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Sample records for recessive consanguineous pakistani

  1. Homozygosity Mapping and Genetic Analysis of Autosomal Recessive Retinal Dystrophies in 144 Consanguineous Pakistani Families

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Chen, Yabin; Jiao, Xiaodong; Jin, Chongfei; Jiang, Dan; Tanwar, Mukesh; Ma, Zhiwei; Huang, Li; Ma, Xiaoyin; Sun, Wenmin; Chen, Jianjun; Ma, Yan; M'hamdi, Oussama; Govindarajan, Gowthaman; Cabrera, Patricia E.; Li, Jiali; Gupta, Nikhil; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Khan, Shaheen N.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Akram, Javed; Ayyagari, Radha; Sieving, Paul A.; Riazuddin, S. Amer; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The Pakistan Punjab population has been a rich source for identifying genes causing or contributing to autosomal recessive retinal degenerations (arRD). This study was carried out to delineate the genetic architecture of arRD in the Pakistani population. Methods The genetic origin of arRD in a total of 144 families selected only for having consanguineous marriages and multiple members affected with arRD was examined. Of these, causative mutations had been identified in 62 families while only the locus had been identified for an additional 15. The remaining 67 families were subjected to homozygosity exclusion mapping by screening of closely flanking microsatellite markers at 180 known candidate genes/loci followed by sequencing of the candidate gene for pathogenic changes. Results Of these 67 families subjected to homozygosity mapping, 38 showed homozygosity for at least one of the 180 regions, and sequencing of the corresponding genes showed homozygous cosegregating mutations in 27 families. Overall, mutations were detected in approximately 61.8 % (89/144) of arRD families tested, with another 10.4% (15/144) being mapped to a locus but without a gene identified. Conclusions These results suggest the involvement of unmapped novel genes in the remaining 27.8% (40/144) of families. In addition, this study demonstrates that homozygosity mapping remains a powerful tool for identifying the genetic defect underlying genetically heterogeneous arRD disorders in consanguineous marriages for both research and clinical applications. PMID:28418496

  2. Genetic dissection of two Pakistani families with consanguineous localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis (LAH).

    PubMed

    Abbas, Seyyedha; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Khan, Shakir; Yousaf, Muhammad Jawad; Azeem, Zahid; Razak, Suhail; Qaiser, Fatima

    2014-07-01

    Genetic analysis of two consanguineous Pakistani families with localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis was performed with the goal to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. Genomic DNA extraction had been done from peripheral blood samples. Extracted DNA was then subjected to PCR (polymerase chain reaction) for amplification. Linkage analysis was performed using 8% polyacrylamide gel. Candidate gene was sequenced after gene linkage supported at highly polymorphic microsatellite markers of the diseased region. Both families were initially tested for linkage to known genes, which were involved in human hereditary hypotrichosis, by genotyping Highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. Family B showed partial linkage at P2RY5 gene on chromosome 13q14.11-q21.32; hence, all exonic regions and their introns boundaries were subjected to DNA sequencing for any pathogenic mutation. Both families were tested for linkage by genotyping polymorphic microsatellite markers linked to known alopecia loci. Family A excluded all known diseased regions that is suggestive of some novel chromosomal disorder. However, sequencing of P2RY5 gene in family B showed no pathogenic mutation.

  3. Genetic dissection of two Pakistani families with consanguineous localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis (LAH)

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Seyyedha; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Khan, Shakir; Yousaf, Muhammad Jawad; Azeem, Zahid; Razak, Suhail; Qaiser, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Genetic analysis of two consanguineous Pakistani families with localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis was performed with the goal to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. Materials and Methods: Genomic DNA extraction had been done from peripheral blood samples. Extracted DNA was then subjected to PCR (polymerase chain reaction) for amplification. Linkage analysis was performed using 8% polyacrylamide gel. Candidate gene was sequenced after gene linkage supported at highly polymorphic microsatellite markers of the diseased region. Results: Both families were initially tested for linkage to known genes, which were involved in human hereditary hypotrichosis, by genotyping Highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. Family B showed partial linkage at P2RY5 gene on chromosome 13q14.11-q21.32; hence, all exonic regions and their introns boundaries were subjected to DNA sequencing for any pathogenic mutation. Conclusion: Both families were tested for linkage by genotyping polymorphic microsatellite markers linked to known alopecia loci. Family A excluded all known diseased regions that is suggestive of some novel chromosomal disorder. However, sequencing of P2RY5 gene in family B showed no pathogenic mutation. PMID:25429336

  4. Exome sequencing of Pakistani consanguineous families identifies 30 novel candidate genes for recessive intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Riazuddin, S; Hussain, M; Razzaq, A; Iqbal, Z; Shahzad, M; Polla, D L; Song, Y; van Beusekom, E; Khan, A A; Tomas-Roca, L; Rashid, M; Zahoor, M Y; Wissink-Lindhout, W M; Basra, M A R; Ansar, M; Agha, Z; van Heeswijk, K; Rasheed, F; Van de Vorst, M; Veltman, J A; Gilissen, C; Akram, J; Kleefstra, T; Assir, M Z; Grozeva, D; Carss, K; Raymond, F L; O'Connor, T D; Riazuddin, S A; Khan, S N; Ahmed, Z M; de Brouwer, A P M; van Bokhoven, H; Riazuddin, S

    2016-07-26

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder, affecting 1-3% of the general population. Although research into the genetic causes of ID has recently gained momentum, identification of pathogenic mutations that cause autosomal recessive ID (ARID) has lagged behind, predominantly due to non-availability of sizeable families. Here we present the results of exome sequencing in 121 large consanguineous Pakistani ID families. In 60 families, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous DNA variants in a single gene, 30 affecting reported ID genes and 30 affecting novel candidate ID genes. Potential pathogenicity of these alleles was supported by co-segregation with the phenotype, low frequency in control populations and the application of stringent bioinformatics analyses. In another eight families segregation of multiple pathogenic variants was observed, affecting 19 genes that were either known or are novel candidates for ID. Transcriptome profiles of normal human brain tissues showed that the novel candidate ID genes formed a network significantly enriched for transcriptional co-expression (P<0.0001) in the frontal cortex during fetal development and in the temporal-parietal and sub-cortex during infancy through adulthood. In addition, proteins encoded by 12 novel ID genes directly interact with previously reported ID proteins in six known pathways essential for cognitive function (P<0.0001). These results suggest that disruptions of temporal parietal and sub-cortical neurogenesis during infancy are critical to the pathophysiology of ID. These findings further expand the existing repertoire of genes involved in ARID, and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms and the transcriptome map of ID.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 26 July 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.109.

  5. The influence of the wahlund effect on the consanguinity hypothesis: consequences for recessive disease incidence in a socially structured pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Overall, Andrew D J

    2009-01-01

    Standard population genetic theory predicts that the relative risk of inheriting recessive disorders between consanguineous and non-consanguineous populations can be manyfold. However, it is rarely considered that consanguineous populations might be composites of socially defined endogamous and genetically differentiated subpopulations. A recent study of a British Pakistani population found evidence to suggest that extended families (biraderi) could contribute significantly to excessive homozygosity over that contributed by consanguinity. This study sets out to illustrate the potential of cryptic population substructure (the Wahlund effect) to contribute to recessive disease incidence in populations with complex social structure. Population parameter estimates were drawn from a recent study of the British Pakistani population along with allele frequency estimates of nine recessive inborn errors of metabolism. The relative contribution of consanguinity and biraderi endogamy to recessive disease incidence was predicted. Population substructure of the magnitude estimated from studies of biraderi endogamy are sufficient to significantly contribute to the incidence of recessive disorders within consanguineous populations. Because non-consanguineous couples have a higher risk of sharing the same recessive mutation in a substructured population relative to a non-substructured population, the health benefits of avoiding consanguinity in these situations is likely to be less pronounced than the standard consanguinity hypothesis predicts. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Consanguinity and prevalence patterns of inherited disease in the UK Pakistani community.

    PubMed

    Corry, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the current knowledge about inherited diseases in UK children of Pakistani origin, who now number over 300,000, and to investigate disease associations with parental consanguinity. Published data on the overall prevalence of inherited diseases were reviewed in conjunction with published and unpublished information from the city of Bradford where there is a large resident Pakistani community. There is significant literature on infant mortality, congenital anomalies, disabilities and many clinical conditions, often drawing attention to ethnic variations and an increased disease prevalence in UK Pakistani children. A further analysis is frequently necessary to differentiate both between genetic and non-genetic causes, and Pakistani and non-Pakistani children, who collectively have been labelled as 'Asian' or 'South Asian'. The analysis suggests that much of the increased mortality and morbidity in UK Pakistani children is due to autosomal recessive conditions. Evidence suggests that this finding is associated with the custom of consanguineous marriage, but future studies might also explore the role of community endogamy. Prevalence data from the first and second post-migration generations could additionally be useful in informing health planning in Pakistan. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Mutations in GRM6 identified in consanguineous Pakistani families with congenital stationary night blindness

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Gottsch, Alexander D. H.; Ullah, Inayat; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Butt, Nadeem H.; Qazi, Zaheeruddin A.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to investigate the causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) in consanguineous Pakistani families. Methods Two consanguineous families with multiple individuals manifesting symptoms of stationary night blindness were recruited. Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination, including fundus examination and electroretinography. Blood samples were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Exclusion analyses were completed by genotyping closely spaced microsatellite markers, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons, along with the exon–intron boundaries of GRM6, were sequenced bidirectionally. Results According to the medical history available to us, affected individuals in both families had experienced night blindness from the early years of their lives. Fundus photographs of affected individuals in both the families appeared normal, with no signs of attenuated arteries or bone spicule pigmentation. The scotopic electroretinogram (ERG) response were absent in all of the affected individuals, while the photopic measurements show reduced b-waves. During exclusion analyses, both families localized to a region on chromosome 5q that harbors GRM6, a gene previously associated with autosomal recessive CSNB. Bidirectional sequencing of GRM6 identified homozygous single base pair changes, specifically c.1336C>T (p.R446X) and c.2267G>A (p.G756D) in families PKRP170 and PKRP172, respectively. Conclusions We identified a novel nonsense and a previously reported missense mutation in GRM6 that were responsible for autosomal recessive CSNB in patients of Pakistani decent. PMID:26628857

  8. Novel C8orf37 mutations cause retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous families of Pakistani origin

    PubMed Central

    Ravesh, Zeinab; El Asrag, Mohammed E.; Weisschuh, Nicole; McKibbin, Martin; Reuter, Peggy; Watson, Christopher M.; Baumann, Britta; Poulter, James A.; Sajid, Sundus; Panagiotou, Evangelia S.; O’Sullivan, James; Abdelhamed, Zakia; Bonin, Michael; Soltanifar, Mehdi; Black, Graeme C.M.; Din, Muhammad Amin-ud; Toomes, Carmel; Ansar, Muhammad; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Wissinger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the molecular basis of retinitis pigmentosa in two consanguineous families of Pakistani origin with multiple affected members. Methods Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes were performed in one family while the other was analyzed with whole exome next-generation sequencing. A minigene splicing assay was used to confirm the splicing defects. Results In family MA48, a novel homozygous nucleotide substitution in C8orf37, c.244–2A>C, that disrupted the consensus splice acceptor site of exon 3 was found. The minigene splicing assay revealed that this mutation activated a cryptic splice site within exon 3, causing a 22 bp deletion in the transcript that is predicted to lead to a frameshift followed by premature protein truncation. In family MA13, a novel homozygous null mutation in C8orf37, c.555G>A, p.W185*, was identified. Both mutations segregated with the disease phenotype as expected in a recessive manner and were absent in 8,244 unrelated individuals of South Asian origin. Conclusions In this report, we describe C8orf37 mutations that cause retinal dystrophy in two families of Pakistani origin, contributing further data on the phenotype and the spectrum of mutations in this form of retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:25802487

  9. CONSANGUINITY, GENETICS AND DEFINITIONS OF KINSHIP IN THE UK PAKISTANI POPULATION.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Small, N A

    2016-11-01

    Consanguineous marriage is a controversial topic in many Western societies, with attention mainly focused on the health of immigrant communities from Asia and Africa. In the UK consanguinity is especially prevalent in the Pakistani community, which now numbers over 1.1 million. Less attention has been paid to the influence of hereditary population stratification within Pakistani communities, in particular biraderi (literally brotherhood) membership, which denotes male lineages that largely govern marriage partner choice and hence the transmission of disease genes. The various roles played by biraderi and their relationship to other socio-occupational and kinship terms, such as caste, quom and zat, are often overlooked in health-based studies. The interchangeable use of these different kinship terms without rigorous definition can create identity uncertainty and hinders inter-study comparisons. Where feasible, standardization of terminology would be both desirable and beneficial, with biraderi the preferred default term to identify specific social and genetic relationships within the Pakistani diaspora.

  10. Mutations in WDR62 gene in Pakistani families with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Kousar, Rizwana; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Khan, Bushra; Basit, Sulman; Mahmood, Saqib; Mir, Asif; Ahmad, Wasim; Ansar, Muhammad

    2011-10-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly is a disorder of neurogenic mitosis that causes reduction in brain size. It is a rare heterogeneous condition with seven causative genes reported to date. Mutations in WD repeat protein 62 are associated with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly with cortical malformations. This study was initiated to screen WDR62 mutations in four consanguineous Pakistani families with autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. As part of a large study to detect the genetic basis of primary microcephaly in Pakistan, homozygosity mapping and DNA sequencing was used to explore the genetic basis of autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in four families. Four out of 100 families recruited in the study revealed linkage to the MCPH2 locus on chromosome 19, which harbor WDR62 gene. DNA sequencing in these MCPH2 linked families result in the identification of a novel nonsense mutation (p.Q648X) and three previously known mutations. Our data indicate that WDR62 mutations cause about 4% of autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in Pakistan.

  11. Differential impact of consanguineous marriages on autosomal recessive diseases in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Halim, Nizar; Hsouna, Sana; Lasram, Khaled; Rejeb, Insaf; Walha, Asma; Talmoudi, Faten; Messai, Habib; Sabrine Ben Brick, Ahlem; Ouragini, Houyem; Cherif, Wafa; Nagara, Majdi; Ben Rhouma, Faten; Chouchene, Ibtissem; Ouechtati, Farah; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Ben Rekaya, Mariem; Messaoud, Olfa; Ben Ammar, Slim; El Matri, Leila; Tebib, Neji; Ben Dridi, Marie F; Mokni, Mourad; Amouri, Ahlem; Kefi, Rym; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Consanguinity is common in Tunisia. However, little information exists on its impact on recessive disorders. In this study, we evaluate the impact of consanguineous marriages on the occurrence of some specific autosomal recessive disorders and consider how other factors, such as population substructure and mutation frequency, may be of equal importance in disease prevalence. Consanguinity profiles were retrospectively studied among 425 Tunisian patients suffering from autosomal recessive xeroderma pigmentosum, dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa, Gaucher disease, Fanconi anemia, glycogenosis type I, and ichthyosis, and compared to those of a healthy control sample. Consanguinity was observed in 341 cases (64.94%). Consanguinity rates per disease were 75.63, 63.64, 60.64, 61.29, 57.89, 73.33, and 51.28%, respectively. First-cousin marriages were the most common form of consanguinity (48.94%) with the percentages of 55.46, 45.46, 47.87, 48.39, 45.61, 56.66, and 35.90%, respectively. A very high level of geographic endogamy was also observed (93.92%), with the values by disease ranging between 75.86 and 96.64%. We observed an overall excess risk associated to consanguinity of nearly sevenfold which was proportional to the number of affected siblings and the frequency of disease allele in the family. Consanguinity was significantly associated with the first five cited diseases (odds ratio = 24.41, 15.17, 7.5, 5.53, and 5.07, respectively). However, no meaningful effects were reported among the remaining diseases. This study reveals a variation in the excess risk linked to consanguinity according to the type of disorder, suggesting the potential of cryptic population substructure to contribute to disease incidence in populations with complex social structure like Tunisia. It also emphasizes the role of other health and demographic aspects such as mutation frequency and reproductive replacement in diseases etiology. © 2015 Wiley

  12. The effect of reproductive compensation on recessive disorders within consanguineous human populations.

    PubMed

    Overall, A D J; Ahmad, M; Nichols, R A

    2002-06-01

    We investigate the effects of consanguinity and population substructure on genetic health using the UK Asian population as an example. We review and expand upon previous treatments dealing with the deleterious effects of consanguinity on recessive disorders and consider how other factors, such as population substructure, may be of equal importance. For illustration, we quantify the relative risks of recessive lethal disorders by presenting some simple calculations that demonstrate the effect 'reproductive compensation' has on the maintenance of recessive alleles. The results show how reproductive compensation can effectively counteract the purging of deleterious alleles within consanguineous populations. Whereas inbreeding does not elevate the equilibrium frequency of affected individuals, reproductive compensation does. We suggest this effect must be built into interpretations of the incidence of genetic disease within populations such as the UK Asians. Information of this nature will benefit health care workers who inform such communities.

  13. Mapping autosomal recessive intellectual disability: combined microarray and exome sequencing identifies 26 novel candidate genes in 192 consanguineous families.

    PubMed

    Harripaul, R; Vasli, N; Mikhailov, A; Rafiq, M A; Mittal, K; Windpassinger, C; Sheikh, T I; Noor, A; Mahmood, H; Downey, S; Johnson, M; Vleuten, K; Bell, L; Ilyas, M; Khan, F S; Khan, V; Moradi, M; Ayaz, M; Naeem, F; Heidari, A; Ahmed, I; Ghadami, S; Agha, Z; Zeinali, S; Qamar, R; Mozhdehipanah, H; John, P; Mir, A; Ansar, M; French, L; Ayub, M; Vincent, J B

    2017-04-11

    Approximately 1% of the global population is affected by intellectual disability (ID), and the majority receive no molecular diagnosis. Previous studies have indicated high levels of genetic heterogeneity, with estimates of more than 2500 autosomal ID genes, the majority of which are autosomal recessive (AR). Here, we combined microarray genotyping, homozygosity-by-descent (HBD) mapping, copy number variation (CNV) analysis, and whole exome sequencing (WES) to identify disease genes/mutations in 192 multiplex Pakistani and Iranian consanguineous families with non-syndromic ID. We identified definite or candidate mutations (or CNVs) in 51% of families in 72 different genes, including 26 not previously reported for ARID. The new ARID genes include nine with loss-of-function mutations (ABI2, MAPK8, MPDZ, PIDD1, SLAIN1, TBC1D23, TRAPPC6B, UBA7 and USP44), and missense mutations include the first reports of variants in BDNF or TET1 associated with ID. The genes identified also showed overlap with de novo gene sets for other neuropsychiatric disorders. Transcriptional studies showed prominent expression in the prenatal brain. The high yield of AR mutations for ID indicated that this approach has excellent clinical potential and should inform clinical diagnostics, including clinical whole exome and genome sequencing, for populations in which consanguinity is common. As with other AR disorders, the relevance will also apply to outbred populations.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 April 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.60.

  14. Novel sequence variants in the LIPH and LPAR6 genes underlies autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis in consanguineous families.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farooq; Sharif, Salma; Furqan Ubaid, Muhammad; Shah, Khadim; Khan, Muhammad Nasim; Umair, Muhammad; Azeem, Zahid; Ahmad, Wasim

    2017-04-19

    Autosomal-recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis (ARWH/H) is a rare genetic disorder of hair caused by variants in the LIPH and LPAR6 genes. The disease is characterized by congenital tightly curled hair leading to sparse hair later in life. In the present report genetic characterization of three consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, displaying clinical features of ARWH/H, was performed. Haplotype and DNA sequence analysis of the LIPH gene revealed a novel homozygous nonsense variant (c.688C > T; p.Gln230*) in family A. In two other families, B and C, sequence analysis of the LPAR6 gene revealed a novel homozygous frameshift variant (c.68_69dupGCAT; p.Phe24Hisfs*29) and a previously reported missense variant (c.188A > T; p.Asp63Val), respectively. Taken together, our findings will expand the spectrum of variants reported in the LIPH and LPAR6 genes. © 2017 Japanese Teratology Society.

  15. Novel homozygous mutations in the EVC and EVC2 genes in two consanguineous families segregating autosomal recessive Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Abdul; Raza, Syed I; Ali, Salman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare developmental disorder characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, teeth, oral and cardiac abnormalities. It is caused by biallelic mutations in the EVC or EVC2 gene, separated by 2.6 kb of genomic sequence on chromosome 4p16. In the present study, we have investigated two consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, segregating EVC in autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was established to chromosome 4p16. Subsequently, sequence analysis identified a novel nonsense mutation (p.Trp234*) in exon 8 of the EVC2 gene and 15 bp duplication in exon 14 of the EVC gene in the two families. This further expands the mutations in the EVC or EVC2 genes resulting in the EVC syndrome.

  16. Recessive versus imprinted disorder: consanguinity can impede establishing the diagnosis of autosomal dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Serap; Akin, Leyla; Akcay, Teoman; Adal, Erdal; Sarikaya, Sevil; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia with low/normal parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels can be observed in hypoparathyroidism (HP), a disorder that may follow an autosomal dominant (AD) or autosomal recessive (AR) mode of inheritance. Similar biochemical changes are also observed in pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) type Ia and Ib, but affected patients usually show elevated PTH levels indicative of hormonal resistance. Features of Albright’s hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) are typically not observed in patients affected by familial forms of PHP-Ib, which are most frequently caused by maternally inherited, heterozygous microdeletions within STX16 and are associated with isolated loss of methylation at GNAS exon A/B. We established the molecular defect in two children of consanguineous Turkish parents, who presented with hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and low 25-OH vitamin D levels, but initially normal or only mildly elevated PTH levels, i.e. findings that do not readily exclude HP. After normalizing serum magnesium levels, hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia persisted, and PTH levels increased, suggesting PTH-resistance rather than PTH-deficiency. Because of the absence of AHO and parental consanguinity, an AR form of PHP-Ib appeared plausible, which had previously been suggested for sporadic cases. However, loss of GNAS methylation was restricted to exon A/B, which led to the identification of the 3-kb STX16 microdeletion. The same mutation was also detected in the healthy mother, who did not show any GNAS methylation abnormality, indicating that her deletion resides on the paternal allele. Our findings emphasize the importance of considering a parentally imprinted, autosomal dominant disorder even if consanguinity suggests an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. PMID:20538864

  17. Autosomal recessive congenital cataract, intellectual disability phenotype linked to STX3 in a consanguineous Tunisian family.

    PubMed

    Chograni, M; Alkuraya, F S; Ourteni, I; Maazoul, F; Lariani, I; Chaabouni, H B

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the genetic basis of autosomal recessive congenital cataract and intellectual disability phenotype in a consanguineous Tunisian family. The whole genome scan of the studied family was performed with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The resulted runs of homozygosity (ROH) were analyzed through the integrated Systems Tool for Eye gene discovery (iSyTE) in order to prioritize candidate genes associated with congenital cataract. Selected genes were amplified and sequenced. Bioinformatic analysis was conducted to predict the function of the mutant gene. We identified a new specific lens gene named syntaxin 3 linked to the studied phenotype. The direct sequencing of this gene revealed a novel missense mutation c.122A>G which results in p.E41G. Bioinformatic analysis suggested a deleterious effect of this mutation on protein structure and function. Here, we report for the first time a missense mutation of a novel lens specific gene STX3 in a phenotype associating autosomal recessive congenital cataract and intellectual disability.

  18. Novel homozygous mutations in the WNT10B gene underlying autosomal recessive split hand/foot malformation in three consanguineous families.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Abdul; Irfanullah; Khan, Saadullah; Zimri, Faridullah Khan; Muhammad, Noor; Rashid, Sajid; Ahmad, Wasim

    2014-01-25

    Split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM), representing variable degree of median clefts of hands and feet, is a genetically heterogeneous group of limb malformations with seven loci mapped on different human chromosomes. However, only 3 genes (TP63, WNT10B, DLX5) for the seven loci have been identified. The study, presented here, described three consanguineous Pakistani families segregating SHFM in autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was searched by genotyping microsatellite markers and mutation screening of candidate gene was performed by Sanger DNA sequencing. Clinical features of affected members of these families exhibited SHFM phenotype with involvement of hands and feet. Genotyping using microsatellite markers mapped the families to WNT10B gene at SHFM6 on chromosome 12q13.11-q13. Subsequently, sequence analysis of WNT10B gene revealed a novel 4-bp deletion mutation (c.1165_1168delAAGT) in one family and 7-bp duplication (c.300_306dupAGGGCGG) in two other families. Structure-based analysis showed a significant conformational shift in the active binding site of mutated WNT10B (p.Lys388Glufs*36), influencing binding with Fzd8. The mutations identified in the WNT10B gene extend the body of evidence implicating it in the pathogenesis of SHFM.

  19. Mutations in the LPAR6 and LIPH genes underlie autosomal recessive hypotrichosis/woolly hair in 17 consanguineous families from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Habib, R; Mir, H; Umm-e-Kalsoom; Naz, G; Ayub, M; Shafique, S; Yamin, T; Ali, N; Basit, S; Wasif, N; Kamran-Ul-Hassan Naqvi, S; Ali, G; Wali, A; Ansar, M; Ahmad, W

    2011-08-01

    Autosomal recessive hypotrichosis/woolly hair is a rare genetic hair loss disorder characterized by sparse scalp hair/woolly hair, sparse to absent eyebrows and eyelashes, sparse axillary and body hair in affected individuals. This form of hair loss results from mutations in either LPAR6 or LIPH gene. To identify mutations in LPAR6 and LIPH genes in 17 consanguineous Pakistani families showing features of hypotrichosis/woolly hair. Genotyping in 17 families was carried out using polymorphic microsatellite markers linked to genes causing autosomal recessive hypotrichosis/woolly hair phenotype. To screen for mutations in LPAR6 and LIPH genes, all of their exons and splice junction sites were amplified by PCR and sequenced using an automated DNA sequencer. Genotyping with polymorphic microsatellite markers showed linkage in eight families to LPAR6 and in nine families to LIPH gene. Sequence analysis revealed four recurrent mutations (p.Phe24HisfsX28; p.Asp63Val; p.Gly146Arg; p.Ile188Phe) in LPAR6 and two recurrent mutations (p.Trp108Arg; p.Ile220ArgfsX29) in LIPH gene. Comparison of the haplotypes generated by typing LPAR6 and LIPH genes linked microsatellite markers in different families suggested common founder natures of the two mutations (c.66_69insCATG and c.659_660delTA). Mutations identified in the present study extend the body of evidence implicating LPAR6 and LIPH genes in pathogenesis of human hereditary hair loss. © The Author(s). CED © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. Reduced bone mineral density and hyaloid vasculature remnants in a consanguineous recessive FEVR family with a mutation in LRP5.

    PubMed

    Downey, L M; Bottomley, H M; Sheridan, E; Ahmed, M; Gilmour, D F; Inglehearn, C F; Reddy, A; Agrawal, A; Bradbury, J; Toomes, C

    2006-09-01

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited blinding condition characterised by abnormal development of the retinal vasculature. FEVR has multiple modes of inheritance, and homozygous mutations in LRP5 have recently been reported as underlying the recessive form of this disease. The aim of this study was to examine LRP5 in a consanguineous recessive FEVR family and to clarify the eye and bone phenotype associated with recessive FEVR. All family members were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy. Linkage to LRP5 was determined by genotyping microsatellite markers, constructing haplotypes and calculating lod scores. Mutation screening of LRP5 was performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA followed by direct sequencing. Bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated in all family members using dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DEXA). The clinical features observed in this family were consistent with a diagnosis of recessive FEVR. A homozygous LRP5 missense mutation, G550R, was identified in all affected individuals and all unaffected family members screened were heterozygous carriers of this mutation. Reduced BMD, hyaloid vasculature remnants, and nystagmus were features of the phenotype. Recessive mutations in LRP5 can cause FEVR with reduced BMD and hyaloid vasculature remnants. Assessment of a patient with a provisional diagnosis of FEVR should therefore include investigation of BMD, with reduced levels suggestive of an underlying LRP5 mutation.

  1. Reduced bone mineral density and hyaloid vasculature remnants in a consanguineous recessive FEVR family with a mutation in LRP5

    PubMed Central

    Downey, L M; Bottomley, H M; Sheridan, E; Ahmed, M; Gilmour, D F; Inglehearn, C F; Reddy, A; Agrawal, A; Bradbury, J; Toomes, C

    2006-01-01

    Background/aims Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited blinding condition characterised by abnormal development of the retinal vasculature. FEVR has multiple modes of inheritance, and homozygous mutations in LRP5 have recently been reported as underlying the recessive form of this disease. The aim of this study was to examine LRP5 in a consanguineous recessive FEVR family and to clarify the eye and bone phenotype associated with recessive FEVR. Methods All family members were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy. Linkage to LRP5 was determined by genotyping microsatellite markers, constructing haplotypes and calculating lod scores. Mutation screening of LRP5 was performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA followed by direct sequencing. Bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated in all family members using dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Results The clinical features observed in this family were consistent with a diagnosis of recessive FEVR. A homozygous LRP5 missense mutation, G550R, was identified in all affected individuals and all unaffected family members screened were heterozygous carriers of this mutation. Reduced BMD, hyaloid vasculature remnants, and nystagmus were features of the phenotype. Conclusion Recessive mutations in LRP5 can cause FEVR with reduced BMD and hyaloid vasculature remnants. Assessment of a patient with a provisional diagnosis of FEVR should therefore include investigation of BMD, with reduced levels suggestive of an underlying LRP5 mutation. PMID:16929062

  2. Does anonymous sperm donation increase the risk for unions between relatives and the incidence of autosomal recessive diseases due to consanguinity?

    PubMed

    Serre, Jean-Louis; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Bernheim, Alain; Fellous, Marc; Rouen, Alexandre; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre

    2014-03-01

    In France gamete donation and notably sperm donation are anonymous. It has been claimed that anonymous artificial insemination by donor (AID) could highly contribute to an increase in the level of consanguinity and the incidence of autosomal recessive diseases, due to the unions between offspring of anonymous donors, unaware of their biological kinship, with the special case of unions between half-siblings. The actual incidence of consanguinity due to AID was compared with that resulting from the two other main sources of consanguinity and recessive diseases, i.e. voluntary unions between related individuals or inadvertent unions between the offspring of a common unknown male ancestor (false paternity). From these data, we estimated that expected unions in France between half sibs per year are 0.12 between offspring of sperm donors (1.2 every 10 years) and 0.5 between offspring of common male ancestors through false paternity (5 every 10 years). More generally, the inadvertent unions between false paternity offspring are roughly four times more frequent than those resulting from anonymous AID. We estimated that in the future, when AID has been in practice for several generations, out the 820 000 annual births in France, respectively, 6 and 25 births will be consanguineous through an unknown common ancestor related to anonymous AID and to a false paternity, both of which are negligible when compared with the 1256 children born from first-degree cousins. About 672 children per year are born with a recessive genetic disease due to the panmictic risk and additional affected cases due to consanguinity would be 34.54 for first-cousin offspring, 0.33 for offspring of individuals related due to false paternity and 0.079 for offspring of individuals related due to anonymous AID. Anonymous AID would therefore be responsible for 0.46% of consanguineous births and for 0.01% of recessive diseases. Therefore, the effect of anonymous AID on half-sibling unions, consanguinity and

  3. Truncation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase component FBXO31 causes non-syndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability in a Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Mir, Asif; Sritharan, Kumudesh; Mittal, Kirti; Vasli, Nasim; Araujo, Carolina; Jamil, Talal; Rafiq, Muhammad Arshad; Anwar, Zubair; Mikhailov, Anna; Rauf, Sobiah; Mahmood, Huda; Shakoor, Abdul; Ali, Sabir; So, Joyce; Naeem, Farooq; Ayub, Muhammad; Vincent, John B

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we have performed autozygosity mapping on a large consanguineous Pakistani family segregating with intellectual disability. We identified two large regions of homozygosity-by-descent (HBD) on 16q12.2-q21 and 16q24.1-q24.3. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on an affected individual from the family, but initially, no obvious mutation was detected. However, three genes within the HBD regions that were not fully captured during the WES were Sanger sequenced and we identified a five base pair deletion (actually six base pairs deleted plus one base pair inserted) in exon 7 of the gene FBXO31. The variant segregated completely in the family, in recessive fashion giving a LOD score of 3.95. This variant leads to a frameshift and a premature stop codon and truncation of the FBXO31 protein, p.(Cys283Asnfs*81). Quantification of mRNA and protein expression suggests that nonsense-mediated mRNA decay also contributes to the loss of FBXO31 protein in affected individuals. FBXO31 functions as a centrosomal E3 ubiquitin ligase, in association with SKP1 and Cullin-1, involved in ubiquitination of proteins targeted for degradation. The FBXO31/SKP1/Cullin1 complex is important for neuronal morphogenesis and axonal identity. FBXO31 also plays a role in dendrite growth and neuronal migration in developing cerebellar cortex. Our finding adds further evidence of the involvement of disruption of the protein ubiquitination pathway in intellectual disability.

  4. Combining gene mapping and phenotype assessment for fast mutation finding in non-consanguineous autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa families.

    PubMed

    Hebrard, Maxime; Manes, Gaël; Bocquet, Béatrice; Meunier, Isabelle; Coustes-Chazalette, Delphine; Hérald, Emilie; Sénéchal, Audrey; Bolland-Augé, Anne; Zelenika, Diana; Hamel, Christian P

    2011-12-01

    Among inherited retinal dystrophies, autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is the most genetically heterogenous condition with 32 genes currently known that account for ~60 % of patients. Molecular diagnosis thus requires the tedious systematic sequencing of 506 exons. To rapidly identify the causative mutations, we devised a strategy that combines gene mapping and phenotype assessment in small non-consanguineous families. Two unrelated sibships with arRP had whole-genome scan using SNP microchips. Chromosomal regions were selected by calculating a score based on SNP coverage and genotype identity of affected patients. Candidate genes from the regions with the highest scores were then selected based on phenotype concordance of affected patients with previously described phenotype for each candidate gene. For families RP127 and RP1459, 33 and 40 chromosomal regions showed possible linkage, respectively. By comparing the scores with the phenotypes, we ended with one best candidate gene for each family, namely tubby-like protein 1 (TULP1) and C2ORF71 for RP127 and RP1459, respectively. We found that RP127 patients were compound heterozygous for two novel TULP1 mutations, p.Arg311Gln and p.Arg342Gln, and that RP1459 patients were compound heterozygous for two novel C2ORF71 mutations, p.Leu777PhefsX34 and p.Leu777AsnfsX28. Phenotype assessment showed that TULP1 patients had severe early onset arRP and that C2ORF71 patients had a cone rod dystrophy type of arRP. Only two affected individuals in each sibship were sufficient to lead to mutation identification by screening the best candidate gene selected by a combination of gene mapping and phenotype characterization.

  5. Differences between 9–11 year old British Pakistani and White British girls in physical activity and behavior during school recess

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background School recess provides an important opportunity for children to engage in physical activity. Previous studies indicate that children and adults of South Asian origin are less active than other ethnic groups in the United Kingdom, but have not investigated whether activity differs within the shared school environment. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that British Pakistani girls aged 9–11 years are less active during recess than White British girls. Methods In Study One, the proportion of recess spent by 137 White British (N = 70) and British Pakistani (N = 67) girls in sedentary behavior, moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA) and vigorous activity (VPA) was determined using accelerometry. In Study Two, 86 White British (N = 48) and British Pakistani (N = 38) girls were observed on the playground using the System for Observing Children’s Activity and Relationships during Play (SOCARP). Accelerometry data were collected during observations to allow identification of activities contributing to objectively measured physical activity. Results Accelerometry data indicated that British Pakistani girls spent 2.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 4.3) less of their total recess time in MVPA and 1.3% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.4) less in VPA than White British girls. Direct observation showed that British Pakistani girls spent 12.0% (95% CI: 2.9, 21.1) less playground time being very active, and 12.3% (95% CI: 1.7, 23.0) less time playing games. Time spent being very active according to direct observation data correlated significantly with accelerometer-assessed time spent in MVPA and VPA, and time spent playing games correlated significantly with accelerometer-assessed time spent in VPA, suggesting that differences in behavior observed in Study Two may have contributed to the differences in time spent in MVPA and VPA in Study One. Conclusions British Pakistani girls were less active than White British girls during school recess. Recess has been identified as

  6. Gene-Targeted Next Generation Sequencing Identifies PNPLA1 Mutations in Patients with a Phenotypic Spectrum of Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis: The Impact of Consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Vahidnezhad, Hassan; Youssefian, Leila; Saeidian, Amir Hossein; Zeinali, Sirous; Mansouri, Parvin; Sotoudeh, Soheila; Barzegar, Mohammadreza; Mohammadi-Asl, Javad; Karamzadeh, Razieh; Abiri, Maryam; McCormick, Kevin; Fortina, Paolo; Uitto, Jouni

    2017-03-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis is a heterogeneous group of disorders associated with mutations in at least nine distinct genes. To ascertain the molecular basis of ichthyosis patients in Iran, a country of approximately 80 million people with a high prevalence of customary consanguineous marriages, we have developed a gene-targeted next generation sequencing array consisting of 38 genes reported in association with ichthyosis phenotypes. In a subset of nine extended consanguineous families, we found homozygous missense mutations in the PNPLA1 gene, six of them being distinct and, to our knowledge, previously unpublished. This gene encodes an enzyme with lipid hydrolase activity, important for development and maintenance of the barrier function of the epidermis. These six mutations, as well as four previously published mutations, reside exclusively within the patatin-like subdomain of PNPLA1 containing the catalytic site. The mutations clustered around the active center of the enzyme or resided at the surface of the protein possibly involved in the protein-protein interactions. Clinical features of the patients showed considerable intra- and interfamilial heterogeneity. Knowledge of the specific mutations allows identification of heterozygous carriers, assisting in genetic counseling, prenatal testing, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis in extended families at risk of recurrence of this disorder, the incidence of which is significantly increased in consanguineous marriages. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Do consanguineous parents of a child affected by an autosomal recessive disease have more DNA identical-by-descent than similarly-related parents with healthy offspring? Design of a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The offspring of consanguineous relations have an increased risk of congenital/genetic disorders and early mortality. Consanguineous couples and their offspring account for approximately 10% of the global population. The increased risk for congenital/genetic disorders is most marked for autosomal recessive disorders and depends on the degree of relatedness of the parents. For children of first cousins the increased risk is 2-4%. For individual couples, however, the extra risk can vary from zero to 25% or higher, with only a minority of these couples having an increased risk of at least 25%. It is currently not possible to differentiate between high-and low-risk couples. The quantity of DNA identical-by-descent between couples with the same degree of relatedness shows a remarkable variation. Here we hypothesize that consanguineous partners with children affected by an autosomal recessive disease have more DNA identical-by-descent than similarly-related partners who have only healthy children. The aim of the study is thus to establish whether the amount of DNA identical-by-descent in consanguineous parents of children with an autosomal recessive disease is indeed different from its proportion in consanguineous parents who have healthy children only. Methods/Design This project is designed as a case-control study. Cases are defined as consanguineous couples with one or more children with an autosomal recessive disorder and controls as consanguineous couples with at least three healthy children and no affected child. We aim to include 100 case couples and 100 control couples. Control couples are matched by restricting the search to the same family, clan or ethnic origin as the case couple. Genome-wide SNP arrays will be used to test our hypothesis. Discussion This study contains a new approach to risk assessment in consanguineous couples. There is no previous study on the amount of DNA identical-by-descent in consanguineous parents of affected children

  8. [Consanguinity and congenital abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Marie; Vedsted-Jakobsen, Agnete

    2003-04-28

    Knowledge of consanguinity is relevant for employees in the Danish national health service, since about 7.5% of the Danish population has another ethnic background than Danish and the majority comes from cultures where consanguineous marriages are not unusual. In the literature it is found that consanguineous couples have a higher risk of having children with congenital malformations. The risk is increased by a factor 2 to 2 1/2. The average risk in Denmark is about 3%. Primarily, the autosomal recessive diseases are expressed in children with consanguineous parents. In order to advise and diagnose it is essential to clarify the consanguinity state. In case of pregnancy with consanguineous parents, we recommend: 1) Counselling to estimate the risk of foetal illness and information about possible examination possibilities. 2) An ultrasound scan at the gestational age of 11-14 weeks in order to measure nuchal translucency and an early malformation scan. 3) An ultrasound scan for malformations at the gestational age of 18-20 weeks. 4) An ultrasound scan especially in order to detect foetal heart malformations at the gestational age of 20-24 weeks.

  9. Consanguinity and reproductive health among Arabs

    PubMed Central

    Tadmouri, Ghazi O; Nair, Pratibha; Obeid, Tasneem; Al Ali, Mahmoud T; Al Khaja, Najib; Hamamy, Hanan A

    2009-01-01

    Consanguineous marriages have been practiced since the early existence of modern humans. Until now consanguinity is widely practiced in several global communities with variable rates depending on religion, culture, and geography. Arab populations have a long tradition of consanguinity due to socio-cultural factors. Many Arab countries display some of the highest rates of consanguineous marriages in the world, and specifically first cousin marriages which may reach 25-30% of all marriages. In some countries like Qatar, Yemen, and UAE, consanguinity rates are increasing in the current generation. Research among Arabs and worldwide has indicated that consanguinity could have an effect on some reproductive health parameters such as postnatal mortality and rates of congenital malformations. The association of consanguinity with other reproductive health parameters, such as fertility and fetal wastage, is controversial. The main impact of consanguinity, however, is an increase in the rate of homozygotes for autosomal recessive genetic disorders. Worldwide, known dominant disorders are more numerous than known recessive disorders. However, data on genetic disorders in Arab populations as extracted from the Catalogue of Transmission Genetics in Arabs (CTGA) database indicate a relative abundance of recessive disorders in the region that is clearly associated with the practice of consanguinity. PMID:19811666

  10. STIL mutation causes autosomal recessive microcephalic lobar holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Naseebullah; Ahmad, Jamil; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J; Altmüller, Janine; Friedrich, Katrin; Barbi, Gotthold; Nürnberg, Peter; Kubisch, Christian; Dobyns, William B; Borck, Guntram

    2015-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous midline brain malformation associated with neurologic manifestations including developmental delay, intellectual disability and seizures. Although mutations in the sonic hedgehog gene SHH and more than 10 other genes are known to cause holoprosencephaly, many patients remain without a molecular diagnosis. Here we show that a homozygous truncating mutation of STIL not only causes severe autosomal recessive microcephaly, but also lobar holoprosencephaly in an extended consanguineous Pakistani family. STIL mutations have previously been linked to centrosomal defects in primary microcephaly at the MCPH7 locus. Our results thus expand the clinical phenotypes associated with biallellic STIL mutations to include holoprosencephaly.

  11. A review of consanguinity in Ireland--estimation of frequency and approaches to mitigate risks.

    PubMed

    Barrett, P

    2016-02-01

    Over half of marriages are consanguineous in some countries, and about 10 % of children worldwide have consanguineous parents. Perceived benefits of consanguineous marriage (CM) include preservation of tradition, stronger family ties, financial advantages, and bride protection. Potential harms include autosomal recessive disorders, complex congenital malformations, stillbirths, postnatal mortality. There have been no population-based data published on frequency of CM in Ireland since 1970. International prevalence figures and published estimates of CM were applied to 2011 Irish Census data to calculate the frequency of CM in at-risk groups. Searches of the published and grey literature were conducted to review evidence-based approaches to mitigate risks of CM and apply findings to the Irish context. The estimated number of consanguineous couples has grown in subpopulations in Ireland in the past decade, particularly among Pakistanis (>967 couples), Nigerians (418-794 couples) and Indians (54-2099 couples). There are up to 3000 consanguineous couples in the Traveller community. Evidence for approaches to mitigate associated risks supports a three-stranded approach: family-centred genetics services, training and education of healthcare professionals (HCPs), community education programmes. Consanguineous couples desire accurate information for reproductive decisions, but may avoid hospital-based services due to language barriers, poor understanding, stigma. Uptake of genetic counselling and carrier testing is higher if a family-centred approach is provided, ideally through home visits in the couple's preferred language. Targeted education programmes enhance community awareness and have led to declines in CM elsewhere. Education of HCPs is necessary to clarify referral pathways, as many have exaggerated impressions of the genetic risks.

  12. Meckel Gruber syndrome: occurrence in non-consanguineous marriages.

    PubMed

    de Silva, M V C; Senanayake, H; Siriwardana, K D V P

    2004-03-01

    Meckel Gruber syndrome is an uncommon, lethal, autosomal recessive disorder, associated consistently with polycystic kidneys, posterior encephalocoele and polydactly. We report three cases in non-consanguineous marriages, suggesting that the single gene defect occurs more commonly in non-consanguineous marriages than mutant genes associated with other autosomal recessive disorders that are usually related with consanguineous marriages. The usefulness of prenatal diagnosis is discussed.

  13. Autozygosity mapping of autosomal recessive non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss (ARNSSNHL)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Nobel, A.; Markham, A.F.

    1994-09-01

    Congenital deafness affects about 1 in 2000 persons and is of genetic origin in approximately half these cases. The majority of congenital deafness is non-syndromic and over 75% of cases are compatible with autosomal recessive inheritance. Mapping of the loci responsible for ARNSSNHL will be complicated by genetic heterogeneity. Our approach to isolating genes involved in ARNSSNHL is by autozygosity mapping which involves the genetic analysis of children resulting from consanguineous marriages with the aim of identifying regions of homozygosity unique to the genomes of affected individuals which have been inherited from a common ancestor. The population employed in this study is the Pakistani community of Leeds, Bradford and Manchester in the UK which originated from the Mirpur region of Pakistan. Microsatellite analysis of the genome with markers spaced, on average, 10 cM apart is in progress and the investigation of 15 consanguineous families has identified one family which shows linkage to human chromosome 13q. This family appears to be linked to the same autosomal recessive deafness locus as two Tunisian families recently described and confirms that this chromosome 13q locus is also responsible, although as a minor contributor, to the deafness observed in the Pakistani population.

  14. Endogamy, consanguinity and community genetics.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H

    2002-12-01

    The population of India is composed of many thousands of subpopulations, divided by geography, language, religion and caste or biraderi (patrilineage) boundaries, with endogamous marriage the norm. The net effect has been the creation of multiple genetic isolates with individual mutation profiles, but to date the clinical consequences of this highly complex differentiation have been largely ignored. In contrast, the topic of consanguinity continues to attract attention among medical and population geneticists, clinicians and social scientists. The significant progress made in India in improving childhood nutritional status and combating infectious disease means that genetic disorders have assumed ever-increasing importance. In populations where consanguineous marriage is widely practised, recessive genetic disorders will continue to gain greater prominence in the overall spectrum of ill health. At the same time this increase will in part be negated by urbanization and the move to smaller family sizes, which predictably will result in a decline in the prevalence of consanguineous unions. Developing an understanding of these changes will require a wide-ranging and multidisciplinary investigative approach for which community genetics is ideally suited.

  15. Consanguinity and deafness in Omani children.

    PubMed

    Khabori, Mazin Al; Patton, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    This study was based on a national retrospective analysis of 1400 questionnaires on the causes of deafness in Omani children, collected from 1986 to 2000. It was found that 70% of the deaf children were from parents of consanguineous marriages, and 30% from non-consanguineous unions. In those with consanguineous families 70.16% were first cousin marriages, 17.54% were second cousins, and 10.86% were from the same tribe. The proportion arising from first cousin marriages was higher than the background rate of first cousin marriages in Oman. In the total cohort, 45% had other family members with hearing loss. There was a greater chance of other relatives being affected in the consanguineous group as opposed to the non-consanguineous group (29.7% versus 15.3%). In most cases the affected relative was a deaf sibling (67.8%). We have demonstrated a higher rate of consanguinity amongst parents of deaf children in Oman and suggest this is associated with a higher frequency of autosomal recessive deafness in this paediatric population.

  16. Association studies in consanguineous populations

    SciTech Connect

    Genin, E.; Clerget-Darpous, F.

    1996-04-01

    To study the genetic determinism of multifactorial diseases in large panmictic populations, a strategy consists in looking for an association with markers closely linked to candidate genes. A distribution of marker genotypes different in patients and controls may indicate that the candidate gene is involved in the disease. In panmictic populations, the power to detect the role of a candidate gene depends on the gametic disequilibrium with the marker locus. In consanguineous populations, we show that it depends on the inbreeding coefficient F as well. Inbreeding increases the power to detect the role of a recessive or quasi-recessive disease-susceptibility factor. The gain in power turns out to be greater for small values of the gametic disequilibrium. Moreover, even in the absence of gametic disequilibrium, the presence of inbreeding may allow to detect the role of a recessive factor. Ignoring inbreeding when it exists may lead to reject falsely a recessive model if the mode of inheritance is inferred on the distribution of genotypes among patients. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Consanguinity and dysmorphology in Arabs.

    PubMed

    Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Hamamy, Hanan

    2014-01-01

    Incidence rates of congenital disorders among the 350 million inhabitants of Arab countries could be influenced via the people's demographic and cultural characteristics. Arabs usually marry at a young age and have large families. They share certain core cultural values and beliefs, with the family accepted as the central structure of society. Consanguineous marriage is favored and respected in most if not all Arab communities, and intrafamilial unions currently account for 20-50% of all marriages. First-cousin unions are especially popular and constitute almost one quarter of all marriages in many Arab countries. Consequently, autosomal recessive (AR) dysmorphic syndromes constitute a considerable proportion of all birth defects among Arabs. Arab geneticists, with their persistent commitment to advancing research, have contributed to the description of a number of rare and new AR syndromes with the identification of novel genes. The collaboration with research teams in high-income countries resulted in a plethora of data on pathogenic variants and their function in causing dysmorphic syndromes. There could still be a considerable number of rare dysmorphic syndromes that prevail among Arabs which are not hitherto described and whose underlying molecular pathologies are not yet defined. Arab countries should thus strive to deploy DNA diagnostics and to build research capability around local priorities. Furthermore, a characterization of the prevailing genetic disorders in each geographic location, together with their mutations, is needed to plan for appropriate screening and testing protocols. An overview of consanguinity in Arab countries and examples of dysmorphology syndromes associated with consanguinity with their available molecular bases will be discussed. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Consanguineous marriage and its relevance to obstetric practice.

    PubMed

    de Costa, Caroline M

    2002-08-01

    At the beginning of the twenty-first century, consanguineous marriage is practiced widely in many parts of the world. More than 2 billion people, of various religious and ethnic backgrounds, live in countries where a large proportion of marriages are contracted between blood relatives. The practice is seen as promoting family stability and having significant social and economic advantages. Consanguineous marriage is important genetically-the children of consanguineous unions are more often homozygous for particular alleles than are the offspring of unrelated parents, and therefore, autosomal recessive disorders, which may be lethal or debilitating, are more common in such children. Health-care providers working with communities where consanguineous marriage is common, in particular obstetricians, family physicians, and pediatricians, need to be aware of the possible impact of such marriages on pregnancy outcomes, so the best possible genetic and antenatal care can be provided, sympathetically and nonjudgmentally, and the best possible results obtained.

  19. Specific aspects of consanguinity: some examples from the Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Romdhane, Lilia; Ben Halim, Nizar; Rejeb, Insaf; Kefi, Rym; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Ben Rekaya, Mariem; Messai, Habib; Messaoud, Olfa; Riahi, Zied; Bonnet, Crystel; Ben Rhouma, Faten; Nagara, Majdi; Petit, Christine; McElreavey, Ken; Romeo, Giovanni; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Located at the cross-road between Europe and Africa, Tunisia is a North African country of 11 million inhabitants. Throughout its history, it has been invaded by different ethnic groups. These historical events, and consanguinity, have impacted on the spectrum and frequency of genetic diseases in Tunisia. Investigations of Tunisian families have significantly contributed to elucidation of the genetic bases of rare disorders, providing an invaluable resource of cases due to particular familial structures (large family size, consanguinity and share of common ancestors). In the present study, we report on and review different aspects of consanguinity in the Tunisian population as a case study, representing several features common to neighboring or historically related countries in North Africa and the Middle East. Despite the educational, demographic and behavioral changes that have taken place during the last four decades, familial and geographical endogamy still exist at high frequencies, especially in rural areas. The health implications of consanguinity in Tunisian families include an increased risk of the expression of autosomal recessive diseases and particular phenotypic expressions. With new sequencing technologies, the investigation of consanguineous populations provides a unique opportunity to better evaluate the impact of consanguinity on the genome dynamic and on health, in addition to a better understanding of the genetic bases of diseases. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Consanguinity, human evolution, and complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bittles, A. H.; Black, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    There is little information on inbreeding during the critical early years of human existence. However, given the small founding group sizes and restricted mate choices it seems inevitable that intrafamilial reproduction occurred and the resultant levels of inbreeding would have been substantial. Currently, couples related as second cousins or closer (F ≥ 0.0156) and their progeny account for an estimated 10.4% of the global population. The highest rates of consanguineous marriage occur in north and sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and west, central, and south Asia. In these regions even couples who regard themselves as unrelated may exhibit high levels of homozygosity, because marriage within clan, tribe, caste, or biraderi boundaries has been a long-established tradition. Mortality in first-cousin progeny is ≈3.5% higher than in nonconsanguineous offspring, although demographic, social, and economic factors can significantly influence the outcome. Improving socioeconomic conditions and better access to health care will impact the effects of consanguinity, with a shift from infant and childhood mortality to extended morbidity. At the same time, a range of primarily social factors, including urbanization, improved female education, and smaller family sizes indicate that the global prevalence of consanguineous unions will decline. This shift in marriage patterns will initially result in decreased homozygosity, accompanied by a reduction in the expression of recessive single-gene disorders. Although the roles of common and rare gene variants in the etiology of complex disease remain contentious, it would be expected that declining consanguinity would also be reflected in reduced prevalence of complex diseases, especially in population isolates. PMID:19805052

  1. First steps in exploring prospective exome sequencing of consanguineous couples.

    PubMed

    Teeuw, Marieke; Waisfisz, Quinten; Zwijnenburg, Petra J G; Sistermans, Erik A; Weiss, Marjan M; Henneman, Lidewij; ten Kate, Leo P; Cornel, Martina C; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Consanguinity is one of the most frequent risk factors for congenital disorders. In theory, prospective exome sequencing of consanguineous couples could identify couples who both are carriers of autosomal recessive diseases, and empower such couples to make informed reproductive decisions. To investigate this, we sent blood samples to our laboratory of four pairs of consanguineous parents having one or more children affected by an autosomal recessive disorder, without revealing any diagnostic information. The study was restricted to find identical, previously described, or evidently pathogenic mutations in both parents of each couple, in over 400 genes known to result in severe autosomal recessive disorders. Out of the six autosomal recessive disorders known to the four couples studied, two were correctly identified. Carrier status of one not previously known autosomal recessive disorder was discovered. As expected, given the pipeline used, large deletions, mutations in genes not present in the gene list, mutations outside the exons and consensus splice sites, and mutations that were not evidently pathogenic and previously not reported, were not identified. The restriction to detecting only couples with identical mutations diminishes the risk of revealing unsolicited findings and shortens the time needed for analysis, but also results in missing couples with different mutations in the same gene. In addition to the proposed pipeline, couples should be offered testing for carrier status of frequent disorders that can present themselves by large deletions, non-exonic mutations or compound heterozygous mutations (e.g. thalassemia, spinal muscular atrophy, cystic fibrosis). Even though sensitivity is reduced, offering exome sequencing prospectively will increase reproductive options for consanguineous couples.

  2. Genotype and phenotype relationships in 10 Pakistani unrelated patients with inherited factor VII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Borhany, M; Boijout, H; Pellequer, J-L; Shamsi, T; Moulis, G; Aguilar-Martinez, P; Schved, J-F; Giansily-Blaizot, M

    2013-11-01

    Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is one of the commonest rare bleeding disorders. It is characterized by a wide molecular and clinical heterogeneity and an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Factor VII-deficient patients are still scarcely explored in Pakistan although rare bleeding disorders became quite common as a result of traditional consanguineous marriages. The aim of the study was to give a first insight of F7 gene mutations in Pakistani population. Ten unrelated FVII-deficient patients living in Pakistan were investigated (median FVII:C = 2%; range = 2-37%). A clinical questionnaire was filled out for each patient and direct sequencing was performed on the coding regions, intron/exon boundaries and 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the F7 gene. Nine different mutations (eight missense mutations and one located within the F7 promoter) were identified on the F7 gene. Five of them were novel (p.Cys82Tyr, p.Cys322Ser, p.Leu357Phe, p.Thr410Ala, c-57C>T, the last being predicted to alter the binding site of transcription factor HNF-4). Half of the patients had single mutations in Cys residues involved in disulfide bridges. The p.Cys82Arg mutation was the most frequent in our series. Six of seven patients with FVII:C levels below 10% were homozygous in connection with the high percentage of consanguinity in our series. In addition, we graded the 10 patients according to three previously published classifications for rare bleeding disorders. The use of the bleeding score proposed by Tosetto and co-workers in 2006 appears to well qualify the bleeding tendency in our series. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Whole exome sequencing identified a novel zinc-finger gene ZNF141 associated with autosomal recessive postaxial polydactyly type A.

    PubMed

    Kalsoom, Umm-e-; Klopocki, Eva; Wasif, Naveed; Tariq, Muhammad; Khan, Saadullah; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter; Mundlos, Stefan; Ahmad, Wasim

    2013-01-01

    Postaxial polydactyly (PAP) type A is characterised by well-formed functionally developed 5th digit duplication in hands and/or feet. It is genetically heterogeneous condition, inherited both in autosomal recessive and dominant manners. To date one autosomal recessive and four autosomal dominant loci have been mapped on human chromosomes. In the present study we have investigated a consanguineous Pakistani family segregating autosomal recessive PAP type A to identify the gene responsible for this phenotype. Whole exome sequencing combined with homozygosity mapping and array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) analysis was used to search for a genetic cause of PAP type A in the present study. Exome sequencing identified a missense mutation (c.1420C>T; p.Thr474Ile) in all the affected individuals of the family, in the gene ZNF141, mapped to the telomeric region on chromosome 4p16.3. This study revealed involvement of a zinc finger gene ZNF141 in causing autosomal recessive PAP type A, which may open up interesting perspectives into the function of this protein in limb development.

  4. A complex microcephaly syndrome in a Pakistani family associated with a novel missense mutation in RBBP8 and a heterozygous deletion in NRXN1.

    PubMed

    Agha, Zehra; Iqbal, Zafar; Azam, Maleeha; Siddique, Maimoona; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Zweier, Christiane; de Leeuw, Nicole; Qamar, Raheel; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2014-03-15

    We report on a consanguineous Pakistani family with a severe congenital microcephaly syndrome resembling the Seckel syndrome and Jawad syndrome. The affected individuals in this family were born to consanguineous parents of whom the mother presented with mild intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy and diabetes mellitus. The two living affected brothers presented with microcephaly, white matter disease of the brain, hyponychia, dysmorphic facial features with synophrys, epilepsy, diabetes mellitus and ID. Genotyping with a 250K SNP array in both affected brothers revealed an 18 MB homozygous region on chromosome 18 p11.21-q12.1 encompassing the SCKL2 locus of the Seckel and Jawad syndromes. Sequencing of the RBBP8 gene, underlying the Seckel and Jawad syndromes, identified the novel mutation c.919A>G, p.Arg307Gly, segregating in a recessive manner in the family. In addition, in the two affected brothers and their mother we have also found a heterozygous 607kb deletion, encompassing exons 13-19 of NRXN1. Bidirectional sequencing of the coding exons of NRXN1 did not reveal any other mutation on the other allele. It thus appears that the phenotype of the mildly affected mother can be explained by the NRXN1 deletion, whereas the more severe and complex microcephalic phenotype of the two affected brothers is due to the simultaneous deletion in NRXN1 and the homozygous missense mutation affecting RBBP8. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Compound heterozygosity for three common MEFV mutations in a highly consanguineous family with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Seidel, H; Steinlein, O K

    2008-07-01

    Consanguinity is not the only factor influencing the occurrence of autosomal recessive disorders such as familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). The extended, multiple consanguineous Turkish pedigree presented here demonstrates that the population frequency of certain mutations (so-called "ancient" mutations) can be at least equally important. In high-risk populations different combinations of mutations can occur within the same family, increasing not only the intrafamilial clinical variability, but also causing considerable recurrence risks even in marriages with unrelated spouses.

  6. Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment Due to Rare Missense Variants within S1PR2

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Faridi, Rabia; Rehman, Atteeq U.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ansar, Muhammad; Wang, Xin; Morell, Robert J.; Isaacson, Rivka; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Dai, Hang; Acharya, Anushree; Qaiser, Tanveer A.; Muhammad, Dost; Ali, Rana Amjad; Shams, Sulaiman; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Shahzad, Shaheen; Raza, Syed Irfan; Bashir, Zil-e-Huma; Smith, Joshua D.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ahmad, Wasim; Friedman, Thomas B.; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are a well-studied class of transmembrane G protein-coupled sphingolipid receptors that mediate multiple cellular processes. However, S1PRs have not been previously reported to be involved in the genetic etiology of human traits. S1PR2 lies within the autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) locus DFNB68 on 19p13.2. From exome sequence data we identified two pathogenic S1PR2 variants, c.323G>C (p.Arg108Pro) and c.419A>G (p.Tyr140Cys). Each of these variants co-segregates with congenital profound hearing impairment in consanguineous Pakistani families with maximum LOD scores of 6.4 for family DEM4154 and 3.3 for family PKDF1400. Neither S1PR2 missense variant was reported among ∼120,000 chromosomes in the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, in 76 unrelated Pakistani exomes, or in 720 Pakistani control chromosomes. Both DNA variants affect highly conserved residues of S1PR2 and are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools. Molecular modeling predicts that these variants affect binding of sphingosine-1-phosphate (p.Arg108Pro) and G protein docking (p.Tyr140Cys). In the previously reported S1pr2−/− mice, stria vascularis abnormalities, organ of Corti degeneration, and profound hearing loss were observed. Additionally, hair cell defects were seen in both knockout mice and morphant zebrafish. Family PKDF1400 presents with ARNSHI, which is consistent with the lack of gross malformations in S1pr2−/− mice, whereas family DEM4154 has lower limb malformations in addition to hearing loss. Our findings suggest the possibility of developing therapies against hair cell damage (e.g., from ototoxic drugs) through targeted stimulation of S1PR2. PMID:26805784

  7. A new autosomal recessive syndrome of characteristic facies, joint contractures, skeletal abnormalities, and normal development: second report with further clinical delineation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ajay; Hall, Christine M; Ransley, Yvonne F; Murday, Victoria A

    1995-01-01

    We describe a girl of Pakistani origin, born to consanguineous parents, with a multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndrome. This is the second report confirming an apparently new autosomal recessive syndrome reported earlier by van den Ende et al in 1992. The hallmarks of this MCA syndrome include characteristic facies with blepharophimosis, narrow, beaked nose, hypoplastic maxilla with or without cleft palate and everted lower lip, arachnodactyly, self-limiting congenital joint contractures, peculiar skeletal abnormalities, and normal growth and development. Further clinical and radiological delineation of the syndrome in this report suggests that the term “Marden-Walker-like syndrome without psychomotor retardation”, used in the first report to describe this condition, does not accurately reflect its clinical picture. The overall prognosis in this syndrome seems good. Images PMID:8558561

  8. Mutations in FYCO1 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianjun; Ma, Zhiwei; Jiao, Xiaodong; Fariss, Robert; Kantorow, Wanda Lee; Kantorow, Marc; Pras, Eran; Frydman, Moshe; Pras, Elon; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, S. Amer; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2011-01-01

    Congenital cataracts (CCs), responsible for about one-third of blindness in infants, are a major cause of vision loss in children worldwide. Autosomal-recessive congenital cataracts (arCC) form a clinically diverse and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of the crystalline lens. To identify the genetic cause of arCC in consanguineous Pakistani families, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis and fine mapping and identified linkage to 3p21-p22 with a summed LOD score of 33.42. Mutations in the gene encoding FYVE and coiled-coil domain containing 1 (FYCO1), a PI(3)P-binding protein family member that is associated with the exterior of autophagosomes and mediates microtubule plus-end-directed vesicle transport, were identified in 12 Pakistani families and one Arab Israeli family in which arCC had previously been mapped to the overlapping CATC2 region. Nine different mutations were identified, including c.3755 delC (p.Ala1252AspfsX71), c.3858_3862dupGGAAT (p.Leu1288TrpfsX37), c.1045 C>T (p.Gln349X), c.2206C>T (p.Gln736X), c.2761C>T (p.Arg921X), c.2830C>T (p.Arg944X), c.3150+1 G>T, c.4127T>C (p.Leu1376Pro), and c.1546C>T (p.Gln516X). Fyco1 is expressed in the mouse embryonic and adult lens and peaks at P12d. Expressed mutant proteins p.Leu1288TrpfsX37 and p.Gln736X are truncated on immunoblots. Wild-type and p.L1376P FYCO1, the only missense mutant identified, migrate at the expected molecular mass. Both wild-type and p. Leu1376Pro FYCO1 proteins expressed in human lens epithelial cells partially colocalize to microtubules and are found adjacent to Golgi, but they primarily colocalize to autophagosomes. Thus, FYCO1 is involved in lens development and transparency in humans, and mutations in this gene are one of the most common causes of arCC in the Pakistani population. PMID:21636066

  9. A novel mutation in homeobox DNA binding domain of HOXC13 gene underlies pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (ECTD9) in a Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Khan, Anwar Kamal; Muhammad, Noor; Aziz, Abdul; Khan, Sher Alam; Shah, Khadim; Nasir, Abdul; Khan, Muzammil Ahmad; Khan, Saadullah

    2017-04-12

    Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED) is a congenital disorder of hair abnormalities and nail dysplasia. Both autosomal recessive and dominant inheritance fashion of PHNED occurs. In literature, to date, five different forms of PHNED have been reported at molecular level, having three genes known and two loci with no gene yet. In this study, a four generations consanguineous family of Pakistani origin with autosomal recessive PHNED was investigated. Affected members exhibited PHNED phenotypes with involvement of complete hair loss and nail dysplasia. To screen for mutation in the genes (HOXC13, KRT74, KRT85), its coding exons and exons-intron boundaries were sequenced. The 3D models of normal and mutated HOXC13 were predicted by using homology modeling. Through investigating the family to known loci, the family was mapped to ectodermal dysplasia 9 (ECTD9) loci with genetic address of 12q13.13. Mutation screening revealed a novel missense mutation (c.929A > C; p.Asn310Thr) in homeobox DNA binding domain of HOXC13 gene in affected members of the family. Due to mutation, loss of hydrogen bonding and difference in potential energy occurs, which may resulting in alteration of protein function. This is the first mutation reported in homeodomain, while 5(th) mutation reported in HOXC13 gene causing PHNED.

  10. [Scattered papules in three Togolese children from a consanguineous marrige: epidermodysplasia verruciformis].

    PubMed

    Saka, B; Mouhari-Touré, A; Kombaté, K; Pitché, P; Tchangaï-Walla, K

    2009-06-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare condition characterized by diffuse flat wart-like lesions. It is an autosomal recessive genodermatosis associated with susceptibility to infection by specific human papillomavirus genotypes and a high risk of skin cancer. In this report we describe three cases of EV after a consanguineous marriage in a family with no history of EV.

  11. Cleft lip and cone-rod dystrophy in a consanguineous sibship.

    PubMed

    Ausems, M G; Wittebol-Post, D; Hennekam, R C

    1996-10-01

    Three siblings from a consanguineous marriage were found to have a cleft lip. Two of them developed a progressive retinopathy which was identified as a cone-rod dystrophy. It is suggested that this association may represent a hitherto unreported entity with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance, although chance co-occurrence cannot be excluded.

  12. [Endogamy and consanguinity in Mauritania].

    PubMed

    Hammami, Abdelmajid; Elgazzeh, Mohamed; Chalbi, Noureddine; Mansour, Ben Abdallah

    2005-01-01

    We examined the types of marriage between husband and wife and their frequency as well as the intensity of consanguinity for the Mauritanian ethnic groups. Then we evaluated for all the population, the variations of each of these dimensions according to the dates of marriage. The analisys of a sample of 2413 couples obtained according to the quota method showed that the Mauritanian population presents a strong family endogamy of about 47.20%. The Wolofs and the Poulards present pourcentages of marriages between blood relations of about 74.47% and of 55.74% respectively. On the other hand, for the Maures, black Maures and Soninkes, the proportions of marriages between blood relations are of the order of 41.25%, 30.52% and 46.99% respectively. This same analysis has also shown that the Mauritanian ethnic groupes present high apparent coefficient of consanguinity. They are of a level of unions between unequal cousins (1 /32) for (1/64) for others. The evaluation of endogamy practices in function of marriage dates (from 1921 to 1991) shows and for all the population a decline tendency in the pourcentages of consanguine marriages, and at the level of a whole Mauritanian population.

  13. Mutations in the beta propeller WDR72 cause autosomal-recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Walid; Parry, David A; Shore, Roger C; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Jafri, Hussain; Rashid, Yasmin; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Al Harasi, Sharifa; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2009-11-01

    Healthy dental enamel is the hardest and most highly mineralized human tissue. Though acellular, nonvital, and without capacity for turnover or repair, it can nevertheless last a lifetime. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a collective term for failure of normal enamel development, covering diverse clinical phenotypes that typically show Mendelian inheritance patterns. One subset, known as hypomaturation AI, is characterised by near-normal volumes of organic enamel matrix but with weak, creamy-brown opaque enamel that fails prematurely after tooth eruption. Mutations in genes critical to enamel matrix formation have been documented, but current understanding of other key events in enamel biomineralization is limited. We investigated autosomal-recessive hypomaturation AI in a consanguineous Pakistani family. A whole-genome SNP autozygosity screen identified a locus on chromosome 15q21.3. Sequencing candidate genes revealed a point mutation in the poorly characterized WDR72 gene. Screening of WDR72 in a panel of nine additional hypomaturation AI families revealed the same mutation in a second, apparently unrelated, Pakistani family and two further nonsense mutations in Omani families. Immunohistochemistry confirmed intracellular localization in maturation-stage ameloblasts. WDR72 function is unknown, but as a putative beta propeller is expected to be a scaffold for protein-protein interactions. The nearest homolog, WDR7, is involved in vesicle mobilization and Ca2+-dependent exocytosis at synapses. Vesicle trafficking is important in maturation-stage ameloblasts with respect to secretion into immature enamel and removal of cleaved enamel matrix proteins via endocytosis. This raises the intriguing possibility that WDR72 is critical to ameloblast vesicle turnover during enamel maturation.

  14. Bleeding disorders in the tribe: result of consanguineous in breeding

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency and clinical features of bleeding disorders in the tribe as a result of consanguineous marriages. Design Cross Sectional Study Introduction Countries in which consanguinity is a normal practice, these rare autosomal recessive disorders run in close families and tribes. Here we describe a family, living in village Ali Murad Chandio, District Badin, labeled as haemophilia. Patients & Methods Our team visited the village & developed the pedigree of the whole extended family, up to seven generations. Performa was filled by incorporating patients, family history of bleeding, signs & symptoms, and bleeding from any site. From them 144 individuals were screened with CBC, bleeding time, platelet aggregation studies & RiCoF. While for PT, APTT, VWF assay and Factor VIII assay, samples were kept frozen at -70 degrees C until tested. Results The family tree of the seven generations comprises of 533 individuals, 63 subjects died over a period of 20 years and 470 were alive. Out of all those 144 subjects were selected on the basis of the bleeding history. Among them 98(68.1%) were diagnosed to have a bleeding disorder; 44.9% patients were male and 55.1% patients were female. Median age of all the patients was 20.81, range (4 months- 80 yrs). The results of bleeding have shown that majority had gum bleeding, epistaxis and menorrhagia. Most common bleeding disorder was Von Willebrand disease and Platelet functional disorders. Conclusion Consanguineous marriages keep all the beneficial and adversely affecting recessive genes within the family; in homozygous states. These genes express themselves and result in life threatening diseases. Awareness, education & genetic counseling will be needed to prevent the spread of such common occurrence of these bleeding disorders in the community. PMID:20822539

  15. A homozygous missense variant in type I keratin KRT25 causes autosomal recessive woolly hair.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Muhammad; Raza, Syed Irfan; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Irfanullah; Shahi, Shamim; Acharya, Anushree; Dai, Hang; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-10-01

    Woolly hair (WH) is a hair abnormality that is primarily characterised by tightly curled hair with abnormal growth. In two unrelated consanguineous Pakistani families with non-syndromic autosomal recessive (AR) WH, homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis identified a locus within 17q21.1-q22, which contains the type I keratin gene cluster. A DNA sample from an affected individual from each family underwent exome sequencing. A homozygous missense variant c.950T>C (p.(Leu317Pro)) within KRT25 segregated with ARWH in both families, and has a combined maximum two-point LOD score of 7.9 at ϴ=0. The KRT25 variant is predicted to result in disruption of the second α-helical rod domain and the entire protein structure, thus possibly interfering with heterodimerisation of K25 with type II keratins within the inner root sheath (IRS) of the hair follicle and the medulla of the hair shaft. Our findings implicate a novel gene involved in human hair abnormality, and are consistent with the curled, fragile hair found in mice with Krt25 mutations, and further support the role of IRS-specific type I keratins in hair follicle development and maintenance of hair texture. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. A homozygous missense variant in type I keratin KRT25 causes autosomal recessive woolly hair

    PubMed Central

    Ansar, Muhammad; Raza, Syed Irfan; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Irfanullah; Shahi, Shamim; Acharya, Anushree; Dai, Hang; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2016-01-01

    Background Woolly hair (WH) is a hair abnormality that is primarily characterised by tightly curled hair with abnormal growth. Methods In two unrelated consanguineous Pakistani families with non-syndromic autosomal recessive (AR) WH, homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis identified a locus within 17q21.1–q22, which contains the type I keratin gene cluster. A DNA sample from an affected individual from each family underwent exome sequencing. Results A homozygous missense variant c.950T>C (p.(Leu317Pro)) within KRT25 segregated with ARWH in both families, and has a combined maximum two-point LOD score of 7.9 at ϴ=0. The KRT25 variant is predicted to result in disruption of the second α-helical rod domain and the entire protein structure, thus possibly interfering with heterodimerisation of K25 with type II keratins within the inner root sheath (IRS) of the hair follicle and the medulla of the hair shaft. Conclusions Our findings implicate a novel gene involved in human hair abnormality, and are consistent with the curled, fragile hair found in mice with Krt25 mutations, and further support the role of IRS-specific type I keratins in hair follicle development and maintenance of hair texture. PMID:26160856

  17. Short stature, brachydactyly, and Peters' anomaly (Peters'-plus syndrome): confirmation of autosomal recessive inheritance.

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, J C; Reis, D F; Llerena Júnior, J; Barbosa Neto, J; Pontes, R L; Middleton, S; Telles, L F

    1991-01-01

    Two sibs with a phenotype characterised by short stature, brachydactyly, and ocular anomalies (Peters' anomaly) are reported (Peters'-plus syndrome). The consanguinity is in agreement with the proposed autosomal recessive inheritance. Images PMID:1856836

  18. Congenital vocal cord paralysis with possible autosomal recessive inheritance: Case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, R.; Friedman, S.; Fallet, S.

    1996-08-23

    We describe an infant with congenital vocal cord paralysis born to consanguineous parents. While autosomal dominant and X-linked inheritance have been previously reported in this condition, we conclude that the degree of parental consanguinity in this case strongly suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. Although we cannot exclude X-linked inheritance, evidence from animal studies demonstrates autosomal recessive inheritance and provides a possible molecular basis for congenital vocal cord paralysis. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Trends in consanguinity in South India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, S; Audinarayana, N

    2001-04-01

    This study uses data from the 1992-93 National Family Health Survey to assess trends in consanguinity in the South Indian states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu. In Kerala, the frequency of consanguineous marriages is very low and one type of preferred marriage of the Dravidian marriage system uncle niece marriage--is conspicuously absent. In the other states of South India, consanguinity and the coefficient of inbreeding are high. While no change in consanguinity is observed during the past three to four decades in Karnataka, a definite decline is observed in Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. Due to recent changes in the demographic and social situation in these states, this decline in consanguinity is likely to continue.

  20. Organ donation consanguinity or universality.

    PubMed

    Kishore, R R

    1996-01-01

    1. Neither the "Diseased Persons" nor the "Genetic Relations" provide an answer to "trading" in human body parts. 2. Live human body constitutes a vital source of supply of organs and tissues and the possibilities of optimum utilisation should be explored. 3. There is no scope for dogmatic postures and open-mindedness should be the approach while dealing with the issue of Organ Transplantation. 4. Society owes a duty to save the file of a dying man and in the event of failure to do so, it is absolutely immoral to interfere with his own arrangements by making unrealistic laws. No immorality is involved if an individual disposes of his spare body parts for a valid consideration to a needy person. 5. The scarcity needs to be urgently overcome otherwise unwarranted trade and crime are liable to thrive. 6. Families are not unconnected or antagonistic fragments of humanity. After thousands of years of continuous efforts the individuals on this earth have attained the stage of organic and functional integration. Atomisation of society on the basis of consanguineous proximities amounts to reversing this holistic trend. Organ transplantation is a functional expression of a highly evolved pursuit with inherent and intimate interaction in the form of organic exchange at the individual level, independent of consanguineous inducements or motivations. As such there is absolutely no scope for restricting organ donations by strangers. 7. Commercialisation should be curbed by making the enforcement agencies more efficient and not by depriving a needy person of his genuine requirements. Legislative craftsmanship lies in providing an answer without curtailing the freedom of the people.

  1. Single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and unexpected consanguinity: considerations for clinicians when returning results to families.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Fernanda; Tabor, Holly K; Chow, Penny M; Conta, Jessie H; Feldman, Kenneth W; Tsuchiya, Karen D; Beck, Anita E

    2015-05-01

    The broad use of single-nucleotide polymorphism microarrays has increased identification of unexpected consanguinity. Therefore, guidelines to address reporting of consanguinity have been published for clinical laboratories. Because no such guidelines for clinicians exist, we describe a case and present recommendations for clinicians to disclose unexpected consanguinity to families. In a boy with multiple endocrine abnormalities and structural birth defects, single-nucleotide polymorphism array analysis revealed ~23% autosomal homozygosity suggestive of a first-degree parental relationship. We assembled an interdisciplinary health-care team, planned the most appropriate way to discuss results of the single-nucleotide polymorphism array with the adult mother, including the possibility of multiple autosomal recessive disorders in her child, and finally met with her as a team. From these discussions, we developed four major considerations for clinicians returning results of unexpected consanguinity, all guided by the child's best interests: (i) ethical and legal obligations for reporting possible abuse, (ii) preservation of the clinical relationship, (iii) attention to justice and psychosocial challenges, and (iv) utilization of the single-nucleotide polymorphism array results to guide further testing. As single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays become a common clinical diagnostic tool, clinicians can use this framework to return results of unexpected consanguinity to families in a supportive and productive manner.

  2. Consanguineous marriage and reproductive risk: attitudes and understanding of ethnic groups practising consanguinity in Western society

    PubMed Central

    Teeuw, Marieke E; Loukili, Ghariba; Bartels, Edien AC; ten Kate, Leo P; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2014-01-01

    Consanguineous couples should be adequately informed about their increased reproductive risk and possibilities for genetic counselling. Information may only be effective if it meets the needs of the target group. This study aimed to gain more insight into: (1) attitudes of people belonging to ethnic groups in Western society towards consanguinity and their understanding of risk for offspring; and (2) their attitudes regarding reproductive information targeted at consanguineous couples. Dutch Moroccans and Turks were invited to complete an online questionnaire by snowball sampling and by placing a link on two popular Dutch Moroccan/Turkish forum websites between September and October 2011. The questionnaire was completed by 201 individuals who were, on average, neither positive nor negative towards consanguinity. Respondents with a consanguineous partner were more positive, estimated the risk for the offspring lower and were less positive about the provision of risk information to consanguineous couples when compared with respondents without a consanguineous partner. Participants of Turkish origin had a more negative attitude towards consanguinity and estimated the reproductive risk higher than Moroccan participants. More than half of the respondents thought that information should be given before marriage, whereas only 10% thought it should never be provided. The general practitioner was most often mentioned (54%) as the designated professional to inform people. Information about genetic risks related to consanguinity should be offered early, preferably before marriage. The diversity of the target population requires various strategies to disseminate information and reach consanguineous couples with the offer of genetic counselling. PMID:23921534

  3. Consanguineous marriage and reproductive risk: attitudes and understanding of ethnic groups practising consanguinity in Western society.

    PubMed

    Teeuw, Marieke E; Loukili, Ghariba; Bartels, Edien Ac; ten Kate, Leo P; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2014-04-01

    Consanguineous couples should be adequately informed about their increased reproductive risk and possibilities for genetic counselling. Information may only be effective if it meets the needs of the target group. This study aimed to gain more insight into: (1) attitudes of people belonging to ethnic groups in Western society towards consanguinity and their understanding of risk for offspring; and (2) their attitudes regarding reproductive information targeted at consanguineous couples. Dutch Moroccans and Turks were invited to complete an online questionnaire by snowball sampling and by placing a link on two popular Dutch Moroccan/Turkish forum websites between September and October 2011. The questionnaire was completed by 201 individuals who were, on average, neither positive nor negative towards consanguinity. Respondents with a consanguineous partner were more positive, estimated the risk for the offspring lower and were less positive about the provision of risk information to consanguineous couples when compared with respondents without a consanguineous partner. Participants of Turkish origin had a more negative attitude towards consanguinity and estimated the reproductive risk higher than Moroccan participants. More than half of the respondents thought that information should be given before marriage, whereas only 10% thought it should never be provided. The general practitioner was most often mentioned (54%) as the designated professional to inform people. Information about genetic risks related to consanguinity should be offered early, preferably before marriage. The diversity of the target population requires various strategies to disseminate information and reach consanguineous couples with the offer of genetic counselling.

  4. Autosomal recessive pericentral pigmentary retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, E I; O'Neill, J F; Maumenee, I H

    1988-11-15

    A brother and sister, born to consanguineous parents, had pigmentary retinopathy in a pericentral distribution. The retinopathy was noted in infancy when the siblings were examined for strabismus. The optic disks, maculae, and retinal vessels were normal. There was mild reduction in amplitude of both scotopic and photopic electroretinographic responses. Both patients had moderate hyperopic astigmatism and esotropia. The fundus and visual acuity remained unchanged over periods of nine and 13 years in the brother and sister, respectively. Results of ocular examinations on the father, mother, and an older sister were normal. These findings support an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance in this family with pericentral pigmentary retinopathy.

  5. A community genetics perspective on consanguineous marriage.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H

    2008-01-01

    Consanguineous marriage has long been a controversial topic, with particular attention focused on adverse health outcomes. Unfortunately, the studies that have been conducted on consanguinity to date have usually lacked control for important sociodemographic variables, such as maternal age and birth intervals, and in estimating specific disease gene frequency, they have ignored the influence of population sub-division. Inadequate attention has also been paid to the social benefits associated with intra-familial marriage, resulting in a biased overall cost-benefit assessment. Worldwide, some 1,000 million people live in countries where 20 to more than 50% of marriages are consanguineous, and large migrant communities from these regions are now resident in Western Europe, North America and Oceania. The need for comprehensive and more balanced investigations into all aspects of consanguineous marriage is pressing and merits a substantial international collaborative research effort.

  6. Autosomal recessive

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the other gene comes from the father. Recessive inheritance means both genes in a pair must be abnormal to cause ... born to parents who carry the same autosomal recessive change ... abnormal gene from both parents and developing the disease. You ...

  7. Consanguinity Among Parents of Iranian Deaf Children

    PubMed Central

    Ajallouyan, Mohammad; Radfar, Shokofeh; Nouhi, Sima; Tavallaie, Seid Abbas; Amirsalari, Susan; Yousefi, Jaleh; Hasanali Fard, Mahdieh

    2016-01-01

    Background It seems that there is a relationship between consanguinity and profound hearing loss but there is little data about the association of consanguinity and hearing loss in Iran. Objectives The aim of this study is to demonstrate the causes of profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss among Iranian samples who are candidates for cochlear implantation. Methods This study was retrospective, analytical, and designed to collect information about profound hearing impaired cases referred to the Baqiyatallah Cochlear implantation center using enumeration. A total of 310 children with profound hearing impairments participated in this study. They were aged from 6 months to 4 years old. The study was done between January 2007 and April 2009. Chi-square tests were used to show whether there was any statistical difference between the incidence of marital consanguinity of their parents and the normal population. Results Sixty-five percent of those 310 children had parents who had married with their relatives. Of the 203 (65%) parents that had consanguineous marriages, 132 were first cousins, which includes the children of two brothers (37 [11.8%] patrilateral parallel cousins), the children of two sisters (38 [12.2%] multi-lateral parallel cousins), or the children of a brother and a sister (57 [18.3%] cross cousins). Fifty-four (17.4%) of the parents were second cousins and 17 (5.2%) were beyond second cousins. Also, hearing loss etiology was obvious in 237 (76.3%) of the patients with profound hearing loss but was unknown in 73 (23.7%). Hereditary was identified as the most common cause in 33% of the cases. Conclusions Our data demonstrated a 65% occurrence of consanguineous marriage among the parents of deaf children, which is statistically different from the percentage of consanguineous marriage among Iranian population (38%). This indicates an obvious relationship between severe hearing loss and consanguineous marriage. PMID:28191326

  8. Autosomal recessive congenital stenosis of aqueduct of Sylvius.

    PubMed

    Barros-Nuñes, P; Rivas, F

    1993-01-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus is an etiologically heterogeneous central nervous system malformation. Mendelian inheritance of stenosis of the aqueduct of Sylvius (SAS) accounts for almost 2% of all nonsyndromic forms. Among the monogenetic forms the great majority are X-linked. In this report we describe autosomal recessive transmission of SAS hydrocephalus in a high consanguinity family.

  9. Consanguinity and disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) are defined as 'congenital conditions in which the development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomical sex is atypical' [Lee et al., Pediatrics 2006;118:e488-e500]. Studies conducted in Western countries, with low rates of consanguinity, show that truly ambiguous genitalia have an estimated incidence of 1:5,000 births. There are indications that the prevalence of DSD is higher in endogamous communities. The incidence of ambiguous genitalia in Saudi Arabia has been estimated at 1:2,500 live births; whilst in Egypt, it has been estimated at 1:3,000 live births. This may be due in part to an increase in disorders of androgen synthesis associated with 46,XX DSD. There is clearly a need for further studies to address the frequency of DSD in communities with high levels of consanguinity. This will be challenging, as an accurate diagnosis is difficult and expensive even in specialized centres. In developing countries with high levels of consanguinity, these limitations can be compounded by cultural, social and religious factors. Overall there is an indication that consanguinity may lead to an increase in incidences of both 46,XY and 46,XX DSD, and a co-ordinated study of populations with higher incidences of consanguinity/endogamy is needed to resolve this. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Effect of consanguinity on birth weight for gestational age in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Ghina; Tamim, Hala; Kanaan, Mona; Khawaja, Marwan; Khogali, Mustafa; Wakim, Gerard; Yunis, Khalid A

    2007-04-01

    Consanguinity, the marriage between relatives, has been associated with adverse child health outcomes because it increases homozygosity of recessive alleles. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of consanguinity on the birth weight of newborns in Greater Beirut, Lebanon. Cross-sectional data were collected on 10,289 consecutive liveborn singleton newborns admitted to eight hospitals belonging to the National Collaborative Perinatal Neonatal Network during the years 2000 and 2001. Birth weight was modeled by use of the fetal growth ratio, defined as the ratio of the observed birth weight to the median birth weight for gestational age. A mixed-effect multiple linear regression model was used to predict the net effect of first- and second-cousin marriage on the birth weight for gestational age, accounting for within-hospital clustering of data. After controlling for medical and sociodemographic covariates, the authors found a statistically significant negative association between consanguinity and birth weight at each gestational age. No significant difference was observed in the decrease in birth weight between the first- and second-cousin marriages. Overall, consanguinity was associated with a decrease in birth weight for gestational age by 1.8% (beta = -0.018, 95% confidence interval: -0.027, -0.008). The largest effects on fetal growth were seen with lower parity and smoking during pregnancy.

  11. Consanguinity and genetic diseases in North Africa and immigrants to Europe.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Wagida A; Khyatti, Meriem; Hemminki, Kari

    2014-08-01

    Endemic diseases are caused by environmental and genetic factors. While in this special issue several chapters deal with environmental factors, including infections, the present focus is on genetic causes of disease clustering due to inbreeding and recessive disease mechanisms. Consanguinity is implying sharing of genetic heritage because of marriage between close relatives originating from a common ancestor. With limited natural selection, recessive genes may become more frequent in an inbred compared with an outbred population. Consanguinity is common in North Africa (NA), and the estimates range from 40 to 49% of all marriages in Tunisia and 29-33% in Morocco. As a consequence, recessive disorders are common in the NA region, and we give some examples. Thalassaemia and sickle cell disease/anaemia constitute the most common inherited recessive disorders globally and they are common in NA, but with immigration they have spread to Europe and to other parts of the world. Another example is familial Mediterranean fever, which is common in the Eastern Mediterranean area. With immigrantion from that area to Sweden, it has become the most common hereditary autoinflammatory disease in that country, and there is no evidence that any native Swede would have been diagnosed with this disease. The examples discussed in this chapter show that the historic movement of populations and current immigration are influencing the concept of 'endemic' disease.

  12. Consanguineous marriage in Oman: understanding the community awareness about congenital effects of and attitude towards consanguineous marriage.

    PubMed

    Mazharul Islam, M

    2017-05-01

    Although consanguinity is widely practiced in Oman, the attitude of community towards consanguinity and the awareness of its health consequences to offspring remain largely unexplored. To analyse the levels and trends of consanguineous marriage and examine community awareness about congenital anomaly associated with consanguinity and attitude towards consanguinity in Oman. The data come from a nationally representative survey on Omani adults of age 18 years and above, irrespective of their marital status. Data were analysed using both descriptive and multivariate statistical techniques. The survey results indicate a very high rate (49%) of consanguineous marriage in Oman. There is a declining trend in consanguinity which may be attributed to decline in first cousin marriage. Omani adults have moderately high knowledge (69%) about health consequences of consanguineous marriage. There is a high positive attitude towards consanguineous marriage (75%) which appeared as a significant predictor of current practice of consanguineous marriage in Oman. The positive attitude of the Omani community towards consanguinity outweighs the negative health consequences of consanguinity, and the practice is likely to remain high in the near future. Strong educational and motivational programmes are needed to bring further changes in attitude towards consanguinity and, thus, reduce the burden of congenital anomalies associated with consanguinity in Oman.

  13. Axial mesodermal dysplasia complex: a new case with parental consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Mota, C R; Azevedo, M; Rocha, G; Manuela, F; Coelho, R; Lima, M R

    2000-01-01

    A female is described with axial mesodermal dysplasia complex (AMDC) born to a consanguineous couple. This is thought to be the first description of a patient with AMDC born to consanguineous parents.

  14. The Genetic Basis of Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss in Indian and Pakistani Populations.

    PubMed

    Yan, Denise; Kannan-Sundhari, Abhiraami; Vishwanath, Subramanian; Qing, Jie; Mittal, Rahul; Kameswaran, Mohan; Liu, Xue Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Deafness encompasses a series of etiologically heterogeneous disorders with mutations in more than 400 independent genes. However, several studies indicate that a large proportion of both syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of deafness in the racially diverse Indian and Pakistani populations are caused by defects in just a few genes. In these countries, there is a strong cultural preference for consanguineous marriage and an associated relatively high prevalence of genetic disorders. The current Indian population is approximately 1.2 billion and it is estimated that 30,000 infants are born with congenital sensorineural hearing loss (HL) each year. The estimated rate of profound bilateral HL is 1.6 per 1000 in Pakistan and 70% of this HL arises in consanguineous families. Knowledge of the genetic cause of deafness within a distinct population is important for accurate genetic counseling and early diagnosis for timely intervention and treatment options. Many sources and technologies are now available for the testing of hearing efficiency. Population-based screening has been proposed as one of the major strategies for translating genetic and genomic advances into population health gains. This review of the genetics of deafness in Indian and Pakistani populations deals with the major causes of deafness in these countries and prospectives for reducing the incidence of inherited deafness.

  15. The Genetic Basis of Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss in Indian and Pakistani Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Denise; Kannan-Sundhari, Abhiraami; Vishwanath, Subramanian; Qing, Jie; Mittal, Rahul; Kameswaran, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Deafness encompasses a series of etiologically heterogeneous disorders with mutations in more than 400 independent genes. However, several studies indicate that a large proportion of both syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of deafness in the racially diverse Indian and Pakistani populations are caused by defects in just a few genes. In these countries, there is a strong cultural preference for consanguineous marriage and an associated relatively high prevalence of genetic disorders. The current Indian population is approximately 1.2 billion and it is estimated that 30,000 infants are born with congenital sensorineural hearing loss (HL) each year. The estimated rate of profound bilateral HL is 1.6 per 1000 in Pakistan and 70% of this HL arises in consanguineous families. Knowledge of the genetic cause of deafness within a distinct population is important for accurate genetic counseling and early diagnosis for timely intervention and treatment options. Many sources and technologies are now available for the testing of hearing efficiency. Population-based screening has been proposed as one of the major strategies for translating genetic and genomic advances into population health gains. This review of the genetics of deafness in Indian and Pakistani populations deals with the major causes of deafness in these countries and prospectives for reducing the incidence of inherited deafness. PMID:26186295

  16. Genomic Runs of Homozygosity Record Population History and Consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Kirin, Mirna; McQuillan, Ruth; Franklin, Christopher S.; Campbell, Harry; McKeigue, Paul M.; Wilson, James F.

    2010-01-01

    The human genome is characterised by many runs of homozygous genotypes, where identical haplotypes were inherited from each parent. The length of each run is determined partly by the number of generations since the common ancestor: offspring of cousin marriages have long runs of homozygosity (ROH), while the numerous shorter tracts relate to shared ancestry tens and hundreds of generations ago. Human populations have experienced a wide range of demographic histories and hold diverse cultural attitudes to consanguinity. In a global population dataset, genome-wide analysis of long and shorter ROH allows categorisation of the mainly indigenous populations sampled here into four major groups in which the majority of the population are inferred to have: (a) recent parental relatedness (south and west Asians); (b) shared parental ancestry arising hundreds to thousands of years ago through long term isolation and restricted effective population size (Ne), but little recent inbreeding (Oceanians); (c) both ancient and recent parental relatedness (Native Americans); and (d) only the background level of shared ancestry relating to continental Ne (predominantly urban Europeans and East Asians; lowest of all in sub-Saharan African agriculturalists), and the occasional cryptically inbred individual. Moreover, individuals can be positioned along axes representing this demographic historic space. Long runs of homozygosity are therefore a globally widespread and under-appreciated characteristic of our genomes, which record past consanguinity and population isolation and provide a distinctive record of the demographic history of an individual's ancestors. Individual ROH measures will also allow quantification of the disease risk arising from polygenic recessive effects. PMID:21085596

  17. Genomic runs of homozygosity record population history and consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Kirin, Mirna; McQuillan, Ruth; Franklin, Christopher S; Campbell, Harry; McKeigue, Paul M; Wilson, James F

    2010-11-15

    The human genome is characterised by many runs of homozygous genotypes, where identical haplotypes were inherited from each parent. The length of each run is determined partly by the number of generations since the common ancestor: offspring of cousin marriages have long runs of homozygosity (ROH), while the numerous shorter tracts relate to shared ancestry tens and hundreds of generations ago. Human populations have experienced a wide range of demographic histories and hold diverse cultural attitudes to consanguinity. In a global population dataset, genome-wide analysis of long and shorter ROH allows categorisation of the mainly indigenous populations sampled here into four major groups in which the majority of the population are inferred to have: (a) recent parental relatedness (south and west Asians); (b) shared parental ancestry arising hundreds to thousands of years ago through long term isolation and restricted effective population size (N(e)), but little recent inbreeding (Oceanians); (c) both ancient and recent parental relatedness (Native Americans); and (d) only the background level of shared ancestry relating to continental N(e) (predominantly urban Europeans and East Asians; lowest of all in sub-Saharan African agriculturalists), and the occasional cryptically inbred individual. Moreover, individuals can be positioned along axes representing this demographic historic space. Long runs of homozygosity are therefore a globally widespread and under-appreciated characteristic of our genomes, which record past consanguinity and population isolation and provide a distinctive record of the demographic history of an individual's ancestors. Individual ROH measures will also allow quantification of the disease risk arising from polygenic recessive effects.

  18. Consanguinity in Kahramanmaras city, Turkey, and its medical impact.

    PubMed

    Donbak, Lale

    2004-12-01

    Recently, several studies have indicated the rate of consanguinity ranging between 20 and 70% in the Middle East. Turkey is one of the countries with a high rate of consanguineous unions in the Middle East. In this study, the rate of consanguinity and its effects on spontaneous abortus, stillbirth, infant mortality, and birth defects were investigated in a population sample residing in Kahramanmaras city, Turkey. For this study, 1000 randomly selected women, aboriginals of Kahramanmaras city, Turkey, were interviewed at their home and the concerning information was obtained by administration of a questionnaire between April 2002 and March 2003. The prevalence of consanguinity was found to be 30.6% with the mean inbreeding coefficient of 0.015373. The most common type of consanguineous mating was first cousin marriages with the frequency of 22.6%. The family pressure and love were the main reasons for marrying with a relative. The mean age at marriage of women and men were lower in consanguineous marriages than that of non-consanguineous unions. There was a negative correlation between the consanguinity and educational level of both sexes. The results revealed differences between consanguineous and non-consanguineous matings, in terms of stillbirth, infant mortality and birth defects whereas the rate of spontaneous abortus was found to be the same in 2 kinds of marriages. The incidence of consanguinity and of first cousin marriages is found to be very high in the Kahramanmaras city. A reduction of consanguinity rate is necessary for the health quality of the population.

  19. Is consanguinity a risk factor for keratoconus?

    PubMed

    Gordon-Shaag, Ariela; Millodot, Michel; Essa, Maron; Garth, Jeanne; Ghara, Mohammed; Shneor, Einat

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether consanguinity is a risk factor for keratoconus (KC). A questionnaire was distributed to all patients presenting to St. John Eye Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. Questionnaire included data on demographic characteristics and potential risk factors. Patients were divided into two groups: cases with KC, in at least one eye, who were diagnosed by the attending ophthalmologist on the basis of abnormal corneal topography and at least one of the common signs of the disease; and controls presenting for problems other than KC and free of systemic and ocular conditions associated with KC. Multivariate logistic analyses were performed to identify risk factors for KC. Seventy cases and 140 controls participated in the study. Groups were similar with respect to sex and age. Univariate analyses found a significant association between KC and parental first-cousin consanguinity, eye rubbing, allergy, positive family history, education (>12 years), and sunglass wear, whereas asthma, eczema, smoking, and second-cousin consanguinity were not. Multivariate analyses showed that total consanguinity (first-cousin and second-cousin) (adjusted odds ratio, 3.96; p = 0.001), eye rubbing and absence of sunglass wear were significant risk factors. Education was also associated with KC, but family history was not so in the multivariate analysis. This study supports the hypothesis that consanguinity is a significant risk factor for KC and provides strong support for a genetic contribution to the disease. Wearing sunglasses in this environment is beneficial, and the study confirmed that eye rubbing, allergy, and education are also significantly associated with KC after adjusting for other predictors.

  20. The mapping of DFNB62, a new locus for autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment, to chromosome 12p13.2-p11.23.

    PubMed

    Ali, G; Santos, R L P; John, P; Wambangco, M A L; Lee, K; Ahmad, W; Leal, Sm

    2006-05-01

    Autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) is the most common form of prelingual inherited hearing impairment (HI). Here is described the mapping of a novel ARNSHI locus in a consanguineous Pakistani family with profound congenital HI. Two-point and multipoint linkage analyses were performed for the genome scan and fine mapping markers. Haplotypes were constructed to determine the region of homozygosity. At theta = 0, the maximum two-point LOD score of 4.0 was obtained at marker AAC040. A maximum multipoint LOD score of 5.3 was derived at marker D12S320, with the three-unit support interval demarcated by D12S89 and D12S1042. The region of homozygosity is flanked by markers D12S358 and D12S1042, which corresponds to 22.4 cM according to the Rutgers combined linkage-physical map of the human genome and spans 15.0 Mb on the sequence-based physical map. A novel ARNSHI locus DFNB62 was mapped to chromosome 12p13.2-p11.23. DFNB62 represents the second ARNSHI locus to map to chromosome 12.

  1. Autosomal recessive pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia linked to chromosome 12p11.1-q14.3 without KRTHB5 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Mahmood; Nawaz, Sadia; Azhar, Aysha; Wajid, Muhammad; Westermark, Per; Baig, Shahid M; Klar, Joakim; Dahl, Niklas

    2010-01-01

    Hair-nail ectodermal dysplasia (HNED; OMIM 602032) constitutes a rare subgroup of ectodermal dysplasias characterised by onychodystrophy, hypotrichosis and brittle hair. We identified a large consanguineous Pakistani family with four siblings affected by a congenital autosomal recessive form of the disease. Based on previous genetic findings in HNED we performed linkage analysis in the family using chromosome 12 markers. A genetic linkage analysis revealed a lod score of 2.92 ( = 0.0) at locus D12S368, indicating the disease gene to be located on chromosome 12. Candidate genes on chromosome 12, including the KRTHB5 gene and four additional keratin II genes, were sequenced in affected family members. Sequence analysis of the coding regions of keratin KRTHB5 gene, previously associated with a distinct clinical form of hair-nail dysplasia, revealed normal coding regions. Our study confirms linkage of a variant clinical form of hair-nail ectodermal dysplasia to chromosome 12 without any mutation in the coding sequences of the KRTHB5 gene. The results suggest this family to have either a non-coding mutation in the KRTHB5 gene, or a mutation in a yet unknown gene within the linked region on chromosome 12.

  2. Attitude of Saudi Arabian adults towards consanguineous marriage

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Omar A.; Al-Shaia, Walaa A.; Al-Hamam, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Marzoug, Hala M.; Ahmed, Anwar E.; Bagha, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research on the attitudes of Saudi adults towards consanguinity is scarce. The study aimed to explore the attitudes towards consanguinity and its associations with socio-demographic characteristics in a sample of Saudi adults. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 386 outpatient waiting-area attendees at King Abdul-Aziz Medical City-Riyadh were included. Participants were asked about their socio-demographic characteristics, attitude towards consanguinity and the reasons behind this. Results: The positive attitude towards consanguinity among the study respondents was 48.1% with 95% confidence interval (42.91–53.33%). Social and traditional culture (59.9%) were found to be the predominant reasons for favoring consanguinity in Saudi Arabia. Evidence against a positive attitude towards consanguinity was noted in respondents who received medical information about consanguinity versus those who had not received medical information (42.3% vs. 57%, p-value = 0.008). According to the multivariate logistic model, the odds of a positive attitude towards consanguinity were 2 times higher for males (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.147, 4.290) and 4.1 times higher in respondents in consanguineous marriages (aOR: 4.1; 95% CI: 2.350, 7.156). The odds of a positive attitude towards consanguinity were 50% less in respondents who received health information on consanguinity compared to those who had not received health information about consanguinity (aOR: 0.50; 95% CI: 0.253, 0.863). Conclusion: One in every two Saudi adults favors consanguinity however, Saudi men and women differ in their attitudes towards consanguinity. Receiving health information on consanguinity was associated with a negative attitude towards this practice. PMID:26835408

  3. Malnutrition in young Pakistani children.

    PubMed

    Hirani, Shela Akbar Ali

    2012-01-01

    Pakistan is a developing country with the second highest infant and child mortality rate in South Asia. In this region, malnutrition underlies much of the high infant and under five child morbidity and mortality rates. Although struggle to tackle the issue of malnutrition among young Pakistani children has been going on since many decades, till yet a realistic solution for this growing problem has not been found. This paper aims at reviewing literature to analyse the biological, maternal, socio-cultural, environmental, and politico-economical determinants of malnutrition among young children in Pakistan so that need based interventions can be recommended to prevent and overcome this growing issue. A systematic search of national, regional, and international literature was undertaken from peer-reviewed databases for 1991-2011 including MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PubMed. The search was augmented by reviewing the literature from WHO and UNICEF websites, books, local newspapers, and reference lists of articles thought to be relevant. Determinants of malnutrition among Pakistani children are multiple and are prevalent at the level of individual, family, and community. An analysis of biological, maternal, socio-cultural, environmental, and politico-economical factors indicate that most of these factors are interrelated; therefore, to tackle this issue, there is a need to plan composite interventions at the level of malnourished children, their families, and the Pakistani community.

  4. Recession Rebound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2011-01-01

    A return to normal after a crisis is a good thing. Who doesn't want back what once seemed lost? The problem is it usually isn't a simple task figuring out how to patch together a scaled-back training program. When the recession hit in fall 2008, trainers were asked to scale down programming and make do with fewer resources. With a recovery in full…

  5. Recession Rebound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2011-01-01

    A return to normal after a crisis is a good thing. Who doesn't want back what once seemed lost? The problem is it usually isn't a simple task figuring out how to patch together a scaled-back training program. When the recession hit in fall 2008, trainers were asked to scale down programming and make do with fewer resources. With a recovery in full…

  6. Drivers of cousin marriage among British Pakistanis.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Why has the apparently high rate of cousin marriage among Bradford Pakistanis been sustained, 50 years since Pakistani migration to Britain began? A review of the anthropological literature on Pakistani migration and settlement, British Pakistani marriage patterns and the phenomenon of transnational marriage. British Pakistanis are diverse in regional origins and social class characteristics, with many Bradford Pakistanis originating from the Mirpur district and northern Punjab. British Pakistani marriages often involve a partner from Pakistan who joins a spouse in the UK. Transnational marriage of first cousins offers relatives in Pakistan opportunities for a 'better' life in the West and are important for British Pakistanis for economic, social, cultural and emotional reasons. These processes are also differentially influenced by region of origin and class characteristics in Pakistan as well as by education, employment and locality in Britain. The pattern observed in Bradford may not be applicable nationally. Further research examining marital decisions over several generations in families differing by social class, region of origin in Pakistan and locality in Britain is necessary to contextualise the findings from Bradford. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Drivers of Cousin Marriage among British Pakistanis

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim Why has the apparently high rate of cousin marriage among Bradford Pakistanis been sustained, 50 years since Pakistani migration to Britain began? Methods A review of the anthropological literature on Pakistani migration and settlement, British Pakistani marriage patterns and the phenomenon of transnational marriage. Results British Pakistanis are diverse in regional origins and social class characteristics, with many Bradford Pakistanis originating from the Mirpur district and northern Punjab. British Pakistani marriages often involve a partner from Pakistan who joins a spouse in the UK. Transnational marriage of first cousins offers relatives in Pakistan opportunities for a ‘better’ life in the West and are important for British Pakistanis for economic, social, cultural and emotional reasons. These processes are also differentially influenced by region of origin and class characteristics in Pakistan as well as by education, employment and locality in Britain. The pattern observed in Bradford may not be applicable nationally. Conclusion Further research examining marital decisions over several generations in families differing by social class, region of origin in Pakistan and locality in Britain is necessary to contextualise the findings from Bradford. PMID:25060267

  8. Consanguinity-related hyperdontia: An orthopantomographic study.

    PubMed

    Shokry, Shereen M; Alenazy, Mohammed S

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to describe the distribution of the non-syndromal supernumerary teeth (NSST) in a population of patients who attended the clinics of Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy (RCsDP), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The study reviewed 1521 panoramic radiographs of Saudi and non-Saudi subjects who attended RCsDP clinic from November 2009 to November 2010. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, utilizing Chi-square. Eighteen (1.2%) patients were found to have NSST, comprising twelve males (66.7%), and six females (33.3%). The most common supernumerary teeth (ST) were the pre-molars six cases (33.3%), followed by the mesiodens, five cases (27.8%). The canines and distomolars three cases (16.6%) each respectively, while the least were the lateral incisors and paramolars of the two cases (11.1%) each. Consanguinity appeared to have a role in the development of hyperdontia in Saudi population because 13 cases (72.2%) out of 18 cases had consanguineous parents, while all patients having consanguineous parents had eumorphic ST.

  9. Gastrocnemius recession.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John G; Bohay, Donald R; Eller, Erik B; Witt, Bryan L

    2014-12-01

    The Grand Rapids Arch Collapse classifications create a novel system for categorizing and correlating numerous common foot and ankle conditions related to a falling arch. The algorithm for treating these conditions is exceptionally replicable and has excellent outcomes. Gastrocnemius equinus diagnosis plays a crucial role in the pathology of arch collapse. A contracture of the gastrocnemius muscle is increasingly recognized as the cause of several foot and ankle conditions. The authors have expanded their indications for gastrocnemius recession to include arch pain without radiographic abnormality, calcaneus apophysitis, plantar fasciitis/fibromas, Achilles tendonosis, early-onset diabetic Charcot arthropathy, and neuropathic forefoot ulcers.

  10. The clinical utility of molecular karyotyping for neurocognitive phenotypes in a consanguineous population.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Sarah M; Wakil, Salma M; Anazi, Shamsa; Alazami, Anas M; Patel, Nisha; Shaheen, Ranad; Shamseldin, Hanan E; Hagos, Samya T; AlDossari, Haya M; Salih, Mustafa A; El Khashab, Heba Y; Kentab, Amal Y; AlNasser, Mohammed N; Bashiri, Fahad A; Kaya, Namik; Hashem, Mais O; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-09-01

    Molecular karyotyping has rapidly become the test of choice in patients with neurocognitive phenotypes, but studies of its clinical utility have largely been limited to outbred populations. In consanguineous populations, single-gene recessive causes of neurocognitive phenotypes are expected to account for a relatively high percentage of cases, thus diminishing the yield of molecular karyotyping. The aim of this study was to test the clinical yield of molecular karyotyping in the highly consanguineous population of Saudi Arabia. We have reviewed the data of 584 patients with neurocognitive phenotypes (mainly referred from pediatric neurology clinics), all evaluated by a single clinical geneticist. At least 21% of tested cases had chromosomal aberrations that are likely disease-causing. These changes include both known and novel deletion syndromes. The higher yield of molecular karyotyping in this study as compared with the commonly cited 11% can be explained by our ability to efficiently identify single-gene disorders, thus enriching the samples that underwent molecular karyotyping for de novo chromosomal aberrations. We show that we were able to identify a causal mutation in 37% of cases on a clinical basis with the help of autozygome analysis, thus bypassing the need for molecular karyotyping. Our study confirms the clinical utility of molecular karyotyping even in highly consanguineous populations.

  11. Consanguinity and endogamy in Northern Tunisia and its impact on non-syndromic deafness.

    PubMed

    Ben Arab, Saida; Masmoudi, Saber; Beltaief, Najeh; Hachicha, Slah; Ayadi, Hammadi

    2004-07-01

    Deafness is an important health problem in the Tunisian population, especially in isolates where the prevalence ranges from 2 to 8%. To evaluate the effect of inbred unions on deafness, a study was conducted on 5,020 individuals (160 are deaf) between 2000 and 2002 in the North of Tunisia. The coefficient of inbreeding for all individuals and the levels of inbreeding in ten districts were computed. The higher levels were obtained in the rural districts. Our study revealed that geographic isolation, social traditions, and parental involvement in mode selection all contribute to increase consanguinity in these regions. The mean inbreeding seems to be similar to those estimated in highly inbred isolates in the world. The relative risk of the 35delG mutation, the single most frequent allele for non-syndromic recessive deafness in Tunisia, was estimated from the observed inbreeding coefficient and found to be 10.76 (SD 7.74) for first-cousin marriages, which are the most common form of consanguineous marriage encountered. Our knowledge of the risk rate of deafness and our understanding of consanguinity is required for the prevention of genetic deafness in the Tunisian population. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. CC2D2A, Encoding A Coiled-Coil and C2 Domain Protein, Causes Autosomal-Recessive Mental Retardation with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Abdul; Windpassinger, Christian; Patel, Megha; Stachowiak, Beata; Mikhailov, Anna; Azam, Matloob; Irfan, Muhammad; Siddiqui, Zahid Kamal; Naeem, Farooq; Paterson, Andrew D.; Lutfullah, Muhammad; Vincent, John B.; Ayub, Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive inheritance is believed to be relatively common in mental retardation (MR), although only four genes for nonsyndromic autosomal-recessive mental retardation (ARMR) have been reported. In this study, we ascertained a consanguineous Pakistani family with ARMR in four living individuals from three branches of the family, plus an additional affected individual later identified as a phenocopy. Retinitis pigmentosa was present in affected individuals, but no other features suggestive of a syndromic form of MR were found. We used Affymetrix 500K microarrays to perform homozygosity mapping and identified a homozygous and haploidentical region of 11.2 Mb on chromosome 4p15.33-p15.2. Linkage analysis across this region produced a maximum two-point LOD score of 3.59. We sequenced genes within the critical region and identified a homozygous splice-site mutation segregating in the family, within a coiled-coil and C2 domain-containing gene, CC2D2A. This mutation leads to the skipping of exon 19, resulting in a frameshift and a truncated protein lacking the C2 domain. Conservation analysis for CC2D2A suggests a functional domain near the C terminus as well as the C2 domain. Preliminary functional studies of CC2D2A suggest a possible role in Ca2+-dependent signal transduction. Identifying the function of CC2D2A, and a possible common pathway with CC2D1A, in correct neuronal development and functioning may help identify possible therapeutic targets for MR. PMID:18387594

  13. [Analysis of clinical phenotype and mode of inheritance in retinitis pigmentosa patients with consanguineous marriage].

    PubMed

    Rong, Wei-ning; Sheng, Xun-lun; Liu, Ya-ni

    2012-10-01

    recessive. The common marriage pattern of consanguinity is between first cousins. The age of onset is early and the ocular fundus changes of some patients are atypical, this should be paid attention clinically.

  14. A study of consanguineous marriage as a risk factor for developing comitant strabismus.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Mansooreh; Farvardin, Majid; Saadat, Mostafa

    2015-04-01

    Inheritance has an important role in the etiology of comitant strabismus. Consanguineous marriage is a leading factor in birth defects in which inheritance has a role. The aim of this study is to reveal if consanguineous marriage increases the risk of developing comitant strabismus. We included 461 patients who underwent primary surgery for comitant strabismus in Shiraz University Khalili Hospital (Fars province, southern Iran) between years 2003 and 2013 in our study. All the patients were living in Shiraz, Iran. Patients were categorized into the following 4 groups: (1) intermittent or constant exotropia, (2) infantile esotropia, (3) non-accommodative acquired esotropia, and (4) accommodative acquired esotropia. A total of 421 healthy children who were born in Shiraz, at the same period of time, were also studied as a control group. Presence and type of the consanguineous marriages were evaluated in the parents of the patients and control group by a questionnaire. Mean of inbreeding coefficient (α) was calculated in each group of patients and was compared with those of control group. The proportion of parental first cousin marriage was 37.7 and 23.5 % among patient and control groups. The mean of inbreeding coefficients (α) were 0.0236, 0.0283, 0.0288, and 0.0236 in four groups of the patients, respectively. The mean of inbreeding coefficient was 0.0263 in total patients, which was significantly higher than 0.0164 of control group (T = 5.27, df = 880, P < 0.001). Patients with non-accommodative acquired esotropia had the highest mean of inbreeding coefficient (α) (0.0288). It seems that recessive form of inheritance plays an important role in the etiology of comitant strabismus. Modified screening programs may be needed for earlier detection of strabismus in the offspring of consanguineous couples.

  15. Is consanguineous marriage religiously encouraged? Islamic and Iranian considerations.

    PubMed

    Akrami, Seyed Mohammad; Osati, Zahra

    2007-03-01

    Consanguineous marriage has had considerable attention as a causative factor in the prevalence of genetic disorders. Iran, with its majority Muslim population, has a high rate of consanguineous marriage. In Iranian tradition, first cousin marriage is an acceptable and appreciated custom. However, there seems to be no encouragement of consanguineous marriage in the Islamic context; it is merely mentioned as a traditional and common custom. This paper may help medical professionals providing premarital genetic counselling, who are regularly asked about consanguineous marriage, especially in Islamic communities. Increased public awareness via the mass media would seem to be a priority.

  16. Consanguinity trends and correlates in the Palestinian Territories.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Shireen; Khawaja, Marwan

    2009-01-01

    Secondary analysis of the trends and correlates of consanguinity in the Palestinian Territories was conducted using data from two separate surveys in 1995 and 2004. The analysis was conducted on ever-married women aged 15-54 who were asked about their relation to their husband in both surveys. A total of 16,197 women in 1995 and 4971 women in 2004 were successfully interviewed. Consanguinity was found to be widely practised in the Palestinian Territories with rates of total consanguinity reaching 45% of all marriages in 2004. Analysis was conducted with the data from the two surveys combined and this indicated that consanguinity was significantly decreasing with time after controlling for other variables. Age of the women, their age at marriage, region and locality type they lived in and their standard of living were all found to be significant predictors of consanguinity. The education level of the women was not found to be significant. After controlling for the survey year, women's labour force status was also found to be a non-significant predictor of consanguinity. Although consanguinity was found to be significantly decreasing slowly with time after controlling for other variables, the future trends of consanguinity are not known due to the unstable political situation in the territories, which could have a direct effect on marriage patterns.

  17. The Implications of Parental Consanguinity on the Care of Neonates.

    PubMed

    Ng, Diana

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 6% of births worldwide, 7.9 million children, are born with a serious genetic congenital abnormality each year. A factor thought to increase the prevalence of birth defects is parental consanguinity, which is a social custom practiced in at least 20% of the world's population. The purpose of this article is to explore the relationship between consanguinity and congenital defects. This article also aims to enhance neonatal healthcare practitioners' comprehension of its implications for practice and research. A review of literature was compiled from a search of the online databases Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), PubMed, EBSCO MegaFILE, and Google Scholar. Literature pertinent to this topic primarily consists of research studies that examine the inbreeding depression phenomenon through comparison of the prevalence of birth defects among the offspring of consanguineous and nonconsanguineous couples. Current studies indicate that the progeny of consanguineous couples are at an increased risk of congenital defects compared with those of nonconsanguineous couples. Consanguinity is one risk factor among many that can lead to a major birth defect. Relationships between consanguineous populations and neonatal healthcare practitioners such as registered nurses, advanced practice nurses, and physicians could significantly alter neonatal health outcomes. Specific recommendations such as genetic counseling and therapeutic communication are discussed. Further studies need to investigate the connection between consanguinity and birth defects while controlling for nongenetic variables. Moreover, a focus on consanguineous communities in the United States would prove beneficial.

  18. Unexpected genetic heterogeneity in a large consanguineous Brazilian pedigree presenting deafness.

    PubMed

    Lezirovitz, Karina; Pardono, Eliete; de Mello Auricchio, Maria T B; de Carvalho E Silva, Fernando L; Lopes, Juliana J; Abreu-Silva, Ronaldo S; Romanos, Jihane; Batissoco, Ana C; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C

    2008-01-01

    Nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness accounts for 80% of hereditary deafness. To date, 52 loci responsible for autosomal recessive deafness have been mapped and 24 genes identified. Here, we report a large inbred Brazilian pedigree with 26 subjects affected by prelingual deafness. Given the extensive consanguinity found in this pedigree, the most probable pattern of inheritance is autosomal recessive. However, our linkage and mutational analysis revealed, instead of an expected homozygous mutation in a single gene, two different mutant alleles and a possible third undetected mutant allele in the MYO15A gene (DFNB3 locus), as well as evidence for other causes for deafness in the same pedigree. Among the 26 affected subjects, 15 were homozygous for the novel c.10573delA mutation in the MYO15A gene, 5 were compound heterozygous for the mutation c.10573delA and the novel deletion c.9957_9960delTGAC and one inherited only a single c.10573delA mutant allele, while the other one could not be identified. Given the extensive consanguinity of the pedigree, there might be at least one more deafness locus segregating to explain the condition in some of the subjects whose deafness is not clearly associated with MYO15A mutations, although overlooked environmental causes could not be ruled out. Our findings illustrate a high level of etiological heterogeneity for deafness in the family and highlight some of the pitfalls of genetic analysis of large genes in extended pedigrees, when homozygosity for a single mutant allele is expected.

  19. Endogamy, consanguinity and community disease profiles.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H

    2005-01-01

    Considerable attention is paid to the role of consanguineous marriage as a causative factor in the prevalence of genetic disorders. At the same time, the potential influence of community endogamy on overall levels of homozygosity and disease profiles remains largely under-investigated. With the ongoing global epidemiological transition from infectious to non-communicable disease, the impact of genetic disorders will become increasingly important and a thorough understanding of the determinants of human population-genetic structure will be all the more necessary. In particular, the genetic components of adult-onset diseases will become more obvious and assume greater significance. Similarly, refinements of study design to incorporate intercommunity genetic variation appear to be an essential prerequisite in pharmacogenetic research if the concept of individualized treatments is to achieve reality, with equivalent subject-control comparison difficulties also predicted in forensic genetics. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Deletion mutation in BSCL2 gene underlies congenital generalized lipodystrophy in a Pakistani family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) also known as Berardinelli-Seip Congenital Lipodystrophy (BSCL) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by loss of adipose tissues, Acanthosis nigricans, diabetes mellitus, muscular hypertrophy, hepatomegaly and hypertriglyceridemia. There are four subclinical phenotypes of CGL (CGL1-4) and mutations in four genes AGPAT2, BSCL2, CAV1 and PTRF have been assigned to each type. Methods The study included clinical and molecular investigations of CGL disease in a consanguineous Pakistani family. For mutation screening all the coding exons including splice junctions of AGPAT2, BSCL2, CAV1 and PTRF genes were PCR amplified and sequenced directly using an automated DNA sequencer ABI3730. Results Sequence analysis revealed a single base pair deletion mutation (c.636delC; p.Tyr213ThrfsX20) in exon 5 of BSCL2 gene causing a frame shift and premature termination codon. Conclusion Mutation identified here in BSCL2 gene causing congenital generalized lipodystrophy is the first report in Pakistani population. The patients exhibited characteristic features of generalized lipodystrophy, Acanthosis nigricans, diabetes mellitus and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1913913076864247. PMID:23659685

  1. Deletion mutation in BSCL2 gene underlies congenital generalized lipodystrophy in a Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Obaid Ur; Khawar, Nadeem; Khan, Muhammad Aman; Ahmed, Jawad; Khattak, Kamran; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Naeem, Muhammad; Jelani, Musharraf

    2013-05-09

    Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) also known as Berardinelli-Seip Congenital Lipodystrophy (BSCL) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by loss of adipose tissues, Acanthosis nigricans, diabetes mellitus, muscular hypertrophy, hepatomegaly and hypertriglyceridemia. There are four subclinical phenotypes of CGL (CGL1-4) and mutations in four genes AGPAT2, BSCL2, CAV1 and PTRF have been assigned to each type. The study included clinical and molecular investigations of CGL disease in a consanguineous Pakistani family. For mutation screening all the coding exons including splice junctions of AGPAT2, BSCL2, CAV1 and PTRF genes were PCR amplified and sequenced directly using an automated DNA sequencer ABI3730. Sequence analysis revealed a single base pair deletion mutation (c.636delC; p.Tyr213ThrfsX20) in exon 5 of BSCL2 gene causing a frame shift and premature termination codon. Mutation identified here in BSCL2 gene causing congenital generalized lipodystrophy is the first report in Pakistani population. The patients exhibited characteristic features of generalized lipodystrophy, Acanthosis nigricans, diabetes mellitus and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1913913076864247.

  2. Obstetric Outcomes of First- and Second-Generation Pakistani Immigrants: A Comparison Study at a Low-Risk Maternity Ward in Norway.

    PubMed

    Bakken, Kjersti S; Skjeldal, Ola H; Stray-Pedersen, Babill

    2017-02-01

    This population-based study compares obstetric outcomes of first- and second-generation Pakistani immigrants and ethnic Norwegians who gave birth at the low-risk maternity ward in Baerum Hospital in Norway from 2006 to 2013. We hypothesized that second-generation Pakistani immigrants are more similar to the ethnic Norwegians because of increased acculturation. Outcome measures were labor onset, epidural analgesia, labor dystocia, episiotomy, vaginal/operative delivery, postpartum hemorrhage, preterm birth, birth weight, transfer to a neonatal intensive care unit, and neonatal jaundice. Compared to first-generation Pakistani immigrants, the second-generation reported more health issues before pregnancy, and they had a higher proportion of preterm births compared to Norwegians. Newborns of first-generation immigrants were more often transferred to a neonatal intensive care compared to Norwegian newborns. Few intergenerational differences in the obstetric outcomes were found between the two generations. A high prevalence of consanguinity in second-generation immigrants suggests the maintenance of a traditional Pakistani marriage pattern.

  3. Lifestyle factors associated with the risk of prostate cancer among Pakistani men.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Shahid; Qasmi, Ghazia; Ahmed, Ashfaq; Kokab, Farkhanda; Zahid, Mohammad Farhan; Afridi, Mohammad Imtiaz; Razzaq, Anjum

    2012-01-01

    Age-adjusted incidence of prostate cancer in Pakistan is 5.3 per 100,000 which is relatively low as compared to other Asian countries, but increasing numbers of cases are being reported. Data on risk factors associated with prostate cancer risk among Pakistani men are sparse. The objective of this study was to identify lifestyle factors associated with the risk of prostate cancer in Pakistani men. An unmatched case-control study was conducted in Lahore from February to October 2011. The study enrolled 195 histologically confirmed cases of adenocarcinoma of prostate from Shaukat Khanum Memorial Hospital and Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology Lahore (INMOL) and Lady Reading Hospital. Peshawar, using purposive sampling technique. A total of 390 hospital controls were selected using convenient sampling technique from different teaching hospitals of Lahore after screening with prostate specific antigen levels. A semi-structured interview form was used to collect data through face-to-face interviews. Odds ratio was used as a measure of strength of association and was calculated using unconditional logistic regression. Farmers were found to be at higher odds of prostate cancer (OR 19.76; 95% CI 5.51-70.80; p < 0.001). No significant association was found with marital status, ethnic background, religious affiliation and consanguineous marriages. Level of physical activity was inversely associated with prostate cancer risk (OR 0.05; 95% CI 0.01-0.26; p < 0.001). Positive association was found with increased red meat consumption (OR 11.82; 95% CI 2.88-48.54; p = 0.001) and dairy products intake (11.76; 95% CI 4.23-32.67; p < 0.001). Red meat consumption, higher dairy products intake and working as farmers are strongly associated with increased odds of prostate cancer among Pakistani men.

  4. Exclusion of LCA5 locus in a consanguineous Turkish family with macular coloboma-type LCA.

    PubMed

    Ozgül, R K; Bozkurt, B; Kiratli, H; Oğüş, A

    2006-07-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an inherited retinal dystrophy, which causes severe visual impairment in early childhood. Recent molecular genetic studies have linked 11 loci (AIPL1, CRB1, CRX, GUCY2D, RPE65, RDH12, RPGRIP1, TULP1, LCA3, LCA5, and LCA9) to LCA. LCA5 is a new locus, which maps to the 6q11-q16 chromosomal region and was found to be associated with macular coloboma-type LCA in a Pakistani family. Herein, we describe the molecular genetic features of a consanguineous Turkish family in which four children have macular coloboma-type LCA. Haplotype analysis was performed on the DNA of the family members using microsatellite markers against GUCY2D, RPE65, and LCA5. Genomic DNA was screened for mutations by means of single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis in exons of the RPE65 and CRX genes. In haplotype analysis, no linkage to LCA5 or GUCY2D loci was detected. None of the tested markers showed homozygosity or segregation between affected siblings. PCR-SSCP mutation analysis revealed no mutations in the screened RPE65 and CRX genes. We excluded LCA5 as the genetic cause of macular coloboma-type LCA in this Turkish family. Macular coloboma-type LCA shows genetic heterogeneity and it is not possible to establish a phenotype-genotype correlation with LCA5 and macular coloboma.

  5. Sequence variants in four genes underlying Bardet-Biedl syndrome in consanguineous families

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Asmat; Umair, Muhammad; Yousaf, Maryam; Khan, Sher Alam; Nazim-ud-din, Muhammad; Shah, Khadim; Ahmad, Farooq; Azeem, Zahid; Ali, Ghazanfar; Alhaddad, Bader; Rafique, Afzal; Jan, Abid; Haack, Tobias B.; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Ghous, Tahseen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the molecular basis of Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) in five consanguineous families of Pakistani origin. Methods Linkage in two families (A and B) was established to BBS7 on chromosome 4q27, in family C to BBS8 on chromosome 14q32.1, and in family D to BBS10 on chromosome 12q21.2. Family E was investigated directly with exome sequence analysis. Results Sanger sequencing revealed two novel mutations and three previously reported mutations in the BBS genes. These mutations include two deletions (c.580_582delGCA, c.1592_1597delTTCCAG) in the BBS7 gene, a missense mutation (p.Gln449His) in the BBS8 gene, a frameshift mutation (c.271_272insT) in the BBS10 gene, and a nonsense mutation (p.Ser40*) in the MKKS (BBS6) gene. Conclusions Two novel mutations and three previously reported variants, identified in the present study, further extend the body of evidence implicating BBS6, BBS7, BBS8, and BBS10 in causing BBS. PMID:28761321

  6. Consanguineous marriages in the province of Antalya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Alper, O M; Erengin, H; Manguoğlu, A E; Bilgen, T; Cetin, Z; Dedeoğlu, N; Lüleci, G

    2004-01-01

    To assess the trends in the frequency and the medical effects of consanguinity in the south coast of Turkish population using local and national data in the last 11 years. This cross-sectional study was carried out in Manavgat province, which is a major tourism center on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey. The authors studied consanguineous marriages in rural and urban population in the Mediterranean coast, Manavgat province, Turkey, via a 1500 random survey sample of married couples. There has been a significant increase in the incidence of consanguineous marriages in rural areas (40.7%) since 1989 in the southern population of Turkey. The results showed that the most frequent type of marriage was between the first cousins. It is found that there is no statistically significant difference between the consanguineous and non-consanguineous marriages in the different age groups. The results were discussed on the basis of educational status, reasons for having consanguineous marriages and the general medical effects as well as with the relation of congenital malformations. The custom of consanguineous unions in the Mediterranean population of Turkey is still extremely high, and preventive measures should be done to decrease its frequency and associated complications.

  7. Loss of function mutations in RP1 are responsible for retinitis pigmentosa in consanguineous familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Firoz; Ullah, Inayat; Ali, Shahbaz; Gottsch, Alexander D.H.; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Assir, Muhammad Zaman; Khan, Shaheen N.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to identify causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in consanguineous families. Methods Large consanguineous families were ascertained from the Punjab province of Pakistan. An ophthalmic examination consisting of a fundus evaluation and electroretinography (ERG) was completed, and small aliquots of blood were collected from all participating individuals. Genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells, and a genome-wide linkage or a locus-specific exclusion analysis was completed with polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs). Two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated, and all coding exons and exon–intron boundaries of RP1 were sequenced to identify the causal mutation. Results The ophthalmic examination showed that affected individuals in all families manifest cardinal symptoms of RP. Genome-wide scans localized the disease phenotype to chromosome 8q, a region harboring RP1, a gene previously implicated in the pathogenesis of RP. Sanger sequencing identified a homozygous single base deletion in exon 4: c.3697delT (p.S1233Pfs22*), a single base substitution in intron 3: c.787+1G>A (p.I263Nfs8*), a 2 bp duplication in exon 2: c.551_552dupTA (p.Q185Yfs4*) and an 11,117 bp deletion that removes all three coding exons of RP1. These variations segregated with the disease phenotype within the respective families and were not present in ethnically matched control samples. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that these mutations in RP1 are responsible for the retinal phenotype in affected individuals of all four consanguineous families. PMID:27307693

  8. Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Israel: High Proportion of Founder Mutations in MMR Genes and Consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Baris, Hagit N; Barnes-Kedar, Inbal; Toledano, Helen; Halpern, Marisa; Hershkovitz, Dov; Lossos, Alexander; Lerer, Israela; Peretz, Tamar; Kariv, Revital; Cohen, Shlomi; Half, Elizabeth E; Magal, Nurit; Drasinover, Valerie; Wimmer, Katharina; Goldberg, Yael; Bercovich, Dani; Levi, Zohar

    2016-03-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in any of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, cause Lynch syndrome (LS), an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome conferring a high risk of colorectal, endometrial, and other cancers in adulthood. Offspring of couples where both spouses have LS have a 1:4 risk of inheriting biallelic MMR gene mutations. These cause constitutional MMR deficiency (CMMRD) syndrome, a severe recessively inherited cancer syndrome with a broad tumor spectrum including mainly hematological malignancies, brain tumors, and colon cancer in childhood and adolescence. Many CMMRD children also present with café au lait spots and axillary freckling mimicking neurofibromatosis type 1. We describe our experience in seven CMMRD families demonstrating the role and importance of founder mutations and consanguinity on its prevalence. Clinical presentations included brain tumors, colon cancer, lymphoma, and small bowel cancer. In children from two nonconsanguineous Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) families, the common Ashkenazi founder mutations were detected; these were homozygous in one family and compound heterozygous in the other. In four consanguineous families of various ancestries, different homozygous mutations were identified. In a nonconsanguineous Caucasus/AJ family, lack of PMS2 was demonstrated in tumor and normal tissues; however, mutations were not identified. CMMRD is rare, but, especially in areas where founder mutations for LS and consanguinity are common, pediatricians should be aware of it since they are the first to encounter these children. Early diagnosis will enable tailored cancer surveillance in the entire family and a discussion regarding prenatal genetic diagnosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. WDR73 missense mutation causes infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia in a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chen; Gai, Nan; Zou, Yongyi; Zheng, Yu; Ma, Ruiyu; Wei, Xianda; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2017-01-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GMS) is a very rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by nephrotic syndrome associated with microcephaly, and various central nervous system abnormalities, mostly cerebral hypoplasia or cerebellar atrophy, intellectual disability and neural-migration defects. WDR73 is the only gene known to cause GMS, and has never been implicated in other disease. Here we present a Chinese consanguineous family with infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia but no microcephaly. Whole exome sequencing identified a WDR73 p.W371G missense mutation. The mutation is confirmed to be segregated in this family by Sanger sequencing according to a recessive inheritance pattern. It is predicted to be deleterious by multiple algorithms and affect highly conserved site. Structural modeling revealed conformational differences between the wild type protein and the p.W371G protein. Real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed altered mRNA and protein levels in mutated samples. Our study indicates the novel WDR73 p.W371G missense mutation causes infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia in recessive mode of inheritance. Our findings imply that microcephaly is a variable phenotype in WDR73-related disease, suggest WDR73 to be a candidate gene of severe intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia, and expand the molecular spectrum of WDR73-related disease.

  10. Diagnosis of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome in Consecutive Pregnancies Affected with Echogenic Kidneys and Polydactyly in a Consanguineous Couple

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Tieneka M.; Sturm, Erica L.; Turner, Clesson E.; Petersen, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal recessive ciliopathic human genetic disorder with variable expression that is difficult to diagnose in pregnancy without known risk factors. Homozygosity testing has been shown to be a useful tool in identifying BBS mutations and candidate genes in affected individuals. We present the first case of prenatal diagnosis of BBS in consecutive pregnancies aided by homozygosity testing via SNP microarray analysis. This case demonstrates a novel approach to the evaluation of recurrent echogenic kidneys in consanguineous couple with no significant family history. PMID:23533844

  11. A novel mutation in FGD4/FRABIN causes Charcot Marie Tooth disease type 4H in patients from a consanguineous Tunisian family.

    PubMed

    Boubaker, Chokri; Hsairi-Guidara, Inès; Castro, Christel; Ayadi, Ines; Boyer, Amandine; Kerkeni, Emna; Courageot, Joël; Abid, Imen; Bernard, Rafaëlle; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kamoun, Fatma; Cheikh, Hassen Ben; Lévy, Nicolas; Triki, Chahnez; Delague, Valérie

    2013-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease constitutes a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary neuropathies characterized by progressive muscular and sensory loss in the distal extremities with chronic distal weakness, deformation of the feet, and loss of deep tendon reflexes. CMT4H is an autosomal recessive demyelinating subtype of CMT, due to mutations in FGD4/FRABIN, for which nine mutations are described to date. In this study, we describe three patients from a consanguineous Tunisian family, presenting with severe, early onset, slowly progressive, autosomal recessive demyelinating CMT, complicated by mild to severe kyphoscoliosis, consistent with CMT4H. In these patients, we report the identification of a novel homozygous frameshift mutation in FGD4: c.514_515insG; p.Ala172Glyfs*27. Our study reports the first mutation identified in FGD4 in Tunisian patients affected with CMT. It further confirms the important clinical heterogeneity observed in patients with mutations in FGD4 and the lack of phenotype/genotype correlations in CMT4H. Our results suggest that FGD4 should be screened in other early-onset CMT subtypes, regardless of the severity of the phenotype, and particularly in patients of consanguineous descent. In Tunisians, as in other populations with high consanguinity rates, screening of genes responsible for rare autosomal recessive CMT subtypes should be prioritized. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  12. Prevalence of consanguineous marriages in South Sinai, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Yamamah, G; Abdel-Raouf, E; Talaat, A; Saad-Hussein, A; Hamamy, H; Meguid, N A

    2013-01-01

    A total of 3961 married couples from six major geographical areas representing the South Sinai governorates in Egypt were studied to assess the rate of consanguineous marriage. The population of six selected areas (St Catherines, Nuweiba, Abu Rudeis, Ras Sudr, El Tor and Abu Zenima) were subdivided into Bedouin, urban and mixed populations. A questionnaire-based interview was conducted showing that the consanguinity rate in this region is 37.5%, with the highest rate recorded in Abu Rudeis (52.3%) and lowest rate in Nuweiba (24.1%). Consanguinity was significantly higher among the Bedouin population compared with the urban population in Abu Rudeis, Ras Sudr, El Tor and Abu Zenima, while in St Catherines and Nuweiba there was no statistically significant difference. Among consanguineous couples, 5%, 60% and 35% were double first cousins, first cousins and second cousins respectively. The mean inbreeding coefficient α of the studied population was 0.01845.

  13. [Gingival recessions and orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Renkema, A M; Padmos, J A D; de Quincey, G de

    2015-11-01

    Gingival recessions represent the most visible periodontal disease. The prevalence of gingival recessions is high. The root surface is literally exposed to negative influences such as erosion, abrasion, discoloration and decay. Moreover, gingival recessions can affect the quality of life by increased thermal sensitivity and reduced dento-gingival aesthetics. The aetiology of gingival recessions is complex and considered to be multifactorial. In order to prevent the development of gingival recessions during and after orthodontic treatment, several factors should be taken into account, among which maintenance of optimal oral hygiene and respect for the 'biological envelope' are decisive. Once gingival recessions have developed, orthodontic therapy can play a positive role in their treatment.

  14. Meckel Gruber Syndrome: Second trimester diagnosis of a case in a non-consanguineous marriage

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Areej; Adhi, Mehreen; Bano, Raffat; Zubair, Aisha; Mushtaq, Ammara

    2013-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber Syndrome (MKS) is a rare, autosomal recessive genetic disorder, incompatible with life. It is characterized by enlarged polycystic kidneys and post axial polydactyly. Foetal or neonatal death is caused by pulmonary hypoplasia. We report a case of a 35 year old woman who presented at 7 weeks of gestation of her sixth pregnancy. A transabdominal anomaly ultrasound performed for her current pregnancy at 18 weeks of gestation showed features consistent with MKS. The termination of pregnancy was declined and a live newborn female was delivered via an emergency caeserean section at 34 weeks of gestation due to previous history of lower segment caesarean section (LSCS) & leaking. Physical examination of the neonate confirmed the features of MKS. The neonate died within 4-5 hours of birth. This case represented a second trimester diagnosis of a recurrent case of MKS in a non-consanguineous marriage. PMID:24353549

  15. Meckel Gruber Syndrome: Second trimester diagnosis of a case in a non-consanguineous marriage.

    PubMed

    Alam, Areej; Adhi, Mehreen; Bano, Raffat; Zubair, Aisha; Mushtaq, Ammara

    2013-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber Syndrome (MKS) is a rare, autosomal recessive genetic disorder, incompatible with life. It is characterized by enlarged polycystic kidneys and post axial polydactyly. Foetal or neonatal death is caused by pulmonary hypoplasia. We report a case of a 35 year old woman who presented at 7 weeks of gestation of her sixth pregnancy. A transabdominal anomaly ultrasound performed for her current pregnancy at 18 weeks of gestation showed features consistent with MKS. The termination of pregnancy was declined and a live newborn female was delivered via an emergency caeserean section at 34 weeks of gestation due to previous history of lower segment caesarean section (LSCS) & leaking. Physical examination of the neonate confirmed the features of MKS. The neonate died within 4-5 hours of birth. This case represented a second trimester diagnosis of a recurrent case of MKS in a non-consanguineous marriage.

  16. Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia caused by a novel ADCK3 mutation that elongates the protein: clinical, genetic and biochemical characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yo-Tsen; Hersheson, Joshua; Plagnol, Vincent; Fawcett, Katherine; Duberley, Kate E C; Preza, Elisavet; Hargreaves, Iain P; Chalasani, Annapurna; Laurá, Matilde; Wood, Nick W; Reilly, Mary M; Houlden, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Background The autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. The large number of ARCA genes leads to delay and difficulties obtaining an exact diagnosis in many patients and families. Ubiquinone (CoQ10) deficiency is one of the potentially treatable causes of ARCAs as some patients respond to CoQ10 supplementation. The AarF domain containing kinase 3 gene (ADCK3) is one of several genes associated with CoQ10 deficiency. ADCK3 encodes a mitochondrial protein which functions as an electron-transfer membrane protein complex in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). Methods We report two siblings from a consanguineous Pakistani family who presented with cerebellar ataxia and severe myoclonus from adolescence. Whole exome sequencing and biochemical assessment of fibroblasts were performed in the index patient. Results A novel homozygous frameshift mutation in ADCK3 (p.Ser616Leufs*114), was identified in both siblings. This frameshift mutation results in the loss of the stop codon, extending the coding protein by 81 amino acids. Significant CoQ10 deficiency and reduced MRC enzyme activities in the index patient's fibroblasts suggested that the mutant protein may reduce the efficiency of mitochondrial electron transfer. CoQ10 supplementation was initiated following these genetic and biochemical analyses. She gained substantial improvement in myoclonic movements, ataxic gait and dysarthric speech after treatment. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of diagnosing ADCK3 mutations and the potential benefit of treatment for patients. The identification of this new mutation broadens the phenotypic spectrum associated with ADCK3 mutations and provides further understanding of their pathogenic mechanism. PMID:24218524

  17. Novel homozygous large deletion including the 5' part of the SPATA7 gene in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Anja-Kathrin; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Zobor, Ditta; Bonin, Michael; Sharkia, Rajech; Wissinger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    To identify the genetic defect in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family with juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (RP). DNA samples were collected from the index patient, her parents, her affected sister, and two non-affected siblings. Genome-wide linkage analysis with 250 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays was performed using DNA from the two affected patients. Owing to consanguinity in the family, we applied homozygosity mapping to identify the disease-causing gene. The candidate gene SPATA7 was screened for mutations with PCR amplifications and direct Sanger sequencing. Following high-density SNP arrays, we identified several homozygous genomic regions one of which included the SPATA7 gene. Several mutations in SPATA7 have been reported for various forms of retinal dystrophy, including Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and juvenile RP. PCR-based sequence content mapping, long-distance PCR amplifications, and subsequent sequencing analysis revealed a homozygous 63.4 kb large deletion that encompasses the 5' part of the SPATA7 gene including exons 1-5. The mutation showed concordant segregation with the phenotype in the family as expected for autosomal recessive mode of inheritance and is consistent with a diagnosis of juvenile RP. We report a novel homozygous large deletion in SPATA7 associated with juvenile RP in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family. This is the first larger deletion mutation reported for SPATA7.

  18. The Religification of Pakistani-American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaffar-Kucher, Ameena

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a cultural production process called religification, in which religious affiliation, rather than race or ethnicity, has become the core category of identity for working-class Pakistani-American youth in the United States. In this dialectical process, triggered by political changes following the September 11 terrorist…

  19. Journalism Education in the Pakistani Borderlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pintak, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Students brave roadside bombs and Taliban threats while on class assignments. Professors are kidnapped and killed. Campus radio stations get regular visits from military intelligence. Welcome to journalism education in Pakistan's tribal areas. The region is off-limits to most outsiders, so students find themselves reporting for Pakistani and…

  20. The Religification of Pakistani-American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaffar-Kucher, Ameena

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a cultural production process called religification, in which religious affiliation, rather than race or ethnicity, has become the core category of identity for working-class Pakistani-American youth in the United States. In this dialectical process, triggered by political changes following the September 11 terrorist…

  1. Journalism Education in the Pakistani Borderlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pintak, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Students brave roadside bombs and Taliban threats while on class assignments. Professors are kidnapped and killed. Campus radio stations get regular visits from military intelligence. Welcome to journalism education in Pakistan's tribal areas. The region is off-limits to most outsiders, so students find themselves reporting for Pakistani and…

  2. Thomsen or Becker myotonia? A novel autosomal recessive nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene associated with a mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Senkevics, Adriano S; Zilbersztajn-Gotlieb, Dinorah; Yamamoto, Lydia U; Muniz, Viviane P; Pavanello, Rita C M; Oliveira, Acary B; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2012-02-01

    We describe a large Brazilian consanguineous kindred with 3 clinically affected patients with a Thomsen myotonia phenotype. They carry a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene (K248X). None of the 6 heterozygote carriers show any sign of myotonia on clinical evaluation or electromyography. These findings confirm the autosomal recessive inheritance of the novel mutation in this family, as well as the occurrence of phenotypic variability in the autosomal recessive forms of myotonia.

  3. Spinal muscular atrophy: clinical spectrum and genetic mutations in Pakistani children.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shahnaz; Moatter, Tariq; Saleem, Ali Faisal

    2012-01-01

    In Pakistan the rate of consanguineous marriages is high, thus, the chance of incidence of autosomal recessive disorders is likely to be high. The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical characteristics and genetics of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in children who presented to Aga Khan University, Karachi. This study was a retrospective review of the medical charts of children (neonate: 15 years) with discharge diagnosis of SMA during last 10 years. Demographic features, consanguinity, and diagnostic analysis (including genetic analysis) were noted. During the study period 67 children had a discharge diagnosis of SMA. Werdnig Hoffman disease (SMA type I) was the commonest variant seen in 37 (56%) children. Overall 68% were infants. High parental consanguinity was observed in 68% of the study cohort. The history of delayed development and undiagnosed early death was observed in the families of 19 children. Genetic testing was performed in 22 (33%) children. Survival motor neuron (SMN) 1 gene deletion was found in 19 (86%) of the 22 patients in whom the gene analysis was done and 13 (68%) were also positive for neuronal apoptosis inhibitory proteins (NAIP) deletion. SMA is not an uncommon neurodegenerative disorder in Pakistan and SMA type I was the most common type. SMN1 gene deletion was the most common genetic deletion found in this study. In addition, family history of developmental delay and frequent early deaths highlights the need for implementation of prenatal diagnosis for early detection, effective control, and management of this disorder in Pakistan.

  4. Impact of consanguineous marriages in GJB2-related hearing loss in the Iranian population: a report of a novel variant.

    PubMed

    Mahdieh, Nejat; Rabbani, Bahareh; Shirkavand, Atefeh; Bagherian, Hamideh; Movahed, Zahra Shahab; Fouladi, Paanti; Rahiminejad, Faezeh; Masoudifard, Masoumeh; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Zeinali, Sirous

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in GJB2 and GJB6 genes are the main causes of autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) in many populations. Here, we investigated GJB2 and GJB6 mutations in 114 patients from 77 affected ARNSHL families including 54 consanguineous marriages and 23 nonrelative marriages in the Iranian population. Clinical studies and genetic counseling were performed for all families. GJB2 and GJB6 genes were directly sequenced. Three known GJB6 large deletions [del(GJB6-D13S1830), del(GJB6-D13S1854), and a 920 kb deletion] were also checked by quantification of a common deleted region within the GJB6 gene. The frequency of consanguinity was 70.13% among the studied families. Biallelic GJB2 mutations were 16.67% in consanguineous marriages and 4.35% in nonrelative marriages. Mutations found were 35delG, delE120, R127H, M163V, W24X, V37I, G12D, V84A, 313-326del14, and E110K. The latter was a novel variant. Neither point mutation nor a large deletion in the GJB6 gene was found in the population. Mean frequency of GJB2 mutations was 17.92%. GJB2 mutations (and not GJB6 mutations) are the major causes of hearing loss in Iran. The role of consanguineous marriages is also highlighted in occurrence of GJB2-related hearing loss. We suggest that other genes may be involved in the population.

  5. Shaped Recess Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram (Inventor); Poinsatte, Philip (Inventor); Thurman, Douglas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    One or more embodiments of techniques or systems for shaped recess flow control are provided herein. A shaped recess or cavity can be formed on a surface associated with fluid flow. The shaped recess can be configured to create or induce fluid effects, temperature effects, or shedding effects that interact with a free stream or other structures. The shaped recess can be formed at an angle to a free stream flow and may be substantially "V" shaped. The shaped recess can be coupled with a cooling channel, for example. The shaped recess can be upstream or downstream from a cooling channel and aligned in a variety of manners. Due to the fluid effects, shedding effects, and temperature effects created by a shaped recess, lift-off or separation of cooling jets of cooling channels can be mitigated, thereby enhancing film cooling effectiveness.

  6. Recurrent mutation in CDMP1 in a family with Grebe chondrodysplasia: broadening the phenotypic manifestation of syndrome in Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Sara; Riaz, Hafiza Fizzah; Touseef, Mohammad; Basit, Sulman; Haque, Muhammad Faiyaz Ul; Malik, Sajid

    2015-01-01

    Grebe syndrome (OMIM-200700) is a very rare type of acromesomelic dysplasia with autosomal recessive inheritance. We studied a Pakistani family with two affected individuals having typical features of Grebe chondrodysplasia. Patients were observed with short and deformed limbs having a proximo-distal gradient of severity. Hind-limbs were more severely affected than fore-limbs. Digits on autopods were very short and nonfunctional. Index subject also had nearsightedness. However, symptoms in the craniofacial and axial skeleton were minimal. Genetic analysis revealed four base pair insertion mutation (c.1114insGAGT) in gene coding cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-1 (CDMP1). This mutation was predicted to cause premature stop codon. The clinical presentation in this study broadens the range of phenotypes associated with CDMP1 mutation in Pakistani population. PMID:26870132

  7. Consanguinity on Robinson Crusoe Island, an isolated Chilean population.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Pia; Fernández, Maria A; De Barbieri, Zulema; Palomino, Hernán

    2014-07-01

    The population of Robinson Crusoe Island is estimated at 633 inhabitants. The current population has a common origin from the first eight families who colonized the island at the end of the 19th century. The objective of this study was to determine the rates of consanguinity, the average coefficients of inbreeding, the types of consanguineous marriages and the inbreeding evolution between 1900 and 2000 on the island. All marriages registered on the island, from the last colonization until 2000 (417 in total), were included in the analysis. In addition, extended genealogies were obtained. The consanguinity rate was 14.9% and the average coefficient of inbreeding (α) 54.05 × 10(-4). The most frequent type of consanguineous marriages was between second cousins, followed by first cousins. The average value of the first/second cousin ratio was 1.11. The population of Robinson Crusoe Island has a high rate of inbreeding. The unique characteristic of the island - its small current population, originating from just a few families, with small rate of gene flow - could explain the observed high and increasing consanguinity.

  8. Classic Kaposi’s sarcoma in three unrelated Turkish children born to consanguineous kindreds

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Gürses; Palanduz, Ayse; Aydogan, Gonul; Cassar, Olivier; Ertem, A Ulya; Telhan, Leyla; Canpolat, Nur; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Picard, Capucine; Gessain, Antoine; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Plancoulaine, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Infection by human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) in childhood is common in the Mediterranean basin; however, classic Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) is exceedingly rare in children not infected with HIV and not receiving immunosuppression, with only 30 cases reported since 1960. We recently reported two children with autosomal and X-linked recessive primary immunodeficiencies underlying KS in a context of multiple clinical manifestations. These reports suggested that classic KS in otherwise healthy children might also result from inborn errors of immunity more specific to HHV-8. In this paper, we describe three unrelated Turkish children with classic KS born to first-cousin parents. The first patient, a girl, developed KS at two years of age with disseminated cutaneous and mucosal lesions. The clinical course progressed rapidly and the patient died within three months, despite treatment with vincristine. The other two children developed a milder form of KS at the age of nine years, with multiple cutaneous lesions. A boy treated with interferon alpha therapy for 12 months is now in full remission at age 14, two years after treatment. The second girl is currently stabilized with etoposide, which was begun four months ago. None of the three children had any relevant familial history or other clinical features. The occurrence of classic KS in three unrelated Turkish children, each born to consanguineous parents, strongly suggests that autosomal recessive predisposition may drive the rare occurrence of HHV-8-associated classic KS in children. PMID:20156905

  9. Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa: COL7A1 Mutation Landscape in a Multi-Ethnic Cohort of 152 Extended Families with High Degree of Customary Consanguineous Marriages.

    PubMed

    Vahidnezhad, Hassan; Youssefian, Leila; Zeinali, Sirous; Saeidian, Amir Hossein; Sotoudeh, Soheila; Mozafari, Nikoo; Abiri, Maryam; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Barzegar, Mohammadreza; Ertel, Adam; Fortina, Paolo; Uitto, Jouni

    2017-03-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a heritable skin disease manifesting with sub-lamina densa blistering, erosions, and chronic ulcers. COL7A1, encoding type VII collagen, has been identified as the candidate gene for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. In this study, we have identified COL7A1 mutations in a large multi-ethnic cohort of 152 extended Iranian families with high degree of consanguinity. The patients were diagnosed by clinical manifestations, histopathology, and immunoepitope mapping. Mutation detection consisted of a combination of single nucleotide polymorphism-based whole-genome homozygosity mapping, Sanger sequencing, and gene-targeted next-generation sequencing. A total of 104 distinct mutations in COL7A1 were identified in 149 of 152 families (98%), 56 (53%) of them being previously unreported. Ninety percent of these mutations were homozygous recessive, reflecting consanguinity in these families. Three recurrent mutations were identified in five or more families, and haplotype analysis suggested a founder effect in two of them. In conclusion, COL7A1 harbored mutations in the overwhelming majority of patients with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, and most of them in this Iranian cohort were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. The mutation profile attests to the impact of consanguinity in these families. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Frequency of consanguineous unions in the Tlemcen area (West Algeria)].

    PubMed

    Zaoui, Salah; Biémont, Christian

    2002-01-01

    In order to describe consanguineous unions and their effects in a sample of the Algerian population, we interviewed 3,983 couples in a hospital and from urban and rural areas near Tlemcen. We observed that unions between cousins represented 34.0% of the marriages. The frequency of unions between relatives was lower in the urban (30.6%) than in the rural areas (40.5%). This difference can be explained by changing custom and family relationships in urban areas, and is evidenced by social and anthropologic factors and the attitude towards consanguineous unions.

  11. Molecular analysis of a consanguineous Iranian polycystic kidney disease family identifies a PKD2 mutation that aids diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Vazifehmand, Reza; Rossetti, Sandro; Saber, Sassan; Khorshid, Hamid Reza Khorram; Harris, Peter C

    2013-09-08

    Polycystic kidney diseases (PKD) are a group of monogenic disorders that are inherited dominantly (autosomal dominant PKD; ADPKD) or recessively, including, autosomal recessive PKD (ARPKD). A number of recessive, syndromic disorders also involve PKD but have a range of pleiotropic phenotypes beyond the kidney, and are enriched in consanguineous families. We describe here a consanguineous Iranian pedigree in which PKD was diagnosed in four generations, but also included cases with additional abnormalities, including mental retardation. We employed molecular screening to reveal the etiology of the PKD. Since the PKD seemed to be dominantly inherited, molecular diagnostics was performed by direct sequencing of the ADPKD genes, PKD1 and PKD2. Clinical and imaging data was collected on family members. The sequence analysis revealed a PKD2 single base-pair deletion, c.1142delG, and segregation was demonstrated in 16 PKD patients from different branches of the family. In keeping with other reports, the PKD2 phenotype in this family was overall mild, and characterized by conserved kidney function, although 12 cases had some evidence of renal insufficiency. Several younger mutation carriers had borderline or no clinical characteristics of ADPKD, while a patient that required a renal transplant at 14 y did not have the PKD2 mutation. The molecular analysis of an Iranian family showed that the PKD was due to a PKD2 mutation. The identification of the causative mutation allowed an accurate diagnosis in a number of individuals with equivocal imaging data. Consequently, these patients could be followed appropriately as at-risk individuals. In addition, the PKD2 diagnosis ruled out a syndromic form of PKD as the cause of the additional phenotypes in the family.

  12. The Genetic Causes of Nonsyndromic Congenital Retinal Detachment: A Genetic and Phenotypic Study of Pakistani Families

    PubMed Central

    Keser, Vafa; Khan, Ayesha; Siddiqui, Sorath; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Qamar, Raheel; Nadaf, Javad; Majewski, Jacek; Chen, Rui; Koenekoop, Robert K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate consanguineous pedigrees from Pakistan with a clinical diagnosis of nonsyndromic congenital retinal nonattachment (NCRNA) and identify genes responsible for the disease as currently only one NCRNA gene is known (atonal basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor 7: ATOH7). Methods We implemented a three-step genotyping platform: single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping to identify loss of heterozygosity regions in patients, Retinal Information Network panel screening for mutations in currently known retinal genes. Negative patients were then subjected to whole exome sequencing. Results We evaluated 21 consanguineous NCRNA pedigrees and identified the causal mutations in known retinal genes in 13 out of our 21 families. We found mutations in ATOH7 in three families. Surprisingly, we then found mutations in familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) genes; low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 mutations (six families), tetraspanin 12 mutations (two families), and NDP mutations (two families). Thus, 62% of the patients were successfully genotyped in our study with seven novel and six previously reported mutations in known retinal genes. Conclusions Although the clinical diagnosis of all children was NCRNA with severe congenital fibrotic retinal detachments, the molecular diagnosis determined that the disease process was in fact a very severe form of FEVR in 10 families. Because severe congenital retinal detachment has not been previously associated with all the FEVR genes, we have thus expanded the phenotypic spectrum of FEVR, a highly variable retinal detachment phenotype that has clinical overlap with NCRNA. We identified seven novel mutations. We also established for the first time genetic overlap between the Iranian and Pakistani populations. We identified eight NCRNA families that do not harbor mutations in any known retinal genes, suggesting novel causal genes in these families. PMID:28192794

  13. Prevention of beta-thalassemia in a large Pakistani family through cascade testing.

    PubMed

    Baig, S M; Din, M A; Hassan, H; Azhar, A; Baig, J M; Aslam, M; Anjum, I; Farooq, M; Hussain, M S; Rasool, M; Nawaz, S; Qureshi, J A; Zaman, T

    2008-01-01

    We report cascade testing of a large Pakistani family for beta-thalassemia alleles. The family was still practicing consanguineous marriages and was at risk of having more affected births. The objective of this study was to show that identification of disease carriers in families with index cases in order to create awareness about disease and provide genetic counseling would result in reduction of the frequency of beta-thalassemia in Pakistan. In this large family with an index case, 27 available living members were tested for beta-thalassemia. Carriers of the disease were detected by measuring hemoglobin indices, and amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction was used for mutation analysis. Genetic counseling was provided to members of this family. There were already 3 marriages between the carrier members and 1 between a carrier and noncarrier in this large family; 12 (44.4%) members were found to carry the mutant gene, representing a very high carrier rate compared to the 5.4% carrier frequency of beta-thalassemia in the general population of Pakistan. The family was counseled for prevention of affected births. The initially reluctant family gradually became cooperative and seriously attended the genetic counseling sessions. Cascade testing is more practical than general population screening in a country with limited health facilities where consanguineous marriages are practiced. This report emphasizes the need of extensive testing within families with index cases to identify the carriers of beta-thalassemia in order to reduce disease occurrence through awareness and genetic counseling. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. A founder splice site mutation underlies glycogen storage disease type 3 in consanguineous Saudi families.

    PubMed

    Basit, Sulman; Malibari, Omhani; Al Balwi, Alia Mahmood; Abdusamad, Firoz; Abu Ismail, Feras

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 3 (GSD III) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by genetic mutations in the gene AGL. AGL encodes amylo-a-1, 6-glucosidase, 4-a-glucanotransferase, a glycogen debranching enzyme. GSD III is characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, growth retardation, progressive myopathy, and cardiomyopathy due to storage of abnormally structured glycogen in both skeletal and cardiac muscles and/or liver. The aim of this study is to detect mutations underlying GSD III in Saudi patients. A cross-sectional clinical genetic study of 5 Saudi consanguineous families examined at the metabolic clinic of the Madinah Maternity and Children Hospital. We present a biochemical and molecular analysis of 5 consanguineous Saudi families with GSD III. DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood of 31 individuals, including 12 patients, and the AGL gene was sequenced bidirectionally. DNA sequences were compared with the AGL reference sequence from the ensemble genome browser. Genotyping and sequence analysis identified a homozygous intronic splice acceptor site mutation (IVS32-12A > G) in 4 families perfectly segregating with the phenotype. Complementary (c)DNA sequence analysis of the AGL gene revealed an 11-bp sequence insertion between exon 32 and exon 33 due to the creation of a new 3' splice site. The predicted mutant enzyme was truncated by 112 carboxyl-terminal amino acids as a result of premature termination. Haplotype analysis revealed that the mutation arises as a result of founder effect, not an independent event. This is the first report of a genetic mutation in the AGL gene from Saudi Arabia. Screening for this mutation can improve genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of GSD III in Saudi Arabia.

  15. Consanguinity and prereproductive mortality in the Utah Mormon population.

    PubMed

    Jorde, L B

    2001-01-01

    To test the effects of parental consanguinity on mortality among offspring, inbreeding coefficients were estimated for 303,675 members of the Utah Mormon population who were born between 1847 and 1945. Although consanguinity has been relatively rare in this population, the large sample size permitted the identification of more than 3,500 inbred offspring. Among the offspring of unrelated parents, 13.2% died before the age of 16. Significant elevations in prereproductive mortality were seen among the offspring of first-cousin marriages (22%) and among the offspring of closer unions (32%). The cor- responding relative risks are 1.70 (95% confidence limits = 1.52, 1.91) and 2.41 (95% confidence limits = 1.59, 3.41), respectively. Other categories of relationship did not produce significant elevations in offspring mortality. Similar results were obtained when a case-control approach was used to remove the effects of socioeconomic variation. Consistent with many other studies of populations with low consanguinity rates, this population experienced a relatively high absolute increase in mortality among the offspring of first-cousin marriages (9%). Preliminary evidence is offered for the hypothesis that mortality differentials are larger in populations with low inbreeding and low mortality because nongenetic causes of death do not obscure the effects of consanguinity. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Starving for Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patt, Mary Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Every weekday, millions of American schoolchildren throw away their half-eaten cafeteria lunches so that they can run outside to play. The traditional placement of lunch before recess, coupled with the recent decline in overall recess time to meet academic time constraints, forces children to choose between two essential needs: (1) food; and (2)…

  17. Recess Makes Kids Smarter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee

    2011-01-01

    Recess has been scaled back or cut altogether in a number of schools around the country. The trend can be traced back to the late eighties and was accelerated under No Child Left Behind. Districts under pressure to show academic progress began to squeeze as much instruction into the day as possible. Others eliminated recess because of concerns…

  18. More Recess Time, Please!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Rong; Coward, Fanni Liu

    2015-01-01

    Students in Shanghai, China, get much more recess time than their U.S. counterparts throughout their education. As U.S. education reform efforts seek ways of raising achievement, they have begun replacing recess with academic time. The lesson from Shanghai is that this may not be the best strategy. But whether the Shanghai system of more and…

  19. More Recess Time, Please!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Rong; Coward, Fanni Liu

    2015-01-01

    Students in Shanghai, China, get much more recess time than their U.S. counterparts throughout their education. As U.S. education reform efforts seek ways of raising achievement, they have begun replacing recess with academic time. The lesson from Shanghai is that this may not be the best strategy. But whether the Shanghai system of more and…

  20. Starving for Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patt, Mary Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Every weekday, millions of American schoolchildren throw away their half-eaten cafeteria lunches so that they can run outside to play. The traditional placement of lunch before recess, coupled with the recent decline in overall recess time to meet academic time constraints, forces children to choose between two essential needs: (1) food; and (2)…

  1. Keeping Recess in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavacky, Francesca; Michael, Shannon L.

    2017-01-01

    Recess is an important part of a comprehensive school physical activity program by providing physical activity to students during the school day, in addition to physical education and classroom physical activity. Unfortunately, recess in the United States is not an expected part of the school day, especially in middle and high schools. High-stakes…

  2. Recess--It's Indispensable!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Olga; Waite-Stupiansky, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    The demise of recess in many elementary schools--and of outdoor play in general--is an issue of great concern to many members of the Play, Policy, and Practice Interest Forum. Most people remember recess as an important part of the school day. It was a time to be outdoors; to organize games; to play on the swings, slides, and other playground…

  3. Mutations of ESPN cause autosomal recessive deafness and vestibular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Naz, S; Griffith, A; Riazuddin, S; Hampton, L; Battey, J; Khan, S; Riazuddin, S; Wilcox, E; Friedman, T

    2004-01-01

    We mapped a human deafness locus DFNB36 to chromosome 1p36.3 in two consanguineous families segregating recessively inherited deafness and vestibular areflexia. This phenotype co-segregates with either of two frameshift mutations, 1988delAGAG and 2469delGTCA, in ESPN, which encodes a calcium-insensitive actin-bundling protein called espin. A recessive mutation of ESPN is known to cause hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction in the jerker mouse. Our results establish espin as an essential protein for hearing and vestibular function in humans. The abnormal vestibular phenotype associated with ESPN mutations will be a useful clinical marker for refining the differential diagnosis of non-syndromic deafness. PMID:15286153

  4. Hurler disease (mucopolysaccharidosis type IH): clinical features and consanguinity in Tunisian population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) was a group of rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, alpha -L -iduronidase, and the resulting accumulation of undergraded dematan sulfate and heparan sulfate. MPS I patients have a wide range of clinical presentations, that makes it difficult to predict patient phenotype which is needed for genetic counseling and also impedes the selection and evaluation of patients undergoing therapy bone marrow transplantation. Aim of the study consanguinity rates have been determined among 14 families with mucopolysaccharidosis type I, seen in the pediatric departments of different geographic areas of Tunisia (Central and Southern areas) for the period August 2004 - August 2011 in order to investigate the relation between consanguinity and this disorder. Patients and methods Clinical and molecular analyses confirmed the diagnosis for MPS type I in the studied families. Results Most of the Tunisian MPS I patients have been identified at the homozygous status: p.P533R mutation (7 homozygous and one double heterozygous p.L578Q/p.P533R patients; 41.66% of all the investigated MPSI patients), p.F177S (1 homozygous patient; 5.55%), p.L530fs (1 patient; 5.55%), p.Y581X (2 patients; 11.11%), p.F602X (3 patients; 16.66%), p.R628X (1 patient; 5.55%). Another mutation: p.L578Q has been identified at the heterozygous status in the only double heterozygous p.L578Q/p.P533R case. Part of the mutations was the result of a founder effect. These described points are the consequences of the high rate of consanguinity. Conclusion The high frequency of p.P533R mutation could be explained by the high degree of inbreeding. This is due to the richness of the genetic background of the studied population. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to develop adequate preventive program adapted to the social, cultural, and economic context. PMID:22074387

  5. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene in Indo-Pakistani patients with type I (tyrosinase-deficient) oculocutaneous albinsm (OCA)

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, R.K.; Droetto, S.; Strunk, K.M.; Holmes, S.A.; Spritz, R.A. ); Bundey, S.; Musarella, M.A.

    1993-12-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by deficient synthesis of melanin pigment. Type I (tyrosinase-deficient) OCA results from mutations of the tyrosinase gene (TYR gene) encoding tyrosinase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first two steps of melanin biosynthesis. Mutations of the TYR gene have been identified in a large number of patients, most of Caucasian ethnic origin, with various forms of type I OCA. The authors present an analysis of the TYR gene in eight Indo-Pakistani patients with type I OCA. The authors describe four novel TYR gene mutations and a fifth mutation previously observed in a Caucasian patient. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Increased Probability of Co-Occurrence of Two Rare Diseases in Consanguineous Families and Resolution of a Complex Phenotype by Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Dennis; Neubauer, Bernd A.; Toliat, Mohammad R.; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Kamrath, Clemens; Schänzer, Anne; Sander, Thomas; Hahn, Andreas; Nothnagel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing of whole genomes and exomes has facilitated a direct assessment of causative genetic variation, now enabling the identification of genetic factors involved in rare diseases (RD) with Mendelian inheritance patterns on an almost routine basis. Here, we describe the illustrative case of a single consanguineous family where this strategy suffered from the difficulty to distinguish between two etiologically distinct disorders, namely the co-occurrence of hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets (HRR) and congenital myopathies (CM), by their phenotypic manifestation alone. We used parametric linkage analysis, homozygosity mapping and whole exome-sequencing to identify mutations underlying HRR and CM. We also present an approximate approach for assessing the probability of co-occurrence of two unlinked recessive RD in a single family as a function of the degree of consanguinity and the frequency of the disease-causing alleles. Linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping yielded elusive results when assuming a single RD, but whole-exome sequencing helped to identify two mutations in two genes, namely SLC34A3 and SEPN1, that segregated independently in this family and that have previously been linked to two etiologically different diseases. We assess the increase in chance co-occurrence of rare diseases due to consanguinity, i.e. under circumstances that generally favor linkage mapping of recessive disease, and show that this probability can increase by several orders of magnitudes. We conclude that such potential co-occurrence represents an underestimated risk when analyzing rare or undefined diseases in consanguineous families and should be given more consideration in the clinical and genetic evaluation. PMID:26789268

  7. An Investigation of Generic Structures of Pakistani Doctoral Thesis Acknowledgements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rofess, Sakander; Mahmood, Muhammad Asim

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates Pakistani doctoral thesis acknowledgements from genre analysis perspective. A corpus of 235 PhD thesis acknowledgements written in English was taken from Pakistani doctoral theses collected from eight different disciplines. HEC Research Repository of Pakistan was used as a data sources. The theses written by Pakistani…

  8. Moral Reasoning of Nigerian and Pakistani Muslim Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maqsud, M.

    1977-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to test the universality of Piaget's and Kohlberg's stages of development of moral judgment in Nigerian and Pakistani cultures. Results show that the moral reasoning of Nigerian and Pakistani Muslim adolescents are greatly affected by their cultural values. (Editor/RK)

  9. Acoustic Analysis of /?/ and /ð/ Sounds in Pakistani English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmood, Muhammad Asim; Asghar, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farhat

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at discovering the nature and extent of deviation in the articulation of consonants in Pakistani English due to the impact of mother tongue. A detailed experiment has been carried out with the help of Praat to analyze the acoustic properties of /?/ and /ð/ sounds spoken by Pakistani speakers. The research reveals that Pakistani…

  10. Recessively Inherited LRBA Mutations Cause Autoimmunity Presenting as Neonatal Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew B; De Franco, Elisa; Lango Allen, Hana; Al Senani, Aisha; Elbarbary, Nancy; Siklar, Zeynep; Berberoglu, Merih; Imane, Zineb; Haghighi, Alireza; Razavi, Zahra; Ullah, Irfan; Alyaarubi, Saif; Gardner, Daphne; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T; Flanagan, Sarah E

    2017-08-01

    Young-onset autoimmune diabetes associated with additional autoimmunity usually reflects a polygenic predisposition, but rare cases result from monogenic autoimmunity. Diagnosing monogenic autoimmunity is crucial for patients' prognosis and clinical management. We sought to identify novel genetic causes of autoimmunity presenting with neonatal diabetes (NDM) (diagnosis <6 months). We performed exome sequencing in a patient with NDM and autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and his unrelated, unaffected parents and identified compound heterozygous null mutations in LRBA Biallelic LRBA mutations cause common variable immunodeficiency-8; however, NDM has not been confirmed in this disorder. We sequenced LRBA in 169 additional patients with diabetes diagnosed <1 year without mutations in the 24 known NDM genes. We identified recessive null mutations in 8 additional probands, of which, 3 had NDM (<6 months). Diabetes was the presenting feature in 6 of 9 probands. Six of 17 (35%) patients born to consanguineous parents and with additional early-onset autoimmunity had recessive LRBA mutations. LRBA testing should be considered in patients with diabetes diagnosed <12 months, particularly if they have additional autoimmunity or are born to consanguineous parents. A genetic diagnosis is important as it can enable personalized therapy with abatacept, a CTLA-4 mimetic, and inform genetic counseling. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Wolcott-Rallison Syndrome Is the Most Common Genetic Cause of Permanent Neonatal Diabetes in Consanguineous Families

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Patch, Ann-Marie; Minton, Jayne A. L.; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Edghill, Emma L.; Hussain, Khalid; Balafrej, Amina; Deeb, Asma; Buchanan, Charles R.; Jefferson, Ian G.; Mutair, Angham; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Ellard, Sian

    2009-01-01

    Context and Objective: Mutations in EIF2AK3 cause Wolcott-Rallison syndrome (WRS), a rare recessive disorder characterized by early-onset diabetes, skeletal abnormalities, and liver dysfunction. Although early diagnosis is important for clinical management, genetic testing is generally performed after the full clinical picture develops. We aimed to identify patients with WRS before any other abnormalities apart from diabetes are present and study the overall frequency of WRS among patients with permanent neonatal diabetes. Research Design and Methods: The coding regions of EIF2AK3 were sequenced in 34 probands with infancy-onset diabetes with a clinical phenotype suggestive of WRS (n = 28) or homozygosity at the WRS locus (n = 6). Results: Twenty-five probands (73.5%) were homozygous or compound heterozygous for mutations in EIF2AK3. Twenty of the 26 mutations identified were novel. Whereas a diagnosis of WRS was suspected before genetic testing in 22 probands, three patients with apparently isolated diabetes were diagnosed after identifying a large homozygous region encompassing EIF2AK3. In contrast to nonconsanguineous pedigrees, mutations in EIF2AK3 are the most common known genetic cause of diabetes among patients born to consanguineous parents (24 vs. < 2%). Age at diabetes onset and birth weight might be used to prioritize genetic testing in the latter group. Conclusions: WRS is the most common cause of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus in consanguineous pedigrees. In addition to testing patients with a definite clinical diagnosis, EIF2AK3 should be tested in patients with isolated neonatal diabetes diagnosed after 3 wk of age from known consanguineous families, isolated populations, or countries in which inbreeding is frequent. PMID:19837917

  12. Reproductive wastage and developmental disorders in relation to consanguinity in south India.

    PubMed

    Asha Bai, P V; John, T J; Subramaniam, V R

    1981-09-01

    The effect of consanguinity on fertility, reproductive loss and developmental disorders were studied in 156 consanguineous marriages in comparison with 221 non-consanguineous marriages. Although fertility was greater (P less than 0.05) in consanguineous than in non-consanguineous marriages, the number of living children were approximately equal in both groups, on account of increased child mortality in the former (P less than 0.05). The frequencies of abortion and stillbirth were (also) approximately equal in both groups. Developmental anomalies were significantly more frequent (P less than 0.001) among the offspring of consanguineous parents. These results indicate the continued presence of deleterious genes in this population, in spite of the practice of consanguinity over many generations.

  13. Mutation of ATF6 causes autosomal recessive achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Muhammad; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Saqib, Muhammad Arif Nadeem; Zulfiqar, Fareeha; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ashraf, Naeem Mahmood; Ullah, Ehsan; Wang, Xin; Sajid, Sundus; Khan, Falak Sher; Amin-ud-Din, Muhammad; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Hameed, Abdul; Riazuddin, Saima; Ahmed, Zubair M; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-09-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is an early-onset retinal dystrophy characterized by photophobia, nystagmus, color blindness and severely reduced visual acuity. Currently mutations in five genes CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2, PDE6C and PDE6H have been implicated in ACHM. We performed homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis in a consanguineous Pakistani ACHM family and mapped the locus to a 15.12-Mb region on chromosome 1q23.1-q24.3 with a maximum LOD score of 3.6. A DNA sample from an affected family member underwent exome sequencing. Within the ATF6 gene, a single-base insertion variant c.355_356dupG (p.Glu119Glyfs*8) was identified, which completely segregates with the ACHM phenotype within the family. The frameshift variant was absent in public variant databases, in 130 exomes from unrelated Pakistani individuals, and in 235 ethnically matched controls. The variant is predicted to result in a truncated protein that lacks the DNA binding and transmembrane domains and therefore affects the function of ATF6 as a transcription factor that initiates the unfolded protein response during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Immunolabeling with anti-ATF6 antibodies showed localization throughout the mouse neuronal retina, including retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptor cells, inner nuclear layer, inner and outer plexiform layers, with a more prominent signal in retinal ganglion cells. In contrast to cytoplasmic expression of wild-type protein, in heterologous cells ATF6 protein with the p.Glu119Glyfs*8 variant is mainly confined to the nucleus. Our results imply that response to ER stress as mediated by the ATF6 pathway is essential for color vision in humans.

  14. Autosomal recessive Oliver-McFarlane syndrome: retinitis pigmentosa, short stature (GH deficiency), trichomegaly, and hair anomalies or CPD syndrome (chorioretinopathy-pituitary dysfunction).

    PubMed

    Haimi, Motti; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth

    2005-10-15

    We describe a brother and sister with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), growth failure, long eyelashes, and sparse hair. They were born to young healthy consanguineous parents and presented at birth with IUGR. Evolving pigmentary retinopathy was diagnosed at the age of 5 years. A similar condition (Oliver-McFarlane) syndrome was reported previously. Our two sibs confirm the existence of this autosomal recessive syndrome.

  15. [Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias].

    PubMed

    Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu

    2009-12-01

    Friedreich ataxia is the most frequent recessive cerebral ataxia d should always be researched first. Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia have a specific treatment. Associated neurological signs such polyneuroapthy, ophtalmologic or oculomotor signs, pyramidal signs, and cerebellar MRI can lead to the etiological diagnosis. Biological tests should be: vitamin E, cholesterol, alpha-fetoprotein levels, acanthocytes, than phytanic acid, cholestanol, lysosomal enzymes. Numerous autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia remain without etiology.

  16. Consanguinity and Neonatal Death: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaman, Reza; Gholami Taramsari, Mahshid; Khosravi, Ahmad; Amiri, Mohammad; Holakouie Naieni, Kourosh; Yunesian, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Although numerous studies have found higher rates of abortion and still births following consanguinity (familial marriages), the question of whether consanguinity significantly increases the risk of neonatal death has inadequately been addressed.This study aims to evaluate familial marriage effects on neonatal death in rural areas in Iran. Materials and methods: In this nested case-control study, 6900 newbornswho were born in rural areas of Kohgiluyeh and Boyerahmad Province (South-West of Iran)were followed till the end of neonatal period, and neonatal death was the outcome of interest. Subsequently 97 cases and 97 controls were selected in study cohort by using risk set sampling model. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) were estimated by usinga conditional logistic regression model. Results: In the final model, prematurity (OR = 5.57), low birthweight (LBW) (OR = 7.68), consanguinity (first cousins) (OR = 5.23), C-section (OR = 7.27), birth rank more than 3 (OR = 6.95) and birthsinterval less than 24 months (OR = 4.65) showed significant statistical association with neonatal mortality (p < 0.05). Conclusion: According to our findings, after adjusting the effects of other significant risk factors, familial marriageto first cousins is considered asan important risk factor for neonatal death. PMID:25530772

  17. Consanguinity and late fertility: spatial analysis reveals positive association patterns.

    PubMed

    Lisa, Antonella; Astolfi, Paola; Zei, Gianna; Tentoni, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The role of consanguinity on human complex traits is an important and controversial issue. In this work we focused on the Sardinian population and examined the effect of consanguineous unions on late female fertility. During the last century the island has been characterized by a high incidence of marriages between relatives, favoured by socio economic conditions and geographical isolation, and by high fertility despite a widespread tendency to delay reproduction. Through spatial analysis techniques, we explored the geographical heterogeneity of consanguinity and late fertility, and identified in Central-Eastern Sardinia a common area with an excess of both traits, where the traits are positively associated. We found that their association did not significantly affect women's fertility in the area, despite the expected negative role of both traits. Intriguingly, this critical zone corresponds well to areas reported by previous studies as being peculiar for a high frequency of centenarians and for lower risk in pregnancy outcome. The proposed approach can be generally exploited to identify target populations on which socioeconomic, biodemographic and genetic data can be collected at the individual level, and deeper analyses carried out to disentangle the determinants of complex biological traits and to investigate their association.

  18. Bloom syndrome: An analysis of consanguineous families assigns the locus mutated to chromosome band 15q26. 1

    SciTech Connect

    German, J.; Roe, A.M.; Ellis, N.A. ); Leppert, M.F. )

    1994-07-05

    By the principle of identity by descent, parental consanguinity in individuals with rare recessively transmitted disorders dictates homozygosity not just at the mutated disease-associated locus but also at sequences that flank that locus closely. In 25 of 26 individuals with Bloom syndrome examined whose parents were related, a polymorphic tetranucleotide repeat in an intron of the protooncogene FES was homozygous far more often than expected (P < 0.0001 by x[sup 2]). Therefore, BLM, the gene that when mutated gives rise to Bloom syndrome, is tightly linked to FES, a gene whose chromosome position is known to be 15q26.1. This successful approach to the assignment of the Bloom syndrome locus to one short segment of the human genome simultaneously (i) demonstrates the power of homozygosity mapping and (ii) becomes the first step in a [open quotes]reverse[close quotes] genetics definition of the primary defect in Bloom syndrome.

  19. Fetus with two identical reciprocal translocations: description of a rare complication of consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Danielle; Vial, Yvan; Thonney, Francine; Beckmann, Jacques S; Meagher-Villemure, Kathleen; Unger, Sheila

    2006-04-01

    We report on a 24-week fetus with multiple organ anomalies secondary to biparental inheritance of an apparently balanced t(17;20) reciprocal translocation. The pregnancy was terminated following the discovery by ultrasound of an abnormal heart and micrognathia. At autopsy, the following anomalies were found: Pierre-Robin sequence, hypoplasia of the right ventricle with muscular hypertrophy, and endocardial fibroelastosis, hypoplastic lungs, dysplastic left kidney, bilateral pelvicalyceal dilatation, central nervous system periventricular heterotopias and right sided club foot. Given the endocardial fibroelastosis and cleft palate, Eastman-Bixler syndrome (Facio-cardio-renal) is a possible diagnosis. The parents were first cousins and each had an identical t(17;20)(q21.1;p11.21) translocation. The fetal karyotype was 46,XX,t(17;20)(q21.1;p11.21)mat,t(17;20)(q21.1;p11.21)pat. While there are a few reports of consanguineous families where both the mother and father had the same reciprocal translocation and offspring with unbalanced karyotypes, we were unable to find any reports of a fetus/child with double identical reciprocal translocations. We propose that although the fetus had an apparently balanced karyotype, inheriting only the translocated chromosomes led to the unmasking of a recessive syndrome. It seems most likely that a gene (or genes) was disrupted by the breaks but the parents might also be heterozygous carriers of a recessive gene mutation since the fetus must be homozygous by descent for many loci on both chromosomes 17 and 20 (as well as on other chromosomal segments). It was not possible to totally exclude segmental uniparental disomy as a cause of the anomalies as no recombinations were detected for chromosome 17. However, there is no evidence to suggest that chromosome 17 is imprinted and UPD 20 was excluded thus making an imprinting error unlikely. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Consanguinity and kinship in Down syndrome in Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean (Québec).

    PubMed

    de Braekeleer, M; Landry, T; Cholette, A

    1994-01-01

    Genealogies of 67 cases of Down syndrome (DS) cytogenetically proven as trisomy 21 born in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean were reconstructed using a population register. Genealogies of three controls for each patient matched on sex, date and place of birth were also reconstructed. The mean kinship coefficient was slightly, but not significantly (p > 0.05), increased in the DS group compared to the control group (0.000222 versus 0.000165). The increase was mostly the result of two patients being related as uncle-nephew. The mean inbreeding coefficient was also higher, although not significantly (p > 0.05), in the DS group than in the control group (0.001348 versus 0.000848). Nine consanguineous marriages (13.4%) were identified in the DS group compared to 17 of 201 (8.5%) in the control group. These results may suggest, as previously reported by Roberts et al. in Shetland, that some recessive element is involved in the etiology of DS, possibly in preventing the loss of the trisomic 21 fetus.

  1. Novel homozygous large deletion including the 5′ part of the SPATA7 gene in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Anja-Kathrin; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Zobor, Ditta; Bonin, Michael; Sharkia, Rajech

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify the genetic defect in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family with juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods DNA samples were collected from the index patient, her parents, her affected sister, and two non-affected siblings. Genome-wide linkage analysis with 250 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays was performed using DNA from the two affected patients. Owing to consanguinity in the family, we applied homozygosity mapping to identify the disease-causing gene. The candidate gene SPATA7 was screened for mutations with PCR amplifications and direct Sanger sequencing. Results Following high-density SNP arrays, we identified several homozygous genomic regions one of which included the SPATA7 gene. Several mutations in SPATA7 have been reported for various forms of retinal dystrophy, including Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and juvenile RP. PCR-based sequence content mapping, long-distance PCR amplifications, and subsequent sequencing analysis revealed a homozygous 63.4 kb large deletion that encompasses the 5′ part of the SPATA7 gene including exons 1–5. The mutation showed concordant segregation with the phenotype in the family as expected for autosomal recessive mode of inheritance and is consistent with a diagnosis of juvenile RP. Conclusions We report a novel homozygous large deletion in SPATA7 associated with juvenile RP in a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family. This is the first larger deletion mutation reported for SPATA7. PMID:25814828

  2. Mutations in the lipase-H gene causing autosomal recessive hypotrichosis and woolly hair.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Sabba; Jan, Abid; Muhammad, Dost; Ahmad, Farooq; Mir, Hina; Younus, Muhammad; Ali, Ghazanfar; Ayub, Muhammad; Ansar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim

    2015-08-01

    Hypotrichosis is characterised by sparse scalp hair, sparse to absent eyebrows and eyelashes, or absence of hair from other parts of the body. In few cases, the condition is associated with tightly curled woolly scalp hair. The present study searched for disease-causing sequence variants in the genes in four Pakistani lineal consanguineous families exhibiting features of hypotrichosis or woolly hair. A haplotype analysis established links in all four families to the LIPH gene located on chromosome 3q27.2. Subsequently, sequencing LIPH identified a novel non-sense mutation (c.328C>T; p.Arg110*) in one and a previously reported 2-bp deletion mutation (c.659_660delTA, p.Ile220ArgfsX29) in three other families.

  3. Genetic screening for autosomal recessive nonsyndromic mental retardation in an isolated population in Israel.

    PubMed

    Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Taub, Ellen; Halpern, Gabrielle J; Drasinover, Valerie; Magal, Nurit; Davidov, Bella; Zlotogora, Joël; Shohat, Mordechai

    2007-02-01

    Nonsyndromic mental retardation (NSMR) is the diagnosis of exclusion in mentally retarded individuals without additional abnormalities. We have recently identified a protein-truncating mutation, G408fsX437, in the gene CC2D1A on chromosome 19p13.12 in nine consanguineous Israeli Arab families with severe autosomal recessive NSMR, and have developed a comprehensive prevention program among the at-risk population in the village. The subjects tested were healthy women who were invited to undergo the genetic screening test as a part of their routine pregnancy monitoring. One hundred and seventeen subjects reported a family history positive for mental retardation. We tested 524 pregnant or preconceptional women and found 47 carriers (approximately 1/11), whose spouses were then recommended to undergo testing. We identified eight carrier couples, who were given genetic counseling and offered prenatal diagnosis. Of all the marriages, 28.6% were consanguineous; 16.5% of the total were between first cousins. The high prevalence of the mutation can be explained both by the founder effect owing to the generally high consanguinity rate among the inhabitants of the village, and also because two families with excessive numbers of mentally retarded offspring were unacceptable as marriage partners by the rest of the families. This is the first example of the establishment of a large-scale genetic screening program for autosomal recessive NSMR, which was made possible owing to the high frequency of the specific causative mutation in this isolated population.

  4. Acceptability of GM foods among Pakistani consumers

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Akhter; Rahut, Dil Bahadur; Imtiaz, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Pakistan majority of the consumers do not have information about genetically modified (GM) foods. In developing countries particularly in Pakistan few studies have focused on consumers' acceptability about GM foods. Using comprehensive primary dataset collected from 320 consumers in 2013 from Pakistan, this study analyzes the determinants of consumers' acceptability of GM foods. The data was analyzed by employing the bivariate probit model and censored least absolute deviation (CLAD) models. The empirical results indicated that urban consumers are more aware of GM foods compared to rural consumers. The acceptance of GM foods was more among females' consumers as compared to male consumers. In addition, the older consumers were more willing to accept GM food compared to young consumers. The acceptability of GM foods was also higher among wealthier households. Low price is the key factor leading to the acceptability of GM foods. The acceptability of the GM foods also reduces the risks among Pakistani consumers. PMID:27494790

  5. Acceptability of GM foods among Pakistani consumers.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhter; Rahut, Dil Bahadur; Imtiaz, Muhammad

    2016-04-02

    In Pakistan majority of the consumers do not have information about genetically modified (GM) foods. In developing countries particularly in Pakistan few studies have focused on consumers' acceptability about GM foods. Using comprehensive primary dataset collected from 320 consumers in 2013 from Pakistan, this study analyzes the determinants of consumers' acceptability of GM foods. The data was analyzed by employing the bivariate probit model and censored least absolute deviation (CLAD) models. The empirical results indicated that urban consumers are more aware of GM foods compared to rural consumers. The acceptance of GM foods was more among females' consumers as compared to male consumers. In addition, the older consumers were more willing to accept GM food compared to young consumers. The acceptability of GM foods was also higher among wealthier households. Low price is the key factor leading to the acceptability of GM foods. The acceptability of the GM foods also reduces the risks among Pakistani consumers.

  6. The practice of consanguineous marriage in Oman: prevalence, trends and determinants.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Mazharul

    2012-09-01

    The practice of consanguineous marriage has been the culturally preferred form of marriage in most Arab and the Middle Eastern countries, including Oman, but due to a paucity of population-based data in the past there is a dearth of information about its form and dynamics in Oman. Recent national-level surveys allow this gap to be filled. This paper examines the prevalence, trends and determinants of consanguineous marriages in Oman using data from the 2000 Oman National Health Survey. The results indicate a very high prevalence of consanguineous marriage in Oman, as more than half (52%) of marriages are consanguineous. First cousin unions are the most common type of consanguineous unions, constituting 39% of all marriages and 75% of all consanguineous marriages. The study observed various patterns of consanguinity, some of them common with other Arab nations, and some unique in nature. Women's age at marriage, employment, place of childhood residence and geographical region appear to be significant determinants of consanguineous marriages. Consanguineous marriage shows a strong association with marital stability, early age at marriage and early-age childbearing. There has been no appreciable change in the prevalence of consanguineous unions in Oman over the last four decades despite massive socioeconomic development and modernization. However, recent marriage cohorts show slight declining trends. The results suggest that consanguinity is likely to remain stable in the future or decline at a slow rate. Specific health education and genetic counselling should be followed in line with WHO recommendations to minimize the negative health consequences of consanguinity for child health.

  7. Tuberous breast and predisposition to breast deformity in consanguineous.

    PubMed

    Dessy, Luca Andrea; De Santo, Liliana; Onesti, Maria Giuseppina; Fallico, Nefer; Mazzocchi, Marco

    2017-05-30

    Tuberous breast deformity is a pathologic condition of the breast consisting of a constricting ring at the breast base, reduction in the volume of the breast parenchyma, and herniation of breast tissue through the nipple-areola complex with areola enlargement. This pathology is generally congenital and has an unknown etiopathogenesis. We report the first observation of tuberous breast deformity in consanguineous. This report suggests the potential role of a genetic base in the development of this deformity. Between May 2008 and March 2011, we observed six female patients from two different families, aged between 18 and 55 years, affected by tuberous breast deformity. The breast deformity was characterized by breast asymmetry in all six cases. Four patients underwent surgery to correct the deformity. Standardized objective measurements of breast and chest were taken. A Visual Analog Scale was used to evaluate patients' and physicians' satisfaction. The first three patients were consanguineous; two were first cousins, and the third was second cousin with one of the above. The other three patients were also from the same family: two sisters and their mother. According to Von Heimburg's classification, the patients presented different degrees of breast deformity. In all operated cases, a good esthetic result with a high satisfaction (average visual analog scale score 9) was achieved. The results remained stable over time and no revisions were needed after the 1-year follow-up. The possibility of a parental consanguinity for breast deformities such tuberous breast has never been described in the literature. This report suggests the possible genetic role in the development of tuberous breast deformity. Further studies and genetic tests are required to prove this hypothesis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effect of consanguinity on Argentinean Angus beef DNA traceability.

    PubMed

    Baldo, A; Rogberg-Muñoz, A; Prando, A; Mello Cesar, A S; Lirón, J P; Sorarrain, N; Ramelli, P; Posik, D M; Pofcher, E; Ripoli, M V; Beretta, E; Peral-García, P; Vaca, R; Mariani, P; Giovambattista, G

    2010-08-01

    Since the 1990s several authors have envisaged the use of DNA to certify meat origin. Two major parameters must be assessed before a DNA based traceability protocol can be implemented in the food chain: (i) the information content of a DNA marker set in a specific livestock breed or group of breeds; (ii) the minimum number of DNA markers needed to obtain a statistically acceptable match probability. The objective of the present work was to establish the effect of different levels of inbreeding in the matching efficiency, and the minimum number of microsatellite markers needed, in a DNA based meat traceability program, starting from an 11-microsatellite marker panel. Samples were obtained from beef production farms in South America, where animals are typically bred under pasture-based extensive conditions. Three groups of animals with different consanguinity rates were sampled. Exclusion power (Q) was higher than 0.999998 and match probability lower than 3.01E-08, for the whole set of markers within each group. Both values were affected by consanguinity. To reach a two mismatch criteria exclusion power (Q(2)) of 99.99, six markers were needed in unrelated animals whereas seven markers were needed in related animals. To reach Q(2)=99.9999, 8 and 10 microsatellite markers, respectively, were needed. In general, one or two more microsatellite markers were needed to identify consanguineous animals. This study proved the DNA marker set used to be suitable for the identification of the meat from all slaughtered animals in Argentina, per week, month, and year. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Recess Renaissance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2015-01-01

    The author tells of his work around the country and world on transforming how schools do recess, free play, and outside time by transforming their outdoor spaces to match. Instead of a playground of fixed structures like traditional school grounds, newer spaces are filled with loose materials that children can use to build forts, dens, and tree…

  10. The Recess Renaissance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2015-01-01

    The author tells of his work around the country and world on transforming how schools do recess, free play, and outside time by transforming their outdoor spaces to match. Instead of a playground of fixed structures like traditional school grounds, newer spaces are filled with loose materials that children can use to build forts, dens, and tree…

  11. Infantile variant of Bartter syndrome and sensorineural deafness: A new autosomal recessive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, D.; Shalev, H.; Carmi, Rivka; Ohaly, M.

    1995-12-04

    The infantile variant of Bartter syndrome (IBS) is usually associated with maternal polyhydramnios, premature birth, postnatal polyuria and hypokalemic hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and a typical appearance. IBS is thought to be an autosomal recessive trait. Several congenital tubular defects are associated with sensorineural deafness (SND). However, an association between the IBS and SND has not been reported so far. Here we describe 5 children of an extended consanguineous Bedouin family with IBS and SND. In 3 of the cases, the typical electrolyte imbalance and facial appearance were detected neonatally. SND was detected as early as age 1 month, suggesting either coincidental homozygotization of 2 recessive genes or a pleiotropic effect of one autosomal recessive gene. This association suggests that evaluation of SND is warranted in every case of IBS. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Autosomal recessive disorders among Arabs: an overview from Kuwait.

    PubMed Central

    Teebi, A S

    1994-01-01

    Kuwait has a cosmopolitan population of 1.7 million, mostly Arabs. This population is a mosaic of large and small minorities representing most Arab communities. In general, Kuwait's population is characterized by a rapid rate of growth, large family size, high rates of consanguineous marriages within the Arab communities with low frequency of intermarriage between them, and the presence of genetic isolates and semi-isolates in some extended families and Bedouin tribes. Genetic services have been available in Kuwait for over a decade. During this time it has become clear that Arabs have a high frequency of genetic disorders, and in particular autosomal recessive traits. Their pattern is unique and some disorders are relatively common. Examples are Bardet-Biedl and Meckel syndromes, phenylketonuria, and familial Mediterranean fever. A relatively large number of new syndromes and variants have been delineated in Kuwait's population, many being the result of homozygosity for autosomal recessive genes that occurred because of inbreeding. Some of these syndromes have subsequently been found in other parts of the world, negating the concept of the private syndrome. This paper provides an overview of autosomal recessive disorders among the Arabs in Kuwait from a personal perspective and published studies, and highlights the need for genetic services in Arab countries with the goal of prevention and treatment of genetic disorders. PMID:8014972

  13. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  14. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  15. Consanguinity profile in the Gaza Strip of Palestine: large-scale community-based study.

    PubMed

    Sirdah, Mahmoud M

    2014-02-01

    Consanguineous marriages which have been practiced throughout history continue to be practiced within different ethnic, religious and social groups to varying degrees with highest prevalences in North Africa, Middle East and central and south Asia. In the Gaza Strip of Palestine, little is known about the consanguinity profile, so the present large-scale study aims to explore the consanguinity profile of two generations using data from the β-thalassemia premarital screening program. Sociodemographic data analysis included 156,635 (141,200 males and 15,435 females) persons and their parents, representing 141,200 couples who were referred to the Thalassemia and Hemophilia Center for premarital testing. In addition, the consanguinity characteristics of parents of 217 transfusion-dependent β-thalassemic non-sibling patients were analyzed. Results revealed a significant decrease in the overall prevalence of consanguineous (first- and second-cousin) marriages between the previous (fathers') generation (45.2%) and the current (groom/bride) generation (39.9%). Among the five governorates of the Gaza Strip, records of Gaza Governorate revealed the lowest occurrence (36.9% current generation and 42.1% previous generation) of consanguineous marriages, as compared to all others. Consanguineous marriages are significantly higher in semi-urban areas (41.6%) than in urban areas (39.1%) in the current generation (previous generation, 46.4% vs 44.7%, respectively). Compound consanguinity (two generation) and a single level of consanguinity were seen in 20.7% and 43.7%, respectively, of the cases. The average age of those with first-cousin marriages is significantly lower (22.4±4.4 years) than those with second-cousin marriages (24.3±6.1 years) and the non-consanguineous (26.5±8.2 years). The rate of consanguineous marriages among never married people (42.2%) is significantly much higher than the rate of people with multiple marriages (18.1%). About 74.7% of the non

  16. Consanguineous marriages in the population of Sheikhupura (Punjab), Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shami, S A; Iqbal, I

    1983-01-01

    This study was based on 1007 couples from the Sheikhupura population. The proportions of various parental relationships were: 0.3784 1st cousins, 0.0318 1st cousins once removed, 0.0784 double 2nd cousins, 0.1033 bradari distant relations, 0.3416 bradari, and 0.0665 unrelated parents. Mean paternal ages in unrelated couples are significantly higher than in 1st cousins, double 2nd cousins, and bradari relations. The differences in paternal and maternal ages are significantly higher in unrelated relations as compared to 1st cousins and double 2nd cousins. Procounced effects of consanguinity on parental deaths and neonatal deaths were observed in 1st cousin marriages compared to other relationships. Juvenile and infant deaths show comparatively less effects of consanguinity in 1st cousin marriages. Mean coefficient of inbreeding calculated for this population was 0.0271. Lethal gene equivalents calculated were 1.5424. The added risk of affected children in 1st cousins over that of unrelated parents was 4.82%. The results suggest that the deleterious genes show their effects more in the prenatal than in the postnatal period.

  17. Loss-of-Function Mutations of ILDR1 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment DFNB42

    PubMed Central

    Borck, Guntram; Rehman, Atteeq Ur; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Pogoda, Hans-Martin; Kakar, Naseebullah; von Ameln, Simon; Grillet, Nicolas; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Ansar, Muhammad; Basit, Sulman; Javed, Qamar; Morell, Robert J.; Nasreen, Nabilah; Shearer, A. Eliot; Ahmad, Adeel; Kahrizi, Kimia; Shaikh, Rehan S.; Ali, Rana A.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Goebel, Ingrid; Meyer, Nicole C.; Kimberling, William J.; Webster, Jennifer A.; Stephan, Dietrich A.; Schiller, Martin R.; Bahlo, Melanie; Najmabadi, Hossein; Gillespie, Peter G.; Nürnberg, Peter; Wollnik, Bernd; Riazuddin, Saima; Smith, Richard J.H.; Ahmad, Wasim; Müller, Ulrich; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Friedman, Thomas B.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Leal, Suzanne M.; Ahmad, Jamil; Kubisch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By using homozygosity mapping in a consanguineous Pakistani family, we detected linkage of nonsyndromic hearing loss to a 7.6 Mb region on chromosome 3q13.31-q21.1 within the previously reported DFNB42 locus. Subsequent candidate gene sequencing identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1135G>T [p.Glu379X]) in ILDR1 as the cause of hearing impairment. By analyzing additional consanguineous families with homozygosity at this locus, we detected ILDR1 mutations in the affected individuals of 10 more families from Pakistan and Iran. The identified ILDR1 variants include missense, nonsense, frameshift, and splice-site mutations as well as a start codon mutation in the family that originally defined the DFNB42 locus. ILDR1 encodes the evolutionarily conserved immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1, a putative transmembrane receptor of unknown function. In situ hybridization detected expression of Ildr1, the murine ortholog, early in development in the vestibule and in hair cells and supporting cells of the cochlea. Expression in hair cell- and supporting cell-containing neurosensory organs is conserved in the zebrafish, in which the ildr1 ortholog is prominently expressed in the developing ear and neuromasts of the lateral line. These data identify loss-of-function mutations of ILDR1, a gene with a conserved expression pattern pointing to a conserved function in hearing in vertebrates, as underlying nonsyndromic prelingual sensorineural hearing impairment. PMID:21255762

  18. Consanguinity and pregnancy outcomes in a multi-ethnic, metropolitan European population.

    PubMed

    Becker, Rolf; Keller, Thomas; Wegner, Rolf-Dieter; Neitzel, Heidemarie; Stumm, Markus; Knoll, Ute; Stärk, Markus; Fangerau, Heiner; Bittles, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the risk of major anomalies in the offspring of consanguineous couples, including data on the prenatal situation. Over 20 years (1993-2012), 35,391 fetuses were examined by prenatal sonography. In 675 cases (1.9%), parents were consanguineous, with 307 couples (45.5%) related as first cousins, 368 couples (54.5%) beyond first cousins. Detailed information was retrieved on 31,710 (89.6%) fetuses, (consanguineous 568: 1.8%). Overall prevalence of major anomalies among fetuses with non-consanguineous parents was 2.9% (consanguineous, 10.9%; first cousins, 12.4%; beyond first cousins, 6.5%). Adjusting the overall numbers for cases having been referred because of a previous index case, the prevalences were 2.8% (non-consanguineous) and 6.1% (consanguineous) (first cousin, 8.5%; beyond first cousin, 3.9%). Further adjustment for differential rates of trisomic pregnancies indicated 2.0%/5.9% congenital anomalies (non-consanguineous/consanguineous groups), that is, a consanguinity-associated excess of 3.9%, 6.1% in first cousin progeny and 1.9% beyond first cousin. The prevalence of major fetal anomalies associated with consanguinity is higher than in evaluations based only on postnatal life. It is important that this information is made available in genetic counselling programmes, especially in multi-ethnic and multi-religious communities, to enable couples to make informed decisions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. School Recess and Social Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jambor, Tom

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the role of school recess periods in children's social development and academic achievement. Also examines changing attitudes toward the use of recess periods in the United States and other nations, and presents strategies for classroom teachers to use in advocating school recess periods in their schools and communities. (MDM)

  20. Molecular spectrum and differential diagnosis in patients referred with sporadic or autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Caparros-Martin, Jose A; Aglan, Mona S; Temtamy, Samia; Otaify, Ghada A; Valencia, Maria; Nevado, Julián; Vallespin, Elena; Del Pozo, Angela; Prior de Castro, Carmen; Calatrava-Ferreras, Lucia; Gutierrez, Pilar; Bueno, Ana M; Sagastizabal, Belen; Guillen-Navarro, Encarna; Ballesta-Martinez, Maria; Gonzalez, Vanesa; Basaran, Sarenur Y; Buyukoglan, Ruksan; Sarikepe, Bilge; Espinoza-Valdez, Cecilia; Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco; Martinez-Glez, Victor; Heath, Karen E; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous bone disorder characterized by recurrent fractures. Although most cases of OI have heterozygous mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2 and show autosomal dominant inheritance, during the last years there has been an explosion in the number of genes responsible for both recessive and dominant forms of this condition. Herein, we have analyzed a cohort of patients with OI, all offspring of unaffected parents, to determine the spectrum of variants accounting for these cases. Twenty patients had nonrelated parents and were sporadic, and 21 were born to consanguineous relationships. Mutation analysis was performed using a next-generation sequencing gene panel, homozygosity mapping, and whole exome sequencing (WES). Patients offspring of nonconsanguineous parents were mostly identified with COL1A1 or COL1A2 heterozygous changes, although there were also a few cases with IFITM5 and WNT1 heterozygous mutations. Only one sporadic patient was a compound heterozygote for two recessive mutations. Patients offspring of consanguineous parents showed homozygous changes in a variety of genes including CRTAP,FKBP10,LEPRE1,PLOD2,PPIB,SERPINF1,TMEM38B, and WNT1. In addition, two patients born to consanguineous parents were found to have de novo COL1A1 heterozygous mutations demonstrating that causative variants in the collagen I structural genes cannot be overlooked in affected children from consanguineous couples. Further to this, WES analysis in probands lacking mutations in OI genes revealed deleterious variants in SCN9A,NTRK1, and SLC2A2, which are associated with congenital indifference to pain (CIP) and Fanconi-Bickel syndrome (FBS). This work provides useful information for clinical and genetic diagnosis of OI patients with no positive family history of this disease. Our data also indicate that CIP and FBS are conditions to be considered in the differential diagnosis of OI and suggest a positive role of SCN9A and NTRK1 in bone development.

  1. Discovery of four recessive developmental disorders using probabilistic genotype and phenotype matching among 4,125 families.

    PubMed

    Akawi, Nadia; McRae, Jeremy; Ansari, Morad; Balasubramanian, Meena; Blyth, Moira; Brady, Angela F; Clayton, Stephen; Cole, Trevor; Deshpande, Charu; Fitzgerald, Tomas W; Foulds, Nicola; Francis, Richard; Gabriel, George; Gerety, Sebastian S; Goodship, Judith; Hobson, Emma; Jones, Wendy D; Joss, Shelagh; King, Daniel; Klena, Nikolai; Kumar, Ajith; Lees, Melissa; Lelliott, Chris; Lord, Jenny; McMullan, Dominic; O'Regan, Mary; Osio, Deborah; Piombo, Virginia; Prigmore, Elena; Rajan, Diana; Rosser, Elisabeth; Sifrim, Alejandro; Smith, Audrey; Swaminathan, Ganesh J; Turnpenny, Peter; Whitworth, James; Wright, Caroline F; Firth, Helen V; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lo, Cecilia W; FitzPatrick, David R; Hurles, Matthew E

    2015-11-01

    Discovery of most autosomal recessive disease-associated genes has involved analysis of large, often consanguineous multiplex families or small cohorts of unrelated individuals with a well-defined clinical condition. Discovery of new dominant causes of rare, genetically heterogeneous developmental disorders has been revolutionized by exome analysis of large cohorts of phenotypically diverse parent-offspring trios. Here we analyzed 4,125 families with diverse, rare and genetically heterogeneous developmental disorders and identified four new autosomal recessive disorders. These four disorders were identified by integrating Mendelian filtering (selecting probands with rare, biallelic and putatively damaging variants in the same gene) with statistical assessments of (i) the likelihood of sampling the observed genotypes from the general population and (ii) the phenotypic similarity of patients with recessive variants in the same candidate gene. This new paradigm promises to catalyze the discovery of novel recessive disorders, especially those with less consistent or nonspecific clinical presentations and those caused predominantly by compound heterozygous genotypes.

  2. Exploring Identity in Muslim Moroccan and Pakistani Immigrant Women

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Cristina; Tagliabue, Semira

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a qualitative investigation of how Muslim Moroccan and Pakistani female immigrants living in Italy conceptualize their cultural identity. Ten Moroccan and 10 Pakistani (adolescent and adult) women were interviewed through in-depth semi-structured interviews. The interviewees expressed a strong attachment to their culture of origin: their religion is a crucial aspect of their identity, along with certain cultural rules and traditional values. At the same time, both Moroccan and Pakistani participants were ambivalent toward and experienced difficulties in developing a connection to the host country, although the two groups exhibit their lack of connection to their host country in different ways: Moroccans’ self-representation is marked by a sense of foreignness and by a lack of an emotional connection with places where they are living while Pakistanis tend to express cultural distance and conflict with the host culture’s values. For both the Moroccan and Pakistani groups, the challenge of integration and biculturalism seems demanding in the Italian context and is marked by a deep feeling of emptiness, a lack of an emotional bond with the new country, and a strong cultural ambivalence. Finally, narrative themes are articulated across four interrelated dimensions (cultural, religious, gendered, spatial), revealing interesting differences based on national origin and generation. PMID:27247642

  3. Genetic Analysis through OtoSeq of Pakistani Families Segregating Prelingual Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Mohsin; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Qaiser, Tanveer A.; Schultz, Julie M.; Hussain, Zawar; Flanagan, Megan; Bhinder, Munir A.; Kissell, Diane; Greinwald, John H; Khan, Shaheen N.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Zhang, Kejian; Riazuddin, Saima; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ahmed, Zubair M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the genetic cause of prelingual sensorineural hearing loss in Pakistani families using a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based mutation screening test named OtoSeq. Study Design Prospective Study Setting Research laboratory Subjects and Methods We used three fluorescently labeled short tandem repeat (STR) markers for each of the known autosomal recessive nonsyndromic (DFNB) and Usher syndrome (USH) locus to perform a linkage analysis of 243 multi-generational Pakistani families segregating prelingual hearing loss. After genotyping, we focused on 34 families with potential linkage to MYO7A, CDH23 and SLC26A4. We screened affected individuals from a subset of these families using the OtoSeq platform to identify underlying genetic variants. Sanger sequencing was performed to confirm and study the segregation of mutations in other family members. For novel mutations, normal hearing individuals from ethnically matched backgrounds were also tested. Results Hearing loss was found to co-segregate with locus-specific STR markers for MYO7A in 32 families, CDH23 in one family and SLC26A4 in one family. Using the OtoSeq platform, a microdroplet PCR-based enrichment followed by NGS, we identified mutations in 28 of the 34 families including 11 novel mutations. Sanger sequencing of these mutations showed 100% concordance with NGS data and co-segregation of the mutant alleles with the hearing loss phenotype in the respective families. Conclusion Using NGS based platforms like OtoSeq in families segregating hearing loss, will contribute to the identification of common and population specific mutations, early diagnosis, genetic counseling and molecular epidemiology. PMID:23770805

  4. Autozygosity reveals recessive mutations and novel mechanisms in dominant genes: implications in variant interpretation.

    PubMed

    Monies, Dorota; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Kurdi, Wesam; Alanazy, Mohammed H; Alkhalidi, Hisham; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Sulaiman, Raashda A; Faqeih, Eissa; Goljan, Ewa; Ibrahim, Niema; Abdulwahab, Firdous; Hashem, Mais; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Shaheen, Ranad; Arold, Stefan T; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe recessive alleles in strictly dominant genes. Identifying recessive mutations in genes for which only dominant disease or risk alleles have been reported can expand our understanding of the medical relevance of these genes both phenotypically and mechanistically. The Saudi population is enriched for autozygosity, which enhances the homozygous occurrence of alleles, including pathogenic alleles in genes that have been associated only with a dominant inheritance pattern. Exome sequencing of patients from consanguineous families with likely recessive phenotypes was performed. In one family, the genotype of the deceased children was inferred from their parents due to lack of available samples. We describe the identification of 11 recessive variants (5 of which are reported here for the first time) in 11 genes for which only dominant disease or risk alleles have been reported. The observed phenotypes for these recessive variants were novel (e.g., FBN2-related myopathy and CSF1R-related brain malformation and osteopetrosis), typical (e.g., ACTG2-related visceral myopathy), or an apparently healthy state (e.g., PDE11A), consistent with the corresponding mouse knockout phenotypes. Our results show that, in the era of genomic sequencing and "reverse phenotyping," recessive variants in dominant genes should not be dismissed based on perceived "incompatibility" with the patient's phenotype before careful consideration.Genet Med advance online publication 06 April 2017.

  5. The prevalence and correlates of consanguineous marriages in Yemen: similarities and contrasts with other Arab countries.

    PubMed

    Jurdi, Rozzet; Saxena, Prem C

    2003-01-01

    Using data on 9762 women from the 1997 Yemen Demographic and Maternal and Child Health Survey, this paper examines the prevalence and socioeconomic correlates of consanguineous marriages in Yemen. The results indicate that 40% of marriages are consanguineous, over 85% of which are between first cousins. The prevalence of consanguineous marriages appears to have increased over time, particularly for the last marriage cohort. As for socioeconomic correlates, the study confirms the inverse association between consanguineous marriages and women's education and occupation, age at marriage and economic status. However, no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of consanguinity has been found by place of residence and geographical region. Somewhat unexpected results have been obtained by husband's background characteristics, with higher educated men and those working in the modern sector of the economy being more likely to be married to cousins.

  6. Pathogenic mutations in TULP1 responsible for retinitis pigmentosa identified in consanguineous familial cases

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Inayat; Kabir, Firoz; Iqbal, Muhammad; Gottsch, Clare Brooks S.; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Assir, Muhammad Zaman; Khan, Shaheen N.; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ayyagari, Radha; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify pathogenic mutations responsible for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in consanguineous familial cases. Methods Seven large familial cases with multiple individuals diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa were included in the study. Affected individuals in these families underwent ophthalmic examinations to document the symptoms and confirm the initial diagnosis. Blood samples were collected from all participating members, and genomic DNA was extracted. An exclusion analysis with microsatellite markers spanning the TULP1 locus on chromosome 6p was performed, and two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. All coding exons along with the exon–intron boundaries of TULP1 were sequenced bidirectionally. We constructed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype for the four familial cases harboring the K489R allele and estimated the likelihood of a founder effect. Results The ophthalmic examinations of the affected individuals in these familial cases were suggestive of RP. Exclusion analyses confirmed linkage to chromosome 6p harboring TULP1 with positive two-point LOD scores. Subsequent Sanger sequencing identified the single base pair substitution in exon14, c.1466A>G (p.K489R), in four families. Additionally, we identified a two-base deletion in exon 4, c.286_287delGA (p.E96Gfs77*); a homozygous splice site variant in intron 14, c.1495+4A>C; and a novel missense variation in exon 15, c.1561C>T (p.P521S). All mutations segregated with the disease phenotype in the respective families and were absent in ethnically matched control chromosomes. Haplotype analysis suggested (p<10−6) that affected individuals inherited the causal mutation from a common ancestor. Conclusions Pathogenic mutations in TULP1 are responsible for the RP phenotype in seven familial cases with a common ancestral mutation responsible for the disease phenotype in four of the seven families. PMID:27440997

  7. Consanguinity in two Uruguayan cities: historical evolution and characteristics (1800--1994).

    PubMed

    Lusiardo, A; Barreto, I; Hidalgo, P C; Bonilla, C; Bertoni, B; Portas, M; Sans, M

    2004-01-01

    Information about consanguinity in Uruguay is scarce and limited to the end of the 20th century. To determine the frequency and characteristics of consanguineous marriages, as well as chronological trends, in two Uruguayan cities over almost two centuries. We analysed 28,393 Roman Catholic Church marriage records and Diocesan consanguinity dispensations belonging to the cities of Melo (Northeast), and Montevideo (South), for the period 1800--1994. 633 (2.23%) marriages were consanguineous. Among them, first cousin marriages were the most common (58.8% of all consanguineous marriages, including double consanguineous), especially those where the bride and groom were related through their maternal side. During the first decades of the 19th century both regions showed low levels of consanguinity. Consanguinity reached its maximum during the mid-1800s and decreased significantly throughout the 20th century. The overall mean coefficients of inbreeding were moderate in both cases, being greater in the Northeast (alpha=0.00165) than in the South (alpha = 0.00089). The low level of consanguinity as well as the structure of consanguineous marriages (distribution by degrees) is similar to that found in other southern South American countries. Temporal trends are similar to those found in industrialized regions in Europe, with maximum inbreeding levels during the middle-late 19th century; however, the clear predominance of first cousin unions, differs from most of the data for European countries. Small differences between the two cities can be related to diverse facts, such as socio-economic conditions, ethnic origin, immigration, and sampling.

  8. APOA5 Q97X Mutation Identified through homozygosity mapping causes severe hypertriglyceridemia in a Chilean consanguineous family

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) has been linked to defects in LPL, APOC2, APOA5, LMF1 and GBIHBP1 genes. However, a number of severe HTG cases are probably caused by as yet unidentified mutations. Very high triglyceride plasma levels (>112 mmol/L at diagnosis) were found in two sisters of a Chilean consanguineous family, which is strongly suggestive of a recessive highly penetrant mutation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic locus responsible for the severe HTG in this family. Methods We carried out a genome-wide linkage study with nearly 300,000 biallelic markers (Illumina Human CytoSNP-12 panel). Using the homozygosity mapping strategy, we searched for chromosome regions with excess of homozygous genotypes in the affected cases compared to non-affected relatives. Results A large homozygous segment was found in the long arm of chromosome 11, with more than 2,500 consecutive homozygous SNP shared by the proband with her affected sister, and containing the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 cluster. Direct sequencing of the APOA5 gene revealed a known homozygous nonsense Q97X mutation (p.Gln97Ter) found in both affected sisters but not in non-affected relatives nor in a sample of unrelated controls. Conclusion The Q97X mutation of the APOA5 gene in homozygous status is responsible for the severe hypertriglyceridemia in this family. We have shown that homozygosity mapping correctly pinpointed the genomic region containing the gene responsible for severe hypertriglyceridemia in this consanguineous Chilean family. PMID:23151256

  9. APOA5 Q97X mutation identified through homozygosity mapping causes severe hypertriglyceridemia in a Chilean consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Dussaillant, Catalina; Serrano, Valentina; Maiz, Alberto; Eyheramendy, Susana; Cataldo, Luis Rodrigo; Chavez, Matías; Smalley, Susan V; Fuentes, Marcela; Rigotti, Attilio; Rubio, Lorena; Lagos, Carlos F; Martinez, José Alfredo; Santos, José Luis

    2012-11-15

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) has been linked to defects in LPL, APOC2, APOA5, LMF1 and GBIHBP1 genes. However, a number of severe HTG cases are probably caused by as yet unidentified mutations. Very high triglyceride plasma levels (>112 mmol/L at diagnosis) were found in two sisters of a Chilean consanguineous family, which is strongly suggestive of a recessive highly penetrant mutation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic locus responsible for the severe HTG in this family. We carried out a genome-wide linkage study with nearly 300,000 biallelic markers (Illumina Human CytoSNP-12 panel). Using the homozygosity mapping strategy, we searched for chromosome regions with excess of homozygous genotypes in the affected cases compared to non-affected relatives. A large homozygous segment was found in the long arm of chromosome 11, with more than 2,500 consecutive homozygous SNP shared by the proband with her affected sister, and containing the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 cluster. Direct sequencing of the APOA5 gene revealed a known homozygous nonsense Q97X mutation (p.Gln97Ter) found in both affected sisters but not in non-affected relatives nor in a sample of unrelated controls. The Q97X mutation of the APOA5 gene in homozygous status is responsible for the severe hypertriglyceridemia in this family. We have shown that homozygosity mapping correctly pinpointed the genomic region containing the gene responsible for severe hypertriglyceridemia in this consanguineous Chilean family.

  10. Domestic violence and consanguineous marriages - perspective from Rawalpindi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, M Ali; Kayani, A; Shaikh, I Ali

    2014-01-09

    Domestic violence is globally endemic and adversely impacts the health and economic well-being of women and society. This study used the standardized and validated assessment instrument "Woman Abuse Screening Tool" to study the prevalence of various forms of domestic violence among married women. The relationship between domestic violence and consanguineous marriage was studied using the chi-squared test. Cumulatively, 1010 married women were interviewed. Emotional abuse was the most commonly reported abuse, reported by 721 (71.4%) women as either often or sometimes, followed by sexual abuse and physical abuse, reported by 527 (52.2%) and 511 (50.6%) respectively. Being married to one's cousin did not protect married women from being abused either emotionally or physically by their husbands; thsi was statistically significant. There is a need for better understanding of the magnitude and scale of domestic violence in Pakistan by using standardized assessment tools for meaningful comparisons across different parts of the country over time.

  11. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000), ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000) and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000). Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder), ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1), and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning), electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia. PMID:17112370

  12. Process Centerless Recess Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malík, Andrej; Görög, Augustín

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with special centerless grinding using various methods, particularly the centerless grinding recess methods. The results of measuring the surface roughness of frontal and cylindrical areas of a workpiece, as well as the roundness of the cylindrical surface of the workpiece are presented in the paper. Qualitative parameters of the machined surfaces are supplemented by the course of the grinding process. The change in the shape of the workpiece in the process of grinding causes also the change of position of the workpiece in the work zone.

  13. Arthrogryposis, perthes disease, and upward gaze palsy: a novel autosomal recessive syndromic form of arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2011-02-01

    In this article, the unusual combination of arthrogryposis, upward gaze palsy, and Perthes disease in two sisters and their cousin who are all part of an extended consanguineous Saudi family is reported. All patients had difficult to control bronchial asthma and subtle facial dysmorphism. Two of the three had pyloric stenosis, two were intellectually normal, and one had academic problems but had a history of birth hypoxia. Pedigree is consistent with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Lack of previous reports suggests this represents a novel syndromic form of arthrogryposis. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Autosomal recessive bilateral frontal polymicrogyria with ectopia lentis and chorioretinal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nooraine, Javeria; Vasudha, Kemmanu; Natesh, Sribhargava; Iyer, Rajesh B; Raghavendra, Seetharam

    2013-10-01

    Polymicrogyria is a type of cortical dysplasia with cortical organizational defect. Bilateral polymicrogyria are distinct with genetic basis in a subset. We hereby report a case of bilateral frontal polymicrogyria (BFP) in association with chorioretinal dystrophy and ectopia lentis (EL) in a 26-year-old lady born of a consanguineous parentage. Her male sibling also had chorioretinal dystrophy and EL. This combination of autosomal recessive inheritance has not been reported earlier in the literature and suggests a role of connective tissue genes in BFP.

  15. Effects of consanguineous marriage on reproductive behaviour, adverse pregnancy outcomes and offspring mortality in Oman.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Mazharul

    2013-05-01

    The long tradition of high prevalence of consanguineous marriages in Omani society may have ramifications for reproductive behaviour and health of offspring. To examine the relevance of consanguinity to reproductive behaviour, adverse pregnancy outcome and offspring mortality in Oman. The data analysed came from the 2000 Oman National Health Survey. Selected indicators that are related to reproductive behaviour, adverse pregnancy outcome and offspring mortality were considered as explanatory variables. Various statistical methods and tests were used for data analysis. Consanguineous marriage was found to be associated with lower age at first birth, higher preference for larger family size, lower level of husband-wife communication about use of family planning methods and lower rate of contraceptive use. Although bivariate analysis showed elevated fertility and childhood mortality among the women with consanguineous marriage, after controlling for relevant socio-demographic factors in multivariate analysis, fertility, childhood mortality and foetal loss showed no significant association with consanguinity in Oman. Consanguinity plays an important role in determining some of the aspects of reproduction and health of newborns, but did not show any detrimental effects on fertility and offspring mortality. The high level of consanguinity and its relevance to reproduction in Oman need to be considered in its public health strategy in a culturally acceptable manner.

  16. Bombay blood group: Is prevalence decreasing with urbanization and the decreasing rate of consanguineous marriage.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Sujata; Kotasthane, Dhananjay S; Chowdhury, Puskar S; Sarkar, Sonali

    2015-01-01

    Bombay blood group although rare is found to be more prevalent in the Western and Southern states of India, believed to be associated with consanguineous marriage. To estimate the prevalence of the Bombay blood group (Oh) in the urban population of Puducherry. To find the effect of urbanization on consanguineous marriage and to establish whether consanguinity plays a part in the prevalence of Oh group. To compare Oh group prevalence with that of other neighboring states, where population is not predominantly urban. This is a descriptive study in a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry, over a period of 6 years. All blood samples showing 'O' group were tested with anti-H lectin. Specialized tests like Adsorption Elution Technique, inhibition assay for determination of secretor status were performed on Oh positive cases. Any history of consanguineous marriage was recorded. All variables were categorical variable and percentage and proportions were calculated manually. Analysis of the results of 35,497 study subjects showed that the most common group was 'O' group constituting 14,164 (39.90%) of subjects. Only three "Oh" that is, Bombay phenotype (0.008%) were detected. Consanguinity was observed in two cases (66.66%). This study shows the prevalence of Bombay blood group representing the urban population of Puducherry, to be high (0.008%) and associated with consanguineous marriage (66.66%). Thus, consanguinity is still an important risk factor present, even in an urban population in Southern India.

  17. Consanguineous marriage and differentials in age at marriage, contraceptive use and fertility in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Bittles, A H

    1999-01-01

    Fertility rates in Pakistan have remained consistently high over the past three decades. While numerous studies have examined sociodemographic determinants, the role of biological factors, and particularly consanguinity, has received little attention, even though marriage between close biological relatives continues to be the norm in Pakistan. Reproductive behaviour among women in consanguineous (first cousin) and non-consanguineous unions was compared, using data from a 1995 study of multi-ethnic communities in Karachi and the 1990-91 Pakistan Demographic & Health Survey (PDHS). The results show that, although female age at first marriage has been gradually rising in both study samples, women in consanguineous unions married at younger ages and were less likely to use modern contraceptive methods. In the Karachi sample, women in first cousin unions experienced a higher mean number of pregnancies and also reported a higher mean number of children ever born (CEB). However, their mean number of surviving children did not differ from those born to women in non-consanguineous unions, implying higher prenatal and/or postnatal losses in couples related as first cousins. On the other hand, the PDHS showed both lower CEB values for women in consanguineous marriages and a lower number of surviving children. Given the continuing popularity of consanguineous marriage, these findings have important implications for future fertility reduction in Pakistan.

  18. Attitudes of Pakistani and Pakistani heritage medical students regarding professionalism at a medical college in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An increased interest in professionalism has been reported in the field of medical education due to concerns regarding deterioration of humanism and professional values in the teaching and practice of medicine. The primary aim of this study was to assess attitudes of Pakistani and Pakistani heritage students at a medical college in Pakistan about important elements of professionalism that an ideal medical doctor should possess. A further objective of the study was to determine students’ preferred ways of learning professionalism. Methods A written survey was distributed to undergraduate medical students at a public sector medical college at Karachi, Pakistan in 2011. Using the Penn State College of Medicine (PSCOM) Professionalism Questionnaire, attitudes of medical students of semester 1, 5, and 8 regarding professionalism were assessed anonymously. Results The mean age of the students was 21.11 ± 2.72 years. Forty-three percent of the respondents were male. Forty percent of the students held Pakistani citizenship. Thirty-five percent students were US citizens with Pakistani parents and twenty-five percent were Pakistani heritage students that had dual citizenships. No significant differences in the elements of professionalism (Accountability, Altruism, Duty, Excellence, Honesty & Integrity and Respect) mean scores or in the overall mean score of professionalism among the various classes were found. The total overall Cronbach alpha value for all elements of the professionalism in the selected classes was above 0.9. The most preferred methods for learning professionalism were role modeling by faculty, case based scenarios and role plays. Conclusion The students rated all the attributes of professionalism as important and there was no difference across the study years. The overall internal consistency of each element of professionalism was high in different classes. Faculty role models, case based scenarios and role plays may be used to teach

  19. Novel ADAM9 homozygous mutation in a consanguineous Egyptian family with severe cone-rod dystrophy and cataract.

    PubMed

    El-Haig, Wael M; Jakobsson, Cecilia; Favez, Tatiana; Schorderet, Daniel F; Abouzeid, Hana

    2014-12-01

    To genetically and phenotypically describe a new ADAM9 homozygous mutation in a consanguineous family from Egypt with autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (arCRD), anterior polar and posterior subcapsular cataract. The parents and their six children were included. They underwent a complete ophthalmic examination with fundus photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT). DNA was extracted from peripheral blood from all family members. Screening for mutations in genes known to be implicated in retinal disorders was done with the IROme, an in-solution enrichment array, followed by high-throughput sequencing. Validation of the results was done by bidirectional Sanger sequencing of ADAM9 exon 14, including exon-intron junctions. Screening of normal controls was done by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. arCRD was diagnosed in the mother and two of her children. Bilateral anterior polar and posterior subcapsular cataract was observed in the mother and bilateral dot cataract was diagnosed in three of the four children not affected with arCRD, one of whom also had glaucoma. The characteristics of the arCRD were childhood-onset visual impairment, reorganisation of the retinal pigment epithelium with mid-periphery greyish-white discolouration, attenuated retinal vasculatur and optic disc pallor. A coloboma-like macular lesion was observed in one of the arCRD-affected children. IROme analysis identified a c.1396-2A>G homozygous mutation in the splice acceptor site of intron 13 of ADAM9. This mutation was homozygous in the two children affected by arCRD and in their affected mother. This mutation was heterozygous in the unaffected father and the four unaffected children. We identified a novel autosomal recessive ADAM9 mutation causing arCRD in a consanguineous Egyptian family. The percentage of arCRD cases caused by mutation in ADAM9 remains to be determined. Few families are reported in the literature to date; hence extensive clinical descriptions of

  20. CT of the pericardial recesses

    SciTech Connect

    Levy-Ravetch, M.; Auh, Y.H.; Rubenstein, W.A.; Whalen, J.P.; Kazam, E.

    1985-04-01

    Within the pericardial cavity there are several recesses where fluid can collect in close contiguity to the major bronchi and lymph nodes. These include the transverse sinus, behind the ascending aorta and pulmonary trunk; the oblique sinus, behind the left atrium; and the left pulmonic recess, between the left pulmonary artery and the left superior pulmonary vein. There are also smaller pericardial recesses between the superior and inferior pulmonary veins, posterolateral to the superior vena cava, and between the inferior vena cava and coronary sinus. An understanding of sectional anatomy is valuable for differentiation of fluid within these recesses from mediastinal masses or enlarged lymph nodes on computed tomographic scans.

  1. New autosomal recessive faciodigitogenital syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Teebi, A S; Naguib, K K; Al-Awadi, S; Al-Saleh, Q A

    1988-01-01

    Most pedigrees of Aarskog's faciodigitogenital syndrome have suggested X linked inheritance. However, sex influenced autosomal dominant inheritance is also a possibility in some families. We describe an Arab family of normal consanguineous parents with five children (three males and two females) with some features of Aarskog syndrome in addition to some unusual hair changes. The possibility that this family represents a distinct previously unrecognised faciodigitogenital syndrome with short stature and hair abnormalities is suggested and discussed. Images PMID:3398008

  2. Families, patients, and physicians in medical decisionmaking: a Pakistani perspective.

    PubMed

    Moazam, F

    2000-01-01

    In Pakistan, as in many non-Western cultures, decisions about a patient's health care are often made by the family or the doctor. For doctors educated in the West, the Pakistani approach requires striking a balance between preserving indigenous values and carving out room for patients to participate in their medical decisions. (HCR)

  3. Workplace Learning in Pakistani Schools: A Myth or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawab, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Literature on workplace learning emphasizes that learning should be continually generated and negotiated in the workplace. How does this concept unfold in the developing context? This paper aims at understanding teachers' workplace learning and the conditions which influence such learning in a private school of Pakistani context.…

  4. Young Pakistani Muslim Women's Reflections on Difference, Future, and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidi, Sara M.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation employs data collected from multiple sites in Southern California over a period of nine months. Several in-depth ethnographic interviews and participant observations were conducted with Pakistani Muslim women (age 17-22) and their parents in an effort to better understand the influence that parents and ethno-religious communities…

  5. Young Pakistani Muslim Women's Reflections on Difference, Future, and Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidi, Sara M.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation employs data collected from multiple sites in Southern California over a period of nine months. Several in-depth ethnographic interviews and participant observations were conducted with Pakistani Muslim women (age 17-22) and their parents in an effort to better understand the influence that parents and ethno-religious communities…

  6. Entrepreneurial Attributes among Postgraduate Students of a Pakistani University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Akhtar; Topping, Keith J.; Tariq, Riaz H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores entrepreneurial attributes among the students of The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, a public sector Pakistani university. Multistage sampling was employed to maximize the representation. Five hundred and twenty one master's level students from thirty departments returned completed questionnaires. Three factors emerged: self…

  7. Small operator outwits recession

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.

    1982-12-01

    Explains how Rockcastle, Inc., one of the smallest surface coal mine operators in the West, maintains production during the recession by concentrating on short-term contracts and spot sales to industrial and commercial users. The mining company has selected well established coal brokers to market its product to users such as sugar beet and cement plants, a brewery, steel mill, utility, and a molybdenum mill. Rockcastle produces, on a two-shift schedule, about 1,200 tpd of coal with a total workforce of 20, or approximately 30 tons per manshift. A fleet of 4 scrapers, with dozer-assist in most cases, is capable of removing 5,000 to 6,000 cu yd of overburden and interburden per shift.

  8. Deep sequencing reveals 50 novel genes for recessive cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Najmabadi, Hossein; Hu, Hao; Garshasbi, Masoud; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Chen, Wei; Hosseini, Masoumeh; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Haas, Stefan; Jamali, Payman; Zecha, Agnes; Mohseni, Marzieh; Püttmann, Lucia; Vahid, Leyla Nouri; Jensen, Corinna; Moheb, Lia Abbasi; Bienek, Melanie; Larti, Farzaneh; Mueller, Ines; Weissmann, Robert; Darvish, Hossein; Wrogemann, Klaus; Hadavi, Valeh; Lipkowitz, Bettina; Esmaeeli-Nieh, Sahar; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Kariminejad, Roxana; Firouzabadi, Saghar Ghasemi; Cohen, Monika; Fattahi, Zohreh; Rost, Imma; Mojahedi, Faezeh; Hertzberg, Christoph; Dehghan, Atefeh; Rajab, Anna; Banavandi, Mohammad Javad Soltani; Hoffer, Julia; Falah, Masoumeh; Musante, Luciana; Kalscheuer, Vera; Ullmann, Reinhard; Kuss, Andreas Walter; Tzschach, Andreas; Kahrizi, Kimia; Ropers, H Hilger

    2011-09-21

    Common diseases are often complex because they are genetically heterogeneous, with many different genetic defects giving rise to clinically indistinguishable phenotypes. This has been amply documented for early-onset cognitive impairment, or intellectual disability, one of the most complex disorders known and a very important health care problem worldwide. More than 90 different gene defects have been identified for X-chromosome-linked intellectual disability alone, but research into the more frequent autosomal forms of intellectual disability is still in its infancy. To expedite the molecular elucidation of autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, we have now performed homozygosity mapping, exon enrichment and next-generation sequencing in 136 consanguineous families with autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from Iran and elsewhere. This study, the largest published so far, has revealed additional mutations in 23 genes previously implicated in intellectual disability or related neurological disorders, as well as single, probably disease-causing variants in 50 novel candidate genes. Proteins encoded by several of these genes interact directly with products of known intellectual disability genes, and many are involved in fundamental cellular processes such as transcription and translation, cell-cycle control, energy metabolism and fatty-acid synthesis, which seem to be pivotal for normal brain development and function.

  9. A 5-year survey of biopsy proven kidney diseases in Lebanon: significant variation in prevalence of primary glomerular diseases by age, population structure and consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Karnib, Hussein H.; Gharavi, Ali G.; Aftimos, Georges; Mahfoud, Ziyad; Saad, Reem; Gemayel, Elias; Masri, Badiaa; Assaad, Shafika; Badr, Kamal F.; Ziyadeh, Fuad N.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Differences in epidemiology of kidney disease across the Middle East may arise from variations in indication for biopsy, environmental exposure and socio-economic status. The Lebanese population is composed of different ethnicities, with distinct ancestry and religion, enabling comparison of their effect on the prevalence of kidney disease within a confined geographic setting and uniform practices. Here we report 5 years’ detailed epidemiology of renal diseases, based on histological diagnosis, in a sample from three large pathology centres in Lebanon. Methods. Records of renal biopsies analysed at the American University of Beirut Medical Center, Hotel Dieu de France Hospital and the Institut National de Pathologie from January 2003 till December 2007 were retrospectively examined. We recorded the following data for each patient: age, gender, indication for renal biopsy and histopathological diagnosis. Religious affiliation and parents’ consanguinity were recorded when feasible. Results. The mean age at renal biopsy was 36.76 ± 20 years (range 1–84). The most common diagnosis was mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis (GN; 20%), followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (13.2%). While there were no differences in age, gender or indications for biopsy among different religious affiliations, mesangioproliferative GN was significantly more frequent among Muslims (P = 0.039) and offspring of consanguineous unions (P = 0.036). On the other hand, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was most prevalent in Christians (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Variation in the distribution of diagnoses between Muslim and Christian groups likely reflects differences in population structure and ancestry. In particular, the increased prevalence of mesangioproliferative GN among offspring of consanguineous unions in Muslims suggests a recessive genetic component to this disease which may be identified via homozygosity mapping. These findings have important

  10. Is there a significant trend in prevalence of consanguineous marriage in Tehran? A review of three generations.

    PubMed

    Akrami, Seyed Mohammad; Montazeri, Vahideh; Shomali, Somaieh Rashid; Heshmat, Ramin; Larijani, Bagher

    2009-02-01

    Consanguineous marriage is a common practice in Iran. The present study surveyed the trend in consanguineous marriage across three generations of Iranians. Index cases, consisting of 400 individuals attending the diabetes and osteoporosis clinic in Shariati Hospital, were interviewed. Data on consanguinity status for 1789 marriages within the index cases' families were obtained. Generation 1 consisted of marriages contracted before 1948, Generation 2 consisted of marriages contracted between 1949 and 1978, and Generation 3 consisted of marriages contracted after 1979. Prevalence of consanguineous marriage within these three generations was 8.8%, 16.6% and 19%, respectively, and represented a significant trend (p < 0.001). First cousin marriage was the most common type of consanguinity (69%). Socioeconomic level of families was not significantly related to having a consanguineous marriage. These data suggest that premarital genetic counseling and mass media efforts are needed to increase public awareness about genetic risks associated with consanguineous marriage.

  11. An estimate of the average number of recessive lethal mutations carried by humans.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ziyue; Waggoner, Darrel; Stephens, Matthew; Ober, Carole; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-04-01

    The effects of inbreeding on human health depend critically on the number and severity of recessive, deleterious mutations carried by individuals. In humans, existing estimates of these quantities are based on comparisons between consanguineous and nonconsanguineous couples, an approach that confounds socioeconomic and genetic effects of inbreeding. To overcome this limitation, we focused on a founder population that practices a communal lifestyle, for which there is almost complete Mendelian disease ascertainment and a known pedigree. Focusing on recessive lethal diseases and simulating allele transmissions, we estimated that each haploid set of human autosomes carries on average 0.29 (95% credible interval [0.10, 0.84]) recessive alleles that lead to complete sterility or death by reproductive age when homozygous. Comparison to existing estimates in humans suggests that a substantial fraction of the total burden imposed by recessive deleterious variants is due to single mutations that lead to sterility or death between birth and reproductive age. In turn, comparison to estimates from other eukaryotes points to a surprising constancy of the average number of recessive lethal mutations across organisms with markedly different genome sizes.

  12. An Estimate of the Average Number of Recessive Lethal Mutations Carried by Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ziyue; Waggoner, Darrel; Stephens, Matthew; Ober, Carole; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-01-01

    The effects of inbreeding on human health depend critically on the number and severity of recessive, deleterious mutations carried by individuals. In humans, existing estimates of these quantities are based on comparisons between consanguineous and nonconsanguineous couples, an approach that confounds socioeconomic and genetic effects of inbreeding. To overcome this limitation, we focused on a founder population that practices a communal lifestyle, for which there is almost complete Mendelian disease ascertainment and a known pedigree. Focusing on recessive lethal diseases and simulating allele transmissions, we estimated that each haploid set of human autosomes carries on average 0.29 (95% credible interval [0.10, 0.84]) recessive alleles that lead to complete sterility or death by reproductive age when homozygous. Comparison to existing estimates in humans suggests that a substantial fraction of the total burden imposed by recessive deleterious variants is due to single mutations that lead to sterility or death between birth and reproductive age. In turn, comparison to estimates from other eukaryotes points to a surprising constancy of the average number of recessive lethal mutations across organisms with markedly different genome sizes. PMID:25697177

  13. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released. PMID:26900563

  14. Fort Play Children Recreate Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Recess beckons well before it actually arrives. Its allure can be heard in children's lunchtime conversations as they discuss imaginary roles, plans, alliances and teams, with an obvious appetite for play and its unbounded possibility. For some children, recess provides the most important reasons to come to school. In team sports, games of chase…

  15. Fort Play Children Recreate Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Recess beckons well before it actually arrives. Its allure can be heard in children's lunchtime conversations as they discuss imaginary roles, plans, alliances and teams, with an obvious appetite for play and its unbounded possibility. For some children, recess provides the most important reasons to come to school. In team sports, games of chase…

  16. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released.

  17. Neonatal diabetes mellitus and cerebellar hypoplasia/agenesis: report of a new recessive syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hoveyda, N.; Shield, J.; Garrett, C.; Chong, W; Beardsall, K.; Bentsi-Enchill, E.; Mallya, H.; Thompson, M.

    1999-01-01

    Classical neonatal diabetes mellitus is defined as hyperglycaemia occurring within the first six weeks of life in term infants. Cerebellar agenesis is rare. We report three cases of neonatal diabetes mellitus, cerebellar hypoplasia/agenesis, and dysmorphism occurring within a highly consanguineous family. This constellation of abnormalities has not previously been described. Two of these cases are sisters and the third case is a female first cousin. The pattern of inheritance suggests this is a previously undescribed autosomal recessive disorder. Prenatal diagnosis of the condition in this family was possible by demonstration of the absence of the cerebellum and severe IUGR.


Keywords: cerebellar agenesis/hypoplasia; neonatal diabetes mellitus; dysmorphic features; autosomal recessive PMID:10507728

  18. Modernization or cultural maintenance: the practice of consanguineous marriage in Iran.

    PubMed

    Jalal Abbasi-Shavazi, Mohammad; McDonald, Peter; Hosseini-Chavoshi, Meimanat

    2008-11-01

    Consanguineous marriage has been the culturally preferred form of marriage in Iran. This paper examines the extent to which education, urbanization and changes in modes of economic production have affected the incidence of consanguineous marriage and attitudes towards consanguineous marriages. The 2002 Iran Fertility Transition Survey conducted in the four provinces of Gilan, Sistan and Baluchistan, Yazd and West Azarbaijan provides information on the degree of relationship of marriage partners from around 6550 ever-married women aged 15-49. Attitudinal data were also obtained. Overall, the level of marriage to biological relatives ranged from 23% in Gilan to 78% in Sistan and Baluchistan. The paper finds that the practice of marriage to biological relatives has remained surprisingly resilient in the face of modernizing influences and that ethnicity, province and area of residence remain important determinants. On the other hand, attitudes have shifted towards marriage with a non-relative. Anthropological research would illuminate the processes of consanguineous marriage in Iran.

  19. Consanguinity and endogamy in the Netherlands: demographic and medical genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Ten Kate, Leo P; Teeuw, Marieke E; Henneman, Lidewij; Cornel, Martina C

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews what is currently known about the presence of consanguinity and endogamy in the Netherlands, in the past and today, and concludes with a discussion of medical genetic aspects. First geographic characteristics, the demographic history, the genetic make-up of the native population, legal aspects and the public opinion are reviewed. Then data on the prevalence of consanguinity in the native population are presented for marriages since 1840, followed by data on consanguineous marriages among immigrants from countries with a tradition of close-kin marriages. It is estimated that approximately 1% of at-risk consanguineous couples are referred to clinical genetic centres for prospective genetic counselling in the Netherlands. This picture will change dramatically if and when next-generation sequencing is introduced to identify couples at ≥ 25% risk prospectively. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Forgiveness in relation to attachment style and consanguine marriage in Iranian married individuals.

    PubMed

    Shahidi, Shahriar; Zaal, Behnaz; Mazaheri, Mohammad Ali

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare forgiveness in secure and insecure Iranian married couples. Whether marriage had occurred within the family (consanguine) or not (non-consanguine) was also considered. 400 married participants completed the Family Forgiveness Scale and the Adult Attachment Questionnaire. Analysis of reported forgiveness within the marital family showed that, although there was no significant difference between secure and insecure participants in overall forgiveness, secure participants rated "reparation" and "resolution" higher, whereas insecure participants rated "realization" and "recognition" higher. Comparing the experience of forgiveness in the family of origin, securely attached couples not only reported significantly more overall forgiveness but reported more "realization" and "resolution" while forgiving. Some interesting sex differences were also found, as individuals in consanguine vs non-consanguine couples differed in mean "recognition" in the forgiveness process.

  1. [Oral mucosa analog allografts in non-consanguineous rats].

    PubMed

    González, Luis; Padrón, Karla; Salmen, Siham; Jerez, Elsy; Dávila, Lorena; Solórzano, Eduvigis

    2017-01-24

    Although there are therapeutic options for the treatment of oral mucosa defects, the need for functional, anatomical and aesthetically similar substitutes persists, as well as for solutions to reduce autologous grafts morbidity. To determine clinical and histological compatibility of equivalent oral mucosa allografts generated through tissue engineering in non-consanguineous rats. We used a sample of oral mucosa from Sprague Dawley rats to obtain a fibroblast culture and a keratinocytes and fibroblasts co-culture. In both cases, we used a commercial collagen membrane as "scaffold". After ten weeks of culture, we grafted the resulting membranes into four Wistar rats. The first phase of the study was the development of the oral mucosa equivalents generated by tissue engineering. Then, we implanted them in immunocompetent Wistar rats, and finallywe evaluated the clinical and histological features of the allografts. In vivo evaluation of mucosal substitutes showed a correct integration of artificial oral mucosa in immunocompetent hosts, with an increase in periodontal biotype and the creation of a zone with increased keratinization. Histologically, the tissue was similar to the control oral mucosa sample with no inflammatory reaction nor clinical or histological rejection signs. The equivalent oral mucosa allografts generated by tissue engineering showed clinical and histological compatibility.

  2. Mutations in the SLURP-1 gene underlie Mal de Meleda in three Pakistani families.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Muhammad; Kurban, Mazen; Shimomura, Yutaka; Christiano, Angela M

    2009-10-01

    Mal de Meleda (MDM) (MIM #248300) is an autosomal recessive palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK). It is characterized clinically by erythematous hyperkeratotic plaques over palms and soles that start early in life and progress later in life in a transgradiens form associated with pain, macerations, foul odor, pseudoainhum, brachydactyly, onychodystrophy and perioral erythema. To look for SLURP-1 gene mutations in patients with MDM. We collected peripheral blood samples from Pakistani family members affected with MDM and 100 population-matched unrelated healthy control individuals in EDTA-containing tubes. All exons of the SLURP-1 gene with adjacent sequences at exon-intron borders were amplified. The amplified PCR products were directly sequenced in an ABI Prism 310 Automated Sequencer. Screening assay, using the restriction enzyme HphI was performed. We determined three mutations in the SLURP-1 gene: one novel mutation, c.Ivs1+1G>A, and two recurrent mutations, p.R96X and p.G86R. Screening assays for the novel mutation excluded the possibility of polymorphism. In vivo transcription assays showed that the mutation c.Ivs1+1G>A leads to aberrant splicing events. Our results expand the spectrum of mutations in SLURP-1 gene.

  3. Gingival Recession: Review and Strategies in Treatment of Recession

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Koppolu; Rajababu, Palaparthy; Satyanarayana, Durvasula; Sagar, Vidya

    2012-01-01

    One of the most common esthetic concerns associated with the periodontal tissues is gingival recession. Gingival recession is the exposure of root surfaces due to apical migration of the gingival tissue margins; gingival margin migrates apical to the cementoenamel junction. Although it rarely results in tooth loss, marginal tissue recession is associated with thermal and tactile sensitivity, esthetic complaints, and a tendency toward root caries. This paper reviews etiology, consequences, and the available surgical procedures for the coverage of exposed root surfaces, including three case reports. PMID:23082256

  4. Consanguineous marriage in PR China: a study in rural Man (Manchu) communities.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Qian, Cong; Bittles, A H

    2002-01-01

    Although there is a long history of consanguineous marriage in China, information on its prevalence is very limited. The Man (Qing) dynasty ruled China for over 250 years, but no consanguinity studies have been reported on this important population. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the present-day level of consanguineous marriage in the Man community, and to compare the data with existing consanguinity information on other Chinese populations. The study was conducted in a group of 11 rural Man communities in the north-eastern Chinese province of Liaoning. Household-based interviews were conducted by local staff on 513 couples, 418 of whom were Man with another 95 Man-Han inter-ethnic marriages. Basic pedigrees were constructed to determine the biological relationship between each set of spouses. Thirty of the 418 couples were in a consanguineous union, with a mean coefficient of inbreeding alpha = 0.0012. The small population sizes of the study may have contributed to the spatial variation in the patterns of inbreeding. Across generations there was a reduction in consanguineous marriages and an increase in inter-ethnic unions, which paralleled changes in civil marriage regulations.

  5. Choice of kin in consanguineous marriages: effects of altruism and ecological factors.

    PubMed

    Denic, Srdjan; Nagelkerke, Nicolaas; Agarwal, Mukesh M

    2010-11-01

    Despite being associated with multiple genetic problems, consanguineous marriages continue to remain extremely prevalent worldwide. Studying the variation of kin preferences in diverse inbred societies may provide some answers to this paradox. To find the reasons for specific kin choice in different geographical areas of the world. We used a set of sociobiological rules (kin altruism, sexuality and inbreeding avoidance) and ecological constraints (e.g. tribal warfare, food availability) that influence human behaviour. The cumulative help that the extended family can provide to a nuclear family was calculated using the coefficient of relatedness between kin in different types of consanguineous families. The maximum potential support for kin markedly varied between different types of consanguineous marriages. Overall, members of consanguineous families received up to two-and-half times more support than members of non-consanguineous families. In various inbred cultures, preference for a specific type of kin was determined by prevailing ecological limitations and sociobiological factors interacting in a complex manner. In different inbred populations, the ideal kin for a consanguineous marriage is the one who can provide the most altruistic support; however, this choice is influenced by biological rules of behaviour and ecological constraints.

  6. A novel mutation in PGAP2 gene causes developmental delay, intellectual disability, epilepsy and microcephaly in consanguineous Saudi family.

    PubMed

    Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Rasool, Mahmood; Jan, Mohammed M; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad H

    2016-12-15

    PGAP2 (Post-GPI Attachment to Proteins 2) gene is involved in lipid remodeling steps of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor maturation. At the surface of the cell this gene is required for proper expression of GPI-anchored proteins. Hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome-3 is an autosomal recessive disorder usually characterized by severe mental retardation. Mutations in the PGAP2 gene cause hyperphosphatasia mental retardation syndrome-3. We have identified a large consanguineous family from Saudi origin segregating developmental delay, intellectual disability, epilepsy and microcephaly. Whole exome sequencing with 100× coverage was performed on two affected siblings of the family. Data analysis in the patient revealed a novel missense mutation c.191C>T in PGAP2 gene resulting in Alanine to Valine substitution (Ala64Val). The mutation was reconfirmed and validated by subsequent Sanger sequencing method. The mutation was ruled out in 100 unrelated healthy controls. We suggest that this pathogenic mutation disrupts the proper function of the gene proteins resulting in the disease state.

  7. Novel homozygous PANK2 mutation identified in a consanguineous Chinese pedigree with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Fang; Li, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Wu, Ji-Min

    2016-08-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) gene mutations. It is clinically characterized by early onset of extrapyramidal symptoms, with or without pigmentary retinopathy, optic atrophy and acanthocytosis. The specific radiographic appearance of PKAN is the eye-of-the-tiger sign. However, there are few studies regarding PKAN patients of Chinese Han ancestry. In the present study, a Chinese 20-year-old female with an 8-year history of unsteady walking and involuntary movements is described. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed eye-of-the-tiger sign. Following sequencing of PANK2, a novel homozygous c.863C>T (p.P288L) mutation was identified in the patient and heterozygous c.863C>T was identified in her consanguineous parents. The absence of this mutation in the 1000 Genomes database, The Exome Aggregation Consortium, and 200 controls demonstrated that this mutation was probably pathogenic for PKAN in this family. In addition, the PANK2 c.863C>T mutation was predicted to be deleterious by SIFT, disease causing by Mutation Taster and probably damaging by PolyPhen2.

  8. Novel homozygous PANK2 mutation identified in a consanguineous Chinese pedigree with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Fang; Li, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Wu, Ji-Min

    2016-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) gene mutations. It is clinically characterized by early onset of extrapyramidal symptoms, with or without pigmentary retinopathy, optic atrophy and acanthocytosis. The specific radiographic appearance of PKAN is the eye-of-the-tiger sign. However, there are few studies regarding PKAN patients of Chinese Han ancestry. In the present study, a Chinese 20-year-old female with an 8-year history of unsteady walking and involuntary movements is described. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed eye-of-the-tiger sign. Following sequencing of PANK2, a novel homozygous c.863C>T (p.P288L) mutation was identified in the patient and heterozygous c.863C>T was identified in her consanguineous parents. The absence of this mutation in the 1000 Genomes database, The Exome Aggregation Consortium, and 200 controls demonstrated that this mutation was probably pathogenic for PKAN in this family. In addition, the PANK2 c.863C>T mutation was predicted to be deleterious by SIFT, disease causing by Mutation Taster and probably damaging by PolyPhen2. PMID:27446545

  9. A novel frameshift mutation in FGA (c.1846 del A) leading to congenital afibrinogenemia in a consanguineous Syrian family.

    PubMed

    Levrat, Emmanuel; Aboukhamis, Imad; de Moerloose, Philippe; Farho, Jaafar; Chamaa, Sahar; Reber, Guido; Fort, Alexandre; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2011-03-01

    Congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare autosomal recessive coagulation disorder characterized essentially by bleeding symptoms, but miscarriages and, paradoxically, thromboembolic events can also occur. Most reported mutations leading to congenital afibrinogenemia are located in FGA encoding the fibrinogen A α-chain. In this study, we analysed 12 individuals from a consanguineous Syrian family with reduced or absent fibrinogen levels: those with fibrinogen levels around 1 g/l (n = 7) were found to be heterozygous for a novel frameshift mutation in FGA exon 5 (c.1846 del A) and those with undetectable fibrinogen levels (n = 5) were homozygous for the same mutation. This novel frameshift mutation is the most C-terminal causative FGA mutation identified to date in afibrinogenemic patients. The resulting aberrant Aα-chain (p.Thr616HisfsX32) is most likely synthesized, but is less efficiently assembled and/or secreted into the circulation given the phenotype of asymptomatic hypofibrinogenemia in heterozygous individuals and bleeding diathesis in homozygous individuals.

  10. Identification of C12orf4 as a gene for autosomal recessive intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Philips, A K; Pinelli, M; de Bie, C I; Mustonen, A; Määttä, T; Arts, H H; Wu, K; Roepman, R; Moilanen, J S; Raza, S; Varilo, T; Scala, G; Cocozza, S; Gilissen, C; van Gassen, K L I; Järvelä, I

    2017-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a major health problem in our society. Genetic causes of ID remain unknown because of its vast heterogeneity. Here we report two Finnish families and one Dutch family with affected individuals presenting with mild to moderate ID, neuropsychiatric symptoms and delayed speech development. By utilizing whole exome sequencing (WES), we identified a founder missense variant c.983T>C (p.Leu328Pro) in seven affected individuals from two Finnish consanguineous families and a deletion c.799_1034-429delinsTTATGA (p.Gln267fs) in one affected individual from a consanguineous Dutch family in the C12orf4 gene on chromosome 12. Both the variants co-segregated in the respective families as an autosomal recessive trait. Screening of the p.Leu328Pro variant showed enrichment in the North Eastern sub-isolate of Finland among anonymous local blood donors with a carrier frequency of 1:53, similar to other disease mutations with a founder effect in that region. To date, only one Arab family with a three affected individuals with a frameshift insertion variant in C12orf4 has been reported. In summary, we expand and establish the clinical and mutational spectrum of C12orf4 variants. Our findings implicate C12orf4 as a causative gene for autosomal recessive ID. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Health problems, complex life, and consanguinity among ethnic minority Muslim women in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, Dharma Nand; Haque, Anwarul

    2015-01-01

    Marriage between blood relatives is common among Muslim ethnic minority population in Nepal. Albeit, the adverse effects of such a consanguineous marriage on health are controversial. To determine the prevalence, characteristics and health outcomes related to consanguineous marriage. A cross-sectional survey was carried out using a cluster sampling technique to select the respondents. A total of 400 women aged 15-49 years were interviewed from September 2011 to February 2012. A structured questionnaire was administered through face-to-face meetings. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were estimated by a stepwise likelihood ratio method with binary logistic regression. The overall prevalence of consanguinity was 36.7%. The median age at marriage and age at first childbirth was 15 and 18 years, respectively. The association of being in a consanguineous marriage among women whose husband's education level were secondary or higher was 3.35 (95% CI 1.56, 7.12) times greater than among those whose husbands were unable to read and write. Woman who have consanguineous marriage were less likely to have (AOR 0.46, 95% CI 0.26, 0.82) used contraceptive than those who have non-consanguineous marriage. Women who have consanguineous marriage were more (AOR 1.80; 95% CI 0.90, 3.61) likely to have birth defect in their children than those who have non-consanguineous marriage. The association of having a history of death after live birth among women who experienced emotional violence was 2.60 (95% CI 1.36, 5.00) and physical violence 2.15 (95% CI 1.16, 3.93) times greater than among those who did not experience violence. Several factors like husband's education and dowry practices are associated with consanguineous marriage. Further, these factors including consanguineous marriage and marital violence are also accountable for negative health consequences. Thus, multicomponent interventions are needed in order to improve the health condition of Nepalese Muslim community in rural area.

  12. British Pakistani Muslim Masculinity, (In)fertility, and the Clinical Encounter.

    PubMed

    Blell, Mwenza

    2017-08-11

    The experiences of men facing fertility disruptions are understudied. For British Pakistanis, the impact of infertility is heightened for women because of normative pressures to bear children. But what of men? I present data from in-depth interviews in North East England with infertile British Pakistani Muslims and relevant health professionals. British Pakistani men's level of participation in clinical encounters and responses to diagnoses of male factor infertility must be understood in the context of kinship, the construction of Pakistani ethnicity in the UK, and the subordinated forms of masculinity which accompany this identity.

  13. Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L. ); DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J. ); Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M. )

    1992-10-01

    A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m[sup 3] internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h[sup [minus]1] was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO[sub 2], and NO[sub x]. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion.

  14. Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L.; DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J.; Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M.

    1992-10-01

    A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m{sup 3} internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h{sup {minus}1} was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x}. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion.

  15. Informed consent in the Pakistani milieu: the physician's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jafarey, A; Farooqui, A

    2005-01-01

    Informed consent enjoys an unassailable position in both clinical and research situations as a safeguard of patients' rights. Keeping the patient involved in the decision making process is easier when there is direct communication with the individual. The Pakistani milieu offers challenges to this process because crucial decision making is often done by family members or is left entirely up to the attending physician. There seems to be a general acceptance of this shifting of focus from the individual to other players. This also raises certain ethical dilemmas for physicians who may feel uncomfortable with communication which excludes the patient or in accepting a paternalistic primary decision making role. The objective of this informal qualitative study was to ascertain physicians' perceptions regarding the process of information delivery to the patient in the Pakistani context and the various influences acting upon it. PMID:15681673

  16. Bombay blood group: Is prevalence decreasing with urbanization and the decreasing rate of consanguineous marriage

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Sujata; Kotasthane, Dhananjay S.; Chowdhury, Puskar S.; Sarkar, Sonali

    2015-01-01

    Context: Bombay blood group although rare is found to be more prevalent in the Western and Southern states of India, believed to be associated with consanguineous marriage. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of the Bombay blood group (Oh) in the urban population of Puducherry. To find the effect of urbanization on consanguineous marriage and to establish whether consanguinity plays a part in the prevalence of Oh group. To compare Oh group prevalence with that of other neighboring states, where population is not predominantly urban. Settings and Design: This is a descriptive study in a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry, over a period of 6 years. Materials and Methods: All blood samples showing ‘O’ group were tested with anti-H lectin. Specialized tests like Adsorption Elution Technique, inhibition assay for determination of secretor status were performed on Oh positive cases. Any history of consanguineous marriage was recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: All variables were categorical variable and percentage and proportions were calculated manually. Results: Analysis of the results of 35,497 study subjects showed that the most common group was ‘O’ group constituting 14,164 (39.90%) of subjects. Only three “Oh” that is, Bombay phenotype (0.008%) were detected. Consanguinity was observed in two cases (66.66%). Conclusions: This study shows the prevalence of Bombay blood group representing the urban population of Puducherry, to be high (0.008%) and associated with consanguineous marriage (66.66%). Thus, consanguinity is still an important risk factor present, even in an urban population in Southern India. PMID:26420929

  17. Inbreeding in Gredos mountain range (Spain): contribution of multiple consanguinity and intervalley variation.

    PubMed

    Fuster, V; Jiménez, A M; Colantonio, S E

    2001-04-01

    The present paper examines consanguineous marriages occurring between 1874 and 1975 in three valleys (Tormes, Alberche, and Tiétar) in the Sierra de Gredos mountain range, Avila province, Spain. Information was obtained from parish registers of 42 localities, corresponding to a total of 41,696 weddings. Consanguineous marriages were defined as those up to the third degree of consanguinity (second cousins). From 1874 to 1975 the percentage of related mates was 4.45% and the inbreeding coefficient was 0.0011868 (for 1874 to 1917 corresponding figures up to the fourth degree were 16.44% and 0.00 19085, respectively). In order to ascertain the characteristics and evolution of mating patterns in Gredos, the contribution of each degree of kinship was analyzed as a whole and then for each valley separately. Regarding total consanguineous marriages in Gredos, there is a low frequency of uncle-niece matings (0.21%) and a first-second cousin mating ratio (C22/C33) of 0.23 (up to the third degree of consanguinity). Before 1918 multiple matings (i.e., those involving more than a single relationship) accounted for 19.16% of consanguineous marriages (up to the fourth degree). The observed frequencies of multiple consanguineous marriages was, on average, about twice that expected at random, and the proportion of such marriages to total inbreeding was 34.65%. The temporal change of the Gredos inbreeding pattern was characterized by a recent decrease; the highest inbreeding levels correspond to the period from 1915 to 1944. Finally, intervalley differences (maximum inbreeding coefficient in the Tormes, minimum in the Tiétar) are interpreted considering the geography, population size, and population mobility for each valley

  18. Confirmation of ADAMTSL4 mutations for autosomal recessive isolated bilateral ectopia lentis.

    PubMed

    Greene, V Bennouna; Stoetzel, C; Pelletier, V; Perdomo-Trujillo, Y; Liebermann, L; Marion, V; De Korvin, H; Boileau, C; Dufier, J L; Dollfus, H

    2010-03-01

    Ectopia lentis (EL) is a zonular disease where alteration of the zonular fibers leads progressively to lens dislocation. It is most often associated with systemic diseases such as Marfan syndrome, Weill-Marchesani syndrome or homocystinuria. Isolated non syndromic ectopia lentis (IEL) is reported in families with autosomal inheritance, with dominant forms being more common than recessive. LTBP2 truncating mutations have been described as a cause of autosomal recessive ectopia lentis as a primary or secondary feature in patients showing ocular (eg, glaucoma) or extraocular manifestations (eg, Marfanoid habitus). Recently, ADAMTSL4 has been shown to be responsible for isolated autosomal recessive ectopia lentis in an inbred family. Herein we show a consanguineous family that carries a novel homozygous splice mutation IVS4-1G>A/IVS4-1G>A in ADAMTSL4 responsible for isolated autosomal recessive EL, thus confirming the involvement of this gene in this condition and underlining the major role of ADAMTS proteases in zonular fibers homeostasis.

  19. Challenges in the care for consanguineous couples: an exploratory interview study among general practitioners and midwives

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is often suggested that an effort must be made to increase awareness among consanguineous couples of their reproductive risk, and to refer them for genetic counseling if needed. Primary care professionals are considered most appropriate for addressing the subject and identifying couples at risk during consultations in their practice. This Dutch study aims to explore the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of such professionals regarding their care for consanguineous couples. Methods Sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with midwives and general practitioners. Results Although most primary care professionals considered it their task to inform couples about the risks of consanguinity, during consultations the topic was generally only briefly touched upon and quickly abandoned. Important reasons for this were professionals’ beliefs about religious and social values of couples, their low perception of the couples’ reproductive risk and expected limited feasibility of referral. Feelings of embarrassment regarding addressing consanguinity did not seem to play a significant role. Conclusions Primary care professional beliefs about their clients’ religious and social values, their attitudes toward the risk, and perceived limited options for referral seem to conflict with the professional norm to address the topic of consanguinity. PMID:23102514

  20. Importance of Genetic Studies in Consanguineous Populations for the Characterization of Novel Human Gene Functions

    PubMed Central

    Shihab, Hashem A.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Gaunt, Tom R.; Day, Ian N.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Consanguineous offspring have elevated levels of homozygosity. Autozygous stretches within their genome are likely to harbour loss of function (LoF) mutations which will lead to complete inactivation or dysfunction of genes. Studying consanguineous offspring with clinical phenotypes has been very useful for identifying disease causal mutations. However, at present, most of the genes in the human genome have no disorder associated with them or have unknown function. This is presumably mostly due to the fact that homozygous LoF variants are not observed in outbred populations which are the main focus of large sequencing projects. However, another reason may be that many genes in the genome—even when completely “knocked out,” do not cause a distinct or defined phenotype. Here, we discuss the benefits and implications of studying consanguineous populations, as opposed to the traditional approach of analysing a subset of consanguineous families or individuals with disease. We suggest that studying consanguineous populations “as a whole” can speed up the characterisation of novel gene functions as well as indicating nonessential genes and/or regions in the human genome. We also suggest designing a single nucleotide variant (SNV) array to make the process more efficient. PMID:27000383

  1. Consanguinity and its sociodemographic differentials in Bhimber District, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Nazish; Malik, Sajid

    2014-06-01

    Kashmiri population in the northeast of Pakistan has strong historical, cultural and linguistic affinities with the neighbouring populations of upper Punjab and Potohar region of Pakistan. However, the study of consanguineous unions, which are customarily practised in many populations of Pakistan, revealed marked differences between the Kashmiris and other populations of northern Pakistan with respect to the distribution of marriage types and inbreeding coefficient (F). The current descriptive epidemiological study carried out in Bhimber district of Mirpur division, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan, demonstrated that consanguineous marriages were 62% of the total marriages (F=0.0348). First-cousin unions were the predominant type of marriages and constituted 50.13% of total marital unions. The estimates of inbreeding coefficient were higher in the literate subjects, and consanguinity was witnessed to be rising with increasing literacy level. Additionally, consanguinity was observed to be associated with ethnicity, family structure, language, and marriage arrangements. Based upon these data, a distinct sociobiological structure, with increased stratification and higher genomic homozygosity, is expected for this Kashmiri population. In this communication, we present detailed distribution of the types of marital unions and the incidences of consanguinity and inbreeding coefficient (F) across various sociodemographic strata of Bhimber/Mirpuri population. The results of this study would have implication not only for other endogamous populations of Pakistan but also for the sizeable Kashmiri community immigrated to Europe.

  2. Consanguinity and epilepsy in Oran, Algeria: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Chentouf, Amina; Talhi, Randa; Dahdouh, Aicha; Benbihi, Latifa; Benilha, Soumia; Oubaiche, Mohand Laid; Chaouch, Malika

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this case-control study was to identify the significance of consanguinity and other risk factors for epilepsy in Oran, Algeria. Unrelated epileptic patients upwards of 16 years, who attended the Neurology Department between October 2013 and March 2014 were included in the study. Controls, matched for age and sex, were selected among non-epileptic patients attending the same department during the same period. The risk factors evaluated were: consanguinity, family history of epilepsy, perinatal complications, infection of the central nervous system, mental retardation, neurological impairment, history of febrile seizures, severe head trauma, cerebrovascular diseases, and addiction. 101 cases and 202 controls participated in the study. Multivariate logistic regression identified five factors significantly associated with epilepsy: first-degree of consanguinity (odds ratio (OR)=2.15), history of epilepsy in first-degree relatives (OR=4.03), antecedent of febrile seizures (OR=5.38), severe head injury (OR=2.94) and mental retardation (OR=9.32). Consanguinity, family history of epilepsy, history of febrile seizures, severe head trauma and mental retardation are risk factors for epilepsy. The implementation of a strategy for prevention and awareness of the impact of consanguineous marriages as well as genetic counseling for couples with a family history of epilepsy are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Profiling β Thalassemia Mutations in Consanguinity and Nonconsanguinity for Prenatal Screening and Awareness Programme

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravindra; Arya, Vandana; Agarwal, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Mutation spectrum varies significantly in different parts and different ethnic groups of India. Social factors such as preference to marry within the community and among 1st degree relatives (consanguinity) play an important role in impeding the gene pool of the disease within the community and so in society by and large. The present paper discusses the role of consanguinity in profiling of beta thalassemia mutation, and thus the approach for prenatal screening and prevention based awareness programme. Clinically diagnosed 516 cases of beta thalassemia were screened at molecular level. A detailed clinical Proforma was recorded with the information of origin of the family, ethnicity, and consanguinity. The present study reports that subjects originating from Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Bihar, and Jharkhand have c.92+5G>C and c.124_127delTTCT mutation as the commonest mutation compared to the subjects hailing from Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh and Nepal where sickle mutation was found more common. In 40 consanguineous unions more common and specific beta mutations with higher rate of homozygosity have been reported. This consanguinity-based data helps not only in deciding target oriented prenatal diagnostic strategies but also in objective based awareness programmes in prevention of thalassemia major birth. PMID:26576156

  4. Consanguinity, endogamy and inborn errors of metabolism in Oman: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Al-Thihli, Khalid; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Al-Hashmi, Nadia; Al-Mamari, Watfa; Islam, M Mazharul; Al-Yahyaee, Said A

    2014-01-01

    The Sultanate of Oman, like many other Arab countries, has relatively high rates of consanguinity. Reports suggest that the incidence of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) is also high in Oman. This retrospective cross-sectional study was designed to evaluate the number of patients with IEM being followed at the only two tertiary centers in Oman treating such patients, and to calculate the consanguinity rates among these families. The electronic medical records of all patients were reviewed for demographic and clinical characteristics. A total of 285 patients with IEM were being followed at the 2 centers involved; 162 (56.8%) were male and 123 (43.2%) were female. The history of consanguinity was documented or available for 241 patients: 229 patients (95%) were born to consanguineous parents related as second cousins or closer. First-cousin marriages were reported in 191 families (79.3%), while 31 patients (12.9%) were born to second cousins. The parents of 5 patients (2%) were related as double first cousins, and 2 patients (1%) were born to first cousins once removed. The average coefficient of inbreeding (F) in our study was 0.081. Seventeen patients (6%) had associated comorbid conditions other than IEM. Our study highlights the clinical burden of IEM in Oman and emphasizes the high consanguinity rates among the parents of affected patients. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. A positive association between consanguinity and fertility in communities of Paraíba, Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Weller, Mathias; Santos, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Consanguinity of human populations can but does not have to be associated with increased fertility. A recent study involving communities of Northeast Brazil revealed increased levels of endogamy. Data from 20 451 interviewed couples and their 74 289 children were analysed. The present study aimed to compare fertility between consanguineous and unrelated couples of these communities. Consanguineous and unrelated couples of the 39 communities had an average of 4.3 (SD = 0.9) and 3.5 (SD = 0.8) children (p < 0.0001), respectively. Average offspring number of consanguineous couples varied from 3.9 (SD = 1.1) to 5.6 (SD = 3.4) for couples related at the level of third cousins and double first cousin/uncle-niece, respectively (p < 0.005). The correlation coefficient between Human Development Index and fertility was -0.38 (p = 0.0179) and -0.23 (p = 0.17) for unrelated and related couples, respectively. Results indicated an overall positive association between consanguinity and fertility. Fertility tended to be increased, for closely related couples, compared to those related more distantly.

  6. Challenges in the care for consanguineous couples: an exploratory interview study among general practitioners and midwives.

    PubMed

    Teeuw, Marieke E; Hagelaar, Anouk; ten Kate, Leo P; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2012-10-26

    It is often suggested that an effort must be made to increase awareness among consanguineous couples of their reproductive risk, and to refer them for genetic counseling if needed. Primary care professionals are considered most appropriate for addressing the subject and identifying couples at risk during consultations in their practice. This Dutch study aims to explore the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of such professionals regarding their care for consanguineous couples. Sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with midwives and general practitioners. Although most primary care professionals considered it their task to inform couples about the risks of consanguinity, during consultations the topic was generally only briefly touched upon and quickly abandoned. Important reasons for this were professionals' beliefs about religious and social values of couples, their low perception of the couples' reproductive risk and expected limited feasibility of referral. Feelings of embarrassment regarding addressing consanguinity did not seem to play a significant role. Primary care professional beliefs about their clients' religious and social values, their attitudes toward the risk, and perceived limited options for referral seem to conflict with the professional norm to address the topic of consanguinity.

  7. Bilateral sensorineural deafness and hydrocephalus due to foramen of Monro obstruction in sibs: A newly described autosomal recessive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Chudley, A.E.; McCullough, C.; McCullough, D.W.

    1997-01-31

    We identified a Canadian-Mennonite family in which a brother and sister have hydrocephalus due to obstruction at the foramen of Monro and profound bilateral sensorineural deafness. This appears to be a unique combination of anomalies and, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. Both parents and a brother are phenotypically normal. The parents are second cousins. Thus, on the basis of consanguinity, affected sibs of both sexes, and in the absence of evidence for intrauterine infections or other adverse perinatal events, this syndrome is likely inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. 37 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Dentinogenesis imperfecta associated with short stature, hearing loss and mental retardation: a new syndrome with autosomal recessive inheritance?

    PubMed

    Cauwels, R G E C; De Coster, P J; Mortier, G R; Marks, L A M; Martens, L C

    2005-08-01

    The follow-up history and oral findings in two brothers from consanguineous parents suggest that the association of dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), delayed tooth eruption, mild mental retardation, proportionate short stature, sensorineural hearing loss and dysmorphic facies may represent a new syndrome with autosomal recessive inheritance. Histological examination of the dentin matrix of a permanent molar from one of the siblings reveals morphological similarities with defective dentinogenesis as presenting in patients affected with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), a condition caused by deficiency of type I collagen. A number of radiographic and histological characteristics, however, are inconsistent with classical features of DI. These findings suggest that DI may imply greater genetical heterogeneity than currently assumed.

  9. A novel nonsense mutation in keratin 10 causes a familial case of recessive epidermolytic ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Jeydith A; Hannoush, Zeina C; Vargas, Luis G; Momany, Allison; Garcia, Carmen C; Murray, Jeffrey C; Dunnwald, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI) is a rare skin disorder characterized by generalized erythroderma and cutaneous blistering at birth, which is substituted by hyperkeratosis later in life. It is caused by autosomal dominant mutations in highly conserved regions of KRT1 and KRT10. To date, only four mutations with autosomal recessive inheritance of EI have been described in consanguineous families. All of them affect the 2B domain of KRT10. In the present study, we describe four patients with EI (including one lethal case) born from unaffected parents in a consanguineous family of a native Venezuelan community. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical, genetic, and morphological aspects of the disease in this family, as well as understand its functional implications. Genomic DNA was sequenced for KRT10 and KRT1. Immunofluoresence for keratin expression was performed on cutaneous biopsies. After examination of cutaneous biopsies histology, our results showed hyperkeratosis and acantholysis with an expanded granular layer. Sequencing of KRT10 demonstrated a nonsense mutation (p.Tyr282Ter.) corresponding to the 1B domain of the protein in patients and a heterozygous pattern in other family members, resulting in complete absence of K10. The loss of K10 was compensated by upregulation of K14 and K17. In conclusion, this novel mutation in KRT10 is the first recessive genetic variation that is not located in the so called “hot spot” for recessive EI, suggesting that other areas of the gene are also susceptible for such mutations. PMID:23957016

  10. Homozygosity Mapping in Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa in South Indian Families.

    PubMed

    Srilekha, Sundaramurthy; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Srikrupa, Natarajan N; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Meenakshi, Swaminathan; Sen, Parveen; Kapur, Suman; Soumittra, Nagasamy

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are retinal degenerative diseases which cause severe retinal dystrophy affecting the photoreceptors. LCA is predominantly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and contributes to 5% of all retinal dystrophies; whereas RP is inherited by all the Mendelian pattern of inheritance and both are leading causes of visual impairment in children and young adults. Homozygosity mapping is an efficient strategy for mapping both known and novel disease loci in recessive conditions, especially in a consanguineous mating, exploiting the fact that the regions adjacent to the disease locus will also be homozygous by descent in such inbred children. Here we have studied eleven consanguineous LCA and one autosomal recessive RP (arRP) south Indian families to know the prevalence of mutations in known genes and also to know the involvement of novel loci, if any. Complete ophthalmic examination was done for all the affected individuals including electroretinogram, fundus photograph, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 250K HMA GeneChip on eleven LCA families followed by screening of candidate gene(s) in the homozygous block identified mutations in ten families; AIPL1 - 3 families, RPE65- 2 families, GUCY2D, CRB1, RDH12, IQCB1 and SPATA7 in one family each, respectively. Six of the ten (60%) mutations identified are novel. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 10K HMA GeneChip on the arRP family identified a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK. The mutations segregated within the family and was absent in 200 control chromosomes screened. In one of the eleven LCA families, the causative gene/mutation was not identified but many homozygous blocks were noted indicating that a possible novel locus/gene might be involved. The genotype and phenotype features, especially the fundus changes for AIPL1, RPE65, CRB1, RDH12 genes were as reported earlier.

  11. Homozygosity Mapping in Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa in South Indian Families

    PubMed Central

    Srilekha, Sundaramurthy; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Srikrupa, Natarajan N.; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Meenakshi, Swaminathan; Sen, Parveen; Kapur, Suman; Soumittra, Nagasamy

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are retinal degenerative diseases which cause severe retinal dystrophy affecting the photoreceptors. LCA is predominantly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and contributes to 5% of all retinal dystrophies; whereas RP is inherited by all the Mendelian pattern of inheritance and both are leading causes of visual impairment in children and young adults. Homozygosity mapping is an efficient strategy for mapping both known and novel disease loci in recessive conditions, especially in a consanguineous mating, exploiting the fact that the regions adjacent to the disease locus will also be homozygous by descent in such inbred children. Here we have studied eleven consanguineous LCA and one autosomal recessive RP (arRP) south Indian families to know the prevalence of mutations in known genes and also to know the involvement of novel loci, if any. Complete ophthalmic examination was done for all the affected individuals including electroretinogram, fundus photograph, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 250K HMA GeneChip on eleven LCA families followed by screening of candidate gene(s) in the homozygous block identified mutations in ten families; AIPL1 – 3 families, RPE65- 2 families, GUCY2D, CRB1, RDH12, IQCB1 and SPATA7 in one family each, respectively. Six of the ten (60%) mutations identified are novel. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 10K HMA GeneChip on the arRP family identified a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK. The mutations segregated within the family and was absent in 200 control chromosomes screened. In one of the eleven LCA families, the causative gene/mutation was not identified but many homozygous blocks were noted indicating that a possible novel locus/gene might be involved. The genotype and phenotype features, especially the fundus changes for AIPL1, RPE65, CRB1, RDH12 genes were as reported earlier. PMID:26147992

  12. The Study of Workplace Learning and Performance Competencies among Pakistani Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwani, Naseem Saeed

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Pakistani Workplace Learning and Performance (WLP) practitioners' perceptions of the importance of WLP competencies at the present time and in the next five years. The goals were to: (1) identify and characterize a profile of Pakistani WLP practitioners; (2) analyze perceptions of the current and future…

  13. Pakistani Students' Perceptions about Use of the Internet in Their Academic Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Zarqa S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore Pakistani university students' use of the Internet in their studies and their perceptions of online academic life. Findings show that Internet use for academic purposes has both positive and negative aspects. There is a gender difference in Pakistani students' perceptions about the use of the Internet in their…

  14. Obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors among the indigenous and immigrant Pakistani population: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Raza, Qaisar; Doak, Colleen M; Khan, Aroosa; Nicolaou, Mary; Seidell, Jaap C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically describe the gender and ethnic differences regarding the prevalence of general/central obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as diabetes mellitus type 2, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia among the indigenous and immigrant Pakistani communities. The search engine used was PubMed, supplemented with regional data from the Medical Institutes of Pakistan. The focus was on the adult Pakistani population (18 years and older). We found only 7 studies among the immigrant Pakistani community and 24 studies among the indigenous Pakistani community. The studies had limitations such as low participation rates and use of self-reported data. There is a higher prevalence of central obesity among women (42.2%) than among men (14.7%) (National Health Survey of Pakistan). Certain ethnicities such as Muhajir and Baluchis showed a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors when compared to other ethnicities in the indigenous Pakistani population. The results also indicate that the prevalence of obesity is 10-20% higher among the immigrant Pakistanis than in the indigenous Pakistanis. The relatively high prevalence of obesity and associated CVD risk factors (especially in women) among both indigenous and immigrant Pakistani populations require the attention of the healthcare professionals and policy makers, both inside and outside Pakistan. © 2013 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  15. Pakistani Students' Perceptions about Use of the Internet in Their Academic Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Zarqa S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore Pakistani university students' use of the Internet in their studies and their perceptions of online academic life. Findings show that Internet use for academic purposes has both positive and negative aspects. There is a gender difference in Pakistani students' perceptions about the use of the Internet in their…

  16. Objective hydrograph baseflow recession analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brian F.; Vogel, Richard M.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2015-06-01

    A streamflow hydrograph recession curve expresses the theoretical relationship between aquifer structure and groundwater outflow to a stream channel. That theoretical relationship is often portrayed empirically using a recession plot defined as a plot of ln(-dQ/dt) versus ln(Q), where Q is streamflow discharge. Such hydrograph recession plots are commonly used to estimate recession parameters, aquifer properties and for evaluating alternative hydrologic hypotheses. We introduce a comprehensive and objective approach to analyze baseflow recessions with innovations including the use of quantile regression, efficient and objective numerical estimation of dQ/dt, inclusion of groundwater withdrawals, and incorporation of seasonal effects. We document that these innovations when all combined, lead to significant improvements, over previous studies, in our ability to discern the theoretical behavior of stream aquifer systems. A case study reveals that our methodology enables us to reject the simple linear reservoir hypothesis of stream aquifer interactions for watersheds in New Jersey and results in improved correlations between low flow statistics and aquifer properties for those same watersheds.

  17. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S.

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  18. An empirical analysis of the effects of consanguineous marriages on economic development.

    PubMed

    Bildirici, Melike; Kökdener, Meltem; Ersin, Oezgür ömer

    2010-01-01

    In this study, development experiences toward economic development are investigated to provide an alternative analysis of economic development, human capital, and genetic inheritance in the light of consanguineous marriages. The countries analyzed in the study are discussed in accordance with consanguineous marriage practices and classified by their per capita gross domestic product (GDP) growth. A broad range of countries are analyzed in the study. Arab countries that experienced high rates of growth in their gross national income during the twentieth century but failed to fulfill adequate development measures as reflected in the growth in national income, countries undergoing transition from tight government regulation to free market democracy, and African nations that have experienced complications in the process of development show important differences in the process of economic development. It is shown that the countries that have reached high average development within the context of per capita GDP have overcome problems integral to consanguineous marriage.

  19. Novel SIL1 nonstop mutation in a Chinese consanguineous family with Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome and Dandy-Walker syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gai, Nan; Jiang, Chen; Zou, Yong-Yi; Zheng, Yu; Liang, De-Sheng; Wu, Ling-Qian

    2016-07-01

    Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, which is characterized by congenital cataracts, cerebellar ataxia, progressive muscle weakness, and delayed psychomotor development. SIL1, which is located at 5q31.2, is the only gene known to cause MSS. Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is defined by hypoplasia, upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis, and cystic dilation of the fourth ventricle; however, its genetic pathogeny remains unclear. Here, we report a Chinese consanguineous family with MSS and DWS. Whole exome sequencing identified a novel nonstop mutation in SIL1. Sanger sequencing revealed that the mutation was segregated in this family according to a recessive mode of inheritance. We found that the mutation changed a stop codon (TGA) to an arginine codon (CGA), and no in-frame termination codon in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of SIL1 could be found. The mRNA levels of SIL1 were decreased by 56.6% and 37.5% in immortalized lymphoblasts of the patients respectively; the protein levels of SIL1 were substantially decreased. This case study is the first report on Chinese MSS patients, MSS complicated by DWS, and a nonstop mutation in SIL1. Our findings imply the pathogenetic association between DWS and MSS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An exome sequencing strategy to diagnose lethal autosomal recessive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, Sian; Kivuva, Emma; Turnpenny, Peter; Stals, Karen; Johnson, Matthew; Xie, Weijia; Caswell, Richard; Lango Allen, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Rare disorders resulting in prenatal or neonatal death are genetically heterogeneous. For some conditions, affected fetuses can be diagnosed by ultrasound scan, but this is not usually possible until mid-gestation. There is often limited fetal DNA available for investigation. We investigated a strategy for diagnosing autosomal recessive lethal disorders in non-consanguineous pedigrees with multiple affected fetuses. Exome sequencing was performed to identify genes where each parent is heterozygous for a rare non-synonymous-coding or splicing variant. Putative pathogenic variants were tested for cosegregation in affected fetuses and unaffected siblings. In eight couples of European ancestry, we found on average 1.75 genes (range 0–4) where both parents were heterozygous for rare potentially deleterious variants. A proof-of-principle study detected heterozygous DYNC2H1 variants in a couple whose five fetuses had short-rib polydactyly. Prospective analysis of two couples with multiple pregnancy terminations for fetal akinesia syndrome was performed and a diagnosis was obtained in both the families. The first couple were each heterozygous for a previously reported GLE1 variant, p.Arg569His or p.Val617Met; both were inherited by their two affected fetuses. The second couple were each heterozygous for a novel RYR1 variant, c.14130-2A>G or p.Ser3074Phe; both were inherited by their three affected fetuses but not by their unaffected child. Biallelic GLE1 and RYR1 disease-causing variants have been described in other cases with fetal akinesia syndrome. We conclude that exome sequencing of parental samples can be an effective tool for diagnosing lethal recessive disorders in outbred couples. This permits early prenatal diagnosis in future pregnancies. PMID:24961629

  1. An exome sequencing strategy to diagnose lethal autosomal recessive disorders.

    PubMed

    Ellard, Sian; Kivuva, Emma; Turnpenny, Peter; Stals, Karen; Johnson, Matthew; Xie, Weijia; Caswell, Richard; Lango Allen, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Rare disorders resulting in prenatal or neonatal death are genetically heterogeneous. For some conditions, affected fetuses can be diagnosed by ultrasound scan, but this is not usually possible until mid-gestation. There is often limited fetal DNA available for investigation. We investigated a strategy for diagnosing autosomal recessive lethal disorders in non-consanguineous pedigrees with multiple affected fetuses. Exome sequencing was performed to identify genes where each parent is heterozygous for a rare non-synonymous-coding or splicing variant. Putative pathogenic variants were tested for cosegregation in affected fetuses and unaffected siblings. In eight couples of European ancestry, we found on average 1.75 genes (range 0-4) where both parents were heterozygous for rare potentially deleterious variants. A proof-of-principle study detected heterozygous DYNC2H1 variants in a couple whose five fetuses had short-rib polydactyly. Prospective analysis of two couples with multiple pregnancy terminations for fetal akinesia syndrome was performed and a diagnosis was obtained in both the families. The first couple were each heterozygous for a previously reported GLE1 variant, p.Arg569His or p.Val617Met; both were inherited by their two affected fetuses. The second couple were each heterozygous for a novel RYR1 variant, c.14130-2A>G or p.Ser3074Phe; both were inherited by their three affected fetuses but not by their unaffected child. Biallelic GLE1 and RYR1 disease-causing variants have been described in other cases with fetal akinesia syndrome. We conclude that exome sequencing of parental samples can be an effective tool for diagnosing lethal recessive disorders in outbred couples. This permits early prenatal diagnosis in future pregnancies.

  2. Missense Mutations in CRYAB Are Liable for Recessive Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Irum, Bushra; Khan, Arif O.; Wang, Qiwei; Kabir, Firoz; Khan, Asma A.; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was initiated to identify causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in consanguineous familial cases. Methods Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological and clinical examination, and slit-lamp photographs were ascertained for affected individuals who have not yet been operated for the removal of the cataractous lens. Blood samples were obtained, and genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells. A genome-wide scan was completed with short tandem repeat (STR) markers, and the logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. Protein coding exons of CRYAB were sequenced, bi-directionally. Evolutionary conservation was investigated by aligning CRYAB orthologues, and the expression of Cryab in embryonic and postnatal mice lens was investigated with TaqMan probe. Results The clinical and ophthalmological examinations suggested that all affected individuals had nuclear cataracts. Genome-wide linkage analysis suggested a potential region on chromosome 11q23 harboring CRYAB. DNA sequencing identified a missense variation: c.34C>T (p.R12C) in CRYAB that segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Subsequent interrogation of our entire cohort of familial cases identified a second familial case localized to chromosome 11q23 harboring a c.31C>T (p.R11C) mutation. In silico analyses suggested that the mutations identified in familial cases, p.R11C and p.R12C will not be tolerated by the three-dimensional structure of CRYAB. Real-time PCR analysis identified the expression of Cryab in mouse lens as early as embryonic day 15 (E15) that increased significantly until postnatal day 6 (P6) with steady level of expression thereafter. Conclusion Here, we report two novel missense mutations, p.R11C and p.R12C, in CRYAB associated with autosomal recessive congenital nuclear cataracts. PMID:26402864

  3. Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: CERS3 mutations identified by a next generation sequencing panel targeting ichthyosis genes.

    PubMed

    Youssefian, Leila; Vahidnezhad, Hassan; Saeidian, Amir Hossein; Sotoudeh, Soheila; Mahmoudi, Hamidreza; Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Adams, Rebecca; Ghanadan, Alireza; Zeinali, Sirous; Fortina, Paolo; Uitto, Jouni

    2017-09-06

    There are at least 38 mutant genes known to be associated with the ichthyosis phenotypes, and autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a specific subgroup caused by mutations in 13 different genes. Mutations in some of these genes, such as CERS3 with only two previous reports, are rare. In this study, we identified mutations in candidate genes in consanguineous families with ARCI with a next generation sequencing (NGS) array that incorporates 38 ichthyosis associated genes. We applied this sequencing array to DNA from 140 ichthyosis families with high prevalence of consanguinity. Among these patients we identified six distinct, previously unreported mutations in CERS3 in six Iranian families. These mutations in each family co-segregated with the ichthyosis phenotype. The patients demonstrated collodion membrane at birth, acrogeria, generalized scaling, and hyperlinearity of the palms and soles. The presence of a significant percentage of CERS3 mutations in our cohort depicts a marked difference between the etiology of ichthyoses in genetically poorly characterized regions and well-characterized western populations. Also, it shows that rare alleles are more prevalent in the gene pool of consanguineous populations and emphasizes the importance of these population studies for better understanding of ichthyosis pathogenesis.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 6 September 2017; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2017.137.

  4. Homozygous mutation in MERTK causes severe autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ksantini, Mohamed; Lafont, Estèle; Bocquet, Béatrice; Meunier, Isabelle; Hamel, Christian P

    2012-01-01

    Gene identification in retinitis pigmentosa is a prerequisite to future therapies. Accordingly, autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa families were genotyped to search for causative mutations. Members of a consanguineous Moroccan family had standard ophthalmologic examination, optical coherence tomography-3 scan, autofluorescence testing, and electroretinogram. Their DNA was genotyped with the 250K SNP microchip (Affymetrix) and homozygosity mapping was done. MERTK exons were polymerase chain reaction amplified and sequenced. Two sisters and one brother out of 6 siblings had rod cone dystrophy type of retinitis pigmentosa. Salient features were night blindness starting in early infancy, dot-like whitish deposits in fovea and macula with corresponding autofluorescent dots in youngest patients, decreased visual acuity, and cone responses higher than rod responses at electroretinogram. The patients were homozygous in regions from chromosomes 2 and 8, but only that of chromosome 2 was inherited from a common ancestor. Sequencing of the MERTK gene belonging to the chromosome 2 region showed that the 3 affected patients carried a novel homozygous mutation in exon 17, c.2323C>T, leading to p.Arg775X, while their unaffected brothers and sister, parents, and paternal grandfather were heterozygous. MERTK mutations lead to severe retinitis pigmentosa with discrete dot-like autofluorescent deposits at early stages, which are a hallmark of this MERTK-specific dystrophy.

  5. Mutations in the hairless gene underlie APL in three families of Pakistani origin

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Liv; Wajid, Muhammad; Shimomura, Yutaka; Christiano, Angela M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Atrichia with papular lesions (APL) (OMIM#209500) is a rare autosomal recessively inherited form of irreversible alopecia characterized by papular lesions of keratin-filled cysts on various regions of the body. Males and females are equally affected and present with a distinct pattern of total hair loss on scalp, axilla and body. It begins shortly after birth with the development of hair loss, and patients are normally devoid of eyelashes and eyebrows. Mutations in the hairless (HR) gene have been previously shown to be responsible for APL. Objective In this study, we studied the molecular basis of APL in three unrelated families of Pakistani origin. Method Molecular analysis of the HR genes was performed on genomic DNA from probands and family members. Results DNA sequencing of the HR gene in family A revealed a novel homozygous 2 bp deletion in exon 6 leading to a frameshift and a downstream premature termination codon in exon 8 (1782-83delAG). In family B, we identified a novel homozygous deletion of a G nucleotide at the exon 15–intron 15 boundary, termed 3097delG. Family C carries a previously reported missense mutation consisting of an A-to-G transition at nucleotide 276 resulting in the mutation N970S in exon 14. Conclusion Two mutations identified in this study are novel mutations in the HR gene and extend the body of evidence implicating the hairless gene family in the pathogenesis of human skin disorders. The one previously reported mutation suggests it may represent a recurrent mutation, or alternatively, an allele that is widely dispersed around the world. PMID:18164595

  6. Algebra, Home Mortgages, and Recessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariner, Jean A. Miller; Miller, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    The current financial crisis and recession in the United States present an opportunity to discuss relevant applications of some topics in typical first-and second-year algebra and precalculus courses. Real-world applications of percent change, exponential functions, and sums of finite geometric sequences can help students understand the problems…

  7. Algebra, Home Mortgages, and Recessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariner, Jean A. Miller; Miller, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    The current financial crisis and recession in the United States present an opportunity to discuss relevant applications of some topics in typical first-and second-year algebra and precalculus courses. Real-world applications of percent change, exponential functions, and sums of finite geometric sequences can help students understand the problems…

  8. Firms Still Training Despite Recession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felstead, Alan; Green, Francis; Jewson, Nick

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that company training is one of the first casualties in times of recession. Falling recruitment, pressures to cut costs and a focus on short-term survival force businesses to put training on the backburner. Expecting the worst, the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES), the Confederation of British Industry (CBI)…

  9. Firms Still Training Despite Recession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felstead, Alan; Green, Francis; Jewson, Nick

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that company training is one of the first casualties in times of recession. Falling recruitment, pressures to cut costs and a focus on short-term survival force businesses to put training on the backburner. Expecting the worst, the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES), the Confederation of British Industry (CBI)…

  10. Consanguinity and the sib-pair method: An approach using identity by descent between and within individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Genin, E.; Clerget-Darpoux, F.

    1996-11-01

    To test for linkage between a trait and a marker, one can consider identical marker alleles in related individuals, for instance, sibs. For recessive diseases, it has been shown that some information may be gained from the identity by descent (IBD) of the two alleles of an affected inbred individual at the marker locus. The aim of this paper is to extend the sib-pair method of linkage analysis to the situation of sib pairs sampled from consanguineous populations. This extension takes maximum advantage of the information provided by both the IBD pattern between sibs and allelic identity within each sib of the pair. This is possible through the use of the condensed identity coefficients. Here, we propose a new test of linkage based on a {Chi}{sup 2}. We compare the performance of this test with that of the classical {Chi}{sup 2} test based on the distribution of sib pairs sharing 0, 1, or 2 alleles IBD. For sib pairs from first-cousin matings, the proposed test can better detect the role of a disease-susceptibility (DS) locus. Its power is shown to be greater than that of the classical test, especially for models where the DS allele may be common and incompletely penetrant; that is to say for situations that may be encountered in multifactorial diseases. A study of the impact of inbreeding on the expected proportions of sib pairs sharing 0, 1, or 2 alleles IBD is also performed here. Ignoring inbreeding, when in fact inbreeding exists, increases the rate of type I errors in tests of linkage. 21 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Genome-scan for loci involved in cleft lip with or without cleft palate in consanguineous families from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Marazita, Mary L; Field, L Leigh; Tunçbilek, Gökhan; Cooper, Margaret E; Goldstein, Toby; Gürsu, K Gürler

    2004-04-15

    Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a common congenital anomaly, with birth prevalence ranging from 1/500 to 1/1,000. A number of genetic loci have shown positive linkage or association results in European Caucasian populations. The purpose of the current study was to assess whether any of those loci have positive results in Turkish Caucasian CL/P families, and to perform a 10 cM genome scan to identify other regions potentially containing cleft susceptibility loci. Eighteen affected individuals with consanguineous parents were identified as part of our on-going studies of orofacial clefts in Ankara, Turkey. Genotyped were 383 genome-scan markers, and 70 additional markers, including markers in six candidate loci or regions on chromosomes 2, 4, 6, 14, 17, and 19 (TGFA, D4S175, F13A1, TGFB3, D17S250, and APOC2) that have been implicated in other studies of families with orofacial clefting. LOD scores (two point and multiple point) and family-based association statistics (TDT) were calculated between each of the markers and CL/P. For the LOD score calculations, an autosomal recessive model was assumed for the inheritance of CL/P. Of the six candidate markers, significant TDT results were obtained with TGFA (P = 0.05). The most statistically significant multipoint results from the linkage genome scan were between putative genes controlling risk of CL/P and regions on chromosomes 4, 10, 12, and 15 (maximum multipoint HLOD's of 1.25, 1.30, 2.73, and 1.28 respectively). These results demonstrate the power of small numbers of families with inbred probands to detect linkage and association. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Parental consanguinity as a cause for increased incidence of births defects in a study of 238,942 consecutive births.

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Alembik, Y; Roth, M P; Dott, B

    1999-01-01

    The risk for birth defects in the offspring of first-cousin matings has been estimated to increase sharply compared to non consanguineous marriages. As a general decline in the frequency of consanguineous marriages was observed in this century, one wonders whether consanguinity is still a factor in the appearance of birth defects in developed countries. Based on our registry of congenital anomalies we tried to answer to this question. In the population studied in North-Eastern France a consanguineous mating was known in 1.21% of the cases with congenital anomalies, vs. 0.27% in controls, (p < 0.001). The frequency of the malformations recorded paralleled the degree of consanguinity: out of 89 malformed children, 51 were seen in first-cousins mating (10.3 times more frequent than in offspring of non consanguineous couples), 17 in second-cousins marriages and 18 in more distant relatives mating. Three were uncle-niece marriage. Excluding known mendelian conditions these numbers were 73, 36, 17 and 17 respectively and the corresponding relative risk were 3.68, 3.01, 3.41 and 4.89 respectively. Therefore there is a negative dose-response effect between level of inbreeding and risk of congenital malformations. Consanguineous mothers were more often pregnant than non consanguineous mothers (p < 0.01) and they had more stillbirths than non consanguineous mothers. These results show that consanguinity is still a factor of birth defects and they must be taken into account for genetic counseling of inbred marriages, in developed countries.

  13. Straight thinking about groundwater recession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuthbert, M. O.

    2014-03-01

    While in catchment and hillslope hydrology a more nuanced approach is now taken to streamflow recession analysis, in the context of major aquifers it is commonly still assumed that the groundwater head recession rate will take exponential form, an idea originally proposed in the 19th Century. However it is shown here that, in early times, the groundwater head recession in a major aquifer should take an almost straight line form with a rate approximately equal to the long-term recharge rate divided by the aquifer storage coefficient. The length of this phase can be estimated from an analytical expression derived in the paper which depends on the aquifer diffusivity, length scale, and the position of the monitoring point. A transitional phase then leads to an exponential phase after some critical time which is independent of the position of the monitoring point. Major aquifers in a state of periodic quasi-steady state are expected to have rates of groundwater flux recession which deviate little from the average rate of groundwater recharge. Where quasi-exponential groundwater declines are observed in nature, their form may be diagnostic of particular types of aquifer properties and/or boundary effects, such as proximity to drainage boundaries, variations in transmissivity with hydraulic head, storage changes due to pumping, nonequilibrium flow at a range of spatial and temporal scales, and variations in specific yield with depth. Recession analysis has applicability to a range of groundwater problems and is powerful way of gaining insight into the hydrologic functioning of an aquifer.

  14. The Effect of Consanguineous Marriage on Reading Disability in the Arab Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Rabia, Salim; Maroun, Lateefeh

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of consanguineous marriage in the Arab community on reading disabilities of offspring. It examined whether the rate of reading disabilities was higher among offspring of first-cousin parents than offspring of unrelated parents; and whether reading-disabled children of first-cousin parents were more disabled in…

  15. The influence of past endogamy and consanguinity on genetic disorders in northern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Egerbladh, I

    2005-09-01

    It has been widely believed that consanguineous marriage was infrequent in northern Europe. As part of ongoing studies into the population structure of northern Sweden, the Demographic DataBase of Umeå University has undertaken digitization of the parish record books of the Swedish Lutheran Church, which date back to the late 17th century. To examine the prevalence and patterns of consanguineous marriage, information from the DataBase was abstracted for the Skellefteå region during the period 1720-1899 and extended family pedigrees constructed. Of the 14,639 marriages recorded, 3,043 (20.8%) were between couples related as sixth cousins or closer. Following changes in the Swedish civil law in 1844 that removed the requirement of royal dispensation for first cousin unions, a significant increase in first cousin marriages occurred during the next two generations, even though the total population of the region grew significantly. There was also strong evidence that consanguineous marriages were favoured within particular families. The findings of the study are consistent with the patterns of single gene disorders reported in specific communities in the region, and they suggest that founder effect, drift and consanguinity all were important influences on population genetic structure in previous generations.

  16. Mutations in GBA2 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia with Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Monia B.; Eleuch-Fayache, Ghada; Schottlaender, Lucia V.; Nehdi, Houda; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Arepalli, Sampath K.; Chong, Sean B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Sailer, Anna; Liu, Guoxiang; Mistry, Pramod K.; Cai, Huaibin; Shrader, Ginamarie; Sassi, Celeste; Bouhlal, Yosr; Houlden, Henry; Hentati, Fayçal; Amouri, Rim; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA) comprises a large and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders with more than 20 different forms currently recognized, many of which are also associated with increased tone and some of which have limb spasticity. Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from a defect in the enzyme acid β-glucosidase 1. β-glucosidase 2 is an enzyme with similar glucosylceramidase activity but to date has not been associated with a monogenic disorder. We studied four unrelated consanguineous families of Tunisian decent diagnosed with cerebellar ataxia of unknown origin. We performed homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in an attempt to identify the genetic origin of their disorder. We were able to identify mutations responsible for autosomal-recessive ataxia in these families within the gene encoding β-glucosidase 2, GBA2. Two nonsense mutations (c.363C>A [p.Tyr121∗] and c.1018C>T [p.Arg340∗]) and a substitution (c.2618G>A [p.Arg873His]) were identified, probably resulting in nonfunctional enzyme. This study suggests GBA2 mutations are a cause of recessive spastic ataxia and responsible for a form of glucosylceramide storage disease in humans. PMID:23332917

  17. Additional case of Marden-Walker syndrome: support for the autosomal-recessive inheritance adn refinement of phenotype in a surviving patient.

    PubMed

    Orrico, A; Galli, L; Zappella, M; Orsi, A; Hayek, G

    2001-02-01

    In this report, we present a 14-year-old girl, born to consanguineous parents, who presented with severe mental retardation, hypotonia, short stature, and congenital joint contractures. The craniofacial features were scaphocephaly, thin/long and immobile face, marked hypoplasia of the midface, temporal narrowness, blepharophimosis, palpebral ptosis, and strabismus. The combination of such a distinctive craniofacial appearance and psychomotor retardation allows us to recognize a new case of the Marden-Walker syndrome. Our patient represents one of the rare cases in which consanguineous mating supports the autosomal-recessive pattern of inheritance of this condition. Furthermore, through refining the phenotype of a surviving patient, this report may contribute to a better recognition of this disorder in older affected children.

  18. Mardini-Nyhan association (lung agenesis, congenital heart, and thumb anomalies): three new cases and possible recurrence in a sib-is there a distinct recessive syndrome?

    PubMed

    Hastings, Rob; Harding, David; Donaldson, Alan; Liebling, Rachel; Hayes, Alison; Kraus, Alison; Joss, Shelagh; Narayanaswamy, Shuba; Turnpenny, Peter; Smithson, Sarah

    2009-12-01

    In 1985, Mardini and Nyhan described three patients from consanguineous families with unilateral complete/partial lung agenesis, congenital cardiac defects, and ipsilateral thumb anomalies. Although there have been many reports of lung agenesis with other malformations, especially hemifacial microsomia and radial ray anomalies, very few demonstrate this triad of defects. We describe three patients with the Mardini-Nyhan association which may represent a distinct entity, although this remains uncertain at present. A fourth patient is also described, the sister of one of the other patients, with complex congenital cardiac disease and bilateral lung lobation abnormalities. This is the first reported incidence of a possible recurrence within a family and suggests, together with the consanguinity observed by Mardini and Nyhan, that recessive inheritance should be considered in genetic counseling for this disorder.

  19. Parental consanguinity and family history of coronary artery disease strongly predict early stenosis.

    PubMed

    Youhanna, Sonia; Platt, Daniel E; Rebeiz, Abdallah; Lauridsen, Michael; Deeb, Mary E; Nasrallah, Antoine; Alam, Samir; Puzantian, Houry; Kabbani, Samer; Ghoul, Melanie; Zreik, Tony G; el Bayeh, Hamid; Abchee, Antoine; Zalloua, Pierre

    2010-10-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a multifactorial disease with acquired and inherited components. We investigated the roles of family history and consanguinity on CAD risk and age at diagnosis in 4284 patients. The compounded impact of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, smoking, and BMI, which are known CAD risk factors, on CAD risk and age at diagnosis was also explored. CAD was determined by cardiac catheterization. Logistic regression and stratification were performed to determine the impact of family history and consanguinity on risk and onset of CAD, controlling for diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, smoking, and BMI. Family history of CAD and gender significantly increased the risk for young age at diagnosis of CAD (p<0.001). Consanguinity did not promote risk of CAD (p=0.38), but did affect age of disease diagnosis (p<0.001). The mean age at disease diagnosis was lowest, 54.8 years, when both family history of CAD and consanguinity were considered as unique risk factors for CAD, compared to 62.8 years for the no-risk-factor patient category (p<0.001). Family history of CAD and smoking are strongly associated with young age at diagnosis. Furthermore, parental consanguinity in the presence of family history lowers the age of disease diagnosis significantly for CAD, emphasizing the role of strong genetic and cultural CAD modifiers. These findings highlight the increased role of genetic determinants of CAD in some population subgroups, and suggest that populations and family structure influence genetic heterogeneity between patients with CAD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antitumour and antioxidant potential of some selected Pakistani honeys.

    PubMed

    Noor, Nadia; Sarfraz, Raja Adil; Ali, Shaukat; Shahid, Muhammad

    2014-01-15

    Antitumour potential of honey is attributed to its excellent antioxidant activity which in turn depends on the geographical origin. The present study focuses on exploration of antioxidant and antitumour potential as well as total phenolic contents (TPC) of 58 Pakistani honeys involving spectrochemical techniques and potato disk assay. Agrobacterium tumefaciens was used to induce tumours in potato disks. All analysed honey samples exhibited 1.33±0.00-155.16±0.98mg/100g of TPC, 50% 2,2-diphenyl picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) inhibition, ⩾7.36±0.43-39.86±2.34mg/100g qurecitin equivalent antioxidant contents, ⩾13.69±0.91-65.50±1.37mg/100g ascorbic acid equivalent antioxidant contents, 64.65±0.43-1780.74±11.79mM ferric reducing antioxidant power and 60% peroxide inhibition. Antitumour activity observed for 43 natural and 10 commercial samples was ⩾20%. Two samples from Faisalabad region showed 87.50±5.50% and 79.00±5.56% antitumour activity which were reference standard. It was concluded that Pakistani honeys possessed excellent antioxidant and antitumour potential overall. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sickness, dreams and moral selfhood among migrant Pakistani Muslims.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Kaveri

    2010-12-01

    This paper draws from two years of fieldwork investigating the social course of illness among Pakistani Muslims in East London, exploring how chronic illness is communicated and negotiated in local worlds disrupted by migrancy. It examines episodic short stories about dreams, premonitions and uncanny coincidences that were prominent within the illness narratives of migrant Pakistani Muslims, recalling and throwing light on complex questions concerning subjective constructions of misfortune, the personal and social meanings of illness and the relationships between narrative and selfhood. The ethnography identifies a strong normative context of communication about ill health and bad news, within which revelation through the mode of the supernatural takes on added significance. Recurrent motifs in the dreams emphasize the connectedness between family members scattered across migratory contexts, and the reawakening of moral obligations in families. Whilst medical anthropology has understood descriptions of dreams and other uncanny experiences as 'subjunctivising tactics' serving to maintain alternative plots about the source and outcome of illness, in the Islamic context the narrating of supernatural encounters can have transformative effects, re-organising praxis and conferring legitimacy to certain forms of moral selfhood. The paper therefore argues that the notion of the 'subjunctive mode' imposes the analysts' own system of logic and that there is a need to understand the interpretive frameworks present in the illness narratives in their own terms.

  2. Pakistani Pharmacy Students’ Perception About Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Shahzad; Malik, Farnaz; Hameed, Abdul; Ahmed, Safia; Riaz, Humayun; Abbasi, Naila

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To assess Pakistani pharmacy students’ perceptions of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), the frequency with which they use CAM, and barriers to use of CAM. Method. A CAM health belief questionnaire was administered to 595 students enrolled in a 5-year doctor of pharmacy program (PharmD) in Pakistan. Results. Attitudes of students towards CAM were positive. Lack of evidence supporting CAM practices was considered to be the major barrier toward more students using CAM. A majority of students (79%) agreed that clinical care should integrate conventional medicine and CAM practices. Many CAM-based therapies, such as dietary supplements, massage, herbal medicines, and homoeopathic medicines were used by the students. Significant gender differences in attitude were observed, with male students having more conservative attitudes toward CAM use. A high percentage of students desired more training in CAM. Conclusions. Pakistani students exhibited positive attitudes about the value of CAM and most felt that CAM should be included in the PharmD curriculum. PMID:22438593

  3. The role of Pakistani dentists in tobacco cessation.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Rubina; Khan, Ayyaz Ali; Moeen, Faisal; Noor, Nouman; Humayun, Sadaf

    2008-12-01

    To assess Pakistani dentists' ability, willingness and perceived barriers to carry out tobacco cessation activities for their patients in the dental office. The study is limited to the smoking form of tobacco use. Using a structured questionnaire for a cross sectional study, 239 full time or part time practising licensed dentists based in Islamabad and Rawalpindi were recruited by two sampling techniques; convenience and cluster sampling. Participation rate was 66.2%. Based on the characteristics, the study population is assumed representative of the average Pakistani dentist. Prevalence of smoking amongst dentists was 20.3%. Only one-third rated their knowledge and ability regarding tobacco cessation messages as good/excellent. The majority of the dentists considered tobacco cessation activity as peripheral to their profession. The main barrier to performing tobacco cessation interventions was cited as gender. Dentists exhibit a superficial approach to delivery of smoking cessation care. It is recommended that dentists be trained in delivering effective tobacco dependence intervention, using the WHO/FDI advocacy guide for oral health professionals, modified to incorporate gender oriented culturally sensitive doctor-patient interaction. Tobacco cessation clinics should also be set up in private and public sectors to augment the dentists' participation.

  4. Assessment of Gender Dimorphism on Sagittal Cephalometry in Pakistani Population.

    PubMed

    Qamruddin, Irfan; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Shahid, Fazal; Tanveer, Sadaf; Mukhtiar, Marvi; Asim, Zainab

    2016-05-01

    To determine and compare the cephalometric values among Pakistani males and females using commonly used sagittal skeletal measurements (ANB, Wits appraisal, Beta-angle) and newly developed cephalometric analyses (Yen-angle and W-angle). Observational, cross-sectional study. Orthodontic Department of Baqai Medical University, Karachi, Pakistan, from August to October 2013. Atotal of 209 pre-treatment lateral cephalometric radiographs of orthodontic patients were selected from departmental records, comprised of 92 males and 117 females. Radiographs were traced for measurements of ANB, Wits appraisal, Beta-angle, W-angle and Yen-angle. Patients were categorized into skeletal classes I, II, and III on the basis of performed measurements, incisor classification, and profile recorded from their records. Descriptive analysis was used to obtain median interquartile range in both the genders and Mann-Whitney U-test was used to observe gender dimorphism. Skeletal class II was the most prevalent type of malocclusion. There were no difference in the obtained measurements between males and females except the Wits appraisal and Beta-angle in class II patients, which showed significant difference in values (p < 0.05). Pakistani population has no significant different difference in the craniofacial morphology of males and females, with the exception of Wits-appraisal and Beta-angle in class II cases.

  5. Novel mutations in the genes TGM1 and ALOXE3 underlying autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Rahim; Ansar, Muhammad; Durrani, Zaka Ullah; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Muhammad, Dost; Ali, Mahboob; Zia, Muhammad; Ayub, Muhammad; Khan, Suliman; Smith, Josh D; Nickerson, Deborah A; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael; Leal, Suzanne M; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-05-01

    Ichthyoses are clinically characterized by scaling or hyperkeratosis of the skin or both. It can be an isolated condition limited to the skin or appear secondarily with involvement of other cutaneous or systemic abnormalities. The present study investigated clinical and molecular characterization of three consanguineous families (A, B, C) segregating two different forms of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI). Linkage in three consanguineous families (A, B, C) segregating two different forms of ARCI was searched by typing microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism marker analysis. Sequencing of the two genes TGM1 and ALOXE3 was performed by the dideoxy chain termination method. Genome-wide linkage analysis established linkage in family A to TGM1 gene on chromosome 14q11 and in families B and C to ALOXE3 gene on chromosome 17p13. Subsequently, sequencing of these genes using samples from affected family members led to the identification of three novel mutations: a missense variant p.Trp455Arg in TGM1 (family A); a nonsense variant p.Arg140* in ALOXE3 (family B); and a complex rearrangement in ALOXE3 (family C). The present study further extends the spectrum of mutations in the two genes involved in causing ARCI. Characterizing the clinical spectrum resulting from mutations in the TGM1 and ALOXE3 genes will improve diagnosis and may direct clinical care of the family members. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  6. Novel mutations in the genes TGM1 and ALOXE3 underlying autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Rahim; Ansar, Muhammad; Durrani, Zaka Ullah; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Muhammad, Dost; Ali, Mahboob; Zia, Muhammad; Ayub, Muhammad; Khan, Suliman; Smith, Josh D.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael; Leal, Suzanne M.; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Background Ichthyoses are clinically characterized by scaling or hyperkeratosis of the skin or both. It can be an isolated condition limited to the skin or appear secondarily with involvement of other cutaneous or systemic abnormalities. Methods The present study investigated clinical and molecular characterization of three consanguineous families (A, B, C) segregating two different forms of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI). Linkage in three consanguineous families (A, B, C) segregating two different forms of ARCI was searched by typing microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism marker analysis. Sequencing of the two genes TGM1 and ALOXE3 was performed by the dideoxy chain termination method. Results Genome-wide linkage analysis established linkage in family A to TGM1 gene on chromosome 14q11 and in families B and C to ALOXE3 gene on chromosome 17p13. Subsequently, sequencing of these genes using samples from affected family members led to the identification of three novel mutations: a missense variant p.Trp455Arg in TGM1 (family A); a nonsense variant p.Arg140* in ALOXE3 (family B); and a complex rearrangement in ALOXE3 (family C). Conclusion The present study further extends the spectrum of mutations in the two genes involved in causing ARCI. Characterizing the clinical spectrum resulting from mutations in the TGM1 and ALOXE3 genes will improve diagnosis and may direct clinical care of the family members. PMID:26578203

  7. A novel GDAP1 mutation 439delA is associated with autosomal recessive CMT disease.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Domna-Maria; Nicolaou, Paschalis; Chitayat, David; Koutsou, Pantelitsa; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Vajsar, Jiri; Murphy, Jillian; Christodoulou, Kyproula

    2006-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common form of inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. Based on neurophysiological and neuropathological criteria CMT has been sub-classified into two main types: demyelinating and axonal. Furthermore, it is genetically heterogeneous with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive (AR) and X-linked modes of inheritance. Thus far, seven genes have been identified in association with the demyelinating AR-CMT disease. We hereby report our clinical and molecular genetic findings in a consanguineous family with AR-CMT. Two young sisters with AR-CMT and other non-affected family members were clinically and electrophysiologically evaluated and then molecular genetic investigation was carried out in order to identify the pathogenic mutation. Following an initial indication for linkage of the family to the CMT4A locus on chromosome 8, we sequenced the Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 1 (GDAP1) gene and identified a single nucleotide deletion in exon 3 that is associated with AR-CMT in the family. We identified a novel GDAP1 439delA mutation that is associated with AR-CMT in a consanguineous family of Iranian descent with two affected young girls and a history in other members of the family.

  8. Differences in Physical Activity during School Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgers, Nicola D.; Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Welk, Gregory J.; Siahpush, Mohammad; Huberty, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Background: School recess provides a daily opportunity for physical activity engagement. The purpose of this study was to examine physical activity levels during recess by gender, ethnicity, and grade, and establish the contribution of recess to daily school physical activity levels. Methods: Two hundred and ten children (45% boys) from grades 3…

  9. Local differences in the Archbishopric of Santiago de Compostela (Galicia, Spain) in relation to the consanguinity structure, 1900-1979.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sellero, C; Fariña, J; Aínsua, R L; Varela, T A

    2001-08-01

    The microgeographic variability of consanguinity in the Archbishopric of Santiago de Compostela (Galicia) between 1900 and 1979 was studied. This Archbishopric covers 106 local councils integrated by 964 parishes, of which 677 (70.23%) were analyzed. Of the 307,094 marriages counted within this period, 15,739 corresponded to weddings between biologically related couples. Within the Archbishopric, eight geographical regions were considered: six coastal regions (Golfo Artabro, Bergantiños, Fisterra, Xallas, Santiago Oeste, and Rías Baixas) and two inland regions (Santiago Este and Terra de Montes). In order to evaluate the differences and similarities among them, the frequencies of all types of marriages (consanguineous and nonconsanguineous) were considered. First, a hierarchical grouping of the regions based on their chi-squared distances was performed. Then, in order to analyze relationships that are exclusively due to the structure of consanguinity, a correspondence analysis was performed and only the frequency of the different types of consanguineous marriages was taken into account. The results from both statistical analyses indicate special features of the Xallas region, both in the level of inbreeding (8.75%, the highest in the Archbishopric) and in the structure of consanguinity, for which a high proportion of uncle-niece marriages was found (6.22% of all consanguineous marriages). In all cases the structure of consanguinity provides informative nuances on the differences and similarities among population groups.

  10. Autosomal recessive peripheral sensory neuropathy in 3 non-Ashkenazi Jewish families.

    PubMed Central

    Tamari, I; Goodman, R M; Sarova, I; Hertz, M; Adar, R; Zvibach, T

    1980-01-01

    Three unrelated Oriental Jewish families with a total of eight subjects with progressive hereditary sensory neuropathy are reported. The parents were all unaffected and because of parental consanguinity in each of the three families it is postulated that this rare neurological disorder is transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner. In one family both parents showed an abnormal response to pain stimulation with normal motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity. This response may be an expression of the carrier state for this hereditary disease. Only five other families (non-Jewish) have been reported as having this form of peripheral hereditary sensory neuropathy. These observations suggest that one type, the progressive form, of peripheral hereditary sensory neuropathy may be more common in Oriental Jews. Images PMID:6937618

  11. New Recessive Syndrome of Microcephaly, Cerebellar Hypoplasia, and Congenital Heart Conduction Defect

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Maha S; Salam, Ghada M H Abdel; Saleem, Sahar N; Dobyns, William B; Issa, Mahmoud Y; Sattar, Shifteh; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2011-01-01

    We identified a two-branch consanguineous family in which four affected members (three females and one male) presented with constitutive growth delay, severe psychomotor retardation, microcephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia, and second-degree heart block. They also shared distinct facial features and similar appearance of their hands and feet. Childhood-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus developed in one affected child around the age of 9 years. Molecular analysis excluded mutations in potentially related genes such as PTF1A, EIF2AK3, EOMES, and WDR62. This condition appears to be unique of other known conditions, suggesting a unique clinical entity of autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22002884

  12. Rapid multipoint linkage analysis of recessive traits in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglyak, L.; Daly, M.J.; Lander, E.S. |

    1995-02-01

    Homozygosity mapping is a powerful strategy for mapping rare recessive traits in children of consanguineous marriages. Practical applications of this strategy are currently limited by the inability of conventional linkage analysis software to compute, in reasonable time, multipoint LOD scores for pedigrees with inbreeding loops. We have developed a new algorithm for rapid multipoint likelihood calculations in small pedigrees, including those with inbreeding loops. The running time of the algorithm grows, at most, linearly with the number of loci considered simultaneously. The running time is not sensitive to the presence of inbreeding loops, missing genotype information, and highly polymorphic loci. We have incorporated this algorithm into a software package, MAPMAKER/HOMOZ, that allows very rapid multipoint mapping of disease genes in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping. Multipoint analysis with dozens of markers can be carried out in minutes on a personal workstation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Further evidence of the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of recessive transgressive PPK in the Mediterranean region.

    PubMed

    Charfeddine, Cherine; Mokni, Mourad; Kassar, Selma; Zribi, Hela; Bouchlaka, Chiraz; Boubaker, Samir; Rebai, Ahmed; Ben Osman, Amel; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2006-01-01

    Transgressive palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) is the phenotypic hallmark of Mal de Meleda (MDM, MIM 24300). It is characterized by erythema and hyperkeratosis that extend to the dorsal face of the hands and feet. The disease is distributed worldwide and includes the Mediterranean population. The gene responsible for MDM, ARS (component B) mapped on chromosome 8qter, encodes for the SLURP-1 protein (Ly-6/uPAR related protein-1). A variety of mutations within the ARS gene have been shown to underlie MDM in different populations. Genetic heterogeneity of MDM is suspected. We have recently shown that three different homozygous mutations (82delT, C77R, C99Y) were responsible for MDM in 17 patients from Northern Tunisia belonging to eight unrelated consanguineous families. We report here a Tunisian family with three siblings presenting with recessive transgressive PPK closely resembling the MDM phenotype that excludes linkage to the ARS gene.

  14. Are streamflow recession characteristics really characteristic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoelzle, M.; Stahl, K.; Weiler, M.

    2013-02-01

    Streamflow recession has been investigated by a variety of methods, often involving the fit of a model to empirical recession plots to parameterize a non-linear storage-outflow relationship based on the dQ/dt-Q method. Such recession analysis methods (RAMs) are used to estimate hydraulic conductivity, storage capacity, or aquifer thickness and to model streamflow recession curves for regionalization and prediction at the catchment scale. Numerous RAMs have been published, but little is known about how comparably the resulting recession models distinguish characteristic catchment behavior. In this study we combined three established recession extraction methods with three different parameter-fitting methods to the power-law storage-outflow model to compare the range of recession characteristics that result from the application of these different RAMs. Resulting recession characteristics including recession time and corresponding storage depletion were evaluated for 20 meso-scale catchments in Germany. We found plausible ranges for model parameterization; however, calculated recession characteristics varied over two orders of magnitude. While recession characteristics of the 20 catchments derived with the different methods correlate strongly, particularly for the RAMs that use the same extraction method, not all rank the catchments consistently, and the differences among some of the methods are larger than among the catchments. To elucidate this variability we discuss the ambiguous roles of recession extraction procedures and the parameterization of the storage-outflow model and the limitations of the presented recession plots. The results suggest strong limitations to the comparability of recession characteristics derived with different methods, not only in the model parameters but also in the relative characterization of different catchments. A multiple-methods approach to investigating streamflow recession characteristics should be considered for applications

  15. Are streamflow recession characteristics really characteristic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoelzle, M.; Stahl, K.; Weiler, M.

    2012-09-01

    Streamflow recession has been investigated by a variety of methods, often involving the fit of a model to empirical recession plots to parameterize a non-linear storage-outflow relationship. Such recession analysis methods (RAMs) are used to estimate hydraulic conductivity, storage capacity, or aquifer thickness and to model streamflow recession curves for regionalization and prediction at the catchment scale. Numerous RAMs have been published, but little is known about how characteristic the resulting recession models are to distinguish characteristic catchment behavior. In this study we combined three established recession extraction methods with three different parameter-fitting methods to the power-law storage-outflow model to compare the range of recession characteristics that result from the application of these different RAMs. Resulting recession characteristics including recession time and corresponding storage depletion were evaluated for 20 meso-scale catchments in Germany. We found plausible ranges for model parameterization, however, calculated recession characteristics varied over two orders of magnitude. While recession characteristics of the 20 catchments derived with the different methods correlate strongly, particularly for the RAMs that use the same extraction method and while they rank the catchments relatively consistent, there are still considerable differences among the methods. To elucidate this variability we discuss the ambiguous roles of recession extraction procedures and the parameterization of storage-outflow model and the limitations of the presented recession plots. The results suggest strong limitations to the comparability of recession characteristics derived with different methods, not only in the model parameters but also in the relative characterization of different catchments. A multiple methods approach to investigate streamflow recession characteristics should be considered for applications whenever possible.

  16. Mutations in MYO1H cause a recessive form of central hypoventilation with autonomic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, Malte; Hernandez-Miranda, Luis R; Ceccherini, Isabella; Weese-Mayer, Debra E; Kragesteen, Bjørt K; Harabula, Izabela; Krawitz, Peter; Birchmeier, Carmen; Leonard, Norma; Mundlos, Stefan

    2017-08-04

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a rare life-threatening disorder of respiratory and autonomic regulation. It is classically caused by dominant mutations in the transcription factor PHOX2B. The objective of the present study was to identify the molecular cause of a recessive form of central hypoventilation with autonomic dysfunction. Here, we used homozygosity mapping and whole-genome sequencing in a consanguineous family with CCHS in combination with functional analyses in CRISPR/Cas9 engineered mice. We report on a consanguineous family with three affected children, all tested PHOX2B mutation negative, presenting with alveolar hypoventilation and symptoms of autonomic dysregulation. Whole-genome sequencing revealed a homozygous frameshift mutation in exon 25 of the MYO1H gene (c.2524_2524delA) segregating with the phenotype in the family. MYO1H encodes for the unconventional myosin IH, which is thought to function as a motor protein in intracellular transport and vesicle trafficking. We show that Myo1h is broadly expressed in the mouse lower medulla, including the CO2-sensitive Phox2b+ retrotrapezoid neurons. To test the pathogenicity of the variant, we engineered two Myo1h mutant mouse strains: the first strain (Myo1h*) resembling the human mutation and the second being a full knock-out (Myo1h(FS) ). Whole-body plethysmography studies in Myo1h* newborns with the re-engineered human mutation revealed hypoventilation and a blunted response to CO2, recapitulating the breathing phenotype observed in the kindred. Our results identify MYO1H as an important gene in CO2 sensitivity and respiratory control and as the cause of a rare recessive form of congenital central hypoventilation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. A novel missense mutation in the EVC gene underlies Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in a Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Umm-E-Kalsoom; Wasif, Naveed; Tariq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim

    2010-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skeletal, ectodermal and cardiac defects. This syndrome is caused by mutations in EVC and EVC2 genes, which are separated by 2.6 kb of genomic sequence on chromosome 4p16. In the present study we ascertained a four-generation pedigree of Pakistani origin with features of EVC. Linkage was searched by genotyping microsatellite markers linked to chromosome 4p16. Affected individuals showed homozygosity to the microsatellite markers tightly linked to EVC and EVC2 genes on chromosome 4p16. It was then subjected to direct sequencing of the EVC and EVC2 genes. Mutation analysis of the EVC and EVC2 genes identified a novel missense change (c.617G>A; p.S206N) in the EVC gene. We herein report on the first family from Pakistan with a large number of individuals affected by EVC. DNA sequence analysis led to the identification of the fifth missense mutation in the EVC gene.

  18. Molecular genetics of MARVELD2 and clinical phenotype in Pakistani and Slovak families segregating DFNB49 hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Gowri; Varga, Lukas; Trincot, Claire; Shahzad, Mohsin; Friedman, Penelope L; Klimes, Iwar; Greinwald, John H; Riazuddin, S Amer; Masindova, Ivica; Profant, Milan; Khan, Shaheen N; Friedman, Thomas B; Ahmed, Zubair M; Gasperikova, Daniela; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, Saima

    2015-04-01

    Pathogenic mutations of MARVELD2, encoding tricellulin, a tricelluar tight junction protein, cause autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNB49) in families of Pakistan and Czech Roma origin. In fact, they are a significant cause of prelingual hearing loss in the Czech Roma, second only to GJB2 variants. Previously, we reported that mice homozygous for p.Arg497* variant of Marveld2 had a broad phenotypic spectrum, where defects were observed in the inner ear, heart, mandibular salivary gland, thyroid gland and olfactory epithelium. The current study describes the types and frequencies of MARVELD2 alleles and clinically reexamines members of DFNB49 families. We found that MARVELD2 variants are responsible for about 1.5 % (95 % CI 0.8-2.6) of non-syndromic hearing loss in our cohort of 800 Pakistani families. The c.1331+2T>C allele is recurrent. In addition, we identified a novel large deletion in a single family, which appears to have resulted from non-allelic homologous recombination between two similar Alu short interspersed elements. Finally, we observed no other clinical manifestations co-segregating with hearing loss in DFNB49 human families, and hypothesize that the additional abnormalities in the Marveld2 mutant mouse indicates a critical non-redundant function for tricellulin in other organ systems.

  19. U.S.-Pakistani Nuclear Relations: A Strategic Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    buy -­‐in   from  establishment  elites.    Even  when  government  policymakers  fail  to  embrace  Track  II...to  maintain   Pakistan’s  “ buy -­‐in”  for  the  global  export  control  regime.   While  the  debate  over  export...Pakistan’s   ‘ buy -­‐in’  for  the  global   export  control   regime.”   U.S.-­‐Pakistani  Nuclear

  20. Antipyretic studies on some indigenous Pakistani medicinal plants: II.

    PubMed

    Ikram, M; Khattak, S G; Gilani, S N

    1987-01-01

    Eight Pakistani medicinal plants were investigated for antipyretic activity in rabbits receiving subcutaneous yeast injections. Hexane- and chloroform-soluble extracts of Aconitum napellus stems, Corchorus depressus whole plant and Gmelina asiatica roots exhibited prominent oral antipyretic activity while insignificant antipyretic effects were found in the hexane- and chloroform-soluble portions of Melia azadirachta seeds, Tinospora cordifolia stems and Vitex trifolia seeds. No antipyretic actions whatsoever were produced by extracts of A. heterophyllum roots and Hedysarum alhagi aerial parts. Toxicity studies revealed no noteworthy toxic or adverse effects for any of the above plant extracts up to the highest oral doses of 1.6 g/kg except in the case of A. napellus.

  1. Chance for India to stop the Pakistani bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, L.S.

    1987-11-01

    India would be far better off it, by adopting cautious restraints on its own nuclear activities, it could obtain firm limits on Pakistan's. Moreover, since the US has been long seeking such restraints from India, New Delhi might be able to strike a bargain under which the United States, in return for India's gesture, would withhold the sale of certain conventional weapon systems to Pakistan that India finds threatening. Thus India could improve its position on both the nuclear and conventional fronts. In November 1986, Brazil invited Argentine nuclear technicians to visit a key classified nuclear installation in Sao Paulo. This July, Argentina reciprocated by permitting Brazilian President Jose Sarney to visit its most sensitive nuclear facility. These events demonstrate that, with far-sighted statesmanship, regional nuclear rivalries need not be irreversible. Indo-Pakistani nuclear tensions could be greatly eased if Prime Minister Gandhi and President Zia seize the opportunity now at hand.

  2. Consanguinity and other marriage market effects of a wealth shock in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mobarak, Ahmed Mushfiq; Kuhn, Randall; Peters, Christina

    2013-10-01

    This paper uses a wealth shock from the construction of a flood protection embankment in rural Bangladesh coupled with data on the universe of all 52,000 marriage decisions between 1982 and 1996 to examine changes in marital prospects for households protected by the embankment relative to unprotected households living on the other side of the river. We use difference-in-difference specifications to document that brides from protected households commanded larger dowries, married wealthier households, and became less likely to marry biological relatives. Financial liquidity-constrained households appear to use within-family marriage (in which one can promise ex-post payments) as a form of credit to meet up-front dowry demands, but the resultant wealth shock for households protected by the embankment relaxed this need to marry consanguineously. Our results shed light on the socioeconomic roots of consanguinity, which carries health risks for offspring but can also carry substantial benefits for the families involved.

  3. Institutional Protocol to Manage Consanguinity Detected by Genetic Testing in Pregnancy in a Minor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Laura P.; Beck, Anita E.; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Chow, Penny M.; Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Wiester, Rebecca T.

    2015-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and other types of genetic tests have the potential to detect first-degree consanguinity and uncover parental rape in cases of minor teenage pregnancy. We present 2 cases in which genetic testing identified parental rape of a minor teenager. In case 1, single-nucleotide polymorphism array in a patient with multiple developmental abnormalities demonstrated multiple long stretches of homozygosity, revealing parental rape of a teenage mother. In case 2, a vague maternal sexual assault history and diagnosis of Pompe disease by direct gene sequencing identified parental rape of a minor. Given the medical, legal, and ethical implications of such revelations, a protocol was developed at our institution to manage consanguinity identified via genetic testing. PMID:25687148

  4. Rate of Parental Consanguineous Marriage among Patients with Visual Impairments in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    AKKAYA, Sezen

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to describe the causes, characteristics, and rate of parental consanguineous marriage associated with patients with visual impairments in Turkey. This study involved 236 patients with visual impairments. The 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases was used to categorize the causes of visual impairments (based on the main cause in both eyes). The mean age of the patients was 38.5 ± 24.2 years (range, 6–95 years), and most were in the 15–30-year age group (35.6%). There were more male patients (65%) than female patients. Blindness, severe visual impairment, and mild to moderate visual impairment were observed in 30 (12.7%), 84 (35.6%), and 122 (51.6%) patients, respectively. Choroidal and retinal diseases were identified as the main underlying cause of visual impairment (62.7%), followed by nystagmus (23.7%), optic tract and nerve diseases (11.0%), congenital cataracts (0.8%), and glaucoma (1.7%). Parental consanguinity was present for 26.3% of the patients, and it was significantly more common in the 15–30-year age group (50%) compared to the other age groups. In Turkey, the main cause of visual impairment was choroid and retinal diseases in all the age groups above 14 years, while nystagmus was the most common cause in the age group below 15 years. Parental consanguinity was significantly higher among the patients with macular dystrophy and those with retinitis pigmentosa than with retinopathy of prematurity, optic nerve diseases, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. Genetic factors are known to be involved in the development of these diseases, indicating that the issue of consanguineous marriage remains a problem in Turkey. PMID:28293658

  5. Phenotypes of Recessive Pediatric Cataract in a Cohort of Children with Identified Homozygous Gene Mutations (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis).

    PubMed

    Khan, Arif O; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-01-01

    To assess for phenotype-genotype correlations in families with recessive pediatric cataract and identified gene mutations. Retrospective review (2004 through 2013) of 26 Saudi Arabian apparently nonsyndromic pediatric cataract families referred to one of the authors (A.O.K.) and for which recessive gene mutations were identified. Fifteen different homozygous recessive gene mutations were identified in the 26 consanguineous families; two genes and five families are novel to this study. Ten families had a founder CRYBB1 deletion (all with bilateral central pulverulent cataract), two had the same missense mutation in CRYAB (both with bilateral juvenile cataract with marked variable expressivity), and two had different mutations in FYCO1 (both with bilateral posterior capsular abnormality). The remaining 12 families each had mutations in 12 different genes (CRYAA, CRYBA1, AKR1E2, AGK, BFSP2, CYP27A1, CYP51A1, EPHA2, GCNT2, LONP1, RNLS, WDR87) with unique phenotypes noted for CYP27A1 (bilateral juvenile fleck with anterior and/or posterior capsular cataract and later cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis), EPHA2 (bilateral anterior persistent fetal vasculature), and BFSP2 (bilateral flecklike with cloudy cortex). Potential carrier signs were documented for several families. In this recessive pediatric cataract case series most identified genes are noncrystallin. Recessive pediatric cataract phenotypes are generally nonspecific, but some notable phenotypes are distinct and associated with specific gene mutations. Marked variable expressivity can occur from a recessive missense CRYAB mutation. Genetic analysis of apparently isolated pediatric cataract can sometimes uncover mutations in a syndromic gene. Some gene mutations seem to be associated with apparent heterozygous carrier signs.

  6. Phenotypes of Recessive Pediatric Cataract in a Cohort of Children with Identified Homozygous Gene Mutations (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif O.; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess for phenotype-genotype correlations in families with recessive pediatric cataract and identified gene mutations. Methods: Retrospective review (2004 through 2013) of 26 Saudi Arabian apparently nonsyndromic pediatric cataract families referred to one of the authors (A.O.K.) and for which recessive gene mutations were identified. Results: Fifteen different homozygous recessive gene mutations were identified in the 26 consanguineous families; two genes and five families are novel to this study. Ten families had a founder CRYBB1 deletion (all with bilateral central pulverulent cataract), two had the same missense mutation in CRYAB (both with bilateral juvenile cataract with marked variable expressivity), and two had different mutations in FYCO1 (both with bilateral posterior capsular abnormality). The remaining 12 families each had mutations in 12 different genes (CRYAA, CRYBA1, AKR1E2, AGK, BFSP2, CYP27A1, CYP51A1, EPHA2, GCNT2, LONP1, RNLS, WDR87) with unique phenotypes noted for CYP27A1 (bilateral juvenile fleck with anterior and/or posterior capsular cataract and later cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis), EPHA2 (bilateral anterior persistent fetal vasculature), and BFSP2 (bilateral flecklike with cloudy cortex). Potential carrier signs were documented for several families. Conclusions: In this recessive pediatric cataract case series most identified genes are noncrystallin. Recessive pediatric cataract phenotypes are generally nonspecific, but some notable phenotypes are distinct and associated with specific gene mutations. Marked variable expressivity can occur from a recessive missense CRYAB mutation. Genetic analysis of apparently isolated pediatric cataract can sometimes uncover mutations in a syndromic gene. Some gene mutations seem to be associated with apparent heterozygous carrier signs. PMID:26622071

  7. Mutations in NSUN2 Cause Autosomal- Recessive Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi-Moheb, Lia; Mertel, Sara; Gonsior, Melanie; Nouri-Vahid, Leyla; Kahrizi, Kimia; Cirak, Sebahattin; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Motazacker, M. Mahdi; Esmaeeli-Nieh, Sahar; Cremer, Kirsten; Weißmann, Robert; Tzschach, Andreas; Garshasbi, Masoud; Abedini, Seyedeh S.; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, H. Hilger; Sigrist, Stephan J.; Kuss, Andreas W.

    2012-01-01

    With a prevalence between 1 and 3%, hereditary forms of intellectual disability (ID) are among the most important problems in health care. Particularly, autosomal-recessive forms of the disorder have a very heterogeneous molecular basis, and genes with an increased number of disease-causing mutations are not common. Here, we report on three different mutations (two nonsense mutations, c.679C>T [p.Gln227∗] and c.1114C>T [p.Gln372∗], as well as one splicing mutation, g.6622224A>C [p.Ile179Argfs∗192]) that cause a loss of the tRNA-methyltransferase-encoding NSUN2 main transcript in homozygotes. We identified the mutations by sequencing exons and exon-intron boundaries within the genomic region where the linkage intervals of three independent consanguineous families of Iranian and Kurdish origin overlapped with the previously described MRT5 locus. In order to gain further evidence concerning the effect of a loss of NSUN2 on memory and learning, we constructed a Drosophila model by deleting the NSUN2 ortholog, CG6133, and investigated the mutants by using molecular and behavioral approaches. When the Drosophila melanogaster NSUN2 ortholog was deleted, severe short-term-memory (STM) deficits were observed; STM could be rescued by re-expression of the wild-type protein in the nervous system. The humans homozygous for NSUN2 mutations showed an overlapping phenotype consisting of moderate to severe ID and facial dysmorphism (which includes a long face, characteristic eyebrows, a long nose, and a small chin), suggesting that mutations in this gene might even induce a syndromic form of ID. Moreover, our observations from the Drosophila model point toward an evolutionarily conserved role of RNA methylation in normal cognitive development. PMID:22541559

  8. Genetically heterogeneous selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin B12: founder effects, consanguinity, and high clinical awareness explain aggregations in Scandinavia and the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Stephan M; Li, Zhongyuan; Bisson, Ryan; Acar, Ceren; Oner, Cihan; Oner, Reyhan; Cetin, Mualla; Abdelaal, Mohamed A; Ismail, Essam A; Lissens, Willy; Krahe, Ralf; Broch, Harald; Gräsbeck, Ralph; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2004-04-01

    Selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin B(12) causing juvenile megaloblastic anemia (MGA; MIM# 261100) is a recessively inherited disorder that is believed to be rare except for notable clusters of cases in Finland, Norway, and the Eastern Mediterranean region. The disease can be caused by mutations in either the cubilin (CUBN; MGA1; MIM# 602997) or the amnionless (AMN; MIM# 605799) gene. To explain the peculiar geographical distribution, we hypothesized that mutations in one of the genes would mainly be responsible for the disease in Scandinavia, and mutations in the other gene in the Mediterranean region. We studied 42 sibships and found all cases in Finland to be due to CUBN (three different mutations) and all cases in Norway to be due to AMN (two different mutations), while in Turkey, Israel, and Saudi Arabia, there were two different AMN mutations and three different CUBN mutations. Haplotype evidence excluded both CUBN and AMN conclusively in five families and tentatively in three families, suggesting the presence of at least one more gene locus that can cause MGA. We conclude that the Scandinavian cases are typical examples of enrichment by founder effects, while in the Mediterranean region high degrees of consanguinity expose rare mutations in both genes. We suggest that in both regions, physician awareness of this disease causes it to be more readily diagnosed than elsewhere; thus, it may well be more common worldwide than previously thought.

  9. Co-existence of phenylketonuria either with maple syrup urine disease or Sandhoff disease in two patients from Iran: emphasizing the role of consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Abiri, Maryam; Talebi, Saeed; Uitto, Jouni; Youssefian, Leila; Vahidnezhad, Hassan; Shirzad, Tina; Salehpour, Shadab; Zeinali, Sirous

    2016-10-01

    Most inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. IEMs are one of the major concerns in Iran due to its extensive consanguineous marriages. Herein, we report two patients with two co-existent IEMs: a girl affected by classic phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) and a male patient affected with Sandhoff disease and PKU, where Sandhoff disease was suspected due to the presence of a cherry-red spot in the eyes at 6 months which is unrelated to PKU. Sequencing of candidate genes in the first patient revealed one novel and three recurrent compound heterozygous mutations of p.Ser231Pro and p.Ala300Ser in the PAH gene and p.Glu330Lys and p.Arg170Cys mutations in the BCKDHB gene. Genetic testing results in the second patient showed previously reported homozygous mutations of p.Arg261Gln in the PAH and p.Arg533Cys mutation in the HEXB gene. Genetic testing confirmed the clinical diagnosis of both diseases in both patients. To the best of our knowledge; this is the first report of the co-existence of two distinct genetic disorders in two individuals from Iran. Co-existent different IEMs in patients complicated the clinical diagnosis and management of the diseases.

  10. Does gingival recession require surgical treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hsun-Liang; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; MacEachern, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Gingival recession represents a clinical condition in adults frequently encountered in the general dental practice. It is estimated that 23% of adults in the US have one or more tooth surfaces with ≥ 3 mm gingival recession. Clinicians often time face dilemmas of whether or not to treat such a condition surgically. Therefore, we were charged by the editorial board to answer this critical question: “Does gingival recession require surgical treatment?” An initial condensed literature search was performed using a combination of gingival recession and surgery controlled terms and keywords. An analysis of the search results highlights our limited understanding of the factors that often guide the treatment of gingival recession. Understanding the etiology, prognosis and treatment of gingival recession continues to offer many unanswered questions and challenges in the field of periodontics as we strive to provide the best care possible for our patients. PMID:26427577

  11. Nonsense mutations in the hairless gene underlie APL in five families of Pakistani origin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunmi; Wajid, Muhammad; Kraemer, Liv; Shimomura, Yutaka; Christiano, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    (1) Background Atrichia with papular lesions (APL) is a rare autosomal recessive form of inherited alopecia. Affected individuals present with a distinct pattern of total hair loss on the scalp, axilla and body shortly after birth and are essentially devoid of eyelashes and eyebrows. This form of hair loss is irreversible and the histology is consistent with an absence of mature hair follicles. In addition to total atrichia, APL patients also present with papules and follicular cysts filled with cornified material. Mutations in the Hairless (HR) gene have been shown to underlie APL. (2) Objective Here, we studied five unrelated large Pakistani families with clinical manifestations of APL. (3) Methods Based on previous reports of HR mutations in APL, we performed direct DNA sequencing analysis. (4) Results DNA sequencing of the HR gene in APL patients revealed three novel nonsense mutations in five unrelated families. All affected individuals were homozygous for a nonsense mutation due to C-to-T transitions at different positions in the amino acid sequence. Two families carry the mutation Q323X (CAG-TAG) in exon 3, two families harbor the mutation Q502X (CAG-TAG) in exon 6, and one family had a mutation at R940X (CGA-TGA) in exon 14. Haplotype analysis revealed that all affected individuals of both APL1 and APL16 families were homozygous for the same haplotype, and likewise, the mutation in families APL2 and APL19 was on the the same haplotype. (5) Conclusions We report three novel nonsense mutations in the HR gene in APL. Two of the newly identified mutations, Q323X and Q502X, were found to be shared between unrelated families and marker analysis confirmed an identical homozygous haplotype for APL1 and APL16, and for APL2 and APL19. These findings suggest that Q323X and Q502X did not arise independently, but instead appear to have been propagated in the population. Collectively, these findings contribute further evidence for the involvement of hairless mutations in

  12. Pendred syndrome in a large consanguineous Brazilian family caused by a homozygous mutation in the SLC26A4 gene.

    PubMed

    Lofrano-Porto, Adriana; Barra, Gustavo B; Nascimento, Paula P; Costa, Patrícia G G; Garcia, Erica C; Vaz, Rodrigo F; Batista, Ana R T; Freitas, Ana C R de; Cherulli, Bruno L B; Bahmad, Fayez; Figueiredo, Larissa G; Neves, Francisco A R; Casulari, Luiz Augusto

    2008-11-01

    Pendred Syndrome (PS) is an autossomal recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness, goiter and iodide organification defect. The hearing loss is associated with inner ear abnormalities, ranging from an isolated enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) to a typical coclear dysplasia. Mutations in the gene that encodes pendrin (SLC26A4), a chloride/iodide transporter, have been shown to be associated with PS. We describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of a large consanguineous family harboring a mutation in the SLC26A4 gene. The proband was a 26-year-old deaf Brazilian woman who presented a bulky multinodular goiter and hypothyroidism since puberty. Five other siblings were deaf: one brother had a similar phenotype, three siblings also had goiters but normal thyroid function tests, and one brother had only a subtle thyroid enlargement. Other 4 siblings had no thyroid or hearing disorder. Parents were first degree cousins and had normal hearing. The mother was healthy, except for subclinical hypothyroidism; the father was deceased. A perchlorate test in the proband showed a discharge of 21% of the incorporated iodide 2h after the administration of 1g of KClO4. Audiological examinations showed profound hearing loss in all deaf subjects; CT and MRI of the temporal bones showed EVA in all of them. Genomic DNA was isolated from whole blood, from the 6 affected and 4 unaffected siblings, the mother and control. The coding region of the PDS gene (exons 2-21), including exon/intron boundaries, were amplified by PCR and sequenced. A single base-pair (T) deletion at position 1197 of exon 10 was detected in homozygous state in the 6 deaf siblings. The mother and 2 unaffected siblings were heterozygous for this mutation, which has been described by Everett et al. The 1197delT mutation is predicted to result in a frameshift and a truncated protein. The existence of PS phenocopies and intrafamilial phenotypic variability are well documented. The definite

  13. A GLRA1 null mutation in recessive hyperekplexia challenges the functional role of glycine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.; Saul, M.; Becker, C.M.

    1996-05-01

    Dominant missense mutations in the human glycine receptor (GlyR) {alpha}1 subunit gene (GLRA1) give rise to hereditary hyperekplexia. These mutations impair agonist affinities and change conductance states of expressed mutant channels, resulting in a partial loss of function. In a recessive case of hyperekplexia, we found a deletion of exons 1-6 of the GLRA1 gene. Born to consanguineous parents, the affected child is homozygous for this GLRA1{sup null} allele consistent with a complete loss of gene function. The child displayed exaggerated startle responses and pronounced head-retraction jerks reflecting a disinhibition of vestigial brain-stem reflexes. In contrast, proprio- and exteroceptive inhibition of muscle activity previously correlated to glycinergic mechanisms were not affected. This case demonstrates that, in contrast to the lethal effect of a null allele in the recessive mouse mutant oscillator (Glra1{sup spd-ot}), the loss of the GlyR {alpha}1 subunit is effectively compensated in man. 38 refs.

  14. Autosomal Recessive Dilated Cardiomyopathy due to DOLK Mutations Results from Abnormal Dystroglycan O-Mannosylation

    PubMed Central

    Morava, Eva; Riemersma, Moniek; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke H. M.; Absmanner, Birgit; Verrijp, Kiek; van den Akker, Willem M. R.; Huijben, Karin; Steenbergen, Gerry; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Jozwiak, Adam; Zucker, Nili; Lorber, Avraham; Lammens, Martin; Knopf, Carlos; van Bokhoven, Hans; Grünewald, Stephanie; Lehle, Ludwig; Kapusta, Livia; Mandel, Hanna; Wevers, Ron A.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic causes for autosomal recessive forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are only rarely identified, although they are thought to contribute considerably to sudden cardiac death and heart failure, especially in young children. Here, we describe 11 young patients (5–13 years) with a predominant presentation of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Metabolic investigations showed deficient protein N-glycosylation, leading to a diagnosis of Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG). Homozygosity mapping in the consanguineous families showed a locus with two known genes in the N-glycosylation pathway. In all individuals, pathogenic mutations were identified in DOLK, encoding the dolichol kinase responsible for formation of dolichol-phosphate. Enzyme analysis in patients' fibroblasts confirmed a dolichol kinase deficiency in all families. In comparison with the generally multisystem presentation in CDG, the nonsyndromic DCM in several individuals was remarkable. Investigation of other dolichol-phosphate dependent glycosylation pathways in biopsied heart tissue indicated reduced O-mannosylation of alpha-dystroglycan with concomitant functional loss of its laminin-binding capacity, which has been linked to DCM. We thus identified a combined deficiency of protein N-glycosylation and alpha-dystroglycan O-mannosylation in patients with nonsyndromic DCM due to autosomal recessive DOLK mutations. PMID:22242004

  15. A recessive Nav1.4 mutation underlies congenital myasthenic syndrome with periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Habbout, Karima; Poulin, Hugo; Rivier, François; Giuliano, Serena; Sternberg, Damien; Fontaine, Bertrand; Eymard, Bruno; Morales, Raul Juntas; Echenne, Bernard; King, Louise; Hanna, Michael G.; Männikkö, Roope; Chahine, Mohamed; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the molecular basis of a complex phenotype of congenital muscle weakness observed in an isolated but consanguineous patient. Methods: The proband was evaluated clinically and neurophysiologically over a period of 15 years. Genetic testing of candidate genes was performed. Functional characterization of the candidate mutation was done in mammalian cell background using whole cell patch clamp technique. Results: The proband had fatigable muscle weakness characteristic of congenital myasthenic syndrome with acute and reversible attacks of most severe muscle weakness as observed in periodic paralysis. We identified a novel homozygous SCN4A mutation (p.R1454W) linked to this recessively inherited phenotype. The p.R1454W substitution induced an important enhancement of fast and slow inactivation, a slower recovery for these inactivated states, and a frequency-dependent regulation of Nav1.4 channels in the heterologous expression system. Conclusion: We identified a novel loss-of-function mutation of Nav1.4 that leads to a recessive phenotype combining clinical symptoms and signs of congenital myasthenic syndrome and periodic paralysis, probably by decreasing channel availability for muscle action potential genesis at the neuromuscular junction and propagation along the sarcolemma. PMID:26659129

  16. Clinical genomics can facilitate countrywide estimation of autosomal recessive disease burden.

    PubMed

    Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Sobahy, Turki; El-Kalioby, Mohamed; Patel, Nisha; Shamseldin, Hanan; Monies, Dorota; Al-Tassan, Nada; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Imtiaz, Faiqa; Shaheen, Ranad; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2016-12-01

    Most autosomal recessive diseases are rare, but they collectively account for a substantial proportion of disease burden, especially in consanguineous populations. Estimation of this disease burden, however, is hampered by many factors, including lack of countrywide registries. Establishing carrier frequency can be a practical surrogate to estimate disease burden, although the requirement of a large representative cohort may be challenging. We propose that the application of clinical genomics in the diagnostic setting offers a unique opportunity to estimate carrier frequency in the population as a secondary benefit. We used a data set of ~7,100 patients who underwent genomic testing for various Mendelian disorders to estimate the carrier frequency. We were able to calculate the frequency of 259 confirmed founder recessive mutations. We found the corresponding disease burden to be, at minimum, ~7 per 1,000 children born to first-cousin parents, with disorders related to intellectual disability and vision impairment being the most common. Our approach can be utilized to inform the design of new policies for the prevention of genetic disorders and highlights an important secondary benefit of clinical genomics.Genet Med 18 12, 1244-1249.

  17. Visual acuity loss in recessive retinitis pigmentosa and its correlation with macular lesions.

    PubMed

    Thobani, Azzrah; Fishman, Gerald A; Genead, Mohamed; Anastasakis, Anastasios

    2011-05-01

    To determine the visual acuity loss in patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and its relation to the presence of macular lesions. A total of 145 patients were included in the visual acuity analysis, and 139 patients were included in the analysis of their macular status. Patients with a history of parental consanguinity or an affected sister and parents unaffected with retinitis pigmentosa were considered as having an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Regardless of age, 68 patients (47%) had visual acuity of 20/40 or better, 109 (75%) had better than 20/200 in at least 1 eye, and 36 (25%) had an acuity of 20/200 or worse in both eyes. An evaluation of the macular status demonstrated that 55 patients (39.6%) had no macular lesion and 77 (55.4%) had an atrophic lesion (either bull's-eye or geographic). Seventy-five percent of patients with no macular lesion had a visual acuity of 20/40 or better and 34 patients (44%) with an atrophic lesion had a visual acuity better than 20/70. These data can be useful to counsel patients on the potential visual acuity impairment likely to be observed at different ages and identify the association of visual acuity loss with macular changes.

  18. Expanding the spectrum of PEX10-related peroxisomal biogenesis disorders: slowly progressive recessive ataxia.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Mathilde; Guissart, Claire; Mallaret, Martial; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Cheillan, David; Drouot, Nathalie; Muller, Jean; Claustres, Mireille; Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu; Koenig, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBDs) consist of a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive diseases, in which peroxisome assembly and proliferation are impaired leading to severe multisystem disease and early death. PBDs include Zellweger spectrum disorders (ZSDs) with a relatively mild clinical phenotype caused by PEX1, (MIM# 602136), PEX2 (MIM# 170993), PEX6 (MIM# 601498), PEX10 (MIM# 602859), PEX12 (MIM# 601758), and PEX16 (MIM# 603360) mutations. Three adult patients are reported belonging to a non-consanguineous French family affected with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, axonal neuropathy, and pyramidal signs. Mental retardation and diabetes mellitus were optional. The age at onset was in childhood or in adolescence (3-15 years). Brain MRI showed marked cerebellar atrophy. Biochemical blood analyses suggested a mild peroxisomal defect. With whole exome sequencing, two mutations in PEX10 were found in the three patients: c.827G>T (novel) causing the missense change p.Cys276Phe and c.932G>A causing the missense change p.Arg311Gln. The phenotypic spectrum related to PEX10 mutations includes slowly progressive, syndromic recessive ataxia.

  19. [Successful treatment of Norwegian scabies with ivermectin in a patient with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa].

    PubMed

    Angelo, C; Pedicelli, C; Provini, A; Annessi, G; Zambruno, G; Paradisi, M

    2004-06-01

    A 14 year-old female born from consanguineous healthy parents was admitted to our institute for the presence of a generalized bullous eruption started at birth. The bullae were asymmetrically distributed all over the cutaneous surface and, over time, evolved into erosions that resolved with scarring areas. On the basis of the clinical picture and the ultrastructural and antigenic studies, a diagnosis of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa was made. In the following months, the patient began to complain a severe pruritus and the bullae and erosions were accompanied with diffuse erythematous patches and plaques covered by thick scale-crusts situated mostly on the arms. Microscopic examination of the scales revealed the presence of many mites and ova. Since the conventional topical therapies for scabies were uneffective, the patient was treated with a single dose (200 mcg/hg) of ivermectin. Although there was an initial improvement, scabies recurred within 2 months from discontinuation of the therapy. Finally, a further single administration of ivermectin at the same dosage led to the complete and permanent resolution of scabies. The association of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and norwegian scabies has been already reported in literature. The case presented suggests that ivermectin represents an effective drug for severe forms of scabies occurring in patients affected by other dermatoses that prevent the use of topical treatments.

  20. Recessive PIEZO2 stop mutation causes distal arthrogryposis with distal muscle weakness, scoliosis and proprioception defects.

    PubMed

    Haliloglu, Goknur; Becker, Kerstin; Temucin, Cagri; Talim, Beril; Küçükşahin, Nalan; Pergande, Matthias; Motameny, Susanne; Nürnberg, Peter; Aydingoz, Ustun; Topaloglu, Haluk; Cirak, Sebahattin

    2017-04-01

    The genetic work-up of arthrogryposis is challenging due to the diverse clinical and molecular etiologies. We report a-18(3/12)-year-old boy, from a 2nd degree consanguineous family, who presented at 3(6/12) years with hypotonia, distal laxity, contractures, feeding difficulties at birth. He required surgery for progressive scoliosis at 16 years of age, and walked independently since then with an unstable gait and coordination defects. His latest examination at 18 years of age revealed a proprioceptive defect and loss-of-joint position sense in the upper limbs. Somatosensory evoked potentials supported bilateral involvement of dorsal column-medial lemniscal sensory pathways and nerve conduction studies revealed a mild axonal neuropathy. Muscle biopsy showed myopathic changes with neonatal myosin expression. Mendeliome sequencing led to the discovery of a recessive stop mutation in piezo-type mechanosensitive ion channel component 2 (PIEZO2, NM_022068, c.1384C>T, p.R462*). PIEZO2 is a nonselective cation channel, expressed in sensory endings of proprioceptors innervating muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs. Dominant PIEZO2 mutations were described in patients with distal arthrogryposis type 5 and Marden-Walker syndrome. Sensory ataxia and proprioception defect with dorsal column involvement together with arthrogryposis, myopathy, scoliosis and progressive respiratory failure may represent a distinct clinical phenotype, and indicate recessive mutations in PIEZO2.

  1. Strategies for Supporting Recess in Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Recess provides students with a needed break from their structured school day. It can improve children's physical, social, and emotional well-being, and enhance learning. Recess helps children meet the goal of 60 minutes of physical activity (PA) each day, as recommended by the US Department of Health and Human Services. National…

  2. Students with Juvenile Arthritis Participating in Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    The participation of a student with juvenile arthritis in recess can often be both challenging and rewarding for the student and general education teacher. This paper will address common characteristics of students with juvenile arthritis and present basic solutions to improve the education of these students in the recess setting. Initially the…

  3. The Crucial Role of Recess in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramstetter, Catherine L.; Murray, Robert; Garner, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Recess is at the heart of a vigorous debate over the role of schools in promoting optimal child development and well-being. Reallocating time to accentuate academic concerns is a growing trend and has put recess at risk. Conversely, pressure to increase activity in school has come from efforts to combat childhood obesity. The purpose…

  4. Recess for Elementary School Students. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) that all elementary school children should be provided with at least one daily period of recess of at least 20 minutes in length. Recess is an essential component of a comprehensive school physical activity program and of the total education experience for…

  5. The Crucial Role of Recess in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramstetter, Catherine L.; Murray, Robert; Garner, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Recess is at the heart of a vigorous debate over the role of schools in promoting optimal child development and well-being. Reallocating time to accentuate academic concerns is a growing trend and has put recess at risk. Conversely, pressure to increase activity in school has come from efforts to combat childhood obesity. The purpose…

  6. Students with Speech Impairments Participating in Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Matthew D.; Watson, Carolyn R.

    2013-01-01

    The participation of students with speech impairments in recess can often be both challenging and rewarding for the students and teachers. This paper will address common characteristics of students with speech impairments and present basic solutions to improve the experience of these students in the recess setting. Initially the definition,…

  7. Students with Multiple Sclerosis Participating in Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Matthew D.; Brentlinger, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The participation of a student with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in recess can often be both challenging and rewarding for the student and teacher. This paper will address common characteristics of students with MS and present basic solutions to improve the experience of these students in the recess setting. Initially, the definition and prevalence of…

  8. Pakistani and Bangladeshi Young Men: Re-Racialization, Class and Masculinity within the Neo-Liberal School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac an Ghaill, Mairtin; Haywood, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article explores Pakistani and Bangladeshi young men's experiences of schooling to examine what inclusion/exclusion means to them. Qualitative research was undertaken with 48 Pakistani and Bangladeshi young men living in areas of the West Midlands, England. The young men highlighted three key areas: the emergence of a schooling regime…

  9. Clinical and molecular characterization of seven Egyptian families with autosomal recessive robinow syndrome: Identification of four novel ROR2 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Aglan, Mona; Amr, Khalda; Ismail, Samira; Ashour, Adel; Otaify, Ghada A; Mehrez, Mennat Allah I; Aboul-Ezz, Eman H A; El-Ruby, Mona; Mazen, Inas; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Temtamy, Samia A

    2015-12-01

    Robinow syndrome (RS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and craniofacial/orodental abnormalities. The syndrome follows both autosomal dominant and recessive patterns of inheritance with similar phenotypic presentation and overlapping features. Autosomal recessive Robinow syndrome (ARRS) is caused by mutations in the ROR2 gene. Here, we present the clinical, radiological and molecular findings of 11 Egyptian patients from 7 unrelated consanguineous families with clinical features of ARRS. Mutation analyses of ROR2 gene identified five pathogenic mutations distributed all over the gene. The identified mutations included four novel (G326A, D166H, S677F, and R528Q) and one previously reported (Y192D). Our results extend the number of ROR2 mutations identified so far, suggest a founder effect in the Egyptian population, and emphasize the important role of genetic testing in proper counseling and patients' management.

  10. The crucial role of recess in school.

    PubMed

    Murray, Robert; Ramstetter, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Recess is at the heart of a vigorous debate over the role of schools in promoting the optimal development of the whole child. A growing trend toward reallocating time in school to accentuate the more academic subjects has put this important facet of a child's school day at risk. Recess serves as a necessary break from the rigors of concentrated, academic challenges in the classroom. But equally important is the fact that safe and well-supervised recess offers cognitive, social, emotional, and physical benefits that may not be fully appreciated when a decision is made to diminish it. Recess is unique from, and a complement to, physical education--not a substitute for it. The American Academy of Pediatrics believes that recess is a crucial and necessary component of a child's development and, as such, it should not be withheld for punitive or academic reasons.

  11. Effects of consanguinity on pre-reproductive mortality: does demographic transition matter?

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Sánchez, Miguel A; Peña, José A

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is an increase on premature deaths due to genetically determined factors at the beginning of a demographic transition. We also analyzed the effects of parental consanguinity on offspring mortality from an epidemiological viewpoint, using parish records for family reconstitution in a Basque population (1800-1990). Among the offspring of unrelated parents, 13.1% died before their first year of life (infant mortality), and 22.8% died before the age of 16 (pre-reproductive mortality). Significant increases in both infant (23.6%) and pre-reproductive (38.5%) deaths were found among the progeny of first cousins or closer relatives, 1C (F > or = 0.0625). The corresponding relative risks of mortality were 1.79 (95% confidence limits: 1.37-2.28) and 1.68 (1.38-2.01), respectively. Estimates of the population attributable risks indicate that 4% of pre-reproductive mortality is ascribable to consanguineous unions, although kinships other than 1C produced only slight increases in offspring mortality. Evidence on the relationship between the demographic transition and the increase in premature deaths due to genetic factors was obtained through a principal component analysis (95.1% of variance accounted for). During the initial stages of the demographic transition, the population experienced substantial elevations in mean family size, natural increase of the population, frequency of close consanguineous matings (1C), and death rate due to congenital anomalies and perinatal diseases. These findings are of interest for the health services of many developing societies in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, which are nowadays immersed in the demographic transition process.

  12. Comparative emissions from Pakistani coals and traditional coals

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; Wachter, E.A.; Wade, J.; Wilson, D.L. ); Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Raza, M.Z. . Fuel Research Center)

    1993-01-01

    Airborne emissions from a traditional Paldstani cooking stove were measured and compared for fuels composed of raw and amended coal briquettes, wood, charcoal, and dung. Small charges of fuel, 200 g, were burned inside a 12 m[sup 3] shed with a forced rate of air exchange of 14 hr[sup [minus]1]. The amended coal contained slaked lime, clay catalyst and 1 % potassium nitrate oxidant. The lime proved effective in reducing the integrated S0[sub 2] emissions but not the early peak S0[sub 2] emissions while combustion was restricted to the skin of the briquettes. Volatile and semivolatile organic emissions and respirable suspended particulates (RSP) were considerably reduced in amended coal compared to raw coal briquettes. The measurements overall indicated that, with respect to CO, S0[sub 2], N0[sub 2], organics and RSP, substitution of amended coal briquettes for traditional fuels will not worsen indoor air quality during domestic cooking. Better utilization of Pakistani's reserves of high-sulfur coal is an attractive energy option for both economic and environmental reasons.

  13. Antinociceptive, antioxidant and phytochemical studies of Pakistani medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Ghias; Rauf, Abdur; Siddiqui, Bina Shaheen; Khan, Haroon; Barkatullah; Ullah, Rooh

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the selected Pakistani medicinal plants (Chenopodium botrys, Micromeria biflora and Teucrium stocksianum) in-vivo followed by their antioxidant potential against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhidrazyl (DPPH) in-vitro. The results demonstrated profound antinociceptive effect of both the crude methanolic extract of Chenopodium botrys (CBM) and subsequent aqueous fraction (CBW) of C. botrys with 80.76% and 84% pain relief in acetic acid induced writhing test at 100 mg/kg i.p respectively. Similarly the crude methanolic extract of Micromeria biflora (MBM) and its subsequent aqueous fraction (MBW) with 66.46% 78.08% pain reversal in acetic acid induced writhing test respectively at 100mg/kg i.p. However, the crude methanolic extract and isolated water fraction of Teucrium stocksianum (TS) did not show any significant effect at test doses. Both the crude extracts and aqueous fractions of selected medicinal plants exhibited marked scavenging effects on DPPH and therefore strongly support the antinociceptive activity. Phytochemical analysis indicated the presence of various classes of natural products (alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids etc.) and thus the current finding can be attributed to the presence of these compounds. In short, our findings provide a strong scientific background to the folk uses C. botrys and M. biflora in the management of various painful conditions.

  14. Multicentric Castleman Disease in an HHV8-Infected Child Born to Consanguineous Parents With Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Moshous, Despina; Cassar, Olivier; Reguerre, Yves; Byun, Minji; Pedergnana, Vincent; Canioni, Danielle; Gessain, Antoine; Oksenhendler, Eric; Fieschi, Claire; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Rivière, Jean-Pierre; Herbigneaux, Rose-Marie; Muszlak, Matthias; Arnaud, Jean-Pierre; Fischer, Alain; Picard, Capucine; Blanche, Stéphane; Plancoulaine, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Childhood multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a rare and unexplained lymphoproliferative disorder. We report a human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8)-infected child, born to consanguineous Comorian parents, who displayed isolated MCD in the absence of any known immunodeficiency. We also systematically review the clinical features of the 32 children previously reported with isolated and unexplained MCD. The characteristics of this patient and the geographic areas of origin of most previous cases suggest that pediatric MCD is associated with HHV-8 infection. Moreover, as previously suggested for Kaposi sarcoma, MCD in childhood may result from inborn errors of immunity to HHV-8 infection. PMID:22157133

  15. Genetic Counseling and Screening of Consanguineous Couples and Their Offspring: Recommendations of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Robin L; Motulsky, Arno G; Bittles, Alan; Hudgins, Louanne; Uhrich, Stefanie; Doyle, Debra Lochner; Silvey, Kerry; Scott, C Ronald; Cheng, Edith; McGillivray, Barbara; Steiner, Robert D; Olson, Debra

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this document is to provide recommendations for genetic counseling and screening for consanguineous couples (related as second cousins or closer) and their offspring with the goals of1. providing preconception reproductive options2. improving pregnancy outcome and identifying reproductive choices3. reducing morbidity and mortality in the 1st years of life, and4. respecting psychosocial and multicultural issues.The recommendations are the opinions of a multicenter working group (the Consanguinity Working Group (CWG)) with expertise in genetic counseling, medical genetics, biochemical genetics, genetic epidemiology, pediatrics, perinatology, and public health genetics, which was convened by the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC). The consensus of the CWG and NSGC reviewers is that beyond a thorough medical family history with follow-up of significant findings, no additional preconception screening is recommended for consanguineous couples. Consanguineous couples should be offered similar genetic screening as suggested for any couple of their ethnic group. During pregnancy, consanguineous couples should be offered maternal-fetal serum marker screening and high-resolution fetal ultrasonography. Newborns should be screened for impaired hearing and detection of treatable inborn errors of metabolism. These recommendations should not be construed as dictating an exclusive course of management, nor does use of such recommendations guarantee a particular outcome. The professional judgment of a health care provider, familiar with the facts and circumstances of a specific case, will always supersede these recommendations.

  16. Rare variants in the notch signaling pathway describe a novel type of autosomal recessive Klippel-Feil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Ender; Yuregir, Ozge O; Bozdogan, Sevcan T; Aslan, Huseyin; Pehlivan, Davut; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Akdemir, Zeynep C; Gambin, Tomasz; Bayram, Yavuz; Atik, Mehmed M; Erdin, Serkan; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R

    2015-11-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome is a rare disorder represented by a subgroup of segmentation defects of the vertebrae and characterized by fusion of the cervical vertebrae, low posterior hairline, and short neck with limited motion. Both autosomal dominant and recessive inheritance patterns were reported in families with Klippel-Feil. Mutated genes for both dominant (GDF6 and GDF3) and recessive (MEOX1) forms of Klippel-Feil syndrome have been shown to be involved in somite development via transcription regulation and signaling pathways. Heterotaxy arises from defects in proteins that function in the development of left-right asymmetry of the developing embryo. We describe a consanguineous family with a male proband who presents with classical Klippel-Feil syndrome together with heterotaxy (situs inversus totalis). The present patient also had Sprengel's deformity, deformity of the sternum, and a solitary kidney. Using exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.299delT; p.L100fs) in RIPPLY2, a gene shown to play a crucial role in somitogenesis and participate in the Notch signaling pathway via negatively regulating Tbx6. Our data confirm RIPPLY2 as a novel gene for autosomal recessive Klippel-Feil syndrome, and in addition-from a mechanistic standpoint-suggest the possibility that mutations in RIPPLY2 could also lead to heterotaxy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Rare Variants in the Notch Signaling Pathway Describe a Novel Type of Autosomal Recessive Klippel–Feil Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Ender; Yuregir, Ozge O.; Bozdogan, Sevcan T.; Aslan, Huseyin; Pehlivan, Davut; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Akdemir, Zeynep C.; Gambin, Tomasz; Bayram, Yavuz; Atik, Mehmed M.; Erdin, Serkan; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Klippel–Feil syndrome is a rare disorder represented by a subgroup of segmentation defects of the vertebrae and characterized by fusion of the cervical vertebrae, low posterior hairline, and short neck with limited motion. Both autosomal dominant and recessive inheritance patterns were reported in families with Klippel–Feil. Mutated genes for both dominant (GDF6 and GDF3) and recessive (MEOX1) forms of Klippel–Feil syndrome have been shown to be involved in somite development via transcription regulation and signaling pathways. Heterotaxy arises from defects in proteins that function in the development of left–right asymmetry of the developing embryo. We describe a consanguineous family with a male proband who presents with classical Klippel–Feil syndrome together with heterotaxy (situs inversus totalis). The present patient also had Sprengel’s deformity, deformity of the sternum, and a solitary kidney. Using exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.299delT; p.L100fs) in RIPPLY2, a gene shown to play a crucial role in somitogenesis and participate in the Notch signaling pathway via negatively regulating Tbx6. Our data confirm RIPPLY2 as a novel gene for autosomal recessive Klippel–Feil syndrome, and in addition—from a mechanistic standpoint—suggest the possibility that mutations in RIPPLY2 could also lead to heterotaxy. PMID:26238661

  18. Exploring Relationship Between Spiritual Intelligence, Religiosity and Life Satisfaction Among Elderly Pakistani Muslims.

    PubMed

    Munawar, Khadeeja; Tariq, Omama

    2017-01-21

    This study is an effort to explore the relationship between spiritual intelligence, religiosity and life satisfaction in elderly Pakistani Muslims. A non-probability purposive sampling technique is utilized in order to recruit a sample of 100 elderly people (n = 50 men; n = 50 = women). Standardized questionnaires were used for collecting data. Data analysis was carried out using Pearson product-moment correlation analysis and independent sample t test. Findings revealed a significant correlation between spiritual intelligence, religiosity and life satisfaction among Pakistani elderly Muslim people. Gender differences were considered while conducting the study, and findings are valid for both male and female elderly Pakistani Muslims. Some findings of this study endorse findings of some previous studies, and it adds latest insights to the existing body of knowledge on the subject.

  19. Nutritional and radiological impact of dietary potassium on the Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Akhter, P; Ashraf, N; Mohammad, D; Orfi, S D; Ahmad, N

    2003-04-01

    The nutritional status of dietary potassium and the radiological impact of its isotope (40)K were estimated for the Pakistani population. Potassium concentration was determined in dietary samples by atomic absorption spectrometry. An average potassium concentration was 4.54+/-0.89 mg/g, which leads to potassium dietary intake of 2.69+/-0.54 g/day and the radiological hazard due to (40)K activity was 79.94 Bq/day. The annual and lifetime effective doses calculated for the reference Pakistani man weighing 64 kg due to measured activity of (40)K were found to be 1.65 x 10(-4) Sv y(-1) and 8.27 x 10(-3) Sv, respectively. Measured data showed that the potassium concentration in the Pakistani diet is adequate and safe according to international standards.

  20. A novel frameshift mutation of DDHD1 in a Japanese patient with autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shiroh; Morikawa, Takuya; Fujioka, Ryuta; Kosaka, Kengo; Yamada, Kohei; Hattori, Gohsuke; Motomura, Manabu; Taniwaki, Takayuki; Shibata, Hiroki

    2016-08-01

    Spastic paraplegia (SPG) type 28 is an autosomal recessive SPG caused by mutations in the DDHD1 gene. We examined a Japanese 54-years-old male patient with autosomal recessive SPG. His parents were consanguineous. He needed a wheelchair for transfer due to spastic paraplegia. There was a history of operations for bilateral hallux valgus, thoracic ossification of the yellow ligament, bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, bilateral ankle contracture, and lumbar spinal canal stenosis. He noticed gait disturbance at age 14. He used a cane for walking in his 40s. On neurological examination, he showed hyperreflexia, spasticity, and weakness in the lower extremities and bilateral Babinski reflexes. Urinary dysfunctions and impaired vibration sense in the lower limbs were observed. By exome sequencing analysis using Agilent SureSelect and Illumina MiSeq, we identified 17,248 homozygous nucleotide variants in the patient. Through the examination of 48 candidate genes known to be responsible for autosomal recessive SPG, we identified a novel homozygous 4-bp deletion, c.914_917delGTAA, p.Ser305Ilefs*2 in exon2 of the DDHD1 gene encoding phosphatidic acid-preferring phospholipase A1 (PA-PLA1). The mutation is expected to cause a frameshift generating a premature stop codon 3-bp downstream from the deletion. In consequence, the DDHD domain that is known to be critical for PLA1 activity is completely depleted in the mutated DDHD1 protein, predicted to be a functionally null mutation of the DDHD1 gene. By Sanger sequencing, we confirmed that both parents are heterozygous for the mutation. This variation was not detected in 474 Japanese control subjects as well as the data of the 1,000G Project. We conclude that the novel mutation in DDHD1 is the causative variant for the SPG28 patient that is the first record of the disease in Japanese population.

  1. The tumour suppressor gene WWOX is mutated in autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with epilepsy and mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Mallaret, Martial; Synofzik, Matthis; Lee, Jaeho; Sagum, Cari A.; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Sharkia, Rajech; Drouot, Nathalie; Renaud, Mathilde; Klein, Fabrice A. C.; Anheim, Mathieu; Tranchant, Christine; Mignot, Cyril; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Bedford, Mark; Bauer, Peter; Salih, Mustafa A.; Schüle, Rebecca; Schöls, Ludger; Aldaz, C. Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    We previously localized a new form of recessive ataxia with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and mental retardation to a 19 Mb interval in 16q21-q23 by homozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Saudi Arabian family. We now report the identification by whole exome sequencing of the missense mutation changing proline 47 into threonine in the first WW domain of the WW domain containing oxidoreductase gene, WWOX, located in the linkage interval. Proline 47 is a highly conserved residue that is part of the WW motif consensus sequence and is part of the hydrophobic core that stabilizes the WW fold. We demonstrate that proline 47 is a key amino acid essential for maintaining the WWOX protein fully functional, with its mutation into a threonine resulting in a loss of peptide interaction for the first WW domain. We also identified another highly conserved homozygous WWOX mutation changing glycine 372 to arginine in a second consanguineous family. The phenotype closely resembled the index family, presenting with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy, mental retardation and ataxia, but also included prominent upper motor neuron disease. Moreover, we observed that the short-lived Wwox knock-out mouse display spontaneous and audiogenic seizures, a phenotype previously observed in the spontaneous Wwox mutant rat presenting with ataxia and epilepsy, indicating that homozygous WWOX mutations in different species causes cerebellar ataxia associated with epilepsy. PMID:24369382

  2. Supporting Pakistani and Chinese families with young children: perspectives of mothers and health visitors.

    PubMed

    Hogg, R; de Kok, B; Netto, G; Hanley, J; Haycock-Stuart, E

    2015-05-01

    In the UK, public health nurses (health visitors) provide support and advice to families with young children, including those from minority ethnic communities. While the need for cultural sensitivity is being increasingly recognized, the factors which contribute to this sensitivity are poorly understood. The Pakistani and Chinese communities constitute the two largest minority ethnic groups in Scotland. This study explored Pakistani and Chinese women's experience of motherhood and of the health visiting service and public health nurses' experiences of working with Chinese and Pakistani mothers. Semi-structured individual interviews were carried out with 16 Pakistani and 15 Chinese mothers. Eight health visitors took part in two focus groups. The study was undertaken in an urban area of Scotland. Data were analysed thematically. Chinese and Pakistani mothers negotiate complex processes in order to ensure that their children maintain their own ethnic identity while fitting in with their peers in their adopted country. Health visitors were seen as supportive, although sometimes advice and information given was culturally inappropriate, and their role was often poorly understood. Health visitors were anxious to be sensitive to families' religious and cultural beliefs. Cultural sensitivity is an important factor in providing appropriate advice and help to Pakistani and Chinese families, and involves health visitors in considering views and practices on parenting which may differ across cultures, including their own. Family characteristics need to be understood on an individual basis, rather than making assumptions about clients' cultural norms and lifestyles. This is best achieved by exploring with mothers if they understand the advice and information they are being offered and also if it is appropriate to their cultural and religious beliefs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Stories of pain and health by elderly Pakistani women in Norway.

    PubMed

    Sverre, Beate Lie; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim; Eilertsen, Grethe

    2014-11-01

    This ethnographic study investigates the stories of elderly Pakistani women living in Norway. Migration studies indicate that elderly migrant women are passive, ill victims caught in a marginalized position due to age, ethnicity and gender, and thus have little access to opposition and agency. To broaden the picture it is necessary to develop an innovative approach to understand what is implicated in the process of migration. The importance of considering life conditions that surrounds potential health promotion behaviors of immigrants is stressed by several researchers. However, up to now limited research guided by this perspective has been done in Norway. Therefore, this study explored how elderly Pakistani women in Norway promote their health and well-being through some distinct social interactions. The intention is to bring awareness to how health, even by so-called disadvantaged social groups, may take place. These practices are important to take into consideration when developing health-promoting policies for elderly immigrants. An ethnographic study of 15 Pakistani women, aged 53-75, was carried out in a multisided fieldwork in Oslo using participant observation and ethnographic interviews. The analytical approach was inspired by the constructivist theoretical framework of narrative ethnography. The elderly Pakistani women in Norway construct stories of living in-between cultures and experiences of acculturative stress caused by being elderly, immigrants and women. However, this analysis also suggests that through distinct social relationships, primarily in the context of a voluntary organization, elderly Pakistani women do health by the way they interact and construct a repertoire of social identities. The healing practices taking place among elderly Pakistani women may counteract the negative health outcomes associated with age, migration and gender implications for immigrant health-promoting policy in Norway may be to increase the establishment and

  4. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia is a disorder that affects the ...

  5. Recessive thrombocytopenia likely due to a homozygous pathogenic variant in the FYB gene: case report.

    PubMed

    Hamamy, Hanan; Makrythanasis, Periklis; Al-Allawi, Nasir; Muhsin, Abdulrahman A; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2014-12-17

    Inherited thrombocytopenias (IT) are a heterogeneous group of rare diseases characterized by a reduced number of blood platelets. The frequency of IT is probably underestimated because of diagnostic difficulties and because not all the existing forms have as yet been identified, with some patients remaining without a definitive diagnosis. Exome Sequencing has made possible the identification of almost all variants in the coding regions of protein-coding genes, thereby providing the opportunity to identify the disease causing gene in a number of patients with indefinite diagnoses, specifically in consanguineous families. Familial thrombocytopenia with small size platelets was present in several members of a highly consanguineous family from Northern Iraq. Genotyping of all affected, their unaffected siblings and parents, followed by exome sequencing revealed a strong candidate loss of function variant in a homozygous state: a frameshift mutation in the FYB gene. The protein encoded by this gene is known to be a cytosolic adaptor molecule expressed by T, natural killer (NK), myeloid cells and platelets, and is involved in platelet activation and controls the expression of interleukin-2. Knock-out mice were reported to show isolated thrombocytopenia. Inherited thrombocytopenias differ in their presentation, associated features, and molecular etiologies. An accurate diagnosis is needed to provide appropriate management as well as counseling for the individuals and their family members. Exome sequencing may become a first diagnostic tool to identify the molecular basis of undiagnosed familial IT. In this report, the clinical evaluation combined with the power and efficiency of genomic analysis defined the FYB gene as the possible underlying cause of autosomal recessive thrombocytopenia with small platelet size. This is the first report linking pathogenic variants in FYB and thrombocytopenia in humans.

  6. Deletion at the GCNT2 Locus Causes Autosomal Recessive Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Irum, Bushra; Khan, Shahid Y.; Ali, Muhammad; Daud, Muhammad; Kabir, Firoz; Rauf, Bushra; Fatima, Fareeha; Iqbal, Hira; Khan, Arif O.; Al Obaisi, Saif; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Nasir, Idrees A.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Husnain, Tayyab; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Akram, Javed; Eghrari, Allen O.; Riazuddin, S. Amer

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to identify the molecular basis of autosomal recessive congenital cataracts (arCC) in a large consanguineous pedigree. Methods All participating individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmic examination. Each patient’s medical history, particularly of cataracts and other ocular abnormalities, was compiled from available medical records and interviews with family elders. Blood samples were donated by all participating family members and used to extract genomic DNA. Genetic analysis was performed to rule out linkage to known arCC loci and genes. Whole-exome sequencing libraries were prepared and paired-end sequenced. A large deletion was found that segregated with arCC in the family, and chromosome walking was conducted to estimate the proximal and distal boundaries of the deletion mutation. Results Exclusion and linkage analysis suggested linkage to a region of chromosome 6p24 harboring GCNT2 (glucosaminyl (N-acetyl) transferase 2) with a two-point logarithm of odds score of 5.78. PCR amplifications of the coding exons of GCNT2 failed in individuals with arCC, and whole-exome data analysis revealed a large deletion on chromosome 6p in the region harboring GCNT2. Chromosomal walking using multiple primer pairs delineated the extent of the deletion to approximately 190 kb. Interestingly, a failure to amplify a junctional fragment of the deletion break strongly suggests an insertion in addition to the large deletion. Conclusion Here, we report a novel insertion/deletion mutation at the GCNT2 locus that is responsible for congenital cataracts in a large consanguineous family. PMID:27936067

  7. A Truncating Mutation of TRAPPC9 Is Associated with Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability and Postnatal Microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Hill, Anthony D.; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Gleason, Danielle; Hill, R. Sean; Bodell, Adria; Crosier, Moira; Straussberg, Rachel; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    Although autosomal genes are increasingly recognized as important causes of intellectual disability, very few of them are known. We identified a genetic locus for autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability associated with variable postnatal microcephaly through homozygosity mapping of a consanguineous Israeli Arab family. Sequence analysis of genes in the candidate interval identified a nonsense nucleotide change in the gene that encodes TRAPPC9 (trafficking protein particle complex 9, also known as NIBP), which has been implicated in NF-κB activation and possibly in intracellular protein trafficking. TRAPPC9 is highly expressed in the postmitotic neurons of the cerebral cortex, and MRI analysis of affected patients shows defects in axonal connectivity. This suggests essential roles of TRAPPC9 in human brain development, possibly through its effect on NF-κB activation and protein trafficking in the postmitotic neurons of the cerebral cortex. PMID:20004763

  8. Autosomal recessive Alport syndrome: an in-depth clinical and molecular analysis of five families.

    PubMed

    Longo, Ilaria; Scala, Elisa; Mari, Francesca; Caselli, Rossella; Pescucci, Chiara; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Speciale, Caterina; Giani, Marisa; Bresin, Elena; Caringella, Domenica Angela; Borochowitz, Zvi-Uri; Siriwardena, Komudi; Winship, Ingrid; Renieri, Alessandra; Meloni, Ilaria

    2006-03-01

    Alport syndrome (ATS) is a progressive inherited nephropathy characterized by irregular thinning, thickening and splitting of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) often associated with hearing loss and ocular symptoms. ATS has been shown to be caused by COL4A5 mutations in its X-linked form and by COL4A3 and COL4A4 mutations in its autosomal forms. Five families with a suspicion of ATS were investigated both from a clinical and molecular point of view. COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes were analysed by DHPLC. Automated sequencing was performed to identify the underlying mutation. Molecular analysis indicated that in all 5 cases the correct diagnosis was autosomal recessive ATS. In three families in which parental consanguinity clearly pinpointed to autosomal recessive ATS, we found COL4A4 homozygous mutations in two of them and COL4A3 homozygous mutation in the other one. In the remaining two families a differential diagnosis including X-linked ATS, autosomal recessive ATS and thin basement membrane nephropathy was considered. The molecular analysis demonstrated that the probands were genetic compounds for two different mutations in the COL4A4 gene pinpointing to the correct diagnosis of autosomal recessive ATS. A clinical evaluation of probands and their relatives of the five families carrying mutations in either the COL4A3 or the COL4A4 gene was carried out to underline the natural history of the autosomal recessive ATS. In addition, this paper stresses the complexity of the clinics and genetics of ATS and how a correct diagnosis is based on a combination of: (i) an in-depth clinical investigation; (ii) a detailed formal genetic analysis; (iii) a correct technical choice of the gene to be investigated; (iv) a correct technical choice of the family member to be included in the mutational screening. A correct diagnosis is the basis for an appropriate genetic counselling dealing with both the correct prognosis and the accurate recurrence risk for the patients and family

  9. Familial Recurrence of 3MC Syndrome in Consanguineous Families: A Clinical and Molecular Diagnostic Approach With Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Olivia K; Haynes, Karla; Schweitzer, Daniela; Johns, Alexis; Magee, William P; Urata, Mark M; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A

    2016-06-29

    We report four individuals from two unrelated consanguineous families with 3MC syndrome. In the first family, chromosome microarray data revealed that the two affected sisters, born to first-cousin parents, shared a unique homozygous C-terminal deletion in the COLEC11 gene. Two affected brothers from a second family, also born to first-cousin parents, shared a region of homozygosity that included the second gene known to cause the 3MC syndrome, MASP1. We discuss the diagnostic approach of craniofacial disorders born to consanguineous parents and highlight a literature search and reference a helpful dysmorphology solution powered by FDNA (Facial Dysmorphology Novel Analysis) technology.

  10. The Effect of Consanguineous Marriage on Mental Health among the Students of the Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinpour, Maryam; Deris, Fatemeh; Solati-Dehkordi, Kamal; Heidari-Soreshjani, Sheida; Karimi, Negar; Teimori, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In Iran, after unintentional accidents, mental health problems are the second leading burden of disease. Consanguineous marriage is very common in Iran and the association between parental consanguinity and mental health is an important issue that has not yet been studied sufficiently in Iran. Aim To investigate the effect of consanguinity and the degree of relationship on different levels of mental health. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, conducted in the Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, two groups of students were enrolled. The first group consisted of 156 students that had consanguineous parent (case group) and the second group was 156 students whose parents had non-blood relationship (control group). The students were evaluated using General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). Statistical analysis was conducted by Pearson’s correlation coefficient, independent t-test and the one-way analysis of variance. Odd ratio was used to estimate the relative risk. Results Over 30% of the individuals were suffering from mental health problems. The most and least common mental health problems in both groups were social dysfunction (54.5% in the case group and the control group 50%) and depression (15.4% in the case group and 17.3% in the control group), respectively. No statistically significant difference was observed in the frequency of overall mental health and its subscales between student with non-consanguineous parent (control group) and the students that had consanguineous parent (case group) (p>0.05) and the status of mental health was not significantly different among student with different degree of kinship (p>0.05). Conclusion The study revealed that social dysfunction was very common among the study students and also there were no relationship between parental consanguineous marriage and mental health. Parental consanguinity and genetic factors may not be the major causes of high prevalence of mental health problems in

  11. Have Employment Patterns in Recessions Changed?.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Norman

    1981-01-01

    A survey of postwar recessions shows that the increasing proportion of service sector jobs has moderated overall employment declines and that women in nontraditional jobs, Blacks, and youths bear a disproportionate share of job losses. (LRA)

  12. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive congenital methemoglobinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... it alters a molecule within these cells called hemoglobin . Hemoglobin carries oxygen to cells and tissues throughout the ... autosomal recessive congenital methemoglobinemia , some of the normal hemoglobin is replaced by an abnormal form called methemoglobin, ...

  13. Graduated recession of the superior oblique muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, J A

    1975-01-01

    Recession of the superior oblique was performed bilaterally in 12 patients with the A phenomenon and unilaterally in four patients with vertical imbalance. The results are discussed. Images PMID:1191613

  14. Autosomal recessive Klippel-Feil syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Elias Oliveira Da

    1982-01-01

    An inbred kindred with 12 cases of Klippel-Feil syndrome (seven females and five males) is reported. Inheritance is undoubtedly autosomal recessive. The main characteristic of the syndrome is fusion of cervical vertebrae. Images PMID:7077623

  15. Systematic review of suicide in economic recession

    PubMed Central

    Oyesanya, Mayowa; Lopez-Morinigo, Javier; Dutta, Rina

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To provide a systematic update of the evidence concerning the relationship between economic recession and suicide. METHODS: A keyword search of Ovid Medline, Embase, Embase Classic, PsycINFO and PsycARTICLES was performed to identify studies that had investigated the association between economic recession and suicide. RESULTS: Thirty-eight studies met predetermined selection criteria and 31 of them found a positive association between economic recession and increased suicide rates. Two studies reported a negative association, two articles failed to find such an association, and three studies were inconclusive. CONCLUSION: Economic recession periods appear to increase overall suicide rates, although further research is warranted in this area, particularly in low income countries. PMID:26110126

  16. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive hypotrichosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... erythema), itchiness (pruritus), or missing patches of skin (erosions) on the scalp. In areas of poor hair ... recessive hypotrichosis with monilethrix hairs and congenital scalp erosions. J Invest Dermatol. 2006 Jun;126(6):1286- ...

  17. Have Employment Patterns in Recessions Changed?.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Norman

    1981-01-01

    A survey of postwar recessions shows that the increasing proportion of service sector jobs has moderated overall employment declines and that women in nontraditional jobs, Blacks, and youths bear a disproportionate share of job losses. (LRA)

  18. Hospital Capital Investment During the Great Recession.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung

    2017-01-01

    Hospital capital investment is important for acquiring and maintaining technology and equipment needed to provide health care. Reduction in capital investment by a hospital has negative implications for patient outcomes. Most hospitals rely on debt and internal cash flow to fund capital investment. The great recession may have made it difficult for hospitals to borrow, thus reducing their capital investment. I investigated the impact of the great recession on capital investment made by California hospitals. Modeling how hospital capital investment may have been liquidity constrained during the recession is a novel contribution to the literature. I estimated the model with California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development data and system generalized method of moments. Findings suggest that not-for-profit and public hospitals were liquidity constrained during the recession. Comparing the changes in hospital capital investment between 2006 and 2009 showed that hospitals used cash flow to increase capital investment by $2.45 million, other things equal.

  19. HYDRORECESSION: A toolbox for streamflow recession analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega, S.

    2015-12-01

    Streamflow recession curves are hydrological signatures allowing to study the relationship between groundwater storage and baseflow and/or low flows at the catchment scale. Recent studies have showed that streamflow recession analysis can be quite sensitive to the combination of different models, extraction techniques and parameter estimation methods. In order to better characterize streamflow recession curves, new methodologies combining multiple approaches have been recommended. The HYDRORECESSION toolbox, presented here, is a Matlab graphical user interface developed to analyse streamflow recession time series with the support of different tools allowing to parameterize linear and nonlinear storage-outflow relationships through four of the most useful recession models (Maillet, Boussinesq, Coutagne and Wittenberg). The toolbox includes four parameter-fitting techniques (linear regression, lower envelope, data binning and mean squared error) and three different methods to extract hydrograph recessions segments (Vogel, Brutsaert and Aksoy). In addition, the toolbox has a module that separates the baseflow component from the observed hydrograph using the inverse reservoir algorithm. Potential applications provided by HYDRORECESSION include model parameter analysis, hydrological regionalization and classification, baseflow index estimates, catchment-scale recharge and low-flows modelling, among others. HYDRORECESSION is freely available for non-commercial and academic purposes.

  20. Exclusion of the locus for autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 from the mineralocorticoid receptor gene region on human chromosome 4q by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E.; Hanukoglu, A.; Rees, M.; Thompson, R.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by salt-wasting in infancy arising from target organ unresponsiveness to mineralocorticoids. Clinical expression of the disease varies from severely affected infants who may die to apparently asymptomatic individuals. Inheritance is Mendelian and may be either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive. A defect in the mineralocortiocoid receptor has been implicated as a likely cause of PHA1. The gene for human mineralocorticoid receptor (MLR) has been cloned and physically mapped to human chromosome 4q31.1-31.2. The etiological role of MLR in autosomal recessive PHA1 was investigated by performing linkage analysis between PHA1 and three simple sequence length polymorphisms (D4S192, D4S1548, and D4S413) on chromosome 4q in 10 consanguineous families. Linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal recessive inheritance with full penetrance and zero phenocopy rate using the MLINK program for two-point analysis and the HOMOZ program for multipoint analysis. Lod scores of less than -2 were obtained over the whole region from D4S192 to D4S413 encompassing MLR. This provides evidence against MLR as the site of mutations causing PHA1 in the majority of autosomal recessive families. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. An intronic deletion in the PROM1 gene leads to autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Eidinger, Osnat; Leibu, Rina; Newman, Hadas; Rizel, Leah; Perlman, Ido; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the genetic basis for autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) in a consanguineous Israeli Jewish family. Patients underwent a detailed ophthalmic evaluation, including eye examination, visual field testing, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and electrophysiological tests, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array was performed to identify homozygous regions shared among two of the affected individuals. Mutation screening of the underlying gene was performed with direct sequencing. In silico and in vitro analyses were used to predict the effect of the identified mutation on splicing. The affected family members are three siblings who have various degrees of progressive visual deterioration, glare, color vision abnormalities, and night vision difficulties. Visual field tests revealed central scotomas of different extension. Cone and rod ERG responses were reduced, with cones more severely affected. Homozygosity mapping revealed several homozygous intervals shared among two of the affected individuals. One included the PROM1 gene. Sequence analysis of the 26 coding exons of PROM1 in one affected individual revealed no mutations in the coding sequence or in intronic splice sites. However, in intron 21, proximate to the intron-exon junction, we observed a homozygous 10 bp deletion between positions -26 and -17 (c.2281-26_-17del). The deletion was linked to a known SNP, c.2281-6C>G. The deletion cosegregated with the disease in the family, and was not detected in public databases or in 101 ethnically-matched control individuals. In silico analysis predicted that this deletion would lead to altered intron 21 splicing. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that a recognition site for the SRSF2 splicing factor is located within the deleted sequence. The in vitro splicing assay demonstrated that c.2281-26_-17del leads to complete exon 22 skipping. A novel

  2. Working of Ideology in the TV Commercials of Cold Drinks in Pakistani Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Madiha; Ahmad, Sofia; Ijaz, Nida; Batool, Sumera; Abid, Maratab

    2015-01-01

    The article aims at the analysis of the TV commercials of three carbonated cold drinks from Pakistani media. The analysis will be carried out using the three dimensional framework presented by Fairclough. Through the analysis, the ideological framing of the commercials will be brought to light. To achieve this purpose different techniques used by…

  3. Continuing Bonds in Bereaved Pakistani Muslims: Effects of Culture and Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhail, Kausar; Jamil, Naila; Oyebode, Jan; Ajmal, Mohammad Asir

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the bereavement process and continuing bond in Pakistani Muslims with the focus on how culture and religion influence these processes. Ten participants were interviewed and their transcribed interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Three main domains were identified from the narratives expressed by the…

  4. Relation of Home Chaos to Cognitive Performance and Behavioral Adjustment of Pakistani Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamama-tus-Sabah, Syeda; Gilani, Nighat; Wachs, Theodore D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings from Western developed countries have linked home chaos to children's cognitive performance and behavioral problems. In the present paper we test whether the same pattern of associations can be replicated in a non-Western developing country. Our sample was 203 Pakistani primary school children. To assess home chaos the Confusion,…

  5. Continuing Bonds in Bereaved Pakistani Muslims: Effects of Culture and Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhail, Kausar; Jamil, Naila; Oyebode, Jan; Ajmal, Mohammad Asir

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the bereavement process and continuing bond in Pakistani Muslims with the focus on how culture and religion influence these processes. Ten participants were interviewed and their transcribed interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Three main domains were identified from the narratives expressed by the…

  6. Obesity and Minority--Changing Meanings of Big Bodies among Young Pakistani Obesity Patients in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wathne, Kjetil; Mburu, Christina Brux; Middelthon, Anne-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Globally, paediatric obesity causes widespread concern, and the role of ethnicity is an important focus. Investigating how culture can mediate health-related behaviour through ideas about bodies, food and physical activity, while addressing a notion that the Pakistani community in Norway is particularly conservative and slow to change, this…

  7. The eye as a window to a rare disease: ectopia lentis and homocystinuria, a Pakistani perspective.

    PubMed

    Shafique, Maeirah; Muzaffar, Waqar; Ishaq, Mazhar

    2016-02-01

    Non-traumatic ectopia lentis has been associated with genetic diseases in a European population; however, no data are present in regards to this in a Pakistani demographic. In third world countries such as Pakistan, due to the lack of screening tests, this disease has the potential to remain undiagnosed till a later age, at which point the eye through the finding of ectopia lentis has potential to lead to the right diagnosis. Our purpose was to investigate Pakistani patients presenting with ectopia lentis who have underlying homocystinuria and establish a relationship between the two. Additionally, we elicited various systemic and ophthalmic features in these settings. Ten Pakistani patients presenting with decreased vision and ectopia lentis with concomitant homocystinuria were included in the study. Assessment of systemic and ophthalmic features was performed. All patients presented with visual deterioration. All 20 (100 %) eyes had ectopia lentis, of which, 15 (75 %) eyes had inferior subluxation, whereas five (25 %) eyes had anterior subluxation of the crystalline lens. Ectopia lentis and homocystinuria appear to have a strong correlation in Pakistani population. Ectopia lentis has the potential to serve as an important clue to its diagnosis, which may in turn lead to decreased morbidity if diagnosed in a timely fashion.

  8. Pakistani Government Secondary Schools Students' Attitudes towards Communicative Language Teaching and Grammar Translation in Quetta, Balochistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhammad, Zeeshan

    2016-01-01

    Students' attitudes towards an English language teaching approach play an important role for its implementation success or failure. This study measured Pakistani government school students' attitudes towards Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) and Grammar Translation (GT). A survey instrument was used to assess students' attitudes. Data were…

  9. Attitudes of Pakistani Community Members and Staff toward People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patka, Mazna; Keys, Christopher B.; Henry, David B.; McDonald, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    The acceptance and inclusion of persons with intellectual disability can vary across cultures, and understanding attitudes can provide insight into such variation. To our knowledge, no previous study has explored attitudes toward people with intellectual disability among Pakistani community members and disability service providers. We administered…

  10. The Impact of Educational Change on School Leaders: Experiences of Pakistani School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razzaq, Jamila; Forde, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The Pakistani education system, like many other countries across the world, is going through a phase of concerted change in the first decade of the 21st century and school leaders are expected to play a crucial role in the management of this change programme. This article considers the impact of educational change on a group of school leaders who…

  11. The Impact of Educational Change on School Leaders: Experiences of Pakistani School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razzaq, Jamila; Forde, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The Pakistani education system, like many other countries across the world, is going through a phase of concerted change in the first decade of the 21st century and school leaders are expected to play a crucial role in the management of this change programme. This article considers the impact of educational change on a group of school leaders who…

  12. Willingness to Communicate in English as a Second Language: A Case Study of Pakistani Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukhari, Syeda Farzana; Cheng, Xiaoguang; Khan, Salman Ali

    2015-01-01

    Willingness to communicate (WTC) construct plays an important role in second language (L2) teaching and learning. Almost any second language learner is likely to respond to a direct question, but many will not continue or initiate communication. The present study investigates Pakistani undergraduate students' perception of their willingness to…

  13. Attitudes of Pakistani Community Members and Staff toward People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patka, Mazna; Keys, Christopher B.; Henry, David B.; McDonald, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    The acceptance and inclusion of persons with intellectual disability can vary across cultures, and understanding attitudes can provide insight into such variation. To our knowledge, no previous study has explored attitudes toward people with intellectual disability among Pakistani community members and disability service providers. We administered…

  14. Exploring British Pakistani Mothers' Perception of Their Child with Disability: Insights from a UK Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Sana

    2017-01-01

    This research lends insight into disabling discourses on South Asian families of children with disabilities. It explores immigrant Pakistani maternal understanding of their children's disability, uniquely through an educational perspective, highlighting maternal roles which schools must acknowledge to improve outcomes for children. The findings of…

  15. Attitudes of Pakistani Medical Students Towards Psychiatry as a Prospective Career: A Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, Ehsan Ullah; Siddiqi, Mohammad Naim; Dogar, Imtiaz; Hamrani, Mohammad Munir; Yousafzai, Abdul Wahab; Zuberi, Saman

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Pakistan is facing a shortage of psychiatrists; there are about 350 psychiatrists in a country of 150 million. Medical specialty choice surveys of medical students have approached this issue from various angles. The authors' objective is to explore the attitudes of Pakistani medical students toward psychiatry as their future career.…

  16. Pakistani English Newspaper Paid Obituary Announcements: A Descriptive Analysis of the Transliterated Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhry, Sajid M.; Christopher, Anne A.; Krishnasamy, Hariharan A/L N.

    2016-01-01

    The study, qualitative and descriptive in nature, examines the use of transliteration in the paid Pakistani obituary announcements authored in the English language. Primarily, it identifies the frequently used transliterated vocabulary in these linguistic messages and reconnoiters the functional relationship that emerges in and between the textual…

  17. Comparative Study of Suicide Potential among Pakistani and American Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farooqi, Yasmin Nilofer

    2004-01-01

    This study compared suicide potential and suicide attempts in 50 Pakistani and 50 American psychiatric patients all of whom reported a positive history of suicide attempts during the past 1-5 years. It further explored the role of nationality, gender, diagnosis, and marital status in respondents' potential for suicide and suicide attempts. The…

  18. Obesity and Minority--Changing Meanings of Big Bodies among Young Pakistani Obesity Patients in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wathne, Kjetil; Mburu, Christina Brux; Middelthon, Anne-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Globally, paediatric obesity causes widespread concern, and the role of ethnicity is an important focus. Investigating how culture can mediate health-related behaviour through ideas about bodies, food and physical activity, while addressing a notion that the Pakistani community in Norway is particularly conservative and slow to change, this…

  19. Drug Issues Affecting Chinese, Indian and Pakistani People Living in Greater Glasgow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, A. J.; Heim, D.; Bakshi, N.; Davies, J. B.; Flatley, K. J.; Hunter, S. C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes research on drug issues affecting Chinese, Indian and Pakistani people living in Greater Glasgow. There were two strands: (i) a questionnaire-based survey of young people and focus groups; (ii) interviews with young people and adults. The primary aims were to gather prevalence data and to investigate perceptions about current…

  20. Role of ICT in Shaping the Future of Pakistani Higher Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaikh, Zaffar Ahmed; Khoja, Shakeel Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the challenges faced by the Pakistani higher education system (HES) in integrating information and communication technology (ICT); it aimed at understanding ICT needs, measuring the increase in ICT demand, determining the relationship between ICT and HES performance, and understanding how the HES copes with the challenges of…

  1. The fate of 12 recessive mutations in a single village.

    PubMed

    Zlotogora, J; Hujerat, Y; Barges, S; Shalev, S A; Chakravarti, A

    2007-03-01

    In a Muslim Arab village, relatively isolated because of the preference of consanguineous marriages, we studied the fate of 12 mutations in 5 different genes. The study was based on carriers detected among relatives of affected patients and of carriers discovered in a random sample of 424 adults. Most of the mutations have been introduced by a carrier(s) originating from another village, but a few have been de novo events. Mutations that are very frequent in the entire village were introduced soon after the foundation of the village. Examples of such mutations are [GBJ2, 35Gdel] and [MEFV, M680I], with a carrier frequency of 7.8% and 6.2%, respectively. Many of the other mutations that are rare were introduced recently into the village and are frequent only among the descendants of the first couple carrying the mutation. For instance all the carriers of [ARSA, Q190H], responsible for metachromatic leukodystrophy, were found among the 218 descendants of a couple who were living in the village 4 generations ago. Since the village is typical for the region this study allows for some general conclusions to be drawn. In a population with a high degree of inbreeding the diagnosis of a single family with a patient(s) affected with a recessive disorder points to a recent event, while the finding of a rare disease in several families from an inbred population points to an older mutation. Mutations are often "exported" from one population to another by marriage. In the new inbred population this novel mutation will either be lost or will become frequent as the result of a founder effect. These observations are important for genetic counselling in the case of a recent mutation, since only the descendants of the founder couple are at risk, while in the case of older mutations the risk may be for the entire village. In the case of those frequent ancient mutations, the risk for a relative of an affected individual will be similar whether he marries a close relative or any random

  2. Responding to the increased genetic risk associated with customary consanguineous marriage among minority ethnic populations: lessons from local innovations in England.

    PubMed

    Salway, Sarah; Ali, Parveen; Ratcliffe, Giles; Such, Elizabeth; Khan, Nasaim; Kingston, Helen; Quarrell, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Populations practising customary consanguineous marriage have a higher incidence of autosomal recessive genetic disorders than those in which reproductive partners are usually unrelated. In the absence of any national-level response, English service developments to address the additional needs of families living with or at risk of such disorders have been locally led. These interventions remain in their infancy here, as elsewhere in Europe, and important questions remain regarding how appropriate, effective and sustainable responses can be operationalised in practice. This formative service review employed four local case studies together with wider consultation exercises over a 4-year period (2011-2015) to document recent responses to this area of need, issues arising and lessons to inform future work. Service components included the following: enhancements to genetic services to provide family-centred, culturally competent approaches to counselling and testing; community genetic literacy approaches; and capacity development among health professionals. Local approaches were, however, very varied in their detail, scope, level of investment and longevity. The provisions of culturally competent genetic counselling services and community-level genetic literacy interventions were generally well received by those who accessed them. Coordinated action across all service components appeared important for an effective service, but healthcare professionals, particularly general practitioners, were often difficult to engage in this agenda. An evaluative culture and engagement in a wider community of practice had supported service development across sites. However, sustaining investment was challenging, particularly where new services were not well integrated into core provision and where commissioning was driven by expectations of short-term reductions in infant mortality and disability.

  3. Novel homozygous missense mutation in GAN associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 in a large consanguineous family from Israel.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, Sharon; Barwick, Katy E S; Straussberg, Rachel; Harlalka, Gaurav V; Nevo, Yoram; Chioza, Barry A; McEntagart, Meriel M; Mimouni-Bloch, Aviva; Weedon, Michael; Crosby, Andrew H

    2016-11-16

    CMT-2 is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of peripheral axonal neuropathies characterized by slowly progressive weakness and atrophy of distal limb muscles resulting from length-dependent motor and sensory neurodegeneration. Classical giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is an autosomal recessively inherited progressive neurodegenerative disorder of the peripheral and central nervous systems, typically diagnosed in early childhood and resulting in death by the end of the third decade. Distinctive phenotypic features are the presence of "kinky" hair and long eyelashes. The genetic basis of the disease has been well established, with over 40 associated mutations identified in the gene GAN, encoding the BTB-KELCH protein gigaxonin, involved in intermediate filament regulation. An Illumina Human CytoSNP-12 array followed by whole exome sequence analysis was used to identify the disease associated gene mutation in a large consanguineous family diagnosed with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT-2) from which all but one affected member had straight hair. Here we report the identification of a novel GAN missense mutation underlying the CMT-2 phenotype observed in this family. Although milder forms of GAN, with and without the presence of kinky hair have been reported previously, a phenotype distinct from that was investigated in this study. All family members lacked common features of GAN, including ataxia, nystagmus, intellectual disability, seizures, and central nervous system involvement. Our findings broaden the spectrum of phenotypes associated with GAN mutations and emphasize a need to proceed with caution when providing families with diagnostic or prognostic information based on either clinical or genetic findings alone.

  4. On the adaptive origins and maladaptive consequences of human inbreeding: parasite prevalence, immune functioning, and consanguineous marriage.

    PubMed

    Hoben, Ashley D; Buunk, Abraham P; Fincher, Corey L; Thornhill, Randy; Schaller, Mark

    2010-11-13

    We propose that consanguineous marriages arise adaptively in response to high parasite prevalence and function to maintain coadapted gene complexes and associated local adaptation that defend against local pathogens. Therefore, a greater prevalence of inbreeding by consanguineous marriage is expected in geographical regions that historically have had high levels of disease-causing parasites. Eventually such marriages may, under the contemporary high movement of people with modern transportation, jeopardize the immunity of those who practice inbreeding as this leads to an increased susceptibility to novel pathogens. Therefore, a greater frequency of inbreeding is expected to predict higher levels of contemporary mortality and morbidity from infectious diseases. This parasite model of human inbreeding was supported by an analysis involving 72 countries worldwide. We found that historically high levels of pathogen prevalence were related positively to the proportion of consanguineous marriages, and that a higher prevalence of such marriages was associated with higher contemporary mortality and morbidity due to pathogens. Our study addresses plausible alternative explanations. The results suggest that consanguineous marriage is an adaptive consequence of historical pathogen ecologies, but is maladaptive in contemporary disease ecologies.

  5. Consanguineous marriages and marriage payment: a study among three south Indian caste groups.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P G

    1988-01-01

    The present study aims at understanding the interrelations between consanguineous marriages and marriage payment. The data are collected from three castes inhabiting two regions of Nellore district, Andhra Pradesh, South India. It is evident from the study that the dowry system is more prevalent among higher castes, while the bride wealth system is more common among the lower castes in the hierarchy. Further, it can be seen that the dowry system is more prevalent in developed regions, while bride-wealth is more common in backward regions. Marriage payment is found to be less common in close kin marriages than in unrelated marriages. Most of the uncle-niece marriages are without any marriage payment, in all the castes. However, most of the matrilateral cross-cousin and patrilateral cross-cousin marriages are also without any marriage payment in the Devanga.

  6. Domestic violence in consanguineous marriages - findings from Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey 2012-13.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Masood Ali

    2016-10-01

    Domestic violence is a pandemic and estimated to affect one in three women globally, in their lifetime. Marriages within blood relations in Pakistan are common. In this study a secondary analysis of Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey 2012-13 was done to study the prevalence and profile of domestic violence in the context of consanguineous marriages in Pakistan. Almost 65% of women had some kind of blood relationship with their husbands. Women having a blood relationship with husbands were more likely to report having ever been subjected to marital control behaviours, emotional and physical violence by their husbands, compared to ones without such relationship. However, these associations fail to reach statistical significance; underscoring the ubiquitous nature of marital control and violence. More effective public health education campaigns for just and equal treatment of wives by their husbands to speedily curb the scourge of domestic violence in the country are needed.

  7. Inequalities in health: a comparative study between ethnic Norwegians and Pakistanis in Oslo, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Hammad Raza; Dalgard, Odd Steffen; Hussain, Akhtar; Dalen, Ingvild; Claussen, Bjorgulf; Ahlberg, Nora L

    2006-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to observe the inequality in health from the perspective of socio-economic factors in relation to ethnic Pakistanis and ethnic Norwegians in Oslo, Norway. Method Data was collected by using an open and structured questionnaire, as a part of the Oslo Health Study 2000–2001. Accordingly 13581 ethnic Norwegians (45% of the eligible) participated as against 339 ethnic Pakistanis (38% of the eligible). Results The ethnic Pakistanis reported a higher prevalence of poor self-rated health 54.7% as opposed to 22.1% (p < 0.001) in ethnic Norwegians, 14% vs. 2.6% (p < 0.001) in diabetes, and 22.0% vs. 9.9% (p < 0.001) in psychological distress. The socio-economic conditions were inversely related to self- rated health, diabetes and distress for the ethnic Norwegians. However, this was surprisingly not the case for the ethnic Pakistanis. Odd ratios did not interfere with the occurrence of diabetes, even after adjusting all the markers of socio-economic status in the multivariate model, while self-reported health and distress showed moderate reduction in the risk estimation. Conclusion There is a large diversity of self-rated health, prevalence of diabetes and distress among the ethnic Pakistanis and Norwegians. Socio-economic status may partly explain the observed inequalities in health. Uncontrolled variables like genetics, lifestyle factors and psychosocial factors related to migration such as social support, community participation, discrimination, and integration may have contributed to the observed phenomenon. This may underline the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in future studies. PMID:16808838

  8. Syndrome Keratitis-Ichtyosis-Deafness (KID) chez un enfant togolais issu d'un mariage consanguin

    PubMed Central

    Kombaté, Koussak; Saka, Bayaki; Landoh, Dadja Essoya; Mouhari-Toure, Abass; Akakpo, Séfako; Belei, Eric; Gnassingbé, Wanguena; Djibril, Mohaman Awalou; Tchangaï-Walla, Kissem; Pitché, Palokinam

    2015-01-01

    Le syndrome KID est une affection génétique rare associant kératite, ichtyose et surdité. Nous rapportons un cas dont la surdité s'est compliquée de mutisme chez un enfant togolais issu d'un mariage consanguin.Il s'agissait d'une fillette de 9 ans admise en dermatologie pour une peau sèche et une kératodermie palmoplantaire évoluant depuis l'enfance, une surdité sévère et un mutisme total évoluant depuis la naissance. Il n'y avait pas d'histoire familiale connue de syndrome KID. Les parents de cet enfant sont des cousins germains. A l'examen, on notait une kératodermie palmoplantaire typique en cuir grossier, une peau sèche ichtyosiforme finement squameuse avec un aspect pachydermique aux genoux et un aspect arlequin aux jambes. L'examen ophtalmologique avait noté une blépharo-conjonctivite, une xérophtalmie, une photophobie et une absence de sourcils. L'examen ORL avait objectivé une hypotrophie des pavillons des oreilles, une surdité sévère et un mutisme total. La particularité de cette observation réside dans la sévérité de l'atteinte auditive qui s'est compliquée de mutisme. Notre enfant étant née de parents consanguins sains, sans histoire familiale de KID, nous pensons que le mode de transmission est probablement sporadique. Une étude moléculaire du cas index et de ses parents, non réalisée à cause de notre plateau technique limité aurait pu le confirmer. PMID:26664520

  9. She stands alone: Pakistani woman film director, Shireen Pasha.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, A

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the activities of film director Shireen Pasha in promoting truth in the mass media in Pakistan. Pasha is described as one who finds it inexcusable in a state-subsidized system that national problems of poverty are not aired openly. Pasha has pursued the goal of exposing the real lives of Pakistanis on film in contrast to the publicly aired segments of "pretty girls in nice drawing rooms." Foreign channels available through satellite communications technology are viewed by Pasha as inappropriate with regard to people's needs and uncreative. Pakistan began with one channel, PTV, which recently refused to air her documentary on living conditions in Pakistan's rural areas "The Travelogue Pakistan." "The Walled City of Lahore" was her film about life in the old city. Both films poetically depicted the honor of humans and their struggle to stay alive. Some of her documentaries are made to show the value of indigenous skills, centuries old know-how, and traditions, regardless of the poverty. Pasha is described as fighting with PTV management over use of resources. Pasha desires to invest in training people to do documentaries or be more field-oriented rather than investing in equipment. Pasha joined PTV in 1975 and left in 1990. Pasha is recognized for her isolation as a woman in the business world, her commitment to exposing remote cultures and truth, and the odds she must confront in attaining her goals. Pasha is committed to doing extensive research, usually conducted during the summer months, in order to construct a credible story line that is produced usually during the winter months. One model of film story line is defined as one where women are portrayed as starting from an indigenous skill or knowledge and shifting to a greater position of power and control over their lives. Pasha believes that people who make films have the responsibility to evoke a reaction in people and to offer solutions. Two acclaimed films, which were supported by

  10. A gene for recessive nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness (DFNB18) maps to the chromosomal region 11p14-p15.1 containing the Usher syndrome type 1C gene.

    PubMed

    Jain, P K; Lalwani, A K; Li, X C; Singleton, T L; Smith, T N; Chen, A; Deshmukh, D; Verma, I C; Smith, R J; Wilcox, E R

    1998-06-01

    Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness segregating in a large consanguineous Indian family was mapped to chromosome 11p14-p15.1 defining a new locus, DFNB18. A maximum lod score of 4.4 at theta = 0 was obtained for the polymorphic micro-satellite marker D11S1888. Haplotype analysis localizes this gene between markers D11S1307 and D11S2368, which is approximately 1.6 cM and encompasses the region of Usher syndrome type 1C (USH1C). We postulate that DFNB18 and USH1C are allelic variants of the same gene.

  11. [How to understand the excessive lateral rectus muscle recession].

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaoli; Wei, Yan

    2014-07-01

    Surgical treatments of intermittent exotropia include symmetric bilateral lateral rectus recession, symmetric bilateral medial rectus resection, asymmetric monocular lateral rectus recession and/or medial rectus resection, in which lateral rectus recession is the most common method. The maximum amount of lateral rectus recession, however, is still controversial. Bilateral lateral rectus recession 7-8 mm for 35(Δ)-40(Δ) exotropia and unilateral lateral rectus recession and medial rectus resection for exotropia larger than 40(Δ) are suggested by most doctor usually. But some other doctors advocated augmented bilateral lateral rectus recession (9-14 mm ) for exotropia larger than 50(Δ) or augmented unilateral lateral rectus recession for moderate angle exotropia (30(Δ)-35(Δ)), which brought confusion in practical clinical work. In this paper, we'll focus on the amount of lateral rectus recession, and discuss several common issues related to augmented lateral rectus recession, in order to provide references for the majority of clinicians.

  12. The prevalence of isolated growth hormone deficiency among children of short stature in Jordan and its relationship with consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Ayman A; Mustafa Ali, Moaath K; Al-Ani, Mohammad A; Momani, Munther S; Yousef, Al-Motassem F

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) among short-statured children in Jordan, where consanguineous marriage (CM) is common, is unknown. No studies have investigated the relationship between degrees of consanguinity and IGHD. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of IGHD among short-statured children referred to a university hospital in Jordan and its relationship with different degrees of consanguinity. We conducted a 24-month cross-sectional observational trial at an outpatient tertiary care center in Amman, Jordan. We obtained detailed family histories, medical evaluations and laboratory tests for 94 short-statured children (50 boys and 44 girls aged 6-16 years). Complete and partial GHD were defined as peak GH responses of 5 and 7 μg/l (15 and 21 mIU/l) [IRMA/DiaSorin®], respectively, in both exercise and insulin tolerance tests. GHD was diagnosed in 69·1% of the short children, including 86% (43/50) of the children of consanguineous parents (83·3%, 93·8% and 81·8% of children of first cousins, first cousins once removed and second cousins, respectively) and 50% (20/44) of the children of nonconsanguineous parents (P = 0·039, 0·002 and 0·013, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of small pituitary MRI between GH-deficient children of consanguineous parents and those of nonconsanguineous parents (28·6% vs 13·6%, P = 0·3). The prevalence of IGHD among referred short children in Jordan was exceptionally high and significantly higher in the children of CM. In countries where CM is common, preconception counselling and rigorous surveillance for GHD in short children may be indicated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Automating Recession Curve Displacement Recharge Estimation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brennan; Schwartz, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Recharge estimation is an important and challenging element of groundwater management and resource sustainability. Many recharge estimation methods have been developed with varying data requirements, applicable to different spatial and temporal scales. The variability and inherent uncertainty in recharge estimation motivates the recommended use of multiple methods to estimate and bound regional recharge estimates. Despite the inherent limitations of using daily gauged streamflow, recession curve displacement methods provide a convenient first-order estimate as part of a multimethod hierarchical approach to estimate watershed-scale annual recharge. The implementation of recession curve displacement recharge estimation in the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) RORA program relies on the subjective, operator-specific selection of baseflow recession events to estimate a gauge-specific recession index. This paper presents a parametric algorithm that objectively automates this tedious, subjective process, parameterizing and automating the implementation of recession curve displacement. Results using the algorithm reproduce regional estimates of groundwater recharge from the USGS Appalachian Valley and Piedmont Regional Aquifer-System Analysis, with an average absolute error of less than 2%. The algorithm facilitates consistent, completely automated estimation of annual recharge that complements more rigorous data-intensive techniques for recharge estimation. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  14. Ethnic-Specific WRN Mutations in South Asian Werner Syndrome Patients: Potential Founder Effect in Patients with Indian or Pakistani Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Bidisha; Lessel, Davor; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Rao, Anuradha S; Hisama, Fuki M; Peter, Dincy; Bennett, Chris; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2013-05-01

    Werner syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple features consistent with accelerated aging. It is caused by mutations in the WRN gene, which encodes a RecQ type helicase. To date, more than 70 disease-causing mutations have been reported. While founder mutations and a corresponding relatively high incidence of WS have been reported in Japan and Sardinia, such mutations have not been previously described among patients of South Asian descent. Here we report two novel WRN mutations in three pedigrees. A homozygous c.561A>G mutation in exon 6 was identified both in a pedigree from Kerala, India and in a British patient of Pakistani ancestry. Although c.561A>G does not alter the corresponding amino acid (p.K187K), it creates a cryptic splice site resulting in a 98bp deletion at the mRNA level (r.557-654del98) followed by a frameshift (p.K187fs). These two cases shared the same haplotype across the WRN gene, and were distinct from another Indian Werner patient with a homozygous stop codon mutation, c.2855 C>A (p.S952*) in exon 24. As the Indian population increases and the awareness of Werner syndrome grows, we anticipate that more cases will be identified with these founder mutations among South Asian Werner syndrome patients.

  15. Ethnic-specific WRN mutations in South Asian Werner syndrome patients: potential founder effect in patients with Indian or Pakistani ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Bidisha; Lessel, Davor; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Rao, Anuradha S; Hisama, Fuki M; Peter, Dincy; Bennett, Chris; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple features consistent with accelerated aging. It is caused by mutations in the WRN gene, which encodes a RecQ type helicase. To date, more than 70 disease-causing mutations have been reported. While founder mutations and a corresponding relatively high incidence of WS have been reported in Japan and Sardinia, such mutations have not been previously described among patients of South Asian descent. Here, we report two novel WRN mutations in three pedigrees. A homozygous c.561A>G mutation in exon 6 was identified both in a pedigree from Kerala, India and in a British patient of Pakistani ancestry. Although c.561A>G does not alter the corresponding amino acid (p.Lys187), it creates a cryptic splice site resulting in a 98 bp deletion at the mRNA level (r.557_654del98) followed by a frameshift (p.Lys187Trpfs*13). These two cases shared the same haplotype across the WRN gene, and were distinct from another Indian Werner patient with a homozygous stop codon mutation, c.2855 C > A (p.Ser952*), in exon 24. As the Indian population increases and the awareness of WS grows, we anticipate that more cases will be identified with these founder mutations among South Asian WS patients. PMID:23936869

  16. Missense mutation (E150K) of rhodopsin in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, U.; Oehlmann, R.; Gal, A.

    1994-09-01

    Missense or nonsense mutations of the rhodopsin gene have been implied in the pathogenesis of at least 3 different traits; autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). For the latter, a single patient has been reported with a nonsense mutation at codon 249 on both alleles. Heterozygous carriers of missense mutations of rhodopsin develop either adRP or CSNB depending on the particular amino acid substitution. Four of the 9 siblings from a consanguineous marriage in southern India were reported the have arRP. Mutational screening and sequencing of the rhodopsin gene revealed a G-to-A transition of the first nucleotide at codon 150 in exon II, which alters glutamate to lysine. The E150K mutation was present in the 4 patients in homozygous form, whereas the parents and 2 of the siblings were heterozygotes. Two-point analysis produced a Zmax=3.46 at theta=0.00. Two unaffected siblings who are heterozygotes for the E150K mutation underwent a thorough ophthalmological and psychophysical examination. No clinical abnormalities were found although these individuals were over forty, whereas the onset of RP in their affected siblings was in the second decade. Collectively, both the genetic and clinical findings strongly suggest that the E150K mutation of rhodopsin is recessive in this family. Glu150 forms part of the CD cytoplasmic loop of rhodopsin, which has been implicated in the binding and activation of transducin. We speculate that E150K leads to RP because the mutant protein may be incapable of activating transducin. It is tempting to speculate that, in addition to mutations in the genes for rhodopsin and the {beta}-subunit of PDE, mutations in the genes for transducin may also result in arRP.

  17. Recessive Mutations in SPTBN2 Implicate β-III Spectrin in Both Cognitive and Motor Development

    PubMed Central

    Kwasniewska, Alexandra; Sadighi Akha, Elham; Parolin Schnekenberg, Ricardo; Suminaite, Daumante; Hope, Jilly; Baker, Ian; Gregory, Lorna; Green, Angie; Allan, Chris; Lamble, Sarah; Jayawant, Sandeep; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Cader, M. Zameel; Hughes, Sarah; Armstrong, Richard J. E.; Kanapin, Alexander; Rimmer, Andrew; Lunter, Gerton; Mathieson, Iain; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Buck, David; Taylor, Jenny C.; Bentley, David; McVean, Gilean; Donnelly, Peter; Knight, Samantha J. L.; Jackson, Mandy; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Németh, Andrea H.

    2012-01-01

    β-III spectrin is present in the brain and is known to be important in the function of the cerebellum. Heterozygous mutations in SPTBN2, the gene encoding β-III spectrin, cause Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 5 (SCA5), an adult-onset, slowly progressive, autosomal-dominant pure cerebellar ataxia. SCA5 is sometimes known as “Lincoln ataxia,” because the largest known family is descended from relatives of the United States President Abraham Lincoln. Using targeted capture and next-generation sequencing, we identified a homozygous stop codon in SPTBN2 in a consanguineous family in which childhood developmental ataxia co-segregates with cognitive impairment. The cognitive impairment could result from mutations in a second gene, but further analysis using whole-genome sequencing combined with SNP array analysis did not reveal any evidence of other mutations. We also examined a mouse knockout of β-III spectrin in which ataxia and progressive degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells has been previously reported and found morphological abnormalities in neurons from prefrontal cortex and deficits in object recognition tasks, consistent with the human cognitive phenotype. These data provide the first evidence that β-III spectrin plays an important role in cortical brain development and cognition, in addition to its function in the cerebellum; and we conclude that cognitive impairment is an integral part of this novel recessive ataxic syndrome, Spectrin-associated Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia type 1 (SPARCA1). In addition, the identification of SPARCA1 and normal heterozygous carriers of the stop codon in SPTBN2 provides insights into the mechanism of molecular dominance in SCA5 and demonstrates that the cell-specific repertoire of spectrin subunits underlies a novel group of disorders, the neuronal spectrinopathies, which includes SCA5, SPARCA1, and a form of West syndrome. PMID:23236289

  18. Ullrich scleroatonic muscular dystrophy is caused by recessive mutations in collagen type VI.

    PubMed

    Camacho Vanegas, O; Bertini, E; Zhang, R Z; Petrini, S; Minosse, C; Sabatelli, P; Giusti, B; Chu, M L; Pepe, G

    2001-06-19

    Ullrich syndrome is a recessive congenital muscular dystrophy affecting connective tissue and muscle. The molecular basis is unknown. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification performed on RNA extracted from fibroblasts or muscle of three Ullrich patients followed by heteroduplex analysis displayed heteroduplexes in one of the three genes coding for collagen type VI (COL6). In patient A, we detected a homozygous insertion of a C leading to a premature termination codon in the triple-helical domain of COL6A2 mRNA. Both healthy consanguineous parents were carriers. In patient B, we found a deletion of 28 nucleotides because of an A --> G substitution at nucleotide -2 of intron 17 causing the activation of a cryptic acceptor site inside exon 18. The second mutation was an exon skipping because of a G --> A substitution at nucleotide -1 of intron 23. Both mutations are present in an affected brother. The first mutation is also present in the healthy mother, whereas the second mutation is carried by their healthy father. In patient C, we found only one mutation so far-the same deletion of 28 nucleotides found in patient B. In this case, it was a de novo mutation, as it is absent in her parents. mRNA and protein analysis of patient B showed very low amounts of COL6A2 mRNA and of COL6. A near total absence of COL6 was demonstrated by immunofluorescence in fibroblasts and muscle. Our results demonstrate that Ullrich syndrome is caused by recessive mutations leading to a severe reduction of COL6.

  19. Mutation of CERKL, a Novel Human Ceramide Kinase Gene, Causes Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP26)

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Miquel; Marfany, Gemma; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the main cause of adult blindness, is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptors through apoptosis. Up to now, 39 genes and loci have been implicated in nonsyndromic RP, yet the genetic bases of >50% of the cases, particularly of the recessive forms, remain unknown. Previous linkage analysis in a Spanish consanguineous family allowed us to define a novel autosomal recessive RP (arRP) locus, RP26, within an 11-cM interval (17.4 Mb) on 2q31.2-q32.3. In the present study, we further refine the RP26 locus down to 2.5 Mb, by microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) homozygosity mapping. After unsuccessful mutational analysis of the nine genes initially reported in this region, a detailed gene search based on expressed-sequence-tag data was undertaken. We finally identified a novel gene encoding a ceramide kinase (CERKL), which encompassed 13 exons. All of the patients from the RP26 family bear a homozygous mutation in exon 5, which generates a premature termination codon. The same mutation was also characterized in another, unrelated, Spanish pedigree with arRP. Human CERKL is expressed in the retina, among other adult and fetal tissues. A more detailed analysis by in situ hybridization on adult murine retina sections shows expression of Cerkl in the ganglion cell layer. Ceramide kinases convert the sphingolipid metabolite ceramide into ceramide-1-phosphate, both key mediators of cellular apoptosis and survival. Ceramide metabolism plays an essential role in the viability of neuronal cells, the membranes of which are particularly rich in sphingolipids. Therefore, CERKL deficiency could shift the relative levels of the signaling sphingolipid metabolites and increase sensitivity of photoreceptor and other retinal cells to apoptotic stimuli. This is the first genetic report suggesting a direct link between retinal neurodegeneration in RP and sphingolipid-mediated apoptosis. PMID

  20. Large bimedial rectus recessions in congenital esotropia.

    PubMed Central

    Szmyd, S. M.; Nelson, L. B.; Calhoun, J. H.; Spratt, C.

    1985-01-01

    The success rate of large (6 and 7 mm) bimedial rectus recessions in 45 congenital esotropes with deviations of 50 prism dioptres or greater was found to be 91%. Judgment of final alignment was made six weeks postoperatively, with an average follow-up of 13 months. Large bimedial rectus recessions are an effective surgical treatment for congenital esotropia. This procedure does not significantly alter adduction, and leaves other muscles available should further surgery be necessary. These findings show that initial surgery on three or more muscles is unnecessary in congenital esotropia. PMID:3994944

  1. Glacier recession in Iceland and Austria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Bayr, Klaus J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been possible to measure glacier recession on the basis of Landsat data, in conjunction with comparisons of the magnitude of recession of a glacier margin with in situ measurements at fixed points along the same margin. Attention is presently given to the cases of Vatnajokull ice cap, in Iceland, and the Pasterze Glacier, in Austria, on the basis of satellite data from 1973-1987 and 1984-1990, respectively. Indications of a trend toward negative mass balance are noted. Nevertheless, while most of the world's small glaciers have been receding, some are advancing either due to local climate or the tidewater glacier cycle.

  2. Glacier recession in Iceland and Austria

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S. Jr.; Bayr, K.J. USGS, Reston, VA Keene State College, NH )

    1992-03-01

    It has been possible to measure glacier recession on the basis of Landsat data, in conjunction with comparisons of the magnitude of recession of a glacier margin with in situ measurements at fixed points along the same margin. Attention is presently given to the cases of Vatnajokull ice cap, in Iceland, and the Pasterze Glacier, in Austria, on the basis of satellite data from 1973-1987 and 1984-1990, respectively. Indications of a trend toward negative mass balance are noted. Nevertheless, while most of the world's small glaciers have been receding, some are advancing either due to local climate or the tidewater glacier cycle. 21 refs.

  3. Access to Power: Governance and Development in the Pakistani Electrical Power Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, Ijlal

    This dissertation explores governance in Pakistan through a study of the state-run electrical power sector. At both the micro and macro level, the Pakistani power sector provides a lens into the heart of the Pakistani state and its governance institutions. This ethnographic and historical study offers an in-depth look at state operations in a developing country, situates the current Pakistani power crisis in a larger context of continuity through periods of dictatorship and democracy, and suggests how efforts to make state service delivery more responsive to citizens might be reconceived. A historical review of the Pakistani power sector establishes first and foremost that the current crisis is the product of longer-term processes for which the policy solutions currently being proposed (with the support of international donors and multilateral lenders) are inadequate. Depoliticized attempts at power sector reform have little to offer in light of the pervasively informal and negotiated nature of the fragmented Pakistani state. The institutions of power sector governance are mutually constituted by the formal rules and the informal---personal relationships, language, violence, money, and power. These rules of the game are as relevant to relations within and between public sector organizations as they are to the engagement of citizens with their state. The same rules apply at the margins of the state---informal squatter settlements---as at the core, though the resources brought to bear and the resultant outcomes are different. The internal incoherence of this state underscores the limitations of formal rules in determining outcomes, and the poor prospects for reform efforts that focus exclusively on the formal aspects of governance. To proactively engage with the question of political will leads away from top-down policy perspectives and counter to the depoliticizing tendencies that currently shape policy reforms. Instead, an energized and informed local participation

  4. A case report: Autosomal recessive microcephaly caused by a novel mutation in MCPH1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Fardaei, Majid; Gholami, Milad; Miryounesi, Mohammad

    2015-10-15

    Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH-MIM 251200) is distinguished by congenital decrease in occipito-frontal head circumference (OFC) of at least 2 standard deviations (SD) below population average in addition to non-progressive mental retardation, without any prominent neurological disorder. Mutations in MCPH1, which encodes the protein microcephalin have been detected in this disorder. Here we report a consanguineous Iranian family with 2 children affected with microcephaly. Despite the severe mental retardation observed in the male patient, the female patient had normal intelligent with no delay in motor milestones or speech. A novel splice-acceptor site homozygous mutation has been detected in intron 4 of MCPH1 gene (c.322-2A>T) which results in an RNA processing defect with a 15-nucleotide deletion in exon 5 of the mRNA transcript (r.322_336del15, p.R108_Q112del5). This novel mutation has resulted in different phenotypes in affected male and female patients of this family. The sex-specific variations in gene regulation during brain development may partially explain such difference in phenotypes probably in addition to other mechanisms such as modifier genes.

  5. Missense variants in AIMP1 gene are implicated in autosomal recessive intellectual disability without neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zafar; Püttmann, Lucia; Musante, Luciana; Razzaq, Attia; Zahoor, Muhammad Yasir; Hu, Hao; Wienker, Thomas F; Garshasbi, Masoud; Fattahi, Zohreh; Gilissen, Christian; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Veltman, Joris A; Pfundt, Rolph; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Kahrizi, Kimia; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2016-03-01

    AIMP1/p43 is a multifunctional non-catalytic component of the multisynthetase complex. The complex consists of nine catalytic and three non-catalytic proteins, which catalyze the ligation of amino acids to their cognate tRNA isoacceptors for use in protein translation. To date, two allelic variants in the AIMP1 gene have been reported as the underlying cause of autosomal recessive primary neurodegenerative disorder. Here, we present two consanguineous families from Pakistan and Iran, presenting with moderate to severe intellectual disability, global developmental delay, and speech impairment without neurodegeneration. By the combination of homozygosity mapping and next generation sequencing, we identified two homozygous missense variants, p.(Gly299Arg) and p.(Val176Gly), in the gene AIMP1 that co-segregated with the phenotype in the respective families. Molecular modeling of the variants revealed deleterious effects on the protein structure that are predicted to result in reduced AIMP1 function. Our findings indicate that the clinical spectrum for AIMP1 defects is broader than witnessed so far.

  6. Telomerase reverse-transcriptase homozygous mutations in autosomal recessive dyskeratosis congenita and Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marrone, Anna; Walne, Amanda; Tamary, Hannah; Masunari, Yuka; Kirwan, Michael; Beswick, Richard; Vulliamy, Tom; Dokal, Inderjeet

    2010-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a multisystem bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by a triad of mucocutaneous abnormalities and an increased predisposition to malignancy. X-linked DC is due to mutations in DKC1, while heterozygous mutations in TERC (telomerase RNA component) and TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase) have been found in autosomal dominant DC. Many patients with DC remain uncharacterized, particularly families displaying autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance. We have now identified novel homozygous TERT mutations in 2 unrelated consanguineous families, where the index cases presented with classical DC or the more severe variant, Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson (HH) syndrome. These TERT mutations resulted in reduced telomerase activity and extremely short telomeres. As these mutations are homozygous, these patients are predicted to have significantly reduced telomerase activity in vivo. Interestingly, in contrast to patients with heterozygous TERT mutations or hemizygous DKC1 mutations, these 2 homozygous TERT patients were observed to have higher-than-expected TERC levels compared with controls. Collectively, the findings from this study demonstrate that homozygous TERT mutations, resulting in a pure but severe telomerase deficiency, produce a phenotype of classical AR-DC and its severe variant, the HH syndrome. PMID:17785587

  7. An update of common autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss genes in Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Ghasemnejad, Tohid; Shekari Khaniani, Mahmoud; Zarei, Fatemeh; Farbodnia, Mina; Mansoori Derakhshan, Sima

    2017-06-01

    Autosomal-recessive genes are responsible for about 80% of the hereditary non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) cases. In Iran, due to consanguineous marriages, NSHL is the second most frequent disability after intellectual disability, occurring one in 16 individuals. Enormous heterogeneity in the genetic pathology of hearing loss causes a major challenge in identification of responsible genes. In Iran, GJB2 is responsible for the most cases of pre-lingual and non-syndromic hearing loss (with frequency of 16.7%) which followed by other genes with lower frequency. Although several studies have indicated that a large proportion of both syndromic and non-syndromic hearing loss in Iranian populations are caused by defects in just a few genes, new detection strategies such as NGS (Next-generation sequencing) have increased the spectrum of responsible mutations. However, by applying this technique in Iran patients screening, the role of lots of novel related genes have been reported. In this review, we aim to describe function of these genes and their contribution to non-syndromic genetic hearing loss in Iranian population and we classify the genes by their functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel G6B gene variant causes familial autosomal recessive thrombocytopenia and anemia.

    PubMed

    Melhem, Motasem; Abu-Farha, Mohamed; Antony, Dinu; Madhoun, Ashraf Al; Bacchelli, Chiara; Alkayal, Fadi; AlKhairi, Irina; John, Sumi; Alomari, Mohamad; Beales, Phillip L; Alsmadi, Osama

    2017-03-01

    To characterize the underlying genetic and molecular defects in a consanguineous family with lifelong blood disorder manifested with thrombocytopenia (low platelets count) and anemia. Genetic linkage analysis, exome sequencing, and functional genomics were carried out to identify and characterize the defective gene. We identified a novel truncation mutation (p.C108*) in chromosome 6 open reading frame 25 (C6orf25) gene in this family. We also showed the p.C108* mutation was responsible for destabilizing the encoded truncated G6B protein. Unlike the truncated form, wild-type G6B expression resulted in enhanced K562 differentiation into megakaryocytes and erythrocytes. C6orf25, also known as G6B, is an effector protein for the key hematopoiesis regulators, Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2. G6B seems to act through an autosomal recessive mode of disease transmission in this family and regarded as the gene responsible for the observed hematological disorder. This inference is well supported further by in vivo evidence where similar outcomes were reported from G6b(-/-) and SHP1/2 DKO mouse models. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Missense variants in AIMP1 gene are implicated in autosomal recessive intellectual disability without neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Zafar; Püttmann, Lucia; Musante, Luciana; Razzaq, Attia; Zahoor, Muhammad Yasir; Hu, Hao; Wienker, Thomas F; Garshasbi, Masoud; Fattahi, Zohreh; Gilissen, Christian; Vissers, Lisenka ELM; de Brouwer, Arjan PM; Veltman, Joris A; Pfundt, Rolph; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Kahrizi, Kimia; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2016-01-01

    AIMP1/p43 is a multifunctional non-catalytic component of the multisynthetase complex. The complex consists of nine catalytic and three non-catalytic proteins, which catalyze the ligation of amino acids to their cognate tRNA isoacceptors for use in protein translation. To date, two allelic variants in the AIMP1 gene have been reported as the underlying cause of autosomal recessive primary neurodegenerative disorder. Here, we present two consanguineous families from Pakistan and Iran, presenting with moderate to severe intellectual disability, global developmental delay, and speech impairment without neurodegeneration. By the combination of homozygosity mapping and next generation sequencing, we identified two homozygous missense variants, p.(Gly299Arg) and p.(Val176Gly), in the gene AIMP1 that co-segregated with the phenotype in the respective families. Molecular modeling of the variants revealed deleterious effects on the protein structure that are predicted to result in reduced AIMP1 function. Our findings indicate that the clinical spectrum for AIMP1 defects is broader than witnessed so far. PMID:26173967

  10. Mutations in SNX14 cause a distinctive autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia and intellectual disability syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anna C; Williams, Hywel; Setó-Salvia, Núria; Bacchelli, Chiara; Jenkins, Dagan; O'Sullivan, Mary; Mengrelis, Konstantinos; Ishida, Miho; Ocaka, Louise; Chanudet, Estelle; James, Chela; Lescai, Francesco; Anderson, Glenn; Morrogh, Deborah; Ryten, Mina; Duncan, Andrew J; Pai, Yun Jin; Saraiva, Jorge M; Ramos, Fabiana; Farren, Bernadette; Saunders, Dawn; Vernay, Bertrand; Gissen, Paul; Straatmaan-Iwanowska, Anna; Baas, Frank; Wood, Nicholas W; Hersheson, Joshua; Houlden, Henry; Hurst, Jane; Scott, Richard; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Moore, Gudrun E; Sousa, Sérgio B; Stanier, Philip

    2014-11-06

    Intellectual disability and cerebellar atrophy occur together in a large number of genetic conditions and are frequently associated with microcephaly and/or epilepsy. Here we report the identification of causal mutations in Sorting Nexin 14 (SNX14) found in seven affected individuals from three unrelated consanguineous families who presented with recessively inherited moderate-severe intellectual disability, cerebellar ataxia, early-onset cerebellar atrophy, sensorineural hearing loss, and the distinctive association of progressively coarsening facial features, relative macrocephaly, and the absence of seizures. We used homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to identify a homozygous nonsense mutation and an in-frame multiexon deletion in two families. A homozygous splice site mutation was identified by Sanger sequencing of SNX14 in a third family, selected purely by phenotypic similarity. This discovery confirms that these characteristic features represent a distinct and recognizable syndrome. SNX14 encodes a cellular protein containing Phox (PX) and regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domains. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis predicts that SNX14 is highly coexpressed with genes involved in cellular protein metabolism and vesicle-mediated transport. All three mutations either directly affected the PX domain or diminished SNX14 levels, implicating a loss of normal cellular function. This manifested as increased cytoplasmic vacuolation as observed in cultured fibroblasts. Our findings indicate an essential role for SNX14 in neural development and function, particularly in development and maturation of the cerebellum.

  11. Homozygosity mapping in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa families detects novel mutations

    PubMed Central

    Marzouka, Nour al Dain; Hebrard, Maxime; Manes, Gaël; Sénéchal, Audrey; Meunier, Isabelle; Hamel, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease resulting in progressive loss of photoreceptors that leads to blindness. To date, 36 genes are known to cause arRP, rendering the molecular diagnosis a challenge. The aim of this study was to use homozygosity mapping to identify the causative mutation in a series of inbred families with arRP. Methods arRP patients underwent standard ophthalmic examination, Goldman perimetry, fundus examination, retinal OCT, autofluorescence measurement, and full-field electroretinogram. Fifteen consanguineous families with arRP excluded for USH2A and EYS were genotyped on 250 K SNP arrays. Homozygous regions were listed, and known genes within these regions were PCR sequenced. Familial segregation and mutation analyzes were performed. Results We found ten mutations, seven of which were novel mutations in eight known genes, including RP1, IMPG2, NR2E3, PDE6A, PDE6B, RLBP1, CNGB1, and C2ORF71, in ten out of 15 families. The patients carrying RP1, C2ORF71, and IMPG2 mutations presented with severe RP, while those with PDE6A, PDE6B, and CNGB1 mutations were less severely affected. The five families without mutations in known genes could be a source of identification of novel genes. Conclusions Homozygosity mapping combined with systematic screening of known genes results in a positive molecular diagnosis in 66.7% of families. PMID:24339724

  12. Novel Deletion of SERPINF1 Causes Autosomal Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type VI in Two Brazilian Families

    PubMed Central

    Moldenhauer Minillo, Renata; Sobreira, Nara; de Fatima de Faria Soares, Maria; Jurgens, Julie; Ling, Hua; Hetrick, Kurt N.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Valle, David; Brunoni, Decio; Alvarez Perez, Ana B.

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) accounts for 10% of all OI cases, and, currently, mutations in 10 genes (CRTAP, LEPRE1, PPIB, SERPINH1, FKBP10, SERPINF1, SP7, BMP1, TMEM38B, and WNT1) are known to be responsible for this form of the disease. PEDF is a secreted glycoprotein of the serpin superfamily that maintains bone homeostasis and regulates osteoid mineralization, and it is encoded by SERPINF1, currently associated with OI type VI (MIM 172860). Here, we report a consanguineous Brazilian family in which multiple individuals from at least 4 generations are affected with a severe form of OI, and we also report an unrelated individual from the same small city in Brazil with a similar but more severe phenotype. In both families the same homozygous SERPINF1 19-bp deletion was identified which is not known in the literature yet. We described intra- and interfamilial clinical and radiological phenotypic variability of OI type VI caused by the same homozygous SERPINF1 19-bp deletion and suggest a founder effect. Furthermore, the SERPINF1 genotypes/phenotypes reported so far in the literature are reviewed. PMID:25565926

  13. Disruption of the methyltransferase-like 23 gene METTL23 causes mild autosomal recessive intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Bernkopf, Marie; Webersinke, Gerald; Tongsook, Chanakan; Koyani, Chintan N.; Rafiq, Muhammad A.; Ayaz, Muhammad; Müller, Doris; Enzinger, Christian; Aslam, Muhammad; Naeem, Farooq; Schmidt, Kurt; Gruber, Karl; Speicher, Michael R.; Malle, Ernst; Macheroux, Peter; Ayub, Muhammad; Vincent, John B.; Windpassinger, Christian; Duba, Hans-Christoph

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characterization of a gene for mild nonsyndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability (ID) in two unrelated families, one from Austria, the other from Pakistan. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis enabled us to define a region of homozygosity by descent on chromosome 17q25. Whole-exome sequencing and analysis of this region in an affected individual from the Austrian family identified a 5 bp frameshifting deletion in the METTL23 gene. By means of Sanger sequencing of METTL23, a nonsense mutation was detected in a consanguineous ID family from Pakistan for which homozygosity-by-descent mapping had identified a region on 17q25. Both changes lead to truncation of the putative METTL23 protein, which disrupts the predicted catalytic domain and alters the cellular localization. 3D-modelling of the protein indicates that METTL23 is strongly predicted to function as an S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase. Expression analysis of METTL23 indicated a strong association with heat shock proteins, which suggests that these may act as a putative substrate for methylation by METTL23. A number of methyltransferases have been described recently in association with ID. Disruption of METTL23 presented here supports the importance of methylation processes for intact neuronal function and brain development. PMID:24626631

  14. Genetic analysis of Indian families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa by homozygosity screening.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hardeep Pal; Jalali, Subhadra; Narayanan, Raja; Kannabiran, Chitra

    2009-09-01

    To identify the disease-causing genes in families with autosomal recessive RP (ARRP). Families were screened for homozygosity at candidate gene loci followed by screening of the selected gene for pathogenic mutations if homozygosity was present at a given locus. A total of 34 families were included, of which 24 were consanguineous. Twenty-three genes were selected for screening. The presence of homozygosity was assessed by genotyping flanking microsatellite markers at each locus in affected individuals. Mutations were detected by sequencing of coding regions of genes. Sequence changes were tested for presence in 100 or more unrelated normal control subjects and for cosegregation in family members. Homozygosity was detected at one or more loci in affected individuals of 10 of 34 families. Homozygous disease cosegregating sequence changes (two frame-shift, two missense, and one nonsense; four novel) were found in the TULP1, RLBP1, ABCA4, RPE65, and RP1 genes in 5 of 10 families. These changes were absent in 100 normal control subjects. In addition, several polymorphisms and novel variants were found. All the putative pathogenic changes were associated with severe forms of RP with onset in childhood. Associated macular degeneration was found in three families with mutations in TULP1, ABCA4, and RP1 genes. Novel mutations were found in different ARRP genes. Mutations were detected in approximately 15% (5/34) of ARRP families tested, suggesting involvement of other genes in the remaining families.

  15. Fetal brain disruption sequence versus fetal brain arrest: A distinct autosomal recessive developmental brain malformation phenotype.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; El-Khayat, Hamed A; Eid, Ola M; Saba, Soliman; Farag, Mona K; Saleem, Sahar N; Gaber, Khaled R

    2015-05-01

    The term fetal brain disruption sequence (FBDS) was coined to describe a number of sporadic conditions caused by numerous external disruptive events presenting with variable imaging findings. However, rare familial occurrences have been reported. We describe five patients (two sib pairs and one sporadic) with congenital severe microcephaly, seizures, and profound intellectual disability. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed unique and uniform picture of underdeveloped cerebral hemispheres with increased extraxial CSF, abnormal gyral pattern (polymicrogyria-like lesions in two sibs and lissencephaly in the others), loss of white matter, dysplastic ventricles, hypogenesis of corpus callosum, and hypoplasia of the brainstem, but hypoplastic cerebellum in one. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) of two patients showed the same developmental brain malformations in utero. These imaging findings are in accordance with arrested brain development rather than disruption. Molecular analysis excluded mutations in potentially related genes such as NDE1, MKL2, OCLN, and JAM3. These unique clinical and imaging findings were described before among familial reports with FBDS. However, our patients represent a recognizable phenotype of developmental brain malformations, that is, apparently distinguishable from either familial microhydranencephaly or microlissencephaly that were collectively termed FBDS. Thus, the use of the umbrella term FBDS is no longer helpful. Accordingly, we propose the term fetal brain arrest to distinguish them from other familial patients diagnosed as FBDS. The presence of five affected patients from three unrelated consanguineous families suggests an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. The spectrum of fetal brain disruption sequence is reviewed.

  16. Substitutions in the conserved C2C domain of otoferlin cause DFNB9, a form of nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness.

    PubMed

    Mirghomizadeh, F; Pfister, M; Apaydin, F; Petit, C; Kupka, S; Pusch, C M; Zenner, H P; Blin, N

    2002-07-01

    DFNB, the nonsyndromic hearing loss with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance constitutes the majority of severe to profound prelingual forms of hearing impairment, usually leading to inability of speech acquisition. We analyzed a consanguineous family with autosomal recessive deafness which has been shown to segregate within chromosomal region 2p23.1 (DFNB9; MIM 601071). By SSCP analysis and DNA sequencing of the 48 exons of the DFNB9 gene, coding for otoferlin, previously reported mutations in OTOF were excluded. Next to a frequent T > C single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 8, two novel mutations linked in exon 15 of the OTOF long splice form were identified comprising substitutions at positions 490 (Pro > Gln) and 515 (Ile > Thr), both located in the conserved Ca(2+) binding C2C domain of this peptide. Comparisons of homology using human and mice otoferlins and closely related peptides and computer simulation analyses suggest that changes in the mutated segment's secondary structure affect the Ca(2+) binding capacity of the C2C domain in otoferlin.

  17. EPS8L2 is a new causal gene for childhood onset autosomal recessive progressive hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Dahmani, Malika; Ammar-Khodja, Fatima; Bonnet, Crystel; Lefèvre, Gaelle M; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Ibrahim, Hassina; Mallek, Zahia; Petit, Christine

    2015-08-19

    More than 70 % of the cases of congenital deafness are of genetic origin, of which approximately 80 % are non-syndromic and show autosomal recessive transmission (DFNB forms). To date, 60 DFNB genes have been identified, most of which cause congenital, severe to profound deafness, whereas a few cause delayed progressive deafness in childhood. We report the study of two Algerian siblings born to consanguineous parents, and affected by progressive hearing loss. After exclusion of GJB2 (the gene most frequently involved in non-syndromic deafness in Mediterranean countries), we performed whole-exome sequencing in one sibling. A frame-shift variant (c.1014delC; p.Ser339Alafs*15) was identified in EPS8L2, encoding Epidermal growth factor receptor Pathway Substrate 8 L2, a protein of hair cells' stereocilia previously implicated in progressive deafness in the mouse. This variant predicts a truncated, inactive protein, or no protein at all owing to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. It was detected at the homozygous state in the two clinically affected siblings, and at the heterozygous state in the unaffected parents and one unaffected sibling, whereas it was never found in a control population of 150 Algerians with normal hearing or in the Exome Variant Server database. Whole-exome sequencing allowed us to identify a new gene responsible for childhood progressive hearing loss transmitted on the autosomal recessive mode.

  18. Biallelic variants in LINGO1 are associated with autosomal recessive intellectual disability, microcephaly, speech and motor delay.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Muhammad; Riazuddin, Saima; Sarwar, Muhammad Tahir; Makrythanasis, Periklis; Paracha, Sohail Aziz; Iqbal, Zafar; Khan, Jamshed; Assir, Muhammad Zaman; Hussain, Mureed; Razzaq, Attia; Polla, Daniel Lôpo; Taj, Abid Sohail; Holmgren, Asbjørn; Batool, Naila; Misceo, Doriana; Iwaszkiewicz, Justyna; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Guipponi, Michel; Hanquinet, Sylviane; Zoete, Vincent; Santoni, Federico A; Frengen, Eirik; Ahmed, Jawad; Riazuddin, Sheikh; van Bokhoven, Hans; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2017-08-24

    PurposeTo elucidate the novel molecular cause in two unrelated consanguineous families with autosomal recessive intellectual disability.MethodsA combination of homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing was used to locate the plausible genetic defect in family F162, while only exome sequencing was followed in the family PKMR65. The protein 3D structure was visualized with the University of California-San Francisco Chimera software.ResultsAll five patients from both families presented with severe intellectual disability, aggressive behavior, and speech and motor delay. Four of the five patients had microcephaly. We identified homozygous missense variants in LINGO1, p.(Arg290His) in family F162 and p.(Tyr288Cys) in family PKMR65. Both variants were predicted to be pathogenic, and segregated with the phenotype in the respective families. Molecular modeling of LINGO1 suggests that both variants interfere with the glycosylation of the protein.ConclusionLINGO1 is a transmembrane receptor, predominantly found in the central nervous system. Published loss-of-function studies in mouse and zebrafish have established a crucial role of LINGO1 in normal neuronal development and central nervous system myelination by negatively regulating oligodendrocyte differentiation and neuronal survival. Taken together, our results indicate that biallelic LINGO1 missense variants cause autosomal recessive intellectual disability in humans.GENETICS in MEDICINE advance online publication, 24 August 2017; doi:10.1038/gim.2017.113.

  19. Autosomal recessive POLR1D mutation with decrease of TCOF1 mRNA is responsible for Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Elise; Collet, Corinne; Genevieve, David; Vincent, Marie; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Sanchez, Elodie; Bolender, Chantal; Eliot, Marie-Madeleine; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Passos-Bueno, Maria-Rita; Wieczorek, Dagmar; van Maldergem, Lionel; Doray, Bérénice

    2014-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a mandibulofacial dysostosis caused by mutations in genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and synthesis. TCOF1 mutations are observed in ~80% of the patients and are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Recently, two other genes have been reported in <2% of patients--POLR1D in patients with autosomal dominant inheritance, and POLR1C in patients with autosomal recessive inheritance. We performed direct sequencing of TCOF1, POLR1C, and POLR1D in two unrelated consanguineous families. The four affected children shared the same homozygous mutation in POLR1D (c.163C>G, p.Leu55Val). This mutation is localized in a region encoding the dimerization domain of the RNA polymerase. It is supposed that this mutation impairs RNA polymerase, resulting in a lower amount of mature dimeric ribosomes. A functional analysis of the transcripts of TCOF1 by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed in the first family, demonstrating a 50% reduction in the index case, compatible with this hypothesis. This is the first report of POLR1D mutation being responsible for an autosomal recessive inherited Treacher Collins syndrome. These results reinforce the concept of genetic heterogeneity of Treacher Collins syndrome and underline the importance of combining clinical expertise and familial molecular analyses for appropriate genetic counseling.

  20. Rare compound heterozygosity involving dominant and recessive mutations of GJB2 gene in an assortative mating hearing impaired Indian family.

    PubMed

    Pavithra, Amritkumar; Chandru, Jayasankaran; Jeffrey, Justin Margret; Karthikeyen, N P; Srisailapathy, C R Srikumari

    2017-01-01

    Connexin 26 (Cx-26), a gap junction protein coded by GJB2 gene, plays a very important role in recycling of potassium ions, one of the vital steps in the mechanotransduction process of hearing. Mutations in the GJB2 gene have been associated with both autosomal recessive as well as dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss. As Cx-26 is linked with skin homeostasis, mutations in this gene are sometimes associated with syndromic forms of hearing loss showing skin anomalies. We report here a non consanguineous assortatively mating hearing impaired family with one of the hearing impaired partners, their hearing impaired sibling and hearing impaired offspring showing compound heterozygosity in the GJB2 gene, involving a dominant mutation p.R184Q and two recessive mutations p.Q124X and c.IVS 1+1G>A in a unique triallelic combination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report from India on p.R184Q mutation in the GJB2 gene associated with rare compound heterozygosity showing nonsyndromic presentation.

  1. [Phenotype and genotype analysis for a consanguineous pedigree with combined coagulation factor VII and X deficiency].

    PubMed

    Jin, Yanhui; Wang, Mingshan; Wang, Yingyu; Yang, Xiaoli; Yang, Lihong; Xie, Yaosheng; Xie, Haixiao; Zhu, Liqing; Yu, Fangyou

    2014-02-01

    To identify potential mutations and explore the molecular mechanism underlying combined inherited coagulation factors VII(FVII) and X(FX) deficiency for a family featuring consanguineous marriage between maternal cousins. Prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, FVII activity (FVII:C), FX activity (FX:C), FVII antigen (FVII:Ag), FX antigen (FX:Ag) and other coagulant parameters of the proband and 5 family members were measured. Potential mutations in exons, exon-intron boundaries and 5', 3' untranslated sequences of F7 and F10 genes were screened by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Suspected mutations were confirmed by sequencing the opposite strand. PT and APTT of the proband were obviously prolonged to become 76.4 s and 60.2 s, respectively. FVII:C, FVII:Ag,FX:C and FX:Ag of the proband were obviously reduced to become 4%, 6%, 6% and 33%, respectively. Both PT and APTT of her grandmother, father, mother and daughter were slightly prolonged, which have measured 16.4 s, 15.8 s,16.9 s, 16.5 s, and 44.0 s, 42.1 s, 41.1 s, 43.5 s, respectively. And their FVII:C (34%, 39%, 31%, 40%, respectively), FX:C (50%, 58%, 47%, 42%, respectively) and FX:Ag (51%, 54%, 58%, 47%, respectively) were slightly reduced, while FVII:Ag was in the normal range. The coagulant parameters of her younger brother were within normal range. Two homozygous mutations, g.11267C to T in exon 8 of F7 gene, which resulted in an Arg277Cys substitution, and g.28139G to T in exon 8 of F10 gene which led to a Val384Phe substitution, were identified in the proband. The proband's grandmother, parents and daughter were heterozygous for both Arg277Cys and Val384Phe mutationss. Wild-type alleles of both F7 and F10 genes were also found in the younger brother. A homozygous Arg277Cys mutation and a Val384Phe mutation have been respectively identified in the F7 and F10 genes, which can explain the low levels of FVII and FX in this family. The former has been

  2. Human knockouts and phenotypic analysis in a cohort with a high rate of consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Saleheen, Danish; Natarajan, Pradeep; Armean, Irina M; Zhao, Wei; Rasheed, Asif; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Won, Hong-Hee; Karczewski, Konrad J; O'Donnell-Luria, Anne H; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Weisburd, Benjamin; Gupta, Namrata; Zaidi, Mozzam; Samuel, Maria; Imran, Atif; Abbas, Shahid; Majeed, Faisal; Ishaq, Madiha; Akhtar, Saba; Trindade, Kevin; Mucksavage, Megan; Qamar, Nadeem; Zaman, Khan Shah; Yaqoob, Zia; Saghir, Tahir; Rizvi, Syed Nadeem Hasan; Memon, Anis; Hayyat Mallick, Nadeem; Ishaq, Mohammad; Rasheed, Syed Zahed; Memon, Fazal-Ur-Rehman; Mahmood, Khalid; Ahmed, Naveeduddin; Do, Ron; Krauss, Ronald M; MacArthur, Daniel G; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric S; Daly, Mark J; Frossard, Philippe; Danesh, John; Rader, Daniel J; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2017-04-12

    A major goal of biomedicine is to understand the function of every gene in the human genome. Loss-of-function mutations can disrupt both copies of a given gene in humans and phenotypic analysis of such 'human knockouts' can provide insight into gene function. Consanguineous unions are more likely to result in offspring carrying homozygous loss-of-function mutations. In Pakistan, consanguinity rates are notably high. Here we sequence the protein-coding regions of 10,503 adult participants in the Pakistan Risk of Myocardial Infarction Study (PROMIS), designed to understand the determinants of cardiometabolic diseases in individuals from South Asia. We identified individuals carrying homozygous predicted loss-of-function (pLoF) mutations, and performed phenotypic analysis involving more than 200 biochemical and disease traits. We enumerated 49,138 rare (<1% minor allele frequency) pLoF mutations. These pLoF mutations are estimated to knock out 1,317 genes, each in at least one participant. Homozygosity for pLoF mutations at PLA2G7 was associated with absent enzymatic activity of soluble lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2; at CYP2F1, with higher plasma interleukin-8 concentrations; at TREH, with lower concentrations of apoB-containing lipoprotein subfractions; at either A3GALT2 or NRG4, with markedly reduced plasma insulin C-peptide concentrations; and at SLC9A3R1, with mediators of calcium and phosphate signalling. Heterozygous deficiency of APOC3 has been shown to protect against coronary heart disease; we identified APOC3 homozygous pLoF carriers in our cohort. We recruited these human knockouts and challenged them with an oral fat load. Compared with family members lacking the mutation, individuals with APOC3 knocked out displayed marked blunting of the usual post-prandial rise in plasma triglycerides. Overall, these observations provide a roadmap for a 'human knockout project', a systematic effort to understand the phenotypic consequences of complete

  3. [Periodontology and esthetics: the gingival recession].

    PubMed

    Corba, N H

    1991-06-01

    Gingival recessions are regarded by many people as an esthetical problem. Successively the etiology, the significance and the indications for therapy are discussed. Different kinds of therapy such as oral hygiene instruction, the free gingival graft and various pedicle grafts are explained. Finally it is advocated that surgical kinds of therapy have to be applied with reservedness.

  4. Nevada, the Great Recession, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verstegen, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of the Great Recession and its aftermath has been devastating in Nevada, especially for public education. This article discusses the budget shortfalls and the impact of the economic crisis in Nevada using case study methodology. It provides a review of documents, including Governor Gibbon's proposals for the public K-12 education system…

  5. Weathering the recession in college health.

    PubMed

    Christmas, William A

    2010-01-01

    The current global recession has increased personal stress levels throughout our society. With dwindling resources, institutions of higher learning are especially prone to budgetary cutbacks during such periods. Based on 22 years of experience as a health service director, the author offers some personal insights in the hope that they will help colleagues cope with the current situation.

  6. Weathering the Recession in College Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christmas, William A.

    2010-01-01

    The current global recession has increased personal stress levels throughout our society. With dwindling resources, institutions of higher learning are especially prone to budgetary cutbacks during such periods. Based on 22 years of experience as a health service director, the author offers some personal insights in the hope that they will help…

  7. Weathering the Recession in College Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christmas, William A.

    2010-01-01

    The current global recession has increased personal stress levels throughout our society. With dwindling resources, institutions of higher learning are especially prone to budgetary cutbacks during such periods. Based on 22 years of experience as a health service director, the author offers some personal insights in the hope that they will help…

  8. Naval stores markets on hold during recession

    SciTech Connect

    Layman, P.

    1982-03-22

    A review of the current state of the market and level of inventory stocks of turpentine and tall oil and its derivatives. It is concluded that pricing is soft as major markets suffer through recession, but that recovery may be quick in some areas where inventory stocks are low.

  9. The Global Picture. Recession to Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) document government and HE (higher education) sector responses to the recession within a select number of key countries which compete with the UK; and (2) compare these responses and analyse them by theme to draw out any common patterns. The focus of the work was to find, where possible, an evidence base…

  10. The Recession and Education: Seize New Opportunities!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskvitz, Alan

    2011-01-01

    The teaching profession has long been thought of as recession proof. Indeed, that may have been one of the reasons why teachers took far lower starting salaries right out of college. Perhaps the greatest common feature of teachers, besides their desire to serve society in a humanitarian way, may be the lack of risk-taking the occupation previously…

  11. Reclaiming Recess: Learning the Language of Persuasion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebhard, Meg; Harman, Ruth; Seger, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    Using a case study approach, the authors describe how a teacher used the tools of systemic functional linguistics (SFL) to teach her fifth grade English Language Learners how to use academic language to challenge school policies regarding recess. In reflecting on these data, we discuss the potential of SFL to support teachers in responding to…

  12. Recession curbs gas pipeline construction costs

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.M.

    1983-01-24

    This paper shows how after 5 yrs. of inflation, gas pipeline construction costs have finally felt the effects of a severe building recession. First quarter (1982) construction activity, compressor equipment and drive units, and high-pressure gas-station piping are discussed. Graphs of OGJ-Morgan composite gas pipeline cost, and gas pipeline cost component indexes are presented.

  13. Gender Differences during Recess in Elementary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twarek, Linda S.; George, Halley S.

    A study examined the differences in what boys and girls choose, or are free to choose, to do on the playground during recess. Given the apparent problem that boys dominate the playground area, leaving girls on the perimeter, it was hypothesized that girls engage in passive, non-competitive, small group activities, whereas boys engage in…

  14. The Global Picture. Recession to Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) document government and HE (higher education) sector responses to the recession within a select number of key countries which compete with the UK; and (2) compare these responses and analyse them by theme to draw out any common patterns. The focus of the work was to find, where possible, an evidence base…

  15. Nevada, the Great Recession, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verstegen, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of the Great Recession and its aftermath has been devastating in Nevada, especially for public education. This article discusses the budget shortfalls and the impact of the economic crisis in Nevada using case study methodology. It provides a review of documents, including Governor Gibbon's proposals for the public K-12 education system…

  16. Recess for Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    During recess, the participation of a student with visual impairments in terms of movement can often be both challenging and rewarding for the student and general education teacher. This paper will address common characteristics of students with visual impairments and present basic solutions to improve the participation of these students in the…

  17. The Effects of Immigration and Media Influence on Body Image Among Pakistani Men.

    PubMed

    Saghir, Sheeba; Hyland, Lynda

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the role of media influence and immigration on body image among Pakistani men. Attitudes toward the body were compared between those living in Pakistan ( n = 56) and those who had immigrated to the United Arab Emirates ( n = 58). Results of a factorial analysis of variance demonstrated a significant main effect of immigrant status. Pakistani men living in the United Arab Emirates displayed poorer body image than those in the Pakistan sample. Results also indicated a second main effect of media influence.Those highly influenced by the media displayed poorer body image. No interaction effect was observed between immigrant status and media influence on body image. These findings suggest that media influence and immigration are among important risk factors for the development of negative body image among non-Western men. Interventions designed to address the negative effects of the media and immigration may be effective at reducing body image disorders and other related health problems in this population.

  18. Muslim Spirituality, Religious Coping, and Reactions to Terrorism Among Pakistani University Students.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ziasma Haneef; Watson, P J; Chen, Zhuo

    2016-12-01

    Pakistani Muslim university students (N = 207) displayed Personal Distress, Public Distress, and Personal Defeat Reactions to Terrorism. All three reactions predicted poorer mental health with Personal Defeat being especially disturbed in its adjustment implications. In line with the assumptions of coping theory, scores on the Negative Religious Coping Scale correlated positively with Personal Distress and with Personal Defeat. However, Positive Religious Coping, the spirituality of Muslim Experiential Religiousness, and the Intrinsic and Extrinsic Personal Religious Orientations exhibited positive rather than the expected negative linkages with Personal Distress and Public Distress. Muslim Experiential Religiousness moderated associations of Positive and Negative Religious Coping with Public Distress. When spirituality was high, these relationships were negative. When spirituality was low, they became positive. These data documented the negative impacts that terrorism can have on Pakistanis and suggested that Muslim religious commitments may have an important role to play in resisting those influences.

  19. Attitudes of Pakistani community members and staff toward people with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Patka, Mazna; Keys, Christopher B; Henry, David B; McDonald, Katherine E

    2013-01-01

    The acceptance and inclusion of persons with intellectual disability can vary across cultures, and understanding attitudes can provide insight into such variation. To our knowledge, no previous study has explored attitudes toward people with intellectual disability among Pakistani community members and disability service providers. We administered the Community Living Attitudes Scale (Henry et al., 1996), a measure of attitudes toward people with intellectual disability developed in the United States, to 262 community members and 190 disability service providers in Pakistan. Confirmatory factor analysis found a 4-factor solution (empowerment, similarity, exclusion, and sheltering) fit the Pakistani sample. More positive attitudes were observed in staff serving people with intellectual disability, females, Christians, Hindus, Sunnis, and people with greater education. We discuss implications for research, theory, and practice.

  20. An overview of the predictors of depression among adult Pakistani women.

    PubMed

    Zahidie, Aysha; Jamali, Tanzil

    2013-08-01

    Diseases of women that are due to their gender specific roles and responsibilities result from cultural and social factors prevalent in the environs. World Health Organization has put special emphasis on research need regarding gender related factors for diseases disproportionately affecting women in developing countries. The objective of this write up was to determine the prevalence of depression and the associated risk factors among adult women in Pakistan. PubMed was searched using key words depression, risk factors, women and Pakistan. Out of 20 initially retrieved articles, 12 were directly related to depression and its risk factors among Pakistani women within Pakistani geographical context. Women in Pakistan are vulnerable to poor mental health due to marriage related issues, domestic violence, verbal or physical abuse by in-laws, stressful life and poor social conditions. Women in their perinatal period are more at risk of depression due to pregnancy related concerns.

  1. Family structure and the mental health of Pakistani Muslim mothers and their children living in Britain.

    PubMed

    Shah, Q; Sonuga-Barke, E

    1995-02-01

    The relationship between family structure and mental health was examined in a British Pakistani Muslim community. Mothers completed an inventory of psychological symptoms of depression and anxiety while a teacher rated their children's behavioural adjustment. Mothers living in extended families reported feeling more depressed and anxious than those in nuclear families; their children, however, were better adjusted. The significance and reasons for the different patterns of association between family structure and psychological well-being for mothers and children are discussed.

  2. Experiences of outreach workers in promoting smoking cessation to Bangladeshi and Pakistani men: longitudinal qualitative evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite having high smoking rates, there have been few tailored cessation programmes for male Bangladeshi and Pakistani smokers in the UK. We report on a qualitative evaluation of a community-based, outreach worker delivered, intervention that aimed to increase uptake of NHS smoking cessation services and tailor services to meet the needs of Bangladeshi and Pakistani men. Methods This was a longitudinal, qualitative study, nested within a phase II cluster randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention. We explored the perspectives and experiences of five outreach workers, two stop smoking service managers and a specialist stop smoking advisor. Data were collected through focus group discussions, weekly diaries, observations of management meetings, shadowing of outreach workers, and one-to-one interviews with outreach workers and their managers. Analysis was undertaken using a modified Framework approach. Results Outreach workers promoted cessation services by word of mouth on the streets, in health service premises, in local businesses and at a wide range of community events. They emphasised the reasons for cessation, especially health effects, financial implications, and the impact of smoking on the family. Many smokers agreed to be referred to cessation services, but few attended, this in part being explained by concerns about the relative inflexibility of existing service provision. Although outreach workers successfully expanded service reach, they faced the challenges of perceived lack of awareness of the health risks associated with smoking in older smokers and apathy in younger smokers. These were compounded by perceptions of "lip service" being given to their role by community organisations and tensions both amongst the outreach workers and with the wider management team. Conclusions Outreach workers expanded reach of the service through taking it to diverse locations of relevance to Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities. The optimum

  3. The Indo-Pakistani Nuclear Issue: A U.S. Policy Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    from Jinnah to Zia have sought help from the USA, which has ’used’ Pakistan for purposes related to its own global objectives and concerns. In...under IAEA safeguards. In his essay in Nuclear Proliferation in South Asia, Akhtar Ali speculated that India may have been able to import additional...further partition of Pakistan and the creation of Bangladesh. Pakistanis extracted three bitter lessons from that defeat. They concluded that: 1

  4. Experiences of outreach workers in promoting smoking cessation to Bangladeshi and Pakistani men: longitudinal qualitative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Begh, Rachna A; Aveyard, Paul; Upton, Penney; Bhopal, Raj S; White, Martin; Amos, Amanda; Prescott, Robin J; Bedi, Raman; Barton, Pelham M; Fletcher, Monica; Gill, Paramjit; Zaidi, Qaim; Sheikh, Aziz

    2011-06-09

    Despite having high smoking rates, there have been few tailored cessation programmes for male Bangladeshi and Pakistani smokers in the UK. We report on a qualitative evaluation of a community-based, outreach worker delivered, intervention that aimed to increase uptake of NHS smoking cessation services and tailor services to meet the needs of Bangladeshi and Pakistani men. This was a longitudinal, qualitative study, nested within a phase II cluster randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention. We explored the perspectives and experiences of five outreach workers, two stop smoking service managers and a specialist stop smoking advisor. Data were collected through focus group discussions, weekly diaries, observations of management meetings, shadowing of outreach workers, and one-to-one interviews with outreach workers and their managers. Analysis was undertaken using a modified Framework approach. Outreach workers promoted cessation services by word of mouth on the streets, in health service premises, in local businesses and at a wide range of community events. They emphasised the reasons for cessation, especially health effects, financial implications, and the impact of smoking on the family. Many smokers agreed to be referred to cessation services, but few attended, this in part being explained by concerns about the relative inflexibility of existing service provision. Although outreach workers successfully expanded service reach, they faced the challenges of perceived lack of awareness of the health risks associated with smoking in older smokers and apathy in younger smokers. These were compounded by perceptions of "lip service" being given to their role by community organisations and tensions both amongst the outreach workers and with the wider management team. Outreach workers expanded reach of the service through taking it to diverse locations of relevance to Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities. The optimum method of outreach to retain and treat

  5. Bacteriuria and pregnancy outcome: a prospective hospital-based study in Pakistani women.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, R N; Khan, K S; Darr, O; Khattak, N; Farooqui, B J; Rizvi, J H

    1994-01-01

    The prevalence of bacteriuria in Pakistani women and its association with complications of pregnancy was studied. Out of 1579 women, 77 had bacteriuria (4.8%). There was no association of age, gravidity, parity, haemoglobin, pre-eclampsia, mode of delivery, gestational age at delivery, preterm delivery and low birth-weight with presence of bacteriuria. With detection and treatment the pregnancy outcome of women with bacteriuria in pregnancy was the same as that of those without.

  6. The rate of consanguineous marriages among parents of schizophrenic patients in the Arab Bedouin population in Southern Israel.

    PubMed

    Dobrusin, Michael; Weitzman, Dahlia; Levine, Joseph; Kremer, Ilana; Rietschel, Marcella; Maier, Wolfgang; Belmaker, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    Consanguinity may contribute to the incidence of schizophrenia in offspring despite the usually accepted polygenic model of schizophrenia inheritance. Bedouin Arab families in southern Israel have a high rate of cousin marriages as do families throughout most Arab societies. We studied consanguinity in the parents of schizophrenic patients admitted in a defined catchment area of southern Israel, compared to a control group of parents of all infants born to Bedouin mothers in this catchment area. There was a small but significant increase in the rate of cousin marriages among the parents of schizophrenia patients compared to parents of infant controls. These results are consistent with claims that inbreeding can contribute to the incidence of schizophrenia even as a polygenic illness. However, the absence of a better matched control group limits confidence in the results.

  7. Factors associated with the process of adaptation among Pakistani adolescent females living in United States.

    PubMed

    Khuwaja, Salma A; Selwyn, Beatrice J; Mgbere, Osaro; Khuwaja, Alam; Kapadia, Asha; McCurdy, Sheryl; Hsu, Chiehwen E

    2013-04-01

    This study explored post-migration experiences of recently migrated Pakistani Muslim adolescent females residing in the United States. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with thirty Pakistani Muslim adolescent females between the ages of 15 and 18 years living with their families in Houston, Texas. Data obtained from the interviews were evaluated using discourse analysis to identify major reoccurring themes. Participants discussed factors associated with the process of adaptation to the American culture. The results revealed that the main factors associated with adaptation process included positive motivation for migration, family bonding, social support networks, inter-familial communication, aspiration of adolescents to learn other cultures, availability of English-as-second-language programs, participation in community rebuilding activities, and faith practices, English proficiency, peer pressure, and inter-generational conflicts. This study provided much needed information on factors associated with adaptation process of Pakistani Muslim adolescent females in the United States. The results have important implications for improving the adaptation process of this group and offer potential directions for intervention and counseling services.

  8. Prevalence of lapses in academic integrity in two Pakistani medical colleges.

    PubMed

    Shukr, Irfan; Roff, Sue

    2015-05-01

    To determine prevalence of professionalism lapses related to academic integrity by students Pakistani medical colleges. 520 students. Cross sectional. A validated and customized version of Dundee Polyprofessional Inventory-1 for use in Pakistani medical schools was used. The students' perceptions on 47 behaviors were explored. The response rate of students was 92%. Ninety percent or more than 90% of student agreed that 30 of the 47 listed behaviors were wrong. Different percentages of the students admitted doing 44 (94%), out of 47 behaviors. Students thought that fellow students were doing dishonest behaviors far more frequently than they themselves were. The commonest dishonest behaviors admitted were proxy attendance (308, 64%), receiving information about the paper from a student who has already sat in the exam, or themselves providing information about a paper who have yet to sit in it (297, 62%), completing work for another student 291 (61%). There are significant issues related to academic integrity in Pakistani medical schools that require remedy. The Dundee Polyprofessional Inventory-1 as customized for use in Pakistan is a useful tool to measure professionalism lapses related to academic integrity.

  9. Identities in the third space? Solidity, elasticity and resilience amongst young British Pakistani Muslims.

    PubMed

    Mythen, Gabe

    2012-09-01

    Over the last decade the issue of identity has been prevalent in discussions about British Muslims, with the events of 9/11 serving as a touchstone for media debates about religious, national and cultural affiliations. The 7/7 terrorist attacks in the UK led to young British Pakistanis being subjected to intense public and institutional scrutiny and wider political concerns being expressed about the failure of multiculturalism. Young British Pakistanis have thus had to negotiate and maintain their identities in an environment in which they have been defined as a threat to national security whilst simultaneously being pressurized to align with 'core British values'. Within this context, we convey the findings of a qualitative study involving British Pakistanis living in the North-west of England. In presenting the experiences and perspectives of participants, three interconnected processes salient to the maintenance of identity are delineated: solidity, elasticity and resilience. Having unpacked these processes, we draw upon Bhabha's third space thesis to explore the political potentiality of and the limits to hybridic identities.

  10. Genetic link of type 1 diabetes susceptibility loci with rheumatoid arthritis in Pakistani patients.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Aysha Karim; Jahangir, Sidrah; Jahngir, Sidrah; John, Peter; Bhatti, Attya; Zia, Asima; Wang, Xingbin; Demirci, F Yesim; Kamboh, M Ilyas

    2015-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) are two autoimmune disorders that have been reported to co-occur in the same subjects or in different subjects from the same family. This suggests the sharing of disease susceptibility loci between RA and T1D. This study was aimed to find out such susceptibility loci that are common in both T1D and RA in Pakistani population. A total of 366 Pakistanis comprising related and unrelated RA cases and controls were recruited. Blood samples were collected from all patients followed by DNA isolation. Thirty-one single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported to be associated with T1D were genotyped in RA cases and controls using TaqMan SNP genotyping assays. Data was analyzed using FamCC software. We have identified seven SNP associations that survived multiple testing corrections using false discovery rate: SKAP2/rs7804356 (p = 2.47E-04), GLIS3/rs7020673 (p = 2.86E-04), GSDMB/rs2290400 (p = 23.48E-04), BACH2/rs11755527 (p = 9.16E-04), C6orf173/ rs9388489 (p = 3.11E-03), PRKCQ/DKFZp667F0711/ rs947474 (p = 4.53E-03), and DLK1/ rs941576 (p = 9.51E-03). Our results support the presence of overlapping loci between RA and T1D in Pakistani patients.

  11. Comparative metal distribution in scalp hair of Pakistani and Irish referents and hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Brabazon, Dermot; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Naher, Sumsun; Nesterenko, Ekaterina

    2011-12-01

    The abnormal metabolism of metal ions plays an important role in health and disease conditions, and studies about them have been attracting significant interest. The aim of our study was to assess the heavy metals (cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn)) in scalp hair samples of 50 Irish and 78 Pakistani hypertensive patients of an urban population together with 50 Irish and 96 Pakistani non-hypertensive male subjects in the age group of 30-50 years. The concentrations of trace and toxic elements were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrophotometer and atomic absorption spectrophotometer before microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked using certified reference materials, and by the conventional wet acid digestion method on the same certified reference materials and on real samples. The recovery of all the studied elements was found to be in the range of 97.5-99.7% in certified reference material. The results of this study showed that the mean values of cadmium, nickel, and lead were significantly higher in scalp hair samples of both Pakistani and Irish hypertensive patients than in referents (p < 0.001); whereas, the concentration of zinc was lower in the scalp hair samples of hypertensive patients of both genders. The deficiency of zinc and the high exposure of trace and toxic metals may be the risk factors associated with hypertension.

  12. Associations of recurrent miscarriages with chromosomal abnormalities, thrombophilia allelic polymorphisms and/or consanguinity in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Turki, Rola F; Assidi, Mourad; Banni, Huda A; Zahed, Hanan A; Karim, Sajjad; Schulten, Hans-Juergen; Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Rouzi, Abdulrahim A; Bajouh, Osama; Jamal, Hassan S; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H; Abuzenadah, Adel M

    2016-10-10

    Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) or recurrent spontaneous abortion is an obstetric complication that affects couples at reproductive age. Previous reports documented a clear relationship between parents with chromosomal abnormalities and both recurrent miscarriages and infertility. However, limited data is available from the Arabian Peninsula which is known by higher rates of consanguineous marriages. The main goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and thrombophilic polymorphisms, and to correlate them with RPL and consanguinity in Saudi Arabia. Cytogenetic analysis of 171 consent patients with RPL was performed by the standard method of 72-h lymphocyte culture and GTG banding. Allelic polymorphisms of three thrombophilic genes (Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin A20210G, MTHFR C677T) were performed using PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) and gel electrophoresis. Data analysis revealed that 7.6 % of patients were carrier of numerical or structural chromosomal abnormalities. A high rate of translocations (46 %) was associated to increased incidence of RPL. A significant correlation between consanguineous RPL patients and chromosomal abnormalities (P < 0.05) was found. Both Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin A20210G allelic polymorphisms were significantly associated with a higher prevalence of RPL. This study demonstrated a strong association between RPL and the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and inherited thrombophilia. Given the high rate of consanguineous marriages in the Saudi population, these results underline the importance of systematic cytogenetic investigation and genetic counseling preferably at the premarital stage or at least during early pregnancy phase through preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD).

  13. Consanguineous mating, specialization, and the environment: how multiple variable interactions affect the evolution of dioecy.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jordan P; Maxwell, Glenn D; Freeman, D Carl

    2013-06-01

    The evolution of dioecy in plants is usually modeled as a consequence of self-fertilization. While increased seed and pollen production and dispersal patterns of specialized unisexuals have been examined, mating among relatives and interaction effects have been largely ignored. Here, we examine multiple variables simultaneously providing a more ecologically realistic set of conditions favoring the evolution of dioecy. • We developed two complementary models to explore the evolution of dioecious plants. In both models, we examined the effects of inbreeding, compensation, and specialization on unisexual invasibility and were able to directly measure the influence of related matings on such a system. • Our results support previous studies indicating dispersal specialization, consanguineous mating, and inbreeding depression facilitate the evolution of dioecy. However, our results suggest that it is the interaction effect of multiple forces acting simultaneously that allows for unisexual invasion at thresholds and frequencies witnessed in nature. Additionally, our results suggest that subdioecious populations often result, and depending on population conditions, dioecy evolves at different rates, lending importance to the ecological and life history conditions of the species. • Mating among relatives significantly enhances the invasibility of a unisexual mutant into a hermaphroditic population and lowers the levels of inbreeding depression required for invasion than previously reported conditions for unisexual invasion especially, if we consider multiple pressures simultaneously.

  14. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Suzanne; Drouet, Valérie; Majounie, Elisa; Deramecourt, Vincent; Jacoupy, Maxime; Nicolas, Aude; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Pujol, Claire; Ciura, Sorana; Erpapazoglou, Zoi; Usenko, Tatiana; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Sahbatou, Mourad; Liebau, Stefan; Ding, Jinhui; Bilgic, Basar; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Guven, Gamze; Tison, François; Tranchant, Christine; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Krack, Paul; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Nalls, Michael A; Hernandez, Dena G; Heutink, Peter; Gibbs, J Raphael; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Gasser, Thomas; Durr, Alexandra; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tazir, Meriem; Destée, Alain; Lohmann, Ebba; Kabashi, Edor; Singleton, Andrew; Corti, Olga; Brice, Alexis

    2016-03-03

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with early-onset parkinsonism and confirmed consanguinity followed by data mining in the exomes of 1,348 PD-affected individuals identified, in three isolated subjects, homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 13C (VPS13C). VPS13C mutations are associated with a distinct form of early-onset parkinsonism characterized by rapid and severe disease progression and early cognitive decline; the pathological features were striking and reminiscent of diffuse Lewy body disease. In cell models, VPS13C partly localized to the outer membrane of mitochondria. Silencing of VPS13C was associated with lower mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, increased respiration rates, exacerbated PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitophagy, and transcriptional upregulation of PARK2 in response to mitochondrial damage. This work suggests that loss of function of VPS13C is a cause of autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism with a distinctive phenotype of rapid and severe progression.

  15. Loss of VPS13C Function in Autosomal-Recessive Parkinsonism Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increases PINK1/Parkin-Dependent Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, Suzanne; Drouet, Valérie; Majounie, Elisa; Deramecourt, Vincent; Jacoupy, Maxime; Nicolas, Aude; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Pujol, Claire; Ciura, Sorana; Erpapazoglou, Zoi; Usenko, Tatiana; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Sahbatou, Mourad; Liebau, Stefan; Ding, Jinhui; Bilgic, Basar; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Guven, Gamze; Tison, François; Tranchant, Christine; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Krack, Paul; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Nalls, Michael A.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heutink, Peter; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Gasser, Thomas; Durr, Alexandra; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tazir, Meriem; Destée, Alain; Lohmann, Ebba; Kabashi, Edor; Singleton, Andrew; Corti, Olga; Brice, Alexis; Lesage, Suzanne; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Agid, Yves; Anheim, Mathieu; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Borg, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Damier, Philippe; Destée, Alain; Dürr, Alexandra; Durif, Franck; Krack, Paul; Klebe, Stephan; Lohmann, Ebba; Martinez, Maria; Pollak, Pierre; Rascol, Olivier; Tranchant, Christine; Vérin, Marc; Viallet, François; Brice, Alexis; Lesage, Suzanne; Majounie, Elisa; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Nalls, Michael A.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Dürr, Alexandra; Arepalli, Sampath; Barker, Roger A.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berg, Daniela; Bettella, Francesco; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M.A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Lesage, Suzanne; Tison, François; Vidailhet, Marie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Agid, Yves; Anheim, Mathieu; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Borg, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Damier, Philippe; Destée, Alain; Dürr, Alexandra; Durif, Franck; Krack, Paul; Klebe, Stephan; Lohmann, Ebba; Martinez, Maria; Pollak, Pierre; Rascol, Olivier; Tranchant, Christine; Vérin, Marc; Bras, Jose M.; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Günther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Dong, Jing; Durif, Frank; Edkins, Sarah; Escott-Price, Valentina; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Gao, Jianjun; Gardner, Michelle; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Harris, Clare; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holmans, Peter; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michèle; Huang, Xuemei; Huber, Heiko; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jónsson, Pálmi V.; Kilarski, Laura L.; Jansen, Iris E.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; Lubbe, Steven; Lungu, Codrin; Martinez, María; Mätzler, Walter; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O’Sullivan, Sean S.; Owen, Michael J.; Pearson, Justin; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Pétursson, Hjörvar; Plagnol, Vincent; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Saad, Mohamad; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Schulte, Claudia; Sharma, Manu; Shaw, Karen; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Shoulson, Ira; Shulman, Joshua; Sidransky, Ellen; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stefánsson, Kári; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Velseboer, Daan; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Wurster, Isabel; Williams, Nigel; Morris, Huw R.; Heutink, Peter; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Gasser, Thomas; Singleton, Andrew B.; Brice, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The genetic causes of approximately 50% of autosomal-recessive early-onset forms of Parkinson disease (PD) remain to be elucidated. Homozygozity mapping and exome sequencing in 62 isolated individuals with early-onset parkinsonism and confirmed consanguinity followed by data mining in the exomes of 1,348 PD-affected individuals identified, in three isolated subjects, homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 13C (VPS13C). VPS13C mutations are associated with a distinct form of early-onset parkinsonism characterized by rapid and severe disease progression and early cognitive decline; the pathological features were striking and reminiscent of diffuse Lewy body disease. In cell models, VPS13C partly localized to the outer membrane of mitochondria. Silencing of VPS13C was associated with lower mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, increased respiration rates, exacerbated PINK1/Parkin-dependent mitophagy, and transcriptional upregulation of PARK2 in response to mitochondrial damage. This work suggests that loss of function of VPS13C is a cause of autosomal-recessive early-onset parkinsonism with a distinctive phenotype of rapid and severe progression. PMID:26942284

  16. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... stationary night blindness autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... collapse boxes. Description Autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness is a disorder of the retina , which is ...

  17. A systematic search for linkage with nonsyndromic recessive deafness in two large Middle Eastern inbred kindreds excludes more than 30% of the genome

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.; Korostishevsky, M.; Frydman, M.

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that as many as 35 loci may individually cause autosomal recessive non-syndromic deafness. The extreme genetic heterogeneity, limited clinical differentiation and phenotypic assortative mating in many western countries make many families unsuitable for genetic linkage studies. Recently the first of those loci was mapped (to 13q) in two consanguineous families from northern Tunisia. We are studying two large highly consanguineous Middle Eastern kindreds (a total of 26 deaf in 98 sampled individuals). Examination in each family showed no evidence of clinical heterogeneity and indicated an uncomplicated profound bilateral sensorineural deafness. We have been able to exclude the 13q locus as the cause of deafness in each kindred and have also excluded such `candidate` loci as regions as those causing Usher`s syndrome type 1 (11q13)(11p), Usher`s syndrome type II (1q32-q41), Waardenburg syndrome type I (2q37), branchio-oto-renal syndrome (8q12-q13), Monge`s deafness (5q31), and Treacher Collins syndrome (5q31.3-q33.3). To date, no lod scores greater than 1 have been obtained in either kindred using 150 RFLT`s, VNTR`s and highly polymorphic microsatellite markers (CA repeats and tetranucleotides). By Morton`s criterion a minimum of 30% of the autosomal genome can be excluded for each kindred separately.

  18. Different sex ratios of children born to Indian and Pakistani immigrants in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A low female-to-male ratio has been observed in different Asian countries, but this phenomenon has not been well studied among immigrants living in Western societies. In this study, we investigated whether a low female-to-male ratio exists among Indian and Pakistani immigrants living in Norway. In particular, we investigated whether the determination of sex via ultrasound examination, a common obstetric procedure that has been used in Norway since the early 1980 s, has influenced the female-to-male ratio among children born to parents of Indian or Pakistani origin. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of live births in mothers of Indian (n = 1597) and Pakistani (n = 5617) origin. Data were obtained from "Statistics Norway" and the female-to-male (F/M) sex ratio was evaluated among 21,325 children born, in increasing birth order, during three stratified periods (i.e., 1969-1986, 1987-1996, and 1997-2005). Results A significant low female-to-male sex ratio was observed among children in the third and fourth birth order (sex ratio 65; 95% CI 51-80) from mothers of Indian origin who gave birth after 1987. Sex ratios did not deviate from the expected natural variation in the Indian cohort from 1969 to 1986, and remained stable in the Pakistani cohort during the entire study period. However, the female-to-male sex ratio seemed less skewed in recent years (i.e., 1997-2005). Conclusion Significant differences were observed in the sex ratio of children born to mothers of Indian origin compared with children born to mothers of Pakistani origin. A skewed number of female births among higher birth orders (i.e., third or later) may partly reflect an increase in sex-selective abortion among mothers of Indian origin, although the numbers are too small to draw firm conclusions. Further research is needed to explain the observed differences in the female-to-male ratio among members of these ethnic groups who reside in Norway. PMID:20682027

  19. Time to Play: Recognizing the Benefits of Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramstetter, Catherine; Murray, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Given the evidence of the value of recess for children and teachers, what can educators, schools, and districts do to promote this critical aspect of the education of the whole child? Daily decisions about who gets recess and when and where it will happen are often made by teachers; thus, teachers are a crucial link for recess. Policies that…

  20. An early-onset recessive cerebellar disorder with distal amyotrophy and, in two patients, gross myoclonia: a probable ataxia telangiectasia variant.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, A S; de Jong, G; Kleijer, W J

    1995-02-01

    We report a family of 4 siblings from a non-consanguineous marriage, presenting with an early onset recessive cerebellar ataxia and progressive distal limb wasting. Ocular or other telangiectasias were absent. There were neither frequent infections nor immunodeficiencies. The two youngest patients exhibited an incapacitating myoclonus which abated markedly after 20 years. Late onset diabetes was demonstrated in 3 patients. Hypogonadism was not a feature and there was a prolonged survival in the 4 patients. The oldest sibling died of a pancreatic adenocarcinoma. alpha-Fetoprotein was elevated with normal carcinoembryonic antigen values in three patients. Cytogenetic analysis and radioresistant DNA synthesis was compatible with the diagnosis of ataxia-telagiectasia. This family probably represents a rare variant of ataxia-telangiectasia.

  1. Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic deafness genes: a review.

    PubMed

    Duman, Duygu; Tekin, Mustafa

    2012-06-01

    More than 50 Percent of prelingual hearing loss is genetic in origin, and of these up to 93 Percent are monogenic autosomal recessive traits. Some forms of genetic deafness can be recognized by their associated syndromic features, but in most cases, hearing loss is the only finding and is referred to as nonsyndromic deafness. To date, more than 700 different mutations have been identified in one of 42 genes in individuals with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL). Reported mutations in GJB2, encoding connexin 26, makes this gene the most common cause of hearing loss in many populations. Other relatively common deafness genes include SLC26A4, MYO15A, OTOF, TMC1, CDH23, and TMPRSS3. In this report we summarize genes and mutations reported in families with ARNSHL. Founder effects were demonstrated for some recurrent mutations but the most significant findings are the extreme locus and allelic heterogeneity and different spectrum of genes and mutations in each population.

  2. Recessive inheritance of a relative fat pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Hasstedt, S J; Ramirez, M E; Kuida, H; Williams, R R

    1989-01-01

    We defined a relative-fat-pattern index (RFPI) as the ratio of subscapular skinfold thickness to the sum of subscapular and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses and computed RFPI for 774 adults (age greater than or equal to 25 years) in 59 pedigrees ascertained through cases of cardiovascular disease. Likelihood analysis of RFPI supported recessive inheritance of an allele with a frequency of 46%, which elevated mean RFPI from .412 to .533 when homozygous. The analysis apportioned the variance in RFPI as 42.3% due to the major locus, 9.5% due to polygenic inheritance, and 48.2% due to random environmental effects. Homozygotes for the recessive allele tended to have small suprailiac skinfold thicknesses rather than large subscapular skinfold thicknesses. Homozygotes were more frequent in younger than in older cases of obesity, coronary heart disease, essential hypertension, and diabetes mellitus; the increase was significant for all but diabetes. PMID:2589320

  3. Semiconductor structure and recess formation etch technique

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Bin; Sun, Min; Palacios, Tomas Apostol

    2017-02-14

    A semiconductor structure has a first layer that includes a first semiconductor material and a second layer that includes a second semiconductor material. The first semiconductor material is selectively etchable over the second semiconductor material using a first etching process. The first layer is disposed over the second layer. A recess is disposed at least in the first layer. Also described is a method of forming a semiconductor structure that includes a recess. The method includes etching a region in a first layer using a first etching process. The first layer includes a first semiconductor material. The first etching process stops at a second layer beneath the first layer. The second layer includes a second semiconductor material.

  4. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the…

  5. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the…

  6. Semiconductor devices having a recessed electrode structure

    DOEpatents

    Palacios, Tomas Apostol; Lu, Bin; Matioli, Elison de Nazareth

    2015-05-26

    An electrode structure is described in which conductive regions are recessed into a semiconductor region. Trenches may be formed in a semiconductor region, such that conductive regions can be formed in the trenches. The electrode structure may be used in semiconductor devices such as field effect transistors or diodes. Nitride-based power semiconductor devices are described including such an electrode structure, which can reduce leakage current and otherwise improve performance.

  7. Posterior peritoneal recesses: assessment using CT

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenstein, W.A.; Auh, Y.H.; Zirinsky, K.; Kneeland, J.B.; Whalen, J.P.; Kazam, E.

    1985-08-01

    Intraperitoneal compartments may extend posteriorly to the level of known retroperitoneal structures at several locations within the abdomen. These locations include the posterior subhepatic or hepatorenal space, the splenorenal space, the retropancreatic recess, the paracolic gutters, and the pararectal fossae. Because of their posterior location, fluid collections within these compartments may be mistaken radiologically for retroperitoneal masses. The sectional anatomy of these spaces and particularly their appearance on computed tomographic scans, are illustrated in this paper.

  8. Recession trims third-quarter building costs

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.M.

    1983-05-09

    The composite cost index for building oil pipelines during the third quarter of 1982 showed a decrease of 0.96%. This decrease was due to a steady drop in the rate of inflation for most pipeline construction materials during the first 9 months of the year. The major thrust behind the pipeline materials decline was a sharp 5.3% drop in the average price of steel line pipe. However, the pipeline construction recession has failed to deter escalating pipeline labor rates.

  9. Cutting Symmetrical Recesses In Soft Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesotas, Tony C.; Tyler, Brent

    1989-01-01

    Simple tool cuts hemispherical recesses in soft ceramic tiles. Designed to expose wires of thermocouples embedded in tiles without damaging leads. Creates neat, precise holes around wires. End mill includes axial hole to accommodate thermocouple wires embedded in material to be cut. Wires pass into hole without being bent or broken. Dimensions in inches. Used in place of such tools as dental picks, tweezers, spatulas, and putty knives.

  10. Cutting Symmetrical Recesses In Soft Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesotas, Tony C.; Tyler, Brent

    1989-01-01

    Simple tool cuts hemispherical recesses in soft ceramic tiles. Designed to expose wires of thermocouples embedded in tiles without damaging leads. Creates neat, precise holes around wires. End mill includes axial hole to accommodate thermocouple wires embedded in material to be cut. Wires pass into hole without being bent or broken. Dimensions in inches. Used in place of such tools as dental picks, tweezers, spatulas, and putty knives.

  11. Attitudes towards prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy for thalassaemia in pregnant Pakistani women in the North of England.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shenaz; Green, Josephine M; Hewison, Jenny

    2006-03-01

    Most births of children affected with beta-thalassaemia major in the United Kingdom are to parents of Pakistani origin. A popular explanation for this is that Pakistanis decline termination of pregnancy on religious grounds. However, various factors influence people's attitudes towards prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy, which have not been investigated in a UK Pakistani sample. This study is aimed at exploring the attitudes of pregnant Pakistani women towards prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy for beta-thalassaemia major in the North of England. Forty-three pregnant women tested for thalassaemia carrier status were interviewed following receipt of their test results. Interviews were analysed using the grounded theory approach. Findings showed: (1) women's awareness of and attitudes towards prenatal diagnosis; (2) the relationship between attitudes towards prenatal diagnosis and termination of an affected foetus; (3) the relationship between attitudes towards termination of pregnancy and religious beliefs, perceptions of severity of the condition, influence of significant others, and (4) the impact of gestational age at the time of the offer of termination of pregnancy. Pakistani women's attitudes towards prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy are influenced by various factors, and therefore their religion should not be taken as a proxy for their attitudes either for or against termination of pregnancy. 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Non-syndromic, autosomal-recessive deafness.

    PubMed

    Petersen, M B; Willems, P J

    2006-05-01

    Non-syndromic deafness is a paradigm of genetic heterogeneity with 85 loci and 39 nuclear disease genes reported so far. Autosomal-recessive genes are responsible for about 80% of the cases of hereditary non-syndromic deafness of pre-lingual onset with 23 different genes identified to date. In the present article, we review these 23 genes, their function, and their contribution to genetic deafness in different populations. The wide range of functions of these DFNB genes reflects the heterogeneity of the genes involved in hearing and hearing loss. Several of these genes are involved in both recessive and dominant deafness, or in both non-syndromic and syndromic deafness. Mutations in the GJB2 gene encoding connexin 26 are responsible for as much as 50% of pre-lingual, recessive deafness. By contrast, mutations in most of the other DFNB genes have so far been detected in only a small number of families, and their contribution to deafness on a population scale might therefore be limited. Identification of all genes involved in hereditary hearing loss will help in our understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying normal hearing, in early diagnosis and therapy.

  13. The Great Recession, unemployment and suicide

    PubMed Central

    Norström, Thor; Grönqvist, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Background How have suicide rates responded to the marked increase in unemployment spurred by the Great Recession? Our paper puts this issue into a wider perspective by assessing (1) whether the unemployment-suicide link is modified by the degree of unemployment protection, and (2) whether the effect on suicide of the present crisis differs from the effects of previous economic downturns. Methods We analysed the unemployment-suicide link using time-series data for 30 countries spanning the period 1960–2012. Separate fixed-effects models were estimated for each of five welfare state regimes with different levels of unemployment protection (Eastern, Southern, Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian and Scandinavian). We included an interaction term to capture the possible excess effect of unemployment during the Great Recession. Results The largest unemployment increases occurred in the welfare state regimes with the least generous unemployment protection. The unemployment effect on male suicides was statistically significant in all welfare regimes, except the Scandinavian one. The effect on female suicides was significant only in the eastern European country group. There was a significant gradient in the effects, being stronger the less generous the unemployment protection. The interaction term capturing the possible excess effect of unemployment during the financial crisis was not significant. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the more generous the unemployment protection the weaker the detrimental impact on suicide of the increasing unemployment during the Great Recession. PMID:25339416

  14. Gender Discrimination in Death Reportage: Reconnoitering Disparities through a Comparative Analysis of Male and Female Paid Obituaries of Pakistani English Newspapers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhry, Sajid M.; Christopher, Anne A.; Krishnasamy, Hariharan A/L N.

    2014-01-01

    The study examines the issue of gender discrimination in the post death scenario of obituarial discourse. It aims to identify the way Pakistani newspaper obituaries recognize and project males and females after their deaths. A total of 601 paid obituaries published in a year's time span in Pakistani English newspapers were evaluated for the…

  15. Etiology and occurrence of gingival recession - An epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Mythri, Sarpangala; Arunkumar, Suryanarayan Maiya; Hegde, Shashikanth; Rajesh, Shanker Kashyap; Munaz, Mohamed; Ashwin, Devasya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Gingival recession is the term used to characterize the apical shift of the marginal gingiva from its normal position on the crown of the tooth. It is frequently observed in adult subjects. The occurrence and severity of the gingival recession present considerable differences between populations. To prevent gingival recession from occurring, it is essential to detect the underlying etiology. The aim of the present study was to determine the occurrence of gingival recession and to identify the most common factor associated with the cause of gingival recession. Methods: A total of 710 subjects aged between 15 years to 60 years were selected. Data were collected by an interview with the help of a proforma and then the dental examination was carried out. The presence of gingival recession was recorded using Miller's classification of gingival recession. The Silness and Loe Plaque Index, Loe and Silness gingival index, community periodontal index were recorded. The data thus obtained were subjected to statistical analysis using Chi-square test and Student's unpaired t-test. Results: Of 710 subjects examined, 291 (40.98%) subjects exhibited gingival recession. The frequency of gingival recession was found to increase with age. High frequency of gingival recession was seen in males (60.5%) compared to females (39.5%). Gingival recession was commonly seen in mandibular incisors (43.0%). Miller's class I gingival recession was more commonly seen. The most common cause for gingival recession was dental plaque accumulation (44.1%) followed by faulty toothbrushing (42.7%). Conclusion: Approximately half of the subjects examined exhibited gingival recession. The etiology of gingival recession is multifactorial, and its appearance is always the result of more than one factor acting together. PMID:26941519

  16. The effect of consanguineous marriage on reading disability in the Arab community.

    PubMed

    Abu-Rabia, Salim; Maroun, Lateefeh

    2005-02-01

    The present study examined the effect of consanguineous marriage in the Arab community on reading disabilities of offspring. It examined whether the rate of reading disabilities was higher among offspring of first-cousin parents than offspring of unrelated parents; and whether reading-disabled children of first-cousin parents were more disabled in phonological awareness and phonological decoding than reading-disabled children of unrelated parents and normally reading younger children. These questions were investigated among 814 pupils of the 4th, 5th, and 6th grades, using word recognition and reading comprehension tests. Two experimental groups were chosen from this population. These were a reading-disabled group of 22 pupils who were children of first-cousin marriages and 21 pupils who were children of unrelated parents. A control group was also selected, consisting of 21 younger normally reading pupils at the same reading level. All the groups were tested on non-words, real words, phonological, orthographic and working memory measures. The results indicated that the rate of reading disabilities among children of first-cousin parents was higher than that of with children of second-cousin parents, distantly related parents, or unrelated parents. Further, no differences were found in phonological awareness and decoding between the two reading-disabled groups. Moreover, the results indicate a significant advantage of the younger normal readers over the reading-disabled children in the measures of phonological awareness, decoding, and orthographical knowledge that requires spelling. However, in reading common words and choosing words in context, the performance of the reading-disabled groups and the normally reading group were similar. It has been suggested that further research is needed to evaluate the role of intelligence, nevertheless our results provide new evidence for a genetic basis to reading disabilities.

  17. Association between Leptin gene polymorphisms and plasma leptin level in three consanguineous families with obesity.

    PubMed

    Fourati, Mouna; Mnif, Mouna; Kharrat, Najla; Charfi, Nédia; Kammoun, Mahdi; Fendri, Nourhène; Sessi, Salwa; Abid, Mohamed; Rebai, Ahmed; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2013-09-15

    Leptin (LEP) gene is one of the most promising candidate genes for obesity. Previous studies have tested the association of polymorphisms in LEP gene with obesity and obesity-related metabolic biomarkers (anthropometric variables, glucose, insulin level, leptin level and lipid profile). However, the results of these studies were still controversial. To determine whether LEP gene is associated with obesity in Tunisian population, we performed a family-based association study between LEP polymorphisms and obesity and obesity-related metabolic biomarkers. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 5' region of LEP gene were genotyped in three consanguineous families including 33 individuals. The previously reported LEP SNPs (H1328084, H1328082, rs10487506, H1328081, H1328080, G-2548A and A19G) were evaluated by PCR-RFLP and direct sequencing methods. Single SNP association and haplotype association analyses were performed using the family-based association test (FBAT). To determine allele frequencies of these SNPs in general population, 52 unrelated individuals from the general Tunisian population were also analyzed. Two SNPs showed significant associations with plasma leptin level (H1328084: A>G, Z=2.058, p=0.039; A19G: G>A, Z=2.058, p=0.039). When haplotypes were constructed with these two-markers, the risk AA haplotype (frequency 57.1%) was positively associated with plasma leptin level (Z=2.058, p=0.039). Moreover, SNPs H1328084 and A19G are predicted to modify transcription-factor binding sites. Our study provided that two functional variants in 5' regulatory region of LEP gene are associated with plasma leptin level as a quantitative trait. It suggested that H1328084 and A19G have an important role in regulating plasma leptin level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cognitive-behavioral treatment of a second-generation child of Pakistani descent: ethnocultural and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Fauzia; McLachlan, Niel; Friedberg, Robert D; Mahr, Safia; Pearl, Amanda M

    2015-01-01

    Ethnocultural variables in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are gaining an increasing amount of attention. This is a welcome development since cultural responsiveness is a core element in ethical and effective CBT practice. However, the literature is sparse and generally silent regarding CBT with children of Pakistani descent. Accordingly, this case based article attempts to close the knowledge gap by reviewing the extant literature pertaining to the role of religion, help seeking behavior, and emotional expression in Pakistani families. The literature review is followed by a case discussion of an 11 year old second generation Pakistani male living in the United Kingdom who is struggling with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The case presentation highlights the importance of culturally informed case conceptualization and individually tailored interventions. The case illustrates the way cognitive behavioral psychotherapy balanced empirically based procedures with a sensitive appreciation of cultural context.

  19. Event-scale power law recession analysis: quantifying methodological uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dralle, David N.; Karst, Nathaniel J.; Charalampous, Kyriakos; Veenstra, Andrew; Thompson, Sally E.

    2017-01-01

    The study of single streamflow recession events is receiving increasing attention following the presentation of novel theoretical explanations for the emergence of power law forms of the recession relationship, and drivers of its variability. Individually characterizing streamflow recessions often involves describing the similarities and differences between model parameters fitted to each recession time series. Significant methodological sensitivity has been identified in the fitting and parameterization of models that describe populations of many recessions, but the dependence of estimated model parameters on methodological choices has not been evaluated for event-by-event forms of analysis. Here, we use daily streamflow data from 16 catchments in northern California and southern Oregon to investigate how combinations of commonly used streamflow recession definitions and fitting techniques impact parameter estimates of a widely used power law recession model. Results are relevant to watersheds that are relatively steep, forested, and rain-dominated. The highly seasonal mediterranean climate of northern California and southern Oregon ensures study catchments explore a wide range of recession behaviors and wetness states, ideal for a sensitivity analysis. In such catchments, we show the following: (i) methodological decisions, including ones that have received little attention in the literature, can impact parameter value estimates and model goodness of fit; (ii) the central tendencies of event-scale recession parameter probability distributions are largely robust to methodological choices, in the sense that differing methods rank catchments similarly according to the medians of these distributions; (iii) recession parameter distributions are method-dependent, but roughly catchment-independent, such that changing the choices made about a particular method affects a given parameter in similar ways across most catchments; and (iv) the observed correlative relationship

  20. What mainly controls recession flows in river basins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Basudev; Nagesh Kumar, D.

    2014-03-01

    The ubiquity of the power law relationship between dQ/dt and Q for recession periods (-dQ/dt=kQα,Q being discharge at the basin outlet at time t) clearly hints at the existence of a dominant recession flow process that is common to all real basins. It is commonly assumed that a basin, during recession events, functions as a single phreatic aquifer resting on a impermeable horizontal bed or the Dupuit-Boussinesq (DB) aquifer, and with time different aquifer geometric conditions arise that give different values of α and k. The recently proposed alternative model, geomorphological recession flow model, however, suggests that recession flows are controlled primarily by the dynamics of the active drainage network (ADN). In this study we use data for several basins and compare the above two contrasting recession flow models in order to understand which of the above two factors dominates during recession periods in steep basins. Particularly, we do the comparison by selecting three key recession flow properties: (1) power law exponent α, (2) dynamic dQ/dt-Q relationship (characterized by k) and (3) recession timescale (time period for which a recession event lasts). Our observations suggest that neither drainage from phreatic aquifers nor evapotranspiration significantly controls recession flows. Results show that the value of α and recession timescale are not modeled well by DB aquifer model. However, the above mentioned three recession curve properties can be captured satisfactorily by considering the dynamics of the ADN as described by geomorphological recession flow model, possibly indicating that the ADN represents not just phreatic aquifers but the organization of various sub-surface storage systems within the basin.

  1. Alterations in the RB1 gene in Pakistani patients with retinoblastoma using direct sequencing analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wasim, Muhammad; Afzal, Sibtain; Shahzad, Muhammad Saqib; Ramzan, Shaiqa; Awan, Ali Raza; Anjum, Aftab Ahmed; Ramzan, Khushnooda

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Retinoblastoma (RB) is a rare intraocular malignant tumor of the developing retina with an estimated incidence of 1:20,000 live births in children under the age of 5 years. In addition to the abnormal whitish appearance of the pupil or leukocoria, strabismus has also been reported as a clinical symptom of the disease. RB1 is the first cloned tumor suppressor gene, and mutational inactivation of this gene is responsible for the development of RB during early childhood. The purpose of this study was to identify mutational alterations in the RB1 gene in Pakistani patients with RB. Methods During this study, 70 clinically evaluated patients with RB were recruited from different regions of Pakistan. The cases included 23 sporadic bilateral (32.9%), 34 sporadic unilateral (48.6%), nine familial bilateral (12.8%), and four familial unilateral (5.7%) cases. Constitutional causative mutations in the RB1 gene were screened via direct sequencing of all RB1 exons and their flanking regions. Results In this report, genetic testing resulted in the identification of 18 mutations in 25 patients with RB including six novel RB1 mutations. Of the total mutations identified, 13 (72.22%) were found to be null mutations caused by nine nonsense, three deletions, and one insertion. Two (11.11%) missense, two (11.11%) splice site mutations, and one (5.55%) base substitution in the promoter region were also found. Moreover, ten intronic variants were identified, one of which is novel. Conclusions Molecular screening and identification of these mutations in Pakistani patients with RB provide the mutational variants of the RB1 gene in the Pakistani population. The detection of oncogenic mutations in patients with RB and genetically predisposed individuals is a major step in clinical management, prognosis, follow-up care, accurate genetic counseling, and presymptomatic diagnosis of RB. PMID:26396485

  2. Dietary patterns of Pakistani adults and their associations with sociodemographic, anthropometric and life-style factors.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Nilofer F; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth; Cordeiro, Lorraine; Jafar, Tazeen H; Cohen, Nancy L

    2013-01-01

    Dietary pattern analysis is an epidemiological method designed to consider the complexity of food preferences and diet patterns of populations. Few studies from South Asia have used this methodology to describe population food intake. Our objective was to identify dietary patterns and understand their associations with sociodemographic, anthropometric and life-style factors among low-income Pakistani urban adults. Dietary information was collected by a thirty-three-item FFQ and dietary patterns were derived by principal component analyses in 5491 subjects enrolled in the Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation (COBRA) study. Three dietary patterns were identified: a fat and sweet pattern characterised by fried snacks/foods, desserts, organ meats, bakery products, Pakistani bread and food purchased from outside the home; a fruit and vegetable pattern including fruits, juices, raw and cooked vegetables, lean meat and low-fat milk; and a seafood and yogurt pattern identified by prawns, fish, potatoes and yogurt. The fat and sweet pattern scores were low among older subjects, those with high BMI and waist circumference but high among females and physically active participants. The fruit and vegetable pattern was associated with younger age, high BMI, education and non-tobacco use. The seafood and yogurt pattern was associated with high BMI, increased physical activity and non-tobacco use. In conclusion, distinct dietary patterns exist for the Pakistani population that may be related to some of the population characteristics and thus may have importance in suggesting dietary and life-style interventions in the prevention of chronic diseases.

  3. Perceptions of the causes of childhood disability among Pakistani families living in the UK.

    PubMed

    Croot, E J; Grant, G; Cooper, C L; Mathers, N

    2008-12-01

    It has been well documented that South Asian families caring for a child with a disability experience discrimination and disadvantage in accessing health and social care services. This gives increasing cause for concern as the number of South Asian people with severe learning impairments in the UK continues to rise. Mainstream services are ill-equipped to provide individual services to parents who choose to define and address disability differently, and whose concerns and solutions may differ from the majority population, despite the fact that these parents possess many strengths and may present alternative ways of addressing their needs. This study aimed to provide a detailed account of the ways that Pakistani parents living in a northern city in the UK and caring for a child with a disability, account for and understand their child's disability. Sixteen in-depth interviews were carried out between October 2002 and July 2003, with Pakistani parents and one grandparent of children with a disability. All final transcripts were in English, and a thematic analysis was undertaken. Results include a detailed account of parents' understanding of the causes of their child's disability. All parents made reference to theological explanations as to why they had a child with a disability; however, most parents also gave biomedical or other explanations. The relationship between theological and biomedical explanations was explored along with the consequences of the different beliefs for individuals and families. Parents also spoke vividly about the impact of negative and stigmatizing beliefs about causes of disability which they felt were prevalent in the Pakistani community, and they used a biomedical discourse to refute these ideas. The authors suggest that knowledge of individual and family beliefs, and awareness of the impact of these beliefs, can provide a valuable conceptual lens for health and social care practitioners to use when working in family-centred, culturally

  4. Patient perspectives on type 2 diabetes and medicine use during Ramadan among Pakistanis in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Mygind, Anna; Kristiansen, Maria; Wittrup, Inge; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig

    2013-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes is highly prevalent among people of Pakistani background. Studies show that adherence to medicines is complicated for people with type 2 diabetes in general. Also, studies indicate that many people with type 2 diabetes and Muslim background fast during the month of Ramadan without adequate counselling on how to adjust their medicines. To explore patient perspectives on medicine use during Ramadan, reasons for fasting and experiences with counselling on medicine use during Ramadan among people of Pakistani background with type 2 diabetes and at least one other chronic condition. Greater Copenhagen, Denmark. The analysis is based on a study exploring lived experiences with counselling on medicines using semi-structured interviews and medication reviews. The analysis presented here builds on the subset of patients with Pakistani background (six interviewers). All interviewees pointed out that Islam allows ill people to refrain from fasting during Ramadan. However, all had fasted during Ramadan despite being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. While fasting, they adapted their use of medicines in different ways, e.g. by changing the time of intake or by skipping morning medicines. Fasting during Ramadan meant a feeling of improvement in well-being for all interviewees. Reasons for this improvement included physiological, social and religious aspects. Healthcare professionals were rarely included in the decision-making process on whether or not to fast. Instead, friends and relatives, especially those with type 2 diabetes, were considered important to the decision-making process. For people with Muslim background and a chronic condition, fasting during Ramadan may mean changes in medicine use that are not always discussed with healthcare professionals. Healthcare professionals should acknowledge that Muslim patients may find fasting during Ramadan beneficial to their well-being and therefore choose to fast despite the Islamic rule of exemption. This patient

  5. Association analysis of GWAS and candidate gene loci in a Pakistani population with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Munir, Saeeda; ber Rahman, Simeen; Rehman, Sadia; Saba, Nusrat; Ahmad, Wasim; Nilsson, Staffan; Mazhar, Kehkashan; Naluai, Åsa Torinsson

    2015-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory and hyper proliferative condition of the skin and a serious chronic systemic autoimmune disease. We undertook an association study to investigate the genetic etiology of psoriasis in a Pakistani population by genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported to be associated in genome-wide association (GWAS) or in candidate gene studies of psoriasis. Fifty seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 42 loci were genotyped in 533 psoriasis patients and 373 controls. Our results showed genome wide significant association of the MHC region (rs1265181 being the most significant from five SNPs used with overall OR=3.38; p=2.97E-18), as well as nominally significant associations at ten other loci (p<0.05) in the Pakistani population (LCE3B, REL, IL13/IL4, TNIP1, IL12B, TRAF3IP2, ZC3H12C, NOS2 and RNF114 from GWAS and PRR9 from a previous candidate gene study). Overall, only nine SNPs out of the 42 GWAS loci, displayed an odds ratio in the opposite allelic direction and only three did not reach similar odds ratio within 95% confidence interval as previously reported (SLC45A1/TNFRSF9, ELMO1 and IL28RA). This indicates similar genetic risk factors and molecular mechanisms behind disease in Pakistani psoriasis patients as in other populations. In addition, we show that the MHC and TNIP1 regions are significantly different in patients with psoriasis onset before the age of 40 (type I) compared to after 40 years of age (type II). MHC being associated mainly with type I while TNIP1 with type II patients.

  6. The Behavior Assessment Battery: a preliminary study of non-stuttering Pakistani grade-school children.

    PubMed

    Vanryckeghem, Martine; Mukati, Samad A

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the importance of a multimodal approach to the assessment of the person who stutters (PWS) has become increasingly recognized. The Behavior Assessment Battery (BAB), which is a normed test procedure developed by G. Brutten, makes it possible to assess the multidimensional facets of this disorder. The emotional and speech-disruptive components that differentiate one who stutters from one who does not (PWNS) are evaluated by means of the Speech Situation Checklist (SSC), their use of behaviours secondary to stuttering are assessed through the Behavior Checklist (BCL) and the person's speech-related attitude is determined via the Communication Attitude Test (CAT). Each of these BAB tests has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure whose obtained normative data are essentially equivalent in Western countries. Because of the lack of normative data on children from non-Western cultures, the present preliminary study was aimed to investigate if the affective, behavioural and cognitive reports of non-stuttering Pakistani children on the BAB measures are like those of their Western peers. Forty-five non-stuttering Pakistani children between the ages of 8 and 11 were administered the SSC, BCL and CAT. As in previous studies, the mean score of the normally fluent children on each of the BAB tests fell into the lower end of the possible distribution of scores. Intercorrelations between the different tests were statistically significant. Although the BCL and CAT results were similar to those found in Western-based investigations, the emotional reaction and speech disruption scores on the SSC reported by Pakistani children sampled were numerically higher to an extent that is noteworthy. The latter finding suggests that this particular BAB measure might be affected by cultural differences. It points to the possibility that the norms of test procedures, such as the BAB, might not be fully appropriate for use in other than Western cultures.

  7. The Great Recession, unemployment and suicide.

    PubMed

    Norström, Thor; Grönqvist, Hans

    2015-02-01

    How have suicide rates responded to the marked increase in unemployment spurred by the Great Recession? Our paper puts this issue into a wider perspective by assessing (1) whether the unemployment-suicide link is modified by the degree of unemployment protection, and (2) whether the effect on suicide of the present crisis differs from the effects of previous economic downturns. We analysed the unemployment-suicide link using time-series data for 30 countries spanning the period 1960-2012. Separate fixed-effects models were estimated for each of five welfare state regimes with different levels of unemployment protection (Eastern, Southern, Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian and Scandinavian). We included an interaction term to capture the possible excess effect of unemployment during the Great Recession. The largest unemployment increases occurred in the welfare state regimes with the least generous unemployment protection. The unemployment effect on male suicides was statistically significant in all welfare regimes, except the Scandinavian one. The effect on female suicides was significant only in the eastern European country group. There was a significant gradient in the effects, being stronger the less generous the unemployment protection. The interaction term capturing the possible excess effect of unemployment during the financial crisis was not significant. Our findings suggest that the more generous the unemployment protection the weaker the detrimental impact on suicide of the increasing unemployment during the Great Recession. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Pakistanis living in Oslo have lower serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels but higher serum ionized calcium levels compared with ethnic Norwegians. The Oslo Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Holvik, Kristin; Meyer, Haakon E; Søgaard, Anne Johanne; Haug, Egil; Falch, Jan A

    2007-01-01

    Background Persons of Pakistani origin living in Oslo have a much higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism but similar bone mineral density compared with ethnic Norwegians. Our objective was to investigate whether Pakistani immigrants living in Oslo have an altered vitamin D metabolism by means of compensatory higher serum levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (s-1,25(OH)2D) compared with ethnic Norwegians; and whether serum levels of ionized calcium (s-Ca2+) differ between Pakistanis and Norwegians. Methods In a cross-sectional, population-based study venous serum samples were drawn from 94 Pakistani men and 67 Pakistani women aged 30–60 years, and 290 Norwegian men and 270 Norwegian women aged 45–60 years; in total 721 subjects. Results Pakistanis had lower s-1,25(OH)2D compared with Norwegians (p < 0.001). Age- and gender adjusted mean (95% CI) levels were 93 (86, 99) pmol/l in Pakistanis and 123 (120, 126) pmol/l in Norwegians, p < 0.001. The difference persisted after controlling for body mass index. There was a positive relation between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OH)D) and s-1,25(OH)2D in both groups. S-Ca2+ was higher in Pakistanis; age-adjusted mean (95% CI) levels were 1.28 (1.27, 1.28) mmol/l in Pakistanis and 1.26 (1.26, 1.26) mmol/l in Norwegians, p < 0.001. In both groups, s-Ca2+ was inversely correlated to serum intact parathyroid hormone levels (s-iPTH). For any s-iPTH, s-Ca2+ was higher in Pakistanis, also when controlling for age. Conclusion Community-dwelling Pakistanis in Oslo with low vitamin D status and secondary hyperparathyroidism have lower s-1,25(OH)2D compared with ethnic Norwegians. However, the Pakistanis have higher s-Ca2+. The cause of the higher s-Ca2+ in Pakistanis in spite of their higher iPTH remains unclear. PMID:17945003

  9. [Hand management in recessive dystrophic bullous epydermolysis].

    PubMed

    Pajardi, G; Novelli, C; Parolo, C; Proserpio, G; Tegon, M; Vecchi, S

    2011-01-01

    Recessive distrofic epidermolysis bullosa creates severe hand deformities with disabling functional limitations. Hand surgeon should perform surgery when deformity inibits function, in order to restore the pinch. We present our experience on 44 patients and 58 operated hands, with the following schema: hand degloving, grafting of the first web and intraoperative dynamic splinting. In 30 patient with an 8 years follow up, 25 had had good or excellent results, and the 5 remaining shows early recurrence. Association of a correct surgical approach and adequate intra and post-operative rehabilitation improve hand function and a slow down inevitable recurrence.

  10. CFLs in Recessed Downlights: Technical Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, Marc R.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Dillon, Heather E.; Sandahl, Linda J.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2005-05-09

    Recessed downlights are the most popular residential lighting fixture in the United States representing about 12 percent of installed residential lighting fixtures and 15 percent of total lighting energy use nationwide. We estimate 400 million recessed downlights are currently installed in American homes, almost all using incandescent light sources. In the year 2000, only 0.44 percent of recessed cans sold were hard-wired for using pin-based CFLs. Recessed downlights consume energy in three ways. First, their incandescent light sources use energy directly, drawing 65 to 150 watts. Second, they consume energy indirectly by adding heat from their light sources to air-conditioning loads. Third, since most are not airtight, they also consume energy indirectly by allowing conditioned air to escape into unconditioned areas above the downlights, such as attics. PNNL calculated potential energy savings and found that if a 65W incandescent non-airtight downlight is replaced with a 26W CFL ICAT downlight operated at 3 hrs per day savings will be 126 kWh/yr. Early reflector CFLs have had high return rates primarily because of failure due to thermal related stress. A PNNL laboratory test of ten commercially available R-CFLs selected from retail store shelves showed almost all operated above their manufacturer rated maximum operating temperatures when they were installed and tested in ICAT downlights in a simulated insulated ceiling apparatus. DOE asked PNNL to investigate the development and introduction of both pin-based and screw-based CFLs for use in ICAT fixtures. PNNL invited manufacturers to submit lamps to a procurement program. PNNL conducted short- and long-term thermal testing of the lamps to measure performance parameters affected by elevated temperatures. 8 out of 10 R-CFLs (secrew-based lamps) failed the long-tem testing. Five out of nine CFL-ICAT (pin-based CFL) fixtures passed the long-term test, surviving a full year of operation in a simulated insulated

  11. Amalgam use and waste management by Pakistani dentists: an environmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, R; Ali Khan, A; Noor, N; Humayun, S

    2010-03-01

    To assess amalgam use and waste management protocols practised by Pakistani dentists, a cross-sectional study was made of 239 dentists in Islamabad and Rawalpindi, recruited by convenience and cluster sampling. Amalgam was the most frequently used restorative material, with the choice dictated by patients' financial constraints. While 90.4% of dentists perceived amalgam as a health risk, only 46.4% considered it an environmental hazard. The majority disposed of amalgam waste in the trash, down the sink or as hospital waste. Very few (5.9%) had an amalgam separator installed in their dental office. Amalgam waste management protocols and mercury recycling should be introduced in Pakistan.

  12. The politics of combating the organ trade: lessons from the Israeli and Pakistani experience.

    PubMed

    Efrat, A

    2013-07-01

    Israel and Pakistan--two major participants in the global organ trade--enacted legislative prohibitions on the trade at roughly the same time. The article highlights three influences that brought about this change of policy in both countries: advocacy by local physicians coupled with media coverage and reinforced by the international medical community. The analysis also explains why the two countries have differed with respect to the enforcement of the organ-trade prohibition. The insights from the Israeli and Pakistani cases will be of use for the transplant community's efforts against organ trafficking.

  13. Neither Friend Nor Foe. The Possibility of Pakistani-Soviet Rapprochement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    ldifUdg 󈧊’bioadsptrrof service of the. Fedeftal Research’Divs1do~jO~# pea ai.2-7-9905,~ fax 202- . 7e-920,.Ia 1 ’rn;eie-fzidmai1:1doc’.g’o’v,:o~r..’wrelt...of its own (numbering about 30,000 troops) that could be placed at the service of the United States. Washington also anticipates a key role for...terrorism by KHAD,, the Afghan secret intelligence service , across the border in Pakistan, against Afghan refugees, Afghan insurgent leaders and Pakistani

  14. ABCA12 mutations and autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: a review of genotype/phenotype correlations and of pathogenetic concepts.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masashi

    2010-10-01

    Mutations in ABCA12 have been described in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCI) including harlequin ichthyosis (HI), congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE), and lamellar ichthyosis (LI). HI shows the most severe phenotype. CIE and LI are clinically characterized by fine, whitish scales on a background of erythematous skin, and large, thick, dark scales over the entire body without serious background erythroderma, respectively. To date, a total of 56 ABCA12 mutations have been reported in 66 ARCI families including 48 HI, 10 LI, and 8 CIE families of African, European, Pakistani/Indian, and Japanese origin (online database: http://www.derm-hokudai.jp/ABCA12/). A total of 62.5% of reported ABCA12 mutations are expected to lead to truncated proteins. Most mutations in HI are truncation mutations and homozygous or compound heterozygous truncation mutations always results in HI phenotype. In CIE families, at least one mutation on each allele is typically a missense mutation. Combinations of missense mutations in the first ATP-binding cassette of ABCA12 underlie the LI phenotype. ABCA12 is a keratinocyte lipid transporter associated with lipid transport in lamellar granules, and loss of ABCA12 function leads to a defective lipid barrier in the stratum corneum, resulting in an ichthyotic phenotype. Recent work using mouse models confirmed ABCA12 roles in skin barrier formation.

  15. Recess and the Importance of Play. A Position Statement on Young Children and Recess.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Early Childhood Specialists in State Departments of Education.

    In this position statement, the National Association of Early Childhood Specialists in State Departments of Education asserts that recess is an essential component of education and that preschool and elementary school children must have the opportunity to participate in regular periods of active, free play with peers. The statement summarizes…

  16. Probabilistic analysis of recessive mutagenesis screen strategies.

    PubMed

    Silver, Jeremy D; Hilton, Douglas J; Bahlo, Melanie; Kile, Benjamin T

    2007-01-01

    Random mutagenesis screens for recessive phenotypes require three generations of breeding, using either a backcross (BC) or intercross (IC) strategy. Hence, they are more costly and technically demanding than those for dominant phenotypes. Maximizing the return from these screens requires maximizing the number of mutations that are bred to homozyosity in the G(3) generation. Using a probabilistic approach, we compare different designs of screens for recessive phenotypes and the impact each one has on the number of mutations that can be effectively screened. We address the issue of BC versus IC strategies and consider genome-wide, region-specific screens and suppressor screens. We find that optimally designed BC and IC screens allow the screening of, on average, similar numbers of mutations but that interpedigree variation is more pronounced when the IC strategy is employed. By conducting a retrospective analysis of published mutagenesis screens, we show that, depending on the strategy, a threefold difference in the numbers of mutations screened per animal used could be expected. This method allows researchers to contrast, for a range of experimental designs, the cost per mutation screened and to maximize the number of mutations that one can expect to screen in a given experiment.

  17. Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic deafness genes: a review

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Duygu; Tekin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    More than 50 percent of prelingual hearing loss is genetic in origin, and of these up to 93 percent are monogenic autosomal recessive traits. Some forms of genetic deafness can be recognized by their associated syndromic features, but in most cases, hearing loss is the only finding and is referred to as nonsyndromic deafness. To date, more than 700 different mutations have been identified in one of 42 genes in individuals with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL). Reported mutations in GJB2, encoding connexin 26, makes this gene the most common cause of hearing loss in many populations. Other relatively common deafness genes include SLC26A4, MYO15A, OTOF, TMC1, CDH23, and TMPRSS3. In this report we summarize genes and mutations reported in families with ARNSHL. Founder effects were demonstrated for some recurrent mutations but the most significant findings are the extreme locus and allelic heterogeneity and different spectrum of genes and mutations in each population. PMID:22652773

  18. [Autosomal recessive ethnic diseases of Czech Gypsies].

    PubMed

    Seeman, P; Sisková, D

    2006-01-01

    Roma (Gypsy ethnic) form a genetically isolated ethnical group of the identical origin with the world population of 10 to 14 millions derived from a limited number of so-called founders. Majority (about 8 millions) of Roma ethnic live in Europe, namely at Balkan and in the southwest of Europe. Roma have specific hereditary diseases, namely those caused by recessive genetic mutations. The molecular-genetic mechanism has been recently elucidated and confirmed in several diseases of the Roma population. Owing to the significant proportion of Roma in the population, patients with those diseases are possible to meet also in the Czech Republic. However, the diagnostics of those diseases is frequently difficult and they are often under diagnosed or misdiagnosed. The article gives examples of autosomal recessive diseases, which can be confirmed at the DNA level which occur in Roma population of the Czech Republic: syndrome of congenital cataract, facial dysmorphism and demyelinating neuropathy, non-syndromic prelingual deafness with GJB2 gene impairment and the congenital myastenic syndrome.

  19. Dominant and recessive inheritance of morbid obesity associated with melanocortin 4 receptor deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Yeo, Giles S.H.; Keogh, Julia M.; Aminian, Shiva; Jebb, Susan A.; Butler, Gary; Cheetham, Tim; O’Rahilly, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Over 20 severely obese subjects in 11 independent kindreds have been reported to have pathogenic heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), making this the most common known monogenic cause of human obesity. To date, the detailed clinical phenotype of this dominantly inherited disorder has not been defined, and no homozygous subjects have been described. We determined the nucleotide sequence of the entire coding region of the MC4R gene in 243 subjects with severe, early-onset obesity. A novel two–base pair GT insertion in codon 279 was found in two unrelated subjects, and four novel missense mutations, N62S, R165Q, V253I, C271Y, and one mutation (T112M) reported previously were found in five subjects. N62S was found in homozygous form in five children with severe obesity from a consanguineous pedigree. All four heterozygous carriers were nonobese. Several features of the phenotype, e.g. hyperphagia, tendency toward tall stature, hyperinsulinemia, and preserved reproductive function, closely resemble those reported previously in Mc4r knock-out mice. In addition, a marked increase in bone mineral density was seen in all affected subjects. In transient transfection assays, the N62S mutant receptor showed a responsiveness to αMSH that was intermediate between the wild-type receptor and mutant receptors carrying nonsense and missense mutations associated with dominantly inherited obesity. Thus MC4R mutations result in a syndrome of hyperphagic obesity in humans that can present with either dominant or recessive patterns of inheritance. PMID:10903343

  20. Dominant and recessive inheritance of morbid obesity associated with melanocortin 4 receptor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, I S; Yeo, G S; Keogh, J M; Aminian, S; Jebb, S A; Butler, G; Cheetham, T; O'Rahilly, S

    2000-07-01

    Over 20 severely obese subjects in 11 independent kindreds have been reported to have pathogenic heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), making this the most common known monogenic cause of human obesity. To date, the detailed clinical phenotype of this dominantly inherited disorder has not been defined, and no homozygous subjects have been described. We determined the nucleotide sequence of the entire coding region of the MC4R gene in 243 subjects with severe, early-onset obesity. A novel two-base pair GT insertion in codon 279 was found in two unrelated subjects, and four novel missense mutations, N62S, R165Q, V253I, C271Y, and one mutation (T112M) reported previously were found in five subjects. N62S was found in homozygous form in five children with severe obesity from a consanguineous pedigree. All four heterozygous carriers were nonobese. Several features of the phenotype, e.g. hyperphagia, tendency toward tall stature, hyperinsulinemia, and preserved reproductive function, closely resemble those reported previously in Mc4r knock-out mice. In addition, a marked increase in bone mineral density was seen in all affected subjects. In transient transfection assays, the N62S mutant receptor showed a responsiveness to alphaMSH that was intermediate between the wild-type receptor and mutant receptors carrying nonsense and missense mutations associated with dominantly inherited obesity. Thus MC4R mutations result in a syndrome of hyperphagic obesity in humans that can present with either dominant or recessive patterns of inheritance.