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Sample records for recoil energy relevant

  1. Measurement of Low Energy Electronic Recoil Response and Electronic/Nuclear Recoils Discrimination in XENON100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jingqiang; Xenon Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The XENON100 detector uses liquid xenon time projection chamber to search for nuclear recoils(NR) caused by hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The backgrounds are mostly electronic recoils(ER), thus it's crucial to distinguish NR from ER. Using high statistical calibration data from tritiated methane, AmBe and other sources in XENON100, the ER/NR discrimination under different electric fields are measured. The Photon yield and recombination fluctuation of low energy electronic recoils under different fields will also be presented and compared to results from NEST and other experiments, which is crucial to understanding the response of liquid xenon detectors in the energy regime of searching dark matter.

  2. Energy acceptance of the St. George recoil separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Z.; Moran, M. T.; Gilardy, G.; Schmitt, J.; Seymour, C.; Couder, M.

    2017-04-01

    Radiative alpha-capture, (α , γ) , reactions play a critical role in nucleosynthesis and nuclear energy generation in a variety of astrophysical environments. The St. George recoil separator at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Laboratory was developed to measure (α , γ) reactions in inverse kinematics via recoil detection in order to obtain nuclear reaction cross sections at the low energies of astrophysical interest, while avoiding the γ-background that plagues traditional measurement techniques. Due to the γ ray produced by the nuclear reaction at the target location, recoil nuclei are produced with a variety of energies and angles, all of which must be accepted by St. George in order to accurately determine the reaction cross section. We demonstrate the energy acceptance of the St. George recoil separator using primary beams of helium, hydrogen, neon, and oxygen, spanning the magnetic and electric rigidity phase space populated by recoils of anticipated (α , γ) reaction measurements. We find the performance of St. George meets the design specifications, demonstrating its suitability for (α , γ) reaction measurements of astrophysical interest.

  3. Simulations of the nuclear recoil head-tail signature in gases relevant to directional dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, N. J. C.; Majewski, P.; Muna, D.; Snowden-Ifft, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    We present the first detailed simulations of the so-called head-tail effect of nuclear recoils in gas, the presence of which is vital to directional WIMP dark matter searches. We include comparison simulations of the range and straggling of carbon, sulphur and fluorine recoils in low pressure gas. However, the prime focus is a detailed investigation of carbon and sulphur recoils in 40 Torr negative ion carbon disulfide, a gas proposed for use in large scale directional detectors. The focus is to determine whether the location of the majority of the ionization charge released and observed from a recoil track in carbon disulfide is at the beginning (tail) of the track, at the end (head) or evenly distributed. We used the SRIM simulation program, together with a purpose-written Monte Carlo generator to model production of ionizing pairs, diffusion and basic readout geometries relevant to potential real detector scenarios, such as under development for the DRIFT experiment. The results indicate the likely existence of a head-tail track asymmetry but with a magnitude critically influenced by several competing factors, notably the W-value assumed, the drift distance and diffusion, and the recoil energy.

  4. Inelastic frontier: Discovering dark matter at high recoil energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam

    2016-12-27

    There exist well-motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the dark matter to upscatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the dark matter itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. In this paper, we extend previous studies of inelastic dark matter to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino supersymmetric dark matter, magnetic inelastic dark matter, and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate (through loop diagrams involving the heavy state) as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible (in the parameter space we consider). Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (when the mass splitting δ≲160 keV), iodine at PICO (when 160≲δ≲300 keV), and tungsten at CRESST (when δ≳300 keV). Amusingly, once δ≳200 keV, weak scale (and larger) dark matter–nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative competitiveness of these diverse experiments is governed by the upper bound on the recoil energies employed by each experiment, as well as strong sensitivity to the mass of the heaviest element in the detector. Several implications, including sizable recoil energy-dependent annual modulation and improvements for future experiments, are discussed. We show that the xenon experiments can improve on the PICO results, if they were to analyze their existing data over a larger range of recoil energies, i.e., 20–500 keV Intriguingly, CRESST has reported several events in the recoil energy range 45–100 keV that, if interpreted as dark matter scattering, is compatible with δ~200 keV and an

  5. Inelastic frontier: Discovering dark matter at high recoil energy

    DOE PAGES

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; ...

    2016-12-27

    There exist well-motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the dark matter to upscatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the dark matter itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. In this paper, we extend previous studies of inelastic dark matter to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino supersymmetric dark matter, magnetic inelasticmore » dark matter, and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate (through loop diagrams involving the heavy state) as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible (in the parameter space we consider). Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (when the mass splitting δ≲160 keV), iodine at PICO (when 160≲δ≲300 keV), and tungsten at CRESST (when δ≳300 keV). Amusingly, once δ≳200 keV, weak scale (and larger) dark matter–nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative competitiveness of these diverse experiments is governed by the upper bound on the recoil energies employed by each experiment, as well as strong sensitivity to the mass of the heaviest element in the detector. Several implications, including sizable recoil energy-dependent annual modulation and improvements for future experiments, are discussed. We show that the xenon experiments can improve on the PICO results, if they were to analyze their existing data over a larger range of recoil energies, i.e., 20–500 keV Intriguingly, CRESST has reported several events in the recoil energy range 45–100 keV that, if interpreted as dark matter scattering, is compatible with δ~200 keV and an

  6. Inelastic frontier: Discovering dark matter at high recoil energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam

    2016-12-01

    There exist well-motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the dark matter to upscatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the dark matter itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. In this paper, we extend previous studies of inelastic dark matter to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino supersymmetric dark matter, magnetic inelastic dark matter, and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate (through loop diagrams involving the heavy state) as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible (in the parameter space we consider). Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (when the mass splitting δ ≲160 keV ), iodine at PICO (when 160 ≲δ ≲300 keV ), and tungsten at CRESST (when δ ≳300 keV ). Amusingly, once δ ≳200 keV , weak scale (and larger) dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative competitiveness of these diverse experiments is governed by the upper bound on the recoil energies employed by each experiment, as well as strong sensitivity to the mass of the heaviest element in the detector. Several implications, including sizable recoil energy-dependent annual modulation and improvements for future experiments, are discussed. We show that the xenon experiments can improve on the PICO results, if they were to analyze their existing data over a larger range of recoil energies, i.e., 20-500 keV Intriguingly, CRESST has reported several events in the recoil energy range 45-100 keV that, if interpreted as dark matter scattering, is compatible with δ ˜200 keV and an

  7. Nuclear recoil energy scale in liquid xenon with application to the direct detection of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, P; Dahl, C E

    2011-02-14

    We show for the first time that the quenching of electronic excitation from nuclear recoils in liquid xenon is well-described by Lindhard theory, if the nuclear recoil energy is reconstructed using the combined (scintillation and ionization) energy scale proposed by Shutt et al.. We argue for the adoption of this perspective in favor of the existing preference for reconstructing nuclear recoil energy solely from primary scintillation. We show that signal partitioning into scintillation and ionization is well-described by the Thomas-Imel box model. We discuss the implications for liquid xenon detectors aimed at the direct detection of dark matter.

  8. MIMAC low energy electron-recoil discrimination measured with fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffard, Q.; Santos, D.; Guillaudin, O.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, J.; Descombes, T.; Muraz, J.-F.; Lebreton, L.; Maire, D.; Colas, P.; Giomataris, I.; Busto, J.; Fouchez, D.; Brunner, J.; Tao, C.

    2016-08-01

    MIMAC (MIcro-TPC MAtrix of Chambers) is a directional WIMP Dark Matter detector project. Direct dark matter experiments need a high level of electron/recoil discrimination to search for nuclear recoils produced by WIMP-nucleus elastic scattering. In this paper, we proposed an original method for electron event rejection based on a multivariate analysis applied to experimental data acquired using monochromatic neutron fields. This analysis shows that a 105 rejection power is reachable for electron/recoil discrimination. Moreover, the efficiency was estimated by a Monte-Carlo simulation showing that a 105 electron rejection power is reached with a 86.49 ± 0.17% nuclear recoil efficiency considering the full energy range and 94.67 ± 0.19% considering a 5 keV lower threshold.

  9. Scintillation efficiency for low energy nuclear recoils in liquid xenon dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wei; Xiong, Xiaonu; Ji, Xiangdong

    2015-02-01

    We perform a theoretical study of the scintillation efficiency of the low energy region crucial for liquid xenon dark matter detectors. We develop a computer program to simulate the cascading process of the recoiling xenon nucleus in liquid xenon and calculate the nuclear quenching effect due to atomic collisions. We use the electronic stopping power extrapolated from experimental data to the low energy region, and take into account the effects of electron escape from electron-ion pair recombination using the generalized Thomas-Imel model fitted to scintillation data. Our result agrees well with the experiments from neutron scattering and vanishes rapidly as the recoil energy drops below 3 keV.

  10. Recoil implantation of boron into silicon by high energy silicon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, L.; Lu, X. M.; Wang, X. M.; Rusakova, I.; Mount, G.; Zhang, L. H.; Liu, J. R.; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2001-07-01

    A recoil implantation technique for shallow junction formation was investigated. After e-gun deposition of a B layer onto Si, 10, 50, or 500 keV Si ion beams were used to introduce surface deposited B atoms into Si by knock-on. It has been shown that recoil implantation with high energy incident ions like 500 keV produces a shallower B profile than lower energy implantation such as 10 keV and 50 keV. This is due to the fact that recoil probability at a given angle is a strong function of the energy of the primary projectile. Boron diffusion was showed to be suppressed in high energy recoil implantation and such suppression became more obvious at higher Si doses. It was suggested that vacancy rich region due to defect imbalance plays the role to suppress B diffusion. Sub-100 nm junction can be formed by this technique with the advantage of high throughput of high energy implanters.

  11. H + D2 Reaction Dynamics in the Limit of Low Product Recoil Energy.

    PubMed

    Aldegunde, J; Herráez-Aguilar, D; Jambrina, P G; Aoiz, F J; Jankunas, J; Zare, R N

    2012-10-18

    Both experiment and theory recently showed that the H + D2(v = 0, j = 0) → HD(v' = 4, j') + D reactions at a collision energy of 1.97 eV display a seemingly anomalous HD product angular distribution that moves in the backward direction as the value of j' increases and the corresponding energy available for product recoil decreases. This behavior was attributed to the presence of a centrifugal barrier along the reaction path. Here, we show, using fully quantum mechanical calculations, that for low recoil energies, the collision mechanism is nearly independent of the HD internal state and the HD product becomes aligned, with its rotational angular momentum j' pointing perpendicular to the recoil momentum k'. As the kinetic energy to overcome this barrier becomes limited, the three atoms adopt a nearly collinear configuration in the transition-state region to permit reaction, which strongly polarizes the resulting HD product. These results are expected to be general for any chemical reaction in the low recoil energy limit.

  12. Low-energy recoils and energy scale in liquid xenon detector for direct dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Mei, Dongming; Cubed Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Liquid xenon has been proven to be a great detector medium for the direct search of dark matter. However, in the energy region of below 10 keV, the light yield and charge production are not fully understood due to the convolution of excitation, recombination and quenching. We have already studied a recombination model to explain the physics processes involved in liquid xenon. Work is continued on the average energy expended per electron-ion pair as a function of energy based on the cross sections for different type of scattering processes. In this paper, the results will be discussed in comparison with available experimental data using Birk's Law to understand how scintillation quenching contributes to the non-linear light yield for electron recoils with energy below 10 keV in liquid xenon. This work is supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-10ER46709 and the state of South Dakota.

  13. Modeling ionization and recombination from low energy nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Bernstein, A.; Joshi, T.; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS) is an as-yet undetected, flavor-independent neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model. CNNS is a flavor-blind interaction, which offers potential benefits for its use in nonproliferation (nuclear reactor monitoring) and astrophysics (supernova and solar neutrinos) applications. One challenge with detecting CNNS is the low energy deposition associated with a typical CNNS nuclear recoil. In addition, nuclear recoils are predicted to result in lower ionization yields than those produced by electron recoils of the same energy. This ratio of nuclear- and electron-induced ionization, known as the nuclear quenching factor, is unknown at energies typical for CNNS interactions in liquid xenon (LXe) and liquid argon (LAr), detector media being considered for CNNS detection. While there have been recent measurements [1] of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in LAr, there is no universal model for nuclear quenching and ionization yield. For this reason, a Monte Carlo simulation has been developed to predict the ionization yield at sub-10 keV energies. The local ionization yield of a recoiling atom in the medium is calculated first. The ejected electrons are subsequently tracked in the electric field resulting from both the local electric charges and the externally applied drift field. The dependence of the ionization yield on the drift electric field is obtained by combining the calculated ionization yield for the initial collision cascade with the electron escape probability. An updated estimate of the CNNS signal expected in a LAr detector operated near a nuclear power reactor is presented.

  14. A coherent understanding of low-energy nuclear recoils in liquid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Peter

    2010-09-01

    Liquid xenon detectors such as XENON10 and XENON100 obtain a significant fraction of their sensitivity to light (∼<10 GeV) particle dark matter by looking for nuclear recoils of only a few keV, just above the detector threshold. Yet in this energy regime a correct treatment of the detector threshold and resolution remains unclear. The energy dependence of the scintillation yield of liquid xenon for nuclear recoils also bears heavily on detector sensitivity, yet numerous measurements have not succeeded in obtaining concordant results. In this article we show that the ratio of detected ionization to scintillation can be leveraged to constrain the scintillation yield. We also present a rigorous treatment of liquid xenon detector threshold and energy resolution. Notably, the effective energy resolution differs significantly from a simple Poisson distribution. We conclude with a calculation of dark matter exclusion limits, and show that existing data from liquid xenon detectors strongly constrain recent interpretations of light dark matter.

  15. Recoil-proton polarization in high-energy deuteron photodisintegration with circularly plarized photons.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Arrington, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Qattan, I. A.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Physics; Rutgers Univ.; Univ. Blaise Pascal; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  16. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Benmokhtar, F.; Glashauser, C.; McCormick, K.; Ransome, R. D.; Arrington, J.; Holt, R. J.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Camsonne, A.

    2007-05-04

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  17. Recoil saturation of the self-energy in atomic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J.R.; Ritchie, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Within the framework of the general self-energy problem for the interaction of a projectile with a many-body system, we consider the dispersion force between two atoms or between a charge and an atom. Since the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is not made, this is a useful approach for exhibiting non-adiabatic effects. We find compact expressions in terms of matrix elements of operators in the atomic displacement which are not limited by multipole expansions. 7 refs.

  18. Development of bubble chambers with enhanced stability and sensitivity to low-energy nuclear recoils

    SciTech Connect

    Bolte, W.J.; Collar, Juan I.; Crisler, M.; Hall, J.; Holmgren, D.; Nakazawa, D.; Odom, B.; O'Sullivan, K.; Plunkett, R.; Ramberg, E.; Raskin, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Vieira, J.D.; /Chicago U., EFI /KICP, Chicago /Fermilab

    2005-03-01

    The viability of using a Bubble Chamber for rare event searches and in particular for the detection of dark matter particle candidates is considered. Techniques leading to the deactivation of inhomogeneous nucleation centers and subsequent enhanced stability in such a detector are described. Results from prototype trials indicate that sensitivity to low-energy nuclear recoils like those expected from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles can be obtained in conditions of near total insensitivity to minimum ionizing backgrounds. An understanding of the response of superheated heavy refrigerants to these recoils is demonstrated within the context of existing theoretical models. We comment on the prospects for the detection of supersymmetric dark matter particles with a large CF{sub 3}I chamber.

  19. Low energy electron/recoil discrimination for directional Dark Matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Billard, J.; Mayet, F.; Santos, D. E-mail: mayet@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2012-07-01

    Directional detection is a promising Dark Matter search strategy. Even though it could accommodate to a sizeable background contamination, electron/recoil discrimination remains a key and challenging issue as for direction-insensitive detectors. The measurement of the 3D track may be used to discriminate electrons from nuclear recoils. While a high rejection power is expected above 20 keV ionization, a dedicated data analysis is needed at low energy. After identifying discriminant observables, a multivariate analysis, namely a Boosted Decision Tree, is proposed, enabling an efficient event tagging for Dark Matter search. We show that it allows us to optimize rejection while keeping a rather high efficiency which is compulsory for rare event search.With respect to a sequential analysis, the rejection is about ∼ 20 times higher with a multivariate analysis, for the same Dark Matter exclusion limit.

  20. A velocity map ion imaging study of difluorobenzene-water complexes: binding energies and recoil distributions.

    PubMed

    Bellm, Susan M; Moulds, Rebecca J; van Leeuwen, Matthew P; Lawrance, Warren D

    2008-03-21

    The binding energies of the p-, m-, and o-difluorobenzene-H(2)O complexes have been measured by velocity map ion imaging to be 922+/-10, 945+/-10, and 891+/-4 cm(-1), respectively. The lack of variation provides circumstantial evidence for water binding to the three isomers via the same interaction, viz. an in-plane O-H...F hydrogen bond to one of the fluorine atoms on the ring, with a second, weaker interaction of the water O atom with an ortho hydrogen, as determined previously for the p-difluorobenzene-H(2)O complex [Kang et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 109, 767 (2005)]. The ground state binding energies for the difluorobenzene-H(2)O complexes are approximately 5%-11% larger than that for benzene-H(2)O, where binding occurs to the pi electrons out-of-plane. However, in the S(1) state the binding energies of the o- and p-difluorobenzene-H(2)O complexes are smaller than the benzene-H(2)O value, raising an interesting question about whether the geometry at the global energy minimum remains in-plane in the excited electronic states of these two complexes. Recoil energy distributions for dissociation of p-difluorobenzene-H(2)O have been measured from the 3(1), 5(2), and 3(1)5(1) levels of the excited electronic state. These levels are 490, 880, and 1304 cm(-1), respectively, above the dissociation threshold. Within the experimental uncertainty, the recoil energy distributions are the same for dissociation from these three states, with average recoil energies of approximately 100 cm(-1). These recoil energies are 60% larger than was observed for the dissociation of p-difluorobenzene-Ar, which is a substantially smaller increase than the 400% seen in a comparable study of dissociation within the triplet state for pyrazine-Ar, -H(2)O complexes. The majority of the available energy is partitioned into vibration and rotation of the fragments.

  1. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of low energy recoil events in MgO

    DOE PAGES

    Petersen, B. A.; Liu, B.; Weber, W. J.; ...

    2017-01-11

    In this paper, low-energy recoil events in MgO are studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the dynamic displacement processes and final defect configurations. Threshold displacement energies, Ed, are obtained for Mg and O along three low-index crystallographic directions, [100], [110], and [111]. The minimum values for Ed are found along the [110] direction consisting of the same element, either Mg or O atoms. Minimum threshold values of 29.5 eV for Mg and 25.5 eV for O, respectively, are suggested from the calculations. For other directions, the threshold energies are considerably higher, 65.5 and 150.0 eV for Omore » along [111] and [100], and 122.5 eV for Mg along both [111] and [100] directions, respectively. These results show that the recoil events in MgO are partial-charge transfer assisted processes where the charge transfer plays an important role. Finally, there is a similar trend found in other oxide materials, where the threshold displacement energy correlates linearly with the peak partial-charge transfer, suggesting this behavior might be universal in ceramic oxides.« less

  2. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of low energy recoil events in MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, B. A.; Liu, B.; Weber, W. J.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Low-energy recoil events in MgO are studied using ab intio molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the dynamic displacement processes and final defect configurations. Threshold displacement energies, Ed, are obtained for Mg and O along three low-index crystallographic directions, [100], [110], and [111]. The minimum values for Ed are found along the [110] direction consisting of the same element, either Mg or O atoms. Minimum threshold values of 29.5 eV for Mg and 25.5 eV for O, respectively, are suggested from the calculations. For other directions, the threshold energies are considerably higher, 65.5 and 150.0 eV for O along [111] and [100], and 122.5 eV for Mg along both [111] and [100] directions, respectively. These results show that the recoil events in MgO are partial-charge transfer assisted processes where the charge transfer plays an important role. There is a similar trend found in other oxide materials, where the threshold displacement energy correlates linearly with the peak partial-charge transfer, suggesting this behavior might be universal in ceramic oxides.

  3. Scintillation efficiency measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) below the DAMA/LIBRA energy threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingke; Shields, Emily; Calaprice, Frank; Westerdale, Shawn; Froborg, Francis; Suerfu, Burkhant; Alexander, Thomas; Aprahamian, Ani; Back, Henning O.; Casarella, Clark; Fang, Xiao; Gupta, Yogesh K.; Ianni, Aldo; Lamere, Edward; Lippincott, W. Hugh; Liu, Qian; Lyons, Stephanie; Siegl, Kevin; Smith, Mallory; Tan, Wanpeng; Kolk, Bryant Vande

    2015-07-01

    The dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal depends on the NaI(Tl) scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoils. Previous measurements for Na recoils have large discrepancies, especially in the DAMA/LIBRA modulation energy region. We report a quenching effect measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) from 3 to 52 keVnr, covering the whole DAMA/LIBRA energy region for dark matter-Na scattering interpretations. By using a low-energy, pulsed neutron beam, a double time-of-flight technique, and pulse-shape discrimination methods, we obtained the most accurate measurement of this kind for NaI(Tl) to date. The results differ significantly from the DAMA reported values at low energies but fall between the other previous measurements. We present the implications of the new quenching results for the dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal.

  4. Exact calculations of nuclear-recoil energies from prompt gamma decays resulting from neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J.H.

    1981-07-20

    The results of an accurate determination of the recoil spectrum from (n, ..gamma..) reactions in molybdenum are presented. The recoil spectrum has been calculated from nuclear level structure data and measured branching ratios. Angular correlations between successive gammas have been accounted for using the standard theoretical techniques of Racah algebra and the density matrix formalism.

  5. A new Recoil Proton Telescope for energy and fluence measurement of fast neutron fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lebreton, Lena; Bachaalany, Mario

    2015-07-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High Energy Neutron metrology Applications), is being developed at the IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons) and aims at characterizing energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a Recoil Proton Telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5 to 20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50{sub m} thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for the proton tracking and a 3 mm thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. This first prototype used CMOS sensors called MIMOSTAR, initially developed for heavy ion physics. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of ten compared with conventional designs. The first prototype has already been done and was a successful study giving the results it offered in terms of energy and fluence measurements. For mono energetic beams going from 5 to 19 MeV, the telescope offered an energy resolution between 5 and 11% and fluence difference going from 5 to 7% compared to other home standards. A second and final prototype of the detector is being designed. It will hold upgraded CMOS sensors called FastPixN. These CMOS sensors are supposed to run 400 times faster than the older version and therefore give the telescope the ability to support neutron flux in the order of 107 to 108cm{sup 2}:s{sup 1}. The first prototypes results showed that a 50 m pixel size is enough for a precise scattering angle reconstruction. Simulations using MCNPX and GEANT4 are already in place for further improvements. A DeltaE diode will replace the third CMOS sensor and will be installed right before the silicon diode for a better recoil proton selection. The final prototype with

  6. Electron recombination in low-energy nuclear recoils tracks in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of electron-ion recombination processes in ionization tracks of recoiled atoms in liquid argon (LAr) detectors. The analysis is based on the results of computer simulations which use realistic models of electron transport and reactions. The calculations reproduce the recent experimental results of the ionization yield from 6.7 keV nuclear recoils in LAr. The statistical distribution of the number of electrons that escape recombination is found to deviate from the binomial distribution, and estimates of recombination fluctuations for nuclear recoils tracks are obtained. A study of the recombination kinetics shows that a significant part of electrons undergo very fast static recombination, an effect that may be responsible for the weak drift-field dependence of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in some noble liquids. The obtained results can be useful in the search for hypothetical dark matter particles and in other studies that involve detection of recoiled nuclei.

  7. Elastic Recoil after Balloon Angioplasty in Hemodialysis Accesses: Does It Actually Occur and Is It Clinically Relevant?

    PubMed

    Rajan, Dheeraj K; Sidhu, Arshdeep; Noel-Lamy, Maxime; Mahajan, Ashish; Simons, Martin E; Sniderman, Kenneth W; Jaskolka, Jeffrey; Tan, Kong Teng

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To qualify and quantify elastic recoil and determine its effect on access patency. Materials and Methods Research ethics board approval was obtained and all patients signed an informed consent form. This was a prospective, nonrandomized study of mature accesses that underwent balloon percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) between January 2009 and December 2012. After PTA, completion fistulography was performed at 0-, 5-, 10-, and 15-minute intervals. From Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine images, percentage of lesion stenosis before and after PTA was measured at each time point. A total of 76 patients (44 men, 32 women; mean age, 59.6 years) were enrolled and underwent 154 PTAs in 56 grafts and 98 fistulas. Venous elastic recoil was defined as recurrent luminal narrowing greater than 50% within 15 minutes after full effacement of the stenosis by the angioplasty balloon. Data collected included sex, age, access type and location, lesion location, length, and time to next intervention. Access patency was estimated by using Kaplan-Meier survival method, association of variables with the risk of loss of patency was assessed by using a Cox proportional hazards model, and a multiple variable model was examined by considering all variables. Results Technical success of PTA with less than 30% residual stenosis was 78%. By 15 minutes, 15.6% (24 of 154) of treated lesions recurrently narrowed by more than 50%, with a majority observed at 5 minutes (15 of 24). Technical failure of PTA was predictive of elastic recoil (P < .001), as was cephalic arch stenosis in fistulas (P = .047) and autogenous fistulas (P = .04). Elastic recoil, when it did occur, did not influence patency. Six-month primary patency was 34.8% in grafts and 47.1% in fistulas. Conclusion Venous elastic recoil after PTA of stenoses in hemodialysis access circuits is common, but its occurrence does not influence access primary patency after PTA. (©) RSNA, 2015.

  8. A Variable Energy, Redshifted, Iron Absorption Line in a recoiling Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civano, Francesca

    The aim of this proposal is to maximize the scientific return of a medium deep (123 ksec) XMM-Newton observation, awarded during the AO10 call for proposal, to obtain a high quality X-ray spectrum of CID-42, a very peculiar source discovered in the COSMOS survey. CID-42 is exceptional in many respects showing a redshifted, variable energy absorption line plus an emission line at ~ 6 keV forming an inverted P-Cygni profile. These features were never observed before in the X-rays. The peculiar nature of CID-42 extends well beyond the X-ray spectrum. First, two optical sources in a common envelope are clearly seen in the HST data. They are separated by about 2.45 kpc. Thanks to the unrivaled Chandra HRC resolution it was possible to unambiguously associate the X-ray emission to only one of the two optical sources. Second, a high velocity (1100 km/s) offset, between the broad and narrow component of the H-beta line is measured in the VLT/Magellan/Keck optical spectra. The velocity offset observed is unlikely to be due to a ongoing merger because too high. Third, the above mentioned inverted P-Cygni profile in the hard X-ray spectrum would be naturally explained by an high velocity (v~0.02-0.14c) gas infall in the innermost region of the accreting Black Hole. All together the observed properties support the interpretation of a Black Hole kicked from the center of the galaxy by asymmetric emission of gravitational waves produced during a major merger. The Black Hole is caught while still active, at ~10^6 yrs after the kick and at a substantial distance from the center of the galaxy. The theoretical expectations suggest that they are extremely rare and just 1 or 2 gravitational wave recoiling Black Holes are expected in a survey like COSMOS. CID- 42 thus represents a ``Rosetta stone'' for the study of SMBH mergers that are believed to occur during galaxy-galaxy mergers, and their fate after the merging. The detailed study of the hard X-ray XMM-Newton spectrum, in the

  9. Shoulder-Fired Weapons with High Recoil Energy: Quantifying Injury and Shooting Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    and clinical measurements............................................................................. 30 16 Accuracy statistics...decreased immediately post-firing and returned to baseline at all sites before the end of the testing week. Statistically, but not clinically significant...performance as measured by the total number of targets hit during the 40-target qualification exercise . Despite the high recoil of the M16A2 and M4

  10. Development of a gaseous proton-recoil detector for fission cross section measurements below 1 MeV neutron energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, P.; Mathieu, L.; Aïche, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Tsekhanovich, I.

    2016-03-01

    The elastic H(n,p) reaction is sometimes used to measure neutron flux, in order to produce high precision measurements. The use of this technique is not straightforward to use below incident neutron energy of 1 MeV, due to a high background in the detected proton spectrum. Experiments have been carried out at the AIFIRA facility to investigate such background and determine its origin and components. Based on these investigations, a gaseous proton-recoil detector has been designed, with a reduced low energy background.

  11. Ab initio molecular dynamics investigations of low-energy recoil events in Ni and NiCo

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Yuan, Fenglin; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-10-06

    Low-energy recoil events in pure Ni and the equiatomic NiCo alloy are studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the threshold displacement energies are strongly dependent on orientation and weakly dependent on composition. The minimum threshold displacement energies are along the [1 1 0] direction in both pure Ni and the NiCo alloy. Compared to pure Ni, the threshold displacement energies increase slightly in the NiCo alloy due to stronger bonds in the alloy, irrespective of the element type of the PKA. A single Ni interstitial occupying the center of a tetrahedron formed by four Ni atoms and a <1 0 0> split interstitial is produced in pure Ni by the recoils, while only the <1 0 0> split interstitial is formed in the NiCo alloy. Compared to the replacement sequences in pure Ni, anti-site defect sequences are observed in the alloy, which have high efficiency for both producing defects and transporting energy outside of the cascade core. These results provide insights into energy transfer processes occurring in equiatomic alloys under irradiation.

  12. Ab initio molecular dynamics investigations of low-energy recoil events in Ni and NiCo

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Bin; Yuan, Fenglin; Jin, Ke; ...

    2015-10-06

    Low-energy recoil events in pure Ni and the equiatomic NiCo alloy are studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the threshold displacement energies are strongly dependent on orientation and weakly dependent on composition. The minimum threshold displacement energies are along the [1 1 0] direction in both pure Ni and the NiCo alloy. Compared to pure Ni, the threshold displacement energies increase slightly in the NiCo alloy due to stronger bonds in the alloy, irrespective of the element type of the PKA. A single Ni interstitial occupying the center of a tetrahedron formed by four Ni atomsmore » and a <1 0 0> split interstitial is produced in pure Ni by the recoils, while only the <1 0 0> split interstitial is formed in the NiCo alloy. Compared to the replacement sequences in pure Ni, anti-site defect sequences are observed in the alloy, which have high efficiency for both producing defects and transporting energy outside of the cascade core. These results provide insights into energy transfer processes occurring in equiatomic alloys under irradiation.« less

  13. Low energy electron and nuclear recoil thresholds in the DRIFT-II negative ion TPC for dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, S.; Daw, E.; Forbes, J.; Ghag, C.; Gold, M.; Hagemann, C.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Lawson, T. B.; Loomba, D.; Majewski, P.; Muna, D.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Paling, S. M.; Petkov, A.; Plank, S. J. S.; Robinson, M.; Sanghi, N.; Snowden-Ifft, D. P.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Turk, J.; Tziaferi, E.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the ability to measure and discriminate particle events at the lowest possible energy is an essential requirement in developing new experiments to search for weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. In this paper we detail an assessment of the potential sensitivity below 10 keV in the 1 m3 DRIFT-II directionally sensitive, low pressure, negative ion time projection chamber (NITPC), based on event-by-event track reconstruction and calorimetry in the multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) readout. By application of a digital smoothing polynomial it is shown that the detector is sensitive to sulfur and carbon recoils down to 2.9 and 1.9 keV respectively, and 1.2 keV for electron induced events. The energy sensitivity is demonstrated through the 5.9 keV gamma spectrum of 55Fe, where the energy resolution is sufficient to identify the escape peak. The effect of a lower energy sensitivity on the WIMP exclusion limit is demonstrated. In addition to recoil direction reconstruction for WIMP searches this sensitivity suggests new prospects for applications also in KK axion searches.

  14. Inelastic processes in ion/surface collisions: Direct recoil ion fractions as a function of kinetic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabalais, J. Wayne; Chen, Jie-Nan

    1986-09-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of the scattered and recoiled particles resulting from 1-10 keV Ar+ ions impingent on surfaces of MgO, Mg(OH)2, graphite, Si, and SiO2 have been obtained. Measurements of directly recoiled (DR) neutrals plus ions and neutrals only are used to calculate positive and negative ion fractions Y+,- from DR events. These positive and negative ion yields observed for DR of H, C, O, and Si have distinctly different behavior as a function of ion kinetic energy. The Y+ values exhibit a ``threshold-type'' behavior with a steep rise followed by a slowly rising or plateau region at higher energy. The Y- values exhibit a maximum in the low energy region followed by a decreasing yield as energy increases. The Y-/Y+ ratio for C and O is very sensitive to the amount of hydrogen present, with the Y+ yields dropping as hydrogen concentration increases. The recently developed model for electronic transitions in keV ion/surface collisions which considers Auger and resonant transitions along the ion trajectory and electron promotions in the quasidiatomic molecule of the close atomic encounter is extended to include DR events. Analytical expressions for Y+,- are derived for the case of surface atoms in positive, neutral, and negative bonding environments. These model expressions are fitted to the experimental data, allowing determination of the probabilities of ionization in the close atomic encounter and of electron capture along the outgoing trajectory.

  15. A G/NARRLI Effort. Measuring the Ionization Yield of Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Tenzing Henry Yatish

    2014-01-01

    Liquid argon has long been used for particle detection due to its attractive drift properties, ample abundance, and reasonable density. The response of liquid argon to lowenergy O(102 -1044 eV) interactions is, however, largely unexplored. Weakly interacting massive particles such as neutrinos and hypothetical dark-matter particles (WIMPs) are predicted to coherently scatter on atomic nuclei, leaving only an isolated low-energy nuclear recoil as evidence. The response of liquid argon to low-energy nuclear recoils must be studied to determine the sensitivity of liquid argon based detectors to these unobserved interactions. Detectors sensitive to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering may be used to monitor nuclear reactors from a distance, to detect neutrinos from supernova, and to test the predicted behavior of neutrinos. Additionally, direct detection of hypothetical weakly interacting dark matter would be a large step toward understanding the substance that accounts for nearly 27% of the universe. In this dissertation I discuss a small dual-phase (liquid-gas) argon proportional scintillation counter built to study the low-energy regime and several novel calibration and characterization techniques developed to study the response of liquid argon to low-energy O(102 -104 eV) interactions.

  16. High acceptance recoil polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    The HARP Collaboration

    1992-12-05

    In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization, an efficient, low-noise, self-calibrating device is being designed. This detector, known as the High Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP), is based on the recoil principle of proton detection from np[r arrow]n[prime]p[prime] or pp[r arrow]p[prime]p[prime] scattering (detected particles are underlined) which intrinsically yields polarization information on the incoming particle. HARP will be commissioned to carry out experiments in 1994.

  17. COSY Simulations to Guide Commissioning of the St. George Recoil Mass Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Jaclyn; Moran, Michael; Seymour, Christopher; Gilardy, Gwenaelle; Meisel, Zach; Couder, Manoel

    2015-10-01

    The goal of St. George (STrong Gradient Electromagnetic Online Recoil separator for capture Gamma ray Experiments) is to measure (α, γ) cross sections relevant to stellar helium burning. Recoil separators such as St. George are able to more closely approach the low astrophysical energies of interest because they collect reaction recoils rather than γ-rays, and thus are not limited by room background. In order to obtain an accurate cross section measurement, a recoil separator must be able to collect all recoils over their full range of expected energy and angular spread. The energy acceptance of St. George is currently being measured, and the angular acceptance will be measured soon. Here we present the results of COSY ion optics simulations and magnetic field analyses which were performed to help guide the commissioning measurements and diagnostic upgrades required to complete those measurements. National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program.

  18. Proposed low-energy absolute calibration of nuclear recoils in a dual-phase noble element TPC using D-D neutron scattering kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbus, J. R.; Rhyne, C. A.; Malling, D. C.; Genecov, M.; Ghosh, S.; Moskowitz, A. G.; Chan, S.; Chapman, J. J.; de Viveiros, L.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Huang, D. Q.; Pangilinan, M.; Taylor, W. C.; Gaitskell, R. J.

    2017-04-01

    We propose a new technique for the calibration of nuclear recoils in large noble element dual-phase time projection chambers used to search for WIMP dark matter in the local galactic halo. This technique provides an in situ measurement of the low-energy nuclear recoil response of the target media using the measured scattering angle between multiple neutron interactions within the detector volume. The low-energy reach and reduced systematics of this calibration have particular significance for the low-mass WIMP sensitivity of several leading dark matter experiments. Multiple strategies for improving this calibration technique are discussed, including the creation of a new type of quasi-monoenergetic neutron source with a minimum possible peak energy of 272 keV. We report results from a time-of-flight-based measurement of the neutron energy spectrum produced by an Adelphi Technology, Inc. DD108 neutron generator, confirming its suitability for the proposed nuclear recoil calibration.

  19. The photodissociation dynamics of OClO between 306 and 370 nm: Fragment translational energy release and recoil anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, Alan; Scheld, Heiner A.; Huber, J. Robert

    1997-04-01

    The photodissociation OClO(à 2A2)→ClO(X˜ 2Π)+O(3P) was studied at wavelengths between 306 and 370 nm using photofragment translational energy spectroscopy. The flight time distributions and anisotropies of the recoiling fragments were measured with the photolysis wavelength tuned to 10 maxima of the structured absorption spectrum, corresponding to a vibronic excitation of the parent molecule with 9-18 quanta in the symmetric stretching coordinate on the à 2A2 surface. The translational energy distributions show that the ClO fragments are created in highly inverted vibrational state distributions which become extremely broad [v(Cl-O)˜1-15] with increasing excitation energy. The large fraction of vibrationally hot ClO fragments produced-particularly at λ<325 nm-could enhance various thermodynamically unfavorable atmospheric reactions in connection with ozone depletion. The main mechanistic features of the dissociation process, which account for the almost constant average translational energy and linearly increasing vibrational energy of ClO as a function of the excitation energy, can be interpreted, to a first approximation, as vibrational predissociation on the à 2A2 potential energy surface involving a relatively late exit barrier. From the measured translational energies the barrier height is estimated to be about 48 kJ/mol.

  20. Measurement of the beam-recoil polarization in low-energy virtual Compton scattering from the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doria, L.; Janssens, P.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Baumann, D.; Bensafa, I.; Benali, M.; Beričič, J.; Bernauer, J. C.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Correa, L.; D'Hose, N.; Defaÿ, X.; Ding, M.; Distler, M. O.; Fonvieille, H.; Friedrich, J.; Friedrich, J. M.; Laveissière, G.; Makek, M.; Marroncle, J.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pasquini, B.; Pochodzalla, J.; Postavaru, O.; Potokar, M.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sánchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Seimetz, M.; Širca, S.; Tamas, G.; Van de Vyver, R.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Van Overloop, A.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; A1 Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Double-polarization observables in the reaction e ⃗p →e'p ⃗'γ have been measured at Q2=0.33 (GeV/c ) 2 . The experiment was performed at the spectrometer setup of the A1 Collaboration using the 855 MeV polarized electron beam provided by the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) and a recoil proton polarimeter. From the double-polarization observables the structure function PLT ⊥ is extracted for the first time, with the value (-15.4 ±3 .3(stat .)-2.4+1.5(syst.)) GeV-2 , using the low-energy theorem for virtual Compton scattering. This structure function provides a hitherto unmeasured linear combination of the generalized polarizabilities of the proton.

  1. Measurement of the scintillation time spectra and pulse-shape discrimination of low-energy β and nuclear recoils in liquid argon with DEAP-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaudruz, P.-A.; Batygov, M.; Beltran, B.; Bonatt, J.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Broerman, B.; Bueno, J. F.; Butcher, A.; Cai, B.; Caldwell, T.; Chen, M.; Chouinard, R.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cranshaw, D.; Dering, K.; Duncan, F.; Fatemighomi, N.; Ford, R.; Gagnon, R.; Giampa, P.; Giuliani, F.; Gold, M.; Golovko, V. V.; Gorel, P.; Grace, E.; Graham, K.; Grant, D. R.; Hakobyan, R.; Hallin, A. L.; Hamstra, M.; Harvey, P.; Hearns, C.; Hofgartner, J.; Jillings, C. J.; Kuźniak, M.; Lawson, I.; La Zia, F.; Li, O.; Lidgard, J. J.; Liimatainen, P.; Lippincott, W. H.; Mathew, R.; McDonald, A. B.; McElroy, T.; McFarlane, K.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mehdiyev, R.; Monroe, J.; Muir, A.; Nantais, C.; Nicolics, K.; Nikkel, J.; Noble, A. J.; O'Dwyer, E.; Olsen, K.; Ouellet, C.; Pasuthip, P.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Pollmann, T.; Rau, W.; Retière, F.; Ronquest, M.; Seeburn, N.; Skensved, P.; Smith, B.; Sonley, T.; Tang, J.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.; Veloce, L.; Walding, J.; Ward, M.

    2016-12-01

    The DEAP-1 low-background liquid argon detector was used to measure scintillation pulse shapes of electron and nuclear recoil events and to demonstrate the feasibility of pulse-shape discrimination down to an electron-equivalent energy of 20 keVee. In the surface dataset using a triple-coincidence tag we found the fraction of β events that are misidentified as nuclear recoils to be < 1.4 ×10-7 (90% C.L.) for energies between 43-86 keVee and for a nuclear recoil acceptance of at least 90%, with 4% systematic uncertainty on the absolute energy scale. The discrimination measurement on surface was limited by nuclear recoils induced by cosmic-ray generated neutrons. This was improved by moving the detector to the SNOLAB underground laboratory, where the reduced background rate allowed the same measurement to be done with only a double-coincidence tag. The combined data set contains 1.23 × 108 events. One of those, in the underground data set, is in the nuclear-recoil region of interest. Taking into account the expected background of 0.48 events coming from random pileup, the resulting upper limit on the level of electronic recoil contamination is < 2.7 ×10-8 (90% C.L.) between 44-89 keVee and for a nuclear recoil acceptance of at least 90%, with 6% systematic uncertainty on the absolute energy scale. We developed a general mathematical framework to describe pulse-shape-discrimination parameter distributions and used it to build an analytical model of the distributions observed in DEAP-1. Using this model, we project a misidentification fraction of approximately 10-10 for an electron-equivalent energy threshold of 15 keVee for a detector with 8 PE/keVee light yield. This reduction enables a search for spin-independent scattering of WIMPs from 1000 kg of liquid argon with a WIMP-nucleon cross-section sensitivity of 10-46 cm2, assuming negligible contribution from nuclear recoil backgrounds.

  2. Recoil Redsfhit with Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, C. F.

    2009-05-01

    ``Recoil Redshift'' is due to the elastic interaction of photons/light with any individual electron, proton, ion, atom or molecule. This generalized Compton effect describes an individual photon-particle interaction where Energy, Linear Momentum and Angular Momentum are conserved, with NO change in the internal energy of the particle. Per Compton, the lost photon energy is zero in the forward photon propagation direction, and the energy loss increases with scattering angle. This is an INDIVIDUAL INcoherent process. To describe collective coherent effects, add/include Huygens forward reconstruction from multiple photon/particle redshifted scatterings. A coherent redshift will occur if the scattered photons' energies are WITHIN the initial linewidth. This yields an asymmetrically broadened redshifted line in the forward coherent direction with clear imaging properties. This is a coherent redshifted version of Rayleigh scattering which assumes identical non-redshifted photons. BUT the Compton Conservation energy-loss process must occur. The search for this small Recoil redshift is a good research project for ultra- precise ``frequency combs'' in gases (atomic and molecular), plasmas and combinations.

  3. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Low-Energy Recoil Events in ThO2, CeO2, and ZrO2

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2012-08-13

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of low-energy recoil events in ThO2, CeO2, and ZrO2 have been carried out to determine the threshold displacement energies, resulting defect configurations, dynamics of defect generation, and role of charge transfer during the process. The results reveal that, in most cases, these fluorite structure oxides exhibit a similar response to low-energy recoils. A variety of different defect configurations are created, consisting mainly of vacancies and interstitials. Charge transfer occurs during the dynamic displacement process. Local charge redistribution leads to cation and O vacancies being negatively and positively charged, respectively. Likewise, due to charge redistribution, the cation and O interstitials are less positively and negatively charged, respectively, than the ions on lattice sites in perfect MO2.

  4. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of low energy recoil events in ThO2, CeO2 and ZrO2

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Haiyan; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J

    2012-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of low energy recoil events in ThO2, CeO2 and ZrO2 have been carried out to determine the threshold displacement energies, resulting defect configurations, dynamics of defect generation, and role of charge transfer during the process. The results reveal that, in most cases, these fluorite structure oxides exhibit a similar response to low-energy recoils. A variety of different defect configurations are created, consisting mainly of vacancies and interstitials. Charge transfer occurs during the dynamic displacement process. Local charge redistribution leads to cation and O vacancies being negatively and positively charged, respectively. Likewise, due to charge redistribution, the cation and O interstitials are less positively and negatively charged, respectively, than the ions on lattice sites in perfect MO2.

  5. Recoil energy distributions for dissociation of the van der Waals molecule p-difluorobenzene-Ar with 450-3000 cm(-1) excess energy.

    PubMed

    Bellm, Susan M; Lawrance, Warren D

    2005-03-08

    Velocity map imaging has been used to measure the distributions of translational energy released in the dissociation of p-difluorobenzene-Ar van der Waals complexes from the 5(1), 3(1), 5(2), 3(1)5(1), 5(3), 3(2), and 3(2)5(1) states. These states span 818-3317 cm(-1) of vibrational energy and correspond to a range of energies above dissociation of 451-2950 cm(-1). The translational energy release (recoil energy) distributions are remarkably similar, peaking at very low energy (10-20 cm(-1)) and decaying in an exponential fashion to approach zero near 300 cm(-1). The average translational energy released is small, shows no dependence on the initial vibrational energy, and spans the range 58-72 cm(-1) for the vibrational levels probed. The average value for the seven levels studied is 63 cm(-1). The low fraction of transfer to translation is qualitatively in accord with Ewing's momentum gap model [G. E. Ewing, Faraday Discuss. 73, 325 (1982)]. No evidence is found in the distributions for a high energy tail, although it is likely that the experiment is not sufficiently sensitive to detect a low fraction of transfer at high translational energies. The average translational energy released is lower than has been seen in comparable systems dissociating from triplet and cation states.

  6. Towards increased policy relevance in energy modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Ramesohl, Stephan; Boyd, Gale

    2003-07-29

    Historically, most energy models were reasonably equipped to assess the impact of a subsidy or change in taxation, but are often insufficient to assess the impact of more innovative policy instruments. We evaluate the models used to assess future energy use, focusing on industrial energy use. We explore approaches to engineering-economic analysis that could help improve the realism and policy relevance of engineering-economic modeling frameworks. We also explore solutions to strengthen the policy usefulness of engineering-economic analysis that can be built from a framework of multi-disciplinary cooperation. We focus on the so-called ''engineering-economic'' (or ''bottom-up'') models, as they include the amount of detail that is commonly needed to model policy scenarios. We identify research priorities for the modeling framework, technology representation in models, policy evaluation and modeling of decision-making behavior.

  7. Measurement and model prediction of proton-recoil track length distributions in NTA film dosimeters for neutron energy spectroscopy and retrospective dose assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taulbee, Timothy D.

    The goal of this research was to determine whether neutron dose reconstruction could be improved through re-analysis of historic NTA films worn by workers in the 1950 through the 1970s. To improve neutron dose reconstruction, the underlying neutron energy spectra is critical in determining the organ dose due to energy dependence of the dose conversion factor as well as the application of radiation weighting factors used in epidemiology and probability of causation calculations. Monte Carlo models of proton-recoil track length distributions were developed and benchmarked against measurement data for both NTA and Ilford films. These models, when applied to several NTA film dosimeter configurations, demonstrated that proton-recoil track length distributions change based upon incident neutron energy. The neutron energy spectra changes that result from the general work environment such as source term and shielding can subsequently be modeled to predict the response of the NTA film dosimeter. An Automatic NTA Film Analyzer has been designed and developed to determine if the difference in proton-recoil track length distributions predicted by the Monte Carlo models could be measured and whether these differences could be correlated to the incident neutron energy spectra. The design required the development of a 2D-3D hybrid track recognition algorithm for a three dimensional analysis of the NTA film in order to accurately determine the proton-recoil track length for subsequent neutron energy determination. NTA films exposed to a plutonium fluoride (PuF4) and polonium boron (PoB) calibration sources were measured and compared. The proton-recoil track lengths were used to reconstruct the incident neutron energy spectra demonstrating the functionality of the analyzer and that reconstruction of the neutron energy spectra from NTA films is feasible. These measurements were compared to the Monte Carlo models and confirmed the applicability of using models to determine the NTA

  8. Effects of primary recoil energy on the production rate of mobile defects during elevated temperature irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, P.R.; Rehn, L.E.; Averback, R.S.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation-induced segregation rates in a Ni-12.7 at.% Si alloy have been measured as a function of temperature using ions of various masses and energies. An analysis of the segregation kinetics using a simple analytical model yielded the relative efficiency of each of the ions for producing mobile defects directly from ratios of their measured segregation rates. In this paper, we also show that the relative efficiencies can also be determined from measured shifts in the peak segregation temperature. Both methods yield a strong decrease in efficiency with increasing ion mass. The reduction in efficiency for the heavior ions was found to be significantly larger than that measured at very low temperatures by resistivity techniques. The latter are often used as a basis for correlating damage structures produced at elevated temperatures. Differences between the low and high temperature measurements indicate that relative efficiencies determined from segregation measurements are more reliable for correlating microstructural changes that are produced in different irradiation environments at high temperatures.

  9. Nuclear recoil measurements with the ARIS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Alden; ARIS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    As direct dark matter searches become increasingly sensitive, it is important to fully characterize the target of the search. The goal of the Argon Recoil Ionization and Scintillation (ARIS) experiment is to quantify information related to the scintillation and ionization energy scale, quenching factor, ion recombination probability, and scintillation time response of nuclear recoils, as expected from WIMPs, in liquid argon. A time projection chamber with an active mass of 0.5 kg of liquid argon and capable of full 3D position reconstruction was exposed to an inverse kinematic neutron beam at the Institut de Physique Nucleaire d'Orsay in France. A scan of nuclear recoil energies was performed through coincidence with a set of neutron detectors to quantify properties of nuclear recoils in liquid argon at various electric fields. The difference in ionization and scintillation response with differing recoil track angle to the electric field was also studied. The preliminary results of the experiment will be presented.

  10. Nuclear Recoil Identification in CDMS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gensheng; Akerib, Dan

    2004-05-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment achieves high sensitivity for WIMP dark matter particles recoiling from nuclei because of the rejection of predominant electromagnetic backgrounds. The measured charge energy and phonon energy ratio, or ionization yield, is a powerful tool for discrimination between nuclear recoil and electron recoil in CDMS experiment. However, since events occurring within a thin surface layer, notably low-energy background beta particles, suffer a loss in ionization charge collection, other method of surface--event rejection becomes important. I will describe the CDMS detector ionization measurement and ballistic phonon readout, with an emphasis on detector phenomenology. In particular, I will describe the primary CDMS detector quantities--ionization yield, phonon risetime, event location information and phonon energy partition distribution. The application of these parameters in nuclear recoil identification and in surface event rejection in CDMS experiment will be summarized.

  11. Precompound emission in low-energy heavy-ion interactions from recoil range and spin distributions of heavy residues: A new experimental method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, Vijay Raj; Shuaib, Mohd.; Singh, Devendra P.; Yadav, Abhishek; Unnati, Kumar, R.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2016-10-01

    Recent investigations of heavy-ion reactions at low incident energies have indicated the presence of precompound emission component in considerable strength. In most cases the strength of the precompound component is estimated from the difference in forward-backward distributions of emitted light fast particles and also from the analysis of the measured excitation functions. This paper reports a new method of deciphering the relative contributions of compound and precompound components associated with fusion of 16O with 159Tb,169Tm, and 181Ta targets by measuring the recoil ranges of heavy residues in an absorbing medium along with the online measurement of the spin distributions in reaction residues produced in the fusion 16O beam with 159Tb and 169Tm targets. Analysis of recoil range and spin distributions of the residues shows two distinct linear momentum-transfer components corresponding to precompound and compound nucleus processes. The input angular momentum associated with precompound products is found to be relatively lower than that associated with compound nucleus process. The precompound components obtained from the present analysis are consistent with those obtained from the analysis of excitation functions.

  12. Biological Effect of Lead-212 Localized in the Nucleus of Mammalian Cells: Role of Recoil Energy in the Radiotoxicity of Internal Alpha-Particle Emitters1

    PubMed Central

    Azure, Michael T.; Archer, Ronald D.; Sastry, Kandula S. R.; Rao, Dandamudi V.; Howell, Roger W.

    2012-01-01

    The radiochemical dipyrrolidinedithiocarbamato-212Pb(II) [212Pb(PDC)2] is synthesized and its effects on colony formation in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells are investigated. The cellular uptake, biological retention, subcellular distribution and cytotoxicity of the radiocompound are determined. The 212Pb is taken up quickly by the cells, reaching saturation levels in 1.25 h. When the cells are washed, the intracellular activity is retained with a biological half-life of 11.6 h. Gamma-ray spectroscopy indicates that the 212Pb daughters (212Bi, 212Po and 208Tl) are in secular equilibrium within the cell. About 72% of the cellular activity localizes in the cell nucleus, of which 35% is bound specifically to nuclear DNA. The mean cellular uptake required to achieve 37% survival is 0.35 mBq of 212Pb per cell, which delivers a dose of 1.0 Gy to the cell nucleus when the recoil energy of 212Bi and 212Po decays is ignored and 1.7 Gy when recoil is included. The corresponding RBE values compared to acute external 137Cs γ rays at 37% survival are 4.0 and 2.3, respectively. The chemical Pb(PDC)2 is not chemotoxic at the concentrations used in this study. Because the β-particle emitter 212Pb decays to the α-particle-emitting daughters 212Bi and 212Po, these studies provide information on the biological effects of α-particle decays that occur in the cell nucleus. Our earlier studies with cells of the same cell line using 210Po (emits 5.3 MeV α particle) localized predominantly in the cytoplasm resulted in an RBE of 6. These earlier results for 210Po, along with the present results for 212Pb, suggest that the recoil energy associated with the 212Bi and 212Po daughter nuclei plays little or no role in imparting biological damage to critical targets in the cell nucleus. PMID:7938477

  13. Measurement of the ionization produced by sub-keV silicon nuclear recoils in a CCD dark matter detector

    DOE PAGES

    Chavarria, A. E.; Collar, J. I.; Peña, J. R.; ...

    2016-10-15

    We report a measurement of the ionization efficiency of silicon nuclei recoiling with sub-keV kinetic energy in the bulk silicon of a charge-coupled device (CCD). Nuclear recoils are produced by low-energy neutrons (<24 keV) from a 124Sb–9Be photoneutron source, and their ionization signal is measured down to 60 eV electron equivalent. This energy range, previously unexplored, is relevant for the detection of low-mass dark matter particles. The measured efficiency is found to deviate from the extrapolation to low energies of the Lindhard model. Furthermore, this measurement also demonstrates the sensitivity to nuclear recoils of CCDs employed by DAMIC, a darkmore » matter direct detection experiment located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory.« less

  14. Measurement of the ionization produced by sub-keV silicon nuclear recoils in a CCD dark matter detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chavarria, A. E.; Collar, J. I.; Peña, J. R.; Privitera, P.; Robinson, A. E.; Scholz, B.; Sengul, C.; Zhou, J.; Estrada, J.; Izraelevitch, F.; Tiffenberg, J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Machado, D. Torres

    2016-10-15

    We report a measurement of the ionization efficiency of silicon nuclei recoiling with sub-keV kinetic energy in the bulk silicon of a charge-coupled device (CCD). Nuclear recoils are produced by low-energy neutrons (<24 keV) from a 124Sb–9Be photoneutron source, and their ionization signal is measured down to 60 eV electron equivalent. This energy range, previously unexplored, is relevant for the detection of low-mass dark matter particles. The measured efficiency is found to deviate from the extrapolation to low energies of the Lindhard model. Furthermore, this measurement also demonstrates the sensitivity to nuclear recoils of CCDs employed by DAMIC, a dark matter direct detection experiment located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory.

  15. Relevance of the second law of thermodynamics to energy conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the potential relevance of the use of analytical tools based on the Second Law of thermodynamics to existing federal programs for energy conservation in the industrial, transportation, buildings, and utility sectors in the US. (LCL)

  16. Heavy ion recoil spectrometry of barium strontium titanate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannard, W. B.; Johnston, P. N.; Walker, S. R.; Bubb, I. F.; Scott, J. F.; Cohen, D. D.; Dytlewski, N.; Martin, J. W.

    1995-05-01

    Thin films of barium strontium titanate have been analysed using heavy ion recoil spectrometry with 77 and 98 MeV 127I ions at the new heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. New calibration procedures have been developed for quantitative analysis. Energy spectra for each of the elements present reveal interdiffusion that was not previously known.

  17. Neutron Fluence and Energy Reconstruction with the LNE-IRSN/MIMAC Recoil Detector MicroTPC at 27 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Maire, D.; Lebreton, L.; Querre, Ph.; Bosson, G.; Guillaudin, O.; Muraz, J.F.; Riffard, Q.; Santos, D.

    2015-07-01

    The French Institute for Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), designated by the French Metrology Institute (LNE) for neutron metrology, is developing a time projection chamber using a Micromegas anode: microTPC. This work is carried out in collaboration with the Laboratory of Subatomic Physics and Cosmology (LPSC). The aim is to characterize the energy distribution of neutron fluence in the energy range 8 keV - 5 MeV with a primary procedure. The time projection chambers are gaseous detectors able to measure charged particles energy and to reconstruct their track if a pixelated anode is used. In our case, the gas is used as a (n, p) converter in order to detect neutrons down to few keV. Coming from elastic collisions with neutrons, recoil protons lose a part of their kinetic energy by ionizing the gas. The ionization electrons are drifted toward a pixelated anode (2D projection), read at 50 MHz by a self-triggered electronic system to obtain the third track dimension. The neutron energy is reconstructed event by event thanks to proton scattering angle and proton energy measurements. The scattering angle is deduced from the 3D track. The proton energy is obtained by charge collection measurements, knowing the ionization quenching factor (i.e. the part of proton kinetic energy lost by ionizing the gas). The fluence is calculated thanks to the detected events number and the simulation of the detector response. The μTPC is a new reliable detector able to measure energy distribution of the neutron fluence without unfolding procedure or prior neutron calibration contrary to usual gaseous counters. The microTPC is still being developed and measurements have been carried out at the AMANDE facility, with neutrons energies going from 8 keV to 565 keV. After the context and the μ-TPC working principle presentation, measurements of the neutron energy and fluence at 27 keV and 144 keV are shown and compared to the complete detector response simulation. This work

  18. Neutron fluence and energy reconstruction with the IRSN recoil detector μ-TPC at 27 keV, 144 keV and 565 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Maire, D.; Lebreton, L.; Richer, J.P.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Guillaudin, O.; Riffard, Q.; Santos, D.

    2015-07-01

    The French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), associated to the French Metrology Institute (LNE), is developing a time projection chamber using a Micromegas anode: μ-TPC. This work is carried out in collaboration with the Laboratory of Subatomic Physics and Cosmology (LPSC). The aim is to characterize with a primary procedure the energy distribution of neutron fluence in the energy range 8 keV - 1 MeV. The time projection chambers are gaseous detectors, which are able to measure charged particles energy and to reconstruct their track if a pixelated anode is used. In our case, the gas is used as a (n, p) converter in order to detect neutrons down to few keV. Coming from elastic collisions with neutrons, recoil protons lose a part of their kinetic energy by ionizing the gas. The ionization electrons are drifted toward a pixelated anode (2D projection), read at 50 MHz by a self-triggered electronic system to obtain the third track dimension. The neutron energy is reconstructed event by event thanks to proton scattering angle and proton energy measurements. The scattering angle is deduced from the 3D track. The proton energy is obtained by charge collection measurements, knowing the ionization quenching factor (i.e. the part of proton kinetic energy lost by ionizing the gas). The fluence is calculated thanks to the detected events number and the simulated detector response. The μ-TPC is a new reliable detector which enables to measure energy distribution of the neutron fluence without deconvolution or neutron calibration contrary to usual gaseous counters. The μ-TPC is still being developed and measurements have been carried out at the AMANDE facility, with neutrons energies going from 8 keV to 565 keV. After the context and the μ-TPC working principle presentation, measurements of the neutron energy and fluence at 27.2 keV, 144 keV and 565 keV are shown and compared to the complete detector simulation. This work shows the first direct

  19. Measurement of the 17 O(p,γ)18F reaction rate at astrophysically relevant energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, U.; Buchmann, L.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Fulton, B. R.; Galinski, N.; Greife, U.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Ottewell, D.; Rojas, A.; Ruiz, C.; Setoodehnia, K.

    2012-03-01

    The 17O(p,γ)18F reaction plays an important role in hydrogen-burning nucleosynthesis. Conflicting values for the low-energy behavior of its cross section exist in the literature. We present direct measurements of the astrophysical S factor of the 17O(p,γ)18F reaction at center-of-mass energies between 250 and 500 keV. These measurements were conducted in inverse kinematics at the DRAGON recoil separator.

  20. Recoil polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Polarization observables in photon-induced meson production off nucleons have long been recognized to hold the promise of a detailed understanding of the excited states in the excitation spectrum of the nucleon. Photon beam and proton target polarization are routinely used at the ELSA facility in the Crystal Barrel/TAPS experiment and have yielded a wealth of data on contributing partial waves and nucleon resonances. A detector study on how to complement these ongoing studies by recoil polarization measurements that offer an orthogonal approach with otherwise unmeasurable observables in the field of non-strange meson photoproduction has been performed. Building on experience with silicon detectors operated in the photon beamline environment, first possible layouts of Si detector telescopes for recoil protons were developed. Various geometries, e.g. Archimedean spiral design of annular sensors, sector shapes and rectangular sensors were studied and have been used during test measurements. A prototype for the recoil polarimeter was built and subjected to performance tests in protonproton scattering at the COSY-accelerator in Jülich.

  1. The XENON100 Dark Matter Experiment: Design, Construction, Calibration and 2010 Search Results with Improved Measurement of the Scintillation Response of Liquid Xenon to Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Guillaume

    An impressive array of astrophysical observations suggest that 83% of the matter in the universe is in a form of non-luminous, cold, collisionless, non-baryonic dark matter. Several extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics aimed at solving the hierarchy problem predict stable weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) that could naturally have the right cosmological relic abundance today to compose most of the dark matter if their interactions with normal matter are on the order of a weak scale cross section. These candidates also have the added benefit that their properties and interaction rates can be computed in a well defined particle physics model. A considerable experimental effort is currently under way to uncover the nature of dark matter. One method of detecting WIMP dark matter is to look for its interactions in terrestrial detectors where it is expected to scatter off nuclei. In 2007, the XENON10 experiment took the lead over the most sensitive direct detection dark matter search in operation, the CDMS II experiment, by probing spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction cross sections down to sigmachi N ˜ 5 x 10-44 cm 2 at 30 GeV/c2. Liquefied noble gas detectors are now among the technologies at the forefront of direct detection experiments. Liquid xenon (LXe), in particular, is a well suited target for WIMP direct detection. It is easily scalable to larger target masses, allows discrimination between nuclear recoils and electronic recoils, and has an excellent stopping power to shield against external backgrounds. A particle losing energy in LXe creates both ionization electrons and scintillation light. In a dual-phase LXe time projection chamber (TPC) the ionization electrons are drifted and extracted into the gas phase where they are accelerated to amplify the charge signal into a proportional scintillation signal. These two signals allow the three-dimensional localization of events with millimeter precision and the ability to

  2. Interpreting Recoil for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsayed, Tarek A.

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of recoil is usually explained to students in the context of Newton's third law. Typically, when a projectile is fired, the recoil of the launch mechanism is interpreted as a reaction to the ejection of the smaller projectile. The same phenomenon is also interpreted in the context of the conservation of linear momentum, which is…

  3. Australian Science and Technology with Relevance to Beamed Energy Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, H. David

    2008-04-01

    Although Australia has no Beamed Energy Propulsion programs at the present time, it is accomplishing significant scientific and technological activity that is of potential relevance to Beamed Energy Propulsion (BEP). These activities include: continual upgrading and enhancement of the Woomera Test Facility, Which is ideal for development and test of high power laser or microwave systems and the flight vehicles they would propel; collaborative development and test, with the US and UK of hypersonic missiles that embody many features needed by beam-propelled flight vehicles; hypersonic air breathing propulsion systems that embody inlet-engine-nozzle features needed for beam-riding agility by air breathing craft; and research on specially conditioned EM fields that could reduce beamed energy lost during atmospheric propagation.

  4. A Study of Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber for the Direct Detection of WIMP Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Huajie

    2014-11-01

    Robust results of WIMP direct detection experiments depend on rm understandings of nuclear recoils in the detector media. This thesis documents the most comprehensive study to date on nuclear recoils in liquid argon - a strong candidate for the next generation multi-ton scale WIMP detectors. This study investigates both the energy partition from nuclear recoil energy to secondary modes (scintillation and ionization) and the pulse shape characteristics of scintillation from nuclear recoils.

  5. Cavity cooling below the recoil limit.

    PubMed

    Wolke, Matthias; Klinner, Julian; Keßler, Hans; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2012-07-06

    Conventional laser cooling relies on repeated electronic excitations by near-resonant light, which constrains its area of application to a selected number of atomic species prepared at moderate particle densities. Optical cavities with sufficiently large Purcell factors allow for laser cooling schemes, avoiding these limitations. Here, we report on an atom-cavity system, combining a Purcell factor above 40 with a cavity bandwidth below the recoil frequency associated with the kinetic energy transfer in a single photon scattering event. This lets us access a yet-unexplored regime of atom-cavity interactions, in which the atomic motion can be manipulated by targeted dissipation with sub-recoil resolution. We demonstrate cavity-induced heating of a Bose-Einstein condensate and subsequent cooling at particle densities and temperatures incompatible with conventional laser cooling.

  6. Inverse Kinematics Studies of Intermediate-Energy Reactions Relevant for SEE and Medical Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Aichelin, J.; Bargholtz, Ch.; Geren, L.; Tegner, P.-E.; Zartova, I.; Blomgren, J.; Olsson, N.; Budzanowski, A.; Czech, B.; Skwirczynska, I.; Chubarov, M.; Lozhkin, O.; Murin, Yu.; Pljuschev, V.; Zubkov, M.; Ekstroem, C.; Kolozhvari, A.; Persson, H.; Westerberg, L.; Jakobsson, B.

    2005-05-24

    The lack of systematic experimental checks on the intermediate-energy nuclear model simulations of heavily ionizing recoils from nucleon-nucleus collisions -- critical inputs for the Single Event Effect analysis of microelectronics and dosimetry calculations including high-LET components in the cancer tumor radiation therapy -- has been a primary motivation for a new experiment planned at the CELSIUS nuclear storage ring of The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden. Details of the experiment and the first results from a feasibility study are presented here.

  7. The Electron Recoil Response of the XENON1T Dark Matter Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shockley, Evan; Xenon1T Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    XENON1T employs a two-phase xenon TPC to search for dark matter by detecting scintillation light produced by nuclear recoils in a 2 ton active volume of liquid xenon. However, nuclear recoils are not the only recoils that can occur since radiogenic electronic recoils are possible. Our only way of differentiating nuclear and electronic recoils is by comparing the relative fraction of scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) signals. For the first Science Run of XENON1T, we must understand the response of our detector to S1 and S2 signals at the low keV energies where dark matter will present itself. Therefore, I will be discussing the current understanding of our signal and detection mechanisms at these energies. This work includes work using sources such as the Rn220 technique developed by XENON collaborators for understanding our rejection of electronic recoils.

  8. Stopping Power of Au for Ti Using Elastic Recoil Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, R.; Freire, J. A.; Ribas, R. V.; Medina, N. H.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Seale, W. A.; Cybulska, E. W.; Wiedemann, K. T.; Allegro, P. R.; Toufen, D. L.

    2009-06-03

    The slowing down of heavy ions in matter is still not well understood especially at low energies (<0.5 MeV/u). In this contribution we present new experimental data for the stopping power of Au for Ti ions using an elastic recoil technique where a heavy-ion beam at low energies is produced by elastic scattering of an energetic primary beam imping on a thin target. Atoms from the target recoil at low energies. We compare our experimental data with previous data and with semi-empirical and theoretical models.

  9. Recoil ion charge state distribution following the beta(sup +) decay of {sup 21}Na

    SciTech Connect

    Scielzo, Nicholas D.; Freedman, Stuart J.; Fujikawa, Brian K.; Vetter, Paul A.

    2003-01-03

    The charge state distribution following the positron decay of 21Na has been measured, with a larger than expected fraction of the daughter 21Ne in positive charge states. No dependence on either the positron or recoil nucleus energy is observed. The data is compared to a simple model based on the sudden approximation. Calculations suggest a small but important contribution from recoil ionization has important consequences for precision beta decay correlation experiments detecting recoil ions.

  10. Recoil-α-fission and recoil-α-α-fission events observed in the reaction 48Ca + 243Am

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, U.; Rudolph, D.; Andersson, L.-L.; Di Nitto, A.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Fahlander, C.; Gates, J. M.; Golubev, P.; Gregorich, K. E.; Gross, C. J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Heßberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kratz, J. V.; Rykaczewski, K.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Schädel, M.; Yakushev, A.; Åberg, S.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Brand, H.; Carlsson, B. G.; Cox, D.; Derkx, X.; Dobaczewski, J.; Eberhardt, K.; Even, J.; Gerl, J.; Jäger, E.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Mistry, A.; Mokry, C.; Nazarewicz, W.; Nitsche, H.; Omtvedt, J. P.; Papadakis, P.; Ragnarsson, I.; Runke, J.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Shi, Yue; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Torres, T.; Traut, T.; Trautmann, N.; Türler, A.; Ward, A.; Ward, D. E.; Wiehl, N.

    2016-09-01

    Products of the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am were studied with the TASISpec set-up at the gas-filled separator TASCA at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany. Amongst the detected thirty correlated α-decay chains associated with the production of element Z = 115, two recoil-α-fission and five recoil- α- α-fission events were observed. The latter five chains are similar to four such events reported from experiments performed at the Dubna gas-filled separator, and three such events reported from an experiment at the Berkeley gas-filled separator. The four chains observed at the Dubna gas-filled separator were assigned to start from the 2n-evaporation channel 289115 due to the fact that these recoil- α- α-fission events were observed only at low excitation energies. Contrary to this interpretation, we suggest that some of these recoil- α- α-fission decay chains, as well as some of the recoil- α- α-fission and recoil-α-fission decay chains reported from Berkeley and in this article, start from the 3n-evaporation channel 288115.

  11. Energy efficiency in waste-to-energy and its relevance with regard to climate control.

    PubMed

    Ragossnig, Arne M; Wartha, Christian; Kirchner, Andreas

    2008-02-01

    This article focuses on systematically highlighting the ways to optimize waste-to-energy plants in terms of their energy efficiency as an indicator of the positive effect with regard to climate control. Potentials for increasing energy efficiency are identified and grouped into categories. The measures mentioned are illustrated by real-world examples. As an example, district cooling as a means for increasing energy efficiency in the district heating network of Vienna is described. Furthermore a scenario analysis shows the relevance of energy efficiency in waste management scenarios based on thermal treatment of waste with regard to climate control. The description is based on a model that comprises all relevant processes from the collection and transportation up to the thermal treatment of waste. The model has been applied for household-like commercial waste. The alternatives compared are a combined heat and power incinerator, which is being introduced in many places as an industrial utility boiler or in metropolitan areas where there is a demand for district heating and a classical municipal solid waste incinerator producing solely electrical power. For comparative purposes a direct landfilling scenario has been included in the scenario analysis. It is shown that the energy efficiency of thermal treatment facilities is crucial to the quantity of greenhouse gases emitted.

  12. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, Scott M.

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS~II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for "background-free'' operation of CDMS~II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space. These results, like any others, are subject to a variety of systematic effects that may alter their final interpretations. A primary focus of this dissertation will be difficulties in precisely calibrating the energy scale for nuclear recoil events like those from WIMPs. Nuclear recoils have suppressed ionization signals relative to electron recoils of the same recoil energy, so the response of the detectors is calibrated differently for each recoil type. The overall normalization and linearity of the energy scale for electron recoils in CDMS~II detectors is clearly established by peaks of known gamma energy in the ionization spectrum of calibration data from a 133Ba source. This electron-equivalent keVee) energy scale enables calibration of the total phonon signal (keVt) by enforcing unity

  13. Calculation of recoil implantation profiles using known range statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, C. D.; Avila, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A method has been developed to calculate the depth distribution of recoil atoms that result from ion implantation onto a substrate covered with a thin surface layer. The calculation includes first order recoils considering projected range straggles, and lateral straggles of recoils but neglecting lateral straggles of projectiles. Projectile range distributions at intermediate energies in the surface layer are deduced from look-up tables of known range statistics. A great saving of computing time and human effort is thus attained in comparison with existing procedures. The method is used to calculate recoil profiles of oxygen from implantation of arsenic through SiO2 and of nitrogen from implantation of phosphorus through Si3N4 films on silicon. The calculated recoil profiles are in good agreement with results obtained by other investigators using the Boltzmann transport equation and they also compare very well with available experimental results in the literature. The deviation between calculated and experimental results is discussed in relation to lateral straggles. From this discussion, a range of surface layer thickness for which the method applies is recommended.

  14. Nuclear Recoil Calibration of DarkSide-50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edkins, Erin; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    DarkSide-50 dark matter experiment is a liquid argon time projection chamber (TPC) surrounded by a liquid scintillator active neutron veto, designed for the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The success of such an experiment is dependent upon a detailed understanding of both the expected signal and backgrounds, achieved using radioactive calibration sources of known energies. Nuclear recoils provide a measurement of both the expected signal and the most dangerous background, as nuclear recoils from neutrons cannot be distinguished from a dark matter signal on an event-by-event basis in the TPC. In this talk, I will present the DS-50 calibration system, and analysis of the results of the calibration of DarkSide-50 to nuclear recoils using radioactive neutron sources. See also the DS-50 presentations by X. Xiang and G. Koh.

  15. Four pi-recoil proportional counter used as neutron spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, E. F.

    1968-01-01

    Study considers problems encountered in using 4 pi-recoil counters for neutron spectra measurement. Emphasis is placed on calibration, shape discrimination, variation of W, the average energy loss per ion pair, and the effects of differentiation on the intrinsic counter resolution.

  16. Recoil-decay tagging spectroscopy of 74162W88

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. J.; Cederwall, B.; Bäck, T.; Qi, C.; Doncel, M.; Jakobsson, U.; Auranen, K.; Bönig, S.; Drummond, M. C.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.; HerzáÅ, A.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Leino, M.; McPeake, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Page, R. D.; Pakarinen, J.; Partanen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Sayǧı, B.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Taylor, M. J.; Thornthwaite, A.; Uusitalo, J.; Xiao, Z. G.

    2015-07-01

    Excited states in the highly neutron-deficient nucleus 162W have been investigated via the 92Mo (78Kr,2α ) 162W reaction. Prompt γ rays were detected by the JUROGAM II high-purity germanium detector array and the recoiling fusion-evaporation products were separated by the recoil ion transport unit (RITU) gas-filled recoil separator and identified with the gamma recoil electron alpha tagging (GREAT) spectrometer at the focal plane of RITU. γ rays from 162W were identified uniquely using mother-daughter and mother-daughter-granddaughter α -decay correlations. The observation of a rotational-like ground-state band is interpreted within the framework of total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations, which suggest an axially symmetric ground-state shape with a γ -soft minimum at β2≈0.15 . Quasiparticle alignment effects are discussed based on cranked shell model calculations. New measurements of the 162W ground-state α -decay energy and half-life were also performed. The observed α -decay energy agrees with previous measurements. The half-life of 162W was determined to be t1 /2=990 (30 ) ms. This value deviates significantly from the currently adopted value of t1 /2=1360 (70 ) ms. In addition, the α -decay energy and half-life of 166Os were measured and found to agree with the adopted values.

  17. Regional characteristics relevant to advanced technology cogeneration development. [industrial energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    To assist DOE in establishing research and development funding priorities in the area of advanced energy conversion technoloy, researchers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory studied those specific factors within various regions of the country that may influence cogeneration with advanced energy conversion systems. Regional characteristics of advanced technology cogeneration possibilities are discussed, with primary emphasis given to coal derived fuels. Factors considered for the study were regional industry concentration, purchased fuel and electricity prices, environmental constraints, and other data of interest to industrial cogeneration.

  18. The shape effect of space debris on recoil impulse by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenglin; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Kunpeng

    2016-10-01

    Removing space debris by high-energy pulsed laser may be the most effective way to mitigate the threat posed by the increasing space debris. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes recoil impulse, which will lower the orbit perigee of space debris and accelerate the atmospheric capture. When the laser beam vertically irradiates a flat debris, it requires a certain laser fluence to reach the optimal impulse coupling, and the recoil impulse is parallel to the laser beam. However, the incident laser fluence varies in different parts of a non-flat surface. We have taken the shape effect into account to propose a numerical method of calculating the recoil impulse. Taking cylinder debris as the target, we have compared the recoil impulse in different laser fluences through simulation experiments, which implies that a higher laser fluence than the optimal one is needed to obtain a larger recoil impulse for irregularly shaped space debris.

  19. Plasma Time in Discriminating Nuclear Recoils in Germanium Detector for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Dongming; Barker, D'ann

    2012-10-01

    In the detection of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils with high-purity germanium detectors, CDMS-type bolometers are often used in measuring the ionization yield. For this technology, the detector is operated in the milli-Kelvin temperature range, which requires high priced detectors. Alternative electron/nuclear recoil discrimination using pulse shape has been widely utilized in the energy range of MeV in neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments with germanium detectors. However, the nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs are in the energy range of keV, and their pulse shape difference with electronic recoils in the same energy range has not proven to be visible in a commercially available germanium detector. This paper presents a new idea of using plasma time difference in pulse shape to discriminate nuclear recoils from electronic recoils. We show the plasma time difference as a function of nuclear recoil energy. The technique using plasma time will be discussed with a generic germanium detector.

  20. Retention studies of recoiling daughter nuclides of 225Ac in polymer vesicles.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; de Kruijff, R M; Rol, A; Thijssen, L; Mendes, E; Morgenstern, A; Bruchertseifer, F; Stuart, M C A; Wolterbeek, H T; Denkova, A G

    2014-02-01

    Alpha radionuclide therapy is steadily gaining importance and a large number of pre-clinical and clinical studies have been carried out. However, due to the recoil effects the daughter recoil atoms, most of which are alpha emitters as well, receive energies that are much higher than the energies of chemical bonds resulting in decoupling of the radionuclide from common targeting agents. Here, we demonstrate that polymer vesicles (i.e. polymersomes) can retain recoiling daughter nuclei based on an experimental study examining the retention of (221)Fr and (213)Bi when encapsulating (225)Ac.

  1. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Processes Relevant To Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael; Zaug, Joseph; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Radousky, Harry; Stavrou, Elissaios

    2016-10-01

    Carbon based materials have been proposed as candidates for the fabrication of plasma-facing components in the design of fusion energy devices. Although these components are not supposed to be in direct contact with the core fusion plasma, plasma instabilities and the harsh environment they are exposed to can cause the degradation of plasma-exposed components and the transfer of contaminants into the plasma followed by deposition of byproducts. In order to investigate the chemistry involved in these processes and to assist the development of models suitable to understand the long term consequences of the carbon ablation/deposition cycle, an inductively coupled plasma flow reactor (ICPFR) has been developed. The ICPFR allows the atomization of carbon containing precursors to high temperatures (in the order of 10000K) and the characterization of the gas and solid species formed downsteam from the plasma source through spectroscopic techniques. In parallel to the experimental analysis a comprehensive set of fluid dynamic and detailed kinetic simulations are used to analyze the data. The combination of these two approaches resulted in a validated and comprehensive chemical model for the formation of carbon deposits in carbon contaminated cooling plasmas. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Hands-on-Entropy, Energy Balance with Biological Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Entropy changes underlie the physics that dominates biological interactions. Indeed, introductory biology courses often begin with an exploration of the qualities of water that are important to living systems. However, one idea that is not explicitly addressed in most introductory physics or biology textbooks is important contribution of the entropy in driving fundamental biological processes towards equilibrium. From diffusion to cell-membrane formation, to electrostatic binding in protein folding, to the functioning of nerve cells, entropic effects often act to counterbalance deterministic forces such as electrostatic attraction and in so doing, allow for effective molecular signaling. A small group of biology, biophysics and computer science faculty have worked together for the past five years to develop curricular modules (based on SCALEUP pedagogy). This has enabled students to create models of stochastic and deterministic processes. Our students are first-year engineering and science students in the calculus-based physics course and they are not expected to know biology beyond the high-school level. In our class, they learn to reduce complex biological processes and structures in order model them mathematically to account for both deterministic and probabilistic processes. The students test these models in simulations and in laboratory experiments that are biologically relevant such as diffusion, ionic transport, and ligand-receptor binding. Moreover, the students confront random forces and traditional forces in problems, simulations, and in laboratory exploration throughout the year-long course as they move from traditional kinematics through thermodynamics to electrostatic interactions. This talk will present a number of these exercises, with particular focus on the hands-on experiments done by the students, and will give examples of the tangible material that our students work with throughout the two-semester sequence of their course on introductory

  3. Direct Measurement of Photon Recoil from a Levitated Nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vijay; Gieseler, Jan; Moritz, Clemens; Dellago, Christoph; Quidant, Romain; Novotny, Lukas

    2016-06-01

    The momentum transfer between a photon and an object defines a fundamental limit for the precision with which the object can be measured. If the object oscillates at a frequency Ω0 , this measurement backaction adds quanta ℏΩ0 to the oscillator's energy at a rate Γrecoil, a process called photon recoil heating, and sets bounds to coherence times in cavity optomechanical systems. Here, we use an optically levitated nanoparticle in ultrahigh vacuum to directly measure Γrecoil. By means of a phase-sensitive feedback scheme, we cool the harmonic motion of the nanoparticle from ambient to microkelvin temperatures and measure its reheating rate under the influence of the radiation field. The recoil heating rate is measured for different particle sizes and for different excitation powers, without the need for cavity optics or cryogenic environments. The measurements are in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions and provide valuable guidance for the realization of quantum ground-state cooling protocols and the measurement of ultrasmall forces.

  4. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Grubelich, Mark C.; Yonas, Gerold

    2017-01-03

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided by a cavitating venturi that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated.

  5. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Bechstedt, U.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Khoukaz, A.; Klehr, F.; Lehrach, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Stockmanns, T.; Täschner, A.; Wuestner, P.; Xu, H.

    2014-10-01

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment.

  6. The mechanics of elastic loading and recoil in anuran jumping.

    PubMed

    Astley, Henry C; Roberts, Thomas J

    2014-12-15

    Many animals use catapult mechanisms to produce extremely rapid movements for escape or prey capture, resulting in power outputs far beyond the limits of muscle. In these catapults, muscle contraction loads elastic structures, which then recoil to release the stored energy extremely rapidly. Many arthropods employ anatomical 'catch mechanisms' to lock the joint in place during the loading period, which can then be released to allow joint motion via elastic recoil. Jumping vertebrates lack a clear anatomical catch, yet face the same requirement to load the elastic structure prior to movement. There are several potential mechanisms to allow loading of vertebrate elastic structures, including the gravitational load of the body, a variable mechanical advantage, and moments generated by the musculature of proximal joints. To test these hypothesized mechanisms, we collected simultaneous 3D kinematics via X-ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology (XROMM) and single-foot forces during the jumps of three Rana pipiens. We calculated joint mechanical advantage, moment and power using inverse dynamics at the ankle, knee, hip and ilio-sacral joints. We found that the increasing proximal joint moments early in the jump allowed for high ankle muscle forces and elastic pre-loading, and the subsequent reduction in these moments allowed the ankle to extend using elastic recoil. Mechanical advantage also changed throughout the jump, with the muscle contracting against a poor mechanical advantage early in the jump during loading and a higher mechanical advantage late in the jump during recoil. These 'dynamic catch mechanisms' serve to resist joint motion during elastic loading, then allow it during elastic recoil, functioning as a catch mechanism based on the balance and orientation of forces throughout the limb rather than an anatomical catch.

  7. A telescope proton recoil spectrometer for fast neutron beam-lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Nocente, M.; Ansell, S.; Frost, C. D.; Gorini, G.

    2015-07-01

    Fast neutron measurements were performed on the VESUVIO beam-line at the ISIS spallation source using a new telescope proton recoil spectrometer. Neutrons interact on a plastic target. Proton production is mainly due to elastic scattering on hydrogen nuclei and secondly due to interaction with carbon nuclei. Recoil protons are measured by a proton spectrometer, which uses in coincidence a 2.54 cm thick YAP scintillator and a 500μm thick silicon detector, measuring the full proton recoil energy and the partial deposited energy in transmission, respectively. Recoil proton spectroscopy measurements (up to Ep = 60MeV) have been interpreted by using Monte Carlo simulations of the beam-line. This instrument is of particular interest for the characterization of the ChipIr beam-line at ISIS, which was designed to feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for the irradiation of micro-electronics.

  8. First measurement of the ionization yield of nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, T.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Bernstein, A.; Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Norman, E. B.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Rebassoo, Finn O.; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2014-05-01

    Liquid phase argon has long been used as a target medium for particle detection via scintillation light. Recently there has been considerable interest in direct detection of both hypothetical darkmatter particles and coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. These as-yet unobserved neutral particle interactions are expected to result in a recoiling argon atom O(keV), generally referred to in the literature as a nuclear recoil. This prompts the question of the available electromagnetic signal in a liquid argon detector. In this Letter we report the first measurement of the ionization yield (Qy), detected electrons per unit energy, resulting from nuclear recoils in liquid argon, measured at 6.7 keV. This is also the lowest energy measurement of nuclear recoils in liquid argon.

  9. Comparative study of Monte Carlo particle transport code PHITS and nuclear data processing code NJOY for recoil cross section spectra under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Because primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) create point defects and clusters in materials that are irradiated with neutrons, it is important to validate the calculations of recoil cross section spectra that are used to estimate radiation damage in materials. Here, the recoil cross section spectra of fission- and fusion-relevant materials were calculated using the Event Generator Mode (EGM) of the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) and also using the data processing code NJOY2012 with the nuclear data libraries TENDL2015, ENDF/BVII.1, and JEFF3.2. The heating number, which is the integral of the recoil cross section spectra, was also calculated using PHITS-EGM and compared with data extracted from the ACE files of TENDL2015, ENDF/BVII.1, and JENDL4.0. In general, only a small difference was found between the PKA spectra of PHITS + TENDL2015 and NJOY + TENDL2015. From analyzing the recoil cross section spectra extracted from the nuclear data libraries using NJOY2012, we found that the recoil cross section spectra were incorrect for 72Ge, 75As, 89Y, and 109Ag in the ENDF/B-VII.1 library, and for 90Zr and 55Mn in the JEFF3.2 library. From analyzing the heating number, we found that the data extracted from the ACE file of TENDL2015 for all nuclides were problematic in the neutron capture region because of incorrect data regarding the emitted gamma energy. However, PHITS + TENDL2015 can calculate PKA spectra and heating numbers correctly.

  10. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Grubelich, Mark C.; Yonas, Gerold

    2016-03-01

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  11. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Grubelich, Mark C; Yonas, Gerold

    2013-11-12

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  12. A Proton Recoil Telescope for Neutron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinausero, M.; Barbui, M.; Prete, G.; Rizzi, V.; Andrighetto, A.; Pesente, S.; Fabris, D.; Lunardon, M.; Nebbia, G.; Viesti, G.; Moretto, S.; Morando, M.; Zenoni, A.; Bocci, F.; Donzella, A.; Bonomi, G.; Fontana, A.

    2006-05-01

    The N2P research program funded by the INFN committee for Experimental Nuclear Physics (CSNIII) has among his goals the construction of a Proton Recoil Telescope (PRT), a detector to measure neutron energy spectra. The interest in such a detector is primarily related to the SPES project for rare beams production at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. For the SPES project it is, in fact, of fundamental importance to have reliable information about energy spectra and yield for neutrons produced by d or p projectiles on thick light targets to model the ''conversion target'' in which the p or d are converted in neutrons. These neutrons, in a second stage, will induce the Uranium fission in the ''production target''. The fission products are subsequently extracted, selected and re-accelerated to produce the exotic beam. The neutron spectra and angular distribution are important parameters to define the final production of fission fragments. In addition, this detector can be used to measure neutron spectra in the field of cancer therapy (this topic is nowadays of particular interest to INFN, for the National Centre for Hadron therapy (CNAO) in Pavia) and space applications.

  13. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  14. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield and scintillation pulse shape from nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Alexander, T.; Aprahamian, A.; Avetisyan, R.; Back, H. O.; Cocco, A. G.; Dejongh, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, Y.; Kendziora, C.; Lippincott, W. H.; Love, C.; Lyons, S.; Manenti, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meng, Y.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Olvitt, D.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Rossi, B.; Saldanha, R.; Sangiorgio, S.; Siegl, K.; Strauss, S. Y.; Tan, W.; Tatarowicz, J.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Yoo, J.; Scene Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V /cm . For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V /cm . We also report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from Krm83 internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni ) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  15. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  16. A Double Scattering Analytical Model For Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barradas, N. P.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.; Darakchieva, V.

    2011-06-01

    We present an analytical model for calculation of double scattering in elastic recoil detection measurements. Only events involving the beam particle and the recoil are considered, i.e. 1) an ion scatters off a target element and then produces a recoil, and 2) an ion produces a recoil which then scatters off a target element. Events involving intermediate recoils are not considered, i.e. when the primary ion produces a recoil which then produces a second recoil. If the recoil element is also present in the stopping foil, recoil events in the stopping foil are also calculated. We included the model in the standard code for IBA data analysis NDF, and applied it to the measurement of hydrogen in Si.

  17. On calibration of the response of liquid argon detectors to nuclear recoils using inelastic neutron scattering on 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polosatkin, S.; Grishnyaev, E.; Dolgov, A.

    2014-10-01

    A method for measuring of ionization and scintillation yields in liquid argon from recoils with particular energy—8.2 keV—is proposed. The method utilizes a process of inelastic scattering of monoenergetic neutrons produced by fusion DD neutron generator. Features of kinematics of inelastic scattering result in a sufficient (fifteen times) increase in count rate of useful events relative to a traditional scheme using elastic scattering with the same recoil energy and comparable energy resolution.

  18. Experimental status of 7Be production and destruction at astrophysical relevant energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Leva, A.; Gialanella, L.; Strieder, F.

    2016-01-01

    The production and destruction of 7Be plays a significant role in the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis as well as in the framework of the solar neutrino. The 3He(α, γ)7Be reaction cross sections has been measured several times in the last decades, but the precision achieved on reaction rate determinations at the relevant astrophysical energies is not yet satisfactory. The experimental status of this reaction will be critically reviewed, and the theoretical descriptions available will be discussed.

  19. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  20. Primary ion dependence of LiF direct recoil intensities and ion fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. N.; Shi, M.; Rabalais, J. W.

    1987-02-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of the scattered and recoiled particles resulting from 1-10 keV He+, Ne+, Ar+, Kr+, and Xe+ ions impingent on surfaces of LiF thin films have been obtained. Measurements of directly recoiled (DR) neutrals plus ions and neutrals alone are used to calculate positive and negative ion fractions Y+,- from DR events. The oppositely charged ion fractions have a distinctly different behavior as a function of kinetic energy. The Y+ values exhibit a threshold at low energy followed by a plateau region at higher energy while the Y- values are maximum in the low energy region followed by a decreasing yield as energy increases. The energy dependence of Y+,- is interpreted in terms of the recently developed model [J. Chem. Phys. 85, 3615 (1986)] for electronic charge exchange in keV ion/surface collisions which considers electron promotions in the close atomic encounter and resonant and Auger transitions along the outgoing trajectory. The ionization potential of the primary ion relative to the energy levels of the target atom is shown to have a large influence on charge exchange in the close encounter. The ratio of direct recoil to scattering particle flux increases by a factor of >102 from He to Xe; scattering and recoil cross sections are used to model this process.

  1. Optical recoil of asymmetric nano-optical antenna.

    PubMed

    Song, Jung-Hwan; Shin, Jonghwa; Lim, Hee-Jin; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2011-08-01

    We propose nano-optical antennas with asymmetric radiation patterns as light-driven mechanical recoil force generators. Directional antennas are found to generate recoil force efficiently when driven in the spectral proximity of their resonances. It is also shown that the recoil force is equivalent to the Poynting vector integrated over a closed sphere containing the antenna structures.

  2. Binding energies of nucleobase complexes: Relevance to homology recognition of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Sergio Cruz; Prentiss, Mara; Fyta, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The binding energies of complexes of DNA nucleobase pairs are evaluated using quantum mechanical calculations at the level of dispersion corrected density functional theory. We begin with Watson-Crick base pairs of singlets, duplets, and triplets and calculate their binding energies. At a second step, mismatches are incorporated into the Watson-Crick complexes in order to evaluate the variation in the binding energy with respect to the canonical Watson-Crick pairs. A linear variation of this binding energy with the degree of mismatching is observed. The binding energies for the duplets and triplets containing mismatches are further compared to the energies of the respective singlets in order to assess the degree of collectivity in these complexes. This study also suggests that mismatches do not considerably affect the energetics of canonical base pairs. Our work is highly relevant to the recognition process in DNA promoted through the RecA protein and suggests a clear distinction between recognition in singlets, and recognition in duplets or triplets. Our work assesses the importance of collectivity in the homology recognition of DNA.

  3. Revealing compressed stops using high-momentum recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, Sebastian; Park, Michael; Shih, David; Tweedie, Brock

    2016-03-01

    Searches for supersymmetric top quarks at the LHC have been making great progress in pushing sensitivity out to higher mass, but are famously plagued by gaps in coverage around lower-mass regions where the decay phase space is closing off. Within the common stop-NLSP/neutralino-LSP simplified model, the line in the mass plane where there is just enough phase space to produce an on-shell top quark remains almost completely unconstrained. Here, we show that is possible to define searches capable of probing a large patch of this difficult region, with S/B ˜ 1 and significances often well beyond 5 σ. The basic strategy is to leverage the large energy gain of LHC Run 2, leading to a sizable population of stop pair events recoiling against a hard jet. The recoil not only re-establishes a [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] signature, but also leads to a distinctive anti-correlation between the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] and the recoil jet transverse vectors when the stops decay all-hadronically. Accounting for jet combinatorics, backgrounds, and imperfections in [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] measurements, we estimate that Run 2 will already start to close the gap in exclusion sensitivity with the first few 10s of fb-1. By 300 fb-1, exclusion sensitivity may extend from stop masses of 550 GeV on the high side down to below 200 GeV on the low side, approaching the "stealth" point at {m}_{overline{t}}={m}_t and potentially overlapping with limits from toverline{t} cross section and spin correlation measurements.

  4. Revealing compressed stops using high-momentum recoils

    SciTech Connect

    Macaluso, Sebastian; Park, Michael; Shih, David; Tweedie, Brock

    2016-03-22

    In this study, searches for supersymmetric top quarks at the LHC have been making great progress in pushing sensitivity out to higher mass, but are famously plagued by gaps in coverage around lower-mass regions where the decay phase space is closing off. Within the common stop-NLSP/neutralino-LSP simplified model, the line in the mass plane where there is just enough phase space to produce an on-shell top quark remains almost completely unconstrained. Here, we show that is possible to define searches capable of probing a large patch of this difficult region, with S/B ~ 1 and significances often well beyond 5σ. The basic strategy is to leverage the large energy gain of LHC Run 2, leading to a sizable population of stop pair events recoiling against a hard jet. The recoil not only re-establishes a ET, but also leads to a distinctive anti-correlation between the ET and the recoil jet transverse vectors when the stops decay all-hadronically. Accounting for jet combinatorics, backgrounds, and imperfections in ET measurements, we estimate that Run 2 will already start to close the gap in exclusion sensitivity with the first few 10s of fb–1. By 300 fb–1, exclusion sensitivity may extend from stop masses of 550 GeV on the high side down to below 200 GeV on the low side, approaching the “stealth” point at m = mt and potentially overlapping with limits from tt¯ cross section and spin correlation measurements.

  5. Revealing compressed stops using high-momentum recoils

    DOE PAGES

    Macaluso, Sebastian; Park, Michael; Shih, David; ...

    2016-03-22

    In this study, searches for supersymmetric top quarks at the LHC have been making great progress in pushing sensitivity out to higher mass, but are famously plagued by gaps in coverage around lower-mass regions where the decay phase space is closing off. Within the common stop-NLSP/neutralino-LSP simplified model, the line in the mass plane where there is just enough phase space to produce an on-shell top quark remains almost completely unconstrained. Here, we show that is possible to define searches capable of probing a large patch of this difficult region, with S/B ~ 1 and significances often well beyond 5σ.more » The basic strategy is to leverage the large energy gain of LHC Run 2, leading to a sizable population of stop pair events recoiling against a hard jet. The recoil not only re-establishes a ET, but also leads to a distinctive anti-correlation between the ET and the recoil jet transverse vectors when the stops decay all-hadronically. Accounting for jet combinatorics, backgrounds, and imperfections in ET measurements, we estimate that Run 2 will already start to close the gap in exclusion sensitivity with the first few 10s of fb–1. By 300 fb–1, exclusion sensitivity may extend from stop masses of 550 GeV on the high side down to below 200 GeV on the low side, approaching the “stealth” point at mt¯ = mt and potentially overlapping with limits from tt¯ cross section and spin correlation measurements.« less

  6. Nuclear Recoil Cross Sections from Time-dependent Studies of Two-Photon Double Ionization of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, Daniel A.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2009-12-21

    We examine the sensitivity of nuclear recoil cross sections produced by two-photon double ionization of helium to the underlying triple differential cross sections (TDCS) used in their computation. We show that this sensitivity is greatest in the energy region just below the threshold for sequential double ionization. Accurate TDCS, extracted from non-perturbative solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, are used here in new computations of the nuclear recoil cross section.

  7. Sub-barrier reactions measured using a recoil mass separator

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Few data exist in the sub-barrier region for reaction channels other than fusion. In particular, our experimental knowledge of quasi-elastic transfer reactions is sparse, despite the belief that this particular channel may be dominant in determining some features of the sub-barrier fusion enhancement. Transfer reactions are governed primarily by the closet approach of the colliding nuclei which, at low energies, results in a strong backward peaking of the angular distribution in the center-of-mass frame. For situations where the projectile has a significant fraction of the target mass, as is so in most cases of interest, the backscattered projectile-like fragment has such low energy that the usual techniques of measurement and identification become invalid. Here, we report on a solution to this problem which allows a systematic study of many aspects of transfer reactions in the energy regime of interest. We exploit the fact that associated with the low-energy backscattered projectile-like fragment is a complementary target-like fragment which recoils to forward angles with a large fraction of the incident beam energy. These target-like fragments were detected and identified using the Daresbury Recoil Mass Separator thus allowing the measurement of quasi-elastic transfer over hitherto inaccessible energy range from the vicinity of the barrier to several tens of MeV below. The experiments described here used VYNi beams of energies ranging from 180 to 260 MeV provided by the Daresbury Laboratory Nuclear Structure Facility tandem accelerator. Data on sub-barrier transfer for targets of /sup 116,118,120,122,124/Sn and /sup 144,148,150,152,154/Sm were obtained. 16 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Blood lactate concentration after exposure to conducted energy weapons (including TASER® devices): is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Jauchem, James R

    2013-09-01

    In previous studies, blood lactate concentration (BLac) consistently increased in anesthetized animals and in human subjects after exposures to TASER(®) conducted energy weapons (CEWs). Some have suggested the increased BLac would have detrimental consequences. In the current review, the following are evaluated: (a) the nature of muscle contractions due to CEWs, (b) general aspects of increased BLac, (c) previous studies of conventional neuromuscular electrical stimulation and CEW exposures, and (d) BLac in disease states. On the basis of these analyses, one can conclude that BLac, per se (independent of acidemia), would not be clinically relevant immediately after short-duration CEW applications, due to the short time course of any increase.

  9. Relevance of deep-subsurface microbiology for underground gas storage and geothermal energy production.

    PubMed

    Gniese, Claudia; Bombach, Petra; Rakoczy, Jana; Hoth, Nils; Schlömann, Michael; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Krüger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives the reader an introduction into the microbiology of deep geological systems with a special focus on potential geobiotechnological applications and respective risk assessments. It has been known for decades that microbial activity is responsible for the degradation or conversion of hydrocarbons in oil, gas, and coal reservoirs. These processes occur in the absence of oxygen, a typical characteristic of such deep ecosystems. The understanding of the responsible microbial processes and their environmental regulation is not only of great scientific interest. It also has substantial economic and social relevance, inasmuch as these processes directly or indirectly affect the quantity and quality of the stored oil or gas. As outlined in the following chapter, in addition to the conventional hydrocarbons, new interest in such deep subsurface systems is rising for different technological developments. These are introduced together with related geomicrobiological topics. The capture and long-termed storage of large amounts of carbon dioxide, carbon capture and storage (CCS), for example, in depleted oil and gas reservoirs, is considered to be an important options to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and global warming. On the other hand, the increasing contribution of energy from natural and renewable sources, such as wind, solar, geothermal energy, or biogas production leads to an increasing interest in underground storage of renewable energies. Energy carriers, that is, biogas, methane, or hydrogen, are often produced in a nonconstant manner and renewable energy may be produced at some distance from the place where it is needed. Therefore, storing the energy after its conversion to methane or hydrogen in porous reservoirs or salt caverns is extensively discussed. All these developments create new research fields and challenges for microbiologists and geobiotechnologists. As a basis for respective future work, we introduce the three major topics, that is

  10. Discrimination of nuclear and electronic recoil events using plasma effect in germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.-Z.; Liu, J.; Mei, D.-M.

    2016-07-01

    We report a new method of using the plasma time difference, which results from the plasma effect, between the nuclear and electronic recoil events in high-purity germanium detectors to distinguish these two types of events in the search for rare physics processes. The physics mechanism of the plasma effect is discussed in detail. A numerical model is developed to calculate the plasma time for nuclear and electronic recoils at various energies in germanium detectors. It can be shown that under certain conditions the plasma time difference is large enough to be observable. The experimental aspects in realizing such a discrimination in germanium detectors is discussed.

  11. Polarization effects in recoil-induced resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazebnyi, D. B.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the field polarization on the amplitude of recoil-induced resonances (RIRs) is considered for laser-cooled free atoms and for atoms in a working magneto-optical trap (MOT). For all closed dipole transitions, explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the polarization dependence of the resonance amplitudes within a perturbation theory. Optimal polarization conditions are found for the observation of resonances.

  12. Study of nuclear recoils in liquid argon with monoenergetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenfus, C.; Allkofer, Y.; Amsler, C.; Creus, W.; Ferella, A.; Rochet, J.; Walter, M.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of developments for liquid argon dark matter detectors we assembled a laboratory setup to scatter neutrons on a small liquid argon target. The neutrons are produced mono-energetically (Ekin = 2.45 MeV) by nuclear fusion in a deuterium plasma and are collimated onto a 3" liquid argon cell operating in single-phase mode (zero electric field). Organic liquid scintillators are used to tag scattered neutrons and to provide a time-of-flight measurement. The setup is designed to study light pulse shapes and scintillation yields from nuclear and electronic recoils as well as from alpha particles at working points relevant for dark matter searches. Liquid argon offers the possibility to scrutinise scintillation yields in noble liquids with respect to the population strength of the two fundamental excimer states. Here we present experimental methods and first results from recent data towards such studies.

  13. Medium modifications with recoil polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, J.F.J. van den; Ent, R.

    1994-04-01

    The authors show that the virtual Compton scattering process allows for a precise study of the off-shell electron-nucleon vertex. In a separable model, they show the sensitivity to new unconstrained structure functions of the nucleon, beyond the usual Dirac and Pauli form factors. In addition, they show the sensitivity to bound nucleon form factors using the reaction 4He({rvec e},e{prime},{rvec p}){sup 3}H. A nucleon embedded in a nucleus represents a complex system. Firstly, the bound nucleon is necessarily off-shell and in principle a complete understanding of the dynamical structure of the nucleon is required in order to calculate its off-shell electromagnetic interaction. Secondly, one faces the possibility of genuine medium effects, such as for example quark-exchange contributions. Furthermore, the electromagnetic coupling to the bound nucleon is dependent on the nuclear dynamics through the self-energy of the nucleon in the nuclear medium.

  14. Complex decay patterns in atomic core photoionization disentangled by ion-recoil measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemin, Renaud; Bomme, Cedric; Marin, Thierry; Journel, Loic; Marchenko, Tatiana; Kushawaha, Rajesh K.; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc; Trcera, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    Following core 1s ionization and resonant excitation of argon atoms, we measure the recoil energy of the ions due to momentum conservation during the emission of Auger electrons. We show that such ion momentum spectroscopy can be used to disentangle to some degree complex decay patterns, involving both radiative and nonradiative decays.

  15. Study of hot electron spatial energy deposition in spherical targets relevant to shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu; Wei, M. S.; Krauland, C.; Reynolds, H.; Hoppe, M.; Peebles, J.; Beg, F. N.; Theobald, W.; Borwick, E.; Li, J.; Ren, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Betti, R.; Campbell, M.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding hot electron generation and coupling is important for the high-intensity shock ignition (SI) inertial confinement fusion concept. Recent hard x-ray experimental data from a SI-relevant platform on OMEGA-60 suggest that <100 keV hot electrons may augment shock pressure by depositing their energy in the solid density region behind the ablation front. These results deduced from simulation are convincing support for electron assisted SI. To further investigate beneficial hot electron characteristics from both high intensity UV and IR lasers in this relevant regime, we performed a joint OMEGA-60/OMEGA EP experiment in the spherical geometry. 60 UV laser beams (18 kJ, 1.8 ns, up to 1015 W/cm2) irradiated a low-density Cu foam ball target with a CH ablator followed by a single IR short pulse laser (2.6 kJ, 100 ps, 1017 W/cm2) at various delays. The electron spatial energy deposition was diagnosed via imaging Cu K α emission with a spherical crystal imager; total K α photon yield and bremsstrahlung radiation were also measured to infer electron spectra. Experimental results are compared with radiation hydrodynamic modeling and will be presented at the meeting. Work supported by the U.S. DOE under contracts DE-NA0002730 (NLUF) and DE-SC0014666.

  16. A Measurement of the Recoil Polarization of Electroproduced Λ(1116)

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, Simeon B.

    2002-01-01

    The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory was used to study the reaction e + p → e' + K+ + Λ(1116) for events where Λ(1116) subsequently decayed via the channel Λ(1116) → p + π-. Data were taken at incident electron beam energies of 2.5, 4.0, and 4.2 GeV during the 1999 E1C run period. They hyperon production spectra span the Q2 range from 0.5 to 2.8 GeV2 and nearly the entire range in the center of mass angles. The proton angular distribution in the Λ(1116) rest frame is used to deduce the recoil polarization of the hyperon, and the W and cos θ$K+\\atop{cm}$ dependence of the recoil polarization will be presented. The data show sizeable negative polarizations for the Λ(1116) as a function of both cos θ$K+\\atop{cm}$ and W.

  17. Energy-Water Nexus Relevant to Baseload Electricity Source Including Mini/Micro Hydropower Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M.; Tanabe, S.; Yamada, M.

    2014-12-01

    Water, food and energy is three sacred treasures that are necessary for human beings. However, recent factors such as population growth and rapid increase in energy consumption have generated conflicting cases between water and energy. For example, there exist conflicts caused by enhanced energy use, such as between hydropower generation and riverine ecosystems and service water, between shale gas and ground water, between geothermal and hot spring water. This study aims to provide quantitative guidelines necessary for capacity building among various stakeholders to minimize water-energy conflicts in enhancing energy use. Among various kinds of renewable energy sources, we target baseload sources, especially focusing on renewable energy of which installation is required socially not only to reduce CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions but to stimulate local economy. Such renewable energy sources include micro/mini hydropower and geothermal. Three municipalities in Japan, Beppu City, Obama City and Otsuchi Town are selected as primary sites of this study. Based on the calculated potential supply and demand of micro/mini hydropower generation in Beppu City, for example, we estimate the electricity of tens through hundreds of households is covered by installing new micro/mini hydropower generation plants along each river. However, the result is based on the existing infrastructures such as roads and electric lines. This means that more potentials are expected if the local society chooses options that enhance the infrastructures to increase micro/mini hydropower generation plants. In addition, further capacity building in the local society is necessary. In Japan, for example, regulations by the river law and irrigation right restrict new entry by actors to the river. Possible influences to riverine ecosystems in installing new micro/mini hydropower generation plants should also be well taken into account. Deregulation of the existing laws relevant to rivers and

  18. Calibration of a compact magnetic proton recoil neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Guoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Qiu, Suizheng; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jinliang; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Yang, Shaohua

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer is considered as a powerful instrument to measure deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron spectrum, as it is currently used in inertial confinement fusion facilities and large Tokamak devices. The energy resolution (ER) and neutron detection efficiency (NDE) are the two most important parameters to characterize a neutron spectrometer. In this work, the ER calibration for the MPR spectrometer was performed by using the HI-13 tandem accelerator at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), and the NDE calibration was performed by using the neutron generator at CIAE. The specific calibration techniques used in this work and the associated accuracies were discussed in details in this paper. The calibration results were presented along with Monte Carlo simulation results.

  19. Research on noneconomic factors relevant to the diffusion of solar total energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, L. G.; Bronfman, L. M.

    1980-08-01

    The policy uses of some of the concepts and models found in diffusion of innovation literatures other than those of economics and marketing were reviewed and evaluated. The results of this review were applied to the specific case of a Solar Total Energy System (STES). The research effort had three parts. The first part was to identify and obtain an overview of the noneconomics social science literature relevant to the problem of forecasting and accelerating adoption rates. After the first part was completed and the principal research perspectives and researchers in the field were identified, a workshop of experts was organized to address the problem of predicting and accelerating diffusion rates for STESs. Finally, the results of the literature review and the workshop are summarized, and a number of approaches suggested by the diffusion literature are used to obtain an evaluation of the adoption potential of STES.

  20. Alpha and recoil track detection in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)—Towards a method for in vitro assessment of radiopharmaceuticals internalized in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Myhra, S. Chakalova, R.; Falzone, N.

    2014-03-15

    A method for detection and characterization of single MeV α-particle and recoil tracks in PMMA photoresist by atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis has been demonstrated. The energy deposition along the track is shown to lead to a latent pattern in the resist due to contrast reversal. It has been shown that the pattern, consisting of conical spikes, can be developed by conventional processing as a result of the dissolution rate of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) being greater than that for the modified material in the cylindrical volume of the track core. The spikes can be imaged and counted by routine AFM analysis. Investigations by angular-resolved near-grazing incidence reveal additional tracks that correspond to recoil tracks. The observations have been correlated with modelling, and shown to be in qualitative agreement with prevailing descriptions of collision cascades. The results may be relevant to technologies that are based on detection and characterization of single energetic ions. In particular, the direct visualization of the collision cascade may allow more accurate estimates of the actual interaction volume, which in turn will permit more precise assessment of dose distribution of α-emitting radionuclides used for targeted radiotherapy. The results could also be relevant to other diagnostic or process technologies based on interaction of energetic ions with matter.

  1. The relevance of rooftops: Analyzing the microscale surface energy balance in the Chicago region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Radhika

    interior through the roof, and the physical properties of the surface. These results hold particular relevance for urban heat island mitigation strategies. Based on the results of this work, recommendations are proposed for widespread adoption of various techniques that enhance building energy efficiency (particularly targeting rooftops), mitigate the negative impacts of the urban heat island, and overcome the current barriers to transforming the market.

  2. Recoil Considerations for Shoulder-Fired Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    2012) Steyr 15.2 mm 35 g 1450 m/s 39.6 lb 11.4 Burns (2012) Type 97 (Japanese) 20 mm 162 g 790 m/s 130 lb 28.7 Burns (2012) 12HB00 ( Remington ...shotgun 0.727 in 807 gr (12 × 00) 1225 ft/s 7.0 lb 4.37 Remington (2011) Remington Express 12B0 shotgun 0.727 in 580 gr (12 × 0) 1275 ft/s...7.0 lb 3.28 Remington 5 Table 3. Recoil-related characteristics of selected shoulder-fired weapons cited in table 1. Nomenclature

  3. Optimal Control of Active Recoil Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    forces from 25 to 2.5% for lower zones and cavitation was avoided for zone 8. Tachometer feedback was shown to be effective for low zones. The...concept of feedback control system coupled with optimization procedure to design recoil mechanisms was demonstrated to be an efficient and very effective ...122o •nl260 .01300 .01340 .01380 • ouzo #01460 •01500 •01540 •01580 •0162" .0166 i 309o,6 504P.6 9964.5 10075,9 39121.5 75397.3

  4. Neutron electric form factor via recoil polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Madey, Richard; Semenov, Andrei; Taylor, Simon; Aghalaryan, Aram; Crouse, Erick; MacLachlan, Glen; Plaster, Bradley; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Tireman, William; Yan, Chenyu; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Anderson, Brian; Asaturyan, Razmik; Baker, O; Baldwin, Alan; Breuer, Herbert; Carlini, Roger; Christy, Michael; Churchwell, Steve; Cole, Leon; Danagoulian, Samuel; Day, Donal; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Fenker, Howard; Finn, John; Gan, Liping; Garrow, Kenneth; Gueye, Paul; Howell, Calvin; Hu, Bitao; Jones, Mark; Kelly, James; Keppel, Cynthia; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Wooyoung; Kowalski, Stanley; Lung, Allison; Mack, David; Manley, D; Markowitz, Pete; Mitchell, Joseph; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Opper, Allena; Perdrisat, Charles; Punjabi, Vina; Raue, Brian; Reichelt, Tilmann; Reinhold, Joerg; Roche, Julie; Sato, Yoshinori; Seo, Wonick; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Stepanyan, Samuel; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Tang, Liguang; Ulmer, Paul; Vulcan, William; Watson, John; Wells, Steven; Wesselmann, Frank; Wood, Stephen; Yan, Chen; Yang, Seunghoon; Yuan, Lulin; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Zhu, Hong Guo; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2003-05-01

    The ratio of the electric to the magnetic form factor of the neutron, G_En/G_Mn, was measured via recoil polarimetry from the quasielastic d({pol-e},e'{pol-n)p reaction at three values of Q^2 [viz., 0.45, 1.15 and 1.47 (GeV/c)^2] in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Preliminary data indicate that G_En follows the Galster parameterization up to Q^2 = 1.15 (GeV/c)^2 and appears to rise above the Galster parameterization at Q^2 = 1.47 (GeV/c)^2.

  5. The ecological relevance of sleep: the trade-off between sleep, memory and energy conservation.

    PubMed

    Roth, Timothy C; Rattenborg, Niels C; Pravosudov, Vladimir V

    2010-03-27

    All animals in which sleep has been studied express signs of sleep-like behaviour, suggesting that sleep must have some fundamental functions that are sustained by natural selection. Those functions, however, are still not clear. Here, we examine the ecological relevance of sleep from the perspective of behavioural trade-offs that might affect fitness. Specifically, we highlight the advantage of using food-caching animals as a system in which a conflict might occur between engaging in sleep for memory/learning and hypothermia/torpor to conserve energy. We briefly review the evidence for the importance of sleep for memory, the importance of memory for food-caching animals and the conflicts that might occur between sleep and energy conservation in these animals. We suggest that the food-caching paradigm represents a naturalistic and experimentally practical system that provides the opportunity for a new direction in sleep research that will expand our understanding of sleep, especially within the context of ecological and evolutionary processes.

  6. (Bio)Chemical Tailoring of Biogenic 3-D Nanopatterned Templates with Energy-Relevant Functionalities

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhage, Kenneth H; Kroger, Nils

    2014-09-08

    The overall aim of this research has been to obtain fundamental understanding of (bio)chemical methodologies that will enable utilization of the unique 3-D nanopatterned architectures naturally produced by diatoms for the syntheses of advanced functional materials attractive for applications in energy harvesting/conversion and storage. This research has been conducted in three thrusts: Thrust 1 (In vivo immobilization of proteins in diatom biosilica) is directed towards elucidating the fundamental mechanism(s) underlying the cellular processes of in vivo immobilization of proteins in diatom silica. Thrust 2 (Shape-preserving reactive conversion of diatom biosilica into porous, high-surface area inorganic replicas) is aimed at understanding the fundamental mechanisms of shape preservation and nanostructural evolution associated with the reactive conversion and/or coating-based conversion of diatom biosilica templates into porous inorganic replicas. Thrust 3 (Immobilization of energy-relevant enzymes in diatom biosilica and onto diatom biosilica-derived inorganic replicas) involves use of the results from both Thrust 1 and 2 to develop strategies for in vivo and in vitro immobilization of enzymes in/on diatom biosilica and diatom biosilica-derived inorganic replicas, respectively. This Final Report describes progress achieved in all 3 of these thrusts.

  7. Rejection of Electronic Recoils with the DMTPC Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, J. P.; Ahlen, S.; Battat, J.; Caldwell, T.; Chernicoff, M.; Deaconu, C.; Dujmic, D.; Dushkin, A.; Fedus, W.; Fisher, P.; Golub, F.; Henderson, S.; Inglis, A.; Kaboth, A.; Kohse, G.; Kirsch, L.; Lanza, R.; Lee, A.; Monroe, J.; Ouyang, H.; Sahin, T.; Sciolla, G.; Skvorodnev, N.; Tomita, H.; Wellenstein, H.; Wolfe, I.; Yamamoto, R.; Yegoryan, H.

    The Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC) collaboration is developing a low-pressure gas TPC for detecting WIMP-nucleon interactions. DMTPC detectors use optical readout with CCD cameras to search for the daily modulation of the directional signal of the dark matter wind. An analysis of several charge readout channels has been developed to obtain additional information about ionization events in the detector. In order to reach sensitivities required for the WIMP detection, the detector needs to minimize backgrounds from electron recoils. This article shows that by using the readout of charge signals in addition to CCD readout, a preliminary statistics-limited 90% C.L. upper limit on the γ and e- rejection factor of 5.6 × 10-6 is obtained for energies between 40 keVee and 200 keVee.

  8. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  9. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis.

    PubMed

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si3N4 membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  10. Constraints on the Nature of CID-42: Recoil Kick or Supermassive Black Hole Pair?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blecha, Laura; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The galaxy CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, is a highly unusual object. An apparent galaxy merger remnant, it displays signatures of both an inspiraling, kiloparsecscale active galactic nucleus (AGN) pair and of a recoiling AGN with a kick velocity approximately greater than 1300 km s(exp -1). Among recoiling AGN candidates, CID-42 alone has both spatial offsets (in optical and X-ray bands) and spectroscopic offsets. In order to constrain the relative likelihood of both scenarios, we develop models using hydrodynamic galaxy merger simulations coupled with radiative transfer calculations. Our gas-rich, major merger models are generally well matched to the galactic morphology and to the inferred stellar mass and star formation rate. We show that a recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) in CID-42 should be observable as an AGN at the time of observation. However, in order for the recoiling AGN to produce narrow-line emission, it must be observed shortly after the kick while it still inhabits a dense gaseous region, implying a large total kick velocity (vk approximately greater than 2000 km s(exp -1)). For the dual AGN scenario, an unusually large broad-line offset is required, and the best match to the observed morphology requires a galaxy that is less luminous than CID-42. Further, the lack of X-ray emission from one of the two optical nuclei is not easily attributed to an intrinsically quiescent SMBH or to a Compton-thick galactic environment. While the current data do not allow either the recoiling or the dual AGN scenario for CID-42 to be excluded, our models highlight the most relevant parameters for distinguishing these possibilities with future observations. In particular, high-quality, spatially-resolved spectra that can pinpoint the origin of the broad and narrow line features will be critical for determining the nature of this unique source.

  11. Constraints on the nature of CID-42: recoil kick or supermassive black hole pair?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecha, Laura; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    The galaxy CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, is a highly unusual object. As an apparent galaxy merger remnant, it displays signatures of both an inspiraling, kiloparsec-scale active galactic nucleus (AGN) pair and of a recoiling AGN with a kick velocity of ≳ 1300 km s-1. Among recoiling AGN candidates, CID-42 alone has both spatial offsets (in optical and X-ray bands) and spectroscopic offsets. In order to constrain the relative likelihood of both scenarios, we develop models using hydrodynamic galaxy merger simulations coupled with radiative transfer calculations. Our gas-rich, major merger models are generally well matched to the galactic morphology and to the inferred stellar mass and star formation rate. We show that a recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) in CID-42 should be observable as an AGN at the time of observation. However, in order for the recoiling AGN to produce narrow-line emission, it must be observed shortly after the kick while it still inhabits a dense gaseous region, implying a large total kick velocity (vk ≳ 2000 km s-1). For the dual AGN scenario, an unusually large broad-line offset is required, and the best match to the observed morphology requires a galaxy that is less luminous than CID-42. Further, the lack of X-ray emission from one of the two optical nuclei is not easily attributed to an intrinsically quiescent SMBH or to a Compton thick galactic environment. While the current data do not allow either the recoiling or the dual AGN scenario for CID-42 to be excluded, our models highlight the most relevant parameters for distinguishing these possibilities with future observations. In particular, high-quality, spatially resolved spectra that can pinpoint the origin of the broad-line and narrow-line features will be critical for determining the nature of this unique source.

  12. Self-pinched beam transport experiments Relevant to Heavy Ion Driven inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Bangerter, R.O.; Fessenden, T.J.; Lee, E.P.; Yu, S.S.; Olson, C.L.; Welch, D.R.; Barnard, J.J.; Friedman, A.; Logan, B.G.; Moir, R.W.; Haber, I.; Ottinger, P.F.; Young, F.C.; Peterson, R.R.; Briggs, R.J.

    1998-02-06

    An attractive feature of the inertial fusion energy (IFE) approach to commercial energy production is that the fusion driver is well separated from the fusion confinement chamber. This ''standoff'' feature means the driver is largely isolated from fusion reaction products. Further, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target ignition (with modest gain) is now scheduled to be demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using a laser driver system. The NIF program will, to a considerable extent, validate indirectly-driven heavy-ion fusion (HIF) target designs for IFE. However, it remains that HIF standoff between the final focus system and the fusion target needs to be seriously addressed. In fact, there now exists a timely opportunity for the Office of Fusion Energy Science (OFES) to experimentally explore the feasibility of one of the attractive final transport options in the fusion chamber: the self-pinched transport mode. Presently, there are several mainline approaches for HIF beam transport and neutralization in the fusion chamber. These range from the (conservative) vacuum ballistic focus, for which there is much experience from high energy research accelerators, to highly neutralized ballistic focus, which matches well to lower voltage acceleration with resulting lower driver costs. Alternatively, Z-discharge channel transport and self-pinched transport in gas-filled chambers may relax requirements on beam quality and final focusing systems, leading to even lower driver cost. In any case, these alternative methods of transport, especially self-pinched transport, are unusually attractive from the standpoint of chamber design and neutronics. There is no requirement for low chamber pressure. Moreover, only a minuscule fraction of the fusion neutrons can escape from the chamber. Therefore, it is relatively easy to shield sensitive components, e-g., superconducting magnets from any significant neutron flux. Indeed, self-pinched transport and liquid wall

  13. Modeling the Observability of Recoiling Black Holes as Offset Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecha, Laura; Torrey, Paul; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Springel, Volker; Sijacki, Debora; Snyder, Gregory; Bird, Simeon; Nelson, Dylan; Xu, Dandan; Hernquist, Lars

    The merger of two supermassive black holes (SMBHs) imparts a gravitational-wave (GW) recoil kick to the remnant SMBH, which can even eject the SMBH from its host galaxy. An actively-accreting, recoiling SMBH may be observable as an offset quasar. Prior to the advent of a space-based GW observatory, detections of these offset quasars may offer the best chance for identifying recent SMBH mergers. Indeed, observational searches for recoiling quasars have already identified several promising candidates. However, systematic searches for recoils are currently hampered by large uncertainties regarding how often offset quasars should be observable and where they are most likely to be found. Motivated by this, we have developed a model for recoiling quasars in a cosmological framework, utilizing information about the progenitor galaxies from the Illustris cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. For the first time, we model the effects of BH spin alignment and recoil dynamics based on the gas-richness of host galaxies. We predict that if BH spins are not highly aligned, seeing-limited observations could resolve offset AGN, making them promising targets for all-sky surveys. The rarity of large broad-line offsets among SDSS quasars is likely due in part to selection effects but suggests that spin alignment plays a role in suppressing recoils. Nonetheless, in our most physically motivated model where alignment occurs only in gas-rich mergers, hundreds of offset AGN should be found in all-sky surveys. Our findings strongly motivate a dedicated search for recoiling AGN.

  14. The exergy of thermal radiation and its relevance in solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Sean Edward

    Driven by the importance of optimizing energy systems and technologies, the field of exergy analysis was developed to better illuminate process inefficiencies and evaluate performance. Exergy analysis provides important information and understanding that cannot be obtained from energy analysis. The field of exergy analysis is well formulated and understood except for thermal radiation (TR) heat transfer. The exergy flux, or maximum work obtainable, from TR has not been unambiguously determined. Moreover, many thermodynamic textbooks are misleading by incorrectly implying that the entropy and exergy transport with TR is calculated by using the same expressions that apply to heat conduction. Research on the exergy of TR was carried out by Petela. However, many researchers have considered Petela's analysis of the exergy of TR to be irrelevant to the conversion of TR fluxes. Petela's thermodynamic approach is considered irrelevant because, others argue, that it neglects fundamental issues that are specific to the conversion of fluxes, issues that are unusual in the context of exergy analysis. The purpose of the research in this thesis is to determine, using fundamental thermodynamic principles, the exergy flux of TR with an arbitrary spectrum and its relevance to solar radiation (SR) conversion. In this thesis it is shown that Petela's result can be used for the exergy flux of blackbody radiation (BR) and represents the upper limit to the conversion of SR approximated as BR. The thesis shows this by resolving a number of fundamental issues: (1)Inherent Irreversibility; (2)Definition of the Environment; (3)Inherent Emission; (4)Threshold Behaviour; (5)Effect of Concentrating TR. This thesis also provides a new expression, based on inherent irreversibility, for the exergy flux of TR with an arbitrary spectrum. Previous analysis by Karlsson assumes that reversible conversion of non-blackbody radiation (NBR) is theoretically possible, whereas this thesis presents evidence

  15. Recoil Experiments Using a Compressed Air Cannon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Brett

    2006-12-01

    Ping-Pong vacuum cannons, potato guns, and compressed air cannons are popular and dramatic demonstrations for lecture and lab.1-3 Students enjoy them for the spectacle, but they can also be used effectively to teach physics. Recently we have used a student-built compressed air cannon as a laboratory activity to investigate impulse, conservation of momentum, and kinematics. It is possible to use the cannon, along with the output from an electronic force plate, as the basis for many other experiments in the laboratory. In this paper, we will discuss the recoil experiment done by our students in the lab and also mention a few other possibilities that this apparatus could be used for.

  16. Modeling nuclear and electronic recoils in noble gas detectors with NEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, Jeremy; NEST Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Noble gases such as xenon and argon are used as targets in single and dual phased rare event detectors like those used in the search for dark matter. Such experiments require an understanding of the behavior of the target material in the presence of low-energy ionizing radiation. This understanding allows an exploration of detector effects such as threshold, energy and position reconstruction, and pulse shape discrimination. The Noble Element Simulation Technique (NEST) package is a comprehensive code base that models the scintillation and ionization yields from liquid and gaseous xenon and argon in the energy regimes of interest to many types of experiments, like dark matter and neutrino detectors. NEST is built on multiple physics models, which are constrained by available data for both electronic and nuclear recoils. A substantial body of data exists in the literature, and we are reaching an era in which sub-keV yields can be explored experimentally. Here we present a new global analysis of all available nuclear recoil data, and the latest updates to the electronic recoil model, in light of recent low-energy measurements and an improved understanding of detector systematics.

  17. A predictive theory for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He

    DOE PAGES

    Hupin, Guillaume; Quaglioni, Sofia; Navratil, Petr

    2014-12-08

    Low-energy cross sections for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He nuclei (also known as α particles) are calculated directly by solving the Schrodinger equation for five nucleons interacting through accurate two- and three-nucleon forces derived within the framework of chiral effective field theory. Precise knowledge of these processes at various proton backscattering/recoil angles and energies is needed for the ion-beam analysis of numerous materials, from the surface layers of solids, to thin films, to fusion-reactor materials. Indeed, the same elastic scattering process, in two different kinematic configurations, can be used to probe the concentrations and depth profiles ofmore » either hydrogen or helium. Furthermore, we compare our results to available experimental data and show that direct calculations with modern nuclear potentials can help to resolve remaining inconsistencies among data sets and can be used to predict these cross sections when measurements are not available.« less

  18. A predictive theory for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He

    SciTech Connect

    Hupin, Guillaume; Quaglioni, Sofia; Navratil, Petr

    2014-12-08

    Low-energy cross sections for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He nuclei (also known as α particles) are calculated directly by solving the Schrodinger equation for five nucleons interacting through accurate two- and three-nucleon forces derived within the framework of chiral effective field theory. Precise knowledge of these processes at various proton backscattering/recoil angles and energies is needed for the ion-beam analysis of numerous materials, from the surface layers of solids, to thin films, to fusion-reactor materials. Indeed, the same elastic scattering process, in two different kinematic configurations, can be used to probe the concentrations and depth profiles of either hydrogen or helium. Furthermore, we compare our results to available experimental data and show that direct calculations with modern nuclear potentials can help to resolve remaining inconsistencies among data sets and can be used to predict these cross sections when measurements are not available.

  19. ArII - ArXVI produced in slow recoil collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, H.

    1983-07-01

    An atom in a gaseous target may be highly ionized in a single collision with a (very fast) very highly ionized projectile. A feature of the kinematics of the collision is that very little kinetic energy is imparted to the target atom. The ion is produced as a slow recoil. Typical recoil energies are 1 eV and change little with the degree of ionization produced in the target. This has several very attractive features as a spectroscopic source. First, the spectra are free from Doppler shifts which depend upon the degree of ionization of the atom, and, second, all of the ionization states produced in the target have the same spatial distribution. This allows reference lines from low ionization states to be reliably used to calibrate the spectra from high ionization states.

  20. Black hole as a point radiator and recoil effect on the brane world.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Valeri; Stojković, Dejan

    2002-10-07

    A small black hole attached to a brane in a higher-dimensional space emitting quanta into the bulk may leave the brane as a result of a recoil. We construct a field theory model in which such a black hole is described as a massive scalar particle with internal degrees of freedom. In this model, the probability of transition between the different internal levels is identical to the probability of thermal emission calculated for the Schwarzschild black hole. The discussed recoil effect implies that the thermal emission of the black holes, which might be created by interaction of high energy particles in colliders, could be terminated and the energy nonconservation can be observed in the brane experiments.

  1. Measurement of the scintillation light quenching at room temperature of sodium recoils in NaI(Tl) and hydrogen recoils in NE 213 by the scattering of neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagemann, Th.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Jochum, J.

    2006-08-01

    At the newly installed neutron scattering facility for the calibration of Dark Matter (DM) detectors we have measured quenching factors (QFs) at room temperature in NE 213 and NaI(Tl). For proton energies Ep between 1 and 3.5 MeV we found the electron-equivalent energy Eee to obey the relation Eee=(0.23±0.03)Ep+(0.02±0.01)Ep2. The QF of the light output from Na recoils in NaI(Tl) at 850 keV was measured to be Q=0.21±0.04.

  2. A gun recoil system employing a magnetorheological fluid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. C.; Wang, J.

    2012-10-01

    This research aims to design and control a full scale gun recoil buffering system which works under real firing impact loading conditions. A conventional gun recoil absorber is replaced with a controllable magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper. Through dynamic analysis of the gun recoil system, a theoretical model for optimal design and control of the MR fluid damper for impact loadings is derived. The optimal displacement, velocity and optimal design rules are obtained. By applying the optimal design theory to protect against impact loadings, an MR fluid damper for a full scale gun recoil system is designed and manufactured. An experimental study is carried out on a firing test rig which consists of a 30 mm caliber, multi-action automatic gun with an MR damper mounted to the fixed base through a sliding guide. Experimental buffering results under passive control and optimal control are obtained. By comparison, optimal control is better than passive control, because it produces smaller variation in the recoil force while achieving less displacement of the recoil body. The optimal control strategy presented in this paper is open-loop with no feedback system needed. This means that the control process is sensor-free. This is a great benefit for a buffering system under impact loading, especially for a gun recoil system which usually works in a harsh environment.

  3. First Measurement of Beam-Recoil Observables Cx and Cz

    SciTech Connect

    R. Bradford; R.A. Schumacher; G. Adams; M.J. Amaryan; P. Ambrozewicz; E. Anciant; M. Anghinolfi; B. Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; G. Audit; H. Avakian; H. Bagdasaryan; N. Baillie; J.P. Ball; N.A. Baltzell; S. Barrow; V. Batourine; M. Battaglieri; K. Beard; I. Bedlinskiy; M. Bektasoglu; M. Bellis; N. Benmouna; B.L. Berman; N. Bianchi; A.S. Biselli; B.E. Bonner; S. Bouchigny; S. Boiarinov; D. Branford; W.J. Briscoe; W.K. Brooks; S. B¨ultmann; V.D. Burkert; C. Butuceanu; J.R. Calarco; S.L. Careccia; D.S. Carman; B. Carnahan; S. Chen; P.L. Cole; A. Coleman; P. Collins; P. Coltharp; D. Cords; † P. Corvisiero; D. Crabb; H. Crannell; V. Crede; J.P. Cummings; R. De Masi; E. De Sanctis; R. De Vita; P.V. Degtyarenko; H. Denizli; L. Dennis; A. Deur; K.V. Dharmawardane; R. Dickson; C. Djalali; G.E. Dodge; J. Donnelly; D. Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; M. Dugger; S. Dytman; O.P. Dzyubak; H. Egiyan; K.S. Egiyan; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; P. Eugenio; R. Fatemi; G. Fedotov; G. Feldman; R.J. Feuerbach; T.A. Forest; H. Funsten; M. Garcon; G. Gavalian; G.P. Gilfoyle; K.L. Giovanetti; F.X. Girod; J.T. Goetz; A. Gonenc; R.W. Gothe; K.A. Griffioen; M. Guidal; M. Guillo; N. Guler; L. Guo; V. Gyurjyan; C. Hadjidakis; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; R.S. Hakobyan; J. Hardie; D. Heddle; F.W. Hersman; K. Hicks; I. Hleiqawi; M. Holtrop; J. Hu; M. Huertas; C.E. Hyde-Wright; Y. Ilieva; D.G. Ireland; B.S. Ishkhanov; E.L. Isupov; M.M. Ito; D. Jenkins; H.S. Jo; K. Joo; H.G. Juengst; N. Kalantarians; J.D. Kellie; M. Khandaker; K.Y. Kim; K. Kim; W. Kim; A. Klein; F.J. Klein; M. Klusman; M. Kossov; L.H. Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; J. Kuhn; S.E. Kuhn; S.V. Kuleshov; J. Lachniet; J.M. Laget; J. Langheinrich; D. Lawrence; A.C.S. Lima; K. Livingston; H.Y. Lu; K. Lukashin; M. MacCormick; J.J. Manak; C. Marchand; N. Markov; S. McAleer; B. McKinnon; J.W.C. McNabb; B.A. Mecking; M.D. Mestayer; C.A. Meyer; T. Mibe; K. Mikhailov; M. Mirazita; R. Miskimen; V. Mokeev; K. Moriya; S.A. Morrow; M. Moteabbed; V. Muccifora; J. Mueller; G.S. Mutchler; P. Nadel-Turonski; J. Napolitano; R. Nasseripour; N. Natasha; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; B.B. Niczyporuk; M.R. Niroula; R.A. Niyazov; M. Nozar; G.V. O’Rielly; M. Osipenko; A.I. Ostrovidov; K. Park; E. Pasyuk; C. Paterson; S.A. Philips; J. Pierce; N. Pivnyuk; D. Pocanic; O. Pogorelko; E. Polli; I. Popa; S. Pozdniakov; B.M. Preedom; J.W. Price; Y. Prok; D. Protopopescu; L.M. Qin; B.P. Quinn; B.A. Raue; G. Riccardi; G. Ricco; M. Ripani; B.G. Ritchie; F. Ronchetti; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; D. Rowntree; P.D. Rubin; F. Sabatie; J. Salamanca; C. Salgado; J.P. Santoro; V. Sapunenko; V.S. Serov; A. Shafi; Y.G. Sharabian; J. Shaw; N.V. Shvedunov; S. Simionatto; A.V. Skabelin; E.S. Smith; L.C. Smith; D.I. Sober; D. Sokhan; M. Spraker; A. Stavinsky; S.S. Stepanyan; S. Stepanyan; B.E. Stokes; P. Stoler; I.I. Strakovsky; S. Strauch; M. Taiuti; S. Taylor; D.J. Tedeschi; U. Thoma; R. Thompson; A. Tkabladze; S. Tkachenko; L. Todor; C. Tur; M. Ungaro; M.F. Vineyard; A.V. Vlassov; K. Wang; D.P. Watts; L.B. Weinstein; H. Weller; D.P. Weygand; M. Williams; E. Wolin; M.H. Wood; A. Yegneswaran; J. Yun; L. Zana; J. Zhang; B. Zhao; and Z.W. Zhao

    2007-03-01

    Spin transfer from circularly polarized real photons to recoiling hyperons has been measured for the reactions $\\vec\\gamma + p \\to K^+ + \\vec\\Lambda$ and $\\vec\\gamma + p \\to K^+ + \\vec\\Sigma^0$. The data were obtained using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies $W$ between 1.6 and 2.53 GeV, and for $-0.85<\\cos\\theta_{K^+}^{c.m.}< +0.95$. For the $\\Lambda$, the polarization transfer coefficient along the photon momentum axis, $C_z$, was found to be near unity for a wide range of energy and kaon production angles. The associated transverse polarization coefficient, $C_x$, is smaller than $C_z$ by a roughly constant difference of unity. Most significantly, the {\\it total} $\\Lambda$ polarization vector, including the induced polarization $P$, has magnitude consistent with unity at all measured energies and production angles when the beam is fully polarized. For the $\\Sigma^0$ this simple phenomenology does not hold. All existing hadrodynamic models are in poor agreement with these results.

  4. Nuclear Recoil Calibrations in the LUX Detector Using Direct and Backscattered D-D Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhyne, Casey; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 350 kg two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. I will discuss the latest calibration of the nuclear recoil (NR) response in liquid xenon (LXe), performed in-situ in the LUX detector using mono-energetic 2.45 MeV neutrons produced via the Adelphi Technologies, Inc. DD108 D-D neutron generator. The calibration measured the NR charge yield in LXe (Qy) to 0.7 keVnr recoil energy with an absolute determination of deposited energy and the NR light yield in LXe (Ly) to recoil energies of 1.1 keVnr, both of which improve upon all previous measurements. I will then focus in depth on the extension of this calibration using a new technique for generating a beam of sub-300 keV quasi-mono-energetic neutrons via the backscatter of 2.45 MeV neutrons off a deuterium-based reflector. Current simulations work optimizing the technique, its advantages, and its impact on future research will be discussed, including the extension of the NR Qy calibration down to 0.14 keVnr, an independent NR Ly calibration, and an a priori estimate of the expected 8B solar neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering signal in the upcoming LUX-ZEPLIN experiment.

  5. Difference between a Photon's Momentum and an Atom's Recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Gibble, Kurt

    2006-08-18

    When an atom absorbs a photon from a laser beam that is not an infinite plane wave, the atom's recoil is less than ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})k in the propagation direction. We show that the recoils in the transverse directions produce a lensing of the atomic wave functions, which leads to a frequency shift that is not discrete but varies linearly with the field amplitude and strongly depends on the atomic state detection. The same lensing effect is also important for microwave atomic clocks. The frequency shifts are of the order of the naive recoil shift for the transverse wave vector of the photons.

  6. In situ and ex situ studies of materials with relevance to electrochemical energy storage and energy generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yu

    Surface analytical techniques have been employed for the preparation and characterization of modified surfaces of relevance to electrochemical energy storage and generation in ultrahigh vacuum environments. Complementary in situ spectroscopic studies were also performed using Raman microscopy for monitoring static and dynamic aspects of Li intercalation and deintercalation into transition metal oxides and graphitic materials. The most important conclusions emerging from this investigation can be summarized as follows: (i) Ruthenium-modified Pt(100) surfaces of very high purity and controlled stoichiometry were prepared in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) by irradiating Ru3(CO)12 films condensed on cold Pt substrates at 150 K with X-rays, and subsequent annealing at ca. 620 K. Exposure of non-annealed Ru(thetaRu ≥0.22)/Pt(100) to large exposures of CO at ca. 200 K, yielded smaller theta CO, and temperature programmed desorption peaks ca. 50 K lower than those observed for bare Pt(100). (ii) Raman spectra of isolated single particles of technical grade LiMn2O4 embedded in Au foils were recorded in situ in 1M LiPF6 in EC/DMC solutions in real time during a voltammetric scan using a Raman microscope. Similar experiments involving single KS-44 carbon particles (8--50 mum in diameter) embedded into thermally annealed Ni foils in 1M LiClO4, ethylene carbonate (EC) diethyl carbonate (DEC) solutions allowed the average concentration of Li+ within the volume of the particle probed by the laser beam following application of a potential step to be monitored spectroscopically in real time. Analysis of these transient data yielded deintercalation time constants for Li+ for dilute stage 1 phase consistent with reported values of Li+ diffusion coefficients within graphitic materials. A new Raman band ascribed to bounding graphite layers was found upon continuous cycling of single KS-44 particles deep into the Li+-intercalation region. This feature was attributed to chemical modifications

  7. Effect of the energy of recoil atoms on conductivity compensation in moderately doped n-Si and n-SiC under irradiation with MeV electrons and protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovski, V. V.; Lebedev, A. A.; Emtsev, V. V.; Oganesyan, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    Processes of radiation defect formation and conductivity compensation in silicon and silicon carbide irradiated with 0.9 MeV electrons are considered in comparison with the electron irradiation at higher energies. The experimental values of the carrier removal rate at the electron energy of 0.9 MeV are nearly an order of magnitude smaller than the similar values of the parameter for higher energy electrons (6-9 MeV). At the same time, the formation cross-section of primary radiation defects (Frenkel pairs, FPs) is nearly energy-independent in this range. It is assumed that these differences are due to the influence exerted by the energy of primary knocked-on atoms (PKAs). As the PKA energy increases, the average distance between the genetically related FPs grows and, as a consequence, the fraction of FPs unrecombined under irradiation becomes larger. The FP recombination radius is estimated (∼1.1 nm), which makes it possible to ascertain the charge state of the recombining components. Second, the increase in the PKA energy enables formation of new, more complex secondary radiation defects. At electron energies exceeding 15 MeV, the average PKA energies are closer to the values obtained under irradiation with 1 MeV protons, compared with an electron irradiation at the same energy. As for the radiation-induced defect formation, the irradiation of silicon with MeV protons can be, in principle, regarded as a superposition of the irradiation with 1 MeV electrons and that with silicon ions having energy of ∼1 keV, with the ;source; of silicon ions generating these ions uniformly across the sample thickness.

  8. Assessing Secondary School Students' Understanding of the Relevance of Energy in Their Daily Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lay, Yoon-Fah; Khoo, Chwee-Hoon; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of energy literacy among 276 Form 2 (Grade 8) Malaysian students as no similar study has been previously conducted in the country, as well as the contribution of students' energy-related knowledge and attitudes on their energy-related behaviors. This was a non-experimental quantitative…

  9. Binary Black Hole Mergers and Recoil Kicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Baker, J.; Choi, D.; Koppitz, M.; vanMeter, J.; Miller, C.

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments in numerical relativity have made it possible to follow reliably the coalescence of two black holes from near the innermost stable circular orbit to final ringdown. This opens up a wide variety of exciting astrophysical applications of these simulations. Chief among these is the net kick received when two unequal mass or spinning black holes merge. The magnitude of this kick has bearing on the production and growth of supermassive black holes during the epoch of structure formation, and on the retention of black holes in stellar clusters. Here we report the first accurate numerical calculation of this kick, for two nonspinning black holes in a 1.5:1 mass ratio, which is expected based on analytic considerations to give a significant fraction of the maximum possible recoil. We have performed multiple runs with different initial separations, orbital angular momenta, resolutions, extraction radii, and gauges. The full range of our kick speeds is 86-116 kilometers per second, and the most reliable runs give kicks between 86 and 97 kilometers per second. This is intermediate between the estimates from two recent post-Newtonian analyses and suggests that at redshifts z greater than 10, halos with masses less than 10(exp 9) M(sub SUN) will have difficulty retaining coalesced black holes after major mergers.

  10. Nitrogen depth profiling using recoil-nucleus time-of-flight spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, J.F. Jr.; Schweikert, E.A.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron depth profiling (NDP) has been shown to be an effective research tool for the profiling of light elements. Significant increases in sensitivity like those realized at the cold neutron NDP facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) reactor continue to advance the technique. Previous work has also shown that the depth resolution of NDP could be improved by measuring (via time of flight) the kinetic energies of recoil nuclei emitted during (n,p) and (n, {alpha}) reactions. The purpose of this work was to extend the technique of recoil-nucleus time-of-flight (TOF) NDP (RN-TOF-NDP) to the profiling of nitrogen in silicon nitride using the {sup 14}N(n,p) {sup 14}C reaction.

  11. A focal-plane detector for the recoil-mass spectrometer of LNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrieri, A.; Maron, G.; Montagnoli, G.; Napoli, D. R.; Prete, G.

    1990-12-01

    A focal-plane detector for a recoil-mass spectrometer has been developed. It consists of a 14 × 14 cm 2 position-sensitive parallel-plate avalanche counter backed by a 43 cm long Bragg chamber. Both detectors work in the same gas volume thus reducing the dead layers. The intrinsic resolution of the position detector is ±0.5 mm, and an overall timing resolution of 660 ps FWHM was measured with 5.5 MeV α-particles. The Bragg chamber allows the identification of elements with energy high enough to overcome the Bragg peak: in all cases it allows the separation between the reaction channels and the beam scattering. The detector has already been used with a good reliability in a variety of transfer and fusion experiments at the LNL Recoil Mass Spectrometer.

  12. RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN SPIN-FLIP RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F. K.; Wang Dong; Chen Xian

    2012-02-20

    Numerical relativity simulations predict that coalescence of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries leads not only to a spin flip but also to a recoiling of the merger remnant SMBHs. In the literature, X-shaped radio sources are popularly suggested to be candidates for SMBH mergers with spin flip of jet-ejecting SMBHs. Here we investigate the spectral and spatial observational signatures of the recoiling SMBHs in radio sources undergoing black hole spin flip. Our results show that SMBHs in most spin-flip radio sources have mass ratio q {approx}> 0.3 with a minimum possible value q{sub min} {approx_equal} 0.05. For major mergers, the remnant SMBHs can get a kick velocity as high as 2100 km s{sup -1} in the direction within an angle {approx}< 40 Degree-Sign relative to the spin axes of remnant SMBHs, implying that recoiling quasars are biased to be with high Doppler-shifted broad emission lines while recoiling radio galaxies are biased to large apparent spatial off-center displacements. We also calculate the distribution functions of line-of-sight velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacements for spin-flip radio sources with different apparent jet reorientation angles. Our results show that the larger the apparent jet reorientation angle is, the larger the Doppler-shifting recoiling velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacement will be. We investigate the effects of recoiling velocity on the dust torus in spin-flip radio sources and suggest that recoiling of SMBHs would lead to 'dust-poor' active galactic nuclei. Finally, we collect a sample of 19 X-shaped radio objects and for each object give the probability of detecting the predicted signatures of recoiling SMBH.

  13. An Experimental Study of Electromagnetic Lorentz Force and Rail Recoil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    MOTIVATION For over 200 years, electromagnetic forces have been extensively researched. During 1802 , Gian Domenico Romagnosi noticed that a magnetic...C. Woods, “Comment: Origin, location, magnitude and consequences of recoil in the plasma armature railgun,” Inst. Elect. Eng. Proc. Sci. Meas...22, pp. 849-850, 1989. [26] A. E. Witalis, “Origin, location, magnitude and consequences of recoil in the plasma armature railgun,” Inst. Elect

  14. Cars and Kinetic Energy--Some Simple Physics with Real-World Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2012-01-01

    Understanding energy usage is crucial to understanding modern civilization, as well as many of the challenges it faces. Energy-related issues also offer real-world examples of important physical concepts, and as such have been the focus of several articles in "The Physics Teacher" in the past few decades (e.g., Refs. 1-5, noted further below).…

  15. Energy issues relevant to domed cities. Winooski, Vermont: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gant, R. E.

    1980-09-01

    Enclosing all or a significant portion of a small urban community within a large secondary building envelope (dome) was examined as a potential alternative energy strategy. The concept of secondary envelopes as a community level energy strategy is discussed. Five alternative energy strategies are presented which might be less costly and technically complex than an urban envelope. The alternatives focused upon local options and resources to affect reductions in total energy consumption and scarce fuels. Insulation and use of efficient appliances, hydroelectric development, installation of cogeneration/district heating systems, use of solar technologies, and combinations of technologies are discussed. The alternatives represent examples of the opportunities available to local governments to exercise a degree of control over the community's energy future.

  16. Moving towards first science with the St. George recoil separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Zachary; Berg, G. P. A.; Gilardy, G.; Moran, M.; Schmitt, J.; Seymour, C.; Stech, E.; Couder, M.

    2015-10-01

    The St. George recoil mass separator has recently been coupled to the 5MV St. Ana accelerator at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Lab. St. George is a unique tool designed to measure radiative alpha-capture reactions for nuclei up to A = 40 in inverse kinematics in order to directly obtain cross sections required for astrophysical models of stellar and explosive helium burning. Commissioning of St. George is presently taking place with primary beams of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen. In this presentation, results will be shown for the measured energy acceptance of St. George, which compare favorably to COSY results when employing the calculated optimal ion-optical settings. Additionally, future plans will be discussed, such as assessing the angular acceptance of St. George and the re-integration of HiPPO at the separator target position to provide a dense, windowless helium gas-jet target. The material presented in this work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation Grant No. 1419765.

  17. Energy absorption buildup factors of human organs and tissues at energies and penetration depths relevant for radiotherapy and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Manohara, S R; Hanagodimath, S M; Gerward, L

    2011-11-15

    Energy absorption geometric progression (GP) fitting parameters and the corresponding buildup factors have been computed for human organs and tissues, such as adipose tissue, blood (whole), cortical bone, brain (grey/white matter), breast tissue, eye lens, lung tissue, skeletal muscle, ovary, testis, soft tissue, and soft tissue (4-component), for the photon energy range 0.015-15 MeV and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp (mean free path). The chemical composition of human organs and tissues is seen to influence the energy absorption buildup factors. It is also found that the buildup factor of human organs and tissues changes significantly with the change of incident photon energy and effective atomic number, Z(eff). These changes are due to the dominance of different photon interaction processes in different energy regions and different chemical compositions of human organs and tissues. With the proper knowledge of buildup factors of human organs and tissues, energy absorption in the human body can be carefully controlled. The present results will help in estimating safe dose levels for radiotherapy patients and also useful in diagnostics and dosimetry. The tissue-equivalent materials for skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, cortical bone, and lung tissue are also discussed. It is observed that water and MS20 are good tissue equivalent materials for skeletal muscle in the extended energy range.

  18. Measurement of the W boson mass and width using a novel recoil model

    SciTech Connect

    Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents a direct measurement of the W boson mass (MW) and decay width (ΓW) in 1 fb-1 of W → ev collider data at D0 using a novel method to model the hadronic recoil. The mass is extracted from fits to the transverse mass MT, pT(e), and ET distributions. The width is extracted from fits to the tail of the MT distribution. The electron energy measurement is simulated using a parameterized model, and the recoil is modeled using a new technique by which Z recoils are chosen from a data library to match the pT and direction of each generated W boson. We measure the the W boson mass to be MW = 80.4035 ± 0.024(stat) ± 0.039(syst) from the MT, MW = 80.4165 ± 0.027(stat) ± 0.038(syst) from the pT(e), and MW = 80.4025 ± 0.023(stat) ± 0.043(syst) from the ET distributions. ΓW is measured to be ΓW = 2.025 ± 0.038(stat) ± 0.061(syst) GeV.

  19. First measurement of nuclear recoil head-tail sense in a fiducialised WIMP dark matter detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battat, J. B. R.; Daw, E.; Ezeribe, A. C.; Gauvreau, J.-L.; Harton, J. L.; Lafler, R.; Lee, E. R.; Loomba, D.; Lumnah, A.; Miller, E. H.; Mouton, F.; Murphy, A. StJ.; Paling, S. M.; Phan, N. S.; Robinson, M.; Sadler, S. W.; Scarff, A.; Schuckman, F. G., II; Snowden-Ifft, D. P.; Spooner, N. J. C.

    2016-10-01

    Recent computational results suggest that directional dark matter detectors have potential to probe for WIMP dark matter particles below the neutrino floor. The DRIFT-IId detector used in this work is a leading directional WIMP search time projection chamber detector. We report the first measurements of the detection of the directional nuclear recoils in a fully fiducialised low-pressure time projection chamber. In this new operational mode, the distance between each event vertex and the readout plane is determined by the measurement of minority carriers produced by adding a small amount of oxygen to the nominal CS2+CF4 target gas mixture. The CS2+CF4+O2 mixture has been shown to enable background-free operation at current sensitivities. Sulfur, fluorine, and carbon recoils were generated using neutrons emitted from a 252Cf source positioned at different locations around the detector. Measurement of the relative energy loss along the recoil tracks allowed the track vector sense, or the so-called head-tail asymmetry parameter, to be deduced. Results show that the previously reported observation of head-tail sensitivity in pure CS2 is well retained after the addition of oxygen to the gas mixture.

  20. Response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters at photon energies relevant to the dosimetry of brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adolfsson, Emelie; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Grindborg, Jan-Erik; Gustafsson, Haakan; Lund, Eva; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate experimentally the energy dependence of the detector response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters for photon energies below 1 MeV relative to that at {sup 60}Co energies. High energy photon beams are used in calibrating dosimeters for use in brachytherapy since the absorbed dose to water can be determined with high accuracy in such beams using calibrated ion chambers and standard dosimetry protocols. In addition to any differences in mass-energy absorption properties between water and detector, variations in radiation yield (detector response) with radiation quality, caused by differences in the density of ionization in the energy imparted (LET), may exist. Knowledge of an eventual deviation in detector response with photon energy is important for attaining high accuracy in measured brachytherapy dose distributions. Methods: Lithium formate EPR dosimeters were irradiated to known levels of air kerma in 25-250 kV x-ray beams and in {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co beams at the Swedish Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory. Conversions from air kerma free in air into values of mean absorbed dose to the detectors were made using EGSnrc MC simulations and x-ray energy spectra measured or calculated for the actual beams. The signals from the detectors were measured using EPR spectrometry. Detector response (the EPR signal per mean absorbed dose to the detector) relative to that for {sup 60}Co was determined for each beam quality. Results: Significant decreases in the relative response ranging from 5% to 6% were seen for x-ray beams at tube voltages {<=}180 kV. No significant reduction in the relative response was seen for {sup 137}Cs and 250 kV x rays. Conclusions: When calibrated in {sup 60}Co or MV photon beams, corrections for the photon energy dependence of detector response are needed to achieve the highest accuracy when using lithium formate EPR dosimeters for measuring absorbed doses around brachytherapy sources emitting photons in the energy

  1. Relevance of behavioral and social models to the study of consumer energy decision making and behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, B.A.

    1980-11-01

    This report reviews social and behavioral science models and techniques for their possible use in understanding and predicting consumer energy decision making and behaviors. A number of models and techniques have been developed that address different aspects of the decision process, use different theoretical bases and approaches, and have been aimed at different audiences. Three major areas of discussion were selected: (1) models of adaptation to social change, (2) decision making and choice, and (3) diffusion of innovation. Within these three areas, the contributions of psychologists, sociologists, economists, marketing researchers, and others were reviewed. Five primary components of the models were identified and compared. The components are: (1) situational characteristics, (2) product characteristics, (3) individual characteristics, (4) social influences, and (5) the interaction or decision rules. The explicit use of behavioral and social science models in energy decision-making and behavior studies has been limited. Examples are given of a small number of energy studies which applied and tested existing models in studying the adoption of energy conservation behaviors and technologies, and solar technology.

  2. Submillisecond Elastic Recoil Reveals Molecular Origins of Fibrin Fiber Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Nathan E.; Ding, Feng; Bucay, Igal; O’Brien, E. Timothy; Gorkun, Oleg V.; Superfine, Richard; Lord, Susan T.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Falvo, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrin fibers form the structural scaffold of blood clots. Thus, their mechanical properties are of central importance to understanding hemostasis and thrombotic disease. Recent studies have revealed that fibrin fibers are elastomeric despite their high degree of molecular ordering. These results have inspired a variety of molecular models for fibrin’s elasticity, ranging from reversible protein unfolding to rubber-like elasticity. An important property that has not been explored is the timescale of elastic recoil, a parameter that is critical for fibrin’s mechanical function and places a temporal constraint on molecular models of fiber elasticity. Using high-frame-rate imaging and atomic force microscopy-based nanomanipulation, we measured the recoil dynamics of individual fibrin fibers and found that the recoil was orders of magnitude faster than anticipated from models involving protein refolding. We also performed steered discrete molecular-dynamics simulations to investigate the molecular origins of the observed recoil. Our results point to the unstructured αC regions of the otherwise structured fibrin molecule as being responsible for the elastic recoil of the fibers. PMID:23790375

  3. Some Simple Arguments about Cost Externalization and its Relevance to the Price of Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.; Winfree, R.

    1999-09-27

    The primary goal of fusion energy research is to develop a source of energy that is less harmful to the environment than are the present sources. A concern often expressed by critics of fusion research is that fusion energy will never be economically competitive with fossil fuels, which in 1997 provided 75% of the world's energy. And in fact, studies of projected fusion electricity generation generally project fusion costs to be higher than those of conventional methods. Yet it is widely agreed that the environmental costs of fossil fuel use are high. Because these costs aren't included in the market price, and furthermore because many governments subsidize fossil fuel production, fossil fuels seem less expensive than they really are. Here we review some simple arguments about cost externalization which provide a useful background for discussion of energy prices. The collectively self-destructive behavior that is the root of many environmental problems, including fossil fuel use, was termed ''the tragedy of the commons'' by the biologist G. Hardin. Hardin's metaphor is that of a grazing commons that is open to all. Each herdsman, in deciding whether to add a cow to his herd, compares the benefit of doing so, which accrues to him alone, to the cost, which is shared by all the herdsmen using the commons, and therefore adds his cow. In this way individually rational behavior leads to the collective destruction of the shared resource. As Hardin pointed out, pollution is one kind of tragedy of the commons. CO{sub 2} emissions and global warming are in this sense classic tragedies.

  4. Cars and Kinetic Energy -- Some Simple Physics with Real-World Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2012-10-01

    Understanding energy usage is crucial to understanding modern civilization, as well as many of the challenges it faces. Energy-related issues also offer real-world examples of important physical concepts, and as such have been the focus of several articles in The Physics Teacher in the past few decades (e.g., Refs. 1-5, noted further below). Here, I illustrate how a basic understanding of kinetic energy—a topic encountered early in any introductory physics course—enables significant insights into the nature of automobile transportation. Specifically, we can accurately predict how much power the average driver in the United States uses, and explain what determines this, without needing to consider any aspects of mechanical engineering or engine design.

  5. Underground Cross Section Measurements of Stellar Reactions at Astrophysically Relevant Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formicola, A.; Gugliemetti, A.

    Accurate knowledge of thermonuclear reaction rates is important to understand the generation of energy, the luminosity of neutrinos, and the synthesis of elements in stars and in the primordial nucleosynthesis. An innovative experimental approach for the study of nuclear fusion reactions based on an accelerator installed in a low background underground laboratory (the LUNA experiment at the Gran Sasso Laboratory) was able to give breaktrough results in this field over the last 25 years. By going underground and by using the typical techniques of low background physics, it is possible to measure nuclear cross sections down to the energy of stellar interest. In this proceeding, the experimental techniques adopted in underground nuclear astrophysics and an overwiev of present and proposed future facilities and of their major scientific drivers are reported.

  6. Collisions of ions with surfaces at chemically relevant energies: Instrumentation and phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Verena; Shen, Jianwei; Evans, Chris; Cooks, R. Graham

    2001-08-01

    An overview of gaseous ion/surface collisions is presented, with special emphasis on the behavior of polyatomic projectile ions at hyperthermal collision energies (1-100 eV) and the instrumentation needed for such studies. The inelastic and reactive processes occurring during ion/surface collisions are described in terms of several archetypes, viz., elastic and quasielastic scattering, chemical sputtering leading to release of surface material, inelastic scattering leading to surface-induced dissociation (SID) of the projectile, ion/surface reactions, and soft landing. Parameters that are important in ion/surface interactions are discussed, including the interaction time, the conversion of translational to internal energy, the translational energies of the scattered ions, the effects of scattering angle, and the influence of the nature of the surface. Different types of tandem mass spectrometers, built specifically to study ion/surface collision phenomena, are discussed and the advantages and disadvantages of the individual designs are compared. The role of SID as a technique in bioanalytical mass spectrometry is illustrated and this inelastic collision experiment is compared and contrasted with gas-phase collision-induced dissociation, the standard method of tandem mass spectrometry. Special emphasis is placed on reactive scattering including the use of ion/surface reactions for surface chemical analysis and for surface chemical modification.

  7. Measurement of the ^7Li(d,n)^8Be Reaction at Astrophysically Relevant Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabourov, A.; Ahmed, M.; Crowell, A.; Howell, C.; Joshi, K.; Nelson, S.; Perdue, B.; Sabourov, K.; Tonchev, A.; Weller, H. R.; Prior, R.; Spraker, M.; Kalantar, N.

    2003-10-01

    We have measured the differential cross section and the polarization observables T_20(θ), T_21(θ), T_22(θ), and iT_11(θ) for the ^7Li(d,n)^8Be reaction at low energies. Polarized deuterons of Ed = 160 keV to 80 keV were stopped in an evaporated lithium target. Nine liquid scintillation detectors were used to detect the emitted neutrons. The present experimental results are being compared to theoretical calculations performed with the DWUCK4 (P.D. Kunz, http://spot.colorado.edu/ ˜kunz/DWBA.html) code. Due to the very low energies of the present experiment, only s- and p-waves are likely to contribute in the entrance channel, limiting the number of transition matrix elements (TMEs) contributing to the reaction. Detailed information on the amplitudes and phases of these TMEs will be obtained by performing a simultaneous fit to the cross section and polarization observables. These results should provide new insight into the dynamics of this reaction at low energies.

  8. Theory and High-Energy-Density Laser Experiments Relevant to Accretion Processes in Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauland, Christine; Drake, R.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Busschaert, C.; Ravasio, A.; Yurchak, R.; Pelka, A.; Koenig, M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Plewa, T.; Huntington, C. M.; Kaczala, D. N.; Klein, S.; Sweeney, R.; Villete, B.; Young, R.; Keiter, P. A.

    2012-05-01

    We present results from high-energy-density (HED) laboratory experiments that explore the contribution of radiative shock waves to the evolving dynamics of the cataclysmic variable (CV) systems in which they reside. CVs can be classified under two main categories, non-magnetic and magnetic. In the process of accretion, both types involve strongly radiating shocks that provide the main source of radiation in the binary systems. This radiation can cause varying structure to develop depending on the optical properties of the material on either side of the shock. The ability of high-intensity lasers to create large energy densities in targets of millimeter-scale volume makes it feasible to create similar radiative shocks in the laboratory. We provide an overview of both CV systems and their connection to the designed and executed laboratory experiments preformed on two laser facilities. Available data and accompanying simulations will likewise be shown. Funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Prog. in High-Energy-Density Lab. Plasmas, by the Nat. Laser User Facility Prog. in NNSA-DS and by the Predictive Sci. Acad. Alliances Prog. in NNSA-ASC, under grant numbers are DE-FG52-09NA29548, DE-FG52-09NA29034, and DE-FC52-08NA28616.

  9. A new setup for elastic recoil analysis using ion induced electron emission for particle identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbauer, E.; Benka, O.; Steinbatz, M.

    1998-03-01

    We describe a new setup for elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) using our recently developed particle identification method. Before the ions and elastic recoil atoms from the target reach a silicon surface barrier detector for energy analysis, they penetrate a set of thin foils (e.g. carbon). The ion induced electron emission yield from the foils depends on the nuclear charge of the penetrating ion and it is roughly proportional to the energy loss in the foil. The emitted electrons are accelerated towards a microchannel plate (MCP), which gives a signal amplitude proportional to the number of emitted electrons. This signal is measured in coincidence with the energy signal from the surface barrier detector using our dual-parameter multichannel analyzer system M2D. Since the energy resolution is not measurably deteriorated by the particle identification our setup offers optimum depth resolution for light elements. Due to the compact design large solid angles for high sensitivity can be achieved. A new measuring chamber has been built which offers considerable improvements. The ERDA scattering angle (30° or 45°) and the target orientation can be selected for optimum depth resolution or sensitivity. Element separation for light elements has been enhanced by several improvements: A new geometry of the foil setup improves the collection efficiency for ion induced electrons onto the MCP, coating of the carbon foils with insulators enhances the electron emission yield. Finally, a new data evaluation procedure has been developed in which the pulse height spectrum of the MCP is considered to be a linear combination of individual spectra from the incident ion and of the recoil atoms. The normalized shapes of these spectra are taken from calibration measurements, the intensities are then calculated using a linear fitting algorithm and finally give the depth profiles of the elements in the target. For hydrogen in near surface layers even isotopic separation is possible

  10. Low momentum recoil detectors in CLAS12 at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Gabriel; CLAS Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Part of the experimental program in Hall B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to studying nucleon structure using DIS on nuclei and detecting low-momentum recoil particles in coincidence with the scattered electron. For this purpose, specially designed central detectors are required in place of the inner tracker of CLAS12 to detect particles with momenta below 100 MeV/c. We will present the status of the BONuS12 RTPC detector that will take data within the next 2 years. We will detail the main improvements made from the previous BONuS RTPC. In a second part, we will discuss another recoil experiment, called ALERT, that has been proposed to run in Hall B. The constraints being different, the recoil detector is based on a drift chamber and an array of scintillators. We will present the main differences between the two detectors and summarize the R&D performed to develop the ALERT detector.

  11. Internal variability of an energy-balance model with delayed albedo effects. [with relevance to climatic variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, K.; Ghil, M.; Vulis, I. L.

    1982-01-01

    A simple, deterministic energy-balance model with possible relevance to climatic variations on the time scale of glaciation cycles, is presented. The lag between ice-sheet extent and zonally-averaged temperature is modeled as a time delay in the ice-albedo feedback. The model exhibits self-sustained oscillations which are quasi-periodic or aperiodic in character. Fourier spectra of solutions have the features of many paleoclimatic records: peaks of variable height and width superimposed on a continuous, red-noise type background.

  12. Using inertial fusion implosions to measure the T+He3 fusion cross section at nucleosynthesis-relevant energies

    DOE PAGES

    Zylstra, A. B.; Herrmann, H. W.; Johnson, M. Gatu; ...

    2016-07-11

    Light nuclei were created during big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Standard BBN theory, using rates inferred from accelerator-beam data, cannot explain high levels of 6Li in low-metallicity stars. Using high energy-density plasmas we measure the T(3He,γ)6Li reaction rate, a candidate for anomalously high 6Li production; we find that the rate is too low to explain the observations, and different than values used in common BBN models. In conclusion, this is the first data directly relevant to BBN, and also the first use of laboratory plasmas, at comparable conditions to astrophysical systems, to address a problem in nuclear astrophysics.

  13. Using Inertial Fusion Implosions to Measure the T + 3He Fusion Cross Section at Nucleosynthesis-Relevant Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Herrmann, H. W.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Kim, Y. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Hale, G.; Li, C. K.; Rubery, M.; Paris, M.; Bacher, A.; Brune, C. R.; Forrest, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Janezic, R.; McNabb, D.; Nikroo, A.; Pino, J.; Sangster, T. C.; Séguin, F. H.; Seka, W.; Sio, H.; Stoeckl, C.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-07-01

    Light nuclei were created during big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Standard BBN theory, using rates inferred from accelerator-beam data, cannot explain high levels of 6Li in in low-metallicity stars. Using high-energy-density plasmas we measure the T (3He, ,γ )6Li reaction rate, a candidate for anomalously high 6Li production; we find that the rate is too low to explain the observations, and different than values used in common BBN models. This is the first data directly relevant to BBN, and also the first use of laboratory plasmas, at comparable conditions to astrophysical systems, to address a problem in nuclear astrophysics.

  14. Using Inertial Fusion Implosions to Measure the T+^{3}He Fusion Cross Section at Nucleosynthesis-Relevant Energies.

    PubMed

    Zylstra, A B; Herrmann, H W; Johnson, M Gatu; Kim, Y H; Frenje, J A; Hale, G; Li, C K; Rubery, M; Paris, M; Bacher, A; Brune, C R; Forrest, C; Glebov, V Yu; Janezic, R; McNabb, D; Nikroo, A; Pino, J; Sangster, T C; Séguin, F H; Seka, W; Sio, H; Stoeckl, C; Petrasso, R D

    2016-07-15

    Light nuclei were created during big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Standard BBN theory, using rates inferred from accelerator-beam data, cannot explain high levels of ^{6}Li in low-metallicity stars. Using high-energy-density plasmas we measure the T(^{3}He,γ)^{6}Li reaction rate, a candidate for anomalously high ^{6}Li production; we find that the rate is too low to explain the observations, and different than values used in common BBN models. This is the first data directly relevant to BBN, and also the first use of laboratory plasmas, at comparable conditions to astrophysical systems, to address a problem in nuclear astrophysics.

  15. Collisions between low-energy electrons and small polyatomic targets of biological relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, Leigh

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, cross section measurements and calculations for DNA prototype molecules have received significant attention from the collisions community, due to the potential applications of this data in modelling electron transport through biological matter with a view to improving radiation dosimetry. Such data are additionally interesting from a fundamental aspect, as small carbon-based molecules are ideal targets for considering effects including target conformation, long-range dynamical interactions and coupling effects between the various degrees of freedom on the scattering properties of the target. At the California State University Fullerton, we have made a series of measurements of the elastic, vibrationally inelastic and electronically inelastic cross sections for a variety of small polyatomic targets, including water and the basic alcohols, ethylene, toluene and several fluorinated alkanes. These processes are important in a range of applications, primarily for modelling electron transport and thermalization, and energy deposition to a biological media. The data were obtained using a high resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer, operating in a crossed beam configuration with a moveable aperture gas source. The gas source design facilitates both an expedient and highly accurate method of removing background signal, and removes uncertainties from the data due to uncertainties in the beam profile. We have also performed scattering calculations employing the Schwinger Multichannel method, in collaboration with the California institute of technology, to compare with our measurements. In this talk, I will present an overview of our recent data and future research plans.

  16. Computing at the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yuri S.; Polyakov, Alexandr N.

    2006-03-01

    Simulation codes for the spectra of heavy implanted nuclei, applications for online data visualization and real time PC-based algorithms are considered. Special attention is paid to the application of real time techniques for radical suppression of background products in heavy-ion-induced nuclear reactions at the U-400 cyclotron of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions. The detection system of the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator (DGFRS) is also briefly described. Calculated heavy recoil spectra are compared with those measured in heavy-ion-induced nuclear reactions.

  17. Fundamental Studies of Charge Migration and Delocalization Relevant to Solar Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Therien

    2012-06-01

    This program aimed to understand the molecular-level principles by which complex chemical systems carry out photochemical charge separation, transport, and storage, and how these insights could impact the design of practical solar energy conversion and storage devices. Towards these goals, this program focused on: (1) carrying out fundamental mechanistic and transient dynamical studies of proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions; (2) characterizing and interrogating via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic methods novel conjugated materials that feature large charge delocalization lengths; and (3) exploring excitation delocalization and migration, as well as polaron transport properties of meso-scale assemblies that are capable of segregating light-harvesting antennae, nanoscale wire-like conduction elements, and distinct oxidizing and reducing environments.

  18. 23Na (α,p )26Mg Reaction Rate at Astrophysically Relevant Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, A. M.; Munch, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Laursen, K. L.; Diget, C. Aa.; Hubbard, N. J.

    2015-07-01

    The production of 26Al in massive stars is sensitive to the 23Na (α,p )26Mg cross section. Recent experimental data suggest the currently recommended cross sections are underestimated by a factor of ˜40 . We present here differential cross sections for the 23Na (α,p )26Mg reaction measured in the energy range Ec .m .=1.7 - 2.5 MeV . Concurrent measurements of Rutherford scattering provide absolute normalizations that are independent of variations in target properties. Angular distributions are measured for both p0 and p1 permitting the determination of total cross sections. The results show no significant deviation from the statistical model calculations upon which the recommended rates are based. We therefore retain the previous recommendation without the increase in cross section and resulting stellar reaction rates by a factor of 40, impacting the 26Al yield from massive stars by more than a factor of 3.

  19. A surface energy analysis of mucoadhesion: contact angle measurements on polycarbophil and pig intestinal mucosa in physiologically relevant fluids.

    PubMed

    Lehr, C M; Bouwstra, J A; Boddé, H E; Junginger, H E

    1992-01-01

    The possible role of surface energy thermodynamics in mucoadhesion was investigated with Polycarbophil and pig intestinal mucosa. In separate experiments, the surface energy parameters of the substrate (mucosa) and the adhesive (polymer film) were determined by contact angle measurements on captive air/octane bubbles in three physiologically relevant test fluids (isotonic saline, artificial gastric fluid, and artificial intestinal fluid). Whereas the swollen Polycarbophil films were relatively hydrophilic as indicated by small water contact angles (22, 23, and 16 degrees), the water contact angles measured on mucosal tissue were significantly larger (61, 48, and 57 degrees). Hence, mucus was found to possess an appreciable hydrophobicity. The measured adhesive performance (force of detachment) between Polycarbophil and pig small intestinal mucosa was highest in nonbuffered saline medium, intermediate in gastric fluid, and minimal in intestinal fluid. In agreement with this trend, the mismatch in surface polarities between substrate and adhesive, calculated from the contact angle data, increased in the same order.

  20. Recoil Polarization and Beam-Recoil Double Polarization Measurement of {eta} Electroproduction on the Proton in the Region of the S{sub 11}(1535) Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, H.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Boehm, R.; Distler, M. O.; Doria, L.; Friedrich, J.; Mueller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Tiator, L.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; Bosnar, D.; Makek, M.; Cheymol, B.; Fonvieille, H.

    2007-09-28

    The beam-recoil double polarization P{sub x{sup '}}{sup h} and P{sub z{sup '}}{sup h} and the recoil polarization P{sub y{sup '}} were measured for the first time for the p(e-vector,e{sup '}p-vector){eta} reaction at a four-momentum transfer of Q{sup 2}=0.1 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} and a center of mass production angle of {theta}=120 deg. at the Mainz Microtron MAMI-C. With a center of mass energy range of 1500 MeV

  1. Survey of Laser Markets Relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy Drivers, information for National Research Council

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A J; Deri, R J; Erlandson, A C

    2011-02-24

    Development of a new technology for commercial application can be significantly accelerated by leveraging related technologies used in other markets. Synergies across multiple application domains attract research and development (R and D) talent - widening the innovation pipeline - and increases the market demand in common components and subsystems to provide performance improvements and cost reductions. For these reasons, driver development plans for inertial fusion energy (IFE) should consider the non-fusion technology base that can be lveraged for application to IFE. At this time, two laser driver technologies are being proposed for IFE: solid-state lasers (SSLs) and KrF gas (excimer) lasers. This document provides a brief survey of organizations actively engaged in these technologies. This is intended to facilitate comparison of the opportunities for leveraging the larger technical community for IFE laser driver development. They have included tables that summarize the commercial organizations selling solid-state and KrF lasers, and a brief summary of organizations actively engaged in R and D on these technologies.

  2. New Scalings of Energy Confinement Time of RFP Plasmas and the Extrapolation to Reactor Relevant Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    Data bases of reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma have been gradually accumulated by recent experiments of several RFP devices. New confinement scalings τX(X=RFPs1)E=0.024Aa2IP/P1/2heat, τX(X=RFPs2)E=0.04s(IN)Aa2I1.25P/P1/2heat which are consistent to the recent data are presented, where units are in [s], [m], [MA] and [MW] respectively and s(IN) is a correction function of IN≡IP/πa2‹ne›20). From the standpoint of new scalings, dependences among parameters of possible RFP reactors are analyzed to find the conditions for RFP reactors. Hs1 Hs2 are defined by the ratios of necessary energy confinement time for RFP reactors for burning against τX(X=RFPs1) and τX(X=RFPs2) respectively. When confinement time follows τX(X=RFPs1)E scaling, confinement enhancement factor of at least Hs1=23 is necessary for RFP reactors to be realistic. When confinement time follows τX(X=RFPs2)E scaling, data points in IP-a space of RFP reactors are within the region of target.

  3. Lifetime measurement of the 41+ state of 58Ni with the recoil distance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loelius, C.; Iwasaki, H.; Brown, B. A.; Honma, M.; Bader, V. M.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Braunroth, T.; Campbell, C. M.; Dewald, A.; Gade, A.; Kobayashi, N.; Langer, C.; Lee, I. Y.; Lemasson, A.; Lunderberg, E.; Morse, C.; Recchia, F.; Smalley, D.; Stroberg, S. R.; Wadsworth, R.; Walz, C.; Weisshaar, D.; Westerberg, A.; Whitmore, K.; Wimmer, K.

    2016-08-01

    The quadrupole transition rate for the 41+→21+ transition of 58Ni was determined from an application of the recoil distance method with the Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking In-beam Nuclear Array (GRETINA). The present result of the B (E 2 ;41+→21+) was found to be 50-6+11e2fm4 , which is about three times smaller than the literature value, indicating substantially less collectivity than previously believed. Shell model calculations performed with the GXPF1A effective interaction agree with the present data and the validity of the standard effective charges in understanding collectivity in the nickel isotopes is discussed.

  4. Recoil effects of a motional scatterer on single-photon scattering in one dimension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiong; Xu, D. Z.; Cai, C. Y.; Sun, C. P.

    2013-01-01

    The scattering of a single photon with sufficiently high energy can cause a recoil of a motional scatterer. We study its backaction on the photon's coherent transport in one dimension by modeling the motional scatterer as a two-level system, which is trapped in a harmonic potential. While the reflection spectrum is of a single peak in the Lamb-Dicke limit, multi-peaks due to phonon excitations can be observed in the reflection spectrum as the trap becomes looser or the mass of the two-level system becomes smaller. PMID:24220217

  5. Epitaxial silicide formation on recoil-implanted substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Shin; Egashira, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoya; Etoh, Ryuji; Hata, Yoshifumi; Tung, R. T.

    2005-01-15

    An epitaxy-on-recoil-implanted-substrate (ERIS) technique is presented. A disordered surface layer, generated by forward recoil implantation of {approx}0.7-3x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} of oxygen during Ar plasma etching of surface oxide, is shown to facilitate the subsequent epitaxial growth of {approx}25-35-nm-thick CoSi{sub 2} layers on Si(100). The dependence of the epitaxial fraction of the silicide on the recoil-implantation parameters is studied in detail. A reduction in the silicide reaction rate due to recoil-implanted oxygen is shown to be responsible for the observed epitaxial formation, similar to mechanisms previously observed for interlayer-mediated growth techniques. Oxygen is found to remain inside the fully reacted CoSi{sub 2} layer, likely in the form of oxide precipitates. The presence of these oxide precipitates, with only a minor effect on the sheet resistance of the silicide layer, has a surprisingly beneficial effect on the thermal stability of the silicide layers. The agglomeration of ERIS-grown silicide layers on polycrystalline Si is significantly suppressed, likely from a reduced diffusivity due to oxygen in the grain boundaries. The implications of the present technique for the processing of deep submicron devices are discussed.

  6. X-ray spectroscopy of a recoiling SMBH candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predehl, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Recent numerical relativity simulations of coalescencing supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries predict that SMBHs can receive kicks with velocities up to several thousand km/s due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. We have recently found the best candidate todate for such a recoiling SMBH (Komossa et al. 2008). We apply for a 25 ks ACIS-S exposure of this exceptional source.

  7. Statistical and Spectral Analysis of Wind Characteristics Relevant to Wind Energy Assessment Using Tower Measurements in Complex Terrain

    DOE PAGES

    Belu, Radian; Koracin, Darko

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate spatial and temporal characteristics of the wind speed and direction in complex terrain that are relevant to wind energy assessment and development, as well as to wind energy system operation, management, and grid integration. Wind data from five tall meteorological towers located in Western Nevada, USA, operated from August 2003 to March 2008, used in the analysis. The multiannual average wind speeds did not show significant increased trend with increasing elevation, while the turbulence intensity slowly decreased with an increase were the average wind speed. The wind speed and direction weremore » modeled using the Weibull and the von Mises distribution functions. The correlations show a strong coherence between the wind speed and direction with slowly decreasing amplitude of the multiday periodicity with increasing lag periods. The spectral analysis shows significant annual periodicity with similar characteristics at all locations. The relatively high correlations between the towers and small range of the computed turbulence intensity indicate that wind variability is dominated by the regional synoptic processes. Knowledge and information about daily, seasonal, and annual wind periodicities are very important for wind energy resource assessment, wind power plant operation, management, and grid integration.« less

  8. Analytic calculation of radiative-recoil corrections to muonium hyperfine splitting: Electron-line contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, M.I.; Karshenboim, S.G.; Shelyuto, V.A. )

    1991-02-01

    The detailed account of analytic calculation of radiative-recoil correction to muonium hyperfine splitting, induced by electron-line radiative insertions, is presented. The consideration is performed in the framework of the effective two-particle formalism. A good deal of attention is paid to the problem of the divergence cancellation and the selection of graphs, relevant to radiative-recoil corrections. The analysis is greatly facilitated by use of the Fried-Yennie gauge for radiative photons. The obtained set of graphs turns out to be gauge-invariant and actual calculations are performed in the Feynman gauge. The main technical tricks, with the help of which we have effectively utilized the existence in the problem of the small parameter-mass ratio and managed to perform all calculations in the analytic form are described. The main intermediate results, as well as the final answer, {delta}E{sub rr} = ({alpha}({Zeta}{alpha})/{pi}{sup 2})(m/M)E{sub F}(6{zeta}(3) + 3{pi}{sup 2} In 2 + {pi}{sup 2}/2 + 17/8), are also presented.

  9. Spatial resolution measurements of the advanced radiographic capability x-ray imaging system at energies relevant to Compton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, G. N.; Izumi, N.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Holder, J. P.; Hargrove, D.; Bradley, D. K.; Lumbard, A.; Cruz, J. G.; Piston, K.; Lee, J. J.; Romano, E.; Bell, P. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Felker, B.; Rekow, V.; Allen, F. V.

    2016-11-01

    Compton radiography provides a means to measure the integrity, ρR and symmetry of the DT fuel in an inertial confinement fusion implosion near peak compression. Upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility will use the ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) laser to drive backlighter sources for Compton radiography experiments and will use the newly commissioned AXIS (ARC X-ray Imaging System) instrument as the detector. AXIS uses a dual-MCP (micro-channel plate) to provide gating and high DQE at the 40-200 keV x-ray range required for Compton radiography, but introduces many effects that contribute to the spatial resolution. Experiments were performed at energies relevant to Compton radiography to begin characterization of the spatial resolution of the AXIS diagnostic.

  10. Spatial resolution measurements of the advanced radiographic capability x-ray imaging system at energies relevant to Compton radiography.

    PubMed

    Hall, G N; Izumi, N; Landen, O L; Tommasini, R; Holder, J P; Hargrove, D; Bradley, D K; Lumbard, A; Cruz, J G; Piston, K; Lee, J J; Romano, E; Bell, P M; Carpenter, A C; Palmer, N E; Felker, B; Rekow, V; Allen, F V

    2016-11-01

    Compton radiography provides a means to measure the integrity, ρR and symmetry of the DT fuel in an inertial confinement fusion implosion near peak compression. Upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility will use the ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) laser to drive backlighter sources for Compton radiography experiments and will use the newly commissioned AXIS (ARC X-ray Imaging System) instrument as the detector. AXIS uses a dual-MCP (micro-channel plate) to provide gating and high DQE at the 40-200 keV x-ray range required for Compton radiography, but introduces many effects that contribute to the spatial resolution. Experiments were performed at energies relevant to Compton radiography to begin characterization of the spatial resolution of the AXIS diagnostic.

  11. On the Mössbauer Effect and the Rigid Recoil Question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Mark

    2017-03-01

    The rigid recoil of a crystal is the accepted mechanism for the Mössbauer effect. It's at odds with the special theory of relativity which does not allow perfectly rigid bodies. The standard model of particle physics which includes QED should not allow any signals to be transmitted faster than the speed of light. If perturbation theory can be used, then the X-ray emitted in a Mössbauer decay must come from a single nuclear decay vertex at which the 4-momentum is exactly conserved in a Feynman diagram. Then the 4-momentum of the final state Mössbauer nucleus must be slightly off the mass shell. This off-shell behavior would be followed by subsequent diffusion of momentum throughout the crystal to bring the nucleus back onto the mass shell and the crystal to a final relaxed state in which it moves rigidly with the appropriate recoil velocity. This mechanism explains the Mössbauer effect at the microscopic level and reconciles it with relativity. Because off-mass-shell quantum mechanics is required, the on-mass-shell theories developed originally for the Mössbauer effect are inadequate. Another possibility is that that the recoil response involves a non-perturbative effect in the standard model which could allow for a non-local instantaneous momentum transfer between the crystal and the decay (or absorption), as proposed for example by Preparata and others in super-radiance theory. The recoil time of the crystal is probably not instantaneous, and if it could be measured, one could distinguish between various theories. An experiment is proposed in this paper to measure this time. The idea is to measure the total energy radiated due to bremsstrahlung from a charged Mössbauer crystal which has experienced a recoil. Using Larmor's formula, along with corrections to it, allows one to design an experiment. The favored idea is to use many small nano-spheres of Mössbauer-active metals, whose outer surfaces are charged. The energy radiated then varies as the charge

  12. Measurement and calculation of recoil pressure produced during CO{sub 2} laser interaction with ice

    SciTech Connect

    Semak, V.V.; Knorovsky, G.A.; Maccallum, D.O.; Noble, D.R.; Kanouff, M.P.

    1999-12-09

    Evaporation is a classical physics problem which, because of its significant importance for many engineering applications, has drawn considerable attention by previous researchers. Classical theoretical models [Ta. I. Frenkel, Kinetic Theory of Liquids, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1946] represent evaporation in a simplistic way as the escape of atoms with highest velocities from a potential well with the depth determined by the atomic binding energy. The processes taking place in the gas phase above the rapidly evaporating surface have also been studied in great detail [S.I.Anisimov and V. A. Khokhlov, Instabilities in Lasser-Matter Interaction, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1995]. The description of evaporation utilizing these models is known to adequately characterize drilling with high beam intensity, e.g., >10{sup 7} W/cm{sup 2}. However, the interaction regimes when beam intensity is relatively low, such as during welding or cutting, lack both theoretical and experimental consideration of the evaporation. It was shown recently that if the evaporation is treated in accordance with Anisimov et.al.'s approach, then predicted evaporation recoil should be a substantial factor influencing melt flow and related heat transfer during laser beam welding and cutting. To verify the applicability of this model for low beam intensity interaction, the authors compared the results of measurements and calculations of recoil pressure generated during laser beam irradiation of a target. The target material used was water ice at {minus}10 C. The displacement of a target supported in a nearly frictionless air bearing under irradiation by a defocused laser beam from a 14 kW CO{sub 2} laser was recorded and Newton's laws of motion used to derive the recoil pressure.

  13. Search for Electronic Recoil Event Rate Modulation with 4 Years of XENON100 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Arneodo, F.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berger, T.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Calvén, J.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; di Gangi, P.; di Giovanni, A.; Diglio, S.; Eurin, G.; Fei, J.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Franco, D.; Fulgione, W.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Galloway, M.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L. W.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Hasterok, C.; Hogenbirk, E.; Itay, R.; Kaminsky, B.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Manfredini, A.; Maris, I.; Marrodán Undagoitia, T.; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Masson, D.; Mayani, D.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Pakarha, P.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Pizzella, V.; Piro, M.-C.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, N.; Dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Silva, M.; Simgen, H.; Sivers, M. V.; Stein, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Wang, H.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wulf, J.; Ye, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xenon Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We report on a search for electronic recoil event rate modulation signatures in the XENON100 data accumulated over a period of 4 yr, from January 2010 to January 2014. A profile likelihood method, which incorporates the stability of the XENON100 detector and the known electronic recoil background model, is used to quantify the significance of periodicity in the time distribution of events. There is a weak modulation signature at a period of 43 1-14+16 day in the low energy region of (2.0-5.8) keV in the single scatter event sample, with a global significance of 1.9 σ ; however, no other more significant modulation is observed. The significance of an annual modulation signature drops from 2.8 σ , from a previous analysis of a subset of this data, to 1.8 σ with all data combined. Single scatter events in the low energy region are thus used to exclude the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation as being due to dark matter electron interactions via axial vector coupling at 5.7 σ .

  14. Search for Electronic Recoil Event Rate Modulation with 4 Years of XENON100 Data.

    PubMed

    Aprile, E; Aalbers, J; Agostini, F; Alfonsi, M; Amaro, F D; Anthony, M; Arneodo, F; Barrow, P; Baudis, L; Bauermeister, B; Benabderrahmane, M L; Berger, T; Breur, P A; Brown, A; Brown, E; Bruenner, S; Bruno, G; Budnik, R; Bütikofer, L; Calvén, J; Cardoso, J M R; Cervantes, M; Cichon, D; Coderre, D; Colijn, A P; Conrad, J; Cussonneau, J P; Decowski, M P; de Perio, P; Di Gangi, P; Di Giovanni, A; Diglio, S; Eurin, G; Fei, J; Ferella, A D; Fieguth, A; Franco, D; Fulgione, W; Gallo Rosso, A; Galloway, M; Gao, F; Garbini, M; Geis, C; Goetzke, L W; Greene, Z; Grignon, C; Hasterok, C; Hogenbirk, E; Itay, R; Kaminsky, B; Kessler, G; Kish, A; Landsman, H; Lang, R F; Lellouch, D; Levinson, L; Lin, Q; Lindemann, S; Lindner, M; Lopes, J A M; Manfredini, A; Maris, I; Marrodán Undagoitia, T; Masbou, J; Massoli, F V; Masson, D; Mayani, D; Messina, M; Micheneau, K; Miguez, B; Molinario, A; Murra, M; Naganoma, J; Ni, K; Oberlack, U; Pakarha, P; Pelssers, B; Persiani, R; Piastra, F; Pienaar, J; Pizzella, V; Piro, M-C; Plante, G; Priel, N; Rauch, L; Reichard, S; Reuter, C; Rizzo, A; Rosendahl, S; Rupp, N; Dos Santos, J M F; Sartorelli, G; Scheibelhut, M; Schindler, S; Schreiner, J; Schumann, M; Scotto Lavina, L; Selvi, M; Shagin, P; Silva, M; Simgen, H; Sivers, M V; Stein, A; Thers, D; Tiseni, A; Trinchero, G; Tunnell, C; Wang, H; Wei, Y; Weinheimer, C; Wulf, J; Ye, J; Zhang, Y

    2017-03-10

    We report on a search for electronic recoil event rate modulation signatures in the XENON100 data accumulated over a period of 4 yr, from January 2010 to January 2014. A profile likelihood method, which incorporates the stability of the XENON100 detector and the known electronic recoil background model, is used to quantify the significance of periodicity in the time distribution of events. There is a weak modulation signature at a period of 431_{-14}^{+16} day in the low energy region of (2.0-5.8) keV in the single scatter event sample, with a global significance of 1.9σ; however, no other more significant modulation is observed. The significance of an annual modulation signature drops from 2.8σ, from a previous analysis of a subset of this data, to 1.8σ with all data combined. Single scatter events in the low energy region are thus used to exclude the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation as being due to dark matter electron interactions via axial vector coupling at 5.7σ.

  15. A recoil resilient lumen support, design, fabrication and mechanical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Arash; Ali, Mohamed Sultan Mohamed; Takahata, Kenichi; Al-Sarawi, Said; Abbott, Derek

    2013-06-01

    Stents are artificial implants that provide scaffolding to a cavity inside the body. This paper presents a new luminal device for reducing the mechanical failure of stents due to recoil, which is one of the most important issues in stenting. This device, which we call a recoil-resilient ring (RRR), is utilized standalone or potentially integrated with existing stents to address the problem of recoil. The proposed structure aims to minimize the need for high-pressure overexpansion that can induce intra-luminal trauma and excess growth of vascular tissue causing later restenosis. The RRR is an overlapped open ring with asymmetrical sawtooth structures that are intermeshed. These teeth can slide on top of each other, while the ring is radially expanded, but interlock step-by-step so as to keep the final expanded state against compressional forces that normally cause recoil. The RRRs thus deliver balloon expandability and, when integrated with a stent, bring both radial rigidity and longitudinal flexibility to the stent. The design of the RRR is investigated through finite element analysis (FEA), and then the devices are fabricated using micro-electro-discharge machining of 200-µm-thick Nitinol sheet. The standalone RRR is balloon expandable in vitro by 5-7 Atm in pressure, which is well within the recommended in vivo pressure ranges for stenting procedures. FEA compression tests indicate 13× less reduction of the cross-sectional area of the RRR compared with a typical stainless steel stent. These results also show perfect elastic recovery of the RRR after removal of the pressure compared to the remaining plastic deformations of the stainless steel stent. On the other hand, experimental loading tests show that the fabricated RRRs have 2.8× radial stiffness compared to a two-column section of a commercial stent while exhibiting comparable elastic recovery. Furthermore, testing of in vitro expansion in a mock artery tube shows around 2.9% recoil, approximately 5-11

  16. Spallation recoil II: Xenon evidence for young SiC grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Altmaier, M.; Herpers, U.; Kuhnhenn, J.; Merchel, S.; Michel, R.; Mohapatra, R. K.

    2005-11-01

    We have determined the recoil range of spallation xenon produced by irradiation of Ba glass targets with ˜1190 and ˜268 MeV protons, using a catcher technique, where spallation products are measured in target and catcher foils. The inferred range for 126Xe produced in silicon carbide is ˜0.19 μm, which implies retention of ˜70% for 126Xe produced in "typical" presolar silicon carbide grains of 1 μm size. Recoil loss of spallation xenon poses a significantly smaller problem than loss of the spallation neon from SiC grains. Ranges differ for the various Xe isotopes and scale approximately linearly as function of the mass difference between the target element, Ba, and the product. As a consequence, SiC grains of various sizes will have differences in spallation Xe composition. In an additional experiment at ˜66 MeV, where the recoil ranges of 22Na and 127Xe produced on Ba glass were determined using γ-spectrometry, we found no evidence for recoil ranges being systematically different at this lower energy. We have used the new data to put constraints on the possible presolar age of the SiC grains analyzed for Xe by Lewis et al. (1994). Uncertainties in the composition of the approximately normal Xe component in SiC (Xe-N) constitute the most serious problem in determining an age, surpassing remaining uncertainties in Xe retention and production rate. A possible interpretation is that spallation contributions are negligible and that trapped 124Xe/126Xe is ˜5% lower in Xe-N than in Q-Xe. But also for other reasonable assumptions for the 124Xe/126Xe ratio in Xe-N (e.g., as in Q-Xe), inferred exposure ages are considerably shorter than theoretically expected lifetimes for interstellar grains. A short presolar age is in line with observations by others (appearance, grain size distribution) that indicate little processing in the interstellar medium (ISM) of surviving (crystalline) SiC. This may be due to amorphization of SiC in the ISM on a much shorter time scale

  17. The new vacuum-mode recoil separator MARA at JYFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarén, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Leino, M.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.

    2008-10-01

    A new vacuum-mode recoil separator MARA (Mass Analysing Recoil Apparatus) is under design and construction at the Department of Physics in the University of Jyväskylä. The separator is intended to separate reaction products from the primary beam in mass region below A = 150 . The ion-optical configuration of the separator will be QQQDEDM, where a magnetic quadrupole (Q) triplet is followed by an electrostatic deflector (DE) and a magnetic dipole (DM). The total length of MARA will be less than 7.0 m and the first order resolving power more than 250 for a beam spot size of 2 mm. In this contribution the main properties of MARA are given and results from simulations are shown.

  18. Direct recoil oxygen ion fractions resulting from Ar + collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie-Nan; Rabalais, J. Wayne

    1986-03-01

    Direct recoil of oxygen from oxidized and hydroxylated magnesium surfaces as a result of 6 keV Ar + collisions produces O -, O +, and O species. The total ion fraction at a recoil angle of 22° is ~33.5%, of which O - is 23.7% and O + is 9.8% for the oxidized surface. The O -/O + intensity ratio is extremely sensitive to the amount of hydrogen present, with the O + yield dropping to ~1% on the hydroxylated surface. These results are considered within a model for electronic transitions in ion/surface collisions which considers Auger and resonant transitions along the ion trajectory and electron promotions in the quasi-diatomic molecule of the close encounter.

  19. Recoil detection of the lightest neutralino in MSSM singlet extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, Vernon; Lewis, Ian; McCaskey, Mat; Shaughnessy, Gabe; Yencho, Brian; Langacker, Paul

    2007-06-01

    We investigate the correlated predictions of singlet extended MSSM models for direct detection and the cosmological relic density of the lightest neutralino. To illustrate the general effects of the singlet, we take heavy sleptons and squarks. We apply CERN LEP (g-2){sub {mu}}, and perturbativity constraints. We find that the WMAP upper bound on the cold dark matter density limits much of the parameter space to regions where the lightest neutralino can be discovered in recoil experiments. The results for the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model and U(1){sup '}-extended minimal supersymmetric standard model are typically similar to the MSSM since their light neutralinos have similar compositions and masses. In the nearly minimal supersymmetric standard model the neutralino is often very light and its recoil detection is within the reach of the CDMS II experiment. In general, most points in the parameter spaces of the singlet models we consider are accessible to the WARP experiment.

  20. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Lamich, George J.

    1994-01-01

    A time of flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line (10). The beam line (10) includes an ion source (12) which injects ions into pulse deflection regions (14) and (16) separated by a drift space (18). A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly (22). The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions (14) and (16).

  1. Recoiling Supermassive Black Holes: a search in the Nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lena, Davide; Robinson, Andrew; Marconi, Alessandro; Axon, David; Capetti, Alessandro; Merritt, David; Batcheldor, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The coalescence of a binary black hole can be accompanied by a large gravitational recoil due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. A recoiling supermassive black hole (SBH) can subsequently undergo long-lived oscillations in the potential well of its host galaxy, suggesting that offset SBHs may be common in the cores of massive ellipticals. We have analyzed HST archival images of 14 nearby core ellipticals, finding evidence for small (<=10 pc) displacements between the AGN (locating the SBH) and the center of the galaxy (the mean photocenter) in 10 of them. Excluding objects that may be affected by large-scale isophotal asymmetries, we consider six galaxies to have detected displacements, including M87, where a displacement was previously reported by Batcheldor et al. 2010. In individual objects, these displacements can be attributed to residual gravitational recoil oscillations following a major or minor merger within the last few Gyr. For plausible merger rates, however, there is a high probability of larger displacements than those observed, if SBH coalescence took place in these galaxies. Remarkably, the AGN-photocenter displacements are approximately aligned with the radio source axis in four of the six galaxies with displacements, including three of the four having relatively powerful kpc-scale jets. This suggests intrinsic asymmetries in radio jet power as a possible displacement mechanism, although approximate alignments are also expected for gravitational recoil. Orbital motion in SBH binaries and interactions with massive perturbers can produce the observed displacement amplitudes but do not offer a ready explanation for the alignments.

  2. Recoiling Supermassive Black Holes: A Search in the Nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lena, D.; Robinson, A.; Marconi, A.; Axon, D. J.; Capetti, A.; Merritt, D.; Batcheldor, D.

    2014-11-01

    The coalescence of a binary black hole can be accompanied by a large gravitational recoil due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. A recoiling supermassive black hole (SBH) can subsequently undergo long-lived oscillations in the potential well of its host galaxy, suggesting that offset SBHs may be common in the cores of massive ellipticals. We have analyzed Hubble Space Telescope archival images of 14 nearby core ellipticals, finding evidence for small (lsim 10 pc) displacements between the active galactic nucleus (AGN; the location of the SBH) and the center of the galaxy (the mean photocenter) in 10 of them. Excluding objects that may be affected by large-scale isophotal asymmetries, we consider six galaxies to have detected displacements, including M87, where a displacement was previously reported by Batcheldor et al. In individual objects, these displacements can be attributed to residual gravitational recoil oscillations following a major or minor merger within the last few gigayears. For plausible merger rates, however, there is a high probability of larger displacements than those observed, if SBH coalescence took place in these galaxies. Remarkably, the AGN-photocenter displacements are approximately aligned with the radio source axis in four of the six galaxies with displacements, including three of the four having relatively powerful kiloparsec-scale jets. This suggests intrinsic asymmetries in radio jet power as a possible displacement mechanism, although approximate alignments are also expected for gravitational recoil. Orbital motion in SBH binaries and interactions with massive perturbers can produce the observed displacement amplitudes but do not offer a ready explanation for the alignments.

  3. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Lamich, G.J.

    1994-09-13

    A time-of-flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line is disclosed. The beam line includes an ion source which injects ions into pulse deflection regions and separated by a drift space. A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly. The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions. 23 figs.

  4. Recoiling supermassive black holes: a search in the nearby universe

    SciTech Connect

    Lena, D.; Robinson, A.; Axon, D. J.; Merritt, D.; Marconi, A.; Capetti, A.; Batcheldor, D.

    2014-11-10

    The coalescence of a binary black hole can be accompanied by a large gravitational recoil due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. A recoiling supermassive black hole (SBH) can subsequently undergo long-lived oscillations in the potential well of its host galaxy, suggesting that offset SBHs may be common in the cores of massive ellipticals. We have analyzed Hubble Space Telescope archival images of 14 nearby core ellipticals, finding evidence for small (≲ 10 pc) displacements between the active galactic nucleus (AGN; the location of the SBH) and the center of the galaxy (the mean photocenter) in 10 of them. Excluding objects that may be affected by large-scale isophotal asymmetries, we consider six galaxies to have detected displacements, including M87, where a displacement was previously reported by Batcheldor et al. In individual objects, these displacements can be attributed to residual gravitational recoil oscillations following a major or minor merger within the last few gigayears. For plausible merger rates, however, there is a high probability of larger displacements than those observed, if SBH coalescence took place in these galaxies. Remarkably, the AGN-photocenter displacements are approximately aligned with the radio source axis in four of the six galaxies with displacements, including three of the four having relatively powerful kiloparsec-scale jets. This suggests intrinsic asymmetries in radio jet power as a possible displacement mechanism, although approximate alignments are also expected for gravitational recoil. Orbital motion in SBH binaries and interactions with massive perturbers can produce the observed displacement amplitudes but do not offer a ready explanation for the alignments.

  5. A stretch/compress scheme for a high temporal resolution detector for the magnetic recoil spectrometer time (MRSt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Hares, J. D.; Wink, C. W.

    2016-11-01

    A time-resolved detector concept for the magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the NIF neutron spectrum is presented. The measurement is challenging due to the time spreading of the recoil protons (or deuterons) as they transit an energy dispersing magnet system. Ions arrive at the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer over an interval of tens of nanoseconds. We seek to measure the time-resolved neutron spectrum with 20 ps precision by manipulating an electron signal derived from the ions. A stretch-compress scheme is employed to remove transit time skewing while simultaneously reducing the bandwidth requirements for signal recording. Simulation results are presented along with design concepts for structures capable of establishing the required electromagnetic fields.

  6. A stretch/compress scheme for a high temporal resolution detector for the magnetic recoil spectrometer time (MRSt)

    DOE PAGES

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Hares, J. D.; ...

    2016-08-02

    Here we present a time-resolved detector concept for the magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the NIF neutron spectrum. The measurement is challenging due to the time spreading of the recoil protons (or deuterons) as they transit an energy dispersing magnet system. Ions arrive at the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer over an interval of tens of nanoseconds. We seek to measure the time-resolved neutron spectrum with 20 ps precision by manipulating an electron signal derived from the ions. A stretch-compress scheme is employed to remove transit time skewing while simultaneously reducing the bandwidth requirements for signal recording.more » Simulation results are presented along with design concepts for structures capable of establishing the required electromagnetic fields.« less

  7. A stretch/compress scheme for a high temporal resolution detector for the magnetic recoil spectrometer time (MRSt)

    SciTech Connect

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Hares, J. D.; Wink, C. W.

    2016-08-02

    Here we present a time-resolved detector concept for the magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the NIF neutron spectrum. The measurement is challenging due to the time spreading of the recoil protons (or deuterons) as they transit an energy dispersing magnet system. Ions arrive at the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer over an interval of tens of nanoseconds. We seek to measure the time-resolved neutron spectrum with 20 ps precision by manipulating an electron signal derived from the ions. A stretch-compress scheme is employed to remove transit time skewing while simultaneously reducing the bandwidth requirements for signal recording. Simulation results are presented along with design concepts for structures capable of establishing the required electromagnetic fields.

  8. A stretch/compress scheme for a high temporal resolution detector for the magnetic recoil spectrometer time (MRSt).

    PubMed

    Hilsabeck, T J; Frenje, J A; Hares, J D; Wink, C W

    2016-11-01

    A time-resolved detector concept for the magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the NIF neutron spectrum is presented. The measurement is challenging due to the time spreading of the recoil protons (or deuterons) as they transit an energy dispersing magnet system. Ions arrive at the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer over an interval of tens of nanoseconds. We seek to measure the time-resolved neutron spectrum with 20 ps precision by manipulating an electron signal derived from the ions. A stretch-compress scheme is employed to remove transit time skewing while simultaneously reducing the bandwidth requirements for signal recording. Simulation results are presented along with design concepts for structures capable of establishing the required electromagnetic fields.

  9. Recoil-induced Resonances as All-optical Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narducci, F. A.; Desavage, S. A.; Gordon, K. H.; Duncan, D. L.; Welch, G. R.; Davis, J. P.

    2010-03-01

    We have measured recoil-induced resonances (RIR) [1,2] in our system of laser-cooled 85Rb atoms. Although this technique has been demonstrated to be useful for the purpose of extracting the cloud temperature [3], our aim was to demonstrate an all optical switch based on recoil-induced resonances. In addition to a very narrow ``free-space'' recoil-induced resonance of approximately 15 kHz, we also discovered a much broader resonance (˜30 MHz), caused by standing waves established by our trapping fields. We compare and contrast the switching dynamics of these two resonances and demonstrate optical switching using both resonances. Finally, we consider the applicability of the narrow, free-space resonance to the slowing of a weak probe field. [1] J. Guo, P.R. Berman, B. Dubetsky and G. Grynberg PRA, 46, 1426 (1992). [2] (a) P. Verkerk, B. Loumis, C. Salomon, C. Cohen-Tannoudji, J. Courtois PRL, 68, 3861 (1992). (b) G. Grynberg, J-Y Courtois, B. Lounis, P. Verkerk PRL, 72, 3017 (1994). [3] (a) T. Brzozowski, M. Brzozowska, J. Zachorowski, M. Zawada, W. Gawlik PRA, 71, 013401 (2005). (b) M. Brzozowska, T. Brzozowski J. Zachorowski, W. Gawlik PRA, 72, 061401(R), (2005).

  10. Recoiling from a Kick in the Head-On Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Dae-Il; Kelly, Bernard J.; Boggs, William D.; Baker, John G.; Centrella, Joan; Van Meter, James

    2007-01-01

    Recoil "kicks" induced by gravitational radiation are expected in the inspiral and merger of black holes. Recently the numerical relativity community has begun to measure the significant kicks found when both unequal masses and spins are considered. Because understanding the cause and magnitude of each component of this kick may be complicated in inspiral simulations, we consider these effects in the context of a simple test problem. We study recoils from collisions of binaries with initially head-on trajectories, starting with the simplest case of equal masses with no spin; adding spin and varying the mass ratio, both separately and jointly. We find spin-induced recoils to be significant even in head-on configurations. Additionally, it appears that the scaling of transverse kicks with spins is consistent with post-Newtonian (PN) theory, even though the kick is generated in the nonlinear merger interaction, where PN theory should not apply. This suggests that a simple heuristic description might be effective in the estimation of spin-kicks.

  11. Anatomy of the Binary Black Hole Recoil: A Multipolar Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Buonanno, Alessandra; vanMeter, James R.; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2007-01-01

    We present a multipolar analysis of the recoil velocity computed in recent numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescence, for both unequal masses and non-zero, non-precessing spins. We show that multipole moments up to and including 1 = 4 are sufficient to accurately reproduce the final recoil velocity (= 98%) and that only a few dominant modes contribute significantly to it (2 95%). We describe how the relative amplitude, and more importantly, the relative phase, of these few modes control the way in which the recoil builds up throughout the inspiral, merger, and ring-down phases. We also find that the numerical results can be reproduced, to a high level of accuracy, by an effective Newtonian formula for the multipole moments obtained by replacing in the Newtonian formula the radial separation with an effective radius computed from the numerical data. Beyond the merger, the numerical results are reproduced by a superposition of three Kerr quasi-normal modes. Analytic formulae, obtained by expressing the multipole moments in terms of the fundamental QNMs of a Kerr BH, are able to explain the onset and amount of '.anti-kick" for each of the simulations. Lastly, we apply this multipolar analysis to understand the remarkable difference between the amplitudes of planar and non-planar kicks for equal-mass spinning black holes.

  12. The recoil proton polarization in. pi. p elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seftor, C.J.

    1988-09-01

    The polarization of the recoil proton for ..pi../sup +/p and ..pi../sup -/p elastic scattering has been measured for various angles at 547 MeV/c and 625 MeV/c by a collaboration involving The George Washington University; the University of California, Los Angeles; and Abilene Christian University. The experiment was performed at the P/sup 3/ East experimental area of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Beam intensities varied from 0.4 to 1.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup -/'s/sec and from 3.0 to 10.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup +/'s/sec. The beam spot size at the target was 1 cm in the horizontal direction by 2.5 cm in the vertical direction. A liquid-hydrogen target was used in a flask 5.7 cm in diameter and 10 cm high. The scattered pion and recoil proton were detected in coincidence using the Large Acceptance Spectrometer (LAS) to detect and momentum analyze the pions and the JANUS recoil proton polarimeter to detect and measure the polarization of the protons. Results from this experiment are compared with previous measurements of the polarization, with analyzing power data previously taken by this group, and to partial-wave analysis predictions. 12 refs., 53 figs., 18 tabs.

  13. The Final Merger of Massive Black Holes: Recoils, Gravitational Waves, and Electromagnetic Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of two massive black holes produces a powerful burst of gravitational radiation, emitting more energy than all the stars in the observable universe combined. The resulting gravitational waveforms will be easily detectable by the space-based LISA out to redshifts z greater than 10, revealing the masses and spins of the black holes to high precision. If the merging black holes have unequal masses, or asymmetric spins, the final black hole that forms can recoil with a velocity exceeding 1000 km/s. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new results that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, recoil velocities, and the possibility of accompanying electromagnetic outbursts.

  14. Hydrogen analysis for granite using proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, T; Sasa, K; Ohshima, H; Kimura, H; Tajima, Y; Takahashi, T; Ishii, S; Yamato, Y; Kurosawa, M

    2008-07-01

    In an effort to develop DS02, a new radiation dosimetry system for the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, measurements of neutron-induced activities have provided valuable information to reconstruct the radiation situation at the time of the bombings. In Hiroshima, the depth profile of (152)Eu activity measured in a granite pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge (128 m from the hypocenter) was compared with that calculated using the DS02 methodology. For calculation of the (152)Eu production due to the thermal-neutron activation reaction, (151)Eu(n,gamma)(152)Eu, information on the hydrogen content in granite is important because the transport and slowing-down process of neutrons penetrating into the pillar is strongly affected by collisions with the protons of hydrogen. In this study, proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry has been used to deduce the proton density in the Motoyasu pillar granite. Slices of granite samples were irradiated by a 20 MeV proton beam, and the energies of scattered and recoil protons were measured with a coincidence method. The water concentration in the pillar granite was evaluated to be 0.30 +/- 0.07%wt. This result is consistent with earlier data on adsorptive water (II) and bound water obtained by the Karl Fisher method.

  15. The Final Merger of Massive Black Holes: Recoils, Gravitational Waves, and Electromagnetic Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2010-03-01

    The final merger of two massive black holes produces a powerful burst of gravitational radiation, emitting more energy than all the stars in the observable universe combined. The resulting gravitational waveforms will be easily detectable by the space-based LISA out to redshifts z > 10, revealing the masses and spins of the black holes to high precision. If the merging black holes have unequal masses, or asymmetric spins, the final black hole that forms can recoil with a velocity exceeding 1000 km/s. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new results that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, recoil velocities, and the possibility of accompanying electromagnetic outbursts. This research is supported in part by NASA grant 06-BEFS06-19 to Goddard Space Flight Center.

  16. XENON100 Dark Matter Search: Scintillation Response of Liquid Xenon to Electronic Recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kyungeun Elizabeth

    Dark matter is one of the missing pieces necessary to complete the puzzle of the universe. Numerous astrophysical observations at all scales suggest that 23 % of the universe is made of nonluminous, cold, collisionless, nonbaryonic, yet undiscovered dark matter. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are the most well-motivated dark matter candidates and significant efforts have been made to search for WIMPs. The XENON100 dark matter experiment is currently the most sensitive experiment in the global race for the first direct detection of WIMP dark matter. XENON100 is a dual-phase (liquid-gas) time projection chamber containing a total of 161 kg of liquid xenon (LXe) with a 62kg WIMP target mass. It has been built with radiopure materials to achieve an ultra-low electromagnetic background and operated at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. WIMPs are expected to scatter off xenon nuclei in the target volume. Simultaneous measurement of ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils allows for the detection of WIMPs in XENON100. Data from the XENON100 experiment have resulted in the most stringent limits on the spin-independent elastic WIMP-nucleon scattering cross sections for most of the significant WIMP masses. As the experimental precision increases, a better understanding of the scintillation and ionization response of LXe to low energy (< 10 keV) particles is crucial for the interpretation of data from LXe based WIMP searches. A setup has been built and operated at Columbia University to measure the scintillation response of LXe to both electronic and nuclear recoils down to energies of a few keV, in particular for the XENON100 experiment. In this thesis, I present the research carried out in the context of the XENON100 dark matter search experiment. For the theoretical foundation of the XENON100 experiment, the first two chapters are dedicated to the motivation for and detection medium choice of the XENON100 experiment

  17. Molecular modeling of the effects of 40Ar recoil in illite particles on their K-Ar isotope dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczerba, Marek; Derkowski, Arkadiusz; Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Środoń, Jan

    2015-06-01

    The radioactive decay of 40K to 40Ar is the basis of isotope age determination of micaceous clay minerals formed during diagenesis. The difference in K-Ar ages between fine and coarse grained illite particles has been interpreted using detrital-authigenic components system, its crystallization history or post-crystallization diffusion. Yet another mechanism should also be considered: natural 40Ar recoil. Whether this recoil mechanism can result in a significant enough loss of 40Ar to provide observable decrease of K-Ar age of the finest illite crystallites at diagenetic temperatures - is the primary objective of this study which is based on molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. All the simulations were performed for the same kinetic energy (initial velocity) of the 40Ar atom, but for varying recoil angles that cover the entire range of their possible values. The results show that 40Ar recoil can lead to various deformations of the illite structure, often accompanied by the displacement of OH groups or breaking of the Si-O bonds. Depending on the recoil angle, there are four possible final positions of the 40Ar atom with respect to the 2:1 layer at the end of the simulation: it can remain in the interlayer space or end up in the closest tetrahedral, octahedral or the opposite tetrahedral sheet. No simulation angles were found for which the 40Ar atom after recoil passes completely through the 2:1 layer. The energy barrier for 40Ar passing through the hexagonal cavity from the tetrahedral sheet into the interlayer was calculated to be 17 kcal/mol. This reaction is strongly exothermic, therefore there is almost no possibility for 40Ar to remain in the tetrahedral sheet of the 2:1 layer over geological time periods. It will either leave the crystal, if close enough to the edge, or return to the interlayer space. On the other hand, if 40Ar ends up in the octahedral sheet after recoil, a substantially higher energy barrier of 55 kcal/mol prevents it from leaving

  18. A Study of Nuclear Recoil Backgrounds in Dark Matter Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Westerdale, Shawn S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great success of the Standard Model of particle physics, a preponderance of astrophysical evidence suggests that it cannot explain most of the matter in the universe. This so-called dark matter has eluded direct detection, though many theoretical extensions to the Standard Model predict the existence of particles with a mass on the $1-1000$ GeV scale that interact only via the weak nuclear force. Particles in this class are referred to as Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), and their high masses and low scattering cross sections make them viable dark matter candidates. The rarity of WIMP-nucleus interactions makes them challenging to detect: any background can mask the signal they produce. Background rejection is therefore a major problem in dark matter detection. Many experiments greatly reduce their backgrounds by employing techniques to reject electron recoils. However, nuclear recoil backgrounds, which produce signals similar to what we expect from WIMPs, remain problematic. There are two primary sources of such backgrounds: surface backgrounds and neutron recoils. Surface backgrounds result from radioactivity on the inner surfaces of the detector sending recoiling nuclei into the detector. These backgrounds can be removed with fiducial cuts, at some cost to the experiment's exposure. In this dissertation we briefly discuss a novel technique for rejecting these events based on signals they make in the wavelength shifter coating on the inner surfaces of some detectors. Neutron recoils result from neutrons scattering from nuclei in the detector. These backgrounds may produce a signal identical to what we expect from WIMPs and are extensively discussed here. We additionally present a new tool for calculating ($\\alpha$, n)yields in various materials. We introduce the concept of a neutron veto system designed to shield against, measure, and provide an anti-coincidence veto signal for background neutrons. We discuss the research and development

  19. Relevance of Morning and Evening Energy and Macronutrient Intake during Childhood for Body Composition in Early Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Diederichs, Tanja; Roßbach, Sarah; Herder, Christian; Alexy, Ute; Buyken, Anette E.

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: This study investigated the relevance of morning and evening energy and macronutrient intake during childhood for body composition in early adolescence; (2) Methods: Analyses were based on data from 372 DONALD (DOrtmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed study) participants. Explorative life-course plots were performed to examine whether morning or evening energy and macronutrient intake at 3/4 years, 5/6 years, or 7/8 years is critical for fat mass index (FMI [kg/m2]) and fat free mass index (FFMI [kg/m2]) in early adolescence (10/11 years). Subsequently, exposures in periods identified as consistently critical were examined in depth using adjusted regression models; (3) Results: Life-course plots identified morning fat and carbohydrate (CHO) intake at 3/4 years and 7/8 years as well as changes in these intakes between 3/4 years and 7/8 years as potentially critical for FMI at 10/11 years. Adjusted regression models corroborated higher FMI values at 10/11 years among those who had consumed less fat (p = 0.01) and more CHO (p = 0.01) in the morning at 7/8 years as well as among those who had decreased their morning fat intake (p = 0.02) and increased their morning CHO intake (p = 0.05) between 3/4 years and 7/8 years; (4) Conclusion: During childhood, adherence to a low fat, high CHO intake in the morning may have unfavorable consequences for FMI in early adolescence. PMID:27834901

  20. Systematic investigation of background sources in neutron flux measurements with a proton-recoil silicon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, P.; Mathieu, L.; Acosta, L.; Aïche, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Tsekhanovich, I.

    2017-01-01

    Proton-recoil detectors (PRDs), based on the well known standard H(n,p) elastic scattering cross section, are the preferred instruments to perform precise quasi-absolute neutron flux measurements above 1 MeV. The limitations of using a single silicon detector as PRD at a continuous neutron beam facility are investigated, with the aim of extending such measurements to neutron energies below 1 MeV. This requires a systematic investigation of the background sources affecting the neutron flux measurement. Experiments have been carried out at the AIFIRA facility to identify these sources. A study on the role of the silicon detector thickness on the background is presented and an energy limit on the use of a single silicon detector to achieve a neutron flux precision better than 1% is given.

  1. Energy deposition at the bone-tissue interface from nuclear fragments produced by high-energy nucleons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Hajnal, Ferenc; Wilson, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The transport of nuclear fragmentation recoils produced by high-energy nucleons in the region of the bone-tissue interface is considered. Results for the different flux and absorbed dose for recoils produced by 1 GeV protons are presented in a bidirectional transport model. The energy deposition in marrow cavities is seen to be enhanced by recoils produced in bone. Approximate analytic formulae for absorbed dose near the interface region are also presented for a simplified range-energy model.

  2. Elastic recoil detection analysis using ion-induced electron emission for particle identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benka, O.; Brandstötter, A.; Steinbauer, E.

    1994-03-01

    We propose a new method to identify particles in ERD analysis, using their electron emission yield from a thin carbon foil. Before the particles reach a silicon surface barrier detector (SB) they penetrate a set of thin foils (typically 6 foils) with a thickness of 3 {μg}/{cm 2} each). The emission yield depends on the nuclear charge of the penetrating ion and it is roughly proportional to the energy loss in the foil. The emitted electrons are accelerated to a muchannel plate (MCP) by a voltage of 300 V. The electron signal from the MCP is proportional to the number of emitted electrons and it occurs in coincidence with the energy signal from the energy detector. For data acquisition we developed a dual parameter multichannel analyzer (M2D) as an add on board for an industry standard personal computer. The two-dimensional spectrum of coincidences and the one-dimensional spectra from both detectors are recorded simultaneously. The M2D has 256K channels which can be freely configured as a two-dimensional matrix. For example a resolution of 1024 × 256 channels is possible. For optimum suppression of random coincidences the coincidence time window can be set from 0.125 μs up to 32 μs. For this new setup the ability for particle identification is discussed for different projectiles (He, C, O, Cl) and targets. H recoil ions can be well separated from He projectiles so that for H analysis the H recoil spectrum and the He forward energy spectrum can be measured simultaneously. An example for depth-profiling of 100 keV H implantations in silicon is given.

  3. Alpha decay studies of {sup 189}Bi{sup m}, {sup 190}Po and {sup 180 }Pb using a rapidly rotating recoil catcher wheel system

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J.C.; Toth, K.S.; Moltz, D.M.

    1996-09-01

    The {alpha} decays of very neutron deficient nuclei near the Z = 82 closed proton shell are of interest because they provide us with structure information that is relevant with regard to the shell model. We used a rapidly rotating recoil catcher wheel system to study the {alpha} decays of {sup 189}Bi{sup {ital m}}, {sup 190}Po, and {sup 180}Pb. The system works as follows. Recoils from the back of the target, after passing through an Al degrader placed behind the target, are stopped in 300-{mu}g/cm{sup 2} Al catcher foils fixed at the edges of the wheel. These are inclined at an angle of 20 degrees with respect to the beam to maximize the catcher efficiency while keeping the thickness that {alpha} particles must travel in order to emerge of the Al foil to a minimum. This arrangement results in an effective thickness of {approx} 900 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} for recoils, but only 150 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} for the emitted {alpha} particles. Stopped recoils are then rotated between an array of 6 Si detectors in series (solid angle of 8% of 4{pi}). Half-life information can be obtained by determining the difference in counts between the detectors. This instrument has proven to be an effective tool for the study of nuclei far from stability with half-lives in the range of 1-50 ms.

  4. Delayed autoionization of recoil ions by the decay of high-spin isomeric states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidikov, V. Z.

    1985-12-01

    The time dependence of the ionization for isotopically different heavy ion fusion recoil ions has been observed. Delayed nuclear-induced autoionization of recoil ions caused by the decay of high-spin nuclear isomeric states by internal conversion was established. Internal conversion in isolated recoil atoms results in a drastic rearrangement in the atomic cloud with a loss of a great number of orbital electrons. Possibilities for the use of the observed phenomena in atomic and nuclear physics are discussed.

  5. Projectile paths corrected for recoil and air resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, H. R.

    1986-01-01

    The angle of projection of a bullet is not the same as the angle of the bore of the firearm just before firing. This is because recoil alters the direction of the barrel as the bullet moves along the barrel. Neither is the angle of projection of an arrow the same as the direction of the arrow just before it is projected. The difficulty in obtaining the angle of projection limits the value of the standard equation for trajectories relative to a horizontal plane. Furthermore, air resistance makes this equation unrealistic for all but short ranges.

  6. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xianpeng; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-01

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10(-7) at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  7. Development of a new Recoil Distance Technique using Coulomb Excitation in Inverse Kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Rother, Wolfram; Dewald, Alfred; Ilie, Gabriela; Pissulla, Thomas; Melon, Barbara; Jolie, Jan; Pascovici, Gheorghe; Iwasaki, Hironori; Hackstein, Matthias; Zell, Karl-Oskar; Julin, Rauno; Jones, Peter; Greenlees, Paul; Rahkila, Panu; Uusitalo, Juha; Scholey, Cath; Harissopulos, Sotirios; Lagoyannis, Anastasios; Konstantinopoulos, Theodore; Grahn, Tuomas

    2009-01-28

    We report on an experiment using Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics in combination with the plunger technique for measuring lifetimes of excited states of the projectiles. Aside from the investigation of E(5) features in {sup 128}Xe, the aim was to explore the special features of such experiments which are also suited to be used with radioactive beams. The measurement was performed at the JYFL with the Koeln coincidence plunger device and the JUROGAM spectrometer using a {sup 128}Xe beam impinging on a {sup nat}Fe target at a beam energy of 525 MeV. Recoils were detected by means of 32 solar cells placed at extreme forward angles. Particle-gated {gamma}-singles and {gamma}{gamma}-coincidences were measured at different target-degrader distances. Details of the experiment and first results are presented.

  8. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianfu Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-15

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10{sup −7} at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  9. Search for Event Rate Modulation in XENON100 Electronic Recoil Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Anthony, M.; Arazi, L.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Balan, C.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Contreras, H.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; di Giovanni, A.; Duchovni, E.; Fattori, S.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Fulgione, W.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L. W.; Grignon, C.; Gross, E.; Hampel, W.; Hasterok, C.; Itay, R.; Kaether, F.; Kaminsky, B.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Le Calloch, M.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Levy, C.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Lyashenko, A.; Macmullin, S.; Marrodán Undagoitia, T.; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Mayani, D.; Melgarejo Fernandez, A. J.; Meng, Y.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Pakarha, P.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; Dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sartorelli, G.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Simgen, H.; Teymourian, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Wall, R.; Wang, H.; Weber, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Zhang, Y.; Xenon Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We have searched for periodic variations of the electronic recoil event rate in the (2-6) keV energy range recorded between February 2011 and March 2012 with the XENON100 detector, adding up to 224.6 live days in total. Following a detailed study to establish the stability of the detector and its background contributions during this run, we performed an unbinned profile likelihood analysis to identify any periodicity up to 500 days. We find a global significance of less than 1 σ for all periods, suggesting no statistically significant modulation in the data. While the local significance for an annual modulation is 2.8 σ , the analysis of a multiple-scatter control sample and the phase of the modulation disfavor a dark matter interpretation. The DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation interpreted as a dark matter signature with axial-vector coupling of weakly interacting massive particles to electrons is excluded at 4.8 σ .

  10. Double and single ionization of He and other targets studied using cold target recoil momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Doerner, R.; Feagin, J. M.; Brauning, H.; Jagutzki, O.; Jung, M.; Kanter, E. P.; Khemliche, H.; Kravis, S.; Mergel, V.; Prior, M. H.; Schmidt-Boeking, H.; Spielberger, L.; Ullrich, J.; Unverzagt, M.; Vogt, T.

    1997-04-01

    Double ionization of an atom by a single photon is the simplest and most fundamental many-electron process. The ejection of two electrons following the absorption of one photon is strictly prohibited in an independent electron approximation. Thus determining the probability of double photoionization alone is already a challenging test of the understanding of electron-electron correlation. Furthermore, in the slow breakup of a bound system into three charged particles, the final state wave function must represent a high degree of few-body Coulomb correlation involving the simultaneous interaction of all three particles. The case of double photoionization is again particularly well suited to study this problem as the energy and the angular momentum delivered to the system can be very well controlled. Helium, as the most basic three body system, has been the target of extensive studies over the past decades. The purpose of this project has been to study double and single ionization using cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS). This technique has been widely applied within the area of ion-atom collisions to study the dynamics of energy and momentum transfer in collisions between few-electron systems, and the entire technical machinery has been transferred to photon-atom collisions. The technique uses space- and time-imaging of He{sup +} and He{sup ++} recoil ions created in photon-He collisions to measure the full momentum vector of each ion produced. Event-mode recording is used and a solid angle of nearly 4{pi} is realized, allowing an extremely high data-collection efficiency. In order to reduce the initial momentum spread of the He target a precooled supersonic He jet is used.

  11. Computerized measurement of pulmonary conductance and elastic recoil.

    PubMed

    Colebatch, H J; Nail, B S; Ng, C K

    1978-04-01

    A system devloped for on-line measurement of transpulmonary pressure, gas flow at the mouth, change in expired volume and plethysmograph volume uses a minicomputer to control a multiplexed analog to digital converter. The computer identified samples as static or dynamic values by monitoring a voltage activating a solenoid valve, used to close the airway. Analysis of these samples by other task-specific programs yielded the static deflation pressure-volume (PV) curve, the conductance-recoil pressure, GL-Pst(L), relationship and the maximum expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve; the MEF-Pst(L) curve and conductance upstream from the equal pressure point were derived. The PV relationship was represented by a fourth-order polynomial and the GL-Pst(L) relationship by linear regression. In 11 subjects the results obtained using on-line data collection, compared with manual analysis of oscillograph recordings, showed small differences in static compliance and in the maximum Pst(L); but overall the two methods showed excellent agreement. Besides advantages of speed and objectivity, this system facilitates a more rigorous analytical treatment of elastic recoil and conductance.

  12. Improvements of the DRAGON recoil separator at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vockenhuber, C.; Buchmann, L.; Caggiano, J.; Chen, A. A.; D'Auria, J. M.; Davis, C. A.; Greife, U.; Hussein, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Ottewell, D.; Ouellet, C. O.; Parikh, A.; Pearson, J.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Trinczek, M.; Zylberberg, J.

    2008-10-01

    The DRAGON (Detector of Recoils And Gammas Of Nuclear reactions) is used to measure radiative proton and alpha capture reaction rates involving both stable and radioactive, heavy-ion reactants at the TRIUMF-ISAC high intensity radioactive beam facility. Completed in 2001 it has been used for several challenging studies for nuclear astrophysics, e.g. 12C(α, γ)16O, 21Na(p, γ)22Mg, 26gAl(p, γ)27Si and 40Ca(α, γ)44Ti. Since initial operation, a number of improvements have been incorporated which are described here. These include a beam centering monitor based on a CCD camera, a mechanical iris to skim of beam halo, a solid state stripper acting as a charge state booster for beams with A ≳ 30, beta and gamma detectors to monitor beam intensity and to determine beam contamination in experiments with radioactive beam and the ionization chamber for both recoil identification and isobar separation.

  13. Contribution of recoil atoms to irradiation damage in absorber materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeone, D.; Hablot, O.; Micalet, V.; Bellon, P.; Serruys, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Absorbing materials are used to control the reactivity of nuclear reactors by taking advantage of nuclear reactions (e.g., 10B(n,α) 7Li) where neutrons are absorbed. During such reactions, energetic recoils are produced. As a result, radiation damage in absorbing materials originates both from these nuclear reactions and from elastic collisions between neutrons and atoms. This damage eventually leads to a partial destruction of the materials, and this is the main limitation on their lifetime in nuclear reactors. Using a formalism developed to calculate displacements per atoms (dpa) in a multi atomic target, we have calculated damages in terms of displacements per atom in a (n,α) absorbing material taking into account geometrical effects of 10 boron self shielding and transmutation reactions induced by neutrons inside the absorber. Radiation damage is calculated for boron carbide and hafnium diboride ceramics in a Pressurized Water Reactor environment. It is shown that recoils produced by nuclear reactions account for the main part of the radiation damage created in these ceramics. Damages are calculated as a function of the distance from the center of an absorber pellet. Due to the self-shielding effect, these damage curves exhibit sharp maxima, the position of which changes in time.

  14. Technique for measuring atomic recoil frequency using coherence functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, S.; Barrett, B.; Chan, I.; Mok, C.; Yavin, I.; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a technique for measuring the atomic recoil frequency using a single-state echo-type atom interferometer that manipulates laser-cooled atoms in the ground state. The interferometer relies on momentum-state interference due to two standing-wave pulses that produce density gratings. The interference is modified by applying a third standing-wave pulse during the interferometer pulse sequence. As a result, the grating contrast exhibits periodic revivals at the atomic recoil frequency ωr as a function of the time at which the third pulse is applied, allowing ωr to be measured easily and precisely. The contrast is accurately described by a coherence function, which is the Fourier transform of the momentum distribution, produced by the third pulse and by the theory of echo formation. If the third pulse is a traveling wave, loss of grating contrast is observed, an effect also described by a coherence function. The decay of the grating contrast as a function of continuous-wave light intensity is used to infer the cross section for photon absorption.

  15. Recoil velocities from equal-mass binary black-hole mergers: A systematic investigation of spin-orbit aligned configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Pollney, Denis; Reisswig, Christian; Szilagyi, Bela; Ansorg, Marcus; Dorband, Ernst Nils; Koppitz, Michael; Rezzolla, Luciano; Deris, Barrett; Diener, Peter; Schnetter, Erik; Nagar, Alessandro

    2007-12-15

    Binary black-hole systems with spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum are of special interest, as studies indicate that this configuration is preferred in nature due to non-vacuum environmental interactions, as well as post-Newtonian (PN) spin-orbit couplings. If the spins of the two bodies differ, there can be a prominent beaming of the gravitational radiation during the late plunge, causing a recoil of the final merged black hole. In this paper we perform an accurate and systematic study of recoil velocities from a sequence of equal-mass black holes whose spins are aligned with the orbital angular momentum, and whose individual spins range from a=+0.584 to -0.584. In this way we extend and refine the results of a previous study which concentrated on the antialigned portion of this sequence, to arrive at a consistent maximum recoil of 448{+-}5 km/s for antialigned models as well as to a phenomenological expression for the recoil velocity as a function of spin ratio. Quite surprisingly, this relation highlights a nonlinear behavior, not predicted by the PN estimates, and can be readily employed in astrophysical studies on the evolution of binary black holes in massive galaxies. An essential result of our analysis, without which no systematic behavior can be found, is the identification of different stages in the waveform, including a transient due to lack of an initial linear momentum in the initial data. Furthermore, by decomposing the recoil computation into coupled modes, we are able to identify a pair of terms which are largely responsible for the kick, indicating that an accurate computation can be obtained from modes up to l=3. Finally, we provide accurate measures of the radiated energy and angular momentum, finding these to increase linearly with the spin ratio, and derive simple expressions for the final spin and the radiated angular momentum which can be easily implemented in N-body simulations of compact stellar systems. Our code is calibrated

  16. A RUNAWAY BLACK HOLE IN COSMOS: GRAVITATIONAL WAVE OR SLINGSHOT RECOIL?

    SciTech Connect

    Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Hao, H.; Aldcroft, T.; Jahnke, K.; Zamorani, G.; Comastri, A.; Bolzonella, M.; Blecha, L.; Loeb, A.; Bongiorno, A.; Brusa, M.; Leauthaud, A.; Mainieri, V.; Piconcelli, E.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.; Trump, J.; Vignali, C.

    2010-07-01

    We present a detailed study of a peculiar source detected in the COSMOS survey at z = 0.359. Source CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, has two compact optical sources embedded in the same galaxy. The distance between the two, measured in the HST/ACS image, is 0.''495 {+-} 0.''005 that, at the redshift of the source, corresponds to a projected separation of 2.46 {+-} 0.02 kpc. A large ({approx}1200 km s{sup -1}) velocity offset between the narrow and broad components of H{beta} has been measured in three different optical spectra from the VLT/VIMOS and Magellan/IMACS instruments. CID-42 is also the only X-ray source in COSMOS, having in its X-ray spectra a strong redshifted broad absorption iron line and an iron emission line, drawing an inverted P-Cygni profile. The Chandra and XMM-Newton data show that the absorption line is variable in energy by {Delta}E = 500 eV over four years and that the absorber has to be highly ionized in order not to leave a signature in the soft X-ray spectrum. That these features-the morphology, the velocity offset, and the inverted P-Cygni profile-occur in the same source is unlikely to be a coincidence. We envisage two possible explanations, both exceptional, for this system: (1) a gravitational wave (GW) recoiling black hole (BH), caught 1-10 Myr after merging; or (2) a Type 1/Type 2 system in the same galaxy where the Type 1 is recoiling due to the slingshot effect produced by a triple BH system. The first possibility gives us a candidate GW recoiling BH with both spectroscopic and imaging signatures. In the second case, the X-ray absorption line can be explained as a BAL-like outflow from the foreground nucleus (a Type 2 AGN) at the rearer one (a Type 1 AGN), which illuminates the otherwise undetectable wind, giving us the first opportunity to show that fast winds are present in obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and possibly universal in AGNs.

  17. Beam suppression of the DRAGON recoil separator for 3He(α,γ)7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjue, S. K. L.; Nara Singh, B. S.; Adsley, P.; Buchmann, L.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Fulton, B. R.; Galinski, N.; Hager, U.; Hass, M.; Howell, D.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Laird, A. M.; Martin, L.; Ottewell, D.; Reeve, S.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Triambak, S.

    2013-02-01

    Preliminary studies in preparation for an absolute cross-section measurement of the radiative capture reaction 3He(α,γ)7Be with the DRAGON recoil separator have demonstrated beam suppression >1014 at the 90% confidence level. A measurement of this cross section by observation of 7Be recoils at the focal plane of the separator should be virtually background free.

  18. Analytical calculation of radiative-recoil corrections to muonium hyperfine splitting: Muon-line contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, M.I.; Karshenboim, S.G.; Shelyuto, V.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Analytic expression for radiative-recoil corrections to muonium ground-state hyperfine splitting induced by muon-line radiative insertions is obtained. This result completes the program of analytic calculation of all radiative-recoil corrections. The perspectives of further muonium hyperfine splitting investigations are also discussed.

  19. Optimal control of gun recoil in direct fire using magnetorheological absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harinder J.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2014-05-01

    Optimal control of a gun recoil absorber is investigated for minimizing recoil loads and maximizing rate of fire. A multi-objective optimization problem was formulated by considering the mechanical model of the recoil absorber employing a spring and a magnetorheological (MR) damper. The damper forces are predicted by evaluating pressure drops using a nonlinear Bingham-plastic model. The optimization methodology provides multiple optimal design configurations with a trade-off between recoil load minimization and increased rate of fire. The configurations with low or high recoil loads imply low or high rate of fire, respectively. The gun recoil absorber performance is also analyzed for perturbations in the firing forces. The adaptive control of the MR damper for varying gun firing forces provides a smooth operation by returning the recoil mass to its battery position (ready to reload and fire) without incurring an end-stop impact. Furthermore, constant load transmissions are observed with respect to the recoil stroke by implementing optimal control during the simulated firing events.

  20. Differential cross sections and recoil polarizations for the reaction γp→K+Σ0

    DOE PAGES

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; ...

    2010-08-06

    Here, high-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and recoil polarizations for the reactionmore » $$\\gamma p \\rightarrow K^+ \\Sigma^0$$ have been obtained using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies ($$\\sqrt{s}$$) from 1.69 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the $K^+$ production angle. Independent measurements were made using the $$K^{+}p\\pi^{-}$$($$\\gamma$$) and $$K^{+}p$$($$\\pi^-,\\gamma$$) final-state topologies, and were found to exhibit good agreement. Our differential cross sections show good agreement with earlier CLAS, SAPHIR and LEPS results, while offering better statistical precision and a 300-MeV increase in $$\\sqrt{s}$$ coverage. Above $$\\sqrt{s} \\approx 2.5$$ GeV, $t$- and $u$-channel Regge scaling behavior can be seen at forward- and backward-angles, respectively. Our recoil polarization ($$P_\\Sigma$$) measurements represent a substantial increase in kinematic coverage and enhanced precision over previous world data. At forward angles we find that $$P_\\Sigma$$ is of the same magnitude but opposite sign as $$P_\\Lambda$$, in agreement with the static SU(6) quark model prediction of $$P_\\Sigma \\approx -P_\\Lambda$$. This expectation is violated in some mid- and backward-angle kinematic regimes, where $$P_\\Sigma$$ and $$P_\\Lambda$$ are of similar magnitudes but also have the same signs. In conjunction with several other meson photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, the present data will help constrain the partial wave analyses being performed to search for missing baryon resonances.« less

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Energetic Uranium Recoil Damage in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2006-10-11

    Defect production and amorphization due to energetic uranium recoils in zircon (ZrSiO4), which is a promising ceramic nuclear waste form, is studied using molecular dynamics simulations with a partial charge model. An algorithm that distinguishes between undamaged crystal, crystalline defects and amorphous regions is used to develop a fundamental understanding of the primary damage state. The amorphous cascade core is separated from the surrounding crystal by a defect-rich region. Small, chemically inhomogeneous amorphous clusters are also produced around the core. The amorphous regions consist of under-coordinated Zr and polymerized Si leading to amorphization and phase separation on a nanometer scale into Zr- and Si-rich regions. This separation could play an important role in the experimentally observed formation of nanoscale ZrO2 in ZrSiO4 irradiated at elevated temperatures.

  2. Elastic recoil detection analysis on the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, R.; Orlic, I.; Cohen, David D.

    2002-05-01

    The heavy ion microprobe at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation is capable of focussing heavy ions with an ME/ q2 of up to 100 amu MeV. This makes the microprobe ideally suited for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). However, beam currents on a microprobe are usually very small, which requires a detection system with a large solid angle. We apply microbeam heavy ion ERDA using a large solid angle ΔE- E telescope with a gas ΔE detector to layered structures. We demonstrate the capability to measure oxygen and carbon with a lateral resolution of 20 μm, together with determination of the depth of the contamination in thin deposited layers.

  3. Dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes and its recoil effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuang; Chen, Qunzhi; Liu, Jiahui; Wang, Kaile; Jiang, Zhe; Sun, Zhili; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-06-15

    A dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes (HEDBS), in which gas flow oriented parallel to the electric field, was proposed. Results showed that with this structure, air can be effectively ignited, forming atmospheric low temperature plasma, and the proposed HEDBS could achieve much higher electron density (5 × 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3}). It was also found that the flow condition, including outlet diameter and flow rate, played a key role in the evolution of electron density. Optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic results showed that the concentration of reactive species had the same variation trend as the electron density. The simulated distribution of discharge gas flow indicated that the HEDBS had a strong recoil effect on discharge gas, and could efficiently promote generating electron density as well as reactive species.

  4. Recoil Polarization for Delta Excitation in Pion Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Kelly; R. E. Roche; Z. Chai; M. K. Jones; O. Gayou; A. J. Sarty; S. Frullani; K. Aniol; E. J. Beise; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; W. U. Boeglin; T. Botto; E. J. Brash; H. Breuer; E. Brown; E. Burtin; J. R. Calarco; C. Cavata; C. C. Chang; N. S. Chant; J.-P. Chen; M. Coman; D. Crovelli; R. De Leo; S. Dieterich; S. Escoffier; K. G. Fissum; V. Garde; F. Garibaldi; S. Georgakopoulus; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; C. Glashausser; J.-O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; A. Hotta; G. M. Huber; H. Ibrahim; M. Iodice; C. W. de Jager; X. Jiang; A. Klimenko; A. Kozlov; G. Kumbartzki; M. Kuss; L. Lagamba; G. Laveissiere; J. J. LeRose; R. A. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; G. J. Lolos; R. W. Lourie; D. J. Margaziotis; F. Marie; P. Markowitz; S. McAleer; D. Meekins; R. Michaels; B. D. Milbrath; J. Mitchell; J. Nappa; D. Neyret; C. F. Perdrisat; M. Potokar; V. A. Punjabi; T. Pussieux; R. D. Ransome; P. G. Roos; M. Rvachev; A. Saha; S. Sirca; R. Suleiman; S. Strauch; J. A. Templon; L. Todor; P. E. Ulmer; G. M. Urciuoli; L. B. Weinstein; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Zheng; and L. Zhu

    2005-08-01

    We measured angular distributions of recoil-polarization response functions for neutral pion electroproduction for W=1.23 GeV at Q{sup 2}=1.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}, obtaining 14 separated response functions plus 2 Rosenbluth combinations; of these, 12 have been observed for the first time. Dynamical models do not describe quantities governed by imaginary parts of interference products well, indicating the need for adjusting magnitudes and phases for nonresonant amplitudes. We performed a nearly model-independent multipole analysis and obtained values for Re(S1+/M1+)=-(6.84+/-0.15)% and Re(E1+/M1+)=-(2.91+/-0.19)% that are distinctly different from those from the traditional Legendre analysis based upon M1+ dominance and sp truncation.

  5. Kicked waveforms: prospects for direct detection of black hole recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerosa, Davide; Moore, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Generic black hole binaries radiate gravitational waves anisotropically, imparting a recoil, or kick, velocity to the merger remnant. If a component of the kick along the line of sight is present, gravitational waves emitted during the final orbits and merger will be gradually Doppler shifted as the kick builds up. We develop a simple prescription to capture this effect in existing waveform models, showing that future gravitational wave experiments will be able to perform direct measurements, not only of the black hole kick velocity, but also of its accumulation profile. In particular, the eLISA space mission will measure supermassive black hole kick velocities as low as 500 km/s, which are expected to be a common outcome of black hole binary coalescence following galaxy mergers. Black hole kicks thus constitute a promising new observable in the growing field of gravitational wave astronomy. Einstein Fellow.

  6. Atomistic simulation of track formation by energetic recoils in zircon.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro A F P; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J

    2010-10-06

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations of fission track formation in zircon. We simulated the passage of a swift heavy ion through crystalline zircon using cylindrical thermal spikes with energy deposition (dE/dx) of 2.5-12.8 keV nm( - 1) and a radius of 3 nm. At a low dE/dx of 2.55 keV nm( - 1), the structural damage recovered almost completely and a damage track was not produced. At higher values of dE/dx, tracks were observed and the radius of the track increased with increasing dE/dx. Our structural analysis shows amorphization in the core of the track and phase separation into Si-rich regions near the center of the track and Zr-rich regions near the periphery. These simulations establish a threshold dE/dx for fission track formation in zircon that is relevant to thermochronology and nuclear waste immobilization.

  7. Investigation of photoneutron reactions on {sup 192}Os and {sup 191,193}Ir at energies of relevance for the astrophysical p process

    SciTech Connect

    Hasper, J.; Zilges, A.; Galaviz, D.; Mueller, S.; Sauerwein, A.; Savran, D.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Sonnabend, K.

    2009-05-15

    We have investigated the photoneutron reactions on the isotopes {sup 192}Os and {sup 191,193}Ir for astrophysically relevant photon energies just above the neutron separation energy. The experiments were performed using the photoactivation technique at the superconducting Darmstadt linear electron accelerator (S-DALINAC). The measurements extend the existing experimental database on photoneutron reactions in this mass region and serve as an important test for the state-of-the-art statistical model calculations commonly used for the prediction of stellar reaction rates.

  8. [Technical aspects and relevance of energy expenditure and physical activity assessment in clinical research for cystic fibrosis patients].

    PubMed

    Béghin, L; Michaud, L; Turck, D; Gottrand, F

    2005-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by deteriorating lung function and mal-digestion, which result in growth failure and/or under-nutrition. Several factors, alone or combined, contribute to malnutrition in CF: poor energy intake, elevation of energy loss as a result of malabsorption, increasing resting energy expenditure due to genetic mutation and/or pulmonary exacerbation. Several techniques have been used to assess energy expenditure and physical activity in order to better understand mechanisms of malnutrition in CF and follow therapeutic interventions. Indirect calorimetry (IC) studies have shown that resting energy expenditure (REE) was 10-22% higher than predictive values. This increase could be attributed to chronic inflammation as a result of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection. Indeed, intravenous antibiotic therapy decreases REE. Doubly labelled water technique and heart rate monitoring calibrated against IC techniques shows that total energy expenditure (TEE) was not different than in healthy children. Physical activity level assessed by the ratio TEE-REE is also not different between CF of healthy children. Recently, new accelerometry technics, easier to use and less invasive have been successfully used in order to assess physical activity level in CF. Precise and ambulatory assessment of energy expenditure and physical activity permit to check and adapt dietary allowances in CF. These techniques could be simultaneously used and be helpful to assess efficacy of intervention studies.

  9. Expansion of Bound-State Energies in Powers of m/M

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, Kirill

    2001-07-25

    We describe a new approach to computing energy levels of a non-relativistic bound-state of two constituents with masses M and m, by a systematic expansion in powers of m/M. After discussing the method, we demonstrate its potential with an example of the radiative recoil corrections to the Lamb shift and hyperfine splitting relevant for the hydrogen, muonic hydrogen, and muonium. A discrepancy between two previous calculations of O({alpha}(Z{alpha}){sup 5} m{sup 2}/M) radiative recoil corrections to the Lamb shift is resolved and several new terms of O({alpha}(Z{alpha}){sup 5} m{sup 4}/M{sup 3}) and higher are obtained.

  10. Expansion of Bound-State Energies in Powers of m/M

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, Andrzej; Melnikov, Kirill

    2001-07-02

    We describe a new approach to computing energy levels of a nonrelativistic bound state of two constituents with masses M and m , by a systematic expansion in powers of m/M . After discussing the method, we demonstrate its potential with an example of the radiative recoil corrections to the Lamb shift and hyperfine splitting relevant for the hydrogen, muonic hydrogen, and muonium. A discrepancy between two previous calculations of O({alpha}(Z{alpha} ){sup 5}m{sup 2}/M) radiative recoil corrections to the Lamb shift is resolved and several new terms of O({alpha}(Z{alpha} ){sup 5}m{sup 4}/M{sup 3}) and higher are obtained.

  11. A Novel method for modeling the recoil in W boson events at hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Ahsan, Mahsana; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-07-01

    We present a new method for modeling the hadronic recoil in W {yields} {ell}{nu} events produced at hadron colliders. The recoil is chosen from a library of recoils in Z {yields} {ell}{ell} data events and overlaid on a simulated W {yields} {ell}{nu} event. Implementation of this method requires that the data recoil library describe the properties of the measured recoil as a function of the true, rather than the measured, transverse momentum of the boson. We address this issue using a multidimensional Bayesian unfolding technique. We estimate the statistical and systematic uncertainties from this method for the W boson mass and width measurements assuming 1 fb{sup -1} of data from the Fermilab Tevatron. The uncertainties are found to be small and comparable to those of a more traditional parameterized recoil model. For the high precision measurements that will be possible with data from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron and from the CERN LHC, the method presented in this paper may be advantageous, since it does not require an understanding of the measured recoil from first principles.

  12. Experimentally Determined Binding Energies of Astrophysically Relevant Hydrocarbons in Pure and H2O-Layered Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmard, Aida; Graninger, Dawn; Fayolle, Edith; Oberg, Karin I.

    2017-01-01

    Small hydrocarbons represent an important organic reservoir in a variety of interstellar environments. Constraints on desorption temperatures and binding energies of hydrocarbons are thus necessary for accurate predictions of where and in which phase these molecules exist. Through a series of temperature programmed desorption experiments, we determined binding energies of 1, 2, and 3-carbon interstellar hydrocarbons (CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H4, C3H6, and C3H8) in pure ices and in relation to water ice, the dominant ice constituent during star and planet formation. These empirically determined values can be used to inform observations and models of the molecular spatial distribution in protoplanetary disks, thus providing insight into planetesimal composition. In addition, knowledge of hydrocarbon binding energies will refine simulations of grain surface chemistry, allowing for better predictions of the chemical conditions that lead to the production of complex organic molecules vital for life.

  13. Investigation of complete and incomplete fusion in 20Ne + 51V system using recoil range measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sabir; Ahmad, Tauseeef; Kumar, Kamal; Rizvi, I. A.; Agarwal, Avinash; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.; Chaubey, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Recoil range distributions of evaporation residues, populated in 20Ne + 51V reaction at Elab ≈ 145 MeV, have been studied to determine the degree of momentum transferred through the complete and incomplete fusion reactions. Evaporation residues (ERs) populated through the complete and incomplete fusion reactions have been identified on the basis of their recoil range in the Al catcher medium. Measured recoil range of evaporation residues have been compared with the theoretical value calculated using the code SRIM. Range integrated cross section of observed ERs have been compared with the value predicted by statistical model code PACE4.

  14. Relevancy 101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris; Newman, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Where we present an overview on why relevancy is a problem, how important it is and how we can improve it. The topic of relevancy is becoming increasingly important in earth data discovery as our audience is tuned to the accuracy of standard search engines like Google.

  15. Comprehensive track-structure based evaluation of DNA damage by light ions from radiotherapy-relevant energies down to stopping

    PubMed Central

    Friedland, W.; Schmitt, E.; Kundrát, P.; Dingfelder, M.; Baiocco, G.; Barbieri, S.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2017-01-01

    Track structures and resulting DNA damage in human cells have been simulated for hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and neon ions with 0.25–256 MeV/u energy. The needed ion interaction cross sections have been scaled from those of hydrogen; Barkas scaling formula has been refined, extending its applicability down to about 10 keV/u, and validated against established stopping power data. Linear energy transfer (LET) has been scored from energy deposits in a cell nucleus; for very low-energy ions, it has been defined locally within thin slabs. The simulations show that protons and helium ions induce more DNA damage than heavier ions do at the same LET. With increasing LET, less DNA strand breaks are formed per unit dose, but due to their clustering the yields of double-strand breaks (DSB) increase, up to saturation around 300 keV/μm. Also individual DSB tend to cluster; DSB clusters peak around 500 keV/μm, while DSB multiplicities per cluster steadily increase with LET. Remarkably similar to patterns known from cell survival studies, LET-dependencies with pronounced maxima around 100–200 keV/μm occur on nanometre scale for sites that contain one or more DSB, and on micrometre scale for megabasepair-sized DNA fragments. PMID:28345622

  16. Characterization of Nuclear Recoils in High Pressure Xenon Gas: Towards a Simultaneous Search for WIMP Dark Matter and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    DOE PAGES

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; ...

    2015-03-24

    Xenon has recently been the medium of choice in several large scale detectors searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Though present-day large scale experiments use liquid xenon, the gas phase offers advantages favorable to both types of searches such as improved intrinsic energy resolution and fewer fluctuations in the partition of deposited energy between scintillation and ionization channels. We recently constructed a high pressure xenon gas TPC as a prototype for the NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and have demonstrated the feasibility of 0.5% FWHM energy resolution at themore » 136Xe double beta Q-value with 3-D tracking capabilities. We now present results from this prototype on the simultaneous observation of scintillation and ionization produced by nuclear recoils at approximately 14 bar pressure. The recoils were produced by neutrons of approximately 2-6 MeV emitted from a radioisotope plutonium-beryllium source, and primary scintillation (S1) and electroluminescent photons produced by ionization (S2) were observed. We discuss the potential of gaseous xenon to distinguish between electron and nuclear recoils through the ratio of these two signals S2/S1. From these results combined with the possibility of using columnar recombination to sense nuclear recoil directionality at high pressures we envision a dual-purpose, ton-scale gaseous xenon detector capable of a combined search for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. This work has been performed within the context of the NEXT collaboration.« less

  17. Characterization of Nuclear Recoils in High Pressure Xenon Gas: Towards a Simultaneous Search for WIMP Dark Matter and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Oliveira, C. A.B.; Nygren, D.

    2015-03-24

    Xenon has recently been the medium of choice in several large scale detectors searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Though present-day large scale experiments use liquid xenon, the gas phase offers advantages favorable to both types of searches such as improved intrinsic energy resolution and fewer fluctuations in the partition of deposited energy between scintillation and ionization channels. We recently constructed a high pressure xenon gas TPC as a prototype for the NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) neutrinoless double beta decay experiment and have demonstrated the feasibility of 0.5% FWHM energy resolution at the 136Xe double beta Q-value with 3-D tracking capabilities. We now present results from this prototype on the simultaneous observation of scintillation and ionization produced by nuclear recoils at approximately 14 bar pressure. The recoils were produced by neutrons of approximately 2-6 MeV emitted from a radioisotope plutonium-beryllium source, and primary scintillation (S1) and electroluminescent photons produced by ionization (S2) were observed. We discuss the potential of gaseous xenon to distinguish between electron and nuclear recoils through the ratio of these two signals S2/S1. From these results combined with the possibility of using columnar recombination to sense nuclear recoil directionality at high pressures we envision a dual-purpose, ton-scale gaseous xenon detector capable of a combined search for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. This work has been performed within the context of the NEXT collaboration.

  18. A recoil ion momentum spectrometer for molecular and atomic fragmentation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Arnab; Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Misra, Deepankar

    2015-04-01

    We report the development and performance studies of a newly built recoil ion momentum spectrometer for the study of atomic and molecular fragmentation dynamics in gas phase upon the impact of charged particles and photons. The present design is a two-stage Wiley-McLaren type spectrometer which satisfies both time and velocity focusing conditions and is capable of measuring singly charged ionic fragments up-to 13 eV in all directions. An electrostatic lens has been introduced in order to achieve velocity imaging. Effects of the lens on time-of-flight as well as on the position have been investigated in detail, both, by simulation and in experiment. We have used 120 keV proton beam on molecular nitrogen gas target. Complete momentum distributions and kinetic energy release distributions have been derived from the measured position and time-of-flight spectra. Along with this, the kinetic energy release spectra of fragmentation of doubly ionized nitrogen molecule upon various projectile impacts are presented.

  19. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; ...

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, wemore » find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.« less

  20. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1-2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. The H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, we find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. After this point, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.

  1. First Measurement of the 19F(α, p)22Ne Reaction at Energies of Astrophysical Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; D’Agata, G.; La Cognata, M.; Indelicato, I.; Spitaleri, C.; Blagus, S.; Cherubini, S.; Figuera, P.; Grassi, L.; Guardo, G. L.; Gulino, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Kshetri, R.; Lamia, L.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatović, T.; Milin, M.; Miljanić D., Đ.; Prepolec, L.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Skukan, N.; Soić, N.; Tokić, V.; Tumino, A.; Uroić, M.

    2017-02-01

    The observational 19F abundance in stellar environments systematically exceeds the predicted one, thus representing one of the unsolved challenges for stellar modeling. It is therefore clear that further investigation is needed in this field. In this work, we focus our attention on the measurement of the {}19{{F}}{(α ,p)}22{Ne} reaction in the astrophysical energy range, between 0.2 and 0.8 MeV (far below the Coulomb barrier, 3.8 MeV), as it represents the main destruction channel in He-rich environments. The lowest energy at which this reaction has been studied with direct measurements is ∼0.66 MeV, covering only the upper tail of the Gamow window, causing the reaction-rate evaluation to be based on extrapolation. To investigate lower energies, the {}19{{F}}{(α ,p)}22{Ne} reaction has been studied by means of the Trojan horse method, applied to the quasi-free {}6{Li}{{(}19{{F}},{p}22{Ne})}2{{H}} reaction at E beam = 6 MeV. The indirect cross section of the {}19{{F}}{(α ,p)}22{Ne} reaction at energies ≲1 MeV was extracted, fully covering the astrophysical region of interest and overlapping existing direct data for normalization. Several resonances have been detected for the first time inside the Gamow window. The reaction rate has been calculated, showing an increase up to a factor of 4 with respect to the literature at astrophysical temperatures. This might lead to potential major astrophysical implications.

  2. {phi} decay: A relevant source for K{sup -} production at energies available at the GSI Schwerionen-Synchrotron (SIS)?

    SciTech Connect

    Agakishiev, G.; Destefanis, M.; Gilardi, C.; Kirschner, D.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Metag, V.; Mishra, D.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Cavalcanti, T. Perez; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Balanda, A.; Dybczak, A.; Michalska, B.; Otwinowski, J.; Przygoda, W.; Salabura, P.; Trebacz, R.

    2009-08-15

    We present phase space distributions and multiplicities of K{sup +}, K{sup -}, and {phi} mesons produced in Ar+KCl reactions at a kinetic beam energy of 1.756 GeV/nucleon and measured with the HADES spectrometer. The inverse slope parameters and yields of kaons supplement the systematics of previous measurements. The percentage of K{sup -} mesons coming from {phi} decay is found to be 18{+-}7%.

  3. Elastic recoil of coronary stents: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Barragan, P; Rieu, R; Garitey, V; Roquebert, P O; Sainsous, J; Silvestri, M; Bayet, G

    2000-05-01

    Minimum elastic recoil (ER) has became an essential feature of new coronary stents when deployed in artheromatous lesions of various morphologies. The ER of coronary stent might be an important component of 6-month restenosis rate by minimizing the luminal loss. We evaluated the intrinsic ER of 23 coronary stents with a mechanical test bench. The amount of ER for one size of stent (3.0 mm) was quantified using a 3D optical contactless machine (Smartscope MVP, Rochester, NY). The stents were expanded on their own balloon for the precrimped stents; the uncrimped stents were expended using identical 3.0-mm balloons. Two types of measurements were done without exterior stress and with a 0.2-bar exterior stress, directly on the stent at the end of balloon expansion, immediately after balloon deflation, and then 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min after. ER ranged from 1.54%+/-0.81% (Bestent BES 15) to 16.51%+/-2.89% (Paragon stent) without stress (P<0.01) and from 2.35%+/-1.14% (Bestent BES 15) to 18.34%+/-2.41% (Cook GR2) under 0.2-bar pressure (P<0.0001). Furthermore, there was a significant reduction between the mean result of tubular stents (TS) and coil stents (CS). The results of in vitro mechanical tests may confirm strongly the interest of a minimum ER in the prevention of the 6-month restenosis.

  4. Collaborative Research: Nanopore Confinement of C-H-O Mixed Volatile Fluids Relevant to Subsurface Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, Brian P.

    2015-03-11

    The scientific objective of this proposal was to obtain a fundamental atomic- to macro-scale understanding of the sorptivity, structure and dynamics of simple and complex hydrocarbon (HC) fluids at mineral surfaces or within nanoporous matrices over temperatures, pressures and compositions encountered in near-surface and shallow crustal environments. The research supported by this award was complementary to that conducted by the group of Prof. David cole at Ohio State University. The scope of the present award was to utilize molecular-level modeling to provide critically important insights into the interfacial properties of mineral-volatile systems, assist in the interpretation of experimental data and predict fluid behavior beyond the limits of current experimental capability. During the past three years the effort has focused primarily on the behavior of C-H volatiles including methane (CH4) and propane (C3H8), mixed-volatile systems including hydrocarbon - CO2 with and without H2O present. The long-range goal is to quantitatively link structure, dynamics and reactivity in complex mineral-/C-H-O systems from the atomic to the molecular to the macroscopic levels. The results are relevant to areas of growing importance such as gas shale, HC-bearing hydrothermal systems, and CO2 storage.

  5. Reply to ``Comment on `Quasisaddles as relevant points of the potential energy surface in the dynamics of supercooled liquids' '' [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 5263 (2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Di Leonardo, R.; Ruocco, G.; Scala, A.; Sciortino, F.

    2003-03-01

    We reply to the Comment on the paper "Quasisaddles as relevant points of the potential energy surface in the dynamics of supercooled liquids" [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 10297 (2002)]. While we agree with J. P. K. Doye and D. J. Wales on their improved enumeration of zero curvature directions at quasisaddle points, we criticize their statement that this has important implications for the interpretation of our results. Indeed, we show here that the temperature dependence of the order of quasisaddles and true saddles are numerically coincident, providing a strong support to our previous interpretation.

  6. Immediate stent recoil in an anastomotic vein graft lesion treated by cutting balloon angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Akkus, Nuri Ilker; Budeepalli, Jagan; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2013-11-01

    Saphenous vein graft (SVG) anastomotic lesions can have significant fibromuscular hyperplasia and may be resistant to balloon angioplasty alone. Stents have been used successfully to treat these lesions. There are no reports of immediate stent recoil following such treatment in the literature. We describe immediate and persistent stent recoil in an anastomotic SVG lesion even after initial and post-deployment complete balloon dilatation of the stent and its successful treatment by cutting balloon angioplasty.

  7. Radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting: Polarization insertions in the muon factor

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, Michael I.; Shelyuto, Valery A.

    2009-09-01

    We consider three-loop radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting in muonium due to insertions of a one-loop polarization operator in the muon factor. The contribution produced by electron polarization insertions is enhanced by the large logarithm of the electron-muon mass ratio. We obtained all single-logarithmic and nonlogarithmic radiative-recoil corrections of order {alpha}{sup 3}(m/M)E{sub F} generated by the diagrams with electron and muon polarization insertions.

  8. Investigation on modeling and controability of a magnetorheological gun recoil damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongsheng; Wang, Juan; Wang, Jiong; Qian, Suxiang; Li, Yancheng

    2009-07-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluid as a new smart material has done well in the vibration and impact control engineering fields because of its good electromechanical coupling characteristics, preferable dynamic performance and higher sensitivity. And success of MRF has been apparent in many engineering applied fields, such as semi-active suspension, civil engineering, etc. So far, little research has been done about MR damper applied into the weapon system. Its primary purpose of this study is to identify its dynamic performance and controability of the artillery recoil mechanism equipped with MR damper. Firstly, based on the traditional artillery recoil mechanism, a recoil dynamic model is developed in order to obtain an ideal rule between recoil force and its stroke. Then, its effects of recoil resistance on the stability and firing accuracy of artillery are explored. Because MR gun recoil damper under high impact load shows a typical nonlinear character and there exists a shear-thinning phenomenon, to establish an accurate dynamic model has been a seeking aim of its design and application for MR damper under high impact load. Secondly, in this paper, considering its actual bearing load, an inertia factor was introduced to Herschel-Bulkley model, and some factor's effect on damping force are simulated and analyzed by using numerical simulation, including its dynamic performance under different flow coefficients and input currents. Finally, both of tests with the fixed current and different On-Off control algorithms have been done to confirm its controability of MR gun recoil damper under high impact load. Experimental results show its dynamic performances of the large-scale single-ended MR gun recoil damper can be changed by altering the applied currents and it has a good controllability.

  9. Atomistic Simulation of Track Formation by Energetic Recoils in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Pedro A.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.

    2010-09-17

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations of fission track formation in zircon. We simulated the passage of a swift heavy ion through crystalline zircon using cylindrical thermal spikes with energy deposition (dE/dx) of 2.5 to 12.8 keV/nm and radius of 3 nm. At a low dE/dx of 2.55 keV/nm, the structural damage recovered almost completely and a damage track was not produced. At higher values of dE/dx, tracks were observed and the radius of the track increased with increasing dE/dx. Our structural analysis shows amorphization in the core of the track and phase separation into Si-rich regions near the center of the track and Zr-rich regions near the periphery. These simulations establish a threshold dE/dx for fission-track formation in zircon that is relevant to thermo-chronology and nuclear waste immobilization.

  10. Clinically relevant HOCl concentrations reduce clot retraction rate via the inhibition of energy production in platelet mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Misztal, T; Rusak, T; Tomasiak, M

    2014-12-01

    Using porcine blood, we examined the impact of hypochlorite, product of activated inflammatory cells, on clot retraction (CR), an important step of hemostasis. We found that, in vitro, HOCl is able to reduce CR rate and enlarge final clot size in whole blood (t.c. 100 μM), platelet-rich plasma (PRP) threshold concentration (t.c. 50 μM), and an artificial system (washed platelets and fibrinogen) (t.c. 25 nM). Combination of low HOCl and peroxynitrite concentrations resulted in synergistic inhibition of CR by these stressors. Concentrations of HOCl completely inhibiting CR failed to affect the kinetics of coagulation measured in PRP and in platelet-free plasma. Concentrations of HOCl reducing CR rate in PRP augmented production of lactate, inhibited consumption of oxygen by platelets, and decreased total adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content in PRP-derived clots. In an artificial system, concentrations of HOCl resulting in inhibition of CR (25-100 nM) reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential and did not affect actin polymerization in thrombin-stimulated platelets. These concentrations of HOCl failed to affect the adhesion of washed platelets to fibrinogen and to evoke sustained calcium signal, thus excluding stressor action on glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptors. Exogenously added Mg-ATP almost completely recovered HOCl-mediated retardation of CR. Concentrations of HOCl higher than those affecting CR reduced thromboelastometric variables (maximum clot firmness and α angle). We conclude that low clinically relevant HOCl concentrations may evoke the inhibition of CR via the reduction of platelet contractility resulted from malfunction of platelet mitochondria. At the inflammatory conditions, CR may be the predominant HOCl target.

  11. Cross sections for proton-induced reactions on Pd isotopes at energies relevant for the γ process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillmann, I.; Coquard, L.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Käppeler, F.; Marganiec, J.; Uberseder, E.; Giesen, U.; Heiske, A.; Feinberg, G.; Hentschel, D.; Hilpp, S.; Leiste, H.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2011-07-01

    Proton-activation reactions on natural and enriched palladium samples were investigated via the activation technique in the energy range of Ep=2.75-9 MeV, close to the upper end of the respective Gamow window of the γ process. We have determined cross sections for 102Pd(p,γ)103Ag, 104Pd(p,γ)105Ag, and 105Pd(p,n)105Ag, as well as partial cross sections of 104Pd(p,n)104Agg, 105Pd(p,γ)106Agm, 106Pd(p,n)106Agm, and 110Pd(p,n)110Agm with uncertainties between 3% and 15% for constraining theoretical Hauser-Feshbach rates and for direct use in γ-process calculations.

  12. Development of the negative ion beams relevant to ITER and JT-60SA at Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Hanada, M. Kojima, A.; Tobari, H.; Nishikiori, R.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Yoshida, M.; Ichikawa, M.; Watanabe, K.; Yamano, Y.; Grisham, L. R.

    2016-02-15

    In order to realize negative ion sources and accelerators to be applicable to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and JT-60 Super Advanced, a large cesium (Cs)-seeded negative ion source and a multi-aperture and multi-stage electric acceleration have been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Long pulse production and acceleration of the negative ion beams have been independently carried out. The long pulse production of the high current beams has achieved 100 s at the beam current of 15 A by modifying the JT-60 negative ion source. The pulse duration time is increased three times longer than that before the modification. As for the acceleration, a pulse duration time has been also extended two orders of magnitudes from 0.4 s to 60 s. The developments of the negative ion source and acceleration at JAEA are well in progress towards the realization of the negative ion sources and accelerators for fusion applications.

  13. Development of the negative ion beams relevant to ITER and JT-60SA at Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Hanada, M; Kojima, A; Tobari, H; Nishikiori, R; Hiratsuka, J; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Yoshida, M; Ichikawa, M; Watanabe, K; Yamano, Y; Grisham, L R

    2016-02-01

    In order to realize negative ion sources and accelerators to be applicable to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and JT-60 Super Advanced, a large cesium (Cs)-seeded negative ion source and a multi-aperture and multi-stage electric acceleration have been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Long pulse production and acceleration of the negative ion beams have been independently carried out. The long pulse production of the high current beams has achieved 100 s at the beam current of 15 A by modifying the JT-60 negative ion source. The pulse duration time is increased three times longer than that before the modification. As for the acceleration, a pulse duration time has been also extended two orders of magnitudes from 0.4 s to 60 s. The developments of the negative ion source and acceleration at JAEA are well in progress towards the realization of the negative ion sources and accelerators for fusion applications.

  14. Investigating the Nexus of Climate, Energy, Water, and Land at Decision-Relevant Scales: The Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Kraucunas, Ian P.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dirks, James A.; Hathaway, John E.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Huang, Maoyi; Jin, Chunlian; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C.W.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Hongyi; Moss, Richard H.; Peterson, Marty J.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.; Thomson, Allison M.; Voisin, Nathalie; West, Tristram O.

    2015-04-01

    The Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA) is an innovative modeling system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to simulate interactions among natural and human systems at scales relevant to regional decision making. PRIMA brings together state-of-the-art models of regional climate, hydrology, agriculture, socioeconomics, and energy systems using a flexible coupling approach. The platform can be customized to inform a variety of complex questions and decisions, such as the integrated evaluation of mitigation and adaptation options across a range of sectors. Research into stakeholder decision support needs underpins the platform's application to regional issues, including uncertainty characterization. Ongoing numerical experiments are yielding new insights into the interactions among human and natural systems on regional scales with an initial focus on the energy-land-water nexus in the upper U.S. Midwest. This paper focuses on PRIMA’s functional capabilities and describes some lessons learned to date about integrated regional modeling.

  15. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-11-01

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ˜20 ps and energy resolution of ˜100 keV for total neutron yields above ˜1016. At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ˜20 ps.

  16. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

    PubMed

    Frenje, J A; Hilsabeck, T J; Wink, C W; Bell, P; Bionta, R; Cerjan, C; Gatu Johnson, M; Kilkenny, J D; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D

    2016-11-01

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ∼20 ps and energy resolution of ∼100 keV for total neutron yields above ∼10(16). At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ∼20 ps.

  17. Detector Calibration to Spontaneous Fission for the Study of Superheavy Elements Using Gas-Filled Recoil Ion Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Mirei; Kaji, Daiya; Morimoto, Kouji; Wakabayashi, Yasuo; Tokanai, Fuyuki; Morita, Kosuke

    Detector response to spontaneous fission (SF) of heavy nuclides produced in the 206Pb(48Ca,2n)252No reaction was investigated using a gas-filled recoil ion separator (GARIS). Kinetic energy distributions of the SF originating from 252No were observed by tuning implantation depth of evaporation residue (ER) to the detector. The focal plane detector used in the GARIS experiments was well calibrated by comparing with the known total kinetic energy (TKE) of SF due to 252No. The correction value for the TKE calculation was deduced as a function of the implantation depth of 252No to the detector. Furthermore, we have investigated the results by comparing with those obtained by a computer simulation using the particle and heavy ion transport code system (PHITS).

  18. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    DOE PAGES

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; ...

    2016-08-02

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with amore » time resolution of ~20 ps and energy resolution of ~100 keV for total neutron yields above ~1016. Lastly, at lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ~20 ps.« less

  19. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-08-02

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ~20 ps and energy resolution of ~100 keV for total neutron yields above ~1016. Lastly, at lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ~20 ps.

  20. Quantifying the Mechanism of Phosphate Monoester Hydrolysis in Aqueous Solution by Evaluating the Relevant ab initio QM/MM Free Energy Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikov, Nikolay V.; Prasad, B. Ram; Chakrabarty, Suman; Chu, Zhen T.; Warshel, Arieh

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the nature of the free energy surfaces for phosphate hydrolysis is a prerequisite for understanding the corresponding key chemical reactions in biology. Here the challenge has been to move to careful ab initio QM/MM (QM(ai)/MM) free energy calculations, where obtaining converging results is very demanding and computationally expensive. This work describes such calculations, focusing on the free energy surface for the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters, paying a special attention to the comparison between the one water (1W) and two water (2W) paths for the proton transfer (PT) step. This issue has been explored before by energy minimization with implicit solvent models and by non-systematic QM/MM energy minimization, as well as by non-systematic free energy mapping. However, no study has provided the needed reliable 2D (3D) surfaces which are necessary for reaching concrete conclusions. Our study generated in a systematic way the 2D (3D) free energy maps for several relevant systems, comparing the results of QM(ai)/MM and QM(ai)/implicit solvent surfaces, and provides an advanced description of the relevant energetics. It is found that the 1W path for the hydrolysis of methyl diphosphate (MDP) trianion is 6–9 kcal/mol higher than the 2W path. This difference becomes slightly larger in the presence of Mg2+ ion, since this ion reduces the pKa of the conjugated acid form of the phosphate oxygen that accepts the proton. Interestingly, the BLYP approach (which has been used extensively in some studies) gives much smaller difference between the 1W and 2W activation barriers. At any rate, it is worth to point out that the 2W transition state for the PT is not much higher that the common plateau that serves as the starting point of both the 1W and 2W PT paths. Thus, the calculated catalytic effects of proteins based on the 2W PT mechanistic models are not expected to be different from the catalytic effects predicted using the 1W PT mechanistic models

  1. Cross sections for proton-induced reactions on Pd isotopes at energies relevant for the {gamma} process

    SciTech Connect

    Dillmann, I.; Coquard, L.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Kaeppeler, F.; Marganiec, J.; Uberseder, E.; Giesen, U.; Heiske, A.; Feinberg, G.; Hentschel, D.; Hilpp, S.; Leiste, H.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2011-07-15

    Proton-activation reactions on natural and enriched palladium samples were investigated via the activation technique in the energy range of E{sub p}=2.75-9 MeV, close to the upper end of the respective Gamow window of the {gamma} process. We have determined cross sections for {sup 102}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 103}Ag, {sup 104}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 105}Ag, and {sup 105}Pd(p, n){sup 105}Ag, as well as partial cross sections of {sup 104}Pd(p, n){sup 104}Ag{sup g}, {sup 105}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 106}Ag{sup m}, {sup 106}Pd(p, n){sup 106}Ag{sup m}, and {sup 110}Pd(p, n){sup 110}Ag{sup m} with uncertainties between 3% and 15% for constraining theoretical Hauser-Feshbach rates and for direct use in {gamma}-process calculations.

  2. High-Intensity Scattering Processes of Relativistic Electrons in Vacuum and Their Relevance to High-Energy Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Troha, Anthony L.; Baldis, Hector A.; Gupta, Atul; Kerman, Arthur K.; Landahl, Eric C.; Luhmann, Neville C. Jr.; Van Meter, James R.

    2000-04-01

    The recent advent of ultra-short pulse, high-intensity lasers, together with advances in other novel technologies, such as high-gradient radiofrequency photoinjectors, have afforded researchers the possibility to simulate astrophysical conditions in the laboratory. Laser-produced plasmas have been successfully used to simulate astrophysical plasmas and supernovae in the laboratory for several years. Now, femtosecond laser systems operating in the terawatt to petawatt range are available, as are synchronized relativistic electron bunches with subpicosecond durations and terahertz bandwidths. With these tools, experiments have been conducted to study phenomena related to supernova explosions, stellar winds, solar coronae, cosmic rays, planetary and celestial matter, and interstellar plasmas. Other experiments have been proposed to investigate Unruh radiation, as well as ponderomotive scattering, which can accelerate electrons in vacuum to relativistic energies using the extremely high gradients in a three-dimensional laser focus. The nonlinear Doppler shift induced by ultrarelativistic radiation pressure is shown to yield complex nonlinear Compton backscattered spectra. Finally, strong radiative corrections are expected when the Doppler-upshifted laser wavelength approaches the Compton scale. These are discussed within the context of high-field classical electrodynamics, a new discipline borne out of the aforementioned innovations. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  3. Recoil Distance Method Lifetime Measurements in 107Cd and 103Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andgren, K.; Ashley, S. F.; Regan, P. H.; McCutchan, E. A.; Zamfir, N. V.; Amon, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Clark, R. M.; Erduran, M. N.; Gürdal, G.; Keyes, K. L.; Meyer, D. A.; Papenberg, A.; Pietralla, N.; Plettner, C.; Rainovski, G.; Ribas, R. V.; Thomas, N. J.; Vinson, J.; Warner, D. D.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.

    2006-04-01

    Preliminary lifetime values have been measured for a number of near-yrast states in the odd-A transitional nuclei 107Cd and 103Pd. The reaction used to populate the nuclei of interest was 98Mo(12C,3nxα)107Cd, 103Pd, with the beam delivered by the tandem accelerator of the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at an incident beam energy of 60 MeV. Our experiment was aimed at the investigation of collective excitations built on the unnatural parity, ν h11/2 orbital, specifically by measuring the B(E2) values of decays from the excited levels built on this intrinsic structure, using the Doppler Recoil Distance Method. We report lifetimes and associated transition probabilities for decays from the 15/2- and the 19/2- states in 107Cd and the first measurement of the 15/2- state in 103Pd. These results suggest that neither a simple rotational or vibrational interpretation is sufficient to explain the observed structures.

  4. Proton recoil telescope based on diamond detectors for measurement of fusion neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Caiffi, Barbara; Taiuti, Mauro; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ripani, Marco; Pillon, Mario

    2015-07-01

    Diamonds are very promising candidates for the neutron diagnostics in harsh environments such as fusion reactor. In the first place this is because of their radiation hardness, exceeding that of Silicon by an order of magnitude. Also, in comparison to the standard on-line neutron diagnostics (fission chambers, silicon based detectors, scintillators), diamonds are less sensitive to γ rays, which represent a huge background in fusion devices. Finally, their low leakage current at high temperature suppresses the detector intrinsic noise. In this talk a CVD diamond based detector has been proposed for the measurement of the 14 MeV neutrons from D-T fusion reaction. The detector was arranged in a proton recoil telescope configuration, featuring a plastic converter in front of the sensitive volume in order to induce the (n,p) reaction. The segmentation of the sensitive volume, achieved by using two crystals, allowed to perform measurements in coincidence, which suppressed the neutron elastic scattering background. A preliminary prototype was assembled and tested at FNG (Frascati Neutron Generator, ENEA), showing promising results regarding efficiency and energy resolution. (authors)

  5. A Critical Review of Alpha Radionuclide Therapy—How to Deal with Recoiling Daughters?

    PubMed Central

    de Kruijff, Robin M.; Wolterbeek, Hubert T.; Denkova, Antonia G.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the successes and challenges currently faced in alpha radionuclide therapy. Alpha particles have an advantage in killing tumour cells as compared to beta or gamma radiation due to their short penetration depth and high linear energy transfer (LET). Touching briefly on the clinical successes of radionuclides emitting only one alpha particle, the main focus of this article lies on those alpha-emitting radionuclides with multiple alpha-emitting daughters in their decay chain. While having the advantage of longer half-lives, the recoiled daughters of radionuclides like 224Ra (radium), 223Ra, and 225Ac (actinium) can do significant damage to healthy tissue when not retained at the tumour site. Three different approaches to deal with this problem are discussed: encapsulation in a nano-carrier, fast uptake of the alpha emitting radionuclides in tumour cells, and local administration. Each approach has been shown to have its advantages and disadvantages, but when larger activities need to be used clinically, nano-carriers appear to be the most promising solution for reducing toxic effects, provided there is no accumulation in healthy tissue. PMID:26066613

  6. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Recoil momentum at a solid surface during developed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, L. I.

    1993-12-01

    The recoil momentum from a laser light pulse in the intensity range 105-107 W/cm2 is experimentally investigated for dielectric and metallic targets as a function of the pressure of the surrounding medium and angle of illumination. An equation with empirical coefficients is obtained for the recoil momentum of illuminated targets. Effects of the screening properties of the erosion jet and the back pressure on the recoil momentum are analyzed as the external pressure is varied.

  7. Fluence measurement of fast neutron fields with a highly efficient recoil proton telescope using active pixel sensors.

    PubMed

    Taforeau, J; Higueret, S; Husson, D; Kachel, M; Lebreton, L

    2014-10-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High-Energy Neutron metrology Applications) is being developed at the LNE-IRSN and aims at characterising energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a recoil proton telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50-µm-thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for proton tracking and a 3-mm-thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode, owing to a large detection solid angle, increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of 10 compared with conventional designs. The ability of the spectrometer to determine the neutron energy was demonstrated and reported elsewhere. This paper focuses on the fluence measurement of monoenergetic neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. Experimental investigations, performed at the AMANDE facility, indicate a good estimation of neutron fluence at various energies. In addition, a complete description of uncertainties budget is presented in this paper and a Monte Carlo propagation of uncertainty sources leads to a fluence measurement with a precision ∼3-5 % depending on the neutron energy.

  8. Relevant Links

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-11-02

    ... A Burning Question Feature Article: Absorption of Solar Radiation by Clouds FIRE ARM Archive SHEBA Archive ... SRB SRB Home Page SSE American Solar Energy Society (ASES)  - A national organization dedicated to advancing the ...

  9. Recoiling black holes: prospects for detection and implications of spin alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecha, Laura; Sijacki, Debora; Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Torrey, Paul; Vogelsberger, Mark; Nelson, Dylan; Springel, Volker; Snyder, Gregory; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Supermassive black hole (BH) mergers produce powerful gravitational wave emission. Asymmetry in this emission imparts a recoil kick to the merged BH, which can eject the BH from its host galaxy altogether. Recoiling BHs could be observed as offset active galactic nuclei (AGN). Several candidates have been identified, but systematic searches have been hampered by large uncertainties regarding their observability. By extracting merging BHs and host galaxy properties from the Illustris cosmological simulations, we have developed a comprehensive model for recoiling AGN. Here, for the first time, we model the effects of BH spin alignment and recoil dynamics based on the gas richness of host galaxies. We predict that if BH spins are not highly aligned, seeing-limited observations could resolve offset AGN, making them promising targets for all-sky surveys. For randomly oriented spins, ≲ 10 spatially offset AGN may be detectable in Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmological Evolution Survey, and >103 could be found with the Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), Euclid, and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST). Nearly a thousand velocity offset AGN are predicted within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint; the rarity of large broad-line offsets among SDSS quasars is likely due in part to selection effects but suggests that spin alignment plays a role in suppressing recoils. None the less, in our most physically motivated model where alignment occurs only in gas-rich mergers, hundreds of offset AGN should be found in all-sky surveys. Our findings strongly motivate a dedicated search for recoiling AGN.

  10. Analysis of accelerator based neutron spectra for BNCT using proton recoil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.G.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1999-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase 1/2 clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra, alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  11. Radiative recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting: Polarization insertions in the electron factor

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, M. I.; Shelyuto, V. A.

    2010-01-15

    We consider three-loop radiative recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting in muonium due to insertions of the one-loop polarization operator in the electron factor. The contribution generated by electron polarization insertions is a cubic polynomial in the large logarithm of the electron-muon mass ratio. The leading logarithm cubed and logarithm squared terms are well known for some time. We calculate all single-logarithmic and nonlogarithmic radiative recoil corrections of the order {alpha}{sup 3}(m/M)E{sub F} generated by diagrams with the electron and muon polarization insertions.

  12. Observation of collective atomic recoil motion in a degenerate fermion gas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengjun; Deng, L; Hagley, E W; Fu, Zhengkun; Chai, Shijie; Zhang, Jing

    2011-05-27

    We demonstrate collective atomic recoil motion with a dilute, ultracold, degenerate fermion gas in a single spin state. By utilizing an adiabatically decompressed magnetic trap with an aspect ratio different from that of the initial trap, a momentum-squeezed fermion cloud is achieved. With a single pump pulse of the proper polarization, we observe, for the first time, multiple wave-mixing processes that result in distinct collective atomic recoil motion modes in a degenerate fermion cloud. Contrary to the case with Bose condensates, no pump-laser detuning asymmetry is present.

  13. Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical cavity with sub-recoil bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinder, J.; Keßler, H.; Georges, Ch.; Vargas, J.; Hemmerich, A.

    2016-12-01

    This article provides a brief synopsis of our recent work on the interaction of Bose-Einstein condensates with the light field inside an optical cavity exhibiting a bandwidth on the order of the recoil frequency. Three different coupling scenarios are discussed giving rise to different physical phenomena at the borderline between the fields of quantum optics and many-body physics. This includes sub-recoil opto-mechanical cooling, cavity-controlled matter wave superradiance and the emergence of a superradiant superfluid or a superradiant Mott insulating many-body phase in a self-organized intra-cavity optical lattice with retarded infinite range interactions.

  14. Reliability, detection limit and depth resolution of the elastic recoil measurement of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisao, Nagai; Shigeki, Hayashi; Michi, Aratani; Tadashi, Nozaki; Minoru, Yanokura; Isao, Kohno; Osamu, Kuboi; Yoshifumi, Yatsurugi

    1987-08-01

    Reliability, detection limit and depth resolution were studied in the elastic recoil measurement of hydrogen mainly in silicon compounds by bombardment with argon ions accelerated up to 50 MeV. For the quantitative determination of hydrogen, recoil silicon atoms proved to serve satisfactorily as an internal monitor. The detection limit was shown to be about 1 to 2×10 12 (atoms/cm 2 for hydrogen on surface and about 1 wt. ppm for hydrogen in bulk. The depth resolution was found to be about 50 nm in most silicon compounds.

  15. Site-specific recoil-induced effects on inner-shell photoionization of linear triatomic molecules: N 1 s photoelectron spectra of N2 O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivosenko, Yu. S.; Pavlychev, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate hard X-ray ionization of linear triatomic molecules accenting recoil-induced effects on the dynamics of molecular frame. This dynamics is studied within the two-springs and harmonic approximations. The mode-channel relationship connecting the excitations of vibrational, rotational and translational degrees of freedom with the Σ → Σ and Σ → Π photoionization channels is applied to compute the N 1s-1 photoelectron spectra of molecular N2 O for various photon energies. The distinct ionized-site- and molecular-orientation-specific changes in the vibration structure of the 1 s photoelectron lines of terminal and central nitrogen atoms are revealed and discussed.

  16. Controllability analysis and testing of a novel magnetorheological absorber for field gun recoil mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Qing; Zheng, Jiajia; Li, Zhaochun; Hu, Ming; Wang, Jiong

    2016-11-01

    This paper aims to analyze the effects of combined working coils of magnetorheological (MR) absorber on the shock mitigation performance and verify the controllability of MR absorber as applied in the recoil system of a field gun. A physical scale model of the field gun is established and a long-stroke MR recoil absorber with four-stage parallel electromagnetic coils is designed to apply separate current to each stage and generate variable magnetic field distribution in the annular flow channel. Based on dynamic analysis and firing stability conditions of the field gun, ideal recoil force-stroke profiles of MR absorber at different limiting firing angles are obtained. The experimental studies are carried out on an impact test rig under different combinations of current loading: conventional unified control mode, separate control mode and timing control mode. The fullness degree index (FDI) is defined as the quantitative evaluation criterion of the controllability of MR absorber during the whole recoil motion. The results show that the force-stroke profile of the novel MR absorber can approach the ideal curve within 25 degrees of the limiting firing angle through judicious exploitation of the adjustable rheological properties of MR fluid.

  17. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Fallows, Scott Mathew

    2014-12-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for \\background- free" operation of CDMS II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space.

  18. Late Paravalvular Aortic Regurgitation: Migration of the Valve or Late Recoil?

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Park, Ki E; Choi, Calvin Y; Mogali, Kiran; Stinson, Wade W; Manning, Eddie W; Bavry, Anthony A

    2017-01-02

    A 79-year-old man underwent trans-catheter aortic valve replacement for symptomatic severe aortic stenosis with a 26-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve. Immediately after valve deployment there was moderate amount of paravalvular leak. Post-dilation was performed with an additional 2 cc of volume, and the paravalvular leak was reduced to trace. Nine months later, trans-thoracic echocardiography revealed moderate to severe paravalvular leak and possible aortic migration of the valve. The patient was brought back for the treatment of the paravalvular leak which was suspected to be due to valve migration. However, fluoroscopy and trans-esophageal echocardiography showed good valve position. Measurement of late valve recoil in the Coplanar view using cine-angiographic analysis software showed that the lower third of the valve had the greatest late recoil (-1.74 mm, 6.55%), which presumably accounted for the progression of the paravalvular leak. Valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve replacement was performed with a 26-mm SAPIEN 3 valve and the paravalvular leak was reduced to trace. This case displays late recoil as a likely mechanism for development of paravalvular leak after SAPIEN XT valve implantation. Our case illustrates that late recoil needs to be systematically evaluated in future studies, especially when trans-catheter aortic valve replacement is being expanded to lower risk and younger patients for whom the longevity and long-term performance of these valves is of critical importance.

  19. Effects of molecular rotation after ionization and prior to fragmentation on observed recoil-frame photoelectron angular distributions in the dissociative photoionization of nonlinear molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Domínguez, Jesús A.; Lucchese, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    Experimental angle-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence experiments measure photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) in dissociative photoionization (DPI) in the reference frame provided by the momenta of the emitted heavy fragments. By extension of the nomenclature used with DPI of diatomic molecules, we refer to such a PAD as a recoil-frame PAD (RFPAD). When the dissociation is fast compared to molecular rotational and bending motions, the emission directions of the heavy fragments can be used to determine the orientation of the bonds that are broken in the DPI at the time of the ionization, which is known as the axial-recoil approximation (ARA). When the ARA is valid, the RFPADs correspond to molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions (MFPADs) when the momenta of a sufficient number of the heavy fragments are determined. When only two fragments are formed, the experiment cannot measure the orientation of the fragments about the recoil axes so that the resulting measured PAD is an azimuthally averaged RFPAD (AA-RFPAD). In this study we consider how the breakdown of the ARA due to rotation will modify the observed RFPADs for DPI processes in nonlinear molecules for ionization by light of arbitrary polarization. This model is applied to the core C 1 s DPI of CH4, with the results compared to experimental measurements and previous theoretical calculations done within the ARA. The published results indicate that there is a breakdown in the ARA for two-fragment events where the heavy-fragment kinetic energy release was less than 9 eV. Including the breakdown of the ARA due to rotation in our calculations gives very good agreement with the experimental AA-RFPAD, leading to an estimate of upper bounds on the predissociative lifetimes as a function of the kinetic energy release of the intermediate ion states formed in the DPI process.

  20. Interfacial stability and self-similar rupture of evaporating liquid layers under vapor recoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Duan, Fei

    2016-12-01

    We investigate interfacial stability of an evaporating viscous liquid layer above/below a horizontal heated substrate in the framework of a long-wave model that accounts for surface tension, positive/negative gravity, and evaporation effects of mass loss and vapor recoil. With the time-dependent linear stability analysis, it is found that the interface instability is enhanced by vapor recoil with time using an effective growth rate. The destabilizing mechanism of vapor thrust competes with the stabilizing surface tension, and the effects of the latter are not asymptotically negligible near rupture, reflected by a rescaled effective interfacial pressure. A two-dimensional nonlinear evolution is investigated for the quasi-equilibrium evaporating layers with different evaporative conditions for Rayleigh-Taylor unstable and sessile layers. For weak mass loss and strong vapor recoil, the well-defined capillary ridges emerge around a deepening narrow valley with increasing wavelength under a positive gravity, while, on the basis of initial condition, main and secondary droplets are either coalesced partially or separated by a sharp dry-out point under a negative gravity. The rupture location depends strongly on the characteristics of a given initial condition, except for the random perturbation. For both the cases, an increase in the modified evaporation number tends to reduce the rupture time tr and droplet thickness remarkably. Similarity analysis along with numerical strategy is presented for the final stage of touch-down dynamics, determined by a physical balance between the vapor recoil and capillary force. The evaporation-driven rupture with a significant vapor recoil and negligible mass loss is shown to contain a countably infinite number of similarity solutions whose horizontal and vertical length scales behave as (tr - t)1/2 and (tr - t)1/3. The first similarity solution represents a stable single-point rupture.

  1. Simulating Makrofol as a detector for neutron-induced recoils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Becker, F; Urban, M; Xuan, Y

    2011-03-01

    The response of solid-state nuclear track detector is extremely dependent on incident angles of neutrons, which determine the angular distribution of secondary particles. In this paper, the authors present a method to investigate the angular response of Makrofol detectors. Using the C++-based Monte-Carlo tool-kit Geant4 in combination with SRIM and our MATLAB codes, we simulated the angular response of Makrofol. The simulations were based on the restricted energy loss model, and the concept of energy threshold and critical angle. Experiments were carried out with (252)Cf neutrons to verify the simulation results.

  2. A combined segmented anode gas ionization chamber and time-of-flight detector for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Possnert, Göran

    2016-10-01

    A dedicated detector system for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University is presented. Benefits of combining a time-of-flight measurement with a segmented anode gas ionization chamber are demonstrated. The capability of ion species identification is improved with the present system, compared to that obtained when using a single solid state silicon detector for the full ion energy signal. The system enables separation of light elements, up to Neon, based on atomic number while signals from heavy elements such as molybdenum and tungsten are separated based on mass, to a sample depth on the order of 1 μm. The performance of the system is discussed and a selection of material analysis applications is given. Plasma-facing materials from fusion experiments, in particular metal mirrors, are used as a main example for the discussion. Marker experiments using nitrogen-15 or oxygen-18 are specific cases for which the described improved species separation and sensitivity are required. Resilience to radiation damage and significantly improved energy resolution for heavy elements at low energies are additional benefits of the gas ionization chamber over a solid state detector based system.

  3. Design of athermal phonon light detector for reducing alpha recoil background of next-gen CUORE 0 νββ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilleri, Joseph; Pyle, Matt; Kolomensky, Yury; Cuore Collaboration; Cdms Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The current generation of bolometric 0 νββ experiments, including CUORE, expect degraded alpha recoils to be the dominant background restricting experimental sensitivity. The CUPID project will aim to improve the sensitivity of CUORE by over an order of magnitude, and search for 0 νββ in the entire region of parameter space consistent with the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Surface contamination of Cu support structures for CUORE's 130Te crystal bolometers is primarily responsible for these unwanted alpha recoils. Electronic signals produced near Qββ (2.53 MeV) have been shown to produce Cherenkov radiation on the order of 100 eV in 130Te crystals. The heavier and slower alpha particles of comparable energy in the region of interest do not produce a Cherenkov signal, allowing for discrimination via a high-resolution cryogenic light detector. A photon detector with energy resolution <10 eV is necessary. We will discuss how athermal phonon collection calorimeter technology developed by the CDMS collaboration over the past decade can be scaled to produce such a sensitive detector, while also satisfying requirements for scintillating crystal alternatives. We will also present the current status of the detector development. NSF: NSF PHY-1314881.

  4. Modeling and Measurement of 39Ar Recoil Loss From Biotite as a Function of Grain Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, J. H.; Nomade, S.; Renne, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    The call for age measurements with less than 1 per mil error puts a demand upon geochronologists to be aware of and quantify a number of problems which were previously negligible. One such factor is 39Ar recoil loss during sample irradiation, a phenomenon which is widely assumed to affect only unusually small crystals having exceptionally high surface/volume ratios. This phenomenon has important implications for thermochronologic studies seeking to exploit a range of closure temperatures arising from variable diffusion radii. Our study focuses on biotite, in which spatial isotope distributions cannot be reliably recovered by stepwise heating and which therefore lack recoil-diagnostic age spectrum behavior. Previous work by Renne et al. [Application of a deuteron-deuteron (D-D) neutron generator to 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, Applied Radiation and Isotopes, in press] used the SRIM code to calculate a ˜20% 39Ar recoil loss from the outermost 0.25 μ m of an infinite slab of phyllosillicate. This result is applied to measured grains of the biotite standard GA1550, a hypabyssal granite from the Mount Dromedary Complex, Australia. We measure the thickness and surface area of 166 grains and approximate the shape of each grain as a cylinder. Grain thickness ranges from 3 to 210 μ m, with an average grain radius of 350 μ m. We predict the amount of 39Ar recoil loss from each grain, finding an expected age error >0.1 % for grains thinner than 150 μ m, a >1% error for grain less than 10 μ m thick, and up to a 3% error for grains less than 3 μ m thick. These modeling results will be tested by analysis of the measured grains after irradiation in the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor. It is important to either account for 39Ar loss in thin biotite grains, or use sufficiently thick ones so that recoil loss is negligible. Our results indicate that only biotite grains thicker than 150 μ m should be used for neutron fluence monitoring in order to avoid bias greater than the

  5. A description of NUEXS, an upgrade of the code FCUP used to compute proton recoil current from CH{sub 2} foils

    SciTech Connect

    Stelts, M.L.; Wood, B.E.

    1982-08-01

    A computer code, FCUP, developed by A. Craft computes currents of recoil protons from a time- and energy-dependent neutron flux striking a CH{sub 2} foil. Three problem areas need to be addressed to extend the code`s usefulness. First, FCUP computes a response that is not time dependent; that is, only the input time bin is broadened to account for the finite time distribution of protons from a single neutron energy; second, the time coordinate of the signal predicted is translated arbitrarily rather than absolutely relative to the time of maximum neutron production in the source; and third, the code does not account for electron pickup by protons at low proton energies in the target and absorber foils. This report describes the changes in calculational method used to overcome these problems.

  6. Simulations of recoiling black holes: adaptive mesh refinement and radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliani, Zakaria; Mizuno, Yosuke; Olivares, Hector; Porth, Oliver; Rezzolla, Luciano; Younsi, Ziri

    2017-01-01

    Context. In many astrophysical phenomena, and especially in those that involve the high-energy regimes that always accompany the astronomical phenomenology of black holes and neutron stars, physical conditions that are achieved are extreme in terms of speeds, temperatures, and gravitational fields. In such relativistic regimes, numerical calculations are the only tool to accurately model the dynamics of the flows and the transport of radiation in the accreting matter. Aims: We here continue our effort of modelling the behaviour of matter when it orbits or is accreted onto a generic black hole by developing a new numerical code that employs advanced techniques geared towards solving the equations of general-relativistic hydrodynamics. Methods: More specifically, the new code employs a number of high-resolution shock-capturing Riemann solvers and reconstruction algorithms, exploiting the enhanced accuracy and the reduced computational cost of adaptive mesh-refinement (AMR) techniques. In addition, the code makes use of sophisticated ray-tracing libraries that, coupled with general-relativistic radiation-transfer calculations, allow us to accurately compute the electromagnetic emissions from such accretion flows. Results: We validate the new code by presenting an extensive series of stationary accretion flows either in spherical or axial symmetry that are performed either in two or three spatial dimensions. In addition, we consider the highly nonlinear scenario of a recoiling black hole produced in the merger of a supermassive black-hole binary interacting with the surrounding circumbinary disc. In this way, we can present for the first time ray-traced images of the shocked fluid and the light curve resulting from consistent general-relativistic radiation-transport calculations from this process. Conclusions: The work presented here lays the ground for the development of a generic computational infrastructure employing AMR techniques to accurately and self

  7. Reaction Mechanisms in 12C+93Nb System:. Excitation Functions and Recoil Range Distributions Below 7 MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Tauseef; Rizvi, I. A.; Agarwal, Avinash; Kumar, Rakesh; Golda, K. S.; Chaubey, A. K.

    The experiments were performed to study excitation functions (EFs) of evaporation residues (ERs), i.e. 103,102,101Ag, 101,100,99Pd, 101,100Rh, 97Ru, 96Tc, 95Tc, 94Tc, 93Mom, 92Nbm populated in the reactions induced by 12C on 93Nb for exploring the reaction dynamics involved at energies ≈ 47-75 MeV. The activation technique followed by offline γ-ray spectrometry has been employed to measure EFs. These measurements were simulated with other reported values available in literature as well as with theoretical predictions based on computer code PACE-2. The effect of variation of level density parameter involved in this code has also been studied. An excellent agreement was found between theoretical and experimental values in some of the fusion evaporation channels. However, significant enhancement of cross-section as observed in α-emission channels may be due to incomplete fusion (ICF) process and/or direct reaction process. To confirm the aforesaid reaction mechanism, Recoil Range Distributions (RRDs) of various ERs have been measured at ≈ 80 MeV. Moreover, an attempt is made to separate the percentage relative contributions of complete and incomplete fusion components from the analysis of the measured RRDs data. Further, the relative percentage ICF fraction, also estimated from EFs data, was found to be sensitive with the projectile energy.

  8. An algorithm for unfolding neutron dose and dose equivalent from digitized recoil-particle tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Bolch, W.E.; Turner, J.E.; Hamm, R.N.

    1986-10-01

    Previous work had demonstrated the feasibility of a digital approach to neutron dosimetry. A Monte Carlo simulation code of one detector design utilizing the operating principles of time-projection chambers was completed. This thesis presents and verifies one version of the dosimeter's computer algorithm. This algorithm processes the output of the ORNL simulation code, but is applicable to all detectors capable of digitizing recoil-particle tracks. Key features include direct measurement of track lengths and identification of particle type for each registered event. The resulting dosimeter should allow more accurate determinations of neutron dose and dose equivalent compared with conventional dosimeters, which cannot measure these quantities directly. Verification of the algorithm was accomplished by running a variety of recoil particles through the simulated detector volume and comparing the resulting absorbed dose and dose equivalent to those unfolded by the algorithm.

  9. A new sliding joint to accommodate recoil of a free-piston-driven expansion tube facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildfind, D. E.; Morgan, R. G.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes a new device to decouple free-piston driver recoil and its associated mechanical vibration from the acceleration tube and test section of The University of Queensland's X3 expansion tube. A sliding joint is introduced to the acceleration tube which axially decouples the facility at this station. When the facility is fired, the upstream section of the facility, which includes the free-piston driver, can recoil upstream freely. The downstream acceleration tube remains stationary. This arrangement provides two important benefits. Firstly, it eliminates nozzle movement relative to the test section before and during the experiment. This has benefits in terms of experimental setup and alignment. Secondly, it prevents transmission of mechanical disturbances from the free-piston driver to the acceleration tube, thereby eliminating mechanically-induced transducer noise in the sensitive pressure transducers installed in this low-pressure tube. This paper details the new design, and presents experimental confirmation of its performance.

  10. Time of flight elastic recoil detection analysis with a position sensitive detector

    SciTech Connect

    Siketic, Zdravko; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Jaksic, Milko; Skukan, Natko

    2010-03-15

    A position sensitive detection system based on the microchannel plate detector has been constructed and installed at the existing time of flight (TOF) spectrometer in order to perform a kinematic correction and improve the surface time/depth resolution of elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) system. The position resolution of the detector has been tested for different types of ions and anode voltages. TOF spectra of recoiled O ions from SiO{sub 2} and F from CaF{sub 2} were collected in coincidence with position sensitive detector signal. Kinematic correction of TOF spectra improved surface time/depth resolution by {approx}20% for our system; however even higher improvements could be obtained in larger solid angle TOF-ERDA systems.

  11. Nuclear Recoil Effect in the Lamb Shift of Light Hydrogenlike Atoms.

    PubMed

    Yerokhin, V A; Shabaev, V M

    2015-12-04

    We report high-precision calculations of the nuclear recoil effect to the Lamb shift of hydrogenlike atoms to the first order in the electron-nucleus mass ratio and to all orders in the nuclear binding strength parameter Zα. The results are in excellent agreement with the known terms of the Zα expansion and allow an accurate identification of the nonperturbative higher-order remainder. For hydrogen, the higher-order remainder was found to be much larger than anticipated. This result resolves the long-standing disagreement between the numerical all-order and analytical Zα-expansion approaches to the recoil effect and completely removes the second-largest theoretical uncertainty in the hydrogen Lamb shift of the 1S and 2S states.

  12. Nuclear Recoil Effect in the Lamb Shift of Light Hydrogenlike Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, V. A.; Shabaev, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    We report high-precision calculations of the nuclear recoil effect to the Lamb shift of hydrogenlike atoms to the first order in the electron-nucleus mass ratio and to all orders in the nuclear binding strength parameter Z α . The results are in excellent agreement with the known terms of the Z α expansion and allow an accurate identification of the nonperturbative higher-order remainder. For hydrogen, the higher-order remainder was found to be much larger than anticipated. This result resolves the long-standing disagreement between the numerical all-order and analytical Z α -expansion approaches to the recoil effect and completely removes the second-largest theoretical uncertainty in the hydrogen Lamb shift of the 1 S and 2 S states.

  13. Nuclear recoil corrections to the Lamb shift of hydrogen and light hydrogenlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, V. A.; Shabaev, V. M.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate calculations of the nuclear recoil effect on the Lamb shift of hydrogenlike atoms are presented. Numerical results are reported for the n s states with n ≤5 and for the 2 p1 /2 and 2 p3 /2 states. The calculations are performed to the first order in the electron-nucleus mass ratio and to all orders in the nuclear binding strength parameter Z α (where Z is the nuclear charge number and α is the fine structure constant). The obtained results provide accurate predictions for the higher-order remainder beyond the known Z α -expansion terms. In the case of hydrogen, the remainder was found to be much larger than anticipated. This result resolves the previously reported disagreement between the numerical all-order and the analytical Z α -expansion approaches for the nuclear recoil effect on the hydrogen Lamb shift.

  14. Zooming in on B→ K^*ℓ ℓ decays at low recoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braß, Simon; Hiller, Gudrun; Nišandžić, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    We analyse B→ K^*ℓ ℓ decays in the region of low hadronic recoil, where an operator product expansion (OPE) in 1/m_b applies. Using a local model for charm contributions based on e^+ e^- → hadrons against the OPE provides a data-driven method to access the limitations to the OPE's accuracy related to binnings in the dilepton mass. Model-independent fits to B→ K^*μ μ low recoil angular observables exhibit presently only small sensitivity to different charm models. They give similar results to the fits based on the OPE and are in agreement with the standard model, but leave also room for new physics. Measurements with resolution small enough to probe charm resonances would be desirable.

  15. What Can We Learn From Proton Recoils about Heavy-Ion SEE Sensitivity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Raymond L.

    2016-01-01

    The fact that protons cause single-event effects (SEE) in most devices through production of light-ion recoils has led to attempts to bound heavy-ion SEE susceptibility through use of proton data. Although this may be a viable strategy for some devices and technologies, the data must be analyzed carefully and conservatively to avoid over-optimistic estimates of SEE performance. We examine the constraints that proton test data can impose on heavy-ion SEE susceptibility.

  16. Kinematically Identified Recoiling Supermassive Black Hole Candidates in SDSS QSOs with z > 0.25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.-C.; Evans, A. S.; Stierwalt, S.; Privon, G. C.

    2016-06-01

    We have performed a spectral decomposition to search for recoiling supermassive black holes (rSMBHs) in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) with z < 0.25. Out of 1271 QSOs, we have identified 26 rSMBH candidates that are recoiling toward us. The projected recoil velocities range from -76 to -307 km s-1 with a mean of -149 ± 58 km s-1. Most of the rSMBH candidates are hosted by gas-rich luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs)/ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), but only 23% of them show signs of tidal features, which suggests that a majority of them are advanced mergers. We find that the black hole masses M BH of the rSMBH candidates are on average ˜5 times smaller than those of their stationary counterparts and cause a scatter in the {M}{BH}-{σ }\\ast relation. The Eddington ratios of all of the rSMBH candidates are larger than 0.1, with a mean of 0.52 ± 0.27, suggesting that they are actively accreting mass. Velocity shifts in high-excitation coronal lines suggest that the rSMBH candidates are recoiling with an average velocity of about -265 km s-1. The electron density in the narrow line region of the H ii rSMBH candidates is about 1/10 of that in active galactic nucleus (AGN) rSMBH candidates, probably because the AGN in the former was more spatially offset than that in the latter. The estimated spatial offsets between the rSMBH candidate and the center of the host galaxy range from 0.″21 to 1.″97 and need to be confirmed spatially with high-resolution adaptive optics imaging observations.

  17. Recoil polarization observables in the electroproduction of K mesons and Λ's from the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Oren V.

    2014-09-01

    A model developed previously to investigate the electromagnetic production of strangeness from the proton is used to investigate single and double recoil polarization observables in the reaction ep →e'K+Λ in the relativistic impulse approximation. The formalism is based on a tree-level, effective Lagrangian model, which incorporates a variety of baryon resonances with spins up to 5/2 and the two kaon resonances, K(892) and K1(1270). The parameters of the model were fit to a large pool of photoproduction data from the CLAS, GRAAL, SAPHIR, and LEPS collaborations and to CLAS data for the virtual photoproduction structure functions σU,σT,σL,σTT,σLT, and σLT'. Using two different versions of this model, results are presented for three recoil polarization asymmetries that have been measured recently at CLAS. A new fit is then presented which incorporates the new polarization data in the fitted data set. Results obtained with this new fit are presented for six recoil polarization asymmetries and compared with results from one of the previous fits.

  18. Stability branching induced by collective atomic recoil in an optomechanical ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ian, Hou

    2017-02-01

    In a ring cavity filled with an atomic condensate, self-bunching of atoms due to the cavity pump mode produce an inversion that re-emits into the cavity probe mode with an exponential gain, forming atomic recoil lasing. An optomechanical ring cavity is formed when one of the reflective mirrors is mounted on a mechanical vibrating beam. In this paper, we extend studies on the stability of linear optomechanical cavities to such ring cavities with two counter-propagating cavity modes, especially when the forward propagating pump mode is taken to its weak coupling limit. We find that when the atomic recoil is in action, stable states of the mechanical mode of the mirror converge into branch cuts, where the gain produced by the recoiling strikes balance with the multiple decay sources, such as cavity leakage in the optomechanical system. This balance is obtained when the propagation delay in the dispersive atomic medium matches in a periodic pattern to the frequencies and linewidths of the cavity mode and the collective bosonic mode of the atoms. We show an input-output hysteresis cycle between the atomic mode and the cavity mode to verify the multi-valuation of the stable states after branching at the weak coupling limit.

  19. Exploring relativistic many-body recoil effects in highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Orts, R Soria; Harman, Z; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Artemyev, A N; Bruhns, H; Martínez, A J González; Jentschura, U D; Keitel, C H; Lapierre, A; Mironov, V; Shabaev, V M; Tawara, H; Tupitsyn, I I; Ullrich, J; Volotka, A V

    2006-09-08

    The relativistic recoil effect has been the object of experimental investigations using highly charged ions at the Heidelberg electron beam ion trap. Its scaling with the nuclear charge Z boosts its contribution to a measurable level in the magnetic-dipole (M1) transitions of B- and Be-like Ar ions. The isotope shifts of 36Ar versus 40Ar have been detected with sub-ppm accuracy, and the recoil effect contribution was extracted from the 1s(2)2s(2)2p 2P(1/2) - 2P(3/2) transition in Ar13+ and the 1s(2)2s2p 3P1-3P2 transition in Ar14+. The experimental isotope shifts of 0.00123(6) nm (Ar13+) and 0.00120(10) nm (Ar14+) are in agreement with our present predictions of 0.00123(5) nm (Ar13+) and 0.00122(5) nm (Ar14+) based on the total relativistic recoil operator, confirming that a thorough understanding of correlated relativistic electron dynamics is necessary even in a region of intermediate nuclear charges.

  20. Recoil-range studies of heavy products of multinucleon transfer from /sup 18/O to /sup 245/Cm and /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, R.M.

    1982-09-01

    Recoil range distributions were measured for alpha and spontaneous fission activities made in the bombardment of /sup 245/Cm and /sup 249/Cf with /sup 18/O from 6.20 MeV/nucleon down to the interaction barrier. The shape of the distributions indicates tht transfers of up to four protons take place via a combination of quasi-elastic (QET) and deep inelastic (DIT) mechanisms, rather than complete fusion-de-excitation (CF) or massive transfer (MT). Angular distributions constructed from recoil range distributions, assuming QET/DIT, indicate that the QET component contributes more significantly to the heavy product residue cross section than the DIT, even though primary cross sections are expected to be higher for DIT than for QET. This may be explained qualitatively as a result of the high excitation energies associated with DIT; the very negative Q/sub gg/ of projectile stripping for these systems combined with the lower expected optimal Q/sub rxn/ of QET compared to DIT can give QET products comparatively low excitation.

  1. Production and Recoil Loss of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Presolar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappitsch, Reto; Leya, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Presolar grains are small particles that condensed in the vicinity of dying stars. Some of these grains survived the voyage through the interstellar medium (ISM) and were incorporated into meteorite parent bodies at the formation of the Solar System. An important question is when these stellar processes happened, i.e., how long presolar grains were drifting through the ISM. While conventional radiometric dating of such small grains is very difficult, presolar grains are irradiated with galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) in the ISM, which induce the production of cosmogenic nuclides. This opens the possibility to determine cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) ages, i.e., how long presolar grains were irradiated in the ISM. Here, we present a new model for the production and loss of cosmogenic 3He, 6,7Li, and 21,22Ne in presolar SiC grains. The cosmogenic production rates are calculated using a state-of-the-art nuclear cross-section database and a GCR spectrum in the ISM consistent with recent Voyager data. Our findings are that previously measured 3He and 21Ne CRE ages agree within the (sometimes large) 2σ uncertainties and that the CRE ages for most presolar grains are smaller than the predicted survival times. The obtained results are relatively robust since interferences from implanted low-energy GCRs into the presolar SiC grains and/or from cosmogenic production within the meteoroid can be neglected.

  2. Effects of the primary recoil spectrum on microstructural evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedersich, H.

    1989-11-01

    For quantitative predictions and comparisons of microstructures that evolve during exposure to different radiation environments at elevated temperature one needs to develop methods that go beyond those based on the number of displacements per atom. The number of freely migrating defects that contribute to the microstructural development is far less than the total number of defects produced, as has been recognized for some time from measurements of radiation-induced segregation and of radiation-enhanced diffusion. One major reason for the small amount of defects available for long range migration is the high concentration and close spatial correlation of vacancies and, to a somewhat lesser degree, of interstitials in cascades produced by high energy knock-ons. As a consequence, many defects either recombine or form immobile defect clusters during the defect formation and cooling phases of the cascades. After doses exceeding a few tenths of a displacement per atom, the residue of small clusters and dislocation loops of vacancy type remaining in the central portions of energetic cascades and subscascades, is the second major reason for the reduction of the mean free path of defects between creation and annihilation. Defect production in various neutron and ion irradiation environments is discussed in light of these facts. A method to calculate the fraction of freely migrating defects from the cluster size distribution of defects produced in cascades is suggested. The results are in good agreement with available data. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Bionta, R M; Casey, D T; Caggiano, J A; Hatarik, R; Khater, H Y; Sayre, D B; Knauer, J P; Sangster, T C; Herrmann, H W; Kilkenny, J D

    2014-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4-20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80-140 mg/cm(2) and CH-ablator ρR's of 400-680 mg/cm(2) are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  4. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Khater, H. Y.; Sayre, D. B.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4-20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80-140 mg/cm2 and CH-ablator ρR's of 400-680 mg/cm2 are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  5. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gatu Johnson, M. Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Khater, H. Y.; Sayre, D. B.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-11-15

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4–20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80–140 mg/cm{sup 2} and CH-ablator ρR's of 400–680 mg/cm{sup 2} are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  6. FastPixN, a new integrated pixel chip for a future fast version of the IRSN - recoil proton telescope.

    PubMed

    Kachel, M; Husson, D; Higueret, S; Taforeau, J; Lebreton, L

    2014-10-01

    A first prototype of recoil proton telescope (RPT) is currently working at the AMANDE facility, being developed as a collaboration between IPHC Strasbourg and the LNE-IRSN. The device, able to measure both energy and fluence of neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV, has to be improved further, in order to reduce the considerable inelastic background generated by the neutrons inside the RPT itself. To achieve faster running cycles, the present complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor pixels used for proton tracking are to be replaced by a new integrated chip, specially developed for this application. The authors present a first version of this new element, with individual pixels readout at a 200-MHz frequency, with a fast 4-bit ADC for each column of 64 pixels. The measured performances point to a complete frame treatment in only 12.6 µs. With a readout speed multiplied by a factor 400 over the existing device, the authors expect a considerable improvement of the telescope at AMANDE, with the potential to reach neutron fluence rates up to 10(7) n cm(-2) s(-1) or more.

  7. An Improved Nuclear Recoil Calibration in the LUX Detector Using a Pulsed D-D Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dongqing

    2017-01-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 370 kg (250 kg active mass) two-_phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. The first absolute charge (Qy) and light (Ly) measurement performed in situ in the LUX detector with a D-D calibration technique for nuclear recoil spanning 0.7 to 74 keV and 1.1 to 74 keV respectively have been reported in. The D-D calibration has subsequently been further improved by incorporating pulsing technique, i.e. the D-D neutron production is concentrated within narrow pulses (20 us / 250 Hz) with the timing information recorded. This technique allows the suppression of accidental backgrounds in D-D neutron data and also provides increased sensitivity for the lower energy NR calibrations. I will report the improved NR absolute Qy and Ly measurements using the pulsed D-D calibration technique performed in situ in the LUX detector. Brown University, Large Underground Xenon(LUX) Collaboration.

  8. The uncertainty analysis on energy scale due to the variation of W value for liquid xenon dark matter detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Mei, Dongming; Cubed Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The average energy expended per electron-ion pair, W value, is critical in understanding a liquid xenon detector energy response to low energy recoils. The reduction of scintillation and ionization yield for electronic recoils and nuclear recoils are explained using the scintillation quenching mechanism due to the variation of the average energy expended per electron hole pair, W value, which includes the energy lost to scintillation and phonon generation. We show the theoretical calculation of scintillation efficiency with W value in comparison with experimental data. The impact of variation of W value on the analysis of energy scale is discussed in detail. We conclude that the W value determined with experimental data depends on recoil energy and particle type. This work is supported by NSF in part by the NSF OIA 1434142, DOE Grant DE-FG02-10ER46709, and the State of South Dakota.

  9. Ionizing Energy Depositions After Fast Neutron Interactions in Silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Bergmann, Benedikt; Pospisil, Stanislav; Caicedo, Ivan; ...

    2016-06-01

    In our study we present the ionizing energy depositions in a 300 μm thick silicon layer after fast neutron impact. With the Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique, the ionizing energy deposition spectra of recoil silicons and secondary charged particles were assigned to (quasi-)monoenergetic neutron energies in the range from 180 keV to hundreds of MeV. We also show and interpret representative measured energy spectra. By separating the ionizing energy losses of the recoil silicon from energy depositions by products of nuclear reactions, the competition of ionizing (IEL) and non-ionizing energy losses (NIEL) of a recoil silicon within the silicon lattice was investigated.more » Furthermore, the data give supplementary information to the results of a previous measurement and are compared with different theoretical predictions.« less

  10. Ionizing Energy Depositions After Fast Neutron Interactions in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Benedikt; Pospisil, Stanislav; Caicedo, Ivan; Kierstead, James; Takai, Helio; Frojdh, Erik

    2016-06-01

    In our study we present the ionizing energy depositions in a 300 μm thick silicon layer after fast neutron impact. With the Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique, the ionizing energy deposition spectra of recoil silicons and secondary charged particles were assigned to (quasi-)monoenergetic neutron energies in the range from 180 keV to hundreds of MeV. We also show and interpret representative measured energy spectra. By separating the ionizing energy losses of the recoil silicon from energy depositions by products of nuclear reactions, the competition of ionizing (IEL) and non-ionizing energy losses (NIEL) of a recoil silicon within the silicon lattice was investigated. Furthermore, the data give supplementary information to the results of a previous measurement and are compared with different theoretical predictions.

  11. Experimental evidence of the vapor recoil mechanism in the boiling crisis.

    PubMed

    Nikolayev, V S; Chatain, D; Garrabos, Y; Beysens, D

    2006-11-03

    Boiling crisis experiments are carried out in the vicinity of the liquid-gas critical point of H2. A magnetic gravity compensation setup is used to enable nucleate boiling at near critical pressure. The measurements of the critical heat flux that defines the threshold for the boiling crisis are carried out as a function of the distance from the critical point. The obtained power law behavior and the boiling crisis dynamics agree with the predictions of the vapor recoil mechanism and disagree with the classical vapor column mechanism.

  12. Calculated yield of isomer depletion due to NEEC for {sup 93m}Mo recoils

    SciTech Connect

    Karamian, S. A.; Carroll, J. J.

    2012-11-15

    In the present work, quantitative calculations were carried out for production and depletion of the {sup 93m}Mo isomer in a relatively simple experiment using {sup 91}Zr beam ions. Such studies could be arranged at existing and operating accelerator facilities, e.g. at GSI or in JINR. The {sup 93m}Mo nuclei produced in a He gas target due to the {sup 4}He({sup 91}Zr, 2n) reaction will recoil into a gas stopper with a high velocity, being then depleted due to NEEC in highly-ionized species.

  13. Recoil polarization measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio at high momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Puckett

    2009-12-01

    Electromagnetic form factors are fundamental properties of the nucleon that describe the effect of its internal quark structure on the cross section and spin observables in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Double-polarization experiments have become the preferred technique to measure the proton and neutron electric form factors at high momentum transfers. The recently completed GEp-III experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility used the recoil polarization method to extend the knowledge of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio GpE/GpM to Q2 = 8.5 GeV2. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the experiment.

  14. Automation of experiments at the Dubna gas-filled separator of recoil nuclei: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2015-03-01

    An application developed in Builder C++ (Windows) for the offline analysis of experimental data from the spectrometer of the gas-filled separator of recoil nuclei (Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions) based on the double-sided silicon strip detector is discussed. The automatic express method developed for calibrating 48 strips of the silicon position-sensitive detector based on the three most energetic spectral lines from the natYb + 48Ca▭*Th reaction is compared to the results produced by more rigorous calibration methods. The examples of spectra for this reaction and the results of filtering for the proposed calibration algorithm are given.

  15. Recoil-free spectroscopy of neutral Sr atoms in the Lamb-Dicke regime.

    PubMed

    Ido, Tetsuya; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2003-08-01

    Recoil-free as well as Doppler-free spectroscopy was demonstrated on the 1S0-3P1 transition of Sr atoms confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice. By investigating the wavelength and polarization dependence of the ac Stark shift acting on the 1S0 and 3P1(m(J)=0) states, we determined the wavelength where the Stark shifts for both states coincide. This Stark-free optical lattice, allowing the purturbation-free spectroscopy of trapped atoms, may keep neutral-atom based optical standards competitive with single-ion standards.

  16. Off-resonance photoemission dynamics studied by recoil frame F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions of CH{sub 3}F

    SciTech Connect

    Stener, M. Decleva, P.; Mizuno, T.; Yagishita, A.; Yoshida, H.

    2014-01-28

    F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions are considered for CH{sub 3}F, a molecule which does not support any shape resonance. In spite of the absence of features in the photoionization cross section profile, the recoil frame photoelectron angular distributions (RFPADs) exhibits dramatic changes depending on both the photoelectron energy and polarization geometry. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are also given to rationalize the photoionization dynamics. The RFPADs have been compared with the theoretical calculations, in order to assess the accuracy of the theoretical method and rationalize the experimental findings. The effect of finite acceptance angles for both ionic fragments and photoelectrons has been included in the calculations, as well as the effect of rotational averaging around the fragmentation axis. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, confirming the good quality of the calculated dynamical quantities (dipole moments and phase shifts)

  17. Characterization of Hundreds of MeV 7Li(p,n) Quasi-Monoenergetic Neutron Source at RCNP Using a Proton Recoil Telescope and TOF Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Masayuki; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Iwase, Hiroshi; Yashima, Hiroshi; Satoh, Daiki; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Masuda, Akihiko; Nakane, Yoshihiro; Tamii, Atsushi; Shima, Tatsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Nakamura, Takashi

    The peak neutron fluence of a quasi-monoenergetic 7Li(p,n) neutron source at RCNP of Osaka University have been measured for four incident proton energies between 100 and 300 MeV, using a proton recoil telescope (PRT) with event selection by a time-of-flight technique. We deduced the cross section of the peak neutron production reaction, 7Li(p,n0,1)7Be, at 0° and compared with that previously obtained with a time-of-flight (TOF) method employing an organic liquid scintillator. The results obtained with different methods are in agreement within their uncertainties and generally consistent with the other experimental data in several hundreds of MeV region.

  18. Studies of metallic species incorporation during growth of SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} films on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} substrates using mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Dhote, A. M.

    1999-01-13

    The incorporation of metallic species (Bi, Sr and Ta) during the growth of layered perovskite SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) on a-axis oriented YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) conducting oxide substrates has been investigated using in situ low energy mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI). This technique is capable of providing monolayer-specific surface information relevant to the growth of single and multi-component thin films and layered heterostructures. The data show a temperature dependence of metallic species incorporation during co-deposition of Sr, Bi and Ta on YBCO surfaces. At high temperatures (400 < T {le} 700 C), negligible incorporation of Bi is observed as compared to Ta and Sr. At low temperatures ({le} 400 C), there is a substantial incorporation of Bi, Sr and Ta on the surface of YBCO, and the MSRI signal intensities for Sr, Bi and Ta are nearly independent of substrate temperature. According to thermodynamic calculations, the presence of Ba and Y on the YBCO surface inhibit the incorporation of Bi due to competition for oxygen required to establish bonding of metallic species to the surface. This may be the explanation for the observed Bi deficiency in films grown on YBCO surfaces at temperatures >400 C. SBT films grown at temperatures {le} 400 C and annealed in oxygen or air at 800 C exhibit a polycrystalline structure with partial a-axis orientation.

  19. Relative optically stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence efficiencies of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C dosimeters to heavy charged particles with energies relevant to space and radiotherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sawakuchi, G. O.; Yukihara, E. G.; McKeever, S. W. S.; Benton, E. R.; Gaza, R.; Uchihori, Y.; Yasuda, N.; Kitamura, H.

    2008-12-15

    This article presents a comprehensive characterization of the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) relative luminescence efficiencies of carbon-doped aluminum (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) for heavy charged particles (HCPs) with atomic numbers ranging from 1 (proton) to 54 (xenon) and energies ranging from 7 to 1000 MeV/u, and investigates the dependence of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C response on experimental conditions. Relative luminescence efficiency values are presented for 19 primary charge/energy combinations, plus 31 additional charge/energy combinations obtained by introducing absorbers in the primary beam. Our results show that for energies of hundreds of MeV/u the data can be described by a single curve of relative luminescence efficiency versus linear energy transfer (LET). This information is needed to compensate for the reduced OSL efficiency to high-LET particles in such applications as space dosimetry. For lower energies, the relative luminescence efficiency as function of LET cannot be described by a single curve; instead, it separates into different components corresponding to different particles. We also present data on the low-LET dose response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, measured under the same experimental conditions in which the relative luminescence efficiencies to HCPs were obtained, providing information relevant to future theoretical investigations of HCP energy deposition and luminescence production in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C.

  20. Response of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters at photon energies relevant to the dosimetry of brachytherapy (<1 MeV)

    SciTech Connect

    Tedgren, Aasa Carlsson; Hedman, Angelica; Grindborg, Jan-Erik; Carlsson, Gudrun Alm

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: High energy photon beams are used in calibrating dosimeters for use in brachytherapy since absorbed dose to water can be determined accurately and with traceability to primary standards in such beams, using calibrated ion chambers and standard dosimetry protocols. For use in brachytherapy, beam quality correction factors are needed, which include corrections for differences in mass energy absorption properties between water and detector as well as variations in detector response (intrinsic efficiency) with radiation quality, caused by variations in the density of ionization (linear energy transfer (LET) -distributions) along the secondary electron tracks. The aim of this work was to investigate experimentally the detector response of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) for photon energies below 1 MeV relative to {sup 60}Co and to address discrepancies between the results found in recent publications of detector response. Methods: LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeters of formulation MTS-N Poland were irradiated to known values of air kerma free-in-air in x-ray beams at tube voltages 25-250 kV, in {sup 137}Cs- and {sup 60}Co-beams at the Swedish Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory. Conversions from air kerma free-in-air into values of mean absorbed dose in the dosimeters in the actual irradiation geometries were made using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. X-ray energy spectra were measured or calculated for the actual beams. Detector response relative to that for {sup 60}Co was determined at each beam quality. Results: An increase in relative response was seen for all beam qualities ranging from 8% at tube voltage 25 kV (effective energy 13 keV) to 3%-4% at 250 kV (122 keV effective energy) and {sup 137}Cs with a minimum at 80 keV effective energy (tube voltage 180 kV). The variation with effective energy was similar to that reported by Davis et al.[Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 106, 33-43 (2003)] with our values being systematically lower by 2%-4%. Compared to the

  1. Recoil effects due to electron shake-off following the beta decay of 6 He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Gordon W. F.; Schulhoff, Eva

    2016-05-01

    There are currently several experiments in progress to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model by high precision studies of angular correlations in the β decay of the helium isotope 6He to form 6Li +e- +νe. After the β decay process, the atomic electrons of 6 Li+ adjust to the sudden change of nuclear charge from 2 to 3. We calculate the probabilities for electron shake-up and shake-off, including recoil effects, by the use of a Stieltjes imaging representation of the final states. A variety of sum rules provides tight consistency checks on the accuracy of the results. Results obtained previously indicate that there is a 7 σ disagreement between theory and experiment for the additional nuclear recoil induced by the emission of atomic shake-off electrons. This disagreement will be further studied, and the results extended to the 1 s 2 p3 P and metastable 1 s 2 s3 S states as initial states of 6 He before β-decay. Research supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  2. Photodissociation of laboratory oriented molecules: Revealing molecular frame properties of nonaxial recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Brom, Alrik J. van den; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Janssen, Maurice H.M.

    2004-12-15

    We report the photodissociation of laboratory oriented OCS molecules. A molecular beam of OCS molecules is hexapole state-selected and spatially oriented in the electric field of a velocity map imaging lens. The oriented OCS molecules are dissociated at 230 nm with the linear polarization set at 45 deg. to the orientation direction of the OCS molecules. The CO({nu}=0,J) photofragments are quantum state-selectively ionized by the same 230 nm pulse and the angular distribution is measured using the velocity map imaging technique. The observed CO({nu}=0,J) images are strongly asymmetric and the degree of asymmetry varies with the CO rotational state J. From the observed asymmetry in the laboratory frame we can directly extract the molecular frame angles between the final photofragment recoil velocity and the permanent dipole moment and the transition dipole moment. The data for CO fragments with high rotational excitation reveal that the dissociation dynamics is highly nonaxial, even though conventional wisdom suggests that the nearly limiting {beta} parameter results from fast axial recoil dynamics. From our data we can extract the relative contribution of parallel and perpendicular transitions at 230 nm excitation.

  3. Earthdata Search: The Relevance of Relevance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Through recent usability studies, the issue of relevance became increasingly clear in the Earthdata Search Client. After all, if a user can't find the data they are looking for, nothing else we do matters. This presentation walks through usability testing findings and recent relevance improvements made to the Earthdata Search Client.

  4. A novel technique for single-shot energy-resolved 2D x-ray imaging of plasmas relevant for the inertial confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Labate, L; Köster, P; Levato, T; Gizzi, L A

    2012-10-01

    A novel x-ray diagnostic of laser-fusion plasmas is described, allowing 2D monochromatic images of hot, dense plasmas to be obtained in any x-ray photon energy range, over a large domain, on a single-shot basis. The device (named energy-encoded pinhole camera) is based upon the use of an array of many pinholes coupled to a large area CCD camera operating in the single-photon mode. The available x-ray spectral domain is only limited by the quantum efficiency of scientific-grade x-ray CCD cameras, thus extending from a few keV up to a few tens of keV. Spectral 2D images of the emitting plasma can be obtained at any x-ray photon energy provided that a sufficient number of photons had been collected at the desired energy. Results from recent inertial confinement fusion related experiments will be reported in order to detail the new diagnostic.

  5. Searching for the low-energy resonances in the 12C(12C,n)23Mg reaction cross section relevant for s-process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, B.; Fang, X.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Alongi, A.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Beard, M.; Best, A.; Browne, J.; Cahillane, C.; Couder, M.; deBoer, R.; Kontos, A.; Long, A.; Lu, W.; Lyons, S.; Notani, M.; Patel, D.; Paul, N.; Roberts, A.; Robertson, D.; Smith, K.; Stech, E.; Talwar, R.; Tan, W.; Tang, X. D.

    2013-03-01

    The 12C(12C,n) reaction (Q=-2.6 MeV) is a potential neutron source for the weak s-process occurring in shell-carbon burning of massive stars. The uncertainty in this reaction rate limits our understanding of the production of elements in the range 60 < A < 110. Current stellar models must rely on the smooth extrapolation of a dubious statistical model calculation based on experimental data taken at energies well above the Gamow window which lies below 3.2 MeV. At Notre Dame, this reaction cross section has been measured in finer steps at energies above 3.5 MeV, while successful measurements down to 3.1 MeV have just recently been achieved. In addition, a new extrapolation based on measurements of the mirror system has been developed which predicts a number of low-energy resonances while accounting well for the high-energy resonances. An overview of this work along with the most recent results and astrophysical implications are presented.

  6. Structural changes on a molecular basis of canola meal by conditioning temperature and time during pelleting process in relation to physiochemical (energy and protein) properties relevant to ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuewei; Zhang, Huihua; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) To investigate the effects of conditioning temperature (70, 80, 90°C), time (30, 60 sec), and interaction (temperature × time) during the pelleting process on internal protein molecular structure changes of the co-products; (2) To identify differences in protein molecular structures among pellets that were processed under different conditions, and between unprocessed mash and pellets; 3) To quantify protein molecular structure changes in relation to predicted energy and protein utilization in dairy cows. The final goal of this program was to show how processing conditions changed internal feed structure on a molecular basis and how molecular structure changes induced by feed processing affected feed milk value in dairy cows. The hypothesis in this study was that processing-induced protein inherent structure changes affected energy and protein availability in dairy cattle and the sensitivity and response of protein internal structure to the different pelleting process conditions could be detected by advanced molecular spectroscopy. The protein molecular structures, amides I and II, amide I to II ratios, α-helix structure, β-sheet structure, and α to β structure ratios, were determined using the advanced vibrational molecular spectroscopy (ATR-FT/IR). The energy values were determined using NRC2001 summary approach in terms of total digestible nutrients, metabolizable and net energy for lactation. The protein and carbohydrate subfactions that are related to rumen degradation characteristics and rumen undegraded protein supply were determined using updated CNCPS system. The experiment design was a RCBD and the treatment design was a 3x2 factorial design. The results showed that pelleting induced changes in protein molecular structure. The sensitivity and response of protein inherent structure to the pelleting depended on the conditioning temperature and time. The protein molecular structure changes were correlated (P < 0

  7. Structural changes on a molecular basis of canola meal by conditioning temperature and time during pelleting process in relation to physiochemical (energy and protein) properties relevant to ruminants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuewei; Zhang, Huihua; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) To investigate the effects of conditioning temperature (70, 80, 90°C), time (30, 60 sec), and interaction (temperature × time) during the pelleting process on internal protein molecular structure changes of the co-products; (2) To identify differences in protein molecular structures among pellets that were processed under different conditions, and between unprocessed mash and pellets; 3) To quantify protein molecular structure changes in relation to predicted energy and protein utilization in dairy cows. The final goal of this program was to show how processing conditions changed internal feed structure on a molecular basis and how molecular structure changes induced by feed processing affected feed milk value in dairy cows. The hypothesis in this study was that processing-induced protein inherent structure changes affected energy and protein availability in dairy cattle and the sensitivity and response of protein internal structure to the different pelleting process conditions could be detected by advanced molecular spectroscopy. The protein molecular structures, amides I and II, amide I to II ratios, α-helix structure, β-sheet structure, and α to β structure ratios, were determined using the advanced vibrational molecular spectroscopy (ATR-FT/IR). The energy values were determined using NRC2001 summary approach in terms of total digestible nutrients, metabolizable and net energy for lactation. The protein and carbohydrate subfactions that are related to rumen degradation characteristics and rumen undegraded protein supply were determined using updated CNCPS system. The experiment design was a RCBD and the treatment design was a 3x2 factorial design. The results showed that pelleting induced changes in protein molecular structure. The sensitivity and response of protein inherent structure to the pelleting depended on the conditioning temperature and time. The protein molecular structure changes were correlated (P < 0

  8. Rutherford forward scattering and elastic recoil detection (RFSERD) as a method for characterizing ultra-thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Lohn, Andrew J.; Doyle, Barney L.; Stein, Gregory J.; ...

    2014-04-03

    We present a novel ion beam analysis technique combining Rutherford forward scattering and elastic recoil detection (RFSERD) and demonstrate its ability to increase efficiency in determining stoichiometry in ultrathin (5-50 nm) films as compared to Rutherford backscattering. In the conventional forward geometries, scattering from the substrate overwhelms the signal from light atoms but in RFSERD, scattered ions from the substrate are ranged out while forward scattered ions and recoiled atoms from the thin film are simultaneously detected in a single detector. Lastly, the technique is applied to tantalum oxide memristors but can be extended to a wide range of materialsmore » systems.« less

  9. Rutherford forward scattering and elastic recoil detection (RFSERD) as a method for characterizing ultra-thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Lohn, Andrew J.; Doyle, Barney L.; Stein, Gregory J.; Mickel, Patrick R.; Stevens, Jim E.; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2014-04-03

    We present a novel ion beam analysis technique combining Rutherford forward scattering and elastic recoil detection (RFSERD) and demonstrate its ability to increase efficiency in determining stoichiometry in ultrathin (5-50 nm) films as compared to Rutherford backscattering. In the conventional forward geometries, scattering from the substrate overwhelms the signal from light atoms but in RFSERD, scattered ions from the substrate are ranged out while forward scattered ions and recoiled atoms from the thin film are simultaneously detected in a single detector. Lastly, the technique is applied to tantalum oxide memristors but can be extended to a wide range of materials systems.

  10. The role of physiological elements in the future therapies of rheumatoid arthritis. II. The relevance of energy redistribution in the process of chronic inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Rzodkiewicz, Przemysław; Wojtecka-Łukasik, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The reasons for development of chronic inflammation are complex and not fully understood. One of the factors affecting the prolongation of inflammation is changes in cell metabolism, occurring at the center of the inflammatory process. In chronic inflammation there is an imbalance between the processes of storage and consumption of energy reserves. Hypoxia that is a consequence of edema results in transition of white blood cells to anaerobic metabolism. Neutrophils, lymphocytes and macrophages produce active oxygen metabolites which on one hand facilitate the elimination of pathogens, and on the other hand, can cause damage to healthy cells located in the inflamed tissue. In this paper, we discuss the importance of disturbed redistribution of energy as one of the main reasons for transformation of the acute inflammatory process into the chronic one. PMID:27407224

  11. Industry-relevant magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc ultra-high vacuum deposition system for in situ x-ray diffraction studies of thin film growth using high energy synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, J L; Thomson, W; Howard, B; Schell, N; Näslund, L-Å; Rogström, L; Johansson-Jõesaar, M P; Ghafoor, N; Odén, M; Nothnagel, E; Shepard, A; Greer, J; Birch, J

    2015-09-01

    We present an industry-relevant, large-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc deposition system purposefully designed for time-resolved in situ thin film deposition/annealing studies using high-energy (>50 keV), high photon flux (>10(12) ph/s) synchrotron radiation. The high photon flux, combined with a fast-acquisition-time (<1 s) two-dimensional (2D) detector, permits time-resolved in situ structural analysis of thin film formation processes. The high-energy synchrotron-radiation based x-rays result in small scattering angles (<11°), allowing large areas of reciprocal space to be imaged with a 2D detector. The system has been designed for use on the 1-tonne, ultra-high load, high-resolution hexapod at the P07 High Energy Materials Science beamline at PETRA III at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron in Hamburg, Germany. The deposition system includes standard features of a typical UHV deposition system plus a range of special features suited for synchrotron radiation studies and industry-relevant processes. We openly encourage the materials research community to contact us for collaborative opportunities using this unique and versatile scientific instrument.

  12. HOTSPUR: gamma ray emission from spheres pulsed with D-T neutrons. I. Calibration of improved NE213 detector assembly. II. Comparison of TART/SANDYL electron recoil spectra to experiment; preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, E.; Hansen, L.F.; Komoto, T.T.; Pohl, B.A.

    1986-09-01

    The NE213 scintillator detector was modified so that the pulse height would be linear with electron energy over the full range of interest - up to 7.1 MeV. Absolute calibration was done with four different calibrated gamma sources. An average correction factor is obtained which normalizes SANDYL calculations with respect to the calibration experiments. The procedure for calculating neutron-induced gamma-ray output and electron recoil spectra is described, and experimental data from a number of spherical assemblies are given and compared to TART/SANDYL calculations. (LEW)

  13. Synthesis of H2 in dirty ice mantles by fast ion energy loss: New experimental results increase the relevance of this mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirranello, Valero; Brown, W. L.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Averna, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experimental results support the importance of H2 production in molecular clouds by cosmic ray bombardment of the mantles of grains. The formation of molecules different from those originally present in the irradiated layer can be explained by the production of molecular fragments induced by the release of energy if the impinging fast particle. One way of considering the process is in terms of a transiently hot cylinder, initially about 50 A in diameter, that exists around the track of an individual fast ion. Since ice has a relatively low thermal conductivity, energy lost by the ion in the ice layers remains confined around the track for time long enough to be thermalized. The hot cylinder increases in diameter and decreases in temperature on a time scale of 10(exp -11) to 10(exp -10) sec. Molecular fragments that are formed in this high temperature region acquire enough mobility to recombine with different partners, forming new molecules. A Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction between cosmic rays and grain mantles, at various depths in the core of a spherical molecular cloud, was performed. The simulation was continued until 40,000 ions had hit each grain of the type and size chosen. During the performed experiments thin icy films made of H2O and CD4 mixed in the gas phase and deposited on a cold finger at 9 K were irradiated with 1.5 MeV helium beams. Among synthesized molecules were found H2, HD, and D2.

  14. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue focuses on the theme of "Energy," and describes several educational resources (Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, activities, and other resources). Sidebars offer features on alternative energy, animal energy, internal combustion engines, and energy from food. Subthemes include harnessing energy, human energy, and…

  15. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE PAGES

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; ...

    2013-04-18

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describesmore » ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.« less

  16. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A.; McKernan, M. A.; Moran, M.; Rygg, J. R.; Yeoman, M. F.; Zacharias, R.; Leeper, R. J.; Fletcher, K.; Farrell, M.; Jasion, D.; Kilkenny, J.; Paguio, R.

    2013-04-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  17. Measurement of the (211)Pb half-life using recoil atoms from (219)Rn decay.

    PubMed

    Aitken-Smith, P M; Collins, S M

    2016-04-01

    The radioactive half-life of (211)Pb was measured, by α-particle counting of samples of radiochemically pure (211)Pb in equilibrium with its α-emitting progeny, (211)Bi and (211)Po. The samples were prepared by the collection of (215)Po recoil atoms from the decay of the (219)Rn decay progeny produced from a (223)Ra sample onto stainless steel discs. The radioactive decay of the (211)Pb was measured utilising a 2π proportional counter operating on the α plateau. A half-life of 36.164 (13)min was determined, which is in agreement with currently available literature. A full uncertainty budget is presented. A recommended half-life of T1/2((211)Pb)=36.161 (17)min has been evaluated from the current literature values.

  18. ASTROPHYSICS. Exclusion of leptophilic dark matter models using XENON100 electronic recoil data.

    PubMed

    2015-08-21

    Laboratory experiments searching for galactic dark matter particles scattering off nuclei have so far not been able to establish a discovery. We use data from the XENON100 experiment to search for dark matter interacting with electrons. With no evidence for a signal above the low background of our experiment, we exclude a variety of representative dark matter models that would induce electronic recoils. For axial-vector couplings to electrons, we exclude cross sections above 6 × 10(-35) cm(2) for particle masses of m(χ) = 2 GeV/c(2). Independent of the dark matter halo, we exclude leptophilic models as an explanation for the long-standing DAMA/LIBRA signal, such as couplings to electrons through axial-vector interactions at a 4.4σ confidence level, mirror dark matter at 3.6σ, and luminous dark matter at 4.6σ.

  19. Recoil Momentum Spectroscopy Study of Electron Capture from He by 10 MeV Hydrogenlike Fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, L.; Winecki, S.; Stöckli, M.; Cocke, C. L.; Richard, P.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.

    1996-05-01

    We have used recoil momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS (J. Ullrich, et al., Comm. At. Mol. Phys. \\underline30), 285 (1994).) to determine final state momentum distributions in the single electron capture from He by 10 MeV F^8+ ions. A momentum resolution below 0.15 a.u. was obtained. The longitidunal momentum resolution is sufficient to allow the separation of final state populations of the L, M and higher states, and to identify excitation of the residual He^+ ion. This probability of this excitation is large in the capture process. Transverse momentum distributions were used to extract transverse cross sections (angular distributions) for different final states. Comparison of the data to theoretical expectations will be presented.

  20. Three-Loop Radiative-Recoil Corrections to Hyperfine Splitting in Muonium: Diagrams with Polarization Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, Michael I.; Shelyuto, Valery A.

    2009-09-25

    We consider three-loop radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting in muonium generated by the diagrams with electron and muon vacuum polarizations. We calculate single-logarithmic and nonlogarithmic contributions of order alpha{sup 3}(m/M)E{sub F} generated by gauge invariant sets of diagrams with electron and muon polarization insertions in the electron and muon factors. Combining these corrections with the older results, we obtain total contribution to hyperfine splitting generated by all diagrams with electron and muon polarization loops. The calculation of this contribution completes an important stage in the implementation of the program of reduction of the theoretical uncertainty of hyperfine splitting below 10 Hz. The new results improve the theory of hyperfine splitting and affect the value of the electron-muon mass ratio extracted from experimental data on muonium hyperfine splitting.

  1. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Magoon, J; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M; Ulreich, J; Ashabranner, R C; Bionta, R M; Carpenter, A C; Felker, B; Khater, H Y; LePape, S; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Rygg, J R; Yeoman, M F; Zacharias, R; Leeper, R J; Fletcher, K; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Kilkenny, J; Paguio, R

    2013-04-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  2. Supermassive recoil velocities for binary black-hole mergers with antialigned spins.

    PubMed

    González, José A; Hannam, Mark; Sperhake, Ulrich; Brügmann, Bernd; Husa, Sascha

    2007-06-08

    Recent calculations of the recoil velocity in binary black-hole mergers have found the kick velocity to be of the order of a few hundred km/s in the case of nonspinning binaries and about 500 km/s in the case of spinning configurations, and have lead to predictions of a maximum kick of up to 1300 km/s. We test these predictions and demonstrate that kick velocities of at least 2500 km/s are possible for equal-mass binaries with antialigned spins in the orbital plane. Kicks of that magnitude are likely to have significant repercussions for models of black-hole formation, the population of intergalactic black holes, and the structure of host galaxies.

  3. Musett: A segmented Si array for Recoil-Decay-Tagging studies at VAMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Ch.; Jeanneau, F.; Sulignano, B.; Druillole, F.; Ljungvall, J.; Paul, B.; Virique, E.; Baron, P.; Bervas, H.; Clément, E.; Delagnes, E.; Dijon, A.; Dossat, E.; Drouart, A.; Farget, F.; Flouzat, Ch.; De France, G.; Görgen, A.; Houarner, Ch.; Jacquot, B.; Korten, W.; Lebertre, G.; Lecornu, B.; Legeard, L.; Lermitage, A.; Lhenoret, S.; Marry, C.; Maugeais, C.; Menager, L.; Meunier, O.; Navin, A.; Nizery, F.; Obertelli, A.; Rauly, E.; Raine, B.; Rejmund, M.; Ropert, J.; Saillant, F.; Savajols, H.; Schmitt, Ch.; Tripon, M.; Wanlin, E.; Wittwer, G.

    2014-05-01

    A new segmented silicon-array called MUSETT has been built for the study of heavy elements using the Recoil-Decay-Tagging technique. MUSETT is located at the focal plane of the VAMOS spectrometer at GANIL and is used in conjunction with a γ-ray array at the target position. This paper describes the device, which consists of four 10×10 cm2 Si detectors and its associated front-end electronics based on highly integrated ASICs electronics. The triggerless readout electronics, the data acquisition and the analysis tools developed for its characterization are presented. This device was commissioned at GANIL with the EXOGAM γ-ray spectrometer using the fusion-evaporation reaction 197Au(22Ne,5n)214Ac. Additionally, the performance of the VAMOS Wien filter used during the in-beam commissioning is also reported.

  4. Infrared Optical Readout of a Gas-Based Recoil Tracking Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Katrina; Barbeau, Phillip; Rich, Grayson; Awe, Connor

    2016-03-01

    Gas-based recoil tracking detectors are used in a variety of nuclear and particle physics experiments to identify particles based on distinct interaction signatures. Past research shows that this technology, if further developed, may prove useful in the ongoing search for dark matter and coherent neutrino scattering observations. This research presents the original design and development of a tracking detector that uses gaseous argon as a scintillating material to measure infrared optical readout. The initial model of this detector, consisting of a wire chamber filled with P-10, has produced unambiguous ionization signals. Current studies are focused toward using pure gaseous argon to detect coincident scintillation signals, which will demonstrate the capability of the detector to image particle tracks using nonvisible radiation.

  5. Recoil Decay Tagging Study Of Transitional Proton Emitters 145,146,147Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A.P.; Woods, P.J.; Davinson, T.; Liu, Z.; Davids, C.N.; Seweryniak, D.; Carpenter, M.P.; Hammond, N.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Mukherjee, G.; Sinha, S.; Blank, B.; Freeman, S.J.; Hoteling, N.; Shergur, J.; Walters, W.B.; Scholey, C.; Sonzogni, A.A.; Woehr, A.

    2005-04-05

    Gamma rays from the transitional proton emitting nuclei 145,146,147Tm have been observed using the recoil-decay tagging technique. The ground state band of 147Tm was confirmed and extended and the unfavoured signature sequence was observed. A ground state rotational band with properties of a decoupled h11/2 band was observed in 145Tm. In addition coincidences between the proton fine structure line and the 2+{yields}0+ {gamma}-ray transition in 144Er were detected at the focal plane of the FMA. This is the first time that coincidences between proton radioactive decays and {gamma} rays have been seen. The particle decay of 146Tm has been measured with improved statistics and a rotational band similar to 147Tm has been observed.

  6. Nonvolatile optical memory via recoil-induced resonance in a pure two-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, A. J. F.; Maynard, M.-A.; Banerjee, C.; Felinto, D.; Goldfarb, F.; Tabosa, J. W. R.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the storage of light via the phenomenon of recoil-induced resonance in a pure two-level system of cold cesium atoms. We use a strong coupling beam and a weak probe beam to couple different external momentum states of the cesium atom via two-photon Raman interaction which leads to the storage of the optical information of the probe beam. We have also measured the probe transmission spectrum, as well as the light storage spectrum which reveals very narrow subnatural resonance features showing absorption and gain. We have demonstrated that this memory presents the unique property of being insensitive to the reading process, which does not destroy the stored information leading to a memory lifetime limited only by the atomic thermal motion.

  7. Spin-orbit force, recoil corrections, and possible BB¯* and DD¯* molecular states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lu; Ma, Li; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the one-boson exchange model, we have calculated the effective potentials between two heavy mesons BB¯* and DD¯* from the t- and u-channel π-, η-, ρ-, ω-, and σ-meson exchanges with four kinds of quantum number: I=0, JPC=1++; I =0, JPC=1+-; I =1, JPC=1++; I =1, JPC=1+-. We keep the recoil corrections to the BB¯* and DD¯* systems up to O(1/M2). The spin-orbit force appears at O(/1M), which turns out to be important for the very loosely bound molecular states. Our numerical results show that the momentum-related corrections are unfavorable to the formation of the molecular states in the I =0, JPC=1++ and I =1, JPC=1+- channels in the DD¯* system.

  8. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  9. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A.; McKernan, M. A.; Moran, M.; Rygg, J. R.; Yeoman, M. F.; Zacharias, R.; Leeper, R. J.; Fletcher, K.; Farrell, M.; Jasion, D.; Kilkenny, J.; Paguio, R.

    2013-04-18

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  10. In-situ, real-time, studies of film growth processes using ion scattering and direct recoil spectroscopy techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Smentkowski, V. S.

    1999-04-22

    Time-of-flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy (TOF-ISARS) enables the characterization of the composition and structure of surfaces with 1-2 monolayer specificity. It will be shown that surface analysis is possible at ambient pressures greater than 3 mTorr using TOF-ISARS techniques; allowing for real-time, in situ studies of film growth processes. TOF-ISARS comprises three analytical techniques: ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), which detects the backscattered primary ion beam; direct recoil spectroscopy (DRS), which detects the surface species recoiled into the forward scattering direction; and mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI), which is 3 variant of DRS capable of isotopic resolution for all surface species--including H and He. The advantages and limitations of each of these techniques will be discussed. The use of the three TOF-ISARS methods for real-time, in situ film growth studies at high ambient pressures will be illustrated. It will be shown that MSRI analysis is possible during sputter deposition. It will be also be demonstrated that the analyzer used for MSRI can also be used for time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) under high vacuum conditions. The use of a single analyzer to perform the complimentary surface analytical techniques of MSRI and SIMS is unique. The dwd functionality of the MSRI analyzer provides surface information not obtained when either MSRI or SIMS is used independently.

  11. Relevance Is the Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeltzer, Larry

    1993-01-01

    Points out that good research must be applied, theoretical, rigorous, and relevant all at the same time. Argues for relevant research that develops and tests theoretical constructs that provide useful business knowledge. (SR)

  12. Active regulation of longitudinal arch compression and recoil during walking and running.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Luke A; Lichtwark, Glen; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2015-01-06

    The longitudinal arch (LA) of the human foot compresses and recoils in response to being cyclically loaded. This has typically been considered a passive process, however, it has recently been shown that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles have the capacity to actively assist in controlling LA motion. Here we tested the hypothesis that intrinsic foot muscles, abductor hallucis (AH), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and quadratus plantae (QP), actively lengthen and shorten during the stance phase of gait in response to loading of the foot. Nine participants walked at 1.25 m s⁻¹ and ran at 2.78 and 3.89 m s⁻¹ on a force-instrumented treadmill while foot and ankle kinematics were recorded according to a multisegment foot model. Muscle-tendon unit (MTU) lengths, determined from the foot kinematics, and intramuscular electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from AH, FDB and QP. Peak EMG amplitude was determined during the stance phase for each participant at each gait velocity. All muscles underwent a process of slow active lengthening during LA compression, followed by a rapid shortening as the arch recoiled during the propulsive phase. Changes in MTU length and peak EMG increased significantly with increasing gait velocity for all muscles. This is the first in vivo evidence that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles function in parallel to the plantar aponeurosis, actively regulating the stiffness of the foot in response to the magnitude of forces encountered during locomotion. These muscles may therefore contribute to power absorption and generation at the foot, limit strain on the plantar aponeurosis and facilitate efficient foot ground force transmission.

  13. Nuclear Microprobe using Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) for Hydrogen Profiling in High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Pascal; Sayir, Ali; Berger, Marie-Helene

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between hydrogen and various high temperature protonic conductors (HTPC) has not been clearly understood due to poor densification and unreacted secondary phases. the melt-processing technique is used in producing fully dense simple SrCe(0.9)Y (0.10) O(3-delta) and complex Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskites that can not be achieved by solid-state sintering. the possibilities of ion beam analysis have been investigated to quantify hydrogen distribution in HTPC perovskites subjected to water heat treatment. Nuclear microprobe technique is based on the interactions of a focused ion beam of MeV light ions (H-1, H-2, He-3, He-4,.) with the sample to be analyzed to determine local elemental concentrations at the cubic micrometer scale, the elastic recoil detection analysis technique (ERDA) has been carried out using He-4(+) microbeams and detecting the resulting recoil protons. Mappings of longitudinal sections of water treated SrCeO3 and Sr(Ca(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3 perovskites have been achieved, the water treatment strongly alters the surface of simple SrCe(0.9)Y(0.10)O(3-delta) perovskite. From Rutherford Back Scattering measurements (RBS), both Ce depletion and surface re-deposition is evidenced. the ERDA investigations on water treated Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskite did not exhibit any spatial difference for the hydrogen incorporation from the surface to the centre. the amount of hydrogen incorporation for Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) was low and required further development of two less conventional techniques, ERDA in forward geometry and forward elastic diffusion H-1(p,p) H-1 with coincidence detection.

  14. INTERACTION OF RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES WITH STARS IN GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shuo; Liu, F. K.; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer; Chen Xian E-mail: fkliu@bac.pku.edu.cn

    2012-03-20

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are the products of frequent galaxy mergers. The coalescence of the SMBHBs is a distinct source of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. The detections of the strong GW radiation and their possible electromagnetic counterparts are essential. Numerical relativity suggests that the post-merger supermassive black hole (SMBH) gets a kick velocity up to 4000 km s{sup -1} due to the anisotropic GW radiations. Here, we investigate the dynamical coevolution and interaction of the recoiling SMBHs and their galactic stellar environments with one million direct N-body simulations including the stellar tidal disruption by the recoiling SMBHs. Our results show that the accretion of disrupted stars does not significantly affect the SMBH dynamical evolution. We investigate the stellar tidal disruption rates as a function of the dynamical evolution of oscillating SMBHs in the galactic nuclei. Our simulations show that most stellar tidal disruptions are contributed by the unbound stars and occur when the oscillating SMBHs pass through the galactic center. The averaged disruption rate is {approx}10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, which is about an order of magnitude lower than that by a stationary SMBH at similar galactic nuclei. Our results also show that a bound star cluster is around the oscillating SMBH of about {approx}0.7% the black hole mass. In addition, we discover a massive cloud of unbound stars following the oscillating SMBH. We also investigate the dependence of the results on the SMBH masses and density slopes of the galactic nuclei.

  15. Active regulation of longitudinal arch compression and recoil during walking and running

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Luke A.; Lichtwark, Glen; Cresswell, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    The longitudinal arch (LA) of the human foot compresses and recoils in response to being cyclically loaded. This has typically been considered a passive process, however, it has recently been shown that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles have the capacity to actively assist in controlling LA motion. Here we tested the hypothesis that intrinsic foot muscles, abductor hallucis (AH), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and quadratus plantae (QP), actively lengthen and shorten during the stance phase of gait in response to loading of the foot. Nine participants walked at 1.25 m s−1 and ran at 2.78 and 3.89 m s−1 on a force-instrumented treadmill while foot and ankle kinematics were recorded according to a multisegment foot model. Muscle–tendon unit (MTU) lengths, determined from the foot kinematics, and intramuscular electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from AH, FDB and QP. Peak EMG amplitude was determined during the stance phase for each participant at each gait velocity. All muscles underwent a process of slow active lengthening during LA compression, followed by a rapid shortening as the arch recoiled during the propulsive phase. Changes in MTU length and peak EMG increased significantly with increasing gait velocity for all muscles. This is the first in vivo evidence that the plantar intrinsic foot muscles function in parallel to the plantar aponeurosis, actively regulating the stiffness of the foot in response to the magnitude of forces encountered during locomotion. These muscles may therefore contribute to power absorption and generation at the foot, limit strain on the plantar aponeurosis and facilitate efficient foot ground force transmission. PMID:25551151

  16. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some human tissues and dosimetric materials for mean energies of various radiation sources relevant to radiotherapy and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2014-09-01

    Effective atomic numbers, Zeff, and electron densities, neff, are convenient parameters used to characterise the radiation response of a multi-element material in many technical and medical applications. Accurate values of these physical parameters provide essential data in medical physics. In the present study, the effective atomic numbers and electron densities have been calculated for some human tissues and dosimetric materials such as Adipose Tissue (ICRU-44), Bone Cortical (ICRU-44), Brain Grey/White Matter (ICRU-44), Breast Tissue (ICRU-44), Lung Tissue (ICRU-44), Soft Tissue (ICRU-44), LiF TLD-100H, TLD-100, Water, Borosilicate Glass, PAG (Gel Dosimeter), Fricke (Gel Dosimeter) and OSL (Aluminium Oxide) using mean photon energies, Em, of various radiation sources. The used radiation sources are Pd-103, Tc-99, Ra-226, I-131, Ir-192, Co-60, 30 kVp, 40 kVp, 50 kVp (Intrabeam, Carl Zeiss Meditec) and 6 MV (Mohan-6 MV) sources. The Em values were then used to calculate Zeff and neff of the tissues and dosimetric materials for various radiation sources. Different calculation methods for Zeff such as the direct method, the interpolation method and Auto-Zeff computer program were used and agreements and disagreements between the used methods have been presented and discussed. It has been observed that at higher Em values agreement is quite satisfactory (Dif.<5%) between the adopted methods.

  17. Measurement of the low-energy quenching factor in germanium using an 88Y/Be photoneutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, B. J.; Chavarria, A. E.; Collar, J. I.; Privitera, P.; Robinson, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    We employ an 88Y/Be photoneutron source to derive the quenching factor for neutron-induced nuclear recoils in germanium, probing recoil energies from a few hundred eVnr to 8.5 keVnr . A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation of our setup is compared to experimental data employing a Lindhard model with a free electronic energy loss k and an adiabatic correction for sub -keVnr nuclear recoils. The best fit k =0.179 ±0.001 obtained using a Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) ensemble sampler is in good agreement with previous measurements, confirming the adequacy of the Lindhard model to describe the stopping of few-keV ions in germanium crystals at a temperature of ˜77 K . This value of k corresponds to a quenching factor of 13.7% to 25.3% for nuclear recoil energies between 0.3 and 8.5 keVnr , respectively.

  18. Atom interferometric studies of light scattering - A new technique for measuring atomic recoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Scott

    This dissertation presents two techniques for measuring the atomic recoil frequency, oq, using a single-state atom interferometer that utilizes a dilute cloud of laser-cooled 85Rb atoms. An important motivation for these measurements is that o q, which is related to the ratio of Planck's constant and the atomic mass of rubidium hmRb , can be used to infer the atomic fine structure constant, alpha. The two techniques presented here involve time domain measurements carried out with standing-wave laser fields that manipulate atoms in the same atomic ground state and exploit the wave nature of cold atoms. The first technique uses two off-resonant standing-wave pulses to interfere momentum states so that the recoil frequency can be determined. However, to model the signal shape it is necessary to include effects of spontaneous emission during the interaction with light and the spatial profile of the laser beam. The second technique provides a robust alternative approach for measuring the recoil frequency because the signal shape is considerably simpler and can be modeled easily. We report measurements of atomic recoil using both techniques that are precise to ˜ 1 part per million. The precision was limited mainly by the time scale of the experiment (˜ 20 ms) due to the presence of magnetic field gradients. The dissertation also discusses recent improvements that have extended the time scale to the transit time limit for cold atoms. This is the time of travel of cold atoms through the region of interaction defined by the laser beams. The interferometer uses two standing-wave pulses separated by time T to put the atoms in a superposition of momentum states. Interference between momentum states produce a density grating echo signal at time 2 T. The echo time, 2T, corresponds to the time at which the Doppler phases of the momentum states associated with all atoms in the sample cancel. The echo technique is, therefore, a general method to overcome the effect of the

  19. Perceptions of document relevance

    PubMed Central

    Bruza, Peter; Chang, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study of how humans perceive and judge the relevance of documents. Humans are adept at making reasonably robust and quick decisions about what information is relevant to them, despite the ever increasing complexity and volume of their surrounding information environment. The literature on document relevance has identified various dimensions of relevance (e.g., topicality, novelty, etc.), however little is understood about how these dimensions may interact. We performed a crowdsourced study of how human subjects judge two relevance dimensions in relation to document snippets retrieved from an internet search engine. The order of the judgment was controlled. For those judgments exhibiting an order effect, a q–test was performed to determine whether the order effects can be explained by a quantum decision model based on incompatible decision perspectives. Some evidence of incompatibility was found which suggests incompatible decision perspectives is appropriate for explaining interacting dimensions of relevance in such instances. PMID:25071622

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Effect of a target size on the recoil momentum upon laser irradiation of absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakou, A. N.; Petrenko, A. M.; Bosak, N. A.

    2004-10-01

    The dependence of a recoil momentum on the radius of a target irradiated by a single-pulse Nd3+:YAG laser (λ=1.064 μm, τ=20 ns, E<=300 mJ) in the air is studied. The recoil momentum decreases three-fold with increasing the relative target radius from 0.3 to 5 and tends to saturation for r>3. The calculation of the recoil momentum on the basis of the Euler and Navier—Stokes equations gave understated values for r>1, which lowered to negative values. The reasons for the qualitative discrepancy between the experimental and calculated data is discussed.

  1. Making Science Relevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eick, Charles; Deutsch, Bill; Fuller, Jennifer; Scott, Fletcher

    2008-01-01

    Science teachers are always looking for ways to demonstrate the relevance of science to students. By connecting science learning to important societal issues, teachers can motivate students to both enjoy and engage in relevant science (Bennet, Lubben, and Hogarth 2007). To develop that connection, teachers can help students take an active role in…

  2. Energy and angular distributions of sputtered atoms at normal incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Y.; Takiguchi, T.; Ishida, M.

    1991-12-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT has been applied to investigate the angular distribution and the energy distribution of atoms sputtered from Cu and Nb targets by normally incident Ar+ ions. It is found that there are two important effects which affect the angular distributions and the energy distributions of sputtered atoms, i.e., the anisotropic effect and the bulk recoil effect. The former effects means that the recoil flux keeps the memory of the incident ion-beam direction because of the incomplete cascade, while the latter one means the contributions of recoils generated at the deeper layer to the angular and the energy distributions of sputtered atoms. The anisotropic effect is important in the low energy region, and it makes the angular distribution under-cosine and the high energy tail of the energy distribution fall off faster than the Thompson distribution. The bulk recoil effect makes angular distribution be over-cosine and the peak position of the energy distribution be shifted to somewhat higher energies.

  3. Investigation of neutron-induced background in Magnetic-Recoil-Spectrometer CR-39 data using a DT neutron source and MCNP simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanese, Lucio M.; Frenje, Johan; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Lahmann, Brandon; Sio, Hong; Petrasso, Richard

    2015-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometers (MRS) installed on the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are routinely used to measure neutron yield, areal density and ion temperatures from DT implosions. The observed background in the lower-energy part of MRS spectra is significantly higher than expected from analysis of neutron-induced background data obtained in stand-alone CR-39 experiments at OMEGA. A possible explanation relates to the scattering of neutrons in the MRS housing vessel, which is not accounted for in current modeling. To test experimentally the impact of individual vessel components on the observed background, parts of the MRS housing have been mocked up and CR-39 data have been collected employing a DT neutron source. The experimental results are contrasted to MCNP simulations to improve our understanding of the mechanism behind the enhanced neutron background. The results will be used to correct measured spectra from OMEGA and the NIF to allow detailed analysis of lower energy data. This work was supported in part by NLUF, US DOE, and LLE.

  4. Single and double electron capture from He by Ar{sup 16+} studied using cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, M.A.; Wolff, W.; Wolf, H.E.; Kamber, E.Y.; Stoeckli, M.; Cocke, C.L.

    1998-10-01

    Single and double electron capture from He targets by Ar{sup 16+} ions have been studied at projectile velocities from 0.3 to 1.5 a.u. Cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy was used to record the energy gain and scattering angle simultaneously. For single capture, the reaction window is found to spread in width approximately as the square root of the projectile velocity and to shift slightly toward smaller energy-gain values as the velocity increases. The angular distributions center at the half Coulomb angle over most of the velocity range covered, but differ in shape from multichannel Landau-Zener model results. For double capture, transfer ionization dominates and feeds primarily n-symmetric states, where {ital n} is the principal quantum number. True double capture feeds mainly n-asymmetric states. The angular distributions for double capture lie outside the half Coulomb angle, indicating the importance of two-step processes in populating doubly excited states. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Recoil effect on beta-decaying in vivo generators, interpreted for (103)Pd/(103m)Rh.

    PubMed

    Szucs, Zoltan; van Rooyen, Johann; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn

    2009-01-01

    The use of Auger emitters as potential radiopharmaceuticals is being increasingly investigated. One of the radionuclides of interest is (103m)Rh, which can be produced from (103)Ru or (103)Pd in an in vivo generator. A potential problem, however, is the recoil of the (103m)Rh out of the carrier molecule and even out of the target cell. In order to determine the likelihood of this happening in the (103)Pd/(103m)Rh, case calculations were made to prove that this does not happen. The equations were generalised for all radionuclides with an atomic mass of 10-240 as a tool for determining the recoil threshold of any beta-emitting radionuclide.

  6. Temperature Dependence and Recoil-free Fraction Effects in Olivines Across the Mg-Fe Solid Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sklute, E. C.; Rothstein, Y.; Dyar, M. D.; Schaefer, M. W.; Menzies, O. N.; Bland, P. A.; Berry, F. J.

    2005-01-01

    Olivine and pyroxene are the major ferromagnesian minerals in most meteorite types and in mafic igneous rocks that are dominant at the surface of the Earth. It is probable that they are the major mineralogical components at the surface of any planetary body that has undergone differentiation processes. In situ mineralogical studies of the rocks and soils on Mars suggest that olivine is a widespread mineral on that planet s surface (particularly at the Gusev site) and that it has been relatively unaffected by alteration. Thus an understanding of the characteristics of Mossbauer spectra of olivine is of great importance in interpreting MER results. However, variable temperature Mossbauer spectra of olivine, which are needed to quantify recoil-free fraction effects and to understand the temperature dependence of olivine spectra, are lacking in the literature. Thus, we present here a study of the temperature dependence and recoil-free fraction of a series of synthetic olivines.

  7. First identification of excited states in 117Ba using the recoil-β -delayed proton tagging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B.; Liu, Z.; Seweryniak, D.; Woods, P. J.; Wang, H. L.; Yang, J.; Liu, H. L.; Davids, C. N.; Carpenter, M. P.; Davinson, T.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Page, R. D.; Robinson, A. P.; Shergur, J.; Sinha, S.; Zhu, S.; Tang, X. D.; Wang, J. G.; Huang, T. H.; Zhang, W. Q.; Sun, M. D.; Liu, X. Y.; Lu, H. Y.

    2017-02-01

    Excited states have been observed for the first time in the neutron-deficient nucleus 117Ba using the recoil-decay tagging technique following the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reaction 64Zn(58Ni, 2p3n)117Ba. Prompt γ rays have been assigned to 117Ba through correlations with β -delayed protons following the decay of A =117 recoils. Through the analysis of the γ -γ coincidence relationships, a high-spin level scheme consisting of two bands has been established in 117Ba. Based on the systematics of the level spacings in the neighboring barium isotopes, the two bands are proposed to have ν h11 /2[532 ] 5 /2- and ν d5 /2[413 ] 5 /2+ configurations, respectively. The observed band-crossing properties are interpreted in the framework of cranked shell model.

  8. Commissioning of a new timestamp-based data acquisition system for the DRAGON recoil mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Gregory; Akers, Charlie; Connolly, Devin; Fallis, Jennifer; Hutcheon, Dave; Olchanski, Konstantin; Ruiz, Chris

    2014-09-01

    The DRAGON recoil mass separator at TRIUMF exists to study radiative proton and alpha capture reactions, which are important in a variety of astrophysical scenarios. DRAGON experiments require a data acquisition system that can be triggered on either reaction product (γ ray or heavy ion), with the additional requirement of being able to promptly recognize coincidence events in an online environment. To this end, we have designed and implemented a new data acquisition system for DRAGON which consists of two independently triggered readouts. Events from both systems are recorded with timestamps from a 20 MHz clock that are used to tag coincidences in the earliest possible stage of the data analysis. In this talk, I will discuss the design, implementation, and commissioning of the new DRAGON data acquisition system, focusing specifically on the trigger logic, coincidence reconstruction algorithm and live time considerations. I will also discuss the results of an experiment commissioning the new system, which measured the strength of the Ecm = 1113 keV resonance in the 20Ne(p , γ) 21Na radiative proton capture reaction.

  9. Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis set up for electronic sputtering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Tripathi, A.; Kabiraj, D.; Sugathan, P.; Chaudhary, G. K.; Barua, P.

    2006-04-01

    Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) set up with a large solid angle (greater than or similar to 4.8 msr) Delta E - E position-sensitive telescope detector is developed at Inter University Accelerator Centre as a dedicated facility for the study of electronic sputtering of thin films under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The detector consists of a gas ionization chamber (Delta E ) and a solid-state surface barrier detector ( E ) housed in a same assembly. The electronic sputtering yield (atoms/ion) is determined by analyzing on-line fluence-dependent ERDA data obtained from a variety of thin films. Large erosion (> 10 5 atoms/ion) of carbon from a-C:H by 150 MeV Ag 13+ ions, evolution of nitrogen (greater than or similar to 880 atoms/ion) from copper nitride and depletion of oxygen (greater than or similar to 1000 atoms/ion) from copper oxide film under 200 MeV Au 15+ ion impact are studied and reported in this work. The electronic sputtering of these materials is discussed on the basis of the thermal spike model of SHI and solid interaction.

  10. Fast neutron detection with coincidence counting of recoil tracks in CR-39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengar, I.; Skvarč, J.; Ilić, R.

    2002-06-01

    Unpredictable background is often the major drawback in the assessment of low fluences of fast neutrons with solid state nuclear track detectors. The problem can be effectively solved by counting coincidence tracks in two detector foils that are in close contact during the irradiation. The detection of fast neutrons performed with a pair of CR-39 detector foils, subsequent chemical etching and evaluation of the etched tracks by an automatic track counting system was studied. After counting, only tracks produced by the same recoil nuclei in the surface layers of both detector foils were taken into account. In this way, the background due to objects that cannot be separated from tracks by an automatic counting system was drastically reduced. Emphasis was given to determining the properties of such a coincidence fast neutron detector based on utilisation of CR-39. The response of the coincidence detector was found to be 3×10 -5 tracks/neutron and is comparable with a detector based on counting tracks in a single foil of CR-39. The lower neutron detection limit was found to be 2×10 4 cm -2 with a counting area of 10 cm 2, and is two orders of magnitude lower than that obtained with a detector based on counting tracks in a single foil of CR-39.

  11. A continuous mode data acquisition technique for proton recoil proportional counter neutron spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, E.F.

    1989-03-01

    The existing proton recoil proportional counter measurement technique used at FNS for joint FNS-ANL fusion blanket neutron spectroscopy requires that numerous piece-wise (but overlapping) measurements be carried out at a sequence of fixed counter voltages. The composite results of all of these independent measurements are required to construct a single neutron spectrum. This approach has been found to be both inefficient and subject to systematic errors. An alternative approach, in which data is acquired continuously using a slow time modulation of the high voltage bias supply, is here described. The electronics requirements are consistent with the basic detector/amplifier systems now operable at FNS. Some additional hardware including a programmable high voltage bias supply and a random amplitude test pulse generator are necessary. A description of the electronics and data acquisition hardware for these measurements will be provided at a later date. In this report we emphasize the numerical procedures involved to acquire and reduce data, and provide an illustrative example using one of the hardest neutron spectra readily available for this work at ANL. 6 refs., 26 figs.

  12. Hydrogen uptake in Zircaloy-2 reactor fuel claddings studied with elastic recoil detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekhara, S.; Doyle, B. L.; Enos, D. G.; Clark, B. G.

    2013-04-01

    The recent trend towards a high burn-up discharge spent nuclear fuel necessitates a thorough understanding of hydrogen uptake in Zr-based cladding materials that encapsulate spent nuclear fuel. Although it is challenging to experimentally replicate exact conditions in a nuclear reactor that lead to hydrogen uptake in claddings, in this study we have attempted to understand the kinetics of hydrogen uptake by first electrolytically charging Zircaloy-2 (Zr-2) cladding material for various durations (100 to 2,600 s), and subsequently examining hydrogen ingress with elastic recoil detection (ERD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To understand the influence of irradiation damage defects on hydrogen uptake, an analogous study was performed on ion - irradiated (0.1, 1 and 25 dpa) Zr-2. Analysis of ERD data from the un-irradiated Zr-2 suggests that the growth of the hydride layer is diffusion controlled, and preliminary TEM results support this assertion. In un-irradiated Zr-2, the diffusivity of hydrogen in the hydride phase was found to be approximately 1.1 × 10-11 cm2/s, while the diffusivity in the hydride phase for lightly irradiated (0.1 and 1 dpa) Zr-2 is an order of magnitude lower. Irradiation to 25 dpa results in a hydrogen diffusivity that is comparable to the un-irradiated Zr-2. These results are compared with existing literature on hydrogen transport in Zr - based materials.

  13. Hadronic effects and observables in B →π ℓ+ℓ- decay at large recoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambrock, Christian; Khodjamirian, Alexander; Rusov, Aleksey

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the amplitude of the rare flavor-changing neutral-current decay B →π ℓ+ℓ- at large recoil of the pion. The nonlocal contributions in which the weak effective operators are combined with the electromagnetic lepton-pair emission are systematically taken into account. These amplitudes are calculated at off-shell values of the lepton-pair mass squared, q2<0 , employing the operator-product expansion, QCD factorization and light-cone sum rules. The results are fitted to hadronic dispersion relations in q2, including the intermediate vector meson contributions. The dispersion relations are then used in the physical region q2>0 . Our main result is the process-dependent addition Δ C9(B π )(q2) to the Wilson coefficient C9 obtained at 4 mℓ2

  14. Observation of a resonance in B+ → K+ μ+ μ- decays at low recoil.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Cowie, E; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-13

    A broad peaking structure is observed in the dimuon spectrum of B+ → K+ μ+ μ- decays in the kinematic region where the kaon has a low recoil against the dimuon system. The structure is consistent with interference between the B+ → K+ μ+ μ- decay and a resonance and has a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations. The mean and width of the resonance are measured to be 4191(-8)(+9)  MeV/c2 and 65(-16)(+22)  MeV/c2, respectively, where the uncertainties include statistical and systematic contributions. These measurements are compatible with the properties of the ψ(4160) meson. First observations of both the decay B+ → ψ(4160)K+ and the subsequent decay ψ(4160) → μ+ μ- are reported. The resonant decay and the interference contribution make up 20% of the yield for dimuon masses above 3770  MeV/c2. This contribution is larger than theoretical estimates.

  15. Bond selectivity in electron-induced reaction due to directed recoil on an anisotropic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggara, Kelvin; Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Chatterjee, Avisek; Cheng, Fang; Polanyi, John C.

    2016-12-01

    Bond-selective reaction is central to heterogeneous catalysis. In heterogeneous catalysis, selectivity is found to depend on the chemical nature and morphology of the substrate. Here, however, we show a high degree of bond selectivity dependent only on adsorbate bond alignment. The system studied is the electron-induced reaction of meta-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). Of the adsorbate's C-I bonds, C-I aligned `Along' the copper row dissociates in 99.3% of the cases giving surface reaction, whereas C-I bond aligned `Across' the rows dissociates in only 0.7% of the cases. A two-electronic-state molecular dynamics model attributes reaction to an initial transition to a repulsive state of an Along C-I, followed by directed recoil of C towards a Cu atom of the same row, forming C-Cu. A similar impulse on an Across C-I gives directed C that, moving across rows, does not encounter a Cu atom and hence exhibits markedly less reaction.

  16. Three-loop radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting generated by one-loop fermion factors

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, Michael I.; Grotch, Howard; Shelyuto, Valery A.

    2004-10-01

    We consider three-loop radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting in muonium generated by diagrams with one-loop radiative photon insertions both in the electron and muon lines. An analytic result for these nonlogarithmic corrections of order {alpha}(Z{sup 2}{alpha})(Z{alpha})(m/M)E{sub F} is obtained. This result constitutes a next step in the implementation of the program of reduction of the theoretical uncertainty of hyperfine splitting below 10 Hz.

  17. Review of Low Energy Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, J. D.

    2007-04-01

    Some issues regarding low energy neutrinos are reviewed. We focus on three aspects i)We show that by employing very low energy (a few keV) electron neutrinos, neutrino disappearance oscillations can be investigated by detecting recoiling electrons with low threshold spherical gaseous TPC's. In such an experiment, which is sensitive to the small mixing angle θ13, the novel feature is that the oscillation length is so small that the full oscillation takes place inside the detector. Thus one can determine accurately all the oscillation parameters and, in particular, measure or set a good limit on θ13. ii) Low threshold gaseous TPC detectors can also be used in detecting nuclear recoils by exploiting the neutral current interaction. Thus these robust and stable detectors can be employed in supernova neutrino detection. iii) The lepton violating neutrinoless double decay is investigated focusing on how the absolute neutrino mass can be extracted from the data.

  18. Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms – Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kropp, Roy K.

    2011-09-30

    A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science® Databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects of marine renewable energy devices on marine mammals and seabirds were examined to begin the search process (e.g., Boehlert et al. 2008; Thompson et al. 2008; Simas et al. 2009). From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Searches were conducted with reference to the potential effects of offshore wind farms and MHK devices on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that often the potential effects were offered as hypotheses that often were not supported by the presentation of appropriate documentation. Therefore, the search was refined and focused on trying to obtain the necessary information to support or challenge a proposed potential effect to a specific concern. One of the expressed concerns regarding MHK devices is that placing wave parks in coastal waters could compromise the migration patterns of whales. Disruption of the annual migration of the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus), which swims at least 30,000 km on its round trip from breeding grounds in Baja California to feeding areas in the Bering Sea, is of particular concern. Among the hypothesized effects on the migrating gray whales are increased predation risk by constricting migration corridor to between array and shore or by forcing the whales to swim into deeper waters, increased metabolic energy costs and delays in reaching the

  19. Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Canada, Britain, and Spain. We found that the energy industry is not in crisis ; however, U.S. government policies, laws, dollars, and even public...CEIMAT (Centro de Investagaciones Energeticas , Medioambeintales y Tecnologicas) Research and development Page 3 of 28ENERGY 8/10/04http://www.ndu.edu...procurement or storage of standard, common use fuels. NATURAL GAS Natural gas, abundant globally and domestically, offers energy versatility among

  20. Measuring the Low Energy Nuclear Quenching Factor in Liquid Argon for a Coherent Neutrino Scatter Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foxe, M.; Bernstein, A.; Hagmann, C.; Joshi, T.; Jovanovic, I.; Kazkaz, K.; Sangiorgio, S.

    2012-08-01

    Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNS) is an as-yet undetected, flavor-independent neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model [D. Freedman, Phys. Rev. D 9 (5) (1974) 1389-1392]. One of the primary reasons the CNS interaction has yet to be observed is the very low energy depositions (less than 1 keV for MeV-energy neutrinos) [A. Drukier, L. Stodolsky, Phys. Rev. D 30 (11) (1984) 2295-2309]. An additional challenge in detecting CNS is nuclear quenching, which is a phenomenon encountered in many detection materials in which nuclear recoils produce less observable energy per unit energy deposited than electronic recoils. The ratio observed signal for nuclear recoils to electronic recoils or nuclear ionization quench factor, is presently unknown in argon at typical CNS energies [C. Hagmann, A. Bernstein, IEEE Trans. on Nucl. Sci. 51 (5) (2004) 2151-2155]. Here we present plans for using the Gamma or Neutron Argon Recoils Resulting in Liquid Ionization (G/NARRLI) detector to measure the nuclear ionization quench factor at ˜8 keV.

  1. Recoil-Implantation Of Multiple Radioisotopes Towards Wear Rate Measurements And Particle Tracing In Prosthetic Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Jacob A.; Timmers, Heiko; Smith, Paul N.; Scarvell, Jennifer M.; Gladkis, Laura

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates a new method of radioisotope labeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene inserts in prosthetic joints for wear studies. The radioisotopes {sup 97}Ru, {sup 100}Pd, {sup 100}Rh, and {sup 101m}Rh are produced in fusion evaporation reactions induced by {sup 12}C ions in a {sup 92}Zr target foil. The fusion products recoil-implant into ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene plugs, machined to fit into the surface of the inserts. During laboratory simulations of the joint motion, a wear rate of the labeled polyethylene may be measured and the pathways of wear debris particles can be traced by detecting characteristic gamma-rays. The concentration profiles of the radioisotopes extend effectively uniformly from the polyethylene surface to a depth of about 4 {mu}m. The multiplicity of labeling and the use of several gamma-ray lines aids with avoiding systematic measurement uncertainties. Two polyethylene plugs were labeled and one was fitted into the surface of the tibial insert of a knee prosthesis, which had been worn in. Actuation over close to 100,000 cycles with a 900 N axial load and a 24 deg. flexion angle removed (14{+-}1)% of the gamma-ray activity from the plug. Most of this activity dispersed into the serum lubricant identifying this as the important debris pathway. Less than 1% activity was transferred to the femoral component of the prosthesis and the measured activity on the tibial tray was insignificant. Assuming uniform wear across the superior surface of the insert, a wear rate of (12{+-}3) mm{sup 3}/Megacycle was determined. This is consistent with wear rate measurements under similar conditions using other techniques.

  2. Treatment of solid tumors by interstitial release of recoiling short-lived alpha emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arazi, L.; Cooks, T.; Schmidt, M.; Keisari, Y.; Kelson, I.

    2007-08-01

    A new method utilizing alpha particles to treat solid tumors is presented. Tumors are treated with interstitial radioactive sources which continually release short-lived alpha emitting atoms from their surface. The atoms disperse inside the tumor, delivering a high dose through their alpha decays. We implement this scheme using thin wire sources impregnated with 224Ra, which release by recoil 220Rn, 216Po and 212Pb atoms. This work aims to demonstrate the feasibility of our method by measuring the activity patterns of the released radionuclides in experimental tumors. Sources carrying 224Ra activities in the range 10-130 kBq were used in experiments on murine squamous cell carcinoma tumors. These included gamma spectroscopy of the dissected tumors and major organs, Fuji-plate autoradiography of histological tumor sections and tissue damage detection by Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. The measurements focused on 212Pb and 212Bi. The 220Rn/216Po distribution was treated theoretically using a simple diffusion model. A simplified scheme was used to convert measured 212Pb activities to absorbed dose estimates. Both physical and histological measurements confirmed the formation of a 5-7 mm diameter necrotic region receiving a therapeutic alpha-particle dose around the source. The necrotic regions shape closely corresponded to the measured activity patterns. 212Pb was found to leave the tumor through the blood at a rate which decreased with tumor mass. Our results suggest that the proposed method, termed DART (diffusing alpha-emitters radiation therapy), may potentially be useful for the treatment of human patients.

  3. Structure relates to elastic recoil and functional role in quadriceps tendon and patellar ligament.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Marco; Quaranta, Marilisa; Macciocca, Maria; De Pasquale, Viviana; Ottani, Vittoria; Ruggeri, Alessandro

    2009-04-01

    Tendons and ligaments have similar but slightly different structure and composition. Crimps of tendons and ligaments are morphological structures related to the elastic functional properties of these connective tissues. Aim of this study was to investigate the morphological arrangement of collagen fibres, fibrils and crimping pattern of suprapatellar (rectus femoris tendon-RFT and vastus intermedius tendon-VIT) and infrapatellar connective tissues (patellar ligament-PL) to relate their structural aspects to their common function role of leg extension. RFT, VIT and PL were removed from knees of Sprague-Dawley rats and light and electron microscopy (TEM and SEM) performed. Sagittal sections showed that collagen array and crimping pattern were similar in RFT and PL but differed from VIT. Morphometric analysis confirmed that crimp number was about the same in RFT and PL (5.4+/-1.4 and 6.1+/-2.8 respectively), but it was almost three times higher in VIT (14.5+/-4.7). Similarly crimp top angle in RFT and PL (141.5+/-15.0 degrees and 146.2+/-12.2 degrees respectively) was significantly higher than in VIT (122.3+/-14.8 degrees ) and the crimp base length was more than twice as wide in RFT (75.5+/-22.6microm) and PL (72.3+/-28.9microm) than in VIT (36+/-14.1microm). The smaller, fewer and most crimped crimps in VIT show that this tendon has a greater elastic recoil and responds to higher forces as among quadriceps muscles the vastus intermedius belly contributes the most during knee extension. By contrast, RFT acting as a "stopper" tendon also plays a ligament role by limiting an excessive flexion of the joint during postural rest position of the knee.

  4. Recoil-Implantation Of Multiple Radioisotopes Towards Wear Rate Measurements And Particle Tracing In Prosthetic Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Jacob A.; Smith, Paul N.; Scarvell, Jennifer M.; Gladkis, Laura; Timmers, Heiko

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates a new method of radioisotope labeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene inserts in prosthetic joints for wear studies. The radioisotopes 97Ru, 100Pd, 100Rh, and 101mRh are produced in fusion evaporation reactions induced by 12C ions in a 92Zr target foil. The fusion products recoil-implant into ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene plugs, machined to fit into the surface of the inserts. During laboratory simulations of the joint motion, a wear rate of the labeled polyethylene may be measured and the pathways of wear debris particles can be traced by detecting characteristic gamma-rays. The concentration profiles of the radioisotopes extend effectively uniformly from the polyethylene surface to a depth of about 4 μm. The multiplicity of labeling and the use of several gamma-ray lines aids with avoiding systematic measurement uncertainties. Two polyethylene plugs were labeled and one was fitted into the surface of the tibial insert of a knee prosthesis, which had been worn in. Actuation over close to 100,000 cycles with a 900 N axial load and a 24° flexion angle removed (14±1)% of the gamma-ray activity from the plug. Most of this activity dispersed into the serum lubricant identifying this as the important debris pathway. Less than 1% activity was transferred to the femoral component of the prosthesis and the measured activity on the tibial tray was insignificant. Assuming uniform wear across the superior surface of the insert, a wear rate of (12±3) mm3/Megacycle was determined. This is consistent with wear rate measurements under similar conditions using other techniques.

  5. Ultrasound imparted air-recoil resonance (UIAR) method for acoustic power estimation: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Kaiplavil, Sreekumar; Rivens, Ian; ter Haar, Gail

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasound imparted air-recoil resonance (UIAR), a new method for acoustic power estimation, is introduced with emphasis on therapeutic high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) monitoring applications. Advantages of this approach over existing practices include fast response; electrical and magnetic inertness, and hence MRI compatibility; portability; high damage threshold and immunity to vibration and interference; low cost; etc. The angle of incidence should be fixed for accurate measurement. However, the transducer-detector pair can be aligned in any direction with respect to the force of gravity. In this sense, the operation of the device is orientation independent. The acoustic response of a pneumatically coupled pair of Helmholtz resonators, with one of them acting as the sensor head, is used for the estimation of acoustic power. The principle is valid in the case of pulsed/ burst as well as continuous ultrasound exposure, the former being more sensitive and accurate. An electro-acoustic theory has been developed for describing the dynamics of pressure flow and resonance in the system considering various thermo- viscous loss mechanisms. Experimental observations are found to be in agreement with theoretical results. Assuming the window damage threshold (~10 J·mm(-2)) and accuracy of RF power estimation are the upper and lower scale-limiting factors, the performance of the device was examined for an RF power range of 5 mW to 100 W with a HIFU transducer operating at 1.70 MHz, and an average nonlinearity of ~1.5% was observed. The device is also sensitive to sub-milliwatt powers. The frequency response was analyzed at 0.85, 1.70, 2.55, and 3.40 MHz and the results are presented with respective theoretical estimates. Typical response time is in the millisecond regime. Output drift is about 3% for resonant and 5% for nonresonant modes. The principle has been optimized to demonstrate a general-purpose acoustic power meter.

  6. Measurement of the production rate of the charm jet recoiling against the W boson using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, Mahsana

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the rate of associated production of the W boson with the charm jet in the proton and anti-proton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement has direct sensitivity to the strange quark content inside the proton. A direct measurement of the momentum distribution of the strange quark inside the proton is essential for a reliable calculation of new physics signal as well as the background processes at the collider experiments. The identification of events containing a W boson and a charm jet is based on the leptonic decays of the W boson together with a tagging technique for the charm jet identification based on the semileptonic decay of the charm quark into the muon. The charm jet recoiling against the W boson must have a minimum transverse momentum of 20 GeV and an absolute value of pseudorapidity less than 2.5. This measurement utilizes the data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Collider. The measured rate of the charm jet production in association with the W boson in the inclusive jet production with the W boson is 0.074 ± 0.023, which is in agreement with the theoretical predictions at the leading order in Quantum Chromodynamics.

  7. Track-hole formation of alpha-particle and recoil nuclei in an LR-115 nuclear track detector exposed to neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, A. F.; Khalil, G. I.

    1994-10-01

    The response function V(REL) of an LR-115 polymeric nuclear track detector has been used to determine the V( R) sensitivity functions for recoil nuclei which are produced by the interactions of fast neutrons with the detector material. For an external radiator placed in close contact with the LR-115 detector, the sensitivity functions have also been determined for the generated nuclei from the (n, α) reaction of thermal neutrons with the radiator material. The REL and the range for the studied nuclei as a function of their energies were calculated by using the BASIC-E version of Henke and Benton's programme. The theory of etch-track kinetics which depends on the V( R) function is used to predict the residual thickness necessary for track-hole formation of a charged particle at different angles by normally incident neutrons. The theoretical treatments were found to be in fair agreement with the previously obtained data for other cellulose nitrate track detectors.

  8. Relevance, Derogation and Permission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolpe, Audun

    We show that a recently developed theory of positive permission based on the notion of derogation is hampered by a triviality result that indicates a problem with the underlying full-meet contraction operation. We suggest a solution that presupposes a particular normal form for codes of norms, adapted from the theory of relevance through propositional letter sharing. We then establish a correspondence between contractions on sets of norms in input/output logic (derogations), and AGM-style contractions on sets of formulae, and use it as a bridge to migrate results on propositional relevance from the latter to the former idiom. Changing the concept accordingly we show that positive permission now incorporates a relevance requirement that wards off triviality.

  9. The Limits to Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averill, M.; Briggle, A.

    2006-12-01

    Science policy and knowledge production lately have taken a pragmatic turn. Funding agencies increasingly are requiring scientists to explain the relevance of their work to society. This stems in part from mounting critiques of the "linear model" of knowledge production in which scientists operating according to their own interests or disciplinary standards are presumed to automatically produce knowledge that is of relevance outside of their narrow communities. Many contend that funded scientific research should be linked more directly to societal goals, which implies a shift in the kind of research that will be funded. While both authors support the concept of useful science, we question the exact meaning of "relevance" and the wisdom of allowing it to control research agendas. We hope to contribute to the conversation by thinking more critically about the meaning and limits of the term "relevance" and the trade-offs implicit in a narrow utilitarian approach. The paper will consider which interests tend to be privileged by an emphasis on relevance and address issues such as whose goals ought to be pursued and why, and who gets to decide. We will consider how relevance, narrowly construed, may actually limit the ultimate utility of scientific research. The paper also will reflect on the worthiness of research goals themselves and their relationship to a broader view of what it means to be human and to live in society. Just as there is more to being human than the pragmatic demands of daily life, there is more at issue with knowledge production than finding the most efficient ways to satisfy consumer preferences or fix near-term policy problems. We will conclude by calling for a balanced approach to funding research that addresses society's most pressing needs but also supports innovative research with less immediately apparent application.

  10. Signal yields, energy resolution, and recombination fluctuations in liquid xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Bramante, R.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Ghag, C.; Gibson, K. R.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Ihm, M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Phelps, P.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stephenson, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.; LUX Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of monoenergetic electronic recoil peaks in the dark-matter-search and calibration data from the first underground science run of the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector. Liquid xenon charge and light yields for electronic recoil energies between 5.2 and 661.7 keV are measured, as well as the energy resolution for the LUX detector at those same energies. Additionally, there is an interpretation of existing measurements and descriptions of electron-ion recombination fluctuations in liquid xenon as limiting cases of a more general liquid xenon recombination fluctuation model. Measurements of the standard deviation of these fluctuations at monoenergetic electronic recoil peaks exhibit a linear dependence on the number of ions for energy deposits up to 661.7 keV, consistent with previous LUX measurements between 2 and 16 keV with 3H. We highlight similarities in liquid xenon recombination for electronic and nuclear recoils with a comparison of recombination fluctuations measured with low-energy calibration data.

  11. Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 142 Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium (Web, free access)   This database provides theoretical values of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium for principle quantum numbers n = 1 to 200 and all allowed orbital angular momenta l and total angular momenta j. The values are based on current knowledge of the revelant theoretical contributions including relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, recoil, and nuclear size effects.

  12. The Relevance of Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunham, L. L.

    1971-01-01

    The "legacy" of the humanities is discussed in terms of relevance, involvement, and other philosophical considerations. Reasons for studying foreign literature in language classes are developed in the article. Comment is also made on attitudes and ideas culled from the writings of Clifton Fadiman, Jean Paul Sartre, and James Baldwin. (RL)

  13. Is Information Still Relevant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The term "information" in information science does not share the characteristics of those of a nomenclature: it does not bear a generally accepted definition and it does not serve as the bases and assumptions for research studies. As the data deluge has arrived, is the concept of information still relevant for information…

  14. Reading, Writing and Relevance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Mary

    This monograph presents classroom activities that were designed to encourage children to read and write in a self-reliant and responsible manner. The activities were chosen for their relevance to the children involved and because the vocabulary involved was interesting, familiar, and worth remembering and using again. The topics are arranged in…

  15. The XMM-Newton spectrum of a candidate recoiling supermassive black hole: An elusive inverted P-Cygni profile

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzuisi, G.; Civano, F.; Marchesi, S.; Hickox, R.; Comastri, A.; Cappelluti, N.; Costantini, E.; Elvis, M.; Fruscione, A.; Mainieri, V.; Jahnke, K.; Komossa, S.; Piconcelli, E.; Vignali, C.; Brusa, M.

    2013-11-20

    We present a detailed spectral analysis of new XMM-Newton data of the source CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, detected in the COSMOS survey at z = 0.359. Previous works suggested that CID-42 is a candidate recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) showing also an inverted P-Cygni profile in the X-ray spectra at ∼6 keV (rest) with an iron emission line plus a redshifted absorption line (detected at 3σ in previous XMM-Newton and Chandra observations). Detailed analysis of the absorption line suggested the presence of ionized material flowing into the black hole at high velocity. In the new long XMM-Newton observation, while the overall spectral shape remains constant, the continuum 2-10 keV flux decrease of ∼20% with respect to previous observation and the absorption line is undetected. The upper limit on the intensity of the absorption line is EW < 162 eV. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations show that the nondetection of the line is solely due to variation in the properties of the inflowing material, in agreement with the transient nature of these features, and that the intensity of the line is lower than the previously measured with a probability of 98.8%. In the scenario of CID-42 as a recoiling SMBH, the absorption line can be interpreted as being due to an inflow of gas with variable density that is located in the proximity of the SMBH and recoiling with it. New monitoring observations will be requested to further characterize this line.

  16. Recoil frame photoemission in multiphoton ionization of small polyatomic molecules: photodynamics of NO2 probed by 400 nm fs pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marggi Poullain, S.; Elkharrat, C.; Li, W. B.; Veyrinas, K.; Houver, J. C.; Cornaggia, C.; Rescigno, T. N.; Lucchese, R. R.; Dowek, D.

    2014-06-01

    We report a general method for the complete analysis of the recoil frame photoelectron angular distribution (RFPAD) in n-photon dissociative ionization of small polyatomic molecules, resulting from (n - 1) bound-to-bound transitions plus one-photon ionization of a neutral excited state of the target. This method relies on the decomposition of the RFPAD in terms of the R_K^{} ( {\\chi ,\\theta _e } ) recoil frame azimuthal harmonics (RFAHs) which are the components of its Fourier expansion in ϕe, where χ and θe are the polar angles referring to the polarization axis P and the photoelectron momentum k relative to the ion fragment recoil direction, respectively, and ϕe is the azimuth of k relative to P. The RFAH expansion method is illustrated by a detailed experimental and theoretical study of one-colour multiphoton dissociative and non-dissociative ionization of the NO2 molecule of C2v symmetry induced by 400 nm fs laser pulses, which involve electronic and nuclear dynamics within the pulse duration of the order of 70 fs. The reaction mechanism proposed to account for five-photon dissociative ionization of NO2 involves the role of [R*(6a1)-1] Rydberg states populated by three-photon absorption, subsequently ionized by a fourth photon into the NO2+ (X1Σg+, v1,v2,v3) manifold involving autoionization of [R*(4b2)-1] Rydberg states, and linear versus bent geometry selective dissociation of NO2+ (X1Σg+, v1,v2,v3) by a fifth photon. The reported calculations provide a coherent picture of the experimental findings although all features are not yet well reproduced.

  17. Potential effects of alpha-recoil on uranium-series dating of calcrete

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neymark, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of paleosol ages in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, at the time the site of a proposed high-level nuclear waste repository, is important for fault-displacement hazard assessment. Uranium-series isotope data were obtained for surface and subsurface calcrete samples from trenches and boreholes in Midway Valley, Nevada, adjacent to Yucca Mountain. 230Th/U ages of 33 surface samples range from 1.3 to 423 thousand years (ka) and the back-calculated 234U/238U initial activity ratios (AR) are relatively constant with a mean value of 1.54 ± 0.15 (1σ), which is consistent with the closed-system behavior. Subsurface calcrete samples are too old to be dated by the 230Th/U method. U-Pb data for post-pedogenic botryoidal opal from a subsurface calcrete sample show that these subsurface calcrete samples are older than ~ 1.65 million years (Ma), old enough to have attained secular equilibrium had their U-Th systems remained closed. However, subsurface calcrete samples show U-series disequilibrium indicating open-system behavior of 238U daughter isotopes, in contrast with the surface calcrete, where open-system behavior is not evident. Data for 21 subsurface calcrete samples yielded calculable 234U/238U model ages ranging from 130 to 1875 ka (assuming an initial AR of 1.54 ± 0.15, the mean value calculated for the surface calcrete samples). A simple model describing continuous α-recoil loss predicts that the 234U/238U and 230Th/238U ARs reach steady-state values ~ 2 Ma after calcrete formation. Potential effects of open-system behavior on 230Th/U ages and initial 234U/238U ARs for younger surface calcrete were estimated using data for old subsurface calcrete samples with the 234U loss and assuming that the total time of water-rock interaction is the only difference between these soils. The difference between the conventional closed-system and open-system ages may exceed errors of the calculated conventional ages for samples older than ~ 250 ka, but is

  18. Improvements in Fabrication of Elastic Scattering Foils Used to Measure Neutron Yield by the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Reynolds, H. G.; Schoff, M. E.; Farrell, M. P.; ...

    2016-08-01

    The magnetic recoil spectrometer uses a deuterated polyethylene polymer (CD2) foil to measure neutron yield in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Higher neutron yields in recent experiments have resulted in primary signal saturation in the detector CR-39 foils, necessitating the fabrication of thinner CD2 foils than established methods could provide. A novel method of fabricating deuterated polymer foils is described. The resulting foils are thinner, smoother, and more uniform in thickness than the foils produced by previous methods. Here, these new foils have successfully been deployed at the National Ignition Facility, enabling higher neutron yield measurements than previous foils, with nomore » primary signal saturation.« less

  19. Improvements in Fabrication of Elastic Scattering Foils Used to Measure Neutron Yield by the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, H. G.; Schoff, M. E.; Farrell, M. P.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Bionta, R. M.; Frenje, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetic recoil spectrometer uses a deuterated polyethylene polymer (CD2) foil to measure neutron yield in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Higher neutron yields in recent experiments have resulted in primary signal saturation in the detector CR-39 foils, necessitating the fabrication of thinner CD2 foils than established methods could provide. A novel method of fabricating deuterated polymer foils is described. The resulting foils are thinner, smoother, and more uniform in thickness than the foils produced by previous methods. Here, these new foils have successfully been deployed at the National Ignition Facility, enabling higher neutron yield measurements than previous foils, with no primary signal saturation.

  20. Spectroscopy of transfermium nuclei using the GABRIELA set up at the focal plane of the VASSILISSA recoil separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschild, K.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Dorvaux, O.; Piot, J.; Curien, D.; Gall, B.; Yeremin, A. V.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Isaev, A. V.; Izosimov, I. N.; Kabachenko, A. P.; Katrasev, D. E.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Malyshev, O. N.; Popeko, A. G.; Sokol, E. A.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Wiborg-Hagen, T.; Nyhus, H. T.; Siem, S.; Drafta, G.; Pantelica, D.; Scintee, N.; Görgen, A.; Kutsarova, T.; Mullins, S.; Šáro, Š.

    2010-06-01

    An IN2P3-JINR collaboration has launched a project called GABRIELA at the Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) within the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna (Russia). The goal of the project is to perform gamma-ray and internal conversion electron spectroscopy of heavy nuclei produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and transported to the focal plane of the recoil separator VASSILISSA. During five experimental campaigns of GABRIELA, the detection system has gained in sensitivity and new spectroscopic information has been obtained for 249Fm, 251Fm, 253No and 255Lr. In this contribution new results for 253No will be discussed.

  1. Spectroscopy of transfermium nuclei using the GABRIELA set up at the focal plane of the VASSILISSA recoil separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschild, K.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Briançon, Ch.; Désesquelles, P.; Garcia-Santamaria, S.; Korichi, A.; Robin, J.; Dorvaux, O.; Piot, J.; Curien, D.; Gall, B.; Khalfallah, F.; Khouaja, A.; Rousseau, M.; Stuttgé, L.; Rowley, N.; Yeremin, A. V.; Belozerov, A. V.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Gorshkov, V. A.; Isaev, A. V.; Izosimov, I. N.; Kabachenko, A. P.; Katrasev, D. E.; Kutznetzov, A. N.; Malyshev, O. N.; Popeko, A. G.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shutov, A. V.; Sokol, E. A.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Wiborg-Hagen, T.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Nyhus, H. T.; Siem, S.; Syed, N. U. H.; Hanappe, F.; Bouchat, V.; Jones, P.; Borcea, R.; Drafta, G.; Pantelica, D.; Rotaru, F.; Scintee, N.; Zamfir, V.; Görgen, A.; Theisen, Ch.; Minkova, A.; Kutsarova, T.; Stodel, Ch.; Mullins, S.; Lieder, E.; Antalic, S.; Šáro, Š.; Venhart, M.

    2010-04-01

    An IN2P3-JINR collaboration has launched a project called GABRIELA at the Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) within the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna (Russia). The goal of the project is to perform gamma-ray and internal conversion electron spectroscopy of heavy nuclei produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and transported to the focal plane of the recoil separator VASSILISSA. During five experimental campaigns of GABRIELA, the detection system has gained in sensitivity and new spectroscopic information has been obtained for 249Fm, 251Fm, 253No and 255Lr.

  2. Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to Q^2 = 8.5 GeV^2

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, A J.R.; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Meziane, M; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnik, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nedev, S; Nuruzzaman,; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvingnon, P; Subedi, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2010-06-01

    Among the most fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dynamics of the nucleon’s quark constituents; indeed, recent proton data have attracted intense theoretical interest. In this Letter, we report new measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio using the recoil polarization method, at momentum transfers Q2=5.2, 6.7, and 8.5  GeV2. By extending the range of Q2 for which GEp is accurately determined by more than 50%, these measurements will provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure in the nonperturbative regime.

  3. The recoil correction and spin-orbit force for the possible B*Bbar* and D*Dbar* states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lu; Ma, Li; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2015-10-01

    In the framework of the one-boson exchange model, we have calculated the effective potentials between two heavy mesons B*Bbar* and D*Dbar* from the t- and u-channel π-, η-, ρ-, ω- and σ-meson exchanges. We keep the recoil corrections to the B*Bbar* and D*Dbar* systems up to O (1/M2), which turns out to be important for the very loosely bound molecular states. Our numerical results show that the momentum-related corrections are favorable to the formation of the molecular states in the IG =1+, JPC =1+- in the B*Bbar* and D*Dbar* systems.

  4. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanebrook, J. Richard

    This document describes a course designed to acquaint students with the many societal and technological problems facing the United States and the world due to the increasing demand for energy. The course begins with a writing assignment that involves readings on the environmental philosophy of Native Americans and the Chernobyl catastrophe.…

  5. Environmentally relevant microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Baker, P W

    2000-01-01

    The development of molecular microbial ecology in the 1990s has allowed scientists to realize that microbial populations in the natural environment are much more diverse than microorganisms so far isolated in the laboratory. This finding has exerted a significant impact on environmental biotechnology, since knowledge in this field has been largely dependent on studies with pollutant-degrading bacteria isolated by conventional culture methods. Researchers have thus started to use molecular ecological methods to analyze microbial populations relevant to pollutant degradation in the environment (called environmentally relevant microorganisms, ERMs), although further effort is needed to gain practical benefits from these studies. This review highlights the utility and limitations of molecular ecological methods for understanding and advancing environmental biotechnology processes. The importance of the combined use of molecular ecological and physiological methods for identifying ERMs is stressed.

  6. First superheavy element experiments at the GSI recoil separator TASCA: The production and decay of element 114 in the {sup 244}Pu({sup 48}Ca,3-4n) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, J. M.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Schaedel, M.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Bruechle, W.; Essel, H. G.; Hartmann, W.; Hessberger, F. P.; Huebner, A.; Jaeger, E.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Schimpf, E.; Steiner, J.

    2011-05-15

    Experiments with the new recoil separator, Transactinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA), at the GSI were performed by using beams of {sup 48}Ca to irradiate targets of {sup 206-208}Pb, which led to the production of {sup 252-254}No isotopes. These studies allowed for evaluation of the performance of TASCA when coupled to a new detector and electronics system. By following these studies, the isotopes of element 114 ({sup 288-291}114) were produced in irradiations of {sup 244}Pu targets with {sup 48}Ca beams at compound nucleus excitation energies around 41.7 and 37.5 MeV, demonstrating TASCA's ability to perform experiments with picobarn-level cross sections. A total of 15 decay chains were observed and were assigned to the decay of {sup 288-291}114. A new {alpha}-decay branch in {sup 281}Ds was observed, leading to the new nucleus {sup 277}Hs.

  7. Exclusive rare B→K*ℓ+ℓ- decays at low recoil: Controlling the long-distance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, Benjamín; Pirjol, Dan

    2004-12-01

    We present a model-independent description of the exclusive rare decays B¯→K*e+e- in the low recoil region (large lepton invariant mass q2˜m2b). In this region the long-distance effects from quark loops can be computed with the help of an operator product expansion in 1/Q, with Q={mb,√(q2)}. Nonperturbative effects up to and including terms suppressed by Λ/Q and m2c/m2b relative to the short-distance amplitude can be included in a model-independent way. Based on these results, we propose an improved method for determining the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub| from a combination of rare and semileptonic B and D decays near the zero recoil point. The residual theoretical uncertainty from long-distance effects in this |Vub| determination comes from terms in the operator product expansion of order αs(Q)Λ/mb, α2s(Q), m4c/m4b, and duality violations, and is estimated to be below 10%.

  8. Energy distribution of the particles obtained after irradiation of carbon nanotubes with carbon projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Cristian D.; Moreno-Marín, Juan Carlos; Heredia-Avalos, Santiago

    2015-06-01

    The idea of using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as masks against irradiation has recently emerged, because of the region of a given material covered by a CNT can be protected from the effects of irradiation, creating nanowires. In this case, it is interesting to know in detail the number of generated recoils and their energy. In order to obtain these data, we simulate the irradiation of CNTs with carbon ions using a molecular dynamics code. To describe the interaction between carbon ions we use the Brenner potential joined smoothly to the Universal ZBL potential at short distances. We have analyzed the energy distributions of the carbon atoms emerging from the CNT for single projectile irradiation with incident energies from 30 eV to 5 keV. Our results show that the number and the energy of the recoil carbon atoms emerging from the CNT increases with the projectile incident energy. In average, each projectile with incident energy of 1 keV produces ∼3.6 recoils, which have a mean energy of 150 eV, while projectiles with 5 keV produce ∼7 recoils with a mean energy of 400 eV.

  9. Subaru and e-Merlin observations of NGC 3718. Diaries of a supermassive black hole recoil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markakis, K.; Dierkes, J.; Eckart, A.; Nishiyama, S.; Britzen, S.; García-Marín, M.; Horrobin, M.; Muxlow, T.; Zensus, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    photometric and spectroscopic characteristics. These characteristics combined with the observed spatial NIR and radio emission offsets, the relative redshift between the broad and the narrow Hα line, the limited star formation activity, and AGN feedback strongly imply the existence of a supermassive black hole recoil. Finally, we discuss a possible interpretation that could naturally incorporate all these findings into one physically consistent picture. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgBased on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  10. Use of the ECL-CAMAC trigger processor system for recoil missing mass triggers at the Tagged Photon Spectrometer at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Bracker, S.; Hartner, G.; Appel, J.; Nash, T.

    1981-05-01

    A trigger processor in operation since May 1980 at the Tagged Photon Spectrometer at Fermilab will be described. The processor, based on the Fermilab ECL-CAMAC system, allows fast selection of high mass diffractive events from the total hadronic cross section. Data from a recoil detector, consisting of 3 wire chambers and 4 layers of scintillator concentric about a 1.5 m liquid hydrogen target, is digitized and presented to the processor within 3 sec. From the chamber data are found the vertices and angles of all recoiling tracks.

  11. Scintillation efficiency of liquid argon in low energy neutron-argon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creus, W.; Allkofer, Y.; Amsler, C.; Ferella, A. D.; Rochet, J.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Walter, M.

    2015-08-01

    Experiments searching for weak interacting massive particles with noble gases such as liquid argon require very low detection thresholds for nuclear recoils. A determination of the scintillation efficiency is crucial to quantify the response of the detector at low energy. We report the results obtained with a small liquid argon cell using a monoenergetic neutron beam produced by a deuterium-deuterium fusion source. The light yield relative to electrons was measured for six argon recoil energies between 11 and 120 keV at zero electric drift field.

  12. Bulk NaI(Tl) scintillation low energy events selection with the ANAIS-0 module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, C.; Amaré, J.; Cebrián, S.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; de Solórzano, A. Ortiz; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2014-11-01

    Dark matter particles scattering off target nuclei are expected to deposit very small energies in form of nuclear recoils (below 100 keV). Because of the low scintillation efficiency for nuclear recoils as compared to electron recoils, in most of the scintillating targets considered in the search for dark matter, the region below 10 keVee (electron equivalent energy) concentrates most of the expected dark matter signal. For this reason, very low energy threshold (at or below 2 keVee) and very low background are required to be competitive in the search for dark matter with such detection technique. This is the case of Annual modulation with NaI Scintillators (ANAIS), which is an experiment to be carried out at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. A good knowledge of the detector response function for real scintillation events in the active volume, a good characterization of other anomalous or noise event populations contributing in that energy range, and the development of convenient filtering procedures for the latter are mandatory in order to achieve the required low background at such a low energy. In this work we present the characteristics of different types of events observed in large size NaI(Tl) detectors, and the event-type identification techniques developed. Such techniques allow distinguishing among events associated with bulk NaI scintillation, and events related to muon interactions in the detectors or shielding, photomultiplier origin events, and analysis event fakes. We describe the specific protocols developed to build bulk scintillation events spectra from the raw data and we apply them to data obtained with one of the ANAIS prototypes, ANAIS-0. Nuclear recoil type events were also explored using data from a neutron calibration; however pulse shape cuts were found not to be effective to discriminate them from electron recoil events. The effect of the filtering procedures developed in this nuclear recoils population has been analyzed in order to

  13. A new value for the half-life of 10Be by Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection and liquid scintillation counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korschinek, G.; Bergmaier, A.; Faestermann, T.; Gerstmann, U. C.; Knie, K.; Rugel, G.; Wallner, A.; Dillmann, I.; Dollinger, G.; von Gostomski, Ch. Lierse; Kossert, K.; Maiti, M.; Poutivtsev, M.; Remmert, A.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of 10Be in different applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is well-known. In this context the half-life of 10Be has a crucial impact, and an accurate and precise determination of the half-life is a prerequisite for many of the applications of 10Be in cosmic-ray and earth science research. Recently, the value of the 10Be half-life has been the centre of much debate. In order to overcome uncertainties inherent in previous determinations, we introduced a new method of high accuracy and precision. An aliquot of our highly enriched 10Be master solution was serially diluted with increasing well-known masses of 9Be. We then determined the initial 10Be concentration by least square fit to the series of measurements of the resultant 10Be/ 9Be ratio. In order to minimize uncertainties because of mass bias which plague other low-energy mass spectrometric methods, we used for the first time Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection (HI-ERD) for the determination of the 10Be/ 9Be isotopic ratios, a technique which does not suffer from difficult to control mass fractionation. The specific activity of the master solution was measured by means of accurate liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The resultant combination of the 10Be concentration and activity yields a 10Be half-life of T1/2 = 1.388 ± 0.018 (1 s, 1.30%) Ma. In a parallel but independent study (Chmeleff et al. [11]), found a value of 1.386 ± 0.016 (1.15%) Ma. Our recommended weighted mean and mean standard error for the new value for 10Be half-life based on these two independent measurements is 1.387 ± 0.012 (0.87%) Ma.

  14. Hydrogen interstitial in H-ion implanted ZnO bulk single crystals: Evaluation by elastic recoil detection analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaida, T.; Kamioka, K.; Nishimura, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Kinomura, A.

    2015-12-01

    The origins of low resistivity in H ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals are evaluated by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Van der Pauw methods. The H-ion implantation (peak concentration: 5.0 × 1015 cm-2) into ZnO is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The maximum of the concentration of the implanted H estimated by a TRIM simulation is at 3600 nm in depth. The resistivity decreases from ∼103 Ω cm for un implanted ZnO to 6.5 Ω cm for as-implanted, 2.3 × 10-1 Ω cm for 200 °C annealed, and 3.2 × 10-1 Ω cm for 400 °C annealed samples. The ERDA measurements can evaluate the concentration of hydrogens which move to the vicinity of the surface (surface to 300 nm or 100 nm) because of the diffusion by the annealing at 200 °C and 400 °C. The hydrogen concentration near the surface estimated using the 2.0 MeV helium beam is ∼3.8 × 1013 cm-2 for annealed samples. From EPR measurements, the oxygen vacancy of +charge state (Vo+) is observed in as-implanted samples. The Vo+ related signal (g = 1.96) observed under no illumination disappears after successive illumination with a red LED and appears again with a blue light illumination. The activation energy of as-implanted, 200 °C annealed, and 400 °C annealed samples estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration lies between 29 meV and 23 meV, suggesting the existence of H interstitial as a shallow donor level.

  15. Hydrogen ion-implantation induced low resistive layer in KNbO3 bulk single crystal: Evaluation by elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinkawa, A.; Shibasaki, Y.; Nishimura, T.; Tanuma, C.; Kuriyama, K.

    2016-03-01

    Origins of low resistivity in H-ion implanted KNbO3 bulk single crystals are studied by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Van der Pauw methods. The H-ion implantation (peak ion fluence: 5.0 × 1015 cm-2) into KNbO3 is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The sheet resistance decreases from ∼108 Ω/□ for an un-implanted KNbO3 sample to 2.33 × 105 Ω/□ for as-implanted, 2.29 × 105 Ω/□ for 100 °C annealed, and 4.25 × 105 Ω/□ for 150 °C annealed samples, respectively. The ERDA experiment using the 1.5 MeV-4He+ beam can evaluate hydrogen from the surface to around 60 nm. The hydrogen concentration near the surface estimated using the 1.5 MeV helium beam is 5.1 × 1014 cm-2 for un-implanted KNbO3 sample, 5.6 × 1014 cm-2 for as-implanted, 3.4 × 1014 cm-2 for 150 °C annealed samples, respectively, indicating that a part of hydrogen is diffused out by annealing. The low resistive layer induced in H-ion implanted KNbO3 suggests the existence of a shallow energy level related to the complex defect consisting of hydrogen interstitial and the proton induced defect such as oxygen vacancy.

  16. High Accuracy, High Energy He-Erd Analysis of H,C, and T

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, James F.; Langley, Robert A.; Doyle, Barney L.; Banks, James C.; Wampler, William R.

    1999-07-22

    A new analysis technique using high-energy helium ions for the simultaneous elastic recoil detection of all three hydrogen isotopes in metal hydride systems extending to depths of several {micro}m's is presented. Analysis shows that it is possible to separate each hydrogen isotope in a heavy matrix such as erbium to depths of 5 {micro}m using incident 11.48MeV {sup 4}He{sup 2} ions with a detection system composed of a range foil and {Delta}E-E telescope detector. Newly measured cross sections for the elastic recoil scattering of {sup 4}He{sup 2} ions from protons and deuterons are presented in the energy range 10 to 11.75 MeV for the laboratory recoil angle of 30{degree}.

  17. Measuring the 16O(α, γ)20Ne Reaction Rate with the Dragon Recoil Separator at Triumf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, U.; Greife, U.; Buchmann, L.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Hutcheon, D.; Ottewell, D.; Reeve, S.; Rojas, A.; Ruiz, C.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Erikson, L.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Vockenhuber, C.; Brown, J. R.; Irvine, D.

    2013-03-01

    The DRAGON recoil separator facility at TRIUMF measures radiative α and proton capture reactions of astrophysical importance in inverse kinematics. This is done employing radioactive and stable ion beams produced and accelerated using the ISAC (Isotope Separator and ACcelerator) facility in conjunction with the DRAGON windowless gas target. Over the last few years, the DRAGON collaboration has embarked on a programme to measure a variety of reactions considered vital to the understanding of various astrophysical scenarios. An overview of DRAGON's separation, beam suppression, and detection capabilities will be given. In addition, examples of recent reaction cross section measurements will be discussed, such as the 16O(α, γ)20Ne reaction, which plays an important part in the He and Ne burning in massive stars.

  18. Advances in the helium-jet coupled on-line mass separator RAMA. [Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Moltz, D M; Aysto, J; Cable, M D; Parry, R F; Haustein, P E; Wouters, J M; Cerny, J

    1980-01-01

    General improvements to the on-line mass separator RAMA (Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer) have yielded a greater reliability and efficiency for some elements. A new utilitarian helium-jet chamber has been installed to facilitate quick target and degrader foil changes in addition to a new ion source holder. A higher efficiency hollow-cathode, cathode-extraction ion source, for lower melting point elements (< 1200/sup 0/C) has also been designed. Tests with the beta-delayed proton emitter /sup 37/Ca showed a factor of five increase in yield over the old hollow-cathode, anode-extraction source. A differentially-pumped-tape drive system compatible with both ..gamma..-..gamma.. and ..beta..-..gamma.. experiments has been incorporated into the general detection system. All major operating parameters will soon be monitored by a complete stand-alone microprocessor system which will eventually be upgraded to a closed-loop control system.

  19. BlackMax: A black-hole event generator with rotation, recoil, split branes, and brane tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, De-Chang; Starkman, Glenn; Stojkovic, Dejan; Issever, Cigdem; Rizvi, Eram; Tseng, Jeff

    2008-04-01

    We present a comprehensive black-hole event generator, BlackMax, which simulates the experimental signatures of microscopic and Planckian black-hole production and evolution at the LHC in the context of brane world models with low-scale quantum gravity. The generator is based on phenomenologically realistic models free of serious problems that plague low-scale gravity, thus offering more realistic predictions for hadron-hadron colliders. The generator includes all of the black-hole gray-body factors known to date and incorporates the effects of black-hole rotation, splitting between the fermions, nonzero brane tension, and black-hole recoil due to Hawking radiation (although not all simultaneously). The generator can be interfaced with Herwig and Pythia. The main code can be downloaded from http://www-pnp.physics.ox.ac.uk/~issever/BlackMax/blackmax.html.

  20. Spectroscopy of transfermium nuclei using the GABRIELA set up at the focal plane of the VASSILISSA recoil separator

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschild, K.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Dorvaux, O.; Piot, J.; Curien, D.; Gall, B.; Yeremin, A. V.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Isaev, A. V.; Izosimov, I. N.; Kabachenko, A. P.; Katrasev, D. E.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Malyshev, O. N.; Popeko, A. G.; Sokol, E. A.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Wiborg-Hagen, T.; Nyhus, H. T

    2010-06-01

    An IN2P3-JINR collaboration has launched a project called GABRIELA at the Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) within the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna (Russia). The goal of the project is to perform gamma-ray and internal conversion electron spectroscopy of heavy nuclei produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and transported to the focal plane of the recoil separator VASSILISSA. During five experimental campaigns of GABRIELA, the detection system has gained in sensitivity and new spectroscopic information has been obtained for {sup 249}Fm, {sup 251}Fm, {sup 253}No and {sup 255}Lr. In this contribution new results for {sup 253}No will be discussed.

  1. Semileptonic B to D Decays at Nonzero Recoil with 2+1 Flavors of Improved Staggered Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Si-Wei; DeTar, Carleton; Du, Daping; Kronfeld, Andreas S.; Laiho, Jack; Van de Water, Ruth S.; /Brookhaven

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Lattice-MILC collaboration is completing a comprehensive program of heavy-light physics on the MILC (2+1)-flavor asqtad ensembles with lattice spacings as small as 0.045 fm and light-to-strange-quark mass ratios as low as 1/20. We use the Fermilab interpretation of the clover action for heavy valence quarks and the asqtad action for light valence quarks. The central goal of the program is to provide ever more exacting tests of the unitarity of the CKM matrix. We give a progress report on one part of the program, namely the analysis of the semileptonic decay B to D at both zero and nonzero recoil. Although final results are not presented, we discuss improvements in the analysis methods, the statistical errors, and the parameter coverage that we expect will lead to a significant reduction in the final error for |V{sub cb}| from this decay channel.

  2. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S; Hartouni, E; Hatchett, S P; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Moses, E; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Smalyuk, V; Yeamans, C B; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Chandler, G A; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J; Fletcher, K; Kilkenny, J; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Paguio, R

    2012-10-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  3. BlackMax: A black-hole event generator with rotation, recoil, split branes, and brane tension

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Dechang; Starkman, Glenn; Stojkovic, Dejan; Issever, Cigdem; Tseng, Jeff; Rizvi, Eram

    2008-04-01

    We present a comprehensive black-hole event generator, BlackMax, which simulates the experimental signatures of microscopic and Planckian black-hole production and evolution at the LHC in the context of brane world models with low-scale quantum gravity. The generator is based on phenomenologically realistic models free of serious problems that plague low-scale gravity, thus offering more realistic predictions for hadron-hadron colliders. The generator includes all of the black-hole gray-body factors known to date and incorporates the effects of black-hole rotation, splitting between the fermions, nonzero brane tension, and black-hole recoil due to Hawking radiation (although not all simultaneously). The generator can be interfaced with Herwig and Pythia. The main code can be downloaded from http://www-pnp.physics.ox.ac.uk/{approx}issever/BlackMax/blackmax.html.

  4. Lifetimes of states in the opposite-parity bands of 153Eu: Recoil-distance measurements following Coulomb excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. F.; Simon, M. W.; Ibbotson, R. W.; Butler, P. A.; Aprahamian, A.; Bruce, A. M.; Cline, D.; Devlin, M.; Jones, G. D.; Jones, P. M.; Wu, C. Y.

    1998-12-01

    The lifetimes of 12 states in the opposite-parity bands of 153Eu have been measured using a recoil-distance technique following Coulomb excitation with a 220-MeV 58Ni beam. Electric-quadrupole (Q0) and -dipole (D0) moments, and intrinsic g factors (gK) have been extracted from the lifetimes. The Q0 and D0 values show very little dependence on spin and parity, and have the values of approximately 6.6 e b and 0.077 e fm, respectively. The gK values are found to differ for the positive- and negative-parity states. Although the large D0 values suggest a reflection-asymmetric octupole-deformed nuclear shape, the different gK values contradict this interpretation. A discussion of the nuclear structure of 153Eu in terms of potential parity-doublet bands and octupole deformation is given.

  5. Electron emission and recoil effects following the beta decay of He6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulhoff, Eva E.; Drake, G. W. F.

    2015-11-01

    Probabilities for atomic electron excitation (shake-up) and ionization (shake-off) are studied following the beta-decay process →Li+6He6+e-+ν¯e , and in particular, recoil-induced contributions to the shake-off probability are calculated within the nonrelativistic sudden approximation. A pseudostate expansion method together with Stieltjes imaging is used to represent the complete two-electron spectrum of final Li+6 ,Li26+, and Li36+ states. Results for the recoil correction show a 7 σ disagreement with the experiment of Carlson et al. [Phys. Rev. 129, 2220 (1963), 10.1103/PhysRev.129.2220]. A variety of sum rules, including a newly derived Thomas-Reich-Kuhn oscillator strength sum rule for dipole recoil terms, provides tight constraints on the accuracy of the results. Calculations are performed for the helium 1 s 2 s 3S metastable state, as well as for the 1 s21S ground state. Our results would reduce the recoil-induced correction to the measured electroneutrino coupling constant ae μ from the apparent 0.6% used in the experiments to 0.09%.

  6. B → Dℓν form factors at nonzero recoil and |Vcb| from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2015-08-10

    We present the first unquenched lattice-QCD calculation of the hadronic form factors for the exclusive decay B¯→Dℓν¯ at nonzero recoil. We carry out numerical simulations on 14 ensembles of gauge-field configurations generated with 2+1 flavors of asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. The ensembles encompass a wide range of lattice spacings (approximately 0.045 to 0.12 fm) and ratios of light (up and down) to strange sea-quark masses ranging from 0.05 to 0.4. For the b and c valence quarks we use improved Wilson fermions with the Fermilab interpretation, while for the light valence quarks we use asqtad-improved staggered fermions. We extrapolate ourmore » results to the physical point using rooted staggered heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory. We then parametrize the form factors and extend them to the full kinematic range using model-independent functions based on analyticity and unitarity. We present our final results for f+(q2) and f0(q2), including statistical and systematic errors, as coefficients of a series in the variable z and the covariance matrix between these coefficients. We then fit the lattice form-factor data jointly with the experimentally measured differential decay rate from BABAR to determine the CKM matrix element, |Vcb|=(39.6 ± 1.7QCD+exp ± 0.2QED) × 10–3. As a byproduct of the joint fit we obtain the form factors with improved precision at large recoil. In conclusion, we use them to update our calculation of the ratio R(D) in the Standard Model, which yields R(D)=0.299(11).« less

  7. The antikick strikes back: Recoil velocities for nearly extremal binary black hole mergers in the test-mass limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, Alessandro; Harms, Enno; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Zenginoǧlu, Anıl

    2014-12-01

    Gravitational waves emitted from a generic binary black hole merger carry away linear momentum anisotropically, resulting in a gravitational recoil, or "kick," of the center of mass. For certain merger configurations the time evolution of the magnitude of the kick velocity has a local maximum followed by a sudden drop. Perturbative studies of this "antikick" in a limited range of black hole spins have found that the antikick decreases for retrograde orbits as a function of negative spin. We analyze this problem using a recently developed code to evolve gravitational perturbations from a point particle in Kerr spacetime driven by an effective-one-body resummed radiation reaction force at linear order in the mass ratio ν ≪1 . Extending previous studies to nearly extremal negative spins, thus complementing current numerical relativity knowledge about the recoil, we find that the well-known decrease of the antikick is overturned and, instead of approaching zero, the antikick increases again to reach Δ v /(c ν2)=3.37 ×10-3 for dimensionless spin a ^=-0.9999 . The corresponding final kick velocity is vend/(c ν2)=0.076 . We interpret the antikick result analytically by means of the quality factor Q of the linear momentum flux, that is used to quantify the amount of nonadiabaticity of the emission process. We show that, besides capturing qualitatively the global properties over the whole spin range, Q actually predicts the return of the antikick for a ^→-1 . Since Q is computed only from the, gauge-invariant, flux of linear momentum, the herein presented verification of its reliability advocates its systematic use also in numerical relativity calculations. In addition, we also connect, in a new way, the properties of the flux to the noncircular character of the plunge dynamics, highlighting the central role of subdominant waveform multipoles in shaping the characteristic interference pattern exhibited by the linear momentum flux as a ^→-1 .

  8. Context and Relevance in Climate Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisman, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Context is key. Often the media and public may ask questions based on false premise or an uninformed position. Therefore, any questions raised can actually be soliciting less relevant answers. Considering the complexity of climate science, these answers can become distractions, or red herrings. Part of climate communications needs then to include perspective and sometimes redirecting the question to answer the relevant premise. Also one must consider how to maintain scientific integrity while discussing contextual issues regarding what climate science means to society to increase understanding. Along this line I will discuss general considerations including economics, energy and related issues pertaining to climate change.

  9. Characterizing a Neutron Energy Spectrum Using a "Forward Edge" Neutron Time-of-Flight Spectroscopy Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    energy spectrum of monoenergetic neutron source [9:562]..............................................27 16. Example data set...is valid only when the absorber is composed of one material and the incident neutrons are monoenergetic . In the case where the absorber consists of...source due to its creation from monoenergetic neutrons . Figure 15: Proton recoil energy spectrum of monoenergetic neutron source [9:562

  10. Examining Different Regions of Relevance: From Highly Relevant to Not Relevant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spink, Amanda; Greisdorf, Howard; Bateman, Judy

    1998-01-01

    Proposes a useful concept of relevance as a relationship and an effect on the movement of a user through the iterative stages of their information seeking process, and that users' relevance judgments can be plotted on a Three-Dimensional Spatial Model of Relevance Level, Degree and Time. Discusses implications for the development of information…

  11. Relevance of equilibrium in multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Takuya; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-15

    The relevance of equilibrium in a multifragmentation reaction of very central {sup 40}Ca + {sup 40}Ca collisions at 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using simulations of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). Two types of ensembles are compared. One is the reaction ensemble of the states at each reaction time t in collision events simulated by AMD, and the other is the equilibrium ensemble prepared by solving the AMD equation of motion for a many-nucleon system confined in a container for a long time. The comparison of the ensembles is performed for the fragment charge distribution and the excitation energies. Our calculations show that there exists an equilibrium ensemble that well reproduces the reaction ensemble at each reaction time t for the investigated period 80{<=}t{<=}300 fm/c. However, there are some other observables that show discrepancies between the reaction and equilibrium ensembles. These may be interpreted as dynamical effects in the reaction. The usual static equilibrium at each instant is not realized since any equilibrium ensemble with the same volume as that of the reaction system cannot reproduce the fragment observables.

  12. SU-E-T-334: Track Structure Simulations of Charged Particles at Low and Intermediate Energies: Cross Sections Needs for Light and Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dingfelder, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose/Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) track structure simulations follow the primary as well as all produced secondary particles in an event-by-event manner, from starting or ejection energy down to total stopping. They provide useful information on physics and chemistry of the biological response to radiation. They depend on reliable interaction cross sections and transport models of the considered radiation quality with biologically relevant materials. Most transport models focus on sufficiently fast and bare (i.e., fully ionized) ions and cross sections calculated within the (relativistic) first Born or Bethe approximations. These theories consider the projectile as a point particle and rely on proton cross sections and simple charge-scaling methods; they neglect the atomic nature of the ion and break down at low and intermediate ion energies. Heavier ions are used in particle therapy and slow to intermediate and low energies in the biologically interesting Bragg peak. Lighter and slower fragment ions, including alpha particles, protons, and neutrons are also produced in nuclear and break up reactions of charged particles. Secondary neutrons also produce recoil protons and ions, mainly in the intermediate energy range. Results/Conclusion: This work reviews existing models for track structure simulations and cross section calculations for light and heavy ions focusing on the low and intermediate energy range. It also presents new and updated aspects on cross section calculations and simulation techniques for ions and discusses the need for new models, calculations, and experimental data.

  13. Relationship between early diastolic intraventricular pressure gradients, an index of elastic recoil, and improvements in systolic and diastolic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Smedira, N. G.; Greenberg, N. L.; Prior, D. L.; McCarthy, P. M.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early diastolic intraventricular pressure gradients (IVPGs) have been proposed to relate to left ventricular (LV) elastic recoil and early ventricular "suction." Animal studies have demonstrated relationships between IVPGs and systolic and diastolic indices during acute ischemia. However, data on the effects of improvements in LV function in humans and the relationship to IVPGs are lacking. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eight patients undergoing CABG and/or infarct exclusion surgery had a triple-sensor high-fidelity catheter placed across the mitral valve intraoperatively for simultaneous recording of left atrial (LA), basal LV, and apical LV pressures. Hemodynamic data obtained before bypass were compared with those with similar LA pressures and heart rates obtained after bypass. From each LV waveform, the time constant of LV relaxation (tau), +dP/dt(max), and -dP/dt(max) were determined. Transesophageal echocardiography was used to determined end-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volumes and ejection fractions (EF). At similar LA pressures and heart rates, IVPG increased after bypass (before bypass 1.64+/-0.79 mm Hg; after bypass 2.67+/-1.25 mm Hg; P<0.01). Significant improvements were observed in ESV, as well as in apical and basal +dP/dt(max), -dP/dt(max), and tau (each P<0.05). Overall, IVPGs correlated inversely with both ESV (IVPG=-0.027[ESV]+3.46, r=-0.64) and EDV (IVPG=-0.027[EDV]+4.30, r=-0.70). Improvements in IVPGs correlated with improvements in apical tau (Deltatau =5.93[DeltaIVPG]+4.76, r=0.91) and basal tau (Deltatau =2.41[DeltaIVPG]+5.13, r=-0.67). Relative changes in IVPGs correlated with changes in ESV (DeltaESV=-0.97[%DeltaIVPG]+23.34, r=-0.79), EDV (DeltaEDV=-1.16[%DeltaIVPG]+34.92, r=-0.84), and EF (DeltaEF=0.38[%DeltaIVPG]-8.39, r=0.85). CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in LV function also increase IVPGs. These changes in IVPGs, suggestive of increases in LV suction and elastic recoil, correlate directly with improvements in LV relaxation

  14. Overview of secondary neutron production relevant to shielding inspace

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, L.; Nakamura, T.; Iwata, Y.; Kurosawa, T.; Iwase, H.; Townsend, L.W.

    2004-12-03

    An overview of experimental secondary neutron measurements relevant to space-related activities is presented. Stopping target yields and cross section measurements conducted at particle accelerators using heavy ions with energies >100 MeV per nucleon are discussed.

  15. Recoil of the Stellar Remnant from the Puppis A Supernova: Proper-Motion Measurement from Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Robert; Winkler, P. F.

    2006-09-01

    A sequence of three Chandra X-ray Observatory High Resolution Camera images taken over a span of five years reveals arc-second-scale displacement of RX J0822--4300, the stellar remnant near the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. We measure its proper motion to be 0.16±0.02 arcsec yr-1 toward the west-southwest. At a distance of 2 kpc, this corresponds to a transverse space velocity of 1500 km s-1. This is the first case of a compact X-ray source with a directly measured proper motion. The space velocity is consistent with the explosion center inferred from proper motions of the oxygen-rich optical filaments, and confirms the idea that Puppis A resulted from an asymmetric explosion accompanied by a kick that imparted on the order of 3x1049 ergs of kinetic energy (some 3 percent of the supernova kinetic energy) to the stellar remnant. We will summarize this measurement and discuss possible mechanisms for producing such a violent kick. This research has been supported by NASA grant GO4-5062X.

  16. Thermal recrystallization of alpha-recoil damaged minerals of the pyrochlore structure type

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, G.R.; Ewing, R.C.; Foltyn, E.M.

    1985-10-01

    Thermal recrystallization effects (heat of recrystallization and identification of phases formed), have been determined for naturally occurring members of the pyrochlore group which have received alpha doses of up to 4 X 10{sup 16} alphas/mg. The heats of recrystallization, E{sub t}, range from 125 to 210 J/g. Release of energy decreases as a function of crystallinity (estimated on the basis of the intensity of x-ray diffraction maxima), with the fully-metamict samples approaching 210 J/g. Lower measured values (40-125 J/g) are the result of alteration of the pyrochlores. Other metamict, complex oxides with stoichiometries of ABO{sub 4} and AB{sub 2}O{sub 6} have lower heats of recrystallization (40-85 J/g), and are easily distinguished from pyrochlore group minerals. Activation energies of recrystallization, E{sub a}, range between values of 0.29 to 0.97 eV, less than those measured for Pu-doped, synthetic zirconolites.

  17. Design and commissioning of a timestamp-based data acquisition system for the DRAGON recoil mass separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, G.; Akers, C.; Connolly, D.; Fallis, J.; Hutcheon, D.; Olchanski, K.; Ruiz, C.

    2014-04-01

    The DRAGON recoil mass separator at TRIUMF exists to study radiative proton and alpha capture reactions, which are important in a variety of astrophysical scenarios. DRAGON experiments require a data acquisition system that can be triggered on either reaction product ( γ-ray or heavy ion), with the additional requirement of being able to promptly recognize coincidence events in an online environment. To this end, we have designed and implemented a new data acquisition system for DRAGON, which consists of two independently triggered readouts. Events from both systems are recorded with timestamps from a 20 MHz clock that are used to tag coincidences in the earliest possible stage of the data analysis. Here we report on the design, implementation, and commissioning of the new DRAGON data acquisition system, including the hardware, trigger logic, coincidence reconstruction algorithm, and live time considerations. We also discuss the results of an experiment commissioning the new system, which measured the strength of the E c.m. = 1113 keV resonance in the 20 Ne( p, γ)21 Na radiative proton capture reaction.

  18. Coincidence recoil-distance Doppler-shift lifetime measurements in {sup 129,130}Ba with EUROBALL Ge cluster detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Stuch, O.; Jessen, K.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Dewald, A.; Kuehn, R.; Kruecken, R.; Petkov, P.; Peusquens, R.; Tiesler, H.; Weil, D.

    2000-04-01

    Picosecond lifetimes in {sup 129,130}Ba were determined using the recoil distance technique with a plunger device coupled to an array of EUROBALL-cluster-detectors for the first time. The differential decay curve method in coincidence mode was employed to derive lifetimes for six states in {sup 129}Ba and twelve states in {sup 130}Ba. The resulting B(E2) values are compared with triaxial rotor plus particle calculations for {sup 129}Ba and, in {sup 130}Ba, to the predictions of the general collective model, the interacting boson model, as well as to the symmetric and asymmetric rotor models. In {sup 130}Ba, the transitional quadrupole moment in the ground state band is remarkably constant before and after the backbend. With this data the two-quasiparticle negative parity band in {sup 130}Ba was confirmed to be based on a {pi}(h{sub 11/2}(multiply-in-circle sign)d{sub 5/2}/g{sub 7/2}) configuration. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  19. Study on depth profiles of hydrogen in boron-doped diamond films by elastic recoil detection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Changgeng, Liao; Shengsheng, Yang; Ximeng, Chen; Yongqiang, Wang

    1999-06-10

    Depth profiles of hydrogen in a set of boron-doped diamond films were studied by a convolution method to simulate the recoil proton spectra induced by {sup 4}He ions of 3 MeV. Results show that the hydrogen depth profiles in these varying-level boron-doped diamond films exhibit a similar three-layer structure: the surface absorption layer, the diffusion region, and the uniform hydrogen-containing matrix. Hydrogen concentrations at all the layers, especially in the surface layer, are found to increase significantly with the boron-doping concentration, implying that more dangling-bonds and/or CH-bonds were introduced by the boron-doping process. While the increased dangling-bonds and/or CH-bonds degrade the microstructure of the diamond films as observed by Raman Shift, the boron-doping significantly reduces the specific resistance and makes semiconducting diamond films possible. Hydrogen mobility (or hydrogen loss) in these films as a result of the {sup 4}He beam irradiation was also observed and discussed.

  20. Recoil distance transmission method: Measurement of interaction cross sections of excited states with fast rare-isotope beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, N.; Whitmore, K.; Iwasaki, H.

    2016-09-01

    The possible appearance of nuclear halos in ground and excited states close to the particle-decay threshold is of great importance in the investigation of nuclear structure and few-body correlations at the limit of stability. In order to obtain direct evidence of the halo structure manifested in nuclear excited states, we have considered a new method to measure the interaction cross sections of excited states. The combination of the transmission method and the recoil distance Doppler-shift method with a plunger device enables us to measure the number of interactions of the excited states in a target. Formulae to determine the interaction cross section are derived, and key issues to realize measurements are discussed. Dominant sources of errors are uncertainties in the excited-state lifetimes and γ-ray yields. We examine prototype experiments and perform simulations to study the impact of each uncertainty on the final result. This method provides a novel opportunity to perform cross section measurements on the excited states of rare isotopes.

  1. Energy and angular dependence of active-type personal dosemeter for high-energy neutron.

    PubMed

    Rito, Hirotaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Oda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to develop an active-type personal dosemeter having suitable sensitivity to high-energy neutrons, the characteristic response of silicon surface barrier detector has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. An agreement of the shape of pulse-height distribution, its change with radiator thickness and the relative sensitivity was confirmed between the calculated and experimental results for 14.8-MeV neutrons. The angular dependence was estimated for other neutron energies, and found that the angular dependence decreased with the incident energy. The reason was also discussed with regard to the radiator thickness relative to maximum range of recoil protons.

  2. Thermal conductivity and energetic recoils in UO2 using a many-body potential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, M. J.; Cooper, M. W. D.; Kuo, E. Y.; Rushton, M. J. D.; Grimes, R. W.; Lumpkin, G. R.; Middleburgh, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on uranium dioxide (UO2) employing a recently developed many-body potential model. Thermal conductivities are computed for a defect free UO2 lattice and a radiation-damaged, defect containing lattice at 300 K, 1000 K and 1500 K. Defects significantly degrade the thermal conductivity of UO2 as does the presence of amorphous UO2, which has a largely temperature independent thermal conductivity of ˜1.4 Wm-1 K-1. The model yields a pre-melting superionic transition temperature at 2600 K, very close to the experimental value and the mechanical melting temperature of 3600 K, slightly lower than those generated with other empirical potentials. The average threshold displacement energy was calculated to be 37 eV. Although the spatial extent of a 1 keV U cascade is very similar to those generated with other empirical potentials and the number of Frenkel pairs generated is close to that from the Basak potential, the vacancy and interstitial cluster distribution is different.

  3. Production of Zero-Energy Radioactive Nuclear Beams through Extraction from the Liquid-Vapour Interface of Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Huang, W. X.; Dendooven, P.; Gloos, K.; Pekola, J. P.; ńystö, J.

    2004-04-01

    A new approach has been investigated to create an ultra-cold radioactive beam from high-energy ions. A 223Ra alpha-decay recoil source has been used to produce radioactive ions in superfluid helium. The alpha spectra demonstrate that the recoiling 219Rn ions have been extracted out of liquid helium. This first observation of the extraction of heavy positive ions across the superfluid helium surface has been possible thanks to the high sensitivity of radioactive ion detection. An efficiency of 36 % has been obtained for the ion extraction out of liquid helium.

  4. Relevance theory: pragmatics and cognition.

    PubMed

    Wearing, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    Relevance Theory is a cognitively oriented theory of pragmatics, i.e., a theory of language use. It builds on the seminal work of H.P. Grice(1) to develop a pragmatic theory which is at once philosophically sensitive and empirically plausible (in both psychological and evolutionary terms). This entry reviews the central commitments and chief contributions of Relevance Theory, including its Gricean commitment to the centrality of intention-reading and inference in communication; the cognitively grounded notion of relevance which provides the mechanism for explaining pragmatic interpretation as an intention-driven, inferential process; and several key applications of the theory (lexical pragmatics, metaphor and irony, procedural meaning). Relevance Theory is an important contribution to our understanding of the pragmatics of communication.

  5. Methanethiol Binding Strengths and Deprotonation Energies in Zn(II)-Imidazole Complexes from M05-2X and MP2 Theories: Coordination Number and Geometry Influences Relevant to Zinc Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Linder, Douglas P; Rodgers, Kenton R

    2015-09-17

    Zn(II) is used in nature as a biocatalyst in hundreds of enzymes, and the structure and dynamics of its catalytic activity are subjects of considerable interest. Many of the Zn(II)-based enzymes are classified as hydrolytic enzymes, in which the Lewis acidic Zn(II) center facilitates proton transfer(s) to a Lewis base, from proton donors such as water or thiol. This report presents the results of a quantum computational study quantifying the dynamic relationship between the zinc coordination number (CN), its coordination geometry, and the thermodynamic driving force behind these proton transfers originating from a charge-neutral methylthiol ligand. Specifically, density functional theory (DFT) and second-order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations have been performed on a series of [(imidazole)nZn-S(H)CH3](2+) and [(imidazole)nZn-SCH3](+) complexes with the CN varied from 1 to 6, n = 0-5. As the number of imidazole ligands coordinated to zinc increases, the S-H proton dissociation energy also increases, (i.e., -S(H)CH3 becomes less acidic), and the Zn-S bond energy decreases. Furthermore, at a constant CN, the S-H proton dissociation energy decreases as the S-Zn-(ImH)n angles increase about their equilibrium position. The zinc-coordinated thiol can become more or less acidic depending upon the position of the coordinated imidazole ligands. The bonding and thermodynamic relationships discussed may apply to larger systems that utilize the [(His)3Zn(II)-L] complex as the catalytic site, including carbonic anhydrase, carboxypeptidase, β-lactamase, the tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme, and the matrix metalloproteinases.

  6. The resonance wave function - is it relevant?

    SciTech Connect

    Elander, Nils; Shilyeava, Ksenia; Volkov, Mikhail; Yarevsky, Evgeny; Rakityansky, Sergei

    2008-04-03

    The physical relevance of the resonance wave function is discussed in view of the complex scaling theory. It is argued that although it is unphysical in the sense that it corresponds to a complex energy it is useful when we want to understand and compute several physical observables. We first review our work on the influence of resonances on a scattering cross sections. We then discuss the partial widths concept as presented by Peshkin, Moiseyev and Lefebvre [J. Chem. Phys. 92 2902 (1990)]. Finally we use this formalism to suggest a way to define a root mean square radius of a resonant state.

  7. Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices; Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms - Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kropp, Roy K.

    2013-01-01

    A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science® databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on seabirds and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects on seabirds and fish were examined to begin the search process. From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on seabirds and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that the potential effects frequently w

  8. Medical Scenarios Relevant to Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacal, Kira; Hurs, Victor; Doerr, Harold

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Operational Support Team (MOST) was tasked by the JSC Space Medicine and Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) to incorporate medical simulation into 1) medical training for astronaut-crew medical officers (CMO) and medical flight control teams and 2) evaluations of procedures and resources required for medical care aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Development of evidence-based medical scenarios that mimic the physiology observed during spaceflight will be needed for the MOST to complete these two tasks. The MOST used a human patient simulator, the ISS-like resources in the Medical Simulation Laboratory (MSL), and evidence from space operations, military operations and medical literature to develop space relevant medical scenarios. These scenarios include conditions concerning airway management, Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and mitigating anaphylactic symptoms. The MOST has used these space relevant medical scenarios to develop a preliminary space medical training regimen for NASA flight surgeons, Biomedical Flight Controllers (Biomedical Engineers; BME) and CMO-analogs. This regimen is conducted by the MOST in the MSL. The MOST has the capability to develop evidence-based space-relevant medical scenarios that can help SLSD I) demonstrate the proficiency of medical flight control teams to mitigate space-relevant medical events and 2) validate nextgeneration medical equipment and procedures for space medicine applications.

  9. What's Relevant in Classical Literature?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickman, Sara

    1970-01-01

    Argues the relevance of various aspects of the Thebian trilogy, "The Iliad," The Odyssey," Great Expectations," and Hamlet" to the concerns of today's high school students; a paper presented at annual convention of National Council of Teachers of English (59th, Washington, D.C., November 29, 1969). (RD)

  10. Making Plant Biology Curricula Relevant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews rationale, purposes, challenges, and relevance of hands-on, plant biology curricula that have been developed in response to the limited use of plants in biology education. Discusses methods to maintain both instructional rigor and student interest in the following topics: cut flowers, container-growing media, fertilizers, hydroponics,…

  11. Culturally and Linguistically Relevant Readalouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Laura A.; Bingham, Gary E.; Pendergast, Meghan L.

    2014-01-01

    The teacher readaloud is an instructional tool established in its ability to foster children's language and literacy development. Increasing cultural and linguistic diversity and changing standards place pressure on teachers to provide literacy and language instruction relevant to children's everyday lives and learning. This article…

  12. Measurements of the electric form factor of the neutron at JLab via recoil polarimetry in the reaction: d(e, e-prime n)p

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Finn

    2004-11-01

    Preliminary results are reported for measurements of the ratio of the electric form factor to the magnetic form factor of the neutron, GEn/GMn, obtained via recoil polarimetry from the quasielastic 2H(e, e?n) 1H reaction at Q2 values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c)2. The measurements, conducted in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, together with other recent polarization measurements, are the result of a decade long effort to establish a firm experimental database for the important, but elusive, electric form factor of the neutron.

  13. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Bionta, R. M.; ...

    2016-08-09

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. Here, this paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ~200 keV FWHM.

  14. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Eckart, M. J.; Farrell, M. P.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoppe, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Reynolds, H. G.; Sayre, D. B.; Schoff, M. E.; Séguin, F. H.; Skulina, K.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. This paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ˜200 keV FWHM.

  15. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Bionta, R M; Casey, D T; Eckart, M J; Farrell, M P; Grim, G P; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hoppe, M; Kilkenny, J D; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Reynolds, H G; Sayre, D B; Schoff, M E; Séguin, F H; Skulina, K; Yeamans, C B

    2016-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. This paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ∼200 keV FWHM.

  16. Coherent Structures in Plasmas Relevant to Electric Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-24

    formation of the plasma structures requires a kinetic description supported by theory and validated by measurements of kinetic properties, including energy...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0229 Coherent Structures in Plasmas Relevant to Electric Propulsion Mark Cappelli LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV CA Final Report...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Coherent Structures in Plasmas Relevant to Electric Propulsion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N/A 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1-0017 5c

  17. The architectural relevance of cybernetics

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, J.H.

    1993-12-31

    This title is taken from an article by Gordon Pask in Architectural Design September 1969. It raises a number of questions which this article attempts to answer. How did Gordon come to be writing for an architectural publication? What was his contribution to architecture? How does he now come to be on the faculty of a school of architecture? And what indeed is the architectural relevance of cybernetics? 12 refs.

  18. Minimizing the cost of locomotion with inclined trunk predicts crouched leg kinematics of small birds at realistic levels of elastic recoil.

    PubMed

    Rode, Christian; Sutedja, Yefta; Kilbourne, Brandon M; Blickhan, Reinhard; Andrada, Emanuel

    2016-02-01

    Small birds move with pronograde trunk orientation and crouched legs. Although the pronograde trunk has been suggested to be beneficial for grounded running, the cause(s) of the specific leg kinematics are unknown. Here we show that three charadriiform bird species (northern lapwing, oystercatcher, and avocet; great examples of closely related species that differ remarkably in their hind limb design) move their leg segments during stance in a way that minimizes the cost of locomotion. We imposed measured trunk motions and ground reaction forces on a kinematic model of the birds. The model was used to search for leg configurations that minimize leg work that accounts for two factors: elastic recoil in the intertarsal joint, and cheaper negative muscle work relative to positive muscle work. A physiological level of elasticity (∼ 0.6) yielded segment motions that match the experimental data best, with a root mean square of angular deviations of ∼ 2.1 deg. This finding suggests that the exploitation of elastic recoil shapes the crouched leg kinematics of small birds under the constraint of pronograde trunk motion. Considering that an upright trunk and more extended legs likely decrease the cost of locomotion, our results imply that the cost of locomotion is a secondary movement criterion for small birds. Scaling arguments suggest that our approach may be utilized to provide new insights into the motion of extinct species such as dinosaurs.

  19. Trajectory dependence of scattered Ne+ and recoiled S- ion fractions from the Cd- and S-terminated CdS{0001} surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houssiau, L.; Rabalais, J. W.; Wolfgang, J.; Nordlander, P.

    1999-04-01

    Scattered Ne+ and recoiled S- ion fractions resulting from 4 keV Ne+ and 4 keV Kr+ impingement, respectively, on both the Cd- and S-terminated surfaces of CdS{0001} have been measured. The absolute values of these ion fractions as well as their dependence on surface structure and electron density have been determined. Using a density functional approach, a clear correlation has been demonstrated between these Ne+ and S- ion fractions and the lateral variation of the electrostatic potential along the outgoing trajectories of the scattered and recoiled atoms. The observed anisotropy in the ion fractions is a result of the variations in surface to atom electron transfer rates due to tunneling barriers introduced by the electrostatic potentials. Both the Ne+ and S- ion fractions are higher on the Cd-terminated surface than on the S-terminated surface and their azimuthal patterns are different due to the spatial modulation of the electron tunneling rates on the surface caused by the electrostatic barriers. The azimuthal anisotropies of electrons ejected during the collision indicate that they are emitted only from collisions whose impact parameters are less than a threshold value, consistent with a kinetic electron emission mechanism.

  20. Using inertial fusion implosions to measure the T+He3 fusion cross section at nucleosynthesis-relevant energies

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, A. B.; Herrmann, H. W.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Kim, Y. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Hale, G.; Li, C. K.; Rubery, M.; Paris, M.; Bacher, A.; Brune, C. R.; Forrest, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Janezic, R.; McNabb, D.; Nikroo, A.; Pino, J.; Sangster, T. C.; Seguin, F. H.; Seka, W.; Sio, H.; Stoeckl, C.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-07-11

    Light nuclei were created during big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Standard BBN theory, using rates inferred from accelerator-beam data, cannot explain high levels of 6Li in low-metallicity stars. Using high energy-density plasmas we measure the T(3He,γ)6Li reaction rate, a candidate for anomalously high 6Li production; we find that the rate is too low to explain the observations, and different than values used in common BBN models. In conclusion, this is the first data directly relevant to BBN, and also the first use of laboratory plasmas, at comparable conditions to astrophysical systems, to address a problem in nuclear astrophysics.

  1. Microdosing: concept, application and relevance.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Tushar; Mukherjee, Shoibal

    2010-04-01

    The use of microdose pharmacokinetic studies as an essential tool in drug development is still to catch on. While this approach promises potential cost savings and a quantum leap in efficiencies of the drug development process, major hurdles still need to be overcome before the technique becomes commonplace and part of routine practice. Clear regulations in Europe and the USA have had an enabling effect. The lack of enabling provisions for microdosing studies in Indian regulation, despite low risk and manifest relevance for the local drug development industry, is inconsistent with the country's aspirations to be among the leaders in pharmaceutical research.

  2. Intraseasonal Variations in Tropical Energy Balance: Relevance to Climate Sensitivity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Ramey, Holly S.; Roberts, Jason B.

    2011-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of organization for tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, here we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged heat and moisture budget. One unresolved question concerns the degree to which observable variations in the "fast" processes (e.g. convection, radiative / turbulent fluxes) can inform our understanding of feedback mechanisms operable in the context of climate change. Our analysis use daily data from satellite observations, the Modern Era analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), and other model integrations to address these questions: (i) How are tropospheric temperature variations related to that tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF), ice water path (IWP), and properties of warmer liquid clouds? (ii) What role does moisture transport play vis-a-vis ocean latent heat flux in enabling the evolution of deep convection to mediate PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007 GRL ) whereby a composite time series of various quantities over 60+ ISO events is built using tropical mean tropospheric temperature signal as a reference to which the variables are related at various lag times (from -30 to +30 days). The area of interest encompasses the global oceans between 20oN/S. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. The decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, is part of the response that constitutes a "discharge" / "recharge" mechanism that facilitates tropical heat balance maintenance on these time scales. However, water vapor and hydrologic scaling relationships for this mode of variability cast doubt on the utility of ISO variations as proxies for climate sensitivity response to external radiatively forced (e.g. greenhouse gas-induced) climate change.

  3. The Constraints of Relevance on Prevocational Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects on how relevance has been invoked as a curricular principle, both by students and teachers, in curriculum documents and in curriculum theory, to explore its variously conceived parameters and conditions. By posing the questions "relevant to whom?", "relevant to what?", "relevant how?" and…

  4. A comparative reliability and performance study of different stent designs in terms of mechanical properties: foreshortening, recoil, radial force, and flexibility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Bin; Choi, Hyuk; Joo, Sang Min; Kim, Han Ki; Shin, Jae Hee; Hwang, Min Ho; Choi, Jaesoon; Kim, Dong-Gon; Lee, Kwang Ho; Lim, Chun Hak; Yoo, Sun Kook; Lee, Heung-Man; Sun, Kyung

    2013-04-01

    This study seeks to improve the mechanical performance of stents by conducting reliability performance testing and finite element method (FEM)-based simulations for coronary stents. Three commercially available stent designs and our own new design were tested to measure the factors affecting performance, specifically foreshortening, recoil, radial force, and flexibility. The stents used in the present experiments were 3 mm in working diameter and 18 mm of working length. The results of the experiments indicate that the foreshortening of stents A, B, C, and our new design, D, was equivalent to 2.25, 0.67, 0.46, and 0.41%, respectively. The recoil of stents A, B, C, and D was 6.00, 4.35, 3.50, and 4.36%, respectively. Parallel plate radial force measurements were A, 3.72 ± 0.28 N; B, 3.81 ± 0.32 N; C, 4.35 ± 0.18 N; and D, 4.02 ± 0.24 N. Radial forces determined by applying uniform pressure in the circumferential direction were A, 28.749 ± 0.81 N; B, 32.231 ± 1.80 N; C, 34.522 ± 3.06 N; and D, 42.183 ± 2.84 N. The maximum force of crimped stent at 2.2-mm deflection was 1.01 ± 0.08 N, 0.82 ± 0.08 N, 0.92 ± 0.12 N, and 0.68 ± 0.07 N for each of stents A, B, C and D. The results of this study enabled us to identify several factors to enhance the performance of stents. In comparing these stents, we found that our design, stent D, which was designed by a collaborative team from seven universities, performed better than the commercial stents across all parameter of foreshortening, recoil, radial force, and flexibility.

  5. Differential cross sections and recoil polarizations for the reaction γpK+Σ0

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; McCracken, M. E.; Williams, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Berman, B. L.; Biselli, A. S.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dhamija, S.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hassall, N.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Konczykowski, P.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Martinez, D.; McAndrew, J.; McKinnon, B.; Mikhailov, K.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moriya, K.; Morrison, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nasseripour, R.; Nepali, C. S.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niroula, M. R.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Salamanca, J.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Watts, D. P.; Vernarsky, B.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voutier, E.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2010-08-06

    Here, high-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and recoil polarizations for the reaction $\\gamma p \\rightarrow K^+ \\Sigma^0$ have been obtained using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies ($\\sqrt{s}$) from 1.69 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the $K^+$ production angle. Independent measurements were made using the $K^{+}p\\pi^{-}$($\\gamma$) and $K^{+}p$($\\pi^-,\\gamma$) final-state topologies, and were found to exhibit good agreement. Our differential cross sections show good agreement with earlier CLAS, SAPHIR and LEPS results, while offering better statistical precision and a 300-MeV increase in $\\sqrt{s}$ coverage. Above $\\sqrt{s} \\approx 2.5$ GeV, $t$- and $u$-channel Regge scaling behavior can be seen at forward- and backward-angles, respectively. Our recoil polarization ($P_\\Sigma$) measurements represent a substantial increase in kinematic coverage and enhanced precision over previous world data. At forward angles we find that $P_\\Sigma$ is of the same magnitude but opposite sign as $P_\\Lambda$, in agreement with the static SU(6) quark model prediction of $P_\\Sigma \\approx -P_\\Lambda$. This expectation is violated in some mid- and backward-angle kinematic regimes, where $P_\\Sigma$ and $P_\\Lambda$ are of similar magnitudes but also have the same signs. In conjunction with several other meson photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, the present data will help constrain the partial wave analyses being performed to search for missing baryon resonances.

  6. Ancient "Observatories" - A Relevant Concept?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    It is quite common, when reading popular books on astronomy, to see a place referred to as "the oldest observatory in the world". In addition, numerous books on archaeoastronomy, of various levels of quality, frequently refer to the existence of "prehistoric" or "ancient" observatories when describing or citing monuments that were certainly not built with the primary purpose of observing the skies. Internet sources are also guilty of this practice. In this chapter, the different meanings of the word observatory will be analyzed, looking at how their significances can be easily confused or even interchanged. The proclaimed "ancient observatories" are a typical result of this situation. Finally, the relevance of the concept of the ancient observatory will be evaluated.

  7. Industrial relevance of thermophilic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Egorova, Ksenia; Antranikian, Garabed

    2005-12-01

    The dramatic increase of newly isolated extremophilic microorganisms, analysis of their genomes and investigations of their enzymes by academic and industrial laboratories demonstrate the great potential of extremophiles in industrial (white) biotechnology. Enzymes derived from extremophiles (extremozymes) are superior to the traditional catalysts because they can perform industrial processes even under harsh conditions, under which conventional proteins are completely denatured. In particular, enzymes from thermophilic and hyperthermophilic Archaea have industrial relevance. Despite intensive investigations, our knowledge of the structure-function relationships of their enzymes is still limited. Information concerning the molecular properties of their enzymes and genes has to be obtained to be able to understand the mechanisms that are responsible for catalytic activity and stability at the boiling point of water.

  8. An audiovisual feedback device for compression depth, rate and complete chest recoil can improve the CPR performance of lay persons during self-training on a manikin.

    PubMed

    Krasteva, Vessela; Jekova, Irena; Didon, Jean-Philippe

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to contribute to the scarce data available about the abilities of untrained lay persons to perform hands-only cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on a manikin and the improvement of their skills during training with an autonomous CPR feedback device. The study focuses on the following questions: (i) Is there a need for such a CPR training device? (ii) How adequate are the embedded visual feedback and audio guidance for training of lay persons who learn and correct themselves in real time without instructor guidance? (iii) What is the achieved effect of only 3 min of training? This is a prospective study in which 63 lay persons (volunteers) received a debriefing to basic life support and then performed two consecutive 3 min trials of hands-only CPR on a manikin. The pre-training skills of the lay persons were tested in trial 1. The training process with audio guidance and visual feedback from a cardio compression control device (CC-Device) was recorded in trial 2. After initial debriefing for correct chest compressions (CC) with rate 85-115 min(-1), depth 3.8-5.4 cm and complete recoil, in trial 1 the lay persons were able to perform CC without feedback at mean rate 95.9 ± 18.9 min(-1), mean depth 4.13 ± 1.5 cm, with low proportions of 'correct depth', 'correct rate' and 'correct recoil' at 33%, 43%, 87%, resulting in the scarce proportion of 14% for compressions, which simultaneously fulfill the three quality criteria ('correct all'). In trial 2, the training process by the CC-Device was established by the significant improvement of the CC skills until the 60th second of training, when 'correct depth', 'correct rate' and 'correct recoil' attained the plateau of the highest quality at 82%, 90%, 96%, respectively, resulting in 73% 'correct all' compressions within 3 min of training. The training was associated with reduced variance of the mean rate 102.4 ± 4.7 min(-1) and mean depth 4.3 ± 0.4 cm, indicating a steady CC performance achieved among

  9. Lifetime measurement of candidate chiral doublet bands in the {sup 103,104}Rh isotopes with the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method in inverse kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Rainovski, G.; Koike, T.; Ahn, T.; Costin, A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lister, C. J.; Zhu, S.; Danchev, M.; Dewald, A.; Joshi, P.; Wadsworth, R.; Moeller, O.; Pietralla, N.; Shinozuka, T.; Timar, J.; Vaman, C.

    2008-09-15

    Lifetimes of chiral candidate structures in {sup 103,104}Rh were measured using the recoil distance Doppler-shift method. The Gammasphere detector array was used in conjunction with the Cologne plunger device. Excited states of {sup 103,104}Rh were populated by the {sup 11}B({sup 96}Zr,4n){sup 103}Rh and {sup 11}B({sup 96}Zr,3n){sup 104}Rh fusion-evaporation reactions in inverse kinematics. Three and five lifetimes of levels belonging to the proposed chiral doublet bands are measured in {sup 103}Rh and {sup 104}Rh, respectively. The previously observed even-odd spin dependence of the B(M1)/B(E2) values is caused by the variation in the B(E2) values, whereas the B(M1) values decrease as a function of spin.

  10. The coincidence counting technique for orders of magnitude background reduction in data obtained with the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H; Manuel, M J-E; Gatu Johnson, M; Schaeffer, J C; Frankel, R; Sinenian, N; Childs, R A; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Burke, M; Roberts, S

    2011-07-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been built and successfully used at OMEGA for measurements of down-scattered neutrons (DS-n), from which an areal density in both warm-capsule and cryogenic-DT implosions have been inferred. Another MRS is currently being commissioned on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for diagnosing low-yield tritium-hydrogen-deuterium implosions and high-yield DT implosions. As CR-39 detectors are used in the MRS, the principal sources of background are neutron-induced tracks and intrinsic tracks (defects in the CR-39). The coincidence counting technique was developed to reduce these types of background tracks to the required level for the DS-n measurements at OMEGA and the NIF. Using this technique, it has been demonstrated that the number of background tracks is reduced by a couple of orders of magnitude, which exceeds the requirement for the DS-n measurements at both facilities.

  11. Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to Q{sup 2}=8.5 GeV{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, A. J. R.; Bertozzi, W.; Gilad, S.; Huang, J.; Moffit, B.; Zhu, L.; Brash, E. J.; Jones, M. K.; Bosted, P.; Covrig, S.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Gaskell, D.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Horn, T.; Meekins, D.; Smith, G.; Wojtsekhowski, B. B.; Wood, S.; Luo, W.

    2010-06-18

    Among the most fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dynamics of the nucleon's quark constituents; indeed, recent proton data have attracted intense theoretical interest. In this Letter, we report new measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio using the recoil polarization method, at momentum transfers Q{sup 2}=5.2, 6.7, and 8.5 GeV{sup 2}. By extending the range of Q{sup 2} for which G{sub E}{sup p} is accurately determined by more than 50%, these measurements will provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure in the nonperturbative regime.

  12. Black-hole horizons as probes of black-hole dynamics. I. Post-merger recoil in head-on collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, José Luis; Macedo, Rodrigo P.; Moesta, Philipp; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2012-04-01

    The understanding of strong-field dynamics near black-hole horizons is a long-standing and challenging problem in general relativity. Recent advances in numerical relativity and in the geometric characterization of black-hole horizons open new avenues into the problem. In this first paper in a series of two, we focus on the analysis of the recoil occurring in the merger of binary black holes, extending the analysis initiated in [L. Rezzolla, R. P. Macedo, and J. L. Jaramillo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 221101 (2010).PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.221101] with Robinson-Trautman spacetimes. More specifically, we probe spacetime dynamics through the correlation of quantities defined at the black-hole horizon and at null infinity. The geometry of these hypersurfaces responds to bulk gravitational fields acting as test screens in a scattering perspective of spacetime dynamics. Within a 3+1 approach we build an effective-curvature vector from the intrinsic geometry of dynamical-horizon sections and correlate its evolution with the flux of Bondi linear momentum at large distances. We employ this setup to study numerically the head-on collision of nonspinning black holes and demonstrate its validity to track the qualitative aspects of recoil dynamics at infinity. We also make contact with the suggestion that the antikick can be described in terms of a “slowness parameter” and how this can be computed from the local properties of the horizon. In a companion paper [J. L. Jaramillo, R. P. Macedo, P. Moesta, and L. Rezzolla, following article, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 85, 084031 (2012).] we will further elaborate on the geometric aspects of this approach and on its relation with other approaches to characterize dynamical properties of black-hole horizons.

  13. B →D ℓν form factors at nonzero recoil and |Vc b| from 2 +1 -flavor lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jon A.; Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Foley, J.; Freeland, E. D.; Gámiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Komijani, J.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Laiho, J.; Levkova, L.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Neil, E. T.; Qiu, Si-Wei; Simone, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, Ran; Fermilab Lattice; MILC Collaborations

    2015-08-01

    We present the first unquenched lattice-QCD calculation of the hadronic form factors for the exclusive decay B ¯→D ℓν ¯ at nonzero recoil. We carry out numerical simulations on 14 ensembles of gauge-field configurations generated with 2 +1 flavors of asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. The ensembles encompass a wide range of lattice spacings (approximately 0.045 to 0.12 fm) and ratios of light (up and down) to strange sea-quark masses ranging from 0.05 to 0.4. For the b and c valence quarks we use improved Wilson fermions with the Fermilab interpretation, while for the light valence quarks we use asqtad-improved staggered fermions. We extrapolate our results to the physical point using rooted staggered heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory. We then parametrize the form factors and extend them to the full kinematic range using model-independent functions based on analyticity and unitarity. We present our final results for f+(q2) and f0(q2), including statistical and systematic errors, as coefficients of a series in the variable z and the covariance matrix between these coefficients. We then fit the lattice form-factor data jointly with the experimentally measured differential decay rate from BABAR to determine the CKM matrix element, |Vc b|=(39.6 ±1. 7QCD +exp±0. 2QED)×10-3 . As a byproduct of the joint fit we obtain the form factors with improved precision at large recoil. Finally, we use them to update our calculation of the ratio R (D ) in the Standard Model, which yields R (D )=0.299 (11 ).

  14. B → Dℓν form factors at nonzero recoil and |Vcb| from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2015-08-10

    We present the first unquenched lattice-QCD calculation of the hadronic form factors for the exclusive decay B¯→Dℓν¯ at nonzero recoil. We carry out numerical simulations on 14 ensembles of gauge-field configurations generated with 2+1 flavors of asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. The ensembles encompass a wide range of lattice spacings (approximately 0.045 to 0.12 fm) and ratios of light (up and down) to strange sea-quark masses ranging from 0.05 to 0.4. For the b and c valence quarks we use improved Wilson fermions with the Fermilab interpretation, while for the light valence quarks we use asqtad-improved staggered fermions. We extrapolate our results to the physical point using rooted staggered heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory. We then parametrize the form factors and extend them to the full kinematic range using model-independent functions based on analyticity and unitarity. We present our final results for f+(q2) and f0(q2), including statistical and systematic errors, as coefficients of a series in the variable z and the covariance matrix between these coefficients. We then fit the lattice form-factor data jointly with the experimentally measured differential decay rate from BABAR to determine the CKM matrix element, |Vcb|=(39.6 ± 1.7QCD+exp ± 0.2QED) × 10–3. As a byproduct of the joint fit we obtain the form factors with improved precision at large recoil. In conclusion, we use them to update our calculation of the ratio R(D) in the Standard Model, which yields R(D)=0.299(11).

  15. Vygotsky's Crisis: Argument, context, relevance.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Ludmila

    2012-06-01

    Vygotsky's The Historical Significance of the Crisis in Psychology (1926-1927) is an important text in the history and philosophy of psychology that has only become available to scholars in 1982 in Russian, and in 1997 in English. The goal of this paper is to introduce Vygotsky's conception of psychology to a wider audience. I argue that Vygotsky's argument about the "crisis" in psychology and its resolution can be fully understood only in the context of his social and political thinking. Vygotsky shared the enthusiasm, widespread among Russian leftist intelligentsia in the 1920s, that Soviet society had launched an unprecedented social experiment: The socialist revolution opened the way for establishing social conditions that would let the individual flourish. For Vygotsky, this meant that "a new man" of the future would become "the first and only species in biology that would create itself." He envisioned psychology as a science that would serve this humanist teleology. I propose that The Crisis is relevant today insofar as it helps us define a fundamental problem: How can we systematically account for the development of knowledge in psychology? I evaluate how Vygotsky addresses this problem as a historian of the crisis.

  16. On Relevance Weight Estimation and Query Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    A Bayesian argument is used to suggest modifications to the Robertson and Jones relevance weighting formula to accommodate the addition to the query of terms taken from the relevant documents identified during the search. (Author)

  17. Direct Measurement of the Bubble Nucleation Energy Threshold in a CF3I Bubble Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, E.; Benjamin, T.; Brice, S. J.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, P. S.; Crisler, M.; Dahl, C. E.; Fustin, D.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harnish, C.; Levine, I.; Lippincott, W. H.; Moan, T.; Nania, T.; Neilson, R.; Ramberg, E.; Robinson, A. E.; Ruschman, M.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; RIvera, R. A.; Uplegger, L.

    2013-07-30

    Here, we measured the energy threshold and efficiency for bubble nucleation from iodine recoils in a CF3I bubble chamber in the energy range of interest for a dark matter search. These interactions cannot be probed by standard neutron calibration methods, so we develop a new technique by observing the elastic scattering of 12 GeV/c negative pions. The pions are tracked with a silicon pixel telescope and the reconstructed scattering angle provides a measure of the nuclear recoil kinetic energy. The bubble chamber was operated with a nominal threshold of (13.6±0.6) keV. Interpretation of the results depends on the response to fluorine and carbon recoils, but in general we find agreement with the predictions of the classical bubble-nucleation theory. Moreover, this measurement confirms the applicability of CF3I as a target for spin-independent dark matter interactions and represents a novel technique for calibration of superheated fluid detectors.

  18. Low-energy irradiation effects in cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Polvi, Jussi; Nordlund, Kai

    2014-01-14

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we determined the threshold energy for creating defects as a function of the incident angle for all carbon and oxygen atoms in the cellulose monomer. Our analysis shows that the damage threshold energy is strongly dependent on the initial recoil direction and on average slightly higher for oxygen atoms than for carbon atoms in cellulose chain. We also performed cumulative bombardment simulations mimicking low-energy electron irradiation (such as TEM imaging) on cellulose. Analyzing the results, we found that formation of free molecules and broken glucose rings were the most common forms of damage, whereas cross-linking and chain scission were less common. Pre-existing damage was found to increase the probability of cross-linking.

  19. Broad Energy Range Neutron Spectroscopy using a Liquid Scintillator and a Proportional Counter: Application to a Neutron Spectrum Similar to that from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J

    2015-09-11

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n)(3)He and D(d,n)(3)He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the (9)Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima.

  20. Broad Energy Range Neutron Spectroscopy using a Liquid Scintillator and a Proportional Counter: Application to a Neutron Spectrum Similar to that from an Improvised Nuclear Device

    PubMed Central

    Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n)3He and D(d,n)3He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the 9Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima. PMID:26273118