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Sample records for receptors protein kinase

  1. Protein kinase activity of the insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gammeltoft, S; Van Obberghen, E

    1986-01-01

    exogenous protein and peptide substrates on tyrosine residues, a reaction which is insulin-sensitive, Mn2+-dependent and specific for ATP. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the beta-subunit activates receptor kinase activity, and dephosphorylation with alkaline phosphatase deactivates the kinase. In intact cells or impure receptor preparations, a serine kinase is also activated by insulin. The cellular role of two kinase activities associated with the insulin receptor is not known, but we propose that the tyrosine- and serine-specific kinases mediate insulin actions on metabolism and growth either through dual-signalling or sequential pathways.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:3017297

  2. Identification of intracellular receptor proteins for activated protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, D; Khaner, H; Lopez, J

    1991-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) translocates from the cytosol to the particulate fraction on activation. This activation-induced translocation of PKC is thought to reflect PKC binding to the membrane lipids. However, immunological and biochemical data suggest that PKC may bind to proteins in the cytoskeletal elements in the particulate fraction and in the nuclei. Here we describe evidence for the presence of intracellular receptor proteins that bind activated PKC. Several proteins from the detergent-insoluble material of the particulate fraction bound PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine and calcium; binding was further increased with the addition of diacylglycerol. Binding of PKC to two of these proteins was concentration-dependent, saturable, and specific, suggesting that these binding proteins are receptors for activated C-kinase, termed here "RACKs." PKC binds to RACKs via a site on PKC distinct from the substrate binding site. We suggest that binding to RACKs may play a role in activation-induced translocation of PKC. Images PMID:1850844

  3. A-kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 Recruits Protein Kinase C to Phosphorylate Roundabout Receptors.

    PubMed

    Samelson, Bret K; Gore, Bryan B; Whiting, Jennifer L; Nygren, Patrick J; Purkey, Alicia M; Colledge, Marcie; Langeberg, Lorene K; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Zweifel, Larry S; Scott, John D

    2015-05-29

    Anchoring proteins direct protein kinases and phosphoprotein phosphatases toward selected substrates to control the efficacy, context, and duration of neuronal phosphorylation events. The A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP79/150 interacts with protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), and protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) to modulate second messenger signaling events. In a mass spectrometry-based screen for additional AKAP79/150 binding partners, we have identified the Roundabout axonal guidance receptor Robo2 and its ligands Slit2 and Slit3. Biochemical and cellular approaches confirm that a linear sequence located in the cytoplasmic tail of Robo2 (residues 991-1070) interfaces directly with sites on the anchoring protein. Parallel studies show that AKAP79/150 interacts with the Robo3 receptor in a similar manner. Immunofluorescent staining detects overlapping expression patterns for murine AKAP150, Robo2, and Robo3 in a variety of brain regions, including hippocampal region CA1 and the islands of Calleja. In vitro kinase assays, peptide spot array mapping, and proximity ligation assay staining approaches establish that human AKAP79-anchored PKC selectively phosphorylates the Robo3.1 receptor subtype on serine 1330. These findings imply that anchored PKC locally modulates the phosphorylation status of Robo3.1 in brain regions governing learning and memory and reward. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. [Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activity].

    PubMed

    Haga, T; Haga, K; Kameyama, K; Nakata, H

    1994-09-01

    Recent progress on the activation of G protein-coupled receptor kinases is reviewed. beta-Adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK) is activated by G protein beta gamma -subunits, which interact with the carboxyl terminal portion of beta ARK. Muscarinic receptor m2-subtypes are phosphorylated by beta ARK1 in the central part of the third intracellular loop (I3). Phosphorylation of I3-GST fusion protein by beta ARK1 is synergistically stimulated by the beta gamma -subunits and mastoparan or a peptide corresponding to portions adjacent to the transmembrane segments of m2-receptors or by beta gamma -subunits and the agonist-bound I3-deleted m2 variant. These results indicate that agonist-bound receptors serve as both substrates and activators of beta ARK.

  5. The Two Faces of Receptor Interacting Protein Kinase-1

    PubMed Central

    Weinlich, Ricardo; Green, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor Interacting Protein Kinase-1 (RIPK1), a key player in inflammation and cell death, assumes opposite functions depending on the cellular context and its posttranslational modifications. Genetic evidence supported by biochemical and cellular biology approaches shed light on the circumstances in which RIPK1 promotes or inhibits these processes. PMID:25459879

  6. Isolation of Drosophila genes encoding G protein-coupled receptor kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Cassill, J A; Whitney, M; Joazeiro, C A; Becker, A; Zuker, C S

    1991-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are regulated via phosphorylation by a variety of protein kinases. Recently, termination of the active state of two such receptors, the beta-adrenergic receptor and rhodopsin, has been shown to be mediated by agonist- or light-dependent phosphorylation of the receptor by members of a family of protein-serine/threonine kinases (here referred to as G protein-coupled receptor kinases). We now report the isolation of a family of genes encoding a set of Drosophila protein kinases that appear to code for G protein-coupled receptor kinases. These proteins share a high degree of sequence homology with the bovine beta-adrenergic receptor kinase. The presence of a conserved family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases in vertebrates and invertebrates points to the central role of these kinases in signal transduction cascades. Images PMID:1662381

  7. GRK mythology: G-protein receptor kinases in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Gerald W

    2009-05-01

    G-protein receptor kinases (GRKs) are indispensable for terminating signaling of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) through receptor desensitization and downregulation. Increased neurohormone levels in heart failure and the adverse consequences of constant neurohormonal stimulation suggest an important protective role for mechanisms that desensitize neurohormone receptor responses. For that reason, GRK2, the first GRK identified in the heart, has been extensively studied in heart failure, cardiac hypertrophy, and myocardial infarction. However, our understanding of the roles of GRKs in general, and the differential effects of cardiac receptor phosphorylation by individual cardiac-expressed GRKs, have evolved considerably in the last few years. Here, recent developments are reviewed, with an emphasis on novel GRK functions and signaling pathways.

  8. Multiple functions of G protein-coupled receptor kinases.

    PubMed

    Watari, Kenji; Nakaya, Michio; Kurose, Hitoshi

    2014-03-06

    Desensitization is a physiological feedback mechanism that blocks detrimental effects of persistent stimulation. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) was originally identified as the kinase that mediates G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) desensitization. Subsequent studies revealed that GRK is a family composed of seven isoforms (GRK1-GRK7). Each GRK shows a differential expression pattern. GRK1, GRK4, and GRK7 are expressed in limited tissues. In contrast, GRK2, GRK3, GRK5, and GRK6 are ubiquitously expressed throughout the body. The roles of GRKs in GPCR desensitization are well established. When GPCRs are activated by their agonists, GRKs phosphorylate serine/threonine residues in the intracellular loops and the carboxyl-termini of GPCRs. Phosphorylation promotes translocation of β-arrestins to the receptors and inhibits further G protein activation by interrupting receptor-G protein coupling. The binding of β-arrestins to the receptors also helps to promote receptor internalization by clathrin-coated pits. Thus, the GRK-catalyzed phosphorylation and subsequent binding of β-arrestin to GPCRs are believed to be the common mechanism of GPCR desensitization and internalization. Recent studies have revealed that GRKs are also involved in the β-arrestin-mediated signaling pathway. The GRK-mediated phosphorylation of the receptors plays opposite roles in conventional G protein- and β-arrestin-mediated signaling. The GRK-catalyzed phosphorylation of the receptors results in decreased G protein-mediated signaling, but it is necessary for β-arrestin-mediated signaling. Agonists that selectively activate GRK/β-arrestin-dependent signaling without affecting G protein signaling are known as β-arrestin-biased agonists. Biased agonists are expected to have potential therapeutic benefits for various diseases due to their selective activation of favorable physiological responses or avoidance of the side effects of drugs. Furthermore, GRKs are recognized as

  9. G protein-coupled receptor kinases: more than just kinases and not only for GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Gurevich, Eugenia V.; Tesmer, John J. G.; Mushegian, Arcady; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) are best known for their role in homologous desensitization of GPCRs. GRKs phosphorylate activated receptors and promote high affinity binding of arrestins, which precludes G protein coupling. GRKs have a multidomain structure, with the kinase domain inserted into a loop of a regulator of G protein signaling homology domain. Unlike many other kinases, GRKs do not need to be phosphorylated in their activation loop to achieve an activated state. Instead, they are directly activated by docking with active GPCRs. In this manner they are able to selectively phosphorylate Ser/Thr residues on only the activated form of the receptor, unlike related kinases such as protein kinase A. GRKs also phosphorylate a variety of non-GPCR substrates and regulate several signaling pathways via direct interactions with other proteins in a phosphorylation-independent manner. Multiple GRK subtypes are present in virtually every animal cell, with the highest expression levels found in neurons, with their extensive and complex signal regulation. Insufficient or excessive GRK activity was implicated in a variety of human disorders, ranging from heart failure to depression to Parkinson’s disease. As key regulators of GPCR-dependent and -independent signaling pathways, GRKs are emerging drug targets and promising molecular tools for therapy. Targeted modulation of expression and/or of activity of several GRK isoforms for therapeutic purposes was recently validated in cardiac disorders and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:21903131

  10. Protein engineering of bacterial histidine kinase receptor systems.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Blain, Katherine Y; Kuo, Mario Meng-Chiang; Choe, Senyon

    2010-07-01

    Two-component systems (TCS) involving the His-Asp phosphotransfer are commonly utilized for signal transduction in prokaryotes in which the two essential components are a sensor histidine kinase (HK) receptor and a response regulator (RR). Despite great efforts in structural and functional characterization of signal perception mechanisms, the exact signaling mechanisms remain elusive for many TCSs. Mimicking the natural TCS signaling pathways, chimeric receptor kinases and response regulators have been constructed through the process of swapping modular domains of related TCSs. To design chimeras with new signaling pathways, domains from different proteins that have little relationship at the primary structural level but carrying desirable functional properties can be conjoined to engineer novel TCSs. These chimeras maintain the ability to respond to environmental stimulants by regulating protein phosphorylation to produce downstream output signals. Depending on the nature of external signals, chimeric TCSs can serve as a novel tool not only to examine the natural signaling mechanisms in TCSs, but also for industrial and clinical applications.

  11. Solubilized placental membrane protein inhibits insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Strout, H.V. Jr.; Slater, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    Regulation of insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase (TK) activity may be important in modulating insulin action. Utilizing an assay which measures IR phosphorylation of angiotensin II (AII), the authors investigated whether fractions of TX-100 solubilized human placental membranes inhibited IR dependent AII phosphorylation. Autophosphorylated IR was incubated with membrane fractions before the addition of AII, and kinase inhibition measured by the loss of TSP incorporated in AII. An inhibitory activity was detected which was dose, time, and temperature dependent. The inhibitor was purified 200-fold by sequential chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin, DEAE, and hydroxyapatite. This inhibitory activity was found to correlate with an 80 KD protein which was electroeluted from preparative slab gels and rabbit antiserum raised. Incubation of membrane fractions with antiserum before the IRTK assay immunoprecipitated the inhibitor. Protein immunoblots of crude or purified fractions revealed only the 80 KD protein. Since IR autophosphorylation is crucial to IRTK activity, the authors investigated the state of IR autophosphorylation after treatment with inhibitor; no change was detected by phosphoamino acid analysis.

  12. Huntingtin-Interacting Protein 1 Phosphorylation by Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Heather M.; Wang, Anmin A.; Coughran, Alanna; Evaul, Kristen; Huang, Sha; Graves, Chiron W.; Soyombo, Abigail A.

    2013-01-01

    Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) binds inositol lipids, clathrin, actin, and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). HIP1 is elevated in many tumors, and its expression is prognostic in prostate cancer. HIP1 overexpression increases levels of the RTK epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transforms fibroblasts. Here we report that HIP1 is tyrosine phosphorylated in the presence of EGFR and platelet-derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR) as well as the oncogenic derivatives EGFRvIII, HIP1/PDGFβR (H/P), and TEL/PDGFβR (T/P). We identified a four-tyrosine “HIP1 phosphorylation motif” (HPM) in the N-terminal region of HIP1 that is required for phosphorylation mediated by both EGFR and PDGFβR but not by the oncoproteins H/P and T/P. We also identified a tyrosine residue (Y152) within the HPM motif of HIP1 that inhibits HIP1 tyrosine phosphorylation. The HPM tyrosines are conserved in HIP1's only known mammalian relative, HIP1-related protein (HIP1r), and are also required for HIP1r phosphorylation. Tyrosine-to-phenylalanine point mutations in the HPM of HIP1 result in proapoptotic activity, indicating that an intact HPM may be necessary for HIP1's role in cellular survival. These data suggest that phosphorylation of HIP1 by RTKs in an N-terminal region contributes to the promotion of cellular survival. PMID:23836884

  13. Control of EGF receptor function by protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells with nanomolar concentrations of the potent tumor promotor, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), is shown to attentuate the ability of epidermal growth factor (EGF) or serum to activate Na/sup +//H/sup +/ exchange, which is measured as an amiloride-inhibitable pH/sub i/ increase or /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake. The ability of PMA to directly activate Na/sup +//H/sup +/ exchange is also reported, but PMA-induced pH/sub i/ increases are modest with respect to those of EGF or serum and require relatively high concentrations of PMA. The effects of PMA on mitogen receptor-stimulated Na/sup +//H/sup +/ exchange were examined in the mouse fibroblast NR6 cell line using platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). The results were similar to those in A431 cells, except that PMA in NR6 cells causes pH/sub i/ increases at lower concentrations. Phorbol diester action is mediated by the activity of the enzyme protein kinase C. The results summarized above support the hypothesis that PMA-induced protein kinase C activity opposes mitogenic stimulation. The presumed endogenous PMA analog is diacylglycerol, which is generated by phosphoinositide hydrolysis and has been reported to be produced in response to the mitogens, EGF and PDGF.

  14. Flunitrazepam rapidly reduces GABAA receptor subunit protein expression via a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Price, Sally A; Bristow, David R

    1998-01-01

    Acute flunitrazepam (1 μM) exposure for 1 h reduced GABAA receptor α1 (22±4%, mean±s.e.mean) and β2/3 (21±4%) subunit protein levels in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells. This rapid decrease in subunit proteins was completely prevented by bisindolymaleimide 1 (1 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, but not by N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, 4.8 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinases A and G. These results suggest the existence of a benzodiazepine-induced mechanism to rapidly alter GABAA receptor protein expression, that appears to be dependent on protein kinase C activity. PMID:9723942

  15. Glucagon receptor activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 via cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Youwei; Cypess, Aaron M.; Muse, Evan D.; Wu, Cui-Rong; Unson, Cecilia G.; Merrifield, R. B.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2001-01-01

    We prepared a stable cell line expressing the glucagon receptor to characterize the effect of Gs-coupled receptor stimulation on extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity. Glucagon treatment of the cell line caused a dose-dependent increase in cAMP concentration, activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), and transient release of intracellular calcium. Glucagon treatment also caused rapid dose-dependent phosphorylation and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK kinase (MEK1/2) and ERK1/2. Inhibition of either PKA or MEK1/2 blocked ERK1/2 activation by glucagon. However, no significant activation of several upstream activators of MEK, including Ras, Rap1, and Raf, was observed in response to glucagon treatment. In addition, chelation of intracellular calcium reduced glucagon-mediated ERK1/2 activation. In transient transfection experiments, glucagon receptor mutants that bound glucagon but failed to increase intracellular cAMP and calcium concentrations showed no glucagon-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We conclude that glucagon-induced MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation is mediated by PKA and that an increase in intracellular calcium concentration is required for maximal ERK activation. PMID:11517300

  16. Diacylglycerol kinase is phosphorylated in vivo upon stimulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and serine/threonine kinases, including protein kinase C-epsilon.

    PubMed Central

    Schaap, D; van der Wal, J; van Blitterswijk, W J; van der Bend, R L; Ploegh, H L

    1993-01-01

    In signal transduction, diacylglycerol (DG) kinase attenuates levels of the second messenger DG by converting it to phosphatidic acid. A previously cloned full-length human 86 kDa DG kinase cDNA was expressed as fusion protein in Escherichia coli, to aid in the generation of DG-kinase-specific monoclonal antibodies suitable for immunoprecipitation experiments. To investigate whether phosphorylation of DG kinase is a possible mechanism for its regulation, COS-7 cells were transiently transfected with the DG kinase cDNA and phosphorylation of the expressed DG kinase was induced by various stimuli. Activation of both cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C (PKC) resulted in phosphorylation of DG kinase on serine residues in vivo, and both kinases induced this phosphorylation within the same tryptic phosphopeptide, suggesting that they may exert similar control over DG kinase. No phosphorylation was observed upon ionomycin treatment, intended to activate Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinases. Co-transfections of DG kinase with either PKC-alpha or PKC-epsilon cDNA revealed that both protein kinases, when stimulated, are able to phosphorylate DG kinase. For PKC-epsilon, DG kinase is the first in vivo substrate identified. Stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF) of COS-7 cells transfected with both DG kinase and EGF-receptor cDNA results mainly in phosphorylation of DG kinase on tyrosine. Since the EGF receptor has an intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, this finding implies that DG kinase may be a direct substrate for the activated EGF receptor. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7679574

  17. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-induced CCR2B receptor desensitization mediated by the G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Aragay, A. M.; Mellado, M.; Frade, J. M. R.; Martin, A. M.; Jimenez-Sainz, M. C.; Martinez-A, C.; Mayor, F.

    1998-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is a member of the chemokine cytokine family, whose physiological function is mediated by binding to the CCR2 and CCR4 receptors, which are members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. MCP-1 plays a critical role in both activation and migration of leukocytes. Rapid chemokine receptor desensitization is very likely essential for accurate chemotaxis. In this report, we show that MCP-1 binding to the CCR2 receptor in Mono Mac 1 cells promotes the rapid desensitization of MCP-1-induced calcium flux responses. This desensitization correlates with the Ser/Thr phosphorylation of the receptor and with the transient translocation of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2, also called β-adrenergic kinase 1 or βARK1) to the membrane. We also demonstrate that GRK2 and the uncoupling protein β-arrestin associate with the receptor, forming a macromolecular complex shortly after MCP-1 binding. Calcium flux responses to MCP-1 in HEK293 cells expressing the CCR2B receptor were also markedly reduced upon cotransfection with GRK2 or the homologous kinase GRK3. Nevertheless, expression of the GRK2 dominant-negative mutant βARK-K220R did not affect the initial calcium response, but favored receptor response to a subsequent challenge by agonists. The modulation of the CCR2B receptor by GRK2 suggests an important role for this kinase in the regulation of monocyte and lymphocyte response to chemokines. PMID:9501202

  18. Conventional protein kinase C isoforms mediate phorbol ester-induced lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Méndez, Aurelio; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocío; Acosta-Cervantes, Germán C; Martínez-Ortiz, Javier; Avendaño-Vázquez, S Eréndira; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-01-15

    Using C9 cells stably expressing LPA1 receptors fused to the enhanced green fluorescent protein, it was observed that activation of protein kinase C induced a rapid and strong increase in the phosphorylation state of these receptors. Overnight incubation with phorbol esters markedly decreased the amount of conventional (α, βI, βII and γ) and novel (δ) but not atypical (ζ) immunodetected PKC isoforms, this treatment blocks the action of protein kinase on receptor function and phosphorylation. Bis-indolylmaleimide I a general, non-subtype selective protein kinase C inhibitor, and Gö 6976, selective for the isoforms α and β, were also able to block LPA1 receptor desensitization and phosphorylation; hispidin, isoform β-selective blocker partially avoided receptor desensitization. Expression of dominant-negative protein kinase C α or β II mutants and knocking down the expression of these kinase isozymes markedly decreased phorbol ester-induced LPA1 receptor phosphorylation without avoiding receptor desensitization. This effect was blocked by bis-indolyl-maleimide and Gö 6976, suggesting that these genetic interventions were not completely effective. It was also observed that protein kinase C α and β II isozymes co-immunoprecipitate with LPA1 receptors and that such an association was further increased by cell treatments with phorbol esters or lysophosphatidic acid. Our data suggest that conventional protein kinase C α and β isozymes modulate LPA1 receptor phosphorylation state. Receptor desensitization appears to be a more complex process that might involve additional elements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Activation of G-proteins by receptor-stimulated nucleoside diphosphate kinase in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed Central

    Bominaar, A A; Molijn, A C; Pestel, M; Veron, M; Van Haastert, P J

    1993-01-01

    Recently, interest in the enzyme nucleoside diphosphate kinase (EC2.7.4.6) has increased as a result of its possible involvement in cell proliferation and development. Since NDP kinase is one of the major sources of GTP in cells, it has been suggested that the effects of an altered NDP kinase activity on cellular processes might be the result of altered transmembrane signal transduction via guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins). In the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum, extracellular cAMP induces an increase of phospholipase C activity via a surface cAMP receptor and G-proteins. In this paper it is demonstrated that part of the cellular NDP kinase is associated with the membrane and stimulated by cell surface cAMP receptors. The GTP produced by the action of NDP kinase is capable of activating G-proteins as monitored by altered G-protein-receptor interaction and the activation of the effector enzyme phospholipase C. Furthermore, specific monoclonal antibodies inhibit the effect of NDP kinase on G-protein activation. These results suggest that receptor-stimulated NDP kinase contributes to the mediation of hormone action by producing GTP for the activation of GTP-binding proteins. Images PMID:8389692

  20. Tyrosine kinase receptor transactivation associated to G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Almendro, Vanessa; García-Recio, Susana; Gascón, Pedro

    2010-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of membrane receptors involved in signal transduction. These receptors are linked to a variety of physiological and biological processes such as regulation of neurotransmission, growth, cell differentiation and oncogenesis among others. Some of the effects of GPCRs are known to be mediated by the activation of MAPK pathways. Several GPCRs are also able to transactivate receptors with tyrosine kinase activity (TKR) such as EGFR and HER2 and thus to control DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. The interaction between these receptors not only plays an important physiological role but its disregulation can induce pathological states such as cancer. For this reason, the crosstalk between these two types of receptors can be considered a possible mechanism for cell transformation, tumor progression, reactivation of the metastatic disease, and the acquisition of resistance to therapies targeting TKR receptors. The transactivation of some TKRs by GPCRs is related to the lost of response of TKRs to inhibitors of TK activity, mainly by the activation of the c-Src protein which can directly phosphorylate and activate the cytoplasmic domain of a TKR. For these reason, the dual inhibition of GPCRs and TKRs in some types of cancer has been proposed as a better strategy to kill tumor cells. Increased understanding of the mechanisms that interconnect the two pathways regulated by GPCRs and TKRs may facilitate the design of new therapeutic strategies.

  1. An unusual protein kinase phosphorylates the chemotactic receptor of Dictystelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, K.; Klein, C. )

    1988-04-01

    The authors report the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of the chemotactic receptor of Dictyostelium discoideum in partially purified plasma membranes. The protein kinase responsible for receptor phosphorylation is associated with this fraction and preferentially phosphorylates the ligand-occupied form of the receptor. 8-Azido({sup 32}P)cAMP labeling of the cell surface has shown that the cAMP receptor exists in two forms. A 45-kDa protein is predominant on unstimulated cells. cAMP stimulation results in an increased receptor phosphorylation such that the receptor migrates on NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE as a 47-kDa protein. Phosphorylation of the chemotactic receptor is not detected in membrane preparations unless cAMP is added to the incubation mixture. Only under those conditions is the phosphorylated 47-kDa form observed. The requirement for cAMP reflects the fact that the kinase involved preferentially uses the ligand-occupied receptor as a substrate. In vitro phosphorylation of the receptor does not involve tyrosine residues. The enzyme does not appear to be a cAMP- or cGMP-dependent protein kinase nor is it sensitive to guanine nucleotides, Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin, Ca{sup 2+}/phospholipid, or EGTA. Similarities with the {beta}-adrenergic receptor protein kinase are discussed.

  2. The protein kinase LKB1 negatively regulates bone morphogenetic protein receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Erna; Edlund, Karolina; Kahata, Kaoru; Zieba, Agata; Morén, Anita; Watanabe, Yukihide; Voytyuk, Iryna; Botling, Johan; Söderberg, Ola; Micke, Patrick; Pyrowolakis, George; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase LKB1 regulates cell metabolism and growth and is implicated in intestinal and lung cancer. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulates cell differentiation during development and tissue homeostasis. We demonstrate that LKB1 physically interacts with BMP type I receptors and requires Smad7 to promote downregulation of the receptor. Accordingly, LKB1 suppresses BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation and affects BMP signaling in Drosophila wing longitudinal vein morphogenesis. LKB1 protein expression and Smad1 phosphorylation analysis in a cohort of non-small cell lung cancer patients demonstrated a negative correlation predominantly in a subset enriched in adenocarcinomas. Lung cancer patient data analysis indicated strong correlation between LKB1 loss-of-function mutations and high BMP2 expression, and these two events further correlated with expression of a gene subset functionally linked to apoptosis and migration. This new mechanism of BMP receptor regulation by LKB1 has ramifications in physiological organogenesis and disease. PMID:26701726

  3. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  4. Biochemical characterization of the protein tyrosine kinase homology domain of the ErbB3 (HER3) receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Sierke, S L; Cheng, K; Kim, H H; Koland, J G

    1997-03-15

    The putative protein tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) of the ErbB3 (HER3) receptor protein was generated as a histidine-tagged recombinant protein (hisTKD-B3) and characterized enzymologically. CD spectroscopy indicated that the hisTKD-B3 protein assumed a native conformation with a secondary structure similar to that of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor TKD. However, when compared with the EGF receptor-derived protein, hisTKD-B3 exhibited negligible intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase activity. Immune complex kinase assays of full-length ErbB3 proteins also yielded no evidence of catalytic activity. A fluorescence assay previously used to characterize the nucleotide-binding properties of the EGF receptor indicated that the ErbB3 protein was unable to bind nucleotide. The hisTKD-B3 protein was subsequently found to be an excellent substrate for the EGF receptor protein tyrosine kinase, which suggested that in vivo phosphorylation of ErbB3 in response to EGF could be attributed to a direct cross-phosphorylation by the EGF receptor protein tyrosine kinase.

  5. Biochemical characterization of the protein tyrosine kinase homology domain of the ErbB3 (HER3) receptor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sierke, S L; Cheng, K; Kim, H H; Koland, J G

    1997-01-01

    The putative protein tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) of the ErbB3 (HER3) receptor protein was generated as a histidine-tagged recombinant protein (hisTKD-B3) and characterized enzymologically. CD spectroscopy indicated that the hisTKD-B3 protein assumed a native conformation with a secondary structure similar to that of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor TKD. However, when compared with the EGF receptor-derived protein, hisTKD-B3 exhibited negligible intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase activity. Immune complex kinase assays of full-length ErbB3 proteins also yielded no evidence of catalytic activity. A fluorescence assay previously used to characterize the nucleotide-binding properties of the EGF receptor indicated that the ErbB3 protein was unable to bind nucleotide. The hisTKD-B3 protein was subsequently found to be an excellent substrate for the EGF receptor protein tyrosine kinase, which suggested that in vivo phosphorylation of ErbB3 in response to EGF could be attributed to a direct cross-phosphorylation by the EGF receptor protein tyrosine kinase. PMID:9148746

  6. Posttranslational protein knockdown coupled to receptor tyrosine kinase activation with phosphoPROTACs

    PubMed Central

    Hines, John; Gough, Jonathan D.; Corson, Timothy W.; Crews, Craig M.

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational knockdown of a specific protein is an attractive approach for examining its function within a system. Here we introduce phospho-dependent proteolysis targeting chimeras (phosphoPROTACs), a method to couple the conditional degradation of targeted proteins to the activation state of particular kinase-signaling pathways. We generated two phosphoPROTACs that couple the tyrosine phosphorylation sequences of either the nerve growth factor receptor, TrkA (tropomyosin receptor kinase A), or the neuregulin receptor, ErbB3 (erythroblastosis oncogene B3), with a peptide ligand for the E3 ubiquitin ligase von Hippel Lindau protein. These phosphoPROTACs recruit either the neurotrophic signaling effector fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2α or the survival-promoting phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, respectively, to be ubiquitinated and degraded upon activation of specific receptor tyrosine kinases and phosphorylation of the phosphoPROTACs. We demonstrate the ability of these phosphoPROTACs to suppress the short- and long-term effects of their respective activating receptor tyrosine kinase pathways both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we show that activation of phosphoPROTACs is entirely dependent on their kinase-mediated phosphorylation, as phenylalanine-containing null variants are inactive. Furthermore, stimulation of unrelated growth factor receptors does not induce target protein knockdown. Although comparable in efficiency to RNAi, this approach has the added advantage of providing a degree of temporal and dosing control as well as cell-type selectivity unavailable using nucleic acid-based strategies. By varying the autophosphorylation sequence of a phosphoPROTAC, it is conceivable that other receptor tyrosine kinase/effector pairings could be similarly exploited to achieve other biological effects. PMID:23674677

  7. Posttranslational protein knockdown coupled to receptor tyrosine kinase activation with phosphoPROTACs.

    PubMed

    Hines, John; Gough, Jonathan D; Corson, Timothy W; Crews, Craig M

    2013-05-28

    Posttranslational knockdown of a specific protein is an attractive approach for examining its function within a system. Here we introduce phospho-dependent proteolysis targeting chimeras (phosphoPROTACs), a method to couple the conditional degradation of targeted proteins to the activation state of particular kinase-signaling pathways. We generated two phosphoPROTACs that couple the tyrosine phosphorylation sequences of either the nerve growth factor receptor, TrkA (tropomyosin receptor kinase A), or the neuregulin receptor, ErbB3 (erythroblastosis oncogene B3), with a peptide ligand for the E3 ubiquitin ligase von Hippel Lindau protein. These phosphoPROTACs recruit either the neurotrophic signaling effector fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2α or the survival-promoting phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, respectively, to be ubiquitinated and degraded upon activation of specific receptor tyrosine kinases and phosphorylation of the phosphoPROTACs. We demonstrate the ability of these phosphoPROTACs to suppress the short- and long-term effects of their respective activating receptor tyrosine kinase pathways both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we show that activation of phosphoPROTACs is entirely dependent on their kinase-mediated phosphorylation, as phenylalanine-containing null variants are inactive. Furthermore, stimulation of unrelated growth factor receptors does not induce target protein knockdown. Although comparable in efficiency to RNAi, this approach has the added advantage of providing a degree of temporal and dosing control as well as cell-type selectivity unavailable using nucleic acid-based strategies. By varying the autophosphorylation sequence of a phosphoPROTAC, it is conceivable that other receptor tyrosine kinase/effector pairings could be similarly exploited to achieve other biological effects.

  8. PREX1 Protein Function Is Negatively Regulated Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation by p21-activated Kinases (PAKs).

    PubMed

    Barrows, Douglas; He, John Z; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-09-16

    Downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation, the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchange factor (PREX) family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activates Rho GTPases, leading to important roles for PREX proteins in numerous cellular processes and diseases, including cancer. PREX1 and PREX2 GEF activity is activated by the second messengers PIP3 and Gβγ, and further regulation of PREX GEF activity occurs by phosphorylation. Stimulation of receptor tyrosine kinases by neuregulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) leads to the phosphorylation of PREX1; however, the kinases that phosphorylate PREX1 downstream of these ligands are not known. We recently reported that the p21-activated kinases (PAKs), which are activated by GTP-bound Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), mediate the phosphorylation of PREX2 after insulin receptor activation. Here we show that certain phosphorylation events on PREX1 after insulin, neuregulin, and IGF1 treatment are PAK-dependent and lead to a reduction in PREX1 binding to PIP3 Like PREX2, PAK-mediated phosphorylation also negatively regulates PREX1 GEF activity. Furthermore, the onset of PREX1 phosphorylation was delayed compared with the phosphorylation of AKT, supporting a model of negative feedback downstream of PREX1 activation. We also found that the phosphorylation of PREX1 after isoproterenol and prostaglandin E2-mediated GPCR activation is partially PAK-dependent and likely also involves protein kinase A, which is known to reduce PREX1 function. Our data point to multiple mechanisms of PREX1 negative regulation by PAKs within receptor tyrosine kinase and GPCR-stimulated signaling pathways that have important roles in diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

  9. Conformational transitions and interactions underlying the function of membrane embedded receptor protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Eduard V; Sharonov, Georgy V; Bocharova, Olga V; Pavlov, Konstantin V

    2017-01-25

    Among membrane receptors, the single-span receptor protein kinases occupy a broad but specific functional niche determined by distinctive features of the underlying transmembrane signaling mechanisms that are briefly overviewed on the basis of some of the most representative examples, followed by a more detailed discussion of several hierarchical levels of organization and interactions involved. All these levels, including single-molecule interactions (e.g., dimerization, liganding, chemical modifications), local processes (e.g. lipid membrane perturbations, cytoskeletal interactions), and larger scale phenomena (e.g., effects of membrane surface shape or electrochemical potential gradients) appear to be closely integrated to achieve the observed diversity of the receptor functioning. Different species of receptor protein kinases meet their specific functional demands through different structural features defining their responses to stimulation, but certain common patterns exist. Signaling by receptor protein kinases is typically associated with the receptor dimerization and clustering, ligand-induced rearrangements of receptor domains through allosteric conformational transitions with involvement of lipids, release of the sequestered lipids, restriction of receptor diffusion, cytoskeleton and membrane shape remodeling. Understanding of complexity and continuity of the signaling processes can help identifying currently neglected opportunities for influencing the receptor signaling with potential therapeutic implications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interactions between membrane receptors in cellular membranes edited by Kalina Hristova.

  10. Insights into the regulation of 5-HT2A serotonin receptors by scaffolding proteins and kinases.

    PubMed

    Allen, John A; Yadav, Prem N; Roth, Bryan L

    2008-11-01

    5-HT(2A) serotonin receptors are essential molecular targets for the actions of LSD-like hallucinogens and atypical antipsychotic drugs. 5-HT(2A) serotonin receptors also mediate a variety of physiological processes in peripheral and central nervous systems including platelet aggregation, smooth muscle contraction, and the modulation of mood and perception. Scaffolding proteins have emerged as important regulators of 5-HT(2A) receptors and our recent studies suggest multiple scaffolds exist for 5-HT(2A) receptors including PSD95, arrestin, and caveolin. In addition, a novel interaction has emerged between p90 ribosomal S6 kinase and 5-HT(2A) receptors which attenuates receptor signaling. This article reviews our recent studies and emphasizes the role of scaffolding proteins and kinases in the regulation of 5-HT(2A) trafficking, targeting and signaling.

  11. Role of Protein Kinase C, PI3-kinase and Tyrosine Kinase in Activation of MAP Kinase by Glucose and Agonists of G-protein Coupled Receptors in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Dietmar

    2001-01-01

    MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase (also called Erk 1/2) plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Its impact on secretory events is less well established. The interplay of protein kinase C (PKC), PI3-kinase nd cellular tyrosine kinase with MAP kinase activity using inhibitors and compounds such as glucose, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and agonists of G-protein coupled receptors like gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), oxytocin (OT) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) was investigated in INS-1 cells, an insulin secreting cell line. MAP kinase activity was determined by using a peptide derived from the EGF receptor as a MAP kinase substrate and [ P 32 ]ATP. Glucose as well as GRP, OT and GIP exhibited a time-dependent increase in MAP kinase activity with a maximum at time point 2.5 min. All further experiments were performed using 2.5 min incubations. The flavone PD 098059 is known to bind to the inactive forms of MEK1 (MAPK/ERK-Kinase) thus preventing activation by upstream activators. 20 μM PD 098059 ( IC 50 =51 μM) inhibited MAP kinase stimulated by either glucose, GRP, OT, GIP or PMA. Inhibiton (“downregulation”) of PKC by a long term (22h) pretreatment with 1 μM PMA did not influence MAP kinase activity when augmented by either of the above mentioned compound. To investigate whether PI3-kinase and cellular tyrosine kinase are involved in G-protein mediated effects on MAP kinase, inhibitors were used: 100 nM wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor) reduced the effects of GRP, OT and GIP but not that of PMA; 100 μM genistein (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the stimulatory effect of either above mentioned compound on MAP kinase activation. Inhibition of MAP kinase by 20 μM PD 098059 did not influence insulin secretion modulated by either compound (glucose, GRP, OT or GIP). [ H 3 ]Thymidine incorporation, however, was severely inhibited by PD 098059. Thus MAP kinase is important for INS-1 cell proliferation but

  12. The PR5K receptor protein kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana is structurally related to a family of plant defense proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Zafian, P; Choudhary, M; Lawton, M

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana gene that codes for a receptor related to antifungal pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. The PR5K gene codes for a predicted 665-amino acid polypeptide that comprises an extracellular domain related to the PR5 proteins, a central transmembrane-spanning domain, and an intracellular protein-serine/threonine kinase. The extracellular domain of PR5K (PR5-like receptor kinase) is most highly related to acidic PR5 proteins that accumulate in the extracellular spaces of plants challenged with pathogenic microorganisms. The kinase domain of PR5K is related to a family of protein-serine/threonine kinases that are involved in the expression of self-incompatibility and disease resistance. PR5K transcripts accumulate at low levels in all tissues examined, although particularly high levels are present in roots and inflorescence stems. Treatments that induce authentic PR5 proteins had no effect on the level of PR5K transcripts, suggesting that the receptor forms part of a preexisting surveillance system. When the kinase domain of PR5K was expressed in Escherichia coli, the resulting polypeptide underwent autophosphorylation, consistent with its predicted enzyme activity. These results are consistent with PR5K encoding a functional receptor kinase. Moreover, the structural similarity between the extracellular domain of PR5K and the antimicrobial PR5- proteins suggests a possible interaction with common or related microbial targets. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8637920

  13. High-fat diet induces protein kinase A and G-protein receptor kinase phosphorylation of β2 -adrenergic receptor and impairs cardiac adrenergic reserve in animal hearts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qin; Hu, Yuting; Wang, Qingtong; Liu, Yongming; Li, Ning; Xu, Bing; Kim, Sungjin; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Xiang, Yang K

    2017-03-15

    Patients with diabetes show a blunted cardiac inotropic response to β-adrenergic stimulation despite normal cardiac contractile reserve. Acute insulin stimulation impairs β-adrenergically induced contractile function in isolated cardiomyocytes and Langendorff-perfused hearts. In this study, we aimed to examine the potential effects of hyperinsulinaemia associated with high-fat diet (HFD) feeding on the cardiac β2 -adrenergic receptor signalling and the impacts on cardiac contractile function. We showed that 8 weeks of HFD feeding leads to reductions in cardiac functional reserve in response to β-adrenergic stimulation without significant alteration of cardiac structure and function, which is associated with significant changes in β2 -adrenergic receptor phosphorylation at protein kinase A and G-protein receptor kinase sites in the myocardium. The results suggest that clinical intervention might be applied to subjects in early diabetes without cardiac symptoms to prevent further cardiac complications. Patients with diabetes display reduced exercise capability and impaired cardiac contractile reserve in response to adrenergic stimulation. We have recently uncovered an insulin receptor and adrenergic receptor signal network in the heart. The aim of this study was to understand the impacts of high-fat diet (HFD) on the insulin-adrenergic receptor signal network in hearts. After 8 weeks of HFD feeding, mice exhibited diabetes, with elevated insulin and glucose concentrations associated with body weight gain. Mice fed an HFD had normal cardiac structure and function. However, the HFD-fed mice displayed a significant elevation of phosphorylation of the β2 -adrenergic receptor (β2 AR) at both the protein kinase A site serine 261/262 and the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase site serine 355/356 and impaired adrenergic reserve when compared with mice fed on normal chow. Isolated myocytes from HFD-fed mice also displayed a reduced contractile response to adrenergic

  14. Activation of a GTP-binding protein and a GTP-binding-protein-coupled receptor kinase (beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1) by a muscarinic receptor m2 mutant lacking phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, K; Haga, K; Haga, T; Moro, O; Sadée, W

    1994-12-01

    A mutant of the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor), lacking a large part of the third intracellular loop, was expressed and purified using the baculovirus/insect cell culture system. The mutant was not phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, as expected from the previous assignment of phosphorylation sites to the central part of the third intracellular loop. However, the m2 receptor mutant was capable of stimulating beta-adrenergic-receptor-kinase-1-mediated phosphorylation of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the m2 phosphorylation sites in an agonist-dependent manner. Both mutant and wild-type m2 receptors reconstituted with the guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G protein), G(o) and G(i)2, displayed guanine-nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding, as assessed by displacement of [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding with carbamoylcholine, and both stimulated guanosine 5'-3-O-[35S]thiotriphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding in the presence of carbamoylcholine and GDP. The Ki values of carbamoylcholine effects on [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding were indistinguishable for the mutant and wild-type m2 receptors. Moreover, the phosphorylation of the wild-type m2 receptor by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1 did not affect m2 interaction with G proteins as assessed by the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate or [35S]GTP[S]. These results indicate that (a) the m2 receptor serves both as an activator and as a substrate of beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, and (b) a large part of the third intracellular loop of the m2 receptor does not contribute to interaction with G proteins and its phosphorylation by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase does not uncouple the receptor and G proteins in reconstituted lipid vesicles.

  15. The Arabidopsis ERECTA gene encodes a putative receptor protein kinase with extracellular leucine-rich repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Torii, K U; Mitsukawa, N; Oosumi, T; Matsuura, Y; Yokoyama, R; Whittier, R F; Komeda, Y

    1996-01-01

    Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta is one of the most popular ecotypes and is used widely for both molecular and genetic studies. It harbors the erecta (er) mutation, which confers a compact inflorescence, blunt fruits, and short petioles. We have identified five er mutant alleles from ecotypes Columbia and Wassilewskija. Phenotypic characterization of the mutant alleles suggests a role for the ER gene in regulating the shape of organs originating from the shoot apical meristem. We cloned the ER gene, and here, we report that it encodes a putative receptor protein kinases. The deduced ER protein contains a cytoplasmic protein kinase catalytic domain, a transmembrane region, and an extracellular domain consisting of leucine-rich repeats, which are thought to interact with other macromolecules. Our results suggest that cell-cell communication mediated by a receptor kinase has an important role in plant morphogenesis. PMID:8624444

  16. Immunoprecipitation of Plasma Membrane Receptor-Like Kinases for Identification of Phosphorylation Sites and Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are difficult to study for numerous reasons. The surface of membrane proteins is relatively hydrophobic and sometimes very unstable, additionally requiring detergents for their extraction from the membrane. This leads to challenges at all levels, including expression, solubilization, purification, identification of associated proteins, and the identification of post-translational modifications. However, recent advances in immunoprecipitation technology allow to isolate membrane proteins efficiently, facilitating the study of protein-protein interactions, the identification of novel associated proteins, and to identify post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. Here, we describe an optimized immunoprecipitation protocol for plant plasma membrane receptor-like kinases.

  17. Modulation of neurosteroid potentiation by protein kinases at synaptic- and extrasynaptic-type GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Joanna M.; Thomas, Philip; Smart, Trevor G.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors are important for inhibition in the CNS where neurosteroids and protein kinases are potent endogenous modulators. Acting individually, these can either enhance or depress receptor function, dependent upon the type of neurosteroid or kinase and the receptor subunit combination. However, in vivo, these modulators probably act in concert to fine-tune GABAA receptor activity and thus inhibition, although how this is achieved remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between these modulators at synaptic-type α1β3γ2L and extrasynaptic-type α4β3δ GABAA receptors using electrophysiology. For α1β3γ2L, potentiation of GABA responses by tetrahydro-deoxycorticosterone was reduced after inhibiting protein kinase C, and enhanced following its activation, suggesting this kinase regulates neurosteroid modulation. In comparison, neurosteroid potentiation was reduced at α1β3S408A,S409Aγ2L receptors, and unaltered by PKC inhibitors or activators, indicating that phosphorylation of β3 subunits is important for regulating neurosteroid activity. To determine whether extrasynaptic-type GABAA receptors were similarly modulated, α4β3δ and α4β3S408A,S409Aδ receptors were investigated. Neurosteroid potentiation was reduced at both receptors by the kinase inhibitor staurosporine. By contrast, neurosteroid-mediated potentiation at α4S443Aβ3S408A,S409Aδ receptors was unaffected by protein kinase inhibition, strongly suggesting that phosphorylation of α4 and β3 subunits is required for regulating neurosteroid activity at extrasynaptic receptors. Western blot analyses revealed that neurosteroids increased phosphorylation of β3S408,S409 implying that a reciprocal pathway exists for neurosteroids to modulate phosphorylation of GABAA receptors. Overall, these findings provide important insight into the regulation of GABAA receptors in vivo, and into the mechanisms by which GABAergic inhibitory transmission may be simultaneously tuned by

  18. Expression, Purification, and Analysis of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Sterne-Marr, Rachel; Baillargeon, Alison I.; Michalski, Kevin R.; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) were first identified based on their ability to specifically phosphorylate activated GPCRs. Although many soluble substrates have since been identified, the chief physiological role of GRKs still remains the uncoupling of GPCRs from heterotrimeric G-proteins by promoting β-arrestin binding through the phosphorylation of the receptor. It is expected that GRKs recognize activated GPCRs through a docking site that not only recognizes the active conformation of the transmembrane domain of the receptor but also stabilizes a more catalytically competent state of the kinase domain. Many of the recent gains in understanding GRK-receptor interactions have been gleaned through biochemical and structural analysis of recombinantly expressed GRKs. Described herein are current techniques and procedures being used to express, purify, and assay GRKs in both in vitro and living cells. PMID:23351749

  19. The Origin and Evolution of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Mushegian, Arcady; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) play key role in homologous desensitization of GPCRs. GRKs phosphorylate activated receptors, promoting high affinity binding of arrestins, which precludes G protein coupling. Direct binding to active GPCRs activates GRKs, so that they selectively phosphorylate only the activated form of the receptor regardless of the accessibility of the substrate peptides within it and their Ser/Thr-containing sequence. Mammalian GRKs were classified into three main lineages, but earlier GRK evolution has not been studied. Here we show that GRKs emerged at the early stages of eukaryotic evolution via an insertion of a kinase similar to ribosomal protein S6 kinase into a loop in RGS domain. GRKs in Metazoa fall into two clades, one including GRK2 and GRK3, and the other consisting of all remaining GRKs, split into GRK1-GRK7 lineage and GRK4-GRK5-GRK6 lineage in vertebrates. One representative of each of the two ancient clades is found as early as placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. Several protists, two oomycetes and unicellular brown algae have one GRK-like protein, suggesting that the insertion of a kinase domain into the RGS domain preceded the origin of Metazoa. The two GRK families acquired distinct structural units in the N- and C-termini responsible for membrane recruitment and receptor association. Thus, GRKs apparently emerged before animals and rapidly expanded in true Metazoa, most likely due to the need for rapid signalling adjustments in fast-moving animals. PMID:22442725

  20. Sch proteins are localized on endoplasmic reticulum membranes and are redistributed after tyrosine kinase receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Lotti, L V; Lanfrancone, L; Migliaccio, E; Zompetta, C; Pelicci, G; Salcini, A E; Falini, B; Pelicci, P G; Torrisi, M R

    1996-01-01

    The intracellular localization of Shc proteins was analyzed by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy in normal cells and cells expressing the epidermal growth factor receptor or the EGFR/erbB2 chimera. In unstimulated cells, the immunolabeling was localized in the central perinuclear area of the cell and mostly associated with the cytosolic side of rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Upon epidermal growth factor treatment and receptor tyrosine kinase activation, the immunolabeling became peripheral and was found to be associated with the cytosolic surface of the plasma membrane and endocytic structures, such as coated pits and endosomes, and with the peripheral cytosol. Receptor activation in cells expressing phosphorylation-defective mutants of Shc and erbB-2 kinase showed that receptor autophosphorylation, but not Shc phosphorylation, is required for redistribution of Shc proteins. The rough endoplasmic reticulum localization of Shc proteins in unstimulated cells and their massive recruitment to the plasma membrane, endocytic structures, and peripheral cytosol following receptor tyrosine kinase activation could account for multiple putative functions of the adaptor protein. PMID:8628261

  1. Phosphorylation of the purified cardiac ryanodine receptor by exogenous and endogenous protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Hohenegger, M; Suko, J

    1993-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor is the main Ca(2+)-release structure in skeletal and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum. In both tissues, phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor has been proposed to be involved in the regulation of Ca2+ release. In the present study, we have examined the ability of the purified cardiac ryanodine receptor to serve as a substrate for phosphorylation by exogenously added catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PK-A), cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PK-G), or calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (PK-CaM). A large amount of phosphate incorporation was observed for PK-CaM (938 +/- 48 pmol of Pi/mg of purified channel protein), whereas the level of phosphorylation was considerably lower with PK-A or PK-G (345 +/- 139 and 96 +/- 6 pmol/mg respectively). In addition, endogenous PK-CaM activity co-migrates with the ryanodine receptor through several steps of purification, suggesting a strong association of the two proteins. This endogenous PK-CaM activity is abolished by a PK-CaM-specific synthetic peptide inhibitor. Endogenous cAMP- and cGMP-dependent phosphorylation was not observed in the purified ryanodine-receptor preparation. Taken together, these observations imply that PK-CaM is the physiologically relevant protein kinase, capable of phosphorylating the channel protein to a minimum stoichiometry of 2 mol of Pi per mol of tetramer. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8257417

  2. Insulin receptor binding and protein kinase activity in muscles of trained rats

    SciTech Connect

    Dohm, G.L.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1987-02-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity, and muscle is quantitatively the most important tissue of insulin action. Since the first step in insulin action is the binding to a membrane receptor, the authors postulated that exercise training would change insulin receptors in muscle and in this study they have investigated this hypothesis. Female rats initially weighing approx. 100 g were trained by treadmill running for 2 h/day, 6 days/wk for 4 wk at 25 m/min (0 grade). Insulin receptors from vastus intermedius muscles were solubilized by homogenizing in a buffer containing 1% Triton X-100 and then partially purified by passing the soluble extract over a wheat germ agglutinin column. The 4 wk training regimen resulted in a 65% increase in citrate synthase activity in red vastus lateralis muscle, indicating an adaptation to exercise ( SVI). Insulin binding by the partially purified receptor preparations was approximately doubled in muscle of trained rats at all insulin concentrations, suggesting an increase in the number of receptors. Training did not alter insulin receptor structure as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility under reducing and nonreducing conditions. Basal insulin receptor protein kinase activity was higher in trained than untrained animals and this was likely due to the greater number of receptors. However, insulin stimulation of the protein kinase activity was depressed by training. These results demonstrate that endurance training does alter receptor number and function in muscle and these changes may be important in increasing insulin sensitivity after exercise training.

  3. Cellular progesterone receptor phosphorylation in response to ligands activating protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.V.; Peralta, W.D.; Greene, G.L.; Fox, C.F.

    1987-08-14

    Progesterone receptors were immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibodies KD68 from lysates of human breast carcinoma T47D cells labelled to steady state specific activity with /sup 32/Pi. The 120 kDa /sup 32/P-labelled progesterone receptor band was resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified by autoradiography. Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed serine phosphorylation, but no threonine or tyrosine phosphorylation. Treatment of the /sup 32/Pi-labelled cells with EGF, TPA or dibutyryl cAMP had no significant quantitative effect on progesterone receptor phosphorylation, though the EGF receptor and the cAMP-dependent protein kinases have been reported to catalyze phosphorylation of purified avian progesterone receptor preparations in cell free systems. Progesterone receptor phosphorylation on serine residues was increased by 2-fold in cells treated with 10 nM progesterone; EGF had no effect on progesterone-mediated progesterone receptor phosphorylation.

  4. SH2 domain proteins as high-affinity receptor tyrosine kinase substrates.

    PubMed

    Sierke, S L; Koland, J G

    1993-09-28

    Activation of a growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) is accompanied by a rapid autophosphorylation of the receptor on tyrosine residues. Receptor activation has been shown to promote the association of signal-transducing proteins containing SH2 domains (second domain of src homology). These receptor-associated proteins can, in turn, be phosphorylated by the RTK, an event which presumably regulates their activities. It has been suggested that SH2 domains in signal-transducing proteins target these proteins as substrates of the activated RTK. To test this hypothesis, recombinant proteins were generated that contained tyrosine phosphorylation sites of the erbB3 receptor and/or the SH2 domain of c-src. Incorporation of the SH2 domain led to a decrease in KM and an increase in Vmax for the substrate. The KM determined for one chimeric SH2/erbB3 substrate was among the lowest reported for epidermal growth factor RTK substrates. Experiments with a truncated kinase lacking C-terminal autophosphorylation sites indicated that the reduction in KM for these substrates was mediated by interactions between the substrate SH2 domain and phosphotyrosine residues of the RTK. These interactions could also inhibit RTK activity. These results demonstrate that the SH2 domain can effectively target substrates to a RTK and that SH2 domain proteins can regulate RTK activity.

  5. A receptor-like kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana is a calmodulin-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Charpenteau, Martine; Jaworski, Krzysztof; Ramirez, Bertha C; Tretyn, Andrzej; Ranjeva, Raoul; Ranty, Benoît

    2004-01-01

    Screening a cDNA expression library with a radiolabelled calmodulin (CaM) probe led to the isolation of AtCaMRLK, a receptor-like kinase (RLK) of Arabidopsis thaliana. AtCaMRLK polypeptide sequence shows a modular organization consisting of the four distinctive domains characteristic of receptor kinases: an amino terminal signal sequence, a domain containing seven leucine-rich repeats, a single putative membrane-spanning segment and a protein kinase domain. Using truncated versions of the protein and a synthetic peptide, we demonstrated that a region of 23 amino acids, located near the kinase domain of AtCaMRLK, binds CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Real-time binding experiments showed that AtCaMRLK interacted in vitro with AtCaM1, a canonical CaM, but not with AtCaM8, a divergent isoform of the Ca2+ sensor. The bacterially expressed kinase domain of the protein was able to autophosphorylate and to phosphorylate the myelin basic protein, using Mn2+ preferentially to Mg2+ as an ion activator. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved lysine residue (Lys423) to alanine, in the kinase subdomain II, resulted in a complete loss of kinase activity. CaM had no influence on the autophosphorylation activity of AtCaMRLK. AtCaMRLK was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of A. thaliana, except in leaves. Disruption in the AtCaMRLK coding sequence by insertion of a DsG transposable element in an Arabidopsis mutant did not generate a discernible phenotype. The CaM-binding motif of AtCaMRLK was found to be conserved in several other members of the plant RLK family, suggesting a role for Ca2+/CaM in the regulation of RLK-mediated pathways. PMID:14720124

  6. A catalytically inactive form of protein kinase C-associated kinase/receptor interacting protein 4, a protein kinase C beta-associated kinase that mediates NF-kappa B activation, interferes with early B cell development.

    PubMed

    Cariappa, Annaiah; Chen, Luojing; Haider, Khaleda; Tang, Mei; Nebelitskiy, Eugene; Moran, Stewart T; Pillai, Shiv

    2003-08-15

    Protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK)/receptor interacting protein 4 (RIP4) is a protein kinase C (PKC) beta-associated kinase that links PKC to NF-kappaB activation. The kinase domain of PKK is similar to that of RIP, RIP2, and RIP3. We show in this study that PKK is expressed early during lymphocyte development and can be detected in common lymphoid progenitor cells. Targeting of a catalytically inactive version of PKK to lymphoid cells resulted in a marked impairment in pro-B cell generation in the bone marrow. Although peripheral B cell numbers were markedly reduced, differentiation into follicular and marginal zone B cells was not defective in these mice. B-1a and B-1b B cells could not be detected in these mice, but this might be a reflection of the overall defect in B cell production observed in these animals. In keeping with a possible link to PKCbeta, peripheral B cells in these mice exhibit a defect in anti-IgM-mediated proliferation. These studies suggest that PKK may be required early in B cell development and for BCR-mediated B cell proliferation.

  7. The prostaglandin EP1 receptor potentiates kainate receptor activation via a protein kinase C pathway and exacerbates status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Asheebo; Gueorguieva, Paoula; Lelutiu, Nadia; Quan, Yi; Shaw, Renee; Dingledine, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) regulates membrane excitability, synaptic transmission, plasticity, and neuronal survival. The consequences of PGE2 release following seizures has been the subject of much study. Here we demonstrate that the prostaglandin E2 receptor 1 (EP1, or Ptger1) modulates native kainate receptors, a family of ionotropic glutamate receptors widely expressed throughout the central nervous system. Global ablation of the EP1 gene in mice (EP1-KO) had no effect on seizure threshold after kainate injection but reduced the likelihood to enter status epilepticus. EP1-KO mice that did experience typical status epilepticus had reduced hippocampal neurodegeneration and a blunted inflammatory response. Further studies with native prostanoid and kainate receptors in cultured cortical neurons, as well as with recombinant prostanoid and kainate receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, demonstrated that EP1 receptor activation potentiates heteromeric but not homomeric kainate receptors via a second messenger cascade involving phospholipase C, calcium and protein kinase C. Three critical GluK5 C-terminal serines underlie the potentiation of the GluK2/GluK5 receptor by EP1 activation. Taken together, these results indicate that EP1 receptor activation during seizures, through a protein kinase C pathway, increases the probability of kainic acid induced status epilepticus, and independently promotes hippocampal neurodegeneration and a broad inflammatory response. PMID:24952362

  8. Increased G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) expression in the anterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Funk, Adam J; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H; McCullumsmith, Robert E

    2014-10-01

    Current pharmacological treatments for schizophrenia target G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including dopamine receptors. Ligand-bound GPCRs are regulated by a family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), members of which uncouple the receptor from heterotrimeric G proteins, desensitize the receptor, and induce receptor internalization via the arrestin family of scaffolding and signaling molecules. GRKs initiate the activation of downstream signaling pathways, can regulate receptors and signaling molecules independent of GPCR phosphorylation, and modulate epigenetic regulators like histone deacetylases (HDACs). We hypothesize that the expression of GRK proteins is altered in schizophrenia, consistent with previous findings of alterations upstream and downstream from this family of molecules that facilitate intracellular signaling processes. In this study, we measured protein expression via Western blot analysis for GRKs 2, 3, 5, and 6 in the anterior cingulate cortex of patients with schizophrenia (n=36) and a comparison group (n=33). To control for antipsychotic treatment, we measured these same targets in haloperidol-treated vs. untreated rats (n=10 for both). We found increased levels of GRK5 in schizophrenia. No changes were detected in GRK protein expression in rats treated with haloperidol decanoate for 9 months. These data suggest that increased GRK5 expression may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia via abnormal regulation of the cytoskeleton, endocytosis, signaling, GPCRs, and histone modification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 terminates G-protein-coupled receptor function in steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wen-Li; Wang, Di; Liu, Chun-Yan; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals across the cell membrane. GPCR kinases (GRKs) desensitize GPCR signals in the cell membrane. However, the role and mechanism of GRKs in the desensitization of steroid hormone signaling are unclear. In this study, we propose that GRK2 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) in response to induction by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), which determines its translocation to the cell membrane of the lepidopteran Helicoverpa armigera. GRK2 protein expression is increased during the metamorphic stage because of induction by 20E. Knockdown of GRK2 in larvae causes accelerated pupation, an increase in 20E-response gene expression, and advanced apoptosis and metamorphosis. 20E induces translocation of GRK2 from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane via steroid hormone ecdysone-responsive GPCR (ErGPCR-2). GRK2 is phosphorylated by PKC on serine 680 after induction by 20E, which leads to the translocation of GRK2 to the cell membrane. GRK2 interacts with ErGPCR-2. These data indicate that GRK2 terminates the ErGPCR-2 function in 20E signaling in the cell membrane by a negative feedback mechanism. PMID:27412951

  10. Interaction between G proteins and tyrosine kinases upon T cell receptor.CD3-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Stanners, J; Kabouridis, P S; McGuire, K L; Tsoukas, C D

    1995-12-22

    Engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR).CD3 complex results in the induction of multiple intracellular events, with protein tyrosine kinases playing a pivotal role in their initiation. Biochemical studies also exist suggesting the involvement of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins); however, the functional consequence of this participation in TCR.CD3-mediated signaling is unresolved. Here, we report TCR.CD3-mediated guanine nucleotide exchange among the 42-kDa G protein alpha subunits of the G alpha q/11 family, their physical association with CD3 epsilon, and the G alpha 11-dependent activation of phospholipase C beta. Protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, however, abrogate TCR.CD3-mediated G protein activation. Quite interesting is the observation that cells transfected with a function-deficient mutant of G alpha 11 display diminished tyrosine phosphorylation of TCR.CD3 zeta and epsilon chains, as well as ZAP-70, upon anti-CD3 antibody triggering. These data indicate the involvement of the G alpha q/11 family in TCR.CD3 signaling at a step proximal to the receptor and suggest a reciprocal regulation between tyrosine kinases and G proteins in T cells.

  11. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation facilitates GABA(B) receptor-effector coupling.

    PubMed

    Couve, A; Thomas, P; Calver, A R; Hirst, W D; Pangalos, M N; Walsh, F S; Smart, T G; Moss, S J

    2002-05-01

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Here we show that the functional coupling of GABA(B)R1/GABA(B)R2 receptors to inwardly rectifying K(+) channels rapidly desensitizes. This effect is alleviated after direct phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser892) in the cytoplasmic tail of GABA(B)R2 by cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Basal phosphorylation of this residue is evident in rat brain membranes and in cultured neurons. Phosphorylation of Ser892 is modulated positively by pathways that elevate cAMP concentration, such as those involving forskolin and beta-adrenergic receptors. GABA(B) receptor agonists reduce receptor phosphorylation, which is consistent with PKA functioning in the control of GABA(B)-activated currents. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of Ser892 specifically enhances the membrane stability of GABA(B) receptors. We conclude that signaling pathways that activate PKA may have profound effects on GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition. These results also challenge the accepted view that phosphorylation is a universal negative modulator of G protein-coupled receptors.

  12. Treponema denticola activates mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathways through Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Ruby, John; Rehani, Kunal; Martin, Michael

    2007-12-01

    Treponema denticola, a spirochete indigenous to the oral cavity, is associated with host inflammatory responses to anaerobic polymicrobial infections of the root canal, periodontium, and alveolar bone. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for the recognition of T. denticola by the innate immune system and the underlying cell signaling pathways that regulate the inflammatory response to T. denticola are currently unresolved. In this study, we demonstrate that T. denticola induces innate immune responses via the utilization of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) but not TLR4. Assessment of TLR2/1 and TLR2/6 heterodimers revealed that T. denticola predominantly utilizes TLR2/6 for the induction of cellular responses. Analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in T. denticola-stimulated monocytes identified a prolonged up-regulation of the MAPK extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38, while no discernible increase in phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) levels was observed. With the aid of pharmacological inhibitors selectively targeting ERK1/2 via the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 kinase and p38, we further demonstrate that ERK1/2 and p38 play a major role in T. denticola-mediated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production.

  13. Insights into protein interaction networks reveal non-receptor kinases as significant druggable targets for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Sundarrajan, Sudharsana; Lulu, Sajitha; Arumugam, Mohanapriya

    2015-07-25

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease of the skin characterized by hyper proliferation and inflammation of the epidermis and dermal components of the skin. T-cell-dependent inflammatory process in skin governs the pathogenesis of psoriasis. An in-silico search strategy was utilized to identify psoriatic therapeutic drug targets. The gene expression profiling of psoriatic skin identified a total of 427 differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Gene ontology investigation of DEGs identified genes involved in calcium binding, apoptosis, keratinisation, lipid transportation and homeostasis apart from immune mediated processes. The protein interaction networks identified proteins involved in various signaling mechanisms with high degree of interconnections. The gene modules derived from the main network were enriched with rich kinome. These sub-networks were dominated by the presence of non-receptor kinase family members which are major signal transmitters in immune response. The computational approach has aided in the identification of non-receptor kinases as potential targets for psoriasis drug development.

  14. Lipid-mediated regulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    DebBurman, S K; Ptasienski, J; Boetticher, E; Lomasney, J W; Benovic, J L; Hosey, M M

    1995-03-17

    G protein-coupled receptor-mediated signaling is attenuated by a process referred to as desensitization, wherein agonist-dependent phosphorylation of receptors by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) is proposed to be a key initial event. However, mechanisms that activate GRKs are not fully understood. In one scenario, beta gamma-subunits of G proteins (G beta gamma) activate certain GRKs (beta-adrenergic receptor kinases 1 and 2, or GRK2 and GRK3), via a pleckstrin homology domain in the COOH terminus. This interaction has been proposed to translocate cytosolic beta-adrenergic receptor kinases (beta ARKs) to the plasma membrane and facilitate interaction with receptor substrates. Here, we report a novel finding that membrane lipids modulate beta ARK activity in vitro in a manner that is analogous and competitive with G beta gamma. Several lipids, including phosphatidylserine (PS), stimulated, whereas phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate inhibited, the ability of these GRKs to phosphorylate agonist-occupied m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Furthermore, both PS and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate specifically bound to beta ARK1, whereas phosphatidylcholine, a lipid that did not modulate beta ARK activity, did not bind to beta ARK1. The lipid regulation of beta ARKs did not occur via a modulation of its autophosphorylation state. PS- and G beta gamma-mediated stimulation of beta ARK1 was compared and found strikingly similar; moreover, their effects together were not additive (except at initial stages of reaction), which suggests that PS and G beta gamma employed a common interaction and activation mechanism with the kinase. The effects of these lipids were prevented by two well known G beta gamma-binding proteins, phosducin and GST-beta ARK-(466-689) fusion protein, suggesting that the G beta gamma-binding domain (possibly the pleckstrin homology domain) of the GRKs is also a site for lipid:protein interaction. We submit the intriguing possibility

  15. A role for protein kinase A and protein kinase M zeta in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-initiated persistent synaptic enhancement in rat hippocampus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J; Li, S; Anwyl, R; Rowan, M J

    2008-01-24

    Antagonists at presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptors increase endogenous acetylcholine (ACh) release and enhance cognition but little is known regarding their actions on plasticity at glutamatergic synapses. Here the mechanisms of the persistent enhancement of hippocampal excitatory transmission induced by the M2/M4 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist methoctramine were investigated in vivo. The persistent facilitatory effect of i.c.v. methoctramine in the CA1 region of urethane-anesthetized rats was mimicked by gallamine, an M2 receptor antagonist, supporting a role for this receptor subtype. Neither the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists D-(-)-2-amino phosphonopentanoic acid (d-AP5) and memantine, nor the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1a antagonist (S)-(+)-alpha-amino-4-carboxy-2-methylbenzeneacetic acid (LY367385) significantly affected the methoctramine-induced persistent synaptic enhancement, indicating a lack of requirement for these glutamate receptors. The selective kinase inhibitors Rp-adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-cAMPS) and the myrostylated pseudosubstrate peptide, Myr-Ser-Ile-Tyr-Arg-Arg-Gly-Ala-Arg-Arg-Trp-Arg-Lys-Leu-OH (ZIP), were used to investigate the roles of protein kinase A (PKA) and the atypical protein kinase C, protein kinase Mzeta (PKM zeta), respectively. Remarkably, pretreatment with either agent prevented the induction of the persistent synaptic enhancement by methoctramine and post-methoctramine treatment with Rp-cAMPS transiently reversed the enhancement. These findings are strong evidence that antagonism of M2 muscarinic ACh receptors in vivo induces an NMDA receptor-independent persistent synaptic enhancement that requires activation of both PKA and PKM zeta.

  16. Ca2+-dependent inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Haga, K; Tsuga, H; Haga, T

    1997-02-11

    Agonist- or light-dependent phosphorylation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) or rhodopsin by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) was found to be inhibited by calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The phosphorylation was fully inhibited in the absence of G protein betagamma subunits and partially inhibited in the presence of betagamma subunits. The dose-response curve for stimulation by betagamma subunits of the m2 and rhodopsin phosphorylation was shifted to the higher concentration of betagamma subunits by addition of Ca2+-calmodulin. The phosphorylation by GRK2 of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing a peptide corresponding to the central part of the third intracellular loop of m2 receptors (I3-GST) was not affected by Ca2+-calmodulin in the presence or absence of betagamma subunits, but the agonist-dependent stimulation of I3-GST phosphorylation by an I3-deleted m2 receptor mutant in the presence of betagamma subunits was suppressed by Ca2+-calmodulin. These results indicate that Ca2+-calmodulin does not directly interact with the catalytic site of GRK2 but inhibits the kinase activity of GRK2 by interfering with the activation of GRK2 by agonist-bound m2 receptors and G protein betagamma subunits. In agreement with the assumption that GRK2 activity is suppressed by the increase in intracellular Ca2+, the sequestration of m2 receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was found to be attenuated by the treatment with a Ca2+ ionophore, A23187.

  17. The Cytoplasmic Adaptor Protein Dok7 Activates the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MuSK via Dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Bergamin, E.; Hallock, P; Burden, S; Hubbard, S

    2010-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate neuromuscular junction requires, among others proteins, Agrin, a neuronally derived ligand, and the following muscle proteins: LRP4, the receptor for Agrin; MuSK, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK); and Dok7 (or Dok-7), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein. Dok7 comprises a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, a phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. Unique among adaptor proteins recruited to RTKs, Dok7 is not only a substrate of MuSK, but also an activator of MuSK's kinase activity. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Dok7 PH-PTB domains in complex with a phosphopeptide representing the Dok7-binding site on MuSK. The structure and biochemical data reveal a dimeric arrangement of Dok7 PH-PTB that facilitates trans-autophosphorylation of the kinase activation loop. The structure provides the molecular basis for MuSK activation by Dok7 and for rationalizing several Dok7 loss-of-function mutations found in patients with congenital myasthenic syndromes.

  18. Identification, purification, and characterization of GRK5, a member of the family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases.

    PubMed

    Premont, R T; Koch, W J; Inglese, J; Lefkowitz, R J

    1994-03-04

    A novel member of the family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), named GRK5, has been cloned from bovine taste epithelium. The cDNA sequence predicts a 590-amino acid protein with high overall similarity to rhodopsin kinase. GRK5 mRNA is found most abundantly in lung, heart, retina, and lingual epithelium, but is expressed very little in brain, liver, kidney, or testis. GRK5 expressed in Sf9 cells was purified to apparent homogeneity. GRK5 major autophosphorylation sites were mapped to Ser484 and Thr485. Purified GRK5 phosphorylates rhodopsin in a light-dependent manner and beta 2-adrenergic receptor in an agonist-dependent manner and phosphorylates the C-terminal tail regions of both receptor proteins. GRK5 possesses neither a CAAX motif specifying protein prenylation like rhodopsin kinase nor similarity to the G protein beta gamma-subunit binding domain of beta-adrenergic receptor kinases. GRK5 phosphorylation of rhodopsin or beta 2-adrenergic receptor is not stimulated by G protein beta gamma-subunits. The GRK5 protein does not undergo agonist-dependent translocation from cytosol to membranes as do beta-adrenergic receptor kinase and rhodopsin kinase, but rather appears to associate with membranes constitutively. GRK5 thus appears functionally similar to other characterized GRKs, but has distinct regulatory properties which may be important for its cellular function.

  19. The complex G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) interactome unveils new physiopathological targets

    PubMed Central

    Penela, Petronila; Murga, Cristina; Ribas, Catalina; Lafarga, Vanesa; Mayor, Federico

    2010-01-01

    GRK2 is a ubiquitous member of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) family that appears to play a central, integrative role in signal transduction cascades. GRKs participate together with arrestins in the regulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), a family of hundreds of membrane proteins of key physiological and pharmacological importance, by triggering receptor desensitization from G proteins and GPCR internalization, and also by helping assemble macromolecular signalosomes in the receptor environment acting as agonist-regulated adaptor scaffolds, thus contributing to signal propagation. In addition, emerging evidence indicates that GRK2 can phosphorylate a growing number of non-GPCR substrates and associate with a variety of proteins related to signal transduction, thus suggesting that this kinase could also have diverse ‘effector’ functions. We discuss herein the increasing complexity of such GRK2 ‘interactome’, with emphasis on the recently reported roles of this kinase in cell migration and cell cycle progression and on the functional impact of the altered GRK2 levels observed in several relevant cardiovascular, inflammatory or tumour pathologies. Deciphering how the different networks of potential GRK2 functional interactions are orchestrated in a stimulus, cell type or context-specific way is critical to unveil the contribution of GRK2 to basic cellular processes, to understand how alterations in GRK2 levels or functionality may participate in the onset or development of several cardiovascular, tumour or inflammatory diseases, and to assess the feasibility of new therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of the activity, levels or specific interactions of GRK2. PMID:20590581

  20. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  1. Walleye dermal sarcoma virus Orf B functions through receptor for activated C kinase (RACK1) and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Candelaria C.; Rovnak, Joel; Quackenbush, Sandra L.

    2008-06-05

    Walleye dermal sarcoma virus is a complex retrovirus that is associated with walleye dermal sarcomas that are seasonal in nature. Fall developing tumors contain low levels of spliced accessory gene transcripts A and B, suggesting a role for the encoded proteins, Orf A and Orf B, in oncogenesis. In explanted tumor cells the 35 kDa Orf B accessory protein is localized to the cell periphery in structures similar to focal adhesions and along actin stress fibers. Similar localization was observed in mammalian cells. The cellular protein, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), bound Orf B in yeast two-hybrid assays and in cell culture. Sequence analysis of walleye RACK1 demonstrated high conservation to other known RACK1 sequences. RACK1 binds to activated protein kinase C (PKC). Orf B associates with PKC{alpha}, which is constitutively activated and localized at the membrane. Activated PKC promoted cell survival, proliferation, and increased cell viability in Orf B-expressing cells.

  2. Kainate receptor-mediated depression of glutamatergic transmission involving protein kinase A in the lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Negrete-Díaz, José Vicente; Duque-Feria, Paloma; Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Carrión, Miriam; Flores, Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    Kainate receptors (KARs) have been described as modulators of synaptic transmission at different synapses. However, this role of KARs has not been well characterized in the amygdala. We have explored the effect of kainate receptor activation at the synapse established between fibers originating at medial geniculate nucleus and the principal cells in the lateral amygdala. We have observed an inhibition of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) amplitude after a brief application of KARs agonists KA and ATPA. Paired-pulse recordings showed a clear pair pulse facilitation that was enhanced after KA or ATPA application. When postsynaptic cells were loaded with BAPTA, the depression of eEPSC amplitude observed after the perfusion of KAR agonists was not prevented. We have also observed that the inhibition of the eEPSCs by KARs agonists was prevented by protein kinase A but not by protein kinase C inhibitors. Taken together our results indicate that KARs present at this synapse are pre-synaptic and their activation mediate the inhibition of glutamate release through a mechanism that involves the activation of protein kinase A. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. G protein-coupled receptor kinase GRK5 phosphorylates moesin and regulates metastasis in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Prabir Kumar; Zhang, Yushan; Coomes, Alexandra S; Kim, Wan-Ju; Stupay, Rachel; Lynch, Lauren D; Atkinson, Tamieka; Kim, Jae I; Nie, Zhongzhen; Daaka, Yehia

    2014-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRK) regulate diverse cellular functions ranging from metabolism to growth and locomotion. Here, we report an important contributory role for GRK5 in human prostate cancer. Inhibition of GRK5 kinase activity attenuated the migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells and, concordantly, increased cell attachment and focal adhesion formation. Mass spectrometric analysis of the phosphoproteome revealed the cytoskeletal-membrane attachment protein moesin as a putative GRK5 substrate. GRK5 regulated the subcellular distribution of moesin and colocalized with moesin at the cell periphery. We identified amino acid T66 of moesin as a principal GRK5 phosphorylation site and showed that enforcing the expression of a T66-mutated moesin reduced cell spreading. In a xenograft model of human prostate cancer, GRK5 silencing reduced tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Taken together, our results established GRK5 as a key contributor to the growth and metastasis of prostate cancer.

  4. Substance P suppresses GABAA receptor function via protein kinase C in primary sensory neurones of bullfrogs.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, K; Akasu, T

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of substance P (SP) and related tachykinins on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptors were examined in acutely dissociated neurones of bullfrog dorsal root ganglia (DRG) by using whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. 2. Application of SP (10 nM to 1 microM) depressed inward currents produced by GABAA receptor activation (IGABA). Neurokinin A (NKA) and neurokinin B (NKB) also depressed IGABA; the rank order of agonist potency was SP > NKA > NKB. Spantide ([D-Arg1, D-Trp7,9,Leu11]SP) and L-703,606, NK1 receptor antagonists, blocked the SP-induced depression of IGABA. 3. SP irreversibly depressed IGABA, when neurones were intracellularly dialysed with GTP gamma S. Intracellular application of GDP beta S prevented the SP-induced depression of IGABA. Pertussis toxin (PTX) did not block the inhibitory effect of SP on IGABA. 4. The depression of IGABA produced by SP was inhibited by H-7 and PKC(19-36), protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, but not by H-9 and HA-1004, protein kinase A inhibitors. IGABA was suppressed by application of sn-1,2-dioctanoyl glycerol (DOG), a PKC activator. 5. It is concluded that activation of neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors downregulates the function of the GABAA receptor of primary sensory neurones through a PTX-insensitive G-protein. PKC may be involved in the transduction pathway of the tachykinin-induced inhibition of the GABAA receptor. PMID:8910228

  5. Molecular Mechanism of Selectivity among G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Thal, David M.; Yeow, Raymond Y.; Schoenau, Christian; Huber, Jochen; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-07-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of cell physiology and control processes ranging from glucose homeostasis to contractility of the heart. A major mechanism for the desensitization of activated GPCRs is their phosphorylation by GPCR kinases (GRKs). Overexpression of GRK2 is strongly linked to heart failure, and GRK2 has long been considered a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Several lead compounds developed by Takeda Pharmaceuticals show high selectivity for GRK2 and therapeutic potential for the treatment of heart failure. To understand how these drugs achieve their selectivity, we determined crystal structures of the bovine GRK2-G{beta}{gamma} complex in the presence of two of these inhibitors. Comparison with the apoGRK2-G{beta}{gamma} structure demonstrates that the compounds bind in the kinase active site in a manner similar to that of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. Both balanol and the Takeda compounds induce a slight closure of the kinase domain, the degree of which correlates with the potencies of the inhibitors. Based on our crystal structures and homology modeling, we identified five amino acids surrounding the inhibitor binding site that we hypothesized could contribute to inhibitor selectivity. However, our results indicate that these residues are not major determinants of selectivity among GRK subfamilies. Rather, selectivity is achieved by the stabilization of a unique inactive conformation of the GRK2 kinase domain.

  6. Hematopoietic G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 deficiency decreases atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDL receptor-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Otten, Jeroen J. T.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Seijkens, Tom; Bot, Ilze; Wijnands, Erwin; Beckers, Linda; Westra, Marijke M.; Bot, Martine; Busch, Matthias; Bermudez, Beatriz; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Leukocyte chemotaxis is deemed instrumental in initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. It is mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors (e.g., CCR2 and CCR5), the activity of which is controlled by G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). In this study, we analyzed the effect of hematopoietic deficiency of a potent regulator kinase of chemotaxis (GRK2) on atherogenesis. LDL receptor-deficient (LDLr−/−) mice with heterozygous hematopoietic GRK2 deficiency, generated by bone marrow transplantation (n=15), displayed a dramatic attenuation of plaque development, with 79% reduction in necrotic core and increased macrophage content. Circulating monocytes decreased and granulocytes increased in GRK2+/− chimeras, which could be attributed to diminished granulocyte colony-forming units in bone marrow. Collectively, these data pointed to myeloid cells as major mediators of the impaired atherogenic response in GRK2+/− chimeras. LDLr−/− mice with macrophage/granulocyte-specific GRK2 deficiency (LysM-Cre GRK2flox/flox; n=8) failed to mimic the aforementioned phenotype, acquitting these cells as major responsible subsets for GRK2 deficiency-associated atheroprotection. To conclude, even partial hematopoietic GRK2 deficiency prevents atherosclerotic lesion progression beyond the fatty streak stage, identifying hematopoietic GRK2 as a potential target for intervention in atherosclerosis.—Otten, J. J. T., de Jager, S. C. A., Kavelaars, A., Seijkens, T., Bot, I., Wijnands, E., Beckers, L., Westra, M. M., Bot, M., Busch, M., Bermudez, B., van Berkel, T. J. C., Heijnen, C. J., Biessen, E. A. L. Hematopoietic G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 deficiency decreases atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDL receptor-knockout mice. PMID:23047899

  7. Crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and tyrosine kinase receptor (TXR) in the heart after morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Almela, Pilar; García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of membrane receptors involved in signal transduction. These receptors are linked to a variety of physiological and biological processes such as regulation of neurotransmission, growth, and cell differentiation among others. Some of the effects of GPCRs are known to be mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated extracellular kinase (MAPK) pathways. Cross-talk among various signal pathways plays an important role in activation of intracellular and intranuclear signal transduction cascades. Naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal leads to an up-regulation of adenyl cyclase-mediated signaling, resulting in high expression of protein kinase (PK) A. In addition, there is also an increased expression of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), one member of MAPK. For this reason, the crosstalk between these GPCRs and receptors with tyrosine kinase activity (TKR) can be considered a possible mechanism for adaptive changes that occurs after morphine withdrawal. Morphine withdrawal activates ERK1/2 and phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) at Ser31 in the right and left ventricle. When N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA-1004), a PKA inhibitor was infused, the ability of morphine withdrawal to activate ERK, which phosphorylates TH at Ser31, was reduced. The present finding demonstrated that the enhancement of ERK1/2 expression and the phosphorylation state of TH at Ser31 during morphine withdrawal are dependent on PKA and suggest cross-talk between PKA and ERK1/2 transduction pathway mediating morphine withdrawal-induced activation of TH. Increasing understanding of the mechanisms that interconnect the two pathway regulated by GPCRs and TKRs may facilitate the design of new therapeutic strategies.

  8. Crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and tyrosine kinase receptor (TXR) in the heart after morphine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Almela, Pilar; García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of membrane receptors involved in signal transduction. These receptors are linked to a variety of physiological and biological processes such as regulation of neurotransmission, growth, and cell differentiation among others. Some of the effects of GPCRs are known to be mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated extracellular kinase (MAPK) pathways. Cross-talk among various signal pathways plays an important role in activation of intracellular and intranuclear signal transduction cascades. Naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal leads to an up-regulation of adenyl cyclase-mediated signaling, resulting in high expression of protein kinase (PK) A. In addition, there is also an increased expression of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), one member of MAPK. For this reason, the crosstalk between these GPCRs and receptors with tyrosine kinase activity (TKR) can be considered a possible mechanism for adaptive changes that occurs after morphine withdrawal. Morphine withdrawal activates ERK1/2 and phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) at Ser31 in the right and left ventricle. When N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA-1004), a PKA inhibitor was infused, the ability of morphine withdrawal to activate ERK, which phosphorylates TH at Ser31, was reduced. The present finding demonstrated that the enhancement of ERK1/2 expression and the phosphorylation state of TH at Ser31 during morphine withdrawal are dependent on PKA and suggest cross-talk between PKA and ERK1/2 transduction pathway mediating morphine withdrawal-induced activation of TH. Increasing understanding of the mechanisms that interconnect the two pathway regulated by GPCRs and TKRs may facilitate the design of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:24409147

  9. Phenotypic Regulation of the Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Miles Apart by G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved DRY motif at the end of the third helix of rhodopsin-like, class-A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a major regulator of receptor stability, signaling activity, and β-arrestin-mediated internalization. Substitution of the DRY arginine with histidine in the human vasopressin receptor results in a loss-of-function phenotype associated with diabetes insipidus. The analogous R150H substitution of the DRY motif in zebrafish sphingosine-1 phosphate receptor 2 (S1p2) produces a mutation, miles apart m93 (milm93), that not only disrupts signaling but also impairs heart field migration. We hypothesized that constitutive S1p2 desensitization is the underlying cause of this strong zebrafish developmental defect. We observed in cell assays that the wild-type S1p2 receptor is at the cell surface whereas in distinct contrast the S1p2 R150H receptor is found in intracellular vesicles, blocking G protein but not arrestin signaling activity. Surface S1p2 R150H expression could be restored by inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Moreover, we observed that β-arrestin 2 and GRK2 colocalize with S1p2 in developing zebrafish embryos and depletion of GRK2 in the S1p2 R150H miles apart zebrafish partially rescued cardia bifida. The ability of reduced GRK2 activity to reverse a developmental phenotype associated with constitutive desensitization supports efforts to genetically or pharmacologically target this kinase in diseases involving biased GPCR signaling. PMID:25555130

  10. Analysis of Phosphorylation of the Receptor-Like Protein Kinase HAESA during Arabidopsis Floral Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Isaiah; Wang, Ying; Seitz, Kati; Baer, John; Bennewitz, Stefan; Mooney, Brian P.; Walker, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs) are the largest family of plant transmembrane signaling proteins. Here we present functional analysis of HAESA, an RLK that regulates floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis. Through in vitro and in vivo analysis of HAE phosphorylation, we provide evidence that a conserved phosphorylation site on a region of the HAE protein kinase domain known as the activation segment positively regulates HAE activity. Additional analysis has identified another putative activation segment phosphorylation site common to multiple RLKs that potentially modulates HAE activity. Comparative analysis suggests that phosphorylation of this second activation segment residue is an RLK specific adaptation that may regulate protein kinase activity and substrate specificity. A growing number of RLKs have been shown to exhibit biologically relevant dual specificity toward serine/threonine and tyrosine residues, but the mechanisms underlying dual specificity of RLKs are not well understood. We show that a phospho-mimetic mutant of both HAE activation segment residues exhibits enhanced tyrosine auto-phosphorylation in vitro, indicating phosphorylation of this residue may contribute to dual specificity of HAE. These results add to an emerging framework for understanding the mechanisms and evolution of regulation of RLK activity and substrate specificity. PMID:26784444

  11. Prostaglandin E2 restrains macrophage maturation via E prostanoid receptor 2/protein kinase A signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zasłona, Zbigniew; Serezani, Carlos H.; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Aronoff, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a lipid mediator that acts by ligating 4 distinct G protein–coupled receptors, E prostanoid (EP) 1 to 4. Previous studies identified the importance of PGE2 in regulating macrophage functions, but little is known about its effect on macrophage maturation. Macrophage maturation was studied in vitro in bone marrow cell cultures, and in vivo in a model of peritonitis. EP2 was the most abundant PGE2 receptor expressed by bone marrow cells, and its expression further increased during macrophage maturation. EP2-deficient (EP2−/−) macrophages exhibited enhanced in vitro maturation compared with wild-type cells, as evidenced by higher F4/80 expression. An EP2 antagonist also increased maturation. In the peritonitis model, EP2−/− mice exhibited a higher percentage of F4/80high/CD11bhigh cells and greater expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (M-CSFR) in both the blood and the peritoneal cavity. Subcutaneous injection of the PGE2 analog misoprostol decreased M-CSFR expression in bone marrow cells and reduced the number of peritoneal macrophages in wild-type mice but not EP2−/− mice. The suppressive effect of EP2 ligation on in vitro macrophage maturation was mimicked by a selective protein kinase A agonist. Our findings reveal a novel role for PGE2/EP2/protein kinase A signaling in the suppression of macrophage maturation. PMID:22234697

  12. Mutational analysis of the potential phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C on the CCKA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, R L L; Fouraux, M A; Pouwels, W; van Emst-de Vries, S E; Ronken, E; De Pont, J J H H M; Willems, P H G M

    1998-01-01

    Many G protein-coupled receptors contain potential phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C (PKC), the exact role of which is poorly understood. In the present study, a mutant cholecystokininA (CCKA) receptor was generated in which the four consensus sites for PKC action were changed in an alanine. Both the wild-type (CCKAWT) and mutant (CCKAMT) receptor were stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells.Binding of [3H]-cholecystokinin-(26-33)-peptide amide (CCK-8) to membranes prepared from CHO-CCKAWT cells and CHO-CCKAMT cells revealed no difference in binding affinity (Kd values of 0.72 nM and 0.86 nM CCK-8, respectively).The dose-response curves for CCK-8-induced cyclic AMP accumulation and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3) formation were shifted to the left in CHO-CCKAMT cells. This leftward shift was mimicked by the potent inhibitor of protein kinase activity, staurosporine. However, the effect of staurosporine was restricted to CHO-CCKAWT cells. This demonstrates that attenuation of CCK-8-induced activation of adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C-β involves a staurosporine-sensitive kinase, which acts directly at the potential sites of PKC action on the CCKA receptor in CCK-8-stimulated CHO-CCKAWT cells.The potent PKC activator, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), evoked a rightward shift of the dose-response curve for CCK-8-induced cyclic AMP accumulation in CHO-CCKAWT cells but not CHO-CCKAMT cells. This is in agreement with the idea that PKC acts directly at the CCKA receptor to attenuate adenylyl cyclase activation.In contrast, TPA evoked a rightward shift of the dose-response curve for CCK-8-induced Ins(1,4,5)P3 formation in both cell lines. This demonstrates that high-level PKC activation inhibits CCK-8-induced Ins(1,4,5)P3 formation also at a post-receptor site.TPA inhibition of agonist-induced Ca2+ mobilization was only partly reversed in CHO-CCKAMT cells. TPA also inhibited Ca2+ mobilization in response to the G

  13. Protein receptor for activated C kinase 1 is involved in morphine reward in mice.

    PubMed

    Wan, L; Su, L; Xie, Y; Liu, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Z

    2009-07-07

    Opiate addiction is associated with upregulation of cAMP signaling in the brain. cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), a nuclear transcription factor, is a downstream component of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway, which has been shown to regulate different physiological and psychological responses of drug addiction. RACK1, the protein receptor for activated C kinase 1, is a multifunctional scaffolding protein known to be a key regulator of various signaling cascades in the CNS. RACK1 functions specifically in integrin mediated activation of ERK cascade and targets active ERK. We examined if RACK1 is involved in the mechanism of drug addiction by regulating CREB in mouse hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Several expressions were observed. Chronic administration of morphine made the expression of RACK1 and CREB mRNA increase in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The expression of RACK1 and CREB protein was strongly positive in CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus of morphine-treated mice brain, especially the pyramidal neurons in the DG of the hippocampus. Using the small interfering RNA technology, we determined that the expression of CREB mRNA was decreased in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of morphine-treated mice. The expression of RACK1 and CREB protein was negative in CA1, CA3 and DG of hippocampus. These findings suggest that morphine reward can influence the expression of RACK1 in mouse hippocampus and prefrontal cortex through regulating CREB transcription.

  14. Role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 in tumoral angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Verónica; Nogués, Laura; Reglero, Clara; Mayor, Federico; Penela, Petronila

    2014-01-01

    Downregulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in endothelial cells has recently been identified as a relevant event in the tumoral angiogenic switch. Based on the effects of altering GRK2 dosage in cell and animal models, this kinase appears to act as a hub in key signaling pathways involved in vascular stabilization and remodeling. Accordingly, decreased GRK2 expression in endothelial cells accelerates tumor growth in mice by impairing the pericytes ensheathing the vessels, thereby promoting hypoxia and macrophage infiltration. These results raise new questions regarding the mechanisms by which transformed cells trigger the decrease in GRK2 observed in human breast cancer vessels and how GRK2 modulates the interactions between different cell types that occur in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27308373

  15. Expansion of the Receptor-Like Kinase/Pelle Gene Family and Receptor-Like Proteins in Arabidopsis1[w

    PubMed Central

    Shin-Han, Shiu; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2003-01-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are a family of transmembrane proteins with versatile N-terminal extracellular domains and C-terminal intracellular kinases. They control a wide range of physiological responses in plants and belong to one of the largest gene families in the Arabidopsis genome with more than 600 members. Interestingly, this gene family constitutes 60% of all kinases in Arabidopsis and accounts for nearly all transmembrane kinases in Arabidopsis. Analysis of four fungal, six metazoan, and two Plasmodium sp. genomes indicates that the family was represented in all but fungal genomes, indicating an ancient origin for the family with a more recent expansion only in the plant lineages. The RLK/Pelle family can be divided into several subfamilies based on three independent criteria: the phylogeny based on kinase domain sequences, the extracellular domain identities, and intron locations and phases. A large number of receptor-like proteins (RLPs) resembling the extracellular domains of RLKs are also found in the Arabidopsis genome. However, not all RLK subfamilies have corresponding RLPs. Several RLK/Pelle subfamilies have undergone differential expansions. More than 33% of the RLK/Pelle members are found in tandem clusters, substantially higher than the genome average. In addition, 470 of the RLK/Pelle family members are located within the segmentally duplicated regions in the Arabidopsis genome and 268 of them have a close relative in the corresponding regions. Therefore, tandem duplications and segmental/whole-genome duplications represent two of the major mechanisms for the expansion of the RLK/Pelle family in Arabidopsis. PMID:12805585

  16. Reprogramming of G protein-coupled receptor recycling and signaling by a kinase switch

    PubMed Central

    Vistein, Rachel; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A.

    2013-01-01

    The postendocytic recycling of signaling receptors is subject to multiple requirements. Why this is so, considering that many other proteins can recycle without apparent requirements, is a fundamental question. Here we show that cells can leverage these requirements to switch the recycling of the beta-2 adrenergic receptor (B2AR), a prototypic signaling receptor, between sequence-dependent and bulk recycling pathways, based on extracellular signals. This switch is determined by protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of B2AR on the cytoplasmic tail. The phosphorylation state of B2AR dictates its partitioning into spatially and functionally distinct endosomal microdomains mediating bulk and sequence-dependent recycling, and also regulates the rate of B2AR recycling and resensitization. Our results demonstrate that G protein-coupled receptor recycling is not always restricted to the sequence-dependent pathway, but may be reprogrammed as needed by physiological signals. Such flexible reprogramming might provide a versatile method for rapidly modulating cellular responses to extracellular signaling. PMID:24003153

  17. G-protein receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) influences opioid analgesic tolerance but not opioid withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Terman, Gregory W; Jin, Wenzhen; Cheong, Young-Pyo; Lowe, Janet; Caron, Marc G; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Chavkin, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Tolerance to opioids frequently follows repeated drug administration and affects the clinical utility of these analgesics. Studies in simple cellular systems have demonstrated that prolonged activation of opioid receptors produces homologous receptor desensitization by G-protein receptor kinase mediated receptor phosphorylation and subsequent β-arrestin binding. To define the role of this regulatory mechanism in the control of the electrophysiological and behavioral responses to opioids, we used mice having a targeted disruption of the G-protein receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) gene. Mice lacking GRK3 did not differ from wild-type littermates neither in their response latencies to noxious stimuli on the hot-plate test nor in their acute antinociceptive responses to fentanyl or morphine. Tolerance to the electrophysiological response to the opioid fentanyl, measured in vitro in the hippocampus, was blocked by GRK3 deletion. In addition, tolerance to the antinociceptive effects of fentanyl was significantly reduced in GRK3 knockouts compared to wild-type littermate controls. Tolerance to the antinociceptive effects of morphine was not affected by GRK3 deletion although morphine tolerance in hippocampal slices from GRK3 knockout mice was significantly inhibited. Tolerance developed more slowly in vitro to morphine than fentanyl supporting previous work in in vitro systems showing a correlation between agonist efficacy and GRK3-mediated desensitization. The results of these studies suggest that GRK3-mediated mechanisms are important components of both electrophysiologic and behavioral opioid tolerance. Fentanyl, a high efficacy opioid, more effectively produced GRK3-dependent effects than morphine, a low efficacy agonist. PMID:14662727

  18. Regulation of beta-adrenergic receptor signaling by S-nitrosylation of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Erin J; Foster, Matthew W; Matsumoto, Akio; Ozawa, Kentaro; Violin, Jonathan D; Que, Loretta G; Nelson, Chris D; Benhar, Moran; Keys, Janelle R; Rockman, Howard A; Koch, Walter J; Daaka, Yehia; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2007-05-04

    beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-ARs), prototypic G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), play a critical role in regulating numerous physiological processes. The GPCR kinases (GRKs) curtail G-protein signaling and target receptors for internalization. Nitric oxide (NO) and/or S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) can prevent the loss of beta-AR signaling in vivo, but the molecular details are unknown. Here we show in mice that SNOs increase beta-AR expression and prevent agonist-stimulated receptor downregulation; and in cells, SNOs decrease GRK2-mediated beta-AR phosphorylation and subsequent recruitment of beta-arrestin to the receptor, resulting in the attenuation of receptor desensitization and internalization. In both cells and tissues, GRK2 is S-nitrosylated by SNOs as well as by NO synthases, and GRK2 S-nitrosylation increases following stimulation of multiple GPCRs with agonists. Cys340 of GRK2 is identified as a principal locus of inhibition by S-nitrosylation. Our studies thus reveal a central molecular mechanism through which GPCR signaling is regulated.

  19. Muscarinic Stimulation Facilitates Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca Release by Modulating Ryanodine Receptor 2 Phosphorylation Through Protein Kinase G and Ca/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Belevych, Andriy E; Liu, Bin; Bonilla, Ingrid M; Radwański, Przemysław B; Kubasov, Igor V; Valdivia, Héctor H; Schober, Karsten; Carnes, Cynthia A; Györke, Sándor

    2016-11-01

    Although the effects and the underlying mechanism of sympathetic stimulation on cardiac Ca handling are relatively well established both in health and disease, the modes of action and mechanisms of parasympathetic modulation are poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that parasympathetic stimulation initiates a novel mode of excitation-contraction coupling that enhances the efficiency of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca store utilization. This efficient mode of excitation-contraction coupling involves reciprocal changes in the phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor 2 at Ser-2808 and Ser-2814. Specifically, Ser-2808 phosphorylation was mediated by muscarinic receptor subtype 2 and activation of PKG (protein kinase G), whereas dephosphorylation of Ser-2814 involved activation of muscarinic receptor subtype 3 and decreased reactive oxygen species-dependent activation of CaMKII (Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II). The overall effect of these changes in phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor 2 is an increase in systolic Ca release at the low sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca content and a paradoxical reduction in aberrant Ca leak. Accordingly, cholinergic stimulation of cardiomyocytes isolated from failing hearts improved Ca cycling efficiency by restoring altered ryanodine receptor 2 phosphorylation balance. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Identification of a novel receptor-like protein kinase that interacts with a geminivirus nuclear shuttle protein.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Andrea C; Andrade, Maxuel O; Santos, Anésia A; Carolino, Sonia M B; Oliveira, Marli L; Baracat-Pereira, Maria Cristina; Brommonshenkel, Sergio H; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2004-01-05

    Despite extensive studies in plant virus-host interactions, the molecular mechanisms of geminivirus movement and interactions with host components remain largely unknown. A tomato kinase protein and its soybean homolog were found to interact specifically with the nuclear shuttle protein (NSP) of Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV) and Tomato crinkle leaf yellows virus (TCrLYV) through yeast two-hybrid screening and in vitro protein binding assays. These proteins, designated LeNIK (Lycopersicon esculentum NSP-Interacting Kinase) and GmNIK (Glycine max NIK), belong to the LRR-RLK (leucine rich-repeat receptor-like kinase) family that is involved in plant developmental processes and/or resistance response. As such, NIK is structurally organized into characteristic domains, including a serine/threonine kinase domain with a nucleotide binding site at the C-terminal region, an internal transmembrane segment and leucine-rich repeats (LRR) at the N-terminal portion. The potential significance of the NSP-NIK interaction is discussed.

  1. Cross-interactions of two p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors and two cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonists with the CCK1 receptor and p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Morel, Caroline; Ibarz, Géraldine; Oiry, Catherine; Carnazzi, Eric; Bergé, Gilbert; Gagne, Didier; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Martinez, Jean

    2005-06-03

    Although SB202190 and SB203580 are described as specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, several reports have indicated that other enzymes are also sensitive to SB203580. Using a pharmacological approach, we report for the first time that compounds SB202190 and SB203580 were able to directly and selectively interact with a G-protein-coupled receptor, namely the cholecystokinin receptor subtype CCK1, but not with the CCK2 receptor. We demonstrated that these compounds were non-competitive antagonists of the CCK1 receptor at concentrations typically used to inhibit protein kinases. By chimeric construction of the CCK2 receptor, we determined the involvement of two CCK1 receptor intracellular loops in the binding of SB202190 and SB203580. We also showed that two CCK antagonists, L364,718 and L365,260, were able to regulate p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. Using a reporter gene strategy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrated that both CCK antagonists inhibited selectively the enzymatic activity of p38 MAP kinase. Kinase assays suggested that this inhibition resulted from a direct interaction with both CCK antagonists. Molecular modeling simulations suggested that this interaction occurs in the ATP binding pocket of p38 MAP kinase. These results suggest that SB202190 and SB203580 bind to the CCK1 receptor and, as such, these compounds should be used with caution in models that express this receptor. We also found that L364,718 and L365,260, two CCK receptor antagonists, directly interacted with p38 MAP kinase and inhibited its activity. These findings suggest that the CCK1 receptor shares structural analogies with the p38 MAP kinase ATP binding site. They open the way to potential design of either a new family of MAP kinase inhibitors from CCK1 receptor ligand structures or new CCK1 receptor ligands based on p38 MAP kinase inhibitor structures.

  2. Identification and Structure-Function Analysis of Subfamily Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Larimore, Kelly M.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2015-02-13

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson’s disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  3. Characterization of an S-locus receptor protein kinase-like gene from peach.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Carole L; Nickerson, Michael L; Farrell, Robert E; Artlip, Timothy S; El Ghaouth, Ahmed; Wilson, Charles L; Wisniewski, Michael E

    2005-04-01

    A receptor-like protein kinase gene (Ppsrkl1) was isolated from a peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch.) bark cDNA library prepared with RNAs isolated from bark collected in December (cold acclimated). Sequence analysis indicated that this gene is related to the S-locus family of receptor protein kinases (SRKs) and that it shares greatest homology with ZMPK1 from maize and At4g32300 from Arabidopsis, both of which are intron-less genes. In bark tissues, Ppsrkl1 is induced by water deficit treatment, repressed by short-day photoperiods and showed no response to cold treatment. The Ppsrkl1 mRNA also increased in roots in response to water deficit. In fruit, Ppsrkl1 shows no response up to 6 h after wounding, but at 12 and 24 h after wounding, Ppsrkl1 mRNA shows an abrupt decline. This decline was prevented by the addition of salicylic acid to the wound site. The Ppsrkl1 mRNA rapidly decreased in fruit after 10-min exposure to UV-C radiation, followed by a return to normal levels within 1.5 h. Taken together, these experiments indicate that Ppsrkl1 is negatively regulated by light and positively influenced by salicylic acid treatment in fruit and water stress in bark and roots.

  4. APS, an adapter protein with a PH and SH2 domain, is a substrate for the insulin receptor kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Z; Smith, B J; Kotani, K; Wilden, P; Pillay, T S

    1999-01-01

    APS (adapter protein with a PH and SH2 domain) is the newest member of a family of tyrosine kinase adapter proteins including SH2-B and Lnk. We previously identified SH2-B as an insulin-receptor-binding protein and substrate [Kotani, Wilden and Pillay (1998) Biochem J. 335, 103-109]. Here we show that APS interacts with the insulin receptor kinase activation loop through its SH2 domain and insulin stimulates the tyrosine-phosphorylation of APS. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of activation-loop tyrosine residues 1158 and 1162 are required for this interaction. PMID:10417330

  5. syk protein tyrosine kinase regulates Fc receptor gamma-chain-mediated transport to lysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnerot, C; Briken, V; Brachet, V; Lankar, D; Cassard, S; Jabri, B; Amigorena, S

    1998-01-01

    B- and T-cell receptors, as well as most Fc receptors (FcR), are part of a large family of membrane proteins named immunoreceptors and are expressed on all cells of the immune system. Immunoreceptors' biological functions rely on two of their fundamental attributes: signal transduction and internalization. The signals required for these two functions are present in the chains associated with immunoreceptors, within conserved amino acid motifs called immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs). We have examined the role of the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) syk, a critical effector of immunoreceptor-mediated cell signalling through ITAMs, in FcR-associated gamma-chain internalization and lysosomal targeting. A point mutation in the immunoreceptor-associated gamma-chain ITAM affecting syk activation, as well as overexpression of a syk dominant negative mutant, inhibited signal transduction without affecting receptor coated-pit localization or internalization. In contrast, blocking of gamma-chain-mediated syk activation impaired FcR transport from endosomes to lysosomes and selectively inhibited the presentation of certain T-cell epitopes. Therefore, activation of the PTK syk is dispensable for receptor internalization, but necessary for cell signalling and for gamma-chain-mediated FcR delivery to lysosomes. PMID:9707420

  6. Crystal Structure of a Complex Between Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B and the Insulin Receptor Tyrosine Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Li,S.; Depetris, R.; Barford, D.; Chernoff, J.; Hubbard, S.

    2005-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a highly specific negative regulator of insulin receptor signaling in vivo. The determinants of PTP1B specificity for the insulin receptor versus other receptor tyrosine kinases are largely unknown. Here, we report a crystal structure at 2.3 Angstroms resolution of the catalytic domain of PTP1B (trapping mutant) in complex with the phosphorylated tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor (IRK). The crystallographic asymmetric unit contains two PTP1B-IRK complexes that interact through an IRK dimer interface. Rather than binding to a phosphotyrosine in the IRK activation loop, PTP1B binds instead to the opposite side of the kinase domain, with the phosphorylated activation loops sequestered within the IRK dimer. The crystal structure provides evidence for a noncatalytic mode of interaction between PTP1B and IRK, which could be important for the selective recruitment of PTP1B to the insulin receptor.

  7. Identification of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in human Gab-1 protein by EGF receptor kinase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lehr, S; Kotzka, J; Herkner, A; Klein, E; Siethoff, C; Knebel, B; Noelle, V; Brüning, J C; Klein, H W; Meyer, H E; Krone, W; Müller-Wieland, D

    1999-01-05

    Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab-1) has been identified recently in a cDNA library of glioblastoma tumors and appears to play a central role in cellular growth response, transformation, and apoptosis. Structural and functional features indicate that Gab-1 is a multisubstrate docking protein downstream in the signaling pathways of different receptor tyrosine kinases, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Therefore, the aim of the study was to characterize the phosphorylation of recombinant human Gab-1 (hGab-1) protein by EGFR in vitro. Using the pGEX system to express the entire protein and different domains of hGab-1 as glutathione S-transferase proteins, kinetic data for phosphorylation of these proteins by wheat germ agglutinine-purified EGFR and the recombinant EGFR (rEGFR) receptor kinase domain were determined. Our data revealed similar affinities of hGab-1-C for both receptor preparations (KM = 2.7 microM for rEGFR vs 3.2 microM for WGA EGFR) as well as for the different recombinant hGab-1 domains. To identify the specific EGFR phosphorylation sites, hGab-1-C was sequenced by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. The entire protein was phosphorylated by rEGFR at eight tyrosine residues (Y285, Y373, Y406, Y447, Y472, Y619, Y657, and Y689). Fifty percent of the identified radioactivity was incorporated in tyrosine Y657 as the predominant peak in HPLC analysis, a site exhibiting features of a potential Syp (PTP1D) binding site. Accordingly, GST-pull down assays with A431 and HepG2 cell lysates showed that phosphorylated intact hGab-1 was able to bind Syp. This binding appears to be specific, because it was abolished by changing the Y657 of hGab-1 to F657. These results demonstrate that hGab-1 is a high-affinity substrate for the EGFR and the major tyrosine phosphorylation site Y657 in the C terminus is a specific binding site for the tyrosine phosphatase Syp.

  8. Cloning and Characterization of a Receptor-Like Protein Kinase Gene Associated with Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Hajouj, Taleb; Michelis, Regina; Gepstein, Shimon

    2000-01-01

    Senescence-associated genes are up-regulated during plant senescence and many have been implicated in encoding enzymes involved in the metabolism of senescing tissues. Using the differential display technique, we identified a SAG in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) leaf that was exclusively expressed during senescence and was designated senescence-associated receptor-like kinase (SARK). The deduced SARK polypeptide consists of a signal peptide, a leucine-rich repeat in the extracellular region, a single membrane-spanning domain, and the characteristic serine/threonine protein kinase domain. The mRNA level for SARK increased prior to the loss of chlorophyll and the decrease of chlorophyll a/b-binding protein mRNA. Detached mature bean leaves, which senesce at an accelerated rate compared with leaves on intact plants, showed a similar temporal pattern of SARK message accumulation. Light and cytokinin, which delayed the initiation of leaf senescence, also delayed SARK gene expression; in contrast, darkness and ethylene, which accelerated senescence, advanced the initial appearance of the SARK transcript. SARK protein accumulation exhibited a temporal pattern similar to that of its mRNA. A possible role for SARK in the regulation of leaf senescence was considered. PMID:11080306

  9. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Mediate Upregulation of Hypothalamic AT1 Receptors in Heart Failure Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shun-Guang; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Weiss, Robert M.; Felder, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    In heart failure (HF), angiotensin type-1 receptor (AT1-R) expression is upregulated in brain regions regulating sympathetic drive, blood pressure and body fluid homeostasis. However, the mechanism by which brain AT1-R are upregulated in HF remains unknown. The present study examined the hypothesis that the angiotensin II (ANG II)-triggered mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) p44/42, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) contribute to upregulation of the AT1-R in the hypothalamus of rats with HF. AT1-R protein, AT1-R mRNA and AT1-R immunoreactivity increased in the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN) and the subfornical organ (SFO) of rats with ischemia-induced HF, compared with sham-operated controls. Phosphorylated p44/42 MAPK, JNK, and p38 MAPK also increased in PVN and SFO. A 4-week intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of the AT1-R antagonist losartan decreased AT1-R protein and phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK, JNK and p38 MAPK in the HF rats. A 4-week ICV infusion of the p44/42 MAPK inhibitor PD98059 or the JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly decreased AT1-R protein and AT1-R immunoreactivity in the PVN and SFO, but the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Treatment with ICV losartan, PD98059 and SP600125 had no effect on AT1-R expression by Western blot in sham-operated rats. In untreated HF rats 4 weeks after coronary ligation, a 3-hour ICV infusion of PD98059, SP600125 or losartan reduced AT1-R mRNA in PVN and SFO. These data indicate that MAPK plays an important role in the upregulation of AT1-R in the rat forebrain in heart failure, and suggest that ANG II upregulates its own receptor by this mechanism. PMID:18768402

  10. [Characterization of a putative S locus encoded receptor protein kinase and its role in self-incompatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase (SRK) protein was predicted to be similar to the growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases in animals but its amino acid sequence of the catalytic domain is more similar to that of the catalytic domains of protein serine/threonine kinases than to protein tyrosine kinases. We have shown that the SRK protein has intrinsic scrine/threonine kinase activity. We subcloned the protein kinase-homologous domain of the SRK[sub 6] cDNA into the bacterial expression vector pGEX-3X and we have constructed a second plasmid identical to the first except that it carried a conservative mutation that substituted Arg for the Lys[sup 524] codon of SRK6 This lysine corresponds to the ATP-binding site, is essential in protein kinases, and is a common target for site-directed mutagenesis as a means to obtain kinase-defective proteins. Cultures bearing the wild-type and mutant SRK catalytic domains each produced an approximately 64 kD protein that reacted with anti-SRK6 antibodies. Following pulse-labeling with [sup 32]P we found that the wild-type SRK6 protein but not the mutant form was detectably phosphorylated. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the affinity purified [sup 32]p-labeled GST-SRK6 fusion protein demonstrated that SRK was phosphorylated predominantly on semine and to a lesser extent on threonine, but not on tyrosine. Thus, SRK6 is a functional serine/threonine protein kinase.

  11. Receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus

    DOEpatents

    Nasrallah, June B.; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Stein, Joshua

    1996-01-01

    Described herein is a S receptor kinase gene (SRK), derived from the S locus in Brassica oleracea, having a extracellular domain highly similar to the secreted product of the S-locus glycoprotein gene.

  12. Role of macrophage-stimulating protein and its receptor, RON tyrosine kinase, in ciliary motility.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, O; Iwama, A; Amitani, R; Takehara, T; Yamaguchi, N; Yamamoto, T; Masuyama, K; Yamanaka, T; Ando, M; Suda, T

    1997-01-01

    Macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP) is an 80-kD serum protein with homology to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Its receptor, RON tyrosine kinase, is a new member of the HGF receptor family. The MSP-RON signaling pathway has been implicated in the functional regulation of mononuclear phagocytes. However, the function of this pathway in other types of cells has not been elucidated. Here we show that in contrast to the HGF receptor, which was expressed at the basolateral surface, RON was localized at the apical surface of ciliated epithelia in the airways and oviduct. In addition, MSP was found in the bronchoalveolar space at biologically significant concentrations. MSP bound to RON on normal human bronchial epithelial cells with a high affinity (Kd = 0.5 nM) and induced autophosphorylation of RON. Activation of RON by MSP led to a significant increase in ciliary beat frequency of human nasal cilia. These findings indicate that the ciliated epithelium of the mucociliary transport apparatus is a novel target of MSP. Ciliary motility is critical for mucociliary transport. Our findings suggest that the MSP-RON signaling pathway is a novel regulatory system of mucociliary function and might be involved in the host defense and fertilization. PMID:9045873

  13. Regulation of glycine receptor diffusion properties and gephyrin interactions by protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Christian G; Grünewald, Nora; Pascual, Olivier; Rostgaard, Nina; Schwarz, Günter; Triller, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) can dynamically exchange between synaptic and extrasynaptic locations through lateral diffusion within the plasma membrane. Their accumulation at inhibitory synapses depends on the interaction of the β-subunit of the GlyR with the synaptic scaffold protein gephyrin. An alteration of receptor–gephyrin binding could thus shift the equilibrium between synaptic and extrasynaptic GlyRs and modulate the strength of inhibitory neurotransmission. Using a combination of dynamic imaging and biochemical approaches, we have characterised the molecular mechanism that links the GlyR–gephyrin interaction with GlyR diffusion and synaptic localisation. We have identified a protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation site within the cytoplasmic domain of the β-subunit of the GlyR (residue S403) that causes a reduction of the binding affinity between the receptor and gephyrin. In consequence, the receptor's diffusion in the plasma membrane is accelerated and GlyRs accumulate less strongly at synapses. We propose that the regulation of GlyR dynamics by PKC thus contributes to the plasticity of inhibitory synapses and may be involved in maladaptive forms of synaptic plasticity. PMID:21829170

  14. Lectin Receptor Kinases Participate in Protein-Protein Interactions to Mediate Plasma Membrane-Cell Wall Adhesions in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces. PMID:16361528

  15. Lectin receptor kinases participate in protein-protein interactions to mediate plasma membrane-cell wall adhesions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces.

  16. Differential role of protein kinase C in desensitization of muscarinic receptor induced by phorbol esters and receptor agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Wi Sheung.

    1989-01-01

    PKC, a phorbol ester receptor, copurified with specific binding sites of ({sup 3}H)phorbol-12,13,-dibutyrate (({sup 3}H)PDBu). The specific binding of ({sup 3}H)PDBu to intact cells was saturable to a single class of binding sites. The PKC and phorbol ester receptors in N1E-115 cells can be down regulated by prolonged phorbol ester incubation. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) suppressed muscarinic receptor-mediated cyclic GMP response in a time-dependent and a concentration-dependent fashion and the suppressive effect of PMA could be attenuated by a protein kinase inhibitor, H-7, as well as by down-regulation of the PKC through long-term incubation with PDBu. Exposure of the cells to the muscarinic agonist carbamylcholine also desensitized subsequent CBC-mediated cyclic GMP response. However, pretreatment with carbamylcholine did not desensitize histamine-induced cyclic GMP formation while treatment with PMA suppressed this histamine-mediated response. Preincubation of the cells with CBC, but not with phorbol ester, resulted in down-regulation of muscarinic receptors. The loss of muscarinic receptors induced by agonist even occurred when the phosphoinositide hydrolysis response was suppressed.

  17. Molecular Mechanism for Inhibition of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 by a Selective RNA Aptamer

    SciTech Connect

    Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lennarz, Sabine; Mayer, Günter; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-08-31

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is maintained in part by the rapid desensitization of activated heptahelical receptors that have been phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). However, during chronic heart failure GRK2 is upregulated and believed to contribute to disease progression. We have determined crystallographic structures of GRK2 bound to an RNA aptamer that potently and selectively inhibits kinase activity. Key to the mechanism of inhibition is the positioning of an adenine nucleotide into the ATP-binding pocket and interactions with the basic {alpha}F-{alpha}G loop region of the GRK2 kinase domain. Constraints imposed on the RNA by the terminal stem of the aptamer also play a role. These results highlight how a high-affinity aptamer can be used to selectively trap a novel conformational state of a protein kinase.

  18. Roles of mitogen activated protein kinases and EGF receptor in arsenite-stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-9 production

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; Myers, Terrance Alix; Rosenberg, Martina; Chavez, Miquella; Hudson, Laurie G. . E-mail: lghudson@unm.edu

    2004-11-01

    The dermatotoxicity of arsenic is well established and epidemiological studies identify an increased incidence of keratinocytic tumors (basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma) associated with arsenic exposure. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms of arsenic-mediated skin carcinogenesis, but activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and subsequent regulation of downstream target genes may contribute to tumor promotion and progression. In this study, we investigated activation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and the stress-associated kinase p38 by arsenite in HaCat cells, a spontaneously immortalized human keratinocyte cell line. Arsenite concentrations {>=}100 {mu}M stimulate rapid activation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. However, upon extended exposure (24 h), persistent stimulation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases was detected at low micromolar concentrations of arsenite. Although ERK and p38 were activated with similar time and concentration dependence, the mechanism of activation differed for these two MAP kinases. ERK activation by arsenite was fully dependent on the catalytic activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and partially dependent on Src-family kinase activity. In contrast, p38 activation was independent of EGF receptor or Src-family kinase activity. Arsenite-stimulated MAP kinase signal transduction resulted in increased production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, an AP-1 regulated gene product. MMP-9 induction by arsenite was prevented when EGF receptor or MAP kinase signaling was inhibited. These studies indicate that EGF receptor activation is a component of arsenite-mediated signal transduction and gene expression in keratinocytes and that low micromolar concentrations of arsenite stimulate key signaling pathways upon extended exposure. Stimulation of MAP kinase cascades by arsenic and subsequent regulation of genes including c-fos, c-jun, and the matrix degrading proteases may play an important

  19. Resveratrol up-regulates AMPA receptor expression via AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated protein translation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guan; Amato, Stephen; Gilbert, James; Man, Heng-Ye

    2015-08-01

    Resveratrol is a phytoalexin that confers overall health benefits including positive regulation in brain function such as learning and cognition. However, whether and how resveratrol affects synaptic activity remains largely unknown. α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are glutamatergic receptors that mediate the majority of fast excitatory transmission and synaptic plasticity, and thus play a critical role in higher brain functions, including learning and memory. We find that in rat primary neurons, resveratrol can rapidly increase AMPAR protein level, AMPAR synaptic accumulation and the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission. The resveratrol effect on AMPAR protein expression is independent of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), the conventional downstream target of resveratrol, but rather is mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and subsequent downstream phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling. Application of the AMPK specific activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) mimics the effects of resveratrol on both signaling and AMPAR expression. The resveratrol-induced increase in AMPAR expression results from elevated protein synthesis via regulation of the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E/4G complex. Disruption of the translation initiation complex completely blocks resveratrol-dependent AMPAR up-regulation. These findings indicate that resveratrol may regulate brain function through facilitation of AMPAR biogenesis and synaptic transmission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Resveratrol Up-regulates AMPA Receptor Expression via AMP-activated protein kinase – mediated Protein Translation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guan; Amato, Stephen; Gilbert, James; Man, Heng-Ye

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a phytoalexin that confers overall health benefits including positive regulation in brain function such as learning and cognition. However, whether and how resveratrol affects synaptic activity remains largely unknown. α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are glutamatergic receptors that mediate the majority of fast excitatory transmission and synaptic plasticity, and thus play a critical role in higher brain functions, including learning and memory. We find that in rat primary neurons, resveratrol can rapidly increase AMPAR protein level, AMPAR synaptic accumulation and the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission. The resveratrol effect on AMPAR protein expression is independent of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), the conventional downstream target of resveratrol, but rather is mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and subsequent downstream phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling. Application of the AMPK specific activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR) mimics the effects of resveratrol on both signaling and AMPAR expression. The resveratrol-induced increase in AMPAR expression results from elevated protein synthesis via regulation of the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E/4G complex. Disruption of the translation initiation complex completely blocks resveratrol-dependent AMPAR up-regulation. These findings indicate that resveratrol may regulate brain function through facilitation of AMPAR biogenesis and synaptic transmission. PMID:25791529

  1. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 plays a relevant role in insulin resistance and obesity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Guerra, Lucia; Nieto-Vazquez, Iria; Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Jurado-Pueyo, María; Zalba, Guillermo; Díez, Javier; Murga, Cristina; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Mayor, Federico; Lorenzo, Margarita

    2010-10-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Given the emerging role of signal transduction in these syndromes, we set out to explore the possible role that G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), first identified as a G protein-coupled receptor regulator, could have as a modulator of insulin responses. We analyzed the influence of GRK2 levels in insulin signaling in myoblasts and adipocytes with experimentally increased or silenced levels of GRK2, as well as in GRK2 hemizygous animals expressing 50% lower levels of this kinase in three different models of insulin resistance: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) infusion, aging, and high-fat diet (HFD). Glucose transport, whole-body glucose and insulin tolerance, the activation status of insulin pathway components, and the circulating levels of important mediators were measured. The development of obesity and adipocyte size with age and HFD was analyzed. Altering GRK2 levels markedly modifies insulin-mediated signaling in cultured adipocytes and myocytes. GRK2 levels are increased by ∼2-fold in muscle and adipose tissue in the animal models tested, as well as in lymphocytes from metabolic syndrome patients. In contrast, hemizygous GRK2 mice show enhanced insulin sensitivity and do not develop insulin resistance by TNF-α, aging, or HFD. Furthermore, reduced GRK2 levels induce a lean phenotype and decrease age-related adiposity. Overall, our data identify GRK2 as an important negative regulator of insulin effects, key to the etiopathogenesis of insulin resistance and obesity, which uncovers this protein as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of these disorders.

  2. Avr4 promotes Cf-4 receptor-like protein association with the BAK1/SERK3 receptor-like kinase to initiate receptor endocytosis and plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Postma, Jelle; Liebrand, Thomas W H; Bi, Guozhi; Evrard, Alexandre; Bye, Ruby R; Mbengue, Malick; Kuhn, Hannah; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; Robatzek, Silke

    2016-04-01

    The first layer of plant immunity is activated by cell surface receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and proteins (RLPs) that detect infectious pathogens. Constitutive interaction with the SUPPRESSOR OF BIR1 (SOBIR1) RLK contributes to RLP stability and kinase activity. As RLK activation requires transphosphorylation with a second associated RLK, it remains elusive how RLPs initiate downstream signaling. We employed live-cell imaging, gene silencing and coimmunoprecipitation to investigate the requirement of associated kinases for functioning and ligand-induced subcellular trafficking of Cf RLPs that mediate immunity of tomato against Cladosporium fulvum. Our research shows that after elicitation with matching effector ligands Avr4 and Avr9, BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE 1/SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR KINASE 3 (BAK1/SERK3) associates with Cf-4 and Cf-9. BAK1/SERK3 is required for the effector-triggered hypersensitive response and resistance of tomato against C. fulvum. Furthermore, Cf-4 interacts with SOBIR1 at the plasma membrane and is recruited to late endosomes upon Avr4 trigger, also depending on BAK1/SERK3. These observations indicate that RLP-mediated resistance and endocytosis require ligand-induced recruitment of BAK1/SERK3, reminiscent of BAK1/SERK3 interaction and subcellular fate of the FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 (FLS2) RLK. This reveals that diverse classes of cell surface immune receptors share common requirements for initiation of resistance and endocytosis. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. G protein-coupled receptor kinase and beta-arrestin-mediated desensitization of the angiotensin II type 1A receptor elucidated by diacylglycerol dynamics.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Dewire, Scott M; Barnes, William G; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2006-11-24

    Receptor desensitization progressively limits responsiveness of cells to chronically applied stimuli. Desensitization in the continuous presence of agonist has been difficult to study with available assay methods. Here, we used a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based live cell assay for the second messenger diacylglycerol to measure desensitization of a model seven-transmembrane receptor, the Gq-coupled angiotensin II type 1(A) receptor, expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. In response to angiotensin II, we observed a transient diacylglycerol response reflecting activation and complete desensitization of the receptor within 2-5 min. By utilizing a variety of approaches including graded tetracycline-inducible receptor expression, mutated receptors, and overexpression or short interfering RNA-mediated silencing of putative components of the cellular desensitization machinery, we conclude that the rate and extent of receptor desensitization are critically determined by the following: receptor concentration in the plasma membrane; the presence of phosphorylation sites on the carboxyl terminus of the receptor; kinase activity of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, but not of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 3, 5, or 6; and stoichiometric expression of beta-arrestin. The findings introduce the use of the biosensor diacylglycerol reporter as a powerful means for studying Gq-coupled receptor desensitization and document that, at the levels of receptor overexpression commonly used in such studies, the properties of the desensitization process are markedly perturbed and do not reflect normal cellular physiology.

  4. Receptor-interacting protein kinases modulate noise-induced sensory hair cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, H-W; Chen, J; Sha, S-H

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases promote the induction of necrotic cell death pathways. Here we investigated signaling pathways in outer hair cells (OHCs) of adult male CBA/J mice exposed to noise that causes permanent threshold shifts, with a particular focus on RIP kinase-regulated necroptosis. One hour after noise exposure, nuclei of OHCs in the basal region of the cochlea displayed both apoptotic and necrotic features. RIP1 and RIP3 protein levels increased and caspase-8 was activated. Treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor ZVAD blocked the activation of caspase-8 and reduced the number of apoptotic nuclei, while increasing levels of RIP1, RIP3, and necrotic OHCs. Conversely, treatment with necrosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) or RIP3 siRNA (siRIP3) diminished noise-induced increases in RIP1 and RIP3, and decreased necrotic OHC nuclei. This treatment also increased the number of apoptotic nuclei without increasing activation of caspase-8. Consistent with the elevation of levels of RIP1 and RIP3, noise-induced active AMPKα levels increased with ZVAD treatment, but decreased with Nec-1 and siRIP3 treatment. Furthermore, treatment with siRIP3 did not alter the activation of caspase-8, but instead increased activation of caspase-9 and promoted endonuclease G translocation into OHC nuclei. Finally, auditory brainstem response functional measurements and morphological assessment of OHCs showed that ZVAD treatment reduces noise-induced deficits. This protective function is potentiated when combined with siRIP3 treatment. In conclusion, noise-induced OHC apoptosis and necrosis are modulated by caspases and RIP kinases, respectively. Inhibition of either pathway shifts the prevalence of OHC death to the alternative pathway. PMID:24874734

  5. Receptor protein kinase FERONIA controls leaf starch accumulation by interacting with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Wang, Long; Li, Chiyu; Liu, Ying; Zhu, Sirui; Qi, Yinyao; Liu, Xuanming; Lin, Qinglu; Luan, Sheng; Yu, Feng

    2015-09-11

    Cell expansion is coordinated by several cues, but available energy is the major factor determining growth. Receptor protein kinase FERONIA (FER) is a master regulator of cell expansion, but the details of its control mechanisms are not clear. Here we show that FER interacts with cytosolic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, GAPC1 and GAPC2), that catalyzes a key reaction in glycolysis, which contributes to energy production. When there is an FER deficiency, there are corresponding decreases in the enzyme activity of GAPDH and increased amounts of starch. More importantly, gapc1/2 mutants mimic fer4 mutants. These data indicate that FER regulated starch content is an evolutionarily conserved function in plants that connects the cell expansion and energy metabolism pathways.

  6. G Protein Coupled Receptor Kinase 3 Regulates Breast Cancer Migration, Invasion, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Matthew J.; Fitzhugh, David J.; Parker, Joel S.; Brozowski, Jaime M.; McGinnis, Marcus W.; Timoshchenko, Roman G.; Serafin, D. Stephen; Lininger, Ruth; Klauber-Demore, Nancy; Sahagian, Gary; Truong, Young K.; Sassano, Maria F.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease that has a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Chemokine receptor interactions are important modulators of breast cancer metastasis; however, it is now recognized that quantitative surface expression of one important chemokine receptor, CXCR4, may not directly correlate with metastasis and that its functional activity in breast cancer may better inform tumor pathogenicity. G protein coupled receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) is a negative regulator of CXCR4 activity, and we show that GRK expression correlates with tumorigenicity, molecular subtype, and metastatic potential in human tumor microarray analysis. Using established human breast cancer cell lines and an immunocompetent in vivo mouse model, we further demonstrate that alterations in GRK3 expression levels in tumor cells directly affect migration and invasion in vitro and the establishment of distant metastasis in vivo. The effects of GRK3 modulation appear to be specific to chemokine-mediated migration behaviors without influencing tumor cell proliferation or survival. These data demonstrate that GRK3 dysregulation may play an important part in TNBC metastasis. PMID:27049755

  7. Antifibrotic effects of noscapine through activation of prostaglandin E2 receptors and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Kach, Jacob; Sandbo, Nathan; La, Jennifer; Denner, Darcy; Reed, Eleanor B; Akimova, Olga; Koltsova, Svetlana; Orlov, Sergei N; Dulin, Nickolai O

    2014-03-14

    Myofibroblast differentiation is a key process in the pathogenesis of fibrotic disease. We have shown previously that differentiation of myofibroblasts is regulated by microtubule polymerization state. In this work, we examined the potential antifibrotic effects of the antitussive drug, noscapine, recently found to bind microtubules and affect microtubule dynamics. Noscapine inhibited TGF-β-induced differentiation of cultured human lung fibroblasts (HLFs). Therapeutic noscapine treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of pulmonary fibrosis in the bleomycin model of the disease. Noscapine did not affect gross microtubule content in HLFs, but inhibited TGF-β-induced stress fiber formation and activation of serum response factor without affecting Smad signaling. Furthermore, noscapine stimulated a rapid and profound activation of protein kinase A (PKA), which mediated the antifibrotic effect of noscapine in HLFs, as assessed with the PKA inhibitor, PKI. In contrast, noscapine did not activate PKA in human bronchial or alveolar epithelial cells. Finally, activation of PKA and the antifibrotic effect of noscapine in HLFs were blocked by the EP2 prostaglandin E2 receptor antagonist, PF-04418948, but not by the antagonists of EP4, prostaglandin D2, or prostacyclin receptors. Together, we demonstrate for the first time the antifibrotic effect of noscapine in vitro and in vivo, and we describe a novel mechanism of noscapine action through EP2 prostaglandin E2 receptor-mediated activation of PKA in pulmonary fibroblasts.

  8. Molecular modeling of G-protein coupled receptor kinase 2: docking and biochemical evaluation of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kassack, M U; Högger, P; Gschwend, D A; Kameyama, K; Haga, T; Graul, R C; Sadée, W

    2000-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) regulates the activity of many receptors. Because potent inhibitors of GRK2 are thus far limited to polyanionic compounds like heparin, we searched for new inhibitors with the aid of a molecular model of GRK2. We used the available crystal structure of cAMP dependent protein kinase (cAPK) as a template to construct a 3D homology model of GRK2. Known cAPK and GRK2 inhibitors were docked into the active sites of GRK2 and cAPK using DOCK v3.5. H8 docked into the hydrophobic pocket of the adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) binding site of cAPK, consistent with its known competitive cAPK inhibition relative to ATP. Similarly, 3 of 4 known GRK2 inhibitors docked into the ATP binding pocket of GRK2 with good scores. Screening the Fine Chemicals Directory (FCD, containing the 3D structures of 13,000 compounds) for docking into the active sites of GRK2 identified H8 and the known GRK2 inhibitor trifluoperazine as candidates. Whereas H8 indeed inhibited light-dependent phosphorylation of rhodopsin by GRK2, but with low potency, 3 additional FCD compounds with promising GRK2 scores failed to inhibit GRK2. This result demonstrates limitations of the GRK2 model in predicting activity among diverse chemical structures. Docking suramin, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (not present in FCD) yielded a good fit into the ATP binding site of GRK2 over cAPK. Suramin did inhibit GRK2 with IC50 32 microM (pA26.39 for competitive inhibition of ATP). Suramin congeners with fewer sulfonic acid residues (NF062, NF503 [IC50 14 microM]) or representing half of the suramin molecule (NF520) also inhibited GRK2 as predicted by docking. In conclusion, suramin and analogues are lead compounds in the development of more potent and selective inhibitors of GRK2.

  9. Interaction between protein kinase Cmu and the vanilloid receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Kedei, Noemi; Wang, Min; Wang, Q Jane; Huppler, Anna R; Toth, Attila; Tran, Richard; Blumberg, Peter M

    2004-12-17

    The capsaicin receptor VR1 is a polymodal nociceptor activated by multiple stimuli. It has been reported that protein kinase C plays a role in the sensitization of VR1. Protein kinase D/PKCmu is a member of the protein kinase D serine/threonine kinase family that exhibits structural, enzymological, and regulatory features distinct from those of the PKCs, with which they are related. As part of our effort to optimize conditions for evaluating VR1 pharmacology, we found that treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells heterologously expressing rat VR1 (CHO/rVR1) with butyrate enhanced rVR1 expression and activity. The expression of PKCmu and PKCbeta1, but not of other PKC isoforms, was also enhanced by butyrate treatment, suggesting the possibility that these two isoforms might contribute to the enhanced activity of rVR1. In support of this hypothesis, we found the following. 1) Overexpression of PKCmu enhanced the response of rVR1 to capsaicin and low pH, and expression of a dominant negative variant of PKCmu reduced the response of rVR1. 2) Reduction of endogenous PKCmu using antisense oligonucleotides decreased the response of exogenous rVR1 expressed in CHO cells as well as of endogenous rVR1 in dorsal root ganglion neurons. 3) PKCmu localized to the plasma membrane when overexpressed in CHO/rVR1 cells. 4) PKCmu directly bound to rVR1 expressed in CHO cells as well as to endogenous rVR1 in dorsal root ganglia or to an N-terminal fragment of rVR1, indicating a direct interaction between PKCmu and rVR1. 5) PKCmu directly phosphorylated rVR1 or a longer N-terminal fragment (amino acids 1-118) of rVR1 but not a shorter one (amino acids 1-99). 6) Mutation of S116A in rVR1 blocked both the phosphorylation of rVR1 by PKCmu and the enhancement by PKCmu of the rVR1 response to capsaicin. We conclude that PKCmu functions as a direct modulator of rVR1.

  10. The receptor kinase family: primary structure of rhodopsin kinase reveals similarities to the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, W; Inglese, J; Palczewski, K; Onorato, J J; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J

    1991-01-01

    Light-dependent deactivation of rhodopsin as well as homologous desensitization of beta-adrenergic receptors involves receptor phosphorylation that is mediated by the highly specific protein kinases rhodopsin kinase (RK) and beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK), respectively. We report here the cloning of a complementary DNA for RK. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a high degree of homology to beta ARK. In a phylogenetic tree constructed by comparing the catalytic domains of several protein kinases, RK and beta ARK are located on a branch close to, but separate from the cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C subfamilies. From the common structural features we conclude that both RK and beta ARK are members of a newly delineated gene family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor kinases that may function in diverse pathways to regulate the function of such receptors. Images PMID:1656454

  11. Regulation of ERBB Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activities in Breast Cancer by the KEK Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-01

    can also inhibit transformation in mouse mammary tumor cells with deregulated expression of receptors and ligands of the ErbB family. 14. SUBJECT...Reportable outcomes Conclusions References Appendices 7 4 5. INTRODUCTION: In 20-30% of breast tumors , ErbB2, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) of the...inhibit transformation in mouse mammary tumor cells with deregulated expression of receptors and ligands of the ErbB family. In the second year of

  12. Vinblastine-dependent down-modulation of TNF receptors in human osteosarcoma cells is mediated by protein kinase C activity.

    PubMed

    Boscoboinik, D; Galeotti, T; Azzi, A

    1994-02-28

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) to a human osteogenic sarcoma cell line (Saos-2) was investigated. These cells express two types of receptors as determined by specific monoclonal antibodies. Vinblastine induced a down-modulation of these receptors weaker than the one produced by phorbol esters or okadaic acid treatment. On exposure of cells to 10 microM vinblastine for two hours an approximately 55-65% diminution of TNF binding was observed, but only 20% reduction occurred under long-term vinblastine treatment. TNF receptor down-modulation induced by vinblastine was partially prevented by protein kinase C inhibitors or protein kinase C depletion. It is suggested that the regulation of TNF binding to each one of its receptors in Saos-2 cells always occurs in a phosphorylation-dependent manner.

  13. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.

    Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.

    Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  14. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.

    Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.

    Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  15. Somatocrinin receptor coupled with cAMP-dependent protein kinase on anterior pituitary granules.

    PubMed

    Lewin, M J; Reyl-Desmars, F; Ling, N

    1983-11-01

    The molecular mechanism of growth hormone release by synthetic somatocrinin was investigated on purified hog anterior pituitary secretory granules; the granules were found to contain a cAMP-dependent protein kinase that catalyzed [gamma-32P]-ATP histone phosphorylation with maximal rates ranging from 1 to 5 nmol of Pi incorporated per mg of protein per 20 min. The activity of this enzyme was further stimulated by somatocrinin. Stimulation was observed at concentrations as low as 0.3 pM, and the half-maximal effect was obtained with 35 +/- 8 pM (n = 4). Michaelis-Menten analysis of phosphorylation kinetics suggested that the peptide did not change significantly the reaction's Vmax, but produced a dramatic increase in enzyme affinity for cAMP: the apparent Km for the nucleotide decreased from 400 X 10(-9) M under unstimulated conditions to 15 X 10(-9) M in the presence of 100 pM somatocrinin. Furthermore, a Hill plot of concentration-dependence curve indicated the existence of negative cooperativity. At the concentration of 35 pM, the less potent analogs of somatocrinin [designated hpGRF-44 to indicate source (human pancreas, hp), activity (growth hormone-releasing factor, GRF), and amino acid composition], hpGRF-(1-37) and [Phe1]hpGRF-(1-40) had 20% and 7%, respectively, of the effect of somatocrinin. The biologically inactive analog hpGRF-(2-40) had no evident effect at concentrations up to 0.1 microM. Therefore, we suggest that somatocrinin stimulation of growth hormone release involves activation of exocytosis through a phosphorylation mechanism mediated by a granular receptor coupled with a cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  16. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  17. Regulated exocytosis contributes to protein kinase C potentiation of vanilloid receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Morenilla-Palao, Cruz; Planells-Cases, Rosa; García-Sanz, Nuria; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2004-06-11

    The vanilloid receptor-1 (TRPV1) plays a key role in the perception of peripheral thermal and inflammatory pain. TRPV1 expression and channel activity are notably up-regulated by proalgesic agents. The transduction pathways involved in TRPV1 sensitization are still elusive. We have used a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that associate with the N terminus of TRPV1. We report that two vesicular proteins, Snapin and synaptotagmin IX (Syt IX), strongly interact in vitro and in vivo with the TRPV1 N-terminal domain. In primary dorsal root ganglion neurons, TRPV1 co-distributes in vesicles with Syt IX and the vesicular protein synaptobrevin. Neither Snapin nor Syt IX affected channel function, but they notably inhibited protein kinase C (PKC)-induced potentiation of TRPV1 channel activity with a potency that rivaled the blockade evoked by botulinum neurotoxin A, a potent blocker of neuronal exocytosis. Noteworthily, we found that PKC activation induced a rapid delivery of functional TRPV1 channels to the plasma membrane. Botulinum neurotoxin A blocked the TRPV1 membrane translocation induced by PKC that was activated with a phorbol ester or the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR5. Therefore, our results indicate that PKC signaling promotes at least in part the SNARE-dependent exocytosis of TRPV1 to the cell surface. Taken together, these findings imply that activity-dependent delivery of channels to the neuronal surface may contribute to the buildup and maintenance of thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia in peripheral nociceptor terminals.

  18. Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor sequences as E. coli fusion proteins: applications in the study of tyrosine kinase function.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; O'Brien, K M; Cerione, R A

    1990-01-15

    To investigate the functions of key domains of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), various EGFR-derived peptide sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins. The purified fusion proteins (GST-TK0-8) were tested as substrates for the tyrosine kinase activities of the EGFR and c-src. Both the GST-TK4 fusion protein, which contains the major C-terminal tyrosine autophosphorylation sites of the EGFR, and GST-TK7, which contains the connecting sequence between the EGFR kinase domain and the C-terminal autophosphorylation domain, were strongly phosphorylated by the EGFR and c-src. Hence the candidate tyrosine phosphorylation sites present in the connecting sequences of the EGFR, as well as the known autophosphorylation sites of the EGFR, can be phosphorylated by the two tyrosine kinases. The protein GST-TK7 was phosphorylated by c-src with a KM of 5-10 microM, which indicated a potential interaction between the connecting segment of the EGFR and the c-src kinase. The GST fusion proteins were also used to map the sites recognized by two anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies and a polyclonal serum raised against an EGFR tyrosine kinase domain fragment. The recognition site of one monoclonal antibody was determined to be in a short sequence surrounding tyr1068, a primary site of autophosphorylation in the C-terminal domain of the receptor. The anti-peptide polyclonal serum recognized only sequences in the GST-TK7 fusion protein, and hence binds to the connecting sequence between the kinase core and the C-terminal domain. These antibodies will therefore be useful reagents for studying the function of two key structural elements of the EGFR tyrosine kinase. The GST-TK fusion proteins should have many other applications in the study of EGFR catalysis and mitogenic signalling.

  19. The Interplay of AMP-activated Protein Kinase and Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer Cells†

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Min; Zhang, Zhen; Ratnam, Manohar; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently emerged as a potential target for cancer therapy due to the observation that activation of AMPK inhibits tumor cell growth. It is well-known that androgen receptor (AR) signaling is a major driver for the development and progression of prostate cancer and that downregulation of AR is a critical step in the induction of apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. However, little is known about the potential interaction between AMPK and AR signaling pathways. In the current study, we showed that activation of AMPK by metformin caused decrease of AR protein level through suppression of AR mRNA expression and promotion of AR protein degradation, demonstrating that AMPK activation is upstream of AR downregulation. We also showed that inhibition of AR function by an anti-androgen or its siRNA enhanced AMPK activation and growth inhibition whereas overexpression of AR delayed AMPK activation and increased prostate cancer cellular resistance to metformin treatment, suggesting that AR suppresses AMPK signaling-mediated growth inhibition in a feedback mechanism. Our findings thus reveal a novel AMPK-AR regulatory loop in prostate cancer cells and should have a potential clinical significance. PMID:24129850

  20. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins as chaperones and co-receptors for FERONIA receptor kinase signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Yeh, Fang-Ling; Cheung, Alice Y; Duan, Qiaohong; Kita, Daniel; Liu, Ming-Che; Maman, Jacob; Luu, Emily J; Wu, Brendan W; Gates, Laura; Jalal, Methun; Kwong, Amy; Carpenter, Hunter; Wu, Hen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis receptor kinase FERONIA (FER) is a multifunctional regulator for plant growth and reproduction. Here we report that the female gametophyte-expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein (GPI-AP) LORELEI and the seedling-expressed LRE-like GPI-AP1 (LLG1) bind to the extracellular juxtamembrane region of FER and show that this interaction is pivotal for FER function. LLG1 interacts with FER in the endoplasmic reticulum and on the cell surface, and loss of LLG1 function induces cytoplasmic retention of FER, consistent with transport of FER from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in a complex with LLG1. We further demonstrate that LLG1 is a component of the FER-regulated RHO GTPase signaling complex and that fer and llg1 mutants display indistinguishable growth, developmental and signaling phenotypes, analogous to how lre and fer share similar reproductive defects. Together our results support LLG1/LRE acting as a chaperone and co-receptor for FER and elucidate a mechanism by which GPI-APs enable the signaling capacity of a cell surface receptor. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06587.001 PMID:26052747

  1. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins as chaperones and co-receptors for FERONIA receptor kinase signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Yeh, Fang-Ling; Cheung, Alice Y; Duan, Qiaohong; Kita, Daniel; Liu, Ming-Che; Maman, Jacob; Luu, Emily J; Wu, Brendan W; Gates, Laura; Jalal, Methun; Kwong, Amy; Carpenter, Hunter; Wu, Hen-Ming

    2015-06-08

    The Arabidopsis receptor kinase FERONIA (FER) is a multifunctional regulator for plant growth and reproduction. Here we report that the female gametophyte-expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein (GPI-AP) LORELEI and the seedling-expressed LRE-like GPI-AP1 (LLG1) bind to the extracellular juxtamembrane region of FER and show that this interaction is pivotal for FER function. LLG1 interacts with FER in the endoplasmic reticulum and on the cell surface, and loss of LLG1 function induces cytoplasmic retention of FER, consistent with transport of FER from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in a complex with LLG1. We further demonstrate that LLG1 is a component of the FER-regulated RHO GTPase signaling complex and that fer and llg1 mutants display indistinguishable growth, developmental and signaling phenotypes, analogous to how lre and fer share similar reproductive defects. Together our results support LLG1/LRE acting as a chaperone and co-receptor for FER and elucidate a mechanism by which GPI-APs enable the signaling capacity of a cell surface receptor.

  2. G-protein receptor kinase 5 regulates the cannabinoid receptor 2-induced up-regulation of serotonin 2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Jade M; Carrasco, Gonzalo A

    2013-05-31

    We have recently reported that cannabinoid agonists can up-regulate and enhance the activity of serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptors in the prefrontal cortex (PFCx). Increased expression and activity of cortical 5-HT2A receptors has been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and schizophrenia. Here we report that repeated CP55940 exposure selectively up-regulates GRK5 proteins in rat PFCx and in a neuronal cell culture model. We sought to examine the mechanism underlying the regulation of GRK5 and to identify the role of GRK5 in the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation and enhanced activity of 5-HT2A receptors. Interestingly, we found that cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation of GRK5 involves CB2 receptors, β-arrestin 2, and ERK1/2 signaling because treatment with CB2 shRNA lentiviral particles, β-arrestin 2 shRNA lentiviral particles, or ERK1/2 inhibitor prevented the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation of GRK5. Most importantly, we found that GRK5 shRNA lentiviral particle treatment prevented the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation and enhanced 5-HT2A receptor-mediated calcium release. Repeated cannabinoid exposure was also associated with enhanced phosphorylation of CB2 receptors and increased interaction between β-arrestin 2 and ERK1/2. These latter phenomena were also significantly inhibited by GRK5 shRNA lentiviral treatment. Our results suggest that sustained activation of CB2 receptors, which up-regulates 5-HT2A receptor signaling, enhances GRK5 expression; the phosphorylation of CB2 receptors; and the β-arrestin 2/ERK interactions. These data could provide a rationale for some of the adverse effects associated with repeated cannabinoid agonist exposure.

  3. Sequestration of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor hm1-hm5 subtypes: effect of G protein-coupled receptor kinases GRK2, GRK4, GRK5 and GRK6.

    PubMed

    Tsuga, H; Okuno, E; Kameyama, K; Haga, T

    1998-03-01

    Sequestration of porcine muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) expressed in COS-7 cells is facilitated by coexpression of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 (GRK2). We examined the effect of coexpression of GRK2, GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 on sequestration of human m1-m5 receptors expressed in COS-7 cells, which was assessed as loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding activity from the cell surface. Sequestration of m4 receptors as well as m2 receptors was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 and attenuated by coexpression of the dominant negative form of GRK2 (DN-GRK2). Sequestration of m3 and m5 receptors also was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 but not affected by coexpression of DN-GRK2. On the other hand, proportions of sequestered m1 receptors were not significantly different with coexpression of GRK2 and DN-GRK2. GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 did not facilitate sequestration of m1-m5 receptors in COS-7 cells, except that the sequestration of m2 receptors tended to be facilitated by coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6. However, coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5, but not GRK6, in BHK-21 cells facilitated sequestration of m2, but not m3, receptors. These results indicate that the effect of GRK2 to facilitate receptor sequestration is not restricted to m2 receptors but is generalized to other muscarinic receptors except m1 receptors and that other kinases, including GRK4 delta, GRK5 and endogenous kinase(s) in COS-7 cells, also contribute to sequestration of m2 and m4 receptors.

  4. The Dtk receptor tyrosine kinase, which binds protein S, is expressed during hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Crosier, P S; Freeman, S A; Orlic, D; Bodine, D M; Crosier, K E

    1996-02-01

    Dtk (Tyro 3/Sky/Rse/Brt/Tif) belongs to a recently recognized subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that also includes Ufo (Axl/Ark) and Mer (Eyk). Ligands for Dtk and Ufo have been identified as protein S and the related molecule Gas6, respectively. This study examined expression of Dtk during ontogeny of the hematopoietic system and compared the pattern of expression with that of Ufo. Both receptors were abundantly expressed in differentiating embryonic stem cells, yolk sac blood islands, para-aortic splanchnopleural mesoderm, fractionated AA4+ fetal liver cells, and fetal thymus from day 14 until birth. Although Ufo was expressed at moderate levels in adult bone marrow, expression of Dtk in this tissue was barely detectable. In adult bone marrow subpopulations fractionated using counterflow centrifugal elutriation, immunomagnetic bead selection for lineage-depletion and FACS sorting for c-kit expression, very low levels of Dtk and/or Ufo were detected in some cell fractions. These results suggest that Dtk and Ufo are likely to be involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis, particularly during the embryonic stages of blood cell development.

  5. Plasma membrane and nuclear localization of G protein coupled receptor kinase 6A.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoshan; Benovic, Jeffrey L; Wedegaertner, Philip B

    2007-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) specifically phosphorylate agonist-occupied GPCRs at the inner surface of the plasma membrane (PM), leading to receptor desensitization. Here we show that the C-terminal 30 amino acids of GRK6A contain multiple elements that either promote or inhibit PM localization. Disruption of palmitoylation by individual mutation of cysteine 561, 562, or 565 or treatment of cells with 2-bromopalmitate shifts GRK6A from the PM to both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Likewise, disruption of the hydrophobic nature of a predicted amphipathic helix by mutation of two leucines to alanines at positions 551 and 552 causes a loss of PM localization. Moreover, acidic amino acids in the C-terminus appear to negatively regulate PM localization; mutational replacement of several acidic residues with neutral or basic residues rescues PM localization of a palmitoylation-defective GRK6A. Last, we characterize the novel nuclear localization, showing that nuclear export of nonpalmitoylated GRK6A is sensitive to leptomycin B and that GRK6A contains a potential nuclear localization signal. Our results suggest that the C-terminus of GRK6A contains a novel electrostatic palmitoyl switch in which acidic residues weaken the membrane-binding strength of the amphipathic helix, thus allowing changes in palmitoylation to regulate PM versus cytoplasmic/nuclear localization.

  6. Free fatty acids and protein kinase C activation induce GPR120 (free fatty acid receptor 4) phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Takei, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-01-15

    GPR120, free fatty acid receptor 4, is a recently deorphanized G protein-coupled receptor that seems to play cardinal roles in the regulation of metabolism and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and metabolic disorders. In the present work a GPR120-Venus fusion protein was expressed in HEK293 Flp-In T-REx cells and its function (increase in intracellular calcium) and phosphorylation were studied. It was observed that the fusion protein migrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels as a band with a mass of ≈70-75kDa, although other bands of higher apparent weight (>130kDa) were also detected. Cell stimulation with docosahexaenoic acid or α-linolenic acid induced concentration-dependent increases in intracellular calcium and GPR120 phosphorylation. Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol esters also induced a marked receptor phosphorylation but did not alter the ability of 1µM docosahexaenoic acid to increase the intracellular calcium concentration. Phorbol ester-induced GPR120 phosphorylation, but not that induced with docosahexaenoic acid, was blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors (bis-indolyl-maleimide I and Gö 6976) suggesting that conventional kinase isoforms mediate this action. The absence of effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on agonist-induced GPR120 phosphorylation indicates that this kinase does not play a major role in agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation. Docosahexaenoic acid action was associated with marked GPR120 internalization whereas that induced with phorbol esters was smaller at early times. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. 5-HT2A SEROTONIN RECEPTOR BIOLOGY: Interacting proteins, kinases and paradoxical regulation

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Bryan L

    2011-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) serotonin receptors are important pharmacological targets for a large number of central nervous system and peripheral serotonergic medications. In this review article I summarize work mainly from my lab regarding serotonin receptor anatomy, pharmacology, signaling and regulation. I highlight the role of serotonin receptor interacting proteins and the emerging paradigm of G-protein coupled receptor functional selectivity. PMID:21288474

  8. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and endothelial dysfunction: molecular insights and pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kumiko; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) and endothelial cells are the major cell types in blood vessels. The principal function of vascular SMC in the body is to regulate blood flow and pressure through contraction and relaxation. The endothelium performs a crucial role in maintaining vascular integrity by achieving whole-organ metabolic homeostasis via the production of factors associated with vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. In this review, we have focused on the production of nitric oxide (NO), a vasorelaxation factor. The extent of NO production represents a key marker in vascular health. A decrease in NO is capable of inducing pathological conditions associated with endothelial dysfunction, such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and atherosclerosis. Recent studies have strongly implicated the involvement of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in the progression of cardiovascular disease. Vasculature which is affected by insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes expresses high levels of GRK2, which may induce endothelial dysfunction by reducing intracellular NO. GRK2 activation also induces changes in the subcellular localization of GRK2 itself and also of β-arrestin 2, a downstream protein. In this review, we describe the pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance and diabetes, focusing on the signal transduction for NO production via GRK2 and β-arrestin 2, providing novel insights into the potential field of translational investigation in the treatment of diabetic complications.

  9. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and endothelial dysfunction: molecular insights and pathophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kumiko; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) and endothelial cells are the major cell types in blood vessels. The principal function of vascular SMC in the body is to regulate blood flow and pressure through contraction and relaxation. The endothelium performs a crucial role in maintaining vascular integrity by achieving whole-organ metabolic homeostasis via the production of factors associated with vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. In this review, we have focused on the production of nitric oxide (NO), a vasorelaxation factor. The extent of NO production represents a key marker in vascular health. A decrease in NO is capable of inducing pathological conditions associated with endothelial dysfunction, such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and atherosclerosis. Recent studies have strongly implicated the involvement of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in the progression of cardiovascular disease. Vasculature which is affected by insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes expresses high levels of GRK2, which may induce endothelial dysfunction by reducing intracellular NO. GRK2 activation also induces changes in the subcellular localization of GRK2 itself and also of β-arrestin 2, a downstream protein. In this review, we describe the pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance and diabetes, focusing on the signal transduction for NO production via GRK2 and β-arrestin 2, providing novel insights into the potential field of translational investigation in the treatment of diabetic complications. PMID:26447102

  10. G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 as a Potential Modulator of the Hallmarks of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nogués, Laura; Reglero, Clara; Rivas, Verónica; Neves, María; Penela, Petronila; Mayor, Federico

    2017-03-01

    Malignant features-such as sustained proliferation, refractoriness to growth suppressors, resistance to cell death or aberrant motility, and metastasis-can be triggered by a variety of mutations and signaling adaptations. Signaling nodes can act as cancer-associated factors by cooperating with oncogene-governed pathways or participating in compensatory transduction networks to strengthen tumor properties. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is arising as one of such nodes. Via its complex network of connections with other cellular proteins, GRK2 contributes to the modulation of basic cellular functions-such as cell proliferation, survival, or motility-and is involved in metabolic homeostasis, inflammation, or angiogenic processes. Moreover, altered GRK2 levels are starting to be reported in different tumoral contexts and shown to promote breast tumorigenesis or to trigger the tumoral angiogenic switch. The ability to modulate several of the hallmarks of cancer puts forward GRK2 as an oncomodifier, able to modulate carcinogenesis in a cell-type specific way.

  11. LIG family receptor tyrosine kinase-associated proteins modulate growth factor signals during neural development.

    PubMed

    Mandai, Kenji; Guo, Ting; St Hillaire, Coryse; Meabon, James S; Kanning, Kevin C; Bothwell, Mark; Ginty, David D

    2009-09-10

    Genome-wide screens were performed to identify transmembrane proteins that mediate axonal growth, guidance and target field innervation of somatosensory neurons. One gene, Linx (alias Islr2), encoding a leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin (LIG) family protein, is expressed in a subset of developing sensory and motor neurons. Domain and genomic structures of Linx and other LIG family members suggest that they are evolutionarily related to Trk receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Several LIGs, including Linx, are expressed in subsets of somatosensory and motor neurons, and select members interact with TrkA and Ret RTKs. Moreover, axonal projection defects in mice harboring a null mutation in Linx resemble those in mice lacking Ngf, TrkA, and Ret. In addition, Linx modulates NGF-TrkA- and GDNF-GFRalpha1/Ret-mediated axonal extension in cultured sensory and motor neurons, respectively. These findings show that LIGs physically interact with RTKs and modulate their activities to control axonal extension, guidance and branching.

  12. LIG Family Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Associated Proteins Modulate Growth Factor Signals During Neural Development

    PubMed Central

    Mandai, Kenji; Guo, Ting; Hillaire, Coryse St.; Meabon, James S.; Kanning, Kevin C.; Bothwell, Mark; Ginty, David D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Genome-wide screens were performed to identify transmembrane proteins that mediate axonal growth, guidance and target field innervation of somatosensory neurons. One gene, Linx (alias Islr2), encoding a leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin (LIG) family protein, is expressed in a subset of developing sensory and motor neurons. Domain and genomic structures of Linx and other LIG family members suggest that they are evolutionarily related to Trk receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Several LIGs, including Linx are expressed in subsets of somatosensory and motor neurons and select members interact with TrkA and Ret RTKs. Moreover, axonal projection defects in mice harboring a null mutation in Linx resemble those in mice lacking Ngf, TrkA and Ret. In addition, Linx modulates NGF–TrkA- and GDNF–GFRα1/Ret-mediated axonal extension in cultured sensory and motor neurons, respectively. These findings show that LIGs physically interact with RTKs and modulate their activities to control axonal extension, guidance and branching. PMID:19755105

  13. Inhibition of T-cell antigen receptor-mediated transmembrane signaling by protein kinase C activation.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, R T; Ho, S N; Barna, T J; Rusovick, K M; McKean, D J

    1988-01-01

    The murine T-lymphoma cell line LBRM-33 is known to require synergistic signals delivered through the antigen receptor (Ti-CD3) complex, together with interleukin 1 (IL-1), for activation of IL-2 gene expression and IL-2 production. Although 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was capable of replacing IL-1 as an activating stimulus under certain conditions, biologic studies indicated that TPA failed to synergize with Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli under conditions in which IL-1 was clearly active. Acute exposure to TPA and other active phorbol esters resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of the increases in phosphoinositide hydrolysis and intracellular free Ca2+ concentration stimulated by phytohemagglutinin or anti-Ti antibodies. TPA treatment induced no direct alteration of phospholipase C enzymatic activities in LBRM-33 cells. In contrast, both Ti-CD3 cross-linkage and TPA rapidly stimulated the phosphorylation of identical CD3 complex polypeptides, presumably via activation of protein kinase C. Exposure of LBRM-33 cells to TPA resulted in a time-dependent, partial down-regulation of surface Ti-CD3 expression. Thus, TPA treatment inhibited the responsiveness of LBRM-33 cells to Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli by inducing an early desensitization of Ti-CD3 receptors, followed by a decrease in membrane receptor expression. These studies indicate that phorbol esters deliver bidirectional signals that both inhibit Ti-CD3-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis and augment IL-2 production in LBRM-33 cells. Images PMID:2977423

  14. Protein kinase C regulates tonic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the hippocampus and thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Damian P; Smart, Trevor G

    2013-01-01

    Tonic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) is an important regulator of neuronal excitability. Phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) provides a key mode of regulation for synaptic GABAARs underlying phasic inhibition; however, less attention has been focused on the plasticity of tonic inhibition and whether this can also be modulated by receptor phosphorylation. To address this issue, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording in acute murine brain slices at both room and physiological temperatures to examine the effects of PKC-mediated phosphorylation on tonic inhibition. Recordings from dentate gyrus granule cells in the hippocampus and dorsal lateral geniculate relay neurons in the thalamus demonstrated that PKC activation caused downregulation of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. Conversely, inhibition of PKC resulted in an increase in tonic GABAAR activity. These findings were corroborated by experiments on human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing recombinant α4β2δ GABAARs, which represent a key extrasynaptic GABAAR isoform in the hippocampus and thalamus. Using bath application of low GABA concentrations to mimic activation by ambient neurotransmitter, we demonstrated a similar inhibition of receptor function following PKC activation at physiological temperature. Live cell imaging revealed that this was correlated with a loss of cell surface GABAARs. The inhibitory effects of PKC activation on α4β2δ GABAAR activity appeared to be mediated by direct phosphorylation at a previously identified site on the β2 subunit, serine 410. These results indicate that PKC-mediated phosphorylation can be an important physiological regulator of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. PMID:24102973

  15. Differential Role of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5 in Physiological Versus Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Traynham, Christopher J; Cannavo, Alessandro; Zhou, Yan; Vouga, Alexandre G; Woodall, Benjamin P; Hullmann, Jonathan; Ibetti, Jessica; Gold, Jessica I; Chuprun, J Kurt; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J

    2015-12-04

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are dynamic regulators of cellular signaling. GRK5 is highly expressed within myocardium and is upregulated in heart failure. Although GRK5 is a critical regulator of cardiac G protein-coupled receptor signaling, recent data has uncovered noncanonical activity of GRK5 within nuclei that plays a key role in pathological hypertrophy. Targeted cardiac elevation of GRK5 in mice leads to exaggerated hypertrophy and early heart failure after transverse aortic constriction (TAC) because of GRK5 nuclear accumulation. In this study, we investigated the role of GRK5 in physiological, swimming-induced hypertrophy (SIH). Cardiac-specific GRK5 transgenic mice and nontransgenic littermate control mice were subjected to a 21-day high-intensity swim protocol (or no swim sham controls). SIH and specific molecular and genetic indices of physiological hypertrophy were assessed, including nuclear localization of GRK5, and compared with TAC. Unlike after TAC, swim-trained transgenic GRK5 and nontransgenic littermate control mice exhibited similar increases in cardiac growth. Mechanistically, SIH did not lead to GRK5 nuclear accumulation, which was confirmed in vitro as insulin-like growth factor-1, a known mediator of physiological hypertrophy, was unable to induce GRK5 nuclear translocation in myocytes. We found specific patterns of altered gene expression between TAC and SIH with GRK5 overexpression. Further, SIH in post-TAC transgenic GRK5 mice was able to preserve cardiac function. These data suggest that although nuclear-localized GRK5 is a pathological mediator after stress, this noncanonical nuclear activity of GRK5 is not induced during physiological hypertrophy. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. p90 ribosomal S6 kinase 2 exerts a tonic brake on G protein-coupled receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Sheffler, Douglas J; Kroeze, Wesley K; Garcia, Bonnie G; Deutch, Ariel Y; Hufeisen, Sandra J; Leahy, Patrick; Brüning, Jens C; Roth, Bryan L

    2006-03-21

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are essential for normal central CNS function and represent the proximal site(s) of action for most neurotransmitters and many therapeutic drugs, including typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs. Similarly, protein kinases mediate many of the downstream actions for both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. We report here that genetic deletion of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2) potentiates GPCR signaling. Initial studies of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(2A) receptor signaling in fibroblasts obtained from RSK2 wild-type (+/+) and knockout (-/-) mice showed that 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and both basal and 5-HT-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation are augmented in RSK2 knockout fibroblasts. Endogenous signaling by other GPCRs, including P2Y-purinergic, PAR-1-thrombinergic, beta1-adrenergic, and bradykinin-B receptors, was also potentiated in RSK2-deficient fibroblasts. Importantly, reintroduction of RSK2 into RSK2-/- fibroblasts normalized signaling, thus demonstrating that RSK2 apparently modulates GPCR signaling by exerting a "tonic brake" on GPCR signal transduction. Our results imply the existence of a novel pathway regulating GPCR signaling, modulated by downstream members of the extracellular signal-related kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade. The loss of RSK2 activity in humans leads to Coffin-Lowry syndrome, which is manifested by mental retardation, growth deficits, skeletal deformations, and psychosis. Because RSK2-inactivating mutations in humans lead to Coffin-Lowry syndrome, our results imply that alterations in GPCR signaling may account for some of its clinical manifestations.

  17. Contraction inhibits insulin-stimulated insulin receptor substrate-1/2-associated phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity, but not protein kinase B activation or glucose uptake, in rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, J P; Soos, M A; Aslesen, R; O'rahilly, S; Jensen, J

    2000-01-01

    The initial stages of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake are thought to involve tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrates (IRSs), which recruit and activate phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), leading to the activation of protein kinase B (PKB) and other downstream effectors. In contrast, contraction stimulates glucose uptake via a PI 3-kinase-independent mechanism. The combined effects of insulin and contraction on glucose uptake are additive. However, it has been reported that contraction causes a decrease in insulin-stimulated IRS-1-associated PI 3-kinase activity. To investigate this paradox, we have examined the effects of contraction on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and proximal insulin-signalling events in isolated rat epitrochlearis muscle. Stimulation by insulin or contraction produced a 3-fold increase in glucose uptake, with the effects of simultaneous treatment by insulin and contraction being additive. Wortmannin completely blocked the additive effect of insulin in contracting skeletal muscle, indicating that this is a PI 3-kinase-dependent effect. Insulin-stimulated recruitment of PI 3-kinase to IRS-1 was unaffected by contraction; however, insulin produced no discernible increase in PI 3-kinase activity in IRS-1 or IRS-2 immunocomplexes in contracting skeletal muscle. Consistent with this, contraction inhibited insulin-stimulated p70(S6K) activation. In contrast, insulin-stimulated activation of PKB was unaffected by contraction. Thus, in contracting skeletal muscle, insulin stimulates glucose uptake and activates PKB, but not p70(S6K), by a PI 3-kinase-dependent mechanism that is independent of changes in IRS-1- and IRS-2-associated PI 3-kinase activity. PMID:10903138

  18. Signal transduction cross talk mediated by Jun N-terminal kinase-interacting protein and insulin receptor substrate scaffold protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Standen, Claire L; Kennedy, Norman J; Flavell, Richard A; Davis, Roger J

    2009-09-01

    Scaffold proteins have been established as important mediators of signal transduction specificity. The insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins represent a critical group of scaffold proteins that are required for signal transduction by the insulin receptor, including the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase. The c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK)-interacting proteins (JIPs) represent a different group of scaffold molecules that are implicated in the regulation of the JNK. These two signaling pathways are functionally linked because JNK can phosphorylate IRS1 on the negative regulatory site Ser-307. Here we demonstrate the physical association of these signaling pathways using a proteomic approach that identified insulin-regulated complexes of JIPs together with IRS scaffold proteins. Studies using mice with JIP scaffold protein defects confirm that the JIP1 and JIP2 proteins are required for normal glucose homeostasis. Together, these observations demonstrate that JIP proteins can influence insulin-stimulated signal transduction mediated by IRS proteins.

  19. Bacterial chemoreceptor arrays are hexagonally packed trimers of receptor dimers networked by rings of kinase and coupling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Briegel, Ariane; Li, Xiaoxiao; Bilwes, Alexandrine M.; Hughes, Kelly T.; Jensen, Grant J.; Crane, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    Chemoreceptor arrays are supramolecular transmembrane machines of unknown structure that allow bacteria to sense their surroundings and respond by chemotaxis. We have combined X-ray crystallography of purified proteins with electron cryotomography of native arrays inside cells to reveal the arrangement of the component transmembrane receptors, histidine kinases (CheA) and CheW coupling proteins. Trimers of receptor dimers lie at the vertices of a hexagonal lattice in a “two-facing-two” configuration surrounding a ring of alternating CheA regulatory domains (P5) and CheW couplers. Whereas the CheA kinase domains (P4) project downward below the ring, the CheA dimerization domains (P3) link neighboring rings to form an extended, stable array. This highly interconnected protein architecture underlies the remarkable sensitivity and cooperative nature of transmembrane signaling in bacterial chemotaxis. PMID:22355139

  20. Trauma-induced expression of astrocytic thrombospondin-1 is regulated by P2 receptors coupled to protein kinase cascades.

    PubMed

    Tran, Minh Dinh; Furones-Alonso, Ofelia; Sanchez-Molano, Juliana; Bramlett, Helen Marie

    2012-08-22

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is an extracellular matrix protein produced by astrocytes, which can promote synaptogenesis. The regulation of astrocytic TSP-1 involves extracellular ATP through the activation of P2Y receptors coupled to various protein kinase signaling pathways. However, not much is known about the mechanisms regulating TSP-1 expression in primary cortical astrocytes after a traumatic brain injury. Using an in-vitro model of central nervous system trauma that stimulates the release of ATP, we found that trauma-induced expression and release of TSP-1 involved purinergic signaling as both expression and release were significantly attenuated by pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2'-4'-disulfonic acid, a P2 receptor antagonist. Further antagonist studies with reactive blue 2 point to a role for P2Y4, as reactive blue 2 is a potent antagonist for rat P2Y4 receptors. In addition, the injury-induced expression of TSP-1 was significantly attenuated by the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase, whereas injury-induced release of TSP-1 was significantly blocked by the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt. Using an in-vivo model of a moderate parasagittal fluid-percussion brain injury, we found that TSP-1 levels were increased when compared with those in sham animals in the cortex, thalamus, and hippocampus. We conclude that TSP-1 expression after injury can be regulated by the activation of P2 receptors coupled with protein kinase signaling pathways and suggest that purinergic signaling, by regulating TSP expression, may play an important role in cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions such as those occurring during central nervous system repair.

  1. Non-receptor cytosolic protein tyrosine kinases from various rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Elberg, G; Li, J; Leibovitch, A; Shechter, Y

    1995-11-30

    Adipocytic-cytosolic non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase (CytPTK) when activated can substitute for the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (InsRTK), in manifesting several insulin effects in insulin-receptor independent fashion. Our aims here were to utilize PolyGlu4Tyr, a good experimental exogenous substrate for protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in general, for studying qualitative and quantitative parameters of CytPTKs extracted from different tissue cytosols. At the same time, we would search for a unique specific marker specifically characterizing CytPTKs. High speed supernatants of spleen, thymus, smooth muscle, lung and kidney were found to be rich in CytPTK activities. Their specific activities being 6- to 13-fold that of liver or adipose cytosols. Brain, testis and adrenal cytosols were an intermediate source of CytPTK activity, whereas CytPTK activity of heart and skeletal muscle was low. It was also evaluated that the capacity of the cytosol to phosphorylate PolyGlu4Tyr is 15-50% that of the non-stimulated Triton X-100 extractable plasma membrane PTKs. Fractionation of the cytosols on superose 12 column revealed several CytPTKs within the same tissue, their peaks ranging between 30 and 450 kDa. Immunoblotting analysis showed Fyn and Lyn were present in most tissue cytosols. Upon immunoprecipitation, however, with anti-Fyn or anti-Lyn, negligible amounts (< 2%) of the total cellular CytPTK were precipitated. Thus, these general markers of CytPTKs comprise only a minor proportion of the total intracellular PolyGlu4Tyr phosphorylating capacity. To see whether a specific marker for CytPTK could be detected, we also examined the requirement of CytPTKs for divalent ions, their preferred phosphate donor and their sensitivity to inhibition by known PTK inhibitors. We found that the order of reactivity with divalent cations was Co2+ > Mn2+ > Mg2+, while Zn2+ and Ca2+ did not support CytPTK activity. The best phosphate donor was ATP (ED50 = 5 microM), but other

  2. Fps/Fes and Fer non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinases regulate collagen- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Senis, Y A; Sangrar, W; Zirngibl, R A; Craig, A W B; Lee, D H; Greer, P A

    2003-05-01

    Fps/Fes and Fer proto-oncoproteins are structurally related non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinases implicated in signaling downstream from cytokines, growth factors and immune receptors. We show that Fps/Fes and Fer are expressed in human and mouse platelets, and are activated following stimulation with collagen and collagen-related peptide (CRP), suggesting a role in GPVI receptor signaling. Fer was also activated following stimulation with thrombin and a protease-activated receptor4 (PAR4)-activating peptide, suggesting a role in signaling downstream from the G protein-coupled PAR4. There were no detectable perturbations in CRP-induced activation of Syk, PLCgamma2, cortactin, Erk, Jnk, Akt or p38 in platelets from mice lacking Fps/Fes, Fer, or both kinases. Platelets lacking Fps/Fes, from a targeted fps/fes null strain of mice, showed increased rates and amplitudes of collagen-induced aggregation, relative to wild-type platelets. P-Selectin expression was also elevated on the surface of Fps/Fes-null platelets in response to CRP. Fer-deficient platelets, from mice targeted with a kinase-inactivating mutation, disaggregated more rapidly than wild-type platelets in response to ADP. This report provides the first evidence that Fps/Fes and Fer are expressed in platelets and become activated downstream from the GPVI collagen receptor, and that Fer is activated downstream from a G-protein coupled receptor. Furthermore, using targeted mouse models we show that deficiency in Fps/Fes or Fer resulted in disregulated platelet aggregation and disaggregation, demonstrating a role for these kinases in regulating platelet functions.

  3. Role of receptor desensitization, phosphatase induction and intracellular cyclic AMP in the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in UTP-stimulated EAhy 926 endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, A; McLees, A; Malarkey, K; Gould, G W; Plevin, R

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms that bring about the termination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) activation in response to UTP in EAhy 926 endothelial cells. UTP-stimulated MAP kinase activity was transient, returning to basal values by 60 min. At this time MAP kinase activation was desensitized; re-application of UTP did not further activate MAP kinase, full re-activation of MAP kinase being only apparent after a 1-2 h wash period. However, activation of MAP kinase by UTP could be sustained beyond 60 min by preincubation of the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. UTP also stimulated expression of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 and this was abolished after pretreatment with cycloheximide. Pretreatment of cells with forskolin abolished the initial activation of MAP kinase kinase or c-Raf-1 by UTP, but only affected MAP kinase activity during prolonged stimulation. The effect of forskolin on prolonged MAP kinase activation was also prevented by cycloheximide. These results suggest that the termination of MAP kinase activity in response to UTP involves a number of interacting mechanisms including receptor desensitization and the induction of a phosphatase. However, several pieces of evidence do not support a major role for MAP kinase phosphatase-1 in termination of the MAP kinase signal. Raising intracellular cyclic AMP may also be involved but only after an initial protein-synthesis step and by a mechanism that does not involve the inactivation of c-Raf-1 or MAP kinase kinase. PMID:8615830

  4. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is associated with the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A. Soren; Lim, Indra A.; Hemsworth, Daniel E.; Horne, Mary C.; Hell, Johannes W.

    1999-01-01

    The molecular basis of long-term potentiation (LTP), a long-lasting change in synaptic transmission, is of fundamental interest because of its implication in learning. Usually LTP depends on Ca2+ influx through postsynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors and subsequent activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). For a molecular understanding of LTP it is crucial to know how CaMKII is localized to its postsynaptic targets because protein kinases often are targeted to their substrates by adapter proteins. Here we show that CaMKII directly binds to the NMDA receptor subunits NR1 and NR2B. Moreover, activation of CaMKIIα by stimulation of NMDA receptors in forebrain slices increase this association. This interaction places CaMKII not only proximal to a major source of Ca2+ influx but also close to α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors, which become phosphorylated upon stimulation of NMDA receptors in these forebrain slices. Identification of the postsynaptic adapter for CaMKII fills a critical gap in the understanding of LTP because CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of AMPA receptors is an important step during LTP. PMID:10077668

  5. Ligand-induced dynamics of heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptor-like kinase complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Jones, Alan M.

    2017-02-10

    Background Arabidopsis, 7-transmembrane Regulator of G signaling protein 1 (AtRGS1) modulates canonical G protein signaling by promoting the inactive state of heterotrimeric G protein complex on the plasma membrane. It is known that plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs) phosphorylate AtRGS1 in vitro but little is known about the in vivo interaction, molecular dynamics, or the cellular consequences of this interaction. Methods Therefore, a subset of the known RLKs that phosphorylate AtRGS1 were selected for elucidation, namely, BAK1, BIR1, FLS2. Several microscopies for both static and dynamic protein-protein interactions were used to follow in vivo interactions between the RLKsmore » and AtRGS1 after the presentation of the Pathogen-associated Molecular Pattern, Flagellin 22 (Flg22). These microscopies included FoÈrster Resonance Energy Transfer, Bimolecular Fluoresence Complementation, and Cross Number and Brightness fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy. In addition, reactive oxygen species and calcium changes in living cells were quantitated using luminometry and R-GECO1 microscopy. Results The LRR RLKs BAK1 and BIR1, interact with AtRGS1 at the plasma membrane. The RLK ligand flg22 sets BAK1 in motion toward AtRGS1 and BIR1 away, both returning to the baseline orientations by 10 minutes. The C-terminal tail of AtRGS1 is important for the interaction with BAK1 and for the tempo of the AtRGS1/BIR1 dynamics. This window of time corresponds to the flg22-induced transient production of reactive oxygen species and calcium release which are both attenuated in the rgs1 and the bak1 null mutants. Conclusions A temporal model of these interactions is proposed. flg22 binding induces nearly instantaneous dimerization between FLS2 and BAK1. Phosphorylated BAK1 interacts with and enables AtRGS1 to move away from BIR1 and AtRGS1 becomes phosphorylated leading to its endocytosis thus leading to de-repression by permitting AtGPA1 to exchange GDP for GTP

  6. Developmental and tumoral vascularization is regulated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Verónica; Carmona, Rita; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramón; Mendiola, Marta; Nogués, Laura; Reglero, Clara; Miguel-Martín, María; García-Escudero, Ramón; Dorn, Gerald W; Hardisson, David; Mayor, Federico; Penela, Petronila

    2013-11-01

    Tumor vessel dysfunction is a pivotal event in cancer progression. Using an in vivo neovascularization model, we identified G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) as a key angiogenesis regulator. An impaired angiogenic response involving immature vessels was observed in mice hemizygous for Grk2 or in animals with endothelium-specific Grk2 silencing. ECs isolated from these animals displayed intrinsic alterations in migration, TGF-β signaling, and formation of tubular networks. Remarkably, an altered pattern of vessel growth and maturation was detected in postnatal retinas from endothelium-specific Grk2 knockout animals. Mouse embryos with systemic or endothelium-selective Grk2 ablation had marked vascular malformations involving impaired recruitment of mural cells. Moreover, decreased endothelial Grk2 dosage accelerated tumor growth in mice, along with reduced pericyte vessel coverage and enhanced macrophage infiltration, and this transformed environment promoted decreased GRK2 in ECs and human breast cancer vessels. Our study suggests that GRK2 downregulation is a relevant event in the tumoral angiogenic switch.

  7. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 promotes platelet activation and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiwen; Zhang, Jian; Yan, Rong; Tian, Jingluan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Mengxing; Cui, Qingya; Zhao, Lili; Hu, Renping; Jiang, Miao; Li, Zhenyu; Ruan, Changgeng; He, Sudan; Dai, Kesheng

    2017-03-14

    Previous studies have shown that receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIP3) is involved in many important biological processes, including necroptosis, apoptosis, and inflammation. Here we show that RIP3 plays a critical role in regulating platelet functions and in vivo thrombosis and hemostasis. Tail bleeding times were significantly longer in RIP3-knockout (RIP3(-/-)) mice compared with their wild-type (WT) littermates. In an in vivo model of arteriole thrombosis, mice lacking RIP3 exhibited prolonged occlusion times. WT mice repopulated with RIP3(-/-) bone marrow-derived cells had longer occlusion times than RIP3(-/-) mice repopulated with WT bone marrow-derived cells, suggesting a role for RIP3-deficient platelets in arterial thrombosis. Consistent with these findings, we observed that RIP3 was expressed in both human and mice platelets. Deletion of RIP3 in mouse platelets caused a marked defect in aggregation and attenuated dense granule secretion in response to low doses of thrombin or a thromboxane A2 analog, U46619. Phosphorylation of Akt induced by U46619 or thrombin was diminished in RIP3(-/-) platelets. Moreover, RIP3 interacted with Gα13 Platelet spreading on fibrinogen and clot retraction were impaired in the absence of RIP3. RIP3 inhibitor dose-dependently inhibited platelet aggregation in vitro and prevented arterial thrombus formation in vivo. These data demonstrate a role for RIP3 in promoting in vivo thrombosis and hemostasis by amplifying platelet activation. RIP3 may represent a novel promising therapeutic target for thrombotic diseases.

  8. Inhibition of Receptor Interacting Protein Kinases Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Induced by Palmitic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingyue; Lu, Lihui; Lei, Song; Chai, Hua; Wu, Siyuan; Tang, Xiaoju; Bao, Qinxue; Chen, Li; Wu, Wenchao; Liu, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) is known to cause cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Cardiac hypertrophy is one of the important pathological features of PA-induced lipotoxicity, but the mechanism by which PA induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is still unclear. Therefore, our study was to test whether necroptosis, a receptor interacting protein kinase 1 and 3 (RIPK1 and RIPK3-) dependent programmed necrosis, was involved in the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We used the PA-treated primary neonatal rat cardiac myocytes (NCMs) or H9c2 cells to study lipotoxicity. Our results demonstrated that cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was induced by PA treatment, determined by upregulation of hypertrophic marker genes and cell surface area enlargement. Upon PA treatment, the expression of RIPK1 and RIPK3 was increased. Pretreatment with the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, was attenuated. Knockdown of RIPK1 or RIPK3 by siRNA suppressed the PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Moreover, a crosstalk between necroptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was observed in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. Inhibition of RIPK1 with Nec-1, phosphorylation level of AKT (Ser473), and mTOR (Ser2481) was significantly reduced in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, RIPKs-dependent necroptosis might be crucial in PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Activation of mTOR may mediate the effect of necroptosis in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by PA. PMID:27057269

  9. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Promotes Flaviviridae Entry and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Le Sommer, Caroline; Barrows, Nicholas J.; Bradrick, Shelton S.; Pearson, James L.; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.

    2012-01-01

    Flaviviruses cause a wide range of severe diseases ranging from encephalitis to hemorrhagic fever. Discovery of host factors that regulate the fate of flaviviruses in infected cells could provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of infection and therefore facilitate the development of anti-flaviviral drugs. We performed genome-scale siRNA screens to discover human host factors required for yellow fever virus (YFV) propagation. Using a 2×2 siRNA pool screening format and a duplicate of the screen, we identified a high confidence list of YFV host factors. To find commonalities between flaviviruses, these candidates were compared to host factors previously identified for West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV). This comparison highlighted a potential requirement for the G protein-coupled receptor kinase family, GRKs, for flaviviral infection. The YFV host candidate GRK2 (also known as ADRBK1) was validated both in siRNA-mediated knockdown HuH-7 cells and in GRK−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Additionally, we showed that GRK2 was required for efficient propagation of DENV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) indicating that GRK2 requirement is conserved throughout the Flaviviridae. Finally, we found that GRK2 participates in multiple distinct steps of the flavivirus life cycle by promoting both entry and RNA synthesis. Together, our findings identified GRK2 as a novel regulator of flavivirus infection and suggest that inhibition of GRK2 function may constitute a new approach for treatment of flavivirus associated diseases. PMID:23029581

  10. Inhibition of Receptor Interacting Protein Kinases Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Induced by Palmitic Acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingyue; Lu, Lihui; Lei, Song; Chai, Hua; Wu, Siyuan; Tang, Xiaoju; Bao, Qinxue; Chen, Li; Wu, Wenchao; Liu, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) is known to cause cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Cardiac hypertrophy is one of the important pathological features of PA-induced lipotoxicity, but the mechanism by which PA induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is still unclear. Therefore, our study was to test whether necroptosis, a receptor interacting protein kinase 1 and 3 (RIPK1 and RIPK3-) dependent programmed necrosis, was involved in the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We used the PA-treated primary neonatal rat cardiac myocytes (NCMs) or H9c2 cells to study lipotoxicity. Our results demonstrated that cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was induced by PA treatment, determined by upregulation of hypertrophic marker genes and cell surface area enlargement. Upon PA treatment, the expression of RIPK1 and RIPK3 was increased. Pretreatment with the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, was attenuated. Knockdown of RIPK1 or RIPK3 by siRNA suppressed the PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Moreover, a crosstalk between necroptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was observed in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. Inhibition of RIPK1 with Nec-1, phosphorylation level of AKT (Ser473), and mTOR (Ser2481) was significantly reduced in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, RIPKs-dependent necroptosis might be crucial in PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Activation of mTOR may mediate the effect of necroptosis in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by PA.

  11. Atomic Structure of GRK5 Reveals Distinct Structural Features Novel for G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinases*♦

    PubMed Central

    Komolov, Konstantin E.; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Benovic, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are members of the protein kinase A, G, and C families (AGC) and play a central role in mediating G protein-coupled receptor phosphorylation and desensitization. One member of the family, GRK5, has been implicated in several human pathologies, including heart failure, hypertension, cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer disease. To gain mechanistic insight into GRK5 function, we determined a crystal structure of full-length human GRK5 at 1.8 Å resolution. GRK5 in complex with the ATP analog 5′-adenylyl β,γ-imidodiphosphate or the nucleoside sangivamycin crystallized as a monomer. The C-terminal tail (C-tail) of AGC kinase domains is a highly conserved feature that is divided into three segments as follows: the C-lobe tether, the active-site tether (AST), and the N-lobe tether (NLT). This domain is fully resolved in GRK5 and reveals novel interactions with the nucleotide and N-lobe. Similar to other AGC kinases, the GRK5 AST is an integral part of the nucleotide-binding pocket, a feature not observed in other GRKs. The AST also mediates contact between the kinase N- and C-lobes facilitating closure of the kinase domain. The GRK5 NLT is largely displaced from its previously observed position in other GRKs. Moreover, although the autophosphorylation sites in the NLT are >20 Å away from the catalytic cleft, they are capable of rapid cis-autophosphorylation suggesting high mobility of this region. In summary, we provide a snapshot of GRK5 in a partially closed state, where structural elements of the kinase domain C-tail are aligned to form novel interactions to the nucleotide and N-lobe not previously observed in other GRKs. PMID:26032409

  12. G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells following acute mental stress.

    PubMed

    Blake Crabb, E; Franco, R Lee; Bowen, Mary K; Huang, Chun-Jung; Caslin, Heather L; Acevedo, Edmund O

    2016-01-15

    This study investigated G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2) density in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and its relationship to plasma pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations following acute mental stress. Apparently healthy males (n=20; 21.3±0.55years) participated in an acute mental stress task. Heart rate was measured at baseline and throughout mental stress. Plasma epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine (NE), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were assessed via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays before, immediately following, and 30, 60 and 120min after the mental stress task. GRK2 density was measured by western blot technique at the same time points. Acute mental stress elicited significant elevations in HR, and plasma EPI and NE. Additionally, GRK2 density increased significantly across time following the stress task. Post hoc analyses revealed that GRK2 density was significantly elevated at 30 and 60min following acute stress. A significant positive correlation was observed between GRK2 density and plasma EPI, while a significant negative correlation was revealed between GRK2 density and TNF-α across all time points. Acute mental stress significantly increased GRK2 density in PBMCs of young adult males. Furthermore, although plasma IL-6 and TNF-α did not change following mental stress, it remains unknown whether a longer time period was needed to observe a pro-inflammatory state associated with the desensitization of β-adrenergic receptor activity. Our findings that GRK2 expression is promptly increased in PBMC following an acute stress task, may suggest a link between stress and intracellular inflammatory signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Protein Kinase Cβ Modulates Ligand-induced Cell Surface Death Receptor Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xue Wei; Heldebrant, Michael P.; Flatten, Karen S.; Loegering, David A.; Dai, Haiming; Schneider, Paula A.; Gomez, Timothy S.; Peterson, Kevin L.; Trushin, Sergey A.; Hess, Allan D.; Smith, B. Douglas; Karp, Judith E.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2010-01-01

    Although treatment with the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) is known to protect a subset of cells from induction of apoptosis by death ligands such as Fas ligand and tumor necrosis factor-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, the mechanism of this protection is unknown. This study demonstrated that protection in short term apoptosis assays and long term proliferation assays was maximal when Jurkat or HL-60 human leukemia cells were treated with 2–5 nm PMA. Immunoblotting demonstrated that multiple PKC isoforms, including PKCα, PKCβ, PKCϵ, and PKCθ, translocated from the cytosol to a membrane-bound fraction at these PMA concentrations. When the ability of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs that specifically down-regulated each of these isoforms was examined, PKCβ shRNA uniquely reversed PMA-induced protection against cell death. The PKCβ-selective small molecule inhibitor enzastaurin had a similar effect. Although mass spectrometry suggested that Fas is phosphorylated on a number of serines and threonines, mutation of these sites individually or collectively had no effect on Fas-mediated death signaling or PMA protection. Further experiments demonstrated that PMA diminished ligand-induced cell surface accumulation of Fas and DR5, and PKCβ shRNA or enzastaurin reversed this effect. Moreover, enzastaurin sensitized a variety of human tumor cell lines and clinical acute myelogenous leukemia isolates, which express abundant PKCβ, to tumor necrosis factor-α related apoptosis-inducing ligand-induced death in the absence of PMA. Collectively, these results identify a specific PKC isoform that modulates death receptor-mediated cytotoxicity as well as a small molecule inhibitor that mitigates the inhibitory effects of PKC activation on ligand-induced death receptor trafficking and cell death. PMID:19887445

  14. Agonist-Biased Signaling via Proteinase Activated Receptor-2: Differential Activation of Calcium and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Rithwik; Mihara, Koichiro; Mathur, Maneesh; Rochdi, Moulay Driss; Bouvier, Michel; DeFea, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of different trypsin-revealed tethered ligand (TL) sequences of rat proteinase-activated receptor 2 (rPAR2) and the corresponding soluble TL-derived agonist peptides to trigger agonist-biased signaling. To do so, we mutated the proteolytically revealed TL sequence of rPAR2 and examined the impact on stimulating intracellular calcium transients and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The TL receptor mutants, rPAR2-Leu37Ser38, rPAR2-Ala37–38, and rPAR2-Ala39–42 were compared with the trypsin-revealed wild-type rPAR2 TL sequence, S37LIGRL42—. Upon trypsin activation, all constructs stimulated MAP kinase signaling, but only the wt-rPAR2 and rPAR2-Ala39–42 triggered calcium signaling. Furthermore, the TL-derived synthetic peptide SLAAAA-NH2 failed to cause PAR2-mediated calcium signaling but did activate MAP kinase, whereas SLIGRL-NH2 triggered both calcium and MAP kinase signaling by all receptors. The peptides AAIGRL-NH2 and LSIGRL-NH2 triggered neither calcium nor MAP kinase signals. Neither rPAR2-Ala37–38 nor rPAR2-Leu37Ser38 constructs recruited β-arrestins-1 or -2 in response to trypsin stimulation, whereas both β-arrestins were recruited to these mutants by SLIGRL-NH2. The lack of trypsin-triggered β-arrestin interactions correlated with impaired trypsin-activated TL-mutant receptor internalization. Trypsin-stimulated MAP kinase activation by the TL-mutated receptors was not blocked by inhibitors of Gαi (pertussis toxin), Gαq [N-cyclohexyl-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-6-methylindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide (GP2A)], Src kinase [4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1)], or the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor [4-(3′-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxy-quinazoline (AG1478)], but was inhibited by the Rho-kinase inhibitor (R)-(+)-trans-N-(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-aminoethyl)-cyclohexanecarboxamide, 2HCl (Y27362). The data indicate that the proteolytically revealed TL sequence(s) and the mode

  15. Molecular cloning of a putative receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus of Brassica oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.C.; Howlett, B.; Boyes, D.C.; Nasrallah, M.E.; Nasrallah, J.B. )

    1991-10-01

    Self-recognition between pollen and stigma during pollination in Brassica oleracea is genetically controlled by the multiallelic self-incompatibility locus (S). The authors describe the S receptor kinase (SRK) gene, a previously uncharacterized gene that residues at the S locus. The nucleotide sequences of genomic DNA and of cDNAs corresponding to SRK predict a putative transmembrane receptor having serine/threonine-specific protein kinase activity. Its extracellular domain exhibits striking homology to the secreted product of the S-locus genotypes are highly polymorphic and have apparently evolved in unison with genetically linked alleles of SLG. SRK directs the synthesis of several alternative transcripts, which potentially encode different protein products, and these transcripts were detected exclusively in reproductive organs. The identification of SRK may provide new perspectives into the signal transduction mechanism underlying pollen recognition.

  16. Regulation of the TNF-alpha receptor in human osteosarcoma cells: role of microtubules and of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, T; Boscoboinik, D; Azzi, A

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the tumor promoter 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and of the phosphatases inhibitor okadaic acid on the binding of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) to a human osteogenic sarcoma cell line (Saos-2) was investigated. Both substances prevented almost completely TNF binding to its receptors. The effect of 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was reversed by the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine and calphostin C or by protein kinase C depletion. Vinblastine, under conditions causing full microtubule disassembly, produced only a 50% decrease of TNF binding. Vinblastine plus PMA was additive in fully preventing TNF binding. It is suggested that the degree of binding of TNF-alpha to its receptors in Saos-2 cells is under the control of a microtubule-dependent and of a microtubule-independent regulatory pathway.

  17. Adrenal G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 in regulation of sympathetic nervous system activity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    McCrink, Katie A; Brill, Ava; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2015-09-26

    Heart failure (HF), the number one cause of death in the western world, is caused by the insufficient performance of the heart leading to tissue underperfusion in response to an injury or insult. It comprises complex interactions between important neurohormonal mechanisms that try but ultimately fail to sustain cardiac output. The most prominent such mechanism is the sympathetic (adrenergic) nervous system (SNS), whose activity and outflow are greatly elevated in HF. SNS hyperactivity confers significant toxicity to the failing heart and markedly increases HF morbidity and mortality via excessive activation of adrenergic receptors, which are G protein-coupled receptors. Thus, ligand binding induces their coupling to heterotrimeric G proteins that transduce intracellular signals. G protein signaling is turned-off by the agonist-bound receptor phosphorylation courtesy of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), followed by βarrestin binding, which prevents the GRK-phosphorylated receptor from further interaction with the G proteins and simultaneously leads it inside the cell (receptor sequestration). Recent evidence indicates that adrenal GRK2 and βarrestins can regulate adrenal catecholamine secretion, thereby modulating SNS activity in HF. The present review gives an account of all these studies on adrenal GRKs and βarrestins in HF and discusses the exciting new therapeutic possibilities for chronic HF offered by targeting these proteins pharmacologically.

  18. Expression of Plant Receptor Kinases in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Barberini, María Laura; Muschietti, Jorge P

    2017-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a useful system to express recombinant proteins and analyze protein-protein interaction. Membrane-spanning proteins like plant receptor kinases find their way to the plasma membrane when expressed in yeast and seem to retain their structure and function. Here, we describe a general yeast DNA transformation procedure based on lithium acetate, salmon sperm DNA, and polyethylene glycol used to express recombinant proteins. Yeast cells expressing plant receptor kinases can be used for in vivo and in vitro studies of receptor function.

  19. Possible effect of lysophosphatidic acid on cell proliferation and involvement of lysophosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid receptors in mechanical stretch-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yohei; Kushida, Nobuhiro; Kokubun, Shuko; Ogawa, Soichiro; Shiomi, Homare; Ishibashi, Kei; Aikawa, Ken; Ikegami, Kentaro; Nomiya, Masanori; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    To determine whether lysophosphatidic acid activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase and increases DNA synthesis in human bladder smooth muscle cells, and to examine the involvement of lysophosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid receptor in mechanical stretch-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in cultured human bladder smooth muscle cells. TaqMan reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the mRNA expression levels of six lysophosphatidic acid receptor subtypes. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activity enhanced by either lysophosphatidic acid or mechanical stretch was measured by western blotting. The effect of lysophosphatidic acid on DNA synthesis was assessed by 5-bromo-2'-deoxy-uridine incorporation assay. Lysophosphatidic acid 1 subtype mRNA was predominantly expressed (96%). Lysophosphatidic acid activated the mitogen-activated protein kinase in a concentration-dependent manner. C-jun NH2 -terminal kinase showed the highest activity among the three subsets of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family members (c-jun NH2 -terminal kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinases, p38). Lysophosphatidic acid also increased incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxy-uridine. These responses were suppressed by Ki16425 (lysophosphatidic acid receptor antagonist). Mechanical stretch mainly induced c-jun NH2 -terminal kinase activation. This activation was partially inhibited by Ki16425. Lysophosphatidic acid might activate the c-jun NH2 -terminal kinase component of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family and DNA synthesis through lysophosphatidic acid receptors (presumably, through lysophosphatidic acid 1) in human bladder smooth muscle cells. The present study also implicates the involvement of lysophosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid receptors in mechanical stretch-induced c-jun NH2 -terminal kinase activation. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor can be partially activated by mechanical stretching through

  20. High‐fat diet induces protein kinase A and G‐protein receptor kinase phosphorylation of β2‐adrenergic receptor and impairs cardiac adrenergic reserve in animal hearts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuting; Wang, Qingtong; Liu, Yongming; Li, Ning; Xu, Bing; Kim, Sungjin; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2017-01-01

    Key points Patients with diabetes show a blunted cardiac inotropic response to β‐adrenergic stimulation despite normal cardiac contractile reserve.Acute insulin stimulation impairs β‐adrenergically induced contractile function in isolated cardiomyocytes and Langendorff‐perfused hearts.In this study, we aimed to examine the potential effects of hyperinsulinaemia associated with high‐fat diet (HFD) feeding on the cardiac β2‐adrenergic receptor signalling and the impacts on cardiac contractile function.We showed that 8 weeks of HFD feeding leads to reductions in cardiac functional reserve in response to β‐adrenergic stimulation without significant alteration of cardiac structure and function, which is associated with significant changes in β2‐adrenergic receptor phosphorylation at protein kinase A and G‐protein receptor kinase sites in the myocardium.The results suggest that clinical intervention might be applied to subjects in early diabetes without cardiac symptoms to prevent further cardiac complications. Abstract Patients with diabetes display reduced exercise capability and impaired cardiac contractile reserve in response to adrenergic stimulation. We have recently uncovered an insulin receptor and adrenergic receptor signal network in the heart. The aim of this study was to understand the impacts of high‐fat diet (HFD) on the insulin–adrenergic receptor signal network in hearts. After 8 weeks of HFD feeding, mice exhibited diabetes, with elevated insulin and glucose concentrations associated with body weight gain. Mice fed an HFD had normal cardiac structure and function. However, the HFD‐fed mice displayed a significant elevation of phosphorylation of the β2‐adrenergic receptor (β2AR) at both the protein kinase A site serine 261/262 and the G‐protein‐coupled receptor kinase site serine 355/356 and impaired adrenergic reserve when compared with mice fed on normal chow. Isolated myocytes from HFD‐fed mice also displayed a

  1. Regulation of oxytocin receptor responsiveness by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 in human myometrial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Willets, Jonathon M; Brighton, Paul J; Mistry, Rajendra; Morris, Gavin E; Konje, Justin C; Challiss, R A John

    2009-08-01

    Oxytocin plays an important role in the progression, timing, and modulation of uterine contraction during labor and is widely used as an uterotonic agent. We investigated the mechanisms regulating oxytocin receptor (OTR) signaling in human primary myometrial smooth muscle cells and the ULTR cell-line. Oxytocin produced concentration-dependent increases in both total [(3)H]inositol phosphate accumulation and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)); however, responses were greater and more reproducible in the ULTR cell line. Assessment of phospholipase C activity in single cells revealed that the OTR desensitizes rapidly (within 5 min) in the presence of oxytocin (100 nm). To characterize OTR desensitization further, cells were stimulated with a maximally effective concentration of oxytocin (100 nm, 30 sec) followed by a variable washout period and a second identical application of oxytocin. This brief exposure to oxytocin caused a marked decrease (>70%) in OTR responsiveness to rechallenge and was fully reversed by increasing the time period between agonist challenges. To assess involvement of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) in OTR desensitization, cells were transfected with small interfering RNAs to cause specific > or =75% knockdown of GRKs 2, 3, 5, or 6. In both primary myometrial and ULTR cells, knockdown of GRK6 largely prevented oxytocin-induced OTR desensitization; in contrast, selective depletion of GRKs 2, 3, or 5 was without effect. These data indicate that GRK6 recruitment is a cardinal effector of OTR responsiveness and provide mechanistic insight into the likely in vivo regulation of OTR signaling in uterine smooth muscle.

  2. Protein Kinases and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna M.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Although drugs of abuse have different chemical structures and interact with different protein targets, all appear to usurp common neuronal systems that regulate reward and motivation. Addiction is a complex disease that is thought to involve drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity due to alterations in cell signaling, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse interact with and change a common network of signaling pathways that include a subset of specific protein kinases. The best studied of these kinases are reviewed here and include extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Fyn tyrosine kinase. These kinases have been implicated in various aspects of drug addiction including acute drug effects, drug self-administration, withdrawal, reinforcement, sensitization, and tolerance. Identifying protein kinase substrates and signaling pathways that contribute to the addicted state may provide novel approaches for new pharma-cotherapies to treat drug addiction. PMID:18991950

  3. Insulin receptors mediate growth effects in cultured fetal neurons. II. Activation of a protein kinase that phosphorylates ribosomal protein S6

    SciTech Connect

    Heidenreich, K.A.; Toledo, S.P. )

    1989-09-01

    As an initial attempt to identify early steps in insulin action that may be involved in the growth responses of neurons to insulin, we investigated whether insulin receptor activation increases the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 in cultured fetal neurons and whether activation of a protein kinase is involved in this process. When neurons were incubated for 2 h with 32Pi, the addition of insulin (100 ng/ml) for the final 30 min increased the incorporation of 32Pi into a 32K microsomal protein. The incorporation of 32Pi into the majority of other neuronal proteins was unaltered by the 30-min exposure to insulin. Cytosolic extracts from insulin-treated neurons incubated in the presence of exogenous rat liver 40S ribosomes and (gamma-32P)ATP displayed a 3- to 8-fold increase in the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 compared to extracts from untreated cells. Inclusion of cycloheximide during exposure of the neurons to insulin did not inhibit the increased cytosolic kinase activity. Activation of S6 kinase activity by insulin was dose dependent (seen at insulin concentration as low as 0.1 ng/ml) and reached a maximum after 20 min of incubation. Addition of phosphatidylserine, diolein, and Ca2+ to the in vitro kinase reaction had no effect on the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Likewise, treatment of neurons with (Bu)2cAMP did not alter the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 by neuronal cytosolic extracts. We conclude that insulin activates a cytosolic protein kinase that phosphorylates ribosomal S6 in neurons and is distinct from protein kinase-C and cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Stimulation of this kinase may play a role in insulin signal transduction in neurons.

  4. Nicotine enhances the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation of alpha4 subunits of neuronal nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y N; Edwards, S C; Wecker, L

    1997-12-01

    Studies determined whether alpha4beta2 or alpha3beta2 neuronal nicotinic receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes are substrates for cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and whether nicotine affects receptor phosphorylation. The cRNAs for the subunits were coinjected into oocytes, and cells were incubated for 24 h in the absence or presence of nicotine (50 nM for alpha4beta2 and 500 nM for alpha3beta2 receptors). Nicotine did not interfere with the isolation of the receptors. When receptors isolated from oocytes expressing alpha4beta2 receptors were incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP and the catalytic subunit of PKA, separated by electrophoresis, and visualized by autoradiography, a labeled phosphoprotein with the predicted molecular size of the alpha4 subunit was present. Phosphorylation of alpha4 subunits of alpha4beta2 receptors increased within the first 5 min of incubation with nicotine and persisted for 24 h. In contrast, receptors isolated from oocytes expressing alpha3beta2 receptors did not exhibit a labeled phosphoprotein corresponding to the size of the alpha3 subunit. Results suggest that the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of alpha4 and not alpha3 subunits may explain the differential inactivation by nicotine of these receptor subtypes expressed in oocytes.

  5. Internalization and recycling of 5-HT2A receptors activated by serotonin and protein kinase C-mediated mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Samarjit; Puri, Sapna; Miledi, Ricardo; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2002-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT), a major neurotransmitter, has a large number of G protein-coupled receptors in mammals. On activation by exposure to their ligand, 5-HT2 receptor subtypes increase IP3 levels and undergo desensitization and internalization. To visualize the receptor in cells during these processes, we have constructed a 5-HT2A-enhanced GFP (SR2-GFP) fusion receptor. We show that this fusion receptor undergoes internalization on exposure to its natural ligand, 5-HT. Because 5-HT2A receptors activate the phospholipase C pathway, we studied the effect of protein kinase C (PKC) on the internalization process and found that activation of PKC by its specific activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, in the absence of 5-HT, leads to internalization of the receptor. Moreover, inhibition of PKC by its inhibitor sphingosine in the presence of 5-HT prevents the internalization process, suggesting that activation of PKC is sufficient and necessary for the internalization of 5-HT2A receptors. We also show that SR2-GFP recycles back to the plasma membrane after 5-HT-dependent internalization, suggesting a mechanism for resensitization. In addition, receptors that have been internalized on addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in the absence of 5-HT also recycle to the surface, with a time course similar to that seen after activation of the receptors by 5-HT. Our study suggests that 5-HT2A receptors internalize and return to the surface after both serotonin- and PKC-mediated processes. This study reveals a role for PKC in receptor internalization and also shows that 5-HT2A receptors are recycled. PMID:12388782

  6. The Cytoplasmic Adapter-Protein Dok7 Activates the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MuSK via Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Bergamin, Elisa; Hallock, Peter T.; Burden, Steven J.; Hubbard, Stevan R.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Formation of the vertebrate neuromuscular junction requires, among others proteins, Agrin, a neuronally derived ligand, and the following muscle proteins: LRP4, the receptor for Agrin; MuSK, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK); and Dok7, a cytoplasmic adapter protein. Dok7 comprises a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, a phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. Unique among adapter proteins recruited to RTKs, Dok7 is not only a substrate of MuSK but also an activator of MuSK’s kinase activity. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Dok7 PH-PTB domains in complex with a phosphopeptide representing the Dok7 binding site on MuSK. The structure and biochemical data reveal a dimeric arrangement of Dok7 PH-PTB that facilitates trans-autophosphorylation of the kinase activation loop. The structure provides the molecular basis for MuSK activation by Dok7 and for rationalizing several Dok7 loss-of-function mutations found in patients with congenital myasthenic syndromes. PMID:20603078

  7. Differential Role of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5 in Physiological Versus Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Traynham, Christopher J.; Cannavo, Alessandro; Zhou, Yan; Vouga, Alexandre G.; Woodall, Benjamin P.; Hullmann, Jonathan; Ibetti, Jessica; Gold, Jessica I.; Chuprun, J. Kurt; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) are dynamic regulators of cellular signaling. GRK5 is highly expressed within myocardium and is up-regulated in heart failure (HF). Although GRK5 is a critical regulator of cardiac GPCR signaling, recent data has uncovered non-canonical activity of GRK5 within nuclei that plays a key role in pathological hypertrophy. Targeted cardiac elevation of GRK5 in mice leads to exaggerated hypertrophy and early HF after transverse aortic constriction (TAC) due to GRK5 nuclear accumulation. Objective In this study we investigated the role of GRK5 in physiological, swimming induced hypertrophy (SIH). Methods and Results Cardiac-specific GRK5 transgenic mice (TgGRK5) and non-transgenic littermate control (NLC) mice were subjected to a 21-day high intensity swim protocol (or no swim sham controls). SIH and specific molecular and genetic indices of physiological hypertrophy were assessed including nuclear localization of GRK5 and compared to TAC. Unlike after TAC, swim-trained TgGRK5 and NLC mice exhibited similar increases in cardiac growth. Mechanistically, SIH did not lead to GRK5 nuclear accumulation, which was confirmed in vitro as insulin-like growth factor-1, a known mediator of physiological hypertrophy, was unable to induce GRK5 nuclear translocation in myocytes. We found specific patterns of altered gene expression between TAC and SIH with GRK5 overexpression. Further, SIH in post-TAC TgGRK5 mice was able to preserve cardiac function. Conclusions These data suggest that while nuclear-localized GRK5 is a pathological mediator after stress, this non-canonical nuclear activity of GRK5 is not induced during physiological hypertrophy. PMID:26515328

  8. E6-Associated Protein Dependent Estrogen Receptor Regulation of Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunit R2A Expression in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Jean-Pierre; Zeidan, Youssef H; Zafar, Nawal; El Hokayem, Jimmy

    2017-02-18

    E6ap is a known transcriptional coregulator for estrogen receptor alpha (Er, Erα) in the presence of estrogen. Protein kinase A (PKA) contains two regulatory subunits derived from four genes. Recent evidence demonstrates that PKA regulates E6ap activity. Data generated in our lab indicated estrogen dependent regulation of Pkar2a levels. Our project sets to investigate a possible feedback mechanism constituting of Erα and E6ap transcriptional regulation of Pkar2a expression. Western blot evaluated protein regulation correlations with E2 in mouse neuroblastoma lines. Bioinformatics detected estrogen response element (ERE) sequences. quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) validated the western blot results. ERE oligonucleotides were synthesized. Reporter gene transcriptional activity was evaluated via Luciferase assay output. Electromobility shift assay (EMSA) assessed direct binding between Erα relevant sequences. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and Re-ChIP were conducted in quantifying protein complex recruitment levels. Pkar2a protein expression directly correlated with E2, and four putative ERE sequences were identified. Pkar2a mRNA expression reverted to baseline with either E2 or E6ap absent. In the presence of E2, ERE-1 and ERE-4 possessed Luciferase reporter gene transcriptional capabilities. ERE-1 portrayed band shifts, representing direct binding to Erα with E2 supplementation. With E2, ERE-1 significantly enhanced Erα and E6ap recruitment levels to the Pkar2a promoter. Pkar2a is directly regulated by Erα and E6ap in the presence of estrogen stimulus. This work indicates a feedback mechanism in the interplay between PKA and E6ap, which may prove crucial for the role of both proteins in cancers and neurogenetic diseases like Angelman syndrome.

  9. Development of natural product-derived receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors based on conservation of protein domain fold.

    PubMed

    Kissau, Lars; Stahl, Petra; Mazitschek, Ralph; Giannis, Athannasios; Waldmann, Herbert

    2003-07-03

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such as Tie-2, IGF1R, Her-2/Neu, EGFR, and VEGFR1-3 play crucial roles in the control of cell growth and differentiation. Inhibition of such RTKs has become a major focus of current anticancer drug development, and therefore the discovery of new classes of inhibitors for these signal-transducing proteins is of prime importance. We have recently proposed a novel concept for improving the hit-finding process by employing natural products as biologically validated starting points in structural space for compound library development. In this concept, natural products are regarded as evolutionary chosen ligands for protein domains which are structurally conserved yet genetically mobile. Here we report on the discovery of novel and highly selective VEGFR-2 and -3, Tie-2, and IGF1R inhibitors derived from the naturally occurring Her-2/Neu kinase inhibitor nakijiquinone C and developed on the basis of this concept. Based on the structure of the natural product, a small library (74 members) was synthesized and investigated for inhibition of kinases with highly similar ATP-binding domains. The library yielded inhibitors with IC(50)s in the low micromolar range with high frequency (7 out of 74). In particular, four inhibitors of Tie-2 were found, a kinase critically involved in the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting ones (angiogenesis) and believed to be a new promising target in antitumor therapy. These results support the "domain concept". To advance the development of improved inhibitors, extensive molecular modeling studies were undertaken, including the construction of new homology models for VEGFR-2 and Tie-2. These studies revealed residues in the kinase structure which are crucial to the development of tailor-made receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  10. Teaching resources. Protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Avrom

    2005-02-22

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering the structure and function of protein kinases and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: A Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of the genomics and evolutionary relationships among kinases and then proceeds to describe the structure-function relationships of specific kinases, the molecular mechanisms underlying substrate specificity, and selected issues in regulation of kinase activity.

  11. SmShb, the SH2-Containing Adaptor Protein B of Schistosoma mansoni Regulates Venus Kinase Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Marion; Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Cailliau, Katia; Hahnel, Steffen; Grevelding, Christoph G.; Dissous, Colette

    2016-01-01

    Venus kinase receptors (VKRs) are invertebrate receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) formed by an extracellular Venus Fly Trap (VFT) ligand binding domain associated via a transmembrane domain with an intracellular tyrosine kinase (TK) domain. Schistosoma mansoni VKRs, SmVKR1 and SmVKR2, are both implicated in reproductive activities of the parasite. In this work, we show that the SH2 domain-containing protein SmShb is a partner of the phosphorylated form of SmVKR1. Expression of these proteins in Xenopus oocytes allowed us to demonstrate that the SH2 domain of SmShb interacts with the phosphotyrosine residue (pY979) located in the juxtamembrane region of SmVKR1. This interaction leads to phosphorylation of SmShb on tyrosines and promotes SmVKR1 signaling towards the JNK pathway. SmShb transcripts are expressed in all parasite stages and they were found in ovary and testes of adult worms, suggesting a possible colocalization of SmShb and SmVKR1 proteins. Silencing of SmShb in adult S. mansoni resulted in an accumulation of mature sperm in testes, indicating a possible role of SmShb in gametogenesis. PMID:27636711

  12. SmShb, the SH2-Containing Adaptor Protein B of Schistosoma mansoni Regulates Venus Kinase Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Morel, Marion; Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Cailliau, Katia; Hahnel, Steffen; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dissous, Colette

    2016-01-01

    Venus kinase receptors (VKRs) are invertebrate receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) formed by an extracellular Venus Fly Trap (VFT) ligand binding domain associated via a transmembrane domain with an intracellular tyrosine kinase (TK) domain. Schistosoma mansoni VKRs, SmVKR1 and SmVKR2, are both implicated in reproductive activities of the parasite. In this work, we show that the SH2 domain-containing protein SmShb is a partner of the phosphorylated form of SmVKR1. Expression of these proteins in Xenopus oocytes allowed us to demonstrate that the SH2 domain of SmShb interacts with the phosphotyrosine residue (pY979) located in the juxtamembrane region of SmVKR1. This interaction leads to phosphorylation of SmShb on tyrosines and promotes SmVKR1 signaling towards the JNK pathway. SmShb transcripts are expressed in all parasite stages and they were found in ovary and testes of adult worms, suggesting a possible colocalization of SmShb and SmVKR1 proteins. Silencing of SmShb in adult S. mansoni resulted in an accumulation of mature sperm in testes, indicating a possible role of SmShb in gametogenesis.

  13. Cannabinoid receptor 1 contributes to sprouted innervation in endometrial ectopic growth through mitogen-activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongxiu; Liang, Xizi; Wang, Juan; Zhao, Qianqian; Yang, Mei; Rong, Weifang; Zhang, Guohua

    2017-05-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates neurite outgrowth and neurogenesis during development of the central nervous system. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is expressed in neurons, including the somata and fibers, that innervate the endometrial ectopic cyst in rats. Here, we investigated the contribution of CB1R and its downstream signaling to the innervation of endometrial ectopic growth. We found that intrathecal injection of a CB1R agonist enhanced both the density of protein gene product (PGP) 9.5-immunoreactive sprouted nerve fibers and the protein level of PGP 9.5 of the ectopic cyst, and the CB1R antagonist induced opposite effects. The CB1R agonist increased the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK), but not pp38, in dorsal root ganglion (DRG), whereas the CB1R antagonist only decreased the expression of pERK. In cultured DRG neurons, CB1R agonists dose-dependently increased neurite elongation. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK) and JNK inhibitors, but not the p38 inhibitor, attenuated CB1R agonist-induced neurite elongation. The inhibitions of CB1R and its downstream ERK and JNK signaling pathways may alleviate the sprouted innervation that has been involved in ENDO-associated pain. This finding may provide a new therapeutic target for patients with endometriosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Receptor-Interacting Protein Kinase 3 Deficiency Delays Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Andrew; Sharma, Archna; Yang, Weng-Lang; Wang, Zhimin; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing consists of a complex, dynamic and overlapping process involving inflammation, proliferation and tissue remodeling. A better understanding of wound healing process at the molecular level is needed for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) controls programmed necrosis in response to TNF-α during inflammation and has been shown to be highly induced during cutaneous wound repair. However, its role in wound healing remains to be demonstrated. To study this, we created dorsal cutaneous wounds on male wild-type (WT) and RIPK3-deficient (Ripk3-/-) mice. Wound area was measured daily until day 14 post-wound and skin tissues were collected from wound sites at various days for analysis. The wound healing rate in Ripk3-/- mice was slower than the WT mice over the 14-day course; especially, at day 7, the wound size in Ripk3-/- mice was 53% larger than that of WT mice. H&E and Masson-Trichrome staining analysis showed impaired quality of wound closure in Ripk3-/- wounds with delayed re-epithelialization and angiogenesis and defected granulation tissue formation and collagen deposition compared to WT. The neutrophil infiltration pattern was altered in Ripk3-/- wounds with less neutrophils at day 1 and more neutrophils at day 3. This altered pattern was also reflected in the differential expression of IL-6, KC, IL-1β and TNF-α between WT and Ripk3-/- wounds. MMP-9 protein expression was decreased with increased Timp-1 mRNA in the Ripk3-/- wounds compared to WT. The microvascular density along with the intensity and timing of induction of proangiogenic growth factors VEGF and TGF-β1 were also decreased or delayed in the Ripk3-/- wounds. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from Ripk3-/- mice migrated less towards chemoattractants TGF-β1 and PDGF than MEFs from WT mice. These results clearly demonstrate that RIPK3 is an essential molecule to maintain the temporal manner of the normal progression

  15. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase-mediated Phosphorylation Regulates Post-endocytic Trafficking of the D2 Dopamine Receptor*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Namkung, Yoon; Dipace, Concetta; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Sibley, David R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-mediated phosphorylation in agonist-induced desensitization, arrestin association, endocytosis, and intracellular trafficking of the D2 dopamine receptor (DAR). Agonist activation of D2 DARs results in rapid and sustained receptor phosphorylation that is solely mediated by GRKs. A survey of GRKs revealed that only GRK2 or GRK3 promotes D2 DAR phosphorylation. Mutational analyses resulted in the identification of eight serine/threonine residues within the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor that are phosphorylated by GRK2/3. Simultaneous mutation of these eight residues results in a receptor construct, GRK(-), that is completely devoid of agonist-promoted GRK-mediated receptor phosphorylation. We found that both wild-type (WT) and GRK(-) receptors underwent a similar degree of agonist-induced desensitization as assessed using [35S]GTPγS binding assays. Similarly, both receptor constructs internalized to the same extent in response to agonist treatment. Furthermore, using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to directly assess receptor association with arrestin3, we found no differences between the WT and GRK(-) receptors. Thus, phosphorylation is not required for arrestin-receptor association or agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. In contrast, when we examined recycling of the D2 DARs to the cell surface, subsequent to agonist-induced endocytosis, the GRK(-) construct exhibited less recycling in comparison with the WT receptor. This impairment appears to be due to a greater propensity of the GRK(-) receptors to down-regulate once internalized. In contrast, if the receptor is highly phosphorylated, then receptor recycling is promoted. These results reveal a novel role for GRK-mediated phosphorylation in regulating the post-endocytic trafficking of a G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:19332542

  16. Ror receptor tyrosine kinases: orphans no more

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jennifer L.; Kuntz, Steven G.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Ror proteins are a conserved family of tyrosine kinase receptors that function in developmental processes, including skeletal and neuronal development, cell movement, and cell polarity. While Ror (receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor) proteins were originally named because the associated ligand and signaling pathway were unknown, recent studies in multiple species now establish that Ror proteins are Wnt receptors. Depending on the cellular context, Ror proteins can either activate or repress transcription of Wnt target genes and can modulate Wnt signaling by sequestering Wnt ligands. New evidence implicates Ror proteins in planar cell polarity (PCP), an alternative Wnt pathway. Here, we review the progress made in understanding these mysterious proteins and in particular we focus on their function as Wnt receptors. PMID:18848778

  17. Phosphorylation of the Drosophila transient receptor potential ion channel is regulated by the phototransduction cascade and involves several protein kinases and phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Voolstra, Olaf; Bartels, Jonas-Peter; Oberegelsbacher, Claudia; Pfannstiel, Jens; Huber, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a cardinal role in regulating cellular processes in eukaryotes. Phosphorylation of proteins is controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases. We previously reported the light-dependent phosphorylation of the Drosophila transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel at multiple sites. TRP generates the receptor potential upon stimulation of the photoreceptor cell by light. An eye-enriched protein kinase C (eye-PKC) has been implicated in the phosphorylation of TRP by in vitro studies. Other kinases and phosphatases of TRP are elusive. Using phosphospecific antibodies and mass spectrometry, we here show that phosphorylation of most TRP sites depends on the phototransduction cascade and the activity of the TRP ion channel. A candidate screen to identify kinases and phosphatases provided in vivo evidence for an involvement of eye-PKC as well as other kinases and phosphatases in TRP phosphorylation.

  18. Alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors affect growth regulation of human mesothelioma cells: role of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Trombino, Sonya; Cesario, Alfredo; Margaritora, Stefano; Granone, PierLuigi; Motta, Giovanni; Falugi, Carla; Russo, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    This study presents data suggesting that both human mesothelioma (cell lines and human mesothelioma biopsies) and human normal mesothelial cells express receptors for acetylcholine and that stimulation of these receptors by nicotine prompted cell growth via activation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Thus, these data demonstrate that: (a) human mesothelioma cells and human biopsies of mesothelioma as well as of normal pleural mesothelial cells express functionally alpha-7 nicotinic acethlycholine receptors, evaluated by alpha-bungarotoxin-FITC binding, receptor binding assay, Western blot, and reverse transcription-PCR; (b) choline acetyltransferase immunostaining is present in mesothelioma cells; (c) mesothelioma cell growth is modulated by the cholinergic system in which agonists (i.e., nicotine) has a proliferative effect, and antagonists (i.e., curare) has an inhibitory effect, evaluated by cell cloning, DNA synthesis and cell cycle; (d) nicotine induces Ca(+2) influx, evaluated by [(45)Ca(2+)] uptake, and consequently activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p90(RSK) phosphorylation), evaluated by Western blot; and (e) apoptosis mechanisms in mesothelioma cells are under the control of the cholinergic system (nicotine antiapoptotic via induction of nuclear factor-kappaB complexes and phosphorylation of Bad at Ser(112); curare proapoptotic via G(0)-G(1) arrest p21(waf-1) dependent but p53 independent). The involvement of the nonneuronal cholinergic system in mesothelioma appears reasonable and open up new therapeutic strategies.

  19. 5-HT1A receptor-mediated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) is modulated by regulator of G protein signaling protein 19.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Terauchi, Akiko; Yee, Christopher H; Umemori, Hisashi; Traynor, John R

    2014-09-01

    The 5-HT1A receptor is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that activates G proteins of the Gαi/o family. 5-HT1A receptors expressed in the raphe, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex are implicated in the control of mood and are targets for anti-depressant drugs. Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins are members of a large family that play important roles in signal transduction downstream of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The main role of RGS proteins is to act as GTPase accelerating proteins (GAPs) to dampen or negatively regulate GPCR-mediated signaling. We have shown that a mouse expressing Gαi2 that is insensitive to all RGS protein GAP activity has an anti-depressant-like phenotype due to increased signaling of postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors, thus implicating the 5-HT1A receptor-Gαi2 complex as an important target. Here we confirm that RGS proteins act as GAPs to regulate signaling to adenylate cyclase and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway downstream of the 5-HT1A receptor, using RGS-insensitive Gαi2 protein expressed in C6 cells. We go on to use short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to show that RGS19 is responsible for the GAP activity in C6 cells and also that RGS19 acts as a GAP for 5-HT1A receptor signaling in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and primary hippocampal neurons. In addition, in both cell types the synergy between 5-HT1A receptor and the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 in stimulating the MAPK pathway is enhanced following shRNA reduction of RGS19 expression. Thus RGS19 may be a viable new target for anti-depressant medications.

  20. Activation of the protein-tyrosine kinase associated with the bombesin receptor complex in small cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudino, G; Cirillo, D; Naldini, L; Rossino, P; Comoglio, P M

    1988-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that bombesin-like peptides produced by small cell lung carcinomas may sustain deregulated proliferation through an autocrine mechanism. We have shown that the neuropeptide bombesin leads to the activation of a protein-tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates a 115-kDa protein (p115) associated with the bombesin receptor complex in mouse Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. We now report that phosphotyrosine antibodies recognize a 115-kDa protein, phosphorylated on tyrosine, in four human small cell lung carcinoma cell lines producing bombesin but not in a nonproducer "variant" line. p115 from detergent-treated small cell lung carcinoma cells binds to bombesin-Sepharose and can be phosphorylated on tyrosine in the presence of radiolabeled ATP and Mn2+. As for the p115 immunoprecipitated from mouse fibroblast, the small cell lung carcinoma p115 can be phosphorylated in an immunocomplex kinase assay. However, the latter does not require the presence of exogenous bombesin for activity. Binding data, obtained by using radiolabeled ligand, suggest receptor occupancy in the cell lines producing bombesin. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that proliferation in some human small cell lung carcinoma lines is under autocrine control, regulated through activation of bombesin receptors. Images PMID:2451242

  1. Genetic Inhibition of Receptor Interacting Protein Kinase-1 Reduces Cell Death and Improves Functional Outcome After Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lule, Sevda; Wu, Limin; McAllister, Lauren M; Edmiston, William J; Chung, Joon Yong; Levy, Emily; Zheng, Yi; Gough, Peter J; Bertin, John; Degterev, Alexei; Lo, Eng H; Whalen, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies using cultured cells and rodent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) models have implicated RIPK1 (receptor interacting protein kinase-1) as a driver of programmed necrosis and secondary injury based on use of chemical inhibitors. However, these inhibitors have off-target effects and cannot be used alone to prove a role for RIPK1. The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of genetic inhibition of the kinase domain of RIPK1 in a mouse ICH model. We subjected 2 lines of mice with RIPK1 point mutations of the kinase domain (K45A and D138N), rendering them kinase inactive, to autologous blood ICH and measured acute cell death and functional outcome. Compared with wild-type controls, RIPK1(K45A/K45A) and RIPK1(D138N/D138N) had significantly less cells with plasmalemma permeability, less acute neuronal cell death, less weight loss and more rapid weight gain to baseline, and improved performance in a Morris water maze paradigm after autologous blood ICH. In addition, mice systemically administered GSK'963, a potent, specific, brain penetrant small molecule RIPK1 inhibitor, had reduced acute neuronal death at 24 hours after ICH. The data show that the kinase domain of RIPK1 is a disease driver of ICH, mediating both acute cell death and functional outcome, and support development of RIPK1 inhibitors as therapeutic agents for human ICH. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Characterization of a putative S-locus encoded receptor protein kinase and its role in self-incompatibility. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Nasrallah, J.B.

    1994-05-01

    The major results of our research effort include the determination of the S-Receptor Kinase (SRK) gene structure, the demonstration of S-haplotype-associated SRK polymorphisms and possible co-evolution of SRK and SLG, the characterization of the temporal and spatial expression patterns of SRK, and the demonstration that SRK has intrinsic serine/threonine kinase activity. Our results have indicated that SLG originated from an SRK-like gene by a gene duplication event and suggested a possible molecular basis for leaky S haplotypes. The data have allowed us to develop a model of self-incompatibility based on the interaction of SRK and SLG and the activation of SRK in response to self-pollination. More generally, the information that we have obtained is potentially relevant to understanding mechanisms of signalling inplants. Thus, the interaction of membrane-based receptor protein kinases with secreted forms of their extracellular domains may represent a generalized mechanism by which receptors signal across the plant cell wall.

  3. Concerted transcriptional activation of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene by insulin and luteinizing hormone in cultured porcine granulosa-luteal cells: possible convergence of protein kinase a, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Sekar, N; Veldhuis, J D

    2001-07-01

    -repressive region in this gene. Non-LH receptor-dependent agonists of protein kinase A (PKA), 8-bromo-cAMP (1 mM), and forskolin (10 microM) with or without insulin/IGF-I costimulation likewise augmented LDL receptor promoter expression with similar strong dependency on the -255 to -139 bp 5'-upstream region. To assess more specific PKA-dependent mediation of LH's contribution to combined hormonal drive, the LDL receptor (-1076 to +11 bp) reporter plasmid was cotransfected with a full-sequence rabbit muscle protein kinase inhibitor (PKI) minigene driven constitutively by a Rous sarcoma virus promoter. Expression of the latter PKA antagonist blocked transcriptional stimulation by LH alone as well as that by LH combined with insulin (or IGF-I) by 70-85% without reducing basal transcriptional activity. Transfection of a mutant inactive (Arg to Gly) Rous sarcoma virus/PKI gene confirmed the specificity of the PKI effect. To investigate the convergent role of the insulin/IGF-I effector pathway mediating bihormonal stimulation of LDL receptor promoter expression, transfected granulosa-luteal cells were pretreated for 30 min with two specific inhibitors of phophatidylinositol 3-kinase, wortmannin (100 nM) and LY 294002 (10 microM), or of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, PD 98059 (50 microM), U0126 (10 microM), or the latter's inactive derivative, U0124 (10 microM). Both classes of antagonists impeded the ability of insulin or IGF-I to enhance LH-stimulated LDL receptor promoter expression by 60-80%. In conclusion, the present analyses indicate that LH and insulin (or IGF-I) can up-regulate LDL receptor transcriptional activity supraadditively in porcine granulosa-luteal cells 1) via one or more agonistic cis-acting DNA regions located between -255 and -139 bp 5'- upstream of the transcriptional start site, 2) without abrogating sterol-sensitive repressive of this promoter, and 3) by way of intracellular mechanisms that include the PKA, phophatidylinositol 3-kinase, and mitogen

  4. A Network of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Links G Protein-Coupled Receptors to the c-jun Promoter: a Role for c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase, p38s, and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Marinissen, Maria Julia; Chiariello, Mario; Pallante, Michael; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    1999-01-01

    The expression of the c-jun proto-oncogene is rapidly induced in response to mitogens acting on a large variety of cell surface receptors. The resulting functional activity of c-Jun proteins appears to be critical for cell proliferation. Recently, we have shown that a large family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), represented by the m1 muscarinic receptor, can initiate intracellular signaling cascades that result in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNK) and that the activation of JNK but not of MAPK correlated with a remarkable increase in the expression of c-jun mRNA. Subsequently, however, we obtained evidence that GPCRs can potently stimulate the activity of the c-jun promoter through MEF2 transcription factors, which do not act downstream from JNK. In view of these observations, we set out to investigate further the nature of the signaling pathway linking GPCRs to the c-jun promoter. Utilizing NIH 3T3 cells, we found that GPCRs can activate the c-jun promoter in a JNK-independent manner. Additionally, we demonstrated that these GPCRs can elevate the activity of novel members of the MAPK family, including ERK5, p38α, p38γ, and p38δ, and that the activation of certain kinases acting downstream from MEK5 (ERK5) and MKK6 (p38α and p38γ) is necessary to fully activate the c-jun promoter. Moreover, in addition to JNK, ERK5, p38α, and p38γ were found to stimulate the c-jun promoter by acting on distinct responsive elements. Taken together, these results suggest that the pathway linking GPCRs to the c-jun promoter involves the integration of numerous signals transduced by a highly complex network of MAPK, rather than resulting from the stimulation of a single linear protein kinase cascade. Furthermore, our findings suggest that each signaling pathway affects one or more regulatory elements on the c-jun promoter and that the transcriptional response most likely results from the temporal integration

  5. Sibiriline, a new small chemical inhibitor of receptor-interacting protein kinase 1, prevents immune-dependent hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Le Cann, Fabienne; Delehouzé, Claire; Leverrier-Penna, Sabrina; Filliol, Aveline; Comte, Arnaud; Delalande, Olivier; Desban, Nathalie; Baratte, Blandine; Gallais, Isabelle; Piquet-Pellorce, Claire; Faurez, Florence; Bonnet, Marion; Mettey, Yvette; Goekjian, Peter; Samson, Michel; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bach, Stéphane; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse

    2017-09-01

    Necroptosis is a regulated form of cell death involved in several disease models including in particular liver diseases. Receptor-interacting protein kinases, RIPK1 and RIPK3, are the main serine/threonine kinases driving this cell death pathway. We screened a noncommercial, kinase-focused chemical library which allowed us to identify Sibiriline as a new inhibitor of necroptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD)-deficient Jurkat cells. Moreover, Sib inhibits necroptotic cell death induced by various death ligands in human or mouse cells while not protecting from caspase-dependent apoptosis. By using competition binding assay and recombinant kinase assays, we demonstrated that Sib is a rather specific competitive RIPK1 inhibitor. Molecular docking analysis shows that Sib is trapped closed to human RIPK1 adenosine triphosphate-binding site in a relatively hydrophobic pocket locking RIPK1 in an inactive conformation. In agreement with its RIPK1 inhibitory property, Sib inhibits both TNF-induced RIPK1-dependent necroptosis and RIPK1-dependent apoptosis. Finally, Sib protects mice from concanavalin A-induced hepatitis. These results reveal the small-molecule Sib as a new RIPK1 inhibitor potentially of interest for the treatment of immune-dependent hepatitis. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Regulation of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase by antigen receptor and Ca2+ in T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tamás, Peter; Hawley, Simon A.; Clarke, Rosemary G.; Mustard, Kirsty J.; Green, Kevin; Hardie, D. Grahame; Cantrell, Doreen A.

    2006-01-01

    The adenosine monophosphate (AMP)–activated protein kinase (AMPK) has a crucial role in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. This study shows that human and mouse T lymphocytes express AMPKα1 and that this is rapidly activated in response to triggering of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). TCR stimulation of AMPK was dependent on the adaptors LAT and SLP76 and could be mimicked by the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ with Ca2+ ionophores or thapsigargin. AMPK activation was also induced by energy stress and depletion of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP). However, TCR and Ca2+ stimulation of AMPK required the activity of Ca2+–calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases (CaMKKs), whereas AMPK activation induced by increased AMP/ATP ratios did not. These experiments reveal two distinct pathways for the regulation of AMPK in T lymphocytes. The role of AMPK is to promote ATP conservation and production. The rapid activation of AMPK in response to Ca2+ signaling in T lymphocytes thus reveals that TCR triggering is linked to an evolutionally conserved serine kinase that regulates energy metabolism. Moreover, AMPK does not just react to cellular energy depletion but also anticipates it. PMID:16818670

  7. Retrograde Neurotrophic Signaling Requires a Protein Interacting with Receptor Tyrosine Kinases via C2H2 Zinc Fingers

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoqin; Zang, Keling; Zhou, Zhiwei; Reichardt, Louis F.

    2010-01-01

    Neurotrophins at axonal terminals signal to cell bodies to regulate neuronal development via signaling endosomes containing activated Trk receptor tyrosine kinases and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Requirements for the formation of signaling endosomes remain, however, poorly characterized. Here we show that a novel Trk-interacting protein, NTRAP (neurotrophic factor receptor–associated protein), plays a crucial role in this signaling process. NTRAP interacts with the Trk intracellular domain through its C2H2 zinc fingers in a kinase-dependent manner. It is associated with vesicles, some of which contain markers for signaling endosomes. Inhibition of NTRAP function suppresses neurotrophin-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells by altering TrkA endocytic traffic, inhibiting the formation of endosomes containing persistently active MAPKs. In compartmentalized sensory neuron cultures, down-regulation of NTRAP abolishes the ability of neurotrophins applied to distal axons to activate the transcription factor adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) and to promote neuronal survival. We propose that NTRAP regulates retrograde neurotrophic signaling by controlling the formation of signaling endosomes. PMID:19864463

  8. Activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptor by gintonin inhibits Kv1.2 channel activity: involvement of tyrosine kinase and receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Choi, Sun-Hye; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Rhee, Jeehae; Chung, Chihye; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2013-08-26

    Gintonin is a novel ginseng-derived G protein-coupled lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand. The primary action of gintonin is to elicit a transient increase in [Ca(2+)]i via activation of LPA receptor subtypes. Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels play important roles in synaptic transmission in nervous systems. The previous reports have shown that Kv channels can be regulated by Gαq/11 protein-coupled receptor ligands. In the present study, we examined the effects of gintonin on Kv1.2 channel activity expressed in Xenopus oocytes after injection of RNA encoding the human Kv1.2 α subunit. Gintonin treatment inhibited Kv1.2 channel activity in reversible and concentration-dependent manners. The inhibitory effect of gintonin on Kv1.2 channel activity was blocked by active phospholipase C inhibitor, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor antagonist, and intracellular Ca(2+) chelator. The co-expression of active receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α (RPTPα) with Kv1.2 channel greatly attenuated gintonin-mediated inhibition of Kv1.2 channel activity, but attenuation was not observed with catalytically inactive RPTPα. Furthermore, neither genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nor site-directed mutation of a tyrosine residue (Y132 to Y132F), which is phosphorylated by tyrosine kinase of the N-terminal of the Kv1.2 channel α subunit, significantly attenuated gintonin-mediated inhibition of Kv1.2 channel activity. These results indicate that the gintonin-mediated Kv1.2 channel regulation involves the dual coordination of both tyrosine kinase and RPTPα coupled to this receptor. Finally, gintonin-mediated regulation of Kv1.2 channel activity might explain one of the modulations of gintonin-mediated neuronal activities in nervous systems.

  9. Receptor-like kinases from Arabidopsis form a monophyletic gene family related to animal receptor kinases

    PubMed Central

    Shiu, Shin-Han; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2001-01-01

    Plant receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are proteins with a predicted signal sequence, single transmembrane region, and cytoplasmic kinase domain. Receptor-like kinases belong to a large gene family with at least 610 members that represent nearly 2.5% of Arabidopsis protein coding genes. We have categorized members of this family into subfamilies based on both the identity of the extracellular domains and the phylogenetic relationships between the kinase domains of subfamily members. Surprisingly, this structurally defined group of genes is monophyletic with respect to kinase domains when compared with the other eukaryotic kinase families. In an extended analysis, animal receptor kinases, Raf kinases, plant RLKs, and animal receptor tyrosine kinases form a well supported group sharing a common origin within the superfamily of serine/threonine/tyrosine kinases. Among animal kinase sequences, Drosophila Pelle and related cytoplasmic kinases fall within the plant RLK clade, which we now define as the RLK/Pelle family. A survey of expressed sequence tag records for land plants reveals that mosses, ferns, conifers, and flowering plants have similar percentages of expressed sequence tags representing RLK/Pelle homologs, suggesting that the size of this gene family may have been close to the present-day level before the diversification of land plant lineages. The distribution pattern of four RLK subfamilies on Arabidopsis chromosomes indicates that the expansion of this gene family is partly a consequence of duplication and reshuffling of the Arabidopsis genome and of the generation of tandem repeats. PMID:11526204

  10. Nucleotide binding by the epidermal growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinase. Trinitrophenyl-ATP as a spectroscopic probe.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K; Koland, J G

    1996-01-05

    The nucleotide binding properties of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor protein-tyrosine kinase were investigated with the fluorescent nucleotide analog 2'(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP). TNP-ATP was found to be an active substrate for the autophosphorylation reaction of the recombinant EGF receptor protein-tyrosine kinase domain (TKD). Whereas the Vmax for the TNP-ATP-dependent autophosphorylation reaction was approximately 200-fold lower than that of ATP, the Km for this reaction was similar to that observed with ATP. The nucleotide analog was also shown to be an inhibitor of the ATP-dependent autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation reactions of the TKD. Spectroscopic studies demonstrated both a high affinity binding of TNP-ATP to the recombinant TKD and a markedly enhanced fluorescence of the bound nucleotide analog. The fluorescence of enzyme-bound TNP-ATP was attenuated in the presence of ATP, which enabled determination of the dissociation constants for both ATP and the Mn2+ complex of ATP. A truncated form of the EGF receptor TKD lacking the C-terminal autophosphorylation domain exhibited an enhanced affinity for TNP-ATP, which indicated that the autophosphorylation domain occupied the peptide substrate binding site of the TKD and modulated the binding of the nucleotide substrates.

  11. Sodium depletion enhances renal expression of (pro)renin receptor via cyclic GMP-protein kinase G signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiqian; Siragy, Helmy M

    2012-02-01

    (Pro)renin receptor (PRR) is expressed in renal vasculature, glomeruli, and tubules. The physiological regulation of this receptor is not well established. We hypothesized that sodium depletion increases PRR expression through cGMP- protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathway. Renal PRR expressions were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats on normal sodium or low-sodium diet (LS) and in cultured rat proximal tubular cells and mouse renal inner medullary collecting duct cells exposed to LS concentration. LS augmented PRR expression in renal glomeruli, proximal tubules, distal tubules, and collecting ducts. LS also increased cGMP production and PKG activity. In cells exposed to normal sodium, cGMP analog increased PKG activity and upregulated PRR expression. In cells exposed to LS, blockade of guanylyl cyclase with 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one decreased PKG activity and downregulated PRR expression. PKG inhibition decreased phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A activity; suppressed LS-mediated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, c-Jun, and nuclear factor-κB p65; and attenuated LS-mediated PRR upregulation. LS also enhanced DNA binding of cAMP response element binding protein 1 to cAMP response elements, nuclear factor-κB p65 to nuclear factor-κB elements, and c-Jun to activator protein 1 elements in PRR promoter in proximal tubular cells. We conclude that sodium depletion upregulates renal PRR expression via the cGMP-PKG signaling pathway by enhancing binding of cAMP response element binding protein 1, nuclear factor-κB p65, and c-Jun to PRR promotor.

  12. A cell-free method for expressing and reconstituting membrane proteins enables functional characterization of the plant receptor-like protein kinase FERONIA.

    PubMed

    Minkoff, Benjamin B; Makino, Shin-Ichi; Haruta, Miyoshi; Beebe, Emily T; Wrobel, Russell L; Fox, Brian G; Sussman, Michael R

    2017-04-07

    There are more than 600 receptor-like kinases (RLKs) in Arabidopsis, but due to challenges associated with the characterization of membrane proteins, only a few have known biological functions. The plant RLK FERONIA is a peptide receptor and has been implicated in plant growth regulation, but little is known about its molecular mechanism of action. To investigate the properties of this enzyme, we used a cell-free wheat germ-based expression system in which mRNA encoding FERONIA was co-expressed with mRNA encoding the membrane scaffold protein variant MSP1D1. With the addition of the lipid cardiolipin, assembly of these proteins into nanodiscs was initiated. FERONIA protein kinase activity in nanodiscs was higher than that of soluble protein and comparable with other heterologously expressed protein kinases. Truncation experiments revealed that the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane domain is necessary for maximal FERONIA activity, whereas the transmembrane domain is inhibitory. An ATP analogue that reacts with lysine residues inhibited catalytic activity and labeled four lysines; mutagenesis demonstrated that two of these, Lys-565 and Lys-663, coordinate ATP in the active site. Mass spectrometric phosphoproteomic measurements further identified phosphorylation sites that were examined using phosphomimetic mutagenesis. The results of these experiments are consistent with a model in which kinase-mediated phosphorylation within the C-terminal region is inhibitory and regulates catalytic activity. These data represent a step further toward understanding the molecular basis for the protein kinase catalytic activity of FERONIA and show promise for future characterization of eukaryotic membrane proteins. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Influence of gαq on the dynamics of m3-acetylcholine receptor-g-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Valerie; Krasel, Cornelius; Brockmann, Jörg; Bünemann, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a serine/threonine kinase with an important function in the desensitization of G-protein-coupled receptors. Based on its ability to bind G-protein βγ subunits as well as activated Gαq subunits, it can be considered as an effector for G-proteins. The recruitment of GRK2 to activated receptors is well known to be mediated by Gβγ together with negatively charged membrane phospholipids. In the current study, we address the role of Gαq on the interaction of GRK2 with activated Gq-protein-coupled receptors. Therefore, we established new Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assays to study the interaction of GRK2 with the M3-acetylcholine (M3-ACh) receptor as well as Gq-protein subunits with high spatiotemporal resolution in single living human embryonic kidney 293T cells. M3-ACh receptor stimulation with 10 µM acetylcholine resulted in distinct changes in FRET, which reflects interaction of the respective proteins. GRK2 mutants with reduced binding affinity toward Gαq [GRK2(D110A)] and Gβγ [GRK2(R587Q)] were used to determine the specific role of Gq-protein-binding by GRK2. Comparison of absolute FRET amplitudes demonstrated that Gαq enhances the extent and stability of the GRK2-M3-ACh receptor interaction, and that not only Gβγ but also Gαq can target GRK2 to the membrane. This reveals an important role of Gαq in efficient recruitment of GRK2 to M3-ACh receptors. Furthermore, interactions between Gαq and GRK2 were associated with a prolongation of the interaction between GRK2 and the M3-ACh receptor and enhanced arrestin recruitment by these receptors, indicating that Gαq influences signaling and desensitization. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. The octopamine receptor OAMB mediates ovulation via Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the Drosophila oviduct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Rohila, Suman; Han, Kyung-An

    2009-01-01

    Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine), is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3) with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg transfer from

  15. The Octopamine Receptor OAMB Mediates Ovulation via Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in the Drosophila Oviduct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Rohila, Suman; Han, Kyung-An

    2009-01-01

    Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine), is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3) with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg transfer from

  16. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hien, Tran Thi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  17. A calcium and free fatty acid-modulated protein kinase as putative effector of the fusicoccin 14-3-3 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    van der Hoeven, P C; Siderius, M; Korthout, H A; Drabkin, A V; de Boer, A H

    1996-01-01

    A protein kinase that is activated by calcium and cis-unsaturated fatty acids has been characterized from oat (Avena sativa L.) root plasma membranes. The kinase phosphorylates a synthetic peptide with a motif (-R-T-L-S-) that can be phosphorylated by both protein kinase C (PKC) and calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK)-type kinases. Calphostin C and chelerythrine, two PKC inhibitors, completely inhibited the kinase activity with values of inhibitor concentration for 50% inhibition of 0.7 and 30 microns, respectively. At low Ca2+ concentrations cis-unsaturated fatty acids (linolenic acid, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, and oleic acid) stimulated the kinase activity almost 10-fold. The two inhibitors of the kinase, calphostin C and chelerythrin, strongly reduced the fusicoccin (FC)-induced H+ extrusion, and the activators of the kinase, the cis-unsaturated fatty acids, prevented [3H]FC binding to the FC 14-3-3 receptor. CDPK antibodies cross-reacted with a 43-kD band in the plasma membrane and in a purified FC receptor fraction. A polypeptide with the same apparent molecular mass was recognized by a synthetic peptide that has a sequence homologous to the annexin-like domain from barely 14-3-3. The possibility of the involvement of a kinase, with properties from both CDPK and PKC, and a phospholipase A2 in the FC Signal transduction pathway is discussed. PMID:8754686

  18. Tyrosine phosphorylation of two cytosolic proteins of 50 kDa and 35 kDa in rat liver by insulin-receptor kinase in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Y C; Yip, C C

    1987-01-01

    Insulin-receptor tyrosine kinase can phosphorylate a variety of artificial substrates in vitro. Its physiological substrate(s), however, remains unknown. In the present study, we show that immobilized insulin receptors phosphorylate tyrosine residues of two cytosolic proteins of 50 kDa and 35 kDa in rat liver. Phosphorylation of these two proteins required Mn2+- or Mg2+-ATP as the phosphate donor. Phosphorylation was time- and temperature-dependent. Furthermore, the rate of phosphorylation of the two proteins was related to the autophosphorylated state of the insulin receptor. The pI of the phosphorylated 50 kDa and 35 kDa proteins was 5.4 and 5.6 respectively. These proteins were present in low abundance. They were not related to each other, nor to the insulin receptor, as demonstrated by in-gel proteolytic digestion and by immunoprecipitation using antibodies produced against them. They were specific substrates for the insulin receptor kinase, since they were not phosphorylated by epidermal-growth-factor-receptor kinase. These observations suggest that the 50 kDa and 35 kDa cytosolic proteins may be endogenous substrates for the insulin-receptor kinase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:2829823

  19. Phospho-dependent functional modulation of GABAB receptors by the metabolic sensor AMP-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Wilkins, Megan E; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Warren, Noel; Tamaki, Keisuke; Iemata, Mika; Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew; Horvath, Zsolt; Freeman, Katie; Carling, David; Huang, Lan; Gonzales, Cathleen; Cooper, Edward; Smart, Trevor G.; Pangalos, Menelas N.; Moss., Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptors composed of R1 and R2 subunits that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain by activating inwardly-rectifying K+ channels (GIRKs) and inhibiting Ca2+ channels. We demonstrate here that GABAB receptors are intimately associated with 5’AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK acts as a metabolic sensor that is potently activated by increases in 5’AMP concentration caused by enhanced metabolic activity, anoxia or ischemia. AMPK binds the R1 subunit and directly phosphorylates S783 in the R2 subunit to enhance GABAB receptor activation of GIRKs. Phosphorylation of S783 is evident in many brain regions, and is increased dramatically after ischemic injury. Finally we also reveal that S783 plays a critical role in enhancing neuronal survival after ischemia. Together our results provide evidence of a novel neuroprotective mechanism, which under conditions of metabolic stress or after ischemia increases GABAB receptor function to reduce excitotoxicity and thereby promoting neuronal survival. PMID:17224405

  20. Phospho-dependent functional modulation of GABA(B) receptors by the metabolic sensor AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Wilkins, Megan E; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Tamaki, Keisuke; Iemata, Mika; Warren, Noel; Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew; Horvath, Zsolt; Freeman, Katie; Carling, David; Huang, Lan; Gonzales, Cathleen; Cooper, Edward; Smart, Trevor G; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J

    2007-01-18

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors composed of R1 and R2 subunits that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain by activating inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRKs) and inhibiting Ca(2+) channels. We demonstrate here that GABA(B) receptors are intimately associated with 5'AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK acts as a metabolic sensor that is potently activated by increases in 5'AMP concentration that are caused by enhanced metabolic activity, anoxia, or ischemia. AMPK binds the R1 subunit and directly phosphorylates S783 in the R2 subunit to enhance GABA(B) receptor activation of GIRKs. Phosphorylation of S783 is evident in many brain regions, and is increased dramatically after ischemic injury. Finally, we also reveal that S783 plays a critical role in enhancing neuronal survival after ischemia. Together our results provide evidence of a neuroprotective mechanism, which, under conditions of metabolic stress or after ischemia, increases GABA(B) receptor function to reduce excitotoxicity and thereby promotes neuronal survival.

  1. Cardiac hyporesponsiveness in severe sepsis is associated with nitric oxide-dependent activation of G protein receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Dal-Secco, Daniela; DalBó, Silvia; Lautherbach, Natalia E S; Gava, Fábio N; Celes, Mara R N; Benedet, Patricia O; Souza, Adriana H; Akinaga, Juliana; Lima, Vanessa; Silva, Katiussia P; Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo A; Rossi, Marcos A; Kettelhut, Isis C; Pupo, André S; Cunha, Fernando Q; Assreuy, Jamil

    2017-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase isoform 2 (GRK2) has a critical role in physiological and pharmacological responses to endogenous and exogenous substances. Sepsis causes an important cardiovascular dysfunction in which nitric oxide (NO) has a relevant role. The present study aimed to assess the putative effect of inducible NO synthase (NOS2)-derived NO on the activity of GRK2 in the context of septic cardiac dysfunction. C57BL/6 mice were submitted to severe septic injury by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Heart function was assessed by isolated and perfused heart, echocardiography, and β-adrenergic receptor binding. GRK2 was determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis in the heart and isolated cardiac myocytes. Sepsis increased NOS2 expression in the heart, increased plasma nitrite + nitrate levels, and reduced isoproterenol-induced isolated ventricle contraction, whole heart tension development, and β-adrenergic receptor density. Treatment with 1400W or with GRK2 inhibitor prevented CLP-induced cardiac hyporesponsiveness 12 and 24 h after CLP. Increased labeling of total and phosphorylated GRK2 was detected in hearts after CLP. With treatment of 1400W or in hearts taken from septic NOS2 knockout mice, the activation of GRK2 was reduced. 1400W or GRK2 inhibitor reduced mortality, improved echocardiographic cardiac parameters, and prevented organ damage. Therefore, during sepsis, NOS2-derived NO increases GRK2, which leads to a reduction in β-adrenergic receptor density, contributing to the heart dysfunction. Isolated cardiac myocyte data indicate that NO acts through the soluble guanylyl cyclase/cGMP/PKG pathway. GRK2 inhibition may be a potential therapeutic target in sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The main novelty presented here is to show that septic shock induces cardiac hyporesponsiveness to isoproterenol by a mechanism dependent on nitric oxide and mediated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase isoform 2. Therefore

  2. Phosphorylation of the nuclear receptor corepressor 1 by protein kinase B switches its corepressor targets in the liver in mice.

    PubMed

    Jo, Young Suk; Ryu, Dongryeol; Maida, Adriano; Wang, Xu; Evans, Ronald M; Schoonjans, Kristina; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1) is a transcriptional coregulator that has wide-ranging effects on gene expression patterns. In the liver, NCoR1 represses lipid synthesis in the fasting state, whereas it inhibits activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) upon feeding, thereby blunting ketogenesis. Here, we show that insulin by activation of protein kinase B induces phosphorylation of NCoR1 on serine 1460, which selectively favors its interaction with PPARα and estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) over liver X receptor alpha (LXRα). Phosphorylation of NCoR1 on S1460 selectively derepresses LXRα target genes, resulting in increased lipogenesis, whereas, at the same time, it inhibits PPARα and ERRα targets, thereby attenuating oxidative metabolism in the liver. Phosphorylation-gated differential recruitment of NCoR1 to different nuclear receptors explains the apparent paradox that liver-specific deletion of NCoR1 concurrently induces both lipogenesis and oxidative metabolism owing to a global derepression of LXRα, PPARα, and ERRα activity. Phosphorylation-mediated recruitment switch of NCoR1 between nuclear receptor subsets provides a mechanism by which corepressors can selectively modulate liver energy metabolism during the fasting-feeding transition. © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  3. A Dual Role for Receptor-interacting Protein Kinase 2 (RIP2) Kinase Activity in Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain 2 (NOD2)-dependent Autophagy*

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Craig R.; Kabi, Amrita; Marina-García, Noemí; Sreekumar, Arun; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Nickerson, Kourtney P.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Nuñez, Gabriel; McDonald, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is triggered by the intracellular bacterial sensor NOD2 (nucleotide-binding, oligomerization domain 2) as an anti-bacterial response. Defects in autophagy have been implicated in Crohn's disease susceptibility. The molecular mechanisms of activation and regulation of this process by NOD2 are not well understood, with recent studies reporting conflicting requirements for RIP2 (receptor-interacting protein kinase 2) in autophagy induction. We examined the requirement of NOD2 signaling mediated by RIP2 for anti-bacterial autophagy induction and clearance of Salmonella typhimurium in the intestinal epithelial cell line HCT116. Our data demonstrate that NOD2 stimulates autophagy in a process dependent on RIP2 tyrosine kinase activity. Autophagy induction requires the activity of the mitogen-activated protein kinases MEKK4 and p38 but is independent of NFκB signaling. Activation of autophagy was inhibited by a PP2A phosphatase complex, which interacts with both NOD2 and RIP2. PP2A phosphatase activity inhibited NOD2-dependent autophagy but not activation of NFκB or p38. Upon stimulation of NOD2, the phosphatase activity of the PP2A complex is inhibited through tyrosine phosphorylation of the catalytic subunit in a process dependent on RIP2 activity. These findings demonstrate that RIP2 tyrosine kinase activity is not only required for NOD2-dependent autophagy but plays a dual role in this process. RIP2 both sends a positive autophagy signal through activation of p38 MAPK and relieves repression of autophagy mediated by the phosphatase PP2A. PMID:22665475

  4. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mirshafiey, Abbas; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Asghari, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication and their function as relay points for signaling pathways. They have a key role in numerous processes that control cellular proliferation and differentiation, regulate cell growth and cellular metabolism, and promote cell survival and apoptosis. Recently, the role of RTKs including TCR, FLT-3, c-Kit, c-Fms, PDGFR, ephrin, neurotrophin receptor, and TAM receptor in autoimmune disorder, especially rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis has been suggested. In multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, RTKs and their tyrosine kinase enzymes are selective important targets for tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) agents. TKIs, compete with the ATP binding site of the catalytic domain of several tyrosine kinases, and act as small molecules that have a favorable safety profile in disease treatment. Up to now, the efficacy of TKIs in numerous animal models of MS has been demonstrated, but application of these drugs in human diseases should be tested in future clinical trials. PMID:25337443

  5. Obesity-induced cardiac lipid accumulation in adult mice is modulated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 levels.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Elisa; Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Arcones, Alba C; Cruces-Sande, Marta; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Mayor, Federico; Murga, Cristina

    2016-11-10

    The leading cause of death among the obese population is heart failure and stroke prompted by structural and functional changes in the heart. The molecular mechanisms that underlie obesity-related cardiac remodeling are complex, and include hemodynamic and metabolic alterations that ultimately affect the functionality of the myocardium. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is an ubiquitous kinase able to desensitize the active form of several G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and is known to play an important role in cardiac GPCR modulation. GRK2 has also been recently identified as a negative modulator of insulin signaling and systemic insulin resistance. We investigated the effects elicited by GRK2 downregulation in obesity-related cardiac remodeling. For this aim, we used  9 month-old wild type (WT) and GRK2+/- mice, which display circa 50% lower levels of this kinase, fed with either a standard or a high fat diet (HFD) for 30 weeks. In these mice we studied different parameters related to cardiac growth and lipid accumulation. We find that GRK2+/- mice are protected from obesity-promoted cardiac and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis. Moreover, the marked intracellular lipid accumulation caused by a HFD in the heart is not observed in these mice. Interestingly, HFD significantly increases cardiac GRK2 levels in WT but not in GRK2+/- mice, suggesting that the beneficial phenotype observed in hemizygous animals correlates with the maintenance of GRK2 levels below a pathological threshold. Low GRK2 protein levels are able to keep the PKA/CREB pathway active and to prevent HFD-induced downregulation of key fatty acid metabolism modulators such as Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activators (PGC1), thus preserving the expression of cardioprotective proteins such as mitochondrial fusion markers mitofusin MFN1 and OPA1. Our data further define the cellular processes and molecular mechanisms by which GRK2 down-regulation is

  6. Sigma-1 receptor stimulation by dehydroepiandrosterone ameliorates cognitive impairment through activation of CaM kinase II, protein kinase C and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in olfactory bulbectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Yui; Ikuno, Tatsuya; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2011-06-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is one of the most abundant neurosteroids synthesized de novo in the CNS. We here found that sigma-1 receptor stimulation by DHEA improves cognitive function through phosphorylation of synaptic proteins in olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mouse hippocampus. We have previously reported that calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were impaired in OBX mouse hippocampus. OBX mice were administered once a day for 7-8 days with DHEA (30 or 60 mg/kg p.o.) 10 days after operation. The spatial, cognitive and conditioned fear memories in OBX mice were significantly improved as assessed by Y-maze, novel object recognition and passive avoidance task, respectively. DHEA also improved impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation in OBX mice. Notably, DHEA treatment restored PKCα (Ser-657) autophosphorylation and NR1 (Ser-896) and myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate (Ser-152/156) phosphorylation to the control levels in the hippocampal CA1 region. Likewise, DHEA treatment improved CaMKIIα (Thr-286) autophosphorylation and GluR1 (Ser-831) phosphorylation to the control levels in the CA1 region. Furthermore, DHEA treatment improved ERK and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (Ser-133) phosphorylation to the control levels. Finally, NE-100, sigma-1 receptor antagonist, significantly inhibited the DHEA-induced improvement of memory-related behaviors and CaMKII, PKC and ERK phosphorylation in CA1 region. Taken together, sigma-1 receptor stimulation by DHEA ameliorates OBX-induced impairment in memory-related behaviors and long-term potentiation in the hippocampal CA1 region through activation of CaMKII, PKC and ERK. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  7. Bisubstrate analog probes for the insulin receptor protein tyrosine kinase: molecular yardsticks for analyzing catalytic mechanism and inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Hines, Aliya C; Parang, Keykavous; Kohanski, Ronald A; Hubbard, Stevan R; Cole, Philip A

    2005-08-01

    Bisubstrate analogs have the potential to provide enhanced specificity for protein kinase inhibition and tools to understand catalytic mechanism. Previous efforts led to the design of a peptide-ATP conjugate bisubstrate analog utilizing aminophenylalanine in place of tyrosine and a thioacetyl linker to the gamma-phosphate of ATP which was a potent inhibitor of the insulin receptor kinase (IRK). In this study, we have examined the contributions of various electrostatic and structural elements in the bisubstrate analog to IRK binding affinity. Three types of changes (seven specific analogs in all) were introduced: a Tyr isostere of the previous aminophenylalanine moiety, modifications of the spacer between the adenine and the peptide, and deletions and substitutions within the peptide moiety. These studies allowed a direct evaluation of the hydrogen bond strength between the anilino nitrogen of the bisubstrate analog and the enzyme catalytic base Asp and showed that it contributes 2.5 kcal/mol of binding energy, in good agreement with previous predictions. Modifications of the linker length resulted in weakened inhibitory affinity, consistent with the geometric requirements of an enzyme-catalyzed dissociative transition state. Alterations in the peptide motif generally led to diminished inhibitory potency, and only some of these effects could be rationalized based on prior kinetic and structural studies. Taken together, these results suggest that a combination of mechanism-based design and empirical synthetic manipulation will be necessary in producing optimized protein kinase bisubstrate analog inhibitors.

  8. Spinal 5-HT7 receptors and protein kinase A constrain intermittent hypoxia-induced phrenic long-term facilitation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M S; Mitchell, G S

    2013-10-10

    Phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) is a form of serotonin-dependent respiratory plasticity induced by acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH). pLTF requires spinal Gq protein-coupled serotonin-2 receptor (5-HT2) activation, new synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and activation of its high-affinity receptor, TrkB. Intrathecal injections of selective agonists for Gs protein-coupled receptors (adenosine 2A and serotonin-7; 5-HT7) also induce long-lasting phrenic motor facilitation via TrkB "trans-activation." Since serotonin released near phrenic motor neurons may activate multiple serotonin receptor subtypes, we tested the hypothesis that 5-HT7 receptor activation contributes to AIH-induced pLTF. A selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (SB-269970, 5mM, 12 μl) was administered intrathecally at C4 to anesthetized, vagotomized and ventilated rats prior to AIH (3, 5-min episodes, 11% O2). Contrary to predictions, pLTF was greater in SB-269970 treated versus control rats (80 ± 11% versus 45 ± 6% 60 min post-AIH; p<0.05). Hypoglossal LTF was unaffected by spinal 5-HT7 receptor inhibition, suggesting that drug effects were localized to the spinal cord. Since 5-HT7 receptors are coupled to protein kinase A (PKA), we tested the hypothesis that PKA inhibits AIH-induced pLTF. Similar to 5-HT7 receptor inhibition, spinal PKA inhibition (KT-5720, 100 μM, 15 μl) enhanced pLTF (99 ± 15% 60 min post-AIH; p<0.05). Conversely, PKA activation (8-br-cAMP, 100 μM, 15 μl) blunted pLTF versus control rats (16 ± 5% versus 45 ± 6% 60 min post-AIH; p<0.05). These findings suggest a novel mechanism whereby spinal Gs protein-coupled 5-HT7 receptors constrain AIH-induced pLTF via PKA activity.

  9. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase specificity for beta-arrestin recruitment to the beta2-adrenergic receptor revealed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Ren, Xiu-Rong; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2006-07-21

    The small family of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) regulate cell signaling by phosphorylating heptahelical receptors, thereby promoting receptor interaction with beta-arrestins. This switches a receptor from G-protein activation to G-protein desensitization, receptor internalization, and beta-arrestin-dependent signal activation. However, the specificity of GRKs for recruiting beta-arrestins to specific receptors has not been elucidated. Here we use the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR), the archetypal nonvisual heptahelical receptor, as a model to test functional GRK specificity. We monitor endogenous GRK activity with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay in live cells by measuring kinetics of the interaction between the beta(2)AR and beta-arrestins. We show that beta(2)AR phosphorylation is required for high affinity beta-arrestin binding, and we use small interfering RNA silencing to show that HEK-293 and U2-OS cells use different subsets of their expressed GRKs to promote beta-arrestin recruitment, with significant GRK redundancy evident in both cell types. Surprisingly, the GRK specificity for beta-arrestin recruitment does not correlate with that for bulk receptor phosphorylation, indicating that beta-arrestin recruitment is specific for a subset of receptor phosphorylations on specific sites. Moreover, multiple members of the GRK family are able to phosphorylate the beta(2)AR and induce beta-arrestin recruitment, with their relative contributions largely determined by their relative expression levels. Because GRK isoforms vary in their regulation, this partially redundant system ensures beta-arrestin recruitment while providing the opportunity for tissue-specific regulation of the rate of beta-arrestin recruitment.

  10. A431 cell variants lacking the blood group A antigen display increased high affinity epidermal growth factor-receptor number, protein-tyrosine kinase activity, and receptor turnover

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) of human A431 cells bears an antigenic determinant that is closely related to the human blood group A carbohydrate structure. Labeling studies with blood group A reactive anti-EGF-R monoclonal antibodies and various lectins revealed that A431 cultures are heterogeneous with respect to blood group A expression. We have isolated clonal variants of these cells that either express (A431A+ cells) or completely lack (A431A- cells) the blood group A specific N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) residue. We show that this difference is due to the absence of a UDP-GalNAc:Gal transferase activity in A431A- cells. Subsequently, we have compared EGF-R functioning in these cell lines. Scatchard analysis of EGF- binding shows that in A431A- cells 6.3% of the EGF-R belongs to a high affinity subclass (Kd = 0.4 nM) while in A431A+ this subclass represents only 3.2% of the total receptor pool. The elevated level of high affinity receptors in A431A- cells is accompanied by a parallel increase in receptor protein- tyrosine kinase activity. In membrane preparations of A431A- cells, receptor autophosphorylation as well as phosphorylation of a tyrosine-containing peptide substrate is 2-3-fold higher as compared with A431A+ cells. In intact A431A-cells, the difference in receptor activity is measured as a 2-3-fold elevated level of receptor phosphorylation and a 2-3-fold higher abundance of phosphotyrosine in total cellular protein in A431A- cells. In addition, [35S]methionine pulse-chase experiments showed a ligand-independent increase in turnover of EGF-R in A431A- cells: the receptor's half life in these cells is 10 h as compared with 17 h in A431A+ cells. Our results suggest a possible involvement of GalNAc residue(s) in determining EGF-R affinity, protein-tyrosine kinase activity and turnover in A431 cells. Furthermore, our results indicate that high affinity EGF-R are the biologically active species with respect to protein-tyrosine kinase

  11. Evidence for new homotypic and heterotypic interactions between transmembrane helices of proteins involved in receptor tyrosine kinase and neuropilin signaling.

    PubMed

    Sawma, Paul; Roth, Lise; Blanchard, Cécile; Bagnard, Dominique; Crémel, Gérard; Bouveret, Emmanuelle; Duneau, Jean-Pierre; Sturgis, James N; Hubert, Pierre

    2014-12-12

    Signaling in eukaryotic cells frequently relies on dynamic interactions of single-pass membrane receptors involving their transmembrane (TM) domains. To search for new such interactions, we have developed a bacterial two-hybrid system to screen for both homotypic and heterotypic interactions between TM helices. We have explored the dimerization of TM domains from 16 proteins involved in both receptor tyrosine kinase and neuropilin signaling. This study has revealed several new interactions. We found that the TM domain of Mucin-4, a putative intramembrane ligand for erbB2, dimerizes not only with erbB2 but also with all four members of the erbB family. In the Neuropilin/Plexin family of receptors, we showed that the TM domains of Neuropilins 1 and 2 dimerize with themselves and also with Plexin-A1, Plexin-B1, and L1CAM, but we were unable to observe interactions with several other TM domains notably those of members of the VEGF receptor family. The potentially important Neuropilin 1/Plexin-A1 interaction was confirmed using a surface plasmon resonance assay. This work shows that TM domain interactions can be highly specific. Exploring further the propensities of TM helix-helix association in cell membrane should have important practical implications related to our understanding of the structure-function of bitopic proteins' assembly and subsequent function, especially in the regulation of signal transduction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 Coordinates Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Sensitization of Peripheral Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Szteyn, Kalina; Rowan, Matthew P.; Gomez, Ruben; Du, Junhui; Carlton, Susan M.; Jeske, Nathaniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate serves as the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the nervous system. Previous studies have identified a role for glutamate and group I metabotropic receptors as targets for study in peripheral inflammatory pain. However, the coordination of signaling events that transpire from receptor activation to afferent neuronal sensitization has not been explored. Herein, we identify that scaffolding protein A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 (AKAP150) coordinates increased peripheral thermal sensitivity following group I metabotropic receptor (mGluR5) activation. In both acute and persistent models of thermal somatosensory behavior, we report that mGluR5 sensitization requires AKAP150 expression. Furthermore, electrophysiological approaches designed to record afferent neuronal activity reveal that mGluR5 sensitization also requires functional AKAP150 expression. In dissociated primary afferent neurons, mGluR5 activation increases TRPV1 responses in an AKAP dependent manner through a mechanism that induces AKAP association with TRPV1. Experimental results presented herein identify a mechanism of receptor-driven scaffolding association with ion channel targets. Importantly, this mechanism could prove significant in the search for therapeutic targets that repress episodes of acute pain from becoming chronic in nature. PMID:26172554

  13. Arabidopsis receptor-like protein30 and receptor-like kinase suppressor of BIR1-1/EVERSHED mediate innate immunity to necrotrophic fungi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguo; Fraiture, Malou; Kolb, Dagmar; Löffelhardt, Birgit; Desaki, Yoshitake; Boutrot, Freddy F G; Tör, Mahmut; Zipfel, Cyril; Gust, Andrea A; Brunner, Frédéric

    2013-10-01

    Effective plant defense strategies rely in part on the perception of non-self determinants, so-called microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), by transmembrane pattern recognition receptors leading to MAMP-triggered immunity. Plant resistance against necrotrophic pathogens with a broad host range is complex and yet not well understood. Particularly, it is unclear if resistance to necrotrophs involves pattern recognition receptors. Here, we partially purified a novel proteinaceous elicitor called sclerotinia culture filtrate elicitor1 (SCFE1) from the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum that induces typical MAMP-triggered immune responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Analysis of natural genetic variation revealed five Arabidopsis accessions (Mt-0, Lov-1, Lov-5, Br-0, and Sq-1) that are fully insensitive to the SCFE1-containing fraction. We used a forward genetics approach and mapped the locus determining SCFE1 sensitivity to receptor-like protein30 (RLP30). We also show that SCFE1-triggered immune responses engage a signaling pathway dependent on the regulatory receptor-like kinases brassinosteroid insensitive1-associated receptor kinase1 (BAK1) and Suppressor of BIR1-1/evershed (SOBIR1/EVR). Mutants of RLP30, BAK1, and SOBIR1 are more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum and the related fungus Botrytis cinerea. The presence of an elicitor in S. sclerotiorum evoking MAMP-triggered immune responses and sensed by RLP30/SOBIR1/BAK1 demonstrates the relevance of MAMP-triggered immunity in resistance to necrotrophic fungi.

  14. Separate Intramolecular Targets for Protein Kinase A Control N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Gating and Ca2+ Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Aman, Teresa K.; Maki, Bruce A.; Ruffino, Thomas J.; Kasperek, Eileen M.; Popescu, Gabriela K.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) enhances synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system by increasing NMDA receptor current amplitude and Ca2+ flux in an isoform-dependent yet poorly understood manner. PKA phosphorylates multiple residues on GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B subunits in vivo, but the functional significance of this multiplicity is unknown. We examined gating and permeation properties of recombinant NMDA receptor isoforms and of receptors with altered C-terminal domain (CTDs) prior to and after pharmacological inhibition of PKA. We found that PKA inhibition decreased GluN1/GluN2B but not GluN1/GluN2A gating; this effect was due to slower rates for receptor activation and resensitization and was mediated exclusively by the GluN2B CTD. In contrast, PKA inhibition reduced NMDA receptor-relative Ca2+ permeability (PCa/PNa) regardless of the GluN2 isoform and required the GluN1 CTD; this effect was due primarily to decreased unitary Ca2+ conductance, because neither Na+ conductance nor Ca2+-dependent block was altered substantially. Finally, we show that both the gating and permeation effects can be reproduced by changing the phosphorylation state of a single residue: GluN2B Ser-1166 and GluN1 Ser-897, respectively. We conclude that PKA effects on NMDA receptor gating and Ca2+ permeability rely on distinct phosphorylation sites located on the CTD of GluN2B and GluN1 subunits. This separate control of NMDA receptor properties by PKA may account for the specific effects of PKA on plasticity during synaptic development and may lead to drugs targeted to alter NMDA receptor gating or Ca2+ permeability. PMID:24847051

  15. A crucial role for cAMP and protein kinase A in D1 dopamine receptor regulated intracellular calcium transients.

    PubMed

    Dai, Rujuan; Ali, Mohammad K; Lezcano, Nelson; Bergson, Clare

    2008-01-01

    D1-like dopamine receptors stimulate Ca(2+) transients in neurons but the effector coupling and signaling mechanisms underlying these responses have not been elucidated. Here we investigated potential mechanisms using both HEK 293 cells that stably express D1 receptors (D1HEK293) and hippocampal neurons in culture. In D1HEK293 cells, the full D1 receptor agonist SKF 81297 evoked a robust dose-dependent increase in Ca(2+)(i) following 'priming' of endogenous G(q/11)-coupled muscarinic or purinergic receptors. The effect of SKF81297 could be mimicked by forskolin or 8-Br-cAMP. Further, cholera toxin and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitors, KT5720 and H89, as well as thapsigargin abrogated the D1 receptor evoked Ca(2+) transients. Removal of the priming agonist and treatment with the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 also blocked the SKF81297-evoked responses. D1R agonist did not stimulate IP(3) production, but pretreatment of cells with the D1R agonist potentiated G(q)-linked receptor agonist mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) stores. In neurons, SKF81297 and SKF83959, a partial D1 receptor agonist, promoted Ca(2+) oscillations in response to G(q/11)-coupled metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) stimulation. The effects of both D1R agonists on the mGluR-evoked Ca(2+) responses were PKA dependent. Altogether the data suggest that dopamine D1R activation and ensuing cAMP production dynamically regulates the efficiency and timing of IP(3)-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) store mobilization.

  16. Distinct cellular and subcellular distributions of G protein-coupled receptor kinase and arrestin isoforms in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, Evgeny; Zurkovsky, Lilia; Garret, Mika B; Ahmed, Mohamed R; Gurevich, Eugenia V

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling.

  17. Distinct Cellular and Subcellular Distributions of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase and Arrestin Isoforms in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Bychkov, Evgeny; Zurkovsky, Lilia; Garret, Mika B.; Ahmed, Mohamed R.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling. PMID:23139825

  18. Involvement of the mannose receptor and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway of the microdomain of the integral membrane protein after enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Ma, Yanlei; Moyer, Mary Pat; Zhang, Peng; Shi, Chenzhang; Qin, Huanlong

    2012-04-01

    The microdomain of the integral membrane protein (MIMP) has been shown to adhere to mucin and to antagonize the adhesion of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) to epithelial cells; however, the mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we further identified the receptor of MIMP on NCM460 cells and investigated the mechanism (the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase [MAPK] pathway) following the interaction of MIMP and its corresponding receptor, mannose receptor. We first identified the target receptor of MIMP on the surfaces of NCM460 cells using immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry technology. We also verified the mannose receptor and examined the degradation and activation of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. The results indicated that MIMP adhered to NCM460 cells by binding to the mannose receptor and inhibited the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK stimulated after EPEC infection via inhibition of the Toll-like receptor 5 pathway. These findings indicated that MIMPs relieve the injury of NCM460 cells after enteropathogenic E. coli infection through the mannose receptor and inhibition of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway, both of which may therefore be potential therapeutic targets for intestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  19. Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) Promotes Dishevelled Protein Degradation via Autophagy and Antagonizes Wnt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Minzhang; Xue, Hua; Cao, Weipeng; Li, Wenxia; Chen, Hua; Liu, Bofeng; Ma, Benyu; Yan, Xiaohua; Chen, Ye-Guang

    2016-06-10

    Wnt signaling plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer development. Dishevelled (Dvl) is an essential and central component in Wnt signaling, and its stability and activity is tightly regulated. It has been shown that Dvl can be degraded via both the proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways. Here we report that receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) negatively regulates Dishevelled stability and Wnt signaling. RACK1 interacts with Dvl proteins and promotes their lysosomal degradation, and this effect is enhanced by autophagy induction. RACK1 also interacts with LC3 and enhances the association of LC3 with Dvl2, thereby leading to degradation of Dvl proteins through autophagy. These findings reveal a novel regulatory function of RACK1 in Wnt signaling by modulating Dvl stability. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Novel Protein Interactions with Endoglin and Activin Receptor-like Kinase 1: Potential Role in Vascular Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guoxiong; Barrios-Rodiles, Miriam; Jerkic, Mirjana; Turinsky, Andrei L.; Nadon, Robert; Vera, Sonia; Voulgaraki, Despina; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Toporsian, Mourad; Letarte, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1 are specialized transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily receptors, primarily expressed in endothelial cells. Mutations in the corresponding ENG or ACVRL1 genes lead to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT1 and HHT2 respectively). To discover proteins interacting with endoglin, ACVRL1 and TGF-β receptor type 2 and involved in TGF-β signaling, we applied LUMIER, a high-throughput mammalian interactome mapping technology. Using stringent criteria, we identified 181 novel unique and shared interactions with ACVRL1, TGF-β receptor type 2, and endoglin, defining potential novel important vascular networks. In particular, the regulatory subunit B-beta of the protein phosphatase PP2A (PPP2R2B) interacted with all three receptors. Interestingly, the PPP2R2B gene lies in an interval in linkage disequilibrium with HHT3, for which the gene remains unidentified. We show that PPP2R2B protein interacts with the ACVRL1/TGFBR2/endoglin complex and recruits PP2A to nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3). Endoglin overexpression in endothelial cells inhibits the association of PPP2R2B with NOS3, whereas endoglin-deficient cells show enhanced PP2A-NOS3 interaction and lower levels of endogenous NOS3 Serine 1177 phosphorylation. Our data suggest that endoglin regulates NOS3 activation status by regulating PPP2R2B access to NOS3, and that PPP2R2B might be the HHT3 gene. Furthermore, endoglin and ACVRL1 contribute to several novel networks, including TGF-β dependent and independent ones, critical for vascular function and potentially defective in HHT. PMID:24319055

  1. Regulation of endothelial protein C receptor shedding by cytokines is mediated through differential activation of MAP kinase signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Menschikowski, Mario; Hagelgans, Albert; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Siegert, Gabriele

    2009-09-10

    The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) plays a pivotal role in coagulation, inflammation, cell proliferation, and cancer, but its activity is markedly changed by ectodomain cleavage and release as the soluble protein (sEPCR). In this study we examined the mechanisms involved in the regulation of EPCR shedding in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). Interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), but not interferon-{gamma} and interleukin-6, suppressed EPCR mRNA transcription and cell-associated EPCR expression in HUVEC. The release of sEPCR induced by IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} correlated with activation of p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). EPCR shedding was also induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, ionomycin, anisomycin, thiol oxidants or alkylators, thrombin, and disruptors of lipid rafts. Both basal and induced shedding of EPCR was blocked by the metalloproteinase inhibitors, TAPI-0 and GM6001, and by the reduced non-protein thiols, glutathione, dihydrolipoic acid, dithiothreitol, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Because other antioxidants and scavengers of reactive oxygen species failed to block the cleavage of EPCR, a direct suppression of metalloproteinase activity seems responsible for the observed effects of reduced thiols. In summary, the shedding of EPCR in HUVEC is effectively regulated by IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha}, and downstream by MAP kinase signaling pathways and metalloproteinases.

  2. Integrin beta and receptor for activated protein kinase C are involved in the cell entry of Bombyx mori cypovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiling; Cao, Guangli; Zhu, Liyuan; Chen, Fei; Zar, Mian Sahib; Wang, Simei; Hu, Xiaolong; Wei, Yuhong; Xue, Renyu; Gong, Chengliang

    2017-02-07

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis using a β1 integrin-dependent internalization was considered as the primary mechanism for the initiation of mammalian reovirus infection. Bombyx mori cypovirus (BmCPV) is a member of Reoviridae family which mainly infects the midgut epithelium of silkworm; the cell entry of BmCPV is poorly explored. In this study, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP), virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA), and BmCPV-protein interaction on the polyvinylidene difluoride membrane (BmCPV-PI-PVDF) methods were employed to screen the interacting proteins of BmCPV, and several proteins including integrin beta and receptor for activated protein kinase C (RACK1) were identified as the candidate interacting proteins for establishing the infection of BmCPV. The infectivity of BmCPV was investigated in vivo and in vitro by RNA interference (RNAi) and antibody blocking methods, and the results showed that the infectivity of BmCPV was significantly reduced by either small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of integrin beta and RACK1 or antibody blocking of integrin beta and RACK1. The expression level of integrin beta or RACK1 is not the highest in the silkworm midgut which is a principal target tissue of BmCPV, suggesting that the molecules other than integrin beta or RACK1 might play a key role in determining the tissue tropism of BmCPV infection. The establishment of BmCPV infection depends on other factors, and these factors interacted with integrin beta and RACK1 to form receptor complex for the cell entry of BmCPV.

  3. Origin and diversification of leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase (LRR-RLK) genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping-Li; Du, Liang; Huang, Yuan; Gao, Shu-Min; Yu, Meng

    2017-02-07

    Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinases (LRR-RLKs) are the largest group of receptor-like kinases in plants and play crucial roles in development and stress responses. The evolutionary relationships among LRR-RLK genes have been investigated in flowering plants; however, no comprehensive studies have been performed for these genes in more ancestral groups. The subfamily classification of LRR-RLK genes in plants, the evolutionary history and driving force for the evolution of each LRR-RLK subfamily remain to be understood. We identified 119 LRR-RLK genes in the Physcomitrella patens moss genome, 67 LRR-RLK genes in the Selaginella moellendorffii lycophyte genome, and no LRR-RLK genes in five green algae genomes. Furthermore, these LRR-RLK sequences, along with previously reported LRR-RLK sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, were subjected to evolutionary analyses. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that plant LRR-RLKs belong to 19 subfamilies, eighteen of which were established in early land plants, and one of which evolved in flowering plants. More importantly, we found that the basic structures of LRR-RLK genes for most subfamilies are established in early land plants and conserved within subfamilies and across different plant lineages, but divergent among subfamilies. In addition, most members of the same subfamily had common protein motif compositions, whereas members of different subfamilies showed variations in protein motif compositions. The unique gene structure and protein motif compositions of each subfamily differentiate the subfamily classifications and, more importantly, provide evidence for functional divergence among LRR-RLK subfamilies. Maximum likelihood analyses showed that some sites within four subfamilies were under positive selection. Much of the diversity of plant LRR-RLK genes was established in early land plants. Positive selection contributed to the evolution of a few LRR-RLK subfamilies.

  4. [Study of possible involvement of MEK mitogen-activated protein kinase and TGF-β receptor in planarian regeneration processes using pharmacological inhibition analysis].

    PubMed

    Ermakov, A M; Ermakova, O N; Ermolaeva, S A

    2014-01-01

    Possible involvement of MEK mitogen-activated protein kinase and TGF-β receptor in the processes of regeneration and morphogenesis in freshwater planarian flatworms Schmidtea mediterranea was studied using a pharmacological inhibitor analysis. It was found that pharmacological inhibitors of these kinases significantly inhibit the regeneration of the head end of the animals and that this effect is realized due to inhibition of proliferative activity of neoblasts, planarian stem cells. It is shown that that the inhibition of the studied protein kinases in regenerating planarians markedly disturbs stem cell differentiation and morphogenesis.

  5. [Characterization of a putative S locus encoded receptor protein kinase and its role in self-incompatibility]. Progress report, January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase (SRK) protein was predicted to be similar to the growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases in animals but its amino acid sequence of the catalytic domain is more similar to that of the catalytic domains of protein serine/threonine kinases than to protein tyrosine kinases. We have shown that the SRK protein has intrinsic scrine/threonine kinase activity. We subcloned the protein kinase-homologous domain of the SRK{sub 6} cDNA into the bacterial expression vector pGEX-3X and we have constructed a second plasmid identical to the first except that it carried a conservative mutation that substituted Arg for the Lys{sup 524} codon of SRK6 This lysine corresponds to the ATP-binding site, is essential in protein kinases, and is a common target for site-directed mutagenesis as a means to obtain kinase-defective proteins. Cultures bearing the wild-type and mutant SRK catalytic domains each produced an approximately 64 kD protein that reacted with anti-SRK6 antibodies. Following pulse-labeling with {sup 32}P we found that the wild-type SRK6 protein but not the mutant form was detectably phosphorylated. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the affinity purified {sup 32}p-labeled GST-SRK6 fusion protein demonstrated that SRK was phosphorylated predominantly on semine and to a lesser extent on threonine, but not on tyrosine. Thus, SRK6 is a functional serine/threonine protein kinase.

  6. Inhibitory effects of two G protein-coupled receptor kinases on the cell surface expression and signaling of the human adrenomedullin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Sekiguchi, Toshio; Nagata, Sayaka; Jiang, Danfeng; Hayashi, Hidetaka; Murakami, Manabu; Hattori, Yuichi; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kato, Johji

    2016-02-19

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR, a family B GPCR) to form the type 1 adrenomedullin receptor (AM{sub 1} receptor). Here, we investigated the effects of the five non-visual GPCR kinases (GRKs 2 through 6) on the cell surface expression of the human (h)AM{sub 1} receptor by cotransfecting each of these GRKs into HEK-293 cells that stably expressed hRAMP2. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that when coexpressed with GRK4 or GRK5, the cell surface expression of the AM{sub 1} receptor was markedly decreased prior to stimulation with AM, thereby attenuating both the specific [{sup 125}I]AM binding and AM-induced cAMP production. These inhibitory effects of both GRKs were abolished by the replacement of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of CLR with that of the calcitonin receptor (a family B GPCR) or β{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor (a family A GPCR). Among the sequentially truncated CLR C-tail mutants, those lacking the five residues 449–453 (Ser-Phe-Ser-Asn-Ser) abolished the inhibition of the cell surface expression of CLR via the overexpression of GRK4 or GRK5. Thus, we provided new insight into the function of GRKs in agonist-unstimulated GPCR trafficking using a recombinant AM{sub 1} receptor and further determined the region of the CLR C-tail responsible for this GRK function. - Highlights: • We discovered a novel function of GRKs in GPCR trafficking using human CLR/RAMP2. • GRKs 4 and 5 markedly inhibited the cell surface expression of human CLR/RAMP2. • Both GRKs exhibited highly significant receptor signaling inhibition. • Five residues of the C-terminal tail of CLR govern this function of GRKs.

  7. The vanilloid receptor (VR1)-mediated effects of anandamide are potently enhanced by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, L; Harrison, S; Bisogno, T; Tognetto, M; Brandi, I; Smith, G D; Creminon, C; Davis, J B; Geppetti, P; Di Marzo, V

    2001-06-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand, anandamide (AEA), is a full agonist of the vanilloid receptor type 1 (VR1) for capsaicin. Here, we demonstrate that the potency and efficacy of AEA at VR1 receptors can be significantly increased by the concomitant activation of protein kinase A (PKA). In human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells over-expressing human VR1, AEA induces a rise in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration that is mediated by this receptor. The EC(50) for this effect was decreased five-fold in the presence of forskolin (FRSK, 1-5 microM) or the cAMP analogue, 8-Br-cAMP (10-100 microM). The effects of 8-Br-cAMP and FRSK were blocked by a selective PKA inhibitor. The FRSK (10 nM) also potently enhanced the sensory neurone- and VR1-mediated constriction by AEA of isolated guinea-pig bronchi, and this effect was abolished by a PKA inhibitor. In rat dorsal root ganglia slices, AEA-induced release of substance P, an effect mediated by VR1 activation, was enhanced three-fold by FRSK (10 nM). Thus, the ability of AEA to stimulate sensory VR1, with subsequent neuropeptide release, appears to be regulated by the state of activation of PKA. This observation supports the hypothesis that endogenous AEA might stimulate VR1 under certain pathophysiological conditions.

  8. Expression and activation of platelet-derived growth factor β receptor, mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Altamura, Gennaro; Uberti, Barbara Degli; Galiero, Giorgio; Martano, Manuela; Pirro, Antonella; Russo, Marco; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe

    2017-02-01

    Canine mammary tumours are frequent neoplasms mostly affecting intact female dogs, for which no 100% efficient therapy is available. Platelet derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR) is a tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) with a potential role in human breast cancer and a series of canine tumours. In this study we demonstrated, for the first time, expression of PDGFβR and its downstream transduction molecules, mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), as well as their activated forms in canine mammary tumours by both biochemical analysis and immunohistochemistry. PDGFβR was expressed and hyperphosphorylated in the majority of tumour samples and tumour derived cell lines. Additionally, both MEK and ERK were expressed and activated in cell lines as well as biopsies. TKR inhibitors (TKRi) are currently under investigation as possible therapy in human breast and several canine tumours, thus our in vivo and in vitro findings pave the way for future studies aimed at establishing a potential therapeutic employment of TKRi for the treatment of canine mammary cancer.

  9. Ligand-induced dynamics of heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptor-like kinase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Jones, Alan M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Arabidopsis, 7-transmembrane Regulator of G signaling protein 1 (AtRGS1) modulates canonical G protein signaling by promoting the inactive state of heterotrimeric G protein complex on the plasma membrane. It is known that plant leucine-rich repeat receptor–like kinases (LRR RLKs) phosphorylate AtRGS1 in vitro but little is known about the in vivo interaction, molecular dynamics, or the cellular consequences of this interaction. Methods Therefore, a subset of the known RLKs that phosphorylate AtRGS1 were selected for elucidation, namely, BAK1, BIR1, FLS2. Several microscopies for both static and dynamic protein-protein interactions were used to follow in vivo interactions between the RLKs and AtRGS1 after the presentation of the Pathogen-associated Molecular Pattern, Flagellin 22 (Flg22). These microscopies included Förster Resonance Energy Transfer, Bimolecular Fluoresence Complementation, and Cross Number and Brightness Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy. In addition, reactive oxygen species and calcium changes in living cells were quantitated using luminometry and R-GECO1 microscopy. Results The LRR RLKs BAK1 and BIR1, interact with AtRGS1 at the plasma membrane. The RLK ligand flg22 sets BAK1 in motion toward AtRGS1 and BIR1 away, both returning to the baseline orientations by 10 minutes. The C-terminal tail of AtRGS1 is important for the interaction with BAK1 and for the tempo of the AtRGS1/BIR1 dynamics. This window of time corresponds to the flg22-induced transient production of reactive oxygen species and calcium release which are both attenuated in the rgs1 and the bak1 null mutants. Conclusions A temporal model of these interactions is proposed. flg22 binding induces nearly instantaneous dimerization between FLS2 and BAK1. Phosphorylated BAK1 interacts with and enables AtRGS1 to move away from BIR1 and AtRGS1 becomes phosphorylated leading to its endocytosis thus leading to de-repression by permitting AtGPA1 to exchange GDP for GTP

  10. Receptor tyrosine kinases in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell surface glycoproteins with enzymatic activity involved in the regulation of various important functions. In all-important physiological functions including differentiation, cell-cell interactions, survival, proliferation, metabolism, migration and signaling these receptors are the key players of regulation. Additionally, mutations of RTKs or their overexpression have been described in many human cancers and are being explored as a novel avenue for a new therapeutic approach. Some of the deregulated RTKs observed to be significantly affected in cancers included vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor, RTK-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor. These deregulated RTKs offer attractive possibilities for the new anticancer therapeutic approach involving specific targeting by monoclonal antibodies as well as kinase. The present review aimed to highlight recent perspectives of RTK ROR1 in cancer.

  11. A high content in lipid-modified peripheral proteins and integral receptor kinases features in the arabidopsis plasma membrane proteome.

    PubMed

    Marmagne, Anne; Ferro, Myriam; Meinnel, Thierry; Bruley, Christophe; Kuhn, Lauriane; Garin, Jérome; Barbier-Brygoo, Hélène; Ephritikhine, Geneviève

    2007-11-01

    The proteomics of plasma membrane has brought to date only scarce and partial information on the actual protein repertoire. In this work, the plant plasma membrane proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. A highly purified plasma membrane fraction was washed by NaCl and Na2CO3 salts, and the insoluble fractions were further analyzed by nano-LC-MS/MS. With 446 proteins identified, we hereby describe the largest plasma membrane proteome diversity reported so far. Half of the proteins were predicted to display transmembrane domains and/or to be anchored to the membrane, validating a posteriori the pertinence of the approach. A fine analysis highlighted two main specific and novel features. First, the main functional category is represented by a majority of as yet unreported signaling proteins, including 11% receptor-like kinases. Second, 16% of the identified proteins are predicted to be lipid-modified, specifically involving double lipid linkage through N-terminal myristoylation, S-palmitoylation, C-terminal prenylation, or glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors. Thus, our approach led for the first time to the identification of a large number of peripheral proteins as part of the plasma membrane and allowed the functionality of the plasma membrane in the cell context to be reconsidered.

  12. Conserved herpesvirus protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gershburg, Edward; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2008-01-01

    Conserved herpesviral protein kinases (CHPKs) are a group of enzymes conserved throughout all subfamilies of Herpesviridae. Members of this group are serine/threonine protein kinases that are likely to play a conserved role in viral infection by interacting with common host cellular and viral factors; however along with a conserved role, individual kinases may have unique functions in the context of viral infection in such a way that they are only partially replaceable even by close homologues. Recent studies demonstrated that CHPKs are crucial for viral infection and suggested their involvement in regulation of numerous processes at various infection steps (primary infection, nuclear egress, tegumentation), although the mechanisms of this regulation remain unknown. Notwithstanding, recent advances in discovery of new CHPK targets, and studies of CHPK knockout phenotypes have raised their attractiveness as targets for antiviral therapy. A number of compounds have been shown to inhibit the activity of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded UL97 protein kinase and exhibit a pronounced antiviral effect, although the same compounds are inactive against Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-encoded protein kinase BGLF4, illustrating the fact that low homology between the members of this group complicates development of compounds targeting the whole group, and suggesting that individualized, structure-based inhibitor design will be more effective. Determination of CHPK structures will greatly facilitate this task. PMID:17881303

  13. Coarse-grained molecular simulation of epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase multi-site self-phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Koland, John G

    2014-01-01

    Upon the ligand-dependent dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity of one receptor monomer is activated, and the dimeric receptor undergoes self-phosphorylation at any of eight candidate phosphorylation sites (P-sites) in either of the two C-terminal (CT) domains. While the structures of the extracellular ligand binding and intracellular PTK domains are known, that of the ∼225-amino acid CT domain is not, presumably because it is disordered. Receptor phosphorylation on CT domain P-sites is critical in signaling because of the binding of specific signaling effector molecules to individual phosphorylated P-sites. To investigate how the combination of conventional substrate recognition and the unique topological factors involved in the CT domain self-phosphorylation reaction lead to selectivity in P-site phosphorylation, we performed coarse-grained molecular simulations of the P-site/catalytic site binding reactions that precede EGFR self-phosphorylation events. Our results indicate that self-phosphorylation of the dimeric EGFR, although generally believed to occur in trans, may well occur with a similar efficiency in cis, with the P-sites of both receptor monomers being phosphorylated to a similar extent. An exception was the case of the most kinase-proximal P-site-992, the catalytic site binding of which occurred exclusively in cis via an intramolecular reaction. We discovered that the in cis interaction of P-site-992 with the catalytic site was facilitated by a cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the PTK domain that allows the short CT domain sequence tethering P-site-992 to the PTK core to reach the catalytic site. Our work provides several new mechanistic insights into the EGFR self-phosphorylation reaction, and demonstrates the potential of coarse-grained molecular simulation approaches for investigating the complexities of self-phosphorylation in molecules such as EGFR

  14. Coarse-Grained Molecular Simulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Protein Tyrosine Kinase Multi-Site Self-Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Koland, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Upon the ligand-dependent dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity of one receptor monomer is activated, and the dimeric receptor undergoes self-phosphorylation at any of eight candidate phosphorylation sites (P-sites) in either of the two C-terminal (CT) domains. While the structures of the extracellular ligand binding and intracellular PTK domains are known, that of the ∼225-amino acid CT domain is not, presumably because it is disordered. Receptor phosphorylation on CT domain P-sites is critical in signaling because of the binding of specific signaling effector molecules to individual phosphorylated P-sites. To investigate how the combination of conventional substrate recognition and the unique topological factors involved in the CT domain self-phosphorylation reaction lead to selectivity in P-site phosphorylation, we performed coarse-grained molecular simulations of the P-site/catalytic site binding reactions that precede EGFR self-phosphorylation events. Our results indicate that self-phosphorylation of the dimeric EGFR, although generally believed to occur in trans, may well occur with a similar efficiency in cis, with the P-sites of both receptor monomers being phosphorylated to a similar extent. An exception was the case of the most kinase-proximal P-site-992, the catalytic site binding of which occurred exclusively in cis via an intramolecular reaction. We discovered that the in cis interaction of P-site-992 with the catalytic site was facilitated by a cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the PTK domain that allows the short CT domain sequence tethering P-site-992 to the PTK core to reach the catalytic site. Our work provides several new mechanistic insights into the EGFR self-phosphorylation reaction, and demonstrates the potential of coarse-grained molecular simulation approaches for investigating the complexities of self-phosphorylation in molecules such as EGFR

  15. Involvement of epidermal growth factor receptors and mitogen-activated protein kinase in progestin-induction of sperm hypermotility in Atlantic croaker through membrane progestin receptor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenxian; Thomas, Peter

    2015-10-15

    The intracellular pathways mediating rapid, nongenomic progestin stimulation of sperm motility remain unclear. The role of epidermal growth factor receptors (Egfr and ErbB2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (Mapk) in membrane progestin receptor-alpha (mPRα)-mediated progestin stimulation of sperm hypermotility was examined in a teleost, Atlantic croaker. Inhibition of upstream regulators of Egfr, intracellular tyrosine kinase (Src) with PP2, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) with Ilomastat, abolished progestin-initiated sperm hypermotility by 17,20β,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (20β-S; 20 nM) and a specific mPRα agonist, Org OD 02-0 (20 nM). Pretreatment of croaker sperm with EGFR inhibitors, AG1478 (5 μM) and RG13022 (50 μM), the ErbB2 inhibitor, AG879 (5 nM), or the MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 (500 nM) blocked progestin stimulation of sperm motility. Levels of phosphorylated extracellular-related kinase 1 and 2 (P-Erk1/2) were increased after 20β-S treatment. These results demonstrate that progestin-mediated hypermotility via mPRα in croaker sperm involves activation of the Egfr, ErbB2 and Mapk pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3-mediated programmed cell necrosis in rats subjected to focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    DONG, YANRU; BAO, CUIFEN; YU, JINGWEI; LIU, XIA

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, the activation of tumor necrosis factor-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) and receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIP3) were investigated following cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury (CIRI). Healthy SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: Sham operation group, model group and inhibitor group. The model group and inhibitor group were further divided into 4 subgroups of 6, 12, 24 and 72 h following CIRI. Using right middle cerebral artery embolization, the CIRI model was generated. To confirm that the CIRI model was established, neurological scores, TTC staining and brain water content measurements were conducted. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting were conducted to investigate the expression of TNFR1 and RIP3 in the cerebral cortex. It was observed that nerve cell necrosis occurred following 6 h of CIRI. The appearance of necrotic cells was gradually increased with increasing CIRI duration. TNFR1 and RIP3 were positively expressed following 6 h of CIRI. With increasing durations of CIRI, the protein expression levels of TNFR1 and RIP3 were significantly increased. Pre-administration with Z-VAD-FMK (zVAD) significantly increased the protein level of RIP3, however, had no effect on the levels of TNFR1, and was accompanied by a reduction in necrosis. In conclusion, RIP3-mediated cell necrosis was enhanced by caspase blockade zVAD and the function of zVAD was independent of TNFR1 signaling following IR. PMID:27220678

  17. Berberine reduces insulin resistance through protein kinase C-dependent up-regulation of insulin receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei-Jia; Zhang, Hao; Song, Dan-Qing; Xue, Rong; Zhao, Wei; Wei, Jing; Wang, Yue-Ming; Shan, Ning; Zhou, Zhen-Xian; Yang, Peng; You, Xue-Fu; Li, Zhuo-Rong; Si, Shu-Yi; Zhao, Li-Xun; Pan, Huai-Ning; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Natural product berberine (BBR) has been reported to have hypoglycemic and insulin-sensitizing activities; however, its mechanism remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the molecular mechanism of BBR against insulin resistance. Here, we identify insulin receptor (InsR) as a target of BBR to increase insulin sensitivity. In cultured human liver cells, BBR increased InsR messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Berberine increased InsR expression in the L6 rat skeletal muscle cells as well. Berberine-enhanced InsR expression improved cellular glucose consumption only in the presence of insulin. Silencing InsR gene with small interfering RNA or blocking the phosphoinositol-3-kinase diminished this effect. Berberine induced InsR gene expression through a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent activation of its promoter. Inhibition of PKC abolished BBR-caused InsR promoter activation and InsR mRNA transcription. In animal models, treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus rats with BBR lowered fasting blood glucose and fasting serum insulin, increased insulin sensitivity, and elevated InsR mRNA as well as PKC activity in the liver. In addition, BBR lowered blood glucose in KK-Ay type 2 but not in NOD/LtJ type 1 diabetes mellitus mice that were insulin deficient. Our results suggest that BBR is a unique natural medicine against insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome.

  18. Targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and protein kinase D1 related pathways by a multiple kinase inhibitor in angiogenesis and inflammation related processes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Varga, Attila; Gyulavári, Pál; Greff, Zoltán; Futosi, Krisztina; Németh, Tamás; Simon-Szabó, Laura; Kerekes, Krisztina; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Brauswetter, Diána; Kokas, Márton; Borbély, Gábor; Erdei, Anna; Mócsai, Attila; Kéri, György; Vántus, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and protein kinase D1 (PKD1) signaling axis plays a critical role in normal and pathological angiogenesis and inflammation related processes. Despite all efforts, the currently available therapeutic interventions are limited. Prior studies have also proved that a multiple target inhibitor can be more efficient compared to a single target one. Therefore, development of novel inflammatory pathway-specific inhibitors would be of great value. To test this possibility, we screened our molecular library using recombinant kinase assays and identified the previously described compound VCC251801 with strong inhibitory effect on both VEGFR2 and PKD1. We further analyzed the effect of VCC251801 in the endothelium-derived EA.hy926 cell line and in different inflammatory cell types. In EA.hy926 cells, VCC251801 potently inhibited the intracellular activation and signaling of VEGFR2 and PKD1 which inhibition eventually resulted in diminished cell proliferation. In this model, our compound was also an efficient inhibitor of in vitro angiogenesis by interfering with endothelial cell migration and tube formation processes. Our results from functional assays in inflammatory cellular models such as neutrophils and mast cells suggested an anti-inflammatory effect of VCC251801. The neutrophil study showed that VCC251801 specifically blocked the immobilized immune-complex and the adhesion dependent TNF-α -fibrinogen stimulated neutrophil activation. Furthermore, similar results were found in mast cell degranulation assay where VCC251801 caused significant reduction of mast cell response. In summary, we described a novel function of a multiple kinase inhibitor which strongly inhibits the VEGFR2-PKD1 signaling and might be a novel inhibitor of pathological inflammatory pathways.

  19. Targeting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 and Protein Kinase D1 Related Pathways by a Multiple Kinase Inhibitor in Angiogenesis and Inflammation Related Processes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Attila; Gyulavári, Pál; Greff, Zoltán; Futosi, Krisztina; Németh, Tamás; Simon-Szabó, Laura; Kerekes, Krisztina; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Brauswetter, Diána; Kokas, Márton; Borbély, Gábor; Erdei, Anna; Mócsai, Attila; Kéri, György; Vántus, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and protein kinase D1 (PKD1) signaling axis plays a critical role in normal and pathological angiogenesis and inflammation related processes. Despite all efforts, the currently available therapeutic interventions are limited. Prior studies have also proved that a multiple target inhibitor can be more efficient compared to a single target one. Therefore, development of novel inflammatory pathway-specific inhibitors would be of great value. To test this possibility, we screened our molecular library using recombinant kinase assays and identified the previously described compound VCC251801 with strong inhibitory effect on both VEGFR2 and PKD1. We further analyzed the effect of VCC251801 in the endothelium-derived EA.hy926 cell line and in different inflammatory cell types. In EA.hy926 cells, VCC251801 potently inhibited the intracellular activation and signaling of VEGFR2 and PKD1 which inhibition eventually resulted in diminished cell proliferation. In this model, our compound was also an efficient inhibitor of in vitro angiogenesis by interfering with endothelial cell migration and tube formation processes. Our results from functional assays in inflammatory cellular models such as neutrophils and mast cells suggested an anti-inflammatory effect of VCC251801. The neutrophil study showed that VCC251801 specifically blocked the immobilized immune-complex and the adhesion dependent TNF-α -fibrinogen stimulated neutrophil activation. Furthermore, similar results were found in mast cell degranulation assay where VCC251801 caused significant reduction of mast cell response. In summary, we described a novel function of a multiple kinase inhibitor which strongly inhibits the VEGFR2-PKD1 signaling and might be a novel inhibitor of pathological inflammatory pathways. PMID:25874616

  20. Receptor interacting protein kinase 1 mediates murine acetaminophen toxicity independent of the necrosome and not through necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Dara, Lily; Johnson, Heather; Suda, Jo; Win, Sanda; Gaarde, William; Han, Derick; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2015-12-01

    Although necrosis in the acetaminophen (APAP) model is known to be regulated by c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) through interaction with mitochondria, the role of necroptosis through receptor-interacting proteins 1 and 3 (RIPK1 and RIPK3) has also been suggested. Our aim was to determine the relationship between these two mechanisms of cell death. To verify the participation of RIPK1, we used antisense knockdown and confirmed protection comparable to the RIPK1 inhibitor, necrostatin, in vivo and in vitro. However, we found no evidence that RIPK3 is expressed in primary mouse hepatocytes under basal conditions or after APAP and RIPK3(-/-) mice were not protected. RIPK3 was exclusively expressed in nonparenchymal cells. RIPK1 knockdown protected RIPK3(-/-) mice to the same extent as wild-type mice, underscoring the independent role of RIPK1. We confirmed that necroptosis is not involved in APAP toxicity by using mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) knockout mice, which were not protected from APAP. Next, we addressed whether there is interplay between RIPK1 and JNK. RIPK1 knockdown decreased the level of JNK activation and translocation to mitochondria and abrogated subsequent translocation of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). Interestingly, APAP induced translocation of RIPK1 to mitochondria, which was unaffected by knockdown of the mitochondrial JNK docking protein, Sh3 homology 3 binding protein 5 (Sab). RIPK1 participates in APAP-induced necrosis upstream of JNK activation whereas RIPK3 and MLKL are dispensable, indicating that necroptosis does not contribute to APAP-induced necrosis and RIPK1 has a unique, independent role. © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  1. Receptor Interacting Protein Kinase-1 mediates murine acetaminophen toxicity independent of the necrosome and not through necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Dara, Lily; Johnson, Heather; Suda, Jo; Win, Sanda; Gaarde, William; Han, Derick; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Although necrosis in the acetaminophen (APAP) model is known to be regulated by c-Jun NH2- terminal kinase, (JNK) through interaction with mitochondria, the role of necroptosis through receptor interacting proteins 1 and 3 (RIPK1 and RIPK3) has also been suggested. Our aim was to determine the relationship between these two mechanisms of cell death. To verify the participation of RIPK1, we used antisense knockdown and confirmed protection comparable to the RIPK1 inhibitor, necrostatin in vivo and in vitro. However, we found no evidence that RIPK3 is expressed in primary mouse hepatocytes under basal conditions or after APAP and RIPK3−/− mice were not protected. RIPK3 was exclusively expressed in nonparenchymal cells. RIPK1 knockdown protected RIPK3−/− mice to the same extent as wild type mice, underscoring the independent role of RIPK1. We confirmed necroptosis is not involved in APAP toxicity by using mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) −/− mice, which were not protected from APAP. Next we addressed if there is interplay between RIPK1 and JNK. RIPK1 knockdown decreased the level of JNK activation and translocation to mitochondria and abrogated subsequent translocation of dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp1). Interestingly, APAP induced the translocation of RIPK1 to mitochondria which was unaffected by the knockdown of the mitochondrial JNK docking protein, Sh3 homology3 binding protein5 (Sab). Conclusion RIPK1 participates in APAP induced necrosis upstream of JNK activation while RIPK3 and MLKL are dispensable, indicating that necroptosis does not contribute to APAP-induced necrosis and RIPK1 has a unique, independent role. PMID:26077809

  2. Protein kinase mediated upregulation of endothelin A, endothelin B and 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B/1D receptors during organ culture in rat basilar artery

    PubMed Central

    Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Svensson, Carl-Lennart; Xu, Cang-Bao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2002-01-01

    Organ culture has been shown to upregulate both endothelin (ET) and 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B/1D (5-HT1B/1D) receptors in rat cerebral arteries. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the involvement of protein kinases, especially protein kinases C (PKC) and A (PKA) in this process. The effect of inhibiting protein kinases during organ culture with staurosporine (unspecific protein kinase inhitor), RO 31-7549 (specific inhibitor of classical PKC's) and H 89 (specific inhibitor of PKA) was examined using in vitro pharmacological examination of cultured vessel segments with ET-1 (unspecific ETA and ETB agonist), S6c (specific ETB agonist) and 5-CT (5-HT1 agonist). Levels of mRNA coding for the ETA, ETB, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors were analysed using real-time RT–PCR. Classical PKC's are critically involved in the appearance of the ETB receptor; co-culture with RO 31-7549 abolished the contractile response (6.9±1.8%) and reduced the ETB receptor mRNA by 44±4% as compared to the cultured control. Correlation between decreased ETB receptor mRNA and abolished contractile function indicates upstream involvement of PKC. Inhibition of PKA generally had an enhancing effect on the induced changes giving rise to a 7–25% increase in Emax in response to ET-1, S6c and 5-CT as compared to the cultured control. Staurosporine inhibited the culture induced upregulation of the response of both the ETA and the 5-HT1B/1D receptors, but had no significant effect on the mRNA levels of these receptors. This lack of correlation indicates an additional downstream involvement of protein kinases. PMID:12183337

  3. Proteolytic activation of proapoptotic kinase protein kinase Cδ by tumor necrosis factor α death receptor signaling in dopaminergic neurons during neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of progressive dopaminergic neuronal loss in Parkinson’s disease (PD) remain poorly understood, largely due to the complex etiology and multifactorial nature of disease pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence from human studies and experimental models over the last decade have identified neuroinflammation as a potential pathophysiological mechanism contributing to disease progression. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) has recently emerged as the primary neuroinflammatory mediator that can elicit dopaminergic cell death in PD. However, the signaling pathways by which TNF mediates dopaminergic cell death have not been completely elucidated. Methods In this study we used a dopaminergic neuronal cell model and recombinant TNF to characterize intracellular signaling pathways activated during TNF-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Etanercept and neutralizing antibodies to tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) were used to block TNF signaling. We confirmed the results from our mechanistic studies in primary embryonic mesencephalic cultures and in vivo using the stereotaxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) model of nigral dopaminergic degeneration. Results TNF signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells triggered the activation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), an isoform of the novel PKC family, by caspase-3 and caspase-8 dependent proteolytic cleavage. Both TNFR1 neutralizing antibodies and the soluble TNF receptor Etanercept blocked TNF-induced PKCδ proteolytic activation. Proteolytic activation of PKCδ was accompanied by translocation of the kinase to the nucleus. Notably, inhibition of PKCδ signaling by small interfering (si)RNA or overexpression of a PKCδ cleavage-resistant mutant protected against TNF-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death. Further, primary dopaminergic neurons obtained from PKCδ knockout (−/−) mice were resistant to TNF toxicity. The proteolytic activation of PKCδ in the mouse substantia nigra in the neuroinflammatory LPS

  4. Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes. Role of third intracellular m2 loop and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T; Honma, T; Lameh, J; Sadée, W

    1998-02-27

    Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine m2 receptors (hm2 receptors) and a hm2 receptor mutant lacking a central part of the third intracellular loop (I3-del m2 receptor) were examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells stably expressing these receptors and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Agonist-induced internalization of up to 80-90% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by measuring loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding sites from the cell surface, and transfer of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites from the plasma membrane into the light-vesicle fractions separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Additionally, translocation of hm2 receptors with endocytic vesicles were visualized by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 60-70% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by determining the loss of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in the cells. The half-time (t1/2) of internalization and down-regulation in the presence of 10(-4) M carbamylcholine was estimated to be 9.5 min and 2.3 h, respectively. The rates of both internalization and down-regulation of hm2 receptors in the presence of 10(-6) M or lower concentrations of carbamylcholine were markedly increased by coexpression of GRK2. Agonist-induced internalization of I3-del m2 receptors was barely detectable upon incubation of cells for 1 h, but agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 40-50% of I3-del m2 receptors occurred upon incubation with 10(-4) M carbamylcholine for 16 h. However, the rate of down-regulation was lower compared with wild type receptors (t1/2 = 9.9 versus 2.3 h). These results indicate that rapid internalization of hm2 receptors is facilitated by their phosphorylation with GRK2 and does not occur in the absence of the third intracellular loop, but down-regulation of hm2 receptors may occur through both GRK2-facilitating pathway and third intracellular loop-independent pathways.

  5. Crosstalk between estrogen receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in the development and progression of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Long; Cai, Bin; Bao, Wei; He, Yin-Yan; Chen, Xiao-Yue; Yang, Yi-Xia; Liu, Xue-Lian; Wan, Xiao-Ping

    2011-11-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic endometrium in relation to estrogen receptor (ER) status and to investigate whether 17β-estradiol (E2) and tamoxifen (TAM) mediate the proliferation and apoptosis of endometrial cancer cells through the MAPK pathway. The expressions of phosphorylated and total extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 [p-ERK1/2] and total ERK1/2 [t-ERK1/2]) were analyzed with immunohistochemistry in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic endometrium. The expression levels of p-ERK1/2 and t-ERK1/2 in RL95-2 and KLE after stimulation by E2, progesterone (P), and TAM were detected by Western blotting. The effects of E2 and TAM in combination with MAPK pathway inhibitors on the growth and apoptosis of endometrial cancer cells were examined by the MTS assay and flow cytometry analysis. The expression level of p-ERK1/2 was significantly associated with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage (P = 0.0072). The ratio of phosphorylated/total ERK1/2 was higher in ER-positive endometrial cancer tissues and cells (P < 0.05). 17β-Estradiol increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and TAM decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in endometrial cancer cell lines within 30 minutes (P < 0.05). The MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, and the stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibitor, SP600125, significantly suppressed the proliferation of human endometrial cancer cell lines RL95-2 and KLE induced by E2 (P < 0.05). The level of TAM-induced apoptosis was greater in KLE than in RL95-2 cells, and the p38 cascade was involved in the TAM-induced apoptosis of both cell lines (P < 0.05). The cross-talk between MAPK signaling and ER status might exert a key role in progression of endometrial cancer. Furthermore, the effects of E2 or TAM on the proliferation or apoptosis of ER

  6. Intrathecal injection of adenosine 2A receptor agonists reversed neuropathic allodynia through protein kinase (PK)A/PKC signaling.

    PubMed

    Loram, Lisa C; Taylor, Frederick R; Strand, Keith A; Harrison, Jacqueline A; Rzasalynn, Rachael; Sholar, Paige; Rieger, Jayson; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2013-10-01

    A single intrathecal dose of adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR) agonist was previously reported to produce a multi-week reversal of allodynia in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain. We aimed to determine if this long-term reversal was induced by A2AR agonism versus more generalized across adenosine receptor subtypes, and begin to explore the intracellular signaling cascades involved. In addition, we sought to identify whether the enduring effect could be extended to other models of neuropathic pain. We tested an A1R and A2BR agonist in CCI and found the same long duration effect with A2BR but not A1R agonism. An A2AR agonist (ATL313) produced a significant long-duration reversal of mechanical allodynia induced by long established CCI (administered 6 weeks after surgery), spinal nerve ligation and sciatic inflammatory neuropathy. To determine if ATL313 had a direct effect on glia, ATL313 was coadministered with lipopolysaccharide to neonatal microglia and astrocytes in vitro. ATL313 significantly attenuated TNFα production in both microglia and astrocytes but had no effect on LPS induced IL-10. Protein kinase C significantly reversed the ATL313 effects on TNFα in vitro in microglia and astrocytes, while a protein kinase A inhibitor only effected microglia. Both intrathecal PKA and PKC inhibitors significantly reversed the effect of the A2AR agonist on neuropathic allodynia. Therefore, A2AR agonists administered IT remain an exciting novel target for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  7. Structural Domains Required for Caenorhabditis elegans G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 (GRK-2) Function in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jordan F.; Wang, Jianjun; Benovic, Jeffrey L.; Ferkey, Denise M.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are key regulators of signal transduction that specifically phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to terminate signaling. Biochemical and crystallographic studies have provided great insight into mammalian GRK2/3 interactions and structure. However, despite extensive in vitro characterization, little is known about the in vivo contribution of these described GRK structural domains and interactions to proper GRK function in signal regulation. We took advantage of the disrupted chemosensory behavior characteristic of Caenorhabditis elegans grk-2 mutants to discern the interactions required for proper in vivo Ce-GRK-2 function. Informed by mammalian crystallographic and biochemical data, we introduced amino acid substitutions into the Ce-grk-2 coding sequence that are predicted to selectively disrupt GPCR phosphorylation, Gαq/11 binding, Gβγ binding, or phospholipid binding. Changing the most amino-terminal residues, which have been shown in mammalian systems to be required specifically for GPCR phosphorylation but not phosphorylation of alternative substrates or recruitment to activated GPCRs, eliminated the ability of Ce-GRK-2 to restore chemosensory signaling. Disrupting interaction between the predicted Ce-GRK-2 amino-terminal α-helix and kinase domain, posited to stabilize GRKs in their active ATP- and GPCR-bound conformation, also eliminated Ce-GRK-2 chemosensory function. Finally, although changing residues within the RH domain, predicted to disrupt interaction with Gαq/11, did not affect Ce-GRK-2 chemosensory function, disruption of the predicted PH domain-mediated interactions with Gβγ and phospholipids revealed that both contribute to Ce-GRK-2 function in vivo. Combined, we have demonstrated functional roles for broadly conserved GRK2/3 structural domains in the in vivo regulation of organismal behavior. PMID:22375004

  8. Phosphorylation substrates for protein kinase C in intact pituitary cells: characterization of a receptor-mediated event using novel gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Strulovici, B.; Tahilramani, R.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.

    1987-09-22

    The involvement of protein kinase C in the signal transduction of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) action was investigated with a GnRH superagonist, partial agonists, and antagonists in intact rat pituitary cells. Exposure of /sup 32/P-labeled cells to GnRH or to the superagonist (D-Nal(2)/sup 6/)GnRH induced the enhanced phosphorylation of 42-, 34-, 11-, and 10-kDa proteins and the dephosphorylation of a 15-kDa protein as assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/autoradiography. This effect was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by potent GnRG antagonists. Downregulation of protein kinase C by prolonged incubation of the pituitary cells with high concentrations of active phorbol esters abolished protein kinase C activity and also prevented the phosphorylation induced by GnRN, or (D-Nal(2)/sup 6/)GnRH. The same effect was obtained by preincubating the cells with the protein kinase C inhibitor H-7. In this study the authors identify for the first time physiological substrates for protein kinase C in intact pituitary cells. They demonstrate a close quantitative correlation between the extent of translocation of protein kinase C, levels of phosphorylation of specific substrates in the intact cells, and the biological activity of the GnRH analogues with varying affinity for the GnRH receptor. These data strengthen the contention that the physiological effects of GnRH are primarily mediated via the phosphatidylinositol/Ca/sup 2 +/ signal transfer system and represent a first step toward defining the physiological substrates of protein kinase C and their role in the cascade of events that starts upon binding of GnRH to its receptor.

  9. MASK, a large ankyrin repeat and KH domain-containing protein involved in Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel K; Carroll, Pamela M; Allard, John D; Simon, Michael A

    2002-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinases Sevenless (SEV) and the Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are required for the proper development of the Drosophila eye. The protein tyrosine phosphatase Corkscrew (CSW) is a common component of many RTK signaling pathways, and is required for signaling downstream of SEV and EGFR. In order to identify additional components of these signaling pathways, mutations that enhanced the phenotype of a dominant negative form of Corkscrew were isolated. This genetic screen identified the novel signaling molecule MASK, a large protein that contains two blocks of ankyrin repeats as well as a KH domain. MASK genetically interacts with known components of these RTK signaling pathways. In the developing eye imaginal disc, loss of MASK function generates phenotypes similar to those generated by loss of other components of the SEV and EGFR pathways. These phenotypes include compromised photoreceptor differentiation, cell survival and proliferation. Although MASK is localized predominantly in the cellular cytoplasm, it is not absolutely required for MAPK activation or nuclear translocation. Based on our results, we propose that MASK is a novel mediator of RTK signaling, and may act either downstream of MAPK or transduce signaling through a parallel branch of the RTK pathway.

  10. Perception of the novel MAMP eMax from different Xanthomonas species requires the Arabidopsis receptor-like protein ReMAX and the receptor kinase SOBIR.

    PubMed

    Jehle, Anna Kristina; Fürst, Ursula; Lipschis, Martin; Albert, Markus; Felix, Georg

    2013-01-01

    As part of their innate immune system plants carry a number of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that can detect a broad range of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). In a recently published article (1) we described a novel, proteinaceous MAMP termed eMax (enigmatic MAMP of Xanthomonas) that derives from Xanthomonas and gets recognized by the receptor-like protein ReMAX (RECEPTOR OF eMax) of Arabidopsis thaliana. ReMAX has no ortholog in Nicotiana benthamiana and this species does not respond to eMax even when transformed with ReMAX. However, interfamily transfer of eMax perception was successful with a chimeric form of ReMAX where the C-terminal part of the protein was replaced by the corresponding part of the tomato RLP EIX2 (ETHYLENE INDUCING XYLANASE2). In this addendum we describe the difficulties with the purification and identification of the MAMP eMax and we present data demonstrating that functionality of ReMAX, much like that of related RLPs, depends on the presence of the receptor kinase SOBIR (SUPPRESSOR OF BIR1-1).

  11. cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits α7 nicotinic receptor activity in layer 1 cortical interneurons through activation of D1/D5 dopamine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Komal, Pragya; Estakhr, Jasem; Kamran, Melad; Renda, Anthony; Nashmi, Raad

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of ion channels, including nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), by protein kinases plays a key role in the modification of synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability. α7 nAChRs are the second most prevalent nAChR subtype in the CNS following α4β2. Serine 365 in the M3–M4 cytoplasmic loop of the α7 nAChR is a phosphorylation site for protein kinase A (PKA). D1/D5 dopamine receptors signal through the adenylate cyclase–PKA pathway and play a key role in working memory and attention in the prefrontal cortex. Thus, we examined whether the dopaminergic system, mediated through PKA, functionally interacts with the α7-dependent cholinergic neurotransmission. In layer 1 interneurons of mouse prefrontal cortex, α7 nicotinic currents were decreased upon stimulation with 8-Br-cAMP, a PKA activator. In HEK 293T cells, dominant negative PKA abolished 8-Br-cAMP's effect of diminishing α7 nicotinic currents, while a constitutively active PKA catalytic subunit decreased α7 currents. In brain slices, the PKA inhibitor KT-5720 nullified 8-Br-cAMP's effect of attenuating α7 nicotinic responses, while applying a PKA catalytic subunit in the pipette solution decreased α7 currents. 8-Br-cAMP stimulation reduced surface expression of α7 nAChRs, but there was no change in single-channel conductance. The D1/D5 dopamine receptor agonist SKF 83822 similarly attenuated α7 nicotinic currents from layer 1 interneurons and this attenuation of nicotinic current was prevented by KT-5720. These results demonstrate that dopamine receptor-mediated activation of PKA negatively modulates nicotinic neurotransmission in prefrontal cortical interneurons, which may be a contributing mechanism of dopamine modulation of cognitive behaviours such as attention or working memory. PMID:25990637

  12. Phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase associates with an insulin receptor substrate-1 serine kinase distinct from its intrinsic serine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cengel, K A; Kason, R E; Freund, G G

    1998-01-01

    Serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) has been proposed as a counter-regulatory mechanism in insulin and cytokine signalling. Here we report that IRS-1 is phosphorylated by a wortmannin insensitive phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI 3-kinase)-associated serine kinase (PAS kinase) distinct from PI 3-kinase serine kinase. We found that PI 3-kinase immune complexes contain 5-fold more wortmannin-insensitive serine kinase activity than SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) and IRS-1 immune complexes. Affinity chromatography of cell lysates with a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein for the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase showed that PAS kinase associated with the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase. This interaction required unoccupied SH2 domain(s) but did not require the PI 3-kinase p110 subunit binding domain. In terms of function, PAS kinase phosphorylated IRS-1 and, after insulin stimulation, PAS kinase phosphorylated IRS-1 in PI 3-kinase-IRS-1 complexes. Phosphopeptide mapping showed that insulin-dependent in vivo sites of IRS-1 serine phosphorylation were comparable to those of PAS kinase phosphorylated IRS-1. More importantly, PAS kinase-dependent phosphorylation of IRS-1 reduced by 4-fold the ability of IRS-1 to act as an insulin receptor substrate. Taken together, these findings indicate that: (a) PAS kinase is distinct from the intrinsic serine kinase activity of PI 3-kinase, (b) PAS kinase associates with the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase through SH2 domain interactions, and (c) PAS kinase is an IRS-1 serine kinase that can reduce the ability of IRS-1 to serve as an insulin receptor substrate. PMID:9761740

  13. Receptor interacting protein kinase-mediated necrosis contributes to cone and rod photoreceptor degeneration in the retina lacking interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kota; Li, Songhua; Gordon, William C; He, Jibao; Liou, Gregory I; Hill, James M; Travis, Gabriel H; Bazan, Nicolas G; Jin, Minghao

    2013-10-30

    Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) secreted by photoreceptors plays a pivotal role in photoreceptor survival with an unknown mechanism. A mutation in the human IRBP has been linked to retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degenerative disease. Mice lacking IRBP display severe early and progressive photoreceptor degeneration. However, the signaling pathway(s) leading to photoreceptor death in IRBP-deficient mice remains poorly understood. Here, we show that amounts of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the interphotoreceptor matrix and retinas of Irbp(-/-) mice were increased more than 10-fold and fivefold, respectively, compared with those in wild-type mice. Moreover, TNF-α receptor 1, an important membrane death receptor that mediates both programmed apoptosis and necrosis, was also significantly increased in Irbp(-/-) retina, and was colocalized with peanut agglutinin to the Irbp(-/-) cone outer segments. Although these death signaling proteins were increased, the caspase-dependent and independent apoptotic pathways were mildly activated in the Irbp(-/-) retinas, suggesting that other cell death mechanism(s) also contributes to the extensive photoreceptor degeneration in Irbp(-/-) retina. We found that receptor interacting protein 1 and 3 (RIP1 and RIP3) kinases, the intracellular key mediators of TNF-induced cellular necrosis, were elevated at least threefold in the Irbp(-/-) retinas. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of RIP1 kinase significantly prevented cone and rod photoreceptor degeneration in Irbp(-/-) mice. These results reveal that RIP kinase-mediated necrosis strongly contributes to cone and rod degeneration in Irbp(-/-) mice, implicating the TNF-RIP pathway as a potential therapeutic target to prevent or delay photoreceptor degeneration in patients with retinitis pigmentosa caused by IRBP mutation.

  14. Long-term exposure to PGE2 causes homologous desensitization of receptor-mediated activation of protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Malty, Ramy Habashy; Hudmon, Andy; Fehrenbacher, Jill C; Vasko, Michael R

    2016-07-11

    Acute exposure to prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) activates EP receptors in sensory neurons which triggers the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling cascade resulting in enhanced excitability of the neurons. With long-term exposure to PGE2, however, the activation of PKA does not appear to mediate persistent PGE2-induced sensitization. Consequently, we examined whether homologous desensitization of PGE2-mediated PKA activation occurs after long-term exposure of isolated sensory neurons to the eicosanoid. Sensory neuronal cultures were harvested from the dorsal root ganglia of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The cultures were pretreated with vehicle or PGE2 and used to examine signaling mechanisms mediating acute versus persistent sensitization by exposure to the eicosanoid using enhanced capsaicin-evoked release of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide (iCGRP) as an endpoint. Neuronal cultures chronically exposed to vehicle or PGE2 also were used to study the ability of the eicosanoid and other agonists to activate PKA and whether long-term exposure to the prostanoid alters expression of EP receptor subtypes. Acute exposure to 1 μM PGE2 augments the capsaicin-evoked release of iCGRP, and this effect is blocked by the PKA inhibitor H-89. After 5 days of exposure to 1 μM PGE2, administration of the eicosanoid still augments evoked release of iCGRP, but the effect is not attenuated by inhibition of PKA or by inhibition of PI3 kinases. The sensitizing actions of PGE2 after acute and long-term exposure were attenuated by EP2, EP3, and EP4 receptor antagonists, but not by an EP1 antagonist. Exposing neuronal cultures to 1 μM PGE2 for 12 h to 5 days blocks the ability of PGE2 to activate PKA. The offset of the desensitization occurs within 24 h of removal of PGE2 from the cultures. Long-term exposure to PGE2 also results in desensitization of the ability of a selective EP4 receptor agonist, L902688 to activate PKA, but does not alter the ability of

  15. Testis dysfunction by isoproterenol is mediated by upregulating endothelin receptor A, leptin and protein kinase Cvarepsilon and is attenuated by an endothelin receptor antagonist CPU0213.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Si; Dai, De-Zai; Dai, Yin

    2010-07-01

    This study has examined whether upregulation of endothelin receptor A, leptin and phosphorylated protein kinase Cvarepsilon contributes to stress-induced testicular damaged and its possible reversal by endothelial (ET) antagonism. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control and isoproterenol (ISO 1mg/kg, subcutaneous (s.c.), 10 days) groups, and intervened with the ET receptor antagonist CPU0213 (20mg/kg, s.c.), on days 6-10. In ISO group, testicular succinate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, acid phosphotase, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and serum testosterone decreased, whereas FSH increased, relative to control. The seminiferous tubules were damaged in association with testicular upregulation of protein abundance of leptin and pPKCvarepsilon, and mRNA and protein expression of leptin receptor (OBRb) and ET(A). CPU0213 was effective in ameliorating these abnormalities. Over-expression of ET(A) and leptin accounting for the testis dysfunction is likely to be mediated by pPKCvarepsilon in the ISO treated rats. The upregulated ET pathway appears to be critical in pathologies of the testis.

  16. Evaluation of the role of g protein-coupled receptor kinase 3 in desensitization of mouse odorant receptors in a Mammalian cell line and in olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kato, Aya; Reisert, Johannes; Ihara, Sayoko; Yoshikawa, Keiichi; Touhara, Kazushige

    2014-11-01

    Thousands of odors are sensed and discriminated by G protein-coupled odorant receptors (ORs) expressed in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) may have a role in desensitization of ORs. However, whether ORs are susceptible to agonist-dependent desensitization and whether GRKs affect odorant responsiveness of OSNs are currently unknown. Here we show that GRK3 attenuated the agonist responsiveness of a specific mouse odorant receptor for eugenol (mOR-EG) upon agonist pretreatment in HEK293 cells, but GRK3 did not affect the response amplitude or the recovery kinetics upon repeated agonist stimulation. We performed electrophysiological recordings of single OSNs which expressed mOR-EG and green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence or absence of GRK3. The kinetics and amplitude of agonist responsiveness of individual GFP-labeled mOR-EG neurons were not significantly affected by the absence of GRK3. These results indicate that the role of GRK3 in attenuating ORs responsiveness in OSNs may have been overestimated.

  17. Evaluation of the Role of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 3 in Desensitization of Mouse Odorant Receptors in a Mammalian Cell Line and in Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Aya; Reisert, Johannes; Ihara, Sayoko; Yoshikawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of odors are sensed and discriminated by G protein-coupled odorant receptors (ORs) expressed in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) may have a role in desensitization of ORs. However, whether ORs are susceptible to agonist-dependent desensitization and whether GRKs affect odorant responsiveness of OSNs are currently unknown. Here we show that GRK3 attenuated the agonist responsiveness of a specific mouse odorant receptor for eugenol (mOR-EG) upon agonist pretreatment in HEK293 cells, but GRK3 did not affect the response amplitude or the recovery kinetics upon repeated agonist stimulation. We performed electrophysiological recordings of single OSNs which expressed mOR-EG and green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence or absence of GRK3. The kinetics and amplitude of agonist responsiveness of individual GFP-labeled mOR-EG neurons were not significantly affected by the absence of GRK3. These results indicate that the role of GRK3 in attenuating ORs responsiveness in OSNs may have been overestimated. PMID:25313015

  18. Paroxetine Is a Direct Inhibitor of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 and Increases Myocardial Contractility

    SciTech Connect

    Thal, David M.; Homan, Kristoff T.; Chen, Jun; Wu, Emily K.; Hinkle, Patricia M.; Huang, Z. Maggie; Chuprun, J. Kurt; Song, Jianliang; Gao, Erhe; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Sklar, Larry A.; Koch, Walter J.; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-08-10

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a well-established therapeutic target for the treatment of heart failure. In this paper we identify the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine as a selective inhibitor of GRK2 activity both in vitro and in living cells. In the crystal structure of the GRK2·paroxetine–Gβγ complex, paroxetine binds in the active site of GRK2 and stabilizes the kinase domain in a novel conformation in which a unique regulatory loop forms part of the ligand binding site. Isolated cardiomyocytes show increased isoproterenol-induced shortening and contraction amplitude in the presence of paroxetine, and pretreatment of mice with paroxetine before isoproterenol significantly increases left ventricular inotropic reserve in vivo with no significant effect on heart rate. Neither is observed in the presence of the SSRI fluoxetine. Our structural and functional results validate a widely available drug as a selective chemical probe for GRK2 and represent a starting point for the rational design of more potent and specific GRK2 inhibitors.

  19. Characterization of the interaction of 5'-p-fluorosulfonylbenzoyl adenosine with the epidermal growth factor receptor/protein kinase in A431 cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Buhrow, S A; Cohen, S; Garbers, D L; Staros, J V

    1983-06-25

    Treatment of membrane vesicles from A431 cells, a human epidermoid carcinoma line, with the affinity label 5'-p-fluorosulfonylbenzoyl [8-14C]adenosine (5'-p-FSO2Bz[14C]Ado) results in an inhibition of the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulable protein kinase and in the modification of proteins having the same molecular weight (Mr = 170,000 and 150,000) as the receptor for EGF (Buhrow, S. A., Cohen, S., and Staros, J. V. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 4019-4022). Modification of the vesicles with 5'-p-FSO2BzAdo inhibits not only the EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of endogenous membrane proteins but also the EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of an exogenous synthetic tyrosine-containing peptide substrate. This indicates that the EGF-stimulable protein kinase is modified by 5'-p-FSO2BzAdo at a site affecting catalytic activity. Membrane vesicles were treated with 5'-p-FSO2Bz-[14C]Ado to affinity label the kinase, then the EGF receptor was purified by affinity chromatography on immobilized EGF. The EGF receptor thus purified contains the 5'-p-SO2Bz[14C]Ado moiety. These data strongly support our hypothesis that the EGF receptor and EGF-stimulable kinase are two parts of the same polypeptide chain.

  20. Interleukin-1-receptor-associated kinase 2 (IRAK2)-mediated interleukin-1-dependent nuclear factor kappaB transactivation in Saos2 cells requires the Akt/protein kinase B kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cenni, Vittoria; Sirri, Alessandra; De Pol, Anto; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Marmiroli, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    The post-receptor pathway that leads to nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation begins with the assembly of a membrane-proximal complex among the interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptors and the adaptor molecules, myeloid differentiation protein 88 (MyD88), IL-1-receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) and tumour-necrosis-factor-receptor-associated factor 6. Eventually, phosphorylation of the inhibitor of NF-kappaB (IkappaB) by the IkappaB kinases releases NF-kappaB, which translocates to the nucleus and modulates gene expression. In this paper, we report that IRAK2 and MyD88, but not IRAK1, interact physically with Akt, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments. Interestingly, the association of Akt with recombinant IRAK2 is decreased by stimulation with IL-1, and is favoured by pre-treatment with phosphatase. Likewise, Akt association with IRAK2 is increased considerably by overexpression of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10), while it is completely abrogated by overexpression of phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1. These data indicate that Akt takes part in the formation of the signalling complex that conveys the signal from the IL-1 receptors to NF-kappaB, a step that is much more membrane-proximal than was reported previously. We also demonstrate that Akt activity is necessary for IL-1-dependent NF-kappaB transactivation, since a kinase-defective mutant of Akt impairs IRAK2- and MyD88-dependent, but not IRAK1-dependent, NF-kappaB activity, as monitored by a gene reporter assay. Accordingly, IRAK2 failed to trigger inducible nitric oxide synthase and IL-1beta production in cells expressing dominant-negative Akt. However, NF-kappaB binding to DNA was not affected by inhibition of Akt, indicating that Akt regulates NF-kappaB at a level distinct from the dissociation of p65 from IkappaBalpha and its translocation to the nucleus, possibly involving phosphorylation of the p65 transactivation domain. PMID:12906710

  1. The chemokine receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 couple to distinct G protein-coupled receptor kinases to mediate and regulate leukocyte functions

    PubMed Central

    Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K.; Su, Yingjun; Singh, Vandana; Hayes, Katherine; Richmond, Ann; Richardson, Ricardo M.

    2012-01-01

    The chemokine receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, couple to Gαi to induce leukocyte recruitment and activation at sites of inflammation. Upon activation by CXCL8, these receptors become phosphorylated, desensitized and internalized. In this study we investigated the role of different G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) in CXCR1- and CXCR2-mediated cellular functions. To that end, shRNA was used to inhibit GRK 2, 3, 5 and 6 in RBL-2H3 cells stably expressing CXCR1 or CXCR2, and CXCL8-mediated receptor activation and regulation were assessed. Inhibition of GRK2 and GRK6, respectively, increased CXCR1 and CXCR2 resistance to phosphorylation, desensitization and internalization, and enhanced CXCL8-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis and exocytosis in vitro. GRK2 depletion diminished CXCR1-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation but had no effect in CXCR2-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. GRK6 depletion had no significant effect on CXCR1 function. However, peritoneal neutrophils from mice deficient in GRK6 (GRK6−/−) displayed an increase in CXCR2-mediated G-protein activation, but in vitro exhibited a decrease in chemotaxis, receptor desensitization and internalization relative to wild type (GRK6+/+) cells. In contrast, neutrophil recruitment in vivo in GRK6−/− mice was increased in response to delivery of CXCL1 through the air-pouch model. In a wound closure assay, GRK6−/− mice showed enhanced myeloperoxidase activity, suggesting enhanced neutrophil recruitment, and faster wound closure as compared to GRK6+/+ animals. Taken together, the results indicate that CXCR1 and CXCR2 couple to distinct GRK isoforms to mediate and regulate inflammatory responses. CXCR1 predominantly couples to GRK2, whereas CXCR2 interacts with GRK6 to negatively regulate receptor sensitization and trafficking, thus affecting cell signaling and angiogenesis. PMID:22869904

  2. Synergistic regulation of m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor desensitization and sequestration by G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 and beta-arrestin-1.

    PubMed

    Schlador, M L; Nathanson, N M

    1997-07-25

    The m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m2 mAChR) belongs to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors and is regulated by many processes that attenuate signaling following prolonged stimulation by agonist. We used a heterologous expression system to examine the ability of G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2) and beta-arrestin-1 to regulate the phosphorylation state and to promote desensitization and sequestration of the m2 mAChR. Treatment of JEG-3 cells transiently expressing the m2 mAChR with a muscarinic agonist induced an approximately 4- or 8-fold increase in receptor phosphorylation in the absence or presence of cotransfected GRK2, respectively, compared with untreated cells transfected with receptor alone. Using the expression of a cAMP-regulated reporter gene to measure receptor function, we found that transiently transfected m2 mAChRs underwent functional desensitization following exposure to agonist. Transfected GRK2 enhanced agonist-induced functional desensitization in a manner that was synergistically enhanced by cotransfection of beta-arrestin-1, which had no effect on m2 mAChR function when coexpressed in the absence of GRK2. Finally, GRK2 and beta-arrestin-1 synergistically enhanced both the rate and extent of agonist-induced m2 mAChR sequestration. These results are the first to demonstrate that agonist-induced desensitization and sequestration of the m2 mAChR in the intact cell can be enhanced by the presence of GRK2 and beta-arrestin-1 and show that these molecules have multiple actions on the m2 mAChR.

  3. μ and κ Opioid Receptors Activate ERK/MAPK via Different Protein Kinase C Isoforms and Secondary Messengers in Astrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Belcheva, Mariana M.; Clark, Amy L.; Haas, Paul D.; Serna, Jannie S.; Hahn, Jason W.; Kiss, Alexi; Coscia, Carmine J.

    2005-01-01

    Acute μ and κ opioids activate the ERK/MAPK phosphorylation cascade that represents an integral part of the signaling pathway of growth factors in astrocytes. By this cross-talk, opioids may impact neural development and plasticity among other basic neurobiological processes in vivo. The μ agonist, [D-ala2, mephe4, gly-ol5]enkephalin (DAMGO), induces a transient stimulation of ERK phosphorylation, whereas κ agonist, U69,593, engenders sustained ERK activation. Here we demonstrate that acute U69,593 and DAMGO stimulate ERK phosphorylation by utilization of different secondary messengers and protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms upstream of the growth factor pathway. Immortalized astrocytes transfected with either antisense calmodulin (CaM), a mutant μ opioid receptor that binds CaM poorly or a dominant negative mutant of PKCε were used as a model system to study μ signaling. Evidence was gained to implicate CaM and PKCε in DAMGO stimulation of ERK. DAMGO activation of PKCε and/or ERK was insensitive to selective inhibitors of Ca2+ mobilization, but it was blocked upon phospholipase C inhibition. These results suggest a novel mechanism wherein, upon DAMGO binding, CaM is released from the μ receptor and activates phospholipase C. Subsequently, phospholipase C generates diacylglycerides that activate PKCε. In contrast, U69,593 appears to act via phosphoinositide 3-kinase, PKCζ, and Ca2+ mobilization. These signaling components were implicated based on studies with specific inhibitors and a dominant negative mutant of PKCζ. Collectively, our findings on acute opioid effects suggest that differences in their mechanism of signaling may contribute to the distinct outcomes on ERK modulation induced by chronic μ and κ opioids. PMID:15944153

  4. Extracellular Signal-Regulated Protein Kinase, c-Jun N-terminal Protein Kinase, and Calcineurin Regulate Transient Receptor Potential M3 (TRPM3) Induced Activation of AP-1.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Andrea; Rössler, Oliver G; Thiel, Gerald

    2017-01-23

    Stimulation of transient receptor potential M3 (TRPM3) cation channels with pregnenolone sulfate induces an influx of Ca(2+) ions into the cells and a rise in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, leading to the activation of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor. Here, we show that expression of a constitutively active mutant of the Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin attenuated pregnenolone sulfate-induced AP-1 activation in TRPM3-expressing cells. Likewise, expression of the regulatory B subunit of calcineurin reduced AP-1 activity in the cells following stimulation of TRPM3 channels. MAP kinase phosphatase-1 has been shown to attenuate TRPM3-mediated AP-1 activation. Here, we show that pregnenolone sulfate-induced stimulation of TRPM3 triggers the phosphorylation and activation of the MAP kinase extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2). Pharmacological and genetic experiments revealed that stimulation of ERK1/2 is essential for the activation of AP-1 in cells expressing stimulated TRPM3 channels. ERK1/2 is required for the activation of the transcription factor c-Jun, a key component of the AP-1 transcription factor, and regulates c-Fos promoter activity. In addition, we identified c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK1/2) as a second signal transducer of activated TRPM3 channels. Together, the data show that calcineurin and the protein kinases ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 are important regulators within the signaling cascade connecting TRPM3 channel stimulation with increased AP-1-regulated transcription. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Suppression of Mitochondrial Biogenesis through Toll-Like Receptor 4–Dependent Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling in Endotoxin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joshua A.; Stallons, L. Jay; Collier, Justin B.; Chavin, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Although disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis and biogenesis (MB) is a widely accepted pathophysiologic feature of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI), the molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are unknown. In this study, we examined the signaling pathways responsible for the suppression of MB in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced AKI. Downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a master regulator of MB, was noted at the mRNA level at 3 hours and protein level at 18 hours in the renal cortex, and was associated with loss of renal function after LPS treatment. LPS-mediated suppression of PGC-1α led to reduced expression of downstream regulators of MB and electron transport chain proteins along with a reduction in renal cortical mitochondrial DNA content. Mechanistically, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) knockout mice were protected from renal injury and disruption of MB after LPS exposure. Immunoblot analysis revealed activation of tumor progression locus 2/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (TPL-2/MEK/ERK) signaling in the renal cortex by LPS. Pharmacologic inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling attenuated renal dysfunction and loss of PGC-1α, and was associated with a reduction in proinflammatory cytokine (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], interleukin-1β) expression at 3 hours after LPS exposure. Neutralization of TNF-α also blocked PGC-1α suppression, but not renal dysfunction, after LPS-induced AKI. Finally, systemic administration of recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α alone was sufficient to produce AKI and disrupt mitochondrial homeostasis. These findings indicate an important role for the TLR4/MEK/ERK pathway in both LPS-induced renal dysfunction and suppression of MB. TLR4/MEK/ERK/TNF-α signaling may represent a novel therapeutic target to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and AKI produced by sepsis. PMID:25503387

  6. Signal-transduction pathways that regulate visceral smooth muscle function. III. Coupling of muscarinic receptors to signaling kinases and effector proteins in gastrointestinal smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Gerthoffer, William T

    2005-05-01

    Stimulation of muscarinic M3 and M2 receptors on gastrointestinal smooth muscle elicits contraction via activation of G proteins that are coupled to a diverse set of downstream signaling pathways and effector proteins. Many studies suggest a canonical excitation-contraction coupling pathway that includes activation of phospholipases, production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, activation of L-type calcium channels, and activation of nonselective cation channels. These events lead to elevated intracellular calcium concentration, which activates myosin light chain kinase to phosphorylate and activate myosin II thus causing contraction. In addition, muscarinic receptors are coupled to signaling pathways that modulate the effect of activator calcium. The Rho/Rho kinase pathway inhibits myosin light chain phosphatase, one of the key steps in sensitization of the contractile proteins to calcium. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases and Src family tyrosine kinases are also activated by muscarinic agonists. Src family tyrosine kinases regulate L-type calcium and nonselective cation channels. Src activation also leads to activation of ERK and p38 MAPKs. ERK MAPKs phosphorylate caldesmon, an actin filament binding protein. P38 MAPKs activate phospholipases and MAPKAP kinase 2/3, which phosphorylate HSP27. HSP27 may regulate cross-bridge function, actin filament formation, and actin filament attachment to the cell membrane. In addition to the well-known role of M3 muscarinic receptors to regulate myoplasmic calcium levels, the integrated effect of muscarinic activation probably also includes signaling pathways that modulate phospholipases, cyclic nucleotides, contractile protein function, and cytoskeletal protein function.

  7. Combining linkage and association mapping identifies RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN KINASE1 as an essential Arabidopsis shoot regeneration gene

    PubMed Central

    Motte, Hans; Vercauteren, Annelies; Depuydt, Stephen; Landschoot, Sofie; Geelen, Danny; Werbrouck, Stefaan; Goormachtig, Sofie; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Vereecke, Danny

    2014-01-01

    De novo shoot organogenesis (i.e., the regeneration of shoots on nonmeristematic tissue) is widely applied in plant biotechnology. However, the capacity to regenerate shoots varies highly among plant species and cultivars, and the factors underlying it are still poorly understood. Here, we evaluated the shoot regeneration capacity of 88 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions and found that the process is blocked at different stages in different accessions. We show that the variation in regeneration capacity between the Arabidopsis accessions Nok-3 and Ga-0 is determined by five quantitative trait loci (QTL): REG-1 to REG-5. Fine mapping by local association analysis identified RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN KINASE1 (RPK1), an abscisic acid-related receptor, as the most likely gene underlying REG-1, which was confirmed by quantitative failure of an RPK1 mutation to complement the high and low REG-1 QTL alleles. The importance of RPK1 in regeneration was further corroborated by mutant and expression analysis. Altogether, our results show that association mapping combined with linkage mapping is a powerful method to discover important genes implicated in a biological process as complex as shoot regeneration. PMID:24850864

  8. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6/β-arrestin 2 system in a rat model of dopamine supersensitivity psychosis.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yasunori; Tadokoro, Shigenori; Takase, Masayuki; Kanahara, Nobuhisa; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Hashimoto, Kenji; Iyo, Masaomi

    2015-12-01

    In humans, long-term antipsychotic treatment is known to induce movement disorders and a psychosis, called dopamine supersensitivity psychosis (DSP). The mechanism by which chronic administration of antipsychotic(s) causes DSP may be the treatment-induced up-regulation of dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2). G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 (GRK6) and beta-arrestin 2 (ARRB2) play important roles in the trafficking of DRD2 by phosphorylation and internalization. We investigated the effects of chronic continuous treatment with mini-pump-administered haloperidol (HAL) on the sensitivity of Wistar rats to dopamine, as measured by the locomotor response to methamphetamine (MAP) and the density of striatal DRD2. Chronic continuous treatment with HAL resulted in significantly higher locomotor response to MAP and significantly higher striatal DRD2 density compared with those in rats administered vehicle (VEH). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays revealed that striatal ARRB2 in DSP model rats tended to decrease in comparison with that in the VEH group. In addition, the ratio of GRK6/ARRB2 in DSP model rats was significantly higher than that in controls. Our results suggest that alterations of the GRK6 and ARRB2 system could induce both DRD2 up-regulation and impairment of the dopamine signaling pathway, resulting potentially in the development of DSP.

  9. Protein kinase Cε is required for spinal analgesic synergy between delta opioid and alpha-2A adrenergic receptor agonist pairs.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Daniel J; Kitto, Kelley F; Overland, Aaron C; Messing, Robert O; Stone, Laura S; Fairbanks, Carolyn A; Wilcox, George L

    2013-08-14

    We recently showed that spinal synergistic interactions between δ opioid receptors (δORs) and α2A adrenergic receptors (α2AARs) require protein kinase C (PKC). To identify which PKC isoforms contribute to analgesic synergy, we evaluated the effects of various PKC-isoform-specific peptide inhibitors on synergy between δORs and α2AARs using the tail flick assay of thermal nociception in mice. Only a PKCε inhibitor abolished synergy between a δOR agonist and an α2AAR agonist. We tested a panel of combinations of opioid and adrenergic agonists in PKCε knock-out mice and found that all four combinations of a δOR agonist and an α2AAR agonist required PKCε for antinociceptive synergy. None of the combinations of a μOR agonist with an α2AR agonist required PKCε. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that PKCε could be found in the population of peptidergic primary afferent nociceptors where δORs and α2AARs have been found to extensively colocalize. Immunoreactivity for PKCε was found in the majority of dorsal root ganglion neurons and intensely labeled laminae I and II of the spinal cord dorsal horn. PKCε is widespread in the spinal nociceptive system and in peptidergic primary afferents it appears to be specifically involved in mediating the synergistic interaction between δORs and α2AARs.

  10. Protein Kinase Cϵ Is Required for Spinal Analgesic Synergy between Delta Opioid and Alpha-2A Adrenergic Receptor Agonist Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Daniel J.; Kitto, Kelley F.; Overland, Aaron C.; Messing, Robert O.; Stone, Laura S.; Fairbanks, Carolyn A.

    2013-01-01

    We recently showed that spinal synergistic interactions between δ opioid receptors (δORs) and α2A adrenergic receptors (α2AARs) require protein kinase C (PKC). To identify which PKC isoforms contribute to analgesic synergy, we evaluated the effects of various PKC-isoform-specific peptide inhibitors on synergy between δORs and α2AARs using the tail flick assay of thermal nociception in mice. Only a PKCϵ inhibitor abolished synergy between a δOR agonist and an α2AAR agonist. We tested a panel of combinations of opioid and adrenergic agonists in PKCϵ knock-out mice and found that all four combinations of a δOR agonist and an α2AAR agonist required PKCϵ for antinociceptive synergy. None of the combinations of a μOR agonist with an α2AR agonist required PKCϵ. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that PKCϵ could be found in the population of peptidergic primary afferent nociceptors where δORs and α2AARs have been found to extensively colocalize. Immunoreactivity for PKCϵ was found in the majority of dorsal root ganglion neurons and intensely labeled laminae I and II of the spinal cord dorsal horn. PKCϵ is widespread in the spinal nociceptive system and in peptidergic primary afferents it appears to be specifically involved in mediating the synergistic interaction between δORs and α2AARs. PMID:23946412

  11. Membrane Receptor-Induced Changes of the Protein Kinases A and C Activity May Play a Leading Role in Promoting Developmental Synapse Elimination at the Neuromuscular Junction.

    PubMed

    Tomàs, Josep M; Garcia, Neus; Lanuza, Maria A; Nadal, Laura; Tomàs, Marta; Hurtado, Erica; Simó, Anna; Cilleros, Víctor

    2017-01-01

    Synapses that are overproduced during histogenesis in the nervous system are eventually lost and connectivity is refined. Membrane receptor signaling leads to activity-dependent mutual influence and competition between axons directly or with the involvement of the postsynaptic cell and the associated glial cell/s. Presynaptic muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (subtypes mAChR; M1, M2 and M4), adenosine receptors (AR; A1 and A2A) and the tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (TrkB), among others, all cooperate in synapse elimination. Between these receptors there are several synergistic, antagonic and modulatory relations that clearly affect synapse elimination. Metabotropic receptors converge in a limited repertoire of intracellular effector kinases, particularly serine protein kinases A and C (PKA and PKC), to phosphorylate protein targets and bring about structural and functional changes leading to axon loss. In most cells A1, M1 and TrkB operate mainly by stimulating PKC whereas A2A, M2 and M4 inhibit PKA. We hypothesize that a membrane receptor-induced shifting in the protein kinases A and C activity (inhibition of PKA and/or stimulation of PKC) in some nerve endings may play an important role in promoting developmental synapse elimination at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). This hypothesis is supported by: (i) the tonic effect (shown by using selective inhibitors) of several membrane receptors that accelerates axon loss between postnatal days P5-P9; (ii) the synergistic, antagonic and modulatory effects (shown by paired inhibition) of the receptors on axonal loss; (iii) the fact that the coupling of these receptors activates/inhibits the intracellular serine kinases; and (iv) the increase of the PKA activity, the reduction of the PKC activity or, in most cases, both situations simultaneously that presumably occurs in all the situations of singly and paired inhibition of the mAChR, AR and TrkB receptors. The use of transgenic animals and various

  12. Neuroprotective effects of inhibiting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, P2X receptors and the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade: a quantitative analysis in organotypical hippocampal slice cultures subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Rundén-Pran, E; Tansø, R; Haug, F M; Ottersen, O P; Ring, A

    2005-01-01

    Cell death was assessed by quantitative analysis of propidium iodide uptake in rat hippocampal slice cultures transiently exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, an in vitro model of brain ischemia. The hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA3, and fascia dentata were analyzed at different stages from 0 to 48 h after the insult. Cell death appeared at 3 h and increased steeply toward 12 h. Only a slight additional increase in propidium iodide uptake was seen at later intervals. The mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 were activated immediately after oxygen and glucose deprivation both in CA1 and in CA3/fascia dentata. Inhibition of the specific mitogen-activated protein kinase activator mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase by PD98059 or U0126 offered partial protection against oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell damage. The non-selective P2X receptor antagonist suramin gave neuroprotection of the same magnitude as the N-methyl-D-aspartate channel blocker MK-801 (approximately 70%). Neuroprotection was also observed with the P2 receptor blocker PPADS. Immunogold data indicated that hippocampal slice cultures (like intact hippocampi) express several isoforms of P2X receptors at the synaptic level, consistent with the idea that the effects of suramin and PPADS are mediated by P2X receptors. Virtually complete neuroprotection was obtained by combined blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, P2X receptors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase. Both P2X receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors mediate influx of calcium. Our results suggest that inhibition of P2X receptors has a neuroprotective potential similar to that of inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. In contrast, our comparative analysis shows that only partial protection can be achieved by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, one of the

  13. The suppressive effect of an intra-prefrontal cortical infusion of BDNF on cocaine-seeking is Trk receptor and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase dependent.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Timothy W; Shi, Xiangdang; Sun, Wei-Lun; McGinty, Jacqueline F

    2011-01-19

    Cocaine-mediated neuroadaptations in the prefrontal cortical-nucleus accumbens pathway underlie drug-seeking in animals with a cocaine self-administration (SA) history. Neuroplasticity in the cortico-accumbens pathway is regulated, in part, by the expression and availability of neurotrophic factors, such as BDNF. We have previously demonstrated that infusion of BDNF into the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) immediately after the last of 10 cocaine SA sessions attenuates contextual, cue- and cocaine prime-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking (Berglind et al., 2007) and normalizes cocaine-induced disruption of glutamatergic transmission in the nucleus accumbens (Berglind et al., 2009). In the present study, the suppressive effect of intra-dmPFC BDNF on cocaine-seeking is shown to depend on Trk receptor-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in the dmPFC. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor, K252a, and the mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase inhibitor, U0126 (1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis[2-aminophenylthio]butadiene), prevented BDNF's suppressive effects on cocaine-seeking. Vehicle-infused rats with a cocaine SA history showed significant decreases in ERK and cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), but not Akt, phosphorylation after the final cocaine SA session that were reversed by intra-dmPFC BDNF. Additionally, BDNF's ability to normalize cocaine-mediated decreases in ERK and CREB phosphorylation was blocked by U0126, demonstrating that ERK/MAPK activation mediated the behavioral effects. This study elucidates a mechanism whereby BDNF/TrkB (tropomyosin receptor kinase B) activates ERK-regulated CREB phosphorylation in the dmPFC to counteract the neuroadaptations induced by cocaine SA and subsequent relapse to cocaine-seeking.

  14. Protein Kinase C-dependent Phosphorylation of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 6 (TRPC6) on Serine 448 Causes Channel Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Simon M.; Monet, Michaël; Boulay, Guylain

    2010-01-01

    TRPC6 is a cation channel in the plasma membrane that plays a role in Ca2+ entry following the stimulation of a Gq-protein coupled or tyrosine kinase receptor. A dysregulation of TRPC6 activity causes abnormal proliferation of smooth muscle cells and glomerulosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of TRPC6 activity by protein kinase C (PKC). We showed that inhibiting PKC with GF1 or activating it with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate potentiated and inhibited agonist-induced Ca2+ entry, respectively, into cells expressing TRPC6. Similar results were obtained when TRPC6 was directly activated with 1-oleyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol. Activation of the cells with carbachol increased the phosphorylation of TRPC6, an effect that was prevented by the inhibition of PKC. The target residue of PKC was identified by an alanine screen of all canonical PKC sites on TRPC6. Unexpectedly, all the mutants, including TRPC6S768A (a residue previously proposed to be a target for PKC), displayed PKC-dependent inhibition of channel activity. Phosphorylation prediction software suggested that Ser448, in a non-canonical PKC consensus sequence, was a potential target for PKCδ. Ba2+ and Ca2+ entry experiments revealed that GF1 did not potentiate TRPC6S448A activity. Moreover, activation of PKC did not enhance the phosphorylation state of TRPC6S448A. Using A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells, which endogenously express TRPC6, we observed that a novel PKC isoform is involved in the inhibition of the vasopressin-induced Ca2+ entry. Furthermore, knocking down PKCδ in A7r5 cells potentiated vasopressin-induced Ca2+ entry. In summary, we provide evidence that PKCδ exerts a negative feedback effect on TRPC6 through the phosphorylation of Ser448. PMID:20961851

  15. Phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein is not involved in μ-opioid receptor-mediated regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    PubMed Central

    BIAN, JIA-MING; WU, NING; SU, RUI-BIN; LI, JIN

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of the μ-opioid receptor activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. Phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) has been reported to act as a negative regulator of the ERK cascade (Raf-MEK-ERK) by binding to Raf-1 kinase. In the present study, the role of PEBP in μ-opioid receptor-mediated ERK activation was investigated in Chinese hamster ovary/μ cells and SH-SY5Y cells, as well as in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing other types of G protein-coupled receptors. The acute activation of μ-opioid receptors by morphine or (D-Ala2, MePhe4, Gly5-ol) enkephalin induced a rapid activation of ERK. Prolonged morphine treatment did not affect the phosphorylation level of ERK compared with control cells, but the phosphorylation level of ERK decreased markedly when cells were precipitated with naloxone following chronic morphine treatment. For the phosphorylation of PEBP, no change was identified under the designated drug treatment and exposure duration. A total of two other types of G protein-coupled receptors, including Gs-coupled dopamine D1 receptors and Gq-coupled adrenergic α1A receptors were also investigated and only the activation of adrenergic α1A receptors induced an upregulated phosphorylation of PEBP, which was protein kinase C activity dependent. Thus, PEBP did not have a significant role in μ-opioid receptor-mediated regulation of ERK. PMID:25573435

  16. Substrate recognition by the Lyn protein-tyrosine kinase. NMR structure of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling region of the B cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Gaul, B S; Harrison, M L; Geahlen, R L; Burton, R A; Post, C B

    2000-05-26

    The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) plays a central role in transmembrane signal transduction in hematopoietic cells by mediating responses leading to proliferation and differentiation. An initial signaling event following activation of the B cell antigen receptor is phosphorylation of the CD79a (Ig-alpha) ITAM by Lyn, a Src family protein-tyrosine kinase. To elucidate the structural basis for recognition between the ITAM substrate and activated Lyn kinase, the structure of an ITAM-derived peptide bound to Lyn was determined using exchange-transferred nuclear Overhauser NMR spectroscopy. The bound substrate structure has an irregular helix-like character. Docking based on the NMR data into the active site of the closely related Lck kinase strongly favors ITAM binding in an orientation similar to binding of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase rather than that of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. The model of the complex provides a rationale for conserved ITAM residues, substrate specificity, and suggests that substrate binds only the active conformation of the Src family tyrosine kinase, unlike the ATP cofactor, which can bind the inactive form.

  17. Physical and functional association of a serine-threonine protein kinase to the cytoplasmic domain of the p80 form of the human tumor necrosis factor receptor in human histiocytic lymphoma U-937 cells.

    PubMed

    Darnay, B G; Reddy, S A; Aggarwal, B B

    1994-08-05

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) binds two distinct cell surface receptors designated p60 and p80. Our previous studies indicate that a protein kinase from U-937 cells binds to and phosphorylates the p60 receptor. While the p80 receptor is phosphorylated in vivo, no association of a protein kinase has been described. We employed a fusion protein comprising of glutathione S-transferase and the cytoplasmic domain of the p80 receptor (GST-p80CD) to identify cellular proteins that might associate with this receptor. From 35S- and 32P-labeled cells, a protein of 59 kDa bound specifically to GST-p80CD. In vitro kinase reactions indicated that serine/threonine protein kinase activity associated with GST-p80CD and causes its phosphorylation. Additionally, a 59-kDa phosphoprotein was also identified after kinase reactions of proteins bound to GST-p80CD. This kinase activity required either Mg2+ or Mn2+ for optimal activity, and it phosphorylated myelin basic protein, histone H2B, and also the cytoplasmic domain of the p60 receptor. Treatment of cells with TNF increased the p80 receptor-associated kinase activity by 200%. In summary, our results provide evidence of a novel ligand-activated serine/threonine protein kinase that associates with the cytoplasmic domain of the p80 receptor and causes the phosphorylation of both forms of the TNF receptor. This p80 TNF receptor-associated protein and the associated kinase described here are referred to as p80-TRAP and p80-TRAK, respectively.

  18. The A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc-signaling complex mediates alpha1 adrenergic receptor-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Appert-Collin, Aline; Cotecchia, Susanna; Nenniger-Tosato, Monique; Pedrazzini, Thierry; Diviani, Dario

    2007-06-12

    In response to various pathological stresses, the heart undergoes a pathological remodeling process that is associated with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Because cardiac hypertrophy can progress to heart failure, a major cause of lethality worldwide, the intracellular signaling pathways that control cardiomyocyte growth have been the subject of intensive investigation. It has been known for more than a decade that the small molecular weight GTPase RhoA is involved in the signaling pathways leading to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Although some of the hypertrophic pathways activated by RhoA have now been identified, the identity of the exchange factors that modulate its activity in cardiomyocytes is currently unknown. In this study, we show that AKAP-Lbc, an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) with an intrinsic Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, is critical for activating RhoA and transducing hypertrophic signals downstream of alpha1-adrenergic receptors (ARs). In particular, our results indicate that suppression of AKAP-Lbc expression by infecting rat neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes with lentiviruses encoding AKAP-Lbc-specific short hairpin RNAs strongly reduces both alpha1-AR-mediated RhoA activation and hypertrophic responses. Interestingly, alpha1-ARs promote AKAP-Lbc activation via a pathway that requires the alpha subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein G12. These findings identify AKAP-Lbc as the first Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) involved in the signaling pathways leading to cardiomyocytes hypertrophy.

  19. Overproduction of the membrane-bound receptor-like protein kinase 1, RPK1, enhances abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Mizuno, Shinji; Tanaka, Hidenori; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Osakabe, Keishi; Todaka, Daisuke; Fujita, Yasunari; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2010-03-19

    RPK1 (receptor-like protein kinase 1) localizes to the plasma membrane and functions as a regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in Arabidopsis. In our current study, we investigated the effect of RPK1 disruption and overproduction upon plant responses to drought stress. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing the RPK1 protein showed increased ABA sensitivity in their root growth and stomatal closure and also displayed less transpirational water loss. In contrast, a mutant lacking RPK1 function, rpk1-1, was found to be resistant to ABA during these processes and showed increased water loss. RPK1 overproduction in these transgenic plants thus increased their tolerance to drought stress. We performed microarray analysis of RPK1 transgenic plants and observed enhanced expression of several stress-responsive genes, such as Cor15a, Cor15b, and rd29A, in addition to H(2)O(2)-responsive genes. Consistently, the expression levels of ABA/stress-responsive genes in rpk1-1 had decreased compared with wild type. The results suggest that the overproduction of RPK1 enhances both the ABA and drought stress signaling pathways. Furthermore, the leaves of the rpk1-1 plants exhibit higher sensitivity to oxidative stress upon ABA-pretreatment, whereas transgenic plants overproducing RPK1 manifest increased tolerance to this stress. Our current data suggest therefore that RPK1 overproduction controls reactive oxygen species homeostasis and enhances both water and oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

  20. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β: its role in breast cancer and associations with receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Zahnow, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) are a family of leucine-zipper transcription factors that regulate gene expression to control cellular proliferation, differentiation, inflammation and metabolism. Encoded by an intronless gene, C/EBPβ is expressed as several distinct protein isoforms (LAP1, LAP2, LIP) whose expression is regulated by the differential use of several in-frame translation start sites. LAP1 and LAP2 are transcriptional activators and are associated with differentiation, whereas LIP is frequently elevated in proliferative tissue and acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of transcription. However, emerging evidence suggests that LIP can serve as a transcriptional activator in some cellular contexts, and that LAP1 and LAP2 might also have unique actions. The LIP:LAP ratio is crucial for the maintenance of normal growth and development, and increases in this ratio lead to aggressive forms of breast cancer. This review discusses the regulation of C/EBPβ activity by post-translational modification, the individual actions of LAP1, LAP2 and LIP, and the functions and downstream targets that are unique to each isoform. The role of the C/EBPβ isoforms in breast cancer is discussed and emphasis is placed on their interactions with receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:19351437

  1. Receptor for Activated Protein Kinase C: Requirement for Efficient MicroRNA Function and Reduced Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Motoyuki; Takata, Akemi; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Kojima, Kentaro; Kishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Chikako; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Omata, Masao; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression that control physiological and pathological processes. A global reduction in miRNA abundance and function is a general trait of human cancers, playing a causal role in the transformed phenotype. Here, we sought to newly identify genes involved in the regulation of miRNA function by performing a genetic screen using reporter constructs that measure miRNA function and retrovirus-based random gene disruption. Of the six genes identified, RACK1, which encodes “receptor for activated protein kinase C” (RACK1), was confirmed to be necessary for full miRNA function. RACK1 binds to KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP), a member of the Dicer complex, and is required for the recruitment of mature miRNAs to the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). In addition, RACK1 expression was frequently found to be reduced in hepatocellular carcinoma. These findings suggest the involvement of RACK1 in miRNA function and indicate that reduced miRNA function, due to decreased expression of RACK1, may have pathologically relevant roles in liver cancers. PMID:21935400

  2. Protein kinase C involvement in homologous desensitization of delta-opioid receptor coupled to Gi1-phospholipase C activation in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ueda, H; Miyamae, T; Hayashi, C; Watanabe, S; Fukushima, N; Sasaki, Y; Iwamura, T; Misu, Y

    1995-11-01

    We have developed the coexpression system of both delta-opioid receptor (DOR1) and M2-muscarinic receptor (M2) which mediate agonist-evoked currents due to common post-receptor mechanisms including Gi1 and phospholipase C (PLC) activation in Xenopus oocytes reconstituted with Gi1 alpha. The DOR1-currents by 100 nM D-Ser2-leu-enkephalin-Thr6 (DSLET) were selectively desensitized by 10 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The PMA-desensitization of DSLET-currents was abolished in the presence of calphostin C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, or reversed by an intracellular injection of calcineurin, a protein phosphatase 2B. When a higher concentration (3 microM) of DSLET was used, DSLET-currents were rapidly desensitized by repeated challenges of DSLET itself. However, repeated challenges of 10 microM ACh caused no influence on such DSLET- or M2-currents. The desensitization of DSLET-currents was selectively reversed by protein kinase C inhibitors. Similar results were also obtained with various delta-opioid agonists. These results suggest that protein kinase C is involved in the homologous desensitization of delta-opioid receptors.

  3. Prenatal testosterone exposure induces hypertension in adult females via androgen receptor-dependent protein kinase Cδ-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Blesson, Chellakkan S; Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar; Hankins, Gary D; Yallampalli, Chandra; Sathishkumar, Kunju

    2015-03-01

    Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone induces hyperandrogenism in adult females and predisposes them to hypertension. We tested whether androgens induce hypertension through transcriptional regulation and signaling of protein kinase C (PKC) in the mesenteric arteries. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with vehicle or testosterone propionate (0.5 mg/kg per day from gestation days 15 to 19, SC) and their 6-month-old adult female offspring were examined. Plasma testosterone levels (0.84±0.04 versus 0.42±0.09 ng/mL) and blood pressures (111.6±1.3 versus 104.5±2.4 mm Hg) were significantly higher in prenatal testosterone-exposed rats compared with controls. This was accompanied with enhanced expression of PKCδ mRNA (1.5-fold) and protein (1.7-fold) in the mesenteric arteries of prenatal testosterone-exposed rats. In addition, mesenteric artery contractile responses to PKC activator, phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate, was significantly greater in prenatal testosterone-exposed rats. Treatment with androgen receptor antagonist flutamide (10 mg/kg, SC, BID for 10 days) significantly attenuated hypertension, PKCδ expression, and the exaggerated vasoconstriction in prenatal testosterone-exposed rats. In vitro exposure of testosterone to cultured mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells dose dependently upregulated PKCδ expression. Analysis of PKCδ gene revealed a putative androgen responsive element in the promoter upstream to the transcription start site and an enhancer element in intron-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that androgen receptors bind to these elements in response to testosterone stimulation. Furthermore, luciferase reporter assays showed that the enhancer element is highly responsive to androgens and treatment with flutamide reverses reporter activity. Our studies identified a novel androgen-mediated mechanism for the control of PKCδ expression via transcriptional regulation that controls vasoconstriction and blood pressure.

  4. Protein kinase C-mediated inhibition of transmembrane signalling through CCK(A) and CCK(B) receptors.

    PubMed

    Smeets, R L; Fouraux, M A; van Emst-de Vries, S E; De Pont, J J; Willems, P H

    1998-03-01

    1. The rat CCK(A) and CCK(B) receptors were stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-09) cells in order to compare modes of signal transduction and effects of protein kinase C (PKC) thereupon. 2. Spectrofluorophotometry of Fura-2-loaded cells revealed that both receptors retained their pharmacological characteristics following expression in CHO cells. Sulphated cholecystokinin-(26-33)-peptide amide (CCK-8-S) increased the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in CCK(A) cells, measured as an increase in Fura-2 fluorescence emission ratio, 1000 fold more potently than its non-sulphated form (CCK-8-NS) (EC50 values of 0.19 nM and 0.18 microM, respectively). By contrast, CCK-8-S and CCK-8-NS were equally potent in CCK(B) cells (EC50 values of 0.86 nM and 1.18 nM, respectively). The CCK(A) receptor agonist JMV-180 increased [Ca2+]i only in CCK(A) cells. Likewise, pentagastrin increased [Ca2+]i only in CCK(B) cells. Finally, CCK-8-S-induced Ca2+ signalling through the CCK(A) receptor was most potently inhibited by the CCK(A) receptor antagonist L364,718, whereas the CCK(B) receptor antagonist L365,260 was more potent in CCK(B) cells. 3. Receptor-mediated activation of adenylyl cyclase was measured in the presence of the inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. CCK-8-S and, to a lesser extent, CCK-8-NS, but not JMV-180 or pentagastrin, stimulated the accumulation of cyclicAMP in CCK(A) cells. By contrast, none of these agonists increased cyclicAMP in CCK(B) cells. 4. Short-term (3 min) pretreatment with the PKC activator 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) evoked a rightward shift of the dose-response curve for the Ca2+ mobilizing effect of CCK-8-S in both cell lines. In addition, short-term TPA pretreatment markedly reduced CCK-8-S-induced cyclicAMP accumulation in CCK(A) cells. In both cases, the inhibitory effect of TPA was abolished by the PKC inhibitors, GF-109203X and staurosporine, whereas no inhibition

  5. GIPC and GAIP form a complex with TrkA: a putative link between G protein and receptor tyrosine kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Lou, X; Yano, H; Lee, F; Chao, M V; Farquhar, M G

    2001-03-01

    NGF initiates the majority of its neurotrophic effects by promoting the activation of the tyrosine kinase receptor TrkA. Here we describe a novel interaction between TrkA and GIPC, a PDZ domain protein. GIPC binds to the juxtamembrane region of TrkA through its PDZ domain. The PDZ domain of GIPC also interacts with GAIP, an RGS (regulators of G protein signaling) protein. GIPC and GAIP are components of a G protein-coupled signaling complex thought to be involved in vesicular trafficking. In transfected HEK 293T cells GIPC, GAIP, and TrkA form a coprecipitable protein complex. Both TrkA and GAIP bind to the PDZ domain of GIPC, but their binding sites within the PDZ domain are different. The association of endogenous GIPC with the TrkA receptor was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation in PC12 (615) cells stably expressing TrkA. By immunofluorescence GIPC colocalizes with phosphorylated TrkA receptors in retrograde transport vesicles located in the neurites and cell bodies of differentiated PC12 (615) cells. These results suggest that GIPC, like other PDZ domain proteins, serves to cluster transmembrane receptors with signaling molecules. When GIPC is overexpressed in PC12 (615) cells, NGF-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (Erk1/2) decreases; however, there is no effect on phosphorylation of Akt, phospholipase C-gamma1, or Shc. The association of TrkA receptors with GIPC and GAIP plus the inhibition of MAP kinase by GIPC suggests that GIPC may provide a link between TrkA and G protein signaling pathways.

  6. GIPC and GAIP Form a Complex with TrkA: A Putative Link between G Protein and Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Xiaojing; Yano, Hiroko; Lee, Francis; Chao, Moses V.; Farquhar, Marilyn Gist

    2001-01-01

    NGF initiates the majority of its neurotrophic effects by promoting the activation of the tyrosine kinase receptor TrkA. Here we describe a novel interaction between TrkA and GIPC, a PDZ domain protein. GIPC binds to the juxtamembrane region of TrkA through its PDZ domain. The PDZ domain of GIPC also interacts with GAIP, an RGS (regulators of G protein signaling) protein. GIPC and GAIP are components of a G protein-coupled signaling complex thought to be involved in vesicular trafficking. In transfected HEK 293T cells GIPC, GAIP, and TrkA form a coprecipitable protein complex. Both TrkA and GAIP bind to the PDZ domain of GIPC, but their binding sites within the PDZ domain are different. The association of endogenous GIPC with the TrkA receptor was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation in PC12 (615) cells stably expressing TrkA. By immunofluorescence GIPC colocalizes with phosphorylated TrkA receptors in retrograde transport vesicles located in the neurites and cell bodies of differentiated PC12 (615) cells. These results suggest that GIPC, like other PDZ domain proteins, serves to cluster transmembrane receptors with signaling molecules. When GIPC is overexpressed in PC12 (615) cells, NGF-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (Erk1/2) decreases; however, there is no effect on phosphorylation of Akt, phospholipase C-γ1, or Shc. The association of TrkA receptors with GIPC and GAIP plus the inhibition of MAP kinase by GIPC suggests that GIPC may provide a link between TrkA and G protein signaling pathways. PMID:11251075

  7. Ginsenoside Rg3 increases nitric oxide production via increases in phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: essential roles of estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Hien, Tran Thi; Kim, Nak Doo; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Oh, Seok Jeong; Lee, Moo Yeol; Kang, Keon Wook

    2010-08-01

    We previously showed that ginsenosides increase nitric oxide (NO) production in vascular endothelium and that ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3) is the most active one among ginseng saponins. However, the mechanism for Rg3-mediated nitric oxide production is still uncertain. In this study, we determined whether Rg3 affects phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in ECV 304 human endothelial cells. Rg3 increased both the phosphorylation and the expression of eNOS in a concentration-dependent manner and a maximal effect was found at 10μg/ml of Rg3. The enzyme activities of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 kinase were enhanced as were estrogen receptor (ER)- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent reporter gene transcriptions in Rg3-treated endothelial cells. Rg3-induced eNOS phosphorylation required the ER-mediated PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Moreover, Rg3 activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through up-regulation of CaM kinase II and Rg3-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation was reversed by AMPK inhibition. The present results provide a mechanism for Rg3-stimulated endothelial NO production.

  8. Ginsenoside Rg3 increases nitric oxide production via increases in phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: Essential roles of estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hien, Tran Thi; Kim, Nak Doo; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Oh, Seok Jeong; Lee, Moo Yeol; Kang, Keon Wook

    2010-08-01

    We previously showed that ginsenosides increase nitric oxide (NO) production in vascular endothelium and that ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3) is the most active one among ginseng saponins. However, the mechanism for Rg3-mediated nitric oxide production is still uncertain. In this study, we determined whether Rg3 affects phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in ECV 304 human endothelial cells. Rg3 increased both the phosphorylation and the expression of eNOS in a concentration-dependent manner and a maximal effect was found at 10 {mu}g/ml of Rg3. The enzyme activities of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 kinase were enhanced as were estrogen receptor (ER)- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent reporter gene transcriptions in Rg3-treated endothelial cells. Rg3-induced eNOS phosphorylation required the ER-mediated PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Moreover, Rg3 activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through up-regulation of CaM kinase II and Rg3-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation was reversed by AMPK inhibition. The present results provide a mechanism for Rg3-stimulated endothelial NO production.

  9. Identification of TIFA as an adapter protein that links tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) to interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1) in IL-1 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Takatsuna, Hiroshi; Kato, Hiroki; Gohda, Jin; Akiyama, Taishin; Moriya, Ayaka; Okamoto, Yoshinari; Yamagata, Yuriko; Otsuka, Masami; Umezawa, Kazuo; Semba, Kentaro; Inoue, Jun-Ichiro

    2003-04-04

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) transduces signals from members of the Toll/interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor family by interacting with IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1) after IRAK-1 is released from the receptor-MyD88 complex upon IL-1 stimulation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of the IRAK-1/TRAF6 interaction are largely unknown. We have identified TIFA, a TRAF-interacting protein with a forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. The FHA domain is a motif known to bind directly to phosphothreonine and phosphoserine. In transient transfection assays, TIFA activates NFkappaBeta and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase. However, TIFA carrying a mutation that abolishes TRAF6 binding or mutations in the FHA domain that are known to abolish FHA domain binding to phosphopeptide fails to activate NFkappaBeta and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase. TIFA, when overexpressed, binds both TRAF6 and IRAK-1 and significantly enhances the IRAK-1/TRAF6 interaction. Furthermore, analysis of endogenous proteins indicates that TIFA associates with TRAF6 constitutively, whereas it associates with IRAK-1 in an IL-1 stimulation-dependent manner in vivo. Thus, TIFA is likely to mediate IRAK-1/TRAF6 interaction upon IL-1 stimulation.

  10. No association of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 or β-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a large Australian cohort.

    PubMed

    Figtree, Gemma A; Bagnall, Richard D; Abdulla, Irfan; Buchholz, Stefan; Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Yan, Warren; Tan, Timothy; Neil, Chris; Horowitz, John D; Semsarian, Chris; Ward, Michael R

    2013-07-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is an increasingly recognized syndrome in which patients present with chest pain and ST changes, and are observed to have reversible LV apical ballooning in the absence of angiographically significant coronary artery stenosis. Although the pathophysiology remains unclear, the syndrome occurs almost exclusively in women, and is often triggered by stress. Recent small studies have reported association of TC with functional variants in the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) gene, as well as in the β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) and β2AR. We tested these associations in a larger cohort of 92 TC patients. In addition we examined for the association of polymorphisms in the oestrogen receptor α (ERα) and catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) with the occurrence of TC, by comparing the allele frequency of these variants in the TC cohort with that in previously genotyped large Caucasian cohorts. Ninety-two patients with TC were recruited from four Australian centres; they had an age range of 41-90 years (mean ± SD = 66.3 ± 9) and 89/92 were female. There were no significant differences in allelic frequency in the TC group vs. the historic control database for any of the loci. In the largest genotyped TC cohort in the literature, we have found no association of genetic variants in the ERα, β1AR, β2AR, or COMT genes, or with the previously implicated GRK5, with occurrence of the syndrome.

  11. Protein kinase A mediates adenosine A2a receptor modulation of neurotransmitter release via synapsin I phosphorylation in cultured cells from medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Joao Paulo Pontes; Almeida, Marina Gomes; Castilho-Martins, Emerson Augusto; Costa, Maisa Aparecida; Fior-Chadi, Debora Rejane

    2014-08-01

    Synaptic transmission is an essential process for neuron physiology. Such process is enabled in part due to modulation of neurotransmitter release. Adenosine is a synaptic modulator of neurotransmitter release in the Central Nervous System, including neurons of medulla oblongata, where several nuclei are involved with neurovegetative reflexes. Adenosine modulates different neurotransmitter systems in medulla oblongata, specially glutamate and noradrenaline in the nucleus tractussolitarii, which are involved in hypotensive responses. However, the intracellular mechanisms involved in this modulation remain unknown. The adenosine A2a receptor modulates neurotransmitter release by activating two cAMP protein effectors, the protein kinase A and the exchange protein activated by cAMP. Therefore, an in vitro approach (cultured cells) was carried out to evaluate modulation of neurotransmission by adenosine A2a receptor and the signaling intracellular pathway involved. Results show that the adenosine A2a receptor agonist, CGS 21680, increases neurotransmitter release, in particular, glutamate and noradrenaline and such response is mediated by protein kinase A activation, which in turn increased synapsin I phosphorylation. This suggests a mechanism of A2aR modulation of neurotransmitter release in cultured cells from medulla oblongata of Wistar rats and suggest that protein kinase A mediates this modulation of neurotransmitter release via synapsin I phosphorylation.

  12. The fine-structural distribution of G-protein receptor kinase 3, beta-arrestin-2, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and phosphodiesterase PDE1C2, and a Cl(-)-cotransporter in rodent olfactory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Menco, Bert Ph M

    2005-03-01

    The sequentially activated molecules of olfactory signal-onset are mostly concentrated in the long, thin distal parts of olfactory epithelial receptor cell cilia. Is this also true for molecules of olfactory signal-termination and -regulation? G-protein receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) supposedly aids in signal desensitization at the level of odor receptors, whereas beta-arrestin-2, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) PDE1C2 are thought to do so at the level of the adenylyl cyclase, ACIII. The Na+, K(+)-2Cl(-)-cotransporter NKCC1 regulates Cl(-)-channel activity. In an attempt to localize the subcellular sites olfactory signal-termination and -regulation we used four antibodies to GRK3, two to beta-arrestin-2, five to CaMKII (one to both the alpha and beta form, and two each specific to CaMKII alpha and beta), two to PDE1C2, and three to Cl(-)-cotransporters. Only antibodies to Cl(-)-cotransporters labeled cytoplasmic compartments of, especially, supporting cells but also those of receptor cells. For all other antibodies, immunoreactivity was mostly restricted to the olfactory epithelial luminal border, confirming light microscopic studies that had shown that antibodies to GRK3, beta- arrestin-2, CaMKII, and PDE1C2 labeled this region. Labeling did indeed include receptor cell cilia but occurred in microvilli of neighboring supporting cells as well. Apical parts of microvillous cells that are distinct from supporting cells, and also of ciliated respiratory cells, immunoreacted slightly with most antibodies. When peptides were available, antibody preabsorption with an excess of peptide reduced labeling intensities. Though some of the antibodies did label apices and microvilli of vomeronasal (VNO) supporting cells, none immunoreacted with VNO sensory structures.

  13. SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE Directly Interacts with the Cytoplasmic Domain of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE and Negatively Regulates Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dong; Cui, Yanjiao; Xu, Fan; Xu, Xinxin; Gao, Guanxiao; Wang, Yaxin; Guo, Zhaoxia; Wang, Dan; Wang, Ning Ning

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in the regulation of leaf senescence. We previously reported that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (AtSARK) positively regulates leaf senescence in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we report the involvement of a protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2C-type protein phosphatase, SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE (SSPP), in the negative regulation of Arabidopsis leaf senescence. SSPP transcript levels decreased greatly during both natural senescence and SARK-induced precocious senescence. Overexpression of SSPP significantly delayed leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Protein pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays demonstrated that the cytosol-localized SSPP could interact with the cytoplasmic domain of the plasma membrane-localized AtSARK. In vitro assays showed that SSPP has protein phosphatase function and can dephosphorylate the cytosolic domain of AtSARK. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of SSPP effectively rescued AtSARK-induced precocious leaf senescence and changes in hormonal responses. All our results suggested that SSPP functions in sustaining proper leaf longevity and preventing early senescence by suppressing or perturbing SARK-mediated senescence signal transduction. PMID:26304848

  14. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 (GRK2) Promotes Breast Tumorigenesis Through a HDAC6-Pin1 Axis.

    PubMed

    Nogués, Laura; Reglero, Clara; Rivas, Verónica; Salcedo, Alicia; Lafarga, Vanesa; Neves, Maria; Ramos, Paula; Mendiola, Marta; Berjón, Alberto; Stamatakis, Kostas; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Lu, Kun Ping; Hardisson, David; Mayor, Federico; Penela, Petronila

    2016-11-01

    In addition to oncogenic drivers, signaling nodes can critically modulate cancer-related cellular networks to strength tumor hallmarks. We identify G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) as a relevant player in breast cancer. GRK2 is up-regulated in breast cancer cell lines, in spontaneous tumors in mice, and in a proportion of invasive ductal carcinoma patients. Increased GRK2 functionality promotes the phosphorylation and activation of the Histone Deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) leading to de-acetylation of the Prolyl Isomerase Pin1, a central modulator of tumor progression, thereby enhancing its stability and functional interaction with key mitotic regulators. Interestingly, a correlation between GRK2 expression and Pin1 levels and de-acetylation status is detected in breast cancer patients. Activation of the HDAC6-Pin1 axis underlies the positive effects of GRK2 on promoting growth factor signaling, cellular proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in both luminal and basal breast cancer cells. Enhanced GRK2 levels promote tumor growth in mice, whereas GRK2 down-modulation sensitizes cells to therapeutic drugs and abrogates tumor formation. Our data suggest that GRK2 acts as an important onco-modulator by strengthening the functionality of key players in breast tumorigenesis such as HDAC6 and Pin1. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Imiquimod directly inhibits Hedgehog signalling by stimulating adenosine receptor/protein kinase A-mediated GLI phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, F; Loipetzberger, A; Gruber, W; Esterbauer, H; Aberger, F; Frischauf, A M

    2013-01-01

    Imiquimod (IMQ), a nucleoside analogue of the imidazoquinoline family, is used in the topical treatment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and other skin diseases. It is reported to be a TLR7 and TLR8 agonist and, as such, initiates a Th1 immune response by activating sentinel cells in the vicinity of the tumour. BCC is a hedgehog (HH)-driven malignancy with oncogenic glioma-associated oncogene (GLI) signalling activated in a ligand-independent manner. Here we show that IMQ can also directly repress HH signalling by negatively modulating GLI activity in BCC and medulloblastoma cells. Further, we provide evidence that the repressive effect of IMQ on HH signalling is not dependent on TLR/MYD88 signalling. Our results suggest a mechanism for IMQ engaging adenosine receptors (ADORAs) to control GLI signalling. Pharmacological activation of ADORA with either an ADORA agonist or IMQ resulted in a protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated GLI phosphorylation and reduction in GLI activator levels. The activation of PKA and HH pathway target gene downregulation in response to IMQ were abrogated by ADORA inhibition. Furthermore, activated Smoothened signalling, which positively signals to GLI transcription factors, could be effectively counteracted by IMQ. These results reveal a previously unknown mode of action of IMQ in the treatment of BCC and also suggest a role for ADORAs in the regulation of oncogenic HH signalling. PMID:23995793

  16. A Peptide Hormone and Its Receptor Protein Kinase Regulate Plant Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Haruta, Miyoshi; Sabat, Grzegorz; Stecker, Kelly; Minkoff, Benjamin B.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells are immobile; thus, plant growth and development depend on cell expansion rather than cell migration. The molecular mechanism by which the plasma membrane initiates changes in the cell expansion rate remains elusive. We found that a secreted peptide, RALF (rapid alkalinization factor), suppresses cell elongation of the primary root by activating the cell surface receptor FERONIA in Arabidopsis thaliana. A direct peptide-receptor interaction is supported by specific binding of RALF to FERONIA and reduced binding and insensitivity to RALF-induced growth inhibition in feronia mutants. Phosphoproteome measurements demonstrate that the RALF-FERONIA interaction causes phosphorylation of plasma membrane H+–adenosine triphosphatase 2 at Ser899, mediating the inhibition of proton transport. The results reveal a molecular mechanism for RALF-induced extracellular alkalinization and a signaling pathway that regulates cell expansion. PMID:24458638

  17. Overlapping and Opposing Functions of G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 (GRK2) and GRK5 during Heart Development*

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Melanie; Berger, Ina M.; Just, Steffen; Caron, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 (GRK2) and 5 (GRK5) are fundamental regulators of cardiac performance in adults but are less well characterized for their function in the hearts of embryos. GRK2 and -5 belong to different subfamilies and function as competitors in the control of certain receptors and signaling pathways. In this study, we used zebrafish to investigate whether the fish homologs of GRK2 and -5, Grk2/3 and Grk5, also have unique, complementary, or competitive roles during heart development. We found that they differentially regulate the heart rate of early embryos and equally facilitate heart function in older embryos and that both are required to develop proper cardiac morphology. A loss of Grk2/3 results in dilated atria and hypoplastic ventricles, and the hearts of embryos depleted in Grk5 present with a generalized atrophy. This Grk5 morphant phenotype was associated with an overall decrease of early cardiac progenitors as well as a reduction in the area occupied by myocardial progenitor cells. In the case of Grk2/3, the progenitor decrease was confined to a subset of precursor cells with a committed ventricular fate. We attempted to rescue the GRK loss-of-function heart phenotypes by downstream activation of Hedgehog signaling. The Grk2/3 loss-of-function embryos were rescued by this approach, but Grk5 embryos failed to respond. In summary, we found that GRK2 and GRK5 control cardiac function as well as morphogenesis during development although with different morphological outcomes. PMID:25104355

  18. Roles of receptor for activated protein kinase C1 for modulating immune responses in white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhong-Wen; Chang, Chin-Chyuan

    2015-10-01

    Complementary (c)DNA encoding a receptor for activated protein kinase C1 (RACK1) messenger (m)RNA of the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, designated LvRACK1, consisted a 1136-bp cDNA containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 954 bp, a 111-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), and a 71-bp 3'-UTR, which is a 36 kDa cytosolic protein, belonging to the Trp-Asp40 (WD40) family of proteins, characterized by containing seven highly conserved Trp-Asp40 (WD40) internal repeats, and a poly A tail. The WD repeat of LvRACK1 can be predicted to form a seven-bladed propeller structure with each WD repeat composed of four antiparallel β-sheets. The WD40 domains have been implicated in protein-protein interactions. A comparison of amino acid sequences showed that LvRACK1 was closely related to arthropods RACK1. LvRACK1 cDNA was synthesized in all tested tissues detected with real-time PCR including haemocytes, hepatopancreas, gills, muscles, subcuticular epithelium, intestines, abdominal nervous ganglia, thoracic nervous ganglia, lymphoid organ, stomach, heart, and antennal gland, especially in subcuticular epithelium and gill. LvRACK1 mRNA transcription in haemocytes of L. vannamei injected with Vibrio alginolyticus decreased. The depletion of LvRACK1 of haemocytes in L. vannamei received its dsRNA revealed the increased respiratory bursts per haemocyte, superoxide dismutase (SOD), activity, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and clotting time, but showed the decreased total haemocyte count (THC), hyaline cells (HCs), phagocytic activity, and transglutaminase (TG) activity. LvRACK1 silenced shrimp showed the upregulated gene expressions of cyMnSOD, mtMnSOD, peroxinectin (PE), and TGI, and showed the downregulated α2-macroglobulin (α2-M), clottable protein (CP), lysozyme, and crustin gene expressions. It is therefore concluded that LvRACK1 is involved in immune defense and signaling transduction in haemocytes of L. vannamei infected with V. alginolyticus.

  19. A Receptor-associated Protein/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Pathway Controls Pseudopod Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kortholt, Arjan; Bolourani, Parvin; Rehmann, Holger; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Weeks, Gerald; Wittinghofer, Alfred

    2010-01-01

    GbpD, a Dictyostelium discoideum guanine exchange factor specific for Rap1, has been implicated in adhesion, cell polarity, and chemotaxis. Cells overexpressing GbpD are flat, exhibit strongly increased cell-substrate attachment, and extend many bifurcated and lateral pseudopodia. Phg2, a serine/threonine-specific kinase, mediates Rap1-regulated cell-substrate adhesion, but not cell polarity or chemotaxis. In this study we demonstrate that overexpression of GbpD in pi3k1/2-null cells does not induce the adhesion and cell morphology phenotype. Furthermore we show that Rap1 directly binds to the Ras binding domain of PI3K, and overexpression of GbpD leads to strongly enhanced PIP3 levels. Consistently, upon overexpression of the PIP3-degradating enzyme PTEN in GbpD-overexpressing cells, the strong adhesion and cell morphology phenotype is largely lost. These results indicate that a GbpD/Rap/PI3K pathway helps control pseudopod formation and cell polarity. As in Rap-regulated pseudopod formation in Dictyostelium, mammalian Rap and PI3K are essential for determining neuronal polarity, suggesting that the Rap/PI3K pathway is a conserved module regulating the establishment of cell polarity. PMID:20089846

  20. Protein kinase A is part of a mechanism that regulates nuclear reimport of the nuclear tRNA export receptors Los1p and Msn5p.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Jacqueline B; van der Merwe, George; Mangroo, Dev

    2014-02-01

    The two main signal transduction mechanisms that allow eukaryotes to sense and respond to changes in glucose availability in the environment are the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/Snf1 kinase-dependent pathways. Previous studies have shown that the nuclear tRNA export process is inhibited in Saccharomyces cerevisiae deprived of glucose. However, the signal transduction pathway involved and the mechanism by which glucose availability regulates nuclear-cytoplasmic tRNA trafficking are not understood. Here, we show that inhibition of nuclear tRNA export is caused by a block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation. Cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation is not caused by activation of Snf1p. Evidence obtained suggests that PKA is part of the mechanism that regulates nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors in response to glucose availability. This mechanism does not appear to involve phosphorylation of the nuclear tRNA export receptors by PKA. The block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors appears to be caused by activation of an unidentified mechanism when PKA is turned off during glucose deprivation. Taken together, the data suggest that PKA facilitates return of the tRNA export receptors to the nucleus by inhibiting an unidentified activity that facilitates cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors when glucose in the environment is limiting. A PKA-independent mechanism was also found to regulate nuclear tRNA export in response to glucose availability. This mechanism, however, does not regulate nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors.

  1. Protein Kinase A Is Part of a Mechanism That Regulates Nuclear Reimport of the Nuclear tRNA Export Receptors Los1p and Msn5p

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Jacqueline B.; van der Merwe, George

    2014-01-01

    The two main signal transduction mechanisms that allow eukaryotes to sense and respond to changes in glucose availability in the environment are the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/Snf1 kinase-dependent pathways. Previous studies have shown that the nuclear tRNA export process is inhibited in Saccharomyces cerevisiae deprived of glucose. However, the signal transduction pathway involved and the mechanism by which glucose availability regulates nuclear-cytoplasmic tRNA trafficking are not understood. Here, we show that inhibition of nuclear tRNA export is caused by a block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation. Cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors during glucose deprivation is not caused by activation of Snf1p. Evidence obtained suggests that PKA is part of the mechanism that regulates nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors in response to glucose availability. This mechanism does not appear to involve phosphorylation of the nuclear tRNA export receptors by PKA. The block in nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors appears to be caused by activation of an unidentified mechanism when PKA is turned off during glucose deprivation. Taken together, the data suggest that PKA facilitates return of the tRNA export receptors to the nucleus by inhibiting an unidentified activity that facilitates cytoplasmic accumulation of the tRNA export receptors when glucose in the environment is limiting. A PKA-independent mechanism was also found to regulate nuclear tRNA export in response to glucose availability. This mechanism, however, does not regulate nuclear reimport of the tRNA export receptors. PMID:24297441

  2. Distinct Kinetic and Spatial Patterns of Protein Kinase C (PKC)- and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent Activation of Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinases 1 and 2 by Human Nicotinic Acid Receptor GPR109A*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo; Deng, Xiaoyan; Wu, Chun; Zhou, Qi; Chen, Linjie; Shi, Ying; Huang, Haishan; Zhou, Naiming

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinic acid (niacin) has been widely used as a lipid-lowering drug for several decades, and recently, orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR109A has been identified as a receptor for niacin. Mechanistic investigations have shown that, upon niacin activation, GPR109A couples to a Gi protein and inhibits adenylate cyclase activity, leading to inhibition of liberation of free fatty acid. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for GPR109A signaling remain largely unknown. Using CHO-K1 cells stably expressing GPR109A and A431 cells, which are a human epidermoid cell line with high levels of endogenous expression of functional GPR109A receptors, we found that activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) by niacin was rapid, peaking at 5 min, and was significantly blocked by pertussis toxin. Furthermore, time course experiments with different kinase inhibitors demonstrated that GPR109A induced ERK1/2 activation via the matrix metalloproteinase/epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation pathway at both early and later time points (2–5 min); this pathway was distinct from the PKC pathway-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation that occurs at early time points (≤2 min) in response to niacin. Overexpression of Gβγ subunit scavengers βARK1-CT and the Gα subunit of transducin led to a significant reduction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a critical role for βγ subunits in GPR109A-activated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Using arrestin-2/3-specific siRNA and an internalization-deficient GPR109A mutant, we found that arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 were not involved in GPR109A-mediated ERK1/2 activation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that upon binding to niacin GPR109A receptors initially activate Gi, leading to dissociation of the Gβγ subunit from activated Gi, and subsequently induce ERK1/2 activation via two distinct pathways, one PKC-dependent pathway occurring at a peak time of ≤2 min and the other matrix metalloproteinase

  3. GPCR responses in vascular smooth muscle can occur predominantly through dual transactivation of kinase receptors and not classical Gαq protein signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Little, Peter J

    2013-05-30

    GPCR signalling is well known to proceed through several linear pathways involving activation of G proteins and their downstream signalling pathways such as activation of phospholipase C. In addition, GPCRs signal via transactivation of Protein Tyrosine Kinase receptors such as that for Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) where GPCR agonists mediate increase levels of phosphorylated Erk (pErk) the immediate downstream product of the activation of EGF receptor. It has recently been shown that this paradigm can be extended to include the GPCR transactivation of a Protein Serine/Threonine Kinase receptor, specifically the Transforming Growth Factor β Type I receptor (also known as Alk V) (TβRI) in which case GPCR activation leads to the formation of carboxy terminal polyphosphorylated Smad2 (phosphoSmad2) being the immediate downstream product of the activation of TβRI. Growth factor and hormone regulation of proteoglycan synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells represent one component of an in vitro model of atherosclerosis because modified proteoglycans show enhanced binding to lipoproteins as the initiating step in atherosclerosis. In the example of proteoglycan synthesis stimulated by GPCR agonists such as thrombin and endothelin-1, the transactivation pathways for the EGF receptor and TβRI are both active and together account for essentially all of the response to the GPCRs. In contrast, signalling downstream of GPCRs such as increased inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate (IP3) and intracellular calcium do not have any effect on GPCR stimulated proteoglycan synthesis. These data lead to the conclusion that dual transactivation pathways for protein tyrosine and serine/threonine kinase receptors may play a far greater role in GPCR signalling than currently recognised.

  4. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by naturally occurring splice variants of TrkC, the receptor for neurotrophin-3.

    PubMed

    Gunn-Moore, F J; Williams, A G; Tavaré, J M

    1997-02-15

    TrkC is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) with high affinity. A number of naturally occurring splice variants of TrkC exist, including one (TrkC kil4) with a 14 amino acid insertion between subdomains VII and VIII of the tyrosine kinase domain. This kinase insert blocks the ability of NT-3 to stimulate neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells and proliferation in fibroblasts. The inserts also block the ability of TrkC to form a high-affinity complex with Shc and phospholipase C gamma (PLC gamma) and the activation of PtdIns 3-kinase, and attenuates the sustained activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In the current study we set out to determine whether the attenuation of the activation of MAPK by the insert was the result of the inability of TrkC to activate the Shc-Ras pathway, PtdIns 3-kinase activation, PLC gamma activation, or a combination thereof. Experiments with the use of cell-permeant inhibitors argue against a major role for PLC gamma and PtdIns 3-kinase in the activation of MAPK by TrkC. The introduction of the 14 amino acid kinase insert appeared to slow the kinetics of NT-3-stimulated Shc phosphorylation and Shc-Grb2 association and reduce their magnitude; an effect which was associated with a delayed, and only transient, activation of MAPK. Taken together, our data suggest that the apparent defect in MAPK activation caused by the kinase insert may result predominantly from an inhibition of high-affinity Shc binding, although a role for PLC gamma and PtdIns 3-kinase cannot be completely excluded.

  5. Protein tyrosine kinase activity is essential for Fc gamma receptor-mediated intracellular killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, L; Nibbering, P H; Zomerdijk, T P; van Furth, R

    1994-01-01

    Our previous study revealed that the intracellular killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human monocytes after cross-linking Fc gamma receptor I (Fc gamma RI) or Fc gamma RII is a phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent process. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity plays a role in the Fc gamma R-mediated intracellular killing of bacteria and activation of PLC in these cells. The results showed that phagocytosis of bacteria by monocytes was not affected by the PTK inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin-47. The intracellular killing of S. aureus by monocytes after cross-linking Fc gamma RII or Fc gamma RII with anti-Fc gamma R monoclonal antibody and a bridging antibody or with human immunoglobulin G (IgG) was inhibited by these compounds in a dose-dependent fashion. The production of O2- by monocytes after stimulation with IgG or IgG-opsonized S. aureus was almost completely blocked by the PTK inhibitor. These results indicate that inhibition of PTK impairs the oxygen-dependent bactericidal mechanisms of monocytes. Genistein and tyrphostin-47, which do not affect the enzymatic activity of purified PLC, prevented activation of PLC after cross-linking Fc gamma RI or Fc gamma RII, measured as an increase in the intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate concentration. Cross-linking Fc gamma RI or Fc gamma RII induced rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in monocytes, one of which was identified as PLC-gamma 1, and the phosphorylation could be completely blocked by PTK inhibitors, leading to the conclusion that activation of PLC after cross-linking Fc gamma R in monocytes is regulated by PTK activity. Together, these results demonstrate that PTK activity is essential for the activation of PLC which is involved in the Fc gamma R-mediated intracellular killing of S. aureus by human monocytes. Images PMID:7927687

  6. Arabidopsis ERECTA-family receptor kinases mediate morphological alterations stimulated by activation of NB-LRR-type UNI proteins.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoyuki; Igari, Kadunari; Bogenschutz, Naomi L; Torii, Keiko U; Tasaka, Masao

    2011-05-01

    Shoot apical meristems (SAMs), which maintain stem cells at the tips of stems, and axillary meristems (AMs), which arise at leaf axils for branch formation, play significant roles in the establishment of plant architecture. Previously, we showed that, in Arabidopsis thaliana, activation of NB-LRR (nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat)-type UNI proteins affects plant morphology through modulation of the regulation of meristems. However, information about genes involved in the processes was still lacking. Here, we report that ERECTA (ER) receptor kinase family members cooperatively mediate the morphological alterations that are stimulated by activation of UNI proteins. uni-1D is a gain-of-function mutation in the UNI gene and uni-1D mutants exhibit early termination of inflorescence stem growth and also formation of extra AMs at leaf axils. The former defect involves modulation of the SAM activity and is suppressed by er mutation. Though the AM phenotype is not affected by a single er mutation, it is suppressed by simultaneous mutations of ER-family members. It was previously shown that trans-zeatin (tZ)-type cytokinins were involved in the morphological phenotypes of uni-1D mutants and that expression of CYP735A2, which is essential for biosynthesis of tZ-type cytokinins, was modulated in uni-1D mutants. We show that this modulation of CYP735A2 expression requires activities of ER-family members. Moreover, the ER activity in UNI-expressing cells contributes to all morphological phenotypes of uni-1D mutants, suggesting that a cross-talk between ER-family-dependent and UNI-triggered signaling pathways plays a significant role in the morphological alterations observed in uni-1D mutants.

  7. Increases in transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 mRNA and protein in primary afferent neurons stimulated by protein kinase C and their possible role in neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijin; Wang, Peng; Zou, Xiaoju; Li, Dingge; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing

    2008-01-01

    A recent study by our group demonstrates pharmacologically that the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is activated by intradermal injection of capsaicin to initiate neurogenic inflammation by the release of neuropeptides in the periphery. In this study, expression of TRPV1, phosphorylated protein kinase C (p-PKC) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were visualized using immunofluorescence, real-time PCR and Western blots to examine whether increases in TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels evoked by capsaicin injection are subject to modulation by the activation of PKC and to analyze the role of this process in the pathogenesis of neurogenic inflammation. Capsaicin injection into the hindpaw skin of anesthetized rats evoked increases in the expression of TRPV1, CGRP and p-PKC in mRNA and/or protein levels and in the number of single labeled TRPV1, p-PKC and CGRP neurons in ipsilateral L4–5 DRGs. Co-expressions of TRPV1 with p-PKC and/or CGRP in DRG neurons were also significantly increased after CAP injection. These evoked expressions both at molecular and cellular levels were significantly inhibited after TRPV1 receptors were blocked by 5′-iodoresiniferatoxin (5 μg) or PKC was inhibited by chelerythrine chloride (5 μg). Taken together, these results provide evidence that up-regulation of TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels under inflammatory conditions evoked by capsaicin injection is subject to modulation by the PKC cascade in which increased CGRP level in DRG neurons may be related to the initiation of neurogenic inflammation. Thus, up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors in DRG neurons seems critical for initiating acute neurogenic inflammation. PMID:18752301

  8. Sorting Nexin 27 Protein Regulates Trafficking of a p21-activated Kinase (PAK) Interacting Exchange Factor (β-Pix)-G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase Interacting Protein (GIT) Complex via a PDZ Domain Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, Julie L.; Tang, Jingrong; McDermott, Mark I.; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Zimmerman, Seth P.; Wincovitch, Stephen M.; Waterman, Clare M.; Milgram, Sharon L.; Playford, Martin P.

    2011-01-01

    Sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) is a 62-kDa protein localized to early endosomes and known to regulate the intracellular trafficking of ion channels and receptors. In addition to a PX domain, SNX27 is the only sorting family member that contains a PDZ domain. To identify novel SNX27-PDZ binding partners, we performed a proteomic screen in mouse principal kidney cortical collecting duct cells using a GST-SNX27 fusion construct as bait. We found that β-Pix (p21-activated kinase-interactive exchange factor), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho family of small GTPases known to regulate cell motility directly interacted with SNX27. The association of β-Pix and SNX27 is specific for β-Pix isoforms terminating in the type-1 PDZ binding motif (ETNL). In the same screen we also identified Git1/2 as a potential SNX27 interacting protein. The interaction between SNX27 and Git1/2 is indirect and mediated by β-Pix. Furthermore, we show recruitment of the β-Pix·Git complex to endosomal sites in a SNX27-dependent manner. Finally, migration assays revealed that depletion of SNX27 from HeLa and mouse principal kidney cortical collecting duct cells significantly decreases cell motility. We propose a model by which SNX27 regulates trafficking of β-Pix to focal adhesions and thereby influences cell motility. PMID:21926430

  9. Sorting nexin 27 protein regulates trafficking of a p21-activated kinase (PAK) interacting exchange factor (β-Pix)-G protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein (GIT) complex via a PDZ domain interaction.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Julie L; Tang, Jingrong; McDermott, Mark I; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Zimmerman, Seth P; Wincovitch, Stephen M; Waterman, Clare M; Milgram, Sharon L; Playford, Martin P

    2011-11-11

    Sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) is a 62-kDa protein localized to early endosomes and known to regulate the intracellular trafficking of ion channels and receptors. In addition to a PX domain, SNX27 is the only sorting family member that contains a PDZ domain. To identify novel SNX27-PDZ binding partners, we performed a proteomic screen in mouse principal kidney cortical collecting duct cells using a GST-SNX27 fusion construct as bait. We found that β-Pix (p21-activated kinase-interactive exchange factor), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho family of small GTPases known to regulate cell motility directly interacted with SNX27. The association of β-Pix and SNX27 is specific for β-Pix isoforms terminating in the type-1 PDZ binding motif (ETNL). In the same screen we also identified Git1/2 as a potential SNX27 interacting protein. The interaction between SNX27 and Git1/2 is indirect and mediated by β-Pix. Furthermore, we show recruitment of the β-Pix·Git complex to endosomal sites in a SNX27-dependent manner. Finally, migration assays revealed that depletion of SNX27 from HeLa and mouse principal kidney cortical collecting duct cells significantly decreases cell motility. We propose a model by which SNX27 regulates trafficking of β-Pix to focal adhesions and thereby influences cell motility.

  10. PDGF-induced receptor phosphorylation and phosphoinositide hydrolysis are unaffected by protein kinase C activation in mouse swiss 3T3 and human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sturani, E.; Vicentini, L.M.; Zippel, R.; Toschi, L.; Pandiella-Alonso, A.; Comoglio, P.M.; Meldolesi, J.

    1986-05-29

    Short (1-10 min) pretreatment of intact cells with activators of protein kinase C (e.g. phorbol-12 myristate, 13-acetate, PMA) affects the activity of a variety of surface receptors (for growth factors, hormones and neurotransmitters), with inhibition of transmembrane signal generation. In two types of fibroblasts it is demonstrated that the PDGF receptor is unaffected by PMA. Exposure to PMA at concentrations up to 100 nM for 10 min failed to inhibit either one of the agonist-induced, receptor-coupled responses of PDGF: the autophosphorylation of receptor molecules at tyrosine residues, and the hydrolysis of membrane polyphosphoinositides. In contrast, the EGF receptor autophosphorylation (in A 431 cells) and the bombesin-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis were readily inhibited by PMA.

  11. Cardiomyocyte-restricted inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase-3 attenuates cardiac dysfunction after chronic pressure overload.

    PubMed

    von Lueder, Thomas G; Gravning, Jørgen; How, Ole-Jakob; Vinge, Leif E; Ahmed, Mohammed Shakil; Krobert, Kurt A; Levy, Finn Olav; Larsen, Terje S; Smiseth, Otto A; Aasum, Ellen; Attramadal, Håvard

    2012-07-01

    Transgenic mice with cardiac-specific expression of a peptide inhibitor of G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)3 [transgenic COOH-terminal GRK3 (GRK3ct) mice] display myocardial hypercontractility without hypertrophy and enhanced α(1)-adrenergic receptor signaling. A role for GRK3 in the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF) has not been investigated, but inhibition of its isozyme, GRK2, has been beneficial in several HF models. Here, we tested whether inhibition of GRK3 modulated evolving cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction after pressure overload. Weight-matched male GRK3ct transgenic and nontransgenic littermate control (NLC) mice subjected to chronic pressure overload by abdominal aortic banding (AB) were compared with sham-operated (SH) mice. At 6 wk after AB, a significant increase of cardiac mass consistent with induction of hypertrophy was found, but no differences between GRK3ct-AB and NLC-AB mice were discerned. Simultaneous left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume analysis of electrically paced, ex vivo perfused working hearts revealed substantially reduced systolic and diastolic function in NLC-AB mice (n = 7), which was completely preserved in GRK3ct-AB mice (n = 7). An additional cohort was subjected to in vivo cardiac catheterization and LV pressure-volume analysis at 12 wk after AB. NLC-AB mice (n = 11) displayed elevated end-diastolic pressure (8.5 ± 3.1 vs. 2.9 ± 1.2 mmHg, P < 0.05), reduced cardiac output (3,448 ± 323 vs. 4,488 ± 342 μl/min, P < 0.05), and reduced dP/dt(max) and dP/dt(min) (both P < 0.05) compared with GRK3ct-AB mice (n = 16), corroborating the preserved cardiac structure and function observed in GRK3ct-AB hearts assessed ex vivo. Increased cardiac mass and myocardial mRNA expression of β-myosin heavy chain confirmed the similar induction of cardiac hypertrophy in both AB groups, but only NLC-AB hearts displayed significantly elevated mRNA levels of brain natriuretic peptide and myocardial collagen contents as well as reduced

  12. Characterization of 5' end of human thromboxane receptor gene. Organizational analysis and mapping of protein kinase C--responsive elements regulating expression in platelets.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, D D; Davis, M G; Houser, W A; Eubank, J J; Ritchie, M E; Dorn, G W

    1995-09-01

    Platelet thromboxane receptors are acutely and reversibly upregulated after acute myocardial infarction. To determine if platelet thromboxane receptors are under transcriptional control, we isolated and characterized human genomic DNA clones containing the 5' flanking region of the thromboxane receptor gene. The exon-intron structure of the 5' portion of the thromboxane receptor gene was determined initially by comparing the nucleotide sequence of the 5' flanking genomic clone with that of a novel human uterine thromboxane receptor cDNA that extended the mRNA 141 bp further upstream than the previously identified human placental cDNA. A major transcription initiation site was located in three human tissues approximately 560 bp upstream from the translation initiation codon and 380 bp upstream from any previously identified transcription initiation site. The thromboxane receptor gene has neither a TATA nor a CAAT consensus site. Promoter function of the 5' flanking region of the thromboxane receptor gene was evaluated by transfection of thromboxane receptor gene promoter/chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) chimera plasmids into platelet-like K562 cells. Thromboxane receptor promoter activity, as assessed by CAT expression, was relatively weak but was significantly enhanced by phorbol ester treatment. Functional analysis of 5' deletion constructs in transfected K562 cells and gel mobility shift localized the major phorbol ester-responsive motifs in the thromboxane receptor gene promoter to a cluster of activator protein-2 (AP-2) binding consensus sites located approximately 1.8 kb 5' from the transcription initiation site. These studies are the first to determine the structure and organization of the 5' end of the thromboxane receptor gene and demonstrate that thromboxane receptor gene expression can be regulated by activation of protein kinase C via induction of an AP-2-like nuclear factor binding to upstream promoter elements. These findings strongly suggest

  13. Fulvestrant-induced cell death and proteasomal degradation of estrogen receptor α protein in MCF-7 cells require the CSK c-Src tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Wei-Lan; Shioda, Keiko; Coser, Kathryn R; Rivizzigno, Danielle; McSweeney, Kristen R; Shioda, Toshi

    2013-01-01

    Fulvestrant is a representative pure antiestrogen and a Selective Estrogen Receptor Down-regulator (SERD). In contrast to the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) such as 4-hydroxytamoxifen that bind to estrogen receptor α (ERα) as antagonists or partial agonists, fulvestrant causes proteasomal degradation of ERα protein, shutting down the estrogen signaling to induce proliferation arrest and apoptosis of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells. We performed genome-wide RNAi knockdown screenings for protein kinases required for fulvestrant-induced apoptosis of the MCF-7 estrogen-dependent human breast caner cells and identified the c-Src tyrosine kinase (CSK), a negative regulator of the oncoprotein c-Src and related protein tyrosine kinases, as one of the necessary molecules. Whereas RNAi knockdown of CSK in MCF-7 cells by shRNA-expressing lentiviruses strongly suppressed fulvestrant-induced cell death, CSK knockdown did not affect cytocidal actions of 4-hydroxytamoxifen or paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent. In the absence of CSK, fulvestrant-induced proteasomal degradation of ERα protein was suppressed in both MCF-7 and T47D estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells whereas the TP53-mutated T47D cells were resistant to the cytocidal action of fulvestrant in the presence or absence of CSK. MCF-7 cell sensitivities to fulvestrant-induced cell death or ERα protein degradation was not affected by small-molecular-weight inhibitors of the tyrosine kinase activity of c-Src, suggesting possible involvement of other signaling molecules in CSK-dependent MCF-7 cell death induced by fulvestrant. Our observations suggest the importance of CSK in the determination of cellular sensitivity to the cytocidal action of fulvestrant.

  14. JAK1 kinase forms complexes with interleukin-4 receptor and 4PS/insulin receptor substrate-1-like protein and is activated by interleukin-4 and interleukin-9 in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yin, T; Tsang, M L; Yang, Y C

    1994-10-28

    Interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-9 regulate the proliferation of T lymphocytes through interactions with their receptors. Previous studies have shown that unknown tyrosine kinases are involved in the proliferative signaling triggered by IL-4 and IL-9. Here we show that IL-4 and IL-9 induce overlapping (170, 130, and 125 kilodalton (kDa)) and distinct (45 and 88/90 kDa, respectively) protein tyrosine phosphorylation in T lymphocytes. We further identify the 170-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated protein as 4PS/insulin receptor substrate-1-like (IRS-1L) protein and 130-kDa protein as JAK1 kinase. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that JAK1 forms complexes with the IL-4 receptor and 4PS/IRS-1L protein following ligand-receptor interaction. In addition, we demonstrate that IL-9, but not IL-4, induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat 91 transcriptional factor. The overlapping and distinct protein tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the same JAK1 kinase in T lymphocytes strongly suggests that IL-4 and IL-9 share the common signal transduction pathways and that the specificity for each cytokine could be achieved through the unique tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins triggered by individual cytokines.

  15. Sustained Receptor Stimulation Leads to Sequestration of Recycling Endosomes in a Classical Protein Kinase C- and Phospholipase D-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Idkowiak-Baldys, Jolanta; Baldys, Aleksander; Raymond, John R.; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable insight has been garnered on initial mechanisms of endocytosis of plasma membrane proteins and their subsequent trafficking through the endosomal compartment. It is also well established that ligand stimulation of many plasma membrane receptors leads to their internalization. However, stimulus-induced regulation of endosomal trafficking has not received much attention. In previous studies, we showed that sustained stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) with phorbol esters led to sequestration of recycling endosomes in a juxtanuclear region. In this study, we investigated whether G-protein-coupled receptors that activate PKC exerted effects on endosomal trafficking. Stimulation of cells with serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)) led to sequestration of the 5-HT receptor (5-HT2AR) into a Rab11-positive juxtanuclear compartment. This sequestration coincided with translocation of PKC as shown by confocal microscopy. Mechanistically the observed sequestration of 5-HT2AR was shown to require continuous PKC activity because it was inhibited by pretreatment with classical PKC inhibitor Gö6976 and could be reversed by posttreatment with this inhibitor. In addition, classical PKC autophosphorylation was necessary for receptor sequestration. Moreover inhibition of phospholipase D (PLD) activity and inhibition of PLD1 and PLD2 using dominant negative constructs also prevented this process. Functionally this sequestration did not affect receptor desensitization or resensitization as measured by intracellular calcium increase. However, the PKC- and PLD-dependent sequestration of receptors resulted in co-sequestration of other plasma membrane proteins and receptors as shown for epidermal growth factor receptor and protease activated receptor-1. This led to heterologous desensitization of those receptors and diverted their cellular fate by protecting them from agonist-induced degradation. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel role for sustained receptor

  16. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase-Cgamma and protein kinase-C signal myelin phagocytosis mediated by complement receptor-3 alone and combined with scavenger receptor-AI/II in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Makranz, Chen; Cohen, Goni; Baron, Ayellet; Levidor, Lital; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Reichert, Fanny; Rotshenker, Shlomo

    2004-03-01

    Complement-receptor-3 (CR3/MAC-1), scavenger-receptor-AI/II (SRAI/II) and Fcgamma-receptor (FcgammaR) can mediate phagocytosis of degenerated myelin in macrophages and microglia. However, CR3/MAC-1 and SRAI/II, but not FcgammaR, mediate phagocytosis after axonal injury. We tested for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase-Cgamma (PLCgamma) and protein kinase-C (PKC) signaling in myelin phagocytosis mediated by CR3/MAC-1 alone and by CR3/MAC-1 combined with SRAI/II. Phagocytosis was inhibited by PI3K inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002, PLCgamma inhibitor U-73122, classical PKC (cPKC) inhibitor Go-6976, general PKC inhibitors Ro-318220 and calphostin-C, and BAPTA/AM which chelates intracellular Ca(2+) required for cPKC activation. PKC activator PMA augmented phagocytosis and further alleviated inhibitions induced by PI3K and PLCgamma inhibitors. Overall, altering PKC activity modulated phagocytosis 4- to 6-fold between inhibition and augmentation. PLCgamma activation did not require tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, signaling of myelin phagocytosis mediated by CR3/MAC-1 alone and by CR3/MAC-1 combined with SRAI/II involves PI3K, PLCgamma and cPKC, the cascade PI3K-->PLCgamma-->cPKC, and wide-range modulation by PKC. This pathway may thus be targeted for in vivo modulation, which may explain differences in the efficiency of CR3/MAC-1-mediated myelin phagocytosis in different pathological conditions.

  17. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia.

    PubMed

    Roth Flach, Rachel J; Danai, Laura V; DiStefano, Marina T; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C; Czech, Michael P

    2016-07-29

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia*

    PubMed Central

    Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Danai, Laura V.; DiStefano, Marina T.; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B.; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K.; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C.; Czech, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo. After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. PMID:27226575

  19. Protein kinase C activators selectively inhibit insulin-stimulated system A transport activity in skeletal muscle at a post-receptor level.

    PubMed Central

    Gumà, A; Camps, M; Palacín, M; Testar, X; Zorzano, A

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the role of phorbol esters on different biological effects induced by insulin in muscle, such as activation of system A transport activity, glucose utilization and insulin receptor function. System A transport activity was measured by monitoring the uptake of the system A-specific analogue alpha-(methyl)aminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB), by intact rat extensor digitorum longus muscle. The addition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA, 0.5 microM) for 60 or 180 min did not modify basal MeAIB uptake by muscle, suggesting that insulin signalling required to stimulate MeAIB transport does not involve protein kinase C activation. However, TPA added 30 min before insulin (100 nM) markedly inhibited insulin-stimulated MeAIB uptake. The addition of polymyxin B (0.1 mM) or H-7 (1 mM), protein kinase C inhibitors, alone or in combination with TPA leads to impairment of insulin-stimulated MeAIB uptake. This paradoxical pattern is incompatible with a unique action of Polymyxin B or H-7 on protein kinase C activity. Therefore these agents are not suitable tools with which to investigate whether a certain insulin effect is mediated by protein kinase C. TPA did not cause a generalized inhibition of insulin action. Thus both TPA and insulin increased 3-O-methylglucose uptake by muscle, and their effects were not additive. Furthermore, TPA did not modify insulin-stimulated lactate production by muscle. In keeping with this selective modification of insulin action, treatment of muscles with TPA did not modify insulin receptor binding or kinase activities. In conclusion, phorbol esters do not mimic insulin action on system A transport activity; however, they markedly inhibit insulin-stimulated amino acid transport, with no modification of insulin receptor function in rat skeletal muscle. It is suggested that protein kinase C activation causes a selective post-receptor modification on the biochemical pathway by which insulin activates system A amino acid

  20. Protein tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways contribute to differences in heterophil-mediated innate immune responsiveness between two lines of broilers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation mediates signal transduction of cellular processes, with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulating virtually all signaling events. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) super-family consists of three conserved pathways that convert receptor activation into ce...

  1. Altered protein kinase C regulation of pulmonary endothelial store- and receptor-operated Ca2+ entry after chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Paffett, Michael L; Riddle, Melissa A; Kanagy, Nancy L; Resta, Thomas C; Walker, Benjimen R

    2010-09-01

    Chronic hypoxia (CH)-induced pulmonary hypertension is associated with decreased basal pulmonary artery endothelial cell (EC) Ca(2+), which correlates with reduced store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) entry. Protein kinase C (PKC) attenuates SOC entry in ECs. Therefore, we hypothesized that PKC has a greater inhibitory effect on EC SOC and receptor-operated Ca(2+) entry after CH. To test this hypothesis, we assessed SOC in the presence or absence of the nonselective PKC inhibitor GF109203X [2-[1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)maleimide] in freshly isolated, Fura-2-loaded ECs obtained from intrapulmonary arteries of control and CH rats (4 weeks at 0.5 atm). We found that SOC entry and 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG)- and ATP-induced Ca(2+) influx were attenuated in ECs from CH rats versus controls, and GF109203X restored SOC and OAG responses to the level of controls. In contrast, nonselective PKC inhibition with GF109203X or the selective PKC(epsilon) inhibitor myristoylated V1-2 attenuated ATP-induced Ca(2+) entry in ECs from control but not CH pulmonary arteries. ATP-induced Ca(2+) entry was also attenuated by the T-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) inhibitor mibefradil in control cells. Consistent with the presence of endothelial T-type VGCC, we observed depolarization-induced Ca(2+) influx in control cells that was inhibited by mibefradil. This response was largely absent in ECs from CH arteries. We conclude that CH enhances PKC-dependent inhibition of SOC- and OAG-induced Ca(2+) entry. Furthermore, these data suggest that CH may reduce the ATP-dependent Ca(2+) entry that is mediated, in part, by PKCepsilon and mibefradil-sensitive Ca(2+) channels in control cells.

  2. High glucose induces inflammatory cytokine through protein kinase C-induced toll-like receptor 2 pathway in gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shao-Yun; Wei, Cong-Cong; Shang, Ting-Ting; Lian, Qi; Wu, Chen-Xuan; Deng, Jia-Yin

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High glucose significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High glucose increased NF-{kappa}B p65 nuclear activity, IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PKC-{alpha}/{delta}-TLR2 pathway is involved in periodontal inflammation under high glucose. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate immune response and inflammation, especially in periodontitis. Meanwhile, hyperglycemia can induce inflammation in diabetes complications. However, the activity of TLRs in periodontitis complicated with hyperglycemia is still unclear. In the present study, high glucose (25 mmol/l) significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts (p < 0.05). Also, high glucose increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) p65 nuclear activity, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-l{beta} (IL-1{beta}) levels. Protein kinase C (PKC)-{alpha} and {delta} knockdown with siRNA significantly decreased TLR2 and NF-{kappa}B p65 expression (p < 0.05), whereas inhibition of PKC-{beta} had no effect on TLR2 and NF-{kappa}B p65 under high glucose (p < 0.05). Additional studies revealed that TLR2 knockdown significantly abrogated high-glucose-induced NF-{kappa}B expression and inflammatory cytokine secretion. Collectively, these data suggest that high glucose stimulates TNF-{alpha} and IL-1{beta} secretion via inducing TLR2 through PKC-{alpha} and PKC-{delta} in human gingival fibroblasts.

  3. A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc anchors a PKN-based signaling complex involved in α1-adrenergic receptor-induced p38 activation.

    PubMed

    Cariolato, Luca; Cavin, Sabrina; Diviani, Dario

    2011-03-11

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways are highly organized signaling systems that transduce extracellular signals into a variety of intracellular responses. In this context, it is currently poorly understood how kinases constituting these signaling cascades are assembled and activated in response to receptor stimulation to generate specific cellular responses. Here, we show that AKAP-Lbc, an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) with an intrinsic Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, is critically involved in the activation of the p38α MAPK downstream of α(1b)-adrenergic receptors (α(1b)-ARs). Our results indicate that AKAP-Lbc can assemble a novel transduction complex containing the RhoA effector PKNα, MLTK, MKK3, and p38α, which integrates signals from α(1b)-ARs to promote RhoA-dependent activation of p38α. In particular, silencing of AKAP-Lbc expression or disrupting the formation of the AKAP-Lbc·p38α signaling complex specifically reduces α(1)-AR-mediated p38α activation without affecting receptor-mediated activation of other MAPK pathways. These findings provide a novel mechanistic hypothesis explaining how assembly of macromolecular complexes can specify MAPK signaling downstream of α(1)-ARs.

  4. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  5. A semisynthetic Eph receptor tyrosine kinase provides insight into ligand-induced kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Nikhil; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Himanen, Juha P.; Muir, Tom W.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We have developed a methodology for generating milligram amounts of functional Eph tyrosine kinase receptor using the protein engineering approach of expressed protein ligation. Stimulation with ligand induces efficient autophosphorylation of the semisynthetic Eph construct. The in vitro phosphorylation of key Eph tyrosine residues upon ligand-induced activation was monitored via time-resolved, quantitative phosphoproteomics, suggesting a precise and unique order of phosphorylation of the Eph tyrosines in the kinase activation process. To our knowledge, this work represents the first reported semisynthesis of a receptor tyrosine kinase and provides a potentially general method for producing single-pass membrane proteins for structural and biochemical characterization. PMID:21439481

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activity is involved in effector functions triggered by the CD94/NKG2-C NK receptor specific for HLA-E.

    PubMed

    Carretero, M; Llano, M; Navarro, F; Bellón, T; López-Botet, M

    2000-10-01

    The CD94/NKG2C heterodimer constitutes an activating receptor involved in NK cell-mediated recognition of the class lb molecule HLA-E. It transduces the triggering signal through an ITAM-bearing molecule, DAP12/KARAP, coupled non-covalently to the receptor. Here we show that specific engagement of the receptor complex expressed on the surface of an NK clone induced the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). By the use of the MEK inhibitor PD098059 we demonstrate that the MAPK pathway participates in the CD94-dependent TNF-alpha production and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we transferred the activating function by transfection of the heterologous RBL cell line with CD94/NKG2-C/DAP12. In this system, cross-linking of the receptor induced calcium mobilization, serotonin release and phosphorylation of MAPK.

  7. Reconstitution of B cell antigen receptor-induced signaling events in a nonlymphoid cell line by expressing the Syk protein-tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Richards, J D; Gold, M R; Hourihane, S L; DeFranco, A L; Matsuuchi, L

    1996-03-15

    B cell antigen receptor (BCR) cross-linking activates both Src family and Syk tyrosine kinases, resulting in increased cellular protein-tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of several downstream signaling enzymes. To define the role of Syk in these events, we expressed the BCR in the AtT20 mouse pituitary cell line. These nonlymphoid cells endogenously expressed the Src family kinase Fyn but not Syk. Anti-IgM stimulation of these cells failed to induce most of the signaling events that occur in B cells. BCR-expressing AtT20 transfectants were generated that also expressed Syk. Syk expression reconstituted several signaling events upon anti-IgM stimulation, including Syk phosphorylation and association with the BCR, tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous proteins including Shc, and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. In contrast, Syk expression did not reconstitute anti-IgM-induced inositol phosphate production. A catalytically inactive Syk mutant could associate with the BCR and become tyrosine phosphorylated but could not reconstitute downstream signaling events. Expression of the Src family kinase Lck instead of Syk also did not reconstitute signaling. Thus, wild type Syk was required to reconstitute several BCR-induced signaling events but was not sufficient to couple the BCR to the phosphoinositide signaling pathway.

  8. Critical role of X-box binding protein 1 in NADPH oxidase 4-triggered cardiac hypertrophy is mediated by receptor interacting protein kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Zhao, Mingyue; Li, Junli; Wang, Yu; Bao, Qinxue; Wu, Siyuan; Deng, Xueqin; Tang, Xiaoju; Wu, Wenchao; Liu, Xiaojing

    2017-02-16

    NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) and the NOX4-related redox signaling are implicated in cardiac hypertrophy. NOX4 is interrelated with endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). Spliced X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1s) is a key mediator of ERS while its role in cardiac hypertrophy is still poorly understood. Recently, receptor interacting protein kinase 1(RIPK1) has been increasingly reported to be associated with ERS. Therefore, we aimed to test the hypothesis that Xbp1s mediates NOX4-triggered cardiac hypertrophy via RIPK1 signaling. In the heart tissue of transverse aortic constriction (TAC) rats and in primary cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes(NCMs) treated with angiotensinII(AngII) or isoproterenol (ISO), NOX4 expression and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and expression of Xbp1s as well as RIPK1-related phosphorylation of P65 subunit of NF-κB were elevated. Gene silencing of NOX4 by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly blocked the upregulation of NOX4, generation of ROS, splicing of Xbp1 and activation of the RIPK1-related NF-κB signaling, meanwhile attenuated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In addition, ROS scavenger (N-acetyl-L-cysteine, NAC) and NOX4 inhibitor GKT137831 reduced ROS generation and alleviated activation of Xbp1 and RIPK1-related NF-κB signaling. Furthermore, splicing of Xbp1 was responsible for the increase in RIPK1 expression in AngII or ISO-treated NCMs. Upregulated RIPK1 in turn activates NF-κB signaling in a kinase activity-independent manner. These findings suggest that Xbp1s plays an important role in NOX4-triggered cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via activating its downstream effector RIPK1, which may prove significant for the development of future therapeutic strategies.

  9. Propofol Modulates Agonist-induced Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Subtype-1 Receptor Desensitization via a Protein Kinase Cε-dependent Pathway in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wickley, Peter J.; Yuge, Ryo; Russell, Mary S.; Zhang, Hongyu; Sulak, Michael A.; Damron, Derek S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The activity of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype-1 (TRPV1) receptors, key nociceptive transducers in dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, is enhanced by protein kinase C ε (PKCε) activation. The intravenous anesthetic propofol has been shown to activate PKCε. Our objectives were to examine whether propofol modulates TRPV1 function in dorsal root ganglion neurons via activation of PKCε. Methods Lumbar dorsal root ganglion neurons from wild-type and PKCε-null mice were isolated and cultured for 24 h. Intracellular free Ca2+ concentration was measured in neurons by using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester. The duration of pain-associated behaviors was also assessed. Phosphorylation of PKCε and TRPV1 and the cellular translocation of PKCε from cytosol to membrane compartments were assessed by immunoblot analysis. Results In wild-type neurons, repeated stimulation with capsaicin (100 nM) progressively decreased the transient rise in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration. After desensitization, exposure to propofol rescued the Ca2+ response. The resensitizing effect of propofol was absent in neurons obtained from PKCε-null mice. Moreover, the capsaicin-induced desensitization of TRPV1 was markedly attenuated in the presence of propofol in neurons from wild-type mice but not in neurons from PKCε-null mice. Propofol also prolonged the duration of agonist-induced pain associated behaviors in wild-type mice. In addition, propofol increased phosphorylation of PKCε as well as TRPV1 and stimulated translocation of PKCε from cytosolic to membrane fraction. Discussion Our results indicate that propofol modulates TRPV1 sensitivity to capsaicin and that this most likely occurs through a PKCε-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1. PMID:20808213

  10. MAPKAP kinase-2; a novel protein kinase activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Stokoe, D; Campbell, D G; Nakielny, S; Hidaka, H; Leevers, S J; Marshall, C; Cohen, P

    1992-01-01

    A novel protein kinase, which was only active when phosphorylated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), has been purified 85,000-fold to homogeneity from rabbit skeletal muscle. This MAP kinase activated protein kinase, termed MAPKAP kinase-2, was distinguished from S6 kinase-II (MAPKAP kinase-1) by its response to inhibitors, lack of phosphorylation of S6 peptides and amino acid sequence. MAPKAP kinase-2 phosphorylated glycogen synthase at Ser7 and the equivalent serine (*) in the peptide KKPLNRTLS*VASLPGLamide whose sequence is similar to the N terminus of glycogen synthase. MAPKAP kinase-2 was resolved into two monomeric species of apparent molecular mass 60 and 53 kDa that had similar specific activities and substrate specificities. Peptide sequences of the 60 and 53 kDa species were identical, indicating that they are either closely related isoforms or derived from the same gene. MAP kinase activated the 60 and 53 kDa forms of MAPKAP kinase-2 by phosphorylating the first threonine residue in the sequence VPQTPLHTSR. Furthermore, Mono Q chromatography of extracts from rat phaeochromocytoma and skeletal muscle demonstrated that two MAP kinase isoforms (p42mapk and p44mapk) were the only enzymes in these cells that were capable of reactivating MAPKAP kinase-2. These results indicate that MAP kinase activates at least two distinct protein kinases, suggesting that it represents a point at which the growth factor-stimulated protein kinase cascade bifurcates. Images PMID:1327754

  11. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor enhances melanogenesis via cAMP-protein kinase (PKA) by upregulating microphthalmia-related transcription factor-tyrosinase in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Xie, Hong-Fu; Tang, Yan; Lin, Shang-Qing; Li, Jin-Mao; Sun, Shu-Na; Hu, Xing-Lin; Huang, Ying-Xue; Shi, Wei; Jian, Dan

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the role and mechanism of action of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) in melanogenesis. GPER expression was detected in the A375 human melanoma cell line and B16 mouse melanoma cell line. Cell proliferation, melanin content, tyrosinase (TYR) activity, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level, and TYR and microphthalmia-related transcription factor (MITF) expression were measured. GPER activation was altered by agonist and antagonist treatment and its expression was downregulated by gene silencing. Estradiol-induced melanin synthesis and the activation of related signaling pathways were suppressed by inhibiting GPER via antagonist treatment. The relationship between GPER and TYR was evaluated in clinical chloasma samples by immunohistochemistry. Upregulation of GPER in A375 cells promoted melanogenesis, favored as indicated by increases in TYR and MITF expression and TYR activity. GPER activated melanin production via the cAMP-protein kinase (PK) A pathway, suggesting that GPER plays an important role in estrogen-induced melanin synthesis. The effect of GPER activation on cAMP-MITF-TYR signaling was also demonstrated in B16 cells. A significant association was observed between GPER and TYR expression in chloasma skin lesions relative to normal skin. GPER enhances melanin synthesis via cAMP-PKA-MITF-TYR signaling and modulates the effects of estrogen in melanogenesis. GPER is therefore a potential drug target for chloasma treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Heart failure-specific changes in protein kinase signalling.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Kristina; Stathopoulou, Konstantina; Schmid, Evelyn; Eder, Petra; Cuello, Friederike

    2014-06-01

    Among the myriad of molecular alterations occurring in heart failure development, aggravation of the disease is often attributed to global or local changes in protein kinase activity, thus making protein kinases attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Since protein kinases do not only have maladaptive roles, but also contribute to the physiological integrity of cells, it is a challenging task to circumvent undesired inhibition of protein kinase activity. Identification of posttranslational modifications and/or protein-protein interactions that are exclusively apparent under pathophysiological conditions provides exciting information for alternative non-kinase inhibitory treatment strategies that eliminate maladaptive functions of a protein kinase, but preserve the beneficial ones. Here, we focus on the disease-specific regulation of a number of protein kinases, namely, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II isoform δ (CaMKIIδ), G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase D (PKD) and protein kinase C isoform β2 (PKCβ2), which are embedded in complex signal transduction pathways implicated in heart failure development, and discuss potential avenues for novel treatment strategies to combat heart disease.

  13. Epigenetic Activation of μ-Opioid Receptor Gene via Increased Expression and Function of Mitogen- and Stress-Activated Protein Kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Wagley, Yadav; Law, Ping-Yee; Wei, Li-Na; Loh, Horace H

    2017-04-01

    Since the discovery of μ-opioid receptor (MOR) gene two decades ago, various regulatory factors have been shown to interact with the MOR promoter and modulate transcript levels. However, the majority of early transcriptional studies on MOR gene have not addressed how intracellular signaling pathways mediate extracellular modulators. In this study, we demonstrate that MOR epigenetic regulation requires multiple coordinated signals converging at the MOR promoter, involving mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1)-ranges of intracellular signaling pathways similar to those activated by opioid agonists. Inhibiting p38 MAPK or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 MAPK (upstream activators of MSK1) reduced MOR expression levels; accordingly, the functional role of MSK1, but not MSK2, was demonstrated using genetic approaches. However, for maximal MSK1 effect, an open chromatin configuration was required, because in vitro CpG methylation of the MOR promoter abolished MSK1 activity. Finally, endogenous MSK1 levels concomitantly increased to regulate MOR gene expression during neuronal differentiation of P19 cells, suggesting a conserved role of this kinase in the epigenic activation of MOR in neurons. Taken together, our findings indicate that the expression of MOR gene requires the activity of intracellular signaling pathways that have been implicated in the behavioral outcomes of opioid drugs, which suggests that an autoregulatory mechanism may function in opioid systems.

  14. The activity and stability of the intrinsically disordered Cip/Kip protein family are regulated by non-receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Otieno, Steve; Lelli, Moreno; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The Cip/Kip family of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitors includes p21Cip1, p27Kip1 and p57Kip2. Their kinase inhibitory activities are mediated by a homologous N-terminal kinase-inhibitory domain (KID). The Cdk inhibitory activity and stability of p27 have been shown to be regulated by a two-step phosphorylation mechanism involving a tyrosine residue within the KID and a threonine residue within the flexible C-terminus. We show that these residues are conserved in p21 and p57, suggesting that a similar phosphorylation cascade regulates these Cdk inhibitors. However, the presence of a cyclin binding motif within its C-terminus alters the regulatory interplay between p21 and Cdk2/cyclin A, and its responses to tyrosine phosphorylation and altered p21:Cdk2/cyclin A stoichiometry. We also show that the Cip/Kip proteins can be phosphorylated in vitro by representatives of many non-receptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) sub-families, suggesting that NRTKs may generally regulate the activity and stability of these Cdk inhibitors. Our results further suggest that the Cip/Kip proteins integrate signals from various NRTK pathways and cell cycle regulation. PMID:25463440

  15. Protein kinase C activation potentiates gating of the vanilloid receptor VR1 by capsaicin, protons, heat and anandamide

    PubMed Central

    Vellani, Vittorio; Mapplebeck, Sarah; Moriondo, Andrea; Davis, John B; McNaughton, Peter A

    2001-01-01

    The effects of activation of protein kinase C (PKC) on membrane currents gated by capsaicin, protons, heat and anandamide were investigated in primary sensory neurones from neonatal rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and in HEK293 cells (human embryonic kidney cell line) transiently or stably expressing the human vanilloid receptor hVR1. Maximal activation of PKC by a brief application of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increased the mean membrane current activated by a low concentration of capsaicin by 1.65-fold in DRG neurones and 2.18-fold in stably transfected HEK293 cells. Bradykinin, which activates PKC, also enhanced the response to capsaicin in DRG neurones. The specific PKC inhibitor RO31-8220 prevented the enhancement caused by PMA. Activation of PKC did not enhance the membrane current at high concentrations of capsaicin, showing that PKC activation increases the probability of channel opening rather than unmasking channels. Application of PMA alone activated an inward current in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with VR1. The current was suppressed by the VR1 antagonist capsazepine. PMA did not, however, activate a current in the large majority of DRG neurones nor in HEK293 cells stably transfected with VR1. Removing external Ca2+ enhanced the response to a low concentration of capsaicin 2.40-fold in DRG neurones and 3.42-fold in HEK293 cells. Activation of PKC in zero Ca2+ produced no further enhancement of the response to capsaicin in either DRG neurones or HEK293 cells stably transfected with VR1. The effects of PKC activation on the membrane current gated by heat, anandamide and low pH were qualitatively similar to those on the capsaicin-gated current. The absence of a current activated by PMA in most DRG neurones or in stably transfected HEK293 cells suggests that activation of PKC does not directly open VR1 channels, but instead increases the probability that they will be activated by capsaicin, heat, low pH or anandamide. Removal of calcium

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel genes from hexaploid wheat that encode double PR-1 domains coupled with a receptor-like protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shunwen; Faris, Justin D; Edwards, Michael C

    2017-04-01

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) contains at least 23 TaPr-1 genes encoding the group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins as identified in our previous work. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of TaPr-1-rk1 and TaPr-1-rk2, two novel genes closely related to the wheat PR-1 family. The two TaPr-1-rk genes are located on homoeologous chromosomes 3D and 3A, respectively, and each contains a large open reading frame (7385 or 6060 bp) that is interrupted by seven introns and subjected to alternative splicing (AS) with five or six isoforms of mRNA transcripts. The deduced full-length TaPR-1-RK1 and TaPR-1-RK2 proteins (95% identity) contain two repeat PR-1 domains, the second of which is fused via a transmembrane helix to a serine/threonine kinase catalytic (STKc) domain characteristic of receptor-like protein kinases. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two PR-1 domains of the TaPR-1-RK proteins form sister clades with their homologues identified in other monocot plants and are well separated from stand-alone PR-1 proteins, whereas the STKc domains may have originated from cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs). Reverse-transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that the TaPr-1-rk genes are predominantly expressed in wheat leaves and their expression levels are elevated in response to pathogen attack, such as infection by barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV), and also to stress conditions, most obviously, to soil salinity. This is the first report of PR-1-CRK hybrid proteins in wheat. The data may shed new insights into the function/evolutionary origin of the PR-1 family and the STKc-mediated defense/stress response pathways in plants.

  17. p75 Neurotrophin Receptor Signaling Activates Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein-2 in Hepatocyte Cells via p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase and Caspase-3*

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Dan Duc; Do, Hai Thi; Bruelle, Céline; Kukkonen, Jyrki P.; Eriksson, Ove; Mogollón, Isabel; Korhonen, Laura T.; Arumäe, Urmas; Lindholm, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) influences the survival and differentiation of a specific population of neurons during development, but its role in non-neuronal cells has been less studied. We observed here that NGF and its pro-form, pro-NGF, are elevated in fatty livers from leptin-deficient mice compared with controls, concomitant with an increase in low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs). Stimulation of mouse primary hepatocytes with NGF or pro-NGF increased LDLR expression through the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). Studies using Huh7 human hepatocyte cells showed that the neurotrophins activate the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP2) that regulates genes involved in lipid metabolism. The mechanisms for this were related to stimulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and activation of caspase-3 and SREBP2 cleavage following NGF and pro-NGF stimulations. Cell fractionation experiments showed that caspase-3 activity was increased particularly in the membrane fraction that harbors SREBP2 and caspase-2. Experiments showed further that caspase-2 interacts with pro-caspase-3 and that p38 MAPK reduced this interaction and caused caspase-3 activation. Because of the increased caspase-3 activity, the cells did not undergo cell death following p75NTR stimulation, possibly due to concomitant activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway by the neurotrophins. These results identify a novel signaling pathway triggered by ligand-activated p75NTR that via p38 MAPK and caspase-3 mediate the activation of SREBP2. This pathway may regulate LDLRs and lipid uptake particularly after injury or during tissue inflammation accompanied by an increased production of growth factors, including NGF and pro-NGF. PMID:26984409

  18. A critical role for Syk protein tyrosine kinase in Fc receptor-mediated antigen presentation and induction of dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Sedlik, Christine; Orbach, Daniel; Veron, Philippe; Schweighoffer, Edina; Colucci, Francesco; Gamberale, Romina; Ioan-Facsinay, Andrea; Verbeek, Sjef; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Bonnerot, Christian; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Di Santo, James; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2003-01-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the only APCs capable of initiating adaptive immune responses. The initiation of immune responses requires that DCs 1) internalize and present Ags; and 2) undergo a differentiation process, called "maturation", which transforms DCs into efficient APCs. DC maturation may be initiated by the engagement of different surface receptors, including certain cytokine receptors (such as TNFR), Toll-like receptors, CD40, and FcRs. The early activation events that link receptor engagement and DC maturation are not well characterized. We found that FcR engagement by immune complexes induced the phosphorylation of Syk, a protein tyrosine kinase acting immediately downstream of FcRs. Syk was dispensable for DC differentiation in vitro and in vivo, but was strictly required for immune complexes internalization and subsequent Ag presentation to T lymphocytes. Importantly, Syk was also required for the induction of DC maturation and IL-12 production after FcR engagement, but not after engagement of other surface receptors, such as TNFR or Toll-like receptors. Therefore, protein tyrosine phosphorylation by Syk represents a novel pathway for the induction of DC maturation.

  19. Neuronal migration and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the six-layered structure of the mammalian cortex via the inside-out pattern of neuronal migration is fundamental to neocortical functions. Extracellular cues such as Reelin induce intracellular signaling cascades through the protein phosphorylation. Migrating neurons also have intrinsic machineries to regulate cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion properties. Protein phosphorylation regulates these processes. Moreover, the balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is modified by extracellular cues. Multipolar-bipolar transition, radial glia-guided locomotion and terminal translocation are critical steps of radial migration of cortical pyramidal neurons. Protein kinases such as Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) involve these steps. In this review, I shall give an overview the roles of protein kinases in neuronal migration. PMID:25628530

  20. Microgravity and Signaling Molecules in Rat Osteoblasts: Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor, and Small GTP-Binding Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumel, Yasuhiro; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Morita, Sadao; Katano, Hisako; Akiyama, Hideo; Hirano, Masahiko; Ohya, Keiichi; Sams, Clarence F.; Whitson, Peggy A.

    2005-01-01

    Rat osteoblasts were cultured for 4 and 5 days aboard Space Shuttle and solubilized on board. The mRNA levels of the post-receptor signaling molecules were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The G-protein alpha subunit G(alpha)q mRNA levels were elevated 3-fold by microgravity. G(alpha)q stimulates PLC(beta), and then PKC. PKC(delta) and PKC(theta) mRNA levels were increased 2- to 5-fold by microgravity The mRNA levels of SOS and Ras GRF were increased 4 to 5-fold by microgravity, while Ras GAP was not altered. Spaceflight-induced bone loss might be attributed to microgravity modulation of the signaling pathway in osteoblasts.

  1. Microgravity and Signaling Molecules in Rat Osteoblasts: Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor, and Small GTP-Binding Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumel, Yasuhiro; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Morita, Sadao; Katano, Hisako; Akiyama, Hideo; Hirano, Masahiko; Ohya, Keiichi; Sams, Clarence F.; Whitson, Peggy A.

    2005-01-01

    Rat osteoblasts were cultured for 4 and 5 days aboard Space Shuttle and solubilized on board. The mRNA levels of the post-receptor signaling molecules were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The G-protein alpha subunit G(alpha)q mRNA levels were elevated 3-fold by microgravity. G(alpha)q stimulates PLC(beta), and then PKC. PKC(delta) and PKC(theta) mRNA levels were increased 2- to 5-fold by microgravity The mRNA levels of SOS and Ras GRF were increased 4 to 5-fold by microgravity, while Ras GAP was not altered. Spaceflight-induced bone loss might be attributed to microgravity modulation of the signaling pathway in osteoblasts.

  2. The protein kinase C family.

    PubMed

    Azzi, A; Boscoboinik, D; Hensey, C

    1992-09-15

    Protein kinase C represents a structurally homologous group of proteins similar in size, structure and mechanism of activation. They can modulate the biological function of proteins in a rapid and reversible manner. Protein kinase C participates in one of the major signal transduction systems triggered by the external stimulation of cells by various ligands including hormones, neurotransmitters and growth factors. Hydrolysis of membrane inositol phospholipids by phospholipase C or of phosphatidylcholine, generates sn-1,2-diacylglycerol, considered the physiological activator of this kinase. Other agents, such as arachidonic acid, participate in the activation of some of these proteins. Activation of protein kinase C by phorbol esters and related compounds is not physiological and may be responsible, at least in part, for their tumor-promoting activity. The cellular localization of the different calcium-activated protein kinases, their substrate and activator specificity are dissimilar and thus their role in signal transduction is unlike. A better understanding of the exact cellular function of the different protein kinase C isoenzymes requires the identification and characterization of their physiological substrates.

  3. Tobacco Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Interacts with Ethylene Receptor Tobacco Histidine Kinase1 and Enhances Plant Growth through Promotion of Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jian-Jun; Cao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Hao-Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is an important phytohormone in the regulation of plant growth, development, and stress response throughout the lifecycle. Previously, we discovered that a subfamily II ethylene receptor tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Histidine Kinase1 (NTHK1) promotes seedling growth. Here, we identified an NTHK1-interacting protein translationally controlled tumor protein (NtTCTP) by the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assay and further characterized its roles in plant growth. The interaction was further confirmed by in vitro glutathione S-transferase pull down and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and the kinase domain of NTHK1 mediates the interaction with NtTCTP. The NtTCTP protein is induced by ethylene treatment and colocalizes with NTHK1 at the endoplasmic reticulum. Overexpression of NtTCTP or NTHK1 reduces plant response to ethylene and promotes seedling growth, mainly through acceleration of cell proliferation. Genetic analysis suggests that NtTCTP is required for the function of NTHK1. Furthermore, association of NtTCTP prevents NTHK1 from proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Our data suggest that plant growth inhibition triggered by ethylene is regulated by a unique feedback mechanism, in which ethylene-induced NtTCTP associates with and stabilizes ethylene receptor NTHK1 to reduce plant response to ethylene and promote plant growth through acceleration of cell proliferation.

  4. Tobacco Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Interacts with Ethylene Receptor Tobacco Histidine Kinase1 and Enhances Plant Growth through Promotion of Cell Proliferation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jian-Jun; Cao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Hao-Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is an important phytohormone in the regulation of plant growth, development, and stress response throughout the lifecycle. Previously, we discovered that a subfamily II ethylene receptor tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Histidine Kinase1 (NTHK1) promotes seedling growth. Here, we identified an NTHK1-interacting protein translationally controlled tumor protein (NtTCTP) by the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assay and further characterized its roles in plant growth. The interaction was further confirmed by in vitro glutathione S-transferase pull down and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and the kinase domain of NTHK1 mediates the interaction with NtTCTP. The NtTCTP protein is induced by ethylene treatment and colocalizes with NTHK1 at the endoplasmic reticulum. Overexpression of NtTCTP or NTHK1 reduces plant response to ethylene and promotes seedling growth, mainly through acceleration of cell proliferation. Genetic analysis suggests that NtTCTP is required for the function of NTHK1. Furthermore, association of NtTCTP prevents NTHK1 from proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Our data suggest that plant growth inhibition triggered by ethylene is regulated by a unique feedback mechanism, in which ethylene-induced NtTCTP associates with and stabilizes ethylene receptor NTHK1 to reduce plant response to ethylene and promote plant growth through acceleration of cell proliferation. PMID:25941315

  5. The interplay between G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) at the crossroads of epithelial cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Lafarga, Vanesa; Mayor, Jr, Federico; Penela, Petronila

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is emerging as a key integrative node in cell migration control. In addition to its canonical role in the desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors involved in chemotaxis, novel recently identified GRK2 substrates and interacting partners appear to mediate the GRK2-dependent modulation of diverse molecular processes involved in motility, such as gradient sensing, cell polarity or cytoskeletal reorganization. We have recently identified an interaction between GRK2 and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), a major cytoplasmic α-tubulin deacetylase involved in cell motility and adhesion. GRK2 dynamically associates with and phosphorylates HDAC6 to stimulate its α-tubulin deacetylase activity at specific cellular localizations such as the leading edge of migrating cells, thus promoting local tubulin deacetylation and enhanced motility. This GRK2-HDAC6 functional interaction may have important implications in pathological contexts related to aberrant epithelial cell migration. PMID:23076141

  6. Protein kinase C activation increases noradrenaline release from the rat hippocampus and modifies the inhibitory effect of alpha 2-adrenoceptor and adenosine A1-receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Fredholm, B B; Lindgren, E

    1988-05-01

    We have studied the effect of stimulating protein kinase C with phorbol esters on the release of [3H]-noradrenaline (NA) in the absence or presence of presynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptor blocking agents and compared that to the elevation of cyclic AMP levels more than 10-fold by a combination of rolipram and forskolin. 4-beta-Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDiBu) increased stimulated (3 Hz) [3H]-NA release markedly and in a concentration dependent manner. 4-alpha-Phorbol-12,13-didecanoate was ineffective. The effect of PDiBu was not significantly reduced by nifedipine (1 microM), but was proportionally less in the presence of an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine. PDiBu inhibited the presynaptic effect of alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists clonidine and UK 14304. By contrast, the presynaptic effect of the adenosine analogue R-PIA was not reduced by PDiBu. PDiBu caused an increase in cyclic AMP that depended on adenosine receptor stimulation. Elevation of cyclic AMP had a limited effect on NA release from rat hippocampus, and did not significantly decrease the presynaptic inhibitory effect of UK 14304 (0.1 microM), of morphine (1 microM) or of the adenosine A1-receptor agonist CHA (1 microM). The effect of phorbol esters and several presynaptic inhibitors of NA-release in the rat hippocampus cannot be explained by changes in cyclic AMP levels in the tissue. Phorbol esters that stimulate protein kinase C appear to interact with a target that is the site of action alpha 2-adrenoceptors in this tissue. This site is not a dihydropyridine sensitive Ca-channel and is also different from the target of presynaptic adenosine receptors. Thus, activation of protein kinase C discriminates between apparently similar presynaptic mechanisms.

  7. Fps/Fes protein-tyrosine kinase regulates mast cell adhesion and migration downstream of Kit and beta1 integrin receptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julie A; Samayawardhena, Lionel A; Craig, Andrew W B

    2010-03-01

    Activation of Kit receptor protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) by its ligand Stem Cell Factor (SCF) is required for the development of mast cells, and for the regulation of mast cell proliferation, migration and modulation of inflammatory mediator release. Recent studies have implicated the non-receptor PTK Fps/Fes (hereafter referred to as Fes) in signaling downstream of oncogenic Kit, however, the potential role of Fes in regulating Kit signaling is not well defined. In this study, we show that SCF induces transient tyrosine phosphorylation of wild-type Fes as well as kinase-dead Fes in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). The latter finding implicates an upstream kinase acting on Fes, which we identified as Fyn PTK. SCF treatment of BMMCs promoted recruitment of Fes to Kit, potentially via direct interaction of the Fes SH2 domain with phosphorylated Kit. While Fes was not required for SCF-induced signaling to Akt and Erk kinases, Fes-deficient (fes-/-) BMMCs displayed a defect in sustained p38 kinase activation, compared to control cells. SCF-treated Fes-deficient BMMCs also displayed elevated beta1 integrin-mediated cell adhesion and spreading on fibronectin, compared to control cells, and a reduction in cell polarization at later times of SCF treatment. Restoring Fes expression in fes-/- BMMCs by retroviral transduction was sufficient to rescue cell spreading and polarization defects. Interestingly, SCF-induced chemotaxis of BMMCs was also defective in Fes-deficient BMMCs, and restored in Fes-rescue BMMCs. Overall, these results implicate Fes in regulating cross-talk between Kit and beta1 integrins to promote cytoskeletal reorganization and motility of mast cells.

  8. Transferrin receptor 2 and HFE regulate furin expression via mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/Erk) signaling. Implications for transferrin-dependent hepcidin regulation

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Maura; Luscieti, Sara; Gandini, Valentina; Maccarinelli, Federica; Finazzi, Dario; Silvestri, Laura; Roetto, Antonella; Arosio, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Background Impaired regulation of hepcidin in response to iron is the cause of genetic hemochromatosis associated with defects of HFE and transferrin receptor 2. However, the role of these proteins in the regulation of hepcidin expression is unclear. Design and Methods Hepcidin expression, SMAD and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) phosphorylation and furin expression were analyzed in hepatic HepG2 cells in which HFE and transferrin receptor 2 were down-regulated or expressed, or furin activity specifically inhibited. Furin expression was also analyzed in the liver of transferrin receptor 2 null mice. Results We showed that the silencing of HFE and transferrin receptor 2 reduced both Erk phosphorylation and furin expression, that the exogenous expression of the two enhanced the induction of phosphoErk1/2 and furin by holotransferrin, but that this did not occur when the pathogenic HFE mutant C282Y was expressed. Furin, phosphoErk1/2 and phosphoSMAD1/5/8 were down-regulated also in transferrin receptor 2-null mice. Treatment of HepG2 cells with an inhibitor of furin activity caused a strong suppression of hepcidin mRNA, probably due to the inhibition of bone morphogenic protein maturation. Conclusions The data indicate that transferrin receptor 2 and HFE are involved in holotransferrin-dependent signaling for the regulation of furin which involved Erk phosphorylation. Furin in turn may control hepcidin expression. PMID:20634490

  9. Effects of the activated mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway via the c-ros receptor tyrosine kinase on the T47D breast cancer cell line following alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Tae; Kim, Se Kye; Choi, Mi Ran; Park, Ji Hyun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2013-03-01

    Compared to other cancers affecting women, breast cancer is significantly associated with alcohol consumption. However, the principles underlying the carcinogenesis of alcohol-induced breast cancer and the related metastatic mechanisms have yet to be established. To observe the effect of alcohol on the growth regulation in breast cancer cells, we identified differentially expressed proteins in alcohol-exposed human breast cancer T47D cells using gel-based proteomics analysis. The expression of c-ros receptor tyrosine kinase (ROS1) was increased and activated by autophosphorylation, thereby activating mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1) through the mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway; activated MSK1, in turn, phosphorylated histone 3 serine 10 (H3S10p) residues in the nucleus. The increase in H3S10 phosphorylation consequently increased the level of expression of immediate-early gene such as c-fos. This study demonstrated that when breast cancer cells are exposed to alcohol, phosphorylated ROS1 activates MSK1 via Erk1/2 in the MAPK pathway, which then induces modifications to histone residues that regulate gene expression by 14-3-3 protein recruitment, leading to a lack of control of breast cancer cell proliferation.

  10. GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN1 interacts with RECEPTOR-LIKE CYTOPLASMIC PROTEIN KINASE1 and suppresses cell death and defense responses in pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sung; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Plants use a variety of innate immune regulators to trigger cell death and defense responses against pathogen attack. We identified pepper (Capsicum annuum) GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (CaGRP1) as a RECEPTOR-LIKE CYTOPLASMIC PROTEIN KINASE1 (CaPIK1)-interacting partner, based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation analyses as well as gene silencing and transient expression analysis. CaGRP1 contains an N-terminal RNA recognition motif and a glycine-rich region at the C-terminus. The CaGRP1 protein had DNA- and RNA-binding activity in vitro. CaGRP1 interacted with CaPIK1 in planta. CaGRP1 and CaGRP1-CaPIK1 complexes were localized to the nucleus in plant cells. CaPIK1 phosphorylated CaGRP1 in vitro and in planta. Transient coexpression of CaGRP1 with CaPIK1 suppressed the CaPIK1-triggered cell death response, accompanied by a reduced CaPIK1-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst. The RNA recognition motif region of CaGRP1 was responsible for the nuclear localization of CaGRP1 as well as the suppression of the CaPIK1-triggered cell death response. CaGRP1 silencing in pepper conferred enhanced resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) infection; however, CaPIK1-silenced plants were more susceptible to Xcv. CaGRP1 interacts with CaPIK1 and negatively regulates CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defense responses by suppressing ROS accumulation.

  11. Role of protein kinase C in caerulein induced expression of substance P and neurokinin-1-receptors in murine pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yung-Hua; Tamizhselvi, Ramasamy; Moochhala, Shabbir; Bian, Jin-Song; Bhatia, Madhav

    2011-10-01

    Substance P (SP) is involved in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) via binding to its high-affinity receptor, neurokinin-1-receptor (NK1R). An up-regulation of SP and NK1R expression was observed in experimental AP and in caerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells. However, the mechanisms that lead to this up-regulation are not fully understood. In this study, we showed the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in caerulein-induced SP and NK1R production in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Caerulein (10(-7) M) stimulation rapidly activated the conventional PKC-α and novel PKC-δ as observed by the phosphorylation of these molecules. Pre-treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with Gö6976 (1-10 nM) and rottlerin (1-10 μM) inhibited PKC-α and PKC-δ phosphorylation, respectively, but not the other way round. At these concentrations used, PKC-α and PKC-δ inhibition reversed the caerulein-induced up-regulation of SP and NK1R, indicating an important role of PKCs in the modulation of SP and NK1R expression. Further experiments looking into signalling mechanisms showed that treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with both Gö6976 and rottlerin inhibited the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Inhibition of PKC-α or PKC-δ also affected caerulein-induced transcription factor activation, as represented by nuclear factor-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activity. The findings in this study suggested that PKC is upstream of the mitogen-activated protein kinases and transcription factors, which then lead to the up-regulation of SP/NK1R expression in caerulein-treated mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

  12. Role of protein kinase C in caerulein induced expression of substance P and neurokinin-1-receptors in murine pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Yung-Hua; Tamizhselvi, Ramasamy; Moochhala, Shabbir; Bian, Jin-Song; Bhatia, Madhav

    2011-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is involved in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) via binding to its high-affinity receptor, neurokinin-1-receptor (NK1R). An up-regulation of SP and NK1R expression was observed in experimental AP and in caerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells. However, the mechanisms that lead to this up-regulation are not fully understood. In this study, we showed the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in caerulein-induced SP and NK1R production in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Caerulein (10−7 M) stimulation rapidly activated the conventional PKC-α and novel PKC-δ as observed by the phosphorylation of these molecules. Pre-treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with Gö6976 (1–10 nM) and rottlerin (1–10 μM) inhibited PKC-α and PKC-δ phosphorylation, respectively, but not the other way round. At these concentrations used, PKC-α and PKC-δ inhibition reversed the caerulein-induced up-regulation of SP and NK1R, indicating an important role of PKCs in the modulation of SP and NK1R expression. Further experiments looking into signalling mechanisms showed that treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with both Gö6976 and rottlerin inhibited the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Inhibition of PKC-α or PKC-δ also affected caerulein-induced transcription factor activation, as represented by nuclear factor-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activity. The findings in this study suggested that PKC is upstream of the mitogen-activated protein kinases and transcription factors, which then lead to the up-regulation of SP/NK1R expression in caerulein-treated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. PMID:20973912

  13. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase, CRK5, enhances abscisic acid sensitivity and confers drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kai; Liang, Shan; Wu, Zhen; Bi, Chao; Yu, Yong-Tao; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) have been reported to regulate many developmental and defense process, but only a few members have been functionally characterized. In the present study, our observations suggest that one of the RLKs, a membrane-localized cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase, CRK5, is involved in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpression of CRK5 increases ABA sensitivity in ABA-induced early seedling growth arrest and promotion of stomatal closure and inhibition of stomatal opening. Interestingly, and importantly, overexpression of CRK5 enhances plant drought tolerance without affecting plant growth at the mature stages and plant productivity. Transgenic lines overexpressing a mutated form of CRK5, CRK5 K372E with the change of the 372nd conserved amino acid residue from lysine to glutamic acid in its kinase domain, result in wild-type ABA and drought responses, supporting the role of CRK5 in ABA signaling. The loss-of-function mutation of the CRK5 gene does not affect the ABA response, while overexpression of two homologs of CRK5, CRK4 and CRK19, confers ABA responses, suggesting that these CRK members function redundantly. We further showed that WRKY18, WRKY40 and WRKY60 transcription factors repress the expression of CRK5, and that CRK5 likely functions upstream of ABI2 in ABA signaling. These findings help in understanding the complex ABA signaling network. PMID:27406784

  14. Insulin receptor substrate-2 phosphorylation is necessary for protein kinase C zeta activation by insulin in L6hIR cells.

    PubMed

    Oriente, F; Formisano, P; Miele, C; Fiory, F; Maitan, M A; Vigliotta, G; Trencia, A; Santopietro, S; Caruso, M; Van Obberghen, E; Beguinot, F

    2001-10-05

    We have investigated glycogen synthase (GS) activation in L6hIR cells expressing a peptide corresponding to the kinase regulatory loop binding domain of insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2) (KRLB). In several clones of these cells (B2, F4), insulin-dependent binding of the KRLB to insulin receptors was accompanied by a block of IRS-2, but not IRS-1, phosphorylation, and insulin receptor binding. GS activation by insulin was also inhibited by >70% in these cells (p < 0.001). The impairment of GS activation was paralleled by a similarly sized inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha (GSK3 alpha) and GSK3 beta inactivation by insulin with no change in protein phosphatase 1 activity. PDK1 (a phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate-dependent kinase) and Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) activation by insulin showed no difference in B2, F4, and in control L6hIR cells. At variance, insulin did not activate PKC zeta in B2 and F4 cells. In L6hIR, inhibition of PKC zeta activity by either a PKC zeta antisense or a dominant negative mutant also reduced by 75% insulin inactivation of GSK3 alpha and -beta (p < 0.001) and insulin stimulation of GS (p < 0.002), similar to Akt/PKB inhibition. In L6hIR, insulin induced protein kinase C zeta (PKC zeta) co-precipitation with GSK3 alpha and beta. PKC zeta also phosphorylated GSK3 alpha and -beta. Alone, these events did not significantly affect GSK3 alpha and -beta activities. Inhibition of PKC zeta activity, however, reduced Akt/PKB phosphorylation of the key serine sites on GSK3 alpha and -beta by >80% (p < 0.001) and prevented full GSK3 inactivation by insulin. Thus, IRS-2, not IRS-1, signals insulin activation of GS in the L6hIR skeletal muscle cells. In these cells, insulin inhibition of GSK3 alpha and -beta requires dual phosphorylation by both Akt/PKB and PKC zeta.

  15. Co-active receptor tyrosine kinases mitigate the effect of FGFR inhibitors in FGFR1-amplified lung cancers with low FGFR1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kotani, H; Ebi, H; Kitai, H; Nanjo, S; Kita, K; Huynh, T G; Ooi, A; Faber, A C; Mino-Kenudson, M; Yano, S

    2016-07-07

    Targeted therapies are effective in subsets of lung cancers with EGFR mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations. Large-scale genomics have recently expanded the lung cancer landscape with FGFR1 amplification found in 10-20% of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). However, the response rates have been low for biomarker-directed fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor therapy in SCC, which contrasts to the relatively high rates of response seen in EGFR mutant and ALK-translocated lung cancers treated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors and ALK inhibitors, respectively. In order to better understand the low response rates of FGFR1-amplified lung cancers to FGFR inhibitors, relationships between gene copy number, mRNA expression and protein expression of FGFR1 were assessed in cell lines, tumor specimens and data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The importance of these factors for the sensitivity to FGFR inhibitors was determined by analyzing drug screen data and conducting in vitro and in vivo experiments. We report that there was a discrepancy between FGFR1 amplification level and FGFR1 protein expression in a number of these cell lines, and the cancers with unexpectedly low FGFR1 expression were uniformly resistant to the different FGFR inhibitors. Further interrogation of the receptor tyrosine kinase activity in these discordant cell lines revealed co-activation of HER2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα) caused by gene amplification or ligand overexpression maintained phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and MEK/ERK signaling even in the presence of FGFR inhibitor. Accordingly, co-inhibition of FGFR1 and HER2 or PDGFRα led to enhanced drug responses. In contrast, FGFR1-amplified high FGFR1 protein-expressing lung cancers are sensitive to FGFR inhibitor monotherapy by downregulating ERK signaling. Addition of a PI3K inhibitor to these high FGFR1 protein-expressing cancers further sensitized them to FGFR

  16. Neuromedin U type 1 receptor stimulation of A-type K+ current requires the βγ subunits of Go protein, protein kinase A, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiming; Jiang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Yuan; Jiang, Xinghong; Wang, Fen; Tao, Jin

    2012-05-25

    Although neuromedin U (NMU) has been implicated in analgesia, the detailed mechanisms still remain unclear. In this study, we identify a novel functional role of NMU type 1 receptor (NMUR1) in regulating the transient outward K(+) currents (I(A)) in small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We found that NMU reversibly increased I(A) in a dose-dependent manner, instead the sustained delayed rectifier K(+) current (I(DR)) was not affected. This NMU-induced I(A) increase was pertussis toxin-sensitive and was totally reversed by NMUR1 knockdown. Intracellular application of GDPβS (guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate)), QEHA peptide, or a selective antibody raised against the Gα(o) or Gβ blocked the stimulatory effects of NMU. Pretreatment of the cells with the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor or ERK inhibitor abolished the NMU-induced I(A) response, whereas inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or PKC had no such effects. Exposure of DRG neurons to NMU markedly induced the phosphorylation of ERK (p-ERK), whereas p-JNK or p-p38 was not affected. Moreover, the NMU-induced p-ERK increase was attenuated by PKA inhibition and activation of PKA by foskolin would mimic the NMU-induced I(A) increase. Functionally, we observed a significant decrease of the firing rate of neuronal action potential induced by NMU and pretreatment of DRG neurons with 4-AP could abolish this effect. In summary, these results suggested that NMU increases I(A) via activation of NMUR1 that couples sequentially to the downstream activities of Gβγ of the G(o) protein, PKA, and ERK, which could contribute to its physiological functions including neuronal hypoexcitability in DRG neurons.

  17. CUL3 and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Thibaud; Kleiss, Charlotte; Sumara, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational mechanisms drive fidelity of cellular processes. Phosphorylation and ubiquitination of substrates represent very common, covalent, posttranslational modifications and are often co-regulated. Phosphorylation may play a critical role both by directly regulating E3-ubiquitin ligases and/or by ensuring specificity of the ubiquitination substrate. Importantly, many kinases are not only critical regulatory components of these pathways but also represent themselves the direct ubiquitination substrates. Recent data suggest the role of CUL3-based ligases in both proteolytic and non-proteolytic regulation of protein kinases. Our own recent study identified the mitotic kinase PLK1 as a direct target of the CUL3 E3-ligase complex containing BTB-KELCH adaptor protein KLHL22.1 In this study, we aim at gaining mechanistic insights into CUL3-mediated regulation of the substrates, in particular protein kinases, by analyzing mechanisms of interaction between KLHL22 and PLK1. We find that kinase activity of PLK1 is redundant for its targeting for CUL3-ubiquitination. Moreover, CUL3/KLHL22 may contact 2 distinct motifs within PLK1 protein, consistent with the bivalent mode of substrate targeting found in other CUL3-based complexes. We discuss these findings in the context of the existing knowledge on other protein kinases and substrates targeted by CUL3-based E3-ligases. PMID:24067371

  18. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Linn, Anning

    1996-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK.

  19. The regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) regulates plasma membrane localization and function.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Shen, Ke; Fischer, Christopher C; Wedegaertner, Philip B

    2014-07-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated GPCRs at the plasma membrane (PM). Here GRK5/GRK4 chimeras and point mutations in GRK5 identify a short sequence within the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain in GRK5 that is critical for GRK5 PM localization. This region of the RGS domain of GRK5 coincides with a region of GRK6 and GRK1 shown to form a hydrophobic dimeric interface (HDI) in crystal structures. Coimmunoprecipitation (coIP) and acceptor photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays show that expressed GRK5 self-associates in cells, whereas GRK5-M165E/F166E (GRK5-EE), containing hydrophilic mutations in the HDI region of the RGS domain, displays greatly decreased coIP interactions. Both forcing dimerization of GRK5-EE, via fusion to leucine zipper motifs, and appending an extra C-terminal membrane-binding region to GRK5-EE (GRK5-EE-CT) recover PM localization. In addition, GRK5-EE displays a decreased ability to inhibit PAR1-induced calcium release compared with GRK5 wild type (wt). In contrast, PM-localized GRK5-EE-CaaX (appending a C-terminal prenylation and polybasic motif from K-ras) or GRK5-EE-CT shows comparable ability to GRK5 wt to inhibit PAR1-induced calcium release. The results suggest a novel model in which GRK5 dimerization is important for its plasma membrane localization and function. © 2014 Xu, Jiang, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. A short isoform of NOD2/CARD15, NOD2-S, is an endogenous inhibitor of NOD2/receptor-interacting protein kinase 2-induced signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Huse, Klaus; Till, Andreas; Hampe, Jochen; Hellmig, Stephan; Sina, Christian; Billmann, Susanne; von Kampen, Oliver; Waetzig, Georg H; Platzer, Matthias; Seegert, Dirk; Schreiber, Stefan

    2006-02-28

    Alterations in splicing patterns of genes contribute to the regulation of gene function by generating endogenous inhibitor or activator molecules. Nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD) 2 is an intracellular receptor for bacterial cell wall components and plays an important role in initiating immune responses against cytoinvasive pathogens. NOD2 overexpression sensitizes intestinal epithelial cells toward bacterial cell wall components, activates the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB, and induces the subsequent release of the chemotactic cytokine IL-8. Here, we have assessed the regulation and function of a transcript isoform of NOD2, NOD2-S, generated by the skipping of the third exon, which encodes for a protein that is truncated within the second caspase recruitment (CARD) domain. NOD2-S is preferentially expressed in the human colon and is up-regulated by the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10. Overexpression of NOD2-S down-regulates NOD2-induced NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 release. Moreover, NOD2-S also interferes with the maturation and secretion of pro-IL-1beta downstream of NOD2 and its adaptor molecule receptor-interacting protein kinase 2. We provide a molecular basis for these effects, as we show that NOD2-S interacts with both, NOD2 and receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 and inhibits the "nodosome" assembly by interfering with the oligomerization of NOD2. These data unveil another level of complexicity in the regulation of intracellular innate immunity and may have important implications for the molecular understanding of NOD/NALP protein-driven disease pathophysiology.

  1. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 3 and Protein Kinase C Phosphorylate the Distal C-Terminal Tail of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 and Mediate Recruitment of Beta-Arrestin.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiansong; Busillo, John M; Stumm, Ralf; Benovic, Jeffrey L

    2017-03-22

    Phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a key event for cell signaling and regulation of receptor function. Previously, using tandem mass spectrometry, we identified two phosphorylation sites at the distal C-terminal tail of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, but were unable to determine which specific residues were phosphorylated. Here, we demonstrate that serines 346 and/or 347 (Ser-346/7) of CXCR4 are phosphorylated upon stimulation with the agonist CXCL12 as well as a CXCR4 pepducin, ATI-2341. ATI-2341, a Gi-biased CXCR4 agonist, induced more robust phosphorylation of Ser-346/7 compared to CXCL12. Knockdown of GRK2, GRK3 or GRK6 reduced CXCL12-induced phosphorylation of Ser-346/7 with GRK3 knockdown having the strongest effect, while inhibition of the conventional PKC isoforms reduced phosphorylation of Ser-346/7 induced by either CXCL12 or ATI-2341. The loss of GRK3- or PKC-mediated phosphorylation of Ser-346/7 impaired the recruitment of β-arrestin to CXCR4. We also found that a pseudo-substrate peptide inhibitor for PKCζ effectively inhibited CXCR4 phosphorylation and signaling, most likely by functioning as a non-specific CXCR4 antagonist. Together, these studies demonstrate the role Ser-346/7 plays in arrestin recruitment and initiation of the process of receptor desensitization and provide insight into the dysregulation of CXCR4 observed in patients with various forms of WHIM syndrome.

  2. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) That Signal via Protein Kinase A (PKA) Cross-talk at Insulin Receptor Substrate 1 (IRS1) to Activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT Pathway.

    PubMed

    Law, Nathan C; White, Morris F; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary E

    2016-12-30

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) activate PI3K/v-AKT thymoma viral oncoprotein (AKT) to regulate many cellular functions that promote cell survival, proliferation, and growth. However, the mechanism by which GPCRs activate PI3K/AKT remains poorly understood. We used ovarian preantral granulosa cells (GCs) to elucidate the mechanism by which the GPCR agonist FSH via PKA activates the PI3K/AKT cascade. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) is secreted in an autocrine/paracrine manner by GCs and activates the IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) but, in the absence of FSH, fails to stimulate YXXM phosphorylation of IRS1 (insulin receptor substrate 1) required for PI3K/AKT activation. We show that PKA directly phosphorylates the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) regulatory subunit myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (MYPT1) to activate PP1 associated with the IGF1R-IRS1 complex. Activated PP1 is sufficient to dephosphorylate at least four IRS1 Ser residues, Ser(318), Ser(346), Ser(612), and Ser(789), and promotes IRS1 YXXM phosphorylation by the IGF1R to activate the PI3K/AKT cascade. Additional experiments indicate that this mechanism also occurs in breast cancer, thyroid, and preovulatory granulosa cells, suggesting that the PKA-dependent dephosphorylation of IRS1 Ser/Thr residues is a conserved mechanism by which GPCRs signal to activate the PI3K/AKT pathway downstream of the IGF1R.

  3. Duplication and Divergence of Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Protein Kinase (LRR-RLK) Genes in Basal Angiosperm Amborella trichopoda.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping-Li; Xie, Lu-Lu; Li, Peng-Wei; Mao, Jian-Feng; Liu, Hui; Gao, Shu-Min; Shi, Peng-Hao; Gong, Jun-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinases (LRR-RLKs) are the largest group of receptor-like kinases, which are one of the largest protein superfamilies in plants, and play crucial roles in development and stress responses. Although the evolution of LRR-RLK families has been investigated in some eudicot and monocot plants, no comprehensive evolutionary studies have been performed for these genes in basal angiosperms like Amborella trichopoda. In this study, we identified 94 LRR-RLK genes in the genome of A. trichopoda. The number of LRR-RLK genes in the genome of A. trichopoda is only 17-50% of that of several eudicot and monocot species. Tandem duplication and whole-genome duplication have made limited contributions to the expansion of LRR-RLK genes in A. trichopoda. According to the phylogenetic analysis, all A. trichopoda LRR-RLK genes can be organized into 18 subfamilies, which roughly correspond to the LRR-RLK subfamilies defined in Arabidopsis thaliana. Most LRR-RLK subfamilies are characterized by highly conserved protein structures, motif compositions, and gene structures. The unique gene structure, protein structures, and protein motif compositions of each subfamily provide evidence for functional divergence among LRR-RLK subfamilies. Moreover, the expression data of LRR-RLK genes provided further evidence for the functional diversification of them. In addition, selection analyses showed that most LRR-RLK protein sites are subject to purifying selection. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of LRR-RLK gene family in angiosperm and provide a framework for further functional investigation on A. trichopoda LRR-RLKs.

  4. Glucocorticoids curtail stimuli-induced CREB phosphorylation in TRH neurons through interaction of the glucocorticoid receptor with the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Sotelo-Rivera, Israim; Cote-Vélez, Antonieta; Uribe, Rosa-María; Charli, Jean-Louis; Joseph-Bravo, Patricia

    2017-03-01

    Corticosterone prevents cold-induced stimulation of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (Trh) expression in rats, and the stimulatory effect of dibutyryl cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (dB-cAMP) on Trh transcription in hypothalamic cultures. We searched for the mechanism of this interference. Immunohistochemical analyses of phosphorylated cAMP-response element binding protein (pCREB) were performed in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of Wistar rats, and in cell cultures of 17-day old rat hypothalami, or neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Cultures were incubated 1h with dB-cAMP, dexamethasone and both drugs combined; their nuclear extracts were used for chromatin immunoprecipitation; cytosolic or nuclear extracts for coimmunoprecipitation analyses of catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKAc) and of glucocorticoid receptor (GR); their subcellular distribution was analyzed by immunocytochemistry. Cold exposure increased pCREB in TRH neurons of rats PVN, effect blunted by corticosterone previous injection. Dexamethasone interfered with forskolin increase in nuclear pCREB and its binding to Trh promoter; antibodies against histone deacetylase-3 precipitated chromatin from nuclear extracts of hypothalamic cells treated with tri-iodothyronine but not with dB-cAMP + dexamethasone, discarding chromatin compaction as responsible mechanism. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses of cytosolic or nuclear extracts showed protein:protein interactions between activated GR and PKAc. Immunocytochemical analyses of hypothalamic or SH-SY5Y cells revealed diminished nuclear translocation of PKAc and GR in cells incubated with forskolin + dexamethasone, compared to either forskolin or dexamethasone alone. Glucocorticoids and cAMP exert mutual inhibition of Trh transcription through interaction of activated glucocorticoid receptor with protein kinase A catalytic subunit, reducing their nuclear translocation, limiting cAMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation and its binding to Trh promoter.

  5. Duplication and Divergence of Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Protein Kinase (LRR-RLK) Genes in Basal Angiosperm Amborella trichopoda

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping-Li; Xie, Lu-Lu; Li, Peng-Wei; Mao, Jian-Feng; Liu, Hui; Gao, Shu-Min; Shi, Peng-Hao; Gong, Jun-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinases (LRR-RLKs) are the largest group of receptor-like kinases, which are one of the largest protein superfamilies in plants, and play crucial roles in development and stress responses. Although the evolution of LRR-RLK families has been investigated in some eudicot and monocot plants, no comprehensive evolutionary studies have been performed for these genes in basal angiosperms like Amborella trichopoda. In this study, we identified 94 LRR-RLK genes in the genome of A. trichopoda. The number of LRR-RLK genes in the genome of A. trichopoda is only 17–50% of that of several eudicot and monocot species. Tandem duplication and whole-genome duplication have made limited contributions to the expansion of LRR-RLK genes in A. trichopoda. According to the phylogenetic analysis, all A. trichopoda LRR-RLK genes can be organized into 18 subfamilies, which roughly correspond to the LRR-RLK subfamilies defined in Arabidopsis thaliana. Most LRR-RLK subfamilies are characterized by highly conserved protein structures, motif compositions, and gene structures. The unique gene structure, protein structures, and protein motif compositions of each subfamily provide evidence for functional divergence among LRR-RLK subfamilies. Moreover, the expression data of LRR-RLK genes provided further evidence for the functional diversification of them. In addition, selection analyses showed that most LRR-RLK protein sites are subject to purifying selection. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of LRR-RLK gene family in angiosperm and provide a framework for further functional investigation on A. trichopoda LRR-RLKs. PMID:28066499

  6. PTP1B-dependent regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling by the actin-binding protein Mena.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Shannon K; Oudin, Madeleine J; Tadros, Jenny; Neil, Jason; Del Rosario, Amanda; Joughin, Brian A; Ritsma, Laila; Wyckoff, Jeff; Vasile, Eliza; Eddy, Robert; Philippar, Ulrike; Lussiez, Alisha; Condeelis, John S; van Rheenen, Jacco; White, Forest; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Gertler, Frank B

    2015-11-01

    During breast cancer progression, alternative mRNA splicing produces functionally distinct isoforms of Mena, an actin regulator with roles in cell migration and metastasis. Aggressive tumor cell subpopulations express Mena(INV), which promotes tumor cell invasion by potentiating EGF responses. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we report that Mena associates constitutively with the tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B and mediates a novel negative feedback mechanism that attenuates receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. On EGF stimulation, complexes containing Mena and PTP1B are recruited to the EGFR, causing receptor dephosphorylation and leading to decreased motility responses. Mena also interacts with the 5' inositol phosphatase SHIP2, which is important for the recruitment of the Mena-PTP1B complex to the EGFR. When Mena(INV) is expressed, PTP1B recruitment to the EGFR is impaired, providing a mechanism for growth factor sensitization to EGF, as well as HGF and IGF, and increased resistance to EGFR and Met inhibitors in signaling and motility assays. In sum, we demonstrate that Mena plays an important role in regulating growth factor-induced signaling. Disruption of this attenuation by Mena(INV) sensitizes tumor cells to low-growth factor concentrations, thereby increasing the migration and invasion responses that contribute to aggressive, malignant cell phenotypes.

  7. A YAC contig spanning a cluster of human type III receptor protein tyrosine kinase genes (PDGFRA-KIT-KDR) in chromosome segment 4q12

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Strunk, K.M.; Lee, S.T.

    1994-07-15

    The authors have mapped five genes encoding protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) to the pericentromeric region of human chromosome 4. PTK4 and TYRO4, which encode nonreceptor intracellular PTKs, are located at 4p12 and 4q13, respectively. The other three genes, PDGFRA, KIT, and KDR, encode type III transmembrane receptor PTKs for known ligands. The authors have developed a contig of 29 yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) spanning approximately 2 Mb of DNA at 4q12 that includes PDGFRA, KIT, and KDR, and have used this YAC contig to map 12 different sequence-tagged sites in this region. PDGFRA, KIT, and KDR thus constitute a cluster of genes at 4q12 encoding closely related type III receptor PTKs. Mutations of the human KIT gene result in piebaldism, an autosomal dominant disorder of melanocyte development. 42 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Suppression of the morphine-induced rewarding effect and G-protein activation in the lower midbrain following nerve injury in the mouse: involvement of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, S; Narita, M; Narita, M; Iino, M; Miyoshi, K; Suzuki, T

    2003-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether a state of neuropathic pain induced by sciatic nerve ligation could alter the rewarding effect, antinociception, and G-protein activation induced by a prototype of mu-opioid receptor agonist morphine in the mouse. The sciatic nerve ligation caused a long-lasting and profound thermal hyperalgesia. Under this neuropathic pain-like state, an i.c.v. morphine-induced place preference was observed in sham-operated mice but not in sciatic nerve-ligated mice. However, no differences in the antinociceptive effect of i.c.v.-administered morphine were noted between the groups. The increases in the binding of guanosine-5'-o-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate induced by morphine in lower midbrain membranes including the ventral tegmental area, which contributes to the expression of the rewarding effect of opioid, were significantly attenuated in sciatic nerve-ligated mice. On the other hand, there were no differences in the stimulation of guanosine-5'-o-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate binding to pons/medulla membranes, which plays an important role in the antinociception of mu-opioid receptor agonists, between the groups. In addition, no changes in levels of guanosine-5'-o-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate binding by either the selective delta- or kappa-opioid receptor agonists were noted in membrane of the lower midbrain and limbic forebrain membranes obtained from sciatic nerve-ligated mice. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that sciatic nerve ligation did not alter the mRNA product of mu-opioid receptors in the lower midbrain, indicating that a decrease in some mu-opioid receptor functions may result from the uncoupling of mu-opioid receptors from G-proteins. We found a significant increase in protein levels of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, which causes receptor phosphorylation in membranes of the lower midbrain but not in the pons/medulla, obtained from mice with nerve injury, whereas there were no

  9. Negative regulation of parathyroid hormone (PTH)-activated phospholipase C by PTH/PTH-related peptide receptor phosphorylation and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Tawfeek, Hesham A W; Abou-Samra, Abdul B

    2008-08-01

    PTH binding to the PTH/PTHrP receptor activates adenylate cyclase/protein kinase A (PKA) and phospholipase C (PLC) pathways and increases receptor phosphorylation. The mechanisms regulating PTH activation of PLC signaling are poorly understood. In the current study, we explored the role of PTH/PTHrP receptor phosphorylation and PKA in PTH activation of PLC. When treated with PTH, LLCPK-1 cells stably expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged wild-type (WT) PTH/PTHrP receptor show a small dose-dependent increase in PLC signaling as measured by inositol trisphosphate accumulation assay. In contrast, PTH treatment of LLCPK-1 cells stably expressing a GFP-tagged receptor mutated in its carboxyl-terminal tail so that it cannot be phosphorylated (PD-GFP) results in significantly higher PLC activation (P<0.001). The effects of PTH on PLC activation are dose dependent and reach maximum at the 100 nm PTH dose. When WT receptor-expressing cells are pretreated with H89, a specific inhibitor of PKA, PTH activation of PLC signaling is enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. H89 pretreatment in PD-GFP cells causes a further increase in PLC activation in response to PTH treatment. Interestingly, PTH and forskolin (adenylate cyclase/PKA pathway activator) treatment causes an increase in PLCbeta3 phosphorylation at the Ser1105 inhibitory site and that increase is blocked by the PKA inhibitor, H89. Expression of a mutant PLCbeta3 in which Ser1105 was mutated to alanine (PLCbeta3-SA), in WT or PD cells increases PTH stimulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation. Altogether, these data suggest that PTH signaling to PLC is negatively regulated by PTH/PTHrP receptor phosphorylation and PKA. Furthermore, phosphorylation at Ser1105 is demonstrated as a regulatory mechanism of PLCbeta3 by PKA.

  10. A novel role for c-Myc in G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 (GRK4) transcriptional regulation in human kidney proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Gildea, John J; Tran, Hanh T; Van Sciver, Robert E; Bigler Wang, Dora; Carlson, Julia M; Felder, Robin A

    2013-05-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 (GRK4) negatively regulates the dopaminergic system by desensitizing the dopamine-1-receptor. The expressional control of GRK4 has not been reported, but here we show that the transcription factor c-Myc binds to the promoter of GRK4 and positively regulates GRK4 protein expression in human renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs). Addition of phorbol esters to RPTCs not only increased c-Myc binding to the GRK4 promoter but also increased both phospho-c-Myc and GRK4 expression. The phorbol ester-mediated increase in GRK4 expression was completely blocked by the c-Myc inhibitor, 10074-G5, indicating that GRK4 is downstream of phospho-c-Myc. The autocrine production of angiotensin II (Ang II) in RPTCs increased the phosphorylation and activation of c-Myc and subsequently GRK4 expression. 3-Amino-4-thio-butyl sulfonate, an inhibitor of aminopeptidase A, increased RPTC secretion of Ang II. 3-Amino-4-thio-butyl sulfonate or Ang II increased the expression of both phospho-c-Myc and GRK4, which was blocked by 10074-G5. Blockade of the Ang II type 1 receptor with losartan decreased phospho-c-Myc and GRK4 expression. Both inhibition of c-Myc activity and blockade of Ang II type 1 receptor restored the coupling of dopamine-1-receptor to adenylyl cyclase stimulation in uncoupled RPTCs, whereas phorbol esters or Ang II caused the uncoupling of normally coupled RPTCs. We suggest that the Ang II type 1 receptor impairs dopamine-1-receptor function via c-Myc activation of GRK4. This novel pathway may be involved in the increase in blood pressure in hypertension that is mediated by increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system and decreased activity of the renal dopaminergic system.

  11. Inhibition of G-protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Prevents the Dysfunctional Cardiac Substrate Metabolism in Fatty Acid Synthase Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Abd Alla, Joshua; Graemer, Muriel; Fu, Xuebin; Quitterer, Ursula

    2016-02-05

    Impairment of myocardial fatty acid substrate metabolism is characteristic of late-stage heart failure and has limited treatment options. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) could counteract the disturbed substrate metabolism of late-stage heart failure. The heart failure-like substrate metabolism was reproduced in a novel transgenic model of myocardium-specific expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), the major palmitate-synthesizing enzyme. The increased fatty acid utilization of FASN transgenic neonatal cardiomyocytes rapidly switched to a heart failure phenotype in an adult-like lipogenic milieu. Similarly, adult FASN transgenic mice developed signs of heart failure. The development of disturbed substrate utilization of FASN transgenic cardiomyocytes and signs of heart failure were retarded by the transgenic expression of GRKInh, a peptide inhibitor of GRK2. Cardioprotective GRK2 inhibition required an intact ERK axis, which blunted the induction of cardiotoxic transcripts, in part by enhanced serine 273 phosphorylation of Pparg (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ). Conversely, the dual-specific GRK2 and ERK cascade inhibitor, RKIP (Raf kinase inhibitor protein), triggered dysfunctional cardiomyocyte energetics and the expression of heart failure-promoting Pparg-regulated genes. Thus, GRK2 inhibition is a novel approach that targets the dysfunctional substrate metabolism of the failing heart. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Transient Receptor Potential Channel 1 Deficiency Impairs Host Defense and Proinflammatory Responses to Bacterial Infection by Regulating Protein Kinase Cα Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xikun; Ye, Yan; Sun, Yuyang; Li, Xuefeng; Wang, Wenxue; Privratsky, Breanna; Tan, Shirui; Zhou, Zongguang; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yu-Quan; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) is a nonselective cation channel that is required for Ca2+ homeostasis necessary for cellular functions. However, whether TRPC1 is involved in infectious disease remains unknown. Here, we report a novel function for TRPC1 in host defense against Gram-negative bacteria. TRPC1−/− mice exhibited decreased survival, severe lung injury, and systemic bacterial dissemination upon infection. Furthermore, silencing of TRPC1 showed decreased Ca2+ entry, reduced proinflammatory cytokines, and lowered bacterial clearance. Importantly, TRPC1 functioned as an endogenous Ca2+ entry channel critical for proinflammatory cytokine production in both alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. We further identified that bacterium-mediated activation of TRPC1 was dependent on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) store depletion. After activation of phospholipase Cγ (PLC-γ), TRPC1 mediated Ca2+ entry and triggered protein kinase Cα (PKCα) activity to facilitate nuclear translocation of NF-κB/Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and augment the proinflammatory response, leading to tissue damage and eventually mortality. These findings reveal that TRPC1 is required for host defense against bacterial infections through the TLR4-TRPC1-PKCα signaling circuit. PMID:26031335

  13. Inhibition of G-protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Prevents the Dysfunctional Cardiac Substrate Metabolism in Fatty Acid Synthase Transgenic Mice*♦

    PubMed Central

    Abd Alla, Joshua; Graemer, Muriel; Fu, Xuebin; Quitterer, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of myocardial fatty acid substrate metabolism is characteristic of late-stage heart failure and has limited treatment options. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) could counteract the disturbed substrate metabolism of late-stage heart failure. The heart failure-like substrate metabolism was reproduced in a novel transgenic model of myocardium-specific expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN), the major palmitate-synthesizing enzyme. The increased fatty acid utilization of FASN transgenic neonatal cardiomyocytes rapidly switched to a heart failure phenotype in an adult-like lipogenic milieu. Similarly, adult FASN transgenic mice developed signs of heart failure. The development of disturbed substrate utilization of FASN transgenic cardiomyocytes and signs of heart failure were retarded by the transgenic expression of GRKInh, a peptide inhibitor of GRK2. Cardioprotective GRK2 inhibition required an intact ERK axis, which blunted the induction of cardiotoxic transcripts, in part by enhanced serine 273 phosphorylation of Pparg (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ). Conversely, the dual-specific GRK2 and ERK cascade inhibitor, RKIP (Raf kinase inhibitor protein), triggered dysfunctional cardiomyocyte energetics and the expression of heart failure-promoting Pparg-regulated genes. Thus, GRK2 inhibition is a novel approach that targets the dysfunctional substrate metabolism of the failing heart. PMID:26670611

  14. Regulation of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V1 protein synthesis by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway in colonic hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shanwei; Al-Thumairy, Hamad W; Hashmi, Fiza; Qiao, Li-Ya

    2017-09-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), also known as the capsaicin receptor or vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1), is expressed in nociceptive neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and participates in the transmission of pain. The present study investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms by which TRPV1 was regulated by nerve growth factor (NGF) signaling pathways in colonic hypersensitivity in response to colitis. We found that during colitis TRPV1 protein levels were significantly increased in specifically labeled colonic afferent neurons in both L1 and S1 DRGs. TRPV1 protein up-regulation in DRG was also enhanced by NGF treatment. We then found that TRPV1 protein up-regulation in DRG was regulated by activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway both in vivo and in vitro. Suppression of endogenous PI3K/Akt activity during colitis or NGF treatment with a specific PI3K inhibitor LY294002 reduced TRPV1 protein production in DRG neurons, and also reduced colitis-evoked TRPV1-mediated visceral hypersensitivity tested by hyper-responsiveness to colorectal distention (CRD) and von Frey filament stimulation of abdomen. Further studies showed that TRPV1 mRNA levels in the DRG were not regulated by either colitis or NGF. We then found that an up-regulation of the protein synthesis pathway was involved by which both colitis and NGF caused a PI3K-dependent increase in the phosphorylation level of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4E-BP)1. These results suggest a novel mechanism in colonic hypersensitivity which involves PI3K/Akt-mediated TRPV1 protein, not mRNA, up-regulation in primary afferent neurons, likely through activation of the protein synthesis pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Phosphorylation of the Yeast Choline Kinase by Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Kurnov, Vladlen; Kersting, Michael C.; Sreenivas, Avula; Carman, George M.

    2005-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae CKI1-encoded choline kinase catalyzes the committed step in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. The enzyme is phosphorylated on multiple serine residues, and some of this phosphorylation is mediated by protein kinase A. In this work, we examined the hypothesis that choline kinase is also phosphorylated by protein kinase C. Using choline kinase as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was dose- and time-dependent, and dependent on the concentrations of choline kinase (Km = 27 μg/ml) and ATP (Km = 15 μM). This phosphorylation, which occurred on a serine residue, was accompanied by a 1.6-fold stimulation of choline kinase activity. The synthetic peptide SRSSS25QRRHS (Vmax/Km = 17.5 mM-1 μmol min-1 mg-1) that contains the protein kinase C motif for Ser25 was a substrate for protein kinase C. A Ser25 to Ala (S25A) mutation in choline kinase resulted in a 60% decrease in protein kinase C phosphorylation of the enzyme. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of the S25A mutant enzyme confirmed that Ser25 was a protein kinase C target site. In vivo, the S25A mutation correlated with a decrease (55%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway whereas an S25D phosphorylation site mimic correlated with an increase (44%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Whereas the S25A (protein kinase C site) mutation did not affect the phosphorylation of choline kinase by protein kinase A, the S30A (protein kinase A site) mutation caused a 46% reduction in enzyme phosphorylation by protein kinase C. A choline kinase synthetic peptide (SQRRHS30LTRQ) containing Ser30 was a substrate (Vmax/Km = 3.0 mM−1 μmol min−1 mg−1) for protein kinase C. Comparison of phosphopeptide maps of the wild type and S30A mutant choline kinase enzymes phosphorylated by protein kinase C confirmed that Ser30 was also a target site for protein kinase C. PMID:15919656

  16. Characterization of the specific interaction between the DNA aptamer sgc8c and protein tyrosine kinase-7 receptors at the surface of T-cells by biosensing AFM.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Michael; Poturnayova, Alexandra; Lamprecht, Constanze; Weich, Sabine; Snejdarkova, Maja; Karpisova, Ivana; Hianik, Tibor; Ebner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We studied the interaction of the specific DNA aptamer sgc8c immobilized at the AFM tip with its corresponding receptor, the protein tyrosine kinase-7 (PTK7) embedded in the membrane of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells (Jurkat T-cells). Performing single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) experiments, we showed that the aptamer sgc8c bound with high probability (38.3 ± 7.48%) and high specificity to PTK7, as demonstrated by receptor blocking experiments and through comparison with the binding behavior of a nonspecific aptamer. The determined kinetic off-rate (koff = 5.16 s(-1)) indicates low dissociation of the sgc8c-PTK7 complex. In addition to the pulling force experiments, simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) experiments using AFM tips functionalized with sgc8c aptamers were realized on the outer regions surface of surface-immobilized Jurkat cells for the first time. This allowed determination of the distribution of PTK7 without any labeling and at near physiological conditions. As a result, we could show a homogeneous distribution of PTK7 molecules on the outer regions of ALL cells with a surface density of 325 ± 12 PTK7 receptors (or small receptor clusters) per μm(2). Graphical Abstract The specific interaction of the DNA aptamer sgc8c and protein tyrosine kinase-7 (PTK7) on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells was characterized. AFM based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) yielded a kinetic off-rate of 5.16 s(-1) of the complex. Simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) revealed a PTK7 density of 325 ± 12 molecules or clusters per μm(2) in the cell membrane.

  17. Calycosin Promotes Angiogenesis Involving Estrogen Receptor and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Signaling Pathway in Zebrafish and HUVEC

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen Hua; Zhang, Zai Jun; Hu, Guang; Cheang, Lorita Chi Veng; Alex, Deepa; Hoi, Maggie Pui Man; Kwan, Yiu Wa; Chan, Shun Wan; Leung, George Pak Heng; Lee, Simon Ming Yuen

    2010-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis plays an important role in a wide range of physiological processes, and many diseases are associated with the dysregulation of angiogenesis. Radix Astragali is a Chinese medicinal herb commonly used for treating cardiovascular disorders and has been shown to possess angiogenic effect in previous studies but its active constituent and underlying mechanism remain unclear. The present study investigates the angiogenic effects of calycosin, a major isoflavonoid isolated from Radix Astragali, in vitro and in vivo. Methodology Tg(fli1:EGFP) and Tg(fli1:nEGFP) transgenic zebrafish embryos were treated with different concentrations of calycosin (10, 30, 100 µM) from 72 hpf to 96 hpf prior morphological observation and angiogenesis phenotypes assessment. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to calycosin (10, 100 µM) from 72 hpf to 78 hpf before gene-expression analysis. The effects of VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor on calycosin-induced angiogenesis were studied using 72 hpf Tg(fli1:EGFP) and Tg(fli1:nEGFP) zebrafish embryos. The pro-angiogenic effects of calycosin were compared with raloxifene and tamoxifen in 72 hpf Tg(fli1:EGFP) zebrafish embryos. The binding affinities of calycosin to estrogen receptors (ERs) were evaluated by cell-free and cell-based estrogen receptor binding assays. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell cultures (HUVEC) were pretreated with different concentrations of calycosin (3, 10, 30, 100 µM) for 48 h then tested for cell viability and tube formation. The role of MAPK signaling in calycosin-induced angiogenesis was evaluated using western blotting. Conclusion Calycosin was shown to induce angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cell cultures (HUVEC) in vitro and zebrafish embryos in vivo via the up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 mRNA expression. It was demonstrated that calycosin acted similar to other selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), such as raloxifene and

  18. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, M.; Hibi, M.; Lin, A.

    1997-02-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE is disclosed. The polypeptide has serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences. The method of detection of JNK is also provided. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites. 44 figs.

  19. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2004-03-16

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  20. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Lin, Anning

    1999-11-30

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  1. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1998-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  2. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit; Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2005-01-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  3. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  4. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  5. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2005-03-08

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  6. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1999-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  7. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  8. EP4 and EP2 receptor activation of protein kinase A by prostaglandin E2 impairs macrophage phagocytosis of Clostridium sordellii

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Lisa M.; Thelen, Tennille; Fordyce, Krystle; Bourdonnay, Emilie; Lewis, Casey; Yu, Han; Zhang, Junyong; Xie, Jingli; Serezani, Carlos H.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Aronoff, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Problem Clostridium sordellii causes endometrial infections but little is known regarding host defenses against this pathogen. Method of Study We tested the hypothesis that the immunoregulatory lipid prostaglandin (PG) E2 suppresses human macrophage clearance of C. sordellii through receptor-induced increases in intracellular cAMP. The THP-1 macrophage cell line was used to quantify C. sordellii phagocytosis. Results PGE2 increased cAMP levels, activated protein kinase A (PKA), and inhibited the class A scavenger receptor-dependent phagocytosis of C. sordellii. Activation of the EP2 and EP4 receptors increased intracellular cAMP and inhibited phagocytosis, with evidence favoring a more important role for EP4 over EP2. This was supported by EP receptor expression data and the use of pharmacological receptor antagonists. In addition, the PKA isoform RI appeared to be more important than RII in mediating the suppression of ingestion of C. sordellii. Conclusions The endogenous lipid mediator PGE2 impairs human innate immune responses against C. sordellii. PMID:23902376

  9. Leishmania MAP kinases--familiar proteins in an unusual context.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Martin

    2007-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases are well-known mediators of signal transduction of higher eukaryotes regulating important processes like proliferation, differentiation, stress response and apoptosis. In Leishmania, the typical three-tiered module of MAP kinase signal transduction pathways is present. However, typical activators like cell surface receptors and substrates such as RNA polymerase II transcription factors are missing. Here, I describe the set of 15 putative mitogen-activated protein kinases encoded in the Leishmania genome and discuss their potential function.

  10. Protein kinase C-alpha regulates insulin action and degradation by interacting with insulin receptor substrate-1 and 14-3-3 epsilon.

    PubMed

    Oriente, Francesco; Andreozzi, Francesco; Romano, Chiara; Perruolo, Giuseppe; Perfetti, Anna; Fiory, Francesca; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2005-12-09

    Protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha exerts a regulatory function on insulin action. We showed by overlay blot that PKCalpha directly binds a 180-kDa protein, corresponding to IRS-1, and a 30-kDa molecular species, identified as 14-3-3epsilon. In intact NIH-3T3 cells overexpressing insulin receptors (3T3-hIR), insulin selectively increased PKCalpha co-precipitation with IRS-1, but not with IRS-2, and with 14-3-3epsilon, but not with other 14-3-3 isoforms. Overexpression of 14-3-3epsilon in 3T3-hIR cells significantly reduced IRS-1-bound PKCalpha activity, without altering IRS-1/PKCalpha co-precipitation. 14-3-3epsilon overexpression also increased insulin-stimulated insulin receptor and IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, followed by increased activation of Raf1, ERK1/2, and Akt/protein kinase B. Insulin-induced glycogen synthase activity and thymidine incorporation were also augmented. Consistently, selective depletion of 14-3-3epsilon by antisense oligonucleotides caused a 3-fold increase of IRS-1-bound PKCalpha activity and a similarly sized reduction of insulin receptor and IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and signaling. In turn, selective inhibition of PKCalpha expression by antisense oligonucleotides reverted the negative effect of 14-3-3epsilon depletion on insulin signaling. Moreover, PKCalpha inhibition was accompanied by a >2-fold decrease of insulin degradation. Similar results were also obtained by overexpressing 14-3-3epsilon. Thus, in NIH-3T3 cells, insulin induces the formation of multimolecular complexes, including IRS-1, PKCalpha, and 14-3-3epsilon. The presence of 14-3-3epsilon in the complex is not necessary for IRS-1/PKCalpha interaction but modulates PKCalpha activity, thereby regulating insulin signaling and degradation.

  11. Prednisone inhibits the focal adhesion kinase/receptor activator of NF-κB ligand/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in rats with adriamycin-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ye, Minyuan; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Xiaoying; Chen, Xuelan; Wu, Xinhong; Lin, Xiuqin; Liu, Yafang

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effects of prednisone on adriamycin-induced nephritic rat kidney damage via the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)/mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. An adriamycin‑induced nephritic rat model was established to investigate these mechanisms. A total of 30 healthy male Sprague‑Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the normal, model or prednisone group. Samples of urine were collected over the course of 24 h at days 7, 14, and 28, and renal cortex tissue samples were harvested at days 14, and 28 following nephritic rat model establishment. The total urinary protein content was measured by biuret colorimetry. Pathological changes in the kidney tissue samples were observed using an electron microscope. The mRNA expressions levels of FAK, RANKL, p38, extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK), c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK), and nephrin were then quantified by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, the protein expressions levels of FAK, RANKL, p38, ERK, JNK, phosphorylated (p)‑FAK, p‑ERK, and p‑JNK were quantified by western blotting. As compared with the normal group, the protein expression levels of FAK, RANKL, p-FAK, p38 and p-ERK in the model group were increased. In the prednisone group, the protein expression levels of p-ERK decreased, as compared with the normal group. In the prednisone group, the urinary protein levels, the protein expression levels of FAK, RANKL, p38, p-FAK, p-p38 and the mRNA expression levels of FAK, p38, RANKL, ERK, JNK decreased, as compared with the model group. In the prednisone group, the mRNA and protein expression levels of nephrin and the serum expression levels of RANKL increased, the serum expression levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG) were decreased, as compared with the model group. No significant changes in the protein expression

  12. Fc gamma receptor cross-linking activates p42, p38, and JNK/SAPK mitogen-activated protein kinases in murine macrophages: role for p42MAPK in Fc gamma receptor-stimulated TNF-alpha synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rose, D M; Winston, B W; Chan, E D; Riches, D W; Gerwins, P; Johnson, G L; Henson, P M

    1997-04-01

    Fc gamma R cross-linking on murine macrophages resulted in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members p42MAPK, p38, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK). The temporal pattern of activation was distinct for each kinase. p42MAPK activation peaked at 5 min after receptor cross-linking, while peak p38 activity occurred 5 to 10 min later. Maximal JNK/SAPK activation occurred 20 min after Fc gamma R cross-linking. The selective MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 (MEK-1) inhibitor PD 098059 inhibited activation of p42MAPK induced by Fc gamma R cross-linking, but not p38 or JNK/SAPK activation. PD 098059 also inhibited the synthesis of TNF-alpha induced by Fc gamma R cross-linking (IC50 approximately 0.1 microM). Together, these results suggest that 1) the activation of MAPKs may play a role in Fc gammaR signal transduction, and 2) the activation of p42MAPK is necessary for Fc gamma R cross-linking-induced TNF-alpha synthesis.

  13. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 promotes triple-negative breast cancer cell migration and invasion via activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Metastasis is the main cause of breast cancer morbidity and mortality. Processes that allow for tumor cell migration and invasion are important therapeutic targets. Here we demonstrate that receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 (RIP2), a kinase known to be involved in inflammatory processes, also has novel roles in cancer cell migration and invasion. Methods A total of six breast cancer expression databases, including The Cancer Genome Atlas, were assessed for RIP2 expression among various clinical subtypes and its role as a prognostic biomarker. mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for RIP2 was performed on 17 stage III breast cancers to determine if there was a correlation between RIP2 expression and lymph node involvement. RNA-interference was used to knock-down RIP2 expression in MDA-MB-231, Htb126, SUM149PT, MCF7, T47D, and HCC1428 cells. Cell migration and invasion were measured in vitro by scratch/wound healing and transwell migration assays. A xenograft mouse model was used to assess tumor growth and chemosensitivity to docetaxel in vivo in MDA-MB-231 cells with and without RIP2 small hairpin RNA knockdown. Western blot and immunofluorescence imaging were used to evaluate protein expressions. Results Interrogation of expression databases showed that RIP2 expression is significantly over-expressed in triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC: estrogen-receptor (ER) negative, progesterone-receptor (PR) negative, Her2/neu- (Her2) negative), compared to other clinical subtypes. High RIP2 expression correlates with worse progression-free survival using a combined breast cancer expression array dataset consisting of 946 patients. Multivariate analysis shows RIP2 as an independent prognostic biomarker. Knock-down of RIP2 significantly decreases migration in both scratch/wound healing and transwell migration assays in MDA-MB-231, Htb126, SUM149PT, MCF7, and T47D cells and is correlated with decreased Nuclear Factor-kappaB and c-Jun N

  14. Genome-wide identification, characterization and expression analysis of populus leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs) comprise the largest group within the receptor-like kinase (RLK) superfamily in plants. This gene family plays critical and diverse roles in plant growth, development and stress response. Although the LRR-RLK families in Arabidopsis and rice have been previously analyzed, no comprehensive studies have been performed on this gene family in tree species. Results In this work, 379 LRR-RLK genes were retrieved from the Populus trichocarpa genome and further grouped into 14 subfamilies based on their structural and sequence similarities. Approximately 82% (312 out of 379) of the PtLRR-RLK genes are located in segmental duplication blocks indicating the role of duplication process in the expansion of this gene family. The conservation and variation in motif composition and intron/exon arrangement among PtLRR-RLK subfamilies were analyzed to provide additional support for their phylogenetic relationship and more importantly to indicate the potential divergence in their functions. Expression profiling of PtLRR-RLKs showed that they were differentially expressed in different organs and tissues and some PtLRR-RLKs were specifically expressed in meristem tissues, which indicated their potential involvement in tissue development and differentiation. For most AtLRR-RLKs with defined functions, Populus homologues exhibiting similar expression patterns could be identified, which might indicate the functional conservation during evolution. Among 12 types of environmental cues analyzed by the genome-wide microarray data, PtLRR-RLKs showed specific responses to shoot organogenesis, wounding, low ammonium feeding, hypoxia and seasonal dormancy, but not to drought, re-watering after drought, flooding, AlCl3 treatment and bacteria or fungi treatments. Conclusions This study provides the first comprehensive genomic analysis of the Populus LRR-RLK gene family. Segmental duplication contributes significantly to the expansion

  15. Drug design for protein kinases and phosphatases: flexible-receptor docking, binding affinity and specificity, and drug-binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chung F; Bairy, Sneha

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews some of our experiences on applying computational techniques to aid the design of drugs targeting protein kinases and phosphatases. It is not a comprehensive review. Rather, it focuses on several less explored approaches or ideas that we have experiences on. It reviews some recent improvements on the Poisson-Boltzmann/Surface Area model for calculating binding affinity and discusses ways to perform calculations that are more tolerant to statistical and systematic errors. Several new ways to incorporate protein flexibility in molecular docking and estimating binding affinity are also discussed. Its discussions also go beyond binding affinity to considering drug-binding kinetics, not only on investigating protein-ligand interactions in isolation, but also on accounting for upstream and downstream influences that can occur in cells, through kinetic modeling of cell signaling. This review also describes a quick molecular simulation method for understanding drug-binding kinetics at the molecular level, with the hope of generating guiding principles for designing drugs with the desired kinetic properties. Sources of drug-binding selectivity that appear obvious but often overlooked are also discussed.

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptors harboring kinase domain mutations associate with the heat shock protein 90 chaperone and are destabilized following exposure to geldanamycins.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Takeshi; Lowell, April M; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Shapiro, Geoffrey I

    2005-07-15

    Somatic mutations in the kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), including L858R and exon 19 deletions, underlie responsiveness to gefitinib and erlotinib in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Acquired resistance to these tyrosine kinase inhibitors is in some cases mediated by a second mutation, T790M. Ansamycin antibiotics, such as geldanamycin, potently inhibit heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), promoting ubiquitin-mediated degradation of oncogenic kinases that require the chaperone for proper conformational folding. Here, we show that L858R and deletion mutant EGFR proteins found in NSCLC interact with the chaperone and are sensitive to degradation following Hsp90 inhibition. In NIH/3T3 cells expressing either wild-type or mutant EGFR, diminution of expression of both L858R and EGFR delL747-S752, P753S occurred following exposure to 50 nmol/L geldanamycin over 24 hours, whereas partial diminution of wild-type EGFR required a minimum of 200 nmol/L drug. In time course experiments, mutant EGFR expression was depleted after only 4 hours of exposure to 1 micromol/L geldanamycin, whereas diminution of wild-type EGFR was less substantial and seen only following 12 hours. Similarly, EGFR proteins in NSCLC cell lines harboring EGFR mutations, including NCI-H1650, NCI-H3255, and NCI-H1975, were also more sensitive to geldanamycin-induced degradation compared with the protein in wild-type cells. Exposure of EGFR-mutant cell lines to geldanamycin induced marked depletion of phospho-Akt and cyclin D1 as well as apoptosis. These data suggest mutational activation of EGFR is associated with dependence on Hsp90 for stability and that Hsp90 inhibition may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of EGFR-mutant NSCLC.

  17. Progesterone induces progesterone receptor gene (PGR) expression via rapid activation of protein kinase pathways required for cooperative estrogen receptor alpha (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) genomic action at ER/PR target genes.

    PubMed

    Diep, Caroline H; Ahrendt, Hannah; Lange, Carol A

    2016-10-01

    Progesterone Receptors (PRs) are critical effectors of estrogen receptor (ER) signaling required for mammary gland development and reproductive proficiency. In breast and reproductive tract malignancies, PR expression is a clinical prognostic marker of ER action. While estrogens primarily regulate PR expression, other factors likely contribute to a dynamic range of receptor expression across diverse tissues. In this study, we identified estrogen-independent but progestin (R5020)-dependent regulation of ER target genes including PGR in ER+/PR+ cancer cell lines. R5020 (10nM-10μM range) induced dose-dependent PR mRNA and protein expression in the absence of estrogen but required both PR and ERα. Antagonists of either PR (RU486, onapristone) or ERα (ICI 182,780) attenuated R5020 induction of TFF1, CTSD, and PGR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays performed on ER+/PR+ cells demonstrated that both ERα and PR were recruited to the same ERE/Sp1 site-containing region of the PGR proximal promoter in response to high dose progestin (10μM). Recruitment of ERα and PR to chromatin and subsequent PR mRNA induction were dependent upon rapid activation of MAPK/ERK and AKT; inhibition of these kinase pathways via U0126 or LY294002 blocked these events. Overall, we have identified a novel mechanism of ERα activation initiated by rapid PR-dependent kinase pathway activation and associated with phosphorylation of ERα Ser118 for estrogen-independent but progestin-dependent ER/PR cross talk. These studies may provide insight into mechanisms of persistent ER-target gene expression during periods of hormone (i.e. estrogen) ablation and suggest caution following prolonged treatment with aromatase or CYP17 inhibitors (i.e. contexts when progesterone levels may be abnormally elevated). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. SRPK1 and Akt Protein Kinases Phosphorylate the RS Domain of Lamin B Receptor with Distinct Specificity: A Combined Biochemical and In Silico Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nikolakaki, Eleni; Vlassi, Metaxia; Giannakouros, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Activated Akt has been previously implicated in acting on RS domain-containing proteins. However, it has been questioned whether its action is direct or it is mediated by co-existing SR kinase activity. To address this issue we studied in detail the phosphorylation of Lamin B Receptor (LBR) by Akt. Using synthetic peptides and a set of recombinant proteins expressing mutants of the LBR RS domain we now demonstrate that while all serines of the RS domain represent more or less equal phosphoacceptor sites for SRPK1, Ser80 and Ser82 are mainly targeted by Akt. 3D-modeling combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that amongst short, overlapping LBR RS-containing peptides complying with the minimum Akt recognition consensus sequence, only those bearing phosphosites either at Ser80 or Ser82 are able to fit into the active site of Akt, at least as effectively as its known substrate, GSK3-β. Combined our results provide evidence that Akt kinases directly phosphorylate an RS domain-containing protein and that both the residues N-terminal the phosphosite and at position +1 are essential for Akt specificity, with the latter substrate position being compatible with the arginine residue of RS-repeats. PMID:27105349

  19. DNA-Encoded Library Screening Identifies Benzo[b][1,4]oxazepin-4-ones as Highly Potent and Monoselective Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Harris, Philip A; King, Bryan W; Bandyopadhyay, Deepak; Berger, Scott B; Campobasso, Nino; Capriotti, Carol A; Cox, Julie A; Dare, Lauren; Dong, Xiaoyang; Finger, Joshua N; Grady, LaShadric C; Hoffman, Sandra J; Jeong, Jae U; Kang, James; Kasparcova, Viera; Lakdawala, Ami S; Lehr, Ruth; McNulty, Dean E; Nagilla, Rakesh; Ouellette, Michael T; Pao, Christina S; Rendina, Alan R; Schaeffer, Michelle C; Summerfield, Jennifer D; Swift, Barbara A; Totoritis, Rachel D; Ward, Paris; Zhang, Aming; Zhang, Daohua; Marquis, Robert W; Bertin, John; Gough, Peter J

    2016-03-10

    The recent discovery of the role of receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1) kinase in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated inflammation has led to its emergence as a highly promising target for the treatment of multiple inflammatory diseases. We screened RIP1 against GSK's DNA-encoded small-molecule libraries and identified a novel highly potent benzoxazepinone inhibitor series. We demonstrate that this template possesses complete monokinase selectivity for RIP1 plus unique species selectivity for primate versus nonprimate RIP1. We elucidate the conformation of RIP1 bound to this benzoxazepinone inhibitor driving its high kinase selectivity and design specific mutations in murine RIP1 to restore potency to levels similar to primate RIP1. This series differentiates itself from known RIP1 inhibitors in combining high potency and kinase selectivity with good pharmacokinetic profiles in rodents. The favorable developability profile of this benzoxazepinone template, as exemplified by compound 14 (GSK'481), makes it an excellent starting point for further optimization into a RIP1 clinical candidate.

  20. Sequence survey of receptor tyrosine kinases reveals mutations in glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Vikki; Huang, Jiaqi; Stockwell, Tim; Ferriera, Steve; Buzko, Oleksandr; Levy, Samuel; Busam, Dana; Li, Kelvin; Edwards, Jennifer B.; Eberhart, Charles; Murphy, Kathleen M.; Tsiamouri, Alexia; Beeson, Karen; Simpson, Andrew J. G.; Venter, J. Craig; Riggins, Gregory J.; Strausberg, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    It is now clear that tyrosine kinases represent attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology now provide the opportunity to survey mutational changes in cancer in a high-throughput and comprehensive manner. Here we report on the sequence analysis of members of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) gene family in the genomes of glioblastoma brain tumors. Previous studies have identified a number of molecular alterations in glioblastoma, including amplification of the RTK epidermal growth factor receptor. We have identified mutations in two other RTKs: (i) fibroblast growth receptor 1, including the first mutations in the kinase domain in this gene observed in any cancer, and (ii) a frameshift mutation in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α gene. Fibroblast growth receptor 1, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α, and epidermal growth factor receptor are all potential entry points to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase intracellular signaling pathways already known to be important for neoplasia. Our results demonstrate the utility of applying DNA sequencing technology to systematically assess the coding sequence of genes within cancer genomes. PMID:16186508

  1. Protein Kinase D and Gβγ Subunits Mediate Agonist-evoked Translocation of Protease-activated Receptor-2 from the Golgi Apparatus to the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Dane D; Zhao, Peishen; Jimenez-Vargas, Nestor N; Lieu, TinaMarie; Gerges, Marina; Yeatman, Holly R; Canals, Meritxell; Vanner, Stephen J; Poole, Daniel P; Bunnett, Nigel W

    2016-05-20

    Agonist-evoked endocytosis of G protein-coupled receptors has been extensively studied. The mechanisms by which agonists stimulate mobilization and plasma membrane translocation of G protein-coupled receptors from intracellular stores are unexplored. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) traffics to lysosomes, and sustained protease signaling requires mobilization and plasma membrane trafficking of PAR2 from Golgi stores. We evaluated the contribution of protein kinase D (PKD) and Gβγ to this process. In HEK293 and KNRK cells, the PAR2 agonists trypsin and 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 activated PKD in the Golgi apparatus, where PKD regulates protein trafficking. PAR2 activation induced translocation of Gβγ, a PKD activator, to the Golgi apparatus, determined by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer between Gγ-Venus and giantin-Rluc8. Inhibitors of PKD (CRT0066101) and Gβγ (gallein) prevented PAR2-stimulated activation of PKD. CRT0066101, PKD1 siRNA, and gallein all inhibited recovery of PAR2-evoked Ca(2+) signaling. PAR2 with a photoconvertible Kaede tag was expressed in KNRK cells to examine receptor translocation from the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane. Irradiation of the Golgi region (405 nm) induced green-red photo-conversion of PAR2-Kaede. Trypsin depleted PAR2-Kaede from the Golgi apparatus and repleted PAR2-Kaede at the plasma membrane. CRT0066101 inhibited PAR2-Kaede translocation to the plasma membrane. CRT0066101 also inhibited sustained protease signaling to colonocytes and nociceptive neurons that naturally express PAR2 and mediate protease-evoked inflammation and nociception. Our results reveal a major role for PKD and Gβγ in agonist-evoked mobilization of intracellular PAR2 stores that is required for sustained signaling by extracellular proteases.

  2. UV activation of receptor tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Coffer, P J; Burgering, B M; Peppelenbosch, M P; Bos, J L; Kruijer, W

    1995-08-03

    The exposure of mammalian cells to ultraviolet radiation (UV) may lead to DNA damage resulting in mutation and thus possibly cancer, while irradiation can further act as a potent tumor promoter. In addition UV induces p21ras-mediated signalling leading to activation of transcription factors such as AP-1 and NF-kappa B, as well as activation of the Src tyrosine kinase. This 'UV-response' has been well studied in mammalian cells and furthermore is conserved in yeast, however the most upstream components of this signal transduction pathway have remained elusive. Here we show that UV rapidly activates both the EGF receptor and insulin receptor, as shown by tyrosine phosphorylation of these receptors. We demonstrate that this activation is due to autophosphorylation as it only occurs in cells containing receptors with a functional kinase domain. We have further analysed the propagation of the UV-induced signal to downstream events such as, IRS-1 and Shc tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation, leukotriene synthesis, MAP kinase activation and gene induction all of which are activated by UV irradiation. Importantly, we demonstrate that in cells expressing a 'kinase-dead' receptor mutant the UV-response is inhibited, blocking leukotriene synthesis, MAP kinase activation and transcriptional induction. Furthermore, prior-stimulation of cells with UV appears to reduce further responsiveness to addition of growth factor suggesting a common signaling pathway. These data demonstrate a critical role for receptor-mediated events in regulating the response mammalian cells to UV exposure.