustained by military personnel have led to rigorous efforts to elucidate the effects of blast exposure on neurosensory function. Recent studies have provided some insight into cognitive and visual deficits sustained following blast exposure; however, limited data are available on the effects of blast on pain and inflammatory processes. Investigation of these secondary effects of blast exposure is necessary to fully comprehend the complex pathophysiology of blast-related injuries. The overall purpose of this study is to determine the effects of single and repeated blast exposure on pain and inflammatory mediators in ocular tissues. A compressed air shock tube was used to deliver a single or repeated blast (68.0 ± 2.7 kPa) to anesthetized rats daily for 5 days. Immunohistochemistry was performed on ocular tissues to determine the expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and endothelin-1 (ET-1) following single and repeated blast exposure. Neutrophil infiltration and myeloperoxidase (MPO) expression were also assessed in blast tissues via immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis, respectively. TRPV1 expression was increased in rat corneas exposed to both single and repeated blast. Increased secretion of CGRP, SP, and ET-1 was also detected in rat corneas as compared to control. Moreover, repeated blast exposure resulted in neutrophil infiltration in the cornea and stromal layer as compared to control animals. Single and repeated blast exposure resulted in increased expression of TRPV1, CGRP, SP, and ET-1 as well as neutrophil infiltration. Collectively, these findings provide novel insight into the activation of pain and inflammation signaling mediators following blast exposure.

  9. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is a mediator of lung toxicity for coal fly ash particulate material.

    PubMed

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Johansen, Mark E; Roberts, Jessica K; Thomas, Karen C; Romero, Erin G; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S; Veranth, John M; Reilly, Christopher A

    2012-03-01

    Environmental particulate matter (PM) pollutants adversely affect human health, but the molecular basis is poorly understood. The ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) has been implicated as a sensor for environmental PM and a mediator of adverse events in the respiratory tract. The objectives of this study were to determine whether TRPV1 can distinguish chemically and physically unique PM that represents important sources of air pollution; to elucidate the molecular basis of TRPV1 activation by PM; and to ascertain the contributions of TRPV1 to human lung cell and mouse lung tissue responses exposed to an insoluble PM agonist, coal fly ash (CFA1). The major findings of this study are that TRPV1 is activated by some, but not all of the prototype PM materials evaluated, with rank-ordered responses of CFA1 > diesel exhaust PM > crystalline silica; TRP melastatin-8 is also robustly activated by CFA1, whereas other TRP channels expressed by airway sensory neurons and lung epithelial cells that may also be activated by CFA1, including TRPs ankyrin 1 (A1), canonical 4α (C4α), M2, V2, V3, and V4, were either slightly (TRPA1) or not activated by CFA1; activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 occurs via cell surface interactions between the solid components of CFA1 and specific amino acid residues of TRPV1 that are localized in the putative pore-loop region; and activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 is not exclusive in mouse lungs but represents a pathway by which CFA1 affects the expression of selected genes in lung epithelial cells and airway tissue.

  10. Desensitization of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) by the TRP vanilloid 1-selective cannabinoid arachidonoyl-2 chloroethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Ruparel, Nikita B; Patwardhan, Amol M; Akopian, Armen N; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies on cannabinoid-induced analgesia implicate certain transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as a therapeutic target along with metabotropic cannabinoid receptors. Although TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1)-selective cannabinoids, such as (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl) pyrrolo-[1,2,3-d,e]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (WIN55,212), are effective at desensitizing TRPA1 and TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), there is a gap in knowledge in understanding the opposite situation, namely whether TRPV1-selective cannabinoids desensitize TRPA1. We selected the TRPV1-specific synthetic cannabinoid, arachidonoyl-2 chloroethanolamine (ACEA), to study peripheral antihyperalgesic properties because ACEA is known to activate TRPV1. Hence, we used in vitro as well as in vivo assays to evaluate the following: 1) the effects of ACEA on the TRPA1-selective agonist, mustard oil (MO), for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from rat hindpaw skin in vitro; 2) the effects of a peripherally selective dose of ACEA on MO-induced nocifensive behavior in vivo; and 3) the effects of five ACEA-insensitive TRPV1 mutations on ACEA-inhibition of MO-evoked calcium accumulation using a Chinese hamster ovary cell expression system. Our results demonstrate that 1) ACEA significantly attenuated (∼40%) MO-evoked CGRP release from rat hindpaw skin, and this effect was not antagonized by the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine; 2) ACEA significantly inhibited (∼40%) MO-induced nocifensive behavior in wild-type mice but not in TRPV1 knockout mice; and 3) all TRPV1 mutations insensitive to ACEA lacked the ability to inhibit MO-evoked calcium accumulation in Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with TRPV1 and TRPA1. Taken together, the results indicate that a TRPV1-selective cannabinoid, ACEA, inhibits MO-evoked responses via a TRPV1-dependent mechanism. This study strengthens the hypothesis that cannabinoids mediate their peripheral analgesic properties, at least

  11. Novel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of pain: structure-activity relationships for ureas with quinoline, isoquinoline, quinazoline, phthalazine, quinoxaline, and cinnoline moieties.

    PubMed

    Gomtsyan, Arthur; Bayburt, Erol K; Schmidt, Robert G; Zheng, Guo Zhu; Perner, Richard J; Didomenico, Stanley; Koenig, John R; Turner, Sean; Jinkerson, Tammie; Drizin, Irene; Hannick, Steven M; Macri, Bryan S; McDonald, Heath A; Honore, Prisca; Wismer, Carol T; Marsh, Kennan C; Wetter, Jill; Stewart, Kent D; Oie, Tetsuro; Jarvis, Michael F; Surowy, Carol S; Faltynek, Connie R; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2005-02-10

    Novel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor antagonists with various bicyclic heteroaromatic pharmacophores were synthesized, and their in vitro activity in blocking capsaicin activation of TRPV1 was assessed. On the basis of the contribution of these pharmacophores to the in vitro potency, they were ranked in the order of 5-isoquinoline > 8-quinoline = 8-quinazoline > 8-isoquinoline > or = cinnoline approximately phthalazine approximately quinoxaline approximately 5-quinoline. The 5-isoquinoline-containing compound 14a (hTRPV1 IC50 = 4 nM) exhibited 46% oral bioavailability and in vivo activity in animal models of visceral and inflammatory pain. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of 14a are substantial improvements over the profile of the high-throughput screening hit 1 (hTRPV1 IC50 = 22 nM), which was not efficacious in animal pain models and was not orally bioavailable.

  12. The potentiating effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide on transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 activity and the electrophysiological responses of rat trigeminal neurons to nociceptive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chatchaisak, Duangthip; Connor, Mark; Srikiatkhachorn, Anan; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2017-02-15

    Growing evidence suggests that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) participates in trigeminal nociceptive responses. However, the role of CGRP in sensitization or desensitization of nociceptive transduction remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to further investigate the CGRP-induced up-regulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) and the responses of trigeminal neurons to nociceptive stimuli. Rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) organ cultures and isolated trigeminal neurons were incubated with CGRP. An increase in TRPV1 levels was observed in CGRP-incubated TG organ cultures. CGRP potentiated capsaicin-induced increase in phosphorylated CaMKII levels in the TG organ cultures. The incubation of the trigeminal neurons with CGRP significantly increased the inward currents in response to capsaicin challenge, and this effect was inhibited by co-incubation with the CGRP receptor antagonist, BIBN4068BS or the inhibitor of protein kinase A, H-89. These findings reveal that CGRP acting on trigeminal neurons may play a significant role in facilitating cellular events that contribute to the peripheral sensitization of the TG in nociceptive transmission.

  13. Involvement of capsaicin-sensitive afferents and the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Receptor in xylene-induced nocifensive behaviour and inflammation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Katalin; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Elekes, Krisztián; Szolcsányi, János

    2009-02-27

    The inflammatory actions of xylene, an aromatic irritant and sensitizing agent, were described to be predominantly neurogenic in the rat, but the mechanism and the role of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) capsaicin receptor localized on a subpopulation of sensory nerves has not been elucidated. This paper characterizes the involvement of capsaicin-sensitive afferents and the TRPV1 receptor in nociceptive and acute inflammatory effects of xylene in the mouse. Topical application of xylene on the paw induced a short, intensive nocifensive behaviour characterized by paw liftings and shakings, which was more intensive in Balb/c than in C57Bl/6 mice. Genetic deletion of the TRPV1 receptor as well as destroying capsaicin-sensitive nerve terminals with resiniferatoxin (RTX) pretreatment markedly reduced, but did not abolish nocifensive behaviours. In respect to the xylene-induced plasma protein extravasation detected by Evans blue leakage, significant difference was neither observed between the Balb/c and C57Bl/6 strains, nor the ear and the dorsal paw skin. These inflammatory responses were diminished in the RTX pretreated group, but not in the TRPV1 gene-deleted one. Injection of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine 15min prior to xylene smearing significantly reduced plasma protein extravasation at both sites. These results demonstrate that xylene-induced acute nocifensive behaviour is mediated by capsaicin-sensitive afferents via TRPV1 receptor activation in mice. Neurogenic inflammatory components play an important role in xylene-induced plasma protein extravasation, but independently of the TRPV1 ion channel. Reactive oxygen or carbonyl species participate in this process presumably via stimulation of the TRPA1 channel.

  14. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 - a polymodal nociceptive receptor - plays a crucial role in formaldehyde-induced skin inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Usuda, Haruki; Endo, Takumi; Shimouchi, Ayumi; Saito, Asaka; Tominaga, Makoto; Yamashita, Hirotaka; Nagai, Hiroichi; Inagaki, Naoki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is irritating to the skin and is the main cause of sick building syndrome. However, the cutaneous reaction induced by long-term FA exposure has not been fully investigated. In our previous study, we demonstrated that repeated painting of 2% - 10% FA on mouse ears caused marked ear swelling and increased mRNA expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and neurotrophins in the ear. TRPV1 is reported to be involved in neurogenic inflammation; therefore, in the present study, we investigated the role of TRPV1 in FA-induced skin inflammation using TRPV1 gene-knockout mice. Mice were painted with 5% FA once a week for 5 weeks, and ear swelling and mRNA expression were investigated. Ear swelling and increased expression of neurotrophins mRNA by FA provocation in wild-type mice were attenuated by disruption of the TRPV1 gene. Furthermore, painting with a threshold dose of capsaicin, which does not induce ear swelling in intact mice, caused marked ear swelling after painting the ear 5 times with FA, indicating that inflamed tissues after FA application are hypersensitive to various ligands of TRPV1 in mice. These results demonstrated that neurogenic inflammation via TRPV1 and neurotrophins could be involved in FA-induced dermatitis.

  15. Unique Responses are Observed in Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 and Vanilloid 1 (TRPA1 and TRPV1) Co-Expressing Cells.

    PubMed

    Sadofsky, Laura R; Sreekrishna, Koti T; Lin, Yakang; Schinaman, Renee; Gorka, Kate; Mantri, Yogita; Haught, John Christian; Huggins, Thomas G; Isfort, Robert J; Bascom, Charles C; Morice, Alyn H

    2014-06-11

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are implicated in modulation of cough and nociception. In vivo, TRPA1 and TRPV1 are often co-expressed in neurons and TRPA1V1 hetero-tetramer formation is noted in cells co-transfected with the respective expression plasmids. In order to understand the impact of TRP receptor interaction on activity, we created stable cell lines expressing the TRPA1, TRPV1 and co-expressing the TRPA1 and TRPV1 (TRPA1V1) receptors. Among the 600 compounds screened against these receptors, we observed a number of compounds that activated the TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPA1V1 receptors; compounds that activated TRPA1 and TRPA1V1; compounds that activated TRPV1 and TRPA1V1; compounds in which TRPA1V1 response was modulated by either TRPA1 or TRPV1; and compounds that activated only TRPV1 or TRPA1 or TRPA1V1; and one compound that activated TRPA1 and TRPV1, but not TRPA1V1. These results suggest that co-expression of TRPA1 and TRPV1 receptors imparts unique activation profiles different from that of cells expressing only TRPA1 or TRPV1.

  16. β2-Microglobulin elicits itch-related responses in mice through the direct activation of primary afferent neurons expressing transient receptor potential vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tsugunobu; Maki, Takahito; Li, Sikai; Uta, Daisuke

    2017-09-05

    Uremic pruritus is an unpleasant symptom in patients undergoing hemodialysis, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. β2-Microglobulin (β2-MG) is well-known as an MHC class I molecule and its level is increased in the plasma of patients undergoing hemodialysis. In this study, we investigated whether β2-MG was a pruritogen in mice. Intradermal injections of β2-MG into the rostral back induced scratching in a dose-dependent manner. Intradermal injection of β2-MG into the cheek also elicited scratching, but not wiping. β2-MG-induced scratching was inhibited by the μ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone hydrochloride. β2-MG-induced scratching was not inhibited by antagonists of itch-related receptors (e.g., H1 histamine receptor (terfenadine), TP thromboxane receptor (DCHCH), BLT1 leukotriene B4 receptor (CMHVA), and proteinase-activated receptor 2 (FSLLRY-NH2)). However, β2-MG-induced scratching was attenuated in mice desensitized by repeated application of capsaicin and also by a selective transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist (BCTC). In addition, β2-MG induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (a marker of activated neurons) in primary culture of dorsal root ganglion neurons that expressed TRPV1. These results suggest that β2-MG is a pruritogen and elicits itch-related responses, at least in part, through TRPV1-expressing primary sensory neurons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 expression in trigeminal ganglion neurons via methyl-CpG binding protein 2 signaling contributes tongue heat sensitivity and inflammatory hyperalgesia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Azumi; Honda, Kuniya; Shirakawa, Tetsuro; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain hypoalgesia has been reported in Rett syndrome patients, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder which can be attributed to mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Here, we examined the role of MeCP2 signaling in tongue heat sensitivity in the normal and inflamed state using Mecp2 heterozygous (Mecp2+/−) mice. Results Heat hypoalgesia of the tongue occurred in Mecp2+/− mice and submucosal injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant into the tongue produced a long-lasting heat hyperalgesia at the inflamed site in wild-type mice but not in Mecp2+/− mice. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 was expressed in a large number of MeCP2-immunoreactive trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue in both wild-type and Mecp2+/− mice (70.9% in wild type; 72.1% in Mecp2+/−). The number of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-immunoreactive trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue was smaller in Mecp2+/− mice relative to wild-type mice (30.5% in wild type; 20.2% in Mecp2+/−). Following complete Freund’s adjuvant injection, the number of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1- and MeCP2-immunoreactive trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue, as well as MeCP2 protein expression in trigeminal ganglion, was significantly increased in wild-type mice but not in Mecp2+/− mice. Additionally, tongue heat hyperalgesia following complete Freund’s adjuvant injection was completely suppressed by the administration of SB366791, a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonist, in the tongue. Conclusions These findings indicate that tongue heat sensitivity and hypersensitivity are dependent on the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 which is regulated via MeCP2 signaling in trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue. PMID:27030715

  18. The cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 inhibits transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and evokes peripheral antihyperalgesia via calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Amol M; Jeske, Nathaniel A; Price, Theodore J; Gamper, Nikita; Akopian, Armen N; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2006-07-25

    Cannabinoids can evoke antihyperalgesia and antinociception at a peripheral site of action. However, the signaling pathways mediating these effects are not clearly understood. We tested the hypothesis that certain cannabinoids directly inhibit peripheral capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive neurons by dephosphorylating and desensitizing transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) via a calcium calcineurin-dependent mechanism. Application of the cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) to cultured trigeminal (TG) neurons or isolated skin biopsies rapidly and significantly inhibited capsaicin-activated inward currents and neuropeptide exocytosis by a mechanism requiring the presence of extracellular calcium. The inhibitory effect did not involve activation of G protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, because neither pertussis toxin nor GDPbetaS treatments altered the WIN effect. However, application of WIN-activated calcineurin, as measured by nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)c4 transcription factor, dephosphorylated TRPV1. The WIN-induced desensitization of TRPV1 was mediated by calcineurin, because the application of structurally distinct calcineurin antagonists (calcineurin autoinhibitory peptide and cyclosporine/cyclophilin complex) abolished WIN-induced inhibition of capsaicin-evoked inward currents and neuropeptide exocytosis. This mechanism also contributed to peripheral antinociceptive/antihyperalgesic effects of WIN because pretreatment with the calcineurin antagonist calcineurin autoinhibitory peptide (CAIP) significantly reduced peripherally mediated WIN effects in two behavioral models. Collectively, these data demonstrate that cannabinoids such as WIN directly inhibit TRPV1 functional activities via a calcineurin pathway that represents a mechanism of cannabinoid actions at peripheral sites.

  19. Involvement of perivascular nerves and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in vascular responses to histamine in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Jin, Honghua; Sun, Pengyuan; Takatori, Shingo; Koyama, Toshihiro; Zamami, Yoshito; Tangsucharit, Panot; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2012-04-05

    A previous report showed that histamine in denuded mesenteric vascular beds produced a triphasic response; an initial small histamine H(2) receptor-mediated vasodilation, a transient histamine H(1) receptor-mediated vasoconstriction, and finally a long-lasting vasodilation. We further investigated the vascular effect of histamine in mesenteric preparations without an endothelium to clarify the possible involvement of perivascular nerves. Male Wistar rat mesenteric vascular beds without an endothelium were perfused with Krebs solution containing methoxamine to produce active tone and lafutidine to block histamine H(2) receptor-mediated vasodilation. Histamine (1-100μM) was perfused for 1min and perfusion pressure was measured with a pressure transducer. Histamine caused a biphasic vascular response; initial vasoconstriction followed vasodilation. Tetrodotoxin (a neurotoxin, 1μM) and procaine (a local anesthetic, 100μM) significantly inhibited the vasoconstriction and vasodilation. Ruthenium red (a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist, 1μM) also significantly inhibited both phases of the response. Pretreatment with capsaicin (a depletor of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves, 5μM) significantly inhibited the vasodilation without affecting the initial vasoconstriction. Both indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, 0.5μM) and seratrodast (a thromboxane A(2) receptor antagonist, 0.1μM) abolished the histamine-induced vasoconstriction and subsequent vasodilation. These results suggest that histamine-induced vasoconstriction and long-lasting vasodilation are mediated by activation of TRPV1 on capsaicin-sensitive and capsaicin-insensitive nerves. They also suggest that perivascular nerves and prostanoids, probably thromboxane A(2), are responsible for the vascular response to histamine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. NOX3 NADPH Oxidase Couples Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 to Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1-Mediated Inflammation and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Sheehan, Kelly; Kaur, Tejbeer; Sheth, Sandeep; Bunch, Jennifer; Perro, Christopher; Rybak, Leonard P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is implicated in cisplatin ototoxicity. Activation of this channel by cisplatin increases reactive oxygen species generation, which contribute to loss of outer hair cells in the cochlea. Knockdown of TRPV1 by short interfering RNA protected against cisplatin ototoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying TRPV1-mediated ototoxicity using cultured organ of Corti transformed cells (UB/OC-1) and rats. Trans-tympanic injections of capsaicin produced transient hearing loss within 24 h, which recovered by 72 h. In UB/OC-1 cells, capsaicin increased NOX3 NADPH oxidase activity and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Intratympanic administration of capsaicin transiently increased STAT1 activity and expression of downstream proinflammatory molecules. Capsaicin produced a transient increase in CD14-positive inflammatory cells into the cochlea, which mimicked the temporal course of STAT1 activation but did not alter the expression of apoptotic genes or damage to outer hair cells. In addition, trans-tympanic administration of STAT1 short interfering RNA protected against capsaicin-induced hearing loss. These data suggest that activation of TRPV1 mediates temporary hearing loss by initiating an inflammatory process in the cochlea via activation of NOX3 and STAT1. Thus, these proteins represent reasonable targets for ameliorating hearing loss. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 999–1010. PMID:20712533

  1. NOX3 NADPH oxidase couples transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 to signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-mediated inflammation and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Sheehan, Kelly; Kaur, Tejbeer; Sheth, Sandeep; Bunch, Jennifer; Perro, Christopher; Rybak, Leonard P; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2011-03-15

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is implicated in cisplatin ototoxicity. Activation of this channel by cisplatin increases reactive oxygen species generation, which contribute to loss of outer hair cells in the cochlea. Knockdown of TRPV1 by short interfering RNA protected against cisplatin ototoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying TRPV1-mediated ototoxicity using cultured organ of Corti transformed cells (UB/OC-1) and rats. Trans-tympanic injections of capsaicin produced transient hearing loss within 24 h, which recovered by 72 h. In UB/OC-1 cells, capsaicin increased NOX3 NADPH oxidase activity and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Intratympanic administration of capsaicin transiently increased STAT1 activity and expression of downstream proinflammatory molecules. Capsaicin produced a transient increase in CD14-positive inflammatory cells into the cochlea, which mimicked the temporal course of STAT1 activation but did not alter the expression of apoptotic genes or damage to outer hair cells. In addition, trans-tympanic administration of STAT1 short interfering RNA protected against capsaicin-induced hearing loss. These data suggest that activation of TRPV1 mediates temporary hearing loss by initiating an inflammatory process in the cochlea via activation of NOX3 and STAT1. Thus, these proteins represent reasonable targets for ameliorating hearing loss.

  2. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) influences how retinal ganglion cell neurons respond to pressure-related stress

    PubMed Central

    Sappington, Rebecca M; Sidorova, Tatiana; Ward, Nicholas J; Chakravarthy, Rohini; Ho, Karen W; Calkins, David J

    2015-01-01

    Our recent studies implicate the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel as a mediator of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function and survival. With elevated pressure in the eye, TRPV1 increases in RGCs, supporting enhanced excitability, while Trpv1 -/- accelerates RGC degeneration in mice. Here we find TRPV1 localized in monkey and human RGCs, similar to rodents. Expression increases in RGCs exposed to acute changes in pressure. In retinal explants, contrary to our animal studies, both Trpv1 -/- and pharmacological antagonism of the channel prevented pressure-induced RGC apoptosis, as did chelation of extracellular Ca2+. Finally, while TRPV1 and TRPV4 co-localize in some RGC bodies and form a protein complex in the retina, expression of their mRNA is inversely related with increasing ocular pressure. We propose that TRPV1 activation by pressure-related insult in the eye initiates changes in expression that contribute to a Ca2+-dependent adaptive response to maintain excitatory signaling in RGCs. PMID:25713995

  3. Nonthermal activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 channels in abdominal viscera tonically inhibits autonomic cold-defense effectors.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Alexandre A; Turek, Victoria F; Almeida, Maria C; Burmeister, Jeffrey J; Oliveira, Daniela L; Roberts, Jennifer L; Bannon, Anthony W; Norman, Mark H; Louis, Jean-Claude; Treanor, James J S; Gavva, Narender R; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2007-07-11

    An involvement of the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 channel in the regulation of body temperature (T(b)) has not been established decisively. To provide decisive evidence for such an involvement and determine its mechanisms were the aims of the present study. We synthesized a new TRPV1 antagonist, AMG0347 [(E)-N-(7-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl)-3-(2-(piperidin-1-yl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-3-yl)acrylamide], and characterized it in vitro. We then found that this drug is the most potent TRPV1 antagonist known to increase T(b) of rats and mice and showed (by using knock-out mice) that the entire hyperthermic effect of AMG0347 is TRPV1 dependent. AMG0347-induced hyperthermia was brought about by one or both of the two major autonomic cold-defense effector mechanisms (tail-skin vasoconstriction and/or thermogenesis), but it did not involve warmth-seeking behavior. The magnitude of the hyperthermic response depended on neither T(b) nor tail-skin temperature at the time of AMG0347 administration, thus indicating that AMG0347-induced hyperthermia results from blockade of tonic TRPV1 activation by nonthermal factors. AMG0347 was no more effective in causing hyperthermia when administered into the brain (intracerebroventricularly) or spinal cord (intrathecally) than when given systemically (intravenously), which indicates a peripheral site of action. We then established that localized intra-abdominal desensitization of TRPV1 channels with intraperitoneal resiniferatoxin blocks the T(b) response to systemic AMG0347; the extent of desensitization was determined by using a comprehensive battery of functional tests. We conclude that tonic activation of TRPV1 channels in the abdominal viscera by yet unidentified nonthermal factors inhibits skin vasoconstriction and thermogenesis, thus having a suppressive effect on T(b).

  4. Acetaminophen Metabolite N-Acylphenolamine Induces Analgesia via Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Receptors Expressed on the Primary Afferent Terminals of C-fibers in the Spinal Dorsal Horn.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Nobuko; Uta, Daisuke; Sasaki, Mika; Ohashi, Masayuki; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2017-08-01

    The widely used analgesic acetaminophen is metabolized to N-acylphenolamine, which induces analgesia by acting directly on transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 or cannabinoid 1 receptors in the brain. Although these receptors are also abundant in the spinal cord, no previous studies have reported analgesic effects of acetaminophen or N-acylphenolamine mediated by the spinal cord dorsal horn. We hypothesized that clinical doses of acetaminophen induce analgesia via these spinal mechanisms. We assessed our hypothesis in a rat model using behavioral measures. We also used in vivo and in vitro whole cell patch-clamp recordings of dorsal horn neurons to assess excitatory synaptic transmission. Intravenous acetaminophen decreased peripheral pinch-induced excitatory responses in the dorsal horn (53.1 ± 20.7% of control; n = 10; P < 0.01), while direct application of acetaminophen to the dorsal horn did not reduce these responses. Direct application of N-acylphenolamine decreased the amplitudes of monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents evoked by C-fiber stimulation (control, 462.5 ± 197.5 pA; N-acylphenolamine, 272.5 ± 134.5 pA; n = 10; P = 0.022) but not those evoked by stimulation of Aδ-fibers. These phenomena were mediated by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors, but not cannabinoid 1 receptors. The analgesic effects of acetaminophen and N-acylphenolamine were stronger in rats experiencing an inflammatory pain model compared to naïve rats. Our results suggest that the acetaminophen metabolite N-acylphenolamine induces analgesia directly via transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors expressed on central terminals of C-fibers in the spinal dorsal horn and leads to conduction block, shunt currents, and desensitization of these fibers.

  5. Increases in transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 mRNA and protein in primary afferent neurons stimulated by protein kinase C and their possible role in neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijin; Wang, Peng; Zou, Xiaoju; Li, Dingge; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing

    2008-01-01

    A recent study by our group demonstrates pharmacologically that the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is activated by intradermal injection of capsaicin to initiate neurogenic inflammation by the release of neuropeptides in the periphery. In this study, expression of TRPV1, phosphorylated protein kinase C (p-PKC) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were visualized using immunofluorescence, real-time PCR and Western blots to examine whether increases in TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels evoked by capsaicin injection are subject to modulation by the activation of PKC and to analyze the role of this process in the pathogenesis of neurogenic inflammation. Capsaicin injection into the hindpaw skin of anesthetized rats evoked increases in the expression of TRPV1, CGRP and p-PKC in mRNA and/or protein levels and in the number of single labeled TRPV1, p-PKC and CGRP neurons in ipsilateral L4–5 DRGs. Co-expressions of TRPV1 with p-PKC and/or CGRP in DRG neurons were also significantly increased after CAP injection. These evoked expressions both at molecular and cellular levels were significantly inhibited after TRPV1 receptors were blocked by 5′-iodoresiniferatoxin (5 μg) or PKC was inhibited by chelerythrine chloride (5 μg). Taken together, these results provide evidence that up-regulation of TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels under inflammatory conditions evoked by capsaicin injection is subject to modulation by the PKC cascade in which increased CGRP level in DRG neurons may be related to the initiation of neurogenic inflammation. Thus, up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors in DRG neurons seems critical for initiating acute neurogenic inflammation. PMID:18752301

  6. Postnatal Excitability Development and Innervation by Functional Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Terminals in Neurons of the Rat Spinal Sacral Dorsal Commissural Nucleus: an Electrophysiological Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun

    2016-11-01

    The sacral dorsal commissural nucleus (SDCN) in the spinal cord receives both somatic and visceral primary afferents. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels are preferentially expressed in certain fine primary afferents. However, knowledge of the SDCN neurons postnatal excitability development and their contacts with TRPV1 fibers remains elusive. Here, whole-cell recordings were conducted in spinal cord slices to evaluate the postnatal development of SDCN neurons and their possible contacts with functional TRPV1-expressing terminals. SDCN neurons in neonatal (postnatal day (P) 1-2), young (P8-10), and adult rats (P35-40) have different electrophysiological properties. SDCN neurons in neonatal rats have higher frequency of spontaneous firing, higher resting membrane potential, and lower presynaptic glutamate release probability. However, no difference in quantal release was found. At all developmental stages, TRPV1 activation with the selective agonist capsaicin increases glutamate release in the presence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks action potential-dependent and polysynaptic neurotransmission, indicating that functional TRPV1 fibers innervate SDCN neurons directly. Capsaicin-induced presynaptic glutamate release onto SDCN neurons depends on external Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 channels; voltage-dependent calcium channels had a slighter impact. In contrast, capsaicin blocked C fiber-evoked synaptic transmission, indicating that TRPV1 activation has opposite effects on spontaneous asynchronous and action potential-dependent synchronous glutamate release. These data indicate that excitability of SDCN neurons undergoes a developmental shift, and these neurons receive functional TRPV1 terminals from early postnatal stage. The opposite action of capsaicin on asynchronous and synchronous glutamate release should be taken into account when TRPV1 channels are considered as therapeutic targets.

  7. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Gene Deficiency Ameliorates Hepatic Injury in a Mouse Model of Chronic Binge Alcohol-Induced Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huilin; Beier, Juliane I.; Arteel, Gavin E.; Ramsden, Christopher E.; Feldstein, Ariel E.; McClain, Craig J.; Kirpich, Irina A.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental alcohol-induced liver injury is exacerbated by a high polyunsaturated fat diet rich in linoleic acid. We postulated that bioactive oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OXLAMs) play a critical role in the development/progression of alcohol-mediated hepatic inflammation and injury. OXLAMs are endogenous ligands for transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). Herein, we evaluated the role of signaling through TRPV1 in an experimental animal model of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Chronic binge alcohol administration increased plasma OXLAM levels, specifically 9- and 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids. This effect was associated with up-regulation of hepatic TRPV1. Exposure of hepatocytes to these OXLAMs in vitro resulted in activation of TRPV1 signal transduction with increased intracellular Ca2+ levels. Genetic depletion of TRPV1 did not blunt hepatic steatosis caused by ethanol, but prevented hepatic injury. TRPV1 deficiency protected from hepatocyte death and prevented the increase in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression, including tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1. TRPV1 depletion markedly blunted ethanol-mediated induction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, an important alcohol-induced hepatic inflammation mediator, via fibrin accumulation. This study indicates, for the first time, that TRPV1 receptor pathway may be involved in hepatic inflammatory response in an experimental animal model of ALD. TRPV1-OXLAM interactions appear to play a significant role in hepatic inflammation/injury, further supporting an important role for dietary lipids in ALD. PMID:25447051

  8. Molecular Cloning and Functional Characterization of Xenopus tropicalis Frog Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Reveal Its Functional Evolution for Heat, Acid, and Capsaicin Sensitivities in Terrestrial Vertebrates*

    PubMed Central

    Ohkita, Masashi; Saito, Shigeru; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Kenji; Tominaga, Makoto; Ohta, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The functional difference of thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the evolutionary context has attracted attention, but thus far little information is available on the TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) function of amphibians, which diverged earliest from terrestrial vertebrate lineages. In this study we cloned Xenopus tropicalis frog TRPV1 (xtTRPV1), and functional characterization was performed using HeLa cells heterologously expressing xtTRPV1 (xtTRPV1-HeLa) and dorsal root ganglion neurons isolated from X. tropicalis (xtDRG neurons) by measuring changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). The channel activity was also observed in xtTRPV1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Furthermore, we tested capsaicin- and heat-induced nocifensive behaviors of the frog X. tropicalis in vivo. At the amino acid level, xtTRPV1 displays ∼60% sequence identity to other terrestrial vertebrate TRPV1 orthologues. Capsaicin induced [Ca2+]i increases in xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons and evoked nocifensive behavior in X. tropicalis. However, its sensitivity was extremely low compared with mammalian orthologues. Low extracellular pH and heat activated xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons. Heat also evoked nocifensive behavior. In oocytes expressing xtTRPV1, inward currents were elicited by heat and low extracellular pH. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that two amino acids (tyrosine 523 and alanine 561) were responsible for the low sensitivity to capsaicin. Taken together, our results indicate that xtTRPV1 functions as a polymodal receptor similar to its mammalian orthologues. The present study demonstrates that TRPV1 functions as a heat- and acid-sensitive channel in the ancestor of terrestrial vertebrates. Because it is possible to examine vanilloid and heat sensitivities in vitro and in vivo, X. tropicalis could be the ideal experimental lower vertebrate animal for the study of TRPV1 function. PMID:22130664

  9. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of Xenopus tropicalis frog transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 reveal its functional evolution for heat, acid, and capsaicin sensitivities in terrestrial vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ohkita, Masashi; Saito, Shigeru; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Kenji; Tominaga, Makoto; Ohta, Toshio

    2012-01-20

    The functional difference of thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the evolutionary context has attracted attention, but thus far little information is available on the TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) function of amphibians, which diverged earliest from terrestrial vertebrate lineages. In this study we cloned Xenopus tropicalis frog TRPV1 (xtTRPV1), and functional characterization was performed using HeLa cells heterologously expressing xtTRPV1 (xtTRPV1-HeLa) and dorsal root ganglion neurons isolated from X. tropicalis (xtDRG neurons) by measuring changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). The channel activity was also observed in xtTRPV1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Furthermore, we tested capsaicin- and heat-induced nocifensive behaviors of the frog X. tropicalis in vivo. At the amino acid level, xtTRPV1 displays ∼60% sequence identity to other terrestrial vertebrate TRPV1 orthologues. Capsaicin induced [Ca(2+)](i) increases in xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons and evoked nocifensive behavior in X. tropicalis. However, its sensitivity was extremely low compared with mammalian orthologues. Low extracellular pH and heat activated xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons. Heat also evoked nocifensive behavior. In oocytes expressing xtTRPV1, inward currents were elicited by heat and low extracellular pH. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that two amino acids (tyrosine 523 and alanine 561) were responsible for the low sensitivity to capsaicin. Taken together, our results indicate that xtTRPV1 functions as a polymodal receptor similar to its mammalian orthologues. The present study demonstrates that TRPV1 functions as a heat- and acid-sensitive channel in the ancestor of terrestrial vertebrates. Because it is possible to examine vanilloid and heat sensitivities in vitro and in vivo, X. tropicalis could be the ideal experimental lower vertebrate animal for the study of TRPV1 function.

  10. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonism in patients with refractory chronic cough: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Saifudin; Murdoch, Robert; Newlands, Amy; Smart, Kevin; Kelsall, Angela; Holt, Kimberley; Dockry, Rachel; Woodcock, Ashley; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2014-07-01

    Inhalation of capsaicin, the extract of hot chili peppers, induces coughing in both animals and human subjects through activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) on airway sensory nerves. Therefore the TRPV1 receptor is an attractive target for the development of antitussive agents. We sought to assess the antitussive effect of TRPV1 antagonism in patients with refractory chronic cough. Twenty-one subjects with refractory chronic cough (>8 weeks) attending a specialist clinic were recruited to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial assessing a TRPV1 antagonist (SB-705498). Cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin (concentration of capsaicin inducing at least 5 coughs) and 24-hour cough frequency were coprimary end points assessed after a single dose of SB-705498 (600 mg) and matched placebo. Cough severity and urge to cough were reported on visual analog scales, and cough-specific quality of life data were also collected. Treatment with SB-705498 produced a significant improvement in cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin at 2 hours and a borderline significant improvement at 24 hours compared with placebo (adjusted mean difference of +1.3 doubling doses at 2 hours [95% CI, +0.3 to +2.2; P = .0049] and +0.7 doubling doses at 24 hours [95% CI, +0.0 to +1.5; P = .0259]). However, 24-hour objective cough frequency was not improved compared with placebo. Patient-reported cough severity, urge to cough, and cough-specific quality of life similarly suggested no effect of SB-705498. This study raises important questions about both the role of TRVP1-mediated mechanisms in patients with refractory chronic cough and also the predictive value of capsaicin challenge testing in the assessment of novel antitussive agents. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Carboxyl-terminal Domain of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Contains Distinct Segments Differentially Involved in Capsaicin- and Heat-induced Desensitization*

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, John; Wang, Sen; Lee, Jongseok; Ro, Jin Y.; Chung, Man-Kyo

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Ca2+-dependent processes are involved in capsaicin-induced desensitization of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), but desensitization of TRPV1 by heat occurs even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, although the mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that capsaicin and heat desensitize TRPV1 through distinct mechanisms involving distinct structural segments of TRPV1. In HEK293 cells that heterologously express TRPV1, we found that heat-induced desensitization was not affected by the inclusion of intracellular ATP or alanine mutation of Lys155, both of which attenuate capsaicin-induced desensitization, suggesting that heat-induced desensitization occurs through mechanisms distinct from capsaicin-induced desensitization. To determine protein domains involved in heat-induced desensitization, we generated chimeric proteins between TRPV1 and TRPV3, a heat-gated channel lacking heat-induced desensitization. We found that TRPV1 with the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of TRPV3 retained heat activation but was impaired in heat-induced desensitization. Further experiments using chimeric or deletion mutants within TRPV1 CTD indicated that the distal half of CTD regulates the activation and desensitization of TRPV1 in modality-specific manners. Within the distal CTD, we identified two segments that distinctly regulated capsaicin- and heat-induced desensitization. The results suggest that the activation and desensitization of TRPV1 by capsaicin and heat can be modulated differentially and disproportionally through different regions of TRPV1 CTD. Identifying the domains involved in thermal regulation of TRPV1 may facilitate the development of novel anti-hyperalgesic approaches aimed at attenuating activation and enhancing desensitization of TRPV1 by thermal stimuli. PMID:24174527

  12. Repeat low-level blast exposure increases transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in the trigeminal ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Teresa A.; Doyle Brackley, Allison; Jeske, Nathaniel A.; Cleland, Jeffery M.; Lund, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Blast-associated sensory and cognitive trauma sustained by military service members is an area of extensively studied research. Recent studies in our laboratory have revealed that low-level blast exposure increased expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), proteins well characterized for their role in mediating pain transmission, in the cornea. Determining the functional consequences of these alterations in protein expression is critical to understanding blast-related sensory trauma. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine TRPV1 and ET-1 expression in ocular associated sensory tissues following primary and tertiary blast. A rodent model of blast injury was used in which anesthetized animals, unrestrained or restrained, received a single or repeat blast (73.8 ± 5.5 kPa) from a compressed air shock tube once or daily for five consecutive days, respectively. Behavioral and functional analyses were conducted to assess blast effects on nocifensive behavior and TRPV1 activity. Immunohistochemistry and Western Blot were also performed with trigeminal ganglia (TG) to determine TRPV1, ET-1 and glial fibrillary associated protein (GFAP) expression following blast. Increased TRPV1, ET-1 and GFAP were detected in the TG of animals exposed to repeat blast. Increased nocifensive responses were also observed in animals exposed to repeat, tertiary blast as compared to single blast and control. Moreover, decreased TRPV1 desensitization was observed in TG neurons exposed to repeat blast. Repeat, tertiary blast resulted in increased TRPV1, ET-1 and GFAP expression in the TG, enhanced nociception and decreased TRPV1 desensitization. PMID:28797041

  13. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, vanilloid 2 and melastatin 8 immunoreactive nerve fibers in human skin from individuals with and without Norrbottnian congenital insensitivity to pain.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, H E; Minde, J K; Sonesson, A; Toolanen, G; Högestätt, E D; Zygmunt, P M

    2009-09-15

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) and melastatin 8 (TRPM8) are thermosensitive cation channels expressed on primary sensory neurons. In contrast to TRPV1, which is present on nociceptive primary afferents and keratinocytes in human skin, less is known about the distribution of TRPV2 and TRPM8 in this tissue. Immunohistochemistry of human forearm skin identified TRPV2 and TRPM8 immunoreactive nerve fibers in epidermis-papillary dermis and around blood vessels and hair follicles in dermis, although these nerve fibers were less abundant than TRPV1 immunoreactive nerve fibers throughout the skin. The TRPV2 and TRPM8 immunoreactive nerve fibers also showed immunoreactivity for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and to a lesser extent substance P (SP). Neither of the TRP ion channels co-localized with neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Nerve fibers immunoreactive for TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPM8, CGRP and SP were absent or substantially reduced in number in individuals with Norrbottnian congenital insensitivity to pain, an autosomal disease selectively affecting the development of C-fiber and Adelta-fiber primary afferents. Quantitative real time PCR detected mRNA transcripts encoding TRPV1 and TRPV2, but not TRPM8, in skin from healthy volunteers, suggesting that these ion channels are also expressed extraneuronally. In conclusion, nerve fibers in human skin express TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPM8 that co-localize with the sensory neuropeptides CGRP and SP, but not with NF200, VIP or TH. A dramatic loss of such nerve fibers was seen in skin from individuals with Norrbottnian congenital insensitivity to pain, further suggesting that these ion channels are expressed primarily on nociceptive primary sensory neurons in human skin.

  14. Diacerein reduces joint damage, pain behavior and inhibits transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, matrix metalloproteinase and glial cells in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Morgana Duarte; Cidral-Filho, Francisco José; Winkelmann-Duarte, Elisa Cristina; Cargnin-Ferreira, Eduardo; Calixto, João B; Dutra, Rafael C; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares

    2015-10-20

    To investigate the antinociceptive, antiedematogenic and chondroprotective effects of diacerein (DIA) in a model of joint inflammation induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), as well as to investigate the involvement of metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and glial cells in DIA's action mechanism. Complete Freund's adjuvant was injected into the knee joint of male rats. We observed mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, vocalization and spontaneous pain-related behaviors, as well as edema of the knee. Tissue samples of the knee were stained with Cason`s technique and the thickness of the condilus cartilage was measured. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on the spinal cord using anti-GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein), anti-MMP and anti-TRPV1 antibodies. Sections of the dorsal horns of the spinal cord were captured and an optical density was obtained. Complete Freund's adjuvant induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity, as well as joint edema and changes in the synovial membrane and cartilage. DIA (30 mg/kg, orally, daily) significantly inhibited mechanical (58 ± 10-87 ± 3%) and thermal (66 ± 12-87 ± 8%) hypersensitivity, vocalization (83 ± 5-41 ± 11%), spontaneous pain score, joint swelling (60 ± 6-40 ± 9%), as well as the histological changes induced by CFA. In addition, DIA inhibited astrocyte activation, and prevented the increase of MMP-9 and TRPV1 expression in the spinal cord of the animals subjected to CFA injections. In short, this study shows that DIA reduces joint damage and hypersensitivity associated with inflammation induced by CFA through the inhibition of astroglial activation and decreases the expression of TRPV1 and MMP-9 in the rat spinal cord. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Repeat low-level blast exposure increases transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in the trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Por, Elaine D; Sandoval, Melody L; Thomas-Benson, Chiquita; Burke, Teresa A; Doyle Brackley, Allison; Jeske, Nathaniel A; Cleland, Jeffery M; Lund, Brian J

    2017-01-01

    Blast-associated sensory and cognitive trauma sustained by military service members is an area of extensively studied research. Recent studies in our laboratory have revealed that low-level blast exposure increased expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), proteins well characterized for their role in mediating pain transmission, in the cornea. Determining the functional consequences of these alterations in protein expression is critical to understanding blast-related sensory trauma. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine TRPV1 and ET-1 expression in ocular associated sensory tissues following primary and tertiary blast. A rodent model of blast injury was used in which anesthetized animals, unrestrained or restrained, received a single or repeat blast (73.8 ± 5.5 kPa) from a compressed air shock tube once or daily for five consecutive days, respectively. Behavioral and functional analyses were conducted to assess blast effects on nocifensive behavior and TRPV1 activity. Immunohistochemistry and Western Blot were also performed with trigeminal ganglia (TG) to determine TRPV1, ET-1 and glial fibrillary associated protein (GFAP) expression following blast. Increased TRPV1, ET-1 and GFAP were detected in the TG of animals exposed to repeat blast. Increased nocifensive responses were also observed in animals exposed to repeat, tertiary blast as compared to single blast and control. Moreover, decreased TRPV1 desensitization was observed in TG neurons exposed to repeat blast. Repeat, tertiary blast resulted in increased TRPV1, ET-1 and GFAP expression in the TG, enhanced nociception and decreased TRPV1 desensitization.

  16. Aging reverses the role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 channel in systemic inflammation from anti-inflammatory to proinflammatory.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Samuel P; Garami, Andras; Pakai, Eszter; Oliveira, Daniela L; Gavva, Narender R; Coimbra, Cândido C; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2012-01-15

    Studies in young rodents have shown that the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel plays a suppressive role in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) by inhibiting production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α and possibly by other mechanisms. We asked whether the anti-inflammatory role of TRPV1 changes with age. First, we studied the effect of AMG517, a selective and potent TRPV1 antagonist, on aseptic, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced SIRS in young (12 wk) mice. In agreement with previous studies, AMG517 increased LPS-induced mortality in the young. We then studied the effects of TRPV1 antagonism (AMG517 or genetic deletion of TRPV1) on SIRS in middle-aged (43-44 wk) mice. Both types of TRPV1 antagonism delayed and decreased LPS-induced mortality, indicating a reversal of the anti-inflammatory role of TRPV1 with aging. In addition, deletion of TRPV1 decreased the serum TNFα response to LPS, suggesting that the suppressive control of TRPV1 on TNFα production is also reversed with aging. In contrast to aseptic SIRS, polymicrobial sepsis (induced by cecal ligation and puncture) caused accelerated mortality in aged TRPV1-deficient mice as compared with wild-type littermates. The recovery of TRPV1-deficient mice from hypothermia associated with the cecal ligation and puncture procedure was delayed. Hence, the reversal of the anti-inflammatory role of TRPV1 found in the aged and their decreased systemic inflammatory response are coupled with suppressed defense against microbial infection. These results caution that TRPV1 antagonists, widely viewed as new-generation painkillers, may decrease the resistance of older patients to infection and sepsis.

  17. H2O2 generated by NADPH oxidase 4 contributes to transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel-mediated mechanosensation in the rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chian-Shiung; Lee, Shang-Hsing; Huang, Ho-Shiang; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-08-15

    The presence of NADPH oxidase (Nox) in the kidney, especially Nox4, results in H2O2 production, which regulates Na(+) excretion and urine formation. Redox-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels (TRPV1s) are distributed in mechanosensory fibers of the renal pelvis and monitor changes in intrapelvic pressure (IPP) during urine formation. The present study tested whether H2O2 derived from Nox4 affects TRPV1 function in renal sensory responses. Perfusion of H2O2 into the renal pelvis dose dependently increased afferent renal nerve activity and substance P (SP) release. These responses were attenuated by cotreatment with catalase or TRPV1 blockers. In single unit recordings, H2O2 activated afferent renal nerve activity in response to rising IPP but not high salt. Western blots revealed that Nox2 (gp91(phox)) and Nox4 are both present in the rat kidney, but Nox4 is abundant in the renal pelvis and originates from dorsal root ganglia. This distribution was associated with expression of the Nox4 regulators p22(phox) and polymerase δ-interacting protein 2. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that IPP increases polymerase δ-interacting protein 2 association with Nox4 or p22(phox) in the renal pelvis. Interestingly, immunofluorescence labeling demonstrated that Nox4 colocalizes with TRPV1 in sensory fibers of the renal pelvis, indicating that H2O2 generated from Nox4 may affect TRPV1 activity. Stepwise increases in IPP and saline loading resulted in H2O2 and SP release, sensory activation, diuresis, and natriuresis. These effects, however, were remarkably attenuated by Nox inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that Nox4-positive fibers liberate H2O2 after mechanostimulation, thereby contributing to a renal sensory nerve-mediated diuretic/natriuretic response.

  18. Advanced oxidation protein products sensitized the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 via NADPH oxidase 1 and 4 to cause mechanical hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ruoting; Jiang, Hui; Sun, Baihui; Wu, Xiaoliang; Li, Wei; Zhu, Siyuan; Liao, Congrui; Zhong, Zhaoming; Chen, Jianting

    2016-12-01

    Oxidative stress is a possible pathogenesis of hyperalgesia. Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), a new family of oxidized protein compounds, have been considered as a novel marker of oxidative stress. However, the role of AOPPs in the mechanism of hyperalgesia remains unknown. Our study aims to investigate whether AOPPs have an effect on hyperalgesia and the possible underlying mechanisms. To identify the AOPPs involved, we induced hyperalgesia in rats by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in hindpaw. The level of plasma AOPPs in CFA-induced rats was 1.6-fold in comparison with what in normal rats (P<0.05). After intravenous injection of AOPPs-modified rat serum albumin (AOPPs-RSA) in Sprague-Dawley rats, the paw mechanical thresholds, measured by the electronic von Frey system, significantly declined. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that AOPPs increased expressions of NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1), NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) tissues. In-vitro studies were performed on primary DRG neurons which were obtained from both thoracic and lumbar DRG of rats. Results indicated that AOPPs triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in DRG neurons, which were significantly abolished by ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and small-interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of Nox1 or Nox4. The expressions of Nox1, Nox4, TRPV1 and CGRP were significantly increased in AOPPs-induced DRG neurons. And relevant siRNA or inhibitors notably suppressed the expressions of these proteins and the calcium influxes in AOPPs-induced DRG neurons. In conclusion, AOPPs increased significantly in CFA-induced hyperalgesia rats and they activated Nox1/Nox4-ROS to sensitize TRPV1-dependent Ca2+ influx and CGRP release which led to inducing mechanical hyperalgesia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lack of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel modulates the development of neurogenic bladder dysfunction induced by cross-sensitization in afferent pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bladder pain of unknown etiology has been associated with co-morbid conditions and functional abnormalities in neighboring pelvic organs. Mechanisms underlying pain co-morbidities include cross-sensitization, which occurs predominantly via convergent neural pathways connecting distinct pelvic organs. Our previous results showed that colonic inflammation caused detrusor instability via activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) signaling pathways, therefore, we aimed to determine whether neurogenic bladder dysfunction can develop in the absence of TRPV1 receptors. Methods Adult male C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and TRPV1−/− (knockout) mice were used in this study. Colonic inflammation was induced by intracolonic trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The effects of transient colitis on abdominal sensitivity and function of the urinary bladder were evaluated by cystometry, contractility and relaxation of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) in vitro to various stimuli, gene and protein expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in bladder sensory neurons, and pelvic responses to mechanical stimulation. Results Knockout of TRPV1 gene did not eliminate the development of cross-sensitization between the colon and urinary bladder. However, TRPV1−/− mice had prolonged intermicturition interval and increased number of non-voiding contractions at baseline followed by reduced urodynamic responses during active colitis. Contractility of DSM was up-regulated in response to KCl in TRPV1−/− mice with inflamed colon. Application of Rho-kinase inhibitor caused relaxation of DSM in WT but not in TRPV1−/− mice during colonic inflammation. TRPV1−/− mice demonstrated blunted effects of TNBS-induced colitis on expression and function of voltage-gated sodium channels in bladder sensory neurons, and delayed development of abdominal hypersensitivity upon colon-bladder cross-talk in genetically modified animals. Conclusions The lack of TRPV1 receptors

  20. Full-length transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels mediate calcium signals and possibly contribute to osmoreception in vasopressin neurones in the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Taiki; Shibasaki, Rina; Kayano, Tomohiko; Takebuchi, Nami; Ichimura, Momoko; Kitamura, Naoki; Asano, Atsushi; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z; Forostyak, Oksana; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Dayanithi, Govindan; Shibuya, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    Neurones in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus possess intrinsic osmosensing mechanisms, which are lost in transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (Trpv1)-knock-out mice. The molecular nature of the osmosensory mechanism in SON neurones is believed to be associated with the N-terminal splice variant of Trpv1, although their entire molecular structures have not been hitherto identified. In this study, we sought for TRPV1-related molecules and their function in the rat SON. We performed RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry to detect TRPV1-related molecules in the SON, and patch-clamp and imaging of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) to measure responses to osmolality changes and TRPV-related drugs in acutely dissociated SON neurones of rats. RT-PCR analysis revealed full-length Trpv1 and a new N-terminal splice variant, Trpv1_SON (LC008303) in the SON. Positive immunostaining was observed using an antibody against the N-terminal portion of TRPV1 in arginine vasopressin (AVP)-immunoreactive neurones, but not in oxytocin (OT)-immunoreactive neurones. Approximately 20% of SON neurones responded to mannitol (50 mM) with increased action potential firing, inward currents, and [Ca(2+)]i mobilization. Mannitol-induced responses were observed in AVP neurones isolated from AVP-eGFP transgenic rats and identified by GFP fluorescence, but not in OT neurones isolated from OT-mRFP transgenic rats and identified by RFP fluorescence. The mannitol-induced [Ca(2+)]i responses were reversibly blocked by the non-selective TRPV antagonist, ruthenium red (10 μM) and the TRPV1 antagonists, capsazepine (10 μM) and BCTC (10 μM). Although the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin (100 nM) evoked no response at room temperature, it triggered cationic currents and [Ca(2+)]i elevation when the temperature was increased to 36°C. These results suggest that AVP neurones in the rat SON possess functional full-length TRPV1. Moreover, differences between the responses to capsaicin or

  1. Characterization of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) Variant Activation by Coal Fly Ash Particles and Associations with Altered Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) Expression and Asthma.

    PubMed

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Stockmann, Chris; Romero, Erin G; Lu, Zhenyu; Shapiro, Darien; Stone, Bryan L; Fassl, Bernhard; Nkoy, Flory; Uchida, Derek A; Ward, Robert M; Veranth, John M; Reilly, Christopher A

    2016-11-25

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are activated by environmental particulate materials. We hypothesized that polymorphic variants of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) would be uniquely responsive to insoluble coal fly ash compared with the prototypical soluble agonist capsaicin. Furthermore, these changes would manifest as differences in lung cell responses to these agonists and perhaps correlate with changes in asthma symptom control. The TRPV1-I315M and -T469I variants were more responsive to capsaicin and coal fly ash. The I585V variant was less responsive to coal fly ash particles due to reduced translation of protein and an apparent role for Ile-585 in activation by particles. In HEK-293 cells, I585V had an inhibitory effect on wild-type TRPV1 expression, activation, and internalization/agonist-induced desensitization. In normal human bronchial epithelial cells, IL-8 secretion in response to coal fly ash treatment was reduced for cells heterozygous for TRPV1-I585V. Finally, both the I315M and I585V variants were associated with worse asthma symptom control with the effects of I315M manifesting in mild asthma and those of the I585V variant manifesting in severe, steroid-insensitive individuals. This effect may be due in part to increased transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) expression by lung epithelial cells expressing the TRPV1-I585V variant. These findings suggest that specific molecular interactions control TRPV1 activation by particles, differential activation, and desensitization of TRPV1 by particles and/or other agonists, and cellular changes in the expression of TRPA1 as a result of I585V expression could contribute to variations in asthma symptom control. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Trypsin induces biphasic muscle contraction and relaxation via transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and neurokinin receptors 1/2 in porcine esophageal body.

    PubMed

    Xiaopeng, Bai; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Ihara, Eikichi; Hirano, Katsuya; Nakano, Kayoko; Hirano, Mayumi; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-15

    Duodenal reflux of fluids containing trypsin relates to refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Esophageal peristalsis and clearance are important factors in GERD pathogenesis. However, the function of trypsin in esophageal body contractility is not fully understood. In this study, effects of trypsin on circular smooth muscle (CSM) and longitudinal smooth muscle (LSM) of the porcine esophageal body were examined. Trypsin elicited a concentration dependent biphasic response, a major contraction and a subsequent relaxation only in CSM. In CSM, contraction occurred at trypsin concentrations of 100nM and relaxation at 1μM. A proteinase-activated receptor (PAR)2 activating peptide, SLIGKV-NH2 (1mM), induced a monophasic contraction. Those responses were unaffected by tetrodotoxin though abolished by the gap junction uncouplers carbenoxolone and octanol. They were also partially inhibited by a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist and abolished by combination of neurokinin receptor 1 (NK1) and NK2 antagonists, but not by an NK3 antagonist, suggesting a PAR2-TRPV1-substance P pathway in sensory neurons. Substance P (100nM), an agonist for various NK receptors (NK1, NK2 and NK3) with differing affinities, induced significant contraction in CSM, but not in LSM. The contraction was also blocked by the combination of NK1 and NK2 antagonists, but not by the NK3 antagonist. Moreover, substance P-induced contractions were unaffected by the TRPV1 antagonist, but inhibited by a gap junction uncoupler. In conclusion, trypsin induced a biphasic response only in CSM and this was mediated by PAR2, TRPV1 and NK1/2. Gap junctions were indispensable in this tachykinin-induced response.

  3. Nonpsychotropic plant cannabinoids, cannabidivarin (CBDV) and cannabidiol (CBD), activate and desensitize transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels in vitro: potential for the treatment of neuronal hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Hill, Charlotte L; Leo, Antonio; Alhusaini, Ahlam; Soubrane, Camille; Mazzarella, Enrico; Russo, Emilio; Whalley, Benjamin J; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Stephens, Gary J

    2014-11-19

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder, with over 50 million people worldwide affected. Recent evidence suggests that the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) may contribute to the onset and progression of some forms of epilepsy. Since the two nonpsychotropic cannabinoids cannabidivarin (CBDV) and cannabidiol (CBD) exert anticonvulsant activity in vivo and produce TRPV1-mediated intracellular calcium elevation in vitro, we evaluated the effects of these two compounds on TRPV1 channel activation and desensitization and in an in vitro model of epileptiform activity. Patch clamp analysis in transfected HEK293 cells demonstrated that CBD and CBDV dose-dependently activate and rapidly desensitize TRPV1, as well as TRP channels of subfamily V type 2 (TRPV2) and subfamily A type 1 (TRPA1). TRPV1 and TRPV2 transcripts were shown to be expressed in rat hippocampal tissue. When tested on epileptiform neuronal spike activity in hippocampal brain slices exposed to a Mg(2+)-free solution using multielectrode arrays (MEAs), CBDV reduced both epileptiform burst amplitude and duration. The prototypical TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, produced similar, although not identical effects. Capsaicin, but not CBDV, effects on burst amplitude were reversed by IRTX, a selective TRPV1 antagonist. These data suggest that CBDV antiepileptiform effects in the Mg(2+)-free model are not uniquely mediated via activation of TRPV1. However, TRPV1 was strongly phosphorylated (and hence likely sensitized) in Mg(2+)-free solution-treated hippocampal tissue, and both capsaicin and CBDV caused TRPV1 dephosphorylation, consistent with TRPV1 desensitization. We propose that CBDV effects on TRP channels should be studied further in different in vitro and in vivo models of epilepsy.

  4. Functionally important amino acid residues in the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel – an overview of the current mutational data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to create an overview of the currently available results of site-directed mutagenesis studies on transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. Systematization of the vast number of data on the functionally important amino acid mutations of TRPV1 may provide a clearer picture of this field, and may promote a better understanding of the relationship between the structure and function of TRPV1. The review summarizes information on 112 unique mutated sites along the TRPV1, exchanged to multiple different residues in many cases. These mutations influence the effect or binding of different agonists, antagonists, and channel blockers, alter the responsiveness to heat, acid, and voltage dependence, affect the channel pore characteristics, and influence the regulation of the receptor function by phosphorylation, glycosylation, calmodulin, PIP2, ATP, and lipid binding. The main goal of this paper is to publish the above mentioned data in a form that facilitates in silico molecular modelling of the receptor by promoting easier establishment of boundary conditions. The better understanding of the structure-function relationship of TRPV1 may promote discovery of new, promising, more effective and safe drugs for treatment of neurogenic inflammation and pain-related diseases and may offer new opportunities for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23800232

  5. A novel 3-(4,5-diphenyl-1,3-oxazol-2-yl)propanal oxime compound is a potent Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 and Vanilloid 1 (TRPA1 and V1) receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Payrits, M; Sághy, É; Mátyus, P; Czompa, A; Ludmerczki, R; Deme, R; Sándor, Z; Helyes, Zs; Szőke, É

    2016-06-02

    Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 and Vanilloid 1 (TRPA1, TRPV1) ion channels expressed on nociceptive primary sensory neurons are important regulators of pain and inflammation. TRPA1 is activated by several inflammatory mediators including formaldehyde and methylglyoxal that are products of the semicarbazide-sensitive amine-oxidase enzyme (SSAO). SZV-1287 is a new 3-(4,5-diphenyl-1,3-oxazol-2-yl)propanal oxime SSAO inhibitor, its chemical structure is similar to other oxime derivatives described as TRPA1 antagonists. Therefore, we investigated its effects on TRPA1 and TRPV1 receptor activation on the cell bodies and peripheral terminals of primary sensory neurons and TRPA1 or TRPV1 receptor-expressing cell lines. Calcium influx in response to the TRPA1 agonist allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC) (200 μM) and the TRPV1 stimulator capsaicin (330 nM) in rat trigeminal neurons or TRPA1 and TRPV1 receptor-expressing cell lines was measured by microfluorimetry or radioactive (45)Ca(2+) uptake experiments. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release as the indicator of 100 μM AITC - or 100 nM capsaicin-induced peripheral sensory nerve terminal activation was measured by radioimmunoassay. SZV-1287 (100, 500 and 1000 nM) exerted a concentration-dependent significant inhibition on both AITC- and capsaicin-evoked calcium influx in trigeminal neurons and TRPA1 or TRPV1 receptor-expressing cell lines. It also significantly inhibited the TRPA1, but not the TRPV1 activation-induced CGRP release from the peripheral sensory nerve endings in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, the reference SSAO inhibitor LJP 1207 with a different structure had no effect on TRPA1 or TRPV1 activation in either model system. This is the first evidence that our novel oxime compound SZV-1287 originally developed as a SSAO inhibitor has a potent dual antagonistic action on TRPA1 and TRPV1 ion channels on primary sensory neurons. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  6. Visualization by High Resolution Immunoelectron Microscopy of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 at Inhibitory Synapses of the Mouse Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Canduela, Miren-Josune; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Puente, Nagore; Reguero, Leire; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Ramos-Uriarte, Almudena; Gerrikagoitia, Inmaculada; Grandes, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), a non-selective cation channel in the peripheral and central nervous system, is localized at postsynaptic sites of the excitatory perforant path synapses in the hippocampal dentate molecular layer (ML). In the present work, we have studied the distribution of TRPV1 at inhibitory synapses in the ML. With this aim, a preembedding immunogold method for high resolution electron microscopy was applied to mouse hippocampus. About 30% of the inhibitory synapses in the ML are TRPV1 immunopositive, which is mostly localized perisynaptically (∼60% of total immunoparticles) at postsynaptic dendritic membranes receiving symmetric synapses in the inner 1/3 of the layer. This TRPV1 pattern distribution is not observed in the ML of TRPV1 knock-out mice. These findings extend the knowledge of the subcellular localization of TRPV1 to inhibitory synapses of the dentate molecular layer where the channel, in addition to excitatory synapses, is present. PMID:25775089

  7. Visualization by high resolution immunoelectron microscopy of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 at inhibitory synapses of the mouse dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Canduela, Miren-Josune; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Puente, Nagore; Reguero, Leire; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Ramos-Uriarte, Almudena; Gerrikagoitia, Inmaculada; Grandes, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), a non-selective cation channel in the peripheral and central nervous system, is localized at postsynaptic sites of the excitatory perforant path synapses in the hippocampal dentate molecular layer (ML). In the present work, we have studied the distribution of TRPV1 at inhibitory synapses in the ML. With this aim, a preembedding immunogold method for high resolution electron microscopy was applied to mouse hippocampus. About 30% of the inhibitory synapses in the ML are TRPV1 immunopositive, which is mostly localized perisynaptically (∼60% of total immunoparticles) at postsynaptic dendritic membranes receiving symmetric synapses in the inner 1/3 of the layer. This TRPV1 pattern distribution is not observed in the ML of TRPV1 knock-out mice. These findings extend the knowledge of the subcellular localization of TRPV1 to inhibitory synapses of the dentate molecular layer where the channel, in addition to excitatory synapses, is present.

  8. Loss of function of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) genetic variant is associated with lower risk of active childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Cantero-Recasens, Gerard; Gonzalez, Juan R; Fandos, César; Duran-Tauleria, Enric; Smit, Lidwien A M; Kauffmann, Francine; Antó, Josep M; Valverde, Miguel A

    2010-09-03

    Transient receptor potential cation channels of the vanilloid subfamily (TRPV) participate in the generation of Ca(2+) signals at different locations of the respiratory system, thereby controlling its correct functioning. TRPV1 expression and activity appear to be altered under pathophysiological conditions such as chronic cough and airway hypersensitivity, whereas TRPV4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, to date, there is no information about the genetic impact of either TRPV1 or TRPV4 on asthma pathophysiology. We now report on the association of two functional SNPs, TRPV1-I585V and TRPV4-P19S, with childhood asthma. Both SNPs were genotyped in a population of 470 controls without respiratory symptoms and 301 asthmatics. Although none of the SNPs modified the risk of suffering from asthma, carriers of the TRPV1-I585V genetic variant showed a lower risk of current wheezing (odds ratio = 0.51; p = 0.01), a characteristic of active asthma, or cough (odds ratio = 0.57; p = 0.02). Functional analysis of TRPV1-I585V, using the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye fura-2 to measure intracellular [Ca(2+)] concentrations, revealed a decreased channel activity in response to two typical TRPV1 stimuli, heat and capsaicin. On the other hand, TRPV4-P19S, despite its loss-of-channel function, showed no significant association with asthma or the presence of wheezing. Our data suggest that genetically determined level of TRPV1 activity is relevant for asthma pathophysiology.

  9. Analysis of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in frogs and lizards illuminates both nociceptive heat and chemical sensitivities and coexpression with TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in ancestral vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigeru; Nakatsuka, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Kenji; Fukuta, Naomi; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Ohta, Toshio; Tominaga, Makoto

    2012-08-31

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and TRP vanilloid 1 (V1) perceive noxious temperatures and chemical stimuli and are involved in pain sensation in mammals. Thus, these two channels provide a model for understanding how different genes with similar biological roles may influence the function of one another during the course of evolution. However, the temperature sensitivity of TRPA1 in ancestral vertebrates and its evolutionary path are unknown as its temperature sensitivities vary among different vertebrate species. To elucidate the functional evolution of TRPA1, TRPA1s of the western clawed (WC) frogs and green anole lizards were characterized. WC frog TRPA1 was activated by heat and noxious chemicals that activate mammalian TRPA1. These stimuli also activated native sensory neurons and elicited nocifensive behaviors in WC frogs. Similar to mammals, TRPA1 was functionally co-expressed with TRPV1, another heat- and chemical-sensitive nociceptive receptor, in native sensory neurons of the WC frog. Green anole TRPA1 was also activated by heat and noxious chemical stimulation. These results suggest that TRPA1 was likely a noxious heat and chemical receptor and co-expressed with TRPV1 in the nociceptive sensory neurons of ancestral vertebrates. Conservation of TRPV1 heat sensitivity throughout vertebrate evolution could have changed functional constraints on TRPA1 and influenced the functional evolution of TRPA1 regarding temperature sensitivity, whereas conserving its noxious chemical sensitivity. In addition, our results also demonstrated that two mammalian TRPA1 inhibitors elicited different effect on the TRPA1s of WC frogs and green anoles, which can be utilized to clarify the structural bases for inhibition of TRPA1.

  10. Analysis of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in Frogs and Lizards Illuminates Both Nociceptive Heat and Chemical Sensitivities and Coexpression with TRP Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in Ancestral Vertebrates*

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Shigeru; Nakatsuka, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Kenji; Fukuta, Naomi; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Ohta, Toshio; Tominaga, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and TRP vanilloid 1 (V1) perceive noxious temperatures and chemical stimuli and are involved in pain sensation in mammals. Thus, these two channels provide a model for understanding how different genes with similar biological roles may influence the function of one another during the course of evolution. However, the temperature sensitivity of TRPA1 in ancestral vertebrates and its evolutionary path are unknown as its temperature sensitivities vary among different vertebrate species. To elucidate the functional evolution of TRPA1, TRPA1s of the western clawed (WC) frogs and green anole lizards were characterized. WC frog TRPA1 was activated by heat and noxious chemicals that activate mammalian TRPA1. These stimuli also activated native sensory neurons and elicited nocifensive behaviors in WC frogs. Similar to mammals, TRPA1 was functionally co-expressed with TRPV1, another heat- and chemical-sensitive nociceptive receptor, in native sensory neurons of the WC frog. Green anole TRPA1 was also activated by heat and noxious chemical stimulation. These results suggest that TRPA1 was likely a noxious heat and chemical receptor and co-expressed with TRPV1 in the nociceptive sensory neurons of ancestral vertebrates. Conservation of TRPV1 heat sensitivity throughout vertebrate evolution could have changed functional constraints on TRPA1 and influenced the functional evolution of TRPA1 regarding temperature sensitivity, whereas conserving its noxious chemical sensitivity. In addition, our results also demonstrated that two mammalian TRPA1 inhibitors elicited different effect on the TRPA1s of WC frogs and green anoles, which can be utilized to clarify the structural bases for inhibition of TRPA1. PMID:22791718

  11. Targeting fatty acid amide hydrolase and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 simultaneously to modulate colonic motility and visceral sensation in the mouse: A pharmacological intervention with N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT).

    PubMed

    Bashashati, M; Fichna, J; Piscitelli, F; Capasso, R; Izzo, A A; Sibaev, A; Timmermans, J-P; Cenac, N; Vergnolle, N; Di Marzo, V; Storr, M

    2017-07-11

    Endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) inhibits intestinal motility and visceral pain, but it may also be proalgesic through transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). AEA is degraded by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). This study explored whether dual inhibition of FAAH and TRPV1 reduces diarrhea and abdominal pain. Immunostaining was performed on myenteric plexus of the mouse colon. The effects of the dual FAAH/TRPV1 inhibitor AA-5-HT on electrically induced contractility, excitatory junction potential (EJP) and fast (f) and slow (s) inhibitory junction potentials (IJP) in the mouse colon, colonic propulsion and visceromotor response (VMR) to rectal distension were studied. The colonic levels of endocannabinoids and fatty acid amides were measured. CB1-positive neurons exhibited TRPV1; only some TRPV1 positive neurons did not express CB1. CB1 and FAAH did not colocalize. AA-5-HT (100 nM-10 μM) decreased colonic contractility by ~60%; this effect was abolished by TRPV1 antagonist 5'-IRTX, but not by CB1 antagonist, SR141716. AA-5-HT (1 μM-10 μM) inhibited EJP by ~30% and IJPs by ~50%. The effects of AA-5-HT on junction potentials were reversed by SR141716 and 5`-IRTX. AA-5-HT (20 mg/kg; i.p.) inhibited colonic propulsion by ~30%; SR141716 but not 5`-IRTX reversed this effect. AA-5-HT decreased VMR by ~50%-60%; these effects were not blocked by SR141716 or 5`-IRTX. AA-5-HT increased AEA in the colon. The effects of AA-5-HT on visceral sensation and colonic motility are differentially mediated by CB1, TRPV1 and non-CB1/TRPV1 mechanisms, possibly reflecting the distinct neuromodulatory roles of endocannabinoid and endovanilloid FAAH substrates in the mouse intestine. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) participate in visceral hyperalgesia in chronic water avoidance stress rat model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan-Bo; Yang, Jing; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Gao, Li-Jun; Wang, Peng; Li, Yan-Qing

    2010-05-01

    Stressfull life events have powerful influences on visceral perception of certain IBS patients. In the present study, we aimed to examine the involvement of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in the stress-induced visceral hyperalgesia. Rats were exposed to 1-h water avoidance stress (WAS) daily for 10 consecutive days. The abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) to colorectal distension was assessed at the end of the 10-day period. Western-blotting analysis was applied to investigate the alterations of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in the colonic afferent dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Compared with control rats, the WAS-treated rats demonstrated a significant increase in the AWR with the pressure > or = 40 mm Hg (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, in the WAS-treated rats, western-blotting analysis showed significant upregulation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in the colonic afferent DRG. The results indicate that WAS could induce the upregulation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in the colonic afferent DRG, and both receptors may be candidate molecules involved in the stress-induced visceral hyperalgesia in rats.

  13. Pharmacology and antitussive efficacy of 4-(3-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-piperazine-1-carboxylic acid (5-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-amide (JNJ17203212), a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonist in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; Scott, Brian P; Nasser, Nadia; Ao, Hong; Maher, Michael P; Dubin, Adrienne E; Swanson, Devin M; Shankley, Nigel P; Wickenden, Alan D; Chaplan, Sandra R

    2007-11-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) plays an integral role in modulating the cough reflex, and it is an attractive antitussive drug target. The purpose of this study was to characterize a TRPV1 antagonist, 4-(3-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-piperazine-1-carboxylic acid (5-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-amide (JNJ17203212), against the guinea pig TRPV1 receptor in vitro followed by a proof-of-principle study in an acid-induced model of cough. The affinity of JNJ17203212 for the recombinant guinea pig TRPV1 receptor was estimated by radioligand binding, and it was functionally characterized by antagonism of low-pH and capsaicin-induced activation of the ion channel (fluorometric imaging plate reader and electrophysiology). The nature of antagonism was further tested against the native channel in isolated guinea pig tracheal rings. Following pharmacokinetic characterization of JNJ17203212 in guinea pigs, pharmacodynamic and efficacy studies were undertaken to establish the antitussive efficacy of the TRPV1 antagonist. The pK(i) of JNJ17203212 for recombinant guinea pig TRPV1 was 7.14 +/- 0.06. JNJ17203212 inhibited both pH (pIC(50) of 7.23 +/- 0.05) and capsaicin (pIC(50) of 6.32 +/- 0.06)-induced channel activation. In whole-cell patch clamp, the pIC(50) for inhibition of guinea pig TRPV1 was 7.3 +/- 0.01. JNJ17203212 demonstrated surmountable antagonism in isolated trachea, with a pK(B) value of 6.2 +/- 0.1. Intraperitoneal administration of 20 mg/kg JNJ17203212 achieved a maximal plasma exposure of 8.0 +/- 0.4 microM, and it attenuated capsaicin evoked coughs with similar efficacy to codeine (25 mg/kg). Last, JNJ17203212 dose-dependently produced antitussive efficacy in citric acid-induced experimental cough in guinea pigs. Our data provide preclinical support for developing TRPV1 antagonists for the treatment of cough.

  14. SA13353 (1-[2-(1-Adamantyl)ethyl]-1-pentyl-3-[3-(4-pyridyl)propyl]urea) inhibits TNF-alpha production through the activation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons mediated via transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masaaki; Tsuji, Fumio; Nose, Masafumi; Seki, Iwao; Oki, Kenji; Setoguchi, Chikako; Suhara, Hiroshi; Sasano, Minoru; Aono, Hiroyuki

    2008-07-07

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is known to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. In the present study, we demonstrate the effects of SA13353 (1-[2-(1-Adamantyl)ethyl]-1-pentyl-3-[3-(4-pyridyl)propyl]urea), a novel orally active inhibitor of TNF-alpha production, in animal models, and its mechanism of action on TNF-alpha production. SA13353 significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF-alpha production in a dose-dependent manner in rats. Moreover, SA13353 exhibited a binding affinity for the rat vanilloid receptor and increased neuropeptide release from the rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. However, its effects were blocked by pretreatment with the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine. The ability of SA13353 and capsaicin to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-alpha production was eliminated by sensory denervation or capsazepine pretreatment in vivo. Although they inhibited LPS-induced TNF-alpha production in mice, these effects were not observed in TRPV1 knockout mice. SA13353 provoked the release of neuropeptides without nerve inactivation, even when chronically administered to rats. These results suggest that SA13353 inhibits TNF-alpha production through activation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons mediated via TRPV1 in vivo. Post-onset treatment of SA13353 strongly reduced the hindpaw swelling and joint destruction associated with collagen-induced arthritis in rats. Thus, SA13353 is expected to be a novel anti-arthritic agent with a unique mechanism of action.

  15. Non-vanillyl resiniferatoxin analogues as potent and metabolically stable transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun-Kyung; Choi, Sun; Lee, Yoonji; Kang, Dong Wook; Ryu, HyungChul; Maeng, Han-Joo; Chung, Suk-Jae; Pavlyukovets, Vladimir A.; Pearce, Larry V.; Toth, Attila; Tran, Richard; Wang, Yun; Morgan, Matthew A.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Lee, Jeewoo

    2009-01-01

    A series of non-vanillyl resiniferatoxin analogues, having 4-methylsulfonylaminophenyl and fluorophenyl moieties as vanillyl surrogates, have been investigated as ligands for rat TRPV1 heterologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Although lacking the metabolically problematic 4-hydroxy substituent on the A-region phenyl ring, the compounds retained substantial agonist potency. Indeed, the 3-methoxy-4-methylsulfonylaminophenyl analog (1) was modestly (2.5-fold) more potent than RTX, with an EC50 = 0.106 nM. Further, it resembled RTX in its kinetics and pattern of stimulation of the levels of intracellular calcium in individual cells, as revealed by imaging. Compound 1 displayed modestly enhanced in vitro stability in rat liver microsomes and in plasma, suggesting that it might be a pharmacokinetically more favorable surrogate of resiniferatoxin. Molecular modeling analyses with selected analogues provide evidence that the conformational differences could affect their binding affinities, especially for the ester versus amide at the B-region. PMID:19135377

  16. Discovery of novel 5,5-diarylpentadienamides as orally available transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Saku, Osamu; Ishida, Hiroshi; Atsumi, Eri; Sugimoto, Yoshiyuki; Kodaira, Hiroshi; Kato, Yoshimitsu; Shirakura, Shiro; Nakasato, Yoshisuke

    2012-04-12

    We have developed a novel and potent chemical series of 5,5-diphenylpentadienamides for targeting TRPV1 in vitro and in vivo. In this investigation, we examined a variety of replacements for the 5-position of dienamides with the goal of addressing issues related to pharmacokinetics. Our data suggest that substitution with alkoxy groups on the phenyl ring at the 5-position increases their ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. This investigation culminated in the discovery of compound (R)-36b, which showed a good pharmacokinetic profile. In vivo, compound (R)-36b was found to be effective at reversing mechanical allodynia in rats in a dose-dependent manner, and it reversed thermal hyperalgesia in a model of neuropathic pain induced by sciatic nerve injury. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  17. Transient receptor potential channel polymorphisms are associated with the somatosensory function in neuropathic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Binder, Andreas; May, Denisa; Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph; Tölle, Thomas R; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Berthele, Achim; Faltraco, Frank; Flor, Herta; Gierthmühlen, Janne; Haenisch, Sierk; Huge, Volker; Magerl, Walter; Maihöfner, Christian; Richter, Helmut; Rolke, Roman; Scherens, Andrea; Uçeyler, Nurcan; Ufer, Mike; Wasner, Gunnar; Zhu, Jihong; Cascorbi, Ingolf

    2011-03-29

    Transient receptor potential channels are important mediators of thermal and mechanical stimuli and play an important role in neuropathic pain. The contribution of hereditary variants in the genes of transient receptor potential channels to neuropathic pain is unknown. We investigated the frequency of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, transient receptor potential melastin 8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and their impact on somatosensory abnormalities in neuropathic pain patients. Within the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (Deutscher Forscbungsverbund Neuropathischer Schmerz) 371 neuropathic pain patients were phenotypically characterized using standardized quantitative sensory testing. Pyrosequencing was employed to determine a total of eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms in transient receptor potential channel genes of the neuropathic pain patients and a cohort of 253 German healthy volunteers. Associations of quantitative sensory testing parameters and single nucleotide polymorphisms between and within groups and subgroups, based on sensory phenotypes, were analyzed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms frequencies did not differ between both the cohorts. However, in neuropathic pain patients transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 710G>A (rs920829, E179K) was associated with the presence of paradoxical heat sensation (p = 0.03), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G (rs8065080, I585V) with cold hypoalgesia (p = 0.0035). Two main subgroups characterized by preserved (1) and impaired (2) sensory function were identified. In subgroup 1 transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G led to significantly less heat hyperalgesia, pinprick hyperalgesia and mechanical hypaesthesia (p = 0.006, p = 0.005 and p<0.001) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1103C>G (rs222747, M315I) to cold hypaesthesia (p = 0.002), but there was absence of associations in subgroup 2. In

  18. Transient Receptor Potential Channel Polymorphisms Are Associated with the Somatosensory Function in Neuropathic Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph; Tölle, Thomas R.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Berthele, Achim; Faltraco, Frank; Flor, Herta; Gierthmühlen, Janne; Haenisch, Sierk; Huge, Volker; Magerl, Walter; Maihöfner, Christian; Richter, Helmut; Rolke, Roman; Scherens, Andrea; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Ufer, Mike; Wasner, Gunnar; Zhu, Jihong; Cascorbi, Ingolf

    2011-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channels are important mediators of thermal and mechanical stimuli and play an important role in neuropathic pain. The contribution of hereditary variants in the genes of transient receptor potential channels to neuropathic pain is unknown. We investigated the frequency of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, transient receptor potential melastin 8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and their impact on somatosensory abnormalities in neuropathic pain patients. Within the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (Deutscher Forscbungsverbund Neuropathischer Schmerz) 371 neuropathic pain patients were phenotypically characterized using standardized quantitative sensory testing. Pyrosequencing was employed to determine a total of eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms in transient receptor potential channel genes of the neuropathic pain patients and a cohort of 253 German healthy volunteers. Associations of quantitative sensory testing parameters and single nucleotide polymorphisms between and within groups and subgroups, based on sensory phenotypes, were analyzed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms frequencies did not differ between both the cohorts. However, in neuropathic pain patients transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 710G>A (rs920829, E179K) was associated with the presence of paradoxical heat sensation (p = 0.03), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G (rs8065080, I585V) with cold hypoalgesia (p = 0.0035). Two main subgroups characterized by preserved (1) and impaired (2) sensory function were identified. In subgroup 1 transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G led to significantly less heat hyperalgesia, pinprick hyperalgesia and mechanical hypaesthesia (p = 0.006, p = 0.005 and p<0.001) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1103C>G (rs222747, M315I) to cold hypaesthesia (p = 0.002), but there was absence of associations in subgroup 2. In

  19. Changes in Gene Expression Patterns of Circadian-Clock, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 and Nerve Growth Factor in Inflamed Human Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chien-Lin; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Shieh, Kun-Ruey

    2015-09-04

    Circadian rhythm is driven by the molecular circadian-clock system and regulates many physiological functions. Diurnal rhythms in the gastrointestinal tract are known to be related to feeding pattern, but whether these rhythms are also related to the gastrointestinal damage or injuries; for example, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is unclear. This study was conducted to determine whether expression of circadian-clock genes or factors involved in vagal stimulation or sensitization were altered in the esophagus of GERD patients. Diurnal patterns of PER1, PER2, BMAL1, CRY2, TRPV1, and NGF mRNA expression were found in patient controls, and these patterns were altered and significantly correlated to the GERD severity in GERD patients. Although levels of CRY1, TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF, and TAC1 mRNA expression did not show diurnal patterns, they were elevated and also correlated with GERD severity in GERD patients. Finally, strong correlations among PER1, TRPV1, NGF and CRY2 mRNA expression, and among PER2, TRPV1 and CRY2 expression were found. Expression levels of CRY1 mRNA highly correlated with levels of TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF and TAC1. This study suggests that the circadian rhythm in the esophagus may be important for the mediation of and/or the response to erosive damage in GERD patients.

  20. Changes in Gene Expression Patterns of Circadian-Clock, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 and Nerve Growth Factor in Inflamed Human Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chien-Lin; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Shieh, Kun-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythm is driven by the molecular circadian-clock system and regulates many physiological functions. Diurnal rhythms in the gastrointestinal tract are known to be related to feeding pattern, but whether these rhythms are also related to the gastrointestinal damage or injuries; for example, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is unclear. This study was conducted to determine whether expression of circadian-clock genes or factors involved in vagal stimulation or sensitization were altered in the esophagus of GERD patients. Diurnal patterns of PER1, PER2, BMAL1, CRY2, TRPV1, and NGF mRNA expression were found in patient controls, and these patterns were altered and significantly correlated to the GERD severity in GERD patients. Although levels of CRY1, TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF, and TAC1 mRNA expression did not show diurnal patterns, they were elevated and also correlated with GERD severity in GERD patients. Finally, strong correlations among PER1, TRPV1, NGF and CRY2 mRNA expression, and among PER2, TRPV1 and CRY2 expression were found. Expression levels of CRY1 mRNA highly correlated with levels of TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF and TAC1. This study suggests that the circadian rhythm in the esophagus may be important for the mediation of and/or the response to erosive damage in GERD patients. PMID:26337663

  1. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome: potential mechanisms for the benefit of capsaicin and hot water hydrotherapy in treatment.

    PubMed

    Richards, John R; Lapoint, Jeff M; Burillo-Putze, Guillermo

    2017-07-21

    Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome is a clinical disorder that has become more prevalent with increasing use of cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids, and which is difficult to treat. Standard antiemetics commonly fail to alleviate the severe nausea and vomiting characteristic of the syndrome. Curiously, cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome patients often report dramatic relief of symptoms with hot showers and baths, and topical capsaicin. In this review, we detail the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of capsaicin and explore possible mechanisms for its beneficial effect, including activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and neurohumoral regulation. Putative mechanisms responsible for the benefit of hot water hydrotherapy are also investigated. An extensive search of PubMed, OpenGrey, and Google Scholar from inception to April 2017 was performed to identify known and theoretical thermoregulatory mechanisms associated with the endocannabinoid system. The searches resulted in 2417 articles. These articles were screened for relevant mechanisms behind capsaicin and heat activation having potential antiemetic effects. References from the selected articles were also hand-searched. A total of 137 articles were considered relevant and included. Capsaicin: Topical capsaicin is primarily used for treatment of neuropathic pain, but it has also been used successfully in some 20 cases of cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of capsaicin as a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 agonist may explain this effect. Topical capsaicin has a longer half-life than oral administration, thus its potential duration of benefit is longer. Capsaicin and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1: Topical capsaicin binds and activates the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor, triggering influx of calcium and sodium, as well as release of inflammatory neuropeptides leading to transient burning, stinging, and itching. This elicits

  2. Roles of transient receptor potential channels in pain

    PubMed Central

    Stucky, Cheryl L.; Dubin, Adrienne E.; Jeske, Nathaniel A.; Malin, Sacha A.; McKemy, David D.; Story, Gina M.

    2009-01-01

    Pain perception begins with the activation of primary sensory nociceptors. Over the past decade, flourishing research has revealed that members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channel family are fundamental molecules that detect noxious stimuli and transduce a diverse range of physical and chemical energy into action potentials in somatosensory nociceptors. Here we highlight the roles of TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), TRP melastatin 8 (TRPM8) and TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in the activation of nociceptors by heat and cold environmental stimuli, mechanical force, and by chemicals including exogenous plant and environmental compounds as well as endogenous inflammatory molecules. The contribution of these channels to pain and somatosensation is discussed at levels ranging from whole animal behavior to molecular modulation by intracellular signaling proteins. An emerging theme is that TRP channels are not simple ion channel transducers of one or two stimuli, but instead serve multidimensional roles in signaling sensory stimuli that are exceptionally diverse in modality and in their environmental milieu. PMID:19203589

  3. [Role of Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Paclitaxel- and Oxaliplatin-induced Peripheral Neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kyoji

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common adverse effect of paclitaxel and oxaliplatin treatment. The major dose-limiting side effect of these drugs is peripheral sensory neuropathy. The symptoms of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy are mostly sensory and peripheral in nature, consisting of mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia, tingling, and numbness. Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity manifests as rapid-onset neuropathic symptoms that are exacerbated by cold exposure and as chronic neuropathy that develops after several treatment cycles. Although many basic and clinical researchers have studied anticancer drug-induced peripheral neuropathy, the mechanism is not well understood. In this review, we focus on (1) analysis of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel expression in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after paclitaxel treatment and (2) analysis of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel in the DRG after oxaliplatin treatment. This review describes that (1) paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain may be the result of up-regulation of TRPV1 in small- and medium-diameter DRG neurons. In addition, paclitaxel treatment increases the release of substance P, but not calcitonin gene-related peptide, in the superficial layers of the spinal dorsal horn. (2) TRPA1 expression via activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in small-diameter DRG neurons, at least in part, contributes to the development of oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hyperalgesia. We suggest that TRPV1 or TRPA1 antagonists may be potential therapeutic lead compounds for treating anticancer drug-induced peripheral neuropathy.

  4. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 Mediates Toluene Diisocyanate–Evoked Respiratory Irritation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Clark, Thomas E.; Kiros, Filmawit; Carr, Michael J.; McAlexander, M. Allen

    2009-01-01

    Toluene diisocyanate (TDI), a reactive, hazardous irritant, causes respiratory symptoms such as cough, rhinitis, dyspnea, and chest tightness in exposed workers. Although previous animal studies have shown that TDI causes respiratory reflexes that are abolished by desensitization of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves, the specific molecular identity of the transducer(s) responsible for sensing this noxious stimulus has, to date, remained elusive. Recent studies have demonstrated that transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), an ion channel largely restricted to a subset of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves, functions as a transducer capable of initiating reflex responses to many reactive chemical stimuli. We therefore hypothesized that TRPA1 is the primary molecular transducer through which TDI causes sensory nerve activation and respiratory reflexes. Consistent with this hypothesis, TDI activated TRPA1, but not the capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel, in heterologous expression systems. TDI also activated a subset of dissociated trigeminal sensory neurons from wild-type but not TRPA1-deficient mice. In vivo, TDI mimicked known TRPA1 agonists by causing a pronounced decrease in breathing rate, indicative of respiratory sensory irritation, and this reflex was abolished in TRPA1-deficient mice. Together, our data suggest that TDI causes sensory nerve activation and airway sensory irritation via the activation of the ion channel, TRPA1. PMID:19059884

  5. Development of PAC-14028, a novel transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel antagonist as a new drug for refractory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyung-Min; Park, Young-Ho

    2012-03-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a member of nonselective cation channels and has been implicated in the progression of neurogenic inflammation and nociception. Through the synthesis of over 2,000 new compounds, a novel non-vanilloid TRPV1 antagonist PAC-14028 was discovered. As well as ideal physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties, PAC-14028 showed meaningful efficacies against diverse disease models that include visceral pain, inflammatory bowel disease, and inflammatory pain. Of note, PAC-14028 effectively attenuates atopic dermatitis and pruritus without significant adverse effects, which is a substantial benefit over conventional pharmacotherapy. This report introduces the potential of a novel TRPV1 antagonist PAC-14028 as a new drug for atopic dermatitis and pruritus.

  6. Effects of transient receptor potential-like current on the firing pattern of action potentials in the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron during exposure to sinusoidal external voltage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing-Shuo; Lo, Yi-Ching; Lius, Yen-Chin; Wu, Sheng-Nan

    2010-12-31

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channels play a role in several inflammatory and nociceptive processes. Previous work showed that magnetic electrical field-induced antinociceptive [corrected] action is mediated by activation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferents. In this study, a modified Hodgkin-Huxley model, in which TRP-like current (ITRP) was incorporated, was implemented to predict the firing behavior of action potentials (APs), as the model neuron was exposed to sinusoidal changes in externally-applied voltage. When model neuron is exposed to low-frequency sinusoidal voltage, increased maximal conductance of ITRP can enhance repetitive bursts of APs accompanied by a shortening of inter-spike interval (ISI) in AP firing. The change in ISIs with number of interval is periodic with the phase-locking. In addition, increased maximal conductance of ITRP can abolish chaotic pattern of AP firing in model neuron during exposure to high-frequency voltage. The ISI pattern is converted from irregular to constant, as maximal conductance of ITRP is increased under such high-frequency voltage. Our simulation results suggest that modulation of TRP-like channels functionally expressed in small-diameter peripheral sensory neurons should be an important mechanism through which it can contribute to the firing pattern of APs.

  7. Structural determinants of the transient receptor potential 1 (TRPV1) channel activation by phospholipid analogs.

    PubMed

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernández-García, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-08-29

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 °C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position Δ9, 10, or 11 and Δ9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Structural Determinants of the Transient Receptor Potential 1 (TRPV1) Channel Activation by Phospholipid Analogs*

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L.; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernández-García, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 °C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position Δ9, 10, or 11 and Δ9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1. PMID:25035428

  9. Sensory nerve terminal mitochondrial dysfunction activates airway sensory nerves via transient receptor potential (TRP) channels.

    PubMed

    Nesuashvili, Lika; Hadley, Stephen H; Bahia, Parmvir K; Taylor-Clark, Thomas E

    2013-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent oxidative stress has been reported for a variety of cell types in inflammatory diseases. Given the abundance of mitochondria at the peripheral terminals of sensory nerves and the sensitivity of transient receptor potential (TRP) ankyrin 1 (A1) and TRP vanilloid 1 (V1) to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their downstream products of lipid peroxidation, we investigated the effect of nerve terminal mitochondrial dysfunction on airway sensory nerve excitability. Here we show that mitochondrial dysfunction evoked by acute treatment with antimycin A (mitochondrial complex III Qi site inhibitor) preferentially activated TRPA1-expressing "nociceptor-like" mouse bronchopulmonary C-fibers. Action potential discharge was reduced by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Inhibition of TRPV1 further reduced C-fiber activation. In mouse dissociated vagal neurons, antimycin A induced Ca(2+) influx that was significantly reduced by pharmacological inhibition or genetic knockout of either TRPA1 or TRPV1. Inhibition of both TRPA1 and TRPV1 was required to abolish antimycin A-induced Ca(2+) influx in vagal neurons. Using an HEK293 cell expression system, antimycin A induced concentration-dependent activation of both hTRPA1 and hTRPV1 but failed to activate nontransfected cells. Myxothiazol (complex III Qo site inhibitor) inhibited antimycin A-induced TRPA1 activation, as did the reducing agent dithiothreitol. Scavenging of both superoxide and hydrogen peroxide inhibited TRPA1 activation following mitochondrial modulation. In conclusion, we present evidence that acute mitochondrial dysfunction activates airway sensory nerves preferentially via TRPA1 through the actions of mitochondrially-derived ROS. This represents a novel mechanism by which inflammation may be transduced into nociceptive electrical signaling.

  10. Alterations in serotonin, transient receptor potential channels and protease-activated receptors in rats with irritable bowel syndrome attenuated by Shugan decoction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai-Lian; Liu, Chu-Hsuan; Ding, Li-Li; Zheng, Yu; Fei, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Lu; Zhou, Xue-Ming; Yuan, Jian-Ye; Xie, Jian-Qun

    2015-04-28

    To determine the molecular mechanisms of Shugan decoction (SGD) in the regulation of colonic motility and visceral hyperalgesia (VHL) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The chemical compounds contained in SGD were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. A rat model of IBS was induced by chronic water avoidance stress (WAS). The number of fecal pellets was counted after WAS and the pain pressure threshold was measured by colorectal distension. Morphological changes in colonic mucosa were detected by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The contents of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in colonic tissue and calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) in serum were measured by ELISA. The protein expression of serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamide (5-HT)], serotonin transporter (SERT), chromogranin A (CgA) and CGRP in colon tissue was measured by immunohistochemistry. SGD inhibited colonic motility dysfunction and VHL in rats with IBS. Blockers of transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) (Ruthenium Red) and TRP ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) (HC-030031) and activator of protease-activated receptor (PAR)4 increased the pain pressure threshold, whereas activators of PAR2 and TRPV4 decreased the pain pressure threshold in rats with IBS. The effect of SGD on pain pressure threshold in these rats was abolished by activators of TRPV1 (capsaicin), TRPV4 (RN1747), TRPA1 (Polygodial) and PAR2 (AC55541). In addition, CGRP levels in serum and colonic tissue were both increased in these rats. TNF-α level in colonic tissue was also significantly upregulated. However, the levels of 5-HT, SERT and CgA in colonic tissue were decreased. All these pathological changes in rats with IBS were attenuated by SGD. SGD alleviated VHL and attenuated colon motility in IBS, partly by regulating TRPV1, TRPV4, TRPA1, PAR2, 5-HT, CgA and SERT, and reducing CGRP and TNF-α level.

  11. Alterations in serotonin, transient receptor potential channels and protease-activated receptors in rats with irritable bowel syndrome attenuated by Shugan decoction

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hai-Lian; Liu, Chu-Hsuan; Ding, Li-Li; Zheng, Yu; Fei, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Lu; Zhou, Xue-Ming; Yuan, Jian-Ye; Xie, Jian-Qun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the molecular mechanisms of Shugan decoction (SGD) in the regulation of colonic motility and visceral hyperalgesia (VHL) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: The chemical compounds contained in SGD were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. A rat model of IBS was induced by chronic water avoidance stress (WAS). The number of fecal pellets was counted after WAS and the pain pressure threshold was measured by colorectal distension. Morphological changes in colonic mucosa were detected by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The contents of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in colonic tissue and calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) in serum were measured by ELISA. The protein expression of serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamide (5-HT)], serotonin transporter (SERT), chromogranin A (CgA) and CGRP in colon tissue was measured by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: SGD inhibited colonic motility dysfunction and VHL in rats with IBS. Blockers of transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) (Ruthenium Red) and TRP ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) (HC-030031) and activator of protease-activated receptor (PAR)4 increased the pain pressure threshold, whereas activators of PAR2 and TRPV4 decreased the pain pressure threshold in rats with IBS. The effect of SGD on pain pressure threshold in these rats was abolished by activators of TRPV1 (capsaicin), TRPV4 (RN1747), TRPA1 (Polygodial) and PAR2 (AC55541). In addition, CGRP levels in serum and colonic tissue were both increased in these rats. TNF-α level in colonic tissue was also significantly upregulated. However, the levels of 5-HT, SERT and CgA in colonic tissue were decreased. All these pathological changes in rats with IBS were attenuated by SGD. CONCLUSION: SGD alleviated VHL and attenuated colon motility in IBS, partly by regulating TRPV1, TRPV4, TRPA1, PAR2, 5-HT, CgA and SERT, and reducing CGRP and TNF-α level. PMID:25944998

  12. H(2)S functions as a nociceptive messenger through transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) activation.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, H; Takahashi, K; Miura, S; Imagawa, T; Saito, S; Tominaga, M; Ohta, T

    2012-08-30

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), an endogenous gasotransmitter, modulates various biological functions, including nociception. It is known that H(2)S causes neurogenic inflammation and elicits hyperalgesia. Here we show that H(2)S activates mouse transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels and elicits acute pain, using TRPA1-gene deficient mice (TRPA1(-/-)) and heterologous expression system. In wild-type mouse sensory neurons, H(2)S increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), which was inhibited by ruthenium red (a nonselective TRP channel blocker) and HC-030031 (a TRPA1 blocker). H(2)S-responsive neurons highly corresponded to TRPA1 agonist-sensitive ones. [Ca(2+)](i) responses to H(2)S were observed in neurons from transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1(-/-)) mice but not from TRPA1(-/-) mice. Heterologously expressed mouse TRPA1, but not mouse TRPV1, was activated by H(2)S. H(2)S-induced [Ca(2+)](i) responses were inhibited by dithiothreitol, a reducing agent. Analyses of the TRPA1 mutant channel revealed that two cysteine residues located in the N-terminal internal domain were responsible for the activation by H(2)S. Intraplantar injection of H(2)S into the mouse hind paw caused acute pain which was significantly less in TRPA1(-/-) mice. The [Ca(2+)](i) responses to H(2)S in sensory neurons and in heterologously expressed channels, and pain-related behavior induced by H(2)S were enhanced under acidic conditions. These results suggest that H(2)S functions as a nociceptive messenger through the activation of TRPA1 channels. TRPA1 may be a therapeutic target for H(2)S-related algesic action, especially under inflammatory conditions.

  13. Clinical potential of GABAB receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jennifer; Kerr, David I B

    2005-01-01

    Metabotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) (GABAB) receptors for the major inhibitory transmitter GABA, together with metabotropic glutamate (mGLuRs) receptors, the extracellular calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs), some V2R pheromone receptors and T1R taste receptors, belong to the family of 3 G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GABAB receptors are known to control neuronal excitability and modulate synaptic neurotransmission, playing a very important role in many physiological activities. These receptors are widely expressed and distributed in the nervous system and have been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and pathophysiological disorders including epilepsy, spasticity, chronic pain, depression, schizophrenia and drug addiction. To form a functional receptor entity, GABAB receptors must exist as a heterodimer consisting of GABAB1 and GABAB2 receptor subtypes with two 7-transmembrane proteins, and these subunits arise from distinct genes. The GABAB1 subunit binds the endogenous ligand within its extracellular N-terminus, whilst the GABAB2 subunit is not only essential for the correct trafficking of the GABAB1 subunit to the cell surface, but is also responsible for the interaction of the receptor with its cognate G-protein. Allosteric modulation has recently been recognized as an alternative pharmacological approach to gain selectivity in drug action. It is now generally accepted that modulators acting at the allosteric sites provide a novel perspective for the development of subtype-selective agents acting at GPCRs. These agents interact with allosteric binding sites quite separate from the highly conserved agonist binding region. In this review, we present a new class of phenylalkylamines, based on the lead compound fendiline, that are potent positive potentiators of GABAB receptor-mediated function and discuss their putative clinical applications. It is proposed that these new modulators may have therapeutic value in GABAB receptor pharmacology and

  14. The blockade of transient receptor potential ankirin 1 (TRPA1) signalling mediates antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like actions in mice

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, Juliana Cavalcante; Noroes, Maíra Macedo; Rachetti, Vanessa de Paula Soares; Soares, Bruno Lobão; Preti, Delia; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Marone, Ilaria Maddalena; Minocci, Daiana; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Gavioli, Elaine Cristina; André, Eunice

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) are involved in many biological processes, including nociception and hyperalgesia. Whereas the involvement of TRPV1 in psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression has been reported, little is known regarding the role of TRPA1 in these conditions. Experimental Approach We investigated the role of TRPA1 in mice models of depression [forced swimming test (FST)] and anxiety [elevated plus maze (EPM) test]. Key Results Administration of the TRPA1 antagonist (HC030031, 30 nmol in 2 μL, i.c.v.) reduced immobility time in the FST. Similar results were obtained after oral administration of HC030031 (30–300 mg·kg−1). The reduction in immobility time in FST induced by HC030031 (100 mg·kg−1) was completely prevented by pretreatment with TRPA1 agonist, cinnamaldehyde (50 mg·kg−1, p.o.), which per se was inactive. In the EPM test, pretreatment with cinnamaldehyde (50 mg·kg−1, p.o.), which per se did not affect behaviour response, prevented the anxiolytic-like effect (increased open arm exploration) evoked by TRPA1 blockade (HC030031, 100 mg·kg−1, p.o.). Treatment with either cinnamaldehyde or HC030031 did not affect spontaneous ambulation. Furthermore, TRPA1-deficient mice showed anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like phenotypes in the FST and EPM test respectively. Conclusion and Implications The present findings indicate that genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade of TRPA1 produces inhibitory activity in mouse models of anxiety and depression. These results imply that TRPA1 exerts tonic control, promoting anxiety and depression, and that TRPA1 antagonism has potential as an innovative strategy for the treatment of anxiety and mood disorders. PMID:24846744

  15. Expression and distribution of three transient receptor potential vanilloid(TRPV) channel proteins in human odontoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wen; Que, Kehua; Zang, Chengcheng; Wen, Jing; Sun, Guangxu; Zhao, Zhiying; Li, Yanzhong

    2017-09-13

    Odontoblasts have been suggested to contribute to nociceptive sensation in the tooth via expression of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. The TRP channels as a family of nonselective cation permeable channels play an important role in sensory transduction of human. In this study, we examined the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential vanilloid-2 (TRPV2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid-3 (TRPV3) channels in native human odontoblasts (HODs) and long-term cultured human dental pulp cells with odontoblast phenotyoe (LHOPs) obtained from healthy wisdom teeth with the use of immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF), quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR),western blotting (WB) and immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) assay. LHOPs samples were made into ultrathin sections, mounted on nickel grids, floated of three TRPV antibodies conjugated with 10 nm colloidal gold particles and observed under IEM at 60,000 magnifications. The relative intracellular distributions of these three channels were analyzed quantitatively on IEM images using a robust sampling, stereological estimation and statistical evaluation method. The results of IHC and IF convinced that TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPV3 channels were expressed in native HODs and (LHOPs). The result of qRT-PCR and WB confirmed that the gene and protein expression of TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV3 channels and TRPV1 mRNA are more abundantly expressed than TRPV2 and TRPV3 in HODs (P < 0.05). Quantitative analysis of IEM images showed that the relative intracellular distributions of these three channels are similar, and TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPV3 proteins were preferential labeled in human odontoblast processes, mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, HODs could play an important role in mediating pulp thermo-sensation due to the expression of these three TRPV channels. The difference of relative intracellular distributions of three

  16. Discovery Of An Orexin Receptor Positive Potentiator

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyong; Reddy, M. Muralidhar

    2013-01-01

    The orexin neurohormones control a variety of important physiological processes by signaling through two related G protein-coupled receptors, including appetite and feeding, wakefulness and energy homeostasis. Pharmacological manipulation of orexin signaling is an important goal. Here we describe the isolation of orexin receptor ligands from a library of microarray-displayed peptoids via a novel two-color, cell-based screen. Functional analysis of derivatives of these “hits” resulted in the development of moderate potency, low molecular weight receptor antagonists. Moreover, further optimization efforts resulted in the fortuitous discovery of a compound that positively potentiates the activity of the receptor. This compound is the first small molecule reported to up-regulate orexin signaling. PMID:24409338

  17. Lutein inhibits the function of the transient receptor potential A1 ion channel in different in vitro and in vivo models.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Györgyi; Szoke, Éva; Kemény, Ágnes; Bagoly, Teréz; Deli, József; Szente, Lajos; Pál, Szilárd; Sándor, Katalin; Szolcsányi, János; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, such as TRP vanilloid 1 and ankyrin repeat domain 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1), are expressed on primary sensory neurons. Lutein, a natural tetraterpene carotenoid, can be incorporated into membranes and might modulate TRP channels. Therefore, the effects of the water-soluble randomly methylated-β-cyclodextrin (RAMEB) complex of lutein were investigated on TRPV1 and TRPA1 activation. RAMEB-lutein (100 μM) significantly diminished Ca(2+) influx to cultured rat trigeminal neurons induced by TRPA1 activation with mustard oil, but not by TRPV1 stimulation with capsaicin, as determined with microfluorimetry. Calcitonin gene-related peptide release from afferents of isolated tracheae evoked by mustard oil, but not by capsaicin, was inhibited by RAMEB-lutein. Mustard oil-induced neurogenic mouse ear swelling was also significantly decreased by 100 μg/ml s.c. RAMEB-lutein pretreatment, while capsaicin-evoked edema was not altered. Myeloperoxidase activity indicating non-neurogenic granulocyte accumulation in the ear was not influenced by RAMEB-lutein in either case. It is concluded that lutein inhibits TRPA1, but not TRPV1 stimulation-induced responses on cell bodies and peripheral terminals of sensory neurons in vitro and in vivo. Based on these distinct actions and the carotenoid structure, the ability of lutein to modulate lipid rafts in the membrane around TRP channels can be suggested.

  18. Arresting a Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Channel

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Arun K.; Kim, Jihee; Ahn, Seungkirl; Xiao, Kunhong; Shenoy, Sudha K.; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    β-Arrestins, originally discovered to desensitize activated G protein-coupled receptors, (aka seven-transmembrane receptors, 7TMRs) also mediate 7TMR internalization and G protein-independent signaling via these receptors. More recently, several regulatory roles of β-arrestins for atypical 7TMRs and non-7TM receptors have emerged. Here, we uncover an entirely novel regulatory role of β-arrestins in cross-talk between the angiotensin receptor (AT1aR) and a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family, TRPV4. AT1aR and TRPV4 form a constitutive complex in the plasma membrane, and angiotensin stimulation leads to recruitment of β-arrestin 1 to this complex. Surprisingly, angiotensin stimulation results in ubiquitination of TRPV4, a process that requires β-arrestin 1, and subsequently to internalization and functional down-regulation of TRPV4. β-Arrestin 1 interacts with, and acts as an adaptor for AIP4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for TRPV4 ubiquitination. Thus, our data provide the first evidence of a functional link between β-arrestins and TRPV4 and uncovers an entirely novel mechanism to maintain appropriate intracellular Ca2+ concentration to avoid excessive Ca2+ signaling. PMID:20650893

  19. Role of transient receptor potential ion channels and evoked levels of neuropeptides in a formaldehyde-induced model of asthma in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; You, Huihui; Ma, Ping; Li, Li; Yuan, Ye; Li, Jinquan; Ye, Xin; Liu, Xudong; Yao, Hanchao; Chen, Ruchong; Lai, Kefang; Yang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a complex pulmonary inflammatory disease characterized by the hyper-responsiveness, remodeling and inflammation of airways. Formaldehyde is a common indoor air pollutant that can cause asthma in people experiencing long-term exposure. The irritant effect and adjuvant effect are the two possible pathways of formaldehyde promoted asthma. To explore the neural mechanisms and adjuvant effect of formaldehyde, 48 Balb/c mice in six experimental groups were exposed to (a) vehicle control; (b) ovalbumin; (c) formaldehyde (3.0 mg/m(3)); (d) ovalbumin+formaldehyde (3.0 mg/m(3)); (e) ovalbumin+formaldehyde (3.0 mg/m(3))+HC-030031 (transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 antagonist); (f) ovalbumin+formaldehyde (3.0 mg/m(3))+ capsazepine (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonist). Experiments were conducted after 4 weeks of combined exposure and 1-week challenge with aerosolized ovalbumin. Airway hyper-responsiveness, pulmonary tissue damage, eosinophil infiltration, and increased levels of interleukin-4, interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, immunoglobulin E, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in lung tissues were found in the ovalbumin+formaldehyde (3.0 mg/m(3)) group compared with the values seen in ovalbumin -only immunized mice. Except for interleukin-1β levels, other changes in the levels of biomarker could be inhibited by HC-030031 and capsazepine. Formaldehyde might be a key risk factor for the rise in asthma cases. Transient receptor potential ion channels and neuropeptides have important roles in formaldehyde promoted-asthma.

  20. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Ion Channels and Evoked Levels of Neuropeptides in a Formaldehyde-Induced Model of Asthma in Balb/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; You, Huihui; Ma, Ping; Li, Li; Yuan, Ye; Li, Jinquan; Ye, Xin; Liu, Xudong; Yao, Hanchao; Chen, Ruchong; Lai, Kefang; Yang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Objective Asthma is a complex pulmonary inflammatory disease characterized by the hyper-responsiveness, remodeling and inflammation of airways. Formaldehyde is a common indoor air pollutant that can cause asthma in people experiencing long-term exposure. The irritant effect and adjuvant effect are the two possible pathways of formaldehyde promoted asthma. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore the neural mechanisms and adjuvant effect of formaldehyde, 48 Balb/c mice in six experimental groups were exposed to (a) vehicle control; (b) ovalbumin; (c) formaldehyde (3.0 mg/m3); (d) ovalbumin+formaldehyde (3.0 mg/m3); (e) ovalbumin+formaldehyde (3.0 mg/m3)+HC-030031 (transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 antagonist); (f) ovalbumin+formaldehyde (3.0 mg/m3)+ capsazepine (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonist). Experiments were conducted after 4 weeks of combined exposure and 1-week challenge with aerosolized ovalbumin. Airway hyper-responsiveness, pulmonary tissue damage, eosinophil infiltration, and increased levels of interleukin-4, interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, immunoglobulin E, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in lung tissues were found in the ovalbumin+formaldehyde (3.0 mg/m3) group compared with the values seen in ovalbumin -only immunized mice. Except for interleukin-1β levels, other changes in the levels of biomarker could be inhibited by HC-030031 and capsazepine. Conclusions/Significance Formaldehyde might be a key risk factor for the rise in asthma cases. Transient receptor potential ion channels and neuropeptides have important roles in formaldehyde promoted-asthma. PMID:23671638

  1. 4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE): evidence of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1-dependent and -independent nociceptive and vasoactive responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Graepel, Rabea; Fernandes, Elizabeth S; Aubdool, Aisah A; Andersson, David A; Bevan, Stuart; Brain, Susan D

    2011-04-01

    This study explores the in vivo effects of the proposed transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) agonist 4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE). Pharmacological inhibitors and genetically modified mice were used to investigate the ability of 4-ONE to act via TRPA1 receptors and possible mechanisms involving transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). We hypothesized that 4-ONE activates sensory nerves, via TRPA1 or possibly TRPV1, and thus triggers mechanical hyperalgesia, edema formation, and vasodilatation in mice. An automated dynamic plantar aesthesiometer was used to determine hind paw withdrawal thresholds, and a laser Doppler flowmeter was used to measure skin blood flow. Edema formation was determined by measuring paw weights and thickness. 4-ONE (10 nmol) triggers unilateral mechanical hyperalgesia, edema formation, and vasodilatation in mice and is shown here to exhibit TRPA1-dependent and -independent effects. Neurogenic vasodilatation and mechanical hyperalgesia at 0.5 h postinjection were significantly greater in TRPA1 wild-type (WT) mice compared with TRPA1 knockout (KO) mice. Edema formation throughout the time course as well as mechanical hyperalgesia from 1 to 4 h postinjection were similar in WT and TRPA1 KO mice. Studies involving TRPV1 KO mice revealed no evidence of TRPV1 involvement or interactions between TRPA1 and TRPV1 in mediating the in vivo effects of 4-ONE. Previously, 4-ONE was shown to be a potent TRPA1 agonist in vitro. We demonstrate its ability to mediate vasodilatation and certain nociceptive effects in vivo. These data indicate the potential of TRPA1 as an oxidant sensor for vasodilator responses in vivo. However, 4-ONE also triggers TRPA1-independent effects that relate to edema formation and pain.

  2. Analysis of potassium and calcium imaging to assay the function of opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Viola; Nockemann, Dinah; Machelska, Halina

    2015-01-01

    As the activation of opioid receptors leads to the modulation of potassium and calcium channels, the ion imaging represents an attractive method to analyze the function of the receptors. Here, we describe the imaging of potassium using the FluxOR™ potassium ion channel assay, and of calcium using Fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester. Specifically, we (1) characterize the activation of the G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium 2 channel by agonists of μ- and δ-opioid receptors with the aid of the FluxOR™ assay in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, and (2) describe calcium imaging protocols to measure capsaicin-induced transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel activity during opioid withdrawal in transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells.

  3. Targeting melanocortin receptors as potential novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Getting, Stephen J

    2006-07-01

    Adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH(1-39)) and the melanocortins (alpha, beta and gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone [MSH]) are derived from a larger precursor molecule known as the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) protein. They exert their numerous biological effects by activating 7 transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), leading to adenylyl cyclase activation and subsequent cAMP accumulation within the target cell. To date, 5 melanocortin receptors (MCR) have been identified and termed MC1R to MC5R, they have been shown to have a wide and varied distribution throughout the body, being found in the central nervous system (CNS), periphery and immune cells. Melanocortins have a multitude of actions including: (i) modulating disease pathologies including arthritis, asthma, obesity; (ii) affecting functions, for example erectile dysfunction, skin tanning; and (iii) organ systems, for example cardiovascular system. Recently a mechanistic approach has been identified with alpha-MSH preventing NF-kappaB activation via the preservation and expression of IkappaBalphaprotein. This leads to a reduction of pro-inflammatory mediators including cytokines and inhibition of adhesion molecule expression, with subsequent reduction in leukocyte emigration. Development of selective ligands with an appropriate pharmacokinetic profile will enable a pharmacological evaluation of the potential beneficial effects of the melanocortins. In this review I have discussed the potential mechanistic action for the melanocortins and some of the disease pathologies shown to be modulated. This review proposes targeting the MCR with the ultimate aim of controlling many of the diseases that we face today.

  4. Transient Receptor Potential Channels in the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Earley, Scott; Brayden, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian genome encodes 28 distinct members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily of cation channels, which exhibit varying degrees of selectivity for different ionic species. Multiple TRP channels are present in all cells and are involved in diverse aspects of cellular function, including sensory perception and signal transduction. Notably, TRP channels are involved in regulating vascular function and pathophysiology, the focus of this review. TRP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells participate in regulating contractility and proliferation, whereas endothelial TRP channel activity is an important contributor to endothelium-dependent vasodilation, vascular wall permeability, and angiogenesis. TRP channels are also present in perivascular sensory neurons and astrocytic endfeet proximal to cerebral arterioles, where they participate in the regulation of vascular tone. Almost all of these functions are mediated by changes in global intracellular Ca2+ levels or subcellular Ca2+ signaling events. In addition to directly mediating Ca2+ entry, TRP channels influence intracellular Ca2+ dynamics through membrane depolarization associated with the influx of cations or through receptor- or store-operated mechanisms. Dysregulation of TRP channels is associated with vascular-related pathologies, including hypertension, neointimal injury, ischemia-reperfusion injury, pulmonary edema, and neurogenic inflammation. In this review, we briefly consider general aspects of TRP channel biology and provide an in-depth discussion of the functions of TRP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and perivascular cells under normal and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25834234

  5. Colour dependence of the early receptor potential and late receptor potential in scallop distal photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, M C; Gorman, A L

    1983-07-01

    1. Intracellular voltage and current responses to short (blue) and long (red) wave-length lights were measured in the distal hyperpolarizing photoreceptor (;off receptor') of the isolated and perfused scallop (Pecten irradians) retina.2. The early receptor potential (e.r.p.) was isolated by holding membrane potential at the reversal potential for the late receptor potential (l.r.p.) or by working at temperatures (< 5.0 degrees C) that abolished the l.r.p.3. The e.r.p., measured using intense flashes of white light, consisted of a positive phase followed by a negative phase, but was converted to a monophasic, negative-going wave following pre-adaptation with red light and to a monophasic, positive-going wave following pre-adaptation with blue light.4. The spectral sensitivity curve for the negative e.r.p. was maximum at 500 nm, whereas the spectral sensitivity curve for the positive e.r.p. was maximum at 575 nm.5. The positive or negative e.r.p.s approached their maximum amplitude exponentially when tested with red or blue flashes of increasing intensity. The results suggest that the positive (or negative) e.r.p. is proportional to the number of photopigment molecules photo-isomerized.6. The photosensitivity maximum of rhodopsin calculated at 500 nm, using the exponential constant and the spectral sensitivity data, was estimated to be 2.1 x 10(-16) cm(2) photon(-1), whereas the photosensitivity maximum of metarhodopsin calculated at 575 nm was estimated to be 2.6 x 10(-16) cm(2) photon(-1).7. In cells pre-adapted with white light, stimulation with blue light caused a hyperpolarizing l.r.p. which was followed by a prolonged hyperpolarizing after-potential (p.h.a.). Stimulation with red light under similar conditions caused an initial hyperpolarization which was followed by a small depolarization during the stimulus, but no after-potential.8. The duration of the p.h.a. was increased by pre-adaptation with a red light, which caused the maximum net transfer of

  6. Potentiation of the ionotropic GABA receptor response by whiskey fragrance.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2002-11-06

    It is well-known that the target of most mood-defining compounds is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activity in the human brain. To study the effects of whiskey fragrance on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting rat whole brain mRNA or cRNA prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors. Most whiskey components such as phenol, ethoxy, and lactone derivatives potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors, especially ethyl phenylpropanoate (EPP), which strongly potentiated the response. When this compound was applied to mice through respiration, the convulsions induced by pentetrazole were delayed, suggesting that EPP was absorbed by the brain, where it could potentiate the GABA(A) receptor responses. The extract of other alcoholic drinks such as wine, sake, brandy, and shochu also potentiated the responses to varying degrees. Although these fragrant components are present in alcoholic drinks at low concentrations (extremely small quantities compared with ethanol), they may also modulate the mood or consciousness of the human through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic fragrant compounds are easily absorbed into the brain through the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response.

  7. Evidence for the role of lipid rafts and sphingomyelin in Ca2+-gating of Transient Receptor Potential channels in trigeminal sensory neurons and peripheral nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Sághy, Éva; Szőke, Éva; Payrits, Maja; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Börzsei, Rita; Erostyák, János; Jánosi, Tibor Zoltán; Sétáló, György; Szolcsányi, János

    2015-10-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) cation channels, such as TRP Vanilloid 1 and TRP Ankyrin repeat domain 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1) are nocisensors playing important role to signal pain. Two "melastatin" TRP receptors, like TRPM8 and TRPM3 are also expressed in a subgroup of primary sensory neurons. These channels serve as thermosensors with unique thermal sensitivity ranges and are activated also by several exogenous and endogenous chemical ligands inducing conformational changes from various allosteric ("multisteric") sites. We analysed the role of plasma membrane microdomains of lipid rafts on isolated trigeminal (TRG) neurons and TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line by measuring agonist-induced Ca2+ transients with ratiometric technique. Stimulation-evoked calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release from sensory nerve endings of the isolated rat trachea by radioimmunoassay was also measured. Lipid rafts were disrupted by cleaving sphingomyelin (SM) with sphingomyelinase (SMase), cholesterol depletion with methyl β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and ganglioside breakdown with myriocin. It has been revealed that intracellular Ca2+ increase responses evoked by the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, the TRPA1 agonsits allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and formaldehyde as well as the TRPM8 activator icilin were inhibited after SMase, MCD and myriocin incubation but the response to the TRPM3 agonist pregnenolon sulphate was not altered. Extracellular SMase treatment did not influence the thapsigargin-evoked Ca2+-release from intracellular stores. Besides the cell bodies, SMase also inhibited capsaicin- or AITC-evoked CGRP release from peripheral sensory nerve terminals, this provides the first evidence for the importance of lipid raft integrity in TRPV1 and TRPA1 gating on capsaicin-sensitive nerve terminals. SM metabolites, ceramide and sphingosine, did not influence TRPA1 and TRPV1 activation on TRG neurons, TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line, and nerve terminals. We suggest, that the hydrophobic

  8. AMPA receptor potentiators for the treatment of CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Michael J; Bleakman, David; Zimmerman, Dennis M; Nisenbaum, Eric S

    2004-06-01

    Glutamate alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors mediate most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system and also participate in forms of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie memory and learning, and the formation of neural networks during development. Molecular cloning techniques have shown that the AMPA receptor family is composed of four different subunits named GluR1-4 or GluRA-D (newly termed as Glu(A1)-Glu(A4)) and native AMPA receptors are most likely tetramers generated by the assembly of one or more of these subunits, yielding homomeric or heteromeric receptors. Additional complexity among AMPA receptors is conferred by alternative splicing of RNA for each subunit giving rise to flip and flop variants. Clinical and experimental data have suggested that positive modulation of AMPA receptors may be therapeutically effective in the treatment of cognitive deficits. Several classes of AMPA receptor potentiators have been reported, including pyrroliddones (piracetam, aniracetam), benzothiazides (cyclothiazide), benzylpiperidines (CX-516, CX-546) and more recently biarylpropylsulfonamides (LY392098, LY404187 and LY503430). These molecules enhance cognitive function in rodents, which appears to correlate with increased hippocampal activity. In addition, clinical studies have suggested that AMPA receptor modulators enhance cognitive function in elderly subjects, as well as patients suffering from neurological and psychiatric disorders. Several independent studies have suggested that AMPA receptors can increase BDNF expression by both calcium-dependent and independent pathways. For example, recent studies have shown that AMPA receptors interact with the protein tyrosine kinase, Lyn. Activation of Lyn can recruit the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway and increase the expression of BDNF. Therefore, in addition to directly enhancing glutamatergic synaptic transmission, AMPA

  9. Pharmacology and therapeutic potential of sigma(1) receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Cobos, E J; Entrena, J M; Nieto, F R; Cendán, C M; Del Pozo, E

    2008-12-01

    Sigma (sigma) receptors, initially described as a subtype of opioid receptors, are now considered unique receptors. Pharmacological studies have distinguished two types of sigma receptors, termed sigma(1) and sigma(2). Of these two subtypes, the sigma(1) receptor has been cloned in humans and rodents, and its amino acid sequence shows no homology with other mammalian proteins. Several psychoactive drugs show high to moderate affinity for sigma(1) receptors, including the antipsychotic haloperidol, the antidepressant drugs fluvoxamine and sertraline, and the psychostimulants cocaine and methamphetamine; in addition, the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin allosterically modulates sigma(1) receptors. Certain neurosteroids are known to interact with sigma(1) receptors, and have been proposed to be their endogenous ligands. These receptors are located in the plasma membrane and in subcellular membranes, particularly in the endoplasmic reticulum, where they play a modulatory role in intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Sigma(1) receptors also play a modulatory role in the activity of some ion channels and in several neurotransmitter systems, mainly in glutamatergic neurotransmission. In accordance with their widespread modulatory role, sigma(1) receptor ligands have been proposed to be useful in several therapeutic fields such as amnesic and cognitive deficits, depression and anxiety, schizophrenia, analgesia, and against some effects of drugs of abuse (such as cocaine and methamphetamine). In this review we provide an overview of the present knowledge of sigma(1) receptors, focussing on sigma(1) ligand neuropharmacology and the role of sigma(1) receptors in behavioral animal studies, which have contributed greatly to the potential therapeutic applications of sigma(1) ligands.

  10. Transient Receptor Potential Channels in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Basso, Lilian; Altier, Christophe

    2016-10-27

    Neuropathic pain caused by disease or dysfunction of the nervous system is one of the most difficult pain conditions to treat. Symptoms include a hypersensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli, processed by specialized nociceptors that constitute the first line of defence of the somatosensory system. The detection of these stimuli depends on the TRP ion channel family, which activates upon damaging pressure, extreme temperature, or toxic endogenous and exogenous chemicals. This review will summarize the current knowledge of the contribution of TRP channels, particularly the thermosensitive TRP, including TRPV1, TRPA1 and TRPM8 channels that play a central role in the sensitization of nociceptive transduction. We will discuss the pharmacology of these receptors and their relative success in preclinical and clinical studies.

  11. CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor As Potential Target against Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aso, Ester; Ferrer, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    The CB2 receptor is one of the components of the endogenous cannabinoid system, a complex network of signaling molecules and receptors involved in the homeostatic control of several physiological functions. Accumulated evidence suggests a role for CB2 receptors in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and indicates their potential as a therapeutic target against this neurodegenerative disease. Levels of CB2 receptors are significantly increased in post-mortem AD brains, mainly in microglia surrounding senile plaques, and their expression levels correlate with the amounts of Aβ42 and β-amyloid plaque deposition. Moreover, several studies on animal models of AD have demonstrated that specific CB2 receptor agonists, which are devoid of psychoactive effects, reduce AD-like pathology, resulting in attenuation of the inflammation associated with the disease but also modulating Aβ and tau aberrant processing, among other effects. CB2 receptor activation also improves cognitive impairment in animal models of AD. This review discusses available data regarding the role of CB2 receptors in AD and the potential usefulness of specific agonists of these receptors against AD. PMID:27303261

  12. Antidromic potential spread modulates the receptor responses in the stretch receptor neurons of the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Purali, Nuhan

    2011-12-01

    The effects of antidromic potential spread were investigated in the stretch receptor neurons of the crayfish. Current and potential responses to conductance changes were recorded in the dynamic clamp condition and compared to those obtained by using some conventional clamp methods and a compartmental neuron model. An analogue circuit was used for dynamic calculation of the injected receptor current as a function of the membrane potential and the given conductance change. Alternatively, receptor current responses to a mechanical stimulus were recorded and compared when the cell was voltage clamped to a previously recorded impulse wave form and the resting potential, respectively. Under dynamic clamp, the receptor current had an oscillating waveform which contrasts with the conventional recordings. Frequency, amplitude and sign of the oscillations were dependent on the applied conductance level, reversal potential and electrotonic attenuation. Mean current amplitude and frequency of the evoked impulse responses were smaller under dynamic clamp, especially for large conductance increases. However, firing frequency was larger if plotted against the mean current response. Recorded responses were similar to those calculated in the model. It was not possible to evoke any adaptation in the slowly adapting neuron by using the dynamic clamp. Evoked potential change served as a self limiting response, preventing the depolarization block. However, impulse duration was significantly shorter in the rapidly adapting neuron when the dynamic clamp was used. It was concluded that, in the stretch receptor neurons during a conductance increase, antidromic potential spread modulates the receptor responses and contributes to adaptation.

  13. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-2 Antagonists: Therapeutic Potential and Potential Risks

    PubMed Central

    Blankenbach, Kira V.; Schwalm, Stephanie; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling system with its specific G-protein-coupled S1P receptors, the enzymes of S1P metabolism and the S1P transporters, offers a multitude of promising targets for drug development. Until today, drug development in this area has nearly exclusively focused on (functional) antagonists at the S1P1 receptor, which cause a unique phenotype of immunomodulation. Accordingly, the first-in class S1P1 receptor modulator, fingolimod, has been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and novel S1P1 receptor (functional) antagonists are being developed for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, lupus erythematodes, or polymyositis. Besides the S1P1 receptor, also S1P2 and S1P3 are widely expressed and regulate many diverse functions throughout the body. The S1P2 receptor, in particular, often exerts cellular functions which are opposed to the functions of the S1P1 receptor. As a consequence, antagonists at the S1P2 receptor have the potential to be useful in a contrasting context and different areas of indication compared to S1P1 antagonists. The present review will focus on the therapeutic potential of S1P2 receptor antagonists and discuss their opportunities as well as their potential risks. Open questions and areas which require further investigations will be emphasized in particular. PMID:27445808

  14. Discoidin Domain Receptors: Potential Actors and Targets in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rammal, Hassan; Saby, Charles; Magnien, Kevin; Van-Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Buache, Emilie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix critically controls cancer cell behavior by inducing several signaling pathways through cell membrane receptors. Besides conferring structural properties to tissues around the tumor, the extracellular matrix is able to regulate cell proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion. Among these receptors, the integrins family constitutes a major class of receptors that mediate cell interactions with extracellular matrix components. Twenty years ago, a new class of extracellular matrix receptors has been discovered. These tyrosine kinase receptors are the two discoidin domain receptors DDR1 and DDR2. DDR1 was first identified in the Dictyostelium discoideum and was shown to mediate cell aggregation. DDR2 shares highly conserved sequences with DDR1. Both receptors are activated upon binding to collagen, one of the most abundant proteins in extracellular matrix. While DDR2 can only be activated by fibrillar collagen, particularly types I and III, DDR1 is mostly activated by type I and IV collagens. In contrast with classical growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors which display a rapid and transient activation, DDR1 and DDR2 are unique in that they exhibit delayed and sustained receptor phosphorylation upon binding to collagen. Recent studies have reported differential expression and mutations of DDR1 and DDR2 in several cancer types and indicate clearly that these receptors have to be taken into account as new players in the different aspects of tumor progression, from non-malignant to highly malignant and invasive stages. This review will discuss the current knowledge on the role of DDR1 and DDR2 in malignant transformation, cell proliferation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, migratory, and invasive processes, and finally the modulation of the response to chemotherapy. These new insights suggest that DDR1 and DDR2 are new potential targets in cancer therapy.

  15. Discoidin Domain Receptors: Potential Actors and Targets in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rammal, Hassan; Saby, Charles; Magnien, Kevin; Van-Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Buache, Emilie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix critically controls cancer cell behavior by inducing several signaling pathways through cell membrane receptors. Besides conferring structural properties to tissues around the tumor, the extracellular matrix is able to regulate cell proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion. Among these receptors, the integrins family constitutes a major class of receptors that mediate cell interactions with extracellular matrix components. Twenty years ago, a new class of extracellular matrix receptors has been discovered. These tyrosine kinase receptors are the two discoidin domain receptors DDR1 and DDR2. DDR1 was first identified in the Dictyostelium discoideum and was shown to mediate cell aggregation. DDR2 shares highly conserved sequences with DDR1. Both receptors are activated upon binding to collagen, one of the most abundant proteins in extracellular matrix. While DDR2 can only be activated by fibrillar collagen, particularly types I and III, DDR1 is mostly activated by type I and IV collagens. In contrast with classical growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors which display a rapid and transient activation, DDR1 and DDR2 are unique in that they exhibit delayed and sustained receptor phosphorylation upon binding to collagen. Recent studies have reported differential expression and mutations of DDR1 and DDR2 in several cancer types and indicate clearly that these receptors have to be taken into account as new players in the different aspects of tumor progression, from non-malignant to highly malignant and invasive stages. This review will discuss the current knowledge on the role of DDR1 and DDR2 in malignant transformation, cell proliferation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, migratory, and invasive processes, and finally the modulation of the response to chemotherapy. These new insights suggest that DDR1 and DDR2 are new potential targets in cancer therapy. PMID:27014069

  16. Respiratory virus infection up-regulates TRPV1, TRPA1 and ASICS3 receptors on airway cells.

    PubMed

    Omar, Shadia; Clarke, Rebecca; Abdullah, Haniah; Brady, Clare; Corry, John; Winter, Hanagh; Touzelet, Olivier; Power, Ultan F; Lundy, Fionnuala; McGarvey, Lorcan P A; Cosby, S Louise

    2017-01-01

    Receptors implicated in cough hypersensitivity are transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential cation channel, Subfamily A, Member 1 (TRPA1) and acid sensing ion channel receptor 3 (ASIC3). Respiratory viruses, such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and measles virus (MV) may interact directly and/or indirectly with these receptors on sensory nerves and epithelial cells in the airways. We used in vitro models of sensory neurones (SHSY5Y or differentiated IMR-32 cells) and human bronchial epithelium (BEAS-2B cells) as well as primary human bronchial epithelial cells (PBEC) to study the effect of MV and RSV infection on receptor expression. Receptor mRNA and protein levels were examined by qPCR and flow cytometry, respectively, following infection or treatment with UV inactivated virus, virus-induced soluble factors or pelleted virus. Concentrations of a range of cytokines in resultant BEAS-2B and PBEC supernatants were determined by ELISA. Up-regulation of TRPV1, TRPA1 and ASICS3 expression occurred by 12 hours post-infection in each cell type. This was independent of replicating virus, within the same cell, as virus-induced soluble factors alone were sufficient to increase channel expression. IL-8 and IL-6 increased in infected cell supernatants. Antibodies against these factors inhibited TRP receptor up-regulation. Capsazepine treatment inhibited virus induced up-regulation of TRPV1 indicating that these receptors are targets for treating virus-induced cough.

  17. Respiratory virus infection up-regulates TRPV1, TRPA1 and ASICS3 receptors on airway cells

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Shadia; Clarke, Rebecca; Abdullah, Haniah; Brady, Clare; Corry, John; Winter, Hanagh; Touzelet, Olivier; Power, Ultan F.; Lundy, Fionnuala; McGarvey, Lorcan P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Receptors implicated in cough hypersensitivity are transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential cation channel, Subfamily A, Member 1 (TRPA1) and acid sensing ion channel receptor 3 (ASIC3). Respiratory viruses, such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and measles virus (MV) may interact directly and/or indirectly with these receptors on sensory nerves and epithelial cells in the airways. We used in vitro models of sensory neurones (SHSY5Y or differentiated IMR-32 cells) and human bronchial epithelium (BEAS-2B cells) as well as primary human bronchial epithelial cells (PBEC) to study the effect of MV and RSV infection on receptor expression. Receptor mRNA and protein levels were examined by qPCR and flow cytometry, respectively, following infection or treatment with UV inactivated virus, virus-induced soluble factors or pelleted virus. Concentrations of a range of cytokines in resultant BEAS-2B and PBEC supernatants were determined by ELISA. Up-regulation of TRPV1, TRPA1 and ASICS3 expression occurred by 12 hours post-infection in each cell type. This was independent of replicating virus, within the same cell, as virus-induced soluble factors alone were sufficient to increase channel expression. IL-8 and IL-6 increased in infected cell supernatants. Antibodies against these factors inhibited TRP receptor up-regulation. Capsazepine treatment inhibited virus induced up-regulation of TRPV1 indicating that these receptors are targets for treating virus-induced cough. PMID:28187208

  18. Sigma-2 Receptor as Potential Indicator of Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Jodi L.; Panyutin, Irina; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Zeng, Chenbo; Mach, Robert H.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The sigma-2 (σ2) receptor is a potential biomarker of proliferative status of solid tumors. Specific synthetic probes using N-substituted-9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-3α-yl carbamate analogs have been designed and implemented for experimental cancer diagnosis and therapy. Procedures We employed the fluorescently-labeled σ2 receptor probe, SW120, to evaluate σ2 receptor expression in human stem cells (SC), including: bone marrow stromal (BMSC), neural progenitor (NPC), amniotic fluid (AFSC), hematopoetic (HSC) and embryonic stem cells (ESC). We concurrently evaluated the intensity of SW120 and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) relative to passage number and multipotency. Results We substantiated significantly higher σ2 receptor density among proliferating SC relative to lineage-restricted cell types. Additionally, cellular internalization of the σ2 receptor in SC was consistent with receptor-mediated endocytosis and confocal microscopy indicated SW120 specific co-localization with a fluorescent marker of lysosomes in all SC imaged. Conclusion These results suggest that σ2 receptors may serve to monitor stem cell differentiation in future experimental studies. PMID:21614680

  19. Adenosine receptor modulation: potential implications in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Dip, Ramiro G

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine is a purine nucleoside whose concentration increases during inflammation and hypoxia and the many roles of this molecule are becoming better understood. Increased reactivity to adenosine of the airways of asthmatic but not of normal subjects underlines the role of adenosine in airway inflammation. The identification and pharmacological characterisation of different adenosine receptors have stimulated the search for subtype-specific ligands able to modulate the effects of this molecule in a directed way. Several compounds of different chemical classes have been identified as having potential drawbacks, including side effects resulting from the broad distribution of the receptors across the organism, have prevented clinical application. In this article, the effects of adenosine's different receptors and the intracellular signalling pathways are reviewed. The potential of adenosine receptor modulation as a therapeutic target for chronic airway inflammation is considered, taking equine recurrent airway disease and feline asthma as examples of naturally occurring airway obstructive diseases. Other potential applications for adenosine receptor modulation are also discussed. As the intrinsic molecular events of adenosine's mechanism of action become uncovered, new concrete therapeutic approaches will become available for the treatment of various conditions in veterinary medicine.

  20. Update on the role of spinal cord TRPV1 receptors in pain modulation.

    PubMed

    Spicarova, D; Nerandzic, V; Palecek, J

    2014-01-01

    The structure, expression and function of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor were intensively studied since the cloning in 1997 and TRPV1 receptors are now considered to act as transducers and molecular integrators of nociceptive stimuli in the periphery. In contrast, spinal TRPV1 receptors were studied less extensively and their role in pain modulation is still not fully understood. This short review is a follow up on our previous summary in this area (Spicarova and Palecek 2008). The aim was to review preferentially the most recent findings concerning the role of the spinal TRPV1 receptors, published within the last five years. The update is given on the expression and function of the spinal TRPV1 receptors, their activation by endogenous agonists, interaction between the endocannabinoid and endovanillod system and possible role of the spinal TRPV1 receptors in pathological pain states. There is now mounting evidence that TRPV1 receptors may be an important element in modulation of nociceptive information at the spinal cord level and represent an interesting target for analgesic therapy.

  1. Vestibular receptors contribute to cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Todd, Neil P M; Paillard, Aurore C; Kluk, Karolina; Whittle, Elizabeth; Colebatch, James G

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic sensitivity of the vestibular apparatus is well-established, but the contribution of vestibular receptors to the late auditory evoked potentials of cortical origin is unknown. Evoked potentials from 500 Hz tone pips were recorded using 70 channel EEG at several intensities below and above the vestibular acoustic threshold, as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In healthy subjects both auditory mid- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), consisting of Na, Pa, N1 and P2 waves, were observed in the sub-threshold conditions. However, in passing through the vestibular threshold, systematic changes were observed in the morphology of the potentials and in the intensity dependence of their amplitude and latency. These changes were absent in a patient without functioning vestibular receptors. In particular, for the healthy subjects there was a fronto-central negativity, which appeared at about 42 ms, referred to as an N42, prior to the AEP N1. Source analysis of both the N42 and N1 indicated involvement of cingulate cortex, as well as bilateral superior temporal cortex. Our findings are best explained by vestibular receptors contributing to what were hitherto considered as purely auditory evoked potentials and in addition tentatively identify a new component that appears to be primarily of vestibular origin.

  2. Activation of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Potentiates Heteromeric Kainate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wetherington, Jonathon; Shaw, Renee; Serrano, Geidy; Swanger, Sharon; Dingledine, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Kainate receptors (KARs), a family of ionotropic glutamate receptors, are widely expressed in the central nervous system and are critically involved in synaptic transmission. KAR activation is influenced by metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGlu) signaling, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. We undertook studies to examine how mGlu modulation affects activation of KARs. Confocal immunohistochemistry of rat hippocampus and cultured rat cortex revealed colocalization of the high-affinity KAR subunits with group I mGlu receptors. In hippocampal and cortical cultures, the calcium signal caused by activation of native KARs was potentiated by activation of group I mGlu receptors. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, activation of group I mGlu receptors potentiated heteromeric but not homomeric KAR-mediated currents, with no change in agonist potency. The potentiation of heteromeric KARs by mGlu1 activation was attenuated by GDPβS, blocked by an inhibitor of phospholipase C or the calcium chelator 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), prolonged by the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid, but unaffected by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor lavendustin A. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition reduced the potentiation by mGlu1 of GluK2/GluK5, and conversely, direct activation of PKC by phorbol 12-myristate,13-acetate potentiated GluK2/GluK5. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified three serines (Ser833, Ser836, and Ser840) within the membrane proximal region of the GluK5 C-terminal domain that, in combination, are required for mGlu1-mediated potentiation of KARs. Together, these data suggest that phosphorylation of key residues in the C-terminal domain changes the overall charge of this domain, resulting in potentiated agonist responses. PMID:23066089

  3. Therapeutic potential of endothelin receptor antagonism in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Czopek, Alicja; Moorhouse, Rebecca; Webb, David J; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-03-01

    Our growing understanding of the role of the endothelin (ET) system in renal physiology and pathophysiology is from emerging studies of renal disease in animal models and humans. ET receptor antagonists reduce blood pressure and proteinuria in chronic kidney disease and cause regression of renal injury in animals. However, the therapeutic potential of ET receptor antagonism has not been fully explored and clinical studies have been largely limited to patients with diabetic nephropathy. There remains a need for more work in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease (patients requiring maintenance dialysis and those with a functioning kidney transplant), ischemia reperfusion injury, and sickle cell disease. The current review summarizes the most recent advances in both preclinical and clinical studies of ET receptor antagonists in the field of kidney disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIX. Cannabinoid Receptors and Their Ligands: Beyond CB1 and CB2

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, A. C.; Abood, M. E.; Alexander, S. P. H.; Di Marzo, V.; Elphick, M. R.; Greasley, P. J.; Hansen, H. S.; Kunos, G.; Mackie, K.; Mechoulam, R.; Ross, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    There are at least two types of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). Ligands activating these G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) include the phytocannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, numerous synthetic compounds, and endogenous compounds known as endocannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists have also been developed. Some of these ligands activate or block one type of cannabinoid receptor more potently than the other type. This review summarizes current data indicating the extent to which cannabinoid receptor ligands undergo orthosteric or allosteric interactions with non-CB1, non-CB2 established GPCRs, deorphanized receptors such as GPR55, ligand-gated ion channels, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, and other ion channels or peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors. From these data, it is clear that some ligands that interact similarly with CB1 and/or CB2 receptors are likely to display significantly different pharmacological profiles. The review also lists some criteria that any novel “CB3” cannabinoid receptor or channel should fulfil and concludes that these criteria are not currently met by any non-CB1, non-CB2 pharmacological receptor or channel. However, it does identify certain pharmacological targets that should be investigated further as potential CB3 receptors or channels. These include TRP vanilloid 1, which possibly functions as an ionotropic cannabinoid receptor under physiological and/or pathological conditions, and some deorphanized GPCRs. Also discussed are 1) the ability of CB1 receptors to form heteromeric complexes with certain other GPCRs, 2) phylogenetic relationships that exist between CB1/CB2 receptors and other GPCRs, 3) evidence for the existence of several as-yet-uncharacterized non-CB1, non-CB2 cannabinoid receptors; and 4) current cannabinoid receptor nomenclature. PMID:21079038

  5. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIX. Cannabinoid receptors and their ligands: beyond CB₁ and CB₂.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, R G; Howlett, A C; Abood, M E; Alexander, S P H; Di Marzo, V; Elphick, M R; Greasley, P J; Hansen, H S; Kunos, G; Mackie, K; Mechoulam, R; Ross, R A

    2010-12-01

    There are at least two types of cannabinoid receptors (CB(1) and CB(2)). Ligands activating these G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) include the phytocannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, numerous synthetic compounds, and endogenous compounds known as endocannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists have also been developed. Some of these ligands activate or block one type of cannabinoid receptor more potently than the other type. This review summarizes current data indicating the extent to which cannabinoid receptor ligands undergo orthosteric or allosteric interactions with non-CB(1), non-CB(2) established GPCRs, deorphanized receptors such as GPR55, ligand-gated ion channels, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, and other ion channels or peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors. From these data, it is clear that some ligands that interact similarly with CB(1) and/or CB(2) receptors are likely to display significantly different pharmacological profiles. The review also lists some criteria that any novel "CB(3)" cannabinoid receptor or channel should fulfil and concludes that these criteria are not currently met by any non-CB(1), non-CB(2) pharmacological receptor or channel. However, it does identify certain pharmacological targets that should be investigated further as potential CB(3) receptors or channels. These include TRP vanilloid 1, which possibly functions as an ionotropic cannabinoid receptor under physiological and/or pathological conditions, and some deorphanized GPCRs. Also discussed are 1) the ability of CB(1) receptors to form heteromeric complexes with certain other GPCRs, 2) phylogenetic relationships that exist between CB(1)/CB(2) receptors and other GPCRs, 3) evidence for the existence of several as-yet-uncharacterized non-CB(1), non-CB(2) cannabinoid receptors; and 4) current cannabinoid receptor nomenclature.

  6. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs) during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Suckow, Shelby K; Caudle, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Background Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs), co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX) prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. Results CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Conclusion Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned animals. Therefore

  7. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs) during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Shelby K; Caudle, Robert M

    2009-09-22

    Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs), co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX) prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned animals. Therefore, these data suggest that CANs

  8. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists rimonabant (SR141716) and AM251 directly potentiate GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Baur, R; Gertsch, J; Sigel, E

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Rimonabant (SR141716) and the structurally related AM251 are widely used in pharmacological experiments as selective cannabinoid receptor CB1 antagonists / inverse agonists. Concentrations of 0.5–10 µM are usually applied in in vitro experiments. We intended to show that these drugs did not act at GABAA receptors but found a significant positive allosteric modulation instead. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Recombinant GABAA receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Receptors were exposed to AM251 or rimonabant in the absence and presence of GABA. Standard electrophysiological techniques were used to monitor the elicited ionic currents. KEY RESULTS AM251 dose-dependently potentiated responses to 0.5 µM GABA at the recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor with an EC50 below 1 µM and a maximal potentiation of about eightfold. The Hill coefficient indicated that more than one binding site for AM251 was located in this receptor. Rimonabant had a lower affinity, but a fourfold higher efficacy. AM251 potentiated also currents mediated by α1β2, αxβ2γ2 (x = 2,3,5,6), α1β3γ2 and α4β2δ GABAA receptors, but not those mediated by α1β1γ2. Interestingly, the CB1 receptor antagonists LY320135 and O-2050 did not significantly affect α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor-mediated currents at concentrations of 1 µM. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study identified rimonabant and AM251 as positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors. Thus, potential GABAergic effects of commonly used concentrations of these compounds should be considered in in vitro experiments, especially at extrasynaptic sites where GABA concentrations are low. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-8. To view Part I of Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-7 PMID:21470203

  9. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and taste sensation.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Y; Matsunami, H

    2009-03-01

    Humans have 5 basic taste sensations: sweet, bitter, sour, salty, and umami (taste of 1-amino acids). Among 33 genes related to transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, 3--including TRP-melastatin 5 (TRPM5), polycystic kidney disease-1-like 3 (PKD1L3), and polycystic kidney disease-2-like 1 (PKD2L1)--are specifically and abundantly expressed in taste receptor cells. TRP-melastatin 5 is co-expressed with taste receptors T1Rs and T2Rs, and functions as a common downstream component in sweet, bitter, and umami taste signal transduction. In contrast, polycystic kidney disease-1-like 3 and polycystic kidney disease-2-like 1 are co-expressed in distinct subsets of taste receptor cells not expressing TRP-melastatin 5. In the heterologous expression system, cells expressing both polycystic kidney disease-1-like 3 and polycystic kidney disease-2-like 1 responded to sour stimuli, showing a unique "off-response" property. Genetic ablation of poly-cystic kidney disease-2-like 1-expressing cells resulted in elimination of gustatory nerve response to sour stimuli, indicating that cells expressing polycystic kidney disease-2-like 1 function as sour taste detectors. These results suggest that polycystic kidney disease-1-like 3/polycystic kidney disease-2-like 1 may play a significant role, possibly as taste receptors, in sour taste sensation.

  10. A potentially novel nicotinic receptor in Aplysia neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    White, Sean H; Carter, Christopher J; Magoski, Neil S

    2014-07-15

    Nicotinic receptors form a diverse group of ligand-gated ionotropic receptors with roles in both synaptic transmission and the control of excitability. In the bag cell neurons of Aplysia, acetylcholine activates an ionotropic receptor, which passes inward current to produce a long-lasting afterdischarge and hormone release, leading to reproduction. While testing the agonist profile of the cholinergic response, we observed a second current that appeared to be gated only by nicotine and not acetylcholine. The peak nicotine-evoked current was markedly smaller in magnitude than the acetylcholine-induced current, cooperative (Hill value of 2.7), had an EC50 near 500 μM, readily recovered from desensitization, showed Ca(2+) permeability, and was blocked by mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, or strychnine, but not by α-conotoxin ImI, methyllycaconitine, or hexamethonium. Aplysia transcriptome analysis followed by PCR yielded 20 full-length potential nicotinic receptor subunits. Sixteen of these were predicted to be cation selective, and real-time PCR suggested that 15 of the 16 subunits were expressed to varying degrees in the bag cell neurons. The acetylcholine-induced current, but not the nicotine current, was reduced by double-strand RNA treatment targeted to both subunits ApAChR-C and -E. Conversely, the nicotine-evoked current, but not the acetylcholine current, was lessened by targeting both subunits ApAChR-H and -P. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report suggesting that a nicotinic receptor is not gated by acetylcholine. Separate receptors may serve as a means to differentially trigger plasticity or safeguard propagation by assuring that only acetylcholine, the endogenous agonist, initiates large enough responses to trigger reproduction.

  11. Functional expression of purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential channels by the human urothelium.

    PubMed

    Shabir, Saqib; Cross, William; Kirkwood, Lisa A; Pearson, Joanna F; Appleby, Peter A; Walker, Dawn; Eardley, Ian; Southgate, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    In addition to its role as a physical barrier, the urothelium is considered to play an active role in mechanosensation. A key mechanism is the release of transient mediators that activate purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to effect changes in intracellular Ca²⁺. Despite the implied importance of these receptors and channels in urothelial tissue homeostasis and dysfunctional bladder disease, little is known about their functional expression by the human urothelium. To evaluate the expression and function of P2X and P2Y receptors and TRP channels, the human ureter and bladder were used to separate urothelial and stromal tissues for RNA isolation and cell culture. RT-PCR using stringently designed primer sets was used to establish which P2 and TRP species were expressed at the transcript level, and selective agonists/antagonists were used to confirm functional expression by monitoring changes in intracellular Ca²⁺ and in a scratch repair assay. The results confirmed the functional expression of P2Y₄ receptors and excluded nonexpressed receptors/channels (P2X₁, P2X₃, P2X₆, P2Y₆, P2Y₁₁, TRPV5, and TRPM8), while a dearth of specific agonists confounded the functional validation of expressed P2X₂, P2X₄, P2Y₁, P2Y₂, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV6 and TRPM7 receptors/channels. Although a conventional response was elicited in control stromal-derived cells, the urothelial cell response to well-characterized TRPV1 and TRPV4 agonists/antagonists revealed unexpected anomalies. In addition, agonists that invoked an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ promoted urothelial scratch repair, presumably through the release of ATP. The study raises important questions about the ligand selectivity of receptor/channel targets expressed by the urothelium. These pathways are important in urothelial tissue homeostasis, and this opens the possibility of selective drug targeting.

  12. Computationally Discovered Potentiating Role of Glycans on NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sinitskiy, Anton V.; Stanley, Nathaniel H.; Hackos, David H.; Hanson, Jesse E.; Sellers, Benjamin D.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2017-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are glycoproteins in the brain central to learning and memory. The effects of glycosylation on the structure and dynamics of NMDARs are largely unknown. In this work, we use extensive molecular dynamics simulations of GluN1 and GluN2B ligand binding domains (LBDs) of NMDARs to investigate these effects. Our simulations predict that intra-domain interactions involving the glycan attached to residue GluN1-N440 stabilize closed-clamshell conformations of the GluN1 LBD. The glycan on GluN2B-N688 shows a similar, though weaker, effect. Based on these results, and assuming the transferability of the results of LBD simulations to the full receptor, we predict that glycans at GluN1-N440 might play a potentiator role in NMDARs. To validate this prediction, we perform electrophysiological analysis of full-length NMDARs with a glycosylation-preventing GluN1-N440Q mutation, and demonstrate an increase in the glycine EC50 value. Overall, our results suggest an intramolecular potentiating role of glycans on NMDA receptors. PMID:28378791

  13. Computationally Discovered Potentiating Role of Glycans on NMDA Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitskiy, Anton V.; Stanley, Nathaniel H.; Hackos, David H.; Hanson, Jesse E.; Sellers, Benjamin D.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2017-04-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are glycoproteins in the brain central to learning and memory. The effects of glycosylation on the structure and dynamics of NMDARs are largely unknown. In this work, we use extensive molecular dynamics simulations of GluN1 and GluN2B ligand binding domains (LBDs) of NMDARs to investigate these effects. Our simulations predict that intra-domain interactions involving the glycan attached to residue GluN1-N440 stabilize closed-clamshell conformations of the GluN1 LBD. The glycan on GluN2B-N688 shows a similar, though weaker, effect. Based on these results, and assuming the transferability of the results of LBD simulations to the full receptor, we predict that glycans at GluN1-N440 might play a potentiator role in NMDARs. To validate this prediction, we perform electrophysiological analysis of full-length NMDARs with a glycosylation-preventing GluN1-N440Q mutation, and demonstrate an increase in the glycine EC50 value. Overall, our results suggest an intramolecular potentiating role of glycans on NMDA receptors.

  14. Transient receptor potential M3 channels are ionotropic steroid receptors in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Thomas F J; Loch, Sabine; Lambert, Sachar; Straub, Isabelle; Mannebach, Stefanie; Mathar, Ilka; Düfer, Martina; Lis, Annette; Flockerzi, Veit; Philipp, Stephan E; Oberwinkler, Johannes

    2008-12-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels are renowned for their ability to sense diverse chemical stimuli. Still, for many members of this large and heterogeneous protein family it is unclear how their activity is regulated and whether they are influenced by endogenous substances. On the other hand, steroidal compounds are increasingly recognized to have rapid effects on membrane surface receptors that often have not been identified at the molecular level. We show here that TRPM3, a divalent-permeable cation channel, is rapidly and reversibly activated by extracellular pregnenolone sulphate, a neuroactive steroid. We show that pregnenolone sulphate activates endogenous TRPM3 channels in insulin-producing beta cells. Application of pregnenolone sulphate led to a rapid calcium influx and enhanced insulin secretion from pancreatic islets. Our results establish that TRPM3 is an essential component of an ionotropic steroid receptor enabling unanticipated crosstalk between steroidal and insulin-signalling endocrine systems.

  15. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials. PMID:19630739

  16. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction.

    PubMed

    Olive, M Foster

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials.

  17. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-05

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action.

  18. Transient receptor potential-like channels mediate metabotropic glutamate receptor EPSCs in rat dopamine neurones

    PubMed Central

    Bengtson, C Peter; Tozzi, Alessandro; Bernardi, Giorgio; Mercuri, Nicola B

    2004-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels form cationic channels activated by diverse factors including mechanical stimuli, changes in osmolarity, pH and temperature, as well as the exogenous irritant, capsaicin. Metabotropic glutamate receptors have also recently been linked to TRP channel activation in neurones of the substantia nigra, hippocampus and cerebellum, suggesting a novel role for such channels in synaptic communication via endogenous neurotransmitters. We tested this for dopamine neurones in rat brain slices by characterizing the current–voltage relationship and pharmacology of EPSCs mediated by group I metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1). Slow inward currents (273 ± 35 pA peak amplitude, 381 ± 25 ms latency, holding potential (Vh) =−73 mV) representing evoked mGluR1 EPSCs were isolated in the presence of antagonists of AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, GABAB, muscarinic and glycine receptors. CPCCOEt (100 μm), an mGluR1 antagonist, blocked the residual EPSC in all recordings. mGluR1-activated EPSCs reversed polarity near −10 mV, consistent with the involvement of a cationic channel. Extracellular application of the non-selective TRP channel blockers SKF 96365, flufenamic acid and ruthenium red caused reversible inhibition of mGluR1-activated EPSCs. These characteristics parallel those of mGluR1 activation with an agonist and indicate the involvement of a TRP-like channel in mGluR1-mediated EPSCs. PMID:14724196

  19. Application potential of toll-like receptors in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ming; Chen, Xi; Ye, Kangruo; Yao, Yuanfei; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptors (TLRs), as the most important pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity, play a pivotal role in inducing immune response through recognition of microbial invaders or specific agonists. Recent studies have suggested that TLRs could serve as important regulators in the development of a variety of cancer. However, increasing evidences have shown that TLRs may display quite opposite outcomes in cancer development. Although several potential therapeutic Toll-like receptor ligands have been found, the mechanism and therapy prospect of TLRs in cancer development has to be further elucidated to accelerate the clinical application. By performing a systematic review of the present findings on TLRs in cancer immunology, we attempted to evaluate the therapeutic potential of TLRs in cancer therapy and elucidate the potential mechanism of cancer progress regulated by TLR signaling and the reported targets on TLRs for clinical application. An electronic databases search was conducted in PubMed, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database from their inception to February 1, 2016. The following keywords were used to search the databases: Toll-like receptors, cancer therapy, therapeutic target, innate immunity. Of 244 studies that were identified, 97 nonrelevant studies were excluded. In total, 147 full-text articles were assessed, and from these, 54 were excluded as they did not provide complete key information. Thus, 93 studies were considered eligible and included in the analysis. According to the data from the included trials, 14 TLR ligands (77.8%) from 82 studies have been demonstrated to display antitumor property in various cancers, whereas 4 ligands (22.2%) from 11 studies promote tumors. Among them, only 3 TLR ligands have been approved for cancer therapy, and 9 ligands were in clinical trials. In addition, the potential mechanism of recently reported targets on TLRs for clinical application was also

  20. Expression of Cannabinoid Receptors in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage: Implications for Future Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Sara L.; Wilkinson, Jeremy Mark; Crawford, Aileen; Bunning, Rowena A.D.; Le Maitre, Christine L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Cannabinoids have shown to reduce joint damage in animal models of arthritis and reduce matrix metalloproteinase expression in primary human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The actions of cannabinoids are mediated by a number of receptors, including cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2), G-protein-coupled receptors 55 and 18 (GPR55 and GPR18), transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma (PPARα and PPARγ). However, to date very few studies have investigated the expression and localization of these receptors in human chondrocytes, and expression during degeneration, and thus their potential in clinical applications is unknown. Methods: Human articular cartilage from patients with symptomatic OA was graded histologically and the expression and localization of cannabinoid receptors within OA cartilage and underlying bone were determined immunohistochemically. Expression levels across regions of cartilage and changes with degeneration were investigated. Results: Expression of all the cannabinoid receptors investigated was observed with no change with grade of degeneration seen in the expression of CB1, CB2, GPR55, PPARα, and PPARγ. Conversely, the number of chondrocytes within the deep zone of cartilage displaying immunopositivity for GPR18 and TRPV1 was significantly decreased in degenerate cartilage. Receptor expression was higher in chondrocytes than in osteocytes in the underlying bone. Conclusions: Chondrocytes from OA joints were shown to express a wide range of cannabinoid receptors even in degenerate tissues, demonstrating that these cells could respond to cannabinoids. Cannabinoids designed to bind to receptors inhibiting the catabolic and pain pathways within the arthritic joint, while avoiding psychoactive effects, could provide potential arthritis therapies. PMID:28861474

  1. AMPA receptor potentiation can prevent ethanol-induced intoxication.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicholas; Messenger, Marcus J; O'Neill, Michael J; Oldershaw, Anna; Gilmour, Gary; Simmons, Rosa M A; Iyengar, Smriti; Libri, Vincenzo; Tricklebank, Mark; Williams, Steve C R

    2008-06-01

    We present a substantial series of behavioral and imaging experiments, which demonstrate, for the first time, that increasing AMPA receptor-mediated neurotransmission via administration of potent and selective biarylsulfonamide AMPA potentiators LY404187 and LY451395 reverses the central effects of an acutely intoxicating dose of ethanol in the rat. Using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI), we observed that LY404187 attenuated ethanol-induced reductions in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) in the anesthetized rat brain. A similar attenuation was apparent when measuring local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) via C14-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography in freely moving conscious rats. Both LY404187 and LY451395 significantly and dose-dependently reversed ethanol-induced deficits in both motor coordination and disruptions in an operant task where animals were trained to press a lever for food reward. Both prophylactic and acute intervention treatment with LY404187 reversed ethanol-induced deficits in motor coordination. Given that LY451395 and related AMPA receptor potentiators/ampakines are tolerated in both healthy volunteers and elderly patients, these data suggest that such compounds may form a potential management strategy for acute alcohol intoxication.

  2. Transient receptor potential cation channels in visceral sensory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2014-01-01

    The extensive literature on this subject is in direct contrast to the limited range of clinical uses for ligands of the transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPs) in diseases of the viscera. TRPV1 is the most spectacular example of this imbalance, as it is in other systems, but it is nonetheless the only TRP target that is currently targeted clinically in bladder sensory dysfunction. It is not clear why this discrepancy exists, but a likely answer is in the promiscuity of TRPs as sensors and transducers for environmental mechanical and chemical stimuli. This review first describes the different sensory pathways from the viscera, and on which nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurones within these pathways TRPs are expressed. They not only fulfil roles as both mechano-and chemo-sensors on visceral afferents, but also form an effector mechanism for cell activation after activation of GPCR and cytokine receptors. Their role may be markedly changed in diseased states, including chronic pain and inflammation. Pain presents the most obvious potential for further development of therapeutic interventions targeted at TRPs, but forms of inflammation are emerging as likely to benefit also. However, despite much basic research, we are still at the beginning of exploring such potential in visceral sensory pathways. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24641218

  3. AT2 Receptors: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Carey, Robert M

    2017-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is arguably the most important and best studied hormonal system in the control of blood pressure (BP) and the pathogenesis of hypertension. The RAS features its main effector angiotensin II (Ang II) acting via its 2 major receptors, angiotensin type-1(AT1R) and type-2 (AT2R). In general, AT2Rs oppose the detrimental actions of Ang II via AT1Rs. AT2R activation induces vasodilation and natriuresis, but its effects to lower BP in hypertension have not been as clear as anticipated. Recent studies, however, have demonstrated that acute and chronic AT2R stimulation can induce natriuresis and lower BP in the Ang II infusion model of experimental hypertension. AT2R activation induces receptor recruitment from intracellular sites to the apical plasma membranes of renal proximal tubule cells via a bradykinin, nitric oxide, and cyclic guanosine 3',5' monophosphate signaling pathway that results in internalization and inactivation of sodium (Na+) transporters Na+-H+ exchanger-3 and Na+/K+ATPase. These responses do not require the presence of concurrent AT1R blockade and are effective both in the prevention and reversal of hypertension. This review will address the role of AT2Rs in the control of BP and Na+ excretion and the case for these receptors as potential therapeutic targets for hypertension in humans. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2016. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Immunolocalization of cannabinoid receptor type 1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, and transient receptor potential vanilloid channels in pterygium.

    PubMed

    Assimakopoulou, Martha; Pagoulatos, Dionysios; Nterma, Pinelopi; Pharmakakis, Nikolaos

    2017-10-01

    Cannabinoids, as multi‑target mediators, activate cannabinoid receptors and transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels. There is evidence to support a functional interaction of cannabinoid receptors and TRPV channels when they are coexpressed. Human conjunctiva demonstrates widespread cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1), CB2 and TRPV channel localization. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression profile for cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) and TRPV channels in pterygium, an ocular surface lesion originating from the conjunctiva. Semi‑serial paraffin‑embedded sections from primary and recurrent pterygium samples were immunohistochemically examined with the use of specific antibodies. All of the epithelial layers in 94, 78, 96, 73 and 80% of pterygia cases, exhibited CB1, CB2, TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPV3 cytoplasmic immunoreactivity, respectively. The epithelium of all pterygia cases (100%) showed strong, mainly nuclear, TRPV4 immunolocalization. In the pterygium stroma, scattered cells demonstrated intense CB2 immunoreactivity, whereas vascular endothelial cells were immunopositive for the cannabinoid receptors and all TRPV channels. Quantitative analyses of the immunohistochemical findings in epithelial cells demonstrated a significantly higher expression level in conjunctiva compared with primary pterygia (P=0.04) for CB1, but not for CB2 (P>0.05). Additionally, CB1 and CB2 were significantly highly expressed in primary pterygia (P=0.01), compared with recurrent pterygia. Furthermore, CB1 expression levels were significantly correlated with CB2 expression levels in primary pterygia (P=0.005), but not in recurrent pterygia (P>0.05). No significant difference was detected for all TRPV channel expression levels between pterygium (primary or recurrent) and conjunctival tissues (P>0.05). A significant correlation between the TRPV1 and TRPV3 expression levels (P<0.001) was detected independently of pterygium recurrence. Finally, TRPV

  5. Combined therapeutic potential of nuclear receptors with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wairagu, Peninah M.; Park, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jihye; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Jung, Soon-Hee; Yong, Suk-Joong; Jeong, Yangsik

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • The 48 NR genes and 48 biological anti-cancer targets are profiled in paired-cells. • Growth inhibition by NR ligands or TKIs is target receptor level-dependent. • T0901317 with gefitinib/PHA665752 shows additive growth inhibition in lung cells. - Abstract: Cancer heterogeneity is a big hurdle in achieving complete cancer treatment, which has led to the emergence of combinational therapy. In this study, we investigated the potential use of nuclear receptor (NR) ligands for combinational therapy with other anti-cancer drugs. We first profiled all 48 NRs and 48 biological anti-cancer targets in four pairs of lung cell lines, where each pair was obtained from the same patient. Two sets of cell lines were normal and the corresponding tumor cell lines while the other two sets consisted of primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines. Analysis of the expression profile revealed 11 NRs and 15 cancer targets from the two pairs of normal versus tumor cell lines, and 9 NRs and 9 cancer targets from the primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines had distinct expression patterns in each category. Finally, the evaluation of nuclear receptor ligand T0901317 for liver X receptor (LXR) demonstrated its combined therapeutic potential with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The combined treatment of cMET inhibitor PHA665752 or EGFR inhibitor gefitinib with T0901317 showed additive growth inhibition in both H2073 and H1993 cells. Mechanistically, the combined treatment suppressed cell cycle progression by inhibiting cyclinD1 and cyclinB expression. Taken together, this study provides insight into the potential use of NR ligands in combined therapeutics with other biological anti-cancer drugs.

  6. Peripheral Glutamate Receptors Are Required for Hyperalgesia Induced by Capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Jin, You-Hong; Takemura, Motohide; Furuyama, Akira; Yonehara, Norifumi

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid1 (TRPV1) and glutamate receptors (GluRs) are located in small diameter primary afferent neurons (nociceptors), and it was speculated that glutamate released in the peripheral tissue in response to activation of TRPV1 might activate nociceptors retrogradely. But, it was not clear which types of GluRs are functioning in the nociceptive sensory transmission. In the present study, we examined the c-Fos expression in spinal cord dorsal horn following injection of drugs associated with glutamate receptors with/without capsaicin into the hindpaw. The subcutaneous injection of capsaicin or glutamate remarkably evoked c-Fos expression in ipsilateral sides of spinal cord dorsal horn. This capsaicin evoked increase of c-Fos expression was significantly prevented by concomitant administration of MK801, CNQX, and CPCCOEt. On the other hand, there were not any significant changes in coinjection of capsaicin and MCCG or MSOP. These results reveal that the activation of iGluRs and group I mGluR in peripheral afferent nerves play an important role in mechanisms whereby capsaicin evokes/maintains nociceptive responses. PMID:22110945

  7. Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Clinical Implications of TRPV1 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh Tabrizi, Mojgan; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Baraldi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2016-12-15

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel expressed on sensory neurons triggering an influx of cations. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers responsive to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Its phosphorylation increases sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli, while desensitization involves a calcium-dependent mechanism resulting in receptor dephosphorylation. TRPV1 functions as a sensor of noxious stimuli and may represent a target to avoid pain and injury. TRPV1 activation has been associated to chronic inflammatory pain and peripheral neuropathy. Its expression is also detected in nonneuronal areas such as bladder, lungs, and cochlea where TRPV1 activation is responsible for pathology development of cystitis, asthma, and hearing loss. This review offers a comprehensive overview about TRPV1 receptor in the pathophysiology of chronic pain, epilepsy, cough, bladder disorders, diabetes, obesity, and hearing loss, highlighting how drug development targeting this channel could have a clinical therapeutic potential. Furthermore, it summarizes the advances of medicinal chemistry research leading to the identification of highly selective TRPV1 antagonists and their analysis of structure-activity relationships (SARs) focusing on new strategies to target this channel.

  8. Glycine Potentiates AMPA Receptor Function through Metabotropic Activation of GluN2A-Containing NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Jun; Hu, Rong; Lujan, Brendan; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Jian-Jian; Nakano, Yasuko; Cui, Tian-Yuan; Liao, Ming-Xia; Chen, Jin-Cao; Man, Heng-Ye; Feng, Hua; Wan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors are Ca2+-permeable ion channels. The activation of NMDA receptors requires agonist glutamate and co-agonist glycine. Recent evidence indicates that NMDA receptor also has metabotropic function. Here we report that in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents independent of the channel activity of NMDA receptors and the activation of glycine receptors. The potentiation of AMPA receptor function by glycine is antagonized by the inhibition of ERK1/2. In the hippocampal neurons and in the HEK293 cells transfected with different combinations of NMDA receptors, glycine preferentially acts on GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2ARs), but not GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2BRs), to enhance ERK1/2 phosphorylation independent of the channel activity of GluN2ARs. Without requiring the channel activity of GluN2ARs, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents through GluN2ARs. Thus, these results reveal a metabotropic function of GluN2ARs in mediating glycine-induced potentiation of AMPA receptor function via ERK1/2 activation. PMID:27807405

  9. Binding Mode Prediction of Evodiamine within Vanilloid Receptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhanli; Sun, Lidan; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Yanhui; Gong, Wuzhuang; Jin, Hongwei; Zhang, Liangren; Liang, Huaping

    2012-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the potential binding mode of drugs is crucial to computer-aided drug design paradigms. It has been reported that evodiamine acts as an agonist of the vanilloid receptor Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). However, the precise interaction between evodiamine and TRPV1 was still not fully understood. In this perspective, the homology models of TRPV1 were generated using the crystal structure of the voltage-dependent shaker family K+ channel as a template. We then performed docking and molecular dynamics simulation to gain a better understanding of the probable binding modes of evodiamine within the TRPV1 binding pocket. There are no significant interspecies differences in evodiamine binding in rat, human and rabbit TRPV1 models. Pharmacophore modeling further provided confidence for the validity of the docking studies. This study is the first to shed light on the structural determinants required for the interaction between TRPV1 and evodiamine, and gives new suggestions for the rational design of novel TRPV1 ligands. PMID:22942745

  10. Transient Receptor Potential Channels as Targets for Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To date, 28 mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been cloned and characterized. They are grouped into six subfamilies on the basis of their amino acid sequence homology: TRP Ankyrin (TRPA), TRP Canonical (TRPC), TRP Melastatin (TRPM), TRP Mucolipin (TRPML), TRP Polycystin (TRPP), and TRP Vanilloid (TRPV). Most of the TRP channels are nonselective cation channels expressed on the cell membrane and exhibit variable permeability ratios for Ca2+ versus Na+. They mediate sensory functions (such as vision, nociception, taste transduction, temperature sensation, and pheromone signaling) and homeostatic functions (such as divalent cation flux, hormone release, and osmoregulation). Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the specific roles of these TRP channels and their activation mechanisms. In this Review, the emphasis will be on the activation of TRP channels by phytochemicals that are claimed to exert health benefits. Recent findings complement the anecdotal evidence that some of these phytochemicals have specific receptors and the activation of which is responsible for the physiological effects. Now, the targets for these phytochemicals are being unveiled; a specific hypothesis can be proposed and tested experimentally to infer a scientific validity of the claims of the health benefits. The broader and pressing issues that have to be addressed are related to the quantities of the active ingredients in a given preparation, their bioavailability, metabolism, adverse effects, excretion, and systemic versus local effects. PMID:24926802

  11. Integration of transient receptor potential canonical channels with lipids

    PubMed Central

    Beech, D J

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels are the canonical (C) subset of the TRP proteins, which are widely expressed in mammalian cells. They are thought to be primarily involved in determining calcium and sodium entry and have wide-ranging functions that include regulation of cell proliferation, motility and contraction. The channels are modulated by a multiplicity of factors, putatively existing as integrators in the plasma membrane. This review considers the sensitivities of TRPC channels to lipids that include diacylglycerols, phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate, lysophospholipids, oxidized phospholipids, arachidonic acid and its metabolites, sphingosine-1-phosphate, cholesterol and some steroidal derivatives and other lipid factors such as gangliosides. Promiscuous and selective lipid sensing have been detected. There appear to be close working relationships with lipids of the phospholipase C and A2 enzyme systems, which may enable integration with receptor signalling and membrane stretch. There are differences in the properties of each TRPC channel that are further complicated by TRPC heteromultimerization. The lipids modulate activity of the channels or insertion in the plasma membrane. Lipid microenvironments and intermediate sensing proteins have been described that include caveolae, G protein signalling, SEC14-like and spectrin-type domains 1 (SESTD1) and podocin. The data suggest that lipid sensing is an important aspect of TRPC channel biology enabling integration with other signalling systems. PMID:21624095

  12. Cannabinoid receptor 2: potential role in immunomodulation and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Rom, Slava; Persidsky, Yuri

    2013-06-01

    An accumulating body of evidence suggests that endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors type 1 and 2 (CB(1), CB(2)) play a significant role in physiologic and pathologic processes, including cognitive and immune functions. While the addictive properties of marijuana, an extract from the Cannabis plant, are well recognized, there is growing appreciation of the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in multiple pathologic conditions involving chronic inflammation (inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis, autoimmune disorders, multiple sclerosis, HIV-1 infection, stroke, Alzheimer's disease to name a few), mainly mediated by CB(2) activation. Development of CB(2) agonists as therapeutic agents has been hampered by the complexity of their intracellular signaling, relative paucity of highly selective compounds and insufficient data regarding end effects in the target cells and organs. This review attempts to summarize recent advances in studies of CB(2) activation in the setting of neuroinflammation, immunomodulation and HIV-1 infection.

  13. Androgen receptor in human health: a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Hifzur Rahman; Nanda, Sanjeev; Parray, Aijaz; Saleem, Mohammad

    2012-12-01

    Androgen is a key for the activation of Androgen Receptor (AR) in most of the disease conditions, however androgen-independent activation of AR is also found in aggressive type human malignancies. An intense search for the inhibitors of AR is underway to cure AR-dependent diseases. In addition to targeting various components of AR signaling pathway, compounds which directly target AR are under preclinical and clinical investigation. Various In vitro and preclinical animal studies suggest that different natural compounds have potential to act against AR. Some natural compounds have been found to be pharmacologically effective against AR irrespective of varying routs of administration viz; oral, intra-peritoneal and intravenous. This mini-review summarizes the studies conducted with different natural agents in determining their pharmacological utility against AR signaling.

  14. Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 1 (TRPC1) Channels as Regulators of Sphingolipid and VEGF Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Muhammad Yasir; Magnusson, Melissa; Kemppainen, Kati; Sukumaran, Pramod; Löf, Christoffer; Pulli, Ilari; Kalhori, Veronica; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-01-01

    The identity of calcium channels in the thyroid is unclear. In human follicular thyroid ML-1 cancer cells, sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), through S1P receptors 1 and 3 (S1P1/S1P3), and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) stimulates migration. We show that human thyroid cells express several forms of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels, including TRPC1. In TRPC1 knockdown (TRPC1-KD) ML-1 cells, the basal and S1P-evoked invasion and migration was attenuated. Furthermore, the expression of S1P3 and VEGFR2 was significantly down-regulated. Transfecting wild-type ML-1 cells with a nonconducting TRPC1 mutant decreased S1P3 and VEGFR2 expression. In TRPC1-KD cells, receptor-operated calcium entry was decreased. To investigate whether the decreased receptor expression was due to attenuated calcium entry, cells were incubated with the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid). In these cells, and in cells where calmodulin and calmodulin-dependent kinase were blocked pharmacologically, S1P3 and VEGFR2 expression was decreased. In TRPC1-KD cells, both hypoxia-inducible factor 1α expression and the secretion and activity of MMP2 and MMP9 were attenuated, and proliferation was decreased in TRPC1-KD cells. This was due to a prolonged G1 phase of the cell cycle, a significant increase in the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27, and a decrease in the expression of cyclin D2, cyclin D3, and CDK6. Transfecting TRPC1 to TRPC1-KD cells rescued receptor expression, migration, and proliferation. Thus, the expression of S1P3 and VEGFR2 is mediated by a calcium-dependent mechanism. TRPC1 has a crucial role in this process. This regulation is important for the invasion, migration, and proliferation of thyroid cancer cells. PMID:25971967

  15. Short latency compound action potentials from mammalian gravity receptor organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity receptor function was characterized in four mammalian species using far-field vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEPs are compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve and central relays that are elicited by linear acceleration ramps applied to the cranium. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, and gerbils were studied. In all species, response onset occurred within 1.5 ms of the stimulus onset. Responses persisted during intense (116 dBSPL) wide-band (50 to 50 inverted question mark omitted inverted question mark000 Hz) forward masking, whereas auditory responses to intense clicks (112 dBpeSPL) were eliminated under the same conditions. VsEPs remained after cochlear extirpation but were eliminated following bilateral labyrinthectomy. Responses included a series of positive and negative peaks that occurred within 8 ms of stimulus onset (range of means at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms: P1=908 to 1062 micros, N1=1342 to 1475 micros, P2=1632 to 1952 micros, N2=2038 to 2387 micros). Mean response amplitudes at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms ranged from 0.14 to 0.99 microV. VsEP input/output functions revealed latency slopes that varied across peaks and species ranging from -19 to -51 micros/dB. Amplitude-intensity slopes also varied ranging from 0.04 to 0.08 microV/dB for rats and mice. Latency values were comparable to those of birds although amplitudes were substantially smaller in mammals. VsEP threshold values were considerably higher in mammals compared to birds and ranged from -8.1 to -10.5 dBre 1.0 g/ms across species. These results support the hypothesis that mammalian gravity receptors are less sensitive to dynamic stimuli than are those of birds.

  16. Short latency compound action potentials from mammalian gravity receptor organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity receptor function was characterized in four mammalian species using far-field vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEPs are compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve and central relays that are elicited by linear acceleration ramps applied to the cranium. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, and gerbils were studied. In all species, response onset occurred within 1.5 ms of the stimulus onset. Responses persisted during intense (116 dBSPL) wide-band (50 to 50 inverted question mark omitted inverted question mark000 Hz) forward masking, whereas auditory responses to intense clicks (112 dBpeSPL) were eliminated under the same conditions. VsEPs remained after cochlear extirpation but were eliminated following bilateral labyrinthectomy. Responses included a series of positive and negative peaks that occurred within 8 ms of stimulus onset (range of means at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms: P1=908 to 1062 micros, N1=1342 to 1475 micros, P2=1632 to 1952 micros, N2=2038 to 2387 micros). Mean response amplitudes at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms ranged from 0.14 to 0.99 microV. VsEP input/output functions revealed latency slopes that varied across peaks and species ranging from -19 to -51 micros/dB. Amplitude-intensity slopes also varied ranging from 0.04 to 0.08 microV/dB for rats and mice. Latency values were comparable to those of birds although amplitudes were substantially smaller in mammals. VsEP threshold values were considerably higher in mammals compared to birds and ranged from -8.1 to -10.5 dBre 1.0 g/ms across species. These results support the hypothesis that mammalian gravity receptors are less sensitive to dynamic stimuli than are those of birds.

  17. Oligopyrrole Macrocycles: Receptors and Chemosensors for Potentially Hazardous Materials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Oligopyrroles represent a diverse class of molecular receptors that have been utilized in a growing number of applications. Recently, these systems have attracted interest as receptors and chemosensors for hazardous materials, including harmful anionic species, high-valent actinide cations, and nitroaromatic explosives. These versatile molecular receptors have been used to develop rudimentary colorimetric and fluorimetric assays for hazardous materials. PMID:21465591

  18. Main ion channels and receptors associated with visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Rocha, Heraldo Arcela; Dantas, Bruna Priscilla Vasconcelos; Rolim, Thaísa Leite; Costa, Bagnólia Araújo; de Medeiros, Arnaldo Correia

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a very frequent functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort and alteration of bowel habits. The IBS physiopathology is extremely complex. Visceral hypersensitivity plays an important role in the pathogenesis of abdominal pain in both in vitro and in vivo models of this functional disorder. In order to obtain a general view of the participation of the main ion channels and receptors regarding the visceral hypersensitivity in the IBS and to describe their chemical structure, a literature review was carried out. A bibliographical research in the following electronic databases: Pubmed and Virtual Library in Health (BVS) was fulfilled by using the search terms “ion channels” “or” “receptors” “and” “visceral hypersensitivity” “or” “visceral nociception” “and” “irritable bowel syndrome”. Original and review articles were considered for data acquisition. The activation of the ATP ion-gated channels, voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and calcium (Cav) channels, as well as the activation of protease-activated receptors (PAR2), transient receptor potential vanilloide-1, serotonin, cannabinoids and cholecystokinin are involved in the genesis of visceral hypersensitivity in IBS. The involvement of ion channels and receptors concerning visceral hypersensitivity is noteworthy in IBS models. PMID:24976114

  19. Resolvin D2 is a potent endogenous inhibitor for transient receptor potential subtype V1/A1, inflammatory pain, and spinal cord synaptic plasticity in mice: distinct roles of resolvin D1, D2, and E1.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Kyu; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Liu, Tong; Lü, Ning; Serhan, Charles N; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2011-12-14

    Inflammatory pain such as arthritic pain is typically treated with opioids and cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors with well known side effects. Transient receptor potential subtype vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankyryn 1 (TRPA1) contribute importantly to the genesis of inflammatory pain via both peripheral mechanisms (peripheral sensitization) and spinal cord mechanisms (central sensitization). Although these TRP channels have been intensively studied, little is known about their endogenous inhibitors. Recent studies have demonstrated that the endogenous lipid mediators resolvins (RvE1 and RvD1), derived from ω-3 unsaturated fatty acids, are potent inhibitors for inflammatory pain, without noticeable side effects. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying resolvins' distinct analgesic actions in mice are unclear. RvD2 is a novel family member of resolvins. Here we report that RvD2 is a remarkably potent inhibitor of TRPV1 (IC(50) = 0.1 nm) and TRPA1 (IC(50) = 2 nm) in primary sensory neurons, whereas RvE1 and RvD1 selectively inhibited TRPV1 (IC(50) = 1 nm) and TRPA1 (IC(50) = 9 nm), respectively. Accordingly, RvD2, RvE1, and RvD1 differentially regulated TRPV1 and TRPA1 agonist-elicited acute pain and spinal cord synaptic plasticity [spontaneous EPSC (sEPSC) frequency increase]. RvD2 also abolished inflammation-induced sEPSC increases (frequency and amplitude), without affecting basal synaptic transmission. Intrathecal administration of RvD2 at very low doses (0.01-1 ng) prevented formalin-induced spontaneous pain. Intrathecal RvD2 also reversed adjuvant-induced inflammatory pain without altering baseline pain and motor function. Finally, intrathecal RvD2 reversed C-fiber stimulation-evoked long-term potentiation in the spinal cord. Our findings suggest distinct roles of resolvins in regulating TRP channels and identify RvD2 as a potent endogenous inhibitor for TRPV1/TRPA1 and inflammatory pain.

  20. Distinct roles of ASIC3 and TRPV1 receptors in electroacupuncture-induced segmental and systemic analgesia.

    PubMed

    Xin, Juanjuan; Su, Yangshuai; Yang, Zhaokun; He, Wei; Shi, Hong; Wang, Xiaoyu; Hu, Ling; Yu, Xiaochun; Jing, Xianghong; Zhu, Bing

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the effects of different afferent fibers on electroacupuncture (EA)-induced analgesia. However, contributions of functional receptors expressed on afferent fibers to the EA analgesia remain unclear. This study investigates the roles of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors in EA-induced segmental and systemic analgesia. Effects of EA at acupoint ST36 with different intensities on the C-fiber reflex and mechanical and thermal pain thresholds were measured among the ASIC3(-/-), TRPV1(-/-), and C57BL/6 mice. Compared with C57BL/6 mice, the ipsilateral inhibition of EA with 0.8 C-fiber threshold (0.8Tc) intensity on C-fiber reflex was markedly reduced in ASIC3(-/-) mice, whereas the bilateral inhibition of 1.0 and 2.0Tc EA was significantly decreased in TRPV1(-/-) mice. The segmental increase in pain thresholds induced by 0.3 mA EA was significantly reduced in ASIC3(-/-) mice, whereas the systemic enhancement of 1.0 mA EA was markedly decreased in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Thus, segmental analgesia of EA with lower intensity is partially mediated by ASIC3 receptor on Aβ-fiber, whereas systemic analgesia induced by EA with higher intensity is more likely induced by TRPV1 receptor on Aδ- and C-fibers.

  1. Are AMPA Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators Potential Pharmacotherapeutics for Addiction?

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, Lucas R.; Olive, M. Foster

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in an activity-dependent manner. Through these mechanisms, AMPA PAMs have shown promise as broad spectrum pharmacotherapeutics in preclinical and clinical studies for various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In recent years, a small collection of preclinical animal studies has also shown that AMPA PAMs may have potential as pharmacotherapeutic adjuncts to extinction-based or cue-exposure therapies for the treatment of drug addiction. The present paper will review this preclinical literature, discuss novel data collected in our laboratory, and recommend future research directions for the possible development of AMPA PAMs as anti-addiction medications. PMID:24380895

  2. Hypersensitivity Induced by Activation of Spinal Cord PAR2 Receptors Is Partially Mediated by TRPV1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mrozkova, Petra; Spicarova, Diana; Palecek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors 2 (PAR2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the peripheral nerve endings are implicated in the development of increased sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli, especially during inflammatory states. Both PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors are co-expressed in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on their peripheral endings and also on presynaptic endings in the spinal cord dorsal horn. However, the modulation of nociceptive synaptic transmission in the superficial dorsal horn after activation of PAR2 and their functional coupling with TRPV1 is not clear. To investigate the role of spinal PAR2 activation on nociceptive modulation, intrathecal drug application was used in behavioural experiments and patch-clamp recordings of spontaneous, miniature and dorsal root stimulation-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs, mEPSCs, eEPSCs) were performed on superficial dorsal horn neurons in acute rat spinal cord slices. Intrathecal application of PAR2 activating peptide SLIGKV-NH2 induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was prevented by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist SB 366791 and was reduced by protein kinases inhibitor staurosporine. Patch-clamp experiments revealed robust decrease of mEPSC frequency (62.8 ± 4.9%), increase of sEPSC frequency (127.0 ± 5.9%) and eEPSC amplitude (126.9 ± 12.0%) in dorsal horn neurons after acute SLIGKV-NH2 application. All these EPSC changes, induced by PAR2 activation, were prevented by SB 366791 and staurosporine pretreatment. Our results demonstrate an important role of spinal PAR2 receptors in modulation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord dorsal horn at least partially mediated by activation of presynaptic TRPV1 receptors. The functional coupling between the PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors on the central branches of DRG neurons may be important especially during different pathological states when it may enhance pain perception. PMID:27755539

  3. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alexandra L; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Rosen, Steven T

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death.

  4. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexandra L.; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Rosen, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3’-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death. PMID:26715915

  5. Depression of gustatory receptor potential in frog taste cell by parasympathetic nerve-induced slow hyperpolarizing potential.

    PubMed

    Sato, Toshihide; Nishishita, Kazuhisa; Mineda, Takao; Okada, Yukio; Toda, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    Parasympathetic nerve (PSN) innervates taste cells of the frog taste disk, and electrical stimulation of PSN elicited a slow hyperpolarizing potential (HP) in taste cells. Here we report that gustatory receptor potentials in frog taste cells are depressed by PSN-induced slow HPs. When PSN was stimulated at 30 Hz during generation of taste cell responses, the large amplitude of depolarizing receptor potential for 1 M NaCl and 1 mM acetic acid was depressed by approximately 40% by slow HPs, but the small amplitude of the depolarizing receptor potential for 10 mM quinine-HCl (Q-HCl) and 1 M sucrose was completely depressed by slow HPs and furthermore changed to the hyperpolarizing direction. The duration of the depolarizing receptor potentials depressed by slow HPs prolonged with increasing period of PSN stimulation. As tastant-induced depolarizing receptor potentials were increased, the amplitude of PSN-induced slow HPs inhibiting the receptor potentials gradually decreased. The mean reversal potentials of the slow HPs were approximately -1 mV under NaCl and acetic acid stimulations, but approximately -14 mV under Q-HCl and sucrose stimulations. This implies that when a slow HP was evoked on the same amplitude of depolarizing receptor potentials, the depression of the NaCl and acetic acid responses in taste cells was larger than that of Q-HCl and sucrose responses. It is concluded that slow HP-induced depression of gustatory depolarizing receptor potentials derives from the interaction between gustatory receptor current and slow hyperpolarizing current in frog taste cells and that the interaction is stronger for NaCl and acetic acid stimulations than for Q-HCl and sucrose stimulations.

  6. The prostaglandin EP1 receptor potentiates kainate receptor activation via a protein kinase C pathway and exacerbates status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Asheebo; Gueorguieva, Paoula; Lelutiu, Nadia; Quan, Yi; Shaw, Renee; Dingledine, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) regulates membrane excitability, synaptic transmission, plasticity, and neuronal survival. The consequences of PGE2 release following seizures has been the subject of much study. Here we demonstrate that the prostaglandin E2 receptor 1 (EP1, or Ptger1) modulates native kainate receptors, a family of ionotropic glutamate receptors widely expressed throughout the central nervous system. Global ablation of the EP1 gene in mice (EP1-KO) had no effect on seizure threshold after kainate injection but reduced the likelihood to enter status epilepticus. EP1-KO mice that did experience typical status epilepticus had reduced hippocampal neurodegeneration and a blunted inflammatory response. Further studies with native prostanoid and kainate receptors in cultured cortical neurons, as well as with recombinant prostanoid and kainate receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, demonstrated that EP1 receptor activation potentiates heteromeric but not homomeric kainate receptors via a second messenger cascade involving phospholipase C, calcium and protein kinase C. Three critical GluK5 C-terminal serines underlie the potentiation of the GluK2/GluK5 receptor by EP1 activation. Taken together, these results indicate that EP1 receptor activation during seizures, through a protein kinase C pathway, increases the probability of kainic acid induced status epilepticus, and independently promotes hippocampal neurodegeneration and a broad inflammatory response. PMID:24952362

  7. Pronociceptive response elicited by TRPA1 receptor activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Andrade, E L; Luiz, A P; Ferreira, J; Calixto, J B

    2008-03-18

    Ankyrin-repeat transient receptor potential 1 (TRPA1) is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and it is found in sensory neurons. In the present study, we found that TRPA1 receptor activation with allyl isothiocyanate or cinnamaldehyde caused dose-dependent spontaneous nociception when injected into the mouse hind paw. Very similar results were obtained when stimulating transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors with capsaicin. Pretreatment with the TRP receptor antagonist Ruthenium Red (1 nmol/paw) inhibited capsaicin-(0.1 nmol/paw) and allyl isothiocyanate-(1 nmol/paw) induced nociceptive responses. However, the nonselective TRPV1 receptor antagonist capsazepine (1 nmol/paw) and the selective TRPV1 receptor antagonist SB 366791 (1 nmol/paw) only attenuated capsaicin-induced nociception. In contrast, the intrathecal treatment with TRPA1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (2.5 nmol/site) and the degeneration of the subset of primary afferent fibers sensitive to capsaicin significantly reduced allyl isothiocyanate-induced nociception. Consequently to TRPA1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment there was a marked decrease of the expression of TRPA1 receptor in both sciatic nervous and spinal cord segments. Moreover, capsaicin and allyl isothiocyanate-induced nociception were not significantly changed by chemical sympathectomy produced by guanethidine. The previous degranulation of mast cells by compound 48/80 and treatment with antagonist H(1) receptor antagonist pyrilamine (400 microg/paw) both significantly inhibited the capsaicin- and allyl isothiocyanate-induced nociception. The selective NK(1) receptor antagonist N(2)-[(4R)-4-hydroxy-1-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl) carbony-1-L-prolyl]-N-methyl-N-phenylmethyl-3-2-(2-naphtyl)-L-alaninamide (10 nmol/paw) reduced either capsaicin- or allyl isothiocyanate-induced nociception. Collectively, the present findings demonstrate that the TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate produces a

  8. The potential role of dopamine D₃ receptor neurotransmission in cognition.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shinichiro; Gerretsen, Philip; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Caravaggio, Fernando; Chow, Tiffany; Le Foll, Bernard; Mulsant, Benoit; Pollock, Bruce; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2013-08-01

    Currently available treatments have limited pro-cognitive effects for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. The primary objective of this work is to review the literature on the role of dopamine D₃ receptors in cognition, and propose dopamine D₃ receptor antagonists as possible cognitive enhancers for neuropsychiatric disorders. A literature search was performed to identify animal and human studies on D₃ receptors and cognition using PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE. The search terms included "dopamine D₃ receptor" and "cognition". The literature search identified 164 articles. The results revealed: (1) D₃ receptors are associated with cognitive functioning in both healthy individuals and those with neuropsychiatric disorders; (2) D₃ receptor blockade appears to enhance while D₃ receptor agonism seems to impair cognitive function, including memory, attention, learning, processing speed, social recognition and executive function independent of age; and (3) D₃ receptor antagonists may exert their pro-cognitive effect by enhancing the release of acetylcholine in the prefrontal cortex, disinhibiting the activity of dopamine neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens or prefrontal cortex, or activating CREB signaling in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that D₃ receptor blockade may enhance cognitive performance in healthy individuals and treat cognitive dysfunction in individuals with a neuropsychiatric disorder. Clinical trials are needed to confirm these effects.

  9. Lipid modulation of thermal transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Hernández-García, Enrique; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    There is a subgroup of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels that are responsive to temperature (thermo-TRP channels). These are important to a variety of sensory and physiological phenomena such as pain and taste perception. All thermo-TRP channels known to date are subject to modulation by lipidic molecules of many kinds, from the ubiquitous cholesterol to more specialized molecules such as prostaglandins. Although the mechanisms and sites of binding of lipids on thermo-TRPs are largely unknown, the explosion on research of lipids and ion channels has revealed previously unsuspected roles for them. Diacyl glycerol is a lipid produced by phospholipase C (PLC) and it was discovered to modulate TRP channels in the eye of the fly, and many mammal TRP channels have been found to interact with lipids. While most of the lipids acting on thermo-TRP channels have been found to activate them, there are a few capable of inhibition. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate is even capable of both inhibition and activation on a couple of thermo-TRPs, depending on the cellular context. More data is required to assess the mechanism through which lipids affect thermo-TRP channel activity and the physiological importance of this interaction.

  10. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Yosuke; Szallasi, Arpad

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are important mediators of sensory signals with marked effects on cellular functions and signalling pathways. Indeed, mutations in genes encoding TRP channels are the cause of several inherited diseases in humans (the so-called ‘TRP channelopathies’) that affect the cardiovascular, renal, skeletal and nervous systems. TRP channels are also promising targets for drug discovery. The initial focus of research was on TRP channels that are expressed on nociceptive neurons. Indeed, a number of potent, small-molecule TRPV1, TRPV3 and TRPA1 antagonists have already entered clinical trials as novel analgesic agents. There has been a recent upsurge in the amount of work that expands TRP channel drug discovery efforts into new disease areas such as asthma, cancer, anxiety, cardiac hypertrophy, as well as obesity and metabolic disorders. A better understanding of TRP channel functions in health and disease should lead to the discovery of first-in-class drugs for these intractable diseases. With this review, we hope to capture the current state of this rapidly expanding and changing field. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24102319

  11. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channel function in the reproductive axis.

    PubMed

    Götz, Viktoria; Qiao, Sen; Beck, Andreas; Boehm, Ulrich

    2017-05-03

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels play important functional roles in the signal transduction machinery of hormone-secreting cells and have recently been implicated in reproductive physiology. While expression studies have demonstrated TRP channel expression at all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (hpg) axis, functional details about TRP channel action at the level of the individual cells controlling reproduction are just beginning to emerge. Canonical TRP (TRPC) channels are prominently expressed in the reproductive center of the neuroendocrine brain, i.e. in kisspeptin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. Kisspeptin neurons are depolarized by leptin via activation of TRPC channels and kisspeptin depolarizes GnRH neurons through TRPC4 activation. Recent studies have functionally identified TRPC channels also in gonadotrope cells in the anterior pituitary gland, which secrete gonadotropins in response to GnRH and thus regulate gonadal function. TRP channel expression in these cells exhibits remarkable plasticity and depends on the hormonal status of the animal. Subsequent functional analyses have demonstrated that TRPC5 in gonadotropes contributes to depolarization of the plasma membrane upon GnRH stimulation and increases the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration via its own Ca(2+) permeability and via the activation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. However, conditional gene targeting experiments will be needed to unambiguously dissect the physiological role of TRPC channels in the different cell types of the reproductive axis in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 by eugenol.

    PubMed

    Chung, G; Im, S T; Kim, Y H; Jung, S J; Rhyu, M-R; Oh, S B

    2014-03-07

    Eugenol is a bioactive plant extract used as an analgesic agent in dentistry. The structural similarity of eugenol to cinnamaldehyde, an active ligand for transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), suggests that eugenol might produce its effect via TRPA1, in addition to TRPV1 as we reported previously. In this study, we investigated the effect of eugenol on TRPA1, by fura-2-based calcium imaging and patch clamp recording in trigeminal ganglion neurons and in a heterologous expression system. As the result, eugenol induced robust calcium responses in rat trigeminal ganglion neurons that responded to a specific TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), and not to capsaicin. Capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist failed to inhibit eugenol-induced calcium responses in AITC-responding neurons. In addition, eugenol response was observed in trigeminal ganglion neurons from TRPV1 knockout mice and human embryonic kidney 293 cell lines that express human TRPA1, which was inhibited by TRPA1-specific antagonist HC-030031. Eugenol-evoked TRPA1 single channel activity and eugenol-induced TRPA1 currents were dose-dependent with EC50 of 261.5μM. In summary, these results demonstrate that the activation of TRPA1 might account for another molecular mechanism underlying the pharmacological action of eugenol.

  13. Transient Receptor Potential Ion Channels Control Thermoregulatory Behaviour in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, Frank; Murray, Shauna A.

    2007-01-01

    Biological functions are governed by thermodynamics, and animals regulate their body temperature to optimise cellular performance and to avoid harmful extremes. The capacity to sense environmental and internal temperatures is a prerequisite for the evolution of thermoregulation. However, the mechanisms that enable ectothermic vertebrates to sense heat remain unknown. The recently discovered thermal characteristics of transient receptor potential ion channels (TRP) render these proteins suitable to act as temperature sensors. Here we test the hypothesis that TRPs are present in reptiles and function to control thermoregulatory behaviour. We show that the hot-sensing TRPV1 is expressed in a crocodile (Crocodylus porosus), an agamid (Amphibolurus muricatus) and a scincid (Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii) lizard, as well as in the quail and zebrafinch (Coturnix chinensis and Poephila guttata). The TRPV1 genes from all reptiles form a unique clade that is delineated from the mammalian and the ancestral Xenopus sequences by an insertion of two amino acids. TRPV1 and the cool-sensing TRPM8 are expressed in liver, muscle (transversospinalis complex), and heart tissues of the crocodile, and have the potential to act as internal thermometer and as external temperatures sensors. Inhibition of TRPV1 and TRPM8 in C. porosus abolishes the typically reptilian shuttling behaviour between cooling and heating environments, and leads to significantly altered body temperature patterns. Our results provide the proximate mechanism of thermal selection in terrestrial ectotherms, which heralds a fundamental change in interpretation, because TRPs provide the mechanism for a tissue-specific input into the animals' thermoregulatory response. PMID:17356692

  14. Presynaptic kainate receptors impart an associative property to hippocampal mossy fiber long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Dietmar; Mellor, Jack; Breustedt, Joerg; Nicoll, Roger A

    2003-10-01

    Hippocampal mossy fiber synapses show an unusual form of long-term potentiation (LTP) that is independent of NMDA receptor activation and is expressed presynaptically. Using receptor antagonists, as well as receptor knockout mice, we found that presynaptic kainate receptors facilitate the induction of mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP), although they are not required for this form of LTP. Most importantly, these receptors impart an associativity to mossy fiber LTP such that activity in neighboring mossy fiber synapses, or even associational/commissural synapses, influences the threshold for inducing mossy fiber LTP. Such a mechanism greatly increases the computational power of this form of plasticity.

  15. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors mediate the effects of dipyrone.

    PubMed

    Crunfli, Fernanda; Vilela, Fabiana C; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    Dipyrone is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used primarily as an analgesic and antipyretic. Some hypothesize that dipyrone activity can modulate other pathways, including endocannabinoid signalling. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible role of endocannabinoids in mediating dipyrone activity. This study is based on the tetrad effects of cannabinoids, namely an antinociceptive and cataleptic state, hypolocomotion and hypothermia. Dipyrone (500 mg/kg, i.p.) treatment decreased locomotor activity, increased the latency to a thermal analgesic response and induced a cataleptic and hypothermic state. These reactions are similar to the tetrad effects caused by the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the effects of dipyrone on locomotor activity, the cataleptic response and thermal analgesia. Both AM251 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) accentuated the reduction in body temperature caused by dipyrone. However, the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630 did not alter the hypothermic response to dipyrone. These results indicate involvement of the endocannabinoid system, especially CB1 receptors, in the analgesic and cataleptic effects of dipyrone, as well as hypolocomotion. However, cannabinoid receptors and TRPV1 were not involved in the hypothermic effects of dipyrone. We hypothesize that the mechanism of action of dipyrone may involve inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase and fatty acid amide hydrolase, which together provide additional arachidonic acid as substrate for endocannabinoid synthesis or other related molecules. This increase in endocannabinoid availability enhances CB1 receptor stimulation, contributing to the observed effects. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Moderate concentrations of 4-O-methylhonokiol potentiate GABAA receptor currents stronger than honokiol.

    PubMed

    Baur, Roland; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Sigel, Erwin

    2014-10-01

    Magnolia bark preparations from Magnolia officinalis of Asian medicinal systems are known for their muscle relaxant effect and anticonvulsant activity. These CNS related effects are ascribed to the presence of the biphenyl-type neolignans honokiol and magnolol that exert a potentiating effect on GABAA receptors. 4-O-methylhonokiol isolated from seeds of the North-American M. grandiflora was compared to honokiol for its activity to potentiate GABAA receptors and its GABAA receptor subtype-specificity was established. Different recombinant GABAA receptors were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and electrophysiological techniques were used determine to their modulation by 4-O-methylhonokiol. 3μM 4-O-methylhonokiol is shown here to potentiate responses of the α₁β₂γ₂ GABAA receptor about 20-fold stronger than the same concentration of honokiol. In the present study potentiation by 4-O-methylhonokiol is also detailed for 12 GABAA receptor subtypes to assess GABAA receptor subunits that are responsible for the potentiating effect. The much higher potentiation of GABAA receptors at identical concentrations of 4-O-methylhonokiol as compared to honokiol parallels previous observations made in other systems of potentiated pharmacological activity of 4-O-methylhonokiol over honokiol. The results point to the use of 4-O-methylhonokiol as a lead for GABAA receptor potentiation and corroborate the use of M. grandiflora seeds against convulsions in Mexican folk medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Therapeutic potential of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Shaun P; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is widely distributed in the human body and contributes to a vast number of physiological processes. Since its discovery, NPY has been implicated in metabolic regulation and, although interest in its role in central mechanisms related to food intake and obesity has somewhat diminished, the topic remains a strong focus of research concerning NPY signalling. In addition, a number of other uses for modulators of NPY receptors have been implied in a range of diseases, although the development of NPY receptor ligands has been slow, with no clinically approved receptor therapeutics currently available. Nevertheless, several interesting small molecule compounds, notably Y2 receptor antagonists, have been published recently, fueling optimism in the field. Herein we review the role of NPY in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases and highlight instances where NPY receptor signalling systems are attractive therapeutic targets. PMID:20972986

  18. Artificial sweeteners and salts producing a metallic taste sensation activate TRPV1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Riera, Céline E; Vogel, Horst; Simon, Sidney A; le Coutre, Johannes

    2007-08-01

    Throughout the world many people use artificial sweeteners (AS) for the purpose of reducing caloric intake. The most prominently used of these molecules include saccharin, aspartame (Nutrasweet), acesulfame-K, and cyclamate. Despite the caloric advantage they provide, one key concern in their use is their aversive aftertaste that has been characterized on a sensory level as bitter and/or metallic. Recently, it has been shown that the activation of particular T2R bitter taste receptors is partially involved with the bitter aftertaste sensation of saccharin and acesulfame-K. To more fully understand the biology behind these phenomena we have addressed the question of whether AS could stimulate transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors, as these receptors are activated by a large range of structurally different chemicals. Moreover, TRPV1 receptors and/or their variants are found in taste receptor cells and in nerve terminals throughout the oral cavity. Hence, TRPV1 activation could be involved in the AS aftertaste or even contribute to the poorly understood metallic taste sensation. Using Ca(2+) imaging on TRPV1 receptors heterologously expressed in the human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and on dissociated primary sensory neurons, we find that in both systems, AS activate TRPV1 receptors, and, moreover, they sensitize these channels to acid and heat. We also found that TRPV1 receptors are activated by CuSO(4), ZnSO(4), and FeSO(4), three salts known to produce a metallic taste sensation. In summary, our results identify a novel group of compounds that activate TRPV1 and, consequently, provide a molecular mechanism that may account for off tastes of sweeteners and metallic tasting salts.

  19. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional erythropoietin receptor: Potential therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    PONIEWIERSKA-BARAN, AGATA; SUSZYNSKA, MALWINA; SUN, WENYUE; ABDELBASET-ISMAIL, AHMED; SCHNEIDER, GABRIELA; BARR, FREDERIC G.; RATAJCZAK, MARIUSZ Z.

    2015-01-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed by cells from the erythroid lineage; however, evidence has accumulated that it is also expressed by some solid tumors. This is an important observation, because recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is employed in cancer patients to treat anemia related to chemo/radiotherapy. In our studies we employed eight rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines (three alveolar-type RMS cell lines and five embrional-type RMS cell lines), and mRNA samples obtained from positive, PAX7-FOXO1-positive, and fusion-negative RMS patient samples. Expression of EpoR was evaluated by RT-PCR, gene array and FACS. The functionality of EpoR in RMS cell lines was evaluated by chemotaxis, adhesion, and direct cell proliferation assays. In some of the experiments, RMS cells were exposed to vincristine (VCR) in the presence or absence of EPO to test whether EPO may impair the therapeutic effect of VCR. We report for a first time that functional EpoR is expressed in human RMS cell lines as well as by primary tumors from RMS patients. Furthermore, EpoR is detectably expressed in both embryonal and alveolar RMS subtypes. At the functional level, several human RMS cell lines responded to EPO stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. Moreover, RMS cells became more resistant to VCR treatment in the presence of EPO. Our findings have important potential clinical implications, indicating that EPO supplementation in RMS patients may have the unwanted side effect of tumor progression. PMID:26412593

  20. TRP Channels as Potential Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Moran, Magdalene M

    2017-09-25

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily of channels comprises a diverse group of cation channels. Four TRP channel subunits coassemble to form functional homo- or heterotetramers that pass sodium, calcium, or both in the inward direction. Modulating TRP channel activity provides an important way to impact cellular function by regulating both membrane excitability and intracellular calcium levels. The import of these channels is underscored by the number of genetic diseases caused when they are mutated: Skeletal, skin, sensory, ocular, cardiac, and neuronal disturbances all arise from aberrant TRP function. Not surprisingly, there has been significant pharmaceutical interest in targeting these fascinating channels. Compounds that modulate TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), TRPV3, TRPV4, TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and TRP melastatin 8 (TRPM8) have all entered clinical trials. The goal of this review is to familiarize the readers with the rationale behind the pursuit of these channels in drug discovery and the status of those efforts. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology Volume 58 is January 6, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  1. Beyond classical benzodiazepines: Novel therapeutic potential of GABAA receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Uwe; Knoflach, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    GABAA receptors are a family of ligand-gated ion channels which are essential for the regulation of central nervous system function. Benzodiazepines – which target GABAA receptors containing the α1, α2, α3, or α5 subunits non-selectively – have been in clinical use for decades and are still among the most widely prescribed drugs for the treatment of insomnia and anxiety disorders. However, their use is limited by side effects and the risk of drug dependence. In the past decade, the identification of separable key functions of GABAA receptor subtypes suggests that receptor subtype-selective compounds could overcome the limitations of classical benzodiazepines and, furthermore, might be valuable for novel indications, such as analgesia, depression, schizophrenia, cognitive enhancement and stroke. PMID:21799515

  2. Sigma receptors as potential therapeutic targets for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Linda; Kaushal, Nidhi; Robson, Matthew J; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2014-11-15

    Sigma receptors comprise a unique family of proteins that have been implicated in the pathophysiology and treatment of many central nervous system disorders, consistent with their high level of expression in the brain and spinal cord. Mounting evidence indicate that targeting sigma receptors may be particularly beneficial in a number of neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer׳s disease, Parkinson׳s disease, stroke, methamphetamine neurotoxicity, Huntington׳s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and retinal degeneration. In this perspective, a brief overview is given on sigma receptors, followed by a focus on common mechanisms of neurodegeneration that appear amenable to modulation by sigma receptor ligands to convey neuroprotective effects and/or restorative functions. Within each of the major mechanisms discussed herein, the neuroprotective effects of sigma ligands are summarized, and when known, the specific sigma receptor subtype(s) involved are identified. Together, the literature suggests sigma receptors may provide a novel target for combatting neurodegenerative diseases through both neuronal and glial mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Aging of whiskey increases the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor response.

    PubMed

    Koda, Hirofumi; Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Aoshima, Hitoshi

    2003-08-27

    It is known that the target of most mood-defining compounds such as ethanol is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activities in the human brain. Because both extracts of whiskey by pentane and fragrant components in whiskey potentiate the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting cRNAs prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors in order to study the effects of whiskey itself on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. Whiskey itself also potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors generally more than ethanol at the same concentration as that of the whiskey. The potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response increased with the aging period of the whiskey. Inhalation of whiskey to mice increased the sleeping time induced by pentobarbital more than that of the same concentration of ethanol as the whiskey. These results suggest that not only ethanol but also minor components in whiskey play an important role in the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor-mediated response and possibly the sedative effect of whiskey. Although the minor components are present in extremely small quantities compared with ethanol in alcoholic beverages, they may modulate the mood or consciousness of humans through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic compounds are easily absorbed into the brain across the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response.

  4. Potentiation of GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes by perfume and phytoncid.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, H; Hamamoto, K

    1999-04-01

    To study the effects of perfume and phytoncid on GABAA receptors, ionotropic GABAA receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injecting mRNAs that had been prepared from rat whole brain. Essential oil, perfume and such phytoncid as leaf alcohol, hinokitiol, pinene, eugenol, citronellol and citronellal potentiated the response in the presence of GABA at low concentrations (10 and 30 microM), possibly because they bound to the potentiation-site in GABAA receptors and increased the affinity of GABA to the receptors. Since it is known that the potentiation of GABAA receptors by benzodiazepine, barbiturate, steroids and anesthetics induces the anxiolytic, anticonvulsant and sedative activity or anesthetic effect, these results suggest the possibility that the intake of perfume or phytoncid through the lungs, the skin or the intestines modulates the neural transmission in the brain through ionotropic GABAA receptors and changes the frame of the human mind, as alcohol or tobacco does.

  5. Functional expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 in the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing; Harada, Narinobu; Kubo, Nobuo; Liu, Bing; Mizuno, Atsuko; Suzuki, Makoto; Yamashita, Toshio

    2006-02-06

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4, the Ca2+-permeable cation channel has been proposed as an osmosensitive and a mechanosensitive channel. We investigated functional expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 in inner hair cells, outer hair cells, and spiral ganglion neurons of the mouse cochlea. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 mRNA and protein were expressed in inner hair cells, outer hair cells, and spiral ganglion neurons on the basis of the findings of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, single-cell reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry, whereas they were negative in transient receptor potential vanilloid 4-/- mice cochleae. Hypotonic stimulation and 4-alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, a transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 synthetic activator, increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in wild-type outer hair cells, whereas in transient receptor potential vanilloid 4-/- mice, outer hair cells failed to exhibit a Ca2+ response to both stimulations. In conclusion, transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 may function as an osmosensory and a mechanosensory receptor in the cochlea.

  6. The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is tonically activated in vivo and involved in body temperature regulation.

    PubMed

    Gavva, Narender R; Bannon, Anthony W; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Hovland, David N; Lehto, Sonya G; Gore, Anu; Juan, Todd; Deng, Hong; Han, Bora; Klionsky, Lana; Kuang, Rongzhen; Le, April; Tamir, Rami; Wang, Jue; Youngblood, Brad; Zhu, Dawn; Norman, Mark H; Magal, Ella; Treanor, James J S; Louis, Jean-Claude

    2007-03-28

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) is a cation channel that serves as a polymodal detector of pain-producing stimuli such as capsaicin, protons (pH <5.7), and heat. TRPV1 antagonists block pain behaviors in rodent models of inflammatory, neuropathic, and cancer pain, suggesting their utility as analgesics. Here, we report that TRPV1 antagonists representing various chemotypes cause an increase in body temperature (hyperthermia), identifying a potential issue for their clinical development. Peripheral restriction of antagonists did not eliminate hyperthermia, suggesting that the site of action is predominantly outside of the blood-brain barrier. Antagonists that are ineffective against proton activation also caused hyperthermia, indicating that blocking capsaicin and heat activation of TRPV1 is sufficient to produce hyperthermia. All TRPV1 antagonists evaluated here caused hyperthermia, suggesting that TRPV1 is tonically activated in vivo and that TRPV1 antagonism and hyperthermia are not separable. TRPV1 antagonists caused hyperthermia in multiple species (rats, dogs, and monkeys), demonstrating that TRPV1 function in thermoregulation is conserved from rodents to primates. Together, these results indicate that tonic TRPV1 activation regulates body temperature.

  7. Characterization of potential ABA receptors in Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Boneh, Uri; Biton, Iris; Zheng, Chuanlin; Schwartz, Amnon; Ben-Ari, Giora

    2012-02-01

    Molecular control mechanisms for abiotic stress tolerance are based on the activation and regulation of specific stress-related genes. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a key endogenous messenger in a plant's response to such stresses. A novel ABA binding mechanism which plays a key role in plant cell signaling cascades has recently been uncovered. In the absence of ABA, a type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) interacts and inhibits the kinase SnRK2. Binding of ABA to the PYR/PYLs receptors enables interaction between the ABA receptor and the PP2C protein, and abrogates the SnRK2 inactivation. The active SnRK2 is then free to activate the ABA-responsive element Binding Factors which target ABA-dependent gene expression. We used the grape as a model to study the ABA perception mechanism in fruit trees. The grape ABA signaling cascade consists of at least seven ABA receptors and six PP2Cs. We used a yeast two-hybrid system to examine physical interaction in vitro between the grape ABA receptors and their interacting partners, and found that twenty-two receptor-PP2C interactions can occur. Moreover, quantifying these affinities by the use of the LacZ reporter enables us to show that VvPP2C4 and VvPP2C9 are the major binding partners of the ABA receptor. We also tested in vivo the root and leaf gene expression of the various ABA receptors and PP2Cs in the presence of exogenic ABA and under different abiotic stresses such as high salt concentration, cold and drought, and found that many of these genes are regulated by such abiotic environmental factors. Our results indicate organ specificity in the ABA receptor genes and stress specificity in the VvPP2Cs. We suggest that VvPP2C4 is the major PP2C involved in ABA perception in leaves and roots, and VvRCAR6 and VvRCAR5 respectively, are the major receptors involved in ABA perception in these organs. Identification, characterization and manipulation of the central players in the ABA signaling cascades in fruit trees is

  8. Potentiation of Gamma Aminobutyric Acid Receptors (GABAAR) by Ethanol: How Are Inhibitory Receptors Affected?

    PubMed Central

    Förstera, Benjamin; Castro, Patricio A.; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the understanding of ethanol actions on the type A γ-aminobutyric acid chloride channel (GABAAR), a member of the pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs). However, the mechanism by which ethanol potentiates the complex is still not fully understood and a number of publications have shown contradictory results. Thus many questions still remain unresolved requiring further studies for a better comprehension of this effect. The present review concentrates on the involvement of GABAAR in the acute actions of ethanol and specifically focuses on the immediate, direct or indirect, synaptic and extra-synaptic modulatory effects. To elaborate on the immediate, direct modulation of GABAAR by acute ethanol exposure, electrophysiological studies investigating the importance of different subunits, and data from receptor mutants will be examined. We will also discuss the nature of the putative binding sites for ethanol based on structural data obtained from other members of the pLGICs family. Finally, we will briefly highlight the glycine gated chloride channel (GlyR), another member of the pLGIC family, as a suitable target for the development of new pharmacological tools. PMID:27199667

  9. Use of Membrane Potential to Achieve Transmembrane Modification with an Artificial Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Wataru; Kawaguchi, Miki; Sun, Xizheng; Nagao, Yusuke; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashida, Mitsuru; Higuchi, Yuriko; Kishimura, Akihiro; Katayama, Yoshiki; Mori, Takeshi

    2017-02-15

    We developed a strategy to modify cell membranes with an artificial transmembrane receptor. Coulomb force on the receptor, caused by the membrane potential, was used to achieve membrane penetration. A hydrophobically modified cationic peptide was used as a membrane potential sensitive region that was connected to biotin through a transmembrane oligoethylene glycol (OEG) chain. This artificial receptor gradually disappeared from the cell membrane via penetration despite the presence of a hydrophilic OEG chain. However, when the receptor was bound to streptavidin (SA), it remained on the cell membrane because of the large and hydrophilic nature of SA.

  10. Dopamine modulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor in dorsal root ganglia neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Rebecchi, Mario; Kaczocha, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Key points Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors transduce noxious thermal stimuli and are responsible for the thermal hyperalgesia associated with inflammatory pain.A large population of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, including the C low threshold mechanoreceptors (C‐LTMRs), express tyrosine hydroxylase, and probably release dopamine.We found that dopamine and SKF 81297 (an agonist at D1/D5 receptors), but not quinpirole (an agonist at D2 receptors), downregulate the activity of TRPV1 channels in DRG neurons.The inhibitory effect of SKF 81297 on TRPV1 channels was strongly dependent on external calcium and preferentially linked to calcium–calmodulin‐dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII).We suggest that modulation of TRPV1 channels by dopamine in nociceptive neurons may represent a way for dopamine to modulate incoming noxious stimuli. Abstract The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor plays a key role in the modulation of nociceptor excitability. To address whether dopamine can modulate the activity of TRPV1 channels in nociceptive neurons, the effects of dopamine and dopamine receptor agonists were tested on the capsaicin‐activated current recorded from acutely dissociated small diameter (<27 μm) dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Dopamine or SKF 81297 (an agonist at D1/D5 receptors), caused inhibition of both inward and outward currents by ∼60% and ∼48%, respectively. The effect of SKF 81297 was reversed by SCH 23390 (an antagonist at D1/D5 receptors), confirming that it was mediated by activation of D1/D5 dopamine receptors. In contrast, quinpirole (an agonist at D2 receptors) had no significant effect on the capsaicin‐activated current. Inhibition of the capsaicin‐activated current by SKF 81297 was mediated by G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and highly dependent on external calcium. The inhibitory effect of SKF 81297 on the capsaicin‐activated current was not affected when

  11. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes.

  12. Arvanil, anandamide and N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA) inhibit emesis through cannabinoid CB1 and vanilloid TRPV1 receptors in the ferret.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, K A; Cristino, L; Oland, L D; Van Sickle, M D; Starowicz, K; Pittman, Q J; Guglielmotti, V; Davison, J S; Di Marzo, V

    2007-05-01

    Cannabinoid (CB) agonists suppress nausea and vomiting (emesis). Similarly, transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor agonists are anti-emetic. Arvanil, N-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzyl)-arachidonamide, is a synthetic 'hybrid' agonist of CB1 and TRPV1 receptors. Anandamide and N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA) are endogenous agonists at both these receptors. We investigated if arvanil, NADA and anandamide were anti-emetic in the ferret and their mechanism of action. All compounds reduced the episodes of emesis in response to morphine 6 glucuronide. These effects were attenuated by AM251, a CB1 antagonist that was pro-emetic per se, and TRPV1 antagonists iodoresiniferatoxin and AMG 9810, which were without pro-emetic effects. Similar sensitivity to arvanil and NADA was found for prodromal signs of emesis. We analysed the distribution of TRPV1 receptors in the ferret brainstem and, for comparison, the co-localization of CB1 and TRPV1 receptors in the mouse brainstem. TRPV1 immunoreactivity was largely restricted to the nucleus of the solitary tract of the ferret, with faint labeling in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and sparse distribution in the area postrema. A similar distribution of TRPV1, and its extensive co-localization with CB1, was observed in the mouse. Our findings suggest that CB1 and TRPV1 receptors in the brainstem play a major role in the control of emesis by agonists of these two receptors. While there appears to be an endogenous 'tone' of CB1 receptors inhibiting emesis, this does not seem to be the case for TRPV1 receptors, indicating that endogenously released endocannabinoids/endovanilloids inhibit emesis preferentially via CB1 receptors.

  13. Involvement of lysophosphatidic acid in bone cancer pain by potentiation of TRPV1 via PKCε pathway in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hai-Li; Zhang, Yu-Qiu; Zhao, Zhi-Qi

    2010-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) released from injury tissue and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor are implicated in the induction of chronic pain. In the present study we examined whether an interaction between LPA receptor LPA(1) and TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons contributes to the development of bone cancer pain. Bone cancer was established by injection of mammary gland carcinoma cells into the rat tibia. Following the development of bone cancer pain, the TRPV1 expression and capsaicin-evoked currents were up-regulated in rat DRG neurons at L(4-6) segments. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed a high co-localization of LPA(1) with TRPV1 in DRG neurons. In isolated DRG neurons, whole-cell patch recording showed that capsaicin-induced currents were potentiated by LPA in a dose-dependent manner. The potentiation was blocked by either LPA(1) antagonist, protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor or PKCε inhibitor, but not by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor or Rho inhibitor. In the behavioral tests, both mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in bone cancer rats were attenuated by LPA(1) antagonist. LPA potentiates TRPV1 current via a PKCε-dependent pathway in DRG neurons of rats with bone cancer, which may be a novel peripheral mechanism underlying the induction of bone cancer pain.

  14. The leukotriene B4 receptors BLT1 and BLT2 form an antagonistic sensitizing system in peripheral sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Sebastian; Sisignano, Marco; Kern, Katharina; Pierre, Sandra; Tunaru, Sorin; Jordan, Holger; Suo, Jing; Treutlein, Elsa-Marie; Angioni, Carlo; Ferreiros, Nerea; Leffler, Andreas; DeBruin, Natasja; Offermanns, Stefan; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus

    2017-04-14

    Sensitization of the heat-activated ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) through lipids is a fundamental mechanism during inflammation-induced peripheral sensitization. Leukotriene B4 is a proinflammatory lipid mediator whose role in peripheral nociceptive sensitization is not well understood to date. Two major G-protein-coupled receptors for leukotriene B4 have been identified: the high-affinity receptor BLT1 and the low-affinity receptor BLT2. Transcriptional screening for the expression G-protein-coupled receptors in murine dorsal root ganglia showed that both receptors were among the highest expressed in dorsal root ganglia. Calcium imaging revealed a sensitization of TRPV1-mediated calcium increases in a relative narrow concentration range for leukotriene B4 (100-200 nm). Selective antagonists and neurons from knock-out mice demonstrated a BLT1-dependent sensitization of TRPV1-mediated calcium increases. Accordingly, leukotriene B4-induced thermal hyperalgesia was mediated through BLT1 and TRPV1 as shown using the respective knock-out mice. Importantly, higher leukotriene B4 concentrations (>0.5 μm) and BLT2 agonists abolished sensitization of the TRPV1-mediated calcium increases. Also, BLT2 activation inhibited protein kinase C- and protein kinase A-mediated sensitization processes through the phosphatase calcineurin. Consequently, a selective BLT2-receptor agonist increased thermal and mechanical withdrawal thresholds during zymosan-induced inflammation. In accordance with these data, immunohistochemical analysis showed that both leukotriene B4 receptors were expressed in peripheral sensory neurons. Thus, the data show that the two leukotriene B4 receptors have opposing roles in the sensitization of peripheral sensory neurons forming a self-restricting system.

  15. Central nicotinic receptors: structure, function, ligands, and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, M Novella; Gratteri, Paola; Guandalini, Luca; Martini, Elisabetta; Bonaccini, Claudia; Gualtieri, Fulvio

    2007-06-01

    The growing interest in nicotinic receptors, because of their wide expression in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues and their involvement in several important CNS pathologies, has stimulated the synthesis of a high number of ligands able to modulate their function. These membrane proteins appear to be highly heterogeneous, and still only incomplete information is available on their structure, subunit composition, and stoichiometry. This is due to the lack of selective ligands to study the role of nAChR under physiological or pathological conditions; so far, only compounds showing selectivity between alpha4beta2 and alpha7 receptors have been obtained. The nicotinic receptor ligands have been designed starting from lead compounds from natural sources such as nicotine, cytisine, or epibatidine, and, more recently, through the high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. This review focuses on the structure of the new agonists, antagonists, and allosteric ligands of nicotinic receptors, it highlights the current knowledge on the binding site models as a molecular modeling approach to design new compounds, and it discusses the nAChR modulators which have entered clinical trials.

  16. Pharmacology and therapeutic potential of pattern recognition receptors.

    PubMed

    Paul-Clark, M J; George, P M; Gatheral, T; Parzych, K; Wright, W R; Crawford, D; Bailey, L K; Reed, D M; Mitchell, J A

    2012-08-01

    Pharmacologists have used pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for decades as a stimulus for studying mediators involved in inflammation and for the screening of anti-inflammatory compounds. However, in the view of immunologists, LPS was too non-specific for studying the mechanisms of immune signalling in infection and inflammation, as no receptors had been identified. This changed in the late 1990s with the discovery of the Toll-like receptors. These 'pattern recognition receptors' (PRRs) were able to recognise highly conserved sequences, the so called pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) present in or on pathogens. This specificity of particular PAMPs and their newly defined receptors provided a common ground between pharmacologists and immunologists for the study of inflammation. PRRs also recognise endogenous agonists, the so called danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which can result in sterile inflammation. The signalling pathways and ligands of many PRRs have now been characterised and there is no doubt that this rich vein of research will aid the discovery of new therapeutics for infectious conditions and chronic inflammatory disease.

  17. Sigma-1 receptor ligands: potential in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2004-01-01

    The sigma receptor was originally proposed to be a subtype of the opioid receptor. However, it is now clear that sigma receptors are unique non-opioid, non-phencyclidine brain proteins. Two types of sigma receptor exist, the sigma-1 receptor and the sigma-2 receptor. sigma-1 receptors have been cloned and their distribution, physiological functions and roles in signal transduction were recently characterised. Certain sex hormones in the brain (neurosteroids) are known to interact with sigma-1 receptors. sigma-1 receptors regulate glutamate NMDA receptor function and the release of neurotransmitters such as dopamine. They are thus proposed to be involved in learning and memory as well as in certain neuropsychiatric disorders. Selective sigma-1 receptor ligands have been suggested to represent a new class of therapeutic agents for neuropsychiatric disorders, although none have yet been introduced into therapeutic use. Early studies showed that psychotomimetic benzomorphans, as well as several antipsychotics, can bind to sigma-1 receptors. As a result of these findings, sigma-1 receptor ligands have been proposed as being of potential use in the treatment of schizophrenia. Nevertheless, the relationship of sigma-1 receptors to the underlying pathogenesis of schizophrenia is still unclear. sigma-1 receptor ligands have failed to improve acute psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia in clinical trials, but, interestingly, a few studies have shown an improvement in negative symptoms in schizophrenic patients. A number of preclinical studies have shown that selective agonists of sigma-1 receptors affect higher-ordered brain functions such as learning and memory, cognition and mood. These studies indicate that sigma-1 receptor agonists may exert therapeutic effects in depression and senile dementia. Indeed, the sigma-1 receptor agonist igmesine, has been shown to improve depression in a clinical trial. The most distinctive feature of the action of sigma-1 receptor ligands is

  18. Crosstalk Between Leptin Receptor and IGF-IR in Breast Cancer: A Potential Mediator of Chemoresistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    the connection between obesity and breast cancer (5). Leptin , a product of the obese (ob) gene, is an adipocytokine that regulates appetite , bone... Leptin Receptor and IGF-IR in Breast Cancer: A Potential Mediator of Chemoresistance Dr. Rita Nahta Emory University Atlanta, GA 30322 Obesity...hormones IGF-I and leptin and their receptors, IGF-IR and leptin receptor (Ob-R), are elevated in breast cancer. Co-immunoprecipitation and

  19. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists rimonabant (SR141716) and AM251 directly potentiate GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Baur, R; Gertsch, J; Sigel, E

    2012-04-01

    Rimonabant (SR141716) and the structurally related AM251 are widely used in pharmacological experiments as selective cannabinoid receptor CB(1) antagonists / inverse agonists. Concentrations of 0.5-10 µM are usually applied in in vitro experiments. We intended to show that these drugs did not act at GABA(A) receptors but found a significant positive allosteric modulation instead. Recombinant GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Receptors were exposed to AM251 or rimonabant in the absence and presence of GABA. Standard electrophysiological techniques were used to monitor the elicited ionic currents. AM251 dose-dependently potentiated responses to 0.5 µM GABA at the recombinant α(1) β(2) γ(2) GABA(A) receptor with an EC(50) below 1 µM and a maximal potentiation of about eightfold. The Hill coefficient indicated that more than one binding site for AM251 was located in this receptor. Rimonabant had a lower affinity, but a fourfold higher efficacy. AM251 potentiated also currents mediated by α(1) β(2) , α(x) β(2) γ(2) (x = 2,3,5,6), α(1) β(3) γ(2) and α(4) β(2) δ GABA(A) receptors, but not those mediated by α(1) β(1) γ(2) . Interestingly, the CB(1) receptor antagonists LY320135 and O-2050 did not significantly affect α(1) β(2) γ(2) GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents at concentrations of 1 µM. This study identified rimonabant and AM251 as positive allosteric modulators of GABA(A) receptors. Thus, potential GABAergic effects of commonly used concentrations of these compounds should be considered in in vitro experiments, especially at extrasynaptic sites where GABA concentrations are low. This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-8. To view Part I of Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-7. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology

  20. Lysophosphatidic acid-induced itch is mediated by signaling of LPA5 receptor, phospholipase D and TRPA1/TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Kittaka, Hiroki; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Fukuta, Naomi; Tominaga, Makoto

    2017-02-08

    Intractable and continuous itch sensations often accompany diseases such as atopic dermatitis, neurogenic lesions, uremia and cholestasis. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an itch mediator found in cholestatic itch patients and it induces acute itch and pain in the experimental rodent models. However, the molecular mechanism by which LPA activates peripheral sensory neurons remains unknown. In this study, we used a cheek injection method in mice to reveal that LPA induced itch-related behaviors but not pain-related behaviors. The LPA-induced itch behavior and cellular effects were dependent on transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which are important for itch signal transduction. We also found that, among the 6 LPA receptors, the LPA5 receptor had the greatest involvement in itching. Furthermore, we demonstrated that phospholipase D (PLD) plays a critical role downstream of LPA5 and that LPA directly and intracellularly activates TRPA1 and TRPV1. These results suggest a unique mechanism that cytoplasmic LPA produced de novo could activate TRPA1 and TRPV1. We conclude that LPA-induced itch is mediated by LPA5 , PLD, TRPA1 and TRPV1 signaling, and thus targeting TRPA1, TRPV1 or PLD could be effective for cholestatic itch interventions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of transient receptor potential and acid-sensing ion channels in peripheral inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    White, John P M; Cibelli, Mario; Rei Fidalgo, Antonio; Paule, Cleoper C; Noormohamed, Faruq; Urban, Laszlo; Maze, Mervyn; Nagy, Istvan

    2010-03-01

    Pain originating in inflammation is the most common pathologic pain condition encountered by the anesthesiologist whether in the context of surgery, its aftermath, or in the practice of pain medicine. Inflammatory agents, released as components of the body's response to peripheral tissue damage or disease, are now known to be collectively capable of activating transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4, transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1, and acid-sensing ion channels, whereas individual agents may activate only certain of these ion channels. These ionotropic receptors serve many physiologic functions-as, indeed, do many of the inflammagens released in the inflammatory process. Here, we introduce the reader to the role of these ionotropic receptors in mediating peripheral pain in response to inflammation.

  2. AMPA RECEPTOR POTENTIATORS: FROM DRUG DESIGN TO COGNITIVE ENHANCEMENT

    PubMed Central

    PARTIN, KATHRYN M.

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of ionotropic glutamate receptors have emerged as a target for treating cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration, but also mental illnesses such as major depressive disorder. The possibility of creating a new class of pharmaceutical agent to treat refractive mental health issues has compelled researchers to redouble their efforts to develop a safe, effective treatment for memory and cognition impairments. Coupled with the more robust research methodologies that have emerged, including more sophisticated high-throughput-screens, higher resolution structural biology techniques, and more focused assessment on pharmacokinetics, the development of positive modulators of AMPA receptors holds great promise. We describe recent approaches that improve our understanding of the basic physiology underlying memory and cognition, and their application towards promoting human health. PMID:25462292

  3. AMPA receptor potentiators: from drug design to cognitive enhancement.

    PubMed

    Partin, Kathryn M

    2015-02-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of ionotropic glutamate receptors have emerged as a target for treating cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration, but also mental illnesses such as major depressive disorder. The possibility of creating a new class of pharmaceutical agent to treat refractive mental health issues has compelled researchers to redouble their efforts to develop a safe, effective treatment for memory and cognition impairments. Coupled with the more robust research methodologies that have emerged, including more sophisticated high-throughput-screens, higher resolution structural biology techniques, and more focused assessment on pharmacokinetics, the development of positive modulators of AMPA receptors holds great promise. We describe recent approaches that improve our understanding of the basic physiology underlying memory and cognition, and their application toward promoting human health.

  4. ROLE OF NMDA, NICOTINIC, AND GABA RECEPTORS IN THE STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIAL IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript characterizes the receptor pathways involved in pattern-evoked potential generation in rats

    " NMDA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors appear to be involved in the generation of the steady-state pattern evoked response in vivo.

    " The pattern evok...

  5. ROLE OF NMDA, NICOTINIC, AND GABA RECEPTORS IN THE STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIAL IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript characterizes the receptor pathways involved in pattern-evoked potential generation in rats

    " NMDA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors appear to be involved in the generation of the steady-state pattern evoked response in vivo.

    " The pattern evok...

  6. Endocannabinoid-binding CB1 and TRPV1 receptors as modulators of sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Palestini, Paola; Chiarini, Marco; Maccarrone, Mauro; Mattioli, Mauro; Barboni, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa reach the ability to fertilize only after they complete a complex series of physical-chemical modification, the capacitation. Recently, the endocannabinoid-binding type-1cannabinoid receptor (CB1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel have been proposed to play a key role in the control of capacitation. In particular CB1, acting via a Gi protein/cAMP/PKA pathway, maintains low cAMP levels in early stages of post ejaculatory life of male gametes. By this way it promotes the maintenance of membrane stability, thus avoiding the premature fusion of plasma membrane (PM) and outer acrosome membrane (OAM), which is mandatory for the exocytosis of acrosome content. TRPV1, on the contrary, becomes active during the latest stages of capacitation, and allows the rapid increase in intracellular calcium concentration that leads to the removal of the F-actin network interposed between PM and OAM, leading to their fusion and, ultimately, to the acrosome reaction. PMID:22482014

  7. Natural product modulators of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as potential anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Sieglitz, Florian; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L

    2016-11-07

    Treatment of cancer is a significant challenge in clinical medicine, and its research is a top priority in chemical biology and drug discovery. Consequently, there is an urgent need for identifying innovative chemotypes capable of modulating unexploited drug targets. The transient receptor potential (TRPs) channels persist scarcely explored as targets, despite intervening in a plethora of pathophysiological events in numerous diseases, including cancer. Both agonists and antagonists have proven capable of evoking phenotype changes leading to either cell death or reduced cell migration. Among these, natural products entail biologically pre-validated and privileged architectures for TRP recognition. Furthermore, several natural products have significantly contributed to our current knowledge on TRP biology. In this Tutorial Review we focus on selected natural products, e.g. capsaicinoids, cannabinoids and terpenes, by highlighting challenges and opportunities in their use as starting points for designing natural product-inspired TRP channel modulators. Importantly, the de-orphanization of natural products as TRP channel ligands may leverage their exploration as viable strategy for developing anticancer therapies. Finally, we foresee that TRP channels may be explored for the selective pharmacodelivery of cytotoxic payloads to diseased tissues, providing an innovative platform in chemical biology and molecular medicine.

  8. BDNF released during neuropathic pain potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenling; Walwyn, Wendy; Ennes, Helena S; Kim, Hyeyoung; McRoberts, James A; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G

    2014-05-01

    NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals can contribute to hyperalgesia by increasing neurotransmitter release. In rats and mice, we found that the ability of intrathecal NMDA to induce neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) internalization (a measure of substance P release) required a previous injection of BDNF. Selective knock-down of NMDA receptors in primary afferents decreased NMDA-induced NK1R internalization, confirming the presynaptic location of these receptors. The effect of BDNF was mediated by tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptors and not p75 neurotrophin receptors (p75(NTR) ), because it was not produced by proBDNF and was inhibited by the trkB antagonist ANA-12 but not by the p75(NTR) inhibitor TAT-Pep5. These effects are probably mediated through the truncated form of the trkB receptor as there is little expression of full-length trkB in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Src family kinase inhibitors blocked the effect of BDNF, suggesting that trkB receptors promote the activation of these NMDA receptors by Src family kinase phosphorylation. Western blots of cultured DRG neurons revealed that BDNF increased Tyr(1472) phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, known to have a potentiating effect. Patch-clamp recordings showed that BDNF, but not proBDNF, increased NMDA receptor currents in cultured DRG neurons. NMDA-induced NK1R internalization was also enabled in a neuropathic pain model or by activating dorsal horn microglia with lipopolysaccharide. These effects were decreased by a BDNF scavenger, a trkB receptor antagonist and a Src family kinase inhibitor, indicating that BDNF released by microglia potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferents during neuropathic pain. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. BDNF released during neuropathic pain potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Walwyn, Wendy; Ennes, Helena S.; Kim, Hyeyoung; McRoberts, James A.; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2014-01-01

    NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals can contribute to hyperalgesia by increasing neurotransmitter release. In rats and mice, we found that the ability of intrathecal NMDA to induce neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) internalization (a measure of substance P release) required a previous injection of BDNF. Selective knock-down of NMDA receptors in primary afferents decreased NMDA-induced NK1R internalization, confirming the presynaptic location of these receptors. The effect of BDNF was mediated by tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptors and not p75 neurotrophin receptors (p75NTR), because it was not produced by proBDNF and was inhibited by the trkB antagonist ANA-12 but not by the p75NTR inhibitor TAT-Pep5. These effects are probably mediated through the truncated form of the trkB receptor as there is little expression of full-length trkB in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Src family kinase inhibitors blocked the effect of BDNF, suggesting that trkB receptors promote the activation of these NMDA receptors by Src family kinase phosphorylation. Western blots of cultured DRG neurons revealed that BDNF increased Tyr1472 phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, known to have a potentiating effect. Patch-clamp recordings showed that BDNF, but not proBDNF, increased NMDA receptor currents in cultured DRG neurons. NMDA-induced NK1R internalization was also enabled in a neuropathic pain model or by activating dorsal horn microglia with lipopolysaccharide. These effects were decreased by a BDNF scavenger, a trkB receptor antagonist and an Src family kinase inhibitor, indicating that BDNF released by microglia potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferents during neuropathic pain. PMID:24611998

  10. Role of angiotensin AT(2) receptors in natriuresis: Intrarenal mechanisms and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Carey, Robert M; Padia, Shetal H

    2013-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is a coordinated hormonal cascade critical for the regulation of blood pressure (BP) and kidney function. Angiotensin (Ang) II, the major angiotensin effector peptide, binds to two major receptors, namely AT1 and AT2 receptors. The AT1 receptors engender antinatriuresis and raise BP, whereas AT2 receptors oppose these effects, inducing natriuresis and reducing BP. There is high AT2 receptor expression in the adult kidney, especially in the proximal tubule. In AT2 receptor-null mice, long-term AngII infusion results in pressor and antinatriuretic hypersensivivity compared with responses in wild-type mice. The major endogenous receptor ligand for AT2 receptor-mediated natriuretic responses appears to be des-aspartyl(1) -AngII (AngIII) instead of AngII. Recent studies have demonstrated that AngII requires metabolism to AngIII by aminopeptidase A to induce natriuresis and that inhibition of aminopeptidase N increases intrarenal AngIII and augments AngIII-induced natriuresis. The renal dopaminergic system is another important natriuretic pathway. Renal proximal tubule the D1 and D5 receptor subtypes (D1 -like receptors (D1LIKE R)) control approximately 50% of basal sodium excretion. Recently, we have found that natriuresis induced by proximal tubule D1LIKE R requires AT2 receptor activation and that D1LIKE R stimulation induces recruitment of AT2 receptors to the apical plasma membrane via a cAMP-dependent mechanism. Initial studies using the potent AT2 receptor non-peptide agonist Compound 21 demonstrate natriuresis in both the presence and absence of AT1 receptor blockade, indicating the therapeutic potential of this compound in fluid-retaining states and hypertension.

  11. P2Y Receptors in the Mammalian Nervous System: Pharmacology, Ligands and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Weisman, Gary A.; Woods, Lucas T.; Erb, Laurie; Seye, Cheikh I.

    2015-01-01

    P2Y receptors for extracellular nucleotides are coupled to activation of a variety of G proteins and stimulate diverse intracellular signaling pathways that regulate functions of cell types that comprise the central nervous system (CNS). There are 8 different subtypes of P2Y receptor expressed in cells of the CNS that are activated by a select group of nucleotide agonists. Here, the agonist selectivity of these 8 P2Y receptor subtypes is reviewed with an emphasis on synthetic agonists with high potency and resistance to degradation by extracellular nucleotidases that have potential applications as therapeutic agents. In addition, the recent identification of a wide variety of subtype-selective antagonists is discussed, since these compounds are critical for discerning cellular responses mediated by activation of individual P2Y receptor subtypes. The functional expression of P2Y receptor subtypes in cells that comprise the CNS is also reviewed and the role of each subtype in the regulation of physiological and pathophysiological responses is considered. Other topics include the role of P2Y receptors in the regulation of blood-brain barrier integrity and potential interactions between different P2Y receptor subtypes that likely impact tissue responses to extracellular nucleotides in the CNS. Overall, current research suggests that P2Y receptors in the CNS regulate repair mechanisms that are triggered by tissue damage, inflammation and disease and thus P2Y receptors represent promising targets for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22963441

  12. NPY signalling pathway in bone homeostasis: Y1 receptor as a potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Sousa, D M; Herzog, H; Lamghari, M

    2009-01-01

    Neuropeptide (NPY) is a neurotransmitter widely distributed in central and peripheral nervous system that has been implicated in several physiological processes through activation of five different Y receptors: Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5, and y6. NPY system has been extensively studied for the last decades due to its implications in a wide variety of physiological processes. For this purpose a diversity of sophisticated animal models and receptors agonists and antagonists has been developed to better understand its actions throughout body homeostasis. Consequently, NPY and its receptors have recently emerged as a potential regulator of bone homeostasis. This is supported by the demonstration of an increase of bone mass in mice lacking Y1 or Y2 receptor genes. Recent findings revealed Y1 receptor as a potential drug target candidate for prevention and treatment of bone loss. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that osteoblasts express Y1 receptor while no other Y receptor was detected in these cells, implicating Y1 receptor signalling in the local control of bone turnover. In this review, we have summarized the findings obtained from studies on NPY system in skeletogenesis focusing on Y1 receptor.

  13. Fc receptors as potential targets for the treatment of allergy, autoimmune disease and cancer.

    PubMed

    Takai, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Akira; Akiyama, Kenichi

    2003-09-01

    The activation threshold of various cells in the immune system is tuned by immune inhibitory receptors. The inhibitory Fc receptor, FcgammaRIIB, is one of the critical elements for keeping immune cells silent. Murine models for allergic responses and autoimmune diseases illustrate the indispensable roles of FcgammaRIIB in the suppression of these immune disorders. On the contrary, activating-type Fc receptors are crucial for the onset and exacerbation of such diseases. In addition, recent reports have revealed the pivotal roles of Fc receptors in enhancing antigen presentation by dendritic cells, which leads to efficient major histocompatibility complex class I- and class II-restricted T cell activation. In this context, anti-cancer immunopotentiation could be augmented by targeting the tumor antigens to Fc receptors on dendritic cells. This review summarizes recent advances in Fc receptor biomedicine in light of exploiting them as potential therapeutic targets for allergy, autoimmune disease and cancer.

  14. Endothelin receptor polymorphisms in the cardiovascular system: potential implications for therapy and screening.

    PubMed

    Holzhauser, Luise; Zolty, Ronald

    2014-11-01

    Since its discovery in 1988, the endothelin system has been employed in multiple physiological and pathological roles. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is not only a major regulator of vascular tone and cardiac contractility but also exerts mitogenic effects and is involved in inflammatory responses. ET-1 acts via two endothelin receptors located mainly on smooth muscle and endothelial cells through complex intracellular pathways differing between receptors and cell types. Polymorphisms of the endothelin receptor A have been associated not only with the risk in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), systolic heart failure and systemic hypertension but are also of prognostic significance in dilated cardiomyopathy. Polymorphisms of endothelin receptors might lead to altered endothelin signaling and influence the response to endothelin receptor antagonist therapy in PAH in light of pharmacogenetics. This review will summarize the role of ET-1 within major cardiovascular pathologies and discuss endothelin receptor polymorphisms with special emphasis on potential therapeutic and screening implications.

  15. Research Resource: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Potential of Nuclear Receptor Expression in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yang; Lee, Woochang; Bookout, Angie L.; Girard, Luc; Raso, Gabriela; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Gadzar, Adi F.; Minna, John D.; Mangelsdorf, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death. Despite a number of studies that have provided prognostic biomarkers for lung cancer, a paucity of reliable markers and therapeutic targets exist to diagnose and treat this aggressive disease. In this study we investigated the potential of nuclear receptors (NRs), many of which are well-established drug targets, as therapeutic markers in lung cancer. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we analyzed the expression of the 48 members of the NR superfamily in a human panel of 55 normal and lung cancer cell lines. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the NR expression profile segregated normal from tumor cell lines and grouped lung cancers according to type (i.e. small vs. non-small cell lung cancers). Moreover, we found that the NR signature was 79% accurate in diagnosing lung cancer incidence in smokers (n = 129). Finally, the evaluation of a subset of NRs (androgen receptor, estrogen receptor, vitamin D receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ) demonstrated the therapeutic potential of using NR expression to predict ligand-dependent growth responses in individual lung cancer cells. Preclinical evaluation of one of these receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ) in mouse xenografts confirmed that ligand-dependent inhibitory growth responses in lung cancer can be predicted based on a tumor's receptor expression status. Taken together, this study establishes NRs as theragnostic markers for predicting lung cancer incidence and further strengthens their potential as therapeutic targets for individualized treatment. PMID:22700587

  16. Melatonin receptors in diabetes: a potential new therapeutical target?

    PubMed

    She, Meihua; Laudon, Moshe; Yin, Weidong

    2014-12-05

    Melatonin is synthesized and secreted mainly by the pineal gland in a circadian fashion, and it thus mediates endogenous circadian rhythms and influences other physiological functions. Both the G-protein coupled receptors MT1 (encoded by MTNR1A) and MT2 (encoded by MTNR1B) in mammals mediate the actions of melatonin. Evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies proved a key role of melatonin in the regulation of glucose metabolism and the pathogenesis of diabetes, as further confirmed by the recent studies of human genetic variants of MTNR1B. Remarkably, it was also suggested that genetic variations within MTNR1B disordered β-cells function directly, i.e. insulin secretion. This indicated the functional link between MT2 and T2D risk at the protein level, and it may represent the prevailing pathomechanism for how impaired melatonin signaling causes metabolic disorders and increases the T2D risk. It is speculated that melatonin and its receptors may be a new therapeutic avenue in diabetes.

  17. Potentiation of alpha7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by select albumins.

    PubMed

    Conroy, William G; Liu, Qing-Song; Nai, Qiang; Margiotta, Joseph F; Berg, Darwin K

    2003-02-01

    Nicotinic receptors containing alpha7 subunits are ligand-gated ion channels widely distributed in the nervous system; they influence a diverse array of events because of their high relative calcium permeability. We show here that nicotine-induced whole-cell responses generated by such receptors can be dramatically potentiated in a rapidly reversible manner by some but not all albumins. The potentiation involves increases both in potency and efficacy with no obvious differences in rise and fall times of the response. The potentiation is not reduced by removing absorbed components; it is abolished by proteolysis, suggesting that the albumin protein backbone is essential. The fact that some albumins are ineffective indicates that minor differences in amino acid sequence may be critical. Experiments with open channel blockers indicate that the potentiation involves increased responses from active receptors rather than recruitment of receptors from a previously silent pool. Single channel recordings reveal that the potentiation correlates with increased single channel opening probability, reflected in increased frequency of channel opening and increased mean channel open time. The potentiation can be exploited to overcome blockade by noncompetitive inhibitors such as beta-amyloid peptide. The results raise the possibility that endogenous compounds use the site to modulate receptor function in vivo, and suggest that the receptors may represent useful targets for therapeutic intervention in cases where they have been implicated in neuropathologies such as Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Anti-fibrotic Potential of AT2 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Del Borgo, Mark; Lee, Huey W.; Baraldi, Dhaniel; Hirmiz, Baydaa; Gaspari, Tracey A.; Denton, Kate M.; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Samuel, Chrishan S.; Widdop, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    There are a number of therapeutic targets to treat organ fibrosis that are under investigation in preclinical models. There is increasing evidence that stimulation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) is a novel anti-fibrotic strategy and we have reviewed the published in vivo preclinical data relating to the effects of compound 21 (C21), which is the only nonpeptide AT2R agonist that is currently available for use in chronic preclinical studies. In particular, the differential influence of AT2R on extracellular matrix status in various preclinical fibrotic models is discussed. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that pharmacological AT2R stimulation using C21 decreases organ fibrosis, which has been most studied in the setting of cardiovascular and renal disease. In addition, AT2R-mediated anti-inflammatory effects may contribute to the beneficial AT2R-mediated anti-fibrotic effects seen in preclinical models. PMID:28912715

  19. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, Philip; Kane, Emilie; Giaid, Adel

    2011-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) binds to its receptor, UT, playing an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland, and central nervous system. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, however, this constriction-dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome, and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) activity leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII), as well as inflammation, high blood pressure, and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases.

  20. Therapeutic potential of nuclear receptor agonists in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Moutinho, Miguel; Landreth, Gary E

    2017-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by an extensive accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, which triggers a set of deleterious processes, including synaptic dysfunction, inflammation, and neuronal injury, leading to neuronal loss and cognitive impairment. A large body of evidence supports that nuclear receptor (NR) activation could be a promising therapeutic approach for AD. NRs are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate gene expression and have cell type-specific effects. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that underlie the beneficial effects of NRs in AD. Moreover, we summarize studies reported in the last 10-15 years and their major outcomes arising from the pharmacological targeting of NRs in AD animal models. The dissection of the pathways regulated by NRs in the context of AD is of importance in identifying novel and effective therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Effect of syncytium structure of receptor systems on stochastic resonance induced by chaotic potential fluctuation.

    PubMed Central

    Kashimori, Y; Funakubo, H; Kambara, T

    1998-01-01

    To study a role of syncytium structure of sensory receptor systems in the detection of weak signals through stochastic resonance, we present a model of a receptor system with syncytium structure in which receptor cells are interconnected by gap junctions. The apical membrane of each cell includes two kinds of ion channels whose gating processes are described by the deterministic model. The membrane potential of each cell fluctuates chaotically or periodically, depending on the dynamical state of collective channel gating. The chaotic fluctuation of membrane potential acts as internal noise for the stochastic resonance. The detection ability of the system increases as the electric conductance between adjacent cells generated by the gap junction increases. This effect of gap junctions arises mainly from the fact that the synchronization of chaotic fluctuation of membrane potential between the receptor cells is strengthened as the density of gap junctions is increased. PMID:9746512

  2. Endocytic Trafficking and Recycling Maintain a Pool of Mobile Surface AMPA Receptors Required for Synaptic Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Enrica Maria; Lu, Jiuyi; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim; Ehlers, Michael D.; Choquet, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY At excitatory glutamatergic synapses, postsynaptic endocytic zones (EZs), which are adjacent to the postsynaptic density (PSD), mediate clathrin-dependent endocytosis of surface AMPA Receptors (AMPAR) as a first step to receptor recycling or degradation. However, it remains unknown if receptor recycling influences AMPARs lateral diffusion, and if EZs are important for the expression of synaptic potentiation. Here we demonstrate that the presence of both EZs and AMPAR recycling maintain a large pool of mobile AMPARs at synapses. In addition, we find that synaptic potentiation is accompanied by an accumulation and immobilization of AMPARs at synapses resulting from both their exocytosis and stabilization at the PSD. Displacement of EZs from the postsynaptic region impairs the expression of synaptic potentiation by blocking AMPAR recycling. Thus receptor recycling is crucial for maintaining a mobile population of surface AMPARs which can be delivered to synapses for increases in synaptic strength. PMID:19607795

  3. P2X receptors in the cardiovascular system and their potential as therapeutic targets in disease.

    PubMed

    Ralevic, Vera

    2015-01-01

    This review considers the expression and roles of P2X receptors in the cardiovascular system in health and disease and their potential as therapeutic targets. P2X receptors are ligand gated ion channels which are activated by the endogenous ligand ATP. They are formed from the assembly of three P2X subunit proteins from the complement of seven (P2X1-7), which can associate to form homomeric or heteromeric P2X receptors. The P2X1 receptor is widely expressed in the cardiovascular system, being located in the heart, in the smooth muscle of the majority of blood vessels and in platelets. P2X1 receptors expressed in blood vessels can be activated by ATP coreleased with noradrenaline as a sympathetic neurotransmitter, leading to smooth muscle depolarisation and contraction. There is evidence that the purinergic component of sympathetic neurotransmission is increased in hypertension, identifying P2X1 receptors as a possible therapeutic target in this disorder. P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors are expressed on cardiac sympathetic neurones and may, through positive feedback of neuronal ATP at this prejunctional site, amplify sympathetic neurotransmission. Activation of P2X receptors expressed in the heart increases cardiac myocyte contractility, and an important role of the P2X4 receptor in this has been identified. Deletion of P2X4 receptors in the heart depresses contractile performance in models of heart failure, while overexpression of P2X4 receptors has been shown to be cardioprotective, thus P2X4 receptors may be therapeutic targets in the treatment of heart disease. P2X receptors have been identified on endothelial cells. Although immunoreactivity for all P2X1-7 receptor proteins has been shown on the endothelium, relatively little is known about their function, with the exception of the endothelial P2X4 receptor, which has been shown to mediate endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to ATP released during shear stress. The potential of P2X receptors as therapeutic targets

  4. Pharmacological hypothermia: a potential for future stroke therapy?

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiyin; Khan, Hajra; Geng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-06-01

    Mild physical hypothermia after stroke has been associated with positive outcomes. Despite the well-studied beneficial effects of hypothermia in the treatment of stroke, lack of precise temperature control, intolerance for the patient, and immunosuppression are some of the reasons which limit its clinical translation. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia has been explored as a possible treatment option following stroke in animal models. Currently, there are eight classes of pharmacological agents/agonists with hypothermic effects affecting a multitude of systems including cannabinoid, opioid, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurotensin, thyroxine derivatives, dopamine, gas, and adenosine derivatives. Interestingly, drugs in the TRPV1, neurotensin, and thyroxine families have been shown to have effects in thermoregulatory control in decreasing the compensatory hypothermic response during cooling. This review will briefly present drugs in the eight classes by summarizing their proposed mechanisms of action as well as side effects. Reported thermoregulatory effects of the drugs will also be presented. This review offers the opinion that these agents may be useful in combination therapies with physical hypothermia to achieve faster and more stable temperature control in hypothermia.

  5. TRPV1: A Potential Drug Target for Treating Various Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Rafael; Sheth, Sandeep; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel present on sensory neurons which is activated by heat, protons, capsaicin and a variety of endogenous lipids termed endovanilloids. As such, TRPV1 serves as a multimodal sensor of noxious stimuli which could trigger counteractive measures to avoid pain and injury. Activation of TRPV1 has been linked to chronic inflammatory pain conditions and peripheral neuropathy, as observed in diabetes. Expression of TRPV1 is also observed in non-neuronal sites such as the epithelium of bladder and lungs and in hair cells of the cochlea. At these sites, activation of TRPV1 has been implicated in the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystitis, asthma and hearing loss. Therefore, drugs which could modulate TRPV1 channel activity could be useful for the treatment of conditions ranging from chronic pain to hearing loss. This review describes the roles of TRPV1 in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected organs of the body and highlights how drugs targeting this channel could be important clinically. PMID:24861977

  6. In vitro endocrine disruption potential of organophosphate flame retardants via human nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Itoh, Toshihiro; Iida, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takahiko

    2013-12-06

    Various organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) are widely used in building materials, textiles and electric appliances, and have been reported to cause indoor environmental pollution in houses and office buildings. In this study, using cell-based transactivation assays, we characterized the agonistic and/or antagonistic activities of 11 OPFRs against human nuclear receptors; estrogen receptor α (ERα), ERβ, androgen receptor (AR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thyroid hormone receptor α1 (TRα1), TRβ1, retinoic acid receptor α (RARα), retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), pregnane X receptor (PXR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), and PPARγ. Of the 11 OPFRs tested, triphenyl phosphate (TPhP) and tricrecyl phosphate (TCP) showed ERα and/or ERβ agonistic activity. In addition, tributyl phosphate (TBP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP), TPhP and TCP showed AR antagonistic activity, and TBP, tris(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (TEHP), TDCPP, TPhP and TCP showed GR antagonistic activity. Furthermore, we found that seven compounds, TBP, tris(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) phosphate (TCPP), TEHP, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP), TDCPP, TPhP, and TCP, display PXR agonistic activity. However, none of test compounds showed agonistic or antagonistic activity against TRα/β, or agonistic activity against RARα, RXRα or PPARα/γ. Taken together, these results suggest that several OPFRs may have potential endocrine disrupting effects via ERα, ERβ, AR, GR and PXR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Incorporation of inwardly rectifying AMPA receptors at silent synapses during hippocampal long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Morita, Daiju; Rah, Jong Cheol; Isaac, John T R

    2014-01-05

    Despite decades of study, the mechanisms by which synapses express the increase in strength during long-term potentiation (LTP) remain an area of intense interest. Here, we have studied how AMPA receptor subunit composition changes during the early phases of hippocampal LTP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. We studied LTP at silent synapses that initially lack AMPA receptors, but contain NMDA receptors. We show that strongly inwardly rectifying AMPA receptors are initially incorporated at silent synapses during LTP and are then subsequently replaced by non-rectifying AMPA receptors. These findings suggest that silent synapses initially incorporate GluA2-lacking, calcium-permeable AMPA receptors during LTP that are then replaced by GluA2-containing calcium-impermeable receptors. We also show that LTP consolidation at CA1 synapses requires a rise in intracellular calcium concentration during the early phase of expression, indicating that calcium influx through the GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors drives their replacement by GluA2-containing receptors during LTP consolidation. Taken together with previous studies in hippocampus and in other brain regions, these findings suggest that a common mechanism for the expression of activity-dependent glutamatergic synaptic plasticity involves the regulation of GluA2-subunit composition and highlights a critical role for silent synapses in this process.

  8. TRPV1, NK1 receptor and substance P immunoreactivity and gene expression in the rat lumbosacral spinal cord and urinary bladder after systemic, low dose vanilloid administration.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yujing J; Saunders, Cassandra I M; Kunde, Dale A; Geraghty, Dominic P

    2011-04-11

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor and substance P (SP) immunoreactivity (-ir) and mRNA in the rat lumbosacral spinal cord and urinary bladder were measured 24h after s.c. injection of the vanilloids, capsaicin (50mg/kg) and resiniferatoxin (RTX, 100μg/kg), or vehicle (10% ethanol/10% Tween 80/saline). In the spinal cord, capsaicin significantly reduced TRPV1 and SP-ir (40-45%) in laminae I/II compared to controls, while RTX produced decreases of ~35%. NK1-ir in the spinal cord was unaffected by both vanilloid treatments. In the bladder, SP-ir was reduced in urothelial cells of some capsaicin- and RTX-treated rats, while SP-ir in the suburothelium and muscularis was significantly reduced by RTX. A significant increase in NK1-ir was observed in the urothelium and muscularis after capsaicin administration. Capsaicin significantly increased SP mRNA in the spinal cord, and TRPV1 and SP mRNA in the bladder, whereas RTX increased TRPV1, SP and NK1 mRNA in the spinal cord, and TRPV1 and SP mRNA in the bladder. These data suggest that stimulation of TRPV1 by low dose vanilloid administration can rapidly (within 24h) alter both transcription and translation of TRPV1 channels, SP and NK1 receptors in the rat urinary bladder and spinal cord. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuroactive steroids have multiple actions to potentiate GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Akk, Gustav; Bracamontes, John R; Covey, Douglas F; Evers, Alex; Dao, Tim; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2004-07-01

    The effects of neuroactive steroids on the function of GABAA receptors were studied using cell-attached records of single channel activity recorded from HEK293 cells transfected with alpha1 beta2 gamma2L subunits. Activity was elicited with a half-maximal (50 microM) concentration of GABA. Two steroids were studied in detail: ACN ((3alpha,5alpha,17beta)-3-hydroxyandrostane-17-carbonitrile) and B285 ((3alpha,5beta,17beta)-3-hydroxy-18-norandrostane-17-carbonitrile). Four effects on channel activity were seen, two on open time distributions and two on closed times. When clusters of openings were elicited in the absence of steroid, the open time distribution contained three components. ACN produced concentration-dependent alterations in the open time distribution. The prevalence of the longest duration class of open times was increased from about 15% to about 40% (EC50 about 180 nM ACN), while the duration of the longest class increased from 7.4 ms to 27 ms (EC50 about 35 nM ACN). B285 also increased the prevalence of the longest duration open times (EC50 about 18 nM B285) but increased the duration only at concentrations close to 10 microM. The differences in the actions of these two steroids suggest that the effects on proportion and duration of the long duration open time component are produced by independent mechanisms and that there are separate recognition sites for the steroids which are associated with the two functional actions. The closed time distributions also showed three components in the absence of steroid. The rate of occurrence of the two brief duration closed time components decreased with increasing ACN, with an EC50 of about 50 nM ACN. In contrast, B285 did not reduce the rate of occurrence of the brief closings until high concentrations were applied. However, both B285 and ACN reduced the rate of occurrence of the activation-related closed state selectively, with comparable IC50 concentrations (about 40 nM ACN, 20 nM B285). As in the case for

  10. The Elastin Receptor Complex: A Unique Matricellular Receptor with High Anti-tumoral Potential

    PubMed Central

    Scandolera, Amandine; Odoul, Ludivine; Salesse, Stéphanie; Guillot, Alexandre; Blaise, Sébastien; Kawecki, Charlotte; Maurice, Pascal; El Btaouri, Hassan; Romier-Crouzet, Béatrice; Martiny, Laurent; Debelle, Laurent; Duca, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Elastin, one of the longest-lived proteins, confers elasticity to tissues with high mechanical constraints. During aging or pathophysiological conditions such as cancer progression, this insoluble polymer of tropoelastin undergoes an important degradation leading to the release of bioactive elastin-derived peptides (EDPs), named elastokines. EDP exhibit several biological functions able to drive tumor development by regulating cell proliferation, invasion, survival, angiogenesis, and matrix metalloproteinase expression in various tumor and stromal cells. Although, several receptors have been suggested to bind elastokines (αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins, galectin-3), their main receptor remains the elastin receptor complex (ERC). This heterotrimer comprises a peripheral subunit, named elastin binding protein (EBP), associated to the protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). The latter is bound to a membrane-associated protein called Neuraminidase-1 (Neu-1). The pro-tumoral effects of elastokines have been linked to their binding onto EBP. Additionally, Neu-1 sialidase activity is essential for their signal transduction. Consistently, EDP-EBP interaction and Neu-1 activity emerge as original anti-tumoral targets. Interestingly, besides its direct involvement in cancer progression, the ERC also regulates diabetes outcome and thrombosis, an important risk factor for cancer development and a vascular process highly increased in patients suffering from cancer. In this review, we will describe ERC and elastokines involvement in cancer development suggesting that this unique receptor would be a promising therapeutic target. We will also discuss the pharmacological concepts aiming at blocking its pro-tumoral activities. Finally, its emerging role in cancer-associated complications and pathologies such as diabetes and thrombotic events will be also considered. PMID:26973522

  11. Modulation of neurosteroid potentiation by protein kinases at synaptic- and extrasynaptic-type GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Joanna M.; Thomas, Philip; Smart, Trevor G.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors are important for inhibition in the CNS where neurosteroids and protein kinases are potent endogenous modulators. Acting individually, these can either enhance or depress receptor function, dependent upon the type of neurosteroid or kinase and the receptor subunit combination. However, in vivo, these modulators probably act in concert to fine-tune GABAA receptor activity and thus inhibition, although how this is achieved remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between these modulators at synaptic-type α1β3γ2L and extrasynaptic-type α4β3δ GABAA receptors using electrophysiology. For α1β3γ2L, potentiation of GABA responses by tetrahydro-deoxycorticosterone was reduced after inhibiting protein kinase C, and enhanced following its activation, suggesting this kinase regulates neurosteroid modulation. In comparison, neurosteroid potentiation was reduced at α1β3S408A,S409Aγ2L receptors, and unaltered by PKC inhibitors or activators, indicating that phosphorylation of β3 subunits is important for regulating neurosteroid activity. To determine whether extrasynaptic-type GABAA receptors were similarly modulated, α4β3δ and α4β3S408A,S409Aδ receptors were investigated. Neurosteroid potentiation was reduced at both receptors by the kinase inhibitor staurosporine. By contrast, neurosteroid-mediated potentiation at α4S443Aβ3S408A,S409Aδ receptors was unaffected by protein kinase inhibition, strongly suggesting that phosphorylation of α4 and β3 subunits is required for regulating neurosteroid activity at extrasynaptic receptors. Western blot analyses revealed that neurosteroids increased phosphorylation of β3S408,S409 implying that a reciprocal pathway exists for neurosteroids to modulate phosphorylation of GABAA receptors. Overall, these findings provide important insight into the regulation of GABAA receptors in vivo, and into the mechanisms by which GABAergic inhibitory transmission may be simultaneously tuned by

  12. Activation of transforming potential of the human insulin receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.H.; Lin, B.; Jong, S.M.J.; Dixon, D.; Ellis, L.; Roth, R.A.; Rutter, W.J.

    1987-08-01

    A retrovirus containing part of the human insulin receptor (hIR) gene was constructed by replacing ros sequences in the avian sarcoma virus UR2 with hIR cDNA sequences coding for 46 amino acids of the extracellular domain and the entire transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the ..beta.. subunit of hIR. The resulting virus, named UIR, contains the hIR sequence fused to the 5' portion of the UR2 gag gene coding for p19. UIR is capable of transforming chicken embryo fibroblasts and promoting formation of colonies in soft agar; however, it does not form tumors in vivo. A variant that arose from the parental UIR is capable of efficiently inducing sarcomas in vivo. UIR-transformed cells exhibit higher rates of glucose uptake and growth than normal cells. The 4-kilobase UIR genome codes for a membrane-associated, glycosylated gag-hIR fusion protein of 75 kDa designated P75/sup gag-hir/. P75/sup gag-hir/ contains a protein tyrosine kinase activity that is capable of undergoing autophosphorylation and of phosphorylating foreign substrates in vitro; it is phosphorylated at both serine and tyrosine residues in vivo

  13. Aggregation propensity of neuronal receptors: potential implications in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Susanna; Diaz-Caballero, Marta; Illa, Ricard; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-09-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of proteins in tissues is linked to the onset of a diverse set of human neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In these pathologies proteins usually aggregate into highly ordered and β-sheet enriched amyloid fibrils. However, the formation of these toxic structures is not restricted to a reduced set of polypeptides but rather an intrinsic property of proteins. This suggests that the number of proteins involved in conformational disorders might be much larger than previously thought. The propensity of a protein to form amyloid assemblies is imprinted in its sequence and can be read using computational approaches. Here, we exploit four of these algorithms to analyze the presence of aggregation-prone regions in the sequence and structure of the extracellular domains of several neuroreceptors, with the idea of identifying patches that can interact anomalously with other aggregation-prone molecules such as the amyloid-β peptide or promote their self-assembly. The number of amyloidogenic regions in these domains is rather low but they are significantly exposed to solvent and therefore are suitable for interactions. We find a significant overlap between aggregation-prone regions and receptors interfaces and/or ligand-binding sites, which illustrates an unavoidable competition between the formation of functional native interactions and that of dangerous amyloid-like contacts leading to disease.

  14. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukas, Philip; Kane, Émilie; Giaid, Adel

    2011-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) binds to its receptor, UT, playing an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland, and central nervous system. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, however, this constriction–dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome, and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) activity leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII), as well as inflammation, high blood pressure, and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases. PMID:21811463

  15. Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and endogenous cannabinoid anandamide directly potentiate the function of glycine receptors.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Nadia; Zhou, Chunyi; Oz, Murat; Sun, Hui; Ye, Jiang Hong; Zhang, Li

    2006-03-01

    Anandamide (AEA) and delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are endogenous and exogenous ligands, respectively, for cannabinoid receptors. Whereas most of the pharmacological actions of cannabinoids are mediated by CB1 receptors, there is also evidence that these compounds can produce effects that are not mediated by the activation of identified cannabinoid receptors. Here, we report that THC and AEA, in a CB1 receptor-independent manner, cause a significant potentiation of the amplitudes of glycine-activated currents (I(Gly)) in acutely isolated neurons from rat ventral tegmental area (VTA) and in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing human homomeric (alpha1) and heteromeric (alpha1beta1) subunits of glycine receptors (GlyRs). The potentiation of I(Gly) by THC and AEA is concentration-dependent, with respective EC50 values of 86 +/- 9 and 319 +/- 31 nM for alpha1 homomeric receptors, 73 +/- 8 and 318 +/- 24 nM for alpha1beta1 heteromeric receptors, and 115 +/- 13 and 230 +/- 29 nM for native GlyRs in VTA neurons. The effects of THC and AEA are selective for I(Gly), because GABA-activated current in VTA neurons or in X. laevis oocytes expressing alpha2beta3gamma2 GABA(A) receptor subunits were unaffected by these compounds. The maximal potentiation by THC and AEA was observed at the lowest concentration of glycine; with increasing concentrations of glycine, the potentiation significantly decreased. The site for THC and AEA seems to be distinct from that of the alcohol and volatile anesthetics. The results indicate that THC and AEA, in pharmacologically relevant concentrations, directly potentiate the function of GlyRs through an allosteric mechanism.

  16. Fluoxetine potentiation of methylphenidate-induced gene regulation in striatal output pathways: potential role for 5-HT1B receptor.

    PubMed

    Van Waes, Vincent; Ehrlich, Sarah; Beverley, Joel A; Steiner, Heinz

    2015-02-01

    Drug combinations that include the psychostimulant methylphenidate plus a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) such as fluoxetine are increasingly used in children and adolescents. For example, this combination is indicated in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and depression comorbidity and other mental disorders. Such co-exposure also occurs in patients on SSRIs who use methylphenidate as a cognitive enhancer. The neurobiological consequences of these drug combinations are poorly understood. Methylphenidate alone can produce gene regulation effects that mimic addiction-related gene regulation by cocaine, consistent with its moderate addiction liability. We have previously shown that combining SSRIs with methylphenidate potentiates methylphenidate-induced gene regulation in the striatum. The present study investigated which striatal output pathways are affected by the methylphenidate + fluoxetine combination, by assessing effects on pathway-specific neuropeptide markers, and which serotonin receptor subtypes may mediate these effects. Our results demonstrate that a 5-day repeated treatment with fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) potentiates methylphenidate (5 mg/kg)-induced expression of both dynorphin (direct pathway marker) and enkephalin (indirect pathway). These changes were accompanied by correlated increases in the expression of the 5-HT1B, but not 5-HT2C, serotonin receptor in the same striatal regions. A further study showed that the 5-HT1B receptor agonist CP94253 (3-10 mg/kg) mimics the fluoxetine potentiation of methylphenidate-induced gene regulation. These findings suggest a role for the 5-HT1B receptor in the fluoxetine effects on striatal gene regulation. Given that 5-HT1B receptors are known to facilitate addiction-related gene regulation and behavior, our results suggest that SSRIs may enhance the addiction liability of methylphenidate by increasing 5-HT1B receptor signaling.

  17. Fluoxetine potentiation of methylphenidate-induced gene regulation in striatal output pathways: Potential role for 5-HT1B receptor

    PubMed Central

    Van Waes, Vincent; Ehrlich, Sarah; Beverley, Joel A.; Steiner, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Drug combinations that include the psychostimulant methylphenidate plus a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) such as fluoxetine are increasingly used in children and adolescents. For example, this combination is indicated in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and depression comorbidity and other mental disorders. Such co-exposure also occurs in patients on SSRIs that use methylphenidate as a cognitive enhancer. The neurobiological consequences of these drug combinations are poorly understood. Methylphenidate alone can produce gene regulation effects that mimic addiction-related gene regulation by cocaine, consistent with its moderate addiction liability. We have previously shown that combining SSRIs with methylphenidate potentiates methylphenidate-induced gene regulation in the striatum. The present study investigated which striatal output pathways are affected by the methylphenidate+fluoxetine combination, by assessing effects on pathway-specific neuropeptide markers, and which serotonin receptor subtypes may mediate these effects. Our results demonstrate that a 5-day repeated treatment with fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) potentiates methylphenidate (5 mg/kg)-induced expression of both dynorphin (direct pathway marker) and enkephalin (indirect pathway). These changes were accompanied by correlated increases in the expression of the 5-HT1B, but not 5-HT2C, serotonin receptor in the same striatal regions. A further study showed that the 5-HT1B receptor agonist CP94253 (3-10 mg/kg) mimics the fluoxetine potentiation of methylphenidate-induced gene regulation. These findings suggest a role for the 5-HT1B receptor in the fluoxetine effects on striatal gene regulation. Given that 5-HT1B receptors are known to facilitate addiction-related gene regulation and behavior, our results suggest that SSRIs may enhance the addiction liability of methylphenidate by increasing 5-HT1B receptor signaling. PMID:25218038

  18. P2Y Receptors in Synaptic Transmission and Plasticity: Therapeutic Potential in Cognitive Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Segundo J; Gerevich, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    ATP released from neurons and astrocytes during neuronal activity or under pathophysiological circumstances is able to influence information flow in neuronal circuits by activation of ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptors and subsequent modulation of cellular excitability, synaptic strength, and plasticity. In the present paper we review cellular and network effects of P2Y receptors in the brain. We show that P2Y receptors inhibit the release of neurotransmitters, modulate voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels, and differentially influence the induction of synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. The findings discussed here may explain how P2Y1 receptor activation during brain injury, hypoxia, inflammation, schizophrenia, or Alzheimer's disease leads to an impairment of cognitive processes. Hence, it is suggested that the blockade of P2Y1 receptors may have therapeutic potential against cognitive disturbances in these states.

  19. The GABAA receptor is an FMRP target with therapeutic potential in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Braat, Sien; D'Hulst, Charlotte; Heulens, Inge; De Rubeis, Silvia; Mientjes, Edwin; Nelson, David L; Willemsen, Rob; Bagni, Claudia; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter P; Kooy, R Frank

    2015-01-01

    Previous research indicates that the GABAAergic system is involved in the pathophysiology of the fragile X syndrome, a frequent form of inherited intellectual disability and associated with autism spectrum disorder. However, the molecular mechanism underlying GABAAergic deficits has remained largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate reduced mRNA expression of GABAA receptor subunits in the cortex and cerebellum of young Fmr1 knockout mice. In addition, we show that the previously reported underexpression of specific subunits of the GABAA receptor can be corrected in YAC transgenic rescue mice, containing the full-length human FMR1 gene in an Fmr1 knockout background. Moreover, we demonstrate that FMRP directly binds several GABAA receptor mRNAs. Finally, positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors with the neurosteroid ganaxolone can modulate specific behaviors in Fmr1 knockout mice, emphasizing the therapeutic potential of the receptor.

  20. P2Y Receptors in Synaptic Transmission and Plasticity: Therapeutic Potential in Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Segundo J.; Gerevich, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    ATP released from neurons and astrocytes during neuronal activity or under pathophysiological circumstances is able to influence information flow in neuronal circuits by activation of ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptors and subsequent modulation of cellular excitability, synaptic strength, and plasticity. In the present paper we review cellular and network effects of P2Y receptors in the brain. We show that P2Y receptors inhibit the release of neurotransmitters, modulate voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels, and differentially influence the induction of synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. The findings discussed here may explain how P2Y1 receptor activation during brain injury, hypoxia, inflammation, schizophrenia, or Alzheimer's disease leads to an impairment of cognitive processes. Hence, it is suggested that the blockade of P2Y1 receptors may have therapeutic potential against cognitive disturbances in these states. PMID:27069691

  1. The GABAA receptor is an FMRP target with therapeutic potential in fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Braat, Sien; D'Hulst, Charlotte; Heulens, Inge; De Rubeis, Silvia; Mientjes, Edwin; Nelson, David L; Willemsen, Rob; Bagni, Claudia; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter P; Kooy, R Frank

    2015-01-01

    Previous research indicates that the GABAAergic system is involved in the pathophysiology of the fragile X syndrome, a frequent form of inherited intellectual disability and associated with autism spectrum disorder. However, the molecular mechanism underlying GABAAergic deficits has remained largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate reduced mRNA expression of GABAA receptor subunits in the cortex and cerebellum of young Fmr1 knockout mice. In addition, we show that the previously reported underexpression of specific subunits of the GABAA receptor can be corrected in YAC transgenic rescue mice, containing the full-length human FMR1 gene in an Fmr1 knockout background. Moreover, we demonstrate that FMRP directly binds several GABAA receptor mRNAs. Finally, positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors with the neurosteroid ganaxolone can modulate specific behaviors in Fmr1 knockout mice, emphasizing the therapeutic potential of the receptor. PMID:25790165

  2. Nitric oxide potentiation of the homomeric ρ1 GABAC receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Gasulla, J; Beltrán González, AN; Calvo, DJ

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE NO is a highly diffusible and reactive gas produced in the nervous system, which acts as a neuronal signal mediating physiological or pathological mechanisms. NO can modulate the activity of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels, including NMDA and GABAA receptors. In the present work, we examined whether GABAC receptor function can also be regulated by NO. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Homomeric ρ1 GABAC receptors were expressed in oocytes and GABA-evoked responses electrophysiologically recorded in the presence or absence of the NO donor DEA. Chemical protection of cysteines by selective sulfhydryl reagents and site-directed mutagenesis were used to determine the protein residues involved in the actions of NO. KEY RESULTS GABAρ1 receptor responses were significantly enhanced in a dose-dependent, fast and reversible manner by DEA and the specific NO scavenger CPTIO prevented these potentiating effects. The ρ1 subunits contain only three cysteine residues, two extracellular at the Cys-loop (C177 and C191) and one intracellular (C364). Mutations of C177 and C191 render the ρ1 GABA receptors non-functional, but C364 can be safely exchanged by alanine (C364A). NEM, N-ethyl maleimide and (2-aminoethyl) methanethiosulfonate prevented the effects of DEA on GABAρ1 receptors. Meanwhile, the potentiating effects of DEA on mutant GABAρ1C364A receptors were similar to those observed on wild-type receptors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results suggest that the function of GABAC receptors can be enhanced by NO acting at the extracellular Cys-loop. PMID:22747884

  3. Potential applications for sigma receptor ligands in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    van Waarde, Aren; Rybczynska, Anna A; Ramakrishnan, Nisha K; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Elsinga, Philip H; Dierckx, Rudi A J O

    2015-10-01

    Sigma receptors (sigma-1 and sigma-2) represent two independent classes of proteins. Their endogenous ligands may include the hallucinogen N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and sphingolipid-derived amines which interact with sigma-1 receptors, besides steroid hormones (e.g., progesterone) which bind to both sigma receptor subpopulations. The sigma-1 receptor is a ligand-regulated molecular chaperone with various ion channels and G-protein-coupled membrane receptors as clients. The sigma-2 receptor was identified as the progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1). Although sigma receptors are over-expressed in tumors and up-regulated in rapidly dividing normal tissue, their ligands induce significant cell death only in tumor tissue. Sigma ligands may therefore be used to selectively eradicate tumors. Multiple mechanisms appear to underlie cell killing after administration of sigma ligands, and the signaling pathways are dependent both on the type of ligand and the type of tumor cell. Recent evidence suggests that the sigma-2 receptor is a potential tumor and serum biomarker for human lung cancer and an important target for inhibiting tumor invasion and cancer progression. Current radiochemical efforts are focused on the development of subtype-selective radioligands for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Right now, the mostpromising tracers are [18F]fluspidine and [18F]FTC-146 for sigma-1 receptors and [11C]RHM-1 and [18F]ISO-1 for the sigma-2 subtype. Nanoparticles coupled to sigma ligands have shown considerable potential for targeted delivery of antitumor drugs in animal models of cancer, but clinical studies exploring this strategy in cancer patients have not yet been reported. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  4. The transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 mediates mechanical hyperalgesia induced by the activation of B1 receptor in mice.

    PubMed

    Meotti, Flavia Carla; Figueiredo, Cláudia Pinto; Manjavachi, Marianne; Calixto, João B

    2017-02-01

    The kinin receptor B1 and the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) work as initiators and gatekeepers of nociception and inflammation. This study reports that the nociceptive transmission induced by activation of B1 receptor is dependent on TRPA1 ion channel. The mechanical hyperalgesia was induced by intrathecal (i.t.) injection of B1 agonist des-Arginine(9)-bradykinin (DABK) or TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde and was evaluated by the withdrawal response after von Frey Hair application in the hind paw. After behavioral experiments, lumbar spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were harvested to assess protein expression and mRNA by immunohistochemistry and real time-PCR, respectively. The pharmacological antagonism (HC030031) or the down-regulation of TRPA1 greatly inhibited the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by DABK. Intrathecal injection of DABK up regulated the ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule (Iba-1) in lumbar spinal cord (L5-L6); TRPA1 protein and mRNA in lumbar spinal cord; and B1 receptor mRNA in both lumbar spinal cord and DRG. The knockdown of TRPA1 prevented microglia activation induced by DABK. Furthermore, the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by either DABK or by cinnamaldehyde was significantly reduced by inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), protein kinase C (PKC) or phospholipase C (PLC). In summary, this study revealed that TRPA1 positively modulates the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by B1 receptor activation in the spinal cord and that the classical GPCR downstream molecules PLC, diacylglycerol (DAG), 3,4,5-inositide phosphate (IP3) and PKC are involved in the nociceptive transmission triggered by these two receptors.

  5. Neuroprotection by selective allosteric potentiators of the EP2 prostaglandin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Ganesh, Thota; Du, Yuhong; Thepchatri, Pahk; Rojas, Asheebo; Lewis, Iestyn; Kurtkaya, Serdar; Li, Lian; Qui, Min; Serrano, Geidy; Shaw, Renee; Sun, Aiming; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the Gαs-coupled EP2 receptor for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes cell survival in several models of tissue damage. To advance understanding of EP2 functions, we designed experiments to develop allosteric potentiators of this key prostaglandin receptor. Screens of 292,000 compounds identified 93 that at 20 μM (i) potentiated the cAMP response to a low concentration of PGE2 by > 50%; (ii) had no effect on EP4 or β2 adrenergic receptors, the cAMP assay itself, or the parent cell line; and (iii) increased the potency of PGE2 on EP2 receptors at least 3-fold. In aqueous solution, the active compounds are largely present as nanoparticles that appear to serve as active reservoirs for bioactive monomer. From 94 compounds synthesized or purchased, based on the modification of one hit compound, the most active increased the potency of PGE2 on EP2 receptors 4- to 5-fold at 10 to 20 μM and showed substantial neuroprotection in an excitotoxicity model. These small molecules represent previously undescribed allosteric modulators of a PGE2 receptor. Our results strongly reinforce the notion that activation of EP2 receptors by endogenous PGE2 released in a cell-injury setting is neuroprotective. PMID:20080612

  6. A critical evaluation of adenosine A2A receptors as potentially "druggable" targets in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Popoli, Patrizia; Blum, David; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Burnouf, Sylvie; Chern, Yijuang

    2008-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a polymorphic CAG trinucleotide repeat encoding a poly-glutamine tract within the Huntingtin protein. GABAergic enkephalin neurons of the basal ganglia, which show the highest levels of expression of adenosine A(2A) receptors, are the most vulnerable in HD. Such a selective neuronal vulnerability, which occurs despite ubiquitous expression of mutant and normal Huntingtin, has suggested that adenosine A(2A) receptors might play a pathogenetic role in HD. In agreement, changes in A(2A) receptor expression and signaling have been reported in various experimental models of HD. The interpretation of the functional significance of the aberrant A(2A) receptor phenotype in HD mice is however complicated by the conflicting data so far reported on the potential neuroprotective and neurodegenerative effects of these receptors in the brain, with some data suggesting a potential pathogenetic role and some other data suggesting activation of trophic or protective pathways in neurons. The same complex profile has emerged in experimental models of HD, in which both A(2A) receptor agonists and antagonists have shown beneficial effects. The main aim of this review is to critically evaluate whether adenosine A(2A) receptors may represent a suitable target to develop drugs against HD.

  7. Computational studies of new potential antimalarial compounds Stereoelectronic complementarity with the receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portela, César; Afonso, Carlos M. M.; Pinto, Madalena M. M.; João Ramos, Maria

    2003-09-01

    One of the most important pharmacological mechanisms of antimalarial action is the inhibition of the aggregation of hematin into hemozoin. We present a group of new potential antimalarial molecules for which we have performed a DFT study of their stereoelectronic properties. Additionally, the same calculations were carried out for the two putative drug receptors involved in the referred activity, i.e., hematin μ-oxo dimer and hemozoin. A complementarity between the structural and electronic profiles of the planned molecules and the receptors can be observed. A docking study of the new compounds in relation to the two putative receptors is also presented, providing a correlation with the defined electrostatic complementarity.

  8. Sigma (σ) receptors as potential therapeutic targets to mitigate psychostimulant effects.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Rae R; Nguyen, Linda; Kaushal, Nidhi; Robson, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Many psychostimulants, including cocaine and methamphetamine, interact with sigma (σ) receptors at physiologically relevant concentrations. The potential therapeutic relevance of this interaction is underscored by the ability to selectively target σ receptors to mitigate many behavioral and physiological effects of psychostimulants in animal and cell-based model systems. This chapter begins with an overview of these enigmatic proteins. Provocative preclinical data showing that σ ligands modulate an array of cocaine and methamphetamine effects are summarized, along with emerging areas of research. Together, the literature suggests targeting of σ receptors as an innovative option for combating undesired actions of psychostimulants through both neuronal and glial mechanisms.

  9. Structure-Based Virtual Screening for Dopamine D2 Receptor Ligands as Potential Antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Silva, Andrea G; Loza, María I; Kolb, Peter; Castro, Marián; Poso, Antti

    2016-04-05

    Structure-based virtual screening using a D2 receptor homology model was performed to identify dopamine D2 receptor ligands as potential antipsychotics. From screening a library of 6.5 million compounds, 21 were selected and were subjected to experimental validation. From these 21 compounds tested, ten D2 ligands were identified (47.6% success rate, among them D2 receptor antagonists, as expected) that have additional affinity for other receptors tested, in particular 5-HT2A receptors. The affinity (Ki values) of the compounds ranged from 58 nm to about 24 μM. Similarity and fragment analysis indicated a significant degree of structural novelty among the identified compounds. We found one D2 receptor antagonist that did not have a protonatable nitrogen atom, which is a key structural element of the classical D2 pharmacophore model necessary for interaction with the conserved Asp(3.32) residue. This compound exhibited greater than 20-fold binding selectivity for the D2 receptor over the D3 receptor. We provide additional evidence that the amide hydrogen atom of this compound forms a hydrogen bond with Asp(3.32), as determined by tests of its derivatives that cannot maintain this interaction. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Progesterone receptor in the prostate: A potential suppressor for benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, RuiQi; Yu, Yue; Dong, Xuesen

    2017-02-01

    Advanced prostate cancer undergoing androgen receptor pathway inhibition (ARPI) eventually progresses to castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), suggesting that (i) androgen receptor (AR) blockage is incomplete, and (ii) there are other critical molecular pathways contributing to prostate cancer (PCa) progression. Although most PCa occurs in the epithelium, prostate stroma is increasingly believed to play a crucial role in promoting tumorigenesis and facilitating tumor progression. In the stroma, sex steroid hormone receptors such as AR and estrogen receptor-α are implicated to have important functions, whereas the progesterone receptor (PR) remains largely under-investigated despite the high sequence and structural similarities between PR and AR. Stromal progesterone/PR signaling may play a critical role in PCa development and progression because not only progesterone is a critical precursor for de novo androgen steroidogenesis and an activator of mutant androgen receptors, but also PR functions in a ligand-independent manner in various important pathways. In fact, recent progress in our understanding of stromal PR function suggests that this receptor may exert an inhibitory effect on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), reactive stroma development, and PCa progression. These early findings of stromal PR warrant further investigations as this receptor could be a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in PCa management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Distribution of somatostatin receptors in normal and neoplastic human tissues: recent advances and potential relevance.

    PubMed

    Reubi, J C; Schaer, J C; Markwalder, R; Waser, B; Horisberger, U; Laissue, J

    1997-01-01

    This short review describes the localization of somatostatin receptors with in vitro receptor autoradiography techniques in several non-classical, normal human somatostatin target tissues as well as in selected human tumors. In addition to brain, gut and neuroendocrine localizations, somatostatin receptors are expressed in most lymphatic tissues, including gut-associated lymphatic tissue, spleen and thymus; in the cortical and medullary area of the kidney; in the stroma of the prostate and in the epithelial cells of the thyroid. Among human tumors, the extremely high density of somatostatin receptors in medulloblastomas should be stressed as well as the favorable prognostic role of the presence of somatostatin receptors in neuroblastomas. Moreover, several types of mesenchymal tumors have somatostatin receptors as well. The receptor subtypes expressed by distinct tumors may vary: Whereas medulloblastomas and neuroblastomas predominantly express sst2, prostate cancers express sst1 rather than sst2. A further emerging somatostatin target is represented by the peritumoral veins, also known to express sst2 receptors. The multiple somatostatin targets in normal and pathological human tissues represents the basis for potential diagnostic and clinical applications of somatostatin analogs.

  12. Metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors as potential targets for the treatment of alcohol use disorder.

    PubMed

    Goodwani, Sunil; Saternos, Hannah; Alasmari, Fawaz; Sari, Youssef

    2017-02-24

    Emerging evidence indicates that dysfunctional glutamate neurotransmission is critical in the initiation and development of alcohol and drug dependence. Alcohol consumption induced downregulation of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) as reported in previous studies from our laboratory. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, which acts via interactions with several glutamate receptors. Alcohol consumption interferes with the glutamatergic signal transmission by altering the functions of these receptors. Among the glutamate receptors involved in alcohol-drinking behavior are the metabotropic receptors such as mGluR1/5, mGluR2/3, and mGluR7, as well as the ionotropic receptors, NMDA and AMPA. Preclinical studies using agonists and antagonists implicate these glutamatergic receptors in the development of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss the neurocircuitry involving glutamate transmission in animals exposed to alcohol and further outline the role of metabotropic and ionotropic receptors in the regulation of alcohol-drinking behavior. This review provides ample information about the potential therapeutic role of glutamatergic receptors for the treatment of AUD.

  13. Devil's Claw to Suppress Appetite—Ghrelin Receptor Modulation Potential of a Harpagophytum procumbens Root Extract

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Fuentes, Cristina; Theeuwes, Wessel F.; McMullen, Michael K.; McMullen, Anna K.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.; Schellekens, Harriët

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach-derived peptide that has been identified as the only circulating hunger hormone that exerts a potent orexigenic effect via activation of its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a). Hence, the ghrelinergic system represents a promising target to treat obesity and obesity-related diseases. In this study we analysed the GHS-R1a receptor activating potential of Harpagophytum procumbens, popularly known as Devil's Claw, and its effect on food intake in vivo. H. procumbens is an important traditional medicinal plant from Southern Africa with potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. This plant has been also used as an appetite modulator but most evidences are anecdotal and to our knowledge, no clear scientific studies relating to appetite modulation have been done to this date. The ghrelin receptor activation potential of an extract derived from the dried tuberous roots of H. procumbens was analysed by calcium mobilization and receptor internalization assays in human embryonic kidney cells (Hek) stably expressing the GHS-R1a receptor. Food intake was investigated in male C57BL/6 mice following intraperitoneal administration of H. procumbens root extract in ad libitum and food restricted conditions. Exposure to H. procumbens extract demonstrated a significant increased cellular calcium influx but did not induce subsequent GHS-R1a receptor internalization, which is a characteristic for full receptor activation. A significant anorexigenic effect was observed in male C57BL/6 mice following peripheral administration of H. procumbens extract. We conclude that H. procumbens root extract is a potential novel source for potent anti-obesity bioactives. These results reinforce the promising potential of natural bioactives to be developed into functional foods with weight-loss and weight maintenance benefits. PMID:25068823

  14. Crosstalk between Leptin Receptor and Igf-Ir in Breast Cancer: A Potential Mediator of Chemoresistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0452 TITLE: Crosstalk between Leptin Receptor and Igf...NUMBER Crosstalk between Leptin Receptor and Igf-Ir in Breast Cancer: A Potential Mediator of Chemoresistance 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1...cancer, and is associated with reduced treatment response and reduced overall survival. The obesity-associated hormones IGF-I and leptin and their

  15. Cannabinoid receptor agonists potentiate action potential-independent release of GABA in the dentate gyrus through a CB1 receptor-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Bhatia, Chinki; Frazier, Charles J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We report a novel excitatory effect of cannabinoid agonists on action potential-independent GABAergic transmission in the rat dentate gyrus. Specifically, we find that both WIN55,212-2 and anandamide increase the frequency of miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) recorded from hilar mossy cells without altering event amplitude, area, rise time, or decay. The effect of WIN55,212-2 on mIPSCs is insensitive to AM251 and preserved in CB1−/− animals, indicating that it does not depend on activation of CB1 receptors. It is also insensitive to AM630 and unaffected by capsazepine suggesting that neither CB2 nor TRPV1 receptors are involved. Further, it is blocked by pre-incubation in suramin and by a selective protein kinase A inhibitor (H-89), and is mimicked (and occluded) by bath application of forskolin. Similar CB1 receptor-independent facilitation of exocytosis is not apparent when recording evoked IPSCs in the presence of AM251, suggesting that the exocytotic mechanism that produces WIN55,212-2 sensitive mIPSCs is distinct from that which produces CB1 sensitive and action potential-dependent release. Despite clear independence from action potentials, WIN55,212-2 mediated facilitation of mIPSCs requires calcium, and yet is insensitive to chelation of calcium in the postsynaptic cell. Finally, we demonstrate that both bath application of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and depolarization-induced release of endogenous cannabinoids have minimal effect on mIPSC frequency. Cumulatively, our results indicate that cannabinoid ligands can selectively facilitate action potential-independent exocytosis of GABA in the rat dentate gyrus, and further emphasize that this new cannabinoid sensitive signalling system is distinct from previously described CB1 receptor-dependent systems in numerous respects. PMID:21646412

  16. Lobeline, a potential pharmacotherapy for drug addiction, binds to mu opioid receptors and diminishes the effects of opioid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dennis K; Lever, John R; Rodvelt, Kelli R; Baskett, James A; Will, Matthew J; Kracke, George R

    2007-07-10

    Lobeline diminishes the behavioral and neurochemical effects of nicotine and amphetamines, and is considered a potential pharmacotherapy for drug abuse and addiction. Lobeline has high affinity for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and inhibits the function of vesicular monoamine and dopamine transporters. The present study investigated the less-explored interaction of lobeline and the endogenous opioid system. In guinea pig brain homogenates, lobeline displaced (K(i)=0.74 microM) the binding of [(3)H]DAMGO [(D-Ala(2), N-ME-Phe(4), Gly(5)-ol)-enkephalin]. In a functional assay system comprised of MOR-1 mu opioid receptors and GIRK2 potassium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, lobeline had no effect on the resting current, but maximally inhibited (IC(50)=1.1 microM) morphine- and DAMGO-activated potassium current in a concentration-dependent manner. In a second functional assay, lobeline-evoked [(3)H]overflow from rat striatal slices preloaded with [(3)H]dopamine was not blocked by naltrexone. Importantly, concentrations of lobeline (0.1-0.3 microM) that did not have intrinsic activity attenuated ( approximately 50%) morphine-evoked [(3)H]overflow. Overall, the results suggest that lobeline functions as a mu opioid receptor antagonist. The ability of lobeline to block psychostimulant effects may be mediated by opioid receptor antagonism, and lobeline could be investigated as a treatment for opiate addiction.

  17. Interaction with Dopamine D2 Receptor Enhances Expression of Transient Receptor Potential Channel 1 at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Meredith A.; Kabbani, Nadine; Paspalas, Constantinos D.; Levenson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Receptor signaling is mediated by direct protein interaction with various types of cytoskeletal, adapter, effector, and additional receptor molecules. In brain tissue and in cultured neurons, activation of dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) has been found to impact cellular calcium signaling. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach, we have uncovered a direct physical interaction between the D2R and the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) subtypes 1, 4 and 5. The TRPC/D2R interaction was further validated by GST-pulldown assays and coimmunoprecipitation from mammalian brain. Ultrastructural analysis of TRPC1 and D2R expression indicates colocalization of the two proteins within the cell body and dendrites of cortical neurons. In cultured cells, expression of D2Rs was found to increase expression of TRPC1 at the cell surface by 50%. These findings shed new light on the constituents of the D2R signalplex, and support the involvement of D2Rs in cellular calcium signaling pathways via a novel link to TRPC channels. PMID:18261457

  18. Serotonin receptors as potential targets for modulation of nicotine use and dependence.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Paul J; Lê, Anh Dzung; Higgins, Guy A

    2008-01-01

    Nicotine use carries considerable health risks and plays a major role in a variety of diseases. Current pharmacological treatments to aid in smoking cessation include nicotine-replacement therapy and non-nicotinic strategies such as bupropion and varenicline. While these treatments benefit some individuals there is still a need for better and more effective treatment strategies. Nicotine is the major psychoactive substance in tobacco. Some behavioural effects of nicotine, including its reinforcing efficacy result in part from activation of mesolimbic dopamine neurons. Modulation of dopamine function is one potential treatment strategy that could treat nicotine dependence. Serotonergic neurons modulate the functioning of dopamine neurons in a complex fashion. Much of this complexity arises from the fact that serotonin (5-HT) exerts its effects through multiple receptor subtypes, some of which even act in apparent functional opposition to each other. This article reviews evidence, primarily from animal experiments, using behavioural procedures relevant to nicotine use on the potential for 5-HT receptors as targets for treating nicotine dependence. The 5-HT(1A, 2A, 2C, 3, 4, 6) receptor subtypes have received most experimental attention, with the 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors being the best studied. Several studies have now shown that 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonists alleviate some of the behavioural signs induced by nicotine withdrawal. Electrophysiological and neurochemical studies show that stimulation of 5-HT(2C) receptors reduces the function of the mesolimbic dopamine pathway. 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists block the stimulatory action of nicotine on midbrain dopamine function. They also reduce several behavioural effects of nicotine including its discriminative stimulus properties and reinforcing effects. Although more work remains to be done, 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists perhaps hold the most promise as potential therapies for smoking cessation.

  19. The identification of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha-independent effects of oleoylethanolamide on intestinal transit in mice.

    PubMed

    Cluny, N L; Keenan, C M; Lutz, B; Piomelli, D; Sharkey, K A

    2009-04-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is an endogenous lipid produced in the intestine that mediates satiety by activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). OEA inhibits gastric emptying and intestinal motility, but the mechanism of action remains to be determined. We investigated whether OEA inhibits intestinal motility by activation of PPARalpha. PPARalpha immunoreactivity was examined in whole mount preparations of mouse gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The effect of OEA on motility was assessed in wildtype, PPARalpha, cannabinoid CB(1) receptor and CB(2) receptor gene-deficient mice and in a model of accelerated GI transit. In addition, the effect of OEA on motility was assessed in mice injected with the PPARalpha antagonist GW6471, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonist SB366791 or the glucagon-like peptide 1 antagonist exendin-3(9-39) amide. PPARalpha immunoreactivity was present in neurons in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses throughout the GI tract. OEA inhibited upper GI transit in a dose-dependent manner, but was devoid of an effect on whole gut transit or colonic propulsion. OEA-induced inhibition of motility was still present in PPARalpha, CB(1) and CB(2) receptor gene-deficient mice and in the presence of GW6471, SB366791 and exendin-3(9-39) amide, suggesting neither PPARalpha nor the cannabinoids and other likely receptors are involved in mediating the effects of OEA. OEA blocked stress-induced accelerated upper GI transit at a dose that had no effect on physiological transit. We show that PPARalpha is found in the enteric nervous system, but our results suggest that PPARalpha is not involved in the suppression of motility by OEA.

  20. A potential role for cannabinoid receptors in the therapeutic action of fenofibrate.

    PubMed

    Priestley, Richard S; Nickolls, Sarah A; Alexander, Stephen P H; Kendall, David A

    2015-04-01

    Cannabinoids are reported to have actions through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which led us to investigate PPAR agonists for activity at the cannabinoid receptors. Radio-ligand binding and functional assays were conducted using human recombinant cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) or cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptors, as well as the guinea pig isolated ileum, using the full agonist CP55940 as a positive control. The PPAR-α agonist fenofibrate exhibited submicromolar affinity for both receptors (pKi CB1, 6.3 ± 0.1; CB2, 7.7 ± 0.1). Functionally, fenofibrate acted as an agonist at the CB2 receptor (pEC50, 7.7 ± 0.1) and a partial agonist at the CB1 receptor, although with a decrease in functional response at higher concentrations, producing bell-shaped concentration-response curves. High concentrations of fenofibrate were able to increase the dissociation rate constant for [(3)H]-CP55940 at the CB1 receptor, (kfast without: 1.2 ± 0.2/min; with: 3.8 ± 0.1 × 10(-2)/min) and decrease the maximal response to CP55940 (Rmax, 86 ± 2%), which is consistent with a negative allosteric modulator. Fenofibrate also reduced electrically induced contractions in isolated guinea pig ileum via CB1 receptors (pEC50, 6.0 ± 0.4). Fenofibrate is thus identified as an example of a new class of cannabinoid receptor ligand and allosteric modulator, with the potential to interact therapeutically with cannabinoid receptors in addition to its primary PPAR target. © FASEB.

  1. Roles of transient receptor potential proteins (TRPs) in epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Denda, Mitsuhiro; Tsutsumi, Moe

    2011-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes are the epithelial cells of mammalian skin. At the basal layer of the epidermis, these cells proliferate strongly, and as they move towards the skin surface, differentiation proceeds. At the uppermost layer of the epidermis, keratinocytes undergo apoptosis and die, forming a thin, water-impermeable layer called the stratum corneum. Peripheral blood vessels do not reach the epidermis, but peripheral nerve fibers do penetrate into it. Until recently, it was considered that the main role of epidermal keratinocytes was to construct and maintain the water-impermeable barrier function. However, since the functional existence of TRPV1, which is activated by heat and low pH, in epidermal keratinocytes was identified, our understanding of the role of keratinocytes has changed enormously. It has been found that many TRP channels are expressed in epidermal keratinocytes, and play important roles in differentiation, proliferation and barrier homeostasis. Moreover, because TRP channels expressed in keratinocytes have the ability to sense a variety of environmental factors, such as temperature, mechanical stress, osmotic stress and chemical stimuli, epidermal keratinocytes might form a key part of the sensory system of the skin. The present review deals with the potential roles of TRP channels expressed in epidermal keratinocytes and focuses on the concept of the epidermis as an active interface between the body and the environment.

  2. Surface charge potentiates conduction through the cardiac ryanodine receptor channel

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Single channel currents through cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels were measured in very low levels of current carrier (e.g., 1 mM Ba2+). The hypothesis that surface charge contributes to these anomalously large single channel currents was tested by changing ionic strength and surface charge density. Channel identity and sidedness was pharmacologically determined. At low ionic strength (20 mM Cs+), Cs+ conduction in the lumen-->myoplasm (L-->M) direction was significantly greater than in the reverse direction (301.7 +/- 92.5 vs 59.8 +/- 38 pS, P < 0.001; mean +/- SD, t test). The Cs+ concentration at which conduction reached half saturation was asymmetric (32 vs 222 mM) and voltage independent. At high ionic strength (400 mM Cs+), conduction in both direction saturated at 550 +/- 32 pS. Further, neutralization of carboxyl groups on the lumenal side of the channel significantly reduced conduction (333.0 +/- 22.5 vs 216.2 +/- 24.4 pS, P < 0.002). These results indicate that negative surface charge exists near the lumenal mouth of the channel but outside the electric field of the membrane. In vivo, this surface charge may potentiate conduction by increasing the local Ca2+ concentration and thus act as a preselection filter for this poorly selective channel. PMID:8035165

  3. Expression and Purification of the Pain Receptor TRPV1 for Spectroscopic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Velisetty, Phanindra; Stein, Richard A; Sierra-Valdez, Francisco J; Vásquez, Valeria; Cordero-Morales, Julio F

    2017-08-29

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is an essential component of the cellular mechanism through which noxious stimuli evoke pain. Functional and structural characterizations of TRPV1 shed light on vanilloid activation, yet the mechanisms for temperature and proton gating remain largely unknown. Spectroscopic approaches are needed to understand the mechanisms by which TRPV1 translates diverse stimuli into channel opening. Here, we have engineered a minimal cysteine-less rat TRPV1 construct (eTRPV1) that can be stably purified and reconstituted for spectroscopic studies. Biophysical analyses of TRPV1 constructs reveal that the S5-pore helix loop influences protein stability and vanilloid and proton responses, but not thermal sensitivity. Cysteine mutants retain function and stability for double electron-electron resonance (DEER) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. DEER measurements in the closed state demonstrate that eTRPV1 reports distances in the extracellular vestibule, equivalent to those observed in the apo TRPV1 structure. EPR measurements show a distinct pattern of mobilities and spectral features, in detergent and liposomes, for residues at the pore domain that agree with their location in the TRPV1 structure. Our results set the stage for a systematic characterization of TRPV1 using spectroscopic approaches to reveal conformational changes compatible with thermal- and ligand-dependent gating.

  4. Opioid, cannabinoid, and transient receptor potential (TRP) systems: effects on body temperature

    PubMed Central

    Rawls, Scott M.; Benamar, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid and opioid drugs produce marked changes in body temperature. Recent findings have extended our knowledge about the thermoregulatory effects of cannabinoids and opioids, particularly as related to delta opioid receptors, endogenous systems, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Although delta opioid receptors were originally thought to play only a minor role in thermoregulation compared to mu and kappa opioid receptors, their activation has been shown to produce hypothermia in multiple species. Endogenous opioids and cannabinoids also regulate body temperature. Mu and kappa opioid receptors are thought to be in tonic balance, with mu and kappa receptor activation producing hyperthermia and hypothermia, respectively. Endocannabinoids participate in the febrile response, but more studies are needed to determine if a cannabinoid CB1 receptor tone exerts control over basal body temperature. A particularly intense research focus is TRP channels, where TRPV1 channel activation produces hypothermia whereas TRPA1 and TRPM8 channel activation causes hyperthermia. The marked hyperthermia produced by TRPV1 channel antagonists suggests these warm channels tonically control body temperature. A better understanding of the roles of cannabinoid, opioid, and TRP systems in thermoregulation may have broad clinical implications and provide insights into interactions among neurotransmitter systems involved in thermoregulation. PMID:21622235

  5. Endocytosis and Trafficking of Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A: Potential Role of Short Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    The targeted endocytosis and redistribution of transmembrane receptors among membrane-bound subcellular organelles are vital for their correct signaling and physiological functions. Membrane receptors committed for internalization and trafficking pathways are sorted into coated vesicles. Cardiac hormones, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) bind to guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and elicit the generation of intracellular second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which lowers blood pressure and incidence of heart failure. After ligand binding, the receptor is rapidly internalized, sequestrated, and redistributed into intracellular locations. Thus, NPRA is considered a dynamic cellular macromolecule that traverses different subcellular locations through its lifetime. The utilization of pharmacologic and molecular perturbants has helped in delineating the pathways of endocytosis, trafficking, down-regulation, and degradation of membrane receptors in intact cells. This review describes the investigation of the mechanisms of internalization, trafficking, and redistribution of NPRA compared with other cell surface receptors from the plasma membrane into the cell interior. The roles of different short-signal peptide sequence motifs in the internalization and trafficking of other membrane receptors have been briefly reviewed and their potential significance in the internalization and trafficking of NPRA is discussed. PMID:26151885

  6. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) Channel and Neurogenic Inflammation in Pathogenesis of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hang; Li, ShuZhuang

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and it affects 300 million people worldwide. However, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie asthma remains limited. Recent studies have suggested that transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), one of the transient receptor potential cation channels, may be involved in airway inflammation in asthma. The present review discusses the relationship between TRPA1 and neurogenic inflammation in asthma, hoping to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:27539812

  7. β-Adrenergic receptor signaling and modulation of long-term potentiation in the mammalian hippocampus.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, Thomas J; Connor, Steven A; Guglietta, Ryan; Nguyen, Peter V

    2015-09-01

    Encoding new information in the brain requires changes in synaptic strength. Neuromodulatory transmitters can facilitate synaptic plasticity by modifying the actions and expression of specific signaling cascades, transmitter receptors and their associated signaling complexes, genes, and effector proteins. One critical neuromodulator in the mammalian brain is norepinephrine (NE), which regulates multiple brain functions such as attention, perception, arousal, sleep, learning, and memory. The mammalian hippocampus receives noradrenergic innervation and hippocampal neurons express β-adrenergic receptors, which are known to play important roles in gating the induction of long-lasting forms of synaptic potentiation. These forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) are believed to importantly contribute to long-term storage of spatial and contextual memories in the brain. In this review, we highlight the contributions of noradrenergic signaling in general and β-adrenergic receptors in particular, toward modulating hippocampal LTP. We focus on the roles of NE and β-adrenergic receptors in altering the efficacies of specific signaling molecules such as NMDA and AMPA receptors, protein phosphatases, and translation initiation factors. Also, the roles of β-adrenergic receptors in regulating synaptic "tagging" and "capture" of LTP within synaptic networks of the hippocampus are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and cellular bases of noradrenergic signaling will enrich our grasp of how the brain makes new, enduring memories, and may shed light on credible strategies for improving mental health through treatment of specific disorders linked to perturbed memory processing and dysfunctional noradrenergic synaptic transmission.

  8. Metabotropic glutamate receptors are required for the induction of long-term potentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, F.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    Recent observations have led to the suggestion that the metabotropic glutamate receptor may play a role in the induction or maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP). However, experimental evidence supporting a role for this receptor in the induction of LTP is still inconclusive and controversial. Here we report that, in rat dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN) neurons, which have the highest density of metabotropic receptors and show functional responses, the induction of LTP is not blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate, but is blocked by two putative metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, L-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid and L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate. Furthermore, superfusion of (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid, a selective metabotropic glutamate agonist, resulted in a long-lasting potentiation of synaptic transmission similar to that induced by tetanic stimuli. Our results demonstrated that activation of postsynaptic metabotropic receptors is both necessary and sufficient for the induction of LTP in the DLSN, and we suggest that such a mechanism may be important at other CNS synapses.

  9. Potential role for ET-2 acting through ETA receptors in experimental colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Claudino, R F; Leite, D F; Bento, A F; Chichorro, J G; Calixto, J B; Rae, G A

    2017-02-01

    This study attempted to clarify the roles of endothelins and mechanisms associated with ETA/ETB receptors in mouse models of colitis. Colitis was induced by intracolonic administration of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS, 1.5 mg/animal) or dextran sulfate sodium (DSS, 3%). After colitis establishment, mice received Atrasentan (ETA receptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg), A-192621 (ETB receptor antagonist, 20 mg/kg) or Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) and several inflammatory parameters were assessed, as well as mRNA levels for ET-1, ET-2 and ET receptors. Atrasentan treatment ameliorates TNBS- and DSS-induced colitis. In the TNBS model was observed reduction in macroscopic and microscopic score, colon weight, neutrophil influx, IL-1β, MIP-2 and keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) levels, inhibition of adhesion molecules expression and restoration of IL-10 levels. However, A192621 treatment did not modify any parameter. ET-1 and ET-2 mRNA was decreased 24 h, but ET-2 mRNA was markedly increased at 48 h after TNBS. ET-2 was able to potentiate LPS-induced KC production in vitro. ETA and ETB receptors mRNA were increased at 24, 48 and 72 h after colitis induction. Atrasentan treatment was effective in reducing the severity of colitis in DSS- and TNBS-treated mice, suggesting that ETA receptors might be a potential target for inflammatory bowel diseases.

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptors are required for the induction of long-term potentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, F.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    Recent observations have led to the suggestion that the metabotropic glutamate receptor may play a role in the induction or maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP). However, experimental evidence supporting a role for this receptor in the induction of LTP is still inconclusive and controversial. Here we report that, in rat dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN) neurons, which have the highest density of metabotropic receptors and show functional responses, the induction of LTP is not blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate, but is blocked by two putative metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, L-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid and L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate. Furthermore, superfusion of (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid, a selective metabotropic glutamate agonist, resulted in a long-lasting potentiation of synaptic transmission similar to that induced by tetanic stimuli. Our results demonstrated that activation of postsynaptic metabotropic receptors is both necessary and sufficient for the induction of LTP in the DLSN, and we suggest that such a mechanism may be important at other CNS synapses.

  11. Potentiation of morphine-induced mechanical antinociception by σ₁ receptor inhibition: role of peripheral σ₁ receptors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fernández, Cristina; Nieto, Francisco Rafael; González-Cano, Rafael; Artacho-Cordón, Antonia; Romero, Lucía; Montilla-García, Ángeles; Zamanillo, Daniel; Baeyens, José Manuel; Entrena, José Manuel; Cobos, Enrique José

    2013-07-01

    We studied the modulation of morphine-induced mechanical antinociception and side effects by σ₁ receptor inhibition. Both wild-type (WT) and σ₁ receptor knockout (σ₁-KO) mice showed similar responses to paw pressure (100-600 g). The systemic (subcutaneous) or local (intraplantar) administration of σ₁ antagonists (BD-1063, BD-1047, NE-100 and S1RA) was devoid of antinociceptive effects in WT mice. However, σ₁-KO mice exhibited an enhanced mechanical antinociception in response to systemic morphine (1-16 mg/kg). Similarly, systemic treatment of WT mice with σ₁ antagonists markedly potentiated morphine-induced antinociception, and its effects were reversed by the selective σ₁ agonist PRE-084. Although the local administration of morphine (50-200 μg) was devoid of antinociceptive effects in WT mice, it induced dose-dependent antinociception in σ₁-KO mice. This effect was limited to the injected paw. Enhancement of peripheral morphine antinociception was replicated in WT mice locally co-administered with σ₁ antagonists and the opioid. None of the σ₁ antagonists tested enhanced morphine-antinociception in σ₁-KO mice, confirming a σ₁-mediated action. Morphine-induced side-effects (hyperlocomotion and inhibition of gastrointestinal transit) were unaltered in σ₁-KO mice. These results cannot be explained by a direct interaction of σ₁ ligands with μ-opioid receptors or adaptive changes of μ-receptors in σ₁-KO mice, given that [(3)H]DAMGO binding in forebrain, spinal cord, and hind-paw skin membranes was unaltered in mutant mice, and none of the σ₁ drugs tested bound to μ-opioid receptors. These results show that σ₁ receptor inhibition potentiates morphine-induced mechanical analgesia but not its acute side effects, and that this enhanced analgesia can be induced at peripheral level.

  12. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  13. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  14. Role and therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in breast cancer progression and metastases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anukriti; Nunes, Jessica J; Ateeq, Bushra

    2015-09-15

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of cell-surface receptors, which have recently emerged as key players in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this review, we discussed our current understanding of the many roles played by GPCRs in general, and particularly Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1), a member of the seven-transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and its significance in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We have also discussed different strategies for targeting AGTR1, and its ligand Angiotension II (Ang II), which might unravel unique opportunities for breast cancer prevention and treatment. For example, AGTR1 blockers (ARBs) which are already in clinical use for treating hypertension, merit further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for AGTR1-positive cancer patients and may have the potential to prevent Ang II-AGTR1 signalling mediated cancer pathogenesis and metastases.

  15. Role and therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in breast cancer progression and metastases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anukriti; Nunes, Jessica J.; Ateeq, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of cell-surface receptors, which have recently emerged as key players in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this review, we discussed our current understanding of the many roles played by GPCRs in general, and particularly Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1), a member of the seven-transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and its significance in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We have also discussed different strategies for targeting AGTR1, and its ligand Angiotension II (Ang II), which might unravel unique opportunities for breast cancer prevention and treatment. For example, AGTR1 blockers (ARBs) which are already in clinical use for treating hypertension, merit further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for AGTR1-positive cancer patients and may have the potential to prevent Ang II-AGTR1 signalling mediated cancer pathogenesis and metastases. PMID:25981295

  16. Positive selection moments identify potential functional residues in human olfactory receptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Weisinger-Lewin, Y.; Lancet, D.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Correlated mutation analysis and molecular models of olfactory receptors have provided evidence that residues in the transmembrane domains form a binding pocket for odor ligands. As an independent test of these results, we have calculated positive selection moments for the alpha-helical sixth transmembrane domain (TM6) of human olfactory receptors. The moments can be used to identify residues that have been preferentially affected by positive selection and are thus likely to interact with odor ligands. The results suggest that residue 622, which is commonly a serine or threonine, could form critical H-bonds. In some receptors a dual-serine subsite, formed by residues 622 and 625, could bind hydroxyl determinants on odor ligands. The potential importance of these residues is further supported by site-directed mutagenesis in the beta-adrenergic receptor. The findings should be of practical value for future physiological studies, binding assays, and site-directed mutagenesis.

  17. Positive selection moments identify potential functional residues in human olfactory receptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Weisinger-Lewin, Y.; Lancet, D.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Correlated mutation analysis and molecular models of olfactory receptors have provided evidence that residues in the transmembrane domains form a binding pocket for odor ligands. As an independent test of these results, we have calculated positive selection moments for the alpha-helical sixth transmembrane domain (TM6) of human olfactory receptors. The moments can be used to identify residues that have been preferentially affected by positive selection and are thus likely to interact with odor ligands. The results suggest that residue 622, which is commonly a serine or threonine, could form critical H-bonds. In some receptors a dual-serine subsite, formed by residues 622 and 625, could bind hydroxyl determinants on odor ligands. The potential importance of these residues is further supported by site-directed mutagenesis in the beta-adrenergic receptor. The findings should be of practical value for future physiological studies, binding assays, and site-directed mutagenesis.

  18. Pungency of TRPV1 agonists is directly correlated with kinetics of receptor activation and lipophilicity.

    PubMed

    Ursu, Daniel; Knopp, Kelly; Beattie, Ruth E; Liu, Bin; Sher, Emanuele

    2010-09-01

    TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) is a ligand-gated ion channel expressed predominantly in nociceptive primary afferents that plays a key role in pain processing. In vivo activation of TRPV1 receptors by natural agonists like capsaicin is associated with a sharp and burning pain, frequently described as pungency. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying pungency we investigated a series of TRPV1 agonists that included both pungent and non-pungent compounds covering a large range of potencies. Pungency of capsaicin, piperine, arvanil, olvanil, RTX (resiniferatoxin) and SDZ-249665 was evaluated in vivo, by determining the increase in the number of eye wipes caused by direct instillation of agonist solutions into the eye. Agonist-induced calcium fluxes were recorded using the FLIPR technique in a recombinant, TRPV1-expressing cell line. Current-clamp recordings were performed in rat DRG (dorsal root ganglia) neurons in order to assess the consequences of TRPV1 activation on neuronal excitability. Using the eye wipe assay the following rank of pungency was obtained: capsaicin>piperine>RTX>arvanil>olvanil>SDZ-249665. We found a strong correlation between kinetics of calcium flux, pungency and lipophilicity of TRPV1 agonists. Current-clamp recordings confirmed that the rate of receptor activation translates in the ability of agonists to generate action potentials in sensory neurons. We have demonstrated that the lipophilicity of the compounds is directly related to the kinetics of TRPV1 activation and that the latter influences their ability to trigger action potentials in sensory neurons and, ultimately, pungency.

  19. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    May, Felicity EB

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  20. FK506-binding protein 52 phosphorylation: a potential mechanism for regulating steroid hormone receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Cox, Marc B; Riggs, Daniel L; Hessling, Martin; Schumacher, Felix; Buchner, Johannes; Smith, David F

    2007-12-01

    Functional maturation of steroid hormone receptors requires ordered assembly into a large multichaperone complex consisting of receptor monomer, an Hsp90 dimer, the p23 cochaperone, and an FK506-binding protein (FKBP) family member or alternate peptidylprolyl isomerase-related cochaperone. Previous cellular studies demonstrated that FKBP52 can potentiate receptor function. These results have been confirmed in fkbp4 gene knockout mice in which males are partially androgen insensitive and females display characteristics of progesterone insensitivity. Conversely, FKBP51, which has a high degree of similarity to FKBP52, antagonizes FKBP52-mediated potentiation. Both proteins consist of three domains: two FKBP12-like domains termed FK1 and FK2 and a tetratricopeptide repeat domain that targets binding to Hsp90. To help understand why the two FKBPs behave differently and to gain insight into FKBP52 potentiation activity, we have analyzed the loop structure that links FK1 and FK2. Within the FK linker of FKBP52 is the sequence TEEED, which forms a consensus casein kinase II phosphorylation site; the corresponding sequence in FKBP51 is FED. We demonstrate that the distinct FK linker sequences per se do not account for lack of potentiation activity by FKBP51. However, phosphorylation of the FK linker appears to be an important regulatory determinant of FKBP52-mediated potentiation of steroid receptor activity.

  1. TRPV1 receptors augment basal synaptic transmission in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Saffarzadeh, F; Eslamizade, M J; Mousavi, S M M; Abraki, S B; Hadjighassem, M R; Gorji, A

    2016-02-09

    Temporal lobe epilepsy in human and animals is attributed to alterations in brain function especially hippocampus formation. Changes in synaptic activity might be causally related to the alterations during epileptogenesis. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) as one of the non-selective ion channels has been shown to be involved in synaptic transmission. However, the potential role of TRPV1 receptors in synaptic function in the epileptic brain needs to be elucidated. In the present study, we used quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), western blotting, and immunohistochemistry to assess hippocampal TRPV1 mRNA expression, protein content, and distribution. Moreover, the effects of pharmacologic activation and inhibition of TRPV1 receptors on the slope of evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were analyzed in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons, after 3months of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). SE induced an upregulation of TRPV1 mRNA and protein content in the whole hippocampal extract, as well as its distribution in both CA1 and CA3 regions. Activation and inhibition of TRPV1 receptors (via capsaicin 1μM and capsazepine 10μM, respectively) did not influence basal synaptic transmission in CA1 and CA3 regions of control slices, however, capsaicin increased and capsazepine decreased synaptic transmission in both regions in tissues from epileptic animals. Taken together, these findings suggest that a higher expression of TRPV1 in the epileptic condition is accompanied by alterations in basal synaptic transmission.

  2. Potentiation of neurotransmitter release by activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses of Xenopus.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, W M; Liou, J C; Lee, Y H; Liou, H C

    1995-01-01

    1. Glutamate receptors play important roles in synaptic plasticity and neural development. Here we report that, at the developing neuromuscular synapses in Xenopus cultures, the activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors at motor nerve terminals potentiates spontaneous acetylcholine (ACh) release. 2. Co-cultures of spinal neurons and myotomal muscle cells were prepared from 1-day-old Xenopus embryos. Spontaneous synaptic currents (SSCs) were recorded from innervated myocytes using whole-cell recording. Bath application of glutamate (10 microM) markedly increased the frequency of SSCs, and the action of glutamate was reversible. 3. Pretreatment with 0.3 microM tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na+ channels and the conduction of action potentials, only slightly inhibited the potentiating action of glutamate on SSCs. Furthermore, the enhancement of ACh secretion was much more prominent when glutamate was applied locally to the synaptic region. 4. Three types of glutamate receptor agonists, kainate, quisqualate, AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid) and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate), were effective in inducing the potentiating effect. The ranking order was: glutamate > kainate > NMDA > AMPA > quisqualate. Glycine potentiated the effects induced by NMDA. Metabotropic receptors were not involved in the potentiating action of glutamate. 5. The potentiating effect of glutamate depended on the influx of Ca2+ through both L-type Ca2+ channels and NMDA-gated channels. 6. Since glutamate is known to be co-released with ACh at some cholinergic nerve terminals, the released glutamate may serve as a positive feedback regulation of ACh secretion at developing neuromuscular junctions via its action on presynaptic glutamate receptors. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:8788945

  3. Expression-dependent pharmacology of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Acevedo, Ricardo E.; Pless, Stephan A.; Schwarz, Stephan K.W.; Ahern, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 channels are polymodal sensors of noxious stimuli and integral players in thermosensation, inflammation and pain signaling. It has been shown previously that under prolonged stimulation, these channels show dynamic pore dilation, providing a pathway for large and otherwise relatively impermeant molecules. Further, we have shown recently that these nonselective cation channels, when activated by capsaicin, are potently and reversibly blocked by external application of quaternary ammonium compounds and local anesthetics. Here we describe a novel phenomenon in transient receptor potential channel pharmacology whereby their expression levels in Xenopus laevis oocytes, as assessed by the magnitude of macroscopic currents, are negatively correlated with extracellular blocker affinity: small current densities give rise to nanomolar blockade by quaternary ammoniums and this affinity decreases linearly as current density increases. Possible mechanisms to explain these data are discussed in light of similar observations in other channels and receptors. PMID:23428812

  4. Naloxone potentiates the inotropic effects of isoproterenol in vitro by a nonopiate receptor mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lechner, R B

    1992-11-01

    Naloxone potentiates the effects of adrenergic agonists when administered to hypovolemic dogs, and it has been assumed that this effect is due to naloxone's action at opiate receptors. To help determine the site and mechanism of this interaction, we administered naloxone and its "d" stereo-isomer (which does not bind to opiate receptors) to guinea pig papillary muscles in the presence and absence of pharmacologic (isoproterenol) and physiologic (treppe) inotropic stimulation. In control muscles and in rapidly paced muscles, naloxone was without significant inotropic effect. In the presence of isoproterenol, d- and l-naloxone exerted significant positive inotropic effects that were dose dependent. We conclude that, since both d- and l-naloxone potentiated the inotropic effects of isoproterenol and this was seen in the absence of opioids, naloxone may increase contractility by a nonopiate receptor-mediated mechanism.

  5. Supraspinal Transient Receptor Potential Subfamily V Member 1 (TRPV1) in Pain and Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Madasu, Manish K; Roche, Michelle; Finn, David P

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) belongs to the diverse transient receptor potential (TRP) family of cation channels. It was first characterized in primary afferent fibres as a receptor for capsaicin. Peripheral TRPV1 has a very well-described role in nociception. However, TRPV1 is now recognized to have a broader distribution and function, with supraspinal/brain TRPV1 known to modulate pain processing. Recently, studies employing histological, genetic and pharmacological approaches have provided evidence that supraspinal TRPV1 also modulates brain neurobiology and behaviours related to anxiety, depression and schizophrenia. Key brain regions involved in TRPV1-mediated modulation of pain and affect include the periaqueductal grey, hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, TRPV1 in the brain is emerging as an important molecular substrate which is dually implicated in both pain and psychiatric disorders, and represents a novel therapeutic target for these conditions and their comorbidity. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Mechanisms intrinsic to 5-HT2B receptor-induced potentiation of NMDA receptor responses in frog motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Holohean, Alice M; Hackman, John C

    2004-10-01

    In the presence of NMDA receptor open-channel blockers [Mg(2+); (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801); 1-amino-3,5-dimethyladamantane (memantine)] and TTX, high concentrations (30-100 microm) of either 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) or alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (alpha-Me-5-HT) significantly potentiated NMDA-induced depolarizations of frog spinal cord motoneurones. Potentiation was blocked by LY-53,857 (10-30 microm), SB 206553 (10 microm), and SB 204741 (30 microm), but not by spiroxatrine (10 microm), WAY 100,635 (1-30 microm), ketanserin (10 microm), RS 102221 (10 microm), or RS 39604 (10-20 microm). Therefore, alpha-Me-5-HT's facilitatory effects appear to involve 5-HT(2B) receptors. These effects were G-protein dependent as they were prevented by prior treatment with guanylyl-5'-imidodiphosphate (GMP-PNP, 100 microm) and H-Arg-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gln-D-Trp-Phe-D-Trp-D-Trp-Met-NH(2) (GP antagonist 2A, 3-6 microm), but not by pertussis toxin (PTX, 3-6 ng ml(-1), 48 h preincubation). This potentiation was not reduced by protein kinase C inhibition with staurosporine (2.0 microm), U73122 (10 microm) or N-(2-aminoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide HCl (H9) (77 microm) or by intracellular Ca(2+) depletion with thapsigargin (0.1 microm) (which inhibits Ca(2+)/ATPase). Exposure of the spinal cord to the L-type Ca(2+) channel blockers nifedipine (10 microm), KN-62 (5 microm) or gallopamil (100 microm) eliminated alpha-Me-5-HT's effects. The calmodulin antagonist N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphtalenesulfonamide (W7) (100 microm) diminished the potentiation. However, the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM Kinase II) blocker KN-93 (10 microm) did not block the 5-HT enhancement of the NMDA responses. In summary, activation of 5-HT(2B) receptors by alpha-Me-5-HT facilitates NMDA-depolarizations of frog motoneurones via a G-protein, a rise in [Ca(2+)](i) from the entry of extracellular Ca(2+) through L-type Ca(2

  7. The Nuclear Hormone Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ Potentiates Cell Chemotactism, Polarization, and Migration▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Nguan Soon; Icre, Guillaume; Montagner, Alexandra; Heggeler, Béatrice Bordier-ten; Wahli, Walter; Michalik, Liliane

    2007-01-01

    After an injury, keratinocytes acquire the plasticity necessary for the reepithelialization of the wound. Here, we identify a novel pathway by which a nuclear hormone receptor, until now better known for its metabolic functions, potentiates cell migration. We show that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) enhances two phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent pathways, namely, the Akt and the Rho-GTPase pathways. This PPARβ/δ activity amplifies the response of keratinocytes to a chemotactic signal, promotes integrin recycling and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and thereby favors cell migration. Using three-dimensional wound reconstructions, we demonstrate that these defects have a strong impact on in vivo skin healing, since PPARβ/δ−/− mice show an unexpected and rare epithelialization phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that nuclear hormone receptors not only regulate intercellular communication at the organism level but also participate in cell responses to a chemotactic signal. The implications of our findings may be far-reaching, considering that the mechanisms described here are important in many physiological and pathological situations. PMID:17682064

  8. Presynaptic inhibition of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors by noradrenaline in nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Elvezio, Vincent; Kaczocha, Martin; Rebecchi, Mario; Puopolo, Michelino

    2017-04-15

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor is a polymodal molecular integrator in the pain pathway expressed in Aδ- and C-fibre nociceptors and is responsible for the thermal hyperalgesia associated with inflammatory pain. Noradrenaline strongly inhibited the activity of TRPV1 channels in dorsal root ganglia neurons. The effect of noradrenaline was reproduced by clonidine and antagonized by yohimbine, consistent with contribution of α2 adrenergic receptors. The inhibitory effect of noradrenaline on TRPV1 channels was dependent on calcium influx and linked to calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. In spinal cord slices, clonidine reduced the frequency of capsaicin-induced miniature EPSCs in the presence of tetrodotoxin and ω-conotoxin-MVIIC, consistent with inhibition of presynaptic TRPV1 channels by α2 adrenergic receptors. We suggest that modulation of presynaptic TRPV1 channels in nociceptive neurons by descending noradrenergic inputs may constitute a mechanism for noradrenaline to modulate incoming noxious stimuli in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor is a well-known contributor to nociceptor excitability. To address whether noradrenaline can down-regulate TRPV1 channel activity in nociceptors and reduce their synaptic transmission, the effects of noradrenaline and clonidine were tested on the capsaicin-activated current recorded from acutely dissociated small diameter (<27 μm) dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and on miniature (m)EPSCs recorded from large lamina I neurons in horizontal spinal cord slices. Noradrenaline or clonidine inhibited the capsaicin-activated current by ∼60%, and the effect was reversed by yohimbine, confirming that it was mediated by activation of α2 adrenergic receptors. Similarly, clonidine reduced the frequency of capsaicin-induced mEPSCs by ∼60%. Inhibition of capsaicin-activated current by noradrenaline was mediated by GTP

  9. GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR REGULATION IN THE RAT EMBRYO: A POTENTIAL SITE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat embryo: a potential site for developmental toxicity?

    Ghosh B, Wood CR, Held GA, Abbott BD, Lau C.

    National Research Council, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711, USA.

  10. GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR REGULATION IN THE RAT EMBRYO: A POTENTIAL SITE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat embryo: a potential site for developmental toxicity?

    Ghosh B, Wood CR, Held GA, Abbott BD, Lau C.

    National Research Council, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711, USA.

  11. Enhanced AMPA Receptor Function Promotes Cerebellar Long-Term Depression Rather than Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Hansel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar…

  12. Enhanced AMPA Receptor Function Promotes Cerebellar Long-Term Depression Rather than Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Hansel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar…

  13. Down-Regulation of GABAA Receptor via Promiscuity with the Vasoactive Peptide Urotensin II Receptor. Potential Involvement in Astrocyte Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lecointre, Céline; Schouft, Marie-Thérèse; Leprince, Jérôme; Compère, Vincent; Morin, Fabrice; Proust, François; Gandolfo, Pierrick; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Castel, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    GABAA receptor (GABAAR) expression level is inversely correlated with the proliferation rate of astrocytes after stroke or during malignancy of astrocytoma, leading to the hypothesis that GABAAR expression/activation may work as a cell proliferation repressor. A number of vasoactive peptides exhibit the potential to modulate astrocyte proliferation, and the question whether these mechanisms may imply alteration in GABAAR-mediated functions and/or plasma membrane densities is open. The peptide urotensin II (UII) activates a G protein-coupled receptor named UT, and mediates potent vasoconstriction or vasodilation in mammalian vasculature. We have previously demonstrated that UII activates a PLC/PIPs/Ca2+ transduction pathway, via both Gq and Gi/o proteins and stimulates astrocyte proliferation in culture. It was also shown that UT/Gq/IP3 coupling is regulated by the GABAAR in rat cultured astrocytes. Here we report that UT and GABAAR are co-expressed in cerebellar glial cells from rat brain slices, in human native astrocytes and in glioma cell line, and that UII inhibited the GABAergic activity in rat cultured astrocytes. In CHO cell line co-expressing human UT and combinations of GABAAR subunits, UII markedly depressed the GABA current (β3γ2>α2β3γ2>α2β1γ2). This effect, characterized by a fast short-term inhibition followed by drastic and irreversible run-down, is not relayed by G proteins. The run-down partially involves Ca2+ and phosphorylation processes, requires dynamin, and results from GABAAR internalization. Thus, activation of the vasoactive G protein-coupled receptor UT triggers functional inhibition and endocytosis of GABAAR in CHO and human astrocytes, via its receptor C-terminus. This UII-induced disappearance of the repressor activity of GABAAR, may play a key role in the initiation of astrocyte proliferation. PMID:22563490

  14. Effects of the potential 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS 19 in an autoshaping learning task.

    PubMed

    Perez-García, Georgina S; Meneses, A

    2005-08-30

    This work aimed to evaluate further the role of 5-HT7 receptors during memory formation in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental learning task. Post-training administration of the potential 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS 19 or antagonist SB-269970 enhanced memory formation or had no effect, respectively. The AS 19 facilitatory effect was reversed by SB-269970, but not by the selective 5-HT1A antagonist WAY100635. Amnesia induced by scopolamine (cholinergic antagonist) or dizocilpine (NMDA antagonist) was also reversed by AS 19. Certainly, reservations regarding the selectivity of AS 19 for 5-HT7 and other 5-HT receptors in vivo are noteworthy and, therefore, its validity for use in animal models as a pharmacological tool. Having mentioned that, it should be noticed that together these data are providing further support to the notion of the 5-HT7 receptors role in memory formation. Importantly, this 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS 19 appears to represent a step forward respect to the notion that potent and selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists can be useful in the treatment of dysfunctional memory in aged-related decline and Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Serotonergic 5-HT6 Receptor Antagonists: Heterocyclic Chemistry and Potential Therapeutic Significance.

    PubMed

    Bali, Alka; Singh, Shalu

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT(6) receptor (5- HT(6)R) is amongst the recently discovered serotonergic receptors with almost exclusive localization in the brain. Hence, this receptor is fast emerging as a promising target for cognition enhancement in central nervous system (CNS) diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (cognitive function), obesity, schizophrenia and anxiety. The last decade has seen a surge of literature reports on the functional role of this receptor in learning and memory processes and investigations related to the chemistry and pharmacology of 5-HT(6) receptor ligands, especially 5- HT(6) receptor antagonists. Studies show the involvement of multiple neurotransmitter systems in cognitive enhancement by 5-HT(6)R antagonists including cholinergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic systems. Several of the 5-HT(6)R ligands are indole based agents bearing structural similarity to the endogenous neurotransmitter serotonin. Based on the pharmacophoric models proposed for these agents, drug designing has been carried out incorporating various heterocyclic replacements for the indole nucleus. In this review, we have broadly summarized the medicinal chemistry and current status of this fairly recent class of drugs along with their potential therapeutic applications.

  16. Temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential channels in corneal tissue layers and cells.

    PubMed

    Mergler, Stefan; Valtink, Monika; Takayoshi, Sumioka; Okada, Yuka; Miyajima, Masayasu; Saika, Shizuya; Reinach, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    We here provide a brief summary of the characteristics of transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) identified in corneal tissue layers and cells. In general, TRPs are nonselective cation channels which are Ca(2+) permeable. Most TRPs serve as thermosensitive molecular sensors (thermo-TRPs). Based on their functional importance, the possibilities are described for drug-targeting TRP activity in a clinical setting. TRPs are expressed in various tissues of the eye including both human corneal epithelial and endothelial layers as well as stromal fibroblasts and stromal nerve fibers. TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) heat receptor, also known as capsaicin receptor, along with TRP melastatin type 8 (TRPM8) cold receptor, which is also known as menthol receptor, are prototypes of the thermo-TRP family. The TRPV1 functional channel is the most investigated TRP channel in these tissues, owing to its contribution to maintaining tissue homeostasis as well as eliciting wound healing responses to injury. Other thermo-TRP family members identified in these tissues are TRPV2, 3 and 4. Finally, there is the TRP ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) cold receptor. All of these thermo-TRPs can be activated within specific temperature ranges and transduce such inputs into chemical and electrical signals. Although several recent studies have begun to unravel complex roles for thermo-TRPs such as TRPV1 in corneal layers and resident cells, additional studies are needed to further elucidate their roles in health and disease.

  17. Estrogen-dependent up-regulation of TRPA1 and TRPV1 receptor proteins in the rat endometrium.

    PubMed

    Pohóczky, Krisztina; Kun, József; Szalontai, Bálint; Szőke, Éva; Sághy, Éva; Payrits, Maja; Kajtár, Béla; Kovács, Krisztina; Környei, József László; Garai, János; Garami, András; Perkecz, Anikó; Czeglédi, Levente; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-02-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors expressed predominantly in sensory nerves are activated by inflammatory stimuli and mediate inflammation and pain. Although they have been shown in the human endometrium, their regulation and function are unknown. Therefore, we investigated their estrogen- and progesterone-dependent alterations in the rat endometrium in comparison with the estrogen-regulated inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Four-week-old (sexually immature) and four-month-old (sexually mature) female rats were treated with the non-selective estrogen receptor (ER) agonist diethylstilboestrol (DES), progesterone and their combination, or ovariectomized. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed to determine mRNA and protein expression levels respectively. Channel function was investigated with ratiometric [Ca(2+)]i measurement in cultured primary rat endometrial cells. Both TRP receptors and MIF were detected in the endometrium at mRNA and protein levels, and their localizations were similar. Immunostaining was observed in the immature epithelium, while stromal, glandular and epithelial positivity were observed in adults. Functionally active TRP receptor proteins were shown in endometrial cells by activation-induced calcium influx. In adults, Trpa1 and Trpv1 mRNA levels were significantly up-regulated after DES treatment. TRPA1 increased after every treatment, but TRPV1 remained unchanged following the combined treatment and ovariectomy. In immature rats, DES treatment resulted in increased mRNA expression of both channels and elevated TRPV1 immunopositivity. MIF expression changed in parallel with TRPA1/TRPV1 in most cases. DES up-regulated Trpa1, Trpv1 and Mif mRNA levels in endometrial cell cultures, but 17β-oestradiol having ERα-selective potency increased only the expression of Trpv1. We provide the first evidence for TRPA1/TRPV1 expression and their estrogen-induced up

  18. Sigma-1 receptors: potential targets for the treatment of substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Robson, Matthew J; Noorbakhsh, Bahar; Seminerio, Michael J; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2012-01-01

    Drug abuse is currently a large economic and societal burden in countries around the globe. Many drugs of abuse currently lack adequate therapies aimed at treating both the addiction and negative complications often associated with their use. Sigma-1 receptors were discovered over 30 years ago and have recently become targets for the development of pharmacotherapies aimed at treating substance abuse and addiction. In vivo preclinical studies have revealed that sigma receptor ligands are able to ameliorate select behavioral effects of many drugs of abuse including cocaine, methamphetamine, ethanol and nicotine. In addition, recent studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms by which sigma-1 receptors modulate the effects of these drugs on neurotransmission, gene regulation and neuroplasticity. Overall, these recent findings suggest that compounds targeting sigma-1 receptors may represent a potential new class of therapeutics aimed at treating drug abuse. Future studies involving clinical populations will be critical for validating the therapeutic potential of sigma-1 receptor ligands for the treatment of substance abuse.

  19. G protein coupled receptor 18: A potential role for endocannabinoid signaling in metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, Gayathri; Simcocks, Anna; Hryciw, Deanne H; Hutchinson, Dana S; McAinch, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are products of dietary fatty acids that are modulated by an alteration in food intake levels. Overweight and obese individuals have substantially higher circulating levels of the arachidonic acid derived endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol, and show an altered pattern of cannabinoid receptor expression. These cannabinoid receptors are part of a large family of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs are major therapeutic targets for various diseases within the cardiovascular, neurological, gastrointestinal, and endocrine systems, as well as metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Obesity is considered a state of chronic low-grade inflammation elicited by an immunological response. Interestingly, the newly deorphanized GPCR (GPR18), which is considered to be a putative cannabinoid receptor, is proposed to have an immunological function. In this review, the current scientific knowledge on GPR18 is explored including its localization, signaling pathways, and pharmacology. Importantly, the involvement of nutritional factors and potential dietary regulation of GPR18 and its (patho)physiological roles are described. Further research on this receptor and its regulation will enable a better understanding of the complex mechanisms of GPR18 and its potential as a novel therapeutic target for treating metabolic disorders.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of iodobenzamide analogues: Potential D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.A.; Kung, H.F.; Kung, M.P.; Billings, J. )

    1990-01-01

    (S)-N-((1-Ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl)-2-hydroxy-3-iodo-6- methoxybenzamide (({sup 123}I)IBZM) is a central nervous system (CNS) D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agent. In order to investigate the versatility of this parent structure in specific dopamine receptor localization and the potential for developing new dopamine receptor imaging agents, a series of new iodinated benzamides with fused ring systems, naphthalene (INAP) and benzofuran (IBF), was synthesized and radiolabeled, and the in vivo and in vitro biological properties were characterized. The best analogue of IBZM is IBF (21). The specific binding of ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) with rat striatal tissue preparation was found to be saturable and displayed a Kd of 0.106 {plus minus} 0.015 nM. Competition data of various receptor ligands for ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) binding show the following rank order of potency: spiperone greater than IBF (21) greater than IBZM greater than (+)-butaclamol greater than ({plus minus})-ADTN,6,7 greater than ketanserin greater than SCH-23390 much greater than propranolol. The in vivo biodistribution results confirm that ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) concentrated in the striatal area after iv injection into rats. The study demonstrates that ({sup 123}I)IBF (21) is a potential agent for imaging CNS D-2 dopamine receptors.

  1. Potentiation of mouse vagal afferent mechanosensitivity by ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, James A; Page, Amanda J; Dorian, Camilla L; Brierley, Stuart M; Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2006-01-01

    Glutamate acts at central synapses via ionotropic (iGluR – NMDA, AMPA and kainate) and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Group I mGluRs are excitatory whilst group II and III are inhibitory. Inhibitory mGluRs also modulate peripherally the mechanosensitivity of gastro-oesophageal vagal afferents. Here we determined the potential of excitatory GluRs to play an opposing role in modulating vagal afferent mechanosensitivity, and investigated expression of receptor subunit mRNA within the nodose ganglion. The responses of mouse gastro-oesophageal vagal afferents to graded mechanical stimuli were investigated before and during application of selective GluR ligands to their peripheral endings. Two types of vagal afferents were tested: tension receptors, which respond to circumferential tension, and mucosal receptors, which respond only to mucosal stroking. The selective iGluR agonists NMDA and AMPA concentration-dependently potentiated afferent responses. Their corresponding antagonists AP-5 and NBQX alone attenuated mechanosensory responses as did the non-selective antagonist kynurenate. The kainate selective agonist SYM-2081 had minor effects on mechanosensitivity, and the antagonist UBP 302 was ineffective. The mGluR5 antagonist MTEP concentration-dependently inhibited mechanosensitivity. Efficacy of agonists and antagonists differed on mucosal and tension receptors. We conclude that excitatory modulation of afferent mechanosensitivity occurs mainly via NMDA, AMPA and mGlu5 receptors, and the role of each differs according to afferent subtypes. PCR data indicated that all NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptor subunits plus mGluR5 are expressed, and are therefore candidates for the neuromodulation we observed. PMID:16945965

  2. G-protein-coupled receptors in aldosterone-producing adenomas: a potential cause of hyperaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ping; Mariniello, Barbara; Mantero, Franco; Shibata, Hirotaka; Rainey, William E

    2007-10-01

    The source of aldosterone in 30-40% of patients with primary hyperaldosteronism (PA) is unilateral aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). The mechanisms causing elevated aldosterone production in APA are unknown. Herein, we examined the expression of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in APA and demonstrated that when compared with normal adrenals, there is a general elevation of certain GPCR in many APA and/or ectopic expression of GPCR in others. RNA samples from normal adrenals (n = 5), APAs (n = 10), and cortisol-producing adenomas (CPAs; n = 13) were used on 15 genomic expression arrays, each of which included 223 GPCR transcripts presented in at least 1 out of 15 of the independent microarrays. The array results were confirmed using real-time RT-PCR (qPCR). Four GPCR transcripts exhibited a statistically significant increase that was greater than threefold when compared with normal adrenals, suggesting a general increase in expression when compared with normal adrenal glands. Four GPCR transcripts exhibited a > 15-fold increase of expression in one or more of the APA samples when compared with normal adrenals. qPCR analysis confirmed array data and found the receptors with the highest fold increase in APA expression to be LH receptor, serotonin receptor 4, GnRH receptor, glutamate receptor metabotropic 3, endothelin receptor type B-like protein, and ACTH receptor. There are also sporadic increased expressions of these genes in the CPAs. Together, these findings suggest a potential role of altered GPCR expression in many cases of PA and provide candidate GPCR for further study.

  3. The 5-HT7 receptor as a potential target for treating drug and alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Sheketha R.; Hedlund, Peter B.; Roberts, Amanda J.; Sari, Youssef; Bell, Richard L.; Engleman, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse take a large toll on society and affected individuals. However, very few effective treatments are currently available to treat alcohol and drug addiction. Basic and clinical research has begun to provide some insights into the underlying neurobiological systems involved in the addiction process. Several neurotransmitter pathways have been implicated and distinct reward neurocircuitry have been proposed—including the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (MCL-DA) system and the extended amygdala. The serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmitter system is of particular interest and multiple 5-HT receptors are thought to play significant roles in alcohol and drug self-administration and the development of drug dependence. Among the 5-HT receptors, the 5-HT7 receptor is currently undergoing characterization as a potential target for the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. Although this receptor has received only limited research regarding addictive behaviors, aspects of its neuroanatomical, biochemical, physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral profiles suggest that it could play a key role in the addiction process. For instance, genomic studies in humans have suggested a link between variants in the gene encoding the 5-HT7 receptor and alcoholism. Recent behavioral testing using high-affinity antagonists in mice and preliminary tests with alcohol-preferring rats suggest that this receptor could mediate alcohol consumption and/or reinforcement and play a role in seeking/craving behavior. Interest in the development of new and more selective pharmacological agents for this receptor will aid in examining the 5-HT7 receptor as a novel target for treating addiction. PMID:25628528

  4. The 5-HT7 receptor as a potential target for treating drug and alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Sheketha R; Hedlund, Peter B; Roberts, Amanda J; Sari, Youssef; Bell, Richard L; Engleman, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse take a large toll on society and affected individuals. However, very few effective treatments are currently available to treat alcohol and drug addiction. Basic and clinical research has begun to provide some insights into the underlying neurobiological systems involved in the addiction process. Several neurotransmitter pathways have been implicated and distinct reward neurocircuitry have been proposed-including the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (MCL-DA) system and the extended amygdala. The serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmitter system is of particular interest and multiple 5-HT receptors are thought to play significant roles in alcohol and drug self-administration and the development of drug dependence. Among the 5-HT receptors, the 5-HT7 receptor is currently undergoing characterization as a potential target for the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. Although this receptor has received only limited research regarding addictive behaviors, aspects of its neuroanatomical, biochemical, physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral profiles suggest that it could play a key role in the addiction process. For instance, genomic studies in humans have suggested a link between variants in the gene encoding the 5-HT7 receptor and alcoholism. Recent behavioral testing using high-affinity antagonists in mice and preliminary tests with alcohol-preferring rats suggest that this receptor could mediate alcohol consumption and/or reinforcement and play a role in seeking/craving behavior. Interest in the development of new and more selective pharmacological agents for this receptor will aid in examining the 5-HT7 receptor as a novel target for treating addiction.

  5. Homology modelling of CB1 receptor and selection of potential inhibitor against Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Shrinivasan, Mahesh; Skariyachan, Sinosh; Aparna, Vaka; Kolte, Vinod Rama

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and patient morbidity has become a health concern worldwide. Obesity is associated with over activity of the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in the regulation of appetite, lipogenesis and insulin resistance. Hypothalamic cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) inverse agonists reduce body weight and improve cardiometabolic abnormalities in experimental and human obesity but displayed neuropsychiatric side effects. Hence, there is a need to develop therapeutics which employs blocking peripheral CB1 receptors and still achieve substantial weight loss. In view of the same, adipose tissue CB1 receptors are employed for this study since it is more specific in reducing visceral fat. Computer aided structure based virtual screening finds application to screen novel inhibitors and develop highly selective and potential drug. The rational drug design requires crystal structure for the CB1 receptor. However, the structure for the CB1 receptor is not available in its native form. Thus, we modelled the crystal structure using a lipid G-Protein coupled receptor (PDB: 3V2W, chain A) as template. Furthermore, we have screened a herbal ligand Quercetin [- 2- (3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl) - 3, 5, 7-trihydroxychromen-4-one] a flavonol present in Mimosa pudica based on its better pharmacokinetics and bioavailability profile. This ligand was selected as an ideal lead molecule. The docking of quercetin with CB1 receptor showed a binding energy of -6.56 Kcal/mol with 4 hydrogen bonds, in comparison to the known drug Rimonabant. This data finds application in proposing antagonism of CB1 receptor with Quercetin, for controlling obesity. PMID:22829723

  6. Potential of the cannabinoid CB(2) receptor as a pharmacological target against inflammation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gálvez, Yolanda; Palomo-Garo, Cristina; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; García, Concepción

    2016-01-04

    Inflammation is an important pathogenic factor in Parkinson's disease (PD), so that it can contribute to kill dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra and to enhance the dopaminergic denervation of the striatum. The cannabinoid type-2 (CB2) receptor has been investigated as a potential anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective target in different neurodegenerative disorders, but still limited evidence has been collected in PD. Here, we show for the first time that CB2 receptors are elevated in microglial cells recruited and activated at lesioned sites in the substantia nigra of PD patients compared to control subjects. Parkinsonian inflammation can be reproduced experimentally in rodents by intrastriatal injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which, through an intense activation of glial elements and peripheral infiltration, provokes a rapid deterioration of the striatum that may extend to the substantia nigra too. Using this experimental model, we recently described a much more intense deterioration of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing nigral neurons in CB2 receptor-deficient mice compared to wild-type animals, supporting a potential neuroprotective role for this receptor. In the present study, we further explored this issue. First, we found elevated levels of the CB2 receptor measured by qRT-PCR in the striatum and substantia nigra of LPS-lesioned mice, as well as an increase in the immunostaining for this receptor in the LPS-lesioned striatum. Second, we found a significant increase in CD68 immunostaining, which serve to identify activated microglia and also infiltrated peripheral macrophages, in these brain structures in response to LPS insult, which was much more intense in CB2 receptor-deficient mice in the case of the substantia nigra. Next, we observed that the activation of CB2 receptors with a selective agonist (HU-308) reversed LPS-induced elevation of CD68 immunostaining in the striatum and the parallel reduction in TH immunostaining. Lastly, we

  7. Therapeutic potential of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in chronic inflammation and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N

    2010-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferatoreactivated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and have been implicated in a variety of physiologic and pathologic processes, such as nutrient metabolism, energy homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer. This article highlights breakthroughs in our understanding of the potential roles of PPARs in inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. PPARs might hold the key to some of the questions that are pertinent to the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases and colorectal cancer and could possibly serve as drug targets for new antiinflammatory therapeutic and anticancer agents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Estrogen Receptors Alpha (ERα) and Beta (ERβ): Subtype-Selective Ligands and Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Paterni, Ilaria; Granchi, Carlotta; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Minutolo, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) are nuclear transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of many complex physiological processes in humans. Modulation of these receptors by prospective therapeutic agents is currently being considered for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of pathological conditions, such as, cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, inflammation, and osteoporosis. This review provides an overview and update of compounds that have been recently reported as modulators of ERs, with a particular focus on their potential clinical applications. PMID:24971815

  9. GABAA receptor modulation by piperine and a non-TRPV1 activating derivative☆

    PubMed Central

    Khom, Sophia; Strommer, Barbara; Schöffmann, Angela; Hintersteiner, Juliane; Baburin, Igor; Erker, Thomas; Schwarz, Thomas; Schwarzer, Christoph; Zaugg, Janine; Hamburger, Matthias; Hering, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    The action of piperine (the pungent component of pepper) and its derivative SCT-66 ((2E,4E)-5-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl))-N,N-diisobutyl-2,4-pentadienamide) on different gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A (GABAA) receptors, transient-receptor-potential-vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors and behavioural effects were investigated. GABAA receptor subtypes and TRPV1 receptors were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Modulation of GABA-induced chloride currents (IGABA) by piperine and SCT-66 and activation of TRPV1 was studied using the two-microelectrode-voltage-clamp technique and fast perfusion. Their effects on explorative behaviour, thermoregulation and seizure threshold were analysed in mice. Piperine acted with similar potency on all GABAA receptor subtypes (EC50 range: 42.8 ± 7.6 μM (α2β2)–59.6 ± 12.3 μM (α3β2)). IGABA modulation by piperine did not require the presence of a γ2S-subunit, suggesting a binding site involving only α and β subunits. IGABA activation was slightly more efficacious on receptors formed from β2/3 subunits (maximal IGABA stimulation through α1β3 receptors: 332 ± 64% and α1β2: 271 ± 36% vs. α1β1: 171 ± 22%, p < 0.05) and α3-subunits (α3β2: 375 ± 51% vs. α5β2:136 ± 22%, p < 0.05). Replacing the piperidine ring by a N,N-diisobutyl residue (SCT-66) prevents interactions with TRPV1 and simultaneously increases the potency and efficiency of GABAA receptor modulation. SCT-66 displayed greater efficacy on GABAA receptors than piperine, with different subunit-dependence. Both compounds induced anxiolytic, anticonvulsant effects and reduced locomotor activity; however, SCT-66 induced stronger anxiolysis without decreasing body temperature and without the proconvulsive effects of TRPV1 activation and thus may serve as a scaffold for the development of novel GABAA receptor modulators. PMID:23623790

  10. Engagement of signaling pathways of protease-activated receptor 2 and μ-opioid receptor in bone cancer pain and morphine tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanju; Gao, Yebo; Hou, Wei; Yang, Liping; Kong, Xiangying; Zheng, Honggang; Li, Conghuang; Hua, Baojin

    2015-09-15

    Pain is one of the most common and distressing symptoms suffered by patients with progression of cancer. Using a rat model of bone cancer, recent findings suggest that proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) signaling pathways contribute to neuropathic pain and blocking PAR2 amplifies antinociceptive effects of systemic morphine. The purpose of our study was to examine the underlying mechanisms responsible for the role of PAR2 in regulating bone cancer-evoked pain and the tolerance of systemic morphine. Breast sarcocarcinoma Walker 256 cells were implanted into the tibia bone cavity of rats and this evoked significant mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Our results showed that the protein expression of PAR2 and its downstream pathways (protein kinases namely, PKCε and PKA) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) were amplified in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of bone cancer rats compared to control rats. Blocking spinal PAR2 by using FSLLRY-NH2 significantly attenuated the activities of PKCε/PKA signaling pathways and TRPV1 expression as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Also, inhibition of PKCε/PKA and TRPV1 significantly diminished the hyperalgesia observed in bone cancer rats. Additionally, blocking PAR2 enhanced the attenuations of PKCε/PKA and cyclic adenosine monophosphate induced by morphine and further extended analgesia of morphine via μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Our data revealed specific signaling pathways, leading to bone cancer pain, including the activation of PAR2, downstream PKCε/PKA, TRPV1 and resultant sensitization of MOR. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of bone cancer pain often observed in clinics.

  11. Potentiation of Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Outgrowth by Fluvoxamine: Role of Sigma-1 Receptors, IP3 Receptors and Cellular Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Tomoko; Ishima, Tamaki; Iyo, Masaomi; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been widely used and are a major therapeutic advance in psychopharmacology. However, their pharmacology is quite heterogeneous. The SSRI fluvoxamine, with sigma-1 receptor agonism, is shown to potentiate nerve-growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC 12 cells. However, the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying potentiation by fluvoxamine are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the roles of cellular signaling pathways in the potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by fluvoxamine and sigma-1 receptor agonists. Methods and Findings The effects of three SSRIs (fluvoxamine, sertraline, paroxetine) and three sigma-1 receptor agonists (SA4503, 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl) piperidine (PPBP), and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)-sulfate) on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells were examined. Also examined were the effects of the sigma-1 receptor antagonist NE-100, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, and specific inhibitors of signaling pathways in the potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by selective sigma-1 receptor agonist SA4503. Fluvoxamine (but not sertraline or paroxetine) and the sigma-1 receptor agonists SA4503, PPBP, and DHEA-sulfate significantly potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The potentiation by fluvoxamine and the three sigma-1 receptor agonists was blocked by co-administration of the selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist NE-100, suggesting that sigma-1 receptors play a role in blocking the enhancement of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, the potentiation by SA4503 was blocked by co-administration of the IP3 receptor antagonist xestospongin C. In addition, the specific inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC-γ), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), p38MAPK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways

  12. Potential roles for calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) in murine anorectic response to deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin).

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenda; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J

    2017-01-01

    Food contamination by the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) has the potential to adversely affect animal and human health by suppressing food intake and impairing growth. In mice, the DON-induced anorectic response results from aberrant satiety hormone secretion by enteroendocrine cells (EECs) of the gastrointestinal tract. Recent in vitro studies in the murine STC-1 EEC model have linked DON-induced satiety hormone secretion to activation of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-coupled protein receptor, and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), a TRP channel. However, it is unknown whether similar mechanisms mediate DON's anorectic effects in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DON-induced food refusal and satiety hormone release in the mouse are linked to activation of CaSR and TRPA1. Oral treatment with selective agonists for CaSR (R-568) or TRPA1 (allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)) suppressed food intake in mice, and the agonist's effects were suppressed by pretreatment with corresponding antagonists NPS-2143 or ruthenium red (RR), respectively. Importantly, NPS-2143 or RR inhibited both DON-induced food refusal and plasma elevations of the satiety hormones cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36); cotreatment with both antagonists additively suppressed both anorectic and hormone responses to DON. Taken together, these in vivo data along with prior in vitro findings support the contention that activation of CaSR and TRPA1 contributes to DON-induced food refusal by mediating satiety hormone exocytosis from EEC.

  13. CPEB3 Deficiency Elevates TRPV1 Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons to Potentiate Thermosensation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Shuian

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 3 (CPEB3) is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein that downregulates translation of multiple plasticity-related proteins (PRPs) at the glutamatergic synapses. Activity-induced synthesis of PRPs maintains long-lasting synaptic changes that are critical for memory consolidation and chronic pain manifestation. CPEB3-knockout (KO) mice show aberrant hippocampus-related plasticity and memory, so we investigated whether CPEB3 might have a role in nociception-associated plasticity. CPEB3 is widely expressed in the brain and peripheral afferent sensory neurons. CPEB3-KO mice with normal mechanosensation showed hypersensitivity to noxious heat. In the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain model, CPEB3-KO animals showed normal thermal hyperalgesia and transiently enhanced mechanical hyperalgesia. Translation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) RNA was suppressed by CPEB3 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), whereas CFA-induced inflammation reversed this inhibition. Moreover, CPEB3/TRPV1 double-KO mice behaved like TRPV1-KO mice, with severely impaired thermosensation and thermal hyperalgesia. An enhanced thermal response was recapitulated in non-inflamed but not inflamed conditional-KO mice, with cpeb3 gene ablated mostly but not completely, in small-diameter nociceptive DRG neurons. CPEB3-regulated translation of TRPV1 RNA may play a role in fine-tuning thermal sensitivity of nociceptors. PMID:26915043

  14. Potentiating effect of eszopiclone on GABA(A) receptor-mediated responses in pedunculopontine neurons.

    PubMed

    Ye, Meijun; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2009-07-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is part of the cholinergic arm of the reticular activating system, which is mostly active during waking and REM sleep. GABAergic modulation of this area appears to regulate sleep-wake cycles. Eszopiclone (ESZ), a nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic agent, appears to modulate GABAergic receptors. However, the action site of ESZ in the brain is still unresolved. We tested the hypothesis that ESZ acts by potentiating GABA(A) receptors on PPN neurons. Wholecell voltage clamp recordings were performed on PPN neurons in 7-15 day rat brainstem slices, and the potentiating effects of ESZ on the responses to the GABA(A) receptor agonist isoguvacine (IGV), and on GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs), were determined. In the presence of tetrodotoxin, ESZ (1) increased the amplitude of the outward current induced by IGV, (2) increased its duration, and (3) enhanced the IGV-induced decrease in input resistance (Rin). The GABA(A) receptor antagonist gabazine (GBZ) blocked these effects. ESZ alone did not induce detectable currents or change Rin at a holding potential of -60 mV, but when held at 0 mV, ESZ induced an outward current in 13/21 PPN cells, an effect blocked by GBZ. ESZ also increased the amplitude (n = 18/21), duration (n = 17/21), and frequency (n = 13/15) of IPSCs. ESZ may potentiate GABA(A) inhibition in the PPN via pre- and post-synaptic modulation, which may underlie the hypnotic effects of ESZ. The differential effects of ESZ on both pre- and post-synaptic sites may partially explain why it has less significant side effects compared to other hypnotic agents.

  15. Neuropeptide receptors as potential drug targets in the treatment of inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pintér, Erika; Pozsgai, Gábor; Hajna, Zsófia; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Szolcsányi, János

    2014-01-01

    Cross-talk between the nervous, endocrine and immune systems exists via regulator molecules, such as neuropeptides, hormones and cytokines. A number of neuropeptides have been implicated in the genesis of inflammation, such as tachykinins and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Development of their receptor antagonists could be a promising approach to anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapy. Anti-inflammatory neuropeptides, such as vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, urocortin, adrenomedullin, somatostatin, cortistatin, ghrelin, galanin and opioid peptides, are also released and act on their own receptors on the neurons as well as on different inflammatory and immune cells. The aim of the present review is to summarize the most prominent data of preclinical animal studies concerning the main pharmacological effects of ligands acting on the neuropeptide receptors. Promising therapeutic impacts of these compounds as potential candidates for the development of novel types of anti-inflammatory drugs are also discussed. PMID:23432438

  16. 4-isopropylcyclohexanol has potential analgesic effects through the inhibition of anoctamin 1, TRPV1 and TRPA1 channel activities

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Yasunori; Furue, Hidemasa; Tominaga, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between calcium-activated chloride channel anoctamin 1 (ANO1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) enhance pain sensations in mice, suggesting that ANO1 inhibition could have analgesic effects. Here we show that menthol and the menthol analogue isopropylcyclohexane (iPr-CyH) inhibited ANO1 channels in mice. The iPr-CyH derivative 4-isopropylcyclohexanol (4-iPr-CyH-OH) inhibited mouse ANO1 currents more potently than iPr-CyH. Moreover, 4-iPr-CyH-OH inhibited the activities of TRPV1, TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), TRP melastatin 8 (TRPM8) and TRPV4. Single-channel analysis revealed that 4-iPr-CyH-OH reduced TRPV1 and TRPA1 current open-times without affecting unitary amplitude or closed-time, suggesting that it affected gating rather than blocking the channel pore. The ability of 4-iPr-CyH-OH to inhibit action potential generation and reduce pain-related behaviors induced by capsaicin in mice suggests that 4-iPr-CyH-OH could have analgesic applications. Thus, 4-iPr-CyH-OH is a promising base chemical to develop novel analgesics that target ANO1 and TRP channels. PMID:28225032

  17. 4-isopropylcyclohexanol has potential analgesic effects through the inhibition of anoctamin 1, TRPV1 and TRPA1 channel activities.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yasunori; Furue, Hidemasa; Tominaga, Makoto

    2017-02-22

    Interactions between calcium-activated chloride channel anoctamin 1 (ANO1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) enhance pain sensations in mice, suggesting that ANO1 inhibition could have analgesic effects. Here we show that menthol and the menthol analogue isopropylcyclohexane (iPr-CyH) inhibited ANO1 channels in mice. The iPr-CyH derivative 4-isopropylcyclohexanol (4-iPr-CyH-OH) inhibited mouse ANO1 currents more potently than iPr-CyH. Moreover, 4-iPr-CyH-OH inhibited the activities of TRPV1, TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), TRP melastatin 8 (TRPM8) and TRPV4. Single-channel analysis revealed that 4-iPr-CyH-OH reduced TRPV1 and TRPA1 current open-times without affecting unitary amplitude or closed-time, suggesting that it affected gating rather than blocking the channel pore. The ability of 4-iPr-CyH-OH to inhibit action potential generation and reduce pain-related behaviors induced by capsaicin in mice suggests that 4-iPr-CyH-OH could have analgesic applications. Thus, 4-iPr-CyH-OH is a promising base chemical to develop novel analgesics that target ANO1 and TRP channels.

  18. Single-channel and structural foundations of neuronal α7 acetylcholine receptor potentiation

    PubMed Central

    daCosta, Corrie J.B.; Free, Chris R.; Corradi, Jeremías; Bouzat, Cecilia; Sine, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Potentiation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by exogenous ligands is a promising strategy for treatment of neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Schizophrenia. To gain insight into molecular mechanisms underlying potentiation, we examined ACh-induced single-channel currents through the human neuronal α7 acetylcholine receptor in the presence of the α7-specific potentiator PNU-120596 (PNU). Compared to the unusually brief single-channel opening episodes elicited by agonist alone, channel opening episodes in the presence of agonist and PNU are dramatically prolonged. Dwell time analysis reveals that PNU introduces two novel components into open-time histograms, indicating at least two degrees of PNU-induced potentiation. Openings of the longest potentiated class coalesce into clusters whose frequency and duration change over a narrow range of PNU concentration. At PNU concentrations approaching saturation, these clusters last up to several minutes, prolonging the sub-millisecond α7 opening episodes by several orders of magnitude. Mutations known to reduce PNU potentiation at the whole-cell level still give rise to multi-second long single-channel clusters. However mutation of five residues lining a cavity within each subunit's transmembrane domain abolishes PNU potentiation, defining minimal structural determinants of PNU potentiation. PMID:21957249

  19. Forskolin induces NMDA receptor-dependent potentiation at a central synapse in the leech.

    PubMed

    Grey, Kathryn B; Burrell, Brian D

    2008-05-01

    In vertebrate hippocampal neurons, application of forskolin (an adenylyl cyclase activator) and rolipram (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor) is an effective technique for inducing chemical long-term potentiation (cLTP) that is N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR)-dependent. However, it is not known whether forskolin induces a similar potentiation in invertebrate synapses. Therefore, we examined whether forskolin plus rolipram treatment could induce potentiation at a known glutamatergic synapse in the leech (Hirudo sp.), specifically between the pressure (P) mechanosensory and anterior pagoda (AP) neurons. Perfusion of isolated ganglia with forskolin (50 muM) in conjunction with rolipram (0.1 muM) in Mg(2+)-free saline significantly potentiated the P-to-AP excitatory postsynaptic potential. Application of 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV, 100 muM), a competitive NMDAR antagonist, blocked the potentiation, indicating P-to-AP potentiation is NMDAR-dependent. Potentiation was blocked by injection of bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA, 1 mM) into the postsynaptic cell, but not by BAPTA injection into the presynaptic neuron, indicating a requirement for postsynaptic elevation of intracellular Ca(2+). Application of db-cAMP mimicked the potentiating effects of forskolin, and Rp-cAMP, an inhibitor of protein kinase A, blocked forskolin-induced potentiation. Potentiation was also blocked by autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide (AIP), indicating a requirement for activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). Finally, potentiation was blocked by botulinum toxin, suggesting that trafficking of glutamate receptors also plays a role in this form of synaptic plasticity. These experiments demonstrate that techniques used to induce cLTP in vertebrate synapses also induce NMDAR-dependent potentiation in the leech CNS and that many of the cellular processes that mediate LTP are conserved between vertebrate and invertebrate phyla.

  20. Design of angiotensin II derivatives suitable for indirect affinity techniques: potential applications to receptor studies.

    PubMed

    Bonnafous, J C; Seyer, R; Tence, M; Marie, J; Kabbaj, M; Aumelas, A

    1988-01-01

    The design of angiotensin II (A II)-derived probes suitable for indirect affinity techniques is presented. Biotin or dinitrophenyl moieties have been added at the N-terminus of A II, through aminohexanoic acid as spacer arm, to generate (6-biotinylamido)-hexanoyl-AII (Bio-Ahx-AII) and dinitrophenyl- aminohexanoyl-AII (Dnp-Ahx-AII). Monoiodinated and highly labeled radioiodinated forms of these probes have been prepared. The two bifunctional ligands displayed high affinities for rat liver A II receptors (Kd values in the nanomolar range) and their secondary acceptors: streptavidin and monoclonal anti-Dnp antibodies respectively. Bio-Ahx-AII and Dnp-Ahx-AII behaved as agonists on several AII-sensitive systems. Based on these structural assessments, the parent photoactivable azido probe: Bio-Ahx-(Ala1,Phe(4N3)8)A II. A II was synthesized and proved to possess similar biological properties than the non-azido compound. The hepatic A II receptor could be covalently labeled by the radioiodinated probe, with a particularly high yield (15-20%); SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of solubilized complexes revealed specific labeling of a 65 Kdaltons binding unit, in agreement with previous data obtained with other azido AII-derived compounds. The potential applications of these probes are: i) receptor purification by combination of its photoaffinity labeling and adsorption of biotin-tagged solubilized hormone-receptor complexes on avidin gels. ii) cell labeling and sorting. iii) histochemical receptor visualization.

  1. The NR4A nuclear receptors as potential targets for anti-aging interventions.

    PubMed

    Paillasse, Michael R; de Medina, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    The development of innovative anti-aging strategy is urgently needed to promote healthy aging and overcome the occurrence of age-related diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Genomic instability, deregulated nutrient sensing and mitochondrial dysfunction are established hallmark of aging. Interestingly, the orphan nuclear receptors NR4A subfamily (NR4A1, NR4A2 and NR4A3) are nutrient sensors that trigger mitochondria biogenesis and improve intrinsic mitochondrial function. In addition, NR4A receptors are components of DNA repair machinery and promote DNA repair. Members of the NR4A subfamily should also be involved in anti-aging properties of hormesis since these receptors are induced by various form of cellular stress and stimulate protective cells response such as anti-oxidative activity and DNA repair. Previous studies reported that NR4A nuclear receptors subfamily is potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of age related disorders (e.g. metabolic syndromes, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases). Consequently, we propose that targeting NR4A receptors might constitute a new approach to delay aging and the onset of diseases affecting our aging population.

  2. Galanin receptor antagonists : a potential novel pharmacological treatment for mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Ogren, Sven Ove; Kuteeva, Eugenia; Hökfelt, Tomas; Kehr, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The pathophysiology of mood disorders involves several genetic and social predisposing factors, as well as a dysregulated response to chronic stress. Accumulated evidence during the last two decades has implicated disturbances in brain serotonin and/or noradrenaline (norepinephrine) neurotransmission in the aetiology of depression. In fact, current pharmacological treatment for mood disorders is based on the use of drugs that act mainly by enhancing brain serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmission by blockade of the active reuptake mechanism for these neurotransmitters. However, current antidepressant drugs have a delayed onset of therapeutic action, and a substantial number of patients do not respond adequately to them. In addition, these drugs have a number of adverse effects that limit patient compliance. In view of this, there is an intense search to identify novel (receptor) targets for antidepressant therapy. Recent studies have indicated that several neuropeptides and their receptors are potential candidates for the development of novel antidepressant treatment. In this context, galanin is of particular interest, since it is co-localised with serotonin in the dorsal raphe nucleus and with noradrenaline in the locus coeruleus, nuclei known to play a major role in affective disorders and in the action of antidepressant drugs. The actions of galanin are mediated by three receptor subtypes (GAL1, GAL2 and GAL3), which are coupled to different intracellular effector systems. Studies in rats have shown that galanin administered intracerebroventricularly is a potent inhibitor of mesencephalic serotonergic neurotransmission, as indicated by a long-lasting reduction in the release of serotonin in the hippocampus. This inhibitory effect is related to activation of the galanin receptors located on the dorsal raphe neurons. Moreover, intracerebroventricular galanin alters the gene expression of serotonin 5-HT1A autoreceptors in the dorsal raphe and also changes their

  3. Cross-species sensitivity to a novel androgen receptor agonist of potential environmental concern, spironolactone.

    PubMed

    LaLone, Carlie A; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Cavallin, Jenna E; Kahl, Michael D; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Makynen, Elizabeth A; Jensen, Kathleen M; Stevens, Kyle E; Severson, Megan N; Blanksma, Chad A; Flynn, Kevin M; Hartig, Philip C; Woodard, Jonne S; Berninger, Jason P; Norberg-King, Teresa J; Johnson, Rodney D; Ankley, Gerald T

    2013-11-01

    Spironolactone is a pharmaceutical that in humans is used to treat conditions like hirsutism, various dermatologic afflictions, and female-pattern hair loss through antagonism of the androgen receptor. Although not routinely monitored in the environment, spironolactone has been detected downstream of a pharmaceutical manufacturer, indicating a potential for exposure of aquatic species. Furthermore, spironolactone has been reported to cause masculinization of female western mosquitofish, a response indicative of androgen receptor activation. Predictive methods to identify homologous proteins to the human and western mosquitofish androgen receptor suggest that vertebrates would be more susceptible to adverse effects mediated by chemicals like spironolactone that target the androgen receptor compared with invertebrate species that lack a relevant homolog. In addition, an adverse outcome pathway previously developed for activation of the androgen receptor suggests that androgen mimics can lead to reproductive toxicity in fish. To assess this, 21-d reproduction studies were conducted with 2 fish species, fathead minnow and Japanese medaka, and the invertebrate Daphnia magna. Spironolactone significantly reduced the fecundity of medaka and fathead minnows at 50 μg/L, whereas daphnia reproduction was not affected by concentrations as large as 500 μg/L. Phenotypic masculinization of females of both fish species was observed at 5 μg/L as evidenced by formation of tubercles in fathead minnows and papillary processes in Japanese medaka. Effects in fish occurred at concentrations below those reported in the environment. These results demonstrate how a priori knowledge of an adverse outcome pathway and the conservation of a key molecular target across vertebrates can be utilized to identify potential chemicals of concern in terms of monitoring and highlight potentially sensitive species and endpoints for testing.

  4. Beta receptor-mediated modulation of the late positive potential in humans.

    PubMed

    de Rover, Mischa; Brown, Stephen B R E; Boot, Nathalie; Hajcak, Greg; van Noorden, Martijn S; van der Wee, Nic J A; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2012-02-01

    Electrophysiological studies have identified a scalp potential, the late positive potential (LPP), which is modulated by the emotional intensity of observed stimuli. Previous work has shown that the LPP reflects the modulation of activity in extrastriate visual cortical structures, but little is known about the source of that modulation. The present study investigated whether beta-adrenergic receptors are involved in the generation of the LPP. We used a genetic individual differences approach (experiment 1) and a pharmacological manipulation (experiment 2) to test the hypothesis that the LPP is modulated by the activation of β-adrenergic receptors. In experiment 1, we found that LPP amplitude depends on allelic variation in the β1-receptor gene polymorphism. In experiment 2, we found that LPP amplitude was modulated by the β-blocker propranolol in a direction dependent on subjects' level of trait anxiety: In participants with lower trait anxiety, propranolol led to a (nonsignificant) decrease in the LPP modulation; in participants with higher trait anxiety, propranolol increased the emotion-related LPP modulation. These results provide initial support for the hypothesis that the LPP reflects the downstream effects, in visual cortical areas, of β-receptor-mediated activation of the amygdala.

  5. The D1 family dopamine receptor, DopR, potentiates hind leg grooming behavior in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pitmon, E.; Stephens, G.; Parkhurst, S. J.; Wolf, F. W.; Kehne, G.; Taylor, M.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila groom away debris and pathogens from the body using their legs in a stereotyped sequence of innate motor behaviors. Here, we investigated one aspect of the grooming repertoire by characterizing the D1 family dopamine receptor, DopR. Removal of DopR results in decreased hind leg grooming, as substantiated by quantitation of dye remaining on mutant and RNAi animals vs. controls and direct scoring of behavioral events. These data are also supported by pharmacological results that D1 receptor agonists fail to potentiate grooming behaviors in headless DopR flies. DopR protein is broadly expressed in the neuropil of the thoracic ganglion and overlaps with TH‐positive dopaminergic neurons. Broad neuronal expression of dopamine receptor in mutant animals restored normal grooming behaviors. These data provide evidence for the role of DopR in potentiating hind leg grooming behaviors in the thoracic ganglion of adult Drosophila. This is a remarkable juxtaposition to the considerable role of D1 family dopamine receptors in rodent grooming, and future investigations of evolutionary relationships of circuitry may be warranted. PMID:26749475

  6. Interaction between gustatory depolarizing receptor potential and efferent-induced slow depolarizing synaptic potential in frog taste cell.

    PubMed

    Sato, Toshihide; Nishishita, Kazuhisa; Okada, Yukio; Toda, Kazuo

    2009-03-01

    Electrical stimulation of parasympathetic nerve (PSN) efferent fibers in the glossopharyngeal nerve induced a slow depolarizing synaptic potential (DSP) in frog taste cells under hypoxia. The objective of this study is to examine the interaction between a gustatory depolarizing receptor potential (GDRP) and a slow DSP. The amplitude of slow DSP added to a tastant-induced GDRP of 10 mV was suppressed to 60% of control slow DSPs for NaCl and acetic acid stimulations, but to 20-30% for quinine-HCl (Q-HCl) and sucrose stimulations. On the other hand, when a GDRP was induced during a prolonged slow DSP, the amplitude of GDRPs induced by 1 M NaCl and 1 M sucrose was suppressed to 50% of controls, but that by 1 mM acetic acid and 10 mM Q-HCl unchanged. It is concluded that the interaction between GDRPs and efferent-induced slow DSPs in frog taste cells under hypoxia derives from the crosstalk between a gustatory receptor current across the receptive membrane and a slow depolarizing synaptic current across the proximal subsynaptic membrane of taste cells.

  7. Maitotoxin Is a Potential Selective Activator of the Endogenous Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Type 1 Channel in Xenopus laevis Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Flores, Pedro L; Rodríguez, Emma; Zapata, Estrella; Carbó, Roxana; Farías, José María; Martínez, Martín

    2017-06-25

    Maitotoxin (MTX) is the most potent marine toxin known to date. It is responsible for a particular human intoxication syndrome called ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP). Several reports indicate that MTX is an activator of non-selective cation channels (NSCC) in different cell types. The molecular identity of these channels is still an unresolved topic, and it has been proposed that the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are involved in this effect. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, MTX at picomolar (pM) concentrations induces the activation of NSCC with functional and pharmacological properties that resemble the activity of TRP channels. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular identity of the TRP channel involved in the MTX response, using the small interference RNA (siRNA) approach and the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique (TEVC). The injection of a specifically designed siRNA to silence the transient receptor potential canonical type 1 (TRPC1) protein expression abolished the MTX response. MTX had no effect on oocytes, even at doses 20-fold higher compared to cells without injection. Total mRNA and protein levels of TRPC1 were notably diminished. The TRPC4 siRNA did not change the MTX effect, even though it was important to note that the protein level was reduced by the silencing of TRPC4. Our results suggest that MTX could be a selective activator of TRPC1 channels in X. laevis oocytes and a useful pharmacological tool for further studies on these TRP channels.

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation: Mechanisms, Pathophysiology, and Potential Therapies in the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Steven J; Kawai, Tatsuo; O'Brien, Shannon; Thomas, Walter; Harris, Raymond C; Eguchi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation impacts the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system, and inhibition of EGFR activity is emerging as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat diseases including hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, renal fibrosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm. The capacity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists, such as angiotensin II (AngII), to promote EGFR signaling is called transactivation and is well described, yet delineating the molecular processes and functional relevance of this crosstalk has been challenging. Moreover, these critical findings are dispersed among many different fields. The aim of our review is to highlight recent advancements in defining the signaling cascades and downstream consequences of EGFR transactivation in the cardiovascular renal system. We also focus on studies that link EGFR transactivation to animal models of the disease, and we discuss potential therapeutic applications.

  9. [Upregulation of P2X3 receptors in dorsal root ganglion of TRPV1 knockout female mice].

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao; Shi, Xiao-Han; Huang, Li-Bin; Rong, Wei-Fang; Ma, Bei

    2014-08-25

    The study was aimed to investigate the changes in mechanical pain threshold in the condition of chronic inflammatory pain after transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) gene was knockout. Hind-paw intraplantar injection of complete freund's adjuvant (CFA, 20 μL) produced peripheral inflammation in wild-type and TRPV1 knockout female mice. The mechanical pain thresholds were measured during the 8 days after injection and pre-injection by using Von-Frey hair. Nine days after injection, mice were killed and the differences of expression of c-Fos and P2X3 receptor in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord dorsal horn were examined by Western blotting between the two groups. Compared with that in wild-type mice, the mechanical pain threshold was increased significantly in TRPV1 knockout mice (P < 0.05); 3 days after CFA injection, the baseline mechanical pain threshold in the TRPV1 knockout mice group was significantly higher than that in the wild-type mice group (P < 0.05); The result of Western blotting showed that the expression of c-Fos protein both in DRG and spinal cord dorsal horn of TRPV1 knockout mice group was decreased significantly compared with that in wild-type mice group (P < 0.01, P < 0.05), while the expression of P2X3 receptor in DRG of TRPV1 knockout mice group was increased significantly compared with that in wild-type mice group (P < 0.05). Our findings indicate that TRPV1 may influence the peripheral mechanical pain threshold by mediating the expression of c-Fos protein both in DRG and spinal cord dorsal horn and changing the expression of P2X3 receptor in DRG.

  10. Activation of PAR2 receptors sensitizes primary afferents and causes leukocyte rolling and adherence in the rat knee joint

    PubMed Central

    Russell, FA; Schuelert, N; Veldhoen, VE; Hollenberg, MD; McDougall, JJ

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose The PAR2 receptors are involved in chronic arthritis by mechanisms that are as yet unclear. Here, we examined PAR2 activation in the rat knee joint. Experimental Approach PAR2 in rat knee joint dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells at L3-L5, retrogradely labelled with Fluoro-gold (FG) were demonstrated immunohistochemically. Electrophysiological recordings from knee joint nerve fibres in urethane anaesthetized Wistar rats assessed the effects of stimulating joint PAR2 with its activating peptide, 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 (1–100 nmol·100 μL−1, via close intra-arterial injection). Fibre firing rate was recorded during joint rotations before and 15 min after administration of PAR2 activating peptide or control peptide. Leukocyte kinetics in the synovial vasculature upon PAR2 activation were followed by intravital microscopy for 60 min after perfusion of 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 or control peptide. Roles for transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) or neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors in the PAR2 responses were assessed using the selective antagonists, SB366791 and RP67580 respectively. Key Results PAR2 were expressed in 59 ± 5% of FG-positive DRG cells; 100 nmol 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 increased joint fibre firing rate during normal and noxious rotation, maximal at 3 min (normal; 110 ± 43%, noxious; 90 ± 31%). 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 also significantly increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion over 60 min. All these effects were blocked by pre-treatment with SB366791 and RP67580 (P < 0.05 compared with 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 alone). Conclusions and Implications PAR2 receptors play an acute inflammatory role in the knee joint via TRPV1- and NK1-dependent mechanisms involving both PAR2-mediated neuronal sensitization and leukocyte trafficking. PMID:22849826

  11. Mutational analysis of the potential phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C on the CCKA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, R L L; Fouraux, M A; Pouwels, W; van Emst-de Vries, S E; Ronken, E; De Pont, J J H H M; Willems, P H G M

    1998-01-01

    Many G protein-coupled receptors contain potential phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C (PKC), the exact role of which is poorly understood. In the present study, a mutant cholecystokininA (CCKA) receptor was generated in which the four consensus sites for PKC action were changed in an alanine. Both the wild-type (CCKAWT) and mutant (CCKAMT) receptor were stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells.Binding of [3H]-cholecystokinin-(26-33)-peptide amide (CCK-8) to membranes prepared from CHO-CCKAWT cells and CHO-CCKAMT cells revealed no difference in binding affinity (Kd values of 0.72 nM and 0.86 nM CCK-8, respectively).The dose-response curves for CCK-8-induced cyclic AMP accumulation and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3) formation were shifted to the left in CHO-CCKAMT cells. This leftward shift was mimicked by the potent inhibitor of protein kinase activity, staurosporine. However, the effect of staurosporine was restricted to CHO-CCKAWT cells. This demonstrates that attenuation of CCK-8-induced activation of adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C-β involves a staurosporine-sensitive kinase, which acts directly at the potential sites of PKC action on the CCKA receptor in CCK-8-stimulated CHO-CCKAWT cells.The potent PKC activator, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), evoked a rightward shift of the dose-response curve for CCK-8-induced cyclic AMP accumulation in CHO-CCKAWT cells but not CHO-CCKAMT cells. This is in agreement with the idea that PKC acts directly at the CCKA receptor to attenuate adenylyl cyclase activation.In contrast, TPA evoked a rightward shift of the dose-response curve for CCK-8-induced Ins(1,4,5)P3 formation in both cell lines. This demonstrates that high-level PKC activation inhibits CCK-8-induced Ins(1,4,5)P3 formation also at a post-receptor site.TPA inhibition of agonist-induced Ca2+ mobilization was only partly reversed in CHO-CCKAMT cells. TPA also inhibited Ca2+ mobilization in response to the G

  12. Reduced ventral striatal/ventral pallidal serotonin1B receptor binding potential in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Murrough, James W; Henry, Shannan; Hu, Jian; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Planeta-Wilson, Beata; Neumaier, John F; Neumeister, Alexander

    2011-02-01

    Although serotonin (5-HT) dysregulation is implicated in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD), the role of specific receptor subtypes remains to be elucidated. Emerging preclinical research suggests an important role for the 5-HT(1B) receptor in behavioral regulation and depressive phenotypes. In particular, 5-HT(1B) heteroreceptors located within the striatum have been shown to play an essential role in antidepressant action. The objective of this study was to determine 5-HT(1B) receptor binding potential (BP (ND)) in the region of the ventral striatum/ventral pallidum (VS/VP) in individuals with MDD and healthy control participants. Ten participants with MDD (30.8 ± 9.5 years, five men/five women) in a current major depressive episode (MDE) and ten healthy control participants (30.7 ± 10.5 years, five men/five women) underwent positron emission tomography (PET) scanning with the selective 5-HT(1B) receptor radioligand [(11)C]P943. Within the VS/VP region of interest, [(11)C]P943 BP (ND) was significantly reduced in the MDD group compared with the healthy control group (1.37 ± 0.13 and 1.68 ± 0.16, respectively; 18.7% between-group difference; p < 0.001). Consistent with preclinical and postmortem data, our findings suggest abnormally reduced function of VS/VP 5-HT(1B) receptors in humans with MDD. Abnormal 5-HT(1B) heteroreceptor function may contribute to dysfunctional reward signaling within the striatum, including the nucleus accumbens, via interaction with dopamine, γ-amino-butyric acid, or glutamate systems. Our findings suggest reduced 5-HT(1B) receptor signaling in the VS/VP in MDD and contribute to the therapeutic rationale for testing 5-HT(1B) agonists as a novel class of antidepressants.

  13. QSAR classification of estrogen receptor binders and pre-screening of potential pleiotropic EDCs.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Gramatica, P

    2010-10-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are suspected of posing serious threats to human and wildlife health through a variety of mechanisms, these being mainly receptor-mediated modes of action. It is reported that some EDCs exhibit dual activities as estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) binders. Indeed, such compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a dual complex mechanism, so steps should be taken not only to identify them a priori from their chemical structure, but also to prioritize them for experimental tests in order to reduce and even forbid their usage. To date, very few EDCs with dual activities have been identified. The present research uses QSARs, to investigate what, so far, is the largest and most heterogeneous ER binder data set (combined METI and EDKB databases). New predictive classification models were derived using different modelling methods and a consensus approach, and these were used to virtually screen a large AR binder data set after strict validation. As a result, 46 AR antagonists were predicted from their chemical structure to also have potential ER binding activities, i.e. pleiotropic EDCs. In addition, 48 not yet recognized ER binders were in silico identified, which increases the number of potential EDCs that are substances of very high concern (SVHC) in REACH. Thus, the proposed screening models, based only on structure information, have the main aim to prioritize experimental tests for the highlighted compounds with potential estrogenic activities and also to design safer alternatives.

  14. Deletion of CB2 cannabinoid receptors reduces synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Kim, Jimok

    2016-03-01

    The effects of cannabinoids are mostly mediated by two types of cannabinoid receptors--CB1 receptors in the nervous system and CB2 receptors in the immune system. However, CB2 cannabinoid receptors have recently been discovered in the brain and also implicated in neurophysiological functions. The deletion of CB2 receptors in mice induces long-term memory deficits and schizophrenia-like behaviors, implying that endogenous activity of CB2 receptors might be involved in neuropsychiatric effects. Little is known about the cellular mechanisms by which physiological activation of CB2 receptors modulates neuronal functions. We aimed to determine how deletion of CB2 receptors in mice affects synaptic transmission and plasticity. Electrophysiological and morphological studies indicated that CB2 receptor knockout resulted in decreases in excitatory synaptic transmission, long-term potentiation, and dendritic spine density in the hippocampus. Our data imply that endogenous activity of CB2 receptors might contribute to the maintenance of synaptic functions and the expression of normal long-term potentiation. This study provides insights into the role of CB2 cannabinoid receptors in regulating cognitive functions such as long-term memory. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Multiscale design of coarse-grained elastic network-based potentials for the μ opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Fossépré, Mathieu; Leherte, Laurence; Laaksonen, Aatto; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2016-09-01

    Despite progress in computer modeling, most biological processes are still out of reach when using all-atom (AA) models. Coarse-grained (CG) models allow classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to be accelerated. Although simplification of spatial resolution at different levels is often investigated, simplification of the CG potential in itself has been less common. CG potentials are often similar to AA potentials. In this work, we consider the design and reliability of purely mechanical CG models of the μ opioid receptor (μOR), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In this sense, CG force fields (FF) consist of a set of holonomic constraints guided by an elastic network model (ENM). Even though ENMs are used widely to perform normal mode analysis (NMA), they are not often implemented as a single FF in the context of MD simulations. In this work, various ENM-like potentials were investigated by varying their force constant schemes and connectivity patterns. A method was established to systematically parameterize ENM-like potentials at different spatial resolutions by using AA data. To do so, new descriptors were introduced. The choice of conformation descriptors that also include flexibility information is important for a reliable parameterization of ENMs with different degrees of sensitivity. Hence, ENM-like potentials, with specific parameters, can be sufficient to accurately reproduce AA MD simulations of μOR at highly coarse-grained resolutions. Therefore, the essence of the flexibility properties of μOR can be captured with simple models at different CG spatial resolutions, opening the way to mechanical approaches to understanding GPCR functions. Graphical Abstract All atom structure, residue interaction network and coarse-grained elastic network models of the μ opioid receptor (μOR).

  16. MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors: ligands, models, oligomers, and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Zlotos, Darius P; Jockers, Ralf; Cecon, Erika; Rivara, Silvia; Witt-Enderby, Paula A

    2014-04-24

    Numerous physiological functions of the pineal gland hormone melatonin are mediated via activation of two G-protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2. The melatonergic drugs on the market, ramelteon and agomelatine, as well as the most advanced drug candidates under clinical evaluation, tasimelteon and TIK-301, are high-affinity nonselective MT1/MT2 agonists. A great number of MT2-selective ligands and, more recently, several MT1-selective agents have been reported to date. Herein, we review recent advances in the field focusing on high-affinity agonists and antagonists and those displaying selectivity toward MT1 and MT2 receptors. Moreover, the existing models of MT1 and MT2 receptors as well as the current status in the emerging field of melatonin receptor oligomerization are critically discussed. In addition to the already existing indications, such as insomnia, circadian sleep disorders, and depression, new potential therapeutic applications of melatonergic ligands including cardiovascular regulation, appetite control, tumor growth inhibition, and neurodegenerative diseases are presented.

  17. Nicotine and Nicotinic Receptor Drugs: Potential for Parkinson's Disease and Drug-Induced Movement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Quik, Maryka; Bordia, Tanuja; Zhang, Danhui; Perez, Xiomara A

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia, as well as nonmotor symptoms including autonomic impairments, olfactory dysfunction, sleep disturbances, depression, and dementia. Although the major neurological deficit is a loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, multiple neurotransmitters systems are compromised in Parkinson's disease. Consistent with this observation, dopamine replacement therapy dramatically improves Parkinson's disease motor symptoms. Additionally, drugs targeting the serotonergic, glutamatergic, adenosine, and other neurotransmitter systems may be beneficial. Recent evidence also indicates that nicotinic cholinergic drugs may be useful for the management of Parkinson's disease. This possibility initially arose from the results of epidemiological studies, which showed that smoking was associated with a decreased incidence of Parkinson's disease, an effect mediated in part by the nicotine in smoke. Further evidence for this idea stemmed from preclinical studies which showed that nicotine administration reduced nigrostriatal damage in parkinsonian rodents and monkeys. In addition to a potential neuroprotective role, emerging work indicates that nicotinic receptor drugs improve the abnormal involuntary movements or dyskinesias that arise as a side effect of l-dopa treatment, the gold standard therapy for Parkinson's disease. Both nicotine and nicotinic receptor drugs reduced l-dopa-induced dyskinesias by over 50% in parkinsonian rodent and monkey models. Notably, nicotine also attenuated the abnormal involuntary movements or tardive dyskinesias that arise with antipsychotic treatment. These observations, coupled with reports that nicotinic receptor drugs have procognitive and antidepressant effects, suggest that central nervous system (CNS) nicotinic receptors may represent useful targets for the treatment of movement disorders.

  18. Receptor neuron responses to potential sex pheromone components in the caddisfly Rhyacophila nubila (Trichoptera: Rhyacophilidae).

    PubMed

    Hansson, B S.; Larsson, M C.

    1998-02-01

    Olfactory single sensillum responses of male and female caddisflies Rhyacophila nubila (Trichoptera: Rhyacophilidae) were examined with the tungsten penetration technique to investigate the presence of receptor neurons tuned to potential sex pheromone components. The compounds tested in the experiment were heptan-2-one, nonan-2-one, (R)-heptan-2-ol, and (R)-nonan-2-ol, which have all been found to be present in female abdominal glands, plus the two antipodes (S)-heptan-2-ol and (S)-nonan-2-ol. Four types of receptor neurons were found in equal proportions in males and females. One type responded primarily to heptan-2-one. A second type responded primarily to (R)-heptan-2-ol and a third type primarily to its enantiomer (S)-heptan-2-ol. The fourth type of receptor neuron responded to nonan-2-one, (R)-nonan-2-one, and (S)-nonan-2-ol, with a bias to nonan-2-one. The receptor neurons responding to the tested compounds made up a great majority of the contacted neurons in both males and females.

  19. Transient receptor potential channels function as a coincidence signal detector mediating phosphatidylserine exposure.

    PubMed

    Harper, Matthew T; Londoño, Juan E Camacho; Quick, Kathryn; Londoño, Julia Camacho; Flockerzi, Veit; Philipp, Stephan E; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Freichel, Marc; Poole, Alastair W

    2013-06-25

    Blood platelet aggregation must be tightly controlled to promote clotting at injury sites but avoid inappropriate occlusion of blood vessels. Thrombin, which cleaves and activates Gq-coupled protease-activated receptors, and collagen-related peptide, which activates the receptor glycoprotein VI, stimulate platelets to aggregate and form thrombi. Coincident activation by these two agonists synergizes, causing the exposure of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface, which is a marker of cell death in many cell types. Phosphatidylserine exposure is also essential to produce additional thrombin on platelet surfaces, which contributes to thrombosis. We found that activation of either thrombin receptors or glycoprotein VI alone produced a calcium signal that was largely dependent only on store-operated Ca(2+) entry. In contrast, experiments with platelets from knockout mice showed that the presence of both ligands activated nonselective cation channels of the transient receptor potential C (TRPC) family, TRPC3 and TRPC6. These channels principally allowed entry of Na(+), which coupled to reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange to allow calcium influx and thereby contribute to Ca(2+) signaling and phosphatidylserine exposure. Thus, TRPC channels act as coincidence detectors to coordinate responses to multiple signals in cells, thereby indirectly mediating in platelets an increase in intracellular calcium concentrations and exposure of prothrombotic phosphatidylserine.

  20. Angiotensin-(1-7) and its receptor as a potential targets for new cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Santos, Robson A S; Ferreira, Anderson J; Pinheiro, Sérgio V B; Sampaio, Walkyria O; Touyz, Rhian; Campagnole-Santos, Maria José

    2005-08-01

    The identification of novel biochemical components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has added a further layer of complexity to the classical concept of this cardiovascular regulatory system. It is now clear that there is a counter-regulatory arm within the RAS that is mainly formed by the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin (1-7)-receptor Mas axis. The functions of this axis are often opposite to those attributed to the major component of the RAS, angiotensin II. This review will highlight the current knowledge concerning the cardiovascular effects of angiotensin-(1-7) through a direct interaction with its receptor Mas or through an indirect interplay with the kallikrein-kinin system. In addition, there will be a discussion of its role in the beneficial effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angio-tensin receptor type 1 (AT1) antagonists, and the potential of this peptide and its receptor as a novel targets for new cardiovascular drugs.

  1. Terpenes and lipids of the endocannabinoid and transient-receptor-potential-channel biosignaling systems.

    PubMed

    Janero, David R; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2014-11-19

    Endocananbnoid-system G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels are critical components of cellular biosignaling networks. These plasma-membrane proteins are pleiotropic in their ability to interact with and engage structurally diverse ligands. The endocannabinoid and TRP signaling systems overlap in their recognition properties with respect to select naturally occurring plant-derived ligands that belong to the terpene and lipid chemical classes, the overlap establishing a physiological connectivity between these two ubiquitous cell-signaling systems. Identification and pharmacological profiling of phytochemicals engaged by cannabinoid GPCRs and/or TRP channels has inspired the synthesis of novel designer ligands that interact with cannabinoid receptors and/or TRP channels as xenobiotics. Functional interplay between the endocannabinoid and TRP-channel signaling systems is responsible for the antinocifensive action of some synthetic cananbinoids (WIN55,212-2 and AM1241), vasorelaxation by the endocannabinoid N-arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide), and the pain-relief afforded by the synthetic anandamide analogue N-arachidonoylaminophenol (AM404), the active metabolite of the widely used nonprescription analgesic and antipyretic acetaminophen (paracetamol). The biological actions of some plant-derived cannabinoid-receptor (e.g., Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol) or TRP-channel (e.g,, menthol) ligands either carry abuse potential themselves or promote the use of other addictive substances, suggesting the therapeutic potential for modulating these signaling systems for abuse-related disorders. The pleiotropic nature of and therapeutically relevant interactions between cananbinergic and TRP-channel signaling suggest the possibility of dual-acting ligands as drugs.

  2. Evidence for the pathophysiological relevance of TRPA1 receptors in the cardiovascular system in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pozsgai, Gabor; Bodkin, Jennifer V; Graepel, Rabea; Bevan, Stuart; Andersson, David A; Brain, Susan D

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1)-induced responses in the vasculature and on blood pressure and heart rate (HR), in response to TRPA1 agonists using wild-type (WT) and TRPA1 knockout (KO) mice. TRPA1 agonists allyl isothiocyanate and cinnamaldehyde (CA) significantly increased blood flow in the skin of anaesthetized WT, but not in TRPA1 KO mice. CA also induced TRPA1-dependent relaxation of mesenteric arteries. Intravenously injected CA induced a transient hypotensive response accompanied by decreased HR that was, depending on genotype and dose, followed by a more sustained dose-dependent pressor response (10-320 micromol/kg). CA (80 micromol/kg) induced a depressor response that was significantly less in TRPA1 KO mice, with minimal pressor effects. The pressor response of a higher CA dose (320 micromol/kg) was observed in WT but not in TRPA1 KO mice, indicating involvement of TRPA1. Experiments using TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) KO and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) KO mice provided little evidence for the involvement of TRPV1 or CGRP, nor did blocking substance P receptors affect responses. However, the cholinergic antagonist atropine sulphate (5 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the depressor response and slowed HR with CA (80 micromol/kg), but had no effect on pressor responses. The pressor response remained unaffected, even in the presence of the ganglion blocker hexamethonium bromide (1 mg/kg). The alpha-adrenergic blocker prazosin hydrochloride (1 mg/kg) significantly inhibited both components, but not slowed HR. TRPA1 is involved in mediating vasodilation. TRPA1 can also influence changes in blood pressure of possible relevance to autonomic system reflexes and potentially to vasovagal/neurocardiogenic syncope disorders.

  3. Nicotinic α7 receptor activation selectively potentiates the function of NMDA receptors in glutamatergic terminals of the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Zappettini, Stefania; Grilli, Massimo; Olivero, Guendalina; Chen, Jiayang; Padolecchia, Cristina; Pittaluga, Anna; Tomé, Angelo R.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Marchi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We here provide functional and immunocytochemical evidence supporting the co-localization and functional interaction between nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors (NMDARs) in glutamatergic terminals of the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Immunocytochemical studies showed that a significant percentage of NAc terminals were glutamatergic and possessed GluN1 and α7-containing nAChR. A short-term pre-exposure of synaptosomes to nicotine (30 µM) or choline (1 mM) caused a significant potentiation of the 100 µM NMDA-evoked [3H]D-aspartate ([3H]D-Asp) outflow, which was prevented by α-bungarotoxin (100 nM). The pre-exposure to nicotine (100 µM) or choline (1 mM) also enhanced the NMDA-induced cytosolic free calcium levels, as measured by FURA-2 fluorescence imaging in individual NAc terminals, an effect also prevented by α-bungarotoxin. Pre-exposure to the α4-nAChR agonists 5IA85380 (10 nM) or RJR2429 (1 µM) did not modify NMDA-evoked ([3H]D-Asp) outflow and calcium transients. The NMDA-evoked ([3H]D-Asp) overflow was partially antagonized by the NMDAR antagonists MK801, D-AP5, 5,7-DCKA and R(-)CPP and unaffected by the GluN2B-NMDAR antagonists Ro256981 and ifenprodil. Notably, pre-treatment with choline increased GluN2A biotin-tagged proteins. In conclusion, our results show that the GluN2A-NMDA receptor function can be positively regulated in NAc terminals in response to a brief incubation with α7 but not α4 nAChRs agonists. This might be a general feature in different brain areas since a similar nAChR-mediated bolstering of NMDA-induced ([3H]D-Asp) overflow was also observed in hippocampal synaptosomes. PMID:25360085

  4. Alleviation of Microglial Activation Induced by p38 MAPK/MK2/PGE2 Axis by Capsaicin: Potential Involvement of other than TRPV1 Mechanism/s.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Harsharan S; Roelofs, Nora; Muñoz, Eduardo; Fiebich, Bernd L

    2017-12-01

    Exaggerated inflammatory responses in microglia represent one of the major risk factors for various central nervous system's (CNS) associated pathologies. Release of excessive inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandins and cytokines are the hallmark of hyper-activated microglia. Here we have investigated the hitherto unknown effects of capsaicin (cap) - a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist- in murine primary microglia, organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) and human primary monocytes. Results demonstrate that cap (0.1-25 µM) significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), 8-iso-PGF2α, and differentially regulated the levels of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 & IL-1β). Pharmacological blockade (via capsazepine & SB366791) and genetic deficiency of TRPV1 (TRPV1(-/-)) did not prevent cap-mediated suppression of PGE2 in activated microglia and OHSCs. Inhibition of PGE2 was partially dependent on the reduced levels of PGE2 synthesising enzymes, COX-2 and mPGES-1. To evaluate potential molecular targets, we discovered that cap significantly suppressed the activation of p38 MAPK and MAPKAPK2 (MK2). Altogether, we demonstrate that cap alleviates excessive inflammatory events by targeting the PGE2 pathway in in vitro and ex vivo immune cell models. These findings have broad relevance in understanding and paving new avenues for ongoing TRPV1 based drug therapies in neuroinflammatory-associated diseases.

  5. A potential 5-HT1A receptor antagonist: p-MPPI.

    PubMed

    Kung, H F; Kung, M P; Clarke, W; Maayani, S; Zhuang, Z P

    1994-01-01

    A potential 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, p-MPPI, 4-(2'-methoxy-)phenyl-1-[2'-(n-2"-pyridinyl)-p-iodobenzamido-]ethy l- piperazine, was developed. The [125I]p-MPPI demonstrated high affinity and selectivity toward 5-HT1A receptors; Kd = 0.36 nM and Bmax = 264 fmol/mg of protein in rat hippocampal membrane homogenates. The binding is not sensitive to GTP (300 microM) or Gpp(NH)p (100 microM). In forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase assay using rat hippocampus, p-MPPI (up to 10 microM) showed no agonist activity as compared to that of (+/-)-8-OH-DPAT. At 100 nM it completely antagonized the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity produced by 100 nM of (+/-)-8-OH-DPAT. This potential 5-HT1A antagonist may provide a powerful tool for studies of the pharmacology of the 5-HT1A receptor system.

  6. Expression and potential role of ErbB receptors in type II endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Androutsopoulos, Georgios; Adonakis, Georgios; Liava, Anna; Ravazoula, Panagiota; Decavalas, Georgios

    2013-06-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract. Based on clinical and pathological features, endometrial cancer is classified into two types. The aim of our study was to describe the expression and the potential clinical role of ErbB receptors in Greek patients with type II endometrial cancer. Between 1991 and 2008, 10 women with histologically confirmed type II endometrial cancer were referred to the Department of Gynecologic Oncology of the University of Patras Medical School. Tissue specimens from endometrial lesions were immunostained for EGFR, ErbB-2, ErbB-3 and ErbB-4. For EGFR, 5 cases were positive (50%) and 5 cases were negative. For ErbB-2, 9 cases were positive (90%) and 1 case was negative. For ErbB-3, all cases were positive. For ErbB-4, 7 cases were positive (70%) and 3 cases were negative. Also for all ErbB receptors, 5 cases were positive (50%). During follow up, 3 patients died from their disease. All of them had papillary serous endometrial cancer and 2 of them were positive for all ErbB receptors. Although our study was based on a small number of cases, it is obvious that we had high expression levels of ErbB receptors in patients with type II endometrial cancer. Also the majority of patients with dismal outcome were positive for all ErbB receptors. This is very important, as ErbB-targeted therapies may be clinically active as adjuvant therapy in well-defined subgroups of type II EC patients with EGFR and ErbB-2 overexpression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Therapeutic Potential of 5-HT2C Receptor Agonists for Addictive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Guy A; Fletcher, Paul J

    2015-07-15

    The neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) has long been associated with the control of a variety of motivated behaviors, including feeding. Much of the evidence linking 5-HT and feeding behavior was obtained from studies of the effects of the 5-HT releaser (dex)fenfluramine in laboratory animals and humans. Recently, the selective 5-HT2C receptor agonist lorcaserin received FDA approval for the treatment of obesity. This review examines evidence to support the use of selective 5-HT2C receptor agonists as treatments for conditions beyond obesity, including substance abuse (particularly nicotine, psychostimulant, and alcohol dependence), obsessive compulsive, and excessive gambling disorder. Following a brief survey of the early literature supporting a role for 5-HT in modulating food and drug reinforcement, we propose that intrinsic differences between SSRI and serotonin releasers may have underestimated the value of serotonin-based pharmacotherapeutics to treat clinical forms of addictive behavior beyond obesity. We then highlight the critical involvement of the 5-HT2C receptor in mediating the effect of (dex)fenfluramine on feeding and body weight gain and the evidence that 5-HT2C receptor agonists reduce measures of drug reward and impulsivity. A recent report of lorcaserin efficacy in a smoking cessation trial further strengthens the idea that 5-HT2C receptor agonists may have potential as a treatment for addiction. This review was prepared as a contribution to the proceedings of the 11th International Society for Serotonin Research Meeting held in Hermanus, South Africa, July 9-12, 2014.

  8. Potential therapeutic relevance of adenosine A2B and A2A receptors in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Popoli, Patrizia; Pepponi, Rita

    2012-09-01

    Adenosine A2B and, much more importantly, adenosine A2A receptors modulate many physiological and pathological processes in the brain. In this review, the most recent evidence concerning the role of such receptors and their potential therapeutic relevance is discussed. The low affinity of A2B receptors for adenosine implies that they might represent a good therapeutic target, since they are activated only under pathological conditions (when adenosine levels raise up to micromolar concentrations). The availability of selective ligands for A2B receptors would allow exploration of such an hypothesis. Since adenosine A2A receptors mediate both potentially neuroprotective and potentially neurotoxic effects, their role in neurodegenerative diseases is highly controversial. Nevertheless, A2A receptor antagonists have shown clear antiparkinsonian effects, and a great interest exists on the role of A2A receptors in Alzheimer's disease, brain ischaemia, spinal cord injury, drug addiction and other conditions. In order to establish whether such receptors represent a target for CNS diseases, at least two conditions are needed: the full comprehension of A2A-dependent mechanisms and the availability of ligands capable of discriminating among the different receptor populations.

  9. Orphan G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): biological functions and potential drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao-long; Wang, Ying; Li, Da-li; Luo, Jian; Liu, Ming-yao

    2012-01-01

    The superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) includes at least 800 seven-transmembrane receptors that participate in diverse physiological and pathological functions. GPCRs are the most successful targets of modern medicine, and approximately 36% of marketed pharmaceuticals target human GPCRs. However, the endogenous ligands of more than 140 GPCRs remain unidentified, leaving the natural functions of those GPCRs in doubt. These are the so-called orphan GPCRs, a great source of drug targets. This review focuses on the signaling transduction pathways of the adhesion GPCR family, the LGR subfamily, and the PSGR subfamily, and their potential functions in immunology, development, and cancers. In this review, we present the current approaches and difficulties of orphan GPCR deorphanization and characterization. PMID:22367282

  10. Evaluation on Potential Contributions of Protease Activated Receptors Related Mediators in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyun; Zeng, Xiaoning; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) have been recognized as a distinctive four-member family of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be cleaved by certain serine proteases. In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the role of PARs in allergic inflammation, the fundamental pathologic changes of allergy, but the potential roles of PARs in allergy remain obscure. Since many of these proteases are produced and actively involved in the pathologic process of inflammation including exudation of plasma components, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tissue damage and repair, PARs appear to make important contribution to allergy. The aim of the present review is to summarize the expression of PARs in inflammatory and structural cells, the influence of agonists or antagonists of PARs on cell behavior, and the involvement of PARs in allergic disorders, which will help us to better understand the roles of serine proteases and PARs in allergy. PMID:24876677

  11. Pannexin-1 as a potentiator of ligand-gated receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Isakson, Brant E; Thompson, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    Pannexins are a class of plasma membrane spanning proteins that presumably form a hexameric, non-selective ion channel. Although similar in secondary structure to the connexins, pannexins notably do not form endogenous gap junctions and act as bona fide ion channels. The pannexins have been primarily studied as ATP-release channels, but the overall diversity of their functions is still being elucidated. There is an intriguing theme with pannexins that has begun to develop. In this review we analyze several recent reports that converge on the idea that pannexin channels (namely Panx1) can potentiate ligand-gated receptor signaling. Although the literature remains sparse, this emerging concept appears consistent between both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors of several ligand families.

  12. Maitotoxin Is a Potential Selective Activator of the Endogenous Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Type 1 Channel in Xenopus laevis Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Pedro L.; Rodríguez, Emma; Zapata, Estrella; Carbó, Roxana; Farías, José María; Martínez, Martín

    2017-01-01

    Maitotoxin (MTX) is the most potent marine toxin known to date. It is responsible for a particular human intoxication syndrome called ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP). Several reports indicate that MTX is an activator of non-selective cation channels (NSCC) in different cell types. The molecular identity of these channels is still an unresolved topic, and it has been proposed that the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are involved in this effect. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, MTX at picomolar (pM) concentrations induces the activation of NSCC with functional and pharmacological properties that resemble the activity of TRP channels. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular identity of the TRP channel involved in the MTX response, using the small interference RNA (siRNA) approach and the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique (TEVC). The injection of a specifically designed siRNA to silence the transient receptor potential canonical type 1 (TRPC1) protein expression abolished the MTX response. MTX had no effect on oocytes, even at doses 20-fold higher compared to cells without injection. Total mRNA and protein levels of TRPC1 were notably diminished. The TRPC4 siRNA did not change the MTX effect, even though it was important to note that the protein level was reduced by the silencing of TRPC4. Our results suggest that MTX could be a selective activator of TRPC1 channels in X. laevis oocytes and a useful pharmacological tool for further studies on these TRP channels. PMID:28672825

  13. The potential role of transient receptor potential type A1 as a mechanoreceptor in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Takashi; Kajiya, Hiroshi; Fukawa, Teruhisa; Sasaki, Mina; Nemoto, Tetsuomi; Tsuzuki, Takashi; Takahashi, Yutaka; Fujii, Shinsuke; Maeda, Hidefumi; Okabe, Koji

    2013-12-01

    Transient receptor potential type A1 (TRPA1) is reported to be a Ca(2+) -permeable channel and is activated by cold temperatures and mechanical stimuli in the hair cells and in dorsal root ganglion. Using a DNA microarray, we found that TRPA1 was significantly up-regulated in human periodontal ligament (hPDL) cells 2 d after intermittent mechanical stimulation (iMS) loading compared with unloaded cells. Although hPDL cells are known to respond to mechanical stimulation induced by occlusal force, little is known about the expression and functional role of TRPA1 in these cells. Therefore, we investigated the effects of iMS on TRPA1 expression and its signaling pathway in hPDL cells. Intermittent mechanical stimulation loading up-regulated TRPA1 expression in hPDL cells in a time-dependent manner, but had no effect on other mechanoreceptors. Furthermore, iMS significantly increased the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), especially extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38, and the expression of C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). Transient receptor potential type A1 agonists also increased MAPK phosphorylation and the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. By contrast, inhibition or silencing of TRPA1 partially suppressed iMS-induced MAPK phosphorylation. In summary, iMS during occlusion activates TRPA1 and MAPK signaling in periodontal ligament tissues, suggesting that TRPA1 regulates the mechanosensitivity of occlusal force via activation of MAPKs in hPDL cells.

  14. Activation of Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Siobhan H.; Pasqui, Francesca; Colvin, Ellen M.; Sanger, Helen; Mogg, Adrian J.; Felder, Christian C.; Broad, Lisa M.; Fitzjohn, Steve M.; Isaac, John T.R.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    Muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptors (M1Rs) are highly expressed in the hippocampus, and their inhibition or ablation disrupts the encoding of spatial memory. It has been hypothesized that the principal mechanism by which M1Rs influence spatial memory is by the regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Here, we use a combination of recently developed, well characterized, selective M1R agonists and M1R knock-out mice to define the roles of M1Rs in the regulation of hippocampal neuronal and synaptic function. We confirm that M1R activation increases input resistance and depolarizes hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and show that this profoundly increases excitatory postsynaptic potential-spike coupling. Consistent with a critical role for M1Rs in synaptic plasticity, we now show that M1R activation produces a robust potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal neurons that has all the hallmarks of long-term potentiation (LTP): The potentiation requires NMDA receptor activity and bi-directionally occludes with synaptically induced LTP. Thus, we describe synergistic mechanisms by which acetylcholine acting through M1Rs excites CA1 pyramidal neurons and induces LTP, to profoundly increase activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. These features are predicted to make a major contribution to the pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic transmission in rodents and humans. PMID:26472558

  15. Activation of Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Siobhan H; Pasqui, Francesca; Colvin, Ellen M; Sanger, Helen; Mogg, Adrian J; Felder, Christian C; Broad, Lisa M; Fitzjohn, Steve M; Isaac, John T R; Mellor, Jack R

    2016-01-01

    Muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptors (M1Rs) are highly expressed in the hippocampus, and their inhibition or ablation disrupts the encoding of spatial memory. It has been hypothesized that the principal mechanism by which M1Rs influence spatial memory is by the regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Here, we use a combination of recently developed, well characterized, selective M1R agonists and M1R knock-out mice to define the roles of M1Rs in the regulation of hippocampal neuronal and synaptic function. We confirm that M1R activation increases input resistance and depolarizes hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and show that this profoundly increases excitatory postsynaptic potential-spike coupling. Consistent with a critical role for M1Rs in synaptic plasticity, we now show that M1R activation produces a robust potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal neurons that has all the hallmarks of long-term potentiation (LTP): The potentiation requires NMDA receptor activity and bi-directionally occludes with synaptically induced LTP. Thus, we describe synergistic mechanisms by which acetylcholine acting through M1Rs excites CA1 pyramidal neurons and induces LTP, to profoundly increase activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. These features are predicted to make a major contribution to the pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic transmission in rodents and humans.

  16. Serotonin stimulates lateral habenula via activation of the post-synaptic serotonin 2/3 receptors and transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wanhong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Guiqin; Gregor, Danielle; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-02-01

    There is growing interest on the role of the lateral habenula (LHb) in depression, because it closely and bilaterally connects with the serotoninergic raphe nuclei. The LHb sends glutamate efferents to the raphe nuclei, while it receives serotoninergic afferents, and expresses a high density of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Recent studies suggest that 5-HT receptors exist both in the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites of LHb neurons, and activation of these receptors may have different effects on the activity of LHb neurons. The current study focused on the effect of 5-HT on the postsynaptic membrane. We found that 5-HT initiated a depolarizing inward current (I((5-HTi))) and accelerated spontaneous firing in ∼80% of LHb neurons in rat brain slices. I((5-HTi)) was also induced by the 5-HT uptake blocker citalopram, indicating activity of endogenous 5-HT. I((5-HTi)) was diminished by 5-HT(2/3) receptor antagonists (ritanserin, SB-200646 or ondansetron), and activated by the selective 5-HT(2/3) agonists 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) piperazine hydrochloride or 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) biguanide hydrochloride. Furthermore, I((5-HTi)) was attenuated by 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate, a blocker of transient receptor potential channels, and an IP3 receptor inhibitor, indicating the involvement of transient receptor potential channels. These results demonstrate that the reciprocal connection between the LHb and the 5-HT system highlights a key role for 5-HT stimulation of LHb neurons that may be important in the pathogenesis of depression.

  17. Serotonin stimulates lateral habenula via activation of the post-synaptic serotonin 2/3 receptors and transient receptor potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Wanhong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Guiqin; Gregor, Danielle; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest on the role of the lateral habenula (LHb) in depression, because it closely and bilaterally connects with the serotoninergic raphe nuclei. The LHb sends glutamate efferents to the raphe nuclei, while it receives serotoninergic afferents, and expresses a high density of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Recent studies suggest that 5-HT receptors exist both in the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites of LHb neurons, and activation of these receptors may have different effects on the activity of LHb neurons. The current study focused on the effect of 5-HT on the postsynaptic membrane. We found that 5-HT initiated a depolarizing inward current (I(5-HTi)) and accelerated spontaneous firing in ~80% of LHb neurons in rat brain slices. I(5-HTi) was also induced by the 5-HT uptake blocker citalopram, indicating activity of endogenous 5-HT. I(5-HTi) was diminished by 5-HT2/3 receptor antagonists (ritanserin, SB-200646 or ondansetron), and activated by the selective 5-HT2/3 agonists 1-(3- Chlorophenyl) piperazine hydrochloride or 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) biguanide hydrochloride. Furthermore, I(5-HTi) was attenuated by 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate, a blocker of transient receptor potential channels, and an IP3 receptor inhibitor, indicating the involvement of transient receptor potential channels. These results demonstrate that the reciprocal connection between the LHb and the 5-HT system highlights a key role for 5-HT stimulation of LHb neurons that may be important in the pathogenesis of depression. PMID:26471419

  18. Tyrosine kinase A receptor (trkA): a potential marker in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Verónica; Gabler, Fernando; Muñoz, Marcela; Yazigi, Roberto; Paredes, Alfonso; Selman, Alberto; Vega, Margarita; Romero, Carmen

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the role of trkA receptor as a potential tumor marker in serous epithelial ovarian cancer and its relationship with the angiogenic factors expression as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF). Additionally, to examine whether NGF and VEGF secreted by epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) explants and from epithelial ovarian cancer cell line (A2780) are involved in the process of angiogenesis, such as cellular proliferation, migration and differentiation of the human endothelial cell line (EA.hy926). The mRNA levels of VEGF, NGF and trkA receptors were measured using PCR in 60 ovarian samples. Cellular localization and semi-quantitative estimation of VEGF, NGF, total trkA and p-trkA was performed using IHC in epithelial cells. NGF, total trkA and p-trkA protein were also evaluated in endothelial cells from the same tissues. Human endothelial cell line EA.hy926 was cultured with conditioned media obtained from both EOC explants and from the A2780 cell line, with or without NGF stimulus. Significantly higher levels of NGF, total trkA and p-trkA protein expressions were observed in epithelial and endothelial cells in poorly differentiated EOC versus normal ovary. Interestingly, the p-trkA receptor expression level showed the most significant difference and its presence was only found in borderline tumor and EOC samples indicating the importance of trkA receptor in EOC as a potential tumor marker. A significant increase in proliferation, migration and differentiation of EA.hy926 cells was observed with NGF, and this effect was significantly reverted when NGF was immuno-blocked and when a trkA inhibitor was used, showing that NGF is an important angiogenic factor in EOC by activating its trkA receptor. These results indicate that p-trkA may be considered as a new potential tumor marker in EOC, and that NGF may also act as a direct angiogenic factor in EOC. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Application potential of toll-like receptors in cancer immunotherapy: Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Chen, Xi; Ye, Kangruo; Yao, Yuanfei; Li, Yu

    2016-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), as the most important pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity, play a pivotal role in inducing immune response through recognition of microbial invaders or specific agonists. Recent studies have suggested that TLRs could serve as important regulators in the development of a variety of cancer. However, increasing evidences have shown that TLRs may display quite opposite outcomes in cancer development. Although several potential therapeutic Toll-like receptor ligands have been found, the mechanism and therapy prospect of TLRs in cancer development has to be further elucidated to accelerate the clinical application. By performing a systematic review of the present findings on TLRs in cancer immunology, we attempted to evaluate the therapeutic potential of TLRs in cancer therapy and elucidate the potential mechanism of cancer progress regulated by TLR signaling and the reported targets on TLRs for clinical application. An electronic databases search was conducted in PubMed, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database from their inception to February 1, 2016. The following keywords were used to search the databases: Toll-like receptors, cancer therapy, therapeutic target, innate immunity. Of 244 studies that were identified, 97 nonrelevant studies were excluded. In total, 147 full-text articles were assessed, and from these, 54 were excluded as they did not provide complete key information. Thus, 93 studies were considered eligible and included in the analysis. According to the data from the included trials, 14 TLR ligands (77.8%) from 82 studies have been demonstrated to display antitumor property in various cancers, whereas 4 ligands (22.2%) from 11 studies promote tumors. Among them, only 3 TLR ligands have been approved for cancer therapy, and 9 ligands were in clinical trials. In addition, the potential mechanism of recently reported targets on TLRs for clinical application was also evaluated

  20. Potentiation of nicotinic receptor response by external calcium in rat central neurons.

    PubMed

    Mulle, C; Léna, C; Changeux, J P

    1992-05-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) responses of rat medial habenular neurons are potentiated up to 3.5-fold by increasing the concentration of external Ca2+ in the millimolar range. This effect, independent of voltage, is probably due to the binding of Ca2+ to an external site. External Ca2+ decreases nAChR single-channel conductance at negative but not positive potentials, and it markedly enhances the frequency of opening of acetylcholine activated channels. The potentiating effect of Ca2+ is mimicked by Ba2+ and Sr2+, but barely by Mg2+. These data support the existence of positively acting allosteric sites for Ca2+, distinct from those involved in the decrease of single-channel conductance. A model in which external Ca2+ changes the properties of activation of the nAChR appears consistent with these data.

  1. Interleukin-1β alters the sensitivity of cannabinoid CB1 receptors controlling glutamate transmission in the striatum.

    PubMed

    De Chiara, V; Motta, C; Rossi, S; Studer, V; Barbieri, F; Lauro, D; Bernardi, G; Centonze, D

    2013-10-10

    Proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β (IL1β) regulate both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. The interaction between IL1β and endocannabinoid system (ECS) is also emerging, based on the evidence that IL1β effects on striatal spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents are regulated by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels, members of the ECS. Furthermore, IL1β has also been shown to control the sensitivity of cannabinoid CB1 receptors controlling GABA transmission (CB1Rs(GABA)) in the striatum. To better detail the synaptic action of IL1β, and to clarify its complex interaction with the ECS, here we investigated the possible interplay between IL1β and CB1Rs controlling glutamate transmission (CB1Rs(glu)), other critical elements of the ECS. Our results show that the sensitivity of CB1Rs(glu) is fully blocked in the presence of IL1β in corticostriatal brain slices, and that the protein kinase C/TRPV1 pathway is involved in this effect. IL1β failed to modulate the sensitivity of glutamate synapses to the stimulation of GABAB receptors. We also provided evidence that IL1β-CB1Rs(GABA) but not IL1β-CB1Rs(glu) interaction is under the control of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/trkB signaling and of lipid raft composition, because BDNF gene partial deletion, pharmacological blockade of trkB and membrane cholesterol removal with methyl-β-cyclodextrin all blocked IL1β-mediated inhibition of CB1Rs(GABA) but left unaltered the sensitivity of CB1Rs(glu) to this cytokine. Our results provide further evidence that synaptic transmission and the ECS are regulated by IL1β in the striatum. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Potentiation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site.

    PubMed

    Young, Gareth T; Zwart, Ruud; Walker, Alison S; Sher, Emanuele; Millar, Neil S

    2008-09-23

    Positive allosteric modulators of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have attracted considerable interest as potential tools for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. However, despite the potential therapeutic usefulness of these compounds, little is known about their mechanism of action. Here, we have examined two allosteric potentiators of alpha7 nAChRs (PNU-120596 and LY-2087101). From studies with a series of subunit chimeras, we have identified the transmembrane regions of alpha7 as being critical in facilitating potentiation of agonist-evoked responses. Furthermore, we have identified five transmembrane amino acids that, when mutated, significantly reduce potentiation of alpha7 nAChRs. The amino acids we have identified are located within the alpha-helical transmembrane domains TM1 (S222 and A225), TM2 (M253), and TM4 (F455 and C459). Mutation of either A225 or M253 individually have particularly profound effects, reducing potentiation of EC(20) concentrations of acetylcholine to a tenth of the level seen with wild-type alpha7. Reference to homology models of the alpha7 nAChR, based on the 4A structure of the Torpedo nAChR, indicates that the side chains of all five amino acids point toward an intrasubunit cavity located between the four alpha-helical transmembrane domains. Computer docking simulations predict that the allosteric compounds such as PNU-120596 and LY-2087101 may bind within this intrasubunit cavity, much as neurosteroids and volatile anesthetics are thought to interact with GABA(A) and glycine receptors. Our findings suggest that this is a conserved modulatory allosteric site within neurotransmitter-gated ion channels.

  3. Deletion of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptors exaggerates renal damage in deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youping; Babánková, Dagmar; Huang, Jie; Swain, Greg M; Wang, Donna H

    2008-08-01

    To determine whether the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel provides protection against hypertension-induced renal damage, hypertension was induced by uninephrectomy and by giving deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt in wild-type (WT) and TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV1-/-) mice. Mean arterial pressure, as determined by radiotelemetry, increased significantly and reached the peak 7 days after DOCA-salt treatment in both WT and TRPV1-/- mice. There was no difference in mean arterial pressure between the 2 strains at the baseline or at the peak that lasted for 4 treatment weeks. DOCA-salt treatment in both WT and TRPV1-/- mice led to increased urinary excretion of albumin and 8-isoprostane, glomerulosclerosis, renal cortical tubulointerstitial injury, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, increased number of tubular proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells, and renal monocyte/macrophage infiltration, all of which were much more severe in DOCA-salt-treated TRPV1-/- compared with DOCA-salt-treated WT mice. Renal TRPV1 protein expression, but not the renal anandamide content, was elevated in DOCA-salt-treated WT compared with vehicle-treated WT mice. Renal anandamide levels were markedly elevated in DOCA-salt-treated TRPV1-/- but not in vehicle-treated TRPV1-/- mice. Thus, our data show that ablation of the TRPV1 gene exacerbates renal damage induced by DOCA-salt hypertension, indicating that TRPV1 may constitute a protective mechanism against end-organ damage induced by hypertension.

  4. Src potentiation of NMDA receptors in hippocampal and spinal neurons is not mediated by reducing zinc inhibition.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Z G; Pelkey, K A; Lu, W Y; Lu, Y M; Roder, J C; MacDonald, J F; Salter, M W

    1999-11-01

    The protein-tyrosine kinase Src is known to potentiate the function of NMDA receptors, which is necessary for the induction of long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. With recombinant receptors composed of NR1-1a/NR2A or NR1-1a/2B subunits, Src reduces voltage-independent inhibition by the divalent cation Zn2+. Thereby the function of recombinant NMDA receptors is potentiated by Src only when the Zn2+ level is sufficient to cause tonic inhibition. Here we investigated whether the Src-induced potentiation of NMDA receptor function in neurons is caused by reducing voltage-independent Zn2+ inhibition. Whereas chelating extracellular Zn2+ blocked the Src-induced potentiation of NR1-1a/2A receptors, we found that Zn2+ chelation did not affect the potentiation of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) currents by Src applied into hippocampal CA1 or CA3 neurons. Moreover, Src did not alter the Zn2+ concentration-inhibition relationship for NMDAR currents in CA1 or CA3 neurons. Also, chelating extracellular Zn2+ did not prevent the upregulation of NMDA single-channel activity by endogenous Src in membrane patches from spinal dorsal horn neurons. Taking these results together we conclude that Src-induced potentiation of NMDAR currents is not mediated by reducing Zn2+ inhibition in hippocampal and dorsal horn neurons.

  5. Potentiating Action of Propofol at GABAA Receptors of Retinal Bipolar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Lan; Xie, An; Bruzik, Karol S.; Frølund, Bente; Qian, Haohua

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Propofol (2,6-diisopropyl phenol), a widely used systemic anesthetic, is known to potentiate GABAA receptor activity in a number of CNS neurons and to produce changes in electroretinographically recorded responses of the retina. However, little is known about propofol's effects on specific retinal neurons. The authors investigated the action of propofol on GABA-elicited membrane current responses of retinal bipolar cells, which have both GABAA and GABAC receptors. Methods. Single, enzymatically dissociated bipolar cells obtained from rat retina were treated with propofol delivered by brief application in combination with GABA or other pharmacologic agents or as a component of the superfusing medium. Results. When applied with GABA at subsaturating concentrations and with TPMPA (a known GABAC antagonist), propofol markedly increased the peak amplitude and altered the kinetics of the response. Propofol increased the response elicited by THIP (a GABAA-selective agonist), and the response was reduced by bicuculline (a GABAA antagonist). The response to 5-methyl I4AA, a GABAC-selective agonist, was not enhanced by propofol. Serial brief applications of (GABA + TPMPA + propofol) led to a progressive increase in peak response amplitude and, at higher propofol concentrations, additional changes that included a prolonged time course of response recovery. Pre-exposure of the cell to perfusing propofol typically enhanced the rate of development of potentiation produced by (GABA + TPMPA + propofol) applications. Conclusions. Propofol exerts a marked and selective potentiation on GABAA receptors of retinal bipolar cells. The data encourage the use of propofol in future studies of bipolar cell function. PMID:21071744

  6. Activin Controls Ethanol Potentiation of Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission Through GABAA Receptors and Concomitant Behavioral Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fang; Puppel, Anne; Huber, Sabine E; Link, Andrea S; Eulenburg, Volker; van Brederode, Johannes F; Müller, Christian P; Alzheimer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β family, exerts multiple functions in the nervous system. Originally identified as a neurotrophic and -protective agent, increasing evidence implicates activin also in the regulation of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in brain regions associated with cognitive and affective functions. To explore how activin impacts on ethanol potentiation of GABA synapses and related behavioral paradigms, we used an established transgenic model of disrupted activin receptor signaling, in which mice express a dominant-negative activin receptor IB mutant (dnActRIB) under the control of the CaMKIIα promoter. Comparison of GABAA receptor currents in hippocampal neurons from dnActRIB mice and wild-type mice showed that all concentrations of ethanol tested (30–150 mM) produced much stronger potentiation of phasic inhibition in the mutant preparation. In dentate granule cells of dnActRIB mice, tonic GABA inhibition was more pronounced than in wild-type neurons, but remained insensitive to low ethanol (30 mM) in both preparations. The heightened ethanol sensitivity of phasic inhibition in mutant hippocampi resulted from both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, the latter probably involving PKCɛ. At the behavioral level, ethanol produced significantly stronger sedation in dnActRIB mice than in wild-type mice, but did not affect consumption of ethanol or escalation after withdrawal. We link the abnormal narcotic response of dnActRIB mice to ethanol to the excessive potentiation of inhibitory neurotransmission. Our study suggests that activin counteracts oversedation from ethanol by curtailing its augmenting effect at GABA synapses. PMID:26717882

  7. Selective activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor achieved by allosteric potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lei; Seager, Matthew A.; Wittmann, Marion; Jacobson, Marlene; Bickel, Denise; Burno, Maryann; Jones, Keith; Graufelds, Valerie Kuzmick; Xu, Guangping; Pearson, Michelle; McCampbell, Alexander; Gaspar, Renee; Shughrue, Paul; Danziger, Andrew; Regan, Christopher; Flick, Rose; Pascarella, Danette; Garson, Susan; Doran, Scott; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Veng, Lone; Lindsley, Craig W.; Shipe, William; Kuduk, Scott; Sur, Cyrille; Kinney, Gene; Seabrook, Guy R.; Ray, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The forebrain cholinergic system promotes higher brain function in part by signaling through the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). During Alzheimer's disease (AD), these cholinergic neurons degenerate, therefore selectively activating M1 receptors could improve cognitive function in these patients while avoiding unwanted peripheral responses associated with non-selective muscarinic agonists. We describe here benzyl quinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA), a highly selective allosteric potentiator of the M1 mAChR. BQCA reduces the concentration of ACh required to activate M1 up to 129-fold with an inflection point value of 845 nM. No potentiation, agonism, or antagonism activity on other mAChRs is observed up to 100 μM. Furthermore studies in M1−/− mice demonstrates that BQCA requires M1 to promote inositol phosphate turnover in primary neurons and to increase c-fos and arc RNA expression and ERK phosphorylation in the brain. Radioligand-binding assays, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicate that BQCA acts at an allosteric site involving residues Y179 and W400. BQCA reverses scopolamine-induced memory deficits in contextual fear conditioning, increases blood flow to the cerebral cortex, and increases wakefulness while reducing delta sleep. In contrast to M1 allosteric agonists, which do not improve memory in scopolamine-challenged mice in contextual fear conditioning, BQCA induces β-arrestin recruitment to M1, suggesting a role for this signal transduction mechanism in the cholinergic modulation of memory. In summary, BQCA exploits an allosteric potentiation mechanism to provide selectivity for the M1 receptor and represents a promising therapeutic strategy for cognitive disorders. PMID:19717450

  8. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists as potential pharmacotherapies for drug abuse disorders.

    PubMed

    Beardsley, Patrick M; Thomas, Brian F; McMahon, Lance R

    2009-04-01

    Since the discovery of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) in 1988, and subsequently of the CB2 receptor (CB2R) in 1993, there has been an exponential growth of research investigating the functions of the endocannabinoid system. The roles of CB1Rs have been of particular interest to psychiatry because of their selective presence within the CNS and because of their association with brain-reward circuits involving mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems. One potential role that has become of considerable focus is the ability of CB1Rs to modulate the effects of the drugs of abuse. Many drugs of abuse elevate dopamine levels, and the ability of CB1R antagonists or inverse agonists to modulate these elevations has suggested their potential application as pharmacotherapies for treating drug abuse disorders. With the identification of the selective CB1R antagonist, rimonabant, in 1994, and subsequently of other CB1R antagonists, there has been a rapid expansion of research investigating their ability to modulate the effects of the drugs of abuse. This review highlights some of the preclinical and clinical studies that have examined the effects of CB1R antagonists under conditions potentially predictive of their therapeutic efficacy as treatments for drug abuse disorders.

  9. Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems. This technical paper recommends several ty...

  10. Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Evaluating Potential Exposures to Ecological Receptors Due to Transport of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants in Subsurface Systems. This technical paper recommends several ty...

  11. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel protein expression?

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina; Förste, Nora; Wittstock, Antje; Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine (HC) or acetylcysteine (ACC) affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patients with chronic renal failure had significantly elevated HC levels and TRPC6 mRNA expression levels in monocytes compared with control subjects. We further observed that administration of HC or ACC significantly increased TRPC6 channel protein expression compared with control conditions. We, therefore, hypothesize that cysteine residues increase TRPC6 channel protein expression in humans.

  12. To kill a tumor cell: the potential of proapoptotic receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenazi, Avi; Herbst, Roy S.

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances in mechanisms that direct abnormal cells to undergo apoptosis frequently and critically contribute to tumorigenesis, yielding a logical target for potential therapeutic intervention. There is currently heightened interest in the extrinsic apoptosis pathway, with several proapoptotic receptor agonists (PARAs) in development. The PARAs include the ligand recombinant human Apo2L/TRAIL and agonistic mAbs. Mechanistic and preclinical data with Apo2L/TRAIL indicate exciting opportunities for synergy with conventional therapies and for combining PARAs with other molecularly targeted agents. Novel molecular biomarkers may help identify those patients most likely to benefit from PARA therapy. PMID:18523647

  13. Indazole-based ligands for estrogen-related receptor α as potential anti-diabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Patch, Raymond J; Huang, Hui; Patel, Sharmila; Cheung, Wing; Xu, Guozhang; Zhao, Bao-Ping; Beauchamp, Derek A; Rentzeperis, Dionisios; Geisler, John G; Askari, Hossein B; Liu, Jianying; Kasturi, Jyotsna; Towers, Meghan; Gaul, Micheal D; Player, Mark R

    2017-09-29

    Estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) is an orphan nuclear receptor that has been functionally implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Herein is described the development of indazole-based N-alkylthiazolidenediones, which function in biochemical assays as selective inverse agonists against this receptor. Series optimization provided several potent analogues that inhibited the recruitment of a co-activator peptide fragment in vitro (IC50s < 50 nM) and reduced fasted circulating insulin and triglyceride levels in a sub-chronic pre-diabetic rat model when administered orally (10 mg/kg). A multi-parametric optimization strategy led to the identification of 50 as an advanced lead, which was more extensively evaluated in additional diabetic models. Chronic oral administration of 50 in two murine models of obesity and insulin resistance improved glucose control and reduced circulating triglycerides with efficacies similar to that of rosiglitazone. Importantly, these effects were attained without the concomitant weight gain that is typically observed with the latter agent. Thus, these studies provide additional support for the development of such molecules for the potential treatment of metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Progress in developing cholecystokinin (CCK)/gastrin receptor ligands which have therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Tapia, Jose A.; Sancho, Veronica; Jensen, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Gastrin and CCK are two of the oldest hormones and within the last 15 years there has been an exponential increase in knowledge of their pharmacology, cell biology, receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R) and roles in physiology and pathological conditions. Despite these advances there is no approved disease indication for CCK receptor antagonists and only minor use of agonists. In this review the important factors determining this slow therapeutic development are reviewed. To assess this it is necessary to briefly review what is known about the roles of CCK receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R) in normal human physiology, their role in pathologic conditions, the selectivity of available potent CCKR agonists/antagonists as well as review their use in human conditions to date and the results. Despite extensive studies in animals and some in humans, recent studies suggest that monotherapy with CCK1R agonists will not be effective in obesity, nor CCK2R antagonists in panic disorders or CCK2R antagonists to inhibit growth of pancreatic cancer. Areas that require more study include the use of CCK2R agonists for imaging tumors and radiotherapy, CCK2R antagonists in hypergastrinemic states especially with long term PPI use and for potentiation of analgesia as well as use of CCK1R antagonists for a number of gastrointestinal disorders [motility disorders (irritable bowel syndrome, dyspepsia, constipation) and pancreatitis (acute, chronic)]. PMID:17997137

  15. Transient receptor potential channels in sensory neurons are targets of the antimycotic agent clotrimazole.

    PubMed

    Meseguer, Victor; Karashima, Yuji; Talavera, Karel; D'Hoedt, Dieter; Donovan-Rodríguez, Tansy; Viana, Felix; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas

    2008-01-16

    Clotrimazole (CLT) is a widely used drug for the topical treatment of yeast infections of skin, vagina, and mouth. Common side effects of topical CLT application include irritation and burning pain of the skin and mucous membranes. Here, we provide evidence that transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in primary sensory neurons underlie these unwanted effects of CLT. We found that clinically relevant CLT concentrations activate heterologously expressed TRPV1 and TRPA1, two TRP channels that act as receptors of irritant chemical and/or thermal stimuli in nociceptive neurons. In line herewith, CLT stimulated a subset of capsaicin-sensitive and mustard oil-sensitive trigeminal neurons, and evoked nocifensive behavior and thermal hypersensitivity with intraplantar injection in mice. Notably, CLT-induced pain behavior was suppressed by the TRPV1-antagonist BCTC [(N-(-4-tertiarybutylphenyl)-4-(3-cholorpyridin-2-yl)tetrahydropyrazine-1(2H)-carboxamide)] and absent in TRPV1-deficient mice. In addition, CLT inhibited the cold and menthol receptor TRPM8, and blocked menthol-induced responses in capsaicin- and mustard oil-insensitive trigeminal neurons. The concentration for 50% inhibition (IC50) of inward TRPM8 current was approximately 200 nM, making CLT the most potent known TRPM8 antagonist and a useful tool to discriminate between TRPM8- and TRPA1-mediated responses. Together, our results identify TRP channels in sensory neurons as molecular targets of CLT, and offer means to develop novel CLT preparations with fewer unwanted sensory side effects.

  16. Interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase inhibitors: potential therapeutic agents for inflammatory- and immune-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Malkeet Singh; Kaur, Maninder; Silakari, Pragati; Silakari, Om

    2015-06-01

    The various cells of innate immune system quickly counter-attack invading pathogens, and mount up "first line" defense through their trans-membrane receptors including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin receptors (IL-Rs) that result in the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Albeit such inflammatory responses are beneficial in pathological conditions, their overstimulation may cause severe inflammatory damage; thus, make this defense system a "double edged sword". IRAK-4 has been evaluated as an indispensable element of IL-Rs and TLR pathways that can regulate the abnormal levels of cytokines, and therefore could be employed to manage immune- and inflammation-related disorders. Historically, the identification of selective and potent inhibitors has been challenging; thus, a limited number of small molecule IRAK-4 inhibitors are available in literature. Recently, IRAK-4 achieved great attention, when Ligand® pharmaceutical and Nimbus Discovery® reported the beneficial potentials of IRAK-4 inhibitors in the pre-clinical evaluation for various inflammatory- and immune-related disorders, but not limited to, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, gout, asthma and cancer.

  17. A TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor of Pseudomonas fluorescens: virulence and vaccine potential.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-hua; Dang, Wei; Sun, Li

    2012-09-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a Gram-negative bacterium and a common aquaculture pathogen. In this study, we identified from a pathogenic P. fluorescens strain a TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor, TdrA, as a secreted protein and examined its function and vaccine potential. TdrA is composed of 746 residues and possesses conserved structural domains of TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that expression of tdrA was upregulated under conditions of iron starvation and during infection of host cells. Consistently, iron depletion induced increased production of TdrA protein in the outer membrane. Compared to the wild type, a tdrA-knock out mutant (1) was unable to grow in the absence of iron, (2) exhibited drastically attenuated overall bacterial virulence, and (3) was impaired in the ability to establish lethal infection in host tissues. Purified recombinant TdrA (rTdrA), when used as a subunit vaccine to immunize flounder, was able to induce strong protective immunity, including production of serum-specific antibodies that resulted in effective protection against lethal-dose P. fluorescens challenge. Together, these results indicate that TdrA is an outer membrane receptor and a protective immunogen that is likely to be involved in iron acquisition and, as a result, required for optimal bacterial virulence.

  18. Structure, Dynamics, and Allosteric Potential of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptor N-Terminal Domains

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, James; Bahar, Ivet; Greger, Ingo H.

    2015-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are tetrameric cation channels that mediate synaptic transmission and plasticity. They have a unique modular architecture with four domains: the intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD) that is involved in synaptic targeting, the transmembrane domain (TMD) that forms the ion channel, the membrane-proximal ligand-binding domain (LBD) that binds agonists such as L-glutamate, and the distal N-terminal domain (NTD), whose function is the least clear. The extracellular portion, comprised of the LBD and NTD, is loosely arranged, mediating complex allosteric regulation and providing a rich target for drug development. Here, we briefly review recent work on iGluR NTD structure and dynamics, and further explore the allosteric potential for the NTD in AMPA-type iGluRs using coarse-grained simulations. We also investigate mechanisms underlying the established NTD allostery in NMDA-type iGluRs, as well as the fold-related metabotropic glutamate and GABAB receptors. We show that the clamshell motions intrinsically favored by the NTD bilobate fold are coupled to dimeric and higher-order rearrangements that impact the iGluR LBD and ultimately the TMD. Finally, we explore the dynamics of intact iGluRs and describe how it might affect receptor operation in a synaptic environment. PMID:26255587

  19. 4-Phenyl quinoline derivatives as potential serotonin receptor ligands with antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pranaya V; Sayed, Alim A; RaviKumar, Ameeta; Puranik, Vedavati G; Zinjarde, Smita S

    2017-08-18

    Antagonists of signaling receptors are often effective non-toxic therapeutic agents. Over the years, there have been evidences describing the role of serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in development of cancer. Although there are reports on the antiproliferative effects of some serotonin receptor antagonists, there are very few investigations related to understanding their structure-activity relationships. In this study, we report the screening of a library of 4-phenyl quinoline derivatives for their antiproliferative activities. Preliminary docking studies indicated that these ligands had the ability to bind to two of the serotonin receptors, 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B. The results of the in silico experiments were validated by performing in vitro studies on MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. The ethylpiperazine derivatives showed maximum toxicity against this cancer cell line. The compounds inhibited Calcium ion efflux (induced by serotonin) and ERK activation. One of the most active 4-phenyl quinoline derivatives (H3a) also induced apoptosis, thereby, suggesting the use of this scaffold as a potential anticancer drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Endocannabinoid release from midbrain dopamine neurons: a potential substrate for cannabinoid receptor antagonist treatment of addiction.

    PubMed

    Lupica, Carl R; Riegel, Arthur C

    2005-06-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that all commonly abused drugs act upon the brain reward circuitry to ultimately increase extracellular concentrations of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and other forebrain areas. Many drugs of abuse appear to increase dopamine levels by dramatically increase the firing and bursting rates of dopamine neurons located in the ventral mesencephalon. Recent clinical evidence in humans and behavioral evidence in animals indicate that cannabinoid receptor antagonists such as SR141716A (Rimonabant) can reduce the self-administration of, and craving for, several commonly addictive drugs. However, the mechanism of this potentially beneficial effect has not yet been identified. We propose, on the basis of recent studies in our laboratory and others, that these antagonists may act by blocking the effects of endogenously released cannabinoid molecules (endocannabinoids) that are released in an activity- and calcium-dependent manner from mesencephalic dopamine neurons. It is hypothesized that, through the antagonism of cannabinoid CB1 receptors located on inhibitory and excitatory axon terminals targeting the midbrain dopamine neurons, the effects of the endocannabinoids are occluded. The data from these studies therefore suggest that the endocannabinoid system and the CB1 receptors located in the ventral mesencephalon may play an important role in regulating drug reward processes, and that this substrate is recruited whenever dopamine neuron activity is increased.

  1. A polycystin-type transient receptor potential (Trp) channel that is activated by ATP

    PubMed Central

    Traynor, David

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT ATP and ADP are ancient extra-cellular signalling molecules that in Dictyostelium amoebae cause rapid, transient increases in cytosolic calcium due to an influx through the plasma membrane. This response is independent of hetero-trimeric G-proteins, the putative IP3 receptor IplA and all P2X channels. We show, unexpectedly, that it is abolished in mutants of the polycystin-type transient receptor potential channel, TrpP. Responses to the chemoattractants cyclic-AMP and folic acid are unaffected in TrpP mutants. We report that the DIF morphogens, cyclic-di-GMP, GABA, glutamate and adenosine all induce strong cytoplasmic calcium responses, likewise independently of TrpP. Thus, TrpP is dedicated to purinergic signalling. ATP treatment causes cell blebbing within seconds but this does not require TrpP, implicating a separate purinergic receptor. We could detect no effect of ATP on chemotaxis and TrpP mutants grow, chemotax and develop almost normally in standard conditions. No gating ligand is known for the human homologue of TrpP, polycystin-2, which causes polycystic kidney disease. Our results now show that TrpP mediates purinergic signalling in Dictyostelium and is directly or indirectly gated by ATP. PMID:28011630

  2. Lipids as regulators of the activity of transient receptor potential type V1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2005-08-19

    After 7 years from its cloning, the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel remains the sole membrane receptor mediating the pharmacological effects of the hot chilli pepper pungent component, capsaicin, and of the Euphorbia toxin, resiniferatoxin. Yet, this ion channel represents one of the most complex examples of how the activity of a protein can be regulated. Among the several chemicophysical stimuli that can modulate TRPV1 permeability to cations, endogenous lipids appear to play a major role, either as allosteric effectors or as direct agonists, or both. Furthermore, the capability of some mediators, such as the endocannabinoid anandamide, or the eicosanoid precursors 12- and 5-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acids, to activate TRPV1 receptors provides a striking example of the "site-dependent" and "metabolic" functional plasticity, respectively, typical of bioactive lipids. In this article, the multi-faceted and most recently discovered aspects of TRPV1 regulation are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the interaction between these membrane channels and some lipid molecules.

  3. The therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Dowie, Megan J; Scotter, Emma L; Molinari, Emanuela; Glass, Michelle

    2010-11-01

    Huntington's disease is a late-onset autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disease characterised by increased symptom severity over time and ultimately premature death. An expanded CAG repeat sequence in the huntingtin gene leads to a polyglutamine expansion in the expressed protein, resulting in complex dysfunctions including cellular excitotoxicity and transcriptional dysregulation. Symptoms include cognitive deficits, psychiatric changes and a movement disorder often referred to as Huntington's chorea, which involves characteristic involuntary dance-like writhing movements. Neuropathologically Huntington's disease is characterised by neuronal dysfunction and death in the striatum and cortex with an overall decrease in cerebral volume (Ho et al., 2001). Neuronal dysfunction begins prior to symptom presentation, and cells of particular vulnerability include the striatal medium spiny neurons. Huntington's is a devastating disease for patients and their families and there is currently no cure, or even an effective therapy for disease symptoms. G-protein coupled receptors are the most abundant receptor type in the central nervous system and are linked to complex downstream pathways, manipulation of which may have therapeutic application in many neurological diseases. This review will highlight the potential of G-protein coupled receptor drug targets as emerging therapies for Huntington's disease.

  4. Transient Receptor Potential Ion Channel Function in Sensory Transduction and Cellular Signaling Cascades Underlying Visceral Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Balemans, Dafne; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Talavera, Karel; Wouters, Mira M

    2017-04-06

    Visceral hypersensitivity is an important mechanism underlying increased abdominal pain perception in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) including functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease in remission. Although the exact pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood, recent studies described upregulation and altered functions of nociceptors and their signaling pathways in aberrant visceral nociception, in particular the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family. A variety of TRP channels are present in the gastrointestinal tract (TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPA1, TRPM2, TRPM5 and TRPM8) and modulation of their function by increased activation or sensitization (decreased activation threshold) or altered expression in visceral afferents, have been reported in visceral hypersensitivity. TRP channels directly detect or transduce osmotic, mechanical, thermal and chemosensory stimuli. In addition, pro-inflammatory mediators released in tissue damage or inflammation can activate receptors of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily leading to TRP channel sensitization and activation, which amplify pain and neurogenic inflammation. In this review, we highlight the current knowledge on the functional roles of neuronal TRP channels in visceral hypersensitivity and discuss the signaling pathways that underlie TRP channel modulation. We propose that a better understanding of TRP channels and their modulators may facilitate the development of more selective and effective therapies to treat visceral hypersensitivity.

  5. Vandetanib as a potential new treatment for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Hatem, Rana; Labiod, Dalila; Château-Joubert, Sophie; de Plater, Ludmilla; El Botty, Rania; Vacher, Sophie; Bonin, Florian; Servely, Jean-Luc; Dieras, Véronique; Bièche, Ivan; Marangoni, Elisabetta

    2016-05-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase RET is implicated in the progression of luminal breast cancers (BC) but its role in estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors is unknown. Here we investigated the expression of RET in breast cancer patients tumors and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and evaluated the therapeutic potential of Vandetanib, a tyrosin kinase inhibitor with strong activity against RET, EGFR and VEGFR2, in ER negative breast cancer PDX. The RT-PCR analysis of RET expression in breast tumors of 446 patients and 57 PDX, showed elevated levels of RET in ER+ and HER2+ subtypes and in a small subgroup of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). The activity of Vandetanib was tested in vivo in three PDX models of TNBC and one model of HER2+ BC with different expression levels of RET and EGFR. Vandetanib induced tumor regression in PDX models with high expression of RET or EGFR. The effect was associated with inhibition of RET/EGFR phosphorylation and MAP kinase pathway and increased necrosis. In a PDX model with no expression of RET nor EGFR, Vandetanib slowed tumor growth without inducing tumor regression. In addition, treatment by Vandetanib decreased expression of murine Vegf receptors and the endothelial marker Cd31 in the four PDX models tested, suggesting inhibition of tumor vascularization. In summary, these preclinical results suggest that Vandetanib treatment could be useful for patients with ER negative breast cancers overexpressing Vandetanib's main targets. © 2015 UICC.

  6. Distribution and Expression of Non-Neuronal Transient Receptor Potential (TRPV) Ion Channels in Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Sulk, Mathias; Seeliger, Stephan; Aubert, Jerome; Schwab, Verena D.; Cevikbas, Ferda; Rivier, Michel; Nowak, Pawel; Voegel, Johannes J.; Buddenkotte, Jörg; Steinhoff, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Rosacea is a frequent chronic inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology. Because early rosacea reveals all characteristics of neurogenic inflammation, a central role of sensory nerves in its pathophysiology has been discussed. Neuroinflammatory mediators and their receptors involved in rosacea are poorly defined. Good candidates may be transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels of vanilloid type (TRPV), which can be activated by many trigger factors of rosacea. Interestingly, TRPV2, TRPV3, and TRPV4 are expressed by both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we analyzed the expression and distribution of TRPV receptors in the various subtypes of rosacea on non-neuronal cells using immunohistochemistry, morphometry, double immunoflourescence, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) as compared with healthy skin and lupus erythematosus. Our results show that dermal immunolabeling of TRPV2 and TRPV3 and gene expression of TRPV1 is significantly increased in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR). Papulopustular rosacea (PPR) displayed an enhanced immunoreactivity for TRPV2, TRPV4, and also of TRPV2 gene expression. In phymatous rosacea (PhR)-affected skin, dermal immunostaining of TRPV3 and TRPV4 and gene expression of TRPV1 and TRPV3 was enhanced, whereas epidermal TRPV2 staining was decreased. Thus, dysregulation of TRPV channels also expressed by non-neuronal cells may be critically involved in the initiation and/or development of rosacea. TRP ion channels may be targets for the treatment of rosacea. PMID:22189789

  7. Arsenite and insulin exhibit opposing effects on epidermal growth factor receptor and keratinocyte proliferative potential

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy J.; Rice, Robert H. . E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu

    2007-05-15

    Previous work has suggested that arsenic exposure contributes to skin carcinogenesis by preserving the proliferative potential of human epidermal keratinocytes, thereby slowing the exit of putative target stem cells into the differentiation pathway. To find a molecular basis for this action, present work has explored the influence of arsenite on keratinocyte responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF). The ability of cultured keratinocytes to found colonies upon passaging several days after confluence was preserved by arsenite and EGF in an additive fashion, but neither was effective when the receptor tyrosine kinase activity was inhibited. Arsenite prevented the loss of EGF receptor protein and phosphorylation of tyrosine 1173, preserving its capability to signal. The level of nuclear {beta}-catenin was higher in cells treated with arsenite and EGF in parallel to elevated colony forming ability, and expression of a dominant negative {beta}-catenin suppressed the increase in both colony forming ability and yield of putative stem cells induced by arsenite and EGF. As judged by expression of three genes regulated by {beta}-catenin, this transcription factor had substantially higher activity in the arsenite/EGF-treated cells. Trivalent antimony exhibited the same effects as arsenite. A novel finding is that insulin in the medium induced the loss of EGF receptor protein, which was largely prevented by arsenite exposure.

  8. Role of beta2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in auditory event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, Noam D; Koehler, Christine; Picciotto, Marina R; Siegel, Steven J

    2009-03-01

    Nicotine improves sensory processing in schizophrenic individuals, as measured by changes in auditory event-related potentials (ERPs). Nicotine administration also alters ERPs in mice by increasing the amplitude and gating of the P20 ERP component while decreasing the amplitude of the N40 ERP component. Less is known about the role of specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes. In this study, we examined whether nAChRs containing the beta2 subunit contribute to nicotine's effects on auditory ERPs. We tested the effect of nicotine in wild-type mice and mice lacking the beta2 nAChR subunit. Mice underwent stereotaxic implantation of stainless steel electrodes located in the CA3 region of the hippocampus, and 50 paired click stimuli were delivered during each drug condition. There was no significant difference in P20 or N40 amplitude or gating between genotypes during the control condition, suggesting that beta2-containing receptors are not essential for the baseline auditory ERP response. Nicotine increased P20 amplitude and enhanced gating in wild-type and beta2 knockout mice, but only decreased N40 amplitude in wild-type mice. There was no effect of nicotine on N40 gating in either genotype. beta2-containing receptors are necessary for nicotine's effects on the N40 component of the mouse auditory ERP. These results suggest that beta2-containing nAChRs modulate sensory processing and may serve as a therapeutic target in schizophrenic individuals.

  9. Quantification and Potential Functions of Endogenous Agonists of Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cenac, Nicolas; Bautzova, Tereza; Le Faouder, Pauline; Veldhuis, Nicholas A; Poole, Daniel P; Rolland, Corinne; Bertrand, Jessica; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Dubourdeau, Marc; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Zecchi, Lisa; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Bunnett, Nigel W; Barbara, Giovanni; Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    In mice, activation of the transient receptor potential cation channels (TRP) TRPV1, TRPV4, and TRPA1 causes visceral hypersensitivity. These receptors and their agonists might be involved in development of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We investigated whether polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolites, which activate TRPs, are present in colon tissues from patients with IBS and act as endogenous agonists to induce hypersensitivity. We analyzed colon biopsy samples from 40 patients with IBS (IBS biopsies) and 11 healthy individuals undergoing colorectal cancer screening (controls), collected during colonoscopy at the University of Bologna, Italy. Levels of the PUFA metabolites that activate TRPV1 (12-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, and leukotriene B4), TRPV4 (5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid [EET] and 8,9-EET), and TRPA1 (PGA1, 8-iso-prostaglandin A2, and 15-deoxy-Δ-prostaglandin J2) were measured in biopsies and their supernatants using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; we also measured levels of the PUFA metabolites prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and resolvins. C57Bl6 mice were given intrathecal injections of small interfering RNAs to reduce levels of TRPV4, or control small interfering RNAs, along with colonic injections of biopsy supernatants; visceral hypersensitivity was measured based on response to colorectal distension. Mouse sensory neurons were cultured and incubated with biopsy supernatants and lipids extracted from biopsies or colons of mice. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect TRPV4 in human dorsal root ganglia samples (from the National Disease Research Interchange). Levels of the TRPV4 agonist 5,6-EET, but not levels of TRPV1 or TRPA1 agonists, were increased in IBS biopsies compared with controls; increases correlated with pain and bloating scores. Supernatants from IBS biopsies, but not from controls, induced visceral hypersensitivity in mice. Small interfering RNA

  10. Analysis of the Mechanism of Action of RPF1: Potentiator of Progesterone Receptor and p53-dependent Transcriptional Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    of the Mechanism of Action of RPFl: Potentiator of Progesterone Receptor and p53-dependent Transcriptional Activity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Maria ...this change. Thank you in advance for your help. Sincerely, Maria R. Huacani Principal Investigator DAMD17-98-1-8072 2 Form Approved REPORT...the Mechanism of Action of RPFl: Potentiator DAMD17-98-1-8072 of Progesterone Receptor and p53-dependent Transcriptional Activity 6. AUTHOR(S) Maria

  11. An AMPA receptor potentiator modulates hippocampal expression of BDNF: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Mackowiak, Marzena; O'Neill, Michael J; Hicks, Caroline A; Bleakman, David; Skolnick, Phil

    2002-07-01

    AMPA receptor activation has been demonstrated to increase the neuronal expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In the present study, we investigated the effect of a novel AMPA receptor potentiator (LY404187) and its active isomer (LY451646) on the expression of BDNF protein and mRNA, as well as TrkB mRNA in rat hippocampus. LY404187 administered for 7 days (1 mg/kg) significantly increased the number of BDNF immunopositive cells in the dentate gyrus, but not other hippocampal subfields. Chronic treatment (7 days) with LY451646 (0.5 mg/kg, comparable to 1 mg/kg of LY404187) increased the level of both BDNF and TrkB mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus, CA3 and CA4 of the hippocampus. However, chronic treatment with lower doses of LY451646 (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) decreased the level of BDNF and TrkB mRNA in hippocampus, whilst the highest used dose of LY451646 (1 mg/kg) had no effect on BDNF and TrkB mRNA in hippocampus. In contrast, acute treatment with LY451646 produced an increase in BDNF mRNA levels at doses of 0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg in the hippocampus (CA4, CA3 and dentate gyrus, but not in CA1). LY451646 at 0.5 mg/kg had no effect, but at 1.0 mg/kg decreased the level of BDNF mRNA in hippocampus. Acute treatment with LY451646 did not affect the TrkB receptor mRNA levels in hippocampus. Our results demonstrate that biarylpropylsulfonamide AMPA receptor potentiators are capable of modulating the expression of BDNF and TrkB mRNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The increase in both BDNF protein and mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus but not in CA1 indicates a specific role of AMPA receptors in the regulation of BDNF expression in this hippocampal subfield. The regulation of BDNF expression by biarylpropylsulfonamids such as LY451646 may have important therapeutical implications for this class of molecule in the treatment of depression and other CNS disorders.

  12. Dynamic brain network reconfiguration as a potential schizophrenia genetic risk mechanism modulated by NMDA receptor function.

    PubMed

    Braun, Urs; Schäfer, Axel; Bassett, Danielle S; Rausch, Franziska; Schweiger, Janina I; Bilek, Edda; Erk, Susanne; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Grimm, Oliver; Geiger, Lena S; Haddad, Leila; Otto, Kristina; Mohnke, Sebastian; Heinz, Andreas; Zink, Mathias; Walter, Henrik; Schwarz, Emanuel; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Tost, Heike

    2016-11-01

    Schizophrenia is increasingly recognized as a disorder of distributed neural dynamics, but the molecular and genetic contributions are poorly understood. Recent work highlights a role for altered N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor signaling and related impairments in the excitation-inhibitory balance and synchrony of large-scale neural networks. Here, we combined a pharmacological intervention with novel techniques from dynamic network neuroscience applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify alterations in the dynamic reconfiguration of brain networks related to schizophrenia genetic risk and NMDA receptor hypofunction. We quantified "network flexibility," a measure of the dynamic reconfiguration of the community structure of time-variant brain networks during working memory performance. Comparing 28 patients with schizophrenia, 37 unaffected first-degree relatives, and 139 healthy controls, we detected significant differences in network flexibility [F(2,196) = 6.541, P = 0.002] in a pattern consistent with the assumed genetic risk load of the groups (highest for patients, intermediate for relatives, and lowest for controls). In an observer-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized, cross-over pharmacological challenge study in 37 healthy controls, we further detected a significant increase in network flexibility as a result of NMDA receptor antagonism with 120 mg dextromethorphan [F(1,34) = 5.291, P = 0.028]. Our results identify a potential dynamic network intermediate phenotype related to the genetic liability for schizophrenia that manifests as altered reconfiguration of brain networks during working memory. The phenotype appears to be influenced by NMDA receptor antagonism, consistent with a critical role for glutamate in the temporal coordination of neural networks and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  13. Dynamic brain network reconfiguration as a potential schizophrenia genetic risk mechanism modulated by NMDA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Urs; Schäfer, Axel; Rausch, Franziska; Schweiger, Janina I.; Bilek, Edda; Erk, Susanne; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Grimm, Oliver; Geiger, Lena S.; Haddad, Leila; Otto, Kristina; Mohnke, Sebastian; Heinz, Andreas; Zink, Mathias; Walter, Henrik; Schwarz, Emanuel; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Tost, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is increasingly recognized as a disorder of distributed neural dynamics, but the molecular and genetic contributions are poorly understood. Recent work highlights a role for altered N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor signaling and related impairments in the excitation–inhibitory balance and synchrony of large-scale neural networks. Here, we combined a pharmacological intervention with novel techniques from dynamic network neuroscience applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify alterations in the dynamic reconfiguration of brain networks related to schizophrenia genetic risk and NMDA receptor hypofunction. We quantified “network flexibility,” a measure of the dynamic reconfiguration of the community structure of time-variant brain networks during working memory performance. Comparing 28 patients with schizophrenia, 37 unaffected first-degree relatives, and 139 healthy controls, we detected significant differences in network flexibility [F(2,196) = 6.541, P = 0.002] in a pattern consistent with the assumed genetic risk load of the groups (highest for patients, intermediate for relatives, and lowest for controls). In an observer-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized, cross-over pharmacological challenge study in 37 healthy controls, we further detected a significant increase in network flexibility as a result of NMDA receptor antagonism with 120 mg dextromethorphan [F(1,34) = 5.291, P = 0.028]. Our results identify a potential dynamic network intermediate phenotype related to the genetic liability for schizophrenia that manifests as altered reconfiguration of brain networks during working memory. The phenotype appears to be influenced by NMDA receptor antagonism, consistent with a critical role for glutamate in the temporal coordination of neural networks and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:27791105

  14. Compound gravity receptor polarization vectors evidenced by linear vestibular evoked potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.; Bell, P. L.; Taylor, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    The utricle and saccule are gravity receptor organs of the vestibular system. These receptors rely on a high-density otoconial membrane to detect linear acceleration and the position of the cranium relative to Earth's gravitational vector. The linear vestibular evoked potential (VsEP) has been shown to be an effective non-invasive functional test specifically for otoconial gravity receptors (Jones et al., 1999). Moreover, there is some evidence that the VsEP can be used to independently test utricular and saccular function (Taylor et al., 1997; Jones et al., 1998). Here we characterize compound macular polarization vectors for the utricle and saccule in hatchling chickens. Pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were presented in two axes, the dorsoventral (DV, +/- Z axis) to isolate the saccule, and the interaural (IA, +/- Y axis) to isolate the utricle. Traditional signal averaging was used to resolve responses recorded from the surface of the skull. Latency and amplitude of eighth nerve components of the linear VsEP were measured. Gravity receptor responses exhibited clear preferences for one stimulus direction in each axis. With respect to each utricular macula, lateral translation in the IA axis produced maximum ipsilateral response amplitudes with substantially greater amplitude intensity (AI) slopes than medially directed movement. Downward caudal motions in the DV axis produced substantially larger response amplitudes and AI slopes. The results show that the macula lagena does not contribute to the VsEP compound polarization vectors of the sacculus and utricle. The findings suggest further that preferred compound vectors for the utricle depend on the pars externa (i.e. lateral hair cell field) whereas for the saccule they depend on pars interna (i.e. superior hair cell fields). These data provide evidence that maculae saccule and utricle can be selectively evaluated using the linear VsEP.

  15. Muscarinic receptor modulation of GABA-mediated giant depolarizing potentials in the neonatal rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Avignone, Elena; Cherubini, Enrico

    1999-01-01

    The whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to study the role of muscarinic receptors in regulating the frequency of giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) in CA3 hippocampal neurones in slices from postnatal (P) P1-P8 rats. Atropine (1 μM) reduced the frequency of GDPs by 64·2 ± 2·9%. The acetylcholinesterase inhibitor edrophonium (20 μM) increased the frequency of GDPs in a developmentally regulated way. This effect was antagonized by the M1 muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine. In the presence of edrophonium, tetanic stimulation of cholinergic fibres induced either an enhancement of GDP frequency (179 ± 79%) or a membrane depolarization (27 ± 16 mV) associated with an increase in synaptic noise. These effects were prevented by atropine. Application of carbachol (3 μM) produced an increase in GDP frequency that at P5-P6 was associated with a membrane depolarization and an increase in synaptic noise. These effects were prevented by atropine, pirenzepine (3 μM) and bicuculline (10 μM). In the presence of pirenzepine, carbachol reduced GDP frequency by 50 ± 4%. Conversely, in the presence of methoctramine (3 μM), carbachol enhanced GDP frequency by 117 ± 4%. It is concluded that endogenous acetylcholine, through the activation of M1 receptors, enhances the release of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), in a developmentally regulated way. On the other hand, carbachol exerts both an up- and downregulation of GABA release through the activation of M1 and M2 receptors, respectively. PMID:10373692