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Sample records for recoil mass separator

  1. Sub-barrier reactions measured using a recoil mass separator

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Few data exist in the sub-barrier region for reaction channels other than fusion. In particular, our experimental knowledge of quasi-elastic transfer reactions is sparse, despite the belief that this particular channel may be dominant in determining some features of the sub-barrier fusion enhancement. Transfer reactions are governed primarily by the closet approach of the colliding nuclei which, at low energies, results in a strong backward peaking of the angular distribution in the center-of-mass frame. For situations where the projectile has a significant fraction of the target mass, as is so in most cases of interest, the backscattered projectile-like fragment has such low energy that the usual techniques of measurement and identification become invalid. Here, we report on a solution to this problem which allows a systematic study of many aspects of transfer reactions in the energy regime of interest. We exploit the fact that associated with the low-energy backscattered projectile-like fragment is a complementary target-like fragment which recoils to forward angles with a large fraction of the incident beam energy. These target-like fragments were detected and identified using the Daresbury Recoil Mass Separator thus allowing the measurement of quasi-elastic transfer over hitherto inaccessible energy range from the vicinity of the barrier to several tens of MeV below. The experiments described here used VYNi beams of energies ranging from 180 to 260 MeV provided by the Daresbury Laboratory Nuclear Structure Facility tandem accelerator. Data on sub-barrier transfer for targets of /sup 116,118,120,122,124/Sn and /sup 144,148,150,152,154/Sm were obtained. 16 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. COSY Simulations to Guide Commissioning of the St. George Recoil Mass Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Jaclyn; Moran, Michael; Seymour, Christopher; Gilardy, Gwenaelle; Meisel, Zach; Couder, Manoel

    2015-10-01

    The goal of St. George (STrong Gradient Electromagnetic Online Recoil separator for capture Gamma ray Experiments) is to measure (α, γ) cross sections relevant to stellar helium burning. Recoil separators such as St. George are able to more closely approach the low astrophysical energies of interest because they collect reaction recoils rather than γ-rays, and thus are not limited by room background. In order to obtain an accurate cross section measurement, a recoil separator must be able to collect all recoils over their full range of expected energy and angular spread. The energy acceptance of St. George is currently being measured, and the angular acceptance will be measured soon. Here we present the results of COSY ion optics simulations and magnetic field analyses which were performed to help guide the commissioning measurements and diagnostic upgrades required to complete those measurements. National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program.

  3. Advances in the helium-jet coupled on-line mass separator RAMA. [Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Moltz, D M; Aysto, J; Cable, M D; Parry, R F; Haustein, P E; Wouters, J M; Cerny, J

    1980-01-01

    General improvements to the on-line mass separator RAMA (Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer) have yielded a greater reliability and efficiency for some elements. A new utilitarian helium-jet chamber has been installed to facilitate quick target and degrader foil changes in addition to a new ion source holder. A higher efficiency hollow-cathode, cathode-extraction ion source, for lower melting point elements (< 1200/sup 0/C) has also been designed. Tests with the beta-delayed proton emitter /sup 37/Ca showed a factor of five increase in yield over the old hollow-cathode, anode-extraction source. A differentially-pumped-tape drive system compatible with both ..gamma..-..gamma.. and ..beta..-..gamma.. experiments has been incorporated into the general detection system. All major operating parameters will soon be monitored by a complete stand-alone microprocessor system which will eventually be upgraded to a closed-loop control system.

  4. Design and commissioning of a timestamp-based data acquisition system for the DRAGON recoil mass separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, G.; Akers, C.; Connolly, D.; Fallis, J.; Hutcheon, D.; Olchanski, K.; Ruiz, C.

    2014-04-01

    The DRAGON recoil mass separator at TRIUMF exists to study radiative proton and alpha capture reactions, which are important in a variety of astrophysical scenarios. DRAGON experiments require a data acquisition system that can be triggered on either reaction product ( γ-ray or heavy ion), with the additional requirement of being able to promptly recognize coincidence events in an online environment. To this end, we have designed and implemented a new data acquisition system for DRAGON, which consists of two independently triggered readouts. Events from both systems are recorded with timestamps from a 20 MHz clock that are used to tag coincidences in the earliest possible stage of the data analysis. Here we report on the design, implementation, and commissioning of the new DRAGON data acquisition system, including the hardware, trigger logic, coincidence reconstruction algorithm, and live time considerations. We also discuss the results of an experiment commissioning the new system, which measured the strength of the E c.m. = 1113 keV resonance in the 20 Ne( p, γ)21 Na radiative proton capture reaction.

  5. The new vacuum-mode recoil separator MARA at JYFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarén, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Leino, M.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.

    2008-10-01

    A new vacuum-mode recoil separator MARA (Mass Analysing Recoil Apparatus) is under design and construction at the Department of Physics in the University of Jyväskylä. The separator is intended to separate reaction products from the primary beam in mass region below A = 150 . The ion-optical configuration of the separator will be QQQDEDM, where a magnetic quadrupole (Q) triplet is followed by an electrostatic deflector (DE) and a magnetic dipole (DM). The total length of MARA will be less than 7.0 m and the first order resolving power more than 250 for a beam spot size of 2 mm. In this contribution the main properties of MARA are given and results from simulations are shown.

  6. Energy acceptance of the St. George recoil separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Z.; Moran, M. T.; Gilardy, G.; Schmitt, J.; Seymour, C.; Couder, M.

    2017-04-01

    Radiative alpha-capture, (α , γ) , reactions play a critical role in nucleosynthesis and nuclear energy generation in a variety of astrophysical environments. The St. George recoil separator at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Laboratory was developed to measure (α , γ) reactions in inverse kinematics via recoil detection in order to obtain nuclear reaction cross sections at the low energies of astrophysical interest, while avoiding the γ-background that plagues traditional measurement techniques. Due to the γ ray produced by the nuclear reaction at the target location, recoil nuclei are produced with a variety of energies and angles, all of which must be accepted by St. George in order to accurately determine the reaction cross section. We demonstrate the energy acceptance of the St. George recoil separator using primary beams of helium, hydrogen, neon, and oxygen, spanning the magnetic and electric rigidity phase space populated by recoils of anticipated (α , γ) reaction measurements. We find the performance of St. George meets the design specifications, demonstrating its suitability for (α , γ) reaction measurements of astrophysical interest.

  7. Computing at the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yuri S.; Polyakov, Alexandr N.

    2006-03-01

    Simulation codes for the spectra of heavy implanted nuclei, applications for online data visualization and real time PC-based algorithms are considered. Special attention is paid to the application of real time techniques for radical suppression of background products in heavy-ion-induced nuclear reactions at the U-400 cyclotron of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions. The detection system of the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator (DGFRS) is also briefly described. Calculated heavy recoil spectra are compared with those measured in heavy-ion-induced nuclear reactions.

  8. Moving towards first science with the St. George recoil separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Zachary; Berg, G. P. A.; Gilardy, G.; Moran, M.; Schmitt, J.; Seymour, C.; Stech, E.; Couder, M.

    2015-10-01

    The St. George recoil mass separator has recently been coupled to the 5MV St. Ana accelerator at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Lab. St. George is a unique tool designed to measure radiative alpha-capture reactions for nuclei up to A = 40 in inverse kinematics in order to directly obtain cross sections required for astrophysical models of stellar and explosive helium burning. Commissioning of St. George is presently taking place with primary beams of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen. In this presentation, results will be shown for the measured energy acceptance of St. George, which compare favorably to COSY results when employing the calculated optimal ion-optical settings. Additionally, future plans will be discussed, such as assessing the angular acceptance of St. George and the re-integration of HiPPO at the separator target position to provide a dense, windowless helium gas-jet target. The material presented in this work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation Grant No. 1419765.

  9. Improvements of the DRAGON recoil separator at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vockenhuber, C.; Buchmann, L.; Caggiano, J.; Chen, A. A.; D'Auria, J. M.; Davis, C. A.; Greife, U.; Hussein, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Ottewell, D.; Ouellet, C. O.; Parikh, A.; Pearson, J.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Trinczek, M.; Zylberberg, J.

    2008-10-01

    The DRAGON (Detector of Recoils And Gammas Of Nuclear reactions) is used to measure radiative proton and alpha capture reaction rates involving both stable and radioactive, heavy-ion reactants at the TRIUMF-ISAC high intensity radioactive beam facility. Completed in 2001 it has been used for several challenging studies for nuclear astrophysics, e.g. 12C(α, γ)16O, 21Na(p, γ)22Mg, 26gAl(p, γ)27Si and 40Ca(α, γ)44Ti. Since initial operation, a number of improvements have been incorporated which are described here. These include a beam centering monitor based on a CCD camera, a mechanical iris to skim of beam halo, a solid state stripper acting as a charge state booster for beams with A ≳ 30, beta and gamma detectors to monitor beam intensity and to determine beam contamination in experiments with radioactive beam and the ionization chamber for both recoil identification and isobar separation.

  10. Beam suppression of the DRAGON recoil separator for 3He(α,γ)7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjue, S. K. L.; Nara Singh, B. S.; Adsley, P.; Buchmann, L.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Fulton, B. R.; Galinski, N.; Hager, U.; Hass, M.; Howell, D.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Laird, A. M.; Martin, L.; Ottewell, D.; Reeve, S.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Triambak, S.

    2013-02-01

    Preliminary studies in preparation for an absolute cross-section measurement of the radiative capture reaction 3He(α,γ)7Be with the DRAGON recoil separator have demonstrated beam suppression >1014 at the 90% confidence level. A measurement of this cross section by observation of 7Be recoils at the focal plane of the separator should be virtually background free.

  11. A focal-plane detector for the recoil-mass spectrometer of LNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrieri, A.; Maron, G.; Montagnoli, G.; Napoli, D. R.; Prete, G.

    1990-12-01

    A focal-plane detector for a recoil-mass spectrometer has been developed. It consists of a 14 × 14 cm 2 position-sensitive parallel-plate avalanche counter backed by a 43 cm long Bragg chamber. Both detectors work in the same gas volume thus reducing the dead layers. The intrinsic resolution of the position detector is ±0.5 mm, and an overall timing resolution of 660 ps FWHM was measured with 5.5 MeV α-particles. The Bragg chamber allows the identification of elements with energy high enough to overcome the Bragg peak: in all cases it allows the separation between the reaction channels and the beam scattering. The detector has already been used with a good reliability in a variety of transfer and fusion experiments at the LNL Recoil Mass Spectrometer.

  12. An adaptable computer control system for the Daresbury Recoil Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, T. P.

    1986-10-01

    This paper describes a computer system for the setting and control of all the magnets and high voltage supplies of a many element spectrometer using an LSI11/23 running RT11 with CAMAC input/output. Magnetic field strengths are measured by an inexpensive and easily constructed system of Hall probes and temperature transducers. The software calculates the field strength in each magnet by applying a temperature correction and a quadratic calibration to the measured Hall voltage. Keyboard commands to the system provide many facilities for setting up and control of the separator. Communication with a remote processor via an X25 link is also described.

  13. Automation of experiments at the Dubna gas-filled separator of recoil nuclei: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2015-03-01

    An application developed in Builder C++ (Windows) for the offline analysis of experimental data from the spectrometer of the gas-filled separator of recoil nuclei (Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions) based on the double-sided silicon strip detector is discussed. The automatic express method developed for calibrating 48 strips of the silicon position-sensitive detector based on the three most energetic spectral lines from the natYb + 48Ca▭*Th reaction is compared to the results produced by more rigorous calibration methods. The examples of spectra for this reaction and the results of filtering for the proposed calibration algorithm are given.

  14. Mass Separation by Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan Manuel; Maldovan, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Being able to manipulate mass flow is critically important in a variety of physical processes in chemical and biomolecular science. For example, separation and catalytic systems, which requires precise control of mass diffusion, are crucial in the manufacturing of chemicals, crystal growth of semiconductors, waste recovery of biological solutes or chemicals, and production of artificial kidneys. Coordinate transformations and metamaterials are powerful methods to achieve precise manipulation of molecular diffusion. Here, we introduce a novel approach to obtain mass separation based on metamaterials that can sort chemical and biomolecular species by cloaking one compound while concentrating the other. A design strategy to realize such metamaterial using homogeneous isotropic materials is proposed. We present a practical case where a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen is manipulated using a metamaterial that cloaks nitrogen and concentrates oxygen. This work lays the foundation for molecular mass separation in biophysical and chemical systems through metamaterial devices.

  15. Commissioning of a new timestamp-based data acquisition system for the DRAGON recoil mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Gregory; Akers, Charlie; Connolly, Devin; Fallis, Jennifer; Hutcheon, Dave; Olchanski, Konstantin; Ruiz, Chris

    2014-09-01

    The DRAGON recoil mass separator at TRIUMF exists to study radiative proton and alpha capture reactions, which are important in a variety of astrophysical scenarios. DRAGON experiments require a data acquisition system that can be triggered on either reaction product (γ ray or heavy ion), with the additional requirement of being able to promptly recognize coincidence events in an online environment. To this end, we have designed and implemented a new data acquisition system for DRAGON which consists of two independently triggered readouts. Events from both systems are recorded with timestamps from a 20 MHz clock that are used to tag coincidences in the earliest possible stage of the data analysis. In this talk, I will discuss the design, implementation, and commissioning of the new DRAGON data acquisition system, focusing specifically on the trigger logic, coincidence reconstruction algorithm and live time considerations. I will also discuss the results of an experiment commissioning the new system, which measured the strength of the Ecm = 1113 keV resonance in the 20Ne(p , γ) 21Na radiative proton capture reaction.

  16. Measurement of the W boson mass and width using a novel recoil model

    SciTech Connect

    Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents a direct measurement of the W boson mass (MW) and decay width (ΓW) in 1 fb-1 of W → ev collider data at D0 using a novel method to model the hadronic recoil. The mass is extracted from fits to the transverse mass MT, pT(e), and ET distributions. The width is extracted from fits to the tail of the MT distribution. The electron energy measurement is simulated using a parameterized model, and the recoil is modeled using a new technique by which Z recoils are chosen from a data library to match the pT and direction of each generated W boson. We measure the the W boson mass to be MW = 80.4035 ± 0.024(stat) ± 0.039(syst) from the MT, MW = 80.4165 ± 0.027(stat) ± 0.038(syst) from the pT(e), and MW = 80.4025 ± 0.023(stat) ± 0.043(syst) from the ET distributions. ΓW is measured to be ΓW = 2.025 ± 0.038(stat) ± 0.061(syst) GeV.

  17. Spectroscopy of transfermium nuclei using the GABRIELA set up at the focal plane of the VASSILISSA recoil separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschild, K.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Dorvaux, O.; Piot, J.; Curien, D.; Gall, B.; Yeremin, A. V.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Isaev, A. V.; Izosimov, I. N.; Kabachenko, A. P.; Katrasev, D. E.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Malyshev, O. N.; Popeko, A. G.; Sokol, E. A.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Wiborg-Hagen, T.; Nyhus, H. T.; Siem, S.; Drafta, G.; Pantelica, D.; Scintee, N.; Görgen, A.; Kutsarova, T.; Mullins, S.; Šáro, Š.

    2010-06-01

    An IN2P3-JINR collaboration has launched a project called GABRIELA at the Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) within the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna (Russia). The goal of the project is to perform gamma-ray and internal conversion electron spectroscopy of heavy nuclei produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and transported to the focal plane of the recoil separator VASSILISSA. During five experimental campaigns of GABRIELA, the detection system has gained in sensitivity and new spectroscopic information has been obtained for 249Fm, 251Fm, 253No and 255Lr. In this contribution new results for 253No will be discussed.

  18. Spectroscopy of transfermium nuclei using the GABRIELA set up at the focal plane of the VASSILISSA recoil separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschild, K.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Briançon, Ch.; Désesquelles, P.; Garcia-Santamaria, S.; Korichi, A.; Robin, J.; Dorvaux, O.; Piot, J.; Curien, D.; Gall, B.; Khalfallah, F.; Khouaja, A.; Rousseau, M.; Stuttgé, L.; Rowley, N.; Yeremin, A. V.; Belozerov, A. V.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Gorshkov, V. A.; Isaev, A. V.; Izosimov, I. N.; Kabachenko, A. P.; Katrasev, D. E.; Kutznetzov, A. N.; Malyshev, O. N.; Popeko, A. G.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shutov, A. V.; Sokol, E. A.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Wiborg-Hagen, T.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Nyhus, H. T.; Siem, S.; Syed, N. U. H.; Hanappe, F.; Bouchat, V.; Jones, P.; Borcea, R.; Drafta, G.; Pantelica, D.; Rotaru, F.; Scintee, N.; Zamfir, V.; Görgen, A.; Theisen, Ch.; Minkova, A.; Kutsarova, T.; Stodel, Ch.; Mullins, S.; Lieder, E.; Antalic, S.; Šáro, Š.; Venhart, M.

    2010-04-01

    An IN2P3-JINR collaboration has launched a project called GABRIELA at the Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) within the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna (Russia). The goal of the project is to perform gamma-ray and internal conversion electron spectroscopy of heavy nuclei produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and transported to the focal plane of the recoil separator VASSILISSA. During five experimental campaigns of GABRIELA, the detection system has gained in sensitivity and new spectroscopic information has been obtained for 249Fm, 251Fm, 253No and 255Lr.

  19. Measuring the 16O(α, γ)20Ne Reaction Rate with the Dragon Recoil Separator at Triumf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, U.; Greife, U.; Buchmann, L.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Hutcheon, D.; Ottewell, D.; Reeve, S.; Rojas, A.; Ruiz, C.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Erikson, L.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Vockenhuber, C.; Brown, J. R.; Irvine, D.

    2013-03-01

    The DRAGON recoil separator facility at TRIUMF measures radiative α and proton capture reactions of astrophysical importance in inverse kinematics. This is done employing radioactive and stable ion beams produced and accelerated using the ISAC (Isotope Separator and ACcelerator) facility in conjunction with the DRAGON windowless gas target. Over the last few years, the DRAGON collaboration has embarked on a programme to measure a variety of reactions considered vital to the understanding of various astrophysical scenarios. An overview of DRAGON's separation, beam suppression, and detection capabilities will be given. In addition, examples of recent reaction cross section measurements will be discussed, such as the 16O(α, γ)20Ne reaction, which plays an important part in the He and Ne burning in massive stars.

  20. Optics of mass separator I

    SciTech Connect

    Balestrini, S.J.

    1981-07-01

    The ion optics of an existing mass separator are documented. The elctrostatic and magnetic stages are analyzed theoretically, both separately and in combination, by paying particular attention to the ion trajectories, the linear and angular magnifications, and the dispersion. The possibility of converting the magnet into a tunable unit by means of current-carrying elements in the gap is demonstrated. The feasibility of correction coils constructed from printed circuit board is shown.

  1. Spectroscopy of transfermium nuclei using the GABRIELA set up at the focal plane of the VASSILISSA recoil separator

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschild, K.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Dorvaux, O.; Piot, J.; Curien, D.; Gall, B.; Yeremin, A. V.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Isaev, A. V.; Izosimov, I. N.; Kabachenko, A. P.; Katrasev, D. E.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Malyshev, O. N.; Popeko, A. G.; Sokol, E. A.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Wiborg-Hagen, T.; Nyhus, H. T

    2010-06-01

    An IN2P3-JINR collaboration has launched a project called GABRIELA at the Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) within the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna (Russia). The goal of the project is to perform gamma-ray and internal conversion electron spectroscopy of heavy nuclei produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and transported to the focal plane of the recoil separator VASSILISSA. During five experimental campaigns of GABRIELA, the detection system has gained in sensitivity and new spectroscopic information has been obtained for {sup 249}Fm, {sup 251}Fm, {sup 253}No and {sup 255}Lr. In this contribution new results for {sup 253}No will be discussed.

  2. Detector Calibration to Spontaneous Fission for the Study of Superheavy Elements Using Gas-Filled Recoil Ion Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Mirei; Kaji, Daiya; Morimoto, Kouji; Wakabayashi, Yasuo; Tokanai, Fuyuki; Morita, Kosuke

    Detector response to spontaneous fission (SF) of heavy nuclides produced in the 206Pb(48Ca,2n)252No reaction was investigated using a gas-filled recoil ion separator (GARIS). Kinetic energy distributions of the SF originating from 252No were observed by tuning implantation depth of evaporation residue (ER) to the detector. The focal plane detector used in the GARIS experiments was well calibrated by comparing with the known total kinetic energy (TKE) of SF due to 252No. The correction value for the TKE calculation was deduced as a function of the implantation depth of 252No to the detector. Furthermore, we have investigated the results by comparing with those obtained by a computer simulation using the particle and heavy ion transport code system (PHITS).

  3. Recoil velocities from equal-mass binary black-hole mergers: A systematic investigation of spin-orbit aligned configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Pollney, Denis; Reisswig, Christian; Szilagyi, Bela; Ansorg, Marcus; Dorband, Ernst Nils; Koppitz, Michael; Rezzolla, Luciano; Deris, Barrett; Diener, Peter; Schnetter, Erik; Nagar, Alessandro

    2007-12-15

    Binary black-hole systems with spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum are of special interest, as studies indicate that this configuration is preferred in nature due to non-vacuum environmental interactions, as well as post-Newtonian (PN) spin-orbit couplings. If the spins of the two bodies differ, there can be a prominent beaming of the gravitational radiation during the late plunge, causing a recoil of the final merged black hole. In this paper we perform an accurate and systematic study of recoil velocities from a sequence of equal-mass black holes whose spins are aligned with the orbital angular momentum, and whose individual spins range from a=+0.584 to -0.584. In this way we extend and refine the results of a previous study which concentrated on the antialigned portion of this sequence, to arrive at a consistent maximum recoil of 448{+-}5 km/s for antialigned models as well as to a phenomenological expression for the recoil velocity as a function of spin ratio. Quite surprisingly, this relation highlights a nonlinear behavior, not predicted by the PN estimates, and can be readily employed in astrophysical studies on the evolution of binary black holes in massive galaxies. An essential result of our analysis, without which no systematic behavior can be found, is the identification of different stages in the waveform, including a transient due to lack of an initial linear momentum in the initial data. Furthermore, by decomposing the recoil computation into coupled modes, we are able to identify a pair of terms which are largely responsible for the kick, indicating that an accurate computation can be obtained from modes up to l=3. Finally, we provide accurate measures of the radiated energy and angular momentum, finding these to increase linearly with the spin ratio, and derive simple expressions for the final spin and the radiated angular momentum which can be easily implemented in N-body simulations of compact stellar systems. Our code is calibrated

  4. Status and plans for recoil separators for experiments with intense stable beams from ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seweryniak, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Argonne fragment mass analyzer (FMA) has been a very important component of the experimental program at the ATLAS facility for many years and is expected to be a viable instrument for experiments with more intense beams which will become available when the ATLAS intensity upgrade is completed. Several upgrades of FMA itself and of the FMA detector suite in preparation for high-intensity beams will be presented. To accommodate experiments with extremely low cross sections, such as studies of super-heavy nuclei, construction of the Argonne gas-filled analyzer (AGFA), which will be complementary to FMA, was proposed. The design considerations for AGFA will be discussed.

  5. The antikick strikes back: Recoil velocities for nearly extremal binary black hole mergers in the test-mass limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, Alessandro; Harms, Enno; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Zenginoǧlu, Anıl

    2014-12-01

    Gravitational waves emitted from a generic binary black hole merger carry away linear momentum anisotropically, resulting in a gravitational recoil, or "kick," of the center of mass. For certain merger configurations the time evolution of the magnitude of the kick velocity has a local maximum followed by a sudden drop. Perturbative studies of this "antikick" in a limited range of black hole spins have found that the antikick decreases for retrograde orbits as a function of negative spin. We analyze this problem using a recently developed code to evolve gravitational perturbations from a point particle in Kerr spacetime driven by an effective-one-body resummed radiation reaction force at linear order in the mass ratio ν ≪1 . Extending previous studies to nearly extremal negative spins, thus complementing current numerical relativity knowledge about the recoil, we find that the well-known decrease of the antikick is overturned and, instead of approaching zero, the antikick increases again to reach Δ v /(c ν2)=3.37 ×10-3 for dimensionless spin a ^=-0.9999 . The corresponding final kick velocity is vend/(c ν2)=0.076 . We interpret the antikick result analytically by means of the quality factor Q of the linear momentum flux, that is used to quantify the amount of nonadiabaticity of the emission process. We show that, besides capturing qualitatively the global properties over the whole spin range, Q actually predicts the return of the antikick for a ^→-1 . Since Q is computed only from the, gauge-invariant, flux of linear momentum, the herein presented verification of its reliability advocates its systematic use also in numerical relativity calculations. In addition, we also connect, in a new way, the properties of the flux to the noncircular character of the plunge dynamics, highlighting the central role of subdominant waveform multipoles in shaping the characteristic interference pattern exhibited by the linear momentum flux as a ^→-1 .

  6. Use of the ECL-CAMAC trigger processor system for recoil missing mass triggers at the Tagged Photon Spectrometer at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Bracker, S.; Hartner, G.; Appel, J.; Nash, T.

    1981-05-01

    A trigger processor in operation since May 1980 at the Tagged Photon Spectrometer at Fermilab will be described. The processor, based on the Fermilab ECL-CAMAC system, allows fast selection of high mass diffractive events from the total hadronic cross section. Data from a recoil detector, consisting of 3 wire chambers and 4 layers of scintillator concentric about a 1.5 m liquid hydrogen target, is digitized and presented to the processor within 3 sec. From the chamber data are found the vertices and angles of all recoiling tracks.

  7. MASS SEPARATION OF HIGH ENERGY PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, L.

    1962-09-25

    An apparatus and method are described for separating charged, high energy particles of equal momentum forming a beam where the particles differ slightly in masses. Magnetic lenses are utilized to focus the beam and maintain that condition while electrostatic fields located between magnetic lenses are utilized to cause transverse separation of the particles into two beams separated by a sufficient amount to permit an aperture to block one beam. (AEC)

  8. CHARGE BOTTLE FOR A MASS SEPARATOR

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, P.H.

    1959-07-01

    Improved mass separator charge bottles are described for containing a dense charge of a chemical compound of copper, nickel, lead or other useful substance which is to be vaporized, and to the method of utilizing such improvcd charge bottles so that the chemical compound is vaporized from the under surface of the charge and thus permits the non-volatile portion thereof to fall to the bottom of the charge bottle where it does not form an obstacle to further evaporation. The charge bottle comprises a vertically disposed cylindrical portion, an inner re-entrant cylindrical portion extending axially and downwardly into the same from the upper end thereof, and evaporative source material in the form of a chemical compound compacted within the upper annular pontion of the charge bottle formed by the re-entrant cylindrical portion, whereby vapor from the chemical compound will pass outwardly from the charge bottle through an apertured closure.

  9. Advances and problems in plasma-optical mass-separation

    SciTech Connect

    Bardakov, V. M.; Ivanov, S. D.; Strokin, N. A.

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents a short review of plasma-optical mass-separation and defines the fields for its possible application. During theoretical studies, numerical simulations, and experiments, the effect of the azimuthator finite size and of the vacuum conditions on the mass separator characteristics was revealed, as well as the quality of different-mass ion separation. The problems, solving which may lead to a successful end of the mass-separation plasma-optical technique implementation, were specified.

  10. Nuclear recoil measurements with the ARIS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Alden; ARIS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    As direct dark matter searches become increasingly sensitive, it is important to fully characterize the target of the search. The goal of the Argon Recoil Ionization and Scintillation (ARIS) experiment is to quantify information related to the scintillation and ionization energy scale, quenching factor, ion recombination probability, and scintillation time response of nuclear recoils, as expected from WIMPs, in liquid argon. A time projection chamber with an active mass of 0.5 kg of liquid argon and capable of full 3D position reconstruction was exposed to an inverse kinematic neutron beam at the Institut de Physique Nucleaire d'Orsay in France. A scan of nuclear recoil energies was performed through coincidence with a set of neutron detectors to quantify properties of nuclear recoils in liquid argon at various electric fields. The difference in ionization and scintillation response with differing recoil track angle to the electric field was also studied. The preliminary results of the experiment will be presented.

  11. Recoiling from a Kick in the Head-On Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Dae-Il; Kelly, Bernard J.; Boggs, William D.; Baker, John G.; Centrella, Joan; Van Meter, James

    2007-01-01

    Recoil "kicks" induced by gravitational radiation are expected in the inspiral and merger of black holes. Recently the numerical relativity community has begun to measure the significant kicks found when both unequal masses and spins are considered. Because understanding the cause and magnitude of each component of this kick may be complicated in inspiral simulations, we consider these effects in the context of a simple test problem. We study recoils from collisions of binaries with initially head-on trajectories, starting with the simplest case of equal masses with no spin; adding spin and varying the mass ratio, both separately and jointly. We find spin-induced recoils to be significant even in head-on configurations. Additionally, it appears that the scaling of transverse kicks with spins is consistent with post-Newtonian (PN) theory, even though the kick is generated in the nonlinear merger interaction, where PN theory should not apply. This suggests that a simple heuristic description might be effective in the estimation of spin-kicks.

  12. Plasma mass filtering for separation of actinides from lanthanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-06-01

    Separating lanthanides from actinides is a key process in reprocessing nuclear spent fuel. Plasma mass filters, which operate on dissociated elements, offer conceptual advantages for such a task as compared with conventional chemical methods. The capabilities of a specific plasma mass filter concept, called the magnetic centrifugal mass filter, are analyzed within this particular context. Numerical simulations indicate separation of americium ions from a mixture of lanthanides ions for plasma densities of the order of 1012 cm-3, and ion temperatures of about 10 eV. In light of collision considerations, separating small fractions of heavy elements from a larger volume of lighter ones is shown to enhance the separation capabilities.

  13. Anatomy of the Binary Black Hole Recoil: A Multipolar Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Buonanno, Alessandra; vanMeter, James R.; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2007-01-01

    We present a multipolar analysis of the recoil velocity computed in recent numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescence, for both unequal masses and non-zero, non-precessing spins. We show that multipole moments up to and including 1 = 4 are sufficient to accurately reproduce the final recoil velocity (= 98%) and that only a few dominant modes contribute significantly to it (2 95%). We describe how the relative amplitude, and more importantly, the relative phase, of these few modes control the way in which the recoil builds up throughout the inspiral, merger, and ring-down phases. We also find that the numerical results can be reproduced, to a high level of accuracy, by an effective Newtonian formula for the multipole moments obtained by replacing in the Newtonian formula the radial separation with an effective radius computed from the numerical data. Beyond the merger, the numerical results are reproduced by a superposition of three Kerr quasi-normal modes. Analytic formulae, obtained by expressing the multipole moments in terms of the fundamental QNMs of a Kerr BH, are able to explain the onset and amount of '.anti-kick" for each of the simulations. Lastly, we apply this multipolar analysis to understand the remarkable difference between the amplitudes of planar and non-planar kicks for equal-mass spinning black holes.

  14. Rotation and instabilities for isotope and mass separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rax, J.-M.; Gueroult, R.

    2016-10-01

    Rotating plasmas have the potential to offer unique capabilities for isotope and mass separation. Among the various electric and magnetic field configurations offering mass separation capabilities, rotating plasmas produced through static or oscillating fields are shown to be a leading candidate for tackling the unsolved problem of large-scale plasma separation. The successful development and deployment of industrial-scale plasma separation technologies could, among many other applications, provide an innovative path towards advanced sustainable nuclear energy. In this context, the potential and versatility of plasma rotation induced by rotating magnetic fields is uncovered and analysed. Analytical stability diagrams are derived from rotating ion orbits as a function of ion mass. Based on these findings, the basic principles of a rotating field plasma separator are then introduced. In light of these results, challenges associated with this original separation process are underlined, and the main directions for a future research program aimed at this important unsolved problem of applied plasma physics are identified.

  15. First superheavy element experiments at the GSI recoil separator TASCA: The production and decay of element 114 in the {sup 244}Pu({sup 48}Ca,3-4n) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, J. M.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Schaedel, M.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Bruechle, W.; Essel, H. G.; Hartmann, W.; Hessberger, F. P.; Huebner, A.; Jaeger, E.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Schimpf, E.; Steiner, J.

    2011-05-15

    Experiments with the new recoil separator, Transactinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA), at the GSI were performed by using beams of {sup 48}Ca to irradiate targets of {sup 206-208}Pb, which led to the production of {sup 252-254}No isotopes. These studies allowed for evaluation of the performance of TASCA when coupled to a new detector and electronics system. By following these studies, the isotopes of element 114 ({sup 288-291}114) were produced in irradiations of {sup 244}Pu targets with {sup 48}Ca beams at compound nucleus excitation energies around 41.7 and 37.5 MeV, demonstrating TASCA's ability to perform experiments with picobarn-level cross sections. A total of 15 decay chains were observed and were assigned to the decay of {sup 288-291}114. A new {alpha}-decay branch in {sup 281}Ds was observed, leading to the new nucleus {sup 277}Hs.

  16. Compact ExB mass separator for heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Hashino, T.; Hirata, F.; Kasuya, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nishiura, M.

    2008-02-15

    A compact ExB mass separator that deflects beam by 30 deg. has been designed and built to prove its principle of operation. The main part of the separator is contained in a shielding box of 11 cm long, 9 cm wide, and 1.5 cm high. An electromagnet of 7 cm pole diameter produced variable magnetic field in the mass separation region instead of a couple of permanent magnets which is to be used in the final design. The experimental result agreed well with the theoretical prediction, and larger mass ions is bent with less magnetic field with the aid of the deflection electric field. The reduction in resolving power for mass separation due to the deflection electric field has been investigated experimentally.

  17. Membrane device and process for mass exchange, separation, and filtration

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L.

    2016-11-15

    A membrane device and processes for fabrication and for using are disclosed. The membrane device may include a number of porous metal membranes that provide a high membrane surface area per unit volume. The membrane device provides various operation modes that enhance throughput and selectivity for mass exchange, mass transfer, separation, and/or filtration applications between feed flow streams and permeate flow streams.

  18. High acceptance recoil polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    The HARP Collaboration

    1992-12-05

    In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization, an efficient, low-noise, self-calibrating device is being designed. This detector, known as the High Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP), is based on the recoil principle of proton detection from np[r arrow]n[prime]p[prime] or pp[r arrow]p[prime]p[prime] scattering (detected particles are underlined) which intrinsically yields polarization information on the incoming particle. HARP will be commissioned to carry out experiments in 1994.

  19. Binary Black Hole Mergers and Recoil Kicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Baker, J.; Choi, D.; Koppitz, M.; vanMeter, J.; Miller, C.

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments in numerical relativity have made it possible to follow reliably the coalescence of two black holes from near the innermost stable circular orbit to final ringdown. This opens up a wide variety of exciting astrophysical applications of these simulations. Chief among these is the net kick received when two unequal mass or spinning black holes merge. The magnitude of this kick has bearing on the production and growth of supermassive black holes during the epoch of structure formation, and on the retention of black holes in stellar clusters. Here we report the first accurate numerical calculation of this kick, for two nonspinning black holes in a 1.5:1 mass ratio, which is expected based on analytic considerations to give a significant fraction of the maximum possible recoil. We have performed multiple runs with different initial separations, orbital angular momenta, resolutions, extraction radii, and gauges. The full range of our kick speeds is 86-116 kilometers per second, and the most reliable runs give kicks between 86 and 97 kilometers per second. This is intermediate between the estimates from two recent post-Newtonian analyses and suggests that at redshifts z greater than 10, halos with masses less than 10(exp 9) M(sub SUN) will have difficulty retaining coalesced black holes after major mergers.

  20. Mass transfer apparatus and method for separation of gases

    DOEpatents

    Blount, Gerald C.

    2015-10-13

    A process and apparatus for separating components of a source gas is provided in which more soluble components of the source gas are dissolved in an aqueous solvent at high pressure. The system can utilize hydrostatic pressure to increase solubility of the components of the source gas. The apparatus includes gas recycle throughout multiple mass transfer stages to improve mass transfer of the targeted components from the liquid to gas phase. Separated components can be recovered for use in a value added application or can be processed for long-term storage, for instance in an underwater reservoir.

  1. Mass Transport Separation via Grace: Anthropogenic and Natural Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, J. O.; de Viron, O.

    2011-12-01

    The GRACE satellite has been monitoring the change in the mass distribution at the Earth surface for nearly 10 years. This becomes enough to study long-term mass change, and to separate interannual variations from trends. Up to now, many studies have shown a fast (and non-linear) loss of mass in many glaciers and ice sheets. They all have been attributed to global warming, though part of the mass variation is also associated with the classical long-term climate variation. Using climatic data as well as the GRACE mascon solution, we can separate the part associated to the anthropogenic part from the non-anthropogenic part, in order to better estimate those contributions. Results and implications from our analyses will be presented.

  2. Recoil polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Polarization observables in photon-induced meson production off nucleons have long been recognized to hold the promise of a detailed understanding of the excited states in the excitation spectrum of the nucleon. Photon beam and proton target polarization are routinely used at the ELSA facility in the Crystal Barrel/TAPS experiment and have yielded a wealth of data on contributing partial waves and nucleon resonances. A detector study on how to complement these ongoing studies by recoil polarization measurements that offer an orthogonal approach with otherwise unmeasurable observables in the field of non-strange meson photoproduction has been performed. Building on experience with silicon detectors operated in the photon beamline environment, first possible layouts of Si detector telescopes for recoil protons were developed. Various geometries, e.g. Archimedean spiral design of annular sensors, sector shapes and rectangular sensors were studied and have been used during test measurements. A prototype for the recoil polarimeter was built and subjected to performance tests in protonproton scattering at the COSY-accelerator in Jülich.

  3. Interfacial stability and self-similar rupture of evaporating liquid layers under vapor recoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Duan, Fei

    2016-12-01

    We investigate interfacial stability of an evaporating viscous liquid layer above/below a horizontal heated substrate in the framework of a long-wave model that accounts for surface tension, positive/negative gravity, and evaporation effects of mass loss and vapor recoil. With the time-dependent linear stability analysis, it is found that the interface instability is enhanced by vapor recoil with time using an effective growth rate. The destabilizing mechanism of vapor thrust competes with the stabilizing surface tension, and the effects of the latter are not asymptotically negligible near rupture, reflected by a rescaled effective interfacial pressure. A two-dimensional nonlinear evolution is investigated for the quasi-equilibrium evaporating layers with different evaporative conditions for Rayleigh-Taylor unstable and sessile layers. For weak mass loss and strong vapor recoil, the well-defined capillary ridges emerge around a deepening narrow valley with increasing wavelength under a positive gravity, while, on the basis of initial condition, main and secondary droplets are either coalesced partially or separated by a sharp dry-out point under a negative gravity. The rupture location depends strongly on the characteristics of a given initial condition, except for the random perturbation. For both the cases, an increase in the modified evaporation number tends to reduce the rupture time tr and droplet thickness remarkably. Similarity analysis along with numerical strategy is presented for the final stage of touch-down dynamics, determined by a physical balance between the vapor recoil and capillary force. The evaporation-driven rupture with a significant vapor recoil and negligible mass loss is shown to contain a countably infinite number of similarity solutions whose horizontal and vertical length scales behave as (tr - t)1/2 and (tr - t)1/3. The first similarity solution represents a stable single-point rupture.

  4. Quark mass correction to chiral separation effect and pseudoscalar condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Er-dong; Lin, Shu

    2017-01-01

    We derived an analytic structure of the quark mass correction to chiral separation effect (CSE) in small mass regime. We confirmed this structure by a D3/D7 holographic model study in a finite density, finite magnetic field background. The quark mass correction to CSE can be related to correlators of pseudo-scalar condensate, quark number density and quark condensate in static limit. We found scaling relations of these correlators with spatial momentum in the small momentum regime. They characterize medium responses to electric field, inhomogeneous quark mass and chiral shift. Beyond the small momentum regime, we found existence of normalizable mode, which possibly leads to formation of spiral phase. The normalizable mode exists beyond a critical magnetic field, whose magnitude decreases with quark chemical potential.

  5. Ion optics system incorporating radio frequency mass separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John R.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Results of an experimental study are presented. They show that an RF mass discriminator, based on a Bennett mass spectrometer concept, can be used to discriminate between two species of ions with about a 2-to-1 charge-to-mass ratio. Such a device would be useful for separating monatomic and diatomic oxygen ions in a system designed to simulate the environment that spacecraft encounter in low earth orbit. The influence of changing mass discriminator parameters - such as the spacing of its grids, the amplitude and frequency of RF voltage signals applied to it and the current density of ions incident upon it - on its species discrimination capabilities is discussed. Experimental results are also compared to the results of a simple theoretical model to gain insight into the processes occurring in the discriminator. These results are shown to be in good agreement.

  6. Recoil-α-fission and recoil-α-α-fission events observed in the reaction 48Ca + 243Am

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, U.; Rudolph, D.; Andersson, L.-L.; Di Nitto, A.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Fahlander, C.; Gates, J. M.; Golubev, P.; Gregorich, K. E.; Gross, C. J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Heßberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kratz, J. V.; Rykaczewski, K.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Schädel, M.; Yakushev, A.; Åberg, S.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Brand, H.; Carlsson, B. G.; Cox, D.; Derkx, X.; Dobaczewski, J.; Eberhardt, K.; Even, J.; Gerl, J.; Jäger, E.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Mistry, A.; Mokry, C.; Nazarewicz, W.; Nitsche, H.; Omtvedt, J. P.; Papadakis, P.; Ragnarsson, I.; Runke, J.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Shi, Yue; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Torres, T.; Traut, T.; Trautmann, N.; Türler, A.; Ward, A.; Ward, D. E.; Wiehl, N.

    2016-09-01

    Products of the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am were studied with the TASISpec set-up at the gas-filled separator TASCA at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany. Amongst the detected thirty correlated α-decay chains associated with the production of element Z = 115, two recoil-α-fission and five recoil- α- α-fission events were observed. The latter five chains are similar to four such events reported from experiments performed at the Dubna gas-filled separator, and three such events reported from an experiment at the Berkeley gas-filled separator. The four chains observed at the Dubna gas-filled separator were assigned to start from the 2n-evaporation channel 289115 due to the fact that these recoil- α- α-fission events were observed only at low excitation energies. Contrary to this interpretation, we suggest that some of these recoil- α- α-fission decay chains, as well as some of the recoil- α- α-fission and recoil-α-fission decay chains reported from Berkeley and in this article, start from the 3n-evaporation channel 288115.

  7. Recoil Redsfhit with Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, C. F.

    2009-05-01

    ``Recoil Redshift'' is due to the elastic interaction of photons/light with any individual electron, proton, ion, atom or molecule. This generalized Compton effect describes an individual photon-particle interaction where Energy, Linear Momentum and Angular Momentum are conserved, with NO change in the internal energy of the particle. Per Compton, the lost photon energy is zero in the forward photon propagation direction, and the energy loss increases with scattering angle. This is an INDIVIDUAL INcoherent process. To describe collective coherent effects, add/include Huygens forward reconstruction from multiple photon/particle redshifted scatterings. A coherent redshift will occur if the scattered photons' energies are WITHIN the initial linewidth. This yields an asymmetrically broadened redshifted line in the forward coherent direction with clear imaging properties. This is a coherent redshifted version of Rayleigh scattering which assumes identical non-redshifted photons. BUT the Compton Conservation energy-loss process must occur. The search for this small Recoil redshift is a good research project for ultra- precise ``frequency combs'' in gases (atomic and molecular), plasmas and combinations.

  8. Mass selective separation applied to radioisotopes of cesium: Mass selective applied to radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, Michael; Eiden, Greg; Farmer, Orville; Finch, Zach; Liezers, Martin

    2016-07-22

    A developed technique that uses the intrinsic mass-based separation capability of a quadrupole mass spectrometer has been used to resolve spectral radiometric interference of two isotopes of the same element. In this work the starting sample was a combination of 137Cs and 134Cs and was (activity) dominated by 137Cs and this methodology separated and “implanted” 134Cs that was later quantified for spectral features and ac- tivity with traditional radiometric techniques. This work demonstrated a 134Cs/137Cs activity ratio enhancement of >4 orders of magnitude and complete removal of 137Cs spectral features from the implanted target mass (i.e., 134).

  9. Is the Binary Mass Ratio Distribution Separation-Dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullikson, Kevin; Kraus, Adam L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries of planets orbiting retired A-stars on close orbits and young A-stars on very wide orbits have renewed interest in the properties of nearby intermediate-mass stars. Especially interesting are the young stars because directly-imaged planets orbiting them may be bright enough for characterization (e.g. HR 8799, Beta Pictoris, etc). However, intermediate-mass stars and especially young intermediate mass stars are part of multiple systems more often than not. Close stellar companions may affect the formation and orbital evolution of any planets, and the properties of the companions can help constrain the binary formation mechanism. The mass ratio distribution of a population of binary stars, especially if the distribution for close companions is significantly different from that of wide companions, is helpful to distinguish companions that were born in or affected by the circumstellar disk from those which formed through fragmentation of the molecular core. Previous imaging surveys have found that binary systems with A-type primary stars tend to have cool companions with extreme mass ratios. There are hints at a much flatter mass ratio distribution for close companions, but strong completeness effects complicate the picture. We have conducted a spectroscopic survey of ~400 nearby main sequence A- and B-type stars, aimed at detecting stellar companions as late as M4 for all orbital separations <100 AU. We have searched for companions to the stars by cross-correlating the spectra against model templates for F-M type stars; a significant peak in the cross-correlation function indicates a detection. Our cross-correlation technique can detect low-mass companions with orbits that are too wide to detect with radial velocity monitoring and too small to detect with imaging techniques, making it complementary to work already done. We will present results from our survey and compare the mass ratio distribution we measure to the corresponding distribution for

  10. Interpreting Recoil for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsayed, Tarek A.

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of recoil is usually explained to students in the context of Newton's third law. Typically, when a projectile is fired, the recoil of the launch mechanism is interpreted as a reaction to the ejection of the smaller projectile. The same phenomenon is also interpreted in the context of the conservation of linear momentum, which is…

  11. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1999-01-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

  12. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, T.N.

    1999-08-24

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area. 12 figs.

  13. Attomole quantitation of protein separations with accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J S; Grant, P G; Buccholz, B A; Dingley, K; Turteltaub, K W

    2000-12-15

    Quantification of specific proteins depends on separation by chromatography or electrophoresis followed by chemical detection schemes such as staining and fluorophore adhesion. Chemical exchange of short-lived isotopes, particularly sulfur, is also prevalent despite the inconveniences of counting radioactivity. Physical methods based on isotopic and elemental analyses offer highly sensitive protein quantitation that has linear response over wide dynamic ranges and is independent of protein conformation. Accelerator mass spectrometry quantifies long-lived isotopes such as 14C to sub-attomole sensitivity. We quantified protein interactions with small molecules such as toxins, vitamins, and natural biochemicals at precisions of 1-5% . Micro-proton-induced-xray-emission quantifies elemental abundances in separated metalloprotein samples to nanogram amounts and is capable of quantifying phosphorylated loci in gels. Accelerator-based quantitation is a possible tool for quantifying the genome translation into proteome.

  14. Chemical separations by bubble-assisted interphase mass-transfer.

    PubMed

    Boyd, David A; Adleman, James R; Goodwin, David G; Psaltis, Demetri

    2008-04-01

    We show that when a small amount of heat is added close to a liquid-vapor interface of a captive gas bubble in a microchannel, interphase mass-transfer through the bubble can occur in a controlled manner with only a slight change in the temperature of the fluid. We demonstrate that this method, which we refer to as bubble-assisted interphase mass-transfer (BAIM), can be applied to interphase chemical separations, e.g., simple distillation, without the need for high temperatures, vacuum, or active cooling. Although any source of localized heating could be used, we illustrate BAIM with an all-optical technique that makes use of the plasmon resonance in an array of nanoscale metal structures that are incorporated into the channel to produce localized heating of the fluid when illuminated by a stationary low-power laser.

  15. Widest Separation and the Lowest Mass Objects among Planetary-mass Companion Candidates around Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, D.

    2014-08-01

    Two substellar companion candidates with planetary mass, around a T-Tauri star in the ρ Ophiuchi star-forming region, are discovered by results of near-infrared imaging. Candidates are separated by 1454AU, candi 1 for short, and 542AU, candi 2 for short. There are high possibilities that both candidates are physically related to its primary star from their common proper motions, colors and statistics of YSOs in star forming region. candi 2 is identified as an extremely low-mass object, 0.0070.002 ⊙, and this is the lowest mass among planetary-mass companion(PMC) candidates imaged to date. In addition, separation from its primary star of candi 1, 0.014 ± 0.002 ⊙, is the widest among PMC candidates imaged to date. Formation of these extremely wide separated, > 100AU, PMCs, like candi 1 and c, is not fully explained by current planet formation theories, core accretion or gravitational instability. This discovery may suggest that PMCs separated by > 100AU form via extreme mass ratio case of cloud core fragmentation for multiple stars. Apologies : Because of our team policy, we cannot present the name and details of this target currently.

  16. RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN SPIN-FLIP RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F. K.; Wang Dong; Chen Xian

    2012-02-20

    Numerical relativity simulations predict that coalescence of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries leads not only to a spin flip but also to a recoiling of the merger remnant SMBHs. In the literature, X-shaped radio sources are popularly suggested to be candidates for SMBH mergers with spin flip of jet-ejecting SMBHs. Here we investigate the spectral and spatial observational signatures of the recoiling SMBHs in radio sources undergoing black hole spin flip. Our results show that SMBHs in most spin-flip radio sources have mass ratio q {approx}> 0.3 with a minimum possible value q{sub min} {approx_equal} 0.05. For major mergers, the remnant SMBHs can get a kick velocity as high as 2100 km s{sup -1} in the direction within an angle {approx}< 40 Degree-Sign relative to the spin axes of remnant SMBHs, implying that recoiling quasars are biased to be with high Doppler-shifted broad emission lines while recoiling radio galaxies are biased to large apparent spatial off-center displacements. We also calculate the distribution functions of line-of-sight velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacements for spin-flip radio sources with different apparent jet reorientation angles. Our results show that the larger the apparent jet reorientation angle is, the larger the Doppler-shifting recoiling velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacement will be. We investigate the effects of recoiling velocity on the dust torus in spin-flip radio sources and suggest that recoiling of SMBHs would lead to 'dust-poor' active galactic nuclei. Finally, we collect a sample of 19 X-shaped radio objects and for each object give the probability of detecting the predicted signatures of recoiling SMBH.

  17. Binary Cepheids: Separations and Mass Ratios in 5 Solar Mass Binaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    material: color figures 1. INTRODUCTION Binary-star studies are valuable for what they provide directly (e.g., stellar masses), as well as for the...the high stellar density in the cluster, this could be a chance alignment. 3.2.2. Approximate Orbital Periods We used the angular separations in Table...subsequent evolution of the system will be drastically altered. For Cepheids we have a good estimation of where this effect sets in. Z Lac—not in our sample

  18. Spectral Measurements of Plasma Rotation and Mass Separation in the Archimedes Plasma Mass Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umstadter, K. R.; Anderegg, F.; Cluggish, B. P.; Freeman, R. L.; Gilleland, J.; Isler, R. C.; Lee, W. D.; Litvak, A.; Mavrin, V.; Miller, R. L.; Ohkawa, T.; Putvinski, S.

    2003-10-01

    The Archimedes Demonstration Unit (ADU), a full scale experiment based upon the Plasma Mass Filter^1 technology, began plasma operations early this year. The Filter is a cylindrical device with an axial magnetic field that utilizes end electrodes to generate a radial electric field in a noble gas plasma of density ˜10^18 m-3. In addition to microwave interferometry, bolometry, videography and Langmuir probe diagnostics, high-resolution and survey spectroscopy is utilized to monitor the plasma emission. This is accomplished through the use of several in-vacuum optical arrays which have collimated views parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic axis. Optical measurements are compared to other diagnostics and electrode currents. Doppler shifts, linewidths and line ratios have been measured to determine rotation speed, temperature and separation in noble gas plasmas. ^1T. Ohkawa, "Plasma Mass Filter", U.S. Patent 6,096,220, August 1, 2000.

  19. In situ mass spectroscopy of recoiled ion studies of degradation processes in SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} thin films during hydrogen gas annealing.

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Chang, R. P. H.; Gruen, D. M.; Im, J.; Kim, S. H.; Kingon, A. I.; Krauss, A. R.

    1999-03-10

    It is known that the forming gas (N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} mixture) annealing process required for microcircuit fabrication results in an unacceptable electrical degradation of SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) ferroelectric capacitors due mainly to the interaction of H{sub 2} with the ferroelectronic layer of the capacitor. We have found a strong relationship between changes in the surface composition of the ferroelectric layer and the electrical properties of SBT capacitors as a result of hydrogen annealing. Mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI) analysis revealed a strong reduction in the Bi signal as a function of exposure to hydrogen at high temperatures ({approximately}500 C). The Bi signal reduction correlates with Bi depletion in the SBT surface region. Subsequent annealing in oxygen at temperatures in the range of 700-800 C resulted in the recovery of the MSRI Bi signal, corresponding to the replenishment of Bi in the previously Bi-depleted surface region. XRD analysis (probing the whole SBT film thickness) showed little difference in the XRD spectra of the SBT fti before and after hydrogen and oxygen-recovery annealing. The combined results of the MSRI and XRD analyses can be interpreted as an indication that the degradation of the electrical properties of the SBT capacitors, after hydrogen annealing, is mainly due to the degradation of the near surface region of the SBT layer.

  20. Isobar Separation in a Multiple-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer by Mass-Selective Re-Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickel, Timo; Plaß, Wolfgang R.; Lippert, Wayne; Lang, Johannes; Yavor, Mikhail I.; Geissel, Hans; Scheidenberger, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    A novel method for (ultra-)high-resolution spatial mass separation in time-of-flight mass spectrometers is presented. Ions are injected into a time-of-flight analyzer from a radio frequency (rf) trap, dispersed in time-of-flight according to their mass-to-charge ratios and then re-trapped dynamically in the same rf trap. This re-trapping technique is highly mass-selective and after sufficiently long flight times can provide even isobaric separation. A theoretical treatment of the method is presented and the conditions for optimum performance of the method are derived. The method has been implemented in a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer and mass separation powers (FWHM) in excess of 70,000, and re-trapping efficiencies of up to 35% have been obtained for the protonated molecular ion of caffeine. The isobars glutamine and lysine (relative mass difference of 1/4000) have been separated after a flight time of 0.2 ms only. Higher mass separation powers can be achieved using longer flight times. The method will have important applications, including isobar separation in nuclear physics and (ultra-)high-resolution precursor ion selection in multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry.

  1. Isobar Separation in a Multiple-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer by Mass-Selective Re-Trapping.

    PubMed

    Dickel, Timo; Plaß, Wolfgang R; Lippert, Wayne; Lang, Johannes; Yavor, Mikhail I; Geissel, Hans; Scheidenberger, Christoph

    2017-03-15

    A novel method for (ultra-)high-resolution spatial mass separation in time-of-flight mass spectrometers is presented. Ions are injected into a time-of-flight analyzer from a radio frequency (rf) trap, dispersed in time-of-flight according to their mass-to-charge ratios and then re-trapped dynamically in the same rf trap. This re-trapping technique is highly mass-selective and after sufficiently long flight times can provide even isobaric separation. A theoretical treatment of the method is presented and the conditions for optimum performance of the method are derived. The method has been implemented in a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer and mass separation powers (FWHM) in excess of 70,000, and re-trapping efficiencies of up to 35% have been obtained for the protonated molecular ion of caffeine. The isobars glutamine and lysine (relative mass difference of 1/4000) have been separated after a flight time of 0.2 ms only. Higher mass separation powers can be achieved using longer flight times. The method will have important applications, including isobar separation in nuclear physics and (ultra-)high-resolution precursor ion selection in multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  2. Recoil-decay tagging spectroscopy of 74162W88

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. J.; Cederwall, B.; Bäck, T.; Qi, C.; Doncel, M.; Jakobsson, U.; Auranen, K.; Bönig, S.; Drummond, M. C.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.; HerzáÅ, A.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Leino, M.; McPeake, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Page, R. D.; Pakarinen, J.; Partanen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Sayǧı, B.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Taylor, M. J.; Thornthwaite, A.; Uusitalo, J.; Xiao, Z. G.

    2015-07-01

    Excited states in the highly neutron-deficient nucleus 162W have been investigated via the 92Mo (78Kr,2α ) 162W reaction. Prompt γ rays were detected by the JUROGAM II high-purity germanium detector array and the recoiling fusion-evaporation products were separated by the recoil ion transport unit (RITU) gas-filled recoil separator and identified with the gamma recoil electron alpha tagging (GREAT) spectrometer at the focal plane of RITU. γ rays from 162W were identified uniquely using mother-daughter and mother-daughter-granddaughter α -decay correlations. The observation of a rotational-like ground-state band is interpreted within the framework of total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations, which suggest an axially symmetric ground-state shape with a γ -soft minimum at β2≈0.15 . Quasiparticle alignment effects are discussed based on cranked shell model calculations. New measurements of the 162W ground-state α -decay energy and half-life were also performed. The observed α -decay energy agrees with previous measurements. The half-life of 162W was determined to be t1 /2=990 (30 ) ms. This value deviates significantly from the currently adopted value of t1 /2=1360 (70 ) ms. In addition, the α -decay energy and half-life of 166Os were measured and found to agree with the adopted values.

  3. Laser vaporization/ionization interface for coupling microscale separation techniques with mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Yu-chen

    1999-06-29

    The present invention provides a laser-induced vaporization and ionization interface for directly coupling microscale separation processes to a mass spectrometer. Vaporization and ionization of the separated analytes are facilitated by the addition of a light-absorbing component to the separation buffer or solvent.

  4. Laser vaporization/ionization interface for coupling microscale separation techniques with mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, Y.C.

    1999-06-29

    The present invention provides a laser-induced vaporization and ionization interface for directly coupling microscale separation processes to a mass spectrometer. Vaporization and ionization of the separated analytes are facilitated by the addition of a light-absorbing component to the separation buffer or solvent. 8 figs.

  5. Optimal control of gun recoil in direct fire using magnetorheological absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harinder J.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2014-05-01

    Optimal control of a gun recoil absorber is investigated for minimizing recoil loads and maximizing rate of fire. A multi-objective optimization problem was formulated by considering the mechanical model of the recoil absorber employing a spring and a magnetorheological (MR) damper. The damper forces are predicted by evaluating pressure drops using a nonlinear Bingham-plastic model. The optimization methodology provides multiple optimal design configurations with a trade-off between recoil load minimization and increased rate of fire. The configurations with low or high recoil loads imply low or high rate of fire, respectively. The gun recoil absorber performance is also analyzed for perturbations in the firing forces. The adaptive control of the MR damper for varying gun firing forces provides a smooth operation by returning the recoil mass to its battery position (ready to reload and fire) without incurring an end-stop impact. Furthermore, constant load transmissions are observed with respect to the recoil stroke by implementing optimal control during the simulated firing events.

  6. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Lamich, George J.

    1994-01-01

    A time of flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line (10). The beam line (10) includes an ion source (12) which injects ions into pulse deflection regions (14) and (16) separated by a drift space (18). A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly (22). The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions (14) and (16).

  7. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Lamich, G.J.

    1994-09-13

    A time-of-flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line is disclosed. The beam line includes an ion source which injects ions into pulse deflection regions and separated by a drift space. A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly. The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions. 23 figs.

  8. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, Scott M.

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS~II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for "background-free'' operation of CDMS~II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space. These results, like any others, are subject to a variety of systematic effects that may alter their final interpretations. A primary focus of this dissertation will be difficulties in precisely calibrating the energy scale for nuclear recoil events like those from WIMPs. Nuclear recoils have suppressed ionization signals relative to electron recoils of the same recoil energy, so the response of the detectors is calibrated differently for each recoil type. The overall normalization and linearity of the energy scale for electron recoils in CDMS~II detectors is clearly established by peaks of known gamma energy in the ionization spectrum of calibration data from a 133Ba source. This electron-equivalent keVee) energy scale enables calibration of the total phonon signal (keVt) by enforcing unity

  9. Optical spectroscopy using mass-separated beams: Nuclear properties of unstable indium and tin isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehl, T.; Kirchner, R.; Klepper, O.; Marx, D.; Dinger, U.; Eberz, J.; Huber, G.; Lochmann, H.; Menges, R.; Ulm, G.

    1987-05-01

    Collinear fast-beam laser-spectroscopy has been used to measure the hyperfine structure and isotope shift of several indium and tin isotopes. The related experimental techniques are described, including the preparation of mass-separated beams of neutron-deficient indium and tin isotopes at the GSI on-line mass separator following fusion-evaporation reactions. The deviation of the observed dependence of the charge radii upon the neutron number from the expected behaviour is briefly discussed.

  10. Atmospheric Pressure Surface Sampling/Ionization Techniques for Direct Coupling of Planar Separations with Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-01-01

    Planar separations, which include thin layer chromatography and gel electrophoresis, are in widespread use as important and powerful tools for conducting separations of complex mixtures. To increase the utility of planar separations, new methods are needed that allow in-situ characterization of the individual components of the separated mixtures. A large number of atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques for use with mass spectrometry have emerged in the past several years, and several have been investigated as a means for mass spectrometric read-out of planar separations. In this article, we review the atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques that have been used for the read-out of planar separation media. For each technique, we briefly explain the operational basics and discuss the analyte type for which it is appropriate and some specific applications from the literature.

  11. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Grubelich, Mark C.; Yonas, Gerold

    2017-01-03

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided by a cavitating venturi that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated.

  12. Conventional and Advanced Separations in Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics: Methodologies and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Heyman, Heino M.; Zhang, Xing; Tang, Keqi; Baker, Erin Shammel; Metz, Thomas O.

    2016-02-16

    Metabolomics is the quantitative analysis of all metabolites in a given sample. Due to the chemical complexity of the metabolome, optimal separations are required for comprehensive identification and quantification of sample constituents. This chapter provides an overview of both conventional and advanced separations methods in practice for reducing the complexity of metabolite extracts delivered to the mass spectrometer detector, and covers gas chromatography (GC), liquid chromatography (LC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separation techniques coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) as both uni-dimensional and as multi-dimensional approaches.

  13. Radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting: Polarization insertions in the muon factor

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, Michael I.; Shelyuto, Valery A.

    2009-09-01

    We consider three-loop radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting in muonium due to insertions of a one-loop polarization operator in the muon factor. The contribution produced by electron polarization insertions is enhanced by the large logarithm of the electron-muon mass ratio. We obtained all single-logarithmic and nonlogarithmic radiative-recoil corrections of order {alpha}{sup 3}(m/M)E{sub F} generated by the diagrams with electron and muon polarization insertions.

  14. A Novel method for modeling the recoil in W boson events at hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Ahsan, Mahsana; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-07-01

    We present a new method for modeling the hadronic recoil in W {yields} {ell}{nu} events produced at hadron colliders. The recoil is chosen from a library of recoils in Z {yields} {ell}{ell} data events and overlaid on a simulated W {yields} {ell}{nu} event. Implementation of this method requires that the data recoil library describe the properties of the measured recoil as a function of the true, rather than the measured, transverse momentum of the boson. We address this issue using a multidimensional Bayesian unfolding technique. We estimate the statistical and systematic uncertainties from this method for the W boson mass and width measurements assuming 1 fb{sup -1} of data from the Fermilab Tevatron. The uncertainties are found to be small and comparable to those of a more traditional parameterized recoil model. For the high precision measurements that will be possible with data from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron and from the CERN LHC, the method presented in this paper may be advantageous, since it does not require an understanding of the measured recoil from first principles.

  15. Delayed bunching for multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbusch, M.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Wienholtz, F.; Chauveau, P.; Delahaye, P.

    2015-06-29

    Many experiments are handicapped when the ion sources do not only deliver the ions of interest but also contaminations, i.e., unwanted ions of similar mass. In the recent years, multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separation has become a promising method to isolate the ions of interest from the contaminants, in particular for measurements with low-energy short-lived nuclides. To further improve the performance of multi-reflection mass separators with respect to the limitations by space-charge effects, the simultaneously trapped ions are spatially widely distributed in the apparatus. Thus, the ions can propagate with reduced Coulomb interactions until, finally, they are bunched by a change in the trapping conditions for high-resolution mass separation. Proof-of-principle measurements are presented.

  16. MASS SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Oppenheimer, F.; Bell, J.W.

    1959-02-17

    An improvement in the mounting arrangement for the ion source within the vacuum tank of a calutron is presented. The entire source is supported by the vacuum envelope through the medium of a bracket secured to a removable face plate. The bracket forms a supporting platform that is generally transverse to the magnetic field. The ion generator is mounted on a pedestal-type insulator supported on the bracket, and the hot leads are brought into the vacuum envelope through a tubular elbow connected to the vacuum envelope, having the axis of its outer opening aligned with the magnetic field at which point a bushing-type insulator is employed. With this arrangement thc ion source is maintained at a positive potential with respect to the vacuum tank and the problem of electron bombardment of the insulator is considerably reduced.

  17. The Outcome of Supernovae in Massive Binaries; Removed Mass, and its Separation Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Ryosuke; Sawai, Hidetomo; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-09-01

    The majority of massive stars are formed in binary systems. It is hence reasonable to expect that most core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) take place in binaries and the existence of a companion star may leave some imprints in observed features. Having this in mind, we have conducted two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the collisions of CCSNe ejecta with the companion star in an almost-equal-mass (~10 M ⊙) binary to find out possible consequences of such events. In particular we pay attention to the amount of mass removed and its dependence on the binary separation. In contrast to the previous surmise, we find that the companion mass is stripped not by momentum transfer but by shock heating. Up to 25% of the original mass can be removed for the closest separations and the removed mass decreases as M ubvpropa -4.3 with the binary separation a. By performing some experimental computations with artificially modified densities of incident ejecta, we show that if the velocity of ejecta is fixed, the density of incident ejecta is the single important parameter that actually determines the removed mass as Mub \\propto ρ ej 1.4. On the other hand, another set of simulations with modified velocities of incident ejecta demonstrate that the strength of the forward shock, which heats up the stellar material and causes the mass loss of the companion star, is actually the key parameter for the removed mass.

  18. Recoil detection of the lightest neutralino in MSSM singlet extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, Vernon; Lewis, Ian; McCaskey, Mat; Shaughnessy, Gabe; Yencho, Brian; Langacker, Paul

    2007-06-01

    We investigate the correlated predictions of singlet extended MSSM models for direct detection and the cosmological relic density of the lightest neutralino. To illustrate the general effects of the singlet, we take heavy sleptons and squarks. We apply CERN LEP (g-2){sub {mu}}, and perturbativity constraints. We find that the WMAP upper bound on the cold dark matter density limits much of the parameter space to regions where the lightest neutralino can be discovered in recoil experiments. The results for the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model and U(1){sup '}-extended minimal supersymmetric standard model are typically similar to the MSSM since their light neutralinos have similar compositions and masses. In the nearly minimal supersymmetric standard model the neutralino is often very light and its recoil detection is within the reach of the CDMS II experiment. In general, most points in the parameter spaces of the singlet models we consider are accessible to the WARP experiment.

  19. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Grubelich, Mark C.; Yonas, Gerold

    2016-03-01

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  20. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Grubelich, Mark C; Yonas, Gerold

    2013-11-12

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  1. A membrane-separator interface for mass-spectrometric analysis of blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Gerasimov, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of rapid mass-spectrometric determination of the content of anesthetic agents in blood plasma with the aid of a membrane-separator interface. The interface employs a hydrophobic selective membrane that is capable of separating various anesthetic drugs (including inhalation anesthetic sevofluran, noninhalation anesthetic thiopental, hypnotic propofol, and opioid analgesic fentanyl) from the blood plasma and introducing samples into a mass spectrometer. Analysis of the blood plasma was not accompanied by the memory effect and did not lead to membrane degradation. Results of clinical investigation of the concentration of anesthetics in the blood plasma of patients are presented.

  2. Nuclear Recoil Identification in CDMS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gensheng; Akerib, Dan

    2004-05-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment achieves high sensitivity for WIMP dark matter particles recoiling from nuclei because of the rejection of predominant electromagnetic backgrounds. The measured charge energy and phonon energy ratio, or ionization yield, is a powerful tool for discrimination between nuclear recoil and electron recoil in CDMS experiment. However, since events occurring within a thin surface layer, notably low-energy background beta particles, suffer a loss in ionization charge collection, other method of surface--event rejection becomes important. I will describe the CDMS detector ionization measurement and ballistic phonon readout, with an emphasis on detector phenomenology. In particular, I will describe the primary CDMS detector quantities--ionization yield, phonon risetime, event location information and phonon energy partition distribution. The application of these parameters in nuclear recoil identification and in surface event rejection in CDMS experiment will be summarized.

  3. Separation of actinides using capillary extraction chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Dominic S; Montoya, Velma M

    2009-08-01

    Trace levels of actinides have been separated on capillary extraction chromatography columns. Detection of the actinides was achieved using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, which was coupled with the extraction chromatography system. In this study, we compare 30-cm long, 4.6 mm i.d. columns to capillary columns (750 microm i.d.) with lengths from 30 cm up to 150 cm. The columns that were tested were packed with TRU resin. We were able to separate a mixture of five actinides ((232)Th, (238)U, (237)Np, (239)Pu, and (241)Am). This work has application to rapid bioassay as well as automated separations of actinide materials.

  4. Intensification of heat and mass transfer by ultrasound: application to heat exchangers and membrane separation processes.

    PubMed

    Gondrexon, N; Cheze, L; Jin, Y; Legay, M; Tissot, Q; Hengl, N; Baup, S; Boldo, P; Pignon, F; Talansier, E

    2015-07-01

    This paper aims to illustrate the interest of ultrasound technology as an efficient technique for both heat and mass transfer intensification. It is demonstrated that the use of ultrasound results in an increase of heat exchanger performances and in a possible fouling monitoring in heat exchangers. Mass transfer intensification was observed in the case of cross-flow ultrafiltration. It is shown that the enhancement of the membrane separation process strongly depends on the physico-chemical properties of the filtered suspensions.

  5. Rapid separation of phosphopeptides by microchip electrophoresis-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ollikainen, Elisa; Bonabi, Ashkan; Nordman, Nina; Jokinen, Ville; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto; Sikanen, Tiina

    2016-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a significant biological process, but separation of phosphorylated peptide isomers is often challenging for many analytical techniques. We developed a microchip electrophoresis (MCE) method for rapid separation of phosphopeptides with on-chip electrospray ionization (ESI) facilitating online sample introduction to the mass spectrometer (MS). With the method, two monophosphorylated positional isomers of insulin receptor peptide (IR1A and IR1B) and a triply phosphorylated insulin receptor peptide (IR3), all with the same amino acid sequence, were separated from the nonphosphorylated peptide (IR0) in less than one minute. For efficient separation of the positional peptide isomers from each other derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethyl reagents (either chloroformate, Fmoc-Cl, or N-succinimidyl carbonate, Fmoc-OSu) was required before the analysis. The derivatization improved not only the separation of the monophosphorylated positional peptide isomers in MCE, but also identification of the phosphorylation site based on MS/MS.

  6. Ion exchange separation of chromium from natural water matrix for stable isotope mass spectrometric analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Bassett, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for separating the Cr dissolved in natural water from matrix elements and determination of its stable isotope ratios using solid-source thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). The separation method takes advantage of the existence of the oxidized form of Cr as an oxyanion to separate it from interfering cations using anion-exchange chromatography, and of the reduced form of Cr as a positively charged ion to separate it from interfering anions such as sulfate. Subsequent processing of the separated sample eliminates residual organic material for application to a solid source filament. Ratios for 53Cr/52Cr for National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 979 can be measured using the silica gel-boric acid technique with a filament-to-filament standard deviation in the mean 53Cr/52Cr ratio for 50 replicates of 0.00005 or less. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Application of a Plasma Mass Separator to Advanced LWR Spent Fuel Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Richard; Miller, Robert; Papay, Larry; Wagoner, John; Ahlfeld, Charles; Czerwinski, Ken

    2006-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating spent fuel reprocessing for the purposes of increasing the effective capacity of a deep geological repository, reducing the radiotoxicity of waste placed in the repository and conserving nuclear fuel resources. DOE is considering hydro-chemical processing of the spent fuel after cutting the fuel cladding and fuel dissolution in nitric acid. The front end process, known as UREX, is largely based on the PUREX process and extracts U, Tc as well as fission product gases. A number of additional processing steps have become known as UREX+. One of the steps includes a further chemical treatment of remove Cs and Sr to reduce repository heat load. Other steps include successive extraction of the actinides from residual fission products, including the lanthanides. The additional UREX+ processing renders the actinides suitable for burning as reactor fuel in an advanced reactor to convert actinides to shorter-lived fission products and to produce power. New methods for separating groups of elements by their atomic mass have been developed and can be exploited to enhance spent fuel reprocessing. These physical processes dry the waste streams so that they can be vaporized and singly ionized in plasma that is contained in longitudinal magnetic and perpendicular electric fields. Proper configuration of the fields causes the plasma to rapidly rotate and expel heavier mass ions at the center of the machine. Lower mass ions form closed orbits within the cylindrical plasma column and are transported to either end of the machine. This plasma mass separator was originally developed to reduce the mass of material that must be immobilized in borosilicate glass from DOE defense waste at former weapons production facilities. The plasma mass separator appears to be well-suited for processing the UREX raffinate and solids streams by exploiting the large atomic mass gap that exists between lanthanides (< {approx}180 amu) and actinides

  8. Revealing compressed stops using high-momentum recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, Sebastian; Park, Michael; Shih, David; Tweedie, Brock

    2016-03-01

    Searches for supersymmetric top quarks at the LHC have been making great progress in pushing sensitivity out to higher mass, but are famously plagued by gaps in coverage around lower-mass regions where the decay phase space is closing off. Within the common stop-NLSP/neutralino-LSP simplified model, the line in the mass plane where there is just enough phase space to produce an on-shell top quark remains almost completely unconstrained. Here, we show that is possible to define searches capable of probing a large patch of this difficult region, with S/B ˜ 1 and significances often well beyond 5 σ. The basic strategy is to leverage the large energy gain of LHC Run 2, leading to a sizable population of stop pair events recoiling against a hard jet. The recoil not only re-establishes a [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] signature, but also leads to a distinctive anti-correlation between the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] and the recoil jet transverse vectors when the stops decay all-hadronically. Accounting for jet combinatorics, backgrounds, and imperfections in [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] measurements, we estimate that Run 2 will already start to close the gap in exclusion sensitivity with the first few 10s of fb-1. By 300 fb-1, exclusion sensitivity may extend from stop masses of 550 GeV on the high side down to below 200 GeV on the low side, approaching the "stealth" point at {m}_{overline{t}}={m}_t and potentially overlapping with limits from toverline{t} cross section and spin correlation measurements.

  9. Revealing compressed stops using high-momentum recoils

    SciTech Connect

    Macaluso, Sebastian; Park, Michael; Shih, David; Tweedie, Brock

    2016-03-22

    In this study, searches for supersymmetric top quarks at the LHC have been making great progress in pushing sensitivity out to higher mass, but are famously plagued by gaps in coverage around lower-mass regions where the decay phase space is closing off. Within the common stop-NLSP/neutralino-LSP simplified model, the line in the mass plane where there is just enough phase space to produce an on-shell top quark remains almost completely unconstrained. Here, we show that is possible to define searches capable of probing a large patch of this difficult region, with S/B ~ 1 and significances often well beyond 5σ. The basic strategy is to leverage the large energy gain of LHC Run 2, leading to a sizable population of stop pair events recoiling against a hard jet. The recoil not only re-establishes a ET, but also leads to a distinctive anti-correlation between the ET and the recoil jet transverse vectors when the stops decay all-hadronically. Accounting for jet combinatorics, backgrounds, and imperfections in ET measurements, we estimate that Run 2 will already start to close the gap in exclusion sensitivity with the first few 10s of fb–1. By 300 fb–1, exclusion sensitivity may extend from stop masses of 550 GeV on the high side down to below 200 GeV on the low side, approaching the “stealth” point at m = mt and potentially overlapping with limits from tt¯ cross section and spin correlation measurements.

  10. Revealing compressed stops using high-momentum recoils

    DOE PAGES

    Macaluso, Sebastian; Park, Michael; Shih, David; ...

    2016-03-22

    In this study, searches for supersymmetric top quarks at the LHC have been making great progress in pushing sensitivity out to higher mass, but are famously plagued by gaps in coverage around lower-mass regions where the decay phase space is closing off. Within the common stop-NLSP/neutralino-LSP simplified model, the line in the mass plane where there is just enough phase space to produce an on-shell top quark remains almost completely unconstrained. Here, we show that is possible to define searches capable of probing a large patch of this difficult region, with S/B ~ 1 and significances often well beyond 5σ.more » The basic strategy is to leverage the large energy gain of LHC Run 2, leading to a sizable population of stop pair events recoiling against a hard jet. The recoil not only re-establishes a ET, but also leads to a distinctive anti-correlation between the ET and the recoil jet transverse vectors when the stops decay all-hadronically. Accounting for jet combinatorics, backgrounds, and imperfections in ET measurements, we estimate that Run 2 will already start to close the gap in exclusion sensitivity with the first few 10s of fb–1. By 300 fb–1, exclusion sensitivity may extend from stop masses of 550 GeV on the high side down to below 200 GeV on the low side, approaching the “stealth” point at mt¯ = mt and potentially overlapping with limits from tt¯ cross section and spin correlation measurements.« less

  11. Comprehensive three-dimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry separation of diesel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Frank Cheng-Yu

    2017-03-17

    Diesel, a complex hydrocarbon mixture, was examined using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and a field ionization mass spectrometer (FIMS), which preferentially yields molecular ions, providing an extra dimension for component separation. Molecular ions collected at low mass resolution can be assigned an NM-class (Nominal Mass-class) value that does not completely express hydrogen deficiency. In contrast to formulae and Z-class assignments that are possible from ultrahigh mass resolution, NM-class assignments are not unambiguous; however, the separation provided by GC×GC can result in coelution of components that differ in NM-class. Hence, compounds that are unresolved by GC×GC separation can be resolved by FIMS provided they differ in mass. This technique allows for easy, automated data processing, evaluation of coelution on quantitative analysis (e.g., using FID) and the identification of additional chemical species and structures. The development of GC×GC×MS creates new opportunities to improve the ability to determine hydrocarbon composition and structure in complex petroleum and refined petroleum products.

  12. Inelastic frontier: Discovering dark matter at high recoil energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam

    2016-12-27

    There exist well-motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the dark matter to upscatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the dark matter itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. In this paper, we extend previous studies of inelastic dark matter to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino supersymmetric dark matter, magnetic inelastic dark matter, and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate (through loop diagrams involving the heavy state) as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible (in the parameter space we consider). Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (when the mass splitting δ≲160 keV), iodine at PICO (when 160≲δ≲300 keV), and tungsten at CRESST (when δ≳300 keV). Amusingly, once δ≳200 keV, weak scale (and larger) dark matter–nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative competitiveness of these diverse experiments is governed by the upper bound on the recoil energies employed by each experiment, as well as strong sensitivity to the mass of the heaviest element in the detector. Several implications, including sizable recoil energy-dependent annual modulation and improvements for future experiments, are discussed. We show that the xenon experiments can improve on the PICO results, if they were to analyze their existing data over a larger range of recoil energies, i.e., 20–500 keV Intriguingly, CRESST has reported several events in the recoil energy range 45–100 keV that, if interpreted as dark matter scattering, is compatible with δ~200 keV and an

  13. Inelastic frontier: Discovering dark matter at high recoil energy

    DOE PAGES

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; ...

    2016-12-27

    There exist well-motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the dark matter to upscatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the dark matter itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. In this paper, we extend previous studies of inelastic dark matter to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino supersymmetric dark matter, magnetic inelasticmore » dark matter, and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate (through loop diagrams involving the heavy state) as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible (in the parameter space we consider). Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (when the mass splitting δ≲160 keV), iodine at PICO (when 160≲δ≲300 keV), and tungsten at CRESST (when δ≳300 keV). Amusingly, once δ≳200 keV, weak scale (and larger) dark matter–nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative competitiveness of these diverse experiments is governed by the upper bound on the recoil energies employed by each experiment, as well as strong sensitivity to the mass of the heaviest element in the detector. Several implications, including sizable recoil energy-dependent annual modulation and improvements for future experiments, are discussed. We show that the xenon experiments can improve on the PICO results, if they were to analyze their existing data over a larger range of recoil energies, i.e., 20–500 keV Intriguingly, CRESST has reported several events in the recoil energy range 45–100 keV that, if interpreted as dark matter scattering, is compatible with δ~200 keV and an

  14. Inelastic frontier: Discovering dark matter at high recoil energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Fox, Patrick J.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam

    2016-12-01

    There exist well-motivated models of particle dark matter which predominantly scatter inelastically off nuclei in direct detection experiments. This inelastic transition causes the dark matter to upscatter in terrestrial experiments into an excited state up to 550 keV heavier than the dark matter itself. An inelastic transition of this size is highly suppressed by both kinematics and nuclear form factors. In this paper, we extend previous studies of inelastic dark matter to determine the present bounds on the scattering cross section and the prospects for improvements in sensitivity. Three scenarios provide illustrative examples: nearly pure Higgsino supersymmetric dark matter, magnetic inelastic dark matter, and inelastic models with dark photon exchange. We determine the elastic scattering rate (through loop diagrams involving the heavy state) as well as verify that exothermic transitions are negligible (in the parameter space we consider). Presently, the strongest bounds on the cross section are from xenon at LUX-PandaX (when the mass splitting δ ≲160 keV ), iodine at PICO (when 160 ≲δ ≲300 keV ), and tungsten at CRESST (when δ ≳300 keV ). Amusingly, once δ ≳200 keV , weak scale (and larger) dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections are allowed. The relative competitiveness of these diverse experiments is governed by the upper bound on the recoil energies employed by each experiment, as well as strong sensitivity to the mass of the heaviest element in the detector. Several implications, including sizable recoil energy-dependent annual modulation and improvements for future experiments, are discussed. We show that the xenon experiments can improve on the PICO results, if they were to analyze their existing data over a larger range of recoil energies, i.e., 20-500 keV Intriguingly, CRESST has reported several events in the recoil energy range 45-100 keV that, if interpreted as dark matter scattering, is compatible with δ ˜200 keV and an

  15. A Study of Nuclear Recoil Backgrounds in Dark Matter Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Westerdale, Shawn S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great success of the Standard Model of particle physics, a preponderance of astrophysical evidence suggests that it cannot explain most of the matter in the universe. This so-called dark matter has eluded direct detection, though many theoretical extensions to the Standard Model predict the existence of particles with a mass on the $1-1000$ GeV scale that interact only via the weak nuclear force. Particles in this class are referred to as Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), and their high masses and low scattering cross sections make them viable dark matter candidates. The rarity of WIMP-nucleus interactions makes them challenging to detect: any background can mask the signal they produce. Background rejection is therefore a major problem in dark matter detection. Many experiments greatly reduce their backgrounds by employing techniques to reject electron recoils. However, nuclear recoil backgrounds, which produce signals similar to what we expect from WIMPs, remain problematic. There are two primary sources of such backgrounds: surface backgrounds and neutron recoils. Surface backgrounds result from radioactivity on the inner surfaces of the detector sending recoiling nuclei into the detector. These backgrounds can be removed with fiducial cuts, at some cost to the experiment's exposure. In this dissertation we briefly discuss a novel technique for rejecting these events based on signals they make in the wavelength shifter coating on the inner surfaces of some detectors. Neutron recoils result from neutrons scattering from nuclei in the detector. These backgrounds may produce a signal identical to what we expect from WIMPs and are extensively discussed here. We additionally present a new tool for calculating ($\\alpha$, n)yields in various materials. We introduce the concept of a neutron veto system designed to shield against, measure, and provide an anti-coincidence veto signal for background neutrons. We discuss the research and development

  16. The outcome of supernovae in massive binaries; removed mass, and its separation dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Ryosuke; Sawai, Hidetomo; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-09-01

    The majority of massive stars are formed in binary systems. It is hence reasonable to expect that most core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) take place in binaries and the existence of a companion star may leave some imprints in observed features. Having this in mind, we have conducted two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the collisions of CCSNe ejecta with the companion star in an almost-equal-mass (∼10 M {sub ☉}) binary to find out possible consequences of such events. In particular we pay attention to the amount of mass removed and its dependence on the binary separation. In contrast to the previous surmise, we find that the companion mass is stripped not by momentum transfer but by shock heating. Up to 25% of the original mass can be removed for the closest separations and the removed mass decreases as M {sub ub}∝a {sup –4.3} with the binary separation a. By performing some experimental computations with artificially modified densities of incident ejecta, we show that if the velocity of ejecta is fixed, the density of incident ejecta is the single important parameter that actually determines the removed mass as M{sub ub}∝ρ{sub ej}{sup 1.4}. On the other hand, another set of simulations with modified velocities of incident ejecta demonstrate that the strength of the forward shock, which heats up the stellar material and causes the mass loss of the companion star, is actually the key parameter for the removed mass.

  17. Selective Fluorination and Separation of Metals with NF3 for Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Richard A.; Barinaga, Charles J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2016-03-01

    We report recent progress on the development of a new methodology based on the generation of volatile metal fluorides through the use of nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and the separation and measurement of these metal fluorides by electron ionization mass spectrometry. Though unreactive under ambient conditions, NF3 reacts selectively at specified temperatures with various metal-containing species to form volatile metal fluorides. Utilizing these species-dependent traits, elements of a sample may be sequentially produced and thus separated on-line. Metals were reacted inside a thermogravimetric analyzer, the gas outlet of which was directly coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer with an electron impact ionization source via a molecular leak valve. We present results of this project including the electron ionization mass spectrum of gaseous tellurium hexafluoride.

  18. Ion Mobility-Mass Correlation Trend Line Separation of Glycoprotein Digests without Deglycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongli; Bendiak, Brad; Siems, William F.; Gang, David R.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2013-01-01

    A high-throughput ion mobility mass spectrometer (IMMS) was used to rapidly separate and analyze peptides and glycopeptides derived from glycoproteins. Two glycoproteins, human α-1-acid glycoprotein and antithrombin III were digested with trypsin and subjected to electrospray traveling wave IMMS analysis. No deglycosylation steps were performed; samples were complex mixtures of peptides and glycopeptides. Peptides and glycosylated peptides with different charge states (up to 4 charges) were observed and fell on distinguishable trend lines in 2-D IMMS spectra in both positive and negative modes. The trend line separation patterns matched between both modes. Peptide sequence was identified based on the corresponding extracted mass spectra and collision induced dissociated (CID) experiments were performed for selected compounds to prove class identification. The signal-to-noise ratio of the glycopeptides was increased dramatically with ion mobility trend line separation compared to non-trend line separation, primarily due to selection of precursor ion subsets within specific mobility windows. In addition, isomeric mobility peaks were detected for specific glycopeptides. IMMS demonstrated unique capabilities and advantages for investigating and separating glycoprotein digests in this study and suggests a novel strategy for rapid glycoproteomics studies in the future. PMID:23914139

  19. A Double Scattering Analytical Model For Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barradas, N. P.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.; Darakchieva, V.

    2011-06-01

    We present an analytical model for calculation of double scattering in elastic recoil detection measurements. Only events involving the beam particle and the recoil are considered, i.e. 1) an ion scatters off a target element and then produces a recoil, and 2) an ion produces a recoil which then scatters off a target element. Events involving intermediate recoils are not considered, i.e. when the primary ion produces a recoil which then produces a second recoil. If the recoil element is also present in the stopping foil, recoil events in the stopping foil are also calculated. We included the model in the standard code for IBA data analysis NDF, and applied it to the measurement of hydrogen in Si.

  20. Binary Cepheids: Separations and Mass Ratios in 5 M ⊙ Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy Evans; Bond, Howard E.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Mason, Brian D.; Karovska, Margarita; Tingle, Evan

    2013-10-01

    Deriving the distribution of binary parameters for a particular class of stars over the full range of orbital separations usually requires the combination of results from many different observing techniques (radial velocities, interferometry, astrometry, photometry, direct imaging), each with selection biases. However, Cepheids—cool, evolved stars of ~5 M ⊙—are a special case because ultraviolet (UV) spectra will immediately reveal any companion star hotter than early type A, regardless of the orbital separation. We have used International Ultraviolet Explorer UV spectra of a complete sample of all 76 Cepheids brighter than V = 8 to create a list of all 18 Cepheids with companions more massive than 2.0 M ⊙. Orbital periods of many of these binaries are available from radial-velocity studies, or can be estimated for longer-period systems from detected velocity variability. In an imaging survey with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3, we resolved three of the companions (those of η Aql, S Nor, and V659 Cen), allowing us to make estimates of the periods out to the long-period end of the distribution. Combining these separations with orbital data in the literature, we derive an unbiased distribution of binary separations, orbital periods, and mass ratios. The distribution of orbital periods shows that the 5 M ⊙ binaries have systematically shorter periods than do 1 M ⊙ stars. Our data also suggest that the distribution of mass ratios depends on both binary separation and system multiplicity. The distribution of mass ratios as a function of orbital separation, however, does not depend on whether a system is a binary or a triple. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained by the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  1. BINARY CEPHEIDS: SEPARATIONS AND MASS RATIOS IN 5 M {sub ☉} BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Karovska, Margarita; Tingle, Evan; Bond, Howard E.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Mason, Brian D. E-mail: heb11@psu.edu

    2013-10-01

    Deriving the distribution of binary parameters for a particular class of stars over the full range of orbital separations usually requires the combination of results from many different observing techniques (radial velocities, interferometry, astrometry, photometry, direct imaging), each with selection biases. However, Cepheids—cool, evolved stars of ∼5 M {sub ☉}—are a special case because ultraviolet (UV) spectra will immediately reveal any companion star hotter than early type A, regardless of the orbital separation. We have used International Ultraviolet Explorer UV spectra of a complete sample of all 76 Cepheids brighter than V = 8 to create a list of all 18 Cepheids with companions more massive than 2.0 M {sub ☉}. Orbital periods of many of these binaries are available from radial-velocity studies, or can be estimated for longer-period systems from detected velocity variability. In an imaging survey with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3, we resolved three of the companions (those of η Aql, S Nor, and V659 Cen), allowing us to make estimates of the periods out to the long-period end of the distribution. Combining these separations with orbital data in the literature, we derive an unbiased distribution of binary separations, orbital periods, and mass ratios. The distribution of orbital periods shows that the 5 M {sub ☉} binaries have systematically shorter periods than do 1 M {sub ☉} stars. Our data also suggest that the distribution of mass ratios depends on both binary separation and system multiplicity. The distribution of mass ratios as a function of orbital separation, however, does not depend on whether a system is a binary or a triple.

  2. Improvements to the on-line mass separator, RAMA, and the beta-delayed charged-particle emission of proton-rich sd shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, Theodore Joseph

    1996-03-01

    To overcome the extreme difficulties encountered in the experimental decay studies of proton drip line nuclei, several techniques have been utilized, including a helium-jet transport system, particle identification detectors and mass separation. Improvements to the ion source/extraction region of the He-jet coupled on-line Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer (RAMA) and its target/ion source coupling resulted in significant increases in RAMA efficiencies and its mass resolution, as well as reductions in the overall transit time. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, the decays of 31Cl, 27P and 28P, with half-lives of 150 msec, 260 msec and 270.3 msec, respectively, were examined using a he-jet and low-energy gas ΔE-gas ΔE-silicon E detector telescopes. Total beta-delayed proton branches of 0.3% and 0.07% in 31Cl and 27P, respectively, were estimated. Several proton peaks that had been previously assigned to the decay of 31Cl were shown to be from the decay of 25Si. In 27P, two proton groups at 459 ± 14 keV and 610 ± 11 keV, with intensities of 7 ± 3% and 92 ± 4% relative to the main (100%) group were discovered. The Gamow-Teller component of the preceding beta-decay of each observed proton transition was compared to results from shell model calculations. Finally, a new proton transition was identified, following the β-decay of 28P, at 1,444 ± 12 keV with a 1.7 ± 0.5% relative intensity to the 100% group. Using similar low-energy detector telescopes and the mass separator TISOL at TRIUMF, the 109 msec and 173 msec activities, 17Ne and 33Ar, were studied. A new proton group with energy 729 ± 15 keV was observed following the beta-decay of 17Ne. Several discrepancies between earlier works as to the energies, intensities and assignments of several proton transitions from 17Ne and 33Ar were resolved.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Energetic Uranium Recoil Damage in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2006-10-11

    Defect production and amorphization due to energetic uranium recoils in zircon (ZrSiO4), which is a promising ceramic nuclear waste form, is studied using molecular dynamics simulations with a partial charge model. An algorithm that distinguishes between undamaged crystal, crystalline defects and amorphous regions is used to develop a fundamental understanding of the primary damage state. The amorphous cascade core is separated from the surrounding crystal by a defect-rich region. Small, chemically inhomogeneous amorphous clusters are also produced around the core. The amorphous regions consist of under-coordinated Zr and polymerized Si leading to amorphization and phase separation on a nanometer scale into Zr- and Si-rich regions. This separation could play an important role in the experimentally observed formation of nanoscale ZrO2 in ZrSiO4 irradiated at elevated temperatures.

  4. Structural characterization of bacterial lipopolysaccharides with mass spectrometry and on- and off-line separation techniques.

    PubMed

    Kilár, Anikó; Dörnyei, Ágnes; Kocsis, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this review is the application of mass spectrometry to the structural characterization of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), also referred to as "endotoxins," because they elicit the strong immune response in infected organisms. Recently, a wide variety of MS-based applications have been implemented to the structure elucidation of LPS. Methodological improvements, as well as on- and off-line separation procedures, proved the versatility of mass spectrometry to study complex LPS mixtures. Special attention is given in the review to the tandem mass spectrometric methods and protocols for the analyses of lipid A, the endotoxic principle of LPS. We compare and evaluate the different ionization techniques (MALDI, ESI) in view of their use in intact R- and S-type LPS and lipid A studies. Methods for sample preparation of LPS prior to mass spectrometric analysis are also described. The direct identification of intrinsic heterogeneities of most intact LPS and lipid A preparations is a particular challenge, for which separation techniques (e.g., TLC, slab-PAGE, CE, GC, HPLC) combined with mass spectrometry are often necessary. A brief summary of these combined methodologies to profile LPS molecular species is provided.

  5. Star-galaxy separation strategies for WISE-2MASS all-sky infrared galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, András; Szapudi, István

    2015-04-01

    We combine photometric information of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) all-sky infrared data bases, and demonstrate how to produce clean and complete galaxy catalogues for future analyses. Adding 2MASS colours to WISE photometry improves star-galaxy separation efficiency substantially at the expense of losing a small fraction of the galaxies. We find that 93 per cent of the WISE objects within W1 < 15.2 mag have a 2MASS match, and that a class of supervised machine learning algorithms, support vector machines (SVM), are efficient classifiers of objects in our multicolour data set. We constructed a training set from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey PhotoObj table with known star-galaxy separation, and determined redshift distribution of our sample from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly spectroscopic survey. Varying the combination of photometric parameters input into our algorithm we show that W1WISE - J2MASS is a simple and effective star-galaxy separator, capable of producing results comparable to the multidimensional SVM classification. We present a detailed description of our star-galaxy separation methods, and characterize the robustness of our tools in terms of contamination, completeness, and accuracy. We explore systematics of the full sky WISE-2MASS galaxy map, such as contamination from moon glow. We show that the homogeneity of the full sky galaxy map is improved by an additional J2MASS < 16.5 mag flux limit. The all-sky galaxy catalogue we present in this paper covers 21 200 deg2 with dusty regions masked out, and has an estimated stellar contamination of 1.2 per cent and completeness of 70.1 per cent among 2.4 million galaxies with zmed ≈ 0.14. WISE-2MASS galaxy maps with well controlled stellar contamination will be useful for spatial statistical analyses, including cross-correlations with other cosmological random fields, such as the cosmic microwave background. The same techniques also yield a

  6. Multidimensional Separation of Natural Products Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Knochenmuss, Richard; Siems, William F.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2016-05-01

    A high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)was interfaced to an atmospheric drift tube ion mobility time of flight mass spectrometry. The power of multidimensional separation was demonstrated using chili pepper extracts. The ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility provided high resolving powers up to 166 for the HPLC eluent. With implementation of Hadamard transform (HT), the duty cycle for the ion mobility drift tube was increased from less than 1% to 50%, and the ion transmission efficiency was improved by over 200 times compared with pulsed mode, improving signal to noise ratio 10 times. HT ion mobility and TOF mass spectrometry provide an additional dimension of separation for complex samples without increasing the analysis time compared with conventional HPLC.

  7. Design and performance of mass-produced sideband separating SIS mixers for ALMA band 4 receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Takafumi; Kuroiwa, Koichi; Takahashi, Toshikazu; Fujii, Yumi; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Asayama, Shin'ichiro; Noguchi, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    We have designed and mass-produced low-noise sideband separating superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) band 4 over the frequency range of 125-163 GHz. An integrated design was adopted for the band 4 sideband separating (2SB) mixer block because of the advantages it offers in terms of compactness, reduced testing time and lower cost. The mixer chip was designed to be robust for handling errors to avoid performance degradation caused by generation of the higher order mode in the mixer chip slot. Detailed analyses revealed its robustness and ability to ensure mass production of the 2SB mixers. Using the robust mixer design in addition to well-established waveguide technologies, all of the 2SB mixers met ALMA specifications for noise temperature and image rejection ratio.

  8. Separation of actinides using capillary extraction chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Dominic S

    2008-01-01

    Trace levels of actinides have been separated on extraction chromatography columns. Detection of the actinides was achieved using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), which was coupled with the extraction chromatography system. In this study we compare 30 cm long, 4.6 mm ID columns to capillary columns (750 {micro}m ID) with lengths from 30 cm up to 150 cm. The columns that were tested were packed with TRU resin. We were able to separate a mixture of five actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}pU, {sup 241}Am). This work has application to rapid bioassay as well as for automated separations of actinide materials.

  9. Proteolysis in microfluidic droplets: an approach to interface protein separation and peptide mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ji; Nie, Lei; Qiao, Liang; Li, Yixin; Guo, Liping; Liu, Baohong; Yang, Pengyuan; Girault, Hubert H

    2012-08-07

    A versatile microreactor protocol based on microfluidic droplets has been developed for on-line protein digestion. Proteins separated by liquid chromatography are fractionated in water-in-oil droplets and digested in sequence. The microfluidic reactor acts also as an electrospray ionization emitter for mass spectrometry analysis of the peptides produced in the individual droplets. Each droplet is an enzymatic micro-reaction unit with efficient proteolysis due to rapid mixing, enhanced mass transfer and automated handling. This droplet approach eliminates sample loss, cross-contamination, non-specific absorption and memory effect. A protein mixture was successfully identified using the droplet-based micro-reactor as interface between reverse phase liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

  10. Electrochemically-Modulated Separation and Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Actinides in Difficult Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Douglas C.; Liezers, Martin; Lehn, Scott A.; Douglas, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Electrochemically-modulated separations (EMS) are a straightforward means of isolating and pre-concentrating elements for on-line mass spectrometric analysis. Elements are accumulated at electrochemical working electrodes and subsequently released into a clean carrier solution for spectroscopic analysis. EMS can employ solely aqueous chemistry and uses electrochemical redox adjustment of oxidation state to “trigger” reversible chelation / complexation. Less tractable elements (e.g., uranium and plutonium), based on redox potentials, can therefore be extracted from difficult matrices following redox adjustment and chelation with electrode chelation sites. Simply put, separation is achieved by a small voltage step that is applied to the target electrode to turn “on” or “off” the specific actinide affinity of an electrode. This separation technology employs both redox and chelation chemistry to effect highly selective accumulation of target actinides, and results in element separation, matrix elimination and analyte preconcentration. Prior studies have developed protocols and preliminary insight into EMS processes for U and Pu. U and Pu are released upon oxidation and reduction, respectively, allowing complete separation due to widely divergent redox potentials. T The coupling of EMS on-line with ICP-MS for elemental and isotopic analysis of uranium and plutonium is presented, with a focus on analytical performance metrics and applicability to safeguards and process monitoring via nondestructive analyses.

  11. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  12. Electrophoretic Separation-Mass Spectrometric Detection on Polymer Microchip Directly Integrated with a Nanospray Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Fumihiko; Shinohara, Hidetoshi; Mizuno, Jun; Otsuka, Koji; Shoji, Shuichi

    We fabricated a polymer chip for microchip electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (MCE—MS). As a substrate material, cycloolefin polymer (COP) was selected due to its high chemical durability and easy metallization for the electrode. A COP microchip with a conventional cross-type channel configuration for the MCE separation was fabricated by hot embossing. After bonding with a rid substrate, a nano electrospray ionization (nano-ESI) tip structure for MS detection was machined directly at the opening of the separation channel end. A gold electrode to keep the electric contact for ESI was deposited around the nanospray tip by electron beam evaporation. When the voltage of 3.0 and 2.0 kV was applied to the inlet and the ESI electrode, respectively, the formation of Taylor cone and stable electrospray were observed at the channel opening. In infusion analysis of caffeine, the MS spectrum with parent mass number of 195, which accords with that of the protonated caffeine, was successfully obtained in the positive mode. Furthermore, the MCE separation and ESI-MS detection of caffeine and arginine was also successfully achieved with resolution of 1.0. Therefore, these results demonstrated that the fabricated microchip integrated with the nano-ESI tip can be employed as the MCE—ESI-MS device.

  13. Integrated Microfluidic Device for Automated Single Cell Analysis using Electrophoretic Separation and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mellors, J. Scott; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M.; Ramsey, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    A microfabricated fluidic device was developed for the automated real-time analysis of individual cells using capillary electrophoresis (CE) and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The microfluidic structure incorporates a means for rapid lysis of single cells within a free solution electrophoresis channel where cellular constituents were separated and an integrated electrospray emitter for ionization of separated components. The eluent was characterized using mass spectrometry. Human erythrocytes were used as a model system for this study. In this monolithically integrated device, cell lysis occurs at a channel intersection using a combination of rapid buffer exchange and an increase in electric field strength. An electroosmotic pump is incorporated at the end of the electrophoretic separation channel to direct eluent to the integrated electrospray emitter. The dissociated heme group and the α and β subunits of hemoglobin from individual erythrocytes were detected as cells continuously flowed through the device. The average analysis throughput was approximately 12 cells per minute demonstrating the potential of this method for high-throughput single cell analysis. PMID:20058879

  14. Optical recoil of asymmetric nano-optical antenna.

    PubMed

    Song, Jung-Hwan; Shin, Jonghwa; Lim, Hee-Jin; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2011-08-01

    We propose nano-optical antennas with asymmetric radiation patterns as light-driven mechanical recoil force generators. Directional antennas are found to generate recoil force efficiently when driven in the spectral proximity of their resonances. It is also shown that the recoil force is equivalent to the Poynting vector integrated over a closed sphere containing the antenna structures.

  15. Radiative recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting: Polarization insertions in the electron factor

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, M. I.; Shelyuto, V. A.

    2010-01-15

    We consider three-loop radiative recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting in muonium due to insertions of the one-loop polarization operator in the electron factor. The contribution generated by electron polarization insertions is a cubic polynomial in the large logarithm of the electron-muon mass ratio. The leading logarithm cubed and logarithm squared terms are well known for some time. We calculate all single-logarithmic and nonlogarithmic radiative recoil corrections of the order {alpha}{sup 3}(m/M)E{sub F} generated by diagrams with the electron and muon polarization insertions.

  16. Charge state separation for protein applications using a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chernushevich, I V; Fell, L M; Bloomfield, N; Metalnikov, P S; Loboda, A V

    2003-01-01

    A novel method for separating ions according to their charge state using a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer is presented. The benefits of charge state separation are particularly apparent in protein identification applications at low femtomole concentration levels, where in conventional TOF MS spectra peptide ions are often lost in a sea of chemical noise. When doubly and triply charged tryptic peptide ions need to be filtered from singly charged background ions, the latter are suppressed by two to three orders of magnitude, while from 10-50% of multiply charged ions remain. The suppression of chemical noise reduces the need for chromatography and can make this experimental approach the electrospray equivalent of conventional MALDI peptide maps. If unambiguous identification cannot be achieved, MS/MS experiments are performed on the precursor ions identified through charge separation, while the previously described Q2-trapping duty cycle enhancement is tuned for approximately 1.4 of the precursor m/z to enhance intensities of ions with m/z values above that of the precursor. The resulting product ion spectra contain few fragments of impurities and provide quick and unambiguous identification through database search. The multiple charge separation technique requires minimal tuning and may become a useful tool for analysis of complex mixtures.

  17. Evaluation of injection methods for fast, high peak capacity separations with low thermal mass gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fitz, Brian D; Mannion, Brandyn C; To, Khang; Hoac, Trinh; Synovec, Robert E

    2015-05-01

    Low thermal mass gas chromatography (LTM-GC) was evaluated for rapid, high peak capacity separations with three injection methods: liquid, headspace solid phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME), and direct vapor. An Agilent LTM equipped with a short microbore capillary column was operated at a column heating rate of 250 °C/min to produce a 60s separation. Two sets of experiments were conducted in parallel to characterize the instrumental platform. First, the three injection methods were performed in conjunction with in-house built high-speed cryo-focusing injection (HSCFI) to cryogenically trap and re-inject the analytes onto the LTM-GC column in a narrower band. Next, the three injection methods were performed natively with LTM-GC. Using HSCFI, the peak capacity of a separation of 50 nl of a 73 component liquid test mixture was 270, which was 23% higher than without HSCFI. Similar peak capacity gains were obtained when using the HSCFI with HS-SPME (25%), and even greater with vapor injection (56%). For the 100 μl vapor sample injected without HSCFI, the preconcentration factor, defined as the ratio of the maximum concentration of the detected analyte peak relative to the analyte concentration injected with the syringe, was determined to be 11 for the earliest eluting peak (most volatile analyte). In contrast, the preconcentration factor for the earliest eluting peak using HSCFI was 103. Therefore, LTM-GC is demonstrated to natively provide in situ analyte trapping, although not to as great an extent as with HSCFI. We also report the use of LTM-GC applied with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) detection for rapid, high peak capacity separations from SPME sampled banana peel headspace.

  18. Medium modifications with recoil polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, J.F.J. van den; Ent, R.

    1994-04-01

    The authors show that the virtual Compton scattering process allows for a precise study of the off-shell electron-nucleon vertex. In a separable model, they show the sensitivity to new unconstrained structure functions of the nucleon, beyond the usual Dirac and Pauli form factors. In addition, they show the sensitivity to bound nucleon form factors using the reaction 4He({rvec e},e{prime},{rvec p}){sup 3}H. A nucleon embedded in a nucleus represents a complex system. Firstly, the bound nucleon is necessarily off-shell and in principle a complete understanding of the dynamical structure of the nucleon is required in order to calculate its off-shell electromagnetic interaction. Secondly, one faces the possibility of genuine medium effects, such as for example quark-exchange contributions. Furthermore, the electromagnetic coupling to the bound nucleon is dependent on the nuclear dynamics through the self-energy of the nucleon in the nuclear medium.

  19. A Measurement of the Recoil Polarization of Electroproduced Λ(1116)

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, Simeon B.

    2002-01-01

    The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory was used to study the reaction e + p → e' + K+ + Λ(1116) for events where Λ(1116) subsequently decayed via the channel Λ(1116) → p + π-. Data were taken at incident electron beam energies of 2.5, 4.0, and 4.2 GeV during the 1999 E1C run period. They hyperon production spectra span the Q2 range from 0.5 to 2.8 GeV2 and nearly the entire range in the center of mass angles. The proton angular distribution in the Λ(1116) rest frame is used to deduce the recoil polarization of the hyperon, and the W and cos θ$K+\\atop{cm}$ dependence of the recoil polarization will be presented. The data show sizeable negative polarizations for the Λ(1116) as a function of both cos θ$K+\\atop{cm}$ and W.

  20. Analysis of Protein Glycosylation and Phosphorylation Using Liquid Phase Separation, Protein Microarray Technology, and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jia; Patwa, Tasneem H.; Pal, Manoj; Qiu, Weilian; Lubman, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Protein glycosylation and phosphorylation are very common posttranslational modifications. The alteration of these modifications in cancer cells is closely related to the onset and progression of cancer and other disease states. In this protocol, strategies for monitoring the changes in protein glycosylation and phosphorylation in serum or tissue cells on a global scale and specifically characterizing these alterations are included. The technique is based on lectin affinity enrichment for glycoproteins, all liquid-phase two-dimensional fractionation, protein microarray, and mass spectrometry technology. Proteins are separated based on pI in the first dimension using chromatofocusing (CF) or liquid isoelectric focusing (IEF) followed by the second-dimension separation using nonporous silica RP-HPLC. Five lectins with different binding specificities to glycan structures are used for screening glycosylation patterns in human serum through a biotin–streptavidin system. Fluorescent phosphodyes and phosphospecific antibodies are employed to detect specific phosphorylated proteins in cell lines or human tissues. The purified proteins of interest are identified by peptide sequencing. Their modifications including glycosylation and phosphorylation could be further characterized by mass-spectrometry-based approaches. These strategies can be used in biological samples for large-scale glycoproteome/phosphoproteome screening as well as for individual protein modification analysis. PMID:19241043

  1. Separation and determination of homogenous fatty alcohol ethoxylates by liquid chromatography with mulitstage mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zembrzuska, Joanna; Budnik, Irena; Lukaszewski, Zenon

    2014-07-01

    Alcohol ethoxylates (AEs) are a significant component of a stream of surfactants directed to the aquatic environment. The aim of this work was the investigation of the dependence of the analytical signals of homogeneous AE homologues on liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry conditions, as well as the separation of AEs from the water matrix and, on this basis, the development of an analytical procedure suitable for the determination of AEs in environmental samples. Homogeneous homologues containing dodecyl moiety and 2-9 oxyethylene subunits were investigated. The analytical signals of the investigated homologues were optimized in terms of concentration of ammonium acetate in the mobile phase (optimum 5 mM) and a column temperature (optimum 35°C) of the liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry system. A separation of AEs from the water matrix by liquid-liquid extraction (ethyl acetate, chloroform) or solid-phase extraction (C18 , styrene divinylbenzene, H-RX) was investigated. In a model investigation, the best recoveries (>90%) were obtained with a styrene divinylbenzene cartridge eluted with a 1:1 mixture of chloroform and methanol. However, much worse recoveries were obtained from the river water sample. Better results were obtained for liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. Recoveries of 62-80% were obtained for homologues having 4-9 oxyethylene subunits, at the lowest spike.

  2. Controllability analysis and testing of a novel magnetorheological absorber for field gun recoil mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Qing; Zheng, Jiajia; Li, Zhaochun; Hu, Ming; Wang, Jiong

    2016-11-01

    This paper aims to analyze the effects of combined working coils of magnetorheological (MR) absorber on the shock mitigation performance and verify the controllability of MR absorber as applied in the recoil system of a field gun. A physical scale model of the field gun is established and a long-stroke MR recoil absorber with four-stage parallel electromagnetic coils is designed to apply separate current to each stage and generate variable magnetic field distribution in the annular flow channel. Based on dynamic analysis and firing stability conditions of the field gun, ideal recoil force-stroke profiles of MR absorber at different limiting firing angles are obtained. The experimental studies are carried out on an impact test rig under different combinations of current loading: conventional unified control mode, separate control mode and timing control mode. The fullness degree index (FDI) is defined as the quantitative evaluation criterion of the controllability of MR absorber during the whole recoil motion. The results show that the force-stroke profile of the novel MR absorber can approach the ideal curve within 25 degrees of the limiting firing angle through judicious exploitation of the adjustable rheological properties of MR fluid.

  3. Fast separation of triterpenoid saponins using supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with single quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Zhang, Tingting; Zhou, Haibo; Feng, Ying; Fan, Chunlin; Chen, Weijia; Crommen, Jacques; Jiang, Zhengjin

    2016-03-20

    Triterpenoid saponins (TSs) are the most important components of some traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) and have exhibited valuable pharmacological properties. In this study, a rapid and efficient method was developed for the separation of kudinosides, stauntosides and ginsenosides using supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with single quadrupole mass spectrometry (SFC-MS). The separation conditions for the selected TSs were carefully optimized after the initial screening of eight stationary phases. The best compromise for all compounds in terms of chromatographic performance and MS sensitivity was obtained when water (5-10%) and formic acid (0.05%) were added to the supercritical carbon dioxide/MeOH mobile phase. Beside the composition of the mobile phase, the nature of the make-up solvent for interfacing SFC with MS was also evaluated. Compared to reversed phase liquid chromatography, the SFC approach showed higher resolution and shorter running time. The developed SFC-MS methods were successfully applied to the separation and identification of TSs present in Ilex latifolia Thunb., Panax quinquefolius L. and Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer. These results suggest that this SFC-MS approach could be employed as a useful tool for the quality assessment of natural products containing TSs as active components.

  4. Cavity cooling below the recoil limit.

    PubMed

    Wolke, Matthias; Klinner, Julian; Keßler, Hans; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2012-07-06

    Conventional laser cooling relies on repeated electronic excitations by near-resonant light, which constrains its area of application to a selected number of atomic species prepared at moderate particle densities. Optical cavities with sufficiently large Purcell factors allow for laser cooling schemes, avoiding these limitations. Here, we report on an atom-cavity system, combining a Purcell factor above 40 with a cavity bandwidth below the recoil frequency associated with the kinetic energy transfer in a single photon scattering event. This lets us access a yet-unexplored regime of atom-cavity interactions, in which the atomic motion can be manipulated by targeted dissipation with sub-recoil resolution. We demonstrate cavity-induced heating of a Bose-Einstein condensate and subsequent cooling at particle densities and temperatures incompatible with conventional laser cooling.

  5. The Argonne fragment mass analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Larson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) is currently under construction at the ATLAS facility. The FMA is an eight-meter long recoil mass spectrometer which will be used to separate nuclear reaction products from the primary heavy-ion beam and disperse them by A/q (mass/charge) at the focal plane. The FMA will be used in many different types of experiments. Gamma rays originating from very weak fusion-evaporation channels can be observed in coincidence with the recoil nucleus identified at the FMA focal plane. Production and decay of nuclei far from stability will be studied at the focal plane by implanting exotic recoils directly into detectors or by using a fast tape transport system. The FMA will also be used for reaction mechanism studies. A radioactive beam facility behind the focal plane is planned, which will allow beta-NMR and nuclear moment measurements to be made. The FMA will utilize the wide range of beam and intensities to be provided by the new ECR-positive ion injector also under construction at ATLAS. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Polarization effects in recoil-induced resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazebnyi, D. B.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the field polarization on the amplitude of recoil-induced resonances (RIRs) is considered for laser-cooled free atoms and for atoms in a working magneto-optical trap (MOT). For all closed dipole transitions, explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the polarization dependence of the resonance amplitudes within a perturbation theory. Optimal polarization conditions are found for the observation of resonances.

  7. Americium and plutonium separation by extraction chromatography for determination by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Zakir H; Cornett, Jack R; Zhao, Xaiolei; Kieser, Liam

    2014-06-04

    A simple method was developed to separate Pu and Am using single column extraction chromatography employing N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide (DGA) resin. Isotope dilution measurements of Am and Pu were performed using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and alpha spectrometry. For maximum adsorption Pu was stabilized in the tetra valent oxidation state in 8M HNO3 with 0.05 M NaNO2 before loading the sample onto the resin. Am(III) was adsorbed also onto the resin from concentrated HNO3, and desorbed with 0.1 M HCl while keeping the Pu adsorbed. The on-column reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) with 0.02 M TiCl3 facilitated the complete desorption of Pu. Interferences (e.g. Ca(2+), Fe(3+)) were washed off from the resin bed with excess HNO3. Using NdF3, micro-precipitates of the separated isotopes were prepared for analysis by both AMS and alpha spectrometry. The recovery was 97.7±5.3% and 95.5±4.6% for (241)Am and (242)Pu respectively in reagents without a matrix. The recoveries of the same isotopes were 99.1±6.0 and 96.8±5.3% respectively in garden soil. The robustness of the method was validated using certified reference materials (IAEA 384 and IAEA 385). The measurements agree with the certified values over a range of about 1-100 Bq kg(-1). The single column separation of Pu and Am saves reagents, separation time, and cost.

  8. Recoil Polarization for Delta Excitation in Pion Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Kelly; R. E. Roche; Z. Chai; M. K. Jones; O. Gayou; A. J. Sarty; S. Frullani; K. Aniol; E. J. Beise; F. Benmokhtar; W. Bertozzi; W. U. Boeglin; T. Botto; E. J. Brash; H. Breuer; E. Brown; E. Burtin; J. R. Calarco; C. Cavata; C. C. Chang; N. S. Chant; J.-P. Chen; M. Coman; D. Crovelli; R. De Leo; S. Dieterich; S. Escoffier; K. G. Fissum; V. Garde; F. Garibaldi; S. Georgakopoulus; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; C. Glashausser; J.-O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; A. Hotta; G. M. Huber; H. Ibrahim; M. Iodice; C. W. de Jager; X. Jiang; A. Klimenko; A. Kozlov; G. Kumbartzki; M. Kuss; L. Lagamba; G. Laveissiere; J. J. LeRose; R. A. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; G. J. Lolos; R. W. Lourie; D. J. Margaziotis; F. Marie; P. Markowitz; S. McAleer; D. Meekins; R. Michaels; B. D. Milbrath; J. Mitchell; J. Nappa; D. Neyret; C. F. Perdrisat; M. Potokar; V. A. Punjabi; T. Pussieux; R. D. Ransome; P. G. Roos; M. Rvachev; A. Saha; S. Sirca; R. Suleiman; S. Strauch; J. A. Templon; L. Todor; P. E. Ulmer; G. M. Urciuoli; L. B. Weinstein; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Zheng; and L. Zhu

    2005-08-01

    We measured angular distributions of recoil-polarization response functions for neutral pion electroproduction for W=1.23 GeV at Q{sup 2}=1.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}, obtaining 14 separated response functions plus 2 Rosenbluth combinations; of these, 12 have been observed for the first time. Dynamical models do not describe quantities governed by imaginary parts of interference products well, indicating the need for adjusting magnitudes and phases for nonresonant amplitudes. We performed a nearly model-independent multipole analysis and obtained values for Re(S1+/M1+)=-(6.84+/-0.15)% and Re(E1+/M1+)=-(2.91+/-0.19)% that are distinctly different from those from the traditional Legendre analysis based upon M1+ dominance and sp truncation.

  9. COMMERCIAL APPLICATION OF PLASMA MASS SEPARATION IN THE ARCHIMEDES FILTER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlfeld, C.E.; Gilleland, J.G.; Wagoner, J.D.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes the commercial application of an innovative plasma mass separator called the Archimedes Filter to a pre-treatment plant that can be integrated into the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford and Savannah River Sites to significantly enhance the treatment of radioactive high-level waste. The output of the Archimedes Filter is completely compatible with existing waste immobilization processes such as vitrification and requires no new waste form to be developed. A full-geometric-scale Demonstration Filter Unit (DEMO) has been constructed and is undergoing initial testing at the Archimedes Technology Group Development Facilities in San Diego. Some of the technology and engineering development is being performed by other organizations in collaboration with Archimedes. The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) is developing the plasma calcination technology and all of the associated systems for AFP feed preparation. Two Russian institutes are involved in the development of the ICP torch and injector system. The Remote System Group (UT-Battelle) at ORNL is developing the remote maintenance system for the filter units. Conceptual design of the Archimedes Filter Plant (AFP) is being developed concurrently with the DEMO testing program. The AFP mission is to significantly reduce the cost and accelerate the rate of vitrification of high-level waste by separating low activity waste from the sludge removed from underground storage tanks. Mass separation is accomplished by vaporizing the sludge feed and injecting it into a partially ionized, neutral plasma. In a single pass, heavy ions are deposited near the center of the filter and light mass ions are transported by the plasma to the ends of the cylindrically-shaped vacuum vessel. Responding to the DOE programs for cost reduction and cleanup acceleration, the AFP Project is planned on an expeditious schedule that executes all phases of the project with private sector funding. The initial AFP

  10. Contribution of mass density heterogeneities to the quasigeoid-to-geoid separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenzer, Robert; Hirt, Christian; Novák, Pavel; Pitoňák, Martin; Šprlák, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The geoid-to-quasigeoid separation is often computed only approximately as a function of the simple planar Bouguer gravity anomaly and the height of the computation point while disregarding the contributions of terrain geometry and anomalous topographic density as well as the sub-geoid masses. In this study we demonstrate that these contributions are significant and, therefore, should be taken into consideration when investigating the relation between the normal and orthometric heights particularly in the mountainous, polar and geologically complex regions. These contributions are evaluated by applying the spectral expressions for gravimetric forward modelling and using the EIGEN-6C4 gravity model, the Earth2014 datasets of terrain, ice thickness and inland bathymetry and the CRUST1.0 sediment and (consolidated) crustal density data. Since the global crustal density models currently available (e.g. CRUST1.0) have a limited accuracy and resolution, the comparison of individual density contributions is—for consistency—realized with a limited spectral resolution up to a spherical harmonic degree 360 (or 180). The results reveal that the topographic contribution globally varies between -0.33 and 0.57 m, with maxima in Himalaya and Tibet. The contribution of ice considerably modifies the geoid-to-quasigeoid separation over large parts of Antarctica and Greenland, where it reaches ˜ 0.2 m. The contributions of sediments and bedrock are less pronounced, with the values typically varying only within a few centimetres. These results, however, have still possibly large uncertainties due to the lack of information on the actual sediment and bedrock density. The contribution of lakes is mostly negligible; its maxima over the Laurentian Great Lakes and the Baikal Lake reach only several millimetres. The contribution of the sub-geoid masses is significant. It is everywhere negative and reaches extreme values of -4.43 m. According to our estimates, the geoid

  11. Measurement of Low Energy Electronic Recoil Response and Electronic/Nuclear Recoils Discrimination in XENON100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jingqiang; Xenon Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The XENON100 detector uses liquid xenon time projection chamber to search for nuclear recoils(NR) caused by hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The backgrounds are mostly electronic recoils(ER), thus it's crucial to distinguish NR from ER. Using high statistical calibration data from tritiated methane, AmBe and other sources in XENON100, the ER/NR discrimination under different electric fields are measured. The Photon yield and recombination fluctuation of low energy electronic recoils under different fields will also be presented and compared to results from NEST and other experiments, which is crucial to understanding the response of liquid xenon detectors in the energy regime of searching dark matter.

  12. A Mass Spectrometry Study of Isotope Separation in the Laser Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suen, Timothy Wu

    Accurate quantification of isotope ratios is critical for both preventing the development of illicit weapons programs in nuclear safeguards and identifying the source of smuggled material in nuclear forensics. While isotope analysis has traditionally been performed by mass spectrometry, the need for in situ measurements has prompted the development of optical techniques, such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). These optical measurements rely on laser ablation for direct solid sampling, but several past studies have suggested that the distribution of isotopes in the ablation plume is not uniform. This study seeks to characterize isotope separation in the laser plume through the use of orthogonal-acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A silver foil was ablated with a Nd:YAG at 355 nm at an energy of 50 muJ with a spot size of 71 mum, for a fluence of 1.3 J/cm2 and an irradiance of 250 MW/cm2. Flat-plate repellers were used to sample the plume, and a temporal profile of the ions was obtained by varying the time delay on the high-voltage pulse. A spatial profile along the axis of the plume was generated by changing the position of the sample, which yielded snapshots of the isotopic composition with time. In addition, the reflectron time-of-flight system was used as an energy filter in conjunction with the repellers to sample slices of the laser plasma orthogonal to the plume axis. Mass spectrometry of the plume revealed a fast ion distribution and a slow ion distribution. Measurements taken across the entire plume showed the fast 109Ag ions slightly ahead in both space and time, causing the 107Ag fraction to drop to 0.34 at 3 mus, 4 mm from the sample surface. Although measurements centered on the near side of the plume did not show isotope separation, the slow ions on the far side of the plume included much more 109Ag than 107Ag. In addition to examining the isotope content of the ablation

  13. Photon Scattering from the Stable Even-Mass Mo Isotopes Below the Neutron-Separation Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Hutcheson, A.; Kwan, E.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Angell, C.; Hammond, S.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Schwengner, R.; Dönau, F.; Wagner, A.

    2008-10-01

    We present results from photon-scattering experiments on the stable even-mass molybdenum isotopes below the neutron-separation energy carried out with bremsstrahlung at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE at the Research Center Dresden-Rossendorf in Germany, and with monoenergetic photon beams at the HIγS facility at TUNL. We applied statistical methods in order to correct for the branching and cascade transitions and to determine the photoabsorption cross section. The obtained results allowed us to extend the tail of the Giant Dipole Resonance below the (,) threshold down to 4 MeV. The photoabsorption cross sections deduced from the present experiments show that the dipole strength increases with the neutron number of the Mo isotopes. The experimental results are discussed in the frame of Quasiparticle-Random-Phase-Approximation in a deformed basis which describe the increasing strength as a result of the deformation.

  14. Advanced Multidimensional Separations in Mass Spectrometry: Navigating the Big Data Deluge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Jody C.; McLean, John A.

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid analytical instrumentation constructed around mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming the preferred technique for addressing many grand challenges in science and medicine. From the omics sciences to drug discovery and synthetic biology, multidimensional separations based on MS provide the high peak capacity and high measurement throughput necessary to obtain large-scale measurements used to infer systems-level information. In this article, we describe multidimensional MS configurations as technologies that are big data drivers and review some new and emerging strategies for mining information from large-scale datasets. We discuss the information content that can be obtained from individual dimensions, as well as the unique information that can be derived by comparing different levels of data. Finally, we summarize some emerging data visualization strategies that seek to make highly dimensional datasets both accessible and comprehensible.

  15. Hollow fiber apparatus and use thereof for fluids separations and heat and mass transfers

    DOEpatents

    Bikson, Benjamin; Etter, Stephen; Ching, Nathaniel

    2014-06-10

    A hollow fiber device includes a hollow fiber bundle, comprising a plurality of hollow fibers, a first tubesheet and a second tubesheet encapsulating respective distal ends of the hollow fiber bundle. The tubesheets have boreholes in fluid communication with bores of the hollow fibers. In at least one of the tubesheets, the boreholes are formed radially. The hollow fiber device can be utilized in heat exchange, in gas/gas, liquid/liquid and gas/liquid heat transfer, in combined heat and mass transfer and in fluid separation assemblies and processes. The design disclosed herein is light weight and compact and is particularly advantageous when the pressure of a first fluid introduced into the bores of hollow fibers is higher than the pressure on the shell side of the device.

  16. Identifying Gel-Separated Proteins Using In-Gel Digestion, Mass Spectrometry, and Database Searching: Consider the Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Jessica C.; Dassenko, David J.; Mohamed, Essa A.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is an important bioanalytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. This is an especially powerful tool when combined with gel separation of proteins and database mining using the mass spectral data. Currently, few hands-on…

  17. Single droplet separations and surface partition coefficient measurements using laser ablation mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2010-01-01

    Surface activity of analytes plays a significant role in many chemical and physical phenomena. We present here a mass spectrometric method to characterize surface activity and solute partitioning between bulk liquid and the gas-liquid interface in droplets. The approach employs ablation by an IR laser from the surface of a microliter droplet deposited on a stainless steel post. The ablated material is ionized for mass spectrometric analysis by either droplet charging or by post-ionization in an electrospray plume. Three areas of application have been explored using this method; 1) separations in a single droplet: continuous ablation by a series of many successive laser pulses results in faster depletion of more surface active analytes, effectively comprising a surface activity-based separation. 2) Partition coefficient measurements: droplet volume is held constant during ablation by continually replenishing lost solvent. This leads to analyte-specific ion signal decay curves that may be fitted to a model based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms and simple analytical expressions, yielding quantitative values for the analyte surface partition coefficients. 3) Studies of the relationship between surface partitioning and HPLC phase partitioning: comparisons of surface activities measured by laser desorption with retention times in reversed phase HPLC reveal that the relationship between the two partitioning processes is very sensitive to chemical structure. Poor correlation between the retention time and surface activity is also observed within a subcategory of analytes (peptides). This effect is attributed to multi-modal solute-stationary phase interactions. The laser desorption approach presented here provides direct information on analyte surface activities free from the complications encountered in chromatographic methods due to chemical structure variations. PMID:19886638

  18. PSEUDOSTREAMERS AS THE SOURCE OF A SEPARATE CLASS OF SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.

    2015-04-10

    Using white-light and extreme-ultraviolet imaging observations, we confirm that pseudostreamers (streamers that separate coronal holes of the same polarity) give rise to a different type of coronal mass ejection (CME) from that associated with helmet streamers (defined as separating coronal holes of opposite polarity). Whereas helmet streamers are the source of the familiar bubble-shaped CMEs characterized by gradual acceleration and a three-part structure, pseudostreamers produce narrower, fanlike ejections with roughly constant speeds. These ejections, which are typically triggered by underlying filament eruptions or small, flaring active regions, are confined laterally and channeled outward by the like-polarity open flux that converges onto the pseudostreamer plasma sheet from both sides. In contrast, helmet streamer CMEs are centered on the relatively weak field around the heliospheric current sheet and thus undergo greater lateral expansion. Pseudostreamer ejections have a morphological resemblance to white-light jets from coronal holes; however, unlike the latter, they are not primarily driven by interchange reconnection, and tend to have larger widths (∼20°–30°), lower speeds (∼250–700 km s{sup −1}), and more complex internal structure.

  19. Separation and Analysis of Boron Isotope in High Plant by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingcai; Dong, Yuliang; Zhu, Huayu; Sun, Aide

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of boron and its isotope in plants is useful to better understand the transposition and translocation of boron within plant, the geochemical behavior in the interface between soil and plant, and the biogeochemical cycle of boron. It is critical to develop a useful method to separate boron from the plant for the geochemical application of boron and its isotope. A method was developed for the extraction of boron in plant sample, whose isotope was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The results indicated that this method of dry ashing coupled with two-step ion-exchange chromatography is powerful for the separation of boron in plant sample with large amounts of organic matters completely. The ratios of boron isotope composition in those plant tissue samples ranged from −19.45‰ to +28.13‰ (total range: 47.58‰) with a mean value of 2.61 ± 11.76‰ SD. The stem and root isotopic compositions were lower than those in flower and leaf. The molecular mechanism of boron isotope may be responsible for the observed variation of boron isotopic composition and are considered as a useful tool for the better understanding of boron cycling process in the environment and for the signature of living systems. PMID:26819618

  20. Analysis of mouse liver membrane proteins using multidimensional separations and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuowei; Wang, Min; Tong, Wei

    2010-12-01

    In the field of proteomic investigation, the analysis of membrane proteins still faces many technical challenges. A fundamental question in this puzzle is how to maintain a proper solvent environment to allow the hydrophobic proteins to remain solubilized. We propose that the denaturation of membrane proteins in a highly concentrated urea solution enables them to be ionized such that ionic exchange chromatography can be employed to separate them. The membrane proteins prepared from the mouse liver were dissolved in 6M guanidine hydrochloride, 20mM Tris-HCl, pH 9.0, and loaded onto a tandem chromatography apparatus coupled with Q-Sepharose FF and Sephacryl S-200HR. These columns were able to adsorb 97.87% of the membrane protein preparations. Using a linear NaCl (0-1.0M) gradient, the bound proteins were eluted out at 0.1-1.0M NaCl, and examined by SDS-PAGE. Furthermore the protein bands underwent excision and digestion with trypsin, followed by reverse-phase chromatography for the separation of the digested peptides and ionic-trap mass spectrometry for the identification of the proteins. From the SDS-PAGE gels, the overlap between proteins from neighboring bands was only 21.34%, indicating that the anionic-size exclusion coupling chromatography efficiently separated these membrane proteins. Of a total of 392 proteins identified, 306 were membrane proteins or membrane-associated proteins. Based on the calculation of hydrophobicity, the GRAVY scores of 83 proteins are greater than, or equal to, 0.00. Taking all of this evidence together, our results revealed that this approach is satisfactory for studies on the membrane proteome from the mouse liver.

  1. Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

    2009-03-29

    Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

  2. Recoil Considerations for Shoulder-Fired Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    2012) Steyr 15.2 mm 35 g 1450 m/s 39.6 lb 11.4 Burns (2012) Type 97 (Japanese) 20 mm 162 g 790 m/s 130 lb 28.7 Burns (2012) 12HB00 ( Remington ...shotgun 0.727 in 807 gr (12 × 00) 1225 ft/s 7.0 lb 4.37 Remington (2011) Remington Express 12B0 shotgun 0.727 in 580 gr (12 × 0) 1275 ft/s...7.0 lb 3.28 Remington 5 Table 3. Recoil-related characteristics of selected shoulder-fired weapons cited in table 1. Nomenclature

  3. Optimal Control of Active Recoil Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    forces from 25 to 2.5% for lower zones and cavitation was avoided for zone 8. Tachometer feedback was shown to be effective for low zones. The...concept of feedback control system coupled with optimization procedure to design recoil mechanisms was demonstrated to be an efficient and very effective ...122o •nl260 .01300 .01340 .01380 • ouzo #01460 •01500 •01540 •01580 •0162" .0166 i 309o,6 504P.6 9964.5 10075,9 39121.5 75397.3

  4. Neutron electric form factor via recoil polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Madey, Richard; Semenov, Andrei; Taylor, Simon; Aghalaryan, Aram; Crouse, Erick; MacLachlan, Glen; Plaster, Bradley; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Tireman, William; Yan, Chenyu; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Anderson, Brian; Asaturyan, Razmik; Baker, O; Baldwin, Alan; Breuer, Herbert; Carlini, Roger; Christy, Michael; Churchwell, Steve; Cole, Leon; Danagoulian, Samuel; Day, Donal; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Fenker, Howard; Finn, John; Gan, Liping; Garrow, Kenneth; Gueye, Paul; Howell, Calvin; Hu, Bitao; Jones, Mark; Kelly, James; Keppel, Cynthia; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Wooyoung; Kowalski, Stanley; Lung, Allison; Mack, David; Manley, D; Markowitz, Pete; Mitchell, Joseph; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Opper, Allena; Perdrisat, Charles; Punjabi, Vina; Raue, Brian; Reichelt, Tilmann; Reinhold, Joerg; Roche, Julie; Sato, Yoshinori; Seo, Wonick; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Stepanyan, Samuel; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Tang, Liguang; Ulmer, Paul; Vulcan, William; Watson, John; Wells, Steven; Wesselmann, Frank; Wood, Stephen; Yan, Chen; Yang, Seunghoon; Yuan, Lulin; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Zhu, Hong Guo; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2003-05-01

    The ratio of the electric to the magnetic form factor of the neutron, G_En/G_Mn, was measured via recoil polarimetry from the quasielastic d({pol-e},e'{pol-n)p reaction at three values of Q^2 [viz., 0.45, 1.15 and 1.47 (GeV/c)^2] in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Preliminary data indicate that G_En follows the Galster parameterization up to Q^2 = 1.15 (GeV/c)^2 and appears to rise above the Galster parameterization at Q^2 = 1.47 (GeV/c)^2.

  5. Enhanced Mixture Separations of Metal Adducted Tetrasaccharides Using Frequency Encoded Ion Mobility Separations and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Kelsey A.; Bendiak, Brad K.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2016-10-01

    Using five isomeric tetrasaccharides in combination with seven multivalent metals, the impact on mobility separations and resulting CID spectra were examined using a hybrid ion mobility atmospheric pressure drift tube system coupled with a linear ion trap. By enhancing the duty cycle of the drift tube system using a linearly chirped frequency, the collision-induced dissociation spectra were encoded in the mobility domain according to the drift times of each glycan isomer precursor. Differential fragmentation patterns correlated with precursor drift times ensured direct assignment of fragments with precursor structure whether as individual standards or in a mixture of isomers. In addition to certain metal ions providing higher degrees of separation than others, in select cases more than one arrival time distribution was observed for a single pure carbohydrate isomer. These observations suggest the existence of alternative coordination sites within a single monomeric species, but more interesting was the observation of different fragmentation ion yields for carbohydrate dimers formed through metal adduction. Positive-ion data were also compared with negative-ion species, where dimer formation did not occur and single peaks were observed for each isomeric tetrasaccharide-alditol. This enhanced analytical power has implications not only for carbohydrate molecules but also for a wide variety of complex mixtures of molecules where dissociation spectra may potentially be derived from combinations of monomeric, homodimeric, and heterodimeric species having identical nominal m/z values.

  6. Studies of metallic species incorporation during growth of SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} films on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} substrates using mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Dhote, A. M.

    1999-01-13

    The incorporation of metallic species (Bi, Sr and Ta) during the growth of layered perovskite SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) on a-axis oriented YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) conducting oxide substrates has been investigated using in situ low energy mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI). This technique is capable of providing monolayer-specific surface information relevant to the growth of single and multi-component thin films and layered heterostructures. The data show a temperature dependence of metallic species incorporation during co-deposition of Sr, Bi and Ta on YBCO surfaces. At high temperatures (400 < T {le} 700 C), negligible incorporation of Bi is observed as compared to Ta and Sr. At low temperatures ({le} 400 C), there is a substantial incorporation of Bi, Sr and Ta on the surface of YBCO, and the MSRI signal intensities for Sr, Bi and Ta are nearly independent of substrate temperature. According to thermodynamic calculations, the presence of Ba and Y on the YBCO surface inhibit the incorporation of Bi due to competition for oxygen required to establish bonding of metallic species to the surface. This may be the explanation for the observed Bi deficiency in films grown on YBCO surfaces at temperatures >400 C. SBT films grown at temperatures {le} 400 C and annealed in oxygen or air at 800 C exhibit a polycrystalline structure with partial a-axis orientation.

  7. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Fallows, Scott Mathew

    2014-12-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for \\background- free" operation of CDMS II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space.

  8. Enriching and Separating Primary Copper Impurity from Pb-3 Mass Pct Cu Melt by Super-Gravity Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuhou; Song, Bo; Song, Gaoyang; Yang, Zhanbing; Xin, Wenbin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, super-gravity technology was introduced in the lead bullion-refining process to investigate the enriching and separating laws of copper impurity from Pb-3 mass pct Cu melt. With the gravity coefficient G = 700 at the cooling rate of ν = 5 K min-1, the entire copper phase gathers at the upper area of the sample, and it is hard to find any copper particles at the bottom area of the sample. The floatation movement of copper phase was greatly intensified by super gravity and the mass pct of copper in tailing lead is up to 8.631 pct, while that in the refined lead is only 0.113 pct. The refining rate of lead bullion reached up to 94.27 pct. Copper-phase impurity can be separated effectively from Pb-3 mass pct Cu melt by filtration method in super-gravity field, and the separation efficiency increased with the increasing gravity coefficient in the range of G ≥ 10. After filtration at 613 K (340 °C) with gravity coefficient G = 100 for 10 minutes, the refined lead, with just 0.157 mass pct copper impurity, was separated to the bottom of the crucible, and the copper dross containing only 23.56 mass pct residual lead was intercepted by the carbon fiber felt, leading to the separation efficiency up to 96.18 pct (meaning a great reduction in metal loss).

  9. A combined segmented anode gas ionization chamber and time-of-flight detector for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Possnert, Göran

    2016-10-01

    A dedicated detector system for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University is presented. Benefits of combining a time-of-flight measurement with a segmented anode gas ionization chamber are demonstrated. The capability of ion species identification is improved with the present system, compared to that obtained when using a single solid state silicon detector for the full ion energy signal. The system enables separation of light elements, up to Neon, based on atomic number while signals from heavy elements such as molybdenum and tungsten are separated based on mass, to a sample depth on the order of 1 μm. The performance of the system is discussed and a selection of material analysis applications is given. Plasma-facing materials from fusion experiments, in particular metal mirrors, are used as a main example for the discussion. Marker experiments using nitrogen-15 or oxygen-18 are specific cases for which the described improved species separation and sensitivity are required. Resilience to radiation damage and significantly improved energy resolution for heavy elements at low energies are additional benefits of the gas ionization chamber over a solid state detector based system.

  10. Heavy ion recoil spectrometry of barium strontium titanate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannard, W. B.; Johnston, P. N.; Walker, S. R.; Bubb, I. F.; Scott, J. F.; Cohen, D. D.; Dytlewski, N.; Martin, J. W.

    1995-05-01

    Thin films of barium strontium titanate have been analysed using heavy ion recoil spectrometry with 77 and 98 MeV 127I ions at the new heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. New calibration procedures have been developed for quantitative analysis. Energy spectra for each of the elements present reveal interdiffusion that was not previously known.

  11. Modeling the Observability of Recoiling Black Holes as Offset Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecha, Laura; Torrey, Paul; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Springel, Volker; Sijacki, Debora; Snyder, Gregory; Bird, Simeon; Nelson, Dylan; Xu, Dandan; Hernquist, Lars

    The merger of two supermassive black holes (SMBHs) imparts a gravitational-wave (GW) recoil kick to the remnant SMBH, which can even eject the SMBH from its host galaxy. An actively-accreting, recoiling SMBH may be observable as an offset quasar. Prior to the advent of a space-based GW observatory, detections of these offset quasars may offer the best chance for identifying recent SMBH mergers. Indeed, observational searches for recoiling quasars have already identified several promising candidates. However, systematic searches for recoils are currently hampered by large uncertainties regarding how often offset quasars should be observable and where they are most likely to be found. Motivated by this, we have developed a model for recoiling quasars in a cosmological framework, utilizing information about the progenitor galaxies from the Illustris cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. For the first time, we model the effects of BH spin alignment and recoil dynamics based on the gas-richness of host galaxies. We predict that if BH spins are not highly aligned, seeing-limited observations could resolve offset AGN, making them promising targets for all-sky surveys. The rarity of large broad-line offsets among SDSS quasars is likely due in part to selection effects but suggests that spin alignment plays a role in suppressing recoils. Nonetheless, in our most physically motivated model where alignment occurs only in gas-rich mergers, hundreds of offset AGN should be found in all-sky surveys. Our findings strongly motivate a dedicated search for recoiling AGN.

  12. Constraints on the Nature of CID-42: Recoil Kick or Supermassive Black Hole Pair?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blecha, Laura; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The galaxy CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, is a highly unusual object. An apparent galaxy merger remnant, it displays signatures of both an inspiraling, kiloparsecscale active galactic nucleus (AGN) pair and of a recoiling AGN with a kick velocity approximately greater than 1300 km s(exp -1). Among recoiling AGN candidates, CID-42 alone has both spatial offsets (in optical and X-ray bands) and spectroscopic offsets. In order to constrain the relative likelihood of both scenarios, we develop models using hydrodynamic galaxy merger simulations coupled with radiative transfer calculations. Our gas-rich, major merger models are generally well matched to the galactic morphology and to the inferred stellar mass and star formation rate. We show that a recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) in CID-42 should be observable as an AGN at the time of observation. However, in order for the recoiling AGN to produce narrow-line emission, it must be observed shortly after the kick while it still inhabits a dense gaseous region, implying a large total kick velocity (vk approximately greater than 2000 km s(exp -1)). For the dual AGN scenario, an unusually large broad-line offset is required, and the best match to the observed morphology requires a galaxy that is less luminous than CID-42. Further, the lack of X-ray emission from one of the two optical nuclei is not easily attributed to an intrinsically quiescent SMBH or to a Compton-thick galactic environment. While the current data do not allow either the recoiling or the dual AGN scenario for CID-42 to be excluded, our models highlight the most relevant parameters for distinguishing these possibilities with future observations. In particular, high-quality, spatially-resolved spectra that can pinpoint the origin of the broad and narrow line features will be critical for determining the nature of this unique source.

  13. Constraints on the nature of CID-42: recoil kick or supermassive black hole pair?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecha, Laura; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    The galaxy CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, is a highly unusual object. As an apparent galaxy merger remnant, it displays signatures of both an inspiraling, kiloparsec-scale active galactic nucleus (AGN) pair and of a recoiling AGN with a kick velocity of ≳ 1300 km s-1. Among recoiling AGN candidates, CID-42 alone has both spatial offsets (in optical and X-ray bands) and spectroscopic offsets. In order to constrain the relative likelihood of both scenarios, we develop models using hydrodynamic galaxy merger simulations coupled with radiative transfer calculations. Our gas-rich, major merger models are generally well matched to the galactic morphology and to the inferred stellar mass and star formation rate. We show that a recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) in CID-42 should be observable as an AGN at the time of observation. However, in order for the recoiling AGN to produce narrow-line emission, it must be observed shortly after the kick while it still inhabits a dense gaseous region, implying a large total kick velocity (vk ≳ 2000 km s-1). For the dual AGN scenario, an unusually large broad-line offset is required, and the best match to the observed morphology requires a galaxy that is less luminous than CID-42. Further, the lack of X-ray emission from one of the two optical nuclei is not easily attributed to an intrinsically quiescent SMBH or to a Compton thick galactic environment. While the current data do not allow either the recoiling or the dual AGN scenario for CID-42 to be excluded, our models highlight the most relevant parameters for distinguishing these possibilities with future observations. In particular, high-quality, spatially resolved spectra that can pinpoint the origin of the broad-line and narrow-line features will be critical for determining the nature of this unique source.

  14. Mosquito mass rearing technology: a cold-water vortex device for continuous unattended separation of Anopheles arabiensis pupae from larvae.

    PubMed

    Balestrino, Fabrizio; Gilles, Jérémie R L; Soliban, Sharon M; Nirschl, Anton; Benedict, Quentin E; Benedict, Mark Q

    2011-09-01

    In mass rearing of anopheline mosquitoes, pupae are usually separated from larvae on a daily basis to prevent unwanted adult emergence from trays. Depending on the device and species, 2 physical characteristics have most often been used for separation: buoyant density and size. In this report, we describe a system for continuous separation of Anopheles arabiensis larvae from pupae based on the natural difference in buoyant density and behavior between the 2 stages. We determined that temperatures 4-15 degrees C caused neither mortality nor reduction in likelihood of pupation or emergence. Separation improved as temperatures decreased down to 4 degrees C. We devised and demonstrated a 15 degrees C water vortex separator that we anticipate can process approximately 1 million larvae and pupae per hour with a < 0.3% pupal contamination rate and which operates unattended.

  15. Recoil Experiments Using a Compressed Air Cannon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Brett

    2006-12-01

    Ping-Pong vacuum cannons, potato guns, and compressed air cannons are popular and dramatic demonstrations for lecture and lab.1-3 Students enjoy them for the spectacle, but they can also be used effectively to teach physics. Recently we have used a student-built compressed air cannon as a laboratory activity to investigate impulse, conservation of momentum, and kinematics. It is possible to use the cannon, along with the output from an electronic force plate, as the basis for many other experiments in the laboratory. In this paper, we will discuss the recoil experiment done by our students in the lab and also mention a few other possibilities that this apparatus could be used for.

  16. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  17. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis.

    PubMed

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si3N4 membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  18. Measurement of the ionization produced by sub-keV silicon nuclear recoils in a CCD dark matter detector

    DOE PAGES

    Chavarria, A. E.; Collar, J. I.; Peña, J. R.; ...

    2016-10-15

    We report a measurement of the ionization efficiency of silicon nuclei recoiling with sub-keV kinetic energy in the bulk silicon of a charge-coupled device (CCD). Nuclear recoils are produced by low-energy neutrons (<24 keV) from a 124Sb–9Be photoneutron source, and their ionization signal is measured down to 60 eV electron equivalent. This energy range, previously unexplored, is relevant for the detection of low-mass dark matter particles. The measured efficiency is found to deviate from the extrapolation to low energies of the Lindhard model. Furthermore, this measurement also demonstrates the sensitivity to nuclear recoils of CCDs employed by DAMIC, a darkmore » matter direct detection experiment located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory.« less

  19. Measurement of the ionization produced by sub-keV silicon nuclear recoils in a CCD dark matter detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chavarria, A. E.; Collar, J. I.; Peña, J. R.; Privitera, P.; Robinson, A. E.; Scholz, B.; Sengul, C.; Zhou, J.; Estrada, J.; Izraelevitch, F.; Tiffenberg, J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Machado, D. Torres

    2016-10-15

    We report a measurement of the ionization efficiency of silicon nuclei recoiling with sub-keV kinetic energy in the bulk silicon of a charge-coupled device (CCD). Nuclear recoils are produced by low-energy neutrons (<24 keV) from a 124Sb–9Be photoneutron source, and their ionization signal is measured down to 60 eV electron equivalent. This energy range, previously unexplored, is relevant for the detection of low-mass dark matter particles. The measured efficiency is found to deviate from the extrapolation to low energies of the Lindhard model. Furthermore, this measurement also demonstrates the sensitivity to nuclear recoils of CCDs employed by DAMIC, a dark matter direct detection experiment located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory.

  20. A gun recoil system employing a magnetorheological fluid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. C.; Wang, J.

    2012-10-01

    This research aims to design and control a full scale gun recoil buffering system which works under real firing impact loading conditions. A conventional gun recoil absorber is replaced with a controllable magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper. Through dynamic analysis of the gun recoil system, a theoretical model for optimal design and control of the MR fluid damper for impact loadings is derived. The optimal displacement, velocity and optimal design rules are obtained. By applying the optimal design theory to protect against impact loadings, an MR fluid damper for a full scale gun recoil system is designed and manufactured. An experimental study is carried out on a firing test rig which consists of a 30 mm caliber, multi-action automatic gun with an MR damper mounted to the fixed base through a sliding guide. Experimental buffering results under passive control and optimal control are obtained. By comparison, optimal control is better than passive control, because it produces smaller variation in the recoil force while achieving less displacement of the recoil body. The optimal control strategy presented in this paper is open-loop with no feedback system needed. This means that the control process is sensor-free. This is a great benefit for a buffering system under impact loading, especially for a gun recoil system which usually works in a harsh environment.

  1. Atom interferometric studies of light scattering - A new technique for measuring atomic recoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Scott

    This dissertation presents two techniques for measuring the atomic recoil frequency, oq, using a single-state atom interferometer that utilizes a dilute cloud of laser-cooled 85Rb atoms. An important motivation for these measurements is that o q, which is related to the ratio of Planck's constant and the atomic mass of rubidium hmRb , can be used to infer the atomic fine structure constant, alpha. The two techniques presented here involve time domain measurements carried out with standing-wave laser fields that manipulate atoms in the same atomic ground state and exploit the wave nature of cold atoms. The first technique uses two off-resonant standing-wave pulses to interfere momentum states so that the recoil frequency can be determined. However, to model the signal shape it is necessary to include effects of spontaneous emission during the interaction with light and the spatial profile of the laser beam. The second technique provides a robust alternative approach for measuring the recoil frequency because the signal shape is considerably simpler and can be modeled easily. We report measurements of atomic recoil using both techniques that are precise to ˜ 1 part per million. The precision was limited mainly by the time scale of the experiment (˜ 20 ms) due to the presence of magnetic field gradients. The dissertation also discusses recent improvements that have extended the time scale to the transit time limit for cold atoms. This is the time of travel of cold atoms through the region of interaction defined by the laser beams. The interferometer uses two standing-wave pulses separated by time T to put the atoms in a superposition of momentum states. Interference between momentum states produce a density grating echo signal at time 2 T. The echo time, 2T, corresponds to the time at which the Doppler phases of the momentum states associated with all atoms in the sample cancel. The echo technique is, therefore, a general method to overcome the effect of the

  2. Nuclear Recoil Effect in the Lamb Shift of Light Hydrogenlike Atoms.

    PubMed

    Yerokhin, V A; Shabaev, V M

    2015-12-04

    We report high-precision calculations of the nuclear recoil effect to the Lamb shift of hydrogenlike atoms to the first order in the electron-nucleus mass ratio and to all orders in the nuclear binding strength parameter Zα. The results are in excellent agreement with the known terms of the Zα expansion and allow an accurate identification of the nonperturbative higher-order remainder. For hydrogen, the higher-order remainder was found to be much larger than anticipated. This result resolves the long-standing disagreement between the numerical all-order and analytical Zα-expansion approaches to the recoil effect and completely removes the second-largest theoretical uncertainty in the hydrogen Lamb shift of the 1S and 2S states.

  3. Nuclear Recoil Effect in the Lamb Shift of Light Hydrogenlike Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, V. A.; Shabaev, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    We report high-precision calculations of the nuclear recoil effect to the Lamb shift of hydrogenlike atoms to the first order in the electron-nucleus mass ratio and to all orders in the nuclear binding strength parameter Z α . The results are in excellent agreement with the known terms of the Z α expansion and allow an accurate identification of the nonperturbative higher-order remainder. For hydrogen, the higher-order remainder was found to be much larger than anticipated. This result resolves the long-standing disagreement between the numerical all-order and analytical Z α -expansion approaches to the recoil effect and completely removes the second-largest theoretical uncertainty in the hydrogen Lamb shift of the 1 S and 2 S states.

  4. Nuclear recoil corrections to the Lamb shift of hydrogen and light hydrogenlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, V. A.; Shabaev, V. M.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate calculations of the nuclear recoil effect on the Lamb shift of hydrogenlike atoms are presented. Numerical results are reported for the n s states with n ≤5 and for the 2 p1 /2 and 2 p3 /2 states. The calculations are performed to the first order in the electron-nucleus mass ratio and to all orders in the nuclear binding strength parameter Z α (where Z is the nuclear charge number and α is the fine structure constant). The obtained results provide accurate predictions for the higher-order remainder beyond the known Z α -expansion terms. In the case of hydrogen, the remainder was found to be much larger than anticipated. This result resolves the previously reported disagreement between the numerical all-order and the analytical Z α -expansion approaches for the nuclear recoil effect on the hydrogen Lamb shift.

  5. Zooming in on B→ K^*ℓ ℓ decays at low recoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braß, Simon; Hiller, Gudrun; Nišandžić, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    We analyse B→ K^*ℓ ℓ decays in the region of low hadronic recoil, where an operator product expansion (OPE) in 1/m_b applies. Using a local model for charm contributions based on e^+ e^- → hadrons against the OPE provides a data-driven method to access the limitations to the OPE's accuracy related to binnings in the dilepton mass. Model-independent fits to B→ K^*μ μ low recoil angular observables exhibit presently only small sensitivity to different charm models. They give similar results to the fits based on the OPE and are in agreement with the standard model, but leave also room for new physics. Measurements with resolution small enough to probe charm resonances would be desirable.

  6. Difference between a Photon's Momentum and an Atom's Recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Gibble, Kurt

    2006-08-18

    When an atom absorbs a photon from a laser beam that is not an infinite plane wave, the atom's recoil is less than ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})k in the propagation direction. We show that the recoils in the transverse directions produce a lensing of the atomic wave functions, which leads to a frequency shift that is not discrete but varies linearly with the field amplitude and strongly depends on the atomic state detection. The same lensing effect is also important for microwave atomic clocks. The frequency shifts are of the order of the naive recoil shift for the transverse wave vector of the photons.

  7. Kinematically Identified Recoiling Supermassive Black Hole Candidates in SDSS QSOs with z > 0.25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.-C.; Evans, A. S.; Stierwalt, S.; Privon, G. C.

    2016-06-01

    We have performed a spectral decomposition to search for recoiling supermassive black holes (rSMBHs) in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) with z < 0.25. Out of 1271 QSOs, we have identified 26 rSMBH candidates that are recoiling toward us. The projected recoil velocities range from -76 to -307 km s-1 with a mean of -149 ± 58 km s-1. Most of the rSMBH candidates are hosted by gas-rich luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs)/ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), but only 23% of them show signs of tidal features, which suggests that a majority of them are advanced mergers. We find that the black hole masses M BH of the rSMBH candidates are on average ˜5 times smaller than those of their stationary counterparts and cause a scatter in the {M}{BH}-{σ }\\ast relation. The Eddington ratios of all of the rSMBH candidates are larger than 0.1, with a mean of 0.52 ± 0.27, suggesting that they are actively accreting mass. Velocity shifts in high-excitation coronal lines suggest that the rSMBH candidates are recoiling with an average velocity of about -265 km s-1. The electron density in the narrow line region of the H ii rSMBH candidates is about 1/10 of that in active galactic nucleus (AGN) rSMBH candidates, probably because the AGN in the former was more spatially offset than that in the latter. The estimated spatial offsets between the rSMBH candidate and the center of the host galaxy range from 0.″21 to 1.″97 and need to be confirmed spatially with high-resolution adaptive optics imaging observations.

  8. Multidimensional Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Separation by Polarity or Shape for the Characterization of Sugar-Based Nonionic Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Katzenmeyer, Bryan C; Hague, Shayna F; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2016-01-05

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) were interfaced with ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and ion mobility (IM) separation to characterize a complex nonionic surfactant, consisting of a methylated glucose core (glucam) conjugated with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO(n)) branches that were partially esterified with stearic acid to form ethoxylated glucam (PEO(n)-glucam) stearates. Reverse-phase LC-MS afforded fast separation according to polarity into five major fractions. Accurate mass measurements of the ions in the mass spectra extracted from these fractions enabled conclusive identification of six components in the surfactant, including PEO(n)-glucam mono-, di-, and tristearates as well as free and esterified PEO(n) as byproducts. MS/MS experiments provided corroborating evidence for the fatty acid content in each fraction based on the number of stearic acid losses observed. With IM-MS, the total surfactant ions were separated according to charge and shape into four distinct bands. Extracted mass spectra confirmed the presence of two disaccharide stearates in the surfactant, which were undetectable by LC-MS. PEO(n)-glucam tristearates were, however, not observed upon IM-MS. Hence, LC-MS and IM-MS unveiled complementary compositional insight. With each method, certain components were particularly well separated from other ingredients (by either polarity or shape), to be detected with confidence. Consequently, combined LC-MS and IM-MS offer a superior approach for the characterization of surfactants and other amphiphilic polymers and for the differentiation of similarly composed amphiphilic blends. It is finally noteworthy that NH4(+) charges minimized chemical noise in MS mode and Li(+) charges maximized the fragmentation efficiency in MS/MS mode.

  9. The direct determination of the masses of unstable atoms with the chalk river on-line isotope separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, K. S.; Schmeing, H.; Evans, H. C.; Hagberg, E.; Hardy, J. C.; Koslowsky, V. T.

    1989-02-01

    A new technique has been developed to measure the spacing of atomic mass doublets of radioactive isotopes directly with an on-line isotope separator. It relies not on ion detection but on observation of the specific radioactive signature of the isotopes under study. Consequently, line shapes and centroids can be determined, free of interference and with great accuracy, even if the corresponding beams strongly overlap or if they are contaminated by unwanted isobars or isomers. In particular, it is of no consequence if one or both members of the doublet are masked by stable background peaks. Doublets are peak matched as in a conventional mass spectrometer. The technique has been evaluated with beams of radioactive nuclides whose masses are known independently. Based on careful calibrations, two new mass values have been obtained: 72Br, 71 936 340 ± 430 μu and 63Ga, 62 939 570 ± 150 μu.

  10. Separation of VX, RVX and GB Enantiomers Using Liquid ChromatographyTime-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (Aberdeen Proving Ground , MD). Samples were made at a 100 µg/mL level for analytical separation and a 22 mg/mL...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT: Chemical nerve agents such...Phenomenex; Torrance, CA) was used to separate the enantiomers for all V and G agents within 15 min. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mode was

  11. A Proton Recoil Telescope for Neutron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinausero, M.; Barbui, M.; Prete, G.; Rizzi, V.; Andrighetto, A.; Pesente, S.; Fabris, D.; Lunardon, M.; Nebbia, G.; Viesti, G.; Moretto, S.; Morando, M.; Zenoni, A.; Bocci, F.; Donzella, A.; Bonomi, G.; Fontana, A.

    2006-05-01

    The N2P research program funded by the INFN committee for Experimental Nuclear Physics (CSNIII) has among his goals the construction of a Proton Recoil Telescope (PRT), a detector to measure neutron energy spectra. The interest in such a detector is primarily related to the SPES project for rare beams production at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. For the SPES project it is, in fact, of fundamental importance to have reliable information about energy spectra and yield for neutrons produced by d or p projectiles on thick light targets to model the ''conversion target'' in which the p or d are converted in neutrons. These neutrons, in a second stage, will induce the Uranium fission in the ''production target''. The fission products are subsequently extracted, selected and re-accelerated to produce the exotic beam. The neutron spectra and angular distribution are important parameters to define the final production of fission fragments. In addition, this detector can be used to measure neutron spectra in the field of cancer therapy (this topic is nowadays of particular interest to INFN, for the National Centre for Hadron therapy (CNAO) in Pavia) and space applications.

  12. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as an element-specific detector for field-flow fractionation particle separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Howard E.; Garbarino, John R.; Murphy, Deirdre M.; Beckett, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer was used for the quantitative measurement of trace elements In specific,submicrometer size-fraction particulates, separated by sedimentation field-flow fractionation. Fractions were collected from the eluent of the field-flow fractionation centrifuge and nebulized, with a Babington-type pneumatic nebulizer, into an argon inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. Measured Ion currents were used to quantify the major, minor, and trace element composition of the size-separated colloidal (< 1-microm diameter) particulates. The composition of surface-water suspended matter collected from the Yarra and Darling rivers in Australia is presented to illustrate the usefulness of this tool for characterizing environmental materials. An adsorption experiment was performed using cadmium lon to demonstrate the utility for studying the processes of trace metal-suspended sediment interactions and contaminant transport in natural aquatic systems.

  13. Separation and identification of Musa acuminate Colla (banana) leaf proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Qi, Y X; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Q; Pu, J J; Xie, Y X

    2013-12-19

    To establish a proteomic reference map of Musa acuminate Colla (banana) leaf, we separated and identified leaf proteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). Tryptic digests of 44 spots were subjected to peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS. Three spots that were not identified by MALDI-TOF MS analysis were identified by searching against the NCBInr, SwissProt, and expressed sequence tag (EST) databases. We identified 41 unique proteins. The majority of the identified leaf proteins were found to be involved in energy metabolism. The results indicate that 2D-PAGE is a sensitive and powerful technique for the separation and identification of Musa leaf proteins. A summary of the identified proteins and their putative functions is discussed.

  14. Automated Sampling and Imaging of Analytes Separated on Thin-Layer Chromatography Plates Using Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2006-01-01

    Modest modifications to the atmospheric sampling capillary of a commercial electrospray mass spectrometer and upgrades to an in-house developed surface positioning control software package (HandsFree TLC/MS ) were used to enable the automated sampling and imaging of analytes on and/or within large area surface substrates using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Sampling and imaging of rhodamine dyes separated on TLC plates were used to illustrate some of the practical applications of this system. Examples are shown for user-defined spot sampling from separated bands on a TLC plate (one or multiple spots), scanning of a complete development lane (one or multiple lanes), or imaging of analyte bands in a development lane (i.e. multiple lane scans with close spacing). The post data processing and data display aspects of the software system are also discussed.

  15. First Measurement of Beam-Recoil Observables Cx and Cz

    SciTech Connect

    R. Bradford; R.A. Schumacher; G. Adams; M.J. Amaryan; P. Ambrozewicz; E. Anciant; M. Anghinolfi; B. Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; G. Audit; H. Avakian; H. Bagdasaryan; N. Baillie; J.P. Ball; N.A. Baltzell; S. Barrow; V. Batourine; M. Battaglieri; K. Beard; I. Bedlinskiy; M. Bektasoglu; M. Bellis; N. Benmouna; B.L. Berman; N. Bianchi; A.S. Biselli; B.E. Bonner; S. Bouchigny; S. Boiarinov; D. Branford; W.J. Briscoe; W.K. Brooks; S. B¨ultmann; V.D. Burkert; C. Butuceanu; J.R. Calarco; S.L. Careccia; D.S. Carman; B. Carnahan; S. Chen; P.L. Cole; A. Coleman; P. Collins; P. Coltharp; D. Cords; † P. Corvisiero; D. Crabb; H. Crannell; V. Crede; J.P. Cummings; R. De Masi; E. De Sanctis; R. De Vita; P.V. Degtyarenko; H. Denizli; L. Dennis; A. Deur; K.V. Dharmawardane; R. Dickson; C. Djalali; G.E. Dodge; J. Donnelly; D. Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; M. Dugger; S. Dytman; O.P. Dzyubak; H. Egiyan; K.S. Egiyan; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; P. Eugenio; R. Fatemi; G. Fedotov; G. Feldman; R.J. Feuerbach; T.A. Forest; H. Funsten; M. Garcon; G. Gavalian; G.P. Gilfoyle; K.L. Giovanetti; F.X. Girod; J.T. Goetz; A. Gonenc; R.W. Gothe; K.A. Griffioen; M. Guidal; M. Guillo; N. Guler; L. Guo; V. Gyurjyan; C. Hadjidakis; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; R.S. Hakobyan; J. Hardie; D. Heddle; F.W. Hersman; K. Hicks; I. Hleiqawi; M. Holtrop; J. Hu; M. Huertas; C.E. Hyde-Wright; Y. Ilieva; D.G. Ireland; B.S. Ishkhanov; E.L. Isupov; M.M. Ito; D. Jenkins; H.S. Jo; K. Joo; H.G. Juengst; N. Kalantarians; J.D. Kellie; M. Khandaker; K.Y. Kim; K. Kim; W. Kim; A. Klein; F.J. Klein; M. Klusman; M. Kossov; L.H. Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; J. Kuhn; S.E. Kuhn; S.V. Kuleshov; J. Lachniet; J.M. Laget; J. Langheinrich; D. Lawrence; A.C.S. Lima; K. Livingston; H.Y. Lu; K. Lukashin; M. MacCormick; J.J. Manak; C. Marchand; N. Markov; S. McAleer; B. McKinnon; J.W.C. McNabb; B.A. Mecking; M.D. Mestayer; C.A. Meyer; T. Mibe; K. Mikhailov; M. Mirazita; R. Miskimen; V. Mokeev; K. Moriya; S.A. Morrow; M. Moteabbed; V. Muccifora; J. Mueller; G.S. Mutchler; P. Nadel-Turonski; J. Napolitano; R. Nasseripour; N. Natasha; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; B.B. Niczyporuk; M.R. Niroula; R.A. Niyazov; M. Nozar; G.V. O’Rielly; M. Osipenko; A.I. Ostrovidov; K. Park; E. Pasyuk; C. Paterson; S.A. Philips; J. Pierce; N. Pivnyuk; D. Pocanic; O. Pogorelko; E. Polli; I. Popa; S. Pozdniakov; B.M. Preedom; J.W. Price; Y. Prok; D. Protopopescu; L.M. Qin; B.P. Quinn; B.A. Raue; G. Riccardi; G. Ricco; M. Ripani; B.G. Ritchie; F. Ronchetti; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; D. Rowntree; P.D. Rubin; F. Sabatie; J. Salamanca; C. Salgado; J.P. Santoro; V. Sapunenko; V.S. Serov; A. Shafi; Y.G. Sharabian; J. Shaw; N.V. Shvedunov; S. Simionatto; A.V. Skabelin; E.S. Smith; L.C. Smith; D.I. Sober; D. Sokhan; M. Spraker; A. Stavinsky; S.S. Stepanyan; S. Stepanyan; B.E. Stokes; P. Stoler; I.I. Strakovsky; S. Strauch; M. Taiuti; S. Taylor; D.J. Tedeschi; U. Thoma; R. Thompson; A. Tkabladze; S. Tkachenko; L. Todor; C. Tur; M. Ungaro; M.F. Vineyard; A.V. Vlassov; K. Wang; D.P. Watts; L.B. Weinstein; H. Weller; D.P. Weygand; M. Williams; E. Wolin; M.H. Wood; A. Yegneswaran; J. Yun; L. Zana; J. Zhang; B. Zhao; and Z.W. Zhao

    2007-03-01

    Spin transfer from circularly polarized real photons to recoiling hyperons has been measured for the reactions $\\vec\\gamma + p \\to K^+ + \\vec\\Lambda$ and $\\vec\\gamma + p \\to K^+ + \\vec\\Sigma^0$. The data were obtained using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies $W$ between 1.6 and 2.53 GeV, and for $-0.85<\\cos\\theta_{K^+}^{c.m.}< +0.95$. For the $\\Lambda$, the polarization transfer coefficient along the photon momentum axis, $C_z$, was found to be near unity for a wide range of energy and kaon production angles. The associated transverse polarization coefficient, $C_x$, is smaller than $C_z$ by a roughly constant difference of unity. Most significantly, the {\\it total} $\\Lambda$ polarization vector, including the induced polarization $P$, has magnitude consistent with unity at all measured energies and production angles when the beam is fully polarized. For the $\\Sigma^0$ this simple phenomenology does not hold. All existing hadrodynamic models are in poor agreement with these results.

  16. An Experimental Study of Electromagnetic Lorentz Force and Rail Recoil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    MOTIVATION For over 200 years, electromagnetic forces have been extensively researched. During 1802 , Gian Domenico Romagnosi noticed that a magnetic...C. Woods, “Comment: Origin, location, magnitude and consequences of recoil in the plasma armature railgun,” Inst. Elect. Eng. Proc. Sci. Meas...22, pp. 849-850, 1989. [26] A. E. Witalis, “Origin, location, magnitude and consequences of recoil in the plasma armature railgun,” Inst. Elect

  17. Heat and mass transfer in porous media phase separation at temperatures below the lambda-point of He-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1986-01-01

    Newtonian fluid motion, coupled to heat transfer via latent heat of phase transition, is well known from numerous studies of condensation and boiling. Considerably less knowledge is available for vapor-liquid phase separation in the absence of gravity effect on the transport phenomena. The present studies are focused on heat and mass transfer associated with vapor-liquid phase separation required for long-term storage of the cryogen liquid He II in space vessels. Though space conditions are the dominant mode of interest in advanced equipment, e.g. IR telescopes, the systems may be operated in principle during terrestrial conditions. The latter are considered in the present work. It emphasizes the linear regime including an extrapolation based on variable thermophysical properties. Data taken with a phase separation approach show departures from the linear regime prediction. They agree with a transport equation proposed for the nonlinear, turbulent regime.

  18. Ion Mobility Separations of Isomers based upon Long Path Length Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Baker, Erin S.; Aly, Noor A.; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Xueyun; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Webb, Ian K.; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based multi-omic measurements, including proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics, and glycomics, are increasingly transforming our ability to characterize and understand biological systems, but, presently have limitations due to the chemical diversity and range of abundances of biomolecules in complex samples. Advances addressing these challenges increasingly are based upon the ability to quickly separate, react and otherwise manipulate sample components for analysis by MS. Here we report on a new approach using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) to enable long serpentine path ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations followed by MS analyses. This approach provides previously unachieved mobility biomolecule isomer separations for biomolecular species, in conjunction with more effective ion utilization, and producing a basis for the improved characterization of very small samples.

  19. In-situ, real-time, studies of film growth processes using ion scattering and direct recoil spectroscopy techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Smentkowski, V. S.

    1999-04-22

    Time-of-flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy (TOF-ISARS) enables the characterization of the composition and structure of surfaces with 1-2 monolayer specificity. It will be shown that surface analysis is possible at ambient pressures greater than 3 mTorr using TOF-ISARS techniques; allowing for real-time, in situ studies of film growth processes. TOF-ISARS comprises three analytical techniques: ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), which detects the backscattered primary ion beam; direct recoil spectroscopy (DRS), which detects the surface species recoiled into the forward scattering direction; and mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI), which is 3 variant of DRS capable of isotopic resolution for all surface species--including H and He. The advantages and limitations of each of these techniques will be discussed. The use of the three TOF-ISARS methods for real-time, in situ film growth studies at high ambient pressures will be illustrated. It will be shown that MSRI analysis is possible during sputter deposition. It will be also be demonstrated that the analyzer used for MSRI can also be used for time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) under high vacuum conditions. The use of a single analyzer to perform the complimentary surface analytical techniques of MSRI and SIMS is unique. The dwd functionality of the MSRI analyzer provides surface information not obtained when either MSRI or SIMS is used independently.

  20. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of a coal extract and its fractions separated by planar chromatography: correlation of structural features with molecular mass

    PubMed

    Islas; Suelves; Carter; Herod; Kandiyoti

    2000-01-01

    The structural characterisation of a coal liquefaction extract and its three fractions separated by planar chromatography has been described. Size exclusion chromatography showed the molecular mass distributions to become progressively larger with decreasing mobility on the plate. UV-fluorescence spectroscopy of the fractions indicated parallel increases in the sizes of polynuclear aromatic ring systems. Analysis by probe-mass spectrometry of the 'whole' coal extract showed the expected array of small polynuclear aromatic groups extending to m/z 450. The probe mass spectra of the lightest fraction ('mobile in pyridine and acetonitrile') showed similar features, except for effects due to vacuum drying to remove solvent. In sharp contrast, the two heaviest fractions ('mobile in pyridine and immobile in acetonitrile' and 'immobile in pyridine') showed no significant ions other than those from residual NMP solvent (m/z 98 and 99). Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of these two heaviest fractions showed only traces of aromatic compounds or fragments. The aromatic pyrolysis products of these fractions were too large and involatile to pass through the GC column. The major components observed in the pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the two heavy fractions were alkanes and alkenes, ranging between C10-C25. Since none of the samples contained free alkanes, alkenes or cycloalkanes before pyrolysis, they were generated during the pyrolysis step. The shifts of UV-fluorescence spectral intensity to shorter wavelengths with decreasing size indicated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) provide direct evidence of differences in structure with changing molecular mass. This evidence strongly suggests that species identified as being of large molecular mass in this extract sample are not composed of molecular aggregates. It remains difficult to establish whether and when it would be legitimate to invoke molecular aggregates to explain the large

  1. Dual reductive/oxidative electrochemistry/liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry: Towards peptide and protein modification, separation and identification.

    PubMed

    Büter, Lars; Frensemeier, Lisa M; Vogel, Martin; Karst, Uwe

    2017-01-06

    A new hyphenated technique based on on-line dual (oxidative and reductive) electrochemistry coupled to liquid chromatography and high resolution electrospray mass spectrometry is presented. Two liquid streams are combined, with one containing a disulfide, which is reduced to the respective thiol in an electrochemical cell based on a titanium working electrode. The other stream contains phenol, which is electrochemically activated to benzoquinone on a boron-doped diamond working electrode. Upon combination of the two streams, a Michael addition takes places, leading to the covalent coupling of thiol to quinone. In continuous flow, the reaction mixture is transferred into an injection valve and the products are separated by reversed phase liquid chromatography and detected by electrospray-high resolution mass spectrometry. Proof of concept is demonstrated for low molecular mass disulfides and peptides, but further optimization will be required in future work to achieve efficient protein labelling.

  2. A mass-balance model to separate and quantify colloidal and solute redistributions in soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, C.R.; Chadwick, O.A.; Hartshorn, A.S.; Khomo, L.M.; Chorover, J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of weathering and pedogenesis have long used calculations based upon low solubility index elements to determine mass gains and losses in open systems. One of the questions currently unanswered in these settings is the degree to which mass is transferred in solution (solutes) versus suspension (colloids). Here we show that differential mobility of the low solubility, high field strength (HFS) elements Ti and Zr can trace colloidal redistribution, and we present a model for distinguishing between mass transfer in suspension and solution. The model is tested on a well-differentiated granitic catena located in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Ti and Zr ratios from parent material, soil and colloidal material are substituted into a mixing equation to quantify colloidal movement. The results show zones of both colloid removal and augmentation along the catena. Colloidal losses of 110kgm-2 (-5% relative to parent material) are calculated for one eluviated soil profile. A downslope illuviated profile has gained 169kgm-2 (10%) colloidal material. Elemental losses by mobilization in true solution are ubiquitous across the catena, even in zones of colloidal accumulation, and range from 1418kgm-2 (-46%) for an eluviated profile to 195kgm-2 (-23%) at the bottom of the catena. Quantification of simultaneous mass transfers in solution and suspension provide greater specificity on processes within soils and across hillslopes. Additionally, because colloids include both HFS and other elements, the ability to quantify their redistribution has implications for standard calculations of soil mass balances using such index elements. ?? 2011.

  3. Recoil Polarization and Beam-Recoil Double Polarization Measurement of {eta} Electroproduction on the Proton in the Region of the S{sub 11}(1535) Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, H.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Boehm, R.; Distler, M. O.; Doria, L.; Friedrich, J.; Mueller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Tiator, L.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; Bosnar, D.; Makek, M.; Cheymol, B.; Fonvieille, H.

    2007-09-28

    The beam-recoil double polarization P{sub x{sup '}}{sup h} and P{sub z{sup '}}{sup h} and the recoil polarization P{sub y{sup '}} were measured for the first time for the p(e-vector,e{sup '}p-vector){eta} reaction at a four-momentum transfer of Q{sup 2}=0.1 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} and a center of mass production angle of {theta}=120 deg. at the Mainz Microtron MAMI-C. With a center of mass energy range of 1500 MeV

  4. On the Mössbauer Effect and the Rigid Recoil Question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Mark

    2017-03-01

    The rigid recoil of a crystal is the accepted mechanism for the Mössbauer effect. It's at odds with the special theory of relativity which does not allow perfectly rigid bodies. The standard model of particle physics which includes QED should not allow any signals to be transmitted faster than the speed of light. If perturbation theory can be used, then the X-ray emitted in a Mössbauer decay must come from a single nuclear decay vertex at which the 4-momentum is exactly conserved in a Feynman diagram. Then the 4-momentum of the final state Mössbauer nucleus must be slightly off the mass shell. This off-shell behavior would be followed by subsequent diffusion of momentum throughout the crystal to bring the nucleus back onto the mass shell and the crystal to a final relaxed state in which it moves rigidly with the appropriate recoil velocity. This mechanism explains the Mössbauer effect at the microscopic level and reconciles it with relativity. Because off-mass-shell quantum mechanics is required, the on-mass-shell theories developed originally for the Mössbauer effect are inadequate. Another possibility is that that the recoil response involves a non-perturbative effect in the standard model which could allow for a non-local instantaneous momentum transfer between the crystal and the decay (or absorption), as proposed for example by Preparata and others in super-radiance theory. The recoil time of the crystal is probably not instantaneous, and if it could be measured, one could distinguish between various theories. An experiment is proposed in this paper to measure this time. The idea is to measure the total energy radiated due to bremsstrahlung from a charged Mössbauer crystal which has experienced a recoil. Using Larmor's formula, along with corrections to it, allows one to design an experiment. The favored idea is to use many small nano-spheres of Mössbauer-active metals, whose outer surfaces are charged. The energy radiated then varies as the charge

  5. Chemical Effects in the Separation Process of a Differential Mobility / Mass Spectrometer System

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bradley B.; Covey, Thomas R.; Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2013-01-01

    In differential mobility spectrometry (DMS, also referred to as high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry, FAIMS), ions are separated on the basis of the difference in their mobility under high and low electric fields. The addition of polar modifiers to the gas transporting the ions through a DMS enhances the formation of clusters in a field-dependent way and thus amplifies the high and low field mobility difference resulting in increased peak capacity and separation power. Observations of the increase in mobility field dependence are consistent with a cluster formation model, also referred to as the dynamic cluster-decluster model. The uniqueness of chemical interactions that occur between an ion and cluster-forming neutrals increases the selectivity of the separation and the depression of low-field mobility relative to high-field mobility increases the compensation voltage and peak capacity. The effect of polar modifiers on the peak capacity across a broad range of chemicals has been investigated. We discuss the theoretical underpinnings which explain the observed effects. In contrast to the result from polar modifiers, we find that using mixtures of inert gases as the transport gas improve resolution by reducing peak width but has very little effect on peak capacity or selectivity. Inert gases do not cluster and thus do not reduce low field mobility relative to high-field mobility. The observed changes in the differential mobility α parameter exhibited by different classes of compounds when the transport gas contains polar modifiers or has a significant fraction of inert gas can be explained on the basis of the physical mechanisms involved in the separation processes. PMID:20121077

  6. First spatial separation of a heavy ion isomeric beam with a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickel, T.; Plaß, W. R.; Ayet San Andres, S.; Ebert, J.; Geissel, H.; Haettner, E.; Hornung, C.; Miskun, I.; Pietri, S.; Purushothaman, S.; Reiter, M. P.; Rink, A.-K.; Scheidenberger, C.; Weick, H.; Dendooven, P.; Diwisch, M.; Greiner, F.; Heiße, F.; Knöbel, R.; Lippert, W.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Prochazka, A.; Ranjan, M.; Takechi, M.; Winfield, J. S.; Xu, X.

    2015-05-01

    211Po ions in the ground and isomeric states were produced via 238U projectile fragmentation at 1000 MeV/u. The 211Po ions were spatially separated in flight from the primary beam and other reaction products by the fragment separator FRS. The ions were energy-bunched, slowed-down and thermalized in a gas-filled cryogenic stopping cell (CSC). They were then extracted from the CSC and injected into a high-resolution multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS). The excitation energy of the isomer and, for the first time, the isomeric-to-ground state ratio were determined from the measured mass spectrum. In the subsequent experimental step, the isomers were spatially separated from the ions in the ground state by an ion deflector and finally collected with a silicon detector for decay spectroscopy. This pioneering experimental result opens up unique perspectives for isomer-resolved studies. With this versatile experimental method new isomers with half-lives longer than a few milliseconds can be discovered and their decay properties can be measured with highest sensitivity and selectivity. These experiments can be extended to studies with isomeric beams in nuclear reactions.

  7. Thermal-Neutron-Induced Fission of 243Cm: Light-Peak Data from the Lohengrin Mass Separator

    SciTech Connect

    Tsekhanovich, I.; Simpson, G.S.; Varapai, N.; Rochman, D.; Sokolov, V.; Fioni, G.; Al Mahamid, Ilham

    2005-05-24

    Thermal-neutron-induced fission of 243Cm was studied at the Lohengrin mass separator. The light-mass peak of the fission-yield curve was investigated, and mass (from A=72 to A=120) and independent-product (for Z=28-37) yields were obtained. A comparison was made of the results obtained on the mass yields with those from the fission of 245Cm as well as with the data given by the JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI libraries. The yield of masses in the superasymmetric region was found to be identical to other fission reactions studied at Lohengrin. Experimental fission-product yields from the fission of 243Cm and 245Cm were able to be well described within a theoretical model, which incorporates standard and superasymmetric fission modes as well as a calculation of the charge-distribution parameters in isobaric chains and neutron multiplicities from primary fragments. A prediction of the yield of Ni isotopes in the fission of 243,245,247Cm was made.

  8. Targeted high-resolution ion mobility separation coupled to ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry of endocrine disruptors in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Benigni, Paolo; Thompson, Christopher J; Ridgeway, Mark E; Park, Melvin A; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2015-04-21

    Traditional separation and detection of targeted compounds from complex mixtures from environmental matrices requires the use of lengthy prefractionation steps and high-resolution mass analyzers due to the large number of chemical components and their large structural diversity (highly isomeric). In the present work, selected accumulation trapped ion mobility spectrometry (SA-TIMS) is coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) for direct separation and characterization of targeted endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDC) from a complex environmental matrix in a single analysis. In particular, targeted identification based on high-resolution mobility (R ∼ 70-120) and ultrahigh-resolution mass measurements (R > 400 000) of seven commonly targeted EDC and their isobars (e.g., bisphenol A, (Z)- and (E)-diethylstilbestrol, hexestrol, estrone, α-estradiol, and 17-ethynylestradiol) is shown from a complex mixture of water-soluble organic matter (e.g., Suwannee River Fulvic Acid Standard II) complemented with reference standard measurements and theoretical calculations (<3% error).

  9. Energy-Resolved Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry—A Concept to Improve the Separation of Isomeric Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Waldemar; Hofmann, Johanna; Pagel, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Recent works using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) have highlighted the power of this instrumental configuration to tackle one of the greatest challenges in glycomics and glycoproteomics: the existence of isobaric isomers. For a successful separation of species with identical mass but different structure via IM-MS, it is crucial to have sufficient IM resolution. In commercially available IM-MS instruments, however, this resolution is limited by the design of the instrument and usually cannot be increased at-will without extensive modifications. Here, we present a systematic approach to improve the resolving capability of IM-MS instruments using so-called energy-resolved ion mobility-mass spectrometry. The technique utilizes the fact that individual components in an isobaric mixture fragment at considerably different energies when activated in the gas phase via collision-induced dissociation (CID). As a result, certain components can be suppressed selectively at increased CID activation energy. Using a mixture of four isobaric carbohydrates, we show that each of the individual sugars can be resolved and unambiguously identified even when their drift times differ by as little as 3 %. However, the presented results also indicate that a certain difference in the gas-phase stability of the individual components is crucial for a successful separation via energy-resolved IM-MS.

  10. Energy-resolved ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a concept to improve the separation of isomeric carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Waldemar; Hofmann, Johanna; Pagel, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Recent works using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) have highlighted the power of this instrumental configuration to tackle one of the greatest challenges in glycomics and glycoproteomics: the existence of isobaric isomers. For a successful separation of species with identical mass but different structure via IM-MS, it is crucial to have sufficient IM resolution. In commercially available IM-MS instruments, however, this resolution is limited by the design of the instrument and usually cannot be increased at-will without extensive modifications. Here, we present a systematic approach to improve the resolving capability of IM-MS instruments using so-called energy-resolved ion mobility-mass spectrometry. The technique utilizes the fact that individual components in an isobaric mixture fragment at considerably different energies when activated in the gas phase via collision-induced dissociation (CID). As a result, certain components can be suppressed selectively at increased CID activation energy. Using a mixture of four isobaric carbohydrates, we show that each of the individual sugars can be resolved and unambiguously identified even when their drift times differ by as little as 3%. However, the presented results also indicate that a certain difference in the gas-phase stability of the individual components is crucial for a successful separation via energy-resolved IM-MS.

  11. Fast separation and analysis of reduced monoclonal antibodies with capillary zone electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yimeng; Sun, Liangliang; Knierman, Michael D; Dovichi, Norman J

    2016-02-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (CZE-ESI-MS) was used for analysis of reduced antibodies. We first developed a simple protocol to condition commercial linear-polyacrylamide coated capillaries for use in top-down proteomics. We then suspended reduced antibodies in a solution of 35% acetic acid, 50% acetonitrile in water. Heavy and light chains were baseline resolved within 10 min and with 3-30 µg/mL detection limits using a 0.1% aqueous formic acid background electrolyte. Quintuplicate runs of a two-antibody mixture produced relative standard deviations of ∼1% in migration time and 10% in peak amplitudes. Resolution was further improved for the two-antibody mixture by using 5% acetic acid as the background electrolyte, highlighting the potential of capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry for analysis of antibody mixtures.

  12. The control system of the CERN-ISOLDE on-line mass-separator facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, O. C.; Borch, O.; Bret, A.; Catherall, R.; Deloose, I.; Focker, G. J.; Forkel, D.; Kugler, E.; Olesen, G.; Pace, A.; Ravn, H. L.; Richard-Serre, C.; Shering, G.; Tengblad, O.; Torgersen, H. J.; Isolde Collaboration

    1992-08-01

    With the move of the ISOLDE facility to the PS-Booster from the now closed Synchro-Cyclotron at CERN, a new control system will be implemented for the two separators. Personal computers, based on the Intel 80386 microprocessor running under MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows, are used. Network-wide distributed front end computers, which access the hardware for controls and measurements, are controlled by PC-consoles via a local area network with a PC file server used as a database.

  13. Recent advances in enrichment and separation strategies for mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chenxi; Zhong, Xuefei; Li, Lingjun

    2016-01-01

    Due to the significance of protein phosphorylation in various biological processes and signaling events, new analytical techniques for enhanced phosphoproteomics have been rapidly introduced in recent years. The combinatorial use of the phospho-specific enrichment techniques and prefractionation methods prior to MS analysis enables comprehensive profiling of the phosphoproteome and facilitates deciphering the critical roles that phosphorylation plays in signaling pathways in various biological systems. This review places special emphasis on the recent five-year (2009–2013) advances for enrichment and separation techniques that have been utilized for phosphopeptides prior to MS analysis. PMID:24687451

  14. Separation of cis and trans Isomers of Polyproline by FAIMS Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creese, Andrew J.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2016-12-01

    High field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is well-established as a tool for separating peptide isomers (sequence inversions and post-translationally modified localization variants). Here, we demonstrate the FAIMS is able to differentiate cis and trans isomers of polyproline. Polyproline assumes an all- cis conformation—the PPI helix—in 1-propanol, and an all- trans conformation—the PPII helix—in aqueous solutions. Differentiation of these conformers may be achieved both through use of a cylindrical FAIMS device and a miniaturized ultrahigh field planar FAIMS device.

  15. Metabonomics study of liver cancer based on ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with HILIC and RPLC separations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Wang, Wenzhao; Lv, Shen; Yin, Peiyuan; Zhao, Xinjie; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Fengxia; Xu, Guowang

    2009-09-14

    In this study, urinary metabolites from liver cancer patients and healthy volunteers were studied by a metabonomic method based on ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Both hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) were used to separate the urinary metabolites. Principle component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares to latent structure-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models were built to separate the healthy volunteers from the liver cancer patients and to find compounds that are expressed in significantly different amounts between the two populations. 21 metabolite ions were considered as potential biomarkers according to the Variable importance in the Project (VIP) value and S-plot. Compared with RPLC, a more sensitive and stable response can be recorded in HILIC mode due to the high content of organic solvent used. Moreover, the liver cancer group and the healthy volunteers can be better separated based on the data from the HILIC separation, which indicates that HILIC is suitable for urinary metabonomic analysis. In HILIC mode, several polar compounds related to arginine and proline metabolism, alanine and aspartate metabolism, lysine degradation, nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism were found to be significantly changed in the concentrations of the two different populations: healthy and cancer. In contrast, in RPLC mode, these changed compounds are related to fatty acids oxidation.

  16. Calculation of recoil implantation profiles using known range statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, C. D.; Avila, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A method has been developed to calculate the depth distribution of recoil atoms that result from ion implantation onto a substrate covered with a thin surface layer. The calculation includes first order recoils considering projected range straggles, and lateral straggles of recoils but neglecting lateral straggles of projectiles. Projectile range distributions at intermediate energies in the surface layer are deduced from look-up tables of known range statistics. A great saving of computing time and human effort is thus attained in comparison with existing procedures. The method is used to calculate recoil profiles of oxygen from implantation of arsenic through SiO2 and of nitrogen from implantation of phosphorus through Si3N4 films on silicon. The calculated recoil profiles are in good agreement with results obtained by other investigators using the Boltzmann transport equation and they also compare very well with available experimental results in the literature. The deviation between calculated and experimental results is discussed in relation to lateral straggles. From this discussion, a range of surface layer thickness for which the method applies is recommended.

  17. Submillisecond Elastic Recoil Reveals Molecular Origins of Fibrin Fiber Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Nathan E.; Ding, Feng; Bucay, Igal; O’Brien, E. Timothy; Gorkun, Oleg V.; Superfine, Richard; Lord, Susan T.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Falvo, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrin fibers form the structural scaffold of blood clots. Thus, their mechanical properties are of central importance to understanding hemostasis and thrombotic disease. Recent studies have revealed that fibrin fibers are elastomeric despite their high degree of molecular ordering. These results have inspired a variety of molecular models for fibrin’s elasticity, ranging from reversible protein unfolding to rubber-like elasticity. An important property that has not been explored is the timescale of elastic recoil, a parameter that is critical for fibrin’s mechanical function and places a temporal constraint on molecular models of fiber elasticity. Using high-frame-rate imaging and atomic force microscopy-based nanomanipulation, we measured the recoil dynamics of individual fibrin fibers and found that the recoil was orders of magnitude faster than anticipated from models involving protein refolding. We also performed steered discrete molecular-dynamics simulations to investigate the molecular origins of the observed recoil. Our results point to the unstructured αC regions of the otherwise structured fibrin molecule as being responsible for the elastic recoil of the fibers. PMID:23790375

  18. Size, separation, structural order, and mass density of molecules packing in water and ice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongli; Zhang, Xi; Ma, Zengsheng; Li, Wen; Zhou, Yichun; Zhou, Ji; Zheng, Weitao; Sun, Chang Q

    2013-10-21

    The structural symmetry and molecular separation in water and ice remain uncertain. We present herewith a solution to unifying the density, the structure order and symmetry, the size (H-O length dH), and the separation (d(OO) = d(L) + d(H) or the O:H length d(L)) of molecules packing in water and ice in terms of statistic mean. This solution reconciles: i) the d(L) and the d(H) symmetrization of the O:H-O bond in compressed ice, ii) the d(OO) relaxation of cooling water and ice and, iii) the d(OO) expansion of a dimer and between molecules at water surface. With any one of the d(OO), the density ρ(g·cm⁻³), the d(L), and the d(H), as a known input, one can resolve the rest quantities using this solution that is probing conditions or methods independent. We clarified that: i) liquid water prefers statistically the mono-phase of tetrahedrally-coordinated structure with fluctuation, ii) the low-density phase (supersolid phase as it is strongly polarized with even lower density) exists only in regions consisting molecules with fewer than four neighbors and, iii) repulsion between electron pairs on adjacent oxygen atoms dictates the cooperative relaxation of the segmented O:H-O bond, which is responsible for the performance of water and ice.

  19. Control of Chemical Effects in the Separation Process of a Differential Mobility / Mass Spectrometer System

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bradley B.; Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2013-01-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) separates ions on the basis of the difference in their migration rates under high versus low electric fields. Several models describing the physical nature of this field mobility dependence have been proposed but emerging as a dominant effect is the clusterization model sometimes referred to as the dynamic cluster-decluster model. DMS resolution and peak capacity is strongly influenced by the addition of modifiers which results in the formation and dissociation of clusters. This process increases selectivity due to the unique chemical interactions that occur between an ion and neutral gas phase molecules. It is thus imperative to bring the parameters influencing the chemical interactions under control and find ways to exploit them in order to improve the analytical utility of the device. In this paper we describe three important areas that need consideration in order to stabilize and capitalize on the chemical processes that dominate a DMS separation. The first involves means of controlling the dynamic equilibrium of the clustering reactions with high concentrations of specific reagents. The second area involves a means to deal with the unwanted heterogeneous cluster ion populations emitted from the electrospray ionization process that degrade resolution and sensitivity. The third involves fine control of parameters that affect the fundamental collision processes, temperature and pressure. PMID:20065515

  20. Rapid chiral separation of racemic cetirizine in human plasma using subcritical fluid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eom, Han Young; Kang, Myunghee; Kang, Seung Woo; Kim, Unyong; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Junghyun; Cho, Hyun-Deok; Jung, Yura; Yang, Dong-Hyug; Han, Sang Beom

    2016-01-05

    A method for fast chiral separation of cetirizine and quantitation of levocetirizine in human plasma using subcritical fluid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated. The chromatographic separation was performed using a Chiralpak IE column (2.1 mm×150 mm, 5 μm) with an isocratic elution of CO2/organic modifier (55/45, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.85 mL/min. The organic modifier was composed of water/methanol (5/95, v/v). The makeup flow was optimized at water/methanol (10/90, v/v) and 0.2 mL/min. The most influential parameters on the separation of cetirizine affecting resolution, retention time and sensitivity were selected by fractional factorial design. The 3 selected factors were optimized by response surface methodology. Tandem mass spectrometry was used at electrospray ionization, positive ion mode, and multiple-reaction monitoring mode. Isotope-labeled cetirizine-d4 was used as the internal standard. The sample preparation of human plasma was conducted by solid phase extraction of hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) type. The developed method was validated for selectivity, linearity, precision, accuracy, recovery, limit of quantitation (LOQ), and limit of detection (LOD). The real human plasma samples were analyzed and the pharmacokinetic results were compared with results of previous research. The developed method was found to be reliable based on the similarity between the results of the current and previous methods. The chiral separation for cetirizine and economic feasibility were compared with those of previous studies using normal phase-HPLC or reversed phase-HPLC. The established analytical method could be successfully applied to pharmacokinetic study with reduction in the analysis time and costs.

  1. Bifunctional glass membrane designed to interface SDS-PAGE separations of proteins with the detection of peptides by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hattan, Stephen J; Du, Jie; Parker, Kenneth C

    2015-04-07

    We describe the construction and characterization of a novel membrane designed to allow proteins separated by gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to be detected as peptides by mass spectrometry in an efficient and comprehensive manner. The key attribute of the membrane is a bifunctional design that allows for the digestion of protein(s) and retention of the resulting peptides with minimal lateral diffusion. Silane chemistries are used to differentially treat the opposing surfaces of a glass filter paper to enable this unique capability.

  2. A new setup for elastic recoil analysis using ion induced electron emission for particle identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbauer, E.; Benka, O.; Steinbatz, M.

    1998-03-01

    We describe a new setup for elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) using our recently developed particle identification method. Before the ions and elastic recoil atoms from the target reach a silicon surface barrier detector for energy analysis, they penetrate a set of thin foils (e.g. carbon). The ion induced electron emission yield from the foils depends on the nuclear charge of the penetrating ion and it is roughly proportional to the energy loss in the foil. The emitted electrons are accelerated towards a microchannel plate (MCP), which gives a signal amplitude proportional to the number of emitted electrons. This signal is measured in coincidence with the energy signal from the surface barrier detector using our dual-parameter multichannel analyzer system M2D. Since the energy resolution is not measurably deteriorated by the particle identification our setup offers optimum depth resolution for light elements. Due to the compact design large solid angles for high sensitivity can be achieved. A new measuring chamber has been built which offers considerable improvements. The ERDA scattering angle (30° or 45°) and the target orientation can be selected for optimum depth resolution or sensitivity. Element separation for light elements has been enhanced by several improvements: A new geometry of the foil setup improves the collection efficiency for ion induced electrons onto the MCP, coating of the carbon foils with insulators enhances the electron emission yield. Finally, a new data evaluation procedure has been developed in which the pulse height spectrum of the MCP is considered to be a linear combination of individual spectra from the incident ion and of the recoil atoms. The normalized shapes of these spectra are taken from calibration measurements, the intensities are then calculated using a linear fitting algorithm and finally give the depth profiles of the elements in the target. For hydrogen in near surface layers even isotopic separation is possible

  3. Recoil effects of a motional scatterer on single-photon scattering in one dimension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiong; Xu, D. Z.; Cai, C. Y.; Sun, C. P.

    2013-01-01

    The scattering of a single photon with sufficiently high energy can cause a recoil of a motional scatterer. We study its backaction on the photon's coherent transport in one dimension by modeling the motional scatterer as a two-level system, which is trapped in a harmonic potential. While the reflection spectrum is of a single peak in the Lamb-Dicke limit, multi-peaks due to phonon excitations can be observed in the reflection spectrum as the trap becomes looser or the mass of the two-level system becomes smaller. PMID:24220217

  4. Enhancement of biological mass spectrometry by using separations based on changes in ion mobility (FAIMS and DMS).

    PubMed

    Purves, Randy W

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of complex biological samples for low-level analytes by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) often requires additional selectivity. Differential mobility techniques (FAIMS and DMS) have been shown to enhance LC-MS/MS analyses by separating ions in the gas-phase on a millisecond timescale by use of a mechanism that is complementary to both liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. In this overview, a simplified description of the operation of these devices is given and an example presented that illustrates the utility of FAIMS (DMS) for solving a challenging analytical assay. Important recent advances in the field, including work with gas modifiers, are presented, along with an outlook for the technology.

  5. Mass transfer limitations in protein separations using ion-exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Sarfert, F T; Etzel, M R

    1997-03-07

    Sorption of bovine serum albumin to commercial 150-micron pore size membranes was measured in batch and flow experiments. For residence times of 2-40 min, early and broad breakthrough curves and broad asymmetric elution peaks were observed that depended strongly on flow-rate. System dispersion could not explain the flow-rate dependence. Breakthrough and elution curves were analyzed using new models that included Langmuir sorption, convection and diffusion. From the analysis, film mass transfer resistance was found to be the rate-limiting factor. The maximum allowable pore size that eliminates this limitation was calculated for different molecular weight solutes.

  6. Electrophoretic separation techniques and their hyphenation to mass spectrometry in biological inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Hannah; Grabmann, Gerlinde; Hartinger, Christian G

    2016-04-01

    Electrophoretic methods have been widely applied in research on the roles of metal complexes in biological systems. In particular, CE, often hyphenated to a sensitive MS detector, has provided valuable information on the modes of action of metal-based pharmaceuticals, and more recently new methods have been added to the electrophoretic toolbox. The range of applications continues to expand as a result of enhanced CE-to-MS interfacing, with sensitivity often at picomolar level, and evolved separation modes allowing for innovative sample analysis. This article is a followup to previous reviews about CE methods in metallodrug research (Electrophoresis, 2003, 24, 2023-2037; Electrophoresis, 2007, 28, 3436-3446; Electrophoresis, 2012, 33, 622-634), also providing a comprehensive overview of metal species studied by electrophoretic methods hyphenated to MS. It highlights the latest CE developments, takes a sneak peek into gel electrophoresis, traces biomolecule labeling, and focuses on the importance of early-stage drug development.

  7. On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for organic aerosol mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, Havala O. T.; Murphy, Benjamin N.; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L.; Carlton, Annmarie G.; Guo, Hongyu; Weber, Rodney; Vasilakos, Petros; Wyat Appel, K.; Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Surratt, Jason D.; Nenes, Athanasios; Hu, Weiwei; Jimenez, Jose L.; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel; Misztal, Pawel K.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2017-01-01

    Organic compounds and liquid water are major aerosol constituents in the southeast United States (SE US). Water associated with inorganic constituents (inorganic water) can contribute to the partitioning medium for organic aerosol when relative humidities or organic matter to organic carbon (OM / OC) ratios are high such that separation relative humidities (SRH) are below the ambient relative humidity (RH). As OM / OC ratios in the SE US are often between 1.8 and 2.2, organic aerosol experiences both mixing with inorganic water and separation from it. Regional chemical transport model simulations including inorganic water (but excluding water uptake by organic compounds) in the partitioning medium for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) when RH > SRH led to increased SOA concentrations, particularly at night. Water uptake to the organic phase resulted in even greater SOA concentrations as a result of a positive feedback in which water uptake increased SOA, which further increased aerosol water and organic aerosol. Aerosol properties, such as the OM / OC and hygroscopicity parameter (κorg), were captured well by the model compared with measurements during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) 2013. Organic nitrates from monoterpene oxidation were predicted to be the least water-soluble semivolatile species in the model, but most biogenically derived semivolatile species in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model were highly water soluble and expected to contribute to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Organic aerosol and SOA precursors were abundant at night, but additional improvements in daytime organic aerosol are needed to close the model-measurement gap. When taking into account deviations from ideality, including both inorganic (when RH > SRH) and organic water in the organic partitioning medium reduced the mean bias in SOA for routine monitoring networks and improved model performance compared to observations from SOAS. Property updates from

  8. Enantiomeric separation in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass analysis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sung-Tong; Nolvachai, Yada; Marriott, Philip J

    2014-11-01

    Chiral comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (eGC×GC) coupled to quadrupole-accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS) was evaluated for its capability to report the chiral composition of several monoterpenes, namely, α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene in cardamom oil. Enantiomers in a standard mixture were fully resolved by direct enantiomeric-GC analysis with a 2,3-di-O-methyl-6-t-butylsilyl derivatized β-cyclodextrin phase; however, the (+)-(R)-limonene enantiomer in cardamom oil was overlapped with other background components including cymene and cineole. Verification of (+)-(R)-limonene components based on characteristic ions at m/z 136, 121, and 107 acquired by chiral single-dimension GC-QTOFMS in the alternate MS/MSMS mode of operation was unsuccessful due to similar parent/daughter ions generated by interfering or co-eluting cymene and cineole. Column phases SUPELCOWAX, SLB-IL111, HP-88, and SLB-IL59, were incorporated as the second dimension column ((2)D) in chiral GC×GC analysis; the SLB-IL59 offered the best resolution for the tested monoterpene enantiomers from the matrix background. Enantiomeric ratios for α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene were determined to be 1.325, 2.703, and 1.040, respectively, in the cardamom oil sample based on relative peak area data.

  9. Simultaneous chiral separation of methylamphetamine and common precursors using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Drake, Samantha J; Morrison, Calum; Smith, Frank

    2011-09-01

    Methylamphetamine, ephedrine, and pseudoephedrine were derivatized using trifluoroacetic anhydride and enantiomers of each were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) fitted with a γ-cyclodextrin (Chiraldex™ G-PN) chiral column. A temperature-programmed method was developed and optimized and the results compared with those obtained using a previously published isothermal GC method applied to GC/MS analysis. Trifluoroacetylated 3-(trifluoromethyl)phenethylamine hydrochloride was used as an internal standard, and mass fragmentation patterns are proposed for all derivatives analyzed. Qualitative validation of the optimized chromatographic conditions was completed in accordance with the guidelines published by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). Under conditions of repeatability and reproducibility, the method gave relative retention times with a relative standard deviation of less than 0.02% for all six analytes of interest. This surpasses the UNODC's acceptance criteria of 2% for validation of qualitative precision. Ephedrine and pseudoephedrine are common precursors in the clandestine manufacture of methylamphetamine. Seizures of illicit methylamphetamine therefore often contain mixtures of these optically active compounds. The simultaneous enantioseparation of these compounds to produce a profile would provide valuable information to law enforcement agencies regarding the provenance of a methylamphetamine seizure.

  10. Enhancing Biological Analyses with Three Dimensional Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility, Low Field Drift Tube Ion Mobility and Mass Spectrometry (μFAIMS/IMS-MS) Separations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin S.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional high throughput separations are ideal for analyzing distinct ion characteristics simultaneously in one analysis. We report on the first evaluation of a platform coupling a high speed field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry microchip (μFAIMS) with drift tube ion mobility and mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). The μFAIMS/IMS-MS platform was used to analyze biological samples and simultaneously acquire multidimensional FAIMS compensation fields, IMS drift times, and accurate ion masses for the detected features. These separations thereby increased the overall measurement separation power, resulting in greater information content and more complete characterization of the complex samples. The separation conditions were optimized for sensitivity and resolving power by the selection of gas compositions and pressures in the FAIMS and IMS separation stages. The resulting performance provided three dimensional separations, benefitting both broad complex mixture studies and targeted analyses by improving isomeric separations and allowing detection of species obscured by interfering peaks. PMID:26140287

  11. Nuclear Recoil Calibration of DarkSide-50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edkins, Erin; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    DarkSide-50 dark matter experiment is a liquid argon time projection chamber (TPC) surrounded by a liquid scintillator active neutron veto, designed for the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The success of such an experiment is dependent upon a detailed understanding of both the expected signal and backgrounds, achieved using radioactive calibration sources of known energies. Nuclear recoils provide a measurement of both the expected signal and the most dangerous background, as nuclear recoils from neutrons cannot be distinguished from a dark matter signal on an event-by-event basis in the TPC. In this talk, I will present the DS-50 calibration system, and analysis of the results of the calibration of DarkSide-50 to nuclear recoils using radioactive neutron sources. See also the DS-50 presentations by X. Xiang and G. Koh.

  12. Low momentum recoil detectors in CLAS12 at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Gabriel; CLAS Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Part of the experimental program in Hall B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to studying nucleon structure using DIS on nuclei and detecting low-momentum recoil particles in coincidence with the scattered electron. For this purpose, specially designed central detectors are required in place of the inner tracker of CLAS12 to detect particles with momenta below 100 MeV/c. We will present the status of the BONuS12 RTPC detector that will take data within the next 2 years. We will detail the main improvements made from the previous BONuS RTPC. In a second part, we will discuss another recoil experiment, called ALERT, that has been proposed to run in Hall B. The constraints being different, the recoil detector is based on a drift chamber and an array of scintillators. We will present the main differences between the two detectors and summarize the R&D performed to develop the ALERT detector.

  13. Ricin as a weapon of mass terror--separating fact from fiction.

    PubMed

    Schep, Leo J; Temple, Wayne A; Butt, Grant A; Beasley, Michael D

    2009-11-01

    In recent years there has been an increased concern regarding the potential use of chemical and biological weapons for mass urban terror. In particular, there are concerns that ricin could be employed as such an agent. This has been reinforced by recent high profile cases involving ricin, and its use during the cold war to assassinate a high profile communist dissident. Nevertheless, despite these events, does it deserve such a reputation? Ricin is clearly toxic, though its level of risk depends on the route of entry. By ingestion, the pathology of ricin is largely restricted to the gastrointestinal tract where it may cause mucosal injuries; with appropriate treatment, most patients will make a full recovery. As an agent of terror, it could be used to contaminate an urban water supply, with the intent of causing lethality in a large urban population. However, a substantial mass of pure ricin powder would be required. Such an exercise would be impossible to achieve covertly and would not guarantee success due to variables such as reticulation management, chlorination, mixing, bacterial degradation and ultra-violet light. By injection, ricin is lethal; however, while parenteral delivery is an ideal route for assassination, it is not realistic for an urban population. Dermal absorption of ricin has not been demonstrated. Ricin is also lethal by inhalation. Low doses can lead to progressive and diffuse pulmonary oedema with associated inflammation and necrosis of the alveolar pneumocytes. However, the risk of toxicity is dependent on the aerodynamic equivalent diameter (AED) of the ricin particles. The AED, which is an indicator of the aerodynamic behaviour of a particle, must be of sufficiently low micron size as to target the human alveoli and thereby cause major toxic effects. To target a large population would also necessitate a quantity of powder in excess of several metric tons. The technical and logistical skills required to formulate such a mass of powder to

  14. Advances in sample preparation in electromigration, chromatographic and mass spectrometric separation methods.

    PubMed

    Gilar, M; Bouvier, E S; Compton, B J

    2001-02-16

    The quality of sample preparation is a key factor in determining the success of analysis. While analysis of pharmaceutically important compounds in biological matrixes has driven forward the development of sample clean-up procedures in last 20 years, today's chemists face an additional challenge: sample preparation and analysis of complex biochemical samples for characterization of genotypic or phenotypic information contained in DNA and proteins. This review focuses on various sample pretreatment methods designed to meet the requirements for the analysis of biopolymers and small drugs in complex matrices. We discuss the advances in development of solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbents, on-line SPE, membrane-based sample preparation, and sample clean-up of biopolymers prior to their analysis by mass spectrometry.

  15. Application of mass-separated focused ion beams in nano-technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, L.

    2008-04-01

    FIB applications like writing ion implantation, ion beam mixing or ion beam synthesis in the μm- or nm range often require ion species other than gallium. Therefore alloy liquid metal ion sources (LMIS) have to be developed and applied in FIB tools. The energy distribution of ions emitted from an alloy LMIS is one of the crucial parameters for the performance of a FIB column. Different source materials like AuGe, AuSi, AuGeSi, CoNd, ErNi, ErFeNiCr, MnGe, GaBi, GaBiLi, SnPb, … were investigated with respect to the energy spread of the different ion species as a function of emission current, ion mass and emitter temperature. Different alloy LMIS's have been developed and used in the FZD - FIB system especially for writing implantation to fabricate sub-μm pattern without any lithographic steps. Co and various other ion species were applied to generate CoSi2 nano-structures, like dots and wires by ion beam synthesis or to manipulate the properties of magnetic films. Additionally, the possibility of varying the flux in the FIB by changing the pixel dwell-time can be used for the investigation of the radiation damage and dynamic annealing in Si, Ge and SiC at elevated implantation temperatures. Furthermore, a broad spectrum of ions was employed to study in a fast manner the sputtering process depending on temperature, angle of incidence and ion mass on a couple of target materials. These studies are important for the 3D-fabrication of various kinds of micro-tools by FIB milling.

  16. Identification of human myocardial proteins separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis using an effective sample preparation for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otto, A; Thiede, B; Müller, E C; Scheler, C; Wittmann-Liebold, B; Jungblut, P

    1996-10-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting is a powerful tool for the identification of proteins separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The identification of in-gel digested proteins by peptide mass fingerprinting was significantly improve in comparison to blot-digests by using a peptide-collecting device. This device allows the effective purification and concentration of enzymatic digests of low-intensity spots without expensive equipment and is described in detail. Sensitivity in the fmol range was demonstrated by unequivocal identification of bovine serum albumin after sodium dodecyl sulfate--polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Furthermore the high performance liquid chromatography pattern of in-gel digests indicated a 2- to 3-fold higher yield of the separated peptides. Therefore, a higher amount of the peptides was available to perform N-terminal sequencing. The identification of 16 proteins from a high-resolution 2-DE gel map of human myocardium tissue has been achieved by means of this technique. Three of these proteins were associated with changes in spot intensity with dilated cardiomyopathy.

  17. Design of a single magnet separator with mass resolving power m/Δm ≈ 20, 000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitenfeldt, Martin; Augustin, Mathieu; Catherall, Richard; Giles, Tim; Schoerling, Daniel; Tveten, Gry M.

    2016-06-01

    ISOLDE at CERN is a leading radioactive ion beam facility. With its upgrade, the HIE-ISOLDE project, an increase in primary beam intensity and energy is envisaged and the aim is a significant increase in intensity of the exotic beams. The high resolution separator (HRS) after the upgrade is required to suppress contaminations almost completely when the masses differ to the beam of interest by Δm / m > 1 / 20, 000 . Here a 120° magnet with a bending radius of 1.25 m has been chosen. The magnetic rigidity is 0.625 Tm (B-field of 0.5 T) to allow for separation of molecules of up to a mass of 300 u. The magnet comprises a yoke in wedged H-type configuration for stability and precision and pole face conductors for focusing and compensation of aberrations. The concept was derived analytically, refined with the OPERA 2D software and tested with the ray-tracing module of OPERA 3D.

  18. Stopping Power of Au for Ti Using Elastic Recoil Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, R.; Freire, J. A.; Ribas, R. V.; Medina, N. H.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Seale, W. A.; Cybulska, E. W.; Wiedemann, K. T.; Allegro, P. R.; Toufen, D. L.

    2009-06-03

    The slowing down of heavy ions in matter is still not well understood especially at low energies (<0.5 MeV/u). In this contribution we present new experimental data for the stopping power of Au for Ti ions using an elastic recoil technique where a heavy-ion beam at low energies is produced by elastic scattering of an energetic primary beam imping on a thin target. Atoms from the target recoil at low energies. We compare our experimental data with previous data and with semi-empirical and theoretical models.

  19. Capillary electrochromatography and capillary electrochromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry for the separation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Desiderio, C; Fanali, S

    2000-10-20

    In this study capillary electrochromatography (CEC) was utilized for the separation of ten non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Experiments were carried out in a commercially available CE instrument using a packed capillary with RP-18 silica particles where the stationary phase completely filled the capillary. The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of ammonium formate buffer pH 2.5 and acetonitrile. Selectivity and resolution were studied changing the pH and the concentration of the buffer, the acetonitrile content mobile phase and the capillary temperature. The optimum experimental conditions for CEC separation of the studied drug mixture were found using 50 mM ammonium formate pH 2.5-acetonitrile (40:60) at 25 degrees C. The CEC capillary was coupled to an electrospray mass spectrometer for the characterization of the NSAIDs. A mobile phase composed by the same buffer but with a higher concentration of acetonitrile (90%) was used in order to speed up the separation of analytes.

  20. Determination of heavy metals by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after on-line separation and preconcentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, Valderi L.; Pozebon, Dirce; Curtius, Adilson J.

    1998-10-01

    A method for the determination of Cu, As, Se, Cd, In, Hg, Tl, Pb and Bi in waters and in biological materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, after an on-line separation, is described. The matrix separation and analyte preconcentration is accomplished by retention of the analytes complexed with the ammonium salt of O,O-diethyl dithiophosphoric acid in a HNO 3 solution on C 18 immobilized on silica in a minicolumn. Methanol, as eluent, is introduced in the conventional pneumatic nebulizer of the instrument. In order to use the best compromise conditions, concerning the ligand and acid concentrations, the analytes were determined in two separate groups. The enrichment factors were in the range from 5 to 61, depending on the analyte. The limits of detection varied from 0.43 ng L -1 for Bi to 33 ng L -1 for Cu. The sample consumption is only 2.3 mL for each group and the sampling frequency is 21 h -1. The accuracy was tested by analysing five certified reference materials: water, riverine water, urine, bovine muscle and bovine liver. The agreement between obtained and certified concentrations was very good, except for As. The relatively small volume of methanol, used as eluent, minimizes the problems produced by the introduction of organic solvent into the plasma.

  1. Surface-induced dissociation of ion mobility-separated noncovalent complexes in a quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mowei; Huang, Chengsi; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2012-07-17

    A custom in-line surface-induced dissociation (SID) device has been incorporated into a commercial ion mobility quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to provide an alternative and potentially more informative activation method than the commonly used collision-induced dissociation (CID). Complicated sample mixtures can be fractionated by ion mobility (IM) and then dissociated by CID or SID for further structural analysis. Interpretation of SID spectra for cesium iodide clusters was greatly simplified with IM prior to dissociation because products originating from different precursors and overlapping in m/z but separated in drift time can be examined individually. Multiple conformations of two protein complexes, source-activated transthyretin tetramer and nativelike serum amyloid P decamer, were separated in ion mobility and subjected to CID and SID. CID spectra of the mobility separated conformations are similar. However, drastic differences can be observed for SID spectra of different conformations, implying different structures in the gas phase. This work highlights the potential of utilizing IM-SID to study quaternary structures of protein complexes and provides information that is complementary to our recently reported SID-IM approach.

  2. Simultaneous speciation of selenium and arsenic using elevated temperature liquid chromatography separation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, X. C.; Li, X.-F.; Lai, V.; Ma, M.; Yalcin, S.; Feldmann, J.

    1998-08-01

    A method was developed for the simultaneous speciation of both arsenic and selenium based on the separation of arsenic and selenium species using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) under elevated column temperatures followed by dual-element detection using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Thirteen arsenic and selenium species, including arsenate, arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, arsenobetaine, arsenocholine, tetramethylarsonium, two arsenosugars, selenate, selenite, selenocystine and selenomethionine, were studied using this approach. The HPLC separation using 70°C constant column temperature resulted in an improved resolution and faster separation of arsenic and selenium species. Nearly baseline resolution of these species was achieved on a reversed phase C18 column using hexanesulfonate as an ion pair reagent. The ICPMS detection of m/ z 75, 77 and 78 enabled simultaneous monitoring of arsenic, selenium, and potential interfering species, such as ArCl. An application of the HPLC/ICPMS technique was demonstrated by the speciation of arsenic and selenium in canned tuna fish. Arsenobetaine and selenocystine were detected as the major arsenic and selenium species, respectively. The technique was also applied to a study on the metabolism of arsenosugars. Speciation of six arsenosugar metabolites in human urine was complete in 19 min at 70°C column temperature, compared to 37 min at room temperature.

  3. Rapid sequential separation of essential oil compounds using continuous heart-cut multi-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung-Ok; Kim, Yujin; Kim, Hee-su; Hyun, Sun-Hee; Kim, So-Hyun; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Marriott, Philip J

    2011-05-06

    A method for separation and identification of peaks in essential oil samples based on rapid repetitive heart-cutting using multidimensional gas chromatography (MDGC)-mass spectrometry (MS) coupled with a cryotrapping interface is described. Lavender essential oil is analyzed by employing repetitive heart-cut intervals of 1.00 and 1.50 min, achieved in a parallel MDGC-MS/GC-FID experiment. The number of peaks that were detected in 1D GC operation above a given response threshold more than tripled when MDGC-MS employing the cryotrapping module method was used. In addition, MDGC-MS enabled detection of peaks that were not individually evident in 1D GC-MS, owing to effective deconvolution in time of previously overlapped peaks in 1D GC. Thus separation using the cryomodulation approach, without recourse to using deconvolution software, was possible. Peaks widths decreased by about 5-7-fold with the described method, peak capacity increased from about 9 per min to 60 per min, and greater sensitivity results. Repeatability of retention times for replicate analyses in the multidimensional mode was better than 0.02% RSD. The present study suggests that the described heart-cutting technique using MDGC-MS can be used for general improvement in separation and identification of volatile compounds.

  4. INVESTIGATION OF THE FORMATION AND SEPARATION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE FROM THE EXPANSION OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Olmedo, O.; Vourlidas, A.; Liu, Y. E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu

    2012-01-20

    We address the nature of EUV waves through direct observations of the formation of a diffuse wave driven by the expansion of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and its subsequent separation from the CME front. The wave and the CME on 2011 June 7 were well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Following the solar eruption onset, marked by the beginning of the rapid increasing of the CME velocity and the X-ray flux of accompanying flare, the CME exhibits a strong lateral expansion. During this impulsive expansion phase, the expansion speed of the CME bubble increases from 100 km s{sup -1} to 450 km s{sup -1} in only six minutes. An important finding is that a diffuse wave front starts to separate from the front of the expanding bubble shortly after the lateral expansion slows down. Also a type II burst is formed near the time of the separation. After the separation, two distinct fronts propagate with different kinematic properties. The diffuse front travels across the entire solar disk, while the sharp front rises up, forming the CME ejecta with the diffuse front ahead of it. These observations suggest that the previously termed EUV wave is a composite phenomenon and driven by the CME expansion. While the CME expansion is accelerating, the wave front is cospatial with the CME front, thus the two fronts are indiscernible. Following the end of the acceleration phase, the wave moves away from the CME front with a gradually increasing distance between them.

  5. Stereoselective separation and pharmacokinetic dissipation of the chiral neonicotinoid sulfoxaflor in soil by ultraperformance convergence chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zenglong; Dong, Fengshou; Xu, Jun; Liu, Xingang; Cheng, Youpu; Liu, Na; Tao, Yan; Pan, Xinglu; Zheng, Yongquan

    2014-10-01

    Ultraperformance convergence chromatography/tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UPC(2)-MS/MS) is a novel tool in separation science that combines the advantages of supercritical fluid chromatography with ultraperformance liquid chromatography/MS/MS technology. The use of nontoxic CO2 fluid and a postcolumn additive to complement MS/MS allows better control of analyte retention for chiral separation and high-sensitivity determination with different chiral stationary phases. This paper reports the stereoselective separation and determination of the chiral neonicotinoid sulfoxaflor in vegetables and soil by UPC(2)-MS/MS. Baseline resolution (Rs ≥ 1.56) of and high selectivity (LOQ ≤ 1.83 μg/kg) for the four stereoisomers were achieved by postcolumn addition of 1 % formic acid-methanol to a Chiralpak IA-3 using CO₂/isopropanol/acetonitrile as the mobile phase at 40 °C, 2,500 psi, and for 6.5 min in electrospray ionization positive mode. Rearranged Van't Hoff equations afforded the thermodynamic parameters ΔH (ο) and ΔS (ο), which were analyzed to promote understanding of the enthalpy-driven separation of sulfoxaflor stereoisomers. The interday mean recovery, intraday repeatability, and interday reproducibility varied from 72.9 to 103.7%, from 1.8 to 9.2%, and from 3.1 to 9.4%, respectively. The proposed method was used to study the pharmacokinetic dissipation of sulfoxaflor stereoisomers in soil under greenhouse conditions. The estimated half-life ranged from 5.59 to 6.03 d, and statistically nonsignificant enantioselective degradation was observed. This study not only demonstrates that the UPC(2)-MS/MS system is an efficient and sensitive method for sulfoxaflor stereoseparation, but also provides the first experimental evidence of the pharmacokinetic dissipation of sulfoxaflor stereoisomers in the environment.

  6. Determination of sirolimus in rabbit arteries using liquid chromatography separation and tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Rodila, Ramona; Watson, Pamela; Ji, Qin; El-Shourbagy, Tawakol A

    2007-10-01

    Sirolimus, an effective immunosuppressive agent, is used for drug eluting stents. During stent development, an analytical method for the determination of sirolimus in tissue needs to be established. Normally, tissue samples are homogenized and then analyzed against the calibration standards prepared in a tissue homogenate. This approach provides insufficient control of the homogenization process. In this paper, tissue quality control samples were introduced for the optimization of the homogenization process during method development, but also allowance for the performance evaluation of the entire analytical process. In addition, a new approach using rabbit blood as a homogenization medium was developed to stabilize sirolimus in rabbit tissue homogenates. Calibration standards and quality controls were prepared by spiking different sirolimus working solutions into rabbit blood. Homogenization quality control samples were prepared by injecting other sirolimus working solutions into empty test tubes and pre-cut arteries within pre-defined masses. A high-throughput homogenization procedure was optimized based on the specific chemical properties of sirolimus. The linear dynamic range was between 49.9 pg/mL and 31.9 ng/mL to accommodate the expected artery homogenate concentrations. Additionally, quality controls in rabbit blood were also used in the extraction to support the calibration standards. The accuracy and precision of the quality controls in rabbit blood reflect the extraction performance and the accuracy and precision of the homogenization tissue quality controls reflect the overall performance of the method. The mean bias was between -4.5 and 0.2% for all levels of quality controls in the blood and between 4.8 and 14.9% for all levels of the homogenization tissue quality controls. The CVs of all concentration levels were < or =5.3% for the quality controls in blood and < or =9.2% for the homogenization tissue quality controls. The method was successfully

  7. Serum peptidome patterns of breast cancer based on magnetic bead separation and mass spectrometry analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world, and the identification of biomarkers for the early detection of breast cancer is a relevant target. The present study aims to determine serum peptidome patterns for screening of breast cancer. Methods The present work focused on the serum proteomic analysis of 36 healthy volunteers and 37 breast cancer patients using a ClinProt Kit combined with mass spectrometry (MS). This approach allows the determination of peptidome patterns that are able to differentiate the studied populations. An independent group of sera (36 healthy volunteers and 37 breast cancer patients) was used to verify the diagnostic capabilities of the peptidome patterns blindly. An immunoassay method was used to determine the serum mucin 1 (CA15-3) of validation group samples. Results Support Vector Machine (SVM) Algorithm was used to construct the peptidome patterns for the identification of breast cancer from the healthy volunteers. Three of the identified peaks at m/z 698, 720 and 1866 were used to construct the peptidome patterns with 91.78% accuracy. Furthermore, the peptidome patterns could differentiate the validation group achieving a sensitivity of 91.89% (34/37) and a specitivity of 91.67% (33/36) (> CA 15–3, P < 0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that the ClinProt Kit combined with MS shows great potentiality for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1501556838687844 PMID:22521044

  8. Enhancing Biological Analyses with Three Dimensional Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility, Low Field Drift Time Ion Mobility and Mass Spectrometry (µFAIMS/IMS-MS) Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin Shammel

    2015-06-30

    We report the first evaluation of a platform coupling a high speed field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry microchip (µFAIMS) with drift tube ion mobility and mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). The µFAIMS/IMS-MS platform was used to analyze biological samples and simultaneously acquire multidimensional information of detected features from the measured FAIMS compensation fields and IMS drift times, while also obtaining accurate ion masses. These separations thereby increase the overall separation power, resulting increased information content, and provide more complete characterization of more complex samples. The separation conditions were optimized for sensitivity and resolving power by the selection of gas compositions and pressures in the FAIMS and IMS separation stages. The resulting performance provided three dimensional separations, benefitting both broad complex mixture studies and targeted analyses by e.g. improving isomeric separations and allowing detection of species obscured by “chemical noise” and other interfering peaks.

  9. Epitaxial silicide formation on recoil-implanted substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Shin; Egashira, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoya; Etoh, Ryuji; Hata, Yoshifumi; Tung, R. T.

    2005-01-15

    An epitaxy-on-recoil-implanted-substrate (ERIS) technique is presented. A disordered surface layer, generated by forward recoil implantation of {approx}0.7-3x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} of oxygen during Ar plasma etching of surface oxide, is shown to facilitate the subsequent epitaxial growth of {approx}25-35-nm-thick CoSi{sub 2} layers on Si(100). The dependence of the epitaxial fraction of the silicide on the recoil-implantation parameters is studied in detail. A reduction in the silicide reaction rate due to recoil-implanted oxygen is shown to be responsible for the observed epitaxial formation, similar to mechanisms previously observed for interlayer-mediated growth techniques. Oxygen is found to remain inside the fully reacted CoSi{sub 2} layer, likely in the form of oxide precipitates. The presence of these oxide precipitates, with only a minor effect on the sheet resistance of the silicide layer, has a surprisingly beneficial effect on the thermal stability of the silicide layers. The agglomeration of ERIS-grown silicide layers on polycrystalline Si is significantly suppressed, likely from a reduced diffusivity due to oxygen in the grain boundaries. The implications of the present technique for the processing of deep submicron devices are discussed.

  10. X-ray spectroscopy of a recoiling SMBH candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predehl, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Recent numerical relativity simulations of coalescencing supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries predict that SMBHs can receive kicks with velocities up to several thousand km/s due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. We have recently found the best candidate todate for such a recoiling SMBH (Komossa et al. 2008). We apply for a 25 ks ACIS-S exposure of this exceptional source.

  11. Direct Measurement of Photon Recoil from a Levitated Nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vijay; Gieseler, Jan; Moritz, Clemens; Dellago, Christoph; Quidant, Romain; Novotny, Lukas

    2016-06-01

    The momentum transfer between a photon and an object defines a fundamental limit for the precision with which the object can be measured. If the object oscillates at a frequency Ω0 , this measurement backaction adds quanta ℏΩ0 to the oscillator's energy at a rate Γrecoil, a process called photon recoil heating, and sets bounds to coherence times in cavity optomechanical systems. Here, we use an optically levitated nanoparticle in ultrahigh vacuum to directly measure Γrecoil. By means of a phase-sensitive feedback scheme, we cool the harmonic motion of the nanoparticle from ambient to microkelvin temperatures and measure its reheating rate under the influence of the radiation field. The recoil heating rate is measured for different particle sizes and for different excitation powers, without the need for cavity optics or cryogenic environments. The measurements are in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions and provide valuable guidance for the realization of quantum ground-state cooling protocols and the measurement of ultrasmall forces.

  12. Four pi-recoil proportional counter used as neutron spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, E. F.

    1968-01-01

    Study considers problems encountered in using 4 pi-recoil counters for neutron spectra measurement. Emphasis is placed on calibration, shape discrimination, variation of W, the average energy loss per ion pair, and the effects of differentiation on the intrinsic counter resolution.

  13. The Final Merger of Massive Black Holes: Recoils, Gravitational Waves, and Electromagnetic Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of two massive black holes produces a powerful burst of gravitational radiation, emitting more energy than all the stars in the observable universe combined. The resulting gravitational waveforms will be easily detectable by the space-based LISA out to redshifts z greater than 10, revealing the masses and spins of the black holes to high precision. If the merging black holes have unequal masses, or asymmetric spins, the final black hole that forms can recoil with a velocity exceeding 1000 km/s. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new results that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, recoil velocities, and the possibility of accompanying electromagnetic outbursts.

  14. The Final Merger of Massive Black Holes: Recoils, Gravitational Waves, and Electromagnetic Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2010-03-01

    The final merger of two massive black holes produces a powerful burst of gravitational radiation, emitting more energy than all the stars in the observable universe combined. The resulting gravitational waveforms will be easily detectable by the space-based LISA out to redshifts z > 10, revealing the masses and spins of the black holes to high precision. If the merging black holes have unequal masses, or asymmetric spins, the final black hole that forms can recoil with a velocity exceeding 1000 km/s. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new results that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, recoil velocities, and the possibility of accompanying electromagnetic outbursts. This research is supported in part by NASA grant 06-BEFS06-19 to Goddard Space Flight Center.

  15. Chemical separation and mass spectrometry of Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, and Cu in terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials using thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Akane; Yamashita, Katsuyuki; Makishima, Akio; Nakamura, Eizo

    2009-12-01

    A sequential chemical separation technique for Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, and Cu in terrestrial and extraterrestrial silicate rocks was developed for precise and accurate determination of elemental concentration by the isotope dilution method (ID). The technique uses a combination of cation-anion exchange chromatography and Eichrom nickel specific resin. The method was tested using a variety of matrixes including bulk meteorite (Allende), terrestrial peridotite (JP-1), and basalt (JB-1b). Concentrations of each element was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) using W filaments and a Si-B-Al type activator for Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn and a Re filament and silicic acid-H3PO4 activator for Cu. The method can be used to precisely determine the concentrations of these elements in very small silicate samples, including meteorites, geochemical reference samples, and mineral standards for microprobe analysis. Furthermore, the Cr mass spectrometry procedure developed in this study can be extended to determine the isotopic ratios of 53Cr/52Cr and 54Cr/52Cr with precision of approximately 0.05epsilon and approximately 0.10epsilon (1epsilon = 0.01%), respectively, enabling cosmochemical applications such as high precision Mn-Cr chronology and investigation of nucleosynthetic isotopic anomalies in meteorites.

  16. Introducing the concept of centergram. A new tool to squeeze data from separation techniques-mass spectrometry couplings.

    PubMed

    Erny, Guillaume L; Simó, Carolina; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2014-02-21

    In separation techniques hyphenated to mass spectrometry (MS) the bulk from the separation step is continuously flowing into the mass spectrometer where the compounds, arriving at each separation time, are ionized and further separated based on their m/z ratio. An MS detector is recognized as being a universal detector, although it can also be a very selective instrument. In spite of these advantages, classical two dimensional representations from these hyphenated systems, such as those based on the base peak of electropherogram/chromatogram or on the total ion of electropherogram/chromatogram, usually hide a large number of features that if correctly assessed will show the presence of co-migrating species and/or the low abundant ones. The uses of peak picking algorithms to detect and measure as many peaks as possible from a dataset allow extracting much more information. However, a single migrating compound usually produces a multiplicity of ions, making difficult to differentiate peaks generated by the same compound from other peaks due e.g., to closely co-migrating/eluting species. In this work, a new representation is proposed and its usefulness demonstrated with experimental data from capillary electrophoresis-hyphenated to a time of flight mass spectrometer via an electrospray interface. This representation, called centergram, is obtained after using a peak picking methodology that detects electrophoretic peaks of single ions and measure their positions. The centergram is the histogram (i.e. the count of the number of observations that fall into each one of the intervals, known as bins, as determined by the user) of the measured positions. The intensity of the bars in this histogram will indicate the amount of peaks in the whole dataset whose centers are within each interval. As a compound that has been separated and has entered the MS instrument will produce multiple images at the same position along the m/z dimension, the centergram will exhibit a series of

  17. The mechanics of elastic loading and recoil in anuran jumping.

    PubMed

    Astley, Henry C; Roberts, Thomas J

    2014-12-15

    Many animals use catapult mechanisms to produce extremely rapid movements for escape or prey capture, resulting in power outputs far beyond the limits of muscle. In these catapults, muscle contraction loads elastic structures, which then recoil to release the stored energy extremely rapidly. Many arthropods employ anatomical 'catch mechanisms' to lock the joint in place during the loading period, which can then be released to allow joint motion via elastic recoil. Jumping vertebrates lack a clear anatomical catch, yet face the same requirement to load the elastic structure prior to movement. There are several potential mechanisms to allow loading of vertebrate elastic structures, including the gravitational load of the body, a variable mechanical advantage, and moments generated by the musculature of proximal joints. To test these hypothesized mechanisms, we collected simultaneous 3D kinematics via X-ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology (XROMM) and single-foot forces during the jumps of three Rana pipiens. We calculated joint mechanical advantage, moment and power using inverse dynamics at the ankle, knee, hip and ilio-sacral joints. We found that the increasing proximal joint moments early in the jump allowed for high ankle muscle forces and elastic pre-loading, and the subsequent reduction in these moments allowed the ankle to extend using elastic recoil. Mechanical advantage also changed throughout the jump, with the muscle contracting against a poor mechanical advantage early in the jump during loading and a higher mechanical advantage late in the jump during recoil. These 'dynamic catch mechanisms' serve to resist joint motion during elastic loading, then allow it during elastic recoil, functioning as a catch mechanism based on the balance and orientation of forces throughout the limb rather than an anatomical catch.

  18. Non-separative headspace solid phase microextraction-mass spectrometry profile as a marker to monitor coffee roasting degree.

    PubMed

    Liberto, Erica; Ruosi, Manuela R; Cordero, Chiara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Bicchi, Carlo; Sgorbini, Barbara

    2013-02-27

    This study describes a non-separative headspace solid phase microextraction-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-MS) approach, in view of its application to online monitoring of a roasting process. The system can quickly provide representative and diagnostic fingerprints of the volatile fraction of samples and, in combination with appropriate chemometric pattern recognition and regression techniques, can successfully be applied to characterize, discriminate, and/or correlate patterns with the roasting process. Eighty coffee samples of different varieties, geographical origins, and blends were analyzed. The experimental HS-SPME-MS results show that the TIC fingerprint can be used to discriminate the degree of roasting; diagnostic ion abundance(s) or ratios were closely correlated with the roasting process; both could successfully be used as markers or analytical decision makers, to monitor roasting processes online, and to define quality and safety of roasted coffee.

  19. Separation, Sizing, and Quantitation of Engineered Nanoparticles in an Organism Model Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Monique E; Hanna, Shannon K; Montoro Bustos, Antonio R; Sims, Christopher M; Elliott, Lindsay C C; Lingayat, Akshay; Johnston, Adrian C; Nikoobakht, Babak; Elliott, John T; Holbrook, R David; Scott, Keana C K; Murphy, Karen E; Petersen, Elijah J; Yu, Lee L; Nelson, Bryant C

    2017-01-24

    For environmental studies assessing uptake of orally ingested engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), a key step in ensuring accurate quantification of ingested ENPs is efficient separation of the organism from ENPs that are either nonspecifically adsorbed to the organism and/or suspended in the dispersion following exposure. Here, we measure the uptake of 30 and 60 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, using a sucrose density gradient centrifugation protocol to remove noningested AuNPs. Both conventional inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and single particle (sp)ICP-MS are utilized to measure the total mass and size distribution, respectively, of ingested AuNPs. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) imaging confirmed that traditional nematode washing procedures were ineffective at removing excess suspended and/or adsorbed AuNPs after exposure. Water rinsing procedures had AuNP removal efficiencies ranging from 57 to 97% and 22 to 83%, while the sucrose density gradient procedure had removal efficiencies of 100 and 93 to 98%, respectively, for the 30 and 60 nm AuNP exposure conditions. Quantification of total Au uptake was performed following acidic digestion of nonexposed and Au-exposed nematodes, whereas an alkaline digestion procedure was optimized for the liberation of ingested AuNPs for spICP-MS characterization. Size distributions and particle number concentrations were determined for AuNPs ingested by nematodes with corresponding confirmation of nematode uptake via high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution resin preparation and large-area SEM imaging. Methods for the separation and in vivo quantification of ENPs in multicellular organisms will facilitate robust studies of ENP uptake, biotransformation, and hazard assessment in the environment.

  20. Determination of mercurial species in fish by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with anion exchange chromatographic separation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaopan; Han, Chao; Cheng, Heyong; Liu, Jinhua; Xu, Zigang; Yin, Xuefeng

    2013-09-24

    This work demonstrated the feasibility of mercury speciation analysis by anion exchange chromatographic separation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection. For the first time, by complexing with the mobile phase containing 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonate into negatively charged complexes, fast separation of inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)), monomethylmercury (MeHg), ethylmercury (EtHg) and phenylmercury (PhHg) was achieved within 5 min on a 12.5-mm strong anion exchange column. The detection limits for Hg(2+), MeHg, EtHg and PhHg were 0.008, 0.024, 0.029 and 0.034 μg L(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations of peak height and peak area (5.0 μg L(-1) for each Hg species) were all below 3%. The determined contents of Hg(2+), MeHg and total Hg in a certified reference material of fish tissue by the proposed method were in good accordance with the certified values with satisfactory recoveries. The relative errors for determining MeHg and total mercury were -2.4% and -1.2%, respectively, with an acceptable range for spike recoveries of 94-101%. Mercury speciation in 11 fish samples were then analyzed after the pretreated procedure. The mercury contents in all fish samples analyzed were found compliant with the criteria of the National Standards of China.

  1. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds from dry-blanched peanut skins by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Kosińska-Cagnazzo, Agnieszka; Kerr, William L; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Swanson, Ruthann B; Pegg, Ronald B

    2014-08-22

    A large variety of phenolic compounds, including phenolic acids (hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamic acids, and their esters), stilbenes (trans-resveratrol and trans-piceatannol), flavan-3-ols (e.g., (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin, and their polymers {the proanthocyanidins, PACs}), other flavonoids (e.g., isoflavones, flavanols, and flavones, etc.) and biflavonoids (e.g., morelloflavone), were identified in dry-blanched peanut skins (PS) by this study. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)) was applied to separate and identify the phenolic constituents. Reversed-phase HPLC was employed to separate free phenolic compounds as well as PAC monomers, dimers, and trimers. PACs with a degree of polymerization (DP) of >4 were chromatographed via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Tentative identification of the separated phenolics was based solely on molecular ions and MS(n) fragmentation patterns acquired by ESI-MS in the negative-ion mode. The connection sequence of PAC oligomers (DP <5) could be deduced mainly through characteristic quinone methide (QM) cleavage ions. When the DP reached 6, only a proportion of the flavan-3-ols could be ascertained in the PACs because of the extremely complicated fragmentation patterns involved. The identification of free phenolic acids, stilbenes, and flavonoids was achieved by authentic commercial standards and also by published literature data. Quantification was performed based on peak areas of the UV (free phenolic compounds) or fluorescence (PACs) signals from the HPLC chromatograms and calibration curves of commercial standards. Overall, PS contain significantly more PACs compared to free phenolic compounds.

  2. Proposed low-energy absolute calibration of nuclear recoils in a dual-phase noble element TPC using D-D neutron scattering kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbus, J. R.; Rhyne, C. A.; Malling, D. C.; Genecov, M.; Ghosh, S.; Moskowitz, A. G.; Chan, S.; Chapman, J. J.; de Viveiros, L.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Huang, D. Q.; Pangilinan, M.; Taylor, W. C.; Gaitskell, R. J.

    2017-04-01

    We propose a new technique for the calibration of nuclear recoils in large noble element dual-phase time projection chambers used to search for WIMP dark matter in the local galactic halo. This technique provides an in situ measurement of the low-energy nuclear recoil response of the target media using the measured scattering angle between multiple neutron interactions within the detector volume. The low-energy reach and reduced systematics of this calibration have particular significance for the low-mass WIMP sensitivity of several leading dark matter experiments. Multiple strategies for improving this calibration technique are discussed, including the creation of a new type of quasi-monoenergetic neutron source with a minimum possible peak energy of 272 keV. We report results from a time-of-flight-based measurement of the neutron energy spectrum produced by an Adelphi Technology, Inc. DD108 neutron generator, confirming its suitability for the proposed nuclear recoil calibration.

  3. Quantitative Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Ropivacaine and Bupivacaine in Authentic, Pharmaceutical and Spiked Human Plasma without Chromatographic Separation

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Nahla N.; Wang, Shudong

    2009-01-01

    The present study employs time of flight mass and bupivacaine in authentic, pharmaceutical and spiked human plasma as well as in the presence of their impurities 2,6-dimethylaniline and alkaline degradation product. The method is based on time of flight electron spray ionization mass spectrometry technique without preliminary chromatographic separation and makes use of bupivacaine as internal standard for ropivacaine, which is used as internal standard for bupivacaine. A linear relationship between drug concentrations and the peak intensity ratio of ions of the analyzed substances is established. The method is linear from 23.8 to 2380.0 ng mL−1 for both drugs. The correlation coefficient was ≥0.996 in authentic and spiked human plasma. The average percentage recoveries in the ranges of 95.39%–102.75% was obtained. The method is accurate (% RE < 5%) and reproducible with intra- and inter-assay precision (RSD% < 8.0%). The quantification limit is 23.8 ng mL−1 for both drugs. The method is not only highly sensitive and selective, but also simple and effective for determination or identification of both drugs in authentic and biological fluids. The method can be applied in purity testing, quality control and stability monitoring for the studied drugs. PMID:19652756

  4. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of ropivacaine and bupivacaine in authentic, pharmaceutical and spiked human plasma without chromatographic separation.

    PubMed

    Salama, Nahla N; Wang, Shudong

    2008-05-28

    The present study employs time of flight mass and bupivacaine in authentic, pharmaceutical and spiked human plasma as well as in the presence of their impurities 2,6-dimethylaniline and alkaline degradation product. The method is based on time of flight electron spray ionization mass spectrometry technique without preliminary chromatographic separation and makes use of bupivacaine as internal standard for ropivacaine, which is used as internal standard for bupivacaine. A linear relationship between drug concentrations and the peak intensity ratio of ions of the analyzed substances is established. The method is linear from 23.8 to 2380.0 ng mL(-1) for both drugs. The correlation coefficient was >or=0.996 in authentic and spiked human plasma. The average percentage recoveries in the ranges of 95.39%-102.75% was obtained. The method is accurate (% RE < 5%) and reproducible with intra- and inter-assay precision (RSD% < 8.0%). The quantification limit is 23.8 ng mL(-1) for both drugs. The method is not only highly sensitive and selective, but also simple and effective for determination or identification of both drugs in authentic and biological fluids. The method can be applied in purity testing, quality control and stability monitoring for the studied drugs.

  5. Analysis of multiple quaternary ammonium compounds in the brain using tandem capillary column separation and high resolution mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Falasca, Sara; Petruzziello, Filomena; Kretz, Robert; Rainer, Gregor; Zhang, Xiaozhe

    2012-06-08

    Endogenous quaternary ammonium compounds are involved in various physiological processes in the central nervous system. In the present study, eleven quaternary ammonium compounds, including acetylcholine, choline, carnitine, acetylcarnitine and seven other acylcarnitines of low polarity, were analyzed from brain extracts using a two dimension capillary liquid chromatography-Fourier transform mass spectrometry method. To deal with their large difference in hydrophobicities, tandem coupling between reversed phase and hydrophilic interaction chromatography columns was used to separate all the targeted quaternary ammonium compounds. Using high accuracy mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring mode, all the compounds could be detected from each brain sample with high selectivity. The developed method was applied for the relative quantification of these quaternary ammonium compounds in three different brain regions of tree shrews: prefrontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus. The comparative analysis showed that quaternary ammonium compounds were differentially distributed across the three brain areas. The analytical method proved to be highly sensitive and reliable for simultaneous determination of all the targeted analytes from brain samples.

  6. Solvent Separating Secondary Metabolites Directly from Biosynthetic Tissue for Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, David; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioactive metabolites are often heterogeneously expressed in tissues both spatially and over time. Therefore, traditional solvent extraction methods benefit from an understanding of the in situ sites of biosynthesis and storage to deal with heterogeneity and maximize yield. Recently, surface-assisted mass spectrometry (MS) methods namely nanostructure-assisted laser desorption ionisation (NALDI) and desorption ionisation on porous silicon (DIOS) surfaces have been developed to enable the direct detection of low molecular weight metabolites. Since direct tissue NALDI-MS or DIOS-MS produce complex spectra due to the wide variety of other metabolites and fragments present in the low mass range, we report here the use of “on surface” solvent separation directly from mollusc tissue onto nanostructured surfaces for MS analysis, as a mechanism for simplifying data annotation and detecting possible artefacts from compound delocalization during the preparative steps. Water, ethanol, chloroform and hexane selectively extracted a range of choline esters, brominated indoles and lipids from Dicathais orbita hypobranchial tissue imprints. These compounds could be quantified on the nanostructured surfaces by comparison to standard curves generated from the pure compounds. Surface-assisted MS could have broad utility for detecting a broad range of secondary metabolites in complex marine tissue samples. PMID:25786067

  7. Recoil effect on beta-decaying in vivo generators, interpreted for (103)Pd/(103m)Rh.

    PubMed

    Szucs, Zoltan; van Rooyen, Johann; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn

    2009-01-01

    The use of Auger emitters as potential radiopharmaceuticals is being increasingly investigated. One of the radionuclides of interest is (103m)Rh, which can be produced from (103)Ru or (103)Pd in an in vivo generator. A potential problem, however, is the recoil of the (103m)Rh out of the carrier molecule and even out of the target cell. In order to determine the likelihood of this happening in the (103)Pd/(103m)Rh, case calculations were made to prove that this does not happen. The equations were generalised for all radionuclides with an atomic mass of 10-240 as a tool for determining the recoil threshold of any beta-emitting radionuclide.

  8. Spallation recoil II: Xenon evidence for young SiC grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, U.; Altmaier, M.; Herpers, U.; Kuhnhenn, J.; Merchel, S.; Michel, R.; Mohapatra, R. K.

    2005-11-01

    We have determined the recoil range of spallation xenon produced by irradiation of Ba glass targets with ˜1190 and ˜268 MeV protons, using a catcher technique, where spallation products are measured in target and catcher foils. The inferred range for 126Xe produced in silicon carbide is ˜0.19 μm, which implies retention of ˜70% for 126Xe produced in "typical" presolar silicon carbide grains of 1 μm size. Recoil loss of spallation xenon poses a significantly smaller problem than loss of the spallation neon from SiC grains. Ranges differ for the various Xe isotopes and scale approximately linearly as function of the mass difference between the target element, Ba, and the product. As a consequence, SiC grains of various sizes will have differences in spallation Xe composition. In an additional experiment at ˜66 MeV, where the recoil ranges of 22Na and 127Xe produced on Ba glass were determined using γ-spectrometry, we found no evidence for recoil ranges being systematically different at this lower energy. We have used the new data to put constraints on the possible presolar age of the SiC grains analyzed for Xe by Lewis et al. (1994). Uncertainties in the composition of the approximately normal Xe component in SiC (Xe-N) constitute the most serious problem in determining an age, surpassing remaining uncertainties in Xe retention and production rate. A possible interpretation is that spallation contributions are negligible and that trapped 124Xe/126Xe is ˜5% lower in Xe-N than in Q-Xe. But also for other reasonable assumptions for the 124Xe/126Xe ratio in Xe-N (e.g., as in Q-Xe), inferred exposure ages are considerably shorter than theoretically expected lifetimes for interstellar grains. A short presolar age is in line with observations by others (appearance, grain size distribution) that indicate little processing in the interstellar medium (ISM) of surviving (crystalline) SiC. This may be due to amorphization of SiC in the ISM on a much shorter time scale

  9. A recoil resilient lumen support, design, fabrication and mechanical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Arash; Ali, Mohamed Sultan Mohamed; Takahata, Kenichi; Al-Sarawi, Said; Abbott, Derek

    2013-06-01

    Stents are artificial implants that provide scaffolding to a cavity inside the body. This paper presents a new luminal device for reducing the mechanical failure of stents due to recoil, which is one of the most important issues in stenting. This device, which we call a recoil-resilient ring (RRR), is utilized standalone or potentially integrated with existing stents to address the problem of recoil. The proposed structure aims to minimize the need for high-pressure overexpansion that can induce intra-luminal trauma and excess growth of vascular tissue causing later restenosis. The RRR is an overlapped open ring with asymmetrical sawtooth structures that are intermeshed. These teeth can slide on top of each other, while the ring is radially expanded, but interlock step-by-step so as to keep the final expanded state against compressional forces that normally cause recoil. The RRRs thus deliver balloon expandability and, when integrated with a stent, bring both radial rigidity and longitudinal flexibility to the stent. The design of the RRR is investigated through finite element analysis (FEA), and then the devices are fabricated using micro-electro-discharge machining of 200-µm-thick Nitinol sheet. The standalone RRR is balloon expandable in vitro by 5-7 Atm in pressure, which is well within the recommended in vivo pressure ranges for stenting procedures. FEA compression tests indicate 13× less reduction of the cross-sectional area of the RRR compared with a typical stainless steel stent. These results also show perfect elastic recovery of the RRR after removal of the pressure compared to the remaining plastic deformations of the stainless steel stent. On the other hand, experimental loading tests show that the fabricated RRRs have 2.8× radial stiffness compared to a two-column section of a commercial stent while exhibiting comparable elastic recovery. Furthermore, testing of in vitro expansion in a mock artery tube shows around 2.9% recoil, approximately 5-11

  10. Simultaneous separation and confirmation of amphetamine and related drugs in equine plasma by non-aqueous capillary-electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, X Q; Uboh, C E; Soma, L R; Guan, F Y; You, Y W; Kahler, M C; Judy, J A; Liu, Y; Chen, J W

    2010-02-01

    A non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (NACE-MS) method was developed for simultaneous separation and identification of 12 amphetamine and related compounds in equine plasma. Analytes were recovered from plasma by liquid-liquid extraction using methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). A bare fused-silica capillary was used for separation of the analytes. Addition of sheath liquid to the capillary effluent allowed the detection of the analytes by positive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry using full scan data acquisition. The limit of detection (LOD) for the target analytes was 10-200 ng/mL and that of confirmation (LOC) was 50-1000 ng/mL in equine plasma. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and mass spectrometry (MS) parameters were optimized for full CE separation and MS detection of the analytes. Separation buffer comprised 25 mM ammonium formate in acetonitrile/methanol (20: 80, v/v) plus 1 M formic acid. Sheath liquid was isopropanol-water-formic acid (50:50:0.5, v/v/v). Samples were hydrodynamically injected and separated at 25 kV. Analytes were electrokinetically separated and mass spectrometrically identified and confirmed. This simple, fast, inexpensive and reproducible method was successfully applied to post race equine plasma and research samples in screening for amphetamine and related drugs.

  11. Analytic calculation of radiative-recoil corrections to muonium hyperfine splitting: Electron-line contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, M.I.; Karshenboim, S.G.; Shelyuto, V.A. )

    1991-02-01

    The detailed account of analytic calculation of radiative-recoil correction to muonium hyperfine splitting, induced by electron-line radiative insertions, is presented. The consideration is performed in the framework of the effective two-particle formalism. A good deal of attention is paid to the problem of the divergence cancellation and the selection of graphs, relevant to radiative-recoil corrections. The analysis is greatly facilitated by use of the Fried-Yennie gauge for radiative photons. The obtained set of graphs turns out to be gauge-invariant and actual calculations are performed in the Feynman gauge. The main technical tricks, with the help of which we have effectively utilized the existence in the problem of the small parameter-mass ratio and managed to perform all calculations in the analytic form are described. The main intermediate results, as well as the final answer, {delta}E{sub rr} = ({alpha}({Zeta}{alpha})/{pi}{sup 2})(m/M)E{sub F}(6{zeta}(3) + 3{pi}{sup 2} In 2 + {pi}{sup 2}/2 + 17/8), are also presented.

  12. Automatically Detecting and Tracking Coronal Mass Ejections. I. Separation of Dynamic and Quiescent Components in Coronagraph Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Huw; Byrne, Jason P.; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    2012-06-01

    Automated techniques for detecting and tracking coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data are of ever increasing importance for space weather monitoring and forecasting. They serve to remove the biases and tedium of human interpretation, and provide the robust analysis necessary for statistical studies across large numbers of observations. An important requirement in their operation is that they satisfactorily distinguish the CME structure from the background quiescent coronal structure (streamers, coronal holes). Many studies resort to some form of time differencing to achieve this, despite the errors inherent in such an approach—notably spatiotemporal crosstalk. This article describes a new deconvolution technique that separates coronagraph images into quiescent and dynamic components. A set of synthetic observations made from a sophisticated model corona and CME demonstrates the validity and effectiveness of the technique in isolating the CME signal. Applied to observations by the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs, the structure of a faint CME is revealed in detail despite the presence of background streamers that are several times brighter than the CME. The technique is also demonstrated to work on SECCHI/COR2 data, and new possibilities for estimating the three-dimensional structure of CMEs using the multiple viewing angles are discussed. Although quiescent coronal structures and CMEs are intrinsically linked, and although their interaction is an unavoidable source of error in any separation process, we show in a companion paper that the deconvolution approach outlined here is a robust and accurate method for rigorous CME analysis. Such an approach is a prerequisite to the higher-level detection and classification of CME structure and kinematics.

  13. Direct recoil oxygen ion fractions resulting from Ar + collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie-Nan; Rabalais, J. Wayne

    1986-03-01

    Direct recoil of oxygen from oxidized and hydroxylated magnesium surfaces as a result of 6 keV Ar + collisions produces O -, O +, and O species. The total ion fraction at a recoil angle of 22° is ~33.5%, of which O - is 23.7% and O + is 9.8% for the oxidized surface. The O -/O + intensity ratio is extremely sensitive to the amount of hydrogen present, with the O + yield dropping to ~1% on the hydroxylated surface. These results are considered within a model for electronic transitions in ion/surface collisions which considers Auger and resonant transitions along the ion trajectory and electron promotions in the quasi-diatomic molecule of the close encounter.

  14. Recoiling Supermassive Black Holes: a search in the Nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lena, Davide; Robinson, Andrew; Marconi, Alessandro; Axon, David; Capetti, Alessandro; Merritt, David; Batcheldor, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The coalescence of a binary black hole can be accompanied by a large gravitational recoil due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. A recoiling supermassive black hole (SBH) can subsequently undergo long-lived oscillations in the potential well of its host galaxy, suggesting that offset SBHs may be common in the cores of massive ellipticals. We have analyzed HST archival images of 14 nearby core ellipticals, finding evidence for small (<=10 pc) displacements between the AGN (locating the SBH) and the center of the galaxy (the mean photocenter) in 10 of them. Excluding objects that may be affected by large-scale isophotal asymmetries, we consider six galaxies to have detected displacements, including M87, where a displacement was previously reported by Batcheldor et al. 2010. In individual objects, these displacements can be attributed to residual gravitational recoil oscillations following a major or minor merger within the last few Gyr. For plausible merger rates, however, there is a high probability of larger displacements than those observed, if SBH coalescence took place in these galaxies. Remarkably, the AGN-photocenter displacements are approximately aligned with the radio source axis in four of the six galaxies with displacements, including three of the four having relatively powerful kpc-scale jets. This suggests intrinsic asymmetries in radio jet power as a possible displacement mechanism, although approximate alignments are also expected for gravitational recoil. Orbital motion in SBH binaries and interactions with massive perturbers can produce the observed displacement amplitudes but do not offer a ready explanation for the alignments.

  15. Recoiling Supermassive Black Holes: A Search in the Nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lena, D.; Robinson, A.; Marconi, A.; Axon, D. J.; Capetti, A.; Merritt, D.; Batcheldor, D.

    2014-11-01

    The coalescence of a binary black hole can be accompanied by a large gravitational recoil due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. A recoiling supermassive black hole (SBH) can subsequently undergo long-lived oscillations in the potential well of its host galaxy, suggesting that offset SBHs may be common in the cores of massive ellipticals. We have analyzed Hubble Space Telescope archival images of 14 nearby core ellipticals, finding evidence for small (lsim 10 pc) displacements between the active galactic nucleus (AGN; the location of the SBH) and the center of the galaxy (the mean photocenter) in 10 of them. Excluding objects that may be affected by large-scale isophotal asymmetries, we consider six galaxies to have detected displacements, including M87, where a displacement was previously reported by Batcheldor et al. In individual objects, these displacements can be attributed to residual gravitational recoil oscillations following a major or minor merger within the last few gigayears. For plausible merger rates, however, there is a high probability of larger displacements than those observed, if SBH coalescence took place in these galaxies. Remarkably, the AGN-photocenter displacements are approximately aligned with the radio source axis in four of the six galaxies with displacements, including three of the four having relatively powerful kiloparsec-scale jets. This suggests intrinsic asymmetries in radio jet power as a possible displacement mechanism, although approximate alignments are also expected for gravitational recoil. Orbital motion in SBH binaries and interactions with massive perturbers can produce the observed displacement amplitudes but do not offer a ready explanation for the alignments.

  16. Recoiling supermassive black holes: a search in the nearby universe

    SciTech Connect

    Lena, D.; Robinson, A.; Axon, D. J.; Merritt, D.; Marconi, A.; Capetti, A.; Batcheldor, D.

    2014-11-10

    The coalescence of a binary black hole can be accompanied by a large gravitational recoil due to anisotropic emission of gravitational waves. A recoiling supermassive black hole (SBH) can subsequently undergo long-lived oscillations in the potential well of its host galaxy, suggesting that offset SBHs may be common in the cores of massive ellipticals. We have analyzed Hubble Space Telescope archival images of 14 nearby core ellipticals, finding evidence for small (≲ 10 pc) displacements between the active galactic nucleus (AGN; the location of the SBH) and the center of the galaxy (the mean photocenter) in 10 of them. Excluding objects that may be affected by large-scale isophotal asymmetries, we consider six galaxies to have detected displacements, including M87, where a displacement was previously reported by Batcheldor et al. In individual objects, these displacements can be attributed to residual gravitational recoil oscillations following a major or minor merger within the last few gigayears. For plausible merger rates, however, there is a high probability of larger displacements than those observed, if SBH coalescence took place in these galaxies. Remarkably, the AGN-photocenter displacements are approximately aligned with the radio source axis in four of the six galaxies with displacements, including three of the four having relatively powerful kiloparsec-scale jets. This suggests intrinsic asymmetries in radio jet power as a possible displacement mechanism, although approximate alignments are also expected for gravitational recoil. Orbital motion in SBH binaries and interactions with massive perturbers can produce the observed displacement amplitudes but do not offer a ready explanation for the alignments.

  17. Recoil-induced Resonances as All-optical Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narducci, F. A.; Desavage, S. A.; Gordon, K. H.; Duncan, D. L.; Welch, G. R.; Davis, J. P.

    2010-03-01

    We have measured recoil-induced resonances (RIR) [1,2] in our system of laser-cooled 85Rb atoms. Although this technique has been demonstrated to be useful for the purpose of extracting the cloud temperature [3], our aim was to demonstrate an all optical switch based on recoil-induced resonances. In addition to a very narrow ``free-space'' recoil-induced resonance of approximately 15 kHz, we also discovered a much broader resonance (˜30 MHz), caused by standing waves established by our trapping fields. We compare and contrast the switching dynamics of these two resonances and demonstrate optical switching using both resonances. Finally, we consider the applicability of the narrow, free-space resonance to the slowing of a weak probe field. [1] J. Guo, P.R. Berman, B. Dubetsky and G. Grynberg PRA, 46, 1426 (1992). [2] (a) P. Verkerk, B. Loumis, C. Salomon, C. Cohen-Tannoudji, J. Courtois PRL, 68, 3861 (1992). (b) G. Grynberg, J-Y Courtois, B. Lounis, P. Verkerk PRL, 72, 3017 (1994). [3] (a) T. Brzozowski, M. Brzozowska, J. Zachorowski, M. Zawada, W. Gawlik PRA, 71, 013401 (2005). (b) M. Brzozowska, T. Brzozowski J. Zachorowski, W. Gawlik PRA, 72, 061401(R), (2005).

  18. The recoil proton polarization in. pi. p elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seftor, C.J.

    1988-09-01

    The polarization of the recoil proton for ..pi../sup +/p and ..pi../sup -/p elastic scattering has been measured for various angles at 547 MeV/c and 625 MeV/c by a collaboration involving The George Washington University; the University of California, Los Angeles; and Abilene Christian University. The experiment was performed at the P/sup 3/ East experimental area of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. Beam intensities varied from 0.4 to 1.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup -/'s/sec and from 3.0 to 10.0 x 10/sup 7/ ..pi../sup +/'s/sec. The beam spot size at the target was 1 cm in the horizontal direction by 2.5 cm in the vertical direction. A liquid-hydrogen target was used in a flask 5.7 cm in diameter and 10 cm high. The scattered pion and recoil proton were detected in coincidence using the Large Acceptance Spectrometer (LAS) to detect and momentum analyze the pions and the JANUS recoil proton polarimeter to detect and measure the polarization of the protons. Results from this experiment are compared with previous measurements of the polarization, with analyzing power data previously taken by this group, and to partial-wave analysis predictions. 12 refs., 53 figs., 18 tabs.

  19. XENON100 Dark Matter Search: Scintillation Response of Liquid Xenon to Electronic Recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kyungeun Elizabeth

    Dark matter is one of the missing pieces necessary to complete the puzzle of the universe. Numerous astrophysical observations at all scales suggest that 23 % of the universe is made of nonluminous, cold, collisionless, nonbaryonic, yet undiscovered dark matter. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are the most well-motivated dark matter candidates and significant efforts have been made to search for WIMPs. The XENON100 dark matter experiment is currently the most sensitive experiment in the global race for the first direct detection of WIMP dark matter. XENON100 is a dual-phase (liquid-gas) time projection chamber containing a total of 161 kg of liquid xenon (LXe) with a 62kg WIMP target mass. It has been built with radiopure materials to achieve an ultra-low electromagnetic background and operated at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. WIMPs are expected to scatter off xenon nuclei in the target volume. Simultaneous measurement of ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils allows for the detection of WIMPs in XENON100. Data from the XENON100 experiment have resulted in the most stringent limits on the spin-independent elastic WIMP-nucleon scattering cross sections for most of the significant WIMP masses. As the experimental precision increases, a better understanding of the scintillation and ionization response of LXe to low energy (< 10 keV) particles is crucial for the interpretation of data from LXe based WIMP searches. A setup has been built and operated at Columbia University to measure the scintillation response of LXe to both electronic and nuclear recoils down to energies of a few keV, in particular for the XENON100 experiment. In this thesis, I present the research carried out in the context of the XENON100 dark matter search experiment. For the theoretical foundation of the XENON100 experiment, the first two chapters are dedicated to the motivation for and detection medium choice of the XENON100 experiment

  20. Characterisation of water masses and phytoplankton nutrient limitation in the East Australian Current separation zone during spring 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, C. S.; Djajadikarta, J. R.; Doblin, M. A.; Everett, J. D.; Thompson, P. A.

    2011-03-01

    This study focuses on the comparison of oceanic and coastal cold-core eddies with inner-shelf and East Australian Current (EAC) waters at the time of the spring bloom (October 2008). The surface water was biologically characterised by the phytoplankton biomass, composition, photo-physiology, carbon fixation and by nutrient-enrichment experiments. Marked differences in phytoplankton biomass and composition were observed. Contrasted biomarker composition suggests that biomarkers could be used to track water masses in this area. Divinyl chlorophyll a, a biomarker for tropical Prochlorophytes, was found only in the EAC. Zeaxanthin a biomarker for Cyanophytes, was found only within the oceanic eddy and in the EAC, whereas chlorophyll b (Chlorophytes) was only present in the coastal eddy and at the front between the inner-shelf and EAC waters. This study showed that cold-core eddies can affect phytoplankton, biomass, biodiversity and productivity. Inside the oceanic eddy, greater phytoplankton biomass and a more complex phytoplankton community were observed relative to adjacent water masses (including the EAC). In fact, phytoplankton communities inside the oceanic eddy more closely resembled the community observed in the inner-shelf waters. At a light level close to half-saturation, phytoplankton carbon fixation (gC d -1) in the oceanic eddy was 13-times greater than at the frontal zone between the eddy and the EAC and 3-times greater than in the inner-shelf water. Nutrient-enrichment experiments demonstrated that nitrogen was the major macronutrient limiting phytoplankton growth in water masses associated with the oceanic eddy. Although the effective quantum yield values demonstrate healthy phytoplankton communities, the phytoplankton community bloomed and shifted in response to nitrogen enrichments inside the oceanic eddy and in the frontal zone between this eddy and the EAC. An effect of Si enrichment was only observed at the frontal zone between the eddy and the EAC

  1. Modified ion exchange separation for tungsten isotopic measurements from kimberlite samples using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Yu Vin; Nakai, Shun'ichi; Ali, Arshad

    2006-03-01

    Tungsten isotope composition of a sample of deep-seated rock can record the influence of core-mantle interaction of the parent magma. Samples of kimberlite, which is known as a carrier of diamond, from the deep mantle might exhibit effects of core-mantle interaction. Although tungsten isotope anomaly was reported for kimberlites from South Africa, a subsequent investigation did not verify the anomaly. The magnesium-rich and calcium-rich chemical composition of kimberlite might engender difficulty during chemical separation of tungsten for isotope analyses. This paper presents a simple, one-step anion exchange technique for precise and accurate determination of tungsten isotopes in kimberlites using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Large quantities of Ca and Mg in kimberlite samples were precipitated and removed with aqueous H(2)SO(4). Highly pure fractions of tungsten for isotopic measurements were obtained following an anion exchange chromatographic procedure involving mixed acids. That procedure enabled efficient removal of high field strength elements (HFSE), such as Hf, Zr and Ti, which are small ions that carry strong charges and develop intense electrostatic fields. The tungsten yields were 85%-95%. Advantages of this system include less time and less use of reagents. Precise and accurate isotopic measurements are possible using fractions of tungsten that are obtained using this method. The accuracy and precision of these measurements were confirmed using various silicate standard rock samples, JB-2, JB-3 and AGV-1.

  2. Analysis of arginine and lysine methylation utilizing peptide separations at neutral pH and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Ambrosius P L; Hung, Ming-Lung; Wilson, Stuart A; Dickman, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    Arginine and lysine methylation are widespread protein post-translational modifications. Peptides containing these modifications are difficult to retain using traditional reversed-phase liquid chromatography because they are intrinsically basic/hydrophilic and often fragment poorly during collision induced fragmentation (CID). Therefore, they are difficult to analyze using standard proteomic workflows. To overcome these caveats, we performed peptide separations at neutral pH, resulting in increased retention of the hydrophilic/basic methylated peptides before identification using MS/MS. Alternatively trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) was used for increased trapping of methylated peptides. Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectrometry was then used to identify and characterize methylated residues. In contrast to previous reports utilizing ETD for arginine methylation, we observed significant amount of side-chain fragmentation. Using heavy methyl stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture it was shown that, similar to CID, a loss of monomethylamine or dimethylamine from the arginine methylated side-chain during ETD can be used as a diagnostic to determine the type of arginine methylation. CID of lysine methylated peptides does not lead to significant neutral losses, but ETD is still beneficial because of the high charge states of such peptides. The developed LC MS/MS methods were successfully applied to tryptic digests of a number of methylated proteins, including splicing factor proline-glutamine-rich protein (SFPQ), RNA and export factor-binding protein 2 (REF2-I) and Sul7D, demonstrating significant advantages over traditional LC MS/MS approaches.

  3. Enantiomeric separation of free L- and D-amino acids in hydrolyzed protein fertilizers by capillary electrophoresis tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Laura; Serra, Nuria Sierras; Marina, María Luisa; Crego, Antonio L

    2013-05-29

    Two capillary electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry (CE-MS(2)) methods were optimized in this work using cyclodextrins (CDs) as chiral selectors in order to determine the degree of racemization of the free amino acids contained in different hydrolyzed protein fertilizers used as plant biostimulants. The methodologies developed were characterized by the specificity of MS(2) experiments enabling the identification of all protein amino acids, except for cysteine. The enantiomeric separation of up to 14 amino acids was achieved with resolutions above 1.0 and limits of detection between 0.02 and 0.8 μM. The methods were applied to the analysis of complex samples such as hydrolyzed protein fertilizers to evaluate the presence of d-amino acids after different kinds of hydrolysis treatments. The results corroborated the absence or almost negligible presence of enantiomeric conversions of the L-amino acids into D-amino acids in the case of fertilizers obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis, as well as the high racemization rate for those obtained through a chemical hydrolysis.

  4. Enhancing glycan isomer separations with metal ions and positive and negative polarity ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xueyun; Zhang, Xing; Schocker, Nathaniel S.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Orton, Daniel J.; Khamsi, Jamal; Ashmus, Roger A.; Almeida, Igor C.; Tang, Keqi; Costello, Catherine E.; Smith, Richard D.; Michael, Katja; Baker, Erin S.

    2016-09-07

    Glycomics has become an increasingly important field of research since glycans play critical roles in biology processes ranging from molecular recognition and signaling to cellular communication. Glycans often conjugate with other biomolecules such as proteins and lipids, and alter their properties and functions, so understanding the effect glycans have on cellular systems is essential. However the analysis of glycans is extremely difficult due to their complexity and structural diversity (i.e., the number and identity of monomer units, and configuration of their glycosidic linkages and connectivities). In this work, we coupled ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to characterize glycan standards and biologically important isomers of synthetic αGal-containing O-glycans including glycotopes of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. IMS-MS results showed significant differences for the glycan structural isomers when analyzed in positive and negative polarity and complexed with different metal cations. These results suggest specific metal ions or ion polarities could be used to target and baseline separate glycan isomers of interest with IMS-MS.

  5. Comprehensive ultra-performance liquid chromatographic separation and mass spectrometric analysis of eicosanoid metabolites in human samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Armando, Aaron M; Quehenberger, Oswald; Yan, Chao; Dennis, Edward A

    2014-09-12

    Over the past decade, the number of known eicosanoids has expanded immensely and we have now developed an ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometric (UPLC-QTRAP/MS/MS) method to monitor and quantify numerous eicosanoids. The UPLC-QTRAP/MS/MS approach utilizes scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) to optimize sensitivity, number of metabolites that can be analyzed and the time requirement of the analysis. A total of 184 eicosanoids including 26 deuterated internal standards can be separated and monitored in a single 5min UPLC run. To demonstrate a practical application, human plasma samples were analyzed following solid-phase extraction (SPE) and the recovery rate and matrix effects were determined for the 26 deuterated internal standards added to the plasma. The method was validated and shown to be sensitive with the limit of quantitation at pg levels for most compounds, accurate with recovery rates of 70-120%, and precise with a CV<30 for all compounds. Also, the method showed a linear response over a range spanning several orders of magnitude. In a QC human plasma sample, we identified and rigorously quantified over 120 eicosanoids.

  6. Recoil Momentum Spectroscopy Study of Electron Capture from He by 10 MeV Hydrogenlike Fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, L.; Winecki, S.; Stöckli, M.; Cocke, C. L.; Richard, P.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.

    1996-05-01

    We have used recoil momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS (J. Ullrich, et al., Comm. At. Mol. Phys. \\underline30), 285 (1994).) to determine final state momentum distributions in the single electron capture from He by 10 MeV F^8+ ions. A momentum resolution below 0.15 a.u. was obtained. The longitidunal momentum resolution is sufficient to allow the separation of final state populations of the L, M and higher states, and to identify excitation of the residual He^+ ion. This probability of this excitation is large in the capture process. Transverse momentum distributions were used to extract transverse cross sections (angular distributions) for different final states. Comparison of the data to theoretical expectations will be presented.

  7. First online multireflection time-of-flight mass measurements of isobar chains produced by fusion-evaporation reactions: Toward identification of superheavy elements via mass spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schury, P.; Wada, M.; Ito, Y.; Kaji, D.; Arai, F.; MacCormick, M.; Murray, I.; Haba, H.; Jeong, S.; Kimura, S.; Koura, H.; Miyatake, H.; Morimoto, K.; Morita, K.; Ozawa, A.; Rosenbusch, M.; Reponen, M.; Söderström, P.-A.; Takamine, A.; Tanaka, T.; Wollnik, H.

    2017-01-01

    Using a multireflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph located after a gas cell coupled with the gas-filled recoil ion separator GARIS-II, the masses of several α -decaying heavy nuclei were directly and precisely measured. The nuclei were produced via fusion-evaporation reactions and separated from projectilelike and targetlike particles using GARIS-II before being stopped in a helium-filled gas cell. Time-of-flight spectra for three isobar chains, 204Fr-204Rn-204At-204Po , 205Fr-205Rn-205At-205Po-205Bi , and 206Fr-206Rn-206At , were observed. Precision atomic mass values were determined for Fr-206204, Rn,205204, and At,205204. Identifications of 205Bi, Po,205204, 206Rn, and 206At were made with N ≲10 detected ions, representing the next step toward use of mass spectrometry to identify exceedingly low-yield species such as superheavy element ions.

  8. Proteomic profiling of amniotic fluid in premature labor using two-dimensional liquid separation and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bujold, Emmanuel; Romero, Roberto; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Erez, Offer; Gotsch, Francesca; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Gomez, Ricardo; Espinoza, Jimmy; Vaisbuch, Edi; Kim, Yeon Mee; Edwin, Samuel; Pisano, Mike; Allen, Beth; Podust, Vladimir N.; Dalmasso, Enrique A.; Rutherford, Jennifer; Rogers, Wade; Moser, Allan; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Barder, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Objective Simultaneous analysis of the protein composition of biological fluids is now possible. Such an approach can be used to identify biological markers of disease and to understand the pathophysiology of disorders that have eluded classification, diagnosis, and treatment. The purpose of this study was to analyze the differences in protein composition in amniotic fluid of patients in preterm labor. Study Design Amniotic fluid was obtained by amniocenteses from three groups of women with preterm labor and intact membranes: (1) women without intra-amniotic infection/inflammation (IAI) who delivered at term; (2) women without intra-amniotic IAI who delivered a preterm neonate; and (3) women with IAI. Intra-amniotic infection was defined as a positive amniotic fluid culture for microorganisms. Intra-amniotic inflammation was defined as an elevated amniotic fluid interleukin (IL)-6 (≥2.3 ng/mL). Two-dimensional (2D) chromatography was used for analysis. The first dimension separated proteins by isoelectric point, while the second, by the degree of hydrophobicity. 2D protein maps were generated using different experimental conditions (reducing agents as well as protein concentration). The maps were used to discern subsets of isoelectric point/hydrophobicity containing differentially expressed proteins. Protein identification of differentially expressed fractions was conducted with mass spectrometry. ELISA immunoassays as well as surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS)--based on-chip antibody capture immunoassay were also used for confirmation of a specific protein that was differentially expressed. Results 1) Amniotic fluid protein composition can be analyzed using a combination of 2D liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for the identification of proteins differentially expressed in patients in preterm labor; 2) While total insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) concentration did not change

  9. ASTROPHYSICS. Exclusion of leptophilic dark matter models using XENON100 electronic recoil data.

    PubMed

    2015-08-21

    Laboratory experiments searching for galactic dark matter particles scattering off nuclei have so far not been able to establish a discovery. We use data from the XENON100 experiment to search for dark matter interacting with electrons. With no evidence for a signal above the low background of our experiment, we exclude a variety of representative dark matter models that would induce electronic recoils. For axial-vector couplings to electrons, we exclude cross sections above 6 × 10(-35) cm(2) for particle masses of m(χ) = 2 GeV/c(2). Independent of the dark matter halo, we exclude leptophilic models as an explanation for the long-standing DAMA/LIBRA signal, such as couplings to electrons through axial-vector interactions at a 4.4σ confidence level, mirror dark matter at 3.6σ, and luminous dark matter at 4.6σ.

  10. Three-Loop Radiative-Recoil Corrections to Hyperfine Splitting in Muonium: Diagrams with Polarization Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, Michael I.; Shelyuto, Valery A.

    2009-09-25

    We consider three-loop radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting in muonium generated by the diagrams with electron and muon vacuum polarizations. We calculate single-logarithmic and nonlogarithmic contributions of order alpha{sup 3}(m/M)E{sub F} generated by gauge invariant sets of diagrams with electron and muon polarization insertions in the electron and muon factors. Combining these corrections with the older results, we obtain total contribution to hyperfine splitting generated by all diagrams with electron and muon polarization loops. The calculation of this contribution completes an important stage in the implementation of the program of reduction of the theoretical uncertainty of hyperfine splitting below 10 Hz. The new results improve the theory of hyperfine splitting and affect the value of the electron-muon mass ratio extracted from experimental data on muonium hyperfine splitting.

  11. Supermassive recoil velocities for binary black-hole mergers with antialigned spins.

    PubMed

    González, José A; Hannam, Mark; Sperhake, Ulrich; Brügmann, Bernd; Husa, Sascha

    2007-06-08

    Recent calculations of the recoil velocity in binary black-hole mergers have found the kick velocity to be of the order of a few hundred km/s in the case of nonspinning binaries and about 500 km/s in the case of spinning configurations, and have lead to predictions of a maximum kick of up to 1300 km/s. We test these predictions and demonstrate that kick velocities of at least 2500 km/s are possible for equal-mass binaries with antialigned spins in the orbital plane. Kicks of that magnitude are likely to have significant repercussions for models of black-hole formation, the population of intergalactic black holes, and the structure of host galaxies.

  12. Collision-induced release, ion mobility separation, and amino acid sequence analysis of subunits from mass-selected noncovalent protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Deepali; Dodds, Eric D

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, mass spectrometry has become a valuable tool for detecting and characterizing protein-protein interactions and for measuring the masses and subunit stoichiometries of noncovalent protein complexes. The gas-phase dissociation of noncovalent protein assemblies via tandem mass spectrometry can be useful in confirming subunit masses and stoichiometries; however, dissociation experiments that are able to yield subunit sequence information must usually be conducted separately. Here, we furnish proof of concept for a method that allows subunit sequence information to be directly obtained from a protein aggregate in a single gas-phase analysis. The experiments were carried out using a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with a traveling-wave ion mobility separator. This instrument configuration allows for a noncovalent protein assembly to be quadrupole selected, then subjected to two successive rounds of collision-induced dissociation with an intervening stage of ion mobility separation. This approach was applied to four model proteins as their corresponding homodimers: glucagon, ubiquitin, cytochrome c, and β-lactoglobulin. In each case, b- and y-type fragment ions were obtained upon further collisional activation of the collisionally-released subunits, resulting in up to 50% sequence coverage. Owing to the incorporation of an ion mobility separation, these results also suggest the intriguing possibility of measuring complex mass, complex collisional cross section, subunit masses, subunit collisional cross sections, and sequence information for the subunits in a single gas-phase experiment. Overall, these findings represent a significant contribution towards the realization of protein interactomic analyses, which begin with native complexes and directly yield subunit identities.

  13. Collision-Induced Release, Ion Mobility Separation, and Amino Acid Sequence Analysis of Subunits from Mass-Selected Noncovalent Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathore, Deepali; Dodds, Eric D.

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, mass spectrometry has become a valuable tool for detecting and characterizing protein-protein interactions and for measuring the masses and subunit stoichiometries of noncovalent protein complexes. The gas-phase dissociation of noncovalent protein assemblies via tandem mass spectrometry can be useful in confirming subunit masses and stoichiometries; however, dissociation experiments that are able to yield subunit sequence information must usually be conducted separately. Here, we furnish proof of concept for a method that allows subunit sequence information to be directly obtained from a protein aggregate in a single gas-phase analysis. The experiments were carried out using a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with a traveling-wave ion mobility separator. This instrument configuration allows for a noncovalent protein assembly to be quadrupole selected, then subjected to two successive rounds of collision-induced dissociation with an intervening stage of ion mobility separation. This approach was applied to four model proteins as their corresponding homodimers: glucagon, ubiquitin, cytochrome c, and β-lactoglobulin. In each case, b- and y-type fragment ions were obtained upon further collisional activation of the collisionally-released subunits, resulting in up to 50% sequence coverage. Owing to the incorporation of an ion mobility separation, these results also suggest the intriguing possibility of measuring complex mass, complex collisional cross section, subunit masses, subunit collisional cross sections, and sequence information for the subunits in a single gas-phase experiment. Overall, these findings represent a significant contribution towards the realization of protein interactomic analyses, which begin with native complexes and directly yield subunit identities.

  14. A complete mass balance of a complex combined anaerobic/aerobic municipal source-separated waste treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Pognani, Michele; Barrena, Raquel; Font, Xavier; Sánchez, Antoni

    2012-05-01

    In this study a combined anaerobic/aerobic full-scale treatment plant designed for the treatment of the source-separated organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) was monitored over a period of one year. During this period, full information was collected about the waste input material, the biogas production, the main rejects and the compost characteristics. The plant includes mechanical pre-treatment, dry thermophilic anaerobic digestion, tunnel composting system and a curing phase to produce compost. To perform the monitoring of the entire plant and the individual steps, traditional chemical methods were used but they present important limitations in determining the critical points and the efficiency of the stabilization of the organic matter. Respiration indices (dynamic and cumulative) allowed for the quantitative calculation of the efficiency of each treatment unit. The mass balance was calculated and expressed in terms of Mgy(-1) of wet (total) matter, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. Results show that during the pre-treatment step about 32% of the initial wet matter is rejected without any treatment. This also reduces the biodegradability of the organic matter that continues to the treatment process. About 50% of the initial nitrogen and 86.4% of the initial phosphorus are found in the final compost. The final compost also achieves a high level of stabilization with a dynamic respiration index of 0.3±0.1g O(2) per kg of total solids per hour, which implies a reduction of 93% from that of the raw OFMSW, without considering the losses of biodegradable organic matter in the refuse (32% of the total input). The anaerobic digestion process is the main contributor to this stabilization.

  15. INTERACTION OF RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES WITH STARS IN GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shuo; Liu, F. K.; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer; Chen Xian E-mail: fkliu@bac.pku.edu.cn

    2012-03-20

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are the products of frequent galaxy mergers. The coalescence of the SMBHBs is a distinct source of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. The detections of the strong GW radiation and their possible electromagnetic counterparts are essential. Numerical relativity suggests that the post-merger supermassive black hole (SMBH) gets a kick velocity up to 4000 km s{sup -1} due to the anisotropic GW radiations. Here, we investigate the dynamical coevolution and interaction of the recoiling SMBHs and their galactic stellar environments with one million direct N-body simulations including the stellar tidal disruption by the recoiling SMBHs. Our results show that the accretion of disrupted stars does not significantly affect the SMBH dynamical evolution. We investigate the stellar tidal disruption rates as a function of the dynamical evolution of oscillating SMBHs in the galactic nuclei. Our simulations show that most stellar tidal disruptions are contributed by the unbound stars and occur when the oscillating SMBHs pass through the galactic center. The averaged disruption rate is {approx}10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, which is about an order of magnitude lower than that by a stationary SMBH at similar galactic nuclei. Our results also show that a bound star cluster is around the oscillating SMBH of about {approx}0.7% the black hole mass. In addition, we discover a massive cloud of unbound stars following the oscillating SMBH. We also investigate the dependence of the results on the SMBH masses and density slopes of the galactic nuclei.

  16. The Electron Recoil Response of the XENON1T Dark Matter Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shockley, Evan; Xenon1T Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    XENON1T employs a two-phase xenon TPC to search for dark matter by detecting scintillation light produced by nuclear recoils in a 2 ton active volume of liquid xenon. However, nuclear recoils are not the only recoils that can occur since radiogenic electronic recoils are possible. Our only way of differentiating nuclear and electronic recoils is by comparing the relative fraction of scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) signals. For the first Science Run of XENON1T, we must understand the response of our detector to S1 and S2 signals at the low keV energies where dark matter will present itself. Therefore, I will be discussing the current understanding of our signal and detection mechanisms at these energies. This work includes work using sources such as the Rn220 technique developed by XENON collaborators for understanding our rejection of electronic recoils.

  17. Recoil ion charge state distribution following the beta(sup +) decay of {sup 21}Na

    SciTech Connect

    Scielzo, Nicholas D.; Freedman, Stuart J.; Fujikawa, Brian K.; Vetter, Paul A.

    2003-01-03

    The charge state distribution following the positron decay of 21Na has been measured, with a larger than expected fraction of the daughter 21Ne in positive charge states. No dependence on either the positron or recoil nucleus energy is observed. The data is compared to a simple model based on the sudden approximation. Calculations suggest a small but important contribution from recoil ionization has important consequences for precision beta decay correlation experiments detecting recoil ions.

  18. Delayed autoionization of recoil ions by the decay of high-spin isomeric states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidikov, V. Z.

    1985-12-01

    The time dependence of the ionization for isotopically different heavy ion fusion recoil ions has been observed. Delayed nuclear-induced autoionization of recoil ions caused by the decay of high-spin nuclear isomeric states by internal conversion was established. Internal conversion in isolated recoil atoms results in a drastic rearrangement in the atomic cloud with a loss of a great number of orbital electrons. Possibilities for the use of the observed phenomena in atomic and nuclear physics are discussed.

  19. High resolution LC-ESI-TOF-mass spectrometry method for fast separation, identification, and quantification of 12 isoflavones in soybeans and soybean products.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Jin; Chung, Ill-Min; Kim, Hunjung; Jung, Mun Yhung

    2015-06-01

    A high resolution LC-ESI-TOF-MS analytical method was established for the rapid isolation, identification, and quantification of 12 isoflavones in soybean and soybean products. Individual isoflavones were identified on the basis of the accurate mass data of their respective protonated mass ions, Na or K adduct ions, fragment ions, and isotope ion patterns. The protonated mass ions of isoflavones were extracted for their quantification in soybean products. Twelve different isoflavones in the soybean products were fully separated, identified and quantified within 12min separation time. The established LC-TOF/MS was an effective analytical method for the simultaneous characterization and quantification of isoflavones with exceptionally short analytical time, high selectivity, a high linearity (r(2)>0.992) in a wide range, low LOD and LOQ, high precision, inter-and intra-day repeatability, and no significant matrix effect. Furthermore, it requires simple sample preparation procedure (solvent extraction, dilution, and syringe filtration).

  20. A RUNAWAY BLACK HOLE IN COSMOS: GRAVITATIONAL WAVE OR SLINGSHOT RECOIL?

    SciTech Connect

    Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Hao, H.; Aldcroft, T.; Jahnke, K.; Zamorani, G.; Comastri, A.; Bolzonella, M.; Blecha, L.; Loeb, A.; Bongiorno, A.; Brusa, M.; Leauthaud, A.; Mainieri, V.; Piconcelli, E.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.; Trump, J.; Vignali, C.

    2010-07-01

    We present a detailed study of a peculiar source detected in the COSMOS survey at z = 0.359. Source CXOC J100043.1+020637, also known as CID-42, has two compact optical sources embedded in the same galaxy. The distance between the two, measured in the HST/ACS image, is 0.''495 {+-} 0.''005 that, at the redshift of the source, corresponds to a projected separation of 2.46 {+-} 0.02 kpc. A large ({approx}1200 km s{sup -1}) velocity offset between the narrow and broad components of H{beta} has been measured in three different optical spectra from the VLT/VIMOS and Magellan/IMACS instruments. CID-42 is also the only X-ray source in COSMOS, having in its X-ray spectra a strong redshifted broad absorption iron line and an iron emission line, drawing an inverted P-Cygni profile. The Chandra and XMM-Newton data show that the absorption line is variable in energy by {Delta}E = 500 eV over four years and that the absorber has to be highly ionized in order not to leave a signature in the soft X-ray spectrum. That these features-the morphology, the velocity offset, and the inverted P-Cygni profile-occur in the same source is unlikely to be a coincidence. We envisage two possible explanations, both exceptional, for this system: (1) a gravitational wave (GW) recoiling black hole (BH), caught 1-10 Myr after merging; or (2) a Type 1/Type 2 system in the same galaxy where the Type 1 is recoiling due to the slingshot effect produced by a triple BH system. The first possibility gives us a candidate GW recoiling BH with both spectroscopic and imaging signatures. In the second case, the X-ray absorption line can be explained as a BAL-like outflow from the foreground nucleus (a Type 2 AGN) at the rearer one (a Type 1 AGN), which illuminates the otherwise undetectable wind, giving us the first opportunity to show that fast winds are present in obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and possibly universal in AGNs.

  1. Projectile paths corrected for recoil and air resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, H. R.

    1986-01-01

    The angle of projection of a bullet is not the same as the angle of the bore of the firearm just before firing. This is because recoil alters the direction of the barrel as the bullet moves along the barrel. Neither is the angle of projection of an arrow the same as the direction of the arrow just before it is projected. The difficulty in obtaining the angle of projection limits the value of the standard equation for trajectories relative to a horizontal plane. Furthermore, air resistance makes this equation unrealistic for all but short ranges.

  2. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  3. Elastic recoil detection analysis using ion-induced electron emission for particle identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benka, O.; Brandstötter, A.; Steinbauer, E.

    1994-03-01

    We propose a new method to identify particles in ERD analysis, using their electron emission yield from a thin carbon foil. Before the particles reach a silicon surface barrier detector (SB) they penetrate a set of thin foils (typically 6 foils) with a thickness of 3 {μg}/{cm 2} each). The emission yield depends on the nuclear charge of the penetrating ion and it is roughly proportional to the energy loss in the foil. The emitted electrons are accelerated to a muchannel plate (MCP) by a voltage of 300 V. The electron signal from the MCP is proportional to the number of emitted electrons and it occurs in coincidence with the energy signal from the energy detector. For data acquisition we developed a dual parameter multichannel analyzer (M2D) as an add on board for an industry standard personal computer. The two-dimensional spectrum of coincidences and the one-dimensional spectra from both detectors are recorded simultaneously. The M2D has 256K channels which can be freely configured as a two-dimensional matrix. For example a resolution of 1024 × 256 channels is possible. For optimum suppression of random coincidences the coincidence time window can be set from 0.125 μs up to 32 μs. For this new setup the ability for particle identification is discussed for different projectiles (He, C, O, Cl) and targets. H recoil ions can be well separated from He projectiles so that for H analysis the H recoil spectrum and the He forward energy spectrum can be measured simultaneously. An example for depth-profiling of 100 keV H implantations in silicon is given.

  4. Computerized measurement of pulmonary conductance and elastic recoil.

    PubMed

    Colebatch, H J; Nail, B S; Ng, C K

    1978-04-01

    A system devloped for on-line measurement of transpulmonary pressure, gas flow at the mouth, change in expired volume and plethysmograph volume uses a minicomputer to control a multiplexed analog to digital converter. The computer identified samples as static or dynamic values by monitoring a voltage activating a solenoid valve, used to close the airway. Analysis of these samples by other task-specific programs yielded the static deflation pressure-volume (PV) curve, the conductance-recoil pressure, GL-Pst(L), relationship and the maximum expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curve; the MEF-Pst(L) curve and conductance upstream from the equal pressure point were derived. The PV relationship was represented by a fourth-order polynomial and the GL-Pst(L) relationship by linear regression. In 11 subjects the results obtained using on-line data collection, compared with manual analysis of oscillograph recordings, showed small differences in static compliance and in the maximum Pst(L); but overall the two methods showed excellent agreement. Besides advantages of speed and objectivity, this system facilitates a more rigorous analytical treatment of elastic recoil and conductance.

  5. Contribution of recoil atoms to irradiation damage in absorber materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeone, D.; Hablot, O.; Micalet, V.; Bellon, P.; Serruys, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Absorbing materials are used to control the reactivity of nuclear reactors by taking advantage of nuclear reactions (e.g., 10B(n,α) 7Li) where neutrons are absorbed. During such reactions, energetic recoils are produced. As a result, radiation damage in absorbing materials originates both from these nuclear reactions and from elastic collisions between neutrons and atoms. This damage eventually leads to a partial destruction of the materials, and this is the main limitation on their lifetime in nuclear reactors. Using a formalism developed to calculate displacements per atoms (dpa) in a multi atomic target, we have calculated damages in terms of displacements per atom in a (n,α) absorbing material taking into account geometrical effects of 10 boron self shielding and transmutation reactions induced by neutrons inside the absorber. Radiation damage is calculated for boron carbide and hafnium diboride ceramics in a Pressurized Water Reactor environment. It is shown that recoils produced by nuclear reactions account for the main part of the radiation damage created in these ceramics. Damages are calculated as a function of the distance from the center of an absorber pellet. Due to the self-shielding effect, these damage curves exhibit sharp maxima, the position of which changes in time.

  6. Technique for measuring atomic recoil frequency using coherence functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, S.; Barrett, B.; Chan, I.; Mok, C.; Yavin, I.; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a technique for measuring the atomic recoil frequency using a single-state echo-type atom interferometer that manipulates laser-cooled atoms in the ground state. The interferometer relies on momentum-state interference due to two standing-wave pulses that produce density gratings. The interference is modified by applying a third standing-wave pulse during the interferometer pulse sequence. As a result, the grating contrast exhibits periodic revivals at the atomic recoil frequency ωr as a function of the time at which the third pulse is applied, allowing ωr to be measured easily and precisely. The contrast is accurately described by a coherence function, which is the Fourier transform of the momentum distribution, produced by the third pulse and by the theory of echo formation. If the third pulse is a traveling wave, loss of grating contrast is observed, an effect also described by a coherence function. The decay of the grating contrast as a function of continuous-wave light intensity is used to infer the cross section for photon absorption.

  7. Differential cross sections and recoil polarizations for the reaction γp→K+Σ0

    DOE PAGES

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; ...

    2010-08-06

    Here, high-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and recoil polarizations for the reactionmore » $$\\gamma p \\rightarrow K^+ \\Sigma^0$$ have been obtained using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies ($$\\sqrt{s}$$) from 1.69 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the $K^+$ production angle. Independent measurements were made using the $$K^{+}p\\pi^{-}$$($$\\gamma$$) and $$K^{+}p$$($$\\pi^-,\\gamma$$) final-state topologies, and were found to exhibit good agreement. Our differential cross sections show good agreement with earlier CLAS, SAPHIR and LEPS results, while offering better statistical precision and a 300-MeV increase in $$\\sqrt{s}$$ coverage. Above $$\\sqrt{s} \\approx 2.5$$ GeV, $t$- and $u$-channel Regge scaling behavior can be seen at forward- and backward-angles, respectively. Our recoil polarization ($$P_\\Sigma$$) measurements represent a substantial increase in kinematic coverage and enhanced precision over previous world data. At forward angles we find that $$P_\\Sigma$$ is of the same magnitude but opposite sign as $$P_\\Lambda$$, in agreement with the static SU(6) quark model prediction of $$P_\\Sigma \\approx -P_\\Lambda$$. This expectation is violated in some mid- and backward-angle kinematic regimes, where $$P_\\Sigma$$ and $$P_\\Lambda$$ are of similar magnitudes but also have the same signs. In conjunction with several other meson photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, the present data will help constrain the partial wave analyses being performed to search for missing baryon resonances.« less

  8. Method for quantitative determination and separation of trace amounts of chemical elements in the presence of large quantities of other elements having the same atomic mass

    DOEpatents

    Miller, C.M.; Nogar, N.S.

    1982-09-02

    Photoionization via autoionizing atomic levels combined with conventional mass spectroscopy provides a technique for quantitative analysis of trace quantities of chemical elements in the presence of much larger amounts of other elements with substantially the same atomic mass. Ytterbium samples smaller than 10 ng have been detected using an ArF* excimer laser which provides the atomic ions for a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Elemental selectivity of greater than 5:1 with respect to lutetium impurity has been obtained. Autoionization via a single photon process permits greater photon utilization efficiency because of its greater absorption cross section than bound-free transitions, while maintaining sufficient spectroscopic structure to allow significant photoionization selectivity between different atomic species. Separation of atomic species from others of substantially the same atomic mass is also described.

  9. UV photodissociation of trapped ions following ion mobility separation in a Q-ToF mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Bellina, Bruno; Brown, Jeffery M; Ujma, Jakub; Murray, Paul; Giles, Kevin; Morris, Michael; Compagnon, Isabelle; Barran, Perdita E

    2014-12-21

    An ion mobility mass spectrometer has been modified to allow optical interrogation of ions with different mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios and/or mobilities (K). An ion gating and trapping procedure has been developed which allows us to store ions for several seconds enabling UV photodissociation (UVPD).

  10. Separating the Chaff from the Oats: Evidence for a Conceptual Distinction between Count Noun and Mass Noun Aggregates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Erica L.; Wisniewski, Edward J.; Trindel, Kelly A.; Imai, Mutsumi

    2004-01-01

    The English language makes a grammatical distinction between count nouns and mass nouns. For example, count nouns but not mass nouns can be pluralized and can appear with the indefinite article. Some scholars dismiss the distinction as an arbitrary convention of language whereas others suggest that it is conceptually based. The present studies…

  11. Analytical calculation of radiative-recoil corrections to muonium hyperfine splitting: Muon-line contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, M.I.; Karshenboim, S.G.; Shelyuto, V.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Analytic expression for radiative-recoil corrections to muonium ground-state hyperfine splitting induced by muon-line radiative insertions is obtained. This result completes the program of analytic calculation of all radiative-recoil corrections. The perspectives of further muonium hyperfine splitting investigations are also discussed.

  12. Exact calculations of nuclear-recoil energies from prompt gamma decays resulting from neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J.H.

    1981-07-20

    The results of an accurate determination of the recoil spectrum from (n, ..gamma..) reactions in molybdenum are presented. The recoil spectrum has been calculated from nuclear level structure data and measured branching ratios. Angular correlations between successive gammas have been accounted for using the standard theoretical techniques of Racah algebra and the density matrix formalism.

  13. Solid-state Marx based two-switch voltage modulator for the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, L. M.; Canacsinh, H.; Ferrao, N.; Mendes, C.; Silva, J. Fernando; Soares, R.; Schipper, J.; Fowler, A.

    2010-07-15

    A new circuit topology is proposed to replace the actual pulse transformer and thyratron based resonant modulator that supplies the 60 kV target potential for the ion acceleration of the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator accelerator, the stability of which is critical for the mass resolution downstream separator, at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The improved modulator uses two solid-state switches working together, each one based on the Marx generator concept, operating as series and parallel switches, reducing the stress on the series stacked semiconductors, and also as auxiliary pulse generator in order to fulfill the target requirements. Preliminary results of a 10 kV prototype, using 1200 V insulated gate bipolar transistors and capacitors in the solid-state Marx circuits, ten stages each, with an electrical equivalent circuit of the target, are presented, demonstrating both the improved voltage stability and pulse flexibility potential wanted for this new modulator.

  14. Selective extraction, separation, and identification of anthocyanins from Hibiscus sabdariffa L. using solid phase extraction-capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (time-of-flight /ion trap).

    PubMed

    Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Puertas-Mejía, Miguel A; Cortacero-Ramírez, Sonia; Beltrán, Raúl; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Joven, Jorge; Dinelli, Giovanni; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2008-07-01

    A method for selective extraction using SPE, electrophoretic separation at basic condition and the identification by using exact masses and fragmentation patterns has been developed in order to know the anthocyanins in dried calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. A detailed and comparative study of several extraction procedures has been carried out to obtain the maximum number of anthocyanidins from the calyces and then a CE-TOF-MS method in positive mode using ESI has been developed for the separation and rapid identification of anthocyanins in H. sabdariffa L. Delphinidin-3-sambubioside, cyanidin-3-sambubioside have been detected as main components and cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside, delphinidin-3-O-glucoside and cyanidin-3,5-diglucoside, and chlorogenic acid as minor constituents. The confirmation of the anthocyanidins and chlorogenic acid was carried out using fragmentation ions with the IT-mass spectrometer (IT-MS).

  15. Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography: ion chromatography × reversed-phase liquid chromatography for separation of low-molar-mass organic acids.

    PubMed

    Brudin, Stella S; Shellie, Robert A; Haddad, Paul R; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2010-10-22

    In the work presented here a novel approach to comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography is evaluated. Ion chromatography is chosen for the first-dimension separation and reversed-phase liquid chromatography is chosen for the second-dimension separation mode. The coupling of these modes is made possible by neutralising the first-dimension effluent, containing KOH, prior to transfer to the second-dimension reversed-phase column. A test mixture of 24 low-molar-mass organic acids is used for optimisation of the system. Three food and beverage samples were analysed in order to evaluate the developed methodology, the resulting two-dimensional separation is near-orthogonal, the set-up is simple and all instrumental components are available commercially. The method proved to be robust and suitable for the analysis of wine, orange juice and yogurt.

  16. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry for rapid separation and identification of main constituents in Chinese herbal formula Xuan Hu Suo San.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huaqi; Zhang, Xinyue; Luo, Shilin; Shang, Fei; Chen, Jianping; Wang, Jinghong; Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Xiaoyan; Sun, Yikun

    2017-02-15

    Xuan Hu Suo San (XHSS) is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been extensively applied in the treatment of osteoarthritis for many years, however, its chemical composition has not yet been elucidated. Thus, a rapid, efficient, and precise method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied in both positive- and negative-ion modes to rapidly separate and identify the main chemical ingredients in XHSS for the first time. Finally, with the optimised separation and detection method, a total of 57 compounds were simultaneously separated within 13 min, among which 14 compounds were confirmed by comparing retention time and MS data with reference standards and others were tentatively identified by comparing with reference literatures. This rapid and sensitive approach is highly useful for the identification and characterisation of chemical constituents, and provides fundamental and extensive information supporting further metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies of XHSS.

  17. An application of high-speed counter-current chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for separation and online identification of coumarins from Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhiguo; Xu, Deran; Yao, Shun; Luo, Jianguang; Kong, Lingyi

    2009-08-15

    A new and systematic application for separation and online identification of coumarins from Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn by preparative high-speed counter-current chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization multi-stage mass spectrometry (prep-HSCCC/ESI-MS(n)) was established. The procedure of separation was guided by the chromatogram of ion current. The structures of acquisitions were deduced by MS information. The hyphenation between prep-HSCCC/ESI-MS(n) was designed to keep the split ratio from 1:20 to 1:200 exactly. Seven compounds were obtained and two new compounds were detected. It was proved that prep-HSCCC/ESI-MS(n) was an effective method for sensitive detection, rapid identification and separation of natural products.

  18. The shape effect of space debris on recoil impulse by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenglin; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Kunpeng

    2016-10-01

    Removing space debris by high-energy pulsed laser may be the most effective way to mitigate the threat posed by the increasing space debris. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes recoil impulse, which will lower the orbit perigee of space debris and accelerate the atmospheric capture. When the laser beam vertically irradiates a flat debris, it requires a certain laser fluence to reach the optimal impulse coupling, and the recoil impulse is parallel to the laser beam. However, the incident laser fluence varies in different parts of a non-flat surface. We have taken the shape effect into account to propose a numerical method of calculating the recoil impulse. Taking cylinder debris as the target, we have compared the recoil impulse in different laser fluences through simulation experiments, which implies that a higher laser fluence than the optimal one is needed to obtain a larger recoil impulse for irregularly shaped space debris.

  19. Electron recombination in low-energy nuclear recoils tracks in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of electron-ion recombination processes in ionization tracks of recoiled atoms in liquid argon (LAr) detectors. The analysis is based on the results of computer simulations which use realistic models of electron transport and reactions. The calculations reproduce the recent experimental results of the ionization yield from 6.7 keV nuclear recoils in LAr. The statistical distribution of the number of electrons that escape recombination is found to deviate from the binomial distribution, and estimates of recombination fluctuations for nuclear recoils tracks are obtained. A study of the recombination kinetics shows that a significant part of electrons undergo very fast static recombination, an effect that may be responsible for the weak drift-field dependence of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in some noble liquids. The obtained results can be useful in the search for hypothetical dark matter particles and in other studies that involve detection of recoiled nuclei.

  20. Three-dimensional enhanced lipidomics analysis combining UPLC, differential ion mobility spectrometry, and mass spectrometric separation strategies1[S

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Paul R. S.; Armando, Aaron M.; Campbell, J. Larry; Quehenberger, Oswald; Dennis, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipids serve as central structural components in cellular membranes and as potent mediators in numerous signaling pathways. There are six main classes of naturally occurring phospholipids distinguished by their distinct polar head groups that contain many unique molecular species with distinct fatty acid composition. Phospholipid molecular species are often expressed as isobaric species that are denoted by the phospholipid class and the total number of carbon atoms and double bonds contained in the esterified fatty acyl groups (e.g., phosphatidylcholine 34:2). Techniques to separate these molecules exist, and each has positive and negative attributes. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography uses polar bonded silica to separate lipids by polar head group but not by specific molecular species. Reversed phase (RP) chromatography can separate by fatty acyl chain composition but not by polar head group. Herein we describe a new strategy called differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS), which separates phospholipid classes by their polar head group. Combining DMS with current LC methods enhances phospholipid separation by increasing resolution, specificity, and signal-to-noise ratio. Additional application of specialized information-dependent acquisition methodologies along with RP chromatography allows full isobaric resolution, identification, and compositional characterization of specific phospholipids at the molecular level. PMID:25225680

  1. Rejection of Electronic Recoils with the DMTPC Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, J. P.; Ahlen, S.; Battat, J.; Caldwell, T.; Chernicoff, M.; Deaconu, C.; Dujmic, D.; Dushkin, A.; Fedus, W.; Fisher, P.; Golub, F.; Henderson, S.; Inglis, A.; Kaboth, A.; Kohse, G.; Kirsch, L.; Lanza, R.; Lee, A.; Monroe, J.; Ouyang, H.; Sahin, T.; Sciolla, G.; Skvorodnev, N.; Tomita, H.; Wellenstein, H.; Wolfe, I.; Yamamoto, R.; Yegoryan, H.

    The Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC) collaboration is developing a low-pressure gas TPC for detecting WIMP-nucleon interactions. DMTPC detectors use optical readout with CCD cameras to search for the daily modulation of the directional signal of the dark matter wind. An analysis of several charge readout channels has been developed to obtain additional information about ionization events in the detector. In order to reach sensitivities required for the WIMP detection, the detector needs to minimize backgrounds from electron recoils. This article shows that by using the readout of charge signals in addition to CCD readout, a preliminary statistics-limited 90% C.L. upper limit on the γ and e- rejection factor of 5.6 × 10-6 is obtained for energies between 40 keVee and 200 keVee.

  2. Elastic recoil detection analysis on the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, R.; Orlic, I.; Cohen, David D.

    2002-05-01

    The heavy ion microprobe at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation is capable of focussing heavy ions with an ME/ q2 of up to 100 amu MeV. This makes the microprobe ideally suited for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). However, beam currents on a microprobe are usually very small, which requires a detection system with a large solid angle. We apply microbeam heavy ion ERDA using a large solid angle ΔE- E telescope with a gas ΔE detector to layered structures. We demonstrate the capability to measure oxygen and carbon with a lateral resolution of 20 μm, together with determination of the depth of the contamination in thin deposited layers.

  3. Dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes and its recoil effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuang; Chen, Qunzhi; Liu, Jiahui; Wang, Kaile; Jiang, Zhe; Sun, Zhili; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-06-15

    A dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes (HEDBS), in which gas flow oriented parallel to the electric field, was proposed. Results showed that with this structure, air can be effectively ignited, forming atmospheric low temperature plasma, and the proposed HEDBS could achieve much higher electron density (5 × 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3}). It was also found that the flow condition, including outlet diameter and flow rate, played a key role in the evolution of electron density. Optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic results showed that the concentration of reactive species had the same variation trend as the electron density. The simulated distribution of discharge gas flow indicated that the HEDBS had a strong recoil effect on discharge gas, and could efficiently promote generating electron density as well as reactive species.

  4. Study of nuclear recoils in liquid argon with monoenergetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenfus, C.; Allkofer, Y.; Amsler, C.; Creus, W.; Ferella, A.; Rochet, J.; Walter, M.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of developments for liquid argon dark matter detectors we assembled a laboratory setup to scatter neutrons on a small liquid argon target. The neutrons are produced mono-energetically (Ekin = 2.45 MeV) by nuclear fusion in a deuterium plasma and are collimated onto a 3" liquid argon cell operating in single-phase mode (zero electric field). Organic liquid scintillators are used to tag scattered neutrons and to provide a time-of-flight measurement. The setup is designed to study light pulse shapes and scintillation yields from nuclear and electronic recoils as well as from alpha particles at working points relevant for dark matter searches. Liquid argon offers the possibility to scrutinise scintillation yields in noble liquids with respect to the population strength of the two fundamental excimer states. Here we present experimental methods and first results from recent data towards such studies.

  5. Kicked waveforms: prospects for direct detection of black hole recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerosa, Davide; Moore, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Generic black hole binaries radiate gravitational waves anisotropically, imparting a recoil, or kick, velocity to the merger remnant. If a component of the kick along the line of sight is present, gravitational waves emitted during the final orbits and merger will be gradually Doppler shifted as the kick builds up. We develop a simple prescription to capture this effect in existing waveform models, showing that future gravitational wave experiments will be able to perform direct measurements, not only of the black hole kick velocity, but also of its accumulation profile. In particular, the eLISA space mission will measure supermassive black hole kick velocities as low as 500 km/s, which are expected to be a common outcome of black hole binary coalescence following galaxy mergers. Black hole kicks thus constitute a promising new observable in the growing field of gravitational wave astronomy. Einstein Fellow.

  6. Calibration of a compact magnetic proton recoil neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Guoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Qiu, Suizheng; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jinliang; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Yang, Shaohua

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer is considered as a powerful instrument to measure deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron spectrum, as it is currently used in inertial confinement fusion facilities and large Tokamak devices. The energy resolution (ER) and neutron detection efficiency (NDE) are the two most important parameters to characterize a neutron spectrometer. In this work, the ER calibration for the MPR spectrometer was performed by using the HI-13 tandem accelerator at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), and the NDE calibration was performed by using the neutron generator at CIAE. The specific calibration techniques used in this work and the associated accuracies were discussed in details in this paper. The calibration results were presented along with Monte Carlo simulation results.

  7. A Study of Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber for the Direct Detection of WIMP Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Huajie

    2014-11-01

    Robust results of WIMP direct detection experiments depend on rm understandings of nuclear recoils in the detector media. This thesis documents the most comprehensive study to date on nuclear recoils in liquid argon - a strong candidate for the next generation multi-ton scale WIMP detectors. This study investigates both the energy partition from nuclear recoil energy to secondary modes (scintillation and ionization) and the pulse shape characteristics of scintillation from nuclear recoils.

  8. Quantitative separation of the influence of copper (II) chloride mass migration on the chemo-responsive shape memory effect in polyurethane shape memory polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Lu, Chunrui; Huang, Wei Min; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-10-01

    Chemo-responsive shape memory effect in polyurethane shape memory polymer (SMP) composite triggered by mass migration of copper (II) chloride (CuCl2) has been experimentally demonstrated. In this study, we present a comprehensive study on quantitative separation of the effect of CuCl2 particle mass migration on the chemo-responsive shape recovery behavior of polyurethane SMP composites with different concentrations of CuCl2 particles. It is found that the SMP is featured with a critical release rate of the mechanical energy storage associated with the shape recovery behavior due to mass migration of the CuCl2 particle. A sequence of molecular interactions among CuCl2 particles, polyurethane macromolecules and water molecules, i.e., assembly of the CuCl2 particle with polyurethane macromolecules, and then disassembly and dissolution of the CuCl2 particle in water, results in an acceleration of water-induced shape recovery of polyurethane SMP. This study focuses on the quantitative separation of the influence of mass migration on the chemo-responsive shape recovery behavior of polyurethane SMP in response to water. It is expected to promote and achieve the actuation of chemo-responsive SMPs in a fully controllable manner.

  9. Effect of bend separation distance on the mass transfer in back-to-back pipe bends arranged in a 180° configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Le, T.; Ewing, D.; Ching, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The mass transfer to turbulent flow through back-to-back pipe bends arranged in a 180° configuration with different lengths of pipe between the bends was measured using a dissolving gypsum test section in water. The measurements were performed for bends with a radius of curvature of 1.5 times the pipe diameter ( D) at a Reynolds numbers of 70,000 and Schmidt number of 1280. The maximum mass transfer in the bends decreased from approximately 1.8 times the mass transfer in the upstream pipe when there was no separation distance between the bends to 1.7 times when there was a 1 D or 5 D length of pipe between the bends. The location of the maximum mass transfer was on the inner sidewall downstream of the second bend when there was no separation distance between the bends. This location changed to the inner wall at the beginning of the second bend when there was a 1 D long pipe between the bends, and to the inner sidewall at the end of the first bend when there was a 5 D long pipe between the bends.

  10. Topographical and Chemical Imaging of a Phase Separated Polymer Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Infrared Spectroscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform.

    PubMed

    Tai, Tamin; Karácsony, Orsolya; Bocharova, Vera; Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the use of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/infrared spectroscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform was demonstrated for the acquisition and correlation of nanoscale sample surface topography and chemical images based on infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The infrared chemical imaging component of the system utilized photothermal expansion of the sample at the tip of the atomic force microscopy probe recorded at infrared wave numbers specific to the different surface constituents. The mass spectrometry-based chemical imaging component of the system utilized nanothermal analysis probes for thermolytic surface sampling followed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the gas phase species produced with subsequent mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup, operation, and image correlation procedures are discussed, and the multimodal imaging capability and utility are demonstrated using a phase separated poly(2-vinylpyridine)/poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer thin film. The topography and both the infrared and mass spectral chemical images showed that the valley regions of the thin film surface were comprised primarily of poly(2-vinylpyridine) and hill or plateau regions were primarily poly(methyl methacrylate). The spatial resolution of the mass spectral chemical images was estimated to be 1.6 μm based on the ability to distinguish surface features in those images that were also observed in the topography and infrared images of the same surface.

  11. Rapid separation and identification of furocoumarins in Angelica dahurica by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection, time-of-flight mass spectrometry and quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai; Gong, Chungui; Lv, Lei; Xu, Yuanjie; Zhao, Liang; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng; Zhang, Guoqing

    2009-07-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection (HPLC/DAD), time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC/TOFMS) and quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC/QITMS) were used for separation, identification and structural analysis of furocoumarins in Angelica dahurica. Two furocoumarins (imperatorin and isoimperatorin) in Angelica dahurica extract were identified unambiguously by comparing their relative retention times, characteristic ultraviolet information and accurate mass measurement. A formula database of known furocoumarins in Angelica dahurica was established, against which the other 21 furocoumarins were identified effectively based on the accurate extract masses and formulae acquired by HPLC/TOFMS. In order to distinguish the isomers, multi-stage mass spectrometry (MSn, ion trap mass spectrometry) was used. General fragmentation behavior of the furocoumarins in the ion trap mass spectrometer was studied by the two furocoumarin standards, and their fragmentation rules in MS(n) spectra were summarized. These deduced fragmentation rules of furocoumarins were successfully implemented in distinguishing the three groups of isomers in Angelica dahurica by HPLC/QITMS. By using the three different analytical techniques, 23 furocoumarins in Angelica dahurica were tentatively identified within 30 min. Finally, HPLC/TOFMS fingerprints of Angelica dahurica were established by which it can be concluded that a rapid and effective method based on the three analytical techniques for identification of chemical components was established. This can provide help for further quality control of Angelica dahurica and pharmacology mechanism study of furocoumarins in Angelica dahurica.

  12. Use of microextraction by packed sorbent directly coupled to an electron ionization single quadrupole mass spectrometer as an alternative for non-separative determinations.

    PubMed

    Casas Ferreira, Ana María; Moreno Cordero, Bernardo; Pérez Pavón, José Luis

    2017-02-01

    Sometimes it is not necessary to separate the individual compounds of a sample to resolve an analytical problem, it is enough to obtain a signal profile of the sample formed by all the components integrating it. Within this strategy, electronic noses based on the direct coupling of a headspace sampler with a mass spectrometer (HS-MS) have been proposed. Nevertheless, this coupling is not suitable for the analysis of non-volatile compounds. In order to propose an alternative to HS-MS determinations for non-volatile compounds, here we present the first 'proof of concept' use of the direct coupling of microextraction by packed sorbents (MEPS) to a mass spectrometer device using an electron ionization (EI) and a single quadrupole as ionization source and analyzer, respectively. As target compounds, a set of analytes with different physic-chemical properties were evaluated (2-ethyl-1-hexanol, styrene, 2-heptanone, among others). The use of MEPS extraction present many advantages, such as it is fast, simple, easy to automate and requires small volumes of sample and organic solvents. Moreover, MEPS cartridges are re-usable as samples can be extracted more than 100 times using the same syringe. In order to introduce into the system all the elution volume from the MEPS extraction, a programmable temperature vaporizer (PTV) is proposed as the injector device. Results obtained with the proposed methodology (MEPS-PTV/MS) were compared with the ones obtained based on the separative scheme, i.e. using gas chromatography separation (MEPS-PTV-GC/MS), and both methods provided similar results. Limits of detection were found to be between 3.26 and 146.6μgL(-1) in the non-separative scheme and between 0.02 and 1.72μgL(-1) when the separative methodology was used. Repeatability and reproducibility were evaluated with values below 17% in all cases.

  13. Cull sow knife-separable lean content evaluation at harvest and lean mass content prediction equation development.

    PubMed

    Abell, Caitlyn E; Stalder, Kenneth J; Hendricks, Haven B; Fitzgerald, Robert F

    2012-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a prediction equation for carcass knife-separable lean within and across USDA cull sow market weight classes (MWC) and to determine carcass and individual primal cut knife separable lean content from cull sows. There were significant percent lean and fat differences in the primal cuts across USDA MWC. The two lighter USDA MWC had a greater percent carcass lean and lower percent fat compared to the two heavier MWC. In general, hot carcass weight explained the majority of carcass lean variation. Additionally, backfat was a significant variation source when predicting cull sow carcass lean. The findings support using a single lean prediction equation across MWC to assist processors when making cull sow purchasing decisions and determine the mix of animals from various USDA MWC that will meet their needs when making pork products with defined lean:fat content.

  14. A design study for a compact two stage in-flight separator with a high mass resolution and large acceptance

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ji-Gwang; Kim, Eun-San; Hatanaka, Kichiji

    2015-03-15

    The rare isotope beam separator with a large angular acceptance and energy acceptance is essential for examining the characteristics of unstable nuclei and exotic nuclear reactions. Careful design, however, is required to compensate for the effects of high order aberrations induced by large aperture magnets, which are used to collect rare isotopes obtained from a high energy primary heavy-ion beam hitting a target. In order to minimize the effect of the high order aberration, the optics was based on the mirror symmetry optics, which provides smaller high order aberrations, for the separation of {sup 132}Sn produced by a fission reaction between the primary beam of {sup 238}U and a relatively thick Pb target. The designed optics provides energy acceptance (full), horizontal angular acceptance, and vertical acceptance of approximately 8%, 60 mrad, and 130 mrad, respectively.

  15. Modeling of mass transfer of Phospholipids in separation process with supercritical CO2 fluid by RBF artificial neural networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An artificial Radial Basis Function (RBF) neural network model was developed for the prediction of mass transfer of the phospholipids from canola meal in supercritical CO2 fluid. The RBF kind of artificial neural networks (ANN) with orthogonal least squares (OLS) learning algorithm were used for mod...

  16. UTILITY OF THREE TYPES OF MASS SPECTROMETERS FOR DETERMINING ELEMENTAL COMPOSITIONS OF IONS FORMED FROM CHROMATOGRAPHICALLY SEPARATED COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sponsor Referee: Douglas F. Barofsky, Oregon State University Concentration factors of 1000 and more reveal dozens of compounds in extracts of water supplies. Library mass spectra for most of these compounds are not available, and alternative means of identification are needed. D...

  17. Plasma Time in Discriminating Nuclear Recoils in Germanium Detector for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Dongming; Barker, D'ann

    2012-10-01

    In the detection of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils with high-purity germanium detectors, CDMS-type bolometers are often used in measuring the ionization yield. For this technology, the detector is operated in the milli-Kelvin temperature range, which requires high priced detectors. Alternative electron/nuclear recoil discrimination using pulse shape has been widely utilized in the energy range of MeV in neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments with germanium detectors. However, the nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs are in the energy range of keV, and their pulse shape difference with electronic recoils in the same energy range has not proven to be visible in a commercially available germanium detector. This paper presents a new idea of using plasma time difference in pulse shape to discriminate nuclear recoils from electronic recoils. We show the plasma time difference as a function of nuclear recoil energy. The technique using plasma time will be discussed with a generic germanium detector.

  18. Determination of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu) in environmental samples using radiochemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yihong; Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Pan, Shaoming; Roos, Per

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports an analytical method for the determination of plutonium isotopes ((238)Pu, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu) in environmental samples using anion exchange chromatography in combination with extraction chromatography for chemical separation of Pu. Both radiometric methods (liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were applied for the measurement of plutonium isotopes. The decontamination factors for uranium were significantly improved up to 7.5 × 10(5) for 20 g soil compared to the level reported in the literature, this is critical for the measurement of plutonium isotopes using mass spectrometric technique. Although the chemical yield of Pu in the entire procedure is about 55%, the analytical results of IAEA soil 6 and IAEA-367 in this work are in a good agreement with the values reported in the literature or reference values, revealing that the developed method for plutonium determination in environmental samples is reliable. The measurement results of (239+240)Pu by alpha spectrometry agreed very well with the sum of (239)Pu and (240)Pu measured by ICP-MS. ICP-MS can not only measure (239)Pu and (240)Pu separately but also (241)Pu. However, it is impossible to measure (238)Pu using ICP-MS in environmental samples even a decontamination factor as high as 10(6) for uranium was obtained by chemical separation.

  19. Separation of polar mushroom toxins by mixed-mode hydrophilic and ionic interaction liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wai-cheung; Tso, Sau-ching; Sze, Sai-tim

    2007-02-01

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) is commonly used to analyze nonvolatile contaminants and naturally occurring toxins in foods. However, polar compounds, such as hydrophilic polypeptides and quaternary ammonium salts, are often not satisfactorily separated by RPLC and present a challenge for analytical scientists. In this study, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC), on an amide-based stationary phase in combination with electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS), is successfully employed to simultaneously separate polar mushroom toxins, including amanitins and phallotoxins, which are cyclic oligopeptides and muscarine, a quaternary ammonium compound, in mushrooms. The sensitivity of different ionization modes is studied, and the positive ionization mode is found to provide a more sensitive and effective tool for the unambiguous identification of the concerned polar toxins because of their characteristic fragmentation patterns. The properties of the mobile phase are also found to have significant impacts on the separation. At a high acetonitrile (ACN) concentration, hydrophilic interaction dominates, and all analytes under study demonstrate a much higher affinity with the stationary phase. The addition of methanol (MeOH) as a modifier could further enhance the HILIC separation for amanitins, phallotoxins, and muscarine. Valley-to-valley separation is achieved upon the optimatizatiqn of the mobile phase (comprising of ACN, MeOH, and ammonium formate buffer at pH approximately 3.5) and the solvent gradient. HILIC coupled with ESI-MS-MS is demonstrated to be a novel technique for the simultaneous separation and confirmatory analysis of the concerned polar toxins by providing an environment of solubility and retention that could not be achieved through the use of RPLC.

  20. Investigation of complete and incomplete fusion in 20Ne + 51V system using recoil range measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sabir; Ahmad, Tauseeef; Kumar, Kamal; Rizvi, I. A.; Agarwal, Avinash; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.; Chaubey, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Recoil range distributions of evaporation residues, populated in 20Ne + 51V reaction at Elab ≈ 145 MeV, have been studied to determine the degree of momentum transferred through the complete and incomplete fusion reactions. Evaporation residues (ERs) populated through the complete and incomplete fusion reactions have been identified on the basis of their recoil range in the Al catcher medium. Measured recoil range of evaporation residues have been compared with the theoretical value calculated using the code SRIM. Range integrated cross section of observed ERs have been compared with the value predicted by statistical model code PACE4.

  1. Nuclear recoil energy scale in liquid xenon with application to the direct detection of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, P; Dahl, C E

    2011-02-14

    We show for the first time that the quenching of electronic excitation from nuclear recoils in liquid xenon is well-described by Lindhard theory, if the nuclear recoil energy is reconstructed using the combined (scintillation and ionization) energy scale proposed by Shutt et al.. We argue for the adoption of this perspective in favor of the existing preference for reconstructing nuclear recoil energy solely from primary scintillation. We show that signal partitioning into scintillation and ionization is well-described by the Thomas-Imel box model. We discuss the implications for liquid xenon detectors aimed at the direct detection of dark matter.

  2. Retention studies of recoiling daughter nuclides of 225Ac in polymer vesicles.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; de Kruijff, R M; Rol, A; Thijssen, L; Mendes, E; Morgenstern, A; Bruchertseifer, F; Stuart, M C A; Wolterbeek, H T; Denkova, A G

    2014-02-01

    Alpha radionuclide therapy is steadily gaining importance and a large number of pre-clinical and clinical studies have been carried out. However, due to the recoil effects the daughter recoil atoms, most of which are alpha emitters as well, receive energies that are much higher than the energies of chemical bonds resulting in decoupling of the radionuclide from common targeting agents. Here, we demonstrate that polymer vesicles (i.e. polymersomes) can retain recoiling daughter nuclei based on an experimental study examining the retention of (221)Fr and (213)Bi when encapsulating (225)Ac.

  3. Online matrix removal platform for coupling gel-based separations to whole protein electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hun; Compton, Philip D; Tran, John C; Kelleher, Neil L

    2015-05-01

    A fractionation method called gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (GELFrEE) has been used to dramatically increase the number of proteins identified in top-down proteomic workflows; however, the technique involves the use of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), a surfactant that interferes with electrospray ionization. Therefore, an efficient removal of SDS is absolutely required prior to mass analysis. Traditionally, methanol/chloroform precipitation and spin columns have been used, but they lack reproducibility and are difficult to automate. Therefore, we developed an in-line matrix removal platform to enable the direct analysis of samples containing SDS and salts. Only small molecules like SDS permeate a porous membrane and are removed in a manner similar to cross-flow filtration. With this device, near-complete removal of SDS is accomplished within 5 min and proteins are subsequently mobilized into a mass spectrometer. The new platform was optimized for the analysis of GELFrEE fractions enriched for histones extracted from human HeLa cells. All four core histones and their proteoforms were detected in a single spectrum by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The new method versus protein precipitation/resuspension showed 2- to 10-fold improved signal intensities, offering a clear path forward to improve proteome coverage and the efficiency of top-down proteomics.

  4. IgY14 and SuperMix immunoaffinity separations coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for human plasma proteomic biomarker discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Zhou, Jianying; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hossain, Mahmud; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2012-02-01

    Interest in the application of advanced proteomics technologies to human blood plasma- or serum-based clinical samples for the purpose of discovering disease biomarkers continues to grow; however, the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations in these types of samples (often >10 orders of magnitude) represents a significant analytical challenge, particularly for detecting low-abundance candidate biomarkers. In response, immunoaffinity separation methods for depleting multiple high- and moderate-abundance proteins have become key tools for enriching low-abundance proteins and enhancing detection of these proteins in plasma proteomics. Herein, we describe IgY14 and tandem IgY14-Supermix separation methods for removing 14 high-abundance and up to 60 moderate-abundance proteins, respectively, from human blood plasma and highlight their utility when combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for interrogating the human plasma proteome.

  5. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds from U.S. pecans by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Katherine S; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wells, M Lenny; Greenspan, Phillip; Pegg, Ronald B

    2014-05-14

    The phenolic acids and proanthocyanidins (PACs) of pecans possess bioactive properties, which might be useful in retarding the onset of and ameliorating the status of certain chronic disease states. There is a general lack of information in the literature regarding such compounds, especially the PACs. Crude phenolic extracts pooled from eight commercially significant cultivars were selected based on their relatively high antioxidant capacities. The pooled extracts were separated via Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography into five ethanolic low-molecular-weight (LMW) fractions and one acetonic high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction. The preparations were then characterized using RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and diol-phase HPLC-ESI-MS/MS in order to determine the key constituents present in the LMW and HMW fractions, respectively. As previously observed in pecan nutmeat, ellagic acid and (+)-catechin were found to be the major phenolics in the LMW fractions. The last eluting LMW fraction did not contain phenolic acids; rather it possessed PAC monomers and dimers. The HMW fraction comprised a majority of its PACs as dimers; yet, monomers, trimers, tetramers, pentamers, and hexamers were also separated and characterized.

  6. Fast neutron detection with coincidence counting of recoil tracks in CR-39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengar, I.; Skvarč, J.; Ilić, R.

    2002-06-01

    Unpredictable background is often the major drawback in the assessment of low fluences of fast neutrons with solid state nuclear track detectors. The problem can be effectively solved by counting coincidence tracks in two detector foils that are in close contact during the irradiation. The detection of fast neutrons performed with a pair of CR-39 detector foils, subsequent chemical etching and evaluation of the etched tracks by an automatic track counting system was studied. After counting, only tracks produced by the same recoil nuclei in the surface layers of both detector foils were taken into account. In this way, the background due to objects that cannot be separated from tracks by an automatic counting system was drastically reduced. Emphasis was given to determining the properties of such a coincidence fast neutron detector based on utilisation of CR-39. The response of the coincidence detector was found to be 3×10 -5 tracks/neutron and is comparable with a detector based on counting tracks in a single foil of CR-39. The lower neutron detection limit was found to be 2×10 4 cm -2 with a counting area of 10 cm 2, and is two orders of magnitude lower than that obtained with a detector based on counting tracks in a single foil of CR-39.

  7. Exclusive rare B→K*ℓ+ℓ- decays at low recoil: Controlling the long-distance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, Benjamín; Pirjol, Dan

    2004-12-01

    We present a model-independent description of the exclusive rare decays B¯→K*e+e- in the low recoil region (large lepton invariant mass q2˜m2b). In this region the long-distance effects from quark loops can be computed with the help of an operator product expansion in 1/Q, with Q={mb,√(q2)}. Nonperturbative effects up to and including terms suppressed by Λ/Q and m2c/m2b relative to the short-distance amplitude can be included in a model-independent way. Based on these results, we propose an improved method for determining the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub| from a combination of rare and semileptonic B and D decays near the zero recoil point. The residual theoretical uncertainty from long-distance effects in this |Vub| determination comes from terms in the operator product expansion of order αs(Q)Λ/mb, α2s(Q), m4c/m4b, and duality violations, and is estimated to be below 10%.

  8. (211)Rn/(211)At and (209)At production with intense mass separated Fr ion beams for preclinical (211)At-based α-therapy research.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jason R; Kunz, Peter; Yang, Hua; Schaffer, Paul; Ruth, Thomas J

    2017-04-01

    Mass-separated francium beams ((211)Fr or (213)Fr) were implanted into solid targets for producing (211)Rn (14.6h half-life) or (209)At (5.41h), in situ. (211)Rn was transferred to dodecane and isolated from contaminants, providing sources for (211)At (7.21h) production by (211)Rn decay (73%). (209)At was recovered with high radionuclidic purity in aqueous solutions, directly. These experiments demonstrated Fr beam implantations as a novel method for producing preclinical quantities of (211)Rn/(211)At (for therapy) and (209)At (for imaging).

  9. Application of different modes of thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry for the separation and detection of large and small biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Tuzimski, Tomasz

    2011-12-09

    Biomolecules are widespread throughout the world. A biomolecule is any organic molecule produced by a living organism, including large polymeric molecules such as proteins, polysaccharides and nucleic acids. Many sample preparation techniques are used in biomolecule analysis; the method selected depends on the complexity of the sample, the nature of the matrix and the analytes, and the analytical technique available. This review covers the current state of knowledge on thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry for qualitative analysis of biomolecules. In the first part of the paper the reader will gain useful information to avoid some problems about performing various modes of thin-layer chromatography combined with mass spectrometry experiments and in the second part he will find useful information for application of these techniques for separation, detection, and qualitative investigation of structures and quantitative determination of biomolecules such as proteins, peptides, oligonucleotides, amino acids, DNA, RNA, and lipids.

  10. Separation and identification of peptides from gel-isolated membrane proteins using a microfabricated device for combined capillary electrophoresis/nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Kelly, J F; Chernushevich, I; Harrison, D J; Thibault, P

    2000-02-01

    The coupling of microfabricated devices to nanoelectrospray mass spectrometers using both a triple quadrupole and a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (QqTOF MS) is presented for the analysis of trace-level membrane proteins. Short disposable nanoelectrospray emitters were directly coupled to the chip device via a low dead volume connection. The analytical performance of this integrated device in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility was evaluated for standard peptide mixtures. A concentration detection limit ranging from 3.2 to 43.5 nM for different peptides was achieved in selected ion monitoring, thus representing a 10-fold improvement in sensitivity compared to that of microelectrospray using the same chip/mass spectrometer. Replicate injections indicated that reproducibility of migration time was typically less than 3.1% RSD whereas RSD values of 6-13% were observed on peak areas. Although complete resolution of individual components is not typically achieved for complex digests, the present chip capillary electrophoresis (chip-CE) device enabled proper sample cleanup and partial separation of multicomponent samples prior to mass spectral identification. Analyses of protein digests were typically achieved in less than 1.5 min with peak widths of 1.8-2.5 s (half-height definition) as indicated from individual reconstructed ion electropherograms. The application of this chip-CE/QqTOF MS system is further demonstrated for the identification of membrane proteins which form a subset of the Haemophilus influenzae proteome. Bands first separated by 1D-gel electrophoresis were excised and digested, and extracted tryptic peptides were loaded on the chip without any further sample cleanup or on-line adsorption preconcentration. Accurate molecular mass determination (< 5 ppm) in peptide-mapping experiments was obtained by introducing an internal standard via a postseparation channel. The analytical potential of this integrated device for the identification of

  11. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds in fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) using liquid chromatography-negative electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Parejo, Irene; Jauregui, Olga; Sánchez-Rabaneda, Ferran; Viladomat, Francesc; Bastida, Jaume; Codina, Carles

    2004-06-16

    Liquid chromatography (LC) diode array detection (DAD) coupled to negative electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used for the rapid and sensitive identification of water-soluble phenolic compounds in fennel waste. The plant material was first extracted and then chromatographed on Sephadex LH-20 to afford seven fractions, each of them being subjected to LC-MS analysis. Identification of the compounds was carried out by interpretation of UV, MS, and MS/MS spectra. Forty-two phenolic substances were identified, 27 of which had not previously been reported in fennel, including hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, flavonoid glycosides, and flavonoid aglycons.

  12. Study of chloropropanols in soy sauce by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry with coupled column separation without derivatisation.

    PubMed

    Xu, X-M; Wu, H-W; He, H-L; Huang, B-F; Han, J-L; Ren, Y-P

    2013-01-01

    A qualitative and quantitative determination method for chloropropanols in soy sauce was developed by GC-MS/MS with coupled column separation without derivatisation. The target compounds were 1,3-dichloropropan-2-ol (1,3-DCP), 2,3-dichloropropan-1-ol (2,3-DCP), 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and 2-monochloropropane-1,3-diol (2-MCPD). 3-MCPD-d(5) was used as an isotope internal standard for MCPDs and 1,3-DCP-d(5) for DCPs. After spiking with internal standards and mixed with 1 g of Extrelut™ NT, about 1 g of the sample was washed by 4 ml of hexane and the analytes were eluted with 15 ml of 95% (v/v) ethyl ether/hexane mixture. The concentrated extract was directly injected without derivatisation, separated by a coupled column - a 3 m Innowax (polyethylene glycol) combined with a 30 m DB-5 ms ((5%-phenyl)-methylpolysiloxane) by a quartz capillary column connector - and detected by GC-MS/MS. The limits of detection (LODs) in the sample matrix were 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 5.0 µg kg(-1) for the above chloropropanols, respectively. The relative proportions of 2-MCPD/3-MCPD ranged from 0.19 to 3.74 in soy sauce samples. 2,3-DCP and 2-MCPD were more stable than 1,3-DCP and 3-MCPD under alkaline condition. The levels of chloropropanols can be decreased by an alkaline treatment process.

  13. The Yale Gas-Filled Split Pole Magnetic Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cata-Danil, G.; Beausang, C. W.; Casten, R. F.; Chen, A.; Chubrich, N.; Cooper, J. R.; Krücken, R.; Liu, B.; Novak, J. R.; Visser, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    1998-10-01

    Design and construction of a gas-filled recoil separator is underway at the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale University. By filling the magnetic field region of the existing Enge Split-Pole magnet with N2 or He2 gases in the 1 to 15 mbar pressure range a gradual focussing of discrete charge states has been measured. The incident ions were ^16O and ^35,37Cl with 49 MeV and 95 MeV energies, respectively. The process is understood as a result of coalescing of trajectories of different charge states around a trajectory defined by the mean charge state (q¯) of the ion in gas. Because q¯ depends on the atomic number Z and is roughly proportional with the ion velocity, the average magnetic rigidity (B¯ρ=Av/q¯) is almost independent of the velocity distribution of the incident ions. The ion trajectories will be therefore be mainly determined by the mass number A and the atomic number Z of the ion. Monte Carlo simulations with the code RAYTRACE closely reproduce the experimental behavior. We plan to use the Yale Mass Separator (YaMS) for nuclear structure studies in conjunction with high efficency gamma detectors (clover detectors) for enhancing weak reaction channels and fission background reduction. Work supported by the US-DOE under contract numbers DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  14. Separation and identification of an oligomeric light stabilizer Chimassorb 944 by gradient elution chromatography coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiu; Diao, Xingli; Wan, Qian-Hong

    2014-10-17

    A non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method has been developed to separate a light stabilizer Chimassorb 944 into individual oligomers, which are further identified using pre-column fluorescent derivatization and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Consistent with previous studies, we find that the Chimassorb 944 product is a complex mixture consisting of a homologous series with the amine end groups and the number of repeat units (n) span from 1 to 26. In addition to the dominant linear species, cyclic oligomers are present at relatively high levels in the low-mass range. Their concentration decreases rapidly with the length of the oligomer backbone and becomes undetectable when n>7. Moreover, comparison of the HPLC and MALDI-MS molar mass distributions of Chimassorb 944 shows that the HPLC analysis produces greater molar mass averages and thus offers an effective means for accurate measure of the relative abundances of the oligomers.

  15. Elastic recoil of coronary stents: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Barragan, P; Rieu, R; Garitey, V; Roquebert, P O; Sainsous, J; Silvestri, M; Bayet, G

    2000-05-01

    Minimum elastic recoil (ER) has became an essential feature of new coronary stents when deployed in artheromatous lesions of various morphologies. The ER of coronary stent might be an important component of 6-month restenosis rate by minimizing the luminal loss. We evaluated the intrinsic ER of 23 coronary stents with a mechanical test bench. The amount of ER for one size of stent (3.0 mm) was quantified using a 3D optical contactless machine (Smartscope MVP, Rochester, NY). The stents were expanded on their own balloon for the precrimped stents; the uncrimped stents were expended using identical 3.0-mm balloons. Two types of measurements were done without exterior stress and with a 0.2-bar exterior stress, directly on the stent at the end of balloon expansion, immediately after balloon deflation, and then 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min after. ER ranged from 1.54%+/-0.81% (Bestent BES 15) to 16.51%+/-2.89% (Paragon stent) without stress (P<0.01) and from 2.35%+/-1.14% (Bestent BES 15) to 18.34%+/-2.41% (Cook GR2) under 0.2-bar pressure (P<0.0001). Furthermore, there was a significant reduction between the mean result of tubular stents (TS) and coil stents (CS). The results of in vitro mechanical tests may confirm strongly the interest of a minimum ER in the prevention of the 6-month restenosis.

  16. Use of liquid chromatography- quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry for enantioselective separation and determination of pyrisoxazole in vegetables, strawberry and soil.

    PubMed

    Qi, Peipei; Yuan, Yuwei; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Xiangyun; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Hu; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Xinquan

    2016-06-03

    The present work firstly described the enantio-separation and determination of pyrisoxazole enantiomers in vegetables, strawberry and soil samples by chiral liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF/MS). Pyrisoxazole has two chiral carbon atoms and consists of four stereoisomers. Taking the specific optical rotation measurement and MS analysis data into consideration, the four enantiomers were discriminated as (-)-A, (+)-A, (+)-B and (-)-B corresponding to their elution order under the optimum chromatographic condition. Influences of the mobile phase and column temperature on the enantio-separation selectivity of pyrisoxazole were explored. The perfect baseline separation of pyrisoxazole enantiomers can be achieved within 10min using methanol- water (70:30, v/v) as mobile phase on chiral Lux Cellulose-3 column. The thermodynamic analysis demonstrated that the enantioseparation of (-)-A and (+)-A, (+)-A and (+)-B were enthalpy driven separation, while the enantioseparation of (+)-B and (-)-B was entropy driven separation. Under the optimum method, method validation including matrix effect, linearity, sensitivity and precision were performed. At the spiked concentration of 10, 50 and 100μgkg(-1), the recoveries of the pyrisoxazole enantiomers in cucumber, tomato, pakchoi, pepper and strawberry samples were 64.2-100% (RSD≤14%); While they were relatively higher in soil samples and all around 120% (RSD ≤10%). The limits of detection are in the range from 0.2 to 1.0μgkg(-1) for cucumber, tomato, pakchoi, pepper, strawberry and soil samples. The developed method was then utilized for monitoring the degradation kinetics of pyrisoxazole enantiomers in strawberry under field trials, which provided the environmental behavior data of chiral pyrisoxazole enantiomers and consequently for further health risk assessment of the chiral pesticides.

  17. A fast and sensitive method for the separation of carotenoids using ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jumaah, Firas; Plaza, Merichel; Abrahamsson, Victor; Turner, Charlotta; Sandahl, Margareta

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a rapid and sensitive ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPSFC-MS) method has been developed and partially validated for the separation of carotenoids within less than 6 min. Six columns of orthogonal selectivity were examined, and the best separation was obtained by using a 1-aminoanthracene (1-AA) column. The length of polyene chain as well as the number of hydroxyl groups in the structure of the studied carotenoids determines their differences in the physiochemical properties and thus the separation that is achieved on this column. All of the investigated carotenoids were baseline separated with resolution values greater than 1.5. The effects of gradient program, back pressure, and column temperature were studied with respect to chromatographic properties such as retention and selectivity. Electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) were compared in both positive and negative mode, using both direct infusion and hyphenated with UHPSFC. The ESI in positive mode provided the highest response. The coefficient of determination (R (2)) for all calibration curves were greater than 0.998. Limit of detection (LOD) was in the range of 2.6 and 25.2 ng/mL for α-carotene and astaxanthin, respectively, whereas limit of quantification (LOQ) was in the range of 7.8 and 58.0 ng/mL for α-carotene and astaxanthin, respectively. Repeatability and intermediate precision of the developed UHPSFC-MS method were determined and found to be RSD < 3 % and RSD < 6 %, respectively. The method was applied in order to determine carotenoids in supercritical fluid extracts of microalgae and rosehip. Graphical Abstract Ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography-a rapid separation method for the analysis of carotenoids in rosehip and microalgae samples.

  18. A telescope proton recoil spectrometer for fast neutron beam-lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Nocente, M.; Ansell, S.; Frost, C. D.; Gorini, G.

    2015-07-01

    Fast neutron measurements were performed on the VESUVIO beam-line at the ISIS spallation source using a new telescope proton recoil spectrometer. Neutrons interact on a plastic target. Proton production is mainly due to elastic scattering on hydrogen nuclei and secondly due to interaction with carbon nuclei. Recoil protons are measured by a proton spectrometer, which uses in coincidence a 2.54 cm thick YAP scintillator and a 500μm thick silicon detector, measuring the full proton recoil energy and the partial deposited energy in transmission, respectively. Recoil proton spectroscopy measurements (up to Ep = 60MeV) have been interpreted by using Monte Carlo simulations of the beam-line. This instrument is of particular interest for the characterization of the ChipIr beam-line at ISIS, which was designed to feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for the irradiation of micro-electronics.

  19. MIMAC low energy electron-recoil discrimination measured with fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffard, Q.; Santos, D.; Guillaudin, O.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, J.; Descombes, T.; Muraz, J.-F.; Lebreton, L.; Maire, D.; Colas, P.; Giomataris, I.; Busto, J.; Fouchez, D.; Brunner, J.; Tao, C.

    2016-08-01

    MIMAC (MIcro-TPC MAtrix of Chambers) is a directional WIMP Dark Matter detector project. Direct dark matter experiments need a high level of electron/recoil discrimination to search for nuclear recoils produced by WIMP-nucleus elastic scattering. In this paper, we proposed an original method for electron event rejection based on a multivariate analysis applied to experimental data acquired using monochromatic neutron fields. This analysis shows that a 105 rejection power is reachable for electron/recoil discrimination. Moreover, the efficiency was estimated by a Monte-Carlo simulation showing that a 105 electron rejection power is reached with a 86.49 ± 0.17% nuclear recoil efficiency considering the full energy range and 94.67 ± 0.19% considering a 5 keV lower threshold.

  20. First measurement of the ionization yield of nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, T.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Bernstein, A.; Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Norman, E. B.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Rebassoo, Finn O.; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2014-05-01

    Liquid phase argon has long been used as a target medium for particle detection via scintillation light. Recently there has been considerable interest in direct detection of both hypothetical darkmatter particles and coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. These as-yet unobserved neutral particle interactions are expected to result in a recoiling argon atom O(keV), generally referred to in the literature as a nuclear recoil. This prompts the question of the available electromagnetic signal in a liquid argon detector. In this Letter we report the first measurement of the ionization yield (Qy), detected electrons per unit energy, resulting from nuclear recoils in liquid argon, measured at 6.7 keV. This is also the lowest energy measurement of nuclear recoils in liquid argon.

  1. Hadronic effects and observables in B →π ℓ+ℓ- decay at large recoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambrock, Christian; Khodjamirian, Alexander; Rusov, Aleksey

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the amplitude of the rare flavor-changing neutral-current decay B →π ℓ+ℓ- at large recoil of the pion. The nonlocal contributions in which the weak effective operators are combined with the electromagnetic lepton-pair emission are systematically taken into account. These amplitudes are calculated at off-shell values of the lepton-pair mass squared, q2<0 , employing the operator-product expansion, QCD factorization and light-cone sum rules. The results are fitted to hadronic dispersion relations in q2, including the intermediate vector meson contributions. The dispersion relations are then used in the physical region q2>0 . Our main result is the process-dependent addition Δ C9(B π )(q2) to the Wilson coefficient C9 obtained at 4 mℓ2

  2. Observation of a resonance in B+ → K+ μ+ μ- decays at low recoil.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Cowie, E; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-13

    A broad peaking structure is observed in the dimuon spectrum of B+ → K+ μ+ μ- decays in the kinematic region where the kaon has a low recoil against the dimuon system. The structure is consistent with interference between the B+ → K+ μ+ μ- decay and a resonance and has a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations. The mean and width of the resonance are measured to be 4191(-8)(+9)  MeV/c2 and 65(-16)(+22)  MeV/c2, respectively, where the uncertainties include statistical and systematic contributions. These measurements are compatible with the properties of the ψ(4160) meson. First observations of both the decay B+ → ψ(4160)K+ and the subsequent decay ψ(4160) → μ+ μ- are reported. The resonant decay and the interference contribution make up 20% of the yield for dimuon masses above 3770  MeV/c2. This contribution is larger than theoretical estimates.

  3. Immediate stent recoil in an anastomotic vein graft lesion treated by cutting balloon angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Akkus, Nuri Ilker; Budeepalli, Jagan; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2013-11-01

    Saphenous vein graft (SVG) anastomotic lesions can have significant fibromuscular hyperplasia and may be resistant to balloon angioplasty alone. Stents have been used successfully to treat these lesions. There are no reports of immediate stent recoil following such treatment in the literature. We describe immediate and persistent stent recoil in an anastomotic SVG lesion even after initial and post-deployment complete balloon dilatation of the stent and its successful treatment by cutting balloon angioplasty.

  4. Investigation on modeling and controability of a magnetorheological gun recoil damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongsheng; Wang, Juan; Wang, Jiong; Qian, Suxiang; Li, Yancheng

    2009-07-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluid as a new smart material has done well in the vibration and impact control engineering fields because of its good electromechanical coupling characteristics, preferable dynamic performance and higher sensitivity. And success of MRF has been apparent in many engineering applied fields, such as semi-active suspension, civil engineering, etc. So far, little research has been done about MR damper applied into the weapon system. Its primary purpose of this study is to identify its dynamic performance and controability of the artillery recoil mechanism equipped with MR damper. Firstly, based on the traditional artillery recoil mechanism, a recoil dynamic model is developed in order to obtain an ideal rule between recoil force and its stroke. Then, its effects of recoil resistance on the stability and firing accuracy of artillery are explored. Because MR gun recoil damper under high impact load shows a typical nonlinear character and there exists a shear-thinning phenomenon, to establish an accurate dynamic model has been a seeking aim of its design and application for MR damper under high impact load. Secondly, in this paper, considering its actual bearing load, an inertia factor was introduced to Herschel-Bulkley model, and some factor's effect on damping force are simulated and analyzed by using numerical simulation, including its dynamic performance under different flow coefficients and input currents. Finally, both of tests with the fixed current and different On-Off control algorithms have been done to confirm its controability of MR gun recoil damper under high impact load. Experimental results show its dynamic performances of the large-scale single-ended MR gun recoil damper can be changed by altering the applied currents and it has a good controllability.

  5. Background correction in separation techniques hyphenated to high-resolution mass spectrometry - Thorough correction with MS scans recorded as profile spectra.

    PubMed

    Erny, Guillaume L; Acunha, Tanize; Simó, Carolina; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Alves, Arminda

    2017-03-01

    Separation techniques hyphenated with high-resolution mass spectrometry have been a true revolution in analytical separation techniques. Such instruments not only provide unmatched resolution, but they also allow measuring the peaks accurate masses that permit identifying monoisotopic formulae. However, data files can be large, with a major contribution from background noise and background ions. Such unnecessary contribution to the overall signal can hide important features as well as decrease the accuracy of the centroid determination, especially with minor features. Thus, noise and baseline correction can be a valuable pre-processing step. The methodology that is described here, unlike any other approach, is used to correct the original dataset with the MS scans recorded as profiles spectrum. Using urine metabolic studies as examples, we demonstrate that this thorough correction reduces the data complexity by more than 90%. Such correction not only permits an improved visualisation of secondary peaks in the chromatographic domain, but it also facilitates the complete assignment of each MS scan which is invaluable to detect possible comigration/coeluting species.

  6. Rapid chiral separation of atenolol, metoprolol, propranolol and the zwitterionic metoprolol acid using supercritical fluid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry - Application to wetland microcosms.

    PubMed

    Svan, Alfred; Hedeland, Mikael; Arvidsson, Torbjörn; Jasper, Justin T; Sedlak, David L; Pettersson, Curt E

    2015-08-28

    A method for enantiomeric separation of the three β-blocking agents atenolol, metoprolol, propranolol and the zwitterionic metoprolol acid, a major metabolite of both metoprolol and in environmental matrices also atenolol, has been developed. By use of supercritical fluid chromatography and the polysaccharide-based Chiralpak(®) IB-3, all four compounds were simultaneously enantiomerically separated (Rs>1.5) within 8min. Detection was performed using tandem mass spectrometry, and to avoid isobaric interference between the co-eluting metoprolol and metoprolol acid, the achiral column Acquity(®) UPC(2) BEH 2-EP was attached ahead of to the chiral column. Carbon dioxide with 18% methanol containing 0.5% (v/v) of the additives trifluoroacetic acid and ammonia in a 2:1 molar ratio were used as mobile phase. A post column make-up flow (0.3mL/min) of methanol containing 0.1% (v/v) formic acid was used to enhance the positive electrospray ionization. Detection was carried out using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in the selected reaction monitoring mode, using one transition per analyte and internal standard. The method was successfully applied for monitoring the enantiomeric fraction change over time in a laboratory scale wetland degradation study. It showed good precision, recovery, sensitivity and low effect of the sample matrix.

  7. Separation of stereoisomers of several furan derivatives by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, supercritical fluid chromatography, and liquid chromatography using chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Hiroko F; Tsubuki, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Kazunori; Shirao, Mika; Matsumoto, Yohichiro; Honda, Toshio; Seyama, Yoshiyuki

    2002-11-15

    The direct separation of several stereoisomers (enantiomers and geometrical isomers) of furan derivatives, important intermediates for the synthesis of physiologically active natural products, was achieved using capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with a per-O-methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, supercritical fluid chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography with a tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) of cellulose or amylose for the chiral stational phases, respectively. The temperature dependence of the peak resolution (Rs) and the retention factor (k) over the range of 110-130 degrees was studied using crotyl furfuryl ether in gas chromatography. Successive increases in the Rs value and of the difference between the k value of the E-isomer and the k value of the Z-isomer were observed when the gradient temperature was decreased. The per-O-methyl-beta-cyclodextrin column was suitable for use with volatile furan ethers whose molecular masses are between 150 and 180. In conclusion, the separation of thermally unstable furan derivatives was accomplished using supercritical fluid chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography.

  8. A protein molecular weight map of ES2 clear cell ovarian carcinoma cells using a two-dimensional liquid separations/mass mapping technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haixing; Kachman, Maureen T; Schwartz, Donald R; Cho, Kathleen R; Lubman, David M

    2002-09-01

    A molecular weight map of the protein content of ES2 human clear cell ovarian carcinoma cells has been produced using a two-dimensional (2-D) liquid separations/mass mapping technique. This method uses a 2-D liquid separation of proteins from whole cell lysates coupled on-line to an electrospray ionization-time of flight (ESI-TOF) mass spectrometer to map the accurate intact molecular weight (M(r)) of the protein content of the cells. The two separation dimensions involve the use of liquid isoelectric focusing as the first phase and nonporous silica reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as the second phase of separation. The detection by ESI-TOF-MS provides an image of pI versus M(r) analogous to 2-D gel electrophoresis. Each protein is then identified based upon matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-TOF-MS peptide mapping and intact M(r) so that a standard map is produced against which other ovarian carcinoma cell lines can be compared. The accurate intact M(r) together with the pI fraction, and peptide map serve to tag the protein for future interlysate comparisons. An internal standard is also used to provide a means for quantitation for future interlysate studies. In the ES2 cell line under study it is shown that nearly 900 M(r) bands are detected over 17 pI fractions from pH 4 to 12 and a M(r) range up to 85 kDa and that around 290 of these bands can be identified using mass spectrometric based techniques. The protein M(r) is detected within an accuracy of 150 ppm and it is shown that many of the proteins in this human cancer sample are modified compared to the database. The protein M(r) map may serve as a highly reproducible standard Web-based method for comparing proteins from related human cell lines.

  9. Characterization of Diesel Fuel by Chemical Separation Combined with Capillary Gas Chromatography (GC) Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Scott D.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Moran, James J.; Sorensen, Christina M.; Wright, Bob W.

    2011-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to perform a preliminary investigation of compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of diesel fuels to evaluate whether the technique could distinguish between the diesel samples from different sources/locations. The ability to differentiate or correlate diesel samples could be valuable for detecting fuel tax evasion schemes. Two fractionation techniques were used to isolate the n-alkanes from the fuel. Both δ13C and δD values for the n-alkanes were then determined by CSIA in each sample. Plots of δD versus δ13C with sample n-alkane points connected in order of increasing carbon number gave well separated clusters with characteristic shapes for each sample. Principal components analysis (PCA) with δ13C, δD, or combined δ13C and δD data on the yielded scores plots that could clearly differentiate the samples, thereby demonstrating the potential of this approach for fingerprinting fuel samples using the δ13C and δD values.

  10. Structural characterization of synthetic polymers and copolymers using multidimensional mass spectrometry interfaced with thermal degradation, liquid chromatography and/or ion mobility separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawani, Nadrah

    This dissertation focuses on coupling mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to thermal degradation, liquid chromatography (LC) and/or ion mobility (IM) spectrometry for the characterization of complex mixtures. In chapter II, an introduction of the history and the principles of MS and LC are discussed. Chapter III illustrates the materials and instrumentation used to complete this dissertation. Polyethers have been characterized utilizing MS/MS, as presented in Chapter IV and Chapter VI. Diblock copolymers of polyethylene oxide and polycaprolactone, PEO-b-PCL, have been characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-Q/ToF) and LC-MS/MS (Chapter V). Thermoplastic elastomers have been characterized by thermal degradation using an atmospheric solids analysis probe (ASAP) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), as discussed in Chapter VII. Interfacing separation techniques with mass spectrometry permitted the detection of species present with low concentration in complex materials and improved the sensitivity of MS. In chapter IV, the fragmentation mechanisms in MS/MS experiments of cyclic and linear poly(ethylene oxide) macroinitiators are discussed. This study aimed at determining the influence of end groups on the fragmentation pathways. In the study reported in Chapter V, ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) was interfaced with MS and MS/MS to achieve the separation and in-depth characterization and separation of amphiphilic diblock copolymers (PEO- b-PCL) in which the architecture of the PEO block is linear or cyclic. Applying UPLC-MS and UPLC-MS/MS provides fast accurate information about the number and type of the blocks in the copolymers. Chapter VI reports MS/MS and IM-MS analyses which were performed to elucidate the influence of molecular size and collision energy on the fragmentation pathways of polyethers subjected to collisionally activated

  11. Indirect chiral separation of new recreational drugs by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using trifluoroacetyl-L-prolyl chloride as chiral derivatization reagent.

    PubMed

    Weiß, Jennifer A; Mohr, Stefan; Schmid, Martin G

    2015-03-01

    New recreational drugs such as amphetamine-, cathinone, and benzofury derivatives gained high popularity on the drug market in recent years. They can be purchased via the Internet from different providers and online portals. Most of these compounds are chiral, which makes the development of chiral separation methods necessary. Besides this, it is useful to find out if the compounds were sold as racemic mixtures. Also, it is important to check whether the new psychoactive compounds contain further ingredients or impurities. The aim of this research was the continuation of the application of a method for indirect chiral separation of 24 new psychoactive compounds recently purchased via the Internet. After derivatization with the chiral derivatization reagent trifluoroacetyl-L-prolyl chloride, chromatographic separation of diastereomers was achieved using a 30 m HP5-MS capillary column. As carrier gas, helium was used with a constant flow of 1.0 ml/min. Three different column temperature programs were tested. Under optimum conditions 13 out of 24 compounds were successfully resolved into their enantiomers obtaining Rs values up to 7.0. The use of a single quadrupole mass spectrometer as the detector allowed the identification of the compounds in multicomponent samples.

  12. Associations of adult separation anxiety disorder with conflict-related trauma, ongoing adversity, and the psychosocial disruptions of mass conflict among West Papuan refugees.

    PubMed

    Tay, Alvin Kuowei; Rees, Susan; Kareth, Moses; Silove, Derrick

    2016-03-01

    Refugees commonly experience traumatic events that threaten the self and close others, suggesting the possibility that they may experience overlapping symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and separation anxiety disorder (SAD). We examine this possibility among West Papua refugees (n = 230) displaced to Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. We also examine associations between the combined PTSD-SAD construct and indices of past trauma exposure, ongoing adversity, and the psychosocial disruptions caused by mass conflict and displacement. We applied culturally adapted interview modules to assess symptoms of PTSD, SAD, traumatic events (TEs), ongoing adversity, and 5 psychosocial dimensions. Latent class analysis identified a PTSD class (23%), a posttraumatic (PT) SAD class (22%), and a low-symptom class (55%). Compared with the low-symptom class, both the PTSD and PT-SAD classes endorsed higher levels of exposure to all domains of TEs (conflict-related trauma, witnessing murder, childhood related adversities, traumatic losses, and health stress) and ongoing adversity (access to health care, displacement/separation, safety in the community, and access to basic needs), but the 2 comorbid groups did not differ on these indices. The PT-SAD class alone scored higher than the low-symptom reference class in relation to disruptions to the psychosocial domains (safety/security, bonds/network, access to justice, roles/identities, existential meaning) and higher than the PTSD class on safety/security, justice and roles/identities. Our findings suggest that the PT-SAD pattern may represent a response to the most severe forms of psychosocial disruptions of mass conflict among refugees. A focus on separation anxiety may enhance psychotherapies designed to treat PTSD in refugees. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Comparative Proteome Analyses of Human Plasma Following in vivo Lipopolysaccharide Administration Using Multidimensional Separations Coupled with Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Calvano, Steve E.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    There is significant interest in characterization of the human plasma proteome due to its potential for providing biomarkers applicable to clinical diagnosis and treatment and for gaining a better understanding of human diseases. We describe here a strategy for the comparative proteome analyses of human plasma, which is applicable to biomarker identifications for various disease states. Multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry has been applied to make comparative proteome analyses of plasma samples from an individual prior to and 9 h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Peptide peak areas and the number of peptide identifications for each protein were used to evaluate the reproducibility of LC-MS/MS and to compare relative changes in protein concentration between the samples following LPS treatment. A total of 804 distinct plasma proteins (not including immunoglobulins) were confidently identified with 32 proteins observed to be significantly increased in concentration following LPS administration, including several known inflammatory response or acute-phase mediators such as C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A and A2, LPS-binding protein, LPS-responsive and beige-like anchor protein, hepatocyte growth factor activator, and von Willebrand factor, and thus constituting potential biomarkers for inflammatory response. PMID:15627965

  14. Biodegradation testing of chemicals with high Henry's constants - Separating mass and effective concentration reveals higher rate constants.

    PubMed

    Birch, Heidi; Andersen, Henrik R; Comber, Mike; Mayer, Philipp

    2017-05-01

    During simulation-type biodegradation tests, volatile chemicals will continuously partition between water phase and headspace. This study addressed how (1) this partitioning affects test results and (2) can be accounted for by combining equilibrium partition and dynamic biodegradation models. An aqueous mixture of 9 (semi)volatile chemicals was first generated using passive dosing and then diluted with environmental surface water producing concentrations in the ng/L to μg/L range. After incubation for 2 h to 4 weeks, automated Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME) was applied directly on the test systems to measure substrate depletion by biodegradation relatively to abiotic controls. HS-SPME was also applied to determine air to water partitioning ratios. Biodegradation rate constants relating to the chemical in the water phase, kwater, were generally a factor 1 to 11 times higher than biodegradation rate constants relating to the total mass of chemical in the test system, ksystem, with one exceptional factor of 72 times for a long chain alkane. True water phase degradation rate constants were found (i) more appropriate for risk assessment than test system rate constants, (ii) to facilitate extrapolation to other air-water systems and (iii) to be better defined input parameters for aquatic exposure and fate models.

  15. Optimization of separation and detection conditions for the multiresidue analysis of pesticides in grapes by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kaushik; Patil, Sangram H; Dasgupta, Soma; Oulkar, Dasharath P; Patil, Shubhangi B; Savant, Rahul; Adsule, Pandurang G

    2008-05-09

    A comprehensive GCxGC-TOFMS method was optimized for multiresidue analysis of pesticides using a combination of a non-polar (RTX-5MS, 10 m x 0.18 mm x 0.2 microm) and a polar capillary column (TR-50MS, 1 m x 0.1 mm x 0.1 microm), connected in series through a dual stage thermal modulator. The method resolved the co-elution problems as observed in full scan one-dimensional GC-MS analysis and allowed chromatographic separation of 51 pesticides within 24 min run time with library-searchable mass spectrometric confirmation. Four pesticides, viz. chlorpyrifos-methyl, vinclozoline, parathion-methyl and heptachlor could be baseline separated on GCxGC, which were otherwise closely eluting and interfering each other's detection in 1D GC-MS run. Similarly, it could be possible to separate myclobutanil, buprofezin, flusilazole and oxyfluorfen on GCxGC. Although in 1D GC-MS, these closely eluting compounds could be identified through deconvolution algorithm and 'peak-find' option of the Chromatof software but the spectral purity significantly improved on GCxGC analysis. Thorough optimization was accomplished for the oven temperature programming, ion source temperature and GCxGC parameters like modulation period, duration of hot pulses, modulation-offset temperature, acquisition rate, etc. to achieve best possible separation of the test compounds. The limit of detection significantly improved by 2-12 times on GCxGC-TOFMS against GC-TOFMS because of sharper and narrower peak shapes. The method was tested for grape matrix after preparing the samples using previously described method and recoveries of the entire test pesticides were within 70-110% at 10 ng/g level of fortification. GCxGC-TOFMS was found to be an excellent technique for library-based screening of pesticides with high accuracy and sensitivity.

  16. Separation and fragmentation study of isocoproporphyrin derivatives by UHPLC-ESI-exact mass MS/MS and identification of a new isocoproporphyrin sulfonic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Benton, Christopher M; Lim, Chang Kee; Moniz, Caje; Baxter, Sinéad L; Jones, Donald J L

    2014-01-01

    Isocoproporphyrin and its derivatives are commonly used as biomarkers of porphyria cutanea tarda, heavy metal toxicity and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) intoxication in humans and animals. However, most are isobaric with other porphyrins and reference materials are unavailable commercially. The structural characterisation of these porphyrins is important but very little data is available. We report here the separation and characterisation of isocoproporphyrin, deethylisocoproporphyrin, hydroxyisocoproporphyrin and ketoisocoproporphyrin, isolated in the faeces of rats fed with a diet containing HCB, by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-exact mass tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Furthermore, we report the identification and characterisation of a previously unreported porphyrin metabolite, isocoproporphyrin sulfonic acid isolated in the rat faeces. The measured mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of the precursor ion was m/z 735.2338, corresponding to a molecular formula of C36H39N4O11S with an error of 0.3 ppm from the calculated m/z 735.2336. The MS/MS data was consistent with an isocoproporphyrin sulfonic acid structure, derived from dehydroisocoproporphyrinogen by sulfonation of the vinyl group. The metabolite was present in a greater abundance than other isocoproporphyrin derivatives and may be a more useful biomarker for HCB intoxication.

  17. Antioxidant activity guided separation of major polyphenols of marjoram (Origanum majorana L.) using flash chromatography and their identification by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad B; Camphuis, Gabriel; Aguiló-Aguayo, Ingrid; Gangopadhyay, Nirupama; Rai, Dilip K

    2014-11-01

    Marjoram extracts have been separated into polar and nonpolar parts using liquid-liquid extraction. Both polar and nonpolar parts of the extracts were further fractionated by flash chromatography. The obtained fractions (90 polar and 45 nonpolar fractions) were investigated for their antioxidant activities by 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power assays. A direct, positive, and linear relationship between antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of the fractions was observed. Based on antioxidant and total phenolic content data, the three fractions with the high antioxidant activities from polar and nonpolar part of the extract were analyzed for their constituent polyphenols by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Compounds were identified by matching the mass spectral data and retention time with those of authentic standards. Identification of the compounds for which there were no "in-house" standards available was carried out by accurate mass measurement of the precursor ions and product ions generated from collision-induced dissociation. Rosmarinic acid was found to be the strongest antioxidant polyphenol conferring the highest antioxidant activity to fractions 47 and 17 of polar and nonpolar part of the extract, respectively. The identification of the rosmarinic acid was further confirmed by (1) H NMR spectroscopy.

  18. Separating Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Contributions to Soil Respiration in Maize-Based Agroecosystems Using Stable Carbon Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, B.; Walters, D. T.; Madhavan, S.; Arkebauer, T. J.; Scoby, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    Any effort to establish a carbon budget for a growing crop by means of a thorough accounting of all C sources and sinks will require the ability to discriminate between autotrophic and heterotrophic contributions to soil surface CO2 flux. Autotrophic soil respiration (Ra) is defined as combined root respiration and the respiration of soil microorganisms residing in the rhizosphere and using root-derived carbohydrates as an energy source, while heterotrophic respiration (Rh) is defined as the respiration of soil microorganisms and macroorganisms not directly under the influence of the live root system and using SOM as an energy source. We partition soil surface CO2 flux into its autotrophic and heterotrophic components by combining root exclusion with stable carbon isotope techniques in production scale (~65 ha) maize-based agroecosystems. After flux measurements, small chambers are placed on collars in both root excluded shields and in non-root excluded soil, ambient headspace CO2 is removed using a soda lime trap, and soil-respired C is allowed to collect in the chambers. Soil respiration samples are then collected in 12mL evacuated exetainers and analyzed for δ13C by means of a Finnigan Delta-S isotope ratio mass spectrometer interfaced with a Thermo Finnigan GasBench II and a cryogenic trap to increase CO2 concentration. These δ13C measurements were made throughout the 2005 growing season in maize fields representing three agroecosystems: irrigated continuous maize, irrigated maize-soybean rotation, and rainfed maize soybean rotation. Estimates of autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration along with other results of this study will be presented.

  19. Analysis of metal-binding proteins separated by non-denaturating gel electrophoresis using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Becker, J Susanne; Mounicou, Sandra; Zoriy, Miroslav V; Becker, J Sabine; Lobinski, Ryszard

    2008-09-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) have become established as very efficient and sensitive biopolymer and elemental mass spectrometric techniques for studying metal-binding proteins (metalloproteins) in life sciences. Protein complexes present in rat tissues (liver and kidney) were separated in their native state in the first dimension by blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Essential and toxic metals, such as zinc, copper, iron, nickel, chromium, cadmium and lead, were detected by scanning the gel bands using quadrupole LA-ICP-MS with and without collision cell as a microanalytical technique. Several proteins were identified by using MALDI-TOF-MS together with a database search. For example, on one protein band cut from the BN-PAGE gel and digested with the enzyme trypsin, two different proteins - protein FAM44B and cathepsin B precursor - were identified. By combining biomolecular and elemental mass spectrometry, it was possible to characterize and identify selected metal-binding rat liver and kidney tissue proteins.

  20. A rapid method for the separation of vitamin D and its metabolites by ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jumaah, Firas; Larsson, Sara; Essén, Sofia; Cunico, Larissa P; Holm, Cecilia; Turner, Charlotta; Sandahl, Margareta

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a new supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SFC-MS) method has been developed for the separation of nine vitamin D metabolites within less than eight minutes. This is the first study of analysis of vitamin D and its metabolites carried out by SFC-MS. Six columns of orthogonal selectivity were examined, and the best separation was obtained by using a 1-aminoanthracene (1-AA) column. The number and the position of hydroxyl groups in the structure of the studied compounds as well as the number of unsaturated bonds determine the physiochemical properties and, thus the separation of vitamin D metabolites that is achieved on this column. All D2 and the D3 forms were baseline separated with resolution values>1.5. The effects of pressure, temperature, flow rate and different gradient modes were studied. Electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) were compared in positive mode, both by direct infusion and after SFC separation. The results showed that the sensitivity in APCI(+) was higher than in ESI(+) using direct infusion. In contrast, the sensitivity in APCI(+) was 6-fold lower than in ESI(+) after SFC separation. The SFC-MS method was validated between 10 and 500ng/mL for all analytes with coefficient of determination (R(2))≥0.999 for all calibration curves. The limits of detection (LOD) were found to range between 0.39 and 5.98ng/mL for 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (24,25(OH)2D3) and 1-hydroxyvitamin D2 (1OHD2), respectively. To show its potential, the method was applied to human plasma samples from healthy individuals. Vitamin D3 (D3), 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD3) and 24,25(OH)2D3 were determined in plasma samples and the concentrations were 6.6±3.0ng/mL, 23.8±9.2ng/mL and 5.4±2.7ng/mL, respectively.

  1. A WIDELY SEPARATED, HIGHLY OCCLUDED COMPANION TO THE NEARBY LOW-MASS T TAURI STAR TWA 30

    SciTech Connect

    Looper, Dagny L.; Pitts, Mark A.; Bochanski, John J.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Mamajek, Eric E.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; West, Andrew A.

    2010-11-15

    We report the discovery of TWA 30B, a wide ({approx}3400 AU), co-moving M dwarf companion to the nearby ({approx}42 pc) young star TWA 30. Companionship is confirmed from their statistically consistent proper motions and radial velocities (RVs), as well as a chance alignment probability of only 0.08%. Like TWA 30A, the spectrum of TWA 30B shows signatures of an actively accreting disk (H I and alkali line emission) and forbidden emission lines tracing outflowing material ([O I], [O II], [O III], [S II], and [N II]). We have also detected [C I] emission in the optical data, marking the first such detection of this line in a pre-main-sequence star. Negligible RV shifts in the emission lines relative to the stellar frame of rest ({Delta}V {approx}< 30 km s{sup -1}) indicate that the outflows are viewed in the plane of the sky and that the corresponding circumstellar disk is viewed edge-on. Indeed, TWA 30B appears to be heavily obscured by its disk, given that it is 5 mag fainter than TWA 30A at K band despite having a slightly earlier spectral type (M4 versus M5). The near-infrared spectrum of TWA 30B also evinces an excess that varies on day timescales, with colors that follow classical T Tauri tracks as opposed to variable reddening (as is the case for TWA 30A). Multi-epoch data show this excess to be well modeled by a black body component with temperatures ranging from 630 to 880 K and emitting areas that scale inversely with the temperature. The variable excess may arise from disk structure such as a rim or a warp at the inner disk edge located at a radial distance of {approx}3-5 R{sub sun}. As the second and third closest actively accreting and outflowing stars to the Sun (after TWA 3), TWA 30AB presents an ideal system for a detailed study of star and planetary formation processes at the low-mass end of the hydrogen-burning spectrum.

  2. Semileptonic B to D Decays at Nonzero Recoil with 2+1 Flavors of Improved Staggered Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Si-Wei; DeTar, Carleton; Du, Daping; Kronfeld, Andreas S.; Laiho, Jack; Van de Water, Ruth S.; /Brookhaven

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Lattice-MILC collaboration is completing a comprehensive program of heavy-light physics on the MILC (2+1)-flavor asqtad ensembles with lattice spacings as small as 0.045 fm and light-to-strange-quark mass ratios as low as 1/20. We use the Fermilab interpretation of the clover action for heavy valence quarks and the asqtad action for light valence quarks. The central goal of the program is to provide ever more exacting tests of the unitarity of the CKM matrix. We give a progress report on one part of the program, namely the analysis of the semileptonic decay B to D at both zero and nonzero recoil. Although final results are not presented, we discuss improvements in the analysis methods, the statistical errors, and the parameter coverage that we expect will lead to a significant reduction in the final error for |V{sub cb}| from this decay channel.

  3. A THERMAL INFRARED IMAGING STUDY OF VERY LOW MASS, WIDE-SEPARATION BROWN DWARF COMPANIONS TO UPPER SCORPIUS STARS: CONSTRAINING CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Vanessa; Hinz, Philip M.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Hoffmann, William F.; Rieke, George; Rodigas, Timothy; Skemer, Andrew; Vaitheeswaran, Vidhya; Currie, Thayne; Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Hill, John M.; Jones, Terry; Kim, Jihun; Leisenring, Jarron; Meyer, Michael; Murray-Clay, Ruth; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Nelson, Matthew J.; and others

    2013-04-10

    We present a 3-5 {mu}m LBT/MMT adaptive optics imaging study of three Upper Scorpius stars with brown dwarf (BD) companions with very low masses/mass ratios (M{sub BD} <25 M{sub Jup}; M{sub BD}/M{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 1%-2%) and wide separations (300-700 AU): GSC 06214, 1RXS 1609, and HIP 78530. We combine these new thermal IR data with existing 1-4 {mu}m and 24 {mu}m photometry to constrain the properties of the BDs and identify evidence for circumprimary/circumsecondary disks in these unusual systems. We confirm that GSC 06214B is surrounded by a disk, further showing that this disk produces a broadband IR excess due to small dust near the dust sublimation radius. An unresolved 24 {mu}m excess in the system may be explained by the contribution from this disk. 1RXS 1609B exhibits no 3-4 {mu}m excess, nor does its primary; however, the system as a whole has a modest 24 {mu}m excess, which may come from warm dust around the primary and/or BD. Neither object in the HIP 78530 system exhibits near- to mid-IR excesses. We additionally find that the 1-4 {mu}m colors of HIP 78530B match a spectral type of M3 {+-} 2, inconsistent with the M8 spectral type assigned based on its near-IR spectrum, indicating that it may be a low-mass star rather than a BD. We present new upper limits on additional low-mass companions in the system (<5 M{sub Jup} beyond 175 AU). Finally, we examine the utility of circumsecondary disks as probes of the formation histories of wide BD companions, finding that the presence of a disk may disfavor BD formation near the primary with subsequent outward scattering.

  4. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  5. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield and scintillation pulse shape from nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Alexander, T.; Aprahamian, A.; Avetisyan, R.; Back, H. O.; Cocco, A. G.; Dejongh, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, Y.; Kendziora, C.; Lippincott, W. H.; Love, C.; Lyons, S.; Manenti, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meng, Y.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Olvitt, D.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Rossi, B.; Saldanha, R.; Sangiorgio, S.; Siegl, K.; Strauss, S. Y.; Tan, W.; Tatarowicz, J.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Yoo, J.; Scene Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V /cm . For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V /cm . We also report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from Krm83 internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni ) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  6. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  7. Using GPS and absolute gravity observations to separate the effects of present-day and Pleistocene ice-mass changes in South East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, T.; Francis, O.; Wahr, J.; Khan, S. A.; Bevis, M.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2017-02-01

    Measurements of vertical crustal uplift from bedrock sites around the edge of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) can be used to constrain present day mass loss. Interpreting any observed crustal displacement around the GrIS in terms of present day changes in ice is complicated, however, by the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) signal. With GPS observations alone, it is impossible to separate the uplift driven by present day mass changes from that due to ice mass changes in the past. Wahr et al. (1995) demonstrated that viscoelastic surface displacements were related to the viscoelastic gravity changes through a proportionality constant that is nearly independent of the choice of Earth viscosity or ice history model. Thus, by making measurements of both gravity and surface motion at a bedrock site, the viscoelastic effects could be removed from the observations and we would be able to constrain present day ice mass changes. Alternatively, we could use the same observations of surface displacements and gravity to determine the GIA signal. In this paper, we extend the theory of Wahr et al. (1995) by introducing a constant, Z, that represents the ratio between the elastic changes in gravity and elastic uplift at a particular site due to present day mass changes. Further, we combine 20 yrs of GPS observations of uplift with eight absolute gravity observations over the same period to determine the GIA signal near Kulusuk, a site on the southeastern side of the GrIS, to experimentally demonstrate the theory. We estimate that the GIA signal in the region is 4.49 ± 1.44mm/yr and is inconsistent with most previously reported model predictions that demonstrate that the GIA signal here is negative. However, as there is very little in situ data to constrain the GIA rate in this part of Greenland, the Earth model or the ice history reconstructions could be inaccurate (Khan et al., 2016). Improving the estimate of GIA in this region of Greenland will allow us to better determine

  8. Separation of silver ions and starch modified silver nanoparticles using high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet and inductively coupled mass spectrometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Traci A.; Saadawi, Ryan; Zhang, Peng; Caruso, Joseph A.; Landero-Figueroa, Julio

    2014-10-01

    The production of commercially available products marketed to contain silver nanoparticles is rapidly increasing. Species-specific toxicity is a phenomenon associated with many elements, including silver, making it imperative to develop a method to identify and quantify the various forms of silver (namely, silver ions vs. silver nanoparticles) possibly present in these products. In this study a method was developed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV-VIS) and inductively coupled mass spectrometric (ICP-MS) detection to separate starch stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver ions (Ag+) by cation exchange chromatography with 0.5 M nitric acid mobile phase. The silver nanoparticles and ions were baseline resolved with an ICP-MS response linear over four orders of magnitude, 0.04 mg kg- 1 detection limit, and 90% chromatographic recovery for silver solutions containing ions and starch stabilized silver nanoparticles smaller than 100 nm.

  9. Cod (Gadus morhua) muscle proteome cataloging using 1D-PAGE protein separation, nano-liquid chromatography peptide fractionation, and linear trap quadrupole (LTQ) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gebriel, Mohammed; Uleberg, Kai-Erik; Larssen, Eivind; Bjørnstad, Anne Hjelle; Sivertsvik, Morten; Møller, Simon Geir

    2010-12-08

    Because Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has high economic value and its protein-rich muscle tissue is a food source, an increased understanding of the effects and consequences of environmental, nutritional, biological, and industrial factors on meat quality is necessary. To gain insight into cod muscle tissue protein composition, a large-scale proteomics approach has been used. One-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, nanoflow liquid chromatography peptide separation, and linear trap quadrupole mass spectrometry were used to identify 4804 peptides, which retrieved 9113 cod expressed sequence tags (ESTs), which in turn were mapped to 446 unique proteins. The same data set identified 3924 proteins from the zebrafish protein database, which highlights the complementary value of the two approaches. The generated data sets will act as a foundation for studies related to physiological status assessment of cod under different environmental conditions, screening for diseases, and biomarker identification for assessment of fish quality during industrial processing and preservation.

  10. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Recoil momentum at a solid surface during developed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, L. I.

    1993-12-01

    The recoil momentum from a laser light pulse in the intensity range 105-107 W/cm2 is experimentally investigated for dielectric and metallic targets as a function of the pressure of the surrounding medium and angle of illumination. An equation with empirical coefficients is obtained for the recoil momentum of illuminated targets. Effects of the screening properties of the erosion jet and the back pressure on the recoil momentum are analyzed as the external pressure is varied.

  11. Femtomolar concentration detection limit and zeptomole mass detection limit for protein separation by capillary isoelectric focusing and laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Lauren M; Dickerson, Jane A; Dada, Oluwatosin; Dovichi, Norman J

    2009-03-01

    Fluorescence tends to produce the lowest detection limits for most forms of capillary electrophoresis. Two issues have discouraged its use in capillary isoelectric focusing. The first issue is fluorescent labeling of proteins. Most labeling reagents react with lysine residues and convert the cationic residue to a neutral or anionic product. At best, these reagents perturb the isoelectric point of the protein. At worse, they convert each protein into hundreds of different fluorescent products that confound analysis. The second issue is the large background signal generated by impurities within commercial ampholytes. This background signal is particularly strong when excited in the blue portion of the spectrum, which is required by many common fluorescent labeling reagents. This paper addresses these issues. For labeling, we employ Chromeo P540, which is a fluorogenic reagent that converts cationic lysine residues to cationic fluorescent products. The reaction products are excited in the green, which reduces the background signal generated by impurities present within the ampholytes. To further reduce the background signal, we photobleach ampholytes with high-power photodiodes. Photobleaching reduced the noise in the ampholyte blank by an order of magnitude. Isoelectric focusing performed with photobleached pH 3-10 ampholytes produced concentration detection limits of 270 +/- 25 fM and mass detection limits of 150 +/- 15 zmol for Chromeo P540 labeled beta-lactoglobulin. Concentration detection limits were 520 +/- 40 fM and mass detection limits were 310 +/- 30 zmol with pH 4-8 ampholytes. A homogenate was prepared from a Barrett's esophagus cell line and separated by capillary isoelectric focusing, reproducibly generating dozens of peaks. The sample taken for the separation was equal to the labeled protein homogenate from three cells.

  12. The SuperCDMS Soudan High Mass Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, Brett; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The SuperCDMS Soudan experiment searches for direct interactions of WIMP dark matter particles with germanium nuclei. The experiment uses detectors (iZIPs) with sophisticated ionization and phonon sensors to distinguish nuclear recoils from electron-recoil backgrounds or surface contaminants. We report the status of an analysis, based on a 1700 kg-day exposure, that seeks to maximize our experimental sensitivity to spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction in the high mass regime (M > 10 Gev /c2).

  13. Separation and measurement of Pa, Th, and U isotopes in marine sediments by microwave-assisted digestion and multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Negre, César; Thomas, Alexander L; Mas, José Luis; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi; Henderson, Gideon M; Masqué, Pere; Zahn, Rainer

    2009-03-01

    This manuscript describes a new protocol for determination of Pa/Th/U in marine sediments. It is based on microwave-assisted digestion and represents an important reduction of working time over conventional hot-plate digestion methods, and the use of HClO(4) is avoided. Although Th and U are completely dissolved with a first microwave step, around 40% of (231)Pa remains undissolved, and a short hot-plate step with reverse aqua regia is required to achieve total digestion and spike equilibration. Next, the method involves a separation of these elements and a further purification of the Pa fraction using Dowex AG1-X8 resin. Separation with Bio-Rad and Sigma-Aldrich resins was compared; although both perform similarly for Th and U, Pa yields are higher with Bio-Rad. Finally, samples are measured using a Nu instruments multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICPMS). Overall chemical yields range around 50% for Pa, 60% for Th, and 70% for U.

  14. Polar Aprotic Modifiers for Chromatographic Separation and Back-Exchange Reduction for Protein Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Monitored by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeja, Santosh G.; Emmett, Mark R.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry is an important non-perturbing tool to study protein structure and protein-protein interactions. However, water in the reversed-phase liquid chromatography mobile phase leads to back-exchange of D for H during chromatographic separation of proteolytic peptides following H/D exchange, resulting in incorrect identification of fast-exchanging hydrogens as unexchanged hydrogens. Previously, fast high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography have been shown to decrease back-exchange. Here, we show that replacement of up to 40% of the water in the LC mobile phase by the modifiers, dimethylformamide (DMF) and N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) (i.e., polar organic modifiers that lack rapid exchanging hydrogens), significantly reduces back-exchange. On-line LC micro-ESI FT-ICR MS resolves overlapped proteolytic peptide isotopic distributions, allowing for quantitative determination of the extent of back-exchange. The DMF modified solvent composition also improves chromatographic separation while reducing back-exchange relative to conventional solvent.

  15. Polar Aprotic Modifiers for Chromatographic Separation and Back-Exchange Reduction for Protein Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Monitored by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Valeja, Santosh G.; Emmett, Mark R.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry is an important non-perturbing tool to study protein structure and protein–protein interactions. However, water in the reversed-phase liquid chromatography mobile phase leads to back-exchange of D for H during chromatographic separation of proteolytic peptides following H/D exchange, resulting in incorrect identification of fast-exchanging hydrogens as unexchanged hydrogens. Previously, fast high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography have been shown to decrease back-exchange. Here, we show that replacement of up to 40% of the water in the LC mobile phase by the modifiers, dimethylformamide (DMF) and N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) (i.e., polar organic modifiers that lack rapid exchanging hydrogens), significantly reduces back-exchange. On-line LC micro-ESI FT-ICR MS resolves overlapped proteolytic peptide isotopic distributions, allowing for quantitative determination of the extent of back-exchange. The DMF modified solvent composition also improves chromatographic separation while reducing back-exchange relative to conventional solvent. PMID:22298288

  16. [Study on the method of nanometer-size zirconium dioxide enrichment separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry determination of trace barium(II) in water].

    PubMed

    Du, Ying-Qiu; Yin, Yi-Dong; Fan, Nai-Ying; Chen, Peng-Gang; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Ren, Hong-Bo; Chen, Guo-You; Qu, Qiu-Yao; Sun, Zhi-Bo; Chen, Yue-Xin

    2012-11-01

    Monoclinic fusiform zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal method, a method was established based on monoclinic fusiform nanometer-sized ZrO2 enrichment separation, and trace barium in water was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The detection limit for Ba(II) was 0.007 ng x mL(-1), and the relative standard deviation was 0.13% (n = 11). The optimal enrichment separation conditions of nanometer-sized ZrO2 for Ba(II) were studied in detail, it was found that the percentage of adsorbed Ba(II) was more than 99% under pH 10.0 and 2 mL 0.5 mol x L(-1) HCl was sufficient for elution of Ba(II) by more than 98%. The static adsorption capacity of ZrO2 to Ba(II) was 196.6 microg x g(-1) and enrichment factor was 250. Properties of nanometer-sized ZrO2 were discussed through regeneration experiment and effects of co-existing ions and contrast experiment to ordinary ZrO2, adsorption properties of nanometer-sized ZrO2 were applied to real samples in the analysis of Ba(II) and the determination was carried out by ICP-MS with satisfactory results.

  17. Separation and identification of underivatized plasma acylcarnitine isomers using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the differential diagnosis of organic acidemias and fatty acid oxidation defects.

    PubMed

    Peng, Minzhi; Fang, Xiefan; Huang, Yonglan; Cai, Yanna; Liang, Cuili; Lin, Ruizhu; Liu, Li

    2013-12-06

    A simple HPLC-MS/MS method has been established to separate and identify underivatized acylcarnitine isomers. Human plasma samples were deproteinized and concentrated. Acylcarnitines were separated on a reverse phase column and detected with triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry. Deuterium-labeled internal standards were used for quantitation. To identify acylcarnitines without pure standards, information-dependent acquisition linking to enhanced product ion scan mode was used. 112 acylcarnitines, including stereoisomers, were found in samples of patients. Dicarboxylic acylcarnitines, such as methylmalonylcarnitine and glutarylcarnitine, were detected with high sensitivity. Three stereoisomers of (R,S)2-methyl-3-hydroxy butyrylcarnitine were detected in samples of patients with β-ketothiolase deficiency. Validation results revealed excellent precision and accuracy of the method. In general the within- and between-run coefficients of variation (CV%) were less than 15%, and recoveries were in the range of 92.7-117.5%. In addition, the reference intervals of acylcarnitines for children aged 3-day to13-year old were established. Using the new method and reference intervals, we have correctly diagnosed 49 patients with fatty acid oxidation defects or organic acidemias in 176 high-risk patients.

  18. Nanoliter-volume protein enrichment, tryptic digestion, and partial separation based on isoelectric points by CE for MALDI mass spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Chandra A; Jurcic, Kristina; Yeung, Ken K-C

    2008-01-01

    Sequence-specific proteolysis is an important part of protein identification by MS. Digestion of protein is commonly performed in-solution, in sample vials with volumes ranging from milli- to microliters. When digestion is performed with a sample volume below 1 microL, handling of solution and potential sample loss via adsorption become significant issues. In this report, a proof of concept for the digestion of a small volume protein solution inside a capillary was demonstrated using a discontinuous buffer system previously studied (Nesbitt, C. A., et al. J. Chromatogr. A 2005, 1073, 175-180). Upon voltage application, a pH junction was created by the discontinuous buffer. Using myoglobin as an example, the protein molecules were enriched at the junction with an estimated volume of a few nanoliters. A protease, trypsin, was then introduced to myoglobin at the junction by coenrichment to induce in-capillary digestion. The voltage application was then suspended to provide the necessary time (2 h) for the proteolysis to proceed. When completed, voltage application was resumed, and the discontinuous buffer reconcentrated the peptides formed from digestion. Importantly, the refocused peptides appeared to roughly elute according to their pIs, resulting in a partial separation. Direct sample deposition from capillary was performed to facilitate mass spectral analysis by MALDI. The partial separation, according to pI, offered the potential benefits of MALDI MS signal enhancement and provided supplementary pI information for peptide identity assignment.

  19. Thin layer chromatography/plasma assisted multiwavelength laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for facile separation and selective identification of low molecular weight compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jialing; Zhou, Zhigui; Yang, Jianwang; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2012-02-07

    A novel plasma assisted multiwavelength (1064, 532, and 355 nm) laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (PAMLDI-MS) system was fabricated and applied in the analysis of low molecular weight compounds through combination with thin layer chromatography (TLC). The TLC/PAMLDI-MS system successfully integrated TLC, the multiwavelength laser ablation, and the excitated state plasma from direct analysis in real time (DART) and was proved to be effective in the facile separation and selective identification of low molecular weight compounds. An automated three-dimensional platform was utilized to facilitate the analysis procedures with all the parameters of the TLC/PAMLDI-MS systematically optimized, and the desorption/ionization mechanisms were discussed. The successful combination of three-wavelength laser with DART based system extended the range of the analytes and provided broad possibilities for the compound desorption from the TLC. The experimental results clearly showed that the laser desorption was wavelength dependent. The PAMLDI-MS system was successfully applied in the detection of low molecular weight compounds from different kinds of samples separated on a normal-phase silica gel, such as dye mixtures, drug standards, and tea extract, with the detection level of 5 ng/mm(2).

  20. Determination of ultralow level 129I/127I in natural samples by separation of microgram carrier free iodine and accelerator mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Chen, Ning; Zhang, Luyuan; Liu, Qi; Luo, Maoyi; Fan, Yukun; Liang, Wangguo; Fu, Yunchong

    2010-09-15

    Separation of carrier free iodine from low iodine level samples and accurate measurement of ultralow level (129)I in micrograms of iodine target are essential but a bottleneck in geological dating of terrestrial system and tracer research using naturally produced (129)I. In this work, we present a carrier free method using coprecipitation of AgI with AgCl for preparing micrograms of iodine target, associated with combustion using a tube furnace for separating iodine from solid samples and anion exchange chromatography for preconcentrating iodine from a large volume of water. An accelerator mass spectrometry was used to measure ultralow level (129)I in micrograms of iodine target. The recovery of iodine in the entire separation procedure is higher than 80% and 65% for solid and water samples, respectively. One microgram iodine in the target (AgI-AgCl) can produce a stable (127)I signal for AMS measurement of (129)I/(127)I, and a detection limit of this method for (129)I is calculated to be 10(5) atoms. This will allow us to accurately determine (129)I in prenuclear geological samples of low iodine concentration with (129)I/(127)I of 10(-12), such as loess, soil, coral, rock, sediment, and groundwater. Some samples with low iodine content have been successfully analyzed, and the lowest value of the (129)I/(127)I ratio of 2 × 10(-11) was observed in 23.5 and 63.5 m loess samples collected in the Loess Plateau, China. The developed method sheds light on a wide application in earth science.

  1. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Bechstedt, U.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Khoukaz, A.; Klehr, F.; Lehrach, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Stockmanns, T.; Täschner, A.; Wuestner, P.; Xu, H.

    2014-10-01

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment.

  2. Simultaneous determination of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol and acrylamide in food by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry with coupled column separation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-min; He, Hua-li; Zhu, Yan; Feng, Liang; Ying, Ying; Huang, Bai-fen; Shen, Hai-tao; Han, Jian-long; Ren, Yi-ping

    2013-01-14

    Both 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and acrylamide are contaminants found in heat-processed foods and their related products. A quantitative method was developed for the simultaneous determination of both contaminants in food by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The analytes were purified and extracted by the matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction (MSPDE) technique with Extrelut NT. A coupled column (a 3 m Innowax combined with a 30 m DB-5 ms) was developed to separate both compounds efficiently without derivatization. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM) was applied to suppress matrix interference and obtain good sensitivity in the determination of both analytes. The limit of detection (LOD) in the sample matrix was 5 μg kg(-1) for 3-MCPD or acrylamide. The average recoveries for 3-MCPD and acrylamide in different food matrices were 90.5-107% and 81.9-95.7%, respectively, with the intraday relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 5.6-13.5% and 5.3-13.4%, respectively. The interday RSDs were 6.1-12.6% for 3-MCPD and were 5.0-12.8% for acrylamide. Both contaminants were found in samples of bread, fried chips, fried instant noodles, soy sauce, and instant noodle flavoring. Neither 3-MCPD nor acrylamide was detected in the samples of dairy products (solid or liquid samples) and non-fried instant noodles.

  3. Detection of bacteria from biological mixtures using immunomagnetic separation combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madonna, A.J.; Basile, F.; Furlong, E.; Voorhees, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    A rapid method for identifying specific bacteria from complex biological mixtures using immunomagnetic separation coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been developed. The technique employs commercially available magnetic beads coated with polycolonal antibodies raised against specific bacteria and whole cell analysis by MALDI-MS. A suspension of a bacterial mixture is mixed with the immunomagnetic beads specific for the target microorganism. After a short incubation period (20 mins) the bacteria captured by the beads are washed, resuspended in deionized H2O and directly applied onto a MALDI probe. Liquid suspensions containing bacterial mixtures can be screened within 1 h total analysis time. Positive tests result in the production of a fingerprint mass spectrum primarily consisting of protein biomarkers characteristic of the targeted microorganism. Using this procedure, Salmonella choleraesuis was isolated and detected from standard bacterial mixtures and spiked samples of river water, human urine, and chicken blood. Copyright ?? 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Benefits of prolonged gradient separation for high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry quantitation of plasma total 15-series F-isoprostanes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alan W; Bruno, Richard S; Frei, Balz; Traber, Maret G

    2006-03-01

    The F(2)-isoprostanes are products of free-radical-induced oxidation of arachidonic acid (AA) that are stereoisomers of prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)). We describe a method for quantitation of several 15-series PGF isomers (15-PGFs) and AA by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS-MS). Plasma samples were subjected to alkaline hydrolysis and acidified, and total (free + esterified) 15-PGFs and AA were extracted with organic solvents. The analytes were separated by gradient reverse-phase HPLC and detected by multiple reaction monitoring on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, using deuterated internal standards for quantitation. The assay had a linear range of 1-40 pg of 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) on column and can quantify as little as 40 pg/mL (0.11 nM) in plasma. Outcomes significantly correlated (p < 0.0001) with data obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry GC-MS or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All plasma 15-PGF isomers increased over time with in vitro cigarette smoke exposure and correlated (p < 0.0001) with each other. The same strong inter-15-PGF correlations were observed in plasma from healthy young adult subjects. The coefficients of variation of HPLC-MS-MS measurements (24-32%) were smaller than those obtained by GC-MS (53%). Thus, HPLC-MS-MS potentially offers greater precision and allows quantitation of more compounds with simpler sample preparation than existing methods. Ours is the first validated quantitative assay using HPLC-tandem MS applied to plasma total 15-PGFs.

  5. Treatment of solid tumors by interstitial release of recoiling short-lived alpha emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arazi, L.; Cooks, T.; Schmidt, M.; Keisari, Y.; Kelson, I.

    2007-08-01

    A new method utilizing alpha particles to treat solid tumors is presented. Tumors are treated with interstitial radioactive sources which continually release short-lived alpha emitting atoms from their surface. The atoms disperse inside the tumor, delivering a high dose through their alpha decays. We implement this scheme using thin wire sources impregnated with 224Ra, which release by recoil 220Rn, 216Po and 212Pb atoms. This work aims to demonstrate the feasibility of our method by measuring the activity patterns of the released radionuclides in experimental tumors. Sources carrying 224Ra activities in the range 10-130 kBq were used in experiments on murine squamous cell carcinoma tumors. These included gamma spectroscopy of the dissected tumors and major organs, Fuji-plate autoradiography of histological tumor sections and tissue damage detection by Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. The measurements focused on 212Pb and 212Bi. The 220Rn/216Po distribution was treated theoretically using a simple diffusion model. A simplified scheme was used to convert measured 212Pb activities to absorbed dose estimates. Both physical and histological measurements confirmed the formation of a 5-7 mm diameter necrotic region receiving a therapeutic alpha-particle dose around the source. The necrotic regions shape closely corresponded to the measured activity patterns. 212Pb was found to leave the tumor through the blood at a rate which decreased with tumor mass. Our results suggest that the proposed method, termed DART (diffusing alpha-emitters radiation therapy), may potentially be useful for the treatment of human patients.

  6. Recoiling black holes: prospects for detection and implications of spin alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecha, Laura; Sijacki, Debora; Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Torrey, Paul; Vogelsberger, Mark; Nelson, Dylan; Springel, Volker; Snyder, Gregory; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Supermassive black hole (BH) mergers produce powerful gravitational wave emission. Asymmetry in this emission imparts a recoil kick to the merged BH, which can eject the BH from its host galaxy altogether. Recoiling BHs could be observed as offset active galactic nuclei (AGN). Several candidates have been identified, but systematic searches have been hampered by large uncertainties regarding their observability. By extracting merging BHs and host galaxy properties from the Illustris cosmological simulations, we have developed a comprehensive model for recoiling AGN. Here, for the first time, we model the effects of BH spin alignment and recoil dynamics based on the gas richness of host galaxies. We predict that if BH spins are not highly aligned, seeing-limited observations could resolve offset AGN, making them promising targets for all-sky surveys. For randomly oriented spins, ≲ 10 spatially offset AGN may be detectable in Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmological Evolution Survey, and >103 could be found with the Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), Euclid, and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST). Nearly a thousand velocity offset AGN are predicted within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint; the rarity of large broad-line offsets among SDSS quasars is likely due in part to selection effects but suggests that spin alignment plays a role in suppressing recoils. None the less, in our most physically motivated model where alignment occurs only in gas-rich mergers, hundreds of offset AGN should be found in all-sky surveys. Our findings strongly motivate a dedicated search for recoiling AGN.

  7. B → Dℓν form factors at nonzero recoil and |Vcb| from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2015-08-10

    We present the first unquenched lattice-QCD calculation of the hadronic form factors for the exclusive decay B¯→Dℓν¯ at nonzero recoil. We carry out numerical simulations on 14 ensembles of gauge-field configurations generated with 2+1 flavors of asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. The ensembles encompass a wide range of lattice spacings (approximately 0.045 to 0.12 fm) and ratios of light (up and down) to strange sea-quark masses ranging from 0.05 to 0.4. For the b and c valence quarks we use improved Wilson fermions with the Fermilab interpretation, while for the light valence quarks we use asqtad-improved staggered fermions. We extrapolate ourmore » results to the physical point using rooted staggered heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory. We then parametrize the form factors and extend them to the full kinematic range using model-independent functions based on analyticity and unitarity. We present our final results for f+(q2) and f0(q2), including statistical and systematic errors, as coefficients of a series in the variable z and the covariance matrix between these coefficients. We then fit the lattice form-factor data jointly with the experimentally measured differential decay rate from BABAR to determine the CKM matrix element, |Vcb|=(39.6 ± 1.7QCD+exp ± 0.2QED) × 10–3. As a byproduct of the joint fit we obtain the form factors with improved precision at large recoil. In conclusion, we use them to update our calculation of the ratio R(D) in the Standard Model, which yields R(D)=0.299(11).« less

  8. A Thermal Infrared Imaging Study of Very Low Mass, Wide-separation Brown Dwarf Companions to Upper Scorpius Stars: Constraining Circumstellar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Vanessa; Hinz, Philip M.; Currie, Thayne; Su, Kate Y. L.; Esposito, Simone; Hill, John M.; Hoffmann, William F.; Jones, Terry; Kim, Jihun; Leisenring, Jarron; Meyer, Michael; Murray-Clay, Ruth; Nelson, Matthew J.; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Rieke, George; Rodigas, Timothy; Skemer, Andrew; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Vaitheeswaran, Vidhya; Wilson, John C.

    2013-04-01

    We present a 3-5 μm LBT/MMT adaptive optics imaging study of three Upper Scorpius stars with brown dwarf (BD) companions with very low masses/mass ratios (M BD <25 M Jup; M BD/M sstarf ≈ 1%-2%) and wide separations (300-700 AU): GSC 06214, 1RXS 1609, and HIP 78530. We combine these new thermal IR data with existing 1-4 μm and 24 μm photometry to constrain the properties of the BDs and identify evidence for circumprimary/circumsecondary disks in these unusual systems. We confirm that GSC 06214B is surrounded by a disk, further showing that this disk produces a broadband IR excess due to small dust near the dust sublimation radius. An unresolved 24 μm excess in the system may be explained by the contribution from this disk. 1RXS 1609B exhibits no 3-4 μm excess, nor does its primary; however, the system as a whole has a modest 24 μm excess, which may come from warm dust around the primary and/or BD. Neither object in the HIP 78530 system exhibits near- to mid-IR excesses. We additionally find that the 1-4 μm colors of HIP 78530B match a spectral type of M3 ± 2, inconsistent with the M8 spectral type assigned based on its near-IR spectrum, indicating that it may be a low-mass star rather than a BD. We present new upper limits on additional low-mass companions in the system (<5 M Jup beyond 175 AU). Finally, we examine the utility of circumsecondary disks as probes of the formation histories of wide BD companions, finding that the presence of a disk may disfavor BD formation near the primary with subsequent outward scattering. Observations reported here were obtained at the LBT and MMT Observatories. The MMT Observatory is a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are: The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT

  9. Discrimination of nuclear and electronic recoil events using plasma effect in germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.-Z.; Liu, J.; Mei, D.-M.

    2016-07-01

    We report a new method of using the plasma time difference, which results from the plasma effect, between the nuclear and electronic recoil events in high-purity germanium detectors to distinguish these two types of events in the search for rare physics processes. The physics mechanism of the plasma effect is discussed in detail. A numerical model is developed to calculate the plasma time for nuclear and electronic recoils at various energies in germanium detectors. It can be shown that under certain conditions the plasma time difference is large enough to be observable. The experimental aspects in realizing such a discrimination in germanium detectors is discussed.

  10. Scintillation efficiency for low energy nuclear recoils in liquid xenon dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wei; Xiong, Xiaonu; Ji, Xiangdong

    2015-02-01

    We perform a theoretical study of the scintillation efficiency of the low energy region crucial for liquid xenon dark matter detectors. We develop a computer program to simulate the cascading process of the recoiling xenon nucleus in liquid xenon and calculate the nuclear quenching effect due to atomic collisions. We use the electronic stopping power extrapolated from experimental data to the low energy region, and take into account the effects of electron escape from electron-ion pair recombination using the generalized Thomas-Imel model fitted to scintillation data. Our result agrees well with the experiments from neutron scattering and vanishes rapidly as the recoil energy drops below 3 keV.

  11. Observation of collective atomic recoil motion in a degenerate fermion gas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengjun; Deng, L; Hagley, E W; Fu, Zhengkun; Chai, Shijie; Zhang, Jing

    2011-05-27

    We demonstrate collective atomic recoil motion with a dilute, ultracold, degenerate fermion gas in a single spin state. By utilizing an adiabatically decompressed magnetic trap with an aspect ratio different from that of the initial trap, a momentum-squeezed fermion cloud is achieved. With a single pump pulse of the proper polarization, we observe, for the first time, multiple wave-mixing processes that result in distinct collective atomic recoil motion modes in a degenerate fermion cloud. Contrary to the case with Bose condensates, no pump-laser detuning asymmetry is present.

  12. Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical cavity with sub-recoil bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinder, J.; Keßler, H.; Georges, Ch.; Vargas, J.; Hemmerich, A.

    2016-12-01

    This article provides a brief synopsis of our recent work on the interaction of Bose-Einstein condensates with the light field inside an optical cavity exhibiting a bandwidth on the order of the recoil frequency. Three different coupling scenarios are discussed giving rise to different physical phenomena at the borderline between the fields of quantum optics and many-body physics. This includes sub-recoil opto-mechanical cooling, cavity-controlled matter wave superradiance and the emergence of a superradiant superfluid or a superradiant Mott insulating many-body phase in a self-organized intra-cavity optical lattice with retarded infinite range interactions.

  13. Reliability, detection limit and depth resolution of the elastic recoil measurement of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisao, Nagai; Shigeki, Hayashi; Michi, Aratani; Tadashi, Nozaki; Minoru, Yanokura; Isao, Kohno; Osamu, Kuboi; Yoshifumi, Yatsurugi

    1987-08-01

    Reliability, detection limit and depth resolution were studied in the elastic recoil measurement of hydrogen mainly in silicon compounds by bombardment with argon ions accelerated up to 50 MeV. For the quantitative determination of hydrogen, recoil silicon atoms proved to serve satisfactorily as an internal monitor. The detection limit was shown to be about 1 to 2×10 12 (atoms/cm 2 for hydrogen on surface and about 1 wt. ppm for hydrogen in bulk. The depth resolution was found to be about 50 nm in most silicon compounds.

  14. A Variable Energy, Redshifted, Iron Absorption Line in a recoiling Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civano, Francesca

    The aim of this proposal is to maximize the scientific return of a medium deep (123 ksec) XMM-Newton observation, awarded during the AO10 call for proposal, to obtain a high quality X-ray spectrum of CID-42, a very peculiar source discovered in the COSMOS survey. CID-42 is exceptional in many respects showing a redshifted, variable energy absorption line plus an emission line at ~ 6 keV forming an inverted P-Cygni profile. These features were never observed before in the X-rays. The peculiar nature of CID-42 extends well beyond the X-ray spectrum. First, two optical sources in a common envelope are clearly seen in the HST data. They are separated by about 2.45 kpc. Thanks to the unrivaled Chandra HRC resolution it was possible to unambiguously associate the X-ray emission to only one of the two optical sources. Second, a high velocity (1100 km/s) offset, between the broad and narrow component of the H-beta line is measured in the VLT/Magellan/Keck optical spectra. The velocity offset observed is unlikely to be due to a ongoing merger because too high. Third, the above mentioned inverted P-Cygni profile in the hard X-ray spectrum would be naturally explained by an high velocity (v~0.02-0.14c) gas infall in the innermost region of the accreting Black Hole. All together the observed properties support the interpretation of a Black Hole kicked from the center of the galaxy by asymmetric emission of gravitational waves produced during a major merger. The Black Hole is caught while still active, at ~10^6 yrs after the kick and at a substantial distance from the center of the galaxy. The theoretical expectations suggest that they are extremely rare and just 1 or 2 gravitational wave recoiling Black Holes are expected in a survey like COSMOS. CID- 42 thus represents a ``Rosetta stone'' for the study of SMBH mergers that are believed to occur during galaxy-galaxy mergers, and their fate after the merging. The detailed study of the hard X-ray XMM-Newton spectrum, in the

  15. Separation and characterization of soluble esterified and glycoside-bound phenolic compounds in dry-blanched peanut skins by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Kosińska-Cagnazzo, Agnieszka; Kerr, William L; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Swanson, Ruthann B; Pegg, Ronald B

    2014-11-26

    A large variety of soluble phenolic compounds, including phenolic acids (hydroxybenzoic acids, ethyl protocatechuate, and hydroxycinnamic acids, as well as phenylacetic acid and phenyllactic acid), stilbenes (trans-piceatannol and trans-3,3',5,5'-tetrahydroxy-4'-methoxystilbene), flavan-3-ols (e.g., (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin, (-)-epiafzelechin, and their polymers (the proanthocyanidins, PACs)), other flavonoids (e.g., isoflavones, flavanols, and flavones), and biflavonoids, were released from esters and glycosides by base/acid hydrolysis and identified in acetonic extracts of dry-blanched peanut skins (PS). Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)) was applied to separate and identify the phenolic constituents. Tentative identification of the separated phenolics was based on molecular ions and MS(n) fragmentation patterns acquired by ESI-MS in the negative-ion mode. Identification of free phenolic acids, stilbenes, and flavonoids was also achieved by commercial standards and by published literature data. Quantification was performed on the basis of peak areas of the UV signals from the HPLC chromatograms and calibration curves of the commercial standards. The flavonoids of PS exist mostly in glycoside-bound forms, but the aglycones can be liberated upon acid hydrolysis. PS contain significantly more PACs compared to free phenolic compounds: PAC monomers to tetramers constituted 92.0% of esterified phenolic compounds. The PAC monomer ((+)-catechin) and dimers are the main phenolics released from glycosides and account for 31.7 and 59.1%, respectively, of the total glycoside-bound phenolic compounds.

  16. The non-Newtonian heat and mass transport of He 2 in porous media used for vapor-liquid phase separation. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.

    1985-01-01

    This investigation of vapor-liquid phase separation (VLPS) of He 2 is related to long-term storage of cryogenic liquid. The VLPS system utilizes porous plugs in order to generate thermomechanical (thermo-osmotic) force which in turn prevents liquid from flowing out of the cryo-vessel (e.g., Infrared Astronomical Satellite). An apparatus was built and VLPS data were collected for a 2 and a 10 micrometer sintered stainless steel plug and a 5 to 15 micrometer sintered bronze plug. The VLPS data obtained at high temperature were in the nonlinear turbulent regime. At low temperature, the Stokes regime was approached. A turbulent flow model was developed, which provides a phenomenological description of the VLPS data. According to the model, most of the phase separation data are in the turbulent regime. The model is based on concepts of the Gorter-Mellink transport involving the mutual friction known from the zero net mass flow (ZNMF) studies. The latter had to be modified to obtain agreement with the present experimental VLPS evidence. In contrast to the well-known ZNMF mode, the VLPS results require a geometry dependent constant (Gorter-Mellink constant). A theoretical interpretation of the phenomenological equation for the VLPS data obtained, is based on modelling of the dynamics of quantized vortices proposed by Vinen. In extending Vinen's model to the VLPS transport of He 2 in porous media, a correlation between the K*(GM) and K(p) was obtained which permits an interpretation of the present findings. As K(p) is crucial, various methods were introduced to measure the permeability of the porous media at low temperatures. Good agreement was found between the room temperature and the low temperature K(p)-value of the plugs.

  17. Separation of isomeric short-chain acyl-CoAs in plant matrices using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Purves, Randy W; Ambrose, Stephen J; Clark, Shawn M; Stout, Jake M; Page, Jonathan E

    2015-02-01

    Acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesters are important intermediates in cellular metabolism and being able to distinguish among them is critical to fully understanding metabolic pathways in plants. Although significant advances have been made in the identification and quantification of acyl-CoAs using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), separation of isomeric species such as isobutyryl- and n-butyrl-CoA has remained elusive. Here we report an ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-MS/MS method for quantifying short-chain acyl-CoAs including isomeric species n-butyryl-CoA and isobutyryl-CoA as well as n-valeryl-CoA and isovaleryl-CoA. The method was applied to the analysis of extracts of hop (Humulus lupulus) and provided strong evidence for the existence of an additional structural isomer of valeryl-CoA, 2-methylbutyryl-CoA, as well as an unexpected isomer of hexanoyl-CoA. The results showed differences in the acyl-CoA composition among varieties of Humulus lupulus, both in glandular trichomes and cone tissues. When compared with the analysis of hemp (Cannabis sativa) extracts, the contribution of isobutyryl-CoAs in hop was greater as would be expected based on the downstream polyketide products. Surprisingly, branched chain valeryl-CoAs (isovaleryl-CoA and 2-methylbutyryl-CoA) were the dominant form of valeryl-CoAs in both hop and hemp. The capability to separate these isomeric forms will help to understand biochemical pathways leading to specialized metabolites in plants.

  18. Separation of a BMS drug candidate and acyl glucuronide from seven glucuronide positional isomers in rat plasma via high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Xue, Y-J; Simmons, Neal J; Liu, Jane; Unger, Steve E; Anderson, Danielle F; Jenkins, Rand G

    2006-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for the determination of a BMS drug candidate and its acyl glucuronide (1-O-beta glucuronide) in rat plasma. A 50-microL aliquot of each plasma sample was fortified with acetonitrile containing the internal standard to precipitate proteins and extract the analytes of interest. After mixing and centrifugation, the supernatant from each sample was transferred to a 96-well plate and injected into an LC/MS/MS system. Chromatographic separation was achieved isocratically on a Phenomenex Luna C(18), 3 mm x 150 mm, 3 microm column. The mobile phase contained 0.075% formic acid in 70:30 (v/v) acetonitrile/water. Under the optimized chromatographic conditions, the BMS drug candidate and its acyl glucuronide were separated from its seven glucuronide positional isomers within 10 min. Resolution of the parent from all glucuronides and acyl glucuronide from its positional isomers was critical to avoid their interference with quantitation of parent or acyl glucuronide. Detection was by positive ion electrospray MS/MS on a Sciex API 4000. The standard curve, which ranged from 5 to 5000 ng/mL, was fitted to a 1/x(2) weighted quadratic regression model for both the BMS drug candidate and its acyl glucuronide. Whole blood and plasma stability experiments were conducted to establish the sample collection, storage, and processing conditions. The validation results demonstrated that this method was rugged and repeatable. The same methodology has also been used in mouse and human plasma for the determination of the BMS drug candidate and its acyl glucuronide.

  19. Comprehensive analysis of dipeptides in alcoholic beverages by tag-based separation and determination using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kei; Tokuoka, Masafumi; Kohno, Hiromi; Sawamura, Nobuko; Myoken, Yuka; Mizuno, Akihiro

    2012-06-15

    Fermented foods and beverages contain several different types of dipeptides, which are believed to be important components for taste. To date, however, a method for the comprehensive analysis of dipeptides in these products has not yet been established. In this study, comprehensive analysis of dipeptides in alcoholic beverages was performed by a high-resolution separation method based on the structural characteristics of 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC)-derivatized dipeptides as well as dipeptide quantification and structural estimation using ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) and UHPLC-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOFMS), respectively. Dipeptide content was found to differ considerably among Japanese sake, beer, and wine; UHPLC-MS/MS analysis revealed that many types of dipeptides are present in sake. Dipeptide quantification analysis identified 32 types of dipeptides within the concentration range of 1.1-97.2 μM in sake. The analysis was validated by dipeptide recovery of 64.0-107.2% (2.5 μM of standard) with a relative standard deviation of ≤33.2% from an actual alcoholic sample. Furthermore, UHPLC-Q-TOFMS analysis suggested the existence of more than 35 types of dipeptides in sake. Thus, by the combined analysis methods, we discovered that more than 60 dipeptides are present in sake. This research is the first report of dipeptide profiling of fermented alcoholic beverages by comprehensive analysis.

  20. Dual magnetic separator for TRIμP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, G. P. A.; Dermois, O. C.; Dammalapati, U.; Dendooven, P.; Harakeh, M. N.; Jungmann, K.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Rogachevskiy, A.; Sohani, M.; Traykov, E.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2006-05-01

    The TRIμP facility, under construction at KVI, requires the production and separation of short-lived and rare isotopes. Direct reactions, fragmentation and fusion-evaporation reactions in normal and inverse kinematics are foreseen to produce nuclides of interest with a variety of heavy-ion beams from the superconducting cyclotron AGOR. For this purpose, we have designed, constructed and commissioned a versatile magnetic separator that allows efficient injection into an ion catcher, i.e., gas-filled stopper/cooler or thermal ionizer, from which a low energy radioactive beam will be extracted. The separator performance was tested with the production and clean separation of 21Na ions, where a beam purity of 99.5% could be achieved. For fusion-evaporation products, some of the features of its operation as a gas-filled recoil separator were tested.

  1. Separation and characterization of metallothionein in the liver of sea turtles by high performance liquid chromatographylinductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinsuke, T.; Yasumi, A.; Takashi, K.

    2003-05-01

    To investigate whether trace metals bind to metallothioneins (MTs) in the hepatocytosol of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) and hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata), MT fraction was obtained by ultracentrifugation and gel filtration methods. MTs separated from hepatocytosol were further purified and characterized by high performance liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In addition, the involvement of MTs in the accumulation of trace metals in the liver of sea turtle was examine. Gel filtration analysis showed that significant amounts of Cu, Zn, Ag and Cd were bound to MT in the cytosol of sea turtles, suggesting that such trace metals were primarily detoxified by interaction with MTs in the liver. Elution profiles of these trace metals by anion-exchange chromatography were different between green turtles and hawksbill turtles. These results suggest the presence of multiple isoforms of MT in the liver of both sea turtles; however, constituents of isoforms were different between green and hawksbill turtles. In both species, we observed the elevation of the height of a specific peak in elution profile with an increase in Cu concentration in hepatocytosol. This result suggests the presence of a novel MT isoform related to copper accumulation in the liver of sea turtles.

  2. High performance liquid chromatography/ion-trap mass spectrometry for separation and simultaneous determination of ethynylestradiol, gestodene, levonorgestrel, cyproterone acetate and desogestrel.

    PubMed

    Matejícek, David; Kubán, Vlastimil

    2007-04-11

    A fast and highly sensitive high performance liquid chromatographic/ion-trap mass spectrometric method (LC/MS) has been developed for simultaneous determination of ethynylestradiol (EE2), gestodene (GES), levonorgestrel (LNG), cyproterone acetate (CPA) and desogestrel (DES). Among three types of sorbents tested (C8, C18 and phenyl) from two suppliers, the best separation was achieved on reverse phase Zorbax SB-Phenyl column using aqueous methanol as a mobile phase. A linear gradient profile from 70 up to 100% (v/v) in 7th min, kept constant at 100% up to 10th min and followed by a negative gradient to 70% of methanol up to 12th min was used for elution. Applicability of electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and influence of the mobile phase composition, its flow rate, capillary/vaporizer temperature of API source and in-source fragmentor voltage ionization are discussed. The on-column limits of quantification (10S/N) were 300 pg of EE2, 14 pg of GES and LNG, 4 pg of CPA and 960 pg of DES per injection (1 microL) using APCI with data collection in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The analytical performance of the method was evaluated using the determination of EE2, GES, LNG, CPA and DES in contraceptives and river water samples.

  3. Development of a fast capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry method for the speciation of organotin compounds under separation conditions of high electrical field strengths.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ashok Kumar; Grundmann, Marco; Matysik, Frank-Michael

    2013-11-15

    A novel approach has been developed for the separation of organotin species with capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. It has been applied to the development of a method for the determination and speciation of organotin compounds namely, dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), diphenyltin (DPT) and triphenyltin (TPT) in water samples. Experiments were made with a special laboratory constructed CE instrument. A non-aqueous buffer system compatible with TOF-MS has been developed using ammonium acetate-acetic acid (50 mM and 1 M) in acetonitrile: methanol (80:20). The total analysis time is less than 3 min for these compounds under the conditions developed. The method has been applied successfully to the determination of these compounds in river water samples. Detection limits of the CE-TOF-MS method were between 1 and 8×10(-7) M, and between 2 and 11×10(-9) M (0.46 to 3.2 µg L(-1)) when used in conjunction with solid phase extraction. The short analysis time as well as good sensitivity and selectivity make it a useful approach for the fast screening of organotin compounds.

  4. Investigation of natural phosphatidylcholine sources: separation and identification by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS2) of molecular species.

    PubMed

    Le Grandois, Julie; Marchioni, Eric; Zhao, Minjie; Giuffrida, Francesca; Ennahar, Saïd; Bindler, Françoise

    2009-07-22

    This study is a contribution to the exploration of natural phospholipid (PL) sources rich in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) with nutritional interest. Phosphatidylcholines (PCs) were purified from total lipid extracts of different food matrices, and their molecular species were separated and identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS(2)). Fragmentation of lithiated adducts allowed for the identification of fatty acids linked to the glycerol backbone. Soy PC was particularly rich in species containing essential fatty acids, such as (18:2-18:2)PC (34.0%), (16:0-18:2)PC (20.8%), and (18:1-18:2)PC (16.3%). PC from animal sources (ox liver and egg yolk) contained major molecular species, such as (16:0-18:2)PC, (16:0-18:1)PC, (18:0-18:2)PC, or (18:0-18:1)PC. Finally, marine source (krill oil), which was particularly rich in (16:0-20:5)PC and (16:0-22:6)PC, appeared to be an interesting potential source for food supplementation with LC-PUFA-PLs, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

  5. Determination of Os by isotope dilution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with the combination of laser ablation to introduce chemically separated geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yali; Ren, Minghao; Xia, Xiaoping; Li, Congying; Sun, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    A method was developed for the determination of trace Os in geological samples by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) with the combination of chemical separation and preconcentration. Samples are digested using aqua regia in Carius tubes, and the Os analyte is converted into volatile OsO4, which is distilled and absorbed with HBr. The HBr solution is concentrated for further Os purification using the microdistillation technique. The purified Os is dissolved in 10 μl of 0.02% sucrose-0.005% H3PO4 solution and then evaporated on pieces of perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) film, resulting in the formation of a tiny object (< 3 × 104 μm2 superficial area). Using LA-ICP-MS measurements, the object can give Os signals at least 100 times higher than those provided by routine solution-ICP-MS while successfully avoiding the memory effect. The procedural blank and detection limit in the developed technique are 3.0 pg and 1.8 pg for Os, respectively when 1 g of samples is taken. Reference materials (RM) are analyzed, and their Os concentrations obtained by isotope dilution are comparable to reference or literature values. Based on the individual RM results, the precision is estimated within the range of 0.6 to 9.4% relative standard deviation (RSD), revealing that this method is applicable to the determination of trace Os in geological samples.

  6. A novelty strategy for the fast analysis of sulfonamide antibiotics in fish tissue using magnetic separation with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jincheng; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yang; Wu, Lidong

    2016-08-01

    A simple, fast and low-cost extraction method with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) determination was developed on sulfonamide antibiotics (SAs) in fish tissue. Magnetic separation was first introduced into the rapid sample preparation procedure combined with acetonitrile extraction for the analysis of SAs. Partitioning was rapidly achieved between acetonitrile solution and solid matrix by applying an external magnetic field. Acetonitrile solution was collected and concentrated under a nitrogen stream. The residue was redissolved with 1‰ formic acid aqueous solution and defatted with n-hexane before analysis. The recoveries of SAs were in the range of 74.87-104.74%, with relative standard deviations <13%. The limits of quantification and the limits of detection for SAs ranged from 5.0 to 25.0 μg (kg-1) and from 2.5 to 10.0 μg (kg-1) , respectively. The presented extraction method proved to be a rapid method which only took 20 min for one sample preparation procedure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Perspectives of the Use of Different Types of Neutron Detectors at the Focal Plane of VASSILISSA Separator

    SciTech Connect

    Svirikhin, A. I.; Yeremin, A. V.; Belozerov, A. V.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Gorshkov, V. A.; Kabachenko, A. P.; Malyshev, O. N.; Popeko, A. G.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shutov, A. V.; Sokol, E. N.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Zadneprovski, B. I.; Eremin, N. V.; Paskhalov, A. A.

    2007-05-22

    Presently available experimental information on spontaneous fission of transfermium elements mainly concerns partial half-lives. In addition, for Fm and No isotopes and for a few Md, Lr and Rf isotopes the total kinetic energy (TKE) and mass distributions of fission fragments from spontaneous fission were also accurately measured. Recoil in - flight separator VASSILISSA is widely used for the synthesis and study of decay properties of heavy and superheavy nuclei. It is planned in the future to measure the TKE and multiplicity distribution of prompt neutrons in spontaneous fission of other No. Now, the search of alternative methods of the neutrons detection was realized. During the search, with colleagues from Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP MSU), the properties of some inorganic scintillators, was investigate.

  8. Recoil implantation of boron into silicon by high energy silicon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, L.; Lu, X. M.; Wang, X. M.; Rusakova, I.; Mount, G.; Zhang, L. H.; Liu, J. R.; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2001-07-01

    A recoil implantation technique for shallow junction formation was investigated. After e-gun deposition of a B layer onto Si, 10, 50, or 500 keV Si ion beams were used to introduce surface deposited B atoms into Si by knock-on. It has been shown that recoil implantation with high energy incident ions like 500 keV produces a shallower B profile than lower energy implantation such as 10 keV and 50 keV. This is due to the fact that recoil probability at a given angle is a strong function of the energy of the primary projectile. Boron diffusion was showed to be suppressed in high energy recoil implantation and such suppression became more obvious at higher Si doses. It was suggested that vacancy rich region due to defect imbalance plays the role to suppress B diffusion. Sub-100 nm junction can be formed by this technique with the advantage of high throughput of high energy implanters.

  9. H + D2 Reaction Dynamics in the Limit of Low Product Recoil Energy.

    PubMed

    Aldegunde, J; Herráez-Aguilar, D; Jambrina, P G; Aoiz, F J; Jankunas, J; Zare, R N

    2012-10-18

    Both experiment and theory recently showed that the H + D2(v = 0, j = 0) → HD(v' = 4, j') + D reactions at a collision energy of 1.97 eV display a seemingly anomalous HD product angular distribution that moves in the backward direction as the value of j' increases and the corresponding energy available for product recoil decreases. This behavior was attributed to the presence of a centrifugal barrier along the reaction path. Here, we show, using fully quantum mechanical calculations, that for low recoil energies, the collision mechanism is nearly independent of the HD internal state and the HD product becomes aligned, with its rotational angular momentum j' pointing perpendicular to the recoil momentum k'. As the kinetic energy to overcome this barrier becomes limited, the three atoms adopt a nearly collinear configuration in the transition-state region to permit reaction, which strongly polarizes the resulting HD product. These results are expected to be general for any chemical reaction in the low recoil energy limit.

  10. Primary ion dependence of LiF direct recoil intensities and ion fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. N.; Shi, M.; Rabalais, J. W.

    1987-02-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of the scattered and recoiled particles resulting from 1-10 keV He+, Ne+, Ar+, Kr+, and Xe+ ions impingent on surfaces of LiF thin films have been obtained. Measurements of directly recoiled (DR) neutrals plus ions and neutrals alone are used to calculate positive and negative ion fractions Y+,- from DR events. The oppositely charged ion fractions have a distinctly different behavior as a function of kinetic energy. The Y+ values exhibit a threshold at low energy followed by a plateau region at higher energy while the Y- values are maximum in the low energy region followed by a decreasing yield as energy increases. The energy dependence of Y+,- is interpreted in terms of the recently developed model [J. Chem. Phys. 85, 3615 (1986)] for electronic charge exchange in keV ion/surface collisions which considers electron promotions in the close atomic encounter and resonant and Auger transitions along the outgoing trajectory. The ionization potential of the primary ion relative to the energy levels of the target atom is shown to have a large influence on charge exchange in the close encounter. The ratio of direct recoil to scattering particle flux increases by a factor of >102 from He to Xe; scattering and recoil cross sections are used to model this process.

  11. Complex decay patterns in atomic core photoionization disentangled by ion-recoil measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemin, Renaud; Bomme, Cedric; Marin, Thierry; Journel, Loic; Marchenko, Tatiana; Kushawaha, Rajesh K.; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Simon, Marc; Trcera, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    Following core 1s ionization and resonant excitation of argon atoms, we measure the recoil energy of the ions due to momentum conservation during the emission of Auger electrons. We show that such ion momentum spectroscopy can be used to disentangle to some degree complex decay patterns, involving both radiative and nonradiative decays.

  12. Shoulder-Fired Weapons with High Recoil Energy: Quantifying Injury and Shooting Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    and clinical measurements............................................................................. 30 16 Accuracy statistics...decreased immediately post-firing and returned to baseline at all sites before the end of the testing week. Statistically, but not clinically significant...performance as measured by the total number of targets hit during the 40-target qualification exercise . Despite the high recoil of the M16A2 and M4

  13. Late Paravalvular Aortic Regurgitation: Migration of the Valve or Late Recoil?

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Park, Ki E; Choi, Calvin Y; Mogali, Kiran; Stinson, Wade W; Manning, Eddie W; Bavry, Anthony A

    2017-01-02

    A 79-year-old man underwent trans-catheter aortic valve replacement for symptomatic severe aortic stenosis with a 26-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT valve. Immediately after valve deployment there was moderate amount of paravalvular leak. Post-dilation was performed with an additional 2 cc of volume, and the paravalvular leak was reduced to trace. Nine months later, trans-thoracic echocardiography revealed moderate to severe paravalvular leak and possible aortic migration of the valve. The patient was brought back for the treatment of the paravalvular leak which was suspected to be due to valve migration. However, fluoroscopy and trans-esophageal echocardiography showed good valve position. Measurement of late valve recoil in the Coplanar view using cine-angiographic analysis software showed that the lower third of the valve had the greatest late recoil (-1.74 mm, 6.55%), which presumably accounted for the progression of the paravalvular leak. Valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve replacement was performed with a 26-mm SAPIEN 3 valve and the paravalvular leak was reduced to trace. This case displays late recoil as a likely mechanism for development of paravalvular leak after SAPIEN XT valve implantation. Our case illustrates that late recoil needs to be systematically evaluated in future studies, especially when trans-catheter aortic valve replacement is being expanded to lower risk and younger patients for whom the longevity and long-term performance of these valves is of critical importance.

  14. Modeling ionization and recombination from low energy nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Bernstein, A.; Joshi, T.; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS) is an as-yet undetected, flavor-independent neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model. CNNS is a flavor-blind interaction, which offers potential benefits for its use in nonproliferation (nuclear reactor monitoring) and astrophysics (supernova and solar neutrinos) applications. One challenge with detecting CNNS is the low energy deposition associated with a typical CNNS nuclear recoil. In addition, nuclear recoils are predicted to result in lower ionization yields than those produced by electron recoils of the same energy. This ratio of nuclear- and electron-induced ionization, known as the nuclear quenching factor, is unknown at energies typical for CNNS interactions in liquid xenon (LXe) and liquid argon (LAr), detector media being considered for CNNS detection. While there have been recent measurements [1] of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in LAr, there is no universal model for nuclear quenching and ionization yield. For this reason, a Monte Carlo simulation has been developed to predict the ionization yield at sub-10 keV energies. The local ionization yield of a recoiling atom in the medium is calculated first. The ejected electrons are subsequently tracked in the electric field resulting from both the local electric charges and the externally applied drift field. The dependence of the ionization yield on the drift electric field is obtained by combining the calculated ionization yield for the initial collision cascade with the electron escape probability. An updated estimate of the CNNS signal expected in a LAr detector operated near a nuclear power reactor is presented.

  15. A Geochemical Mass-Balance Method for Base-Flow Separation, Upper Hillsborough River Watershed, West-Central Florida, 2003-2005 and 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kish, G.R.; Stringer, C.E.; Stewart, M.T.; Rains, M.C.; Torres, A.E.

    2010-01-01

    Geochemical mass-balance (GMB) and conductivity mass-balance (CMB) methods for hydrograph separation were used to determine the contribution of base flow to total stormflow at two sites in the upper Hillsborough River watershed in west-central Florida from 2003-2005 and at one site in 2009. The chemical and isotopic composition of streamflow and precipitation was measured during selected local and frontal low- and high-intensity storm events and compared to the geochemical and isotopic composition of groundwater. Input for the GMB method included cation, anion, and stable isotope concentrations of surface water and groundwater, whereas input for the CMB method included continuous or point-sample measurement of specific conductance. The surface water is a calcium-bicarbonate type water, which closely resembles groundwater geochemically, indicating that much of the surface water in the upper Hillsborough River basin is derived from local groundwater discharge. This discharge into the Hillsborough River at State Road 39 and at Hillsborough River State Park becomes diluted by precipitation and runoff during the wet season, but retains the calcium-bicarbonate characteristics of Upper Floridan aquifer water. Field conditions limited the application of the GMB method to low-intensity storms but the CMB method was applied to both low-intensity and high-intensity storms. The average contribution of base flow to total discharge for all storms ranged from 31 to 100 percent, whereas the contribution of base flow to total discharge during peak discharge periods ranged from less than 10 percent to 100 percent. Although calcium, magnesium, and silica were consistent markers of Upper Floridan aquifer chemistry, their use in calculating base flow by the GMB method was limited because the frequency of point data collected in this study was not sufficient to capture the complete hydrograph from pre-event base-flow to post-event base-flow concentrations. In this study, pre-event water

  16. The XENON100 Dark Matter Experiment: Design, Construction, Calibration and 2010 Search Results with Improved Measurement of the Scintillation Response of Liquid Xenon to Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Guillaume

    An impressive array of astrophysical observations suggest that 83% of the matter in the universe is in a form of non-luminous, cold, collisionless, non-baryonic dark matter. Several extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics aimed at solving the hierarchy problem predict stable weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) that could naturally have the right cosmological relic abundance today to compose most of the dark matter if their interactions with normal matter are on the order of a weak scale cross section. These candidates also have the added benefit that their properties and interaction rates can be computed in a well defined particle physics model. A considerable experimental effort is currently under way to uncover the nature of dark matter. One method of detecting WIMP dark matter is to look for its interactions in terrestrial detectors where it is expected to scatter off nuclei. In 2007, the XENON10 experiment took the lead over the most sensitive direct detection dark matter search in operation, the CDMS II experiment, by probing spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction cross sections down to sigmachi N ˜ 5 x 10-44 cm 2 at 30 GeV/c2. Liquefied noble gas detectors are now among the technologies at the forefront of direct detection experiments. Liquid xenon (LXe), in particular, is a well suited target for WIMP direct detection. It is easily scalable to larger target masses, allows discrimination between nuclear recoils and electronic recoils, and has an excellent stopping power to shield against external backgrounds. A particle losing energy in LXe creates both ionization electrons and scintillation light. In a dual-phase LXe time projection chamber (TPC) the ionization electrons are drifted and extracted into the gas phase where they are accelerated to amplify the charge signal into a proportional scintillation signal. These two signals allow the three-dimensional localization of events with millimeter precision and the ability to

  17. Polysialylated N-Glycans Identified in Human Serum Through Combined Developments in Sample Preparation, Separations and Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kronewitter, Scott R.; Marginean, Ioan; Cox, Jonathan T.; Zhao, Rui; Hagler, Clay D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Carlson, Timothy S.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Camp, David G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-09-02

    The N-glycan diversity of human serum glycoproteins, i.e. the human blood serum N-glycome, is complex due to the range of glycan structures potentially synthesizable by human glycosylation enzymes. The reported glycome, however, is limited by methods of sample preparation, available analytical platforms, e.g., based upon electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and software tools for data analysis. In this report, several improvements have been implemented in sample preparation and analysis to extend ESI-MS glycan characterization and to provide an improved view of glycan diversity. Sample preparation improvements include acidified, microwave-accelerated, PNGase F N-glycan release, and sodium borohydride reduction were optimized to improve quantitative yields and conserve the number of glycoforms detected. Two-stage desalting (during solid phase extraction and on the analytical column) increased the sensitivity by reducing analyte signal division between multiple reducing-end-forms or cation adducts. On-line separations were improved by using extended length graphitized carbon columns and adding TFA as an acid modifier to a formic acid/reversed phase gradient which provides additional resolving power and significantly improved desorption of both large and heavily sialylated glycans. To improve MS sensitivity and provide gentler ionization conditions at the source-MS interface, subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) has been utilized. When method improvements are combined together with the Glycomics Quintavariate Informed Quantification (GlyQ-IQ) recently described1 these technologies demonstrate the ability to significantly extend glycan detection sensitivity and provide expanded glycan coverage. We demonstrate application of these advances in the context of the human serum glycome, and for which our initial observations include detection of a new class of heavily sialylated N-glycans, including polysialylated N-glycans.

  18. Strong anion exchange liquid chromatographic separation of protein amino acids for natural 13C-abundance determination by isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abaye, Daniel A; Morrison, Douglas J; Preston, Tom

    2011-02-15

    Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and the analysis of their (13)C abundances is greatly simplified by the use of liquid chromatography (LC) systems coupled with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) compared with gas chromatography (GC)-based methods. To date, various cation exchange chromatography columns have been employed for amino acid separation. Here, we report strong anion exchange chromatography (SAX) coupled to IRMS with a Liquiface interface for amino acid δ(13)C determination. Mixtures of underivatised amino acids (0.1-0.5 mM) and hydrolysates of representative proteins (prawns and bovine serum albumin) were resolved by LC/IRMS using a SAX column and inorganic eluents. Background inorganic carbon content was minimised through careful preparation of alkaline reagents and use of a pre-injector on-line carbonate removal device. SAX chromatography completely resolved 11 of the 16 expected protein amino acids following acid hydrolysis in underivatised form. Basic and neutral amino acids were resolved with 35 mM NaOH in isocratic mode. Elution of the aromatic and acidic amino acids required a higher hydroxide concentration (180 mM) and a counterion (NO 3-, 5-25 mM). The total run time was 70 min. The average δ(13)C precision of baseline-resolved peaks was 0.75‰ (range 0.04 to 1.06‰). SAX is a viable alternative to cation chromatography, especially where analysis of basic amino acids is important. The technology shows promise for (13)C amino acid analysis in ecology, archaeology, forensic science, nutrition and protein metabolism.

  19. Measurement of the scintillation light quenching at room temperature of sodium recoils in NaI(Tl) and hydrogen recoils in NE 213 by the scattering of neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagemann, Th.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Jochum, J.

    2006-08-01

    At the newly installed neutron scattering facility for the calibration of Dark Matter (DM) detectors we have measured quenching factors (QFs) at room temperature in NE 213 and NaI(Tl). For proton energies Ep between 1 and 3.5 MeV we found the electron-equivalent energy Eee to obey the relation Eee=(0.23±0.03)Ep+(0.02±0.01)Ep2. The QF of the light output from Na recoils in NaI(Tl) at 850 keV was measured to be Q=0.21±0.04.

  20. Separated Shoulder

    MedlinePlus

    Separated shoulder Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A separated shoulder is an injury to the ligaments that hold your collarbone (clavicle) to your shoulder blade. In a mild separated shoulder, the ligaments ...

  1. Atomistic simulation of track formation by energetic recoils in zircon.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro A F P; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J

    2010-10-06

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations of fission track formation in zircon. We simulated the passage of a swift heavy ion through crystalline zircon using cylindrical thermal spikes with energy deposition (dE/dx) of 2.5-12.8 keV nm( - 1) and a radius of 3 nm. At a low dE/dx of 2.55 keV nm( - 1), the structural damage recovered almost completely and a damage track was not produced. At higher values of dE/dx, tracks were observed and the radius of the track increased with increasing dE/dx. Our structural analysis shows amorphization in the core of the track and phase separation into Si-rich regions near the center of the track and Zr-rich regions near the periphery. These simulations establish a threshold dE/dx for fission track formation in zircon that is relevant to thermochronology and nuclear waste immobilization.

  2. Modeling and Measurement of 39Ar Recoil Loss From Biotite as a Function of Grain Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, J. H.; Nomade, S.; Renne, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    The call for age measurements with less than 1 per mil error puts a demand upon geochronologists to be aware of and quantify a number of problems which were previously negligible. One such factor is 39Ar recoil loss during sample irradiation, a phenomenon which is widely assumed to affect only unusually small crystals having exceptionally high surface/volume ratios. This phenomenon has important implications for thermochronologic studies seeking to exploit a range of closure temperatures arising from variable diffusion radii. Our study focuses on biotite, in which spatial isotope distributions cannot be reliably recovered by stepwise heating and which therefore lack recoil-diagnostic age spectrum behavior. Previous work by Renne et al. [Application of a deuteron-deuteron (D-D) neutron generator to 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, Applied Radiation and Isotopes, in press] used the SRIM code to calculate a ˜20% 39Ar recoil loss from the outermost 0.25 μ m of an infinite slab of phyllosillicate. This result is applied to measured grains of the biotite standard GA1550, a hypabyssal granite from the Mount Dromedary Complex, Australia. We measure the thickness and surface area of 166 grains and approximate the shape of each grain as a cylinder. Grain thickness ranges from 3 to 210 μ m, with an average grain radius of 350 μ m. We predict the amount of 39Ar recoil loss from each grain, finding an expected age error >0.1 % for grains thinner than 150 μ m, a >1% error for grain less than 10 μ m thick, and up to a 3% error for grains less than 3 μ m thick. These modeling results will be tested by analysis of the measured grains after irradiation in the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor. It is important to either account for 39Ar loss in thin biotite grains, or use sufficiently thick ones so that recoil loss is negligible. Our results indicate that only biotite grains thicker than 150 μ m should be used for neutron fluence monitoring in order to avoid bias greater than the

  3. Reaction Mechanisms in 12C+93Nb System:. Excitation Functions and Recoil Range Distributions Below 7 MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Tauseef; Rizvi, I. A.; Agarwal, Avinash; Kumar, Rakesh; Golda, K. S.; Chaubey, A. K.

    The experiments were performed to study excitation functions (EFs) of evaporation residues (ERs), i.e. 103,102,101Ag, 101,100,99Pd, 101,100Rh, 97Ru, 96Tc, 95Tc, 94Tc, 93Mom, 92Nbm populated in the reactions induced by 12C on 93Nb for exploring the reaction dynamics involved at energies ≈ 47-75 MeV. The activation technique followed by offline γ-ray spectrometry has been employed to measure EFs. These measurements were simulated with other reported values available in literature as well as with theoretical predictions based on computer code PACE-2. The effect of variation of level density parameter involved in this code has also been studied. An excellent agreement was found between theoretical and experimental values in some of the fusion evaporation channels. However, significant enhancement of cross-section as observed in α-emission channels may be due to incomplete fusion (ICF) process and/or direct reaction process. To confirm the aforesaid reaction mechanism, Recoil Range Distributions (RRDs) of various ERs have been measured at ≈ 80 MeV. Moreover, an attempt is made to separate the percentage relative contributions of complete and incomplete fusion components from the analysis of the measured RRDs data. Further, the relative percentage ICF fraction, also estimated from EFs data, was found to be sensitive with the projectile energy.

  4. Design of athermal phonon light detector for reducing alpha recoil background of next-gen CUORE 0 νββ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilleri, Joseph; Pyle, Matt; Kolomensky, Yury; Cuore Collaboration; Cdms Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The current generation of bolometric 0 νββ experiments, including CUORE, expect degraded alpha recoils to be the dominant background restricting experimental sensitivity. The CUPID project will aim to improve the sensitivity of CUORE by over an order of magnitude, and search for 0 νββ in the entire region of parameter space consistent with the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Surface contamination of Cu support structures for CUORE's 130Te crystal bolometers is primarily responsible for these unwanted alpha recoils. Electronic signals produced near Qββ (2.53 MeV) have been shown to produce Cherenkov radiation on the order of 100 eV in 130Te crystals. The heavier and slower alpha particles of comparable energy in the region of interest do not produce a Cherenkov signal, allowing for discrimination via a high-resolution cryogenic light detector. A photon detector with energy resolution <10 eV is necessary. We will discuss how athermal phonon collection calorimeter technology developed by the CDMS collaboration over the past decade can be scaled to produce such a sensitive detector, while also satisfying requirements for scintillating crystal alternatives. We will also present the current status of the detector development. NSF: NSF PHY-1314881.

  5. Atomistic Simulation of Track Formation by Energetic Recoils in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Pedro A.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.

    2010-09-17

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations of fission track formation in zircon. We simulated the passage of a swift heavy ion through crystalline zircon using cylindrical thermal spikes with energy deposition (dE/dx) of 2.5 to 12.8 keV/nm and radius of 3 nm. At a low dE/dx of 2.55 keV/nm, the structural damage recovered almost completely and a damage track was not produced. At higher values of dE/dx, tracks were observed and the radius of the track increased with increasing dE/dx. Our structural analysis shows amorphization in the core of the track and phase separation into Si-rich regions near the center of the track and Zr-rich regions near the periphery. These simulations establish a threshold dE/dx for fission-track formation in zircon that is relevant to thermo-chronology and nuclear waste immobilization.

  6. New separators at the ATLAS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Birger; Agfa Collaboration; Airis Team

    2015-10-01

    Two new separators are being built for the ATLAS facility. The Argonne Gas-Filled Analyzer (AGFA) is a novel design consisting of a single quadrupole and a multipole magnet that has both dipole and quadrupole field components. The design allows for placing Gammasphere at the target position while providing a solid angle of ~ 22 msr for capturing recoil products emitted at zero degrees. This arrangement enables studies of prompt gamma ray emission from weakly populated trans-fermium nuclei and those near the doubly-magic N = Z = 50 shell closure measured in coincidence with the recoils registered by AGFA. The Argonne In-flight Radioactive Ion Separator (AIRIS) is a magnetic chicane that will be installed immediately downstream of the last ATLAS cryostat and serve to separate radioactive ion beams generated in flight at an upstream high intensity production target. These beams will be further purified by a downstream RF sweeper and transported into a number of target stations including HELIOS, the Enge spectrograph, the FMA and Gammasphere. This talk will present the status of these two projects. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Rapid assessment of human amylin aggregation and its inhibition by copper(II) ions by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with ion mobility separation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hang; Ha, Emmeline; Donaldson, Robert P.; Jeremic, Aleksandar M.; Vertes, Akos

    2015-09-09

    Native electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is often used to monitor noncovalent complex formation between peptides and ligands. The relatively low throughput of this technique, however, is not compatible with extensive screening. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) MS combined with ion mobility separation (IMS) can analyze complex formation and provide conformation information within a matter of seconds. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) or amylin, a 37-amino acid residue peptide, is produced in pancreatic beta-cells through proteolytic cleavage of its prohormone. Both amylin and its precursor can aggregate and produce toxic oligomers and fibrils leading to cell death in the pancreas that can eventually contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The inhibitory effect of the copper(II) ion on amylin aggregation has been recently discovered, but details of the interaction remain unknown. Finding other more physiologically tolerated approaches requires large scale screening of potential inhibitors. In this paper, we demonstrate that LAESI-IMS-MS can reveal the binding stoichiometry, copper oxidation state, and the dissociation constant of human amylin–copper(II) complex. The conformations of hIAPP in the presence of copper(II) ions were also analyzed by IMS, and preferential association between the β-hairpin amylin monomer and the metal ion was found. The copper(II) ion exhibited strong association with the —HSSNN– residues of the amylin. In the absence of copper(II), amylin dimers were detected with collision cross sections consistent with monomers of β-hairpin conformation. When copper(II) was present in the solution, no dimers were detected. Thus, the copper(II) ions disrupt the association pathway to the formation of β-sheet rich amylin fibrils. Using LAESI-IMS-MS for the assessment of amylin–copper(II) interactions demonstrates the utility of this technique for the high-throughput screening of potential

  8. Rapid assessment of human amylin aggregation and its inhibition by copper(II) ions by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with ion mobility separation

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Hang; Ha, Emmeline; Donaldson, Robert P.; ...

    2015-09-09

    Native electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is often used to monitor noncovalent complex formation between peptides and ligands. The relatively low throughput of this technique, however, is not compatible with extensive screening. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) MS combined with ion mobility separation (IMS) can analyze complex formation and provide conformation information within a matter of seconds. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) or amylin, a 37-amino acid residue peptide, is produced in pancreatic beta-cells through proteolytic cleavage of its prohormone. Both amylin and its precursor can aggregate and produce toxic oligomers and fibrils leading to cell death in the pancreasmore » that can eventually contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The inhibitory effect of the copper(II) ion on amylin aggregation has been recently discovered, but details of the interaction remain unknown. Finding other more physiologically tolerated approaches requires large scale screening of potential inhibitors. In this paper, we demonstrate that LAESI-IMS-MS can reveal the binding stoichiometry, copper oxidation state, and the dissociation constant of human amylin–copper(II) complex. The conformations of hIAPP in the presence of copper(II) ions were also analyzed by IMS, and preferential association between the β-hairpin amylin monomer and the metal ion was found. The copper(II) ion exhibited strong association with the —HSSNN– residues of the amylin. In the absence of copper(II), amylin dimers were detected with collision cross sections consistent with monomers of β-hairpin conformation. When copper(II) was present in the solution, no dimers were detected. Thus, the copper(II) ions disrupt the association pathway to the formation of β-sheet rich amylin fibrils. Using LAESI-IMS-MS for the assessment of amylin–copper(II) interactions demonstrates the utility of this technique for the high-throughput screening of

  9. Speciation of metallothionein-like proteins of the mussel Mytilus edulis by orthogonal separation mechanisms with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry detection: effect of selenium administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarello, Claudio N.; del Rosario Fernández de la Campa, María.; Francisco Carrasco, José; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2002-03-01

    Several complementary separation mechanisms (size-exclusion chromatography, SEC; fast protein liquid chromatography, FPLC; reverse-phase chromatography, RPC) have been coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection to investigate the speciation of Cd, Se, Cu and Zn in mussel hepatopancreas. SEC with double-focusing (DF) ICP-MS detection was used first for speciation analysis of those four trace elements, both in uncontaminated mussels and in mussels exposed to Cd (500 μg l -1) or to Cd+Se (500 μg l -1 of each element). Observed SEC results indicated that Se does not seem to significantly bind to metallothionein-like proteins (MLPs) 'in vivo'. Total cytosolic Cd and MLPs content were lower in Cd+Se exposed mussels than those exposed to Cd only. For each treatment, 50 μl of the SEC peak fraction containing the MLPs was used to perform fast protein liquid chromatography coupled 'on-line' with a quadrupole (Q) ICP-MS. 82Se and 114Cd isotopes were simultaneously monitored. Four and five Cd/MLPs isoforms were then detected in mussels exposed to only Cd and Cd+Se, respectively. In contrast, no signs of Se/MLP isoforms were found for both treatments. Subsequently, the bulk of MLPs eluting from the FPLC system were isolated and lyophilizated. A 50-μl aliquot of such reconstituted lyophilisate was then injected into a Vydac C 8 Reverse-Phase column directly connected to the Q-ICP-MS. Results confirmed the presence of one more Cd/MLP peak in those mussels exposed to Cd+Se. However, the number of Cd/MLP peaks detected decreased to three and four in only Cd and Cd+Se exposed animals, respectively. These results tend to indicate that Se, which does not trigger the biosynthesis of MLPs, could probably orient such synthesis towards the generation of a new Cd/MLP isoform in mussels submitted to both elements. The possible interrelation/complementation between Se and MLP against Cd toxicity is discussed.

  10. Ultracapacitor separator

    DOEpatents

    Wei, Chang; Jerabek, Elihu Calvin; LeBlanc, Jr., Oliver Harris

    2001-03-06

    An ultracapacitor includes two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying the pores in the electrodes and separator. The electrolyte is a polar aprotic organic solvent and a salt. The porous separator comprises a wet laid cellulosic material.

  11. An algorithm for unfolding neutron dose and dose equivalent from digitized recoil-particle tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Bolch, W.E.; Turner, J.E.; Hamm, R.N.

    1986-10-01

    Previous work had demonstrated the feasibility of a digital approach to neutron dosimetry. A Monte Carlo simulation code of one detector design utilizing the operating principles of time-projection chambers was completed. This thesis presents and verifies one version of the dosimeter's computer algorithm. This algorithm processes the output of the ORNL simulation code, but is applicable to all detectors capable of digitizing recoil-particle tracks. Key features include direct measurement of track lengths and identification of particle type for each registered event. The resulting dosimeter should allow more accurate determinations of neutron dose and dose equivalent compared with conventional dosimeters, which cannot measure these quantities directly. Verification of the algorithm was accomplished by running a variety of recoil particles through the simulated detector volume and comparing the resulting absorbed dose and dose equivalent to those unfolded by the algorithm.

  12. A predictive theory for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He

    DOE PAGES

    Hupin, Guillaume; Quaglioni, Sofia; Navratil, Petr

    2014-12-08

    Low-energy cross sections for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He nuclei (also known as α particles) are calculated directly by solving the Schrodinger equation for five nucleons interacting through accurate two- and three-nucleon forces derived within the framework of chiral effective field theory. Precise knowledge of these processes at various proton backscattering/recoil angles and energies is needed for the ion-beam analysis of numerous materials, from the surface layers of solids, to thin films, to fusion-reactor materials. Indeed, the same elastic scattering process, in two different kinematic configurations, can be used to probe the concentrations and depth profiles ofmore » either hydrogen or helium. Furthermore, we compare our results to available experimental data and show that direct calculations with modern nuclear potentials can help to resolve remaining inconsistencies among data sets and can be used to predict these cross sections when measurements are not available.« less

  13. A predictive theory for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He

    SciTech Connect

    Hupin, Guillaume; Quaglioni, Sofia; Navratil, Petr

    2014-12-08

    Low-energy cross sections for elastic scattering and recoil of protons from 4He nuclei (also known as α particles) are calculated directly by solving the Schrodinger equation for five nucleons interacting through accurate two- and three-nucleon forces derived within the framework of chiral effective field theory. Precise knowledge of these processes at various proton backscattering/recoil angles and energies is needed for the ion-beam analysis of numerous materials, from the surface layers of solids, to thin films, to fusion-reactor materials. Indeed, the same elastic scattering process, in two different kinematic configurations, can be used to probe the concentrations and depth profiles of either hydrogen or helium. Furthermore, we compare our results to available experimental data and show that direct calculations with modern nuclear potentials can help to resolve remaining inconsistencies among data sets and can be used to predict these cross sections when measurements are not available.

  14. A new sliding joint to accommodate recoil of a free-piston-driven expansion tube facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildfind, D. E.; Morgan, R. G.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes a new device to decouple free-piston driver recoil and its associated mechanical vibration from the acceleration tube and test section of The University of Queensland's X3 expansion tube. A sliding joint is introduced to the acceleration tube which axially decouples the facility at this station. When the facility is fired, the upstream section of the facility, which includes the free-piston driver, can recoil upstream freely. The downstream acceleration tube remains stationary. This arrangement provides two important benefits. Firstly, it eliminates nozzle movement relative to the test section before and during the experiment. This has benefits in terms of experimental setup and alignment. Secondly, it prevents transmission of mechanical disturbances from the free-piston driver to the acceleration tube, thereby eliminating mechanically-induced transducer noise in the sensitive pressure transducers installed in this low-pressure tube. This paper details the new design, and presents experimental confirmation of its performance.

  15. Time of flight elastic recoil detection analysis with a position sensitive detector

    SciTech Connect

    Siketic, Zdravko; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Jaksic, Milko; Skukan, Natko

    2010-03-15

    A position sensitive detection system based on the microchannel plate detector has been constructed and installed at the existing time of flight (TOF) spectrometer in order to perform a kinematic correction and improve the surface time/depth resolution of elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) system. The position resolution of the detector has been tested for different types of ions and anode voltages. TOF spectra of recoiled O ions from SiO{sub 2} and F from CaF{sub 2} were collected in coincidence with position sensitive detector signal. Kinematic correction of TOF spectra improved surface time/depth resolution by {approx}20% for our system; however even higher improvements could be obtained in larger solid angle TOF-ERDA systems.

  16. A coherent understanding of low-energy nuclear recoils in liquid xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Peter

    2010-09-01

    Liquid xenon detectors such as XENON10 and XENON100 obtain a significant fraction of their sensitivity to light (∼<10 GeV) particle dark matter by looking for nuclear recoils of only a few keV, just above the detector threshold. Yet in this energy regime a correct treatment of the detector threshold and resolution remains unclear. The energy dependence of the scintillation yield of liquid xenon for nuclear recoils also bears heavily on detector sensitivity, yet numerous measurements have not succeeded in obtaining concordant results. In this article we show that the ratio of detected ionization to scintillation can be leveraged to constrain the scintillation yield. We also present a rigorous treatment of liquid xenon detector threshold and energy resolution. Notably, the effective energy resolution differs significantly from a simple Poisson distribution. We conclude with a calculation of dark matter exclusion limits, and show that existing data from liquid xenon detectors strongly constrain recent interpretations of light dark matter.

  17. ArII - ArXVI produced in slow recoil collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, H.

    1983-07-01

    An atom in a gaseous target may be highly ionized in a single collision with a (very fast) very highly ionized projectile. A feature of the kinematics of the collision is that very little kinetic energy is imparted to the target atom. The ion is produced as a slow recoil. Typical recoil energies are 1 eV and change little with the degree of ionization produced in the target. This has several very attractive features as a spectroscopic source. First, the spectra are free from Doppler shifts which depend upon the degree of ionization of the atom, and, second, all of the ionization states produced in the target have the same spatial distribution. This allows reference lines from low ionization states to be reliably used to calibrate the spectra from high ionization states.

  18. Black hole as a point radiator and recoil effect on the brane world.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Valeri; Stojković, Dejan

    2002-10-07

    A small black hole attached to a brane in a higher-dimensional space emitting quanta into the bulk may leave the brane as a result of a recoil. We construct a field theory model in which such a black hole is described as a massive scalar particle with internal degrees of freedom. In this model, the probability of transition between the different internal levels is identical to the probability of thermal emission calculated for the Schwarzschild black hole. The discussed recoil effect implies that the thermal emission of the black holes, which might be created by interaction of high energy particles in colliders, could be terminated and the energy nonconservation can be observed in the brane experiments.

  19. Nitrogen depth profiling using recoil-nucleus time-of-flight spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, J.F. Jr.; Schweikert, E.A.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron depth profiling (NDP) has been shown to be an effective research tool for the profiling of light elements. Significant increases in sensitivity like those realized at the cold neutron NDP facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) reactor continue to advance the technique. Previous work has also shown that the depth resolution of NDP could be improved by measuring (via time of flight) the kinetic energies of recoil nuclei emitted during (n,p) and (n, {alpha}) reactions. The purpose of this work was to extend the technique of recoil-nucleus time-of-flight (TOF) NDP (RN-TOF-NDP) to the profiling of nitrogen in silicon nitride using the {sup 14}N(n,p) {sup 14}C reaction.

  20. Development of bubble chambers with enhanced stability and sensitivity to low-energy nuclear recoils

    SciTech Connect

    Bolte, W.J.; Collar, Juan I.; Crisler, M.; Hall, J.; Holmgren, D.; Nakazawa, D.; Odom, B.; O'Sullivan, K.; Plunkett, R.; Ramberg, E.; Raskin, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Vieira, J.D.; /Chicago U., EFI /KICP, Chicago /Fermilab

    2005-03-01

    The viability of using a Bubble Chamber for rare event searches and in particular for the detection of dark matter particle candidates is considered. Techniques leading to the deactivation of inhomogeneous nucleation centers and subsequent enhanced stability in such a detector are described. Results from prototype trials indicate that sensitivity to low-energy nuclear recoils like those expected from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles can be obtained in conditions of near total insensitivity to minimum ionizing backgrounds. An understanding of the response of superheated heavy refrigerants to these recoils is demonstrated within the context of existing theoretical models. We comment on the prospects for the detection of supersymmetric dark matter particles with a large CF{sub 3}I chamber.

  1. Low energy electron/recoil discrimination for directional Dark Matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Billard, J.; Mayet, F.; Santos, D. E-mail: mayet@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2012-07-01

    Directional detection is a promising Dark Matter search strategy. Even though it could accommodate to a sizeable background contamination, electron/recoil discrimination remains a key and challenging issue as for direction-insensitive detectors. The measurement of the 3D track may be used to discriminate electrons from nuclear recoils. While a high rejection power is expected above 20 keV ionization, a dedicated data analysis is needed at low energy. After identifying discriminant observables, a multivariate analysis, namely a Boosted Decision Tree, is proposed, enabling an efficient event tagging for Dark Matter search. We show that it allows us to optimize rejection while keeping a rather high efficiency which is compulsory for rare event search.With respect to a sequential analysis, the rejection is about ∼ 20 times higher with a multivariate analysis, for the same Dark Matter exclusion limit.

  2. What Can We Learn From Proton Recoils about Heavy-Ion SEE Sensitivity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Raymond L.

    2016-01-01

    The fact that protons cause single-event effects (SEE) in most devices through production of light-ion recoils has led to attempts to bound heavy-ion SEE susceptibility through use of proton data. Although this may be a viable strategy for some devices and technologies, the data must be analyzed carefully and conservatively to avoid over-optimistic estimates of SEE performance. We examine the constraints that proton test data can impose on heavy-ion SEE susceptibility.

  3. Recoil-proton polarization in high-energy deuteron photodisintegration with circularly plarized photons.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Arrington, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Qattan, I. A.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Physics; Rutgers Univ.; Univ. Blaise Pascal; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    2007-05-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  4. Recoil-Proton Polarization in High-Energy Deuteron Photodisintegration with Circularly Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Benmokhtar, F.; Glashauser, C.; McCormick, K.; Ransome, R. D.; Arrington, J.; Holt, R. J.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E. C.; Wijesooriya, K.; Camsonne, A.

    2007-05-04

    We measured the angular dependence of the three recoil-proton polarization components in two-body photodisintegration of the deuteron at a photon energy of 2 GeV. These new data provide a benchmark for calculations based on quantum chromodynamics. Two of the five existing models have made predictions of polarization observables. Both explain the longitudinal polarization transfer satisfactorily. Transverse polarizations are not well described, but suggest isovector dominance.

  5. Recoil polarization observables in the electroproduction of K mesons and Λ's from the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Oren V.

    2014-09-01

    A model developed previously to investigate the electromagnetic production of strangeness from the proton is used to investigate single and double recoil polarization observables in the reaction ep →e'K+Λ in the relativistic impulse approximation. The formalism is based on a tree-level, effective Lagrangian model, which incorporates a variety of baryon resonances with spins up to 5/2 and the two kaon resonances, K(892) and K1(1270). The parameters of the model were fit to a large pool of photoproduction data from the CLAS, GRAAL, SAPHIR, and LEPS collaborations and to CLAS data for the virtual photoproduction structure functions σU,σT,σL,σTT,σLT, and σLT'. Using two different versions of this model, results are presented for three recoil polarization asymmetries that have been measured recently at CLAS. A new fit is then presented which incorporates the new polarization data in the fitted data set. Results obtained with this new fit are presented for six recoil polarization asymmetries and compared with results from one of the previous fits.

  6. Modeling nuclear and electronic recoils in noble gas detectors with NEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, Jeremy; NEST Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Noble gases such as xenon and argon are used as targets in single and dual phased rare event detectors like those used in the search for dark matter. Such experiments require an understanding of the behavior of the target material in the presence of low-energy ionizing radiation. This understanding allows an exploration of detector effects such as threshold, energy and position reconstruction, and pulse shape discrimination. The Noble Element Simulation Technique (NEST) package is a comprehensive code base that models the scintillation and ionization yields from liquid and gaseous xenon and argon in the energy regimes of interest to many types of experiments, like dark matter and neutrino detectors. NEST is built on multiple physics models, which are constrained by available data for both electronic and nuclear recoils. A substantial body of data exists in the literature, and we are reaching an era in which sub-keV yields can be explored experimentally. Here we present a new global analysis of all available nuclear recoil data, and the latest updates to the electronic recoil model, in light of recent low-energy measurements and an improved understanding of detector systematics.

  7. Nuclear Recoil Calibrations in the LUX Detector Using Direct and Backscattered D-D Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhyne, Casey; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 350 kg two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. I will discuss the latest calibration of the nuclear recoil (NR) response in liquid xenon (LXe), performed in-situ in the LUX detector using mono-energetic 2.45 MeV neutrons produced via the Adelphi Technologies, Inc. DD108 D-D neutron generator. The calibration measured the NR charge yield in LXe (Qy) to 0.7 keVnr recoil energy with an absolute determination of deposited energy and the NR light yield in LXe (Ly) to recoil energies of 1.1 keVnr, both of which improve upon all previous measurements. I will then focus in depth on the extension of this calibration using a new technique for generating a beam of sub-300 keV quasi-mono-energetic neutrons via the backscatter of 2.45 MeV neutrons off a deuterium-based reflector. Current simulations work optimizing the technique, its advantages, and its impact on future research will be discussed, including the extension of the NR Qy calibration down to 0.14 keVnr, an independent NR Ly calibration, and an a priori estimate of the expected 8B solar neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering signal in the upcoming LUX-ZEPLIN experiment.

  8. Stability branching induced by collective atomic recoil in an optomechanical ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ian, Hou

    2017-02-01

    In a ring cavity filled with an atomic condensate, self-bunching of atoms due to the cavity pump mode produce an inversion that re-emits into the cavity probe mode with an exponential gain, forming atomic recoil lasing. An optomechanical ring cavity is formed when one of the reflective mirrors is mounted on a mechanical vibrating beam. In this paper, we extend studies on the stability of linear optomechanical cavities to such ring cavities with two counter-propagating cavity modes, especially when the forward propagating pump mode is taken to its weak coupling limit. We find that when the atomic recoil is in action, stable states of the mechanical mode of the mirror converge into branch cuts, where the gain produced by the recoiling strikes balance with the multiple decay sources, such as cavity leakage in the optomechanical system. This balance is obtained when the propagation delay in the dispersive atomic medium matches in a periodic pattern to the frequencies and linewidths of the cavity mode and the collective bosonic mode of the atoms. We show an input-output hysteresis cycle between the atomic mode and the cavity mode to verify the multi-valuation of the stable states after branching at the weak coupling limit.

  9. First measurement of nuclear recoil head-tail sense in a fiducialised WIMP dark matter detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battat, J. B. R.; Daw, E.; Ezeribe, A. C.; Gauvreau, J.-L.; Harton, J. L.; Lafler, R.; Lee, E. R.; Loomba, D.; Lumnah, A.; Miller, E. H.; Mouton, F.; Murphy, A. StJ.; Paling, S. M.; Phan, N. S.; Robinson, M.; Sadler, S. W.; Scarff, A.; Schuckman, F. G., II; Snowden-Ifft, D. P.; Spooner, N. J. C.

    2016-10-01

    Recent computational results suggest that directional dark matter detectors have potential to probe for WIMP dark matter particles below the neutrino floor. The DRIFT-IId detector used in this work is a leading directional WIMP search time projection chamber detector. We report the first measurements of the detection of the directional nuclear recoils in a fully fiducialised low-pressure time projection chamber. In this new operational mode, the distance between each event vertex and the readout plane is determined by the measurement of minority carriers produced by adding a small amount of oxygen to the nominal CS2+CF4 target gas mixture. The CS2+CF4+O2 mixture has been shown to enable background-free operation at current sensitivities. Sulfur, fluorine, and carbon recoils were generated using neutrons emitted from a 252Cf source positioned at different locations around the detector. Measurement of the relative energy loss along the recoil tracks allowed the track vector sense, or the so-called head-tail asymmetry parameter, to be deduced. Results show that the previously reported observation of head-tail sensitivity in pure CS2 is well retained after the addition of oxygen to the gas mixture.

  10. Exploring relativistic many-body recoil effects in highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Orts, R Soria; Harman, Z; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Artemyev, A N; Bruhns, H; Martínez, A J González; Jentschura, U D; Keitel, C H; Lapierre, A; Mironov, V; Shabaev, V M; Tawara, H; Tupitsyn, I I; Ullrich, J; Volotka, A V

    2006-09-08

    The relativistic recoil effect has been the object of experimental investigations using highly charged ions at the Heidelberg electron beam ion trap. Its scaling with the nuclear charge Z boosts its contribution to a measurable level in the magnetic-dipole (M1) transitions of B- and Be-like Ar ions. The isotope shifts of 36Ar versus 40Ar have been detected with sub-ppm accuracy, and the recoil effect contribution was extracted from the 1s(2)2s(2)2p 2P(1/2) - 2P(3/2) transition in Ar13+ and the 1s(2)2s2p 3P1-3P2 transition in Ar14+. The experimental isotope shifts of 0.00123(6) nm (Ar13+) and 0.00120(10) nm (Ar14+) are in agreement with our present predictions of 0.00123(5) nm (Ar13+) and 0.00122(5) nm (Ar14+) based on the total relativistic recoil operator, confirming that a thorough understanding of correlated relativistic electron dynamics is necessary even in a region of intermediate nuclear charges.

  11. An Improved Nuclear Recoil Calibration in the LUX Detector Using a Pulsed D-D Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dongqing

    2017-01-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 370 kg (250 kg active mass) two-_phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. The first absolute charge (Qy) and light (Ly) measurement performed in situ in the LUX detector with a D-D calibration technique for nuclear recoil spanning 0.7 to 74 keV and 1.1 to 74 keV respectively have been reported in. The D-D calibration has subsequently been further improved by incorporating pulsing technique, i.e. the D-D neutron production is concentrated within narrow pulses (20 us / 250 Hz) with the timing information recorded. This technique allows the suppression of accidental backgrounds in D-D neutron data and also provides increased sensitivity for the lower energy NR calibrations. I will report the improved NR absolute Qy and Ly measurements using the pulsed D-D calibration technique performed in situ in the LUX detector. Brown University, Large Underground Xenon(LUX) Collaboration.

  12. On calibration of the response of liquid argon detectors to nuclear recoils using inelastic neutron scattering on 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polosatkin, S.; Grishnyaev, E.; Dolgov, A.

    2014-10-01

    A method for measuring of ionization and scintillation yields in liquid argon from recoils with particular energy—8.2 keV—is proposed. The method utilizes a process of inelastic scattering of monoenergetic neutrons produced by fusion DD neutron generator. Features of kinematics of inelastic scattering result in a sufficient (fifteen times) increase in count rate of useful events relative to a traditional scheme using elastic scattering with the same recoil energy and comparable energy resolution.

  13. Nuclear Recoil Cross Sections from Time-dependent Studies of Two-Photon Double Ionization of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, Daniel A.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2009-12-21

    We examine the sensitivity of nuclear recoil cross sections produced by two-photon double ionization of helium to the underlying triple differential cross sections (TDCS) used in their computation. We show that this sensitivity is greatest in the energy region just below the threshold for sequential double ionization. Accurate TDCS, extracted from non-perturbative solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, are used here in new computations of the nuclear recoil cross section.

  14. Evaluation of Enhanced Comprehensive 2-D Gas Chromatography-Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for the Separation of Recalcitrant Polychlorinated Biphenyl Isomers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The separation of some recalcitrant polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) isomers in extracts from environmental compartments has been a daunting task for environmental chemists. Summed quantitation values for coeluting PCB isomers are often reported. This composite data obscures the ac...

  15. Separation of plutonium and neptunium species by capillary electrophoresis-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and application to natural groundwater samples.

    PubMed

    Kuczewski, Bernhard; Marquardt, Christian M; Seibert, Alice; Geckeis, Horst; Kratz, Jens Volker; Trautmann, Norbert

    2003-12-15

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was coupled to ICPMS in order to combine the good performance of this separation technique with the high sensitivity of the ICPMS for the analysis of plutonium and neptunium oxidation states. The combination of a fused-silica capillary with a MicroMist AR 30-I-FM02 nebulizer and a Cinnabar small-volume cyclonic spray chamber yielded the best separation results. With this setup, it was possible to separate a model element mixture containing neptunium (NpO2(+)), uranium (UO2(2+)), lanthanum (La3+), and thorium (Th4+) in 1 M acetic acid. The same conditions were also suitable for the separation of various oxidation states of plutonium and neptunium in different aqueous samples. All separations were obtained within less than 15 min. A detection limit of 50 ppb identical with 2 x 10(-7) M (3-fold standard deviation of a blank) was achieved. To prove the negligible disturbance of the plutonium and neptunium redox equilibria during the CE separations, plutonium and neptunium speciation by CE-ICPMS in acidic solutions was compared with the results of UV/visible absorption spectroscopy and was found to be in good agreement. The CE-ICPMS system was also applied to study the reduction of Pu(VI) in a humic acid-containing groundwater at different pH values.

  16. Topographical and Chemical Imaging of a Phase Separated Polymer Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Infrared Spectroscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Tamin; Karácsony, Orsolya; Bocharova, Vera; Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2016-02-18

    This article describes how the use of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/infrared spectroscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform was demonstrated for the acquisition and correlation of nanoscale sample surface topography and chemical images based on infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

  17. Microfabrication, separations, and detection by mass spectrometry on ultrathin-layer chromatography plates prepared via the low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride onto carbon nanotube templates.

    PubMed

    Kanyal, Supriya S; Häbe, Tim T; Cushman, Cody V; Dhunna, Manan; Roychowdhury, Tuhin; Farnsworth, Paul B; Morlock, Gertrud E; Linford, Matthew R

    2015-07-24

    Microfabrication of ultrathin-layer chromatography (UTLC) plates via conformal deposition of silicon nitride by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition onto patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) scaffolds was demonstrated. After removal of the CNTs and hydroxylation, the resulting UTLC phase showed no expansion or distortion of their microfeatures and the absence/reduction of remaining nitrogenic species. Developing time of a mixture of lipophilic dyes on this UTLC plates was 86% shorter than on high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) plates. A water-soluble food dye mixture was also separated resulting in low band broadening and reduced developing time compared to HPTLC. For the latter example, mobile phase optimization on a single UTLC plate consisted of 14 developments with different mobile phases, each preceded by a plate prewashing step. The same plate was again reused for additional 11 separations under varying conditions resulting in a development procedure with a mean separation efficiency of 233,000theoretical plates/m and a reduced mobile phase consumption of only 400μL. This repeated use proved the physical robustness of the ultrathin layer and its resistance to damage. The layer was highly suited for hyphenation to ambient mass spectrometry, including desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry imaging and direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry.

  18. This-layer chromatography/electrospray ionization triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry system: analysis of rhodamine dyes separated on reversed-phase C8 plates

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    The direct analysis of separated rhodamine dyes on reversed-phase C{sub 8} thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling/electrospray emitter probe coupled with a triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer is presented. This report represents continuing work to advance the performance metrics and utility of this basic surface sampling electrospray mass spectrometry system for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography plates. Experimental results examining the role of sampling probe spray end configuration on liquid aspiration rate and gas-phase ion signal generated are discussed. The detection figures-of-merit afforded by full-scan, automated product ion and selected reaction monitoring modes of operation were examined. The effect of different eluting solvents on mass spectrum signal levels with the reversed-phase C{sub 8} plate was investigated. The combined effect of eluting solvent flow-rate and development lane surface scan rate on preservation of chromatographic resolution was also studied. Analysis of chromatographically separated red pen ink extracts from eight different pens using selected reaction monitoring demonstrated the potential of this surface sampling electrospray mass spectrometry system for targeted compound analysis with real samples.

  19. Subaru and e-Merlin observations of NGC 3718. Diaries of a supermassive black hole recoil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markakis, K.; Dierkes, J.; Eckart, A.; Nishiyama, S.; Britzen, S.; García-Marín, M.; Horrobin, M.; Muxlow, T.; Zensus, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    NGC 3718 is a low-ionization nuclear emission line region (LINER) L1.9 galaxy, lying at a distance of about ~17.4 Mpc from the Earth; its similarities with NGC 5128 often award it the name northern Centaurus A. The presence of a compact radio source with a candidate jet structure, a prominent dust lane, and a strongly warped molecular and atomic gas disk are indications that NGC 3718 has undergone some sort of a large-scale gravitational interaction sometime in the recent past, which channeled gas towards the center, feeding the black hole and igniting the central engine. One proposed scenario involves an encounter with the close neighboring galaxy NGC 3729, while other authors favor a merging event with mass ratio ≥(3-4):1 as the origin of NGC3718. We use high angular resolution (~100 mas) e-Merlin radio and Subaru near-IR (NIR) (~170 mas) data to take a detailed view of the processes taking place in its central region. In order to preserve some objectivity in our interpretation, we combine our results with literature values and findings from previous studies. Our NIR maps suggest, on the one hand, that towards the stellar bulge there are no large-scale absorption phenomena caused by the apparent dust lane and, on the other, that there is a significant (local) contribution from hot (~1000 K) dust to the nuclear NIR emission. The position where this takes place appears to be closer to the offset compact radio emission from our e-Merlin 6 cm map and is offset by ~4.25 pc from the center of the underlying stellar bulge. The shape of the radio map suggests the presence of one (or possibly two, forming an X-shape) bipolar structure(s) ~1 (~0.6) arcsec across, which combined with the balance between the gas and the stellar velocity dispersions and the presence of hard X-ray emission, point towards effects expected by AGN feedback. We also argue that NGC 3718 has a core in its surface brightness profile, although it is a gas-rich galaxy and we discuss its mixed

  20. Measurement and calculation of recoil pressure produced during CO{sub 2} laser interaction with ice

    SciTech Connect

    Semak, V.V.; Knorovsky, G.A.; Maccallum, D.O.; Noble, D.R.; Kanouff, M.P.

    1999-12-09

    Evaporation is a classical physics problem which, because of its significant importance for many engineering applications, has drawn considerable attention by previous researchers. Classical theoretical models [Ta. I. Frenkel, Kinetic Theory of Liquids, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1946] represent evaporation in a simplistic way as the escape of atoms with highest velocities from a potential well with the depth determined by the atomic binding energy. The processes taking place in the gas phase above the rapidly evaporating surface have also been studied in great detail [S.I.Anisimov and V. A. Khokhlov, Instabilities in Lasser-Matter Interaction, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1995]. The description of evaporation utilizing these models is known to adequately characterize drilling with high beam intensity, e.g., >10{sup 7} W/cm{sup 2}. However, the interaction regimes when beam intensity is relatively low, such as during welding or cutting, lack both theoretical and experimental consideration of the evaporation. It was shown recently that if the evaporation is treated in accordance with Anisimov et.al.'s approach, then predicted evaporation recoil should be a substantial factor influencing melt flow and related heat transfer during laser beam welding and cutting. To verify the applicability of this model for low beam intensity interaction, the authors compared the results of measurements and calculations of recoil pressure generated during laser beam irradiation of a target. The target material used was water ice at {minus}10 C. The displacement of a target supported in a nearly frictionless air bearing under irradiation by a defocused laser beam from a 14 kW CO{sub 2} laser was recorded and Newton's laws of motion used to derive the recoil pressure.

  1. Chiral Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalcup, A. M.

    2010-07-01

    The main goal of this review is to provide a brief overview of chiral separations to researchers who are versed in the area of analytical separations but unfamiliar with chiral separations. To researchers who are not familiar with this area, there is currently a bewildering array of commercially available chiral columns, chiral derivatizing reagents, and chiral selectors for approaches that span the range of analytical separation platforms (e.g., high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, supercritical-fluid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis). This review begins with a brief discussion of chirality before examining the general strategies and commonalities among all of the chiral separation techniques. Rather than exhaustively listing all the chiral selectors and applications, this review highlights significant issues and differences between chiral and achiral separations, providing salient examples from specific classes of chiral selectors where appropriate.

  2. Water separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, W. F.; Austin, I. G. (Inventor)

    1964-01-01

    An apparatus for separating liquids from gases or gaseous fluids is described. Features of the apparatus include: (1) the collection and removal of the moisture in the fluid is not dependent upon, or affected by gravity; (2) all the collected water is cyclically drained from the apparatus irrespective of the attitude of the separator; and (3) a fluid actuator is utilized to remove the collected water from the separator.

  3. Battery separators.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pankaj; Zhang, Zhengming John

    2004-10-01

    The ideal battery separator would be infinitesimally thin, offer no resistance to ionic transport in electrolytes, provide infinite resistance to electronic conductivity for isolation of electrodes, be highly tortuous to prevent dendritic growths, and be inert to chemical reactions. Unfortunately, in the real world the ideal case does not exist. Real world separators are electronically insulating membranes whose ionic resistivity is brought to the desired range by manipulating the membranes thickness and porosity. It is clear that no single separator satisfies all the needs of battery designers, and compromises have to be made. It is ultimately the application that decides which separator is most suitable. We hope that this paper will be a useful tool and will help the battery manufacturers in selecting the most appropriate separators for their batteries and respective applications. The information provided is purely technical and does not include other very important parameters, such as cost of production, availability, and long-term stability. There has been a continued demand for thinner battery separators to increase battery power and capacity. This has been especially true for lithiumion batteries used in portable electronics. However, it is very important to ensure the continued safety of batteries, and this is where the role of the separator is greatest. Thus, it is essential to optimize all the components of battery to improve the performance while maintaining the safety of these cells. Separator manufacturers should work along with the battery manufacturers to create the next generation of batteries with increased reliability and performance, but always keeping safety in mind. This paper has attempted to present a comprehensive review of literature on separators used in various batteries. It is evident that a wide variety of separators are available and that they are critical components in batteries. In many cases, the separator is one of the major factors

  4. A velocity map ion imaging study of difluorobenzene-water complexes: binding energies and recoil distributions.

    PubMed

    Bellm, Susan M; Moulds, Rebecca J; van Leeuwen, Matthew P; Lawrance, Warren D

    2008-03-21

    The binding energies of the p-, m-, and o-difluorobenzene-H(2)O complexes have been measured by velocity map ion imaging to be 922+/-10, 945+/-10, and 891+/-4 cm(-1), respectively. The lack of variation provides circumstantial evidence for water binding to the three isomers via the same interaction, viz. an in-plane O-H...F hydrogen bond to one of the fluorine atoms on the ring, with a second, weaker interaction of the water O atom with an ortho hydrogen, as determined previously for the p-difluorobenzene-H(2)O complex [Kang et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 109, 767 (2005)]. The ground state binding energies for the difluorobenzene-H(2)O complexes are approximately 5%-11% larger than that for benzene-H(2)O, where binding occurs to the pi electrons out-of-plane. However, in the S(1) state the binding energies of the o- and p-difluorobenzene-H(2)O complexes are smaller than the benzene-H(2)O value, raising an interesting question about whether the geometry at the global energy minimum remains in-plane in the excited electronic states of these two complexes. Recoil energy distributions for dissociation of p-difluorobenzene-H(2)O have been measured from the 3(1), 5(2), and 3(1)5(1) levels of the excited electronic state. These levels are 490, 880, and 1304 cm(-1), respectively, above the dissociation threshold. Within the experimental uncertainty, the recoil energy distributions are the same for dissociation from these three states, with average recoil energies of approximately 100 cm(-1). These recoil energies are 60% larger than was observed for the dissociation of p-difluorobenzene-Ar, which is a substantially smaller increase than the 400% seen in a comparable study of dissociation within the triplet state for pyrazine-Ar, -H(2)O complexes. The majority of the available energy is partitioned into vibration and rotation of the fragments.

  5. Lifetime measurement of the 41+ state of 58Ni with the recoil distance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loelius, C.; Iwasaki, H.; Brown, B. A.; Honma, M.; Bader, V. M.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Braunroth, T.; Campbell, C. M.; Dewald, A.; Gade, A.; Kobayashi, N.; Langer, C.; Lee, I. Y.; Lemasson, A.; Lunderberg, E.; Morse, C.; Recchia, F.; Smalley, D.; Stroberg, S. R.; Wadsworth, R.; Walz, C.; Weisshaar, D.; Westerberg, A.; Whitmore, K.; Wimmer, K.

    2016-08-01

    The quadrupole transition rate for the 41+→21+ transition of 58Ni was determined from an application of the recoil distance method with the Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking In-beam Nuclear Array (GRETINA). The present result of the B (E 2 ;41+→21+) was found to be 50-6+11e2fm4 , which is about three times smaller than the literature value, indicating substantially less collectivity than previously believed. Shell model calculations performed with the GXPF1A effective interaction agree with the present data and the validity of the standard effective charges in understanding collectivity in the nickel isotopes is discussed.

  6. Experimental evidence of the vapor recoil mechanism in the boiling crisis.

    PubMed

    Nikolayev, V S; Chatain, D; Garrabos, Y; Beysens, D

    2006-11-03

    Boiling crisis experiments are carried out in the vicinity of the liquid-gas critical point of H2. A magnetic gravity compensation setup is used to enable nucleate boiling at near critical pressure. The measurements of the critical heat flux that defines the threshold for the boiling crisis are carried out as a function of the distance from the critical point. The obtained power law behavior and the boiling crisis dynamics agree with the predictions of the vapor recoil mechanism and disagree with the classical vapor column mechanism.

  7. Calculated yield of isomer depletion due to NEEC for {sup 93m}Mo recoils

    SciTech Connect

    Karamian, S. A.; Carroll, J. J.

    2012-11-15

    In the present work, quantitative calculations were carried out for production and depletion of the {sup 93m}Mo isomer in a relatively simple experiment using {sup 91}Zr beam ions. Such studies could be arranged at existing and operating accelerator facilities, e.g. at GSI or in JINR. The {sup 93m}Mo nuclei produced in a He gas target due to the {sup 4}He({sup 91}Zr, 2n) reaction will recoil into a gas stopper with a high velocity, being then depleted due to NEEC in highly-ionized species.

  8. Recoil polarization measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio at high momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Puckett

    2009-12-01

    Electromagnetic form factors are fundamental properties of the nucleon that describe the effect of its internal quark structure on the cross section and spin observables in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Double-polarization experiments have become the preferred technique to measure the proton and neutron electric form factors at high momentum transfers. The recently completed GEp-III experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility used the recoil polarization method to extend the knowledge of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio GpE/GpM to Q2 = 8.5 GeV2. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the experiment.

  9. Recoil-free spectroscopy of neutral Sr atoms in the Lamb-Dicke regime.

    PubMed

    Ido, Tetsuya; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2003-08-01

    Recoil-free as well as Doppler-free spectroscopy was demonstrated on the 1S0-3P1 transition of Sr atoms confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice. By investigating the wavelength and polarization dependence of the ac Stark shift acting on the 1S0 and 3P1(m(J)=0) states, we determined the wavelength where the Stark shifts for both states coincide. This Stark-free optical lattice, allowing the purturbation-free spectroscopy of trapped atoms, may keep neutral-atom based optical standards competitive with single-ion standards.

  10. Simulations of the nuclear recoil head-tail signature in gases relevant to directional dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, N. J. C.; Majewski, P.; Muna, D.; Snowden-Ifft, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    We present the first detailed simulations of the so-called head-tail effect of nuclear recoils in gas, the presence of which is vital to directional WIMP dark matter searches. We include comparison simulations of the range and straggling of carbon, sulphur and fluorine recoils in low pressure gas. However, the prime focus is a detailed investigation of carbon and sulphur recoils in 40 Torr negative ion carbon disulfide, a gas proposed for use in large scale directional detectors. The focus is to determine whether the location of the majority of the ionization charge released and observed from a recoil track in carbon disulfide is at the beginning (tail) of the track, at the end (head) or evenly distributed. We used the SRIM simulation program, together with a purpose-written Monte Carlo generator to model production of ionizing pairs, diffusion and basic readout geometries relevant to potential real detector scenarios, such as under development for the DRIFT experiment. The results indicate the likely existence of a head-tail track asymmetry but with a magnitude critically influenced by several competing factors, notably the W-value assumed, the drift distance and diffusion, and the recoil energy.

  11. Separation and characterization of bufadienolides in toad skin using two-dimensional normal-phase liquid chromatography×reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Jin, Hongli; Li, Xiaolong; Zhao, Jianqiang; Guo, Xiujie; Wang, Jixia; Guo, Zhimou; Zhang, Xiuli; Tao, Yanduo; Liu, Yanfang; Chen, Deliang; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-07-15

    Bufadienolides possess various bioactivities especially antitumor. Due to the high structural diversity, the separation of bufadienolides often suffers from coelution problem on conventional RP columns. In this work, an off-line two-dimensional normal-phase liquid chromatography×reversed-phase liquid chromatography (2D-NPLC×RPLC) method was developed to separate and characterize bufadienolides in toad skin. Several RP and NP columns were evaluated with five reference bufadienlides. The XUnion C18 and XAmide columns exhibited superior chromatographic performances for bufadienlide separation, and were selected in RPLC and NPLC, respectively. RPLC was used in the second-dimension for the good compatibility with MS, while NPLC was adopted in the first-dimension. The orthogonality of the 2D-NPLC×RPLC system was investigated by the geometric approach using fifteen bufadienolide mixtures. The result was 49.6%, demonstrating reasonable orthogonality of this 2D-LC system. By combining the 2D-LC system with MS, 64 bufadienlides including 33 minor ones and 11 pairs of isomers in toad skin were identified. This off-line 2D-NPLC×RPLC allowed to solve the coelution problem of bufadienlides in one-dimension RPLC, and thus facilitated the identification significantly.

  12. Separation of the fatty acids in menhaden oil as methyl esters with a highly polar ionic liquid gas chromatographic column and identification by time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fardin-Kia, Ali Reza; Delmonte, Pierluigi; Kramer, John K G; Jahreis, Gerhard; Kuhnt, Katrin; Santercole, Viviana; Rader, Jeanne I

    2013-12-01

    The fatty acids contained in marine oils or products are traditionally analyzed by gas chromatography using capillary columns coated with polyethylene glycol phases. Recent reports indicate that 100 % cyanopropyl siloxane phases should also be used when the analyzed samples contain trans fatty acids. We investigated the separation of the fatty acid methyl esters prepared from menhaden oil using the more polar SLB-IL111 (200 m × 0.25 mm) ionic liquid capillary column and the chromatographic conditions previously optimized for the separation of the complex mixture of fatty acid methyl esters prepared from milk fat. Identifications of fatty acids were achieved by applying Ag(+)-HPLC fractionation and GC-TOF/MS analysis in CI(+) mode with isobutane as the ionization reagent. Calculation of equivalent chain lengths confirmed the assignment of double bond positions. This methodology allowed the identification of 125 fatty acids in menhaden oil, including isoprenoid and furanoid fatty acids, and the novel 7-methyl-6-hexadecenoic and 7-methyl-6-octadecenoic fatty acids. The chromatographic conditions applied in this study showed the potential of separating in a single 90-min analysis, among others, the short chain and trans fatty acids contained in dairy products, and the polyunsaturated fatty acids contained in marine products.

  13. Separation and identification of purine nucleosides in the urine of patients with malignant cancer by reverse phase liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Yu; Wang, Shao-Min; Liu, Hong-Min; Bu, Shan-Shan; Li, Juan; Han, Dong; Zhang, Ming-zhi; Wu, Guang-Yin

    2009-05-01

    Urinary-modified nucleosides have a potential role as cancer biomarkers for a number of malignant diseases. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was combined with full-scan mass spectrometry, MS/MS analysis and accurate mass measurements in order to identify purine nucleosides purified from urine. Potential purine nucleosides were assessed by their evident UV absorbance in the HPLC chromatogram and then further examined by the mass spectrometric techniques. In this manner, numerous modified purine nucleosides were identified in the urine samples from cancer patients including xanthine, adenosine, N1-methyladenosine, 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine, 2-methyladenosine, N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine, inosine, N1-methylinosine, guanosine, N1-methylguanosine, N7-methylguanine, N2-methylguanosine, N2,N2-dimethyguanosine, N2,N2,N7-trimethylguanosine. Furthermore, a number of novel purine nucleosides were tentatively identified via critical interpretation of the combined mass spectrometric data including N3-methyladenosine, N7-methyladenine, 5'-dehydro-2'-deoxyinosine, N3-methylguanine, O6-methylguanosine, N1,N2,N7-trimethylguanosine, N1-methyl-N2-ethylguanosine and N7-methyl-N1-ethylguanosine.

  14. Rapid separation and characterization of diterpenoid alkaloids in processed roots of Aconitum carmichaeli using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Dayuan; Huang, Juan; Huang, Zhihai; Bai, Junqi; Qiu, Xiaohui

    2014-10-01

    The lateral root of Aconitum carmichaeli, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used to treat rheumatic diseases. For decades, diterpenoid alkaloids have dominated the phytochemical and biomedical research on this plant. In this study, a rapid and sensitive method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with linear ion trap-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry was developed to characterize the diterpenoid alkaloids in Aconitum carmichaeli. Based on an optimized chromatographic condition, more than 120 diterpenoid alkaloids were separated with good resolution. Using a systematic strategy that combines high resolution separation, highly accurate mass measurements and a good understanding of the diagnostic fragment-based fragmentation patterns, these diterpenoid alkaloids were identified or tentatively identified. The identification of these chemicals provided essential data for further phytochemical studies and toxicity research of Aconitum carmichaeli. Moreover, the ultra high performance liquid chromatography with linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometry platform was an effective and accurate tool for rapid qualitative analysis of secondary metabolite productions from natural resources.

  15. The Separation and Quantitation of Peptides with and without Oxidation of Methionine and Deamidation of Asparagine Using Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography with Mass Spectrometry (HILIC-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badgett, Majors J.; Boyes, Barry; Orlando, Ron

    2017-01-01

    Peptides with deamidated asparagine residues and oxidized methionine residues are often not resolved sufficiently to allow quantitation of their native and modified forms using reversed phase (RP) chromatography. The accurate quantitation of these modifications is vital in protein biotherapeutic analysis because they can affect a protein's function, activity, and stability. We demonstrate here that hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) adequately and predictably separates peptides with these modifications from their native counterparts. Furthermore, coefficients describing the extent of the hydrophilicity of these modifications have been derived and were incorporated into a previously made peptide retention prediction model that is capable of predicting the retention times of peptides with and without these modifications.

  16. Development of a comprehensive two-dimensional hydrophilic interaction chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry system and its application in separation and identification of saponins from Quillaja saponaria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2008-02-15

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) was used in two dimensions in a comprehensive two-dimensional HILIC hyphenated with a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HILICxHILIC-Q-TOF-MS) system for the analysis of complex samples of hydrophilic compounds. A TSKgel Amide-80 column was employed as the first dimension, and a short PolyHydroxyethyl A column was as the second dimension. The column system showed moderate orthogonality at defined operational conditions. A high speed Q-TOF-MS detector as a third complementary dimension significantly improved the peak capacity. The separation capability of the developed HILICxHILIC-Q-TOF-MS system was tested by separating an extract from Quillaja saponaria. The major components, quillaja saponins, in the extract were well identified by means of [M-H](-) ions, characteristic product ions, and their two-dimensional retention behaviors. Several pairs of isomers, which were often co-eluted on conventional LC-MS methods and had similar fragmentation characteristics in MS/MS spectra, were well separated on the two-dimensional system based on their different hydrophilicity. The developed comprehensive two-dimensional HILIC system demonstrates unique selectivity for hydrophilic compounds and satisfactory peak capacity and resolution for analogues by making sufficient use of two-dimensional separation plane.

  17. Enrichment, resolution, and identification of nickel porphyrins in petroleum asphaltene by cyclograph separation and atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kuangnan; Edwards, Kathleen E; Mennito, Anthony S; Walters, Clifford C; Kushnerick, J Douglas

    2010-01-01

    We report here the first high resolution mass spectrometric evidence of nickel porphyrins in petroleum. A petroleum asphaltene sample is fractionated by a silica-gel cyclograph. Nickel content is enriched by approximately 3 fold in one of the cyclograph fractions. The fraction is subsequently analyzed by atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) with an average mass resolving power of over 500 K (M/DeltaM(fwhm)). Similar to vanadyl porphyrins, monocylcoalkano-type (presumed to be deocophylerythro-etioporphyrin DPEP) Ni porphyrins are found to be the most abundant family followed by etio, bicycloalkano-type, and rhodo-monocylcoalkano-type Ni porphyrins. A Z number ranging from -28 to -44 and a carbon number ranging from 26 to 41 were observed. A significant amount of nickel and vanadyl geoporphyrins are in more condensed tetrapyrrolic cores than just chlorophyll-derived DPEP- and etioporphyrins. Ni has a higher etio/DPEP ratio and rhodo-etio/rhodo-DPEP ratio than does VO.

  18. Search for Electronic Recoil Event Rate Modulation with 4 Years of XENON100 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Arneodo, F.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berger, T.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Calvén, J.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; di Gangi, P.; di Giovanni, A.; Diglio, S.; Eurin, G.; Fei, J.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Franco, D.; Fulgione, W.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Galloway, M.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L. W.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Hasterok, C.; Hogenbirk, E.; Itay, R.; Kaminsky, B.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Manfredini, A.; Maris, I.; Marrodán Undagoitia, T.; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Masson, D.; Mayani, D.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Pakarha, P.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Pizzella, V.; Piro, M.-C.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, N.; Dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Silva, M.; Simgen, H.; Sivers, M. V.; Stein, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Wang, H.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wulf, J.; Ye, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xenon Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We report on a search for electronic recoil event rate modulation signatures in the XENON100 data accumulated over a period of 4 yr, from January 2010 to January 2014. A profile likelihood method, which incorporates the stability of the XENON100 detector and the known electronic recoil background model, is used to quantify the significance of periodicity in the time distribution of events. There is a weak modulation signature at a period of 43 1-14+16 day in the low energy region of (2.0-5.8) keV in the single scatter event sample, with a global significance of 1.9 σ ; however, no other more significant modulation is observed. The significance of an annual modulation signature drops from 2.8 σ , from a previous analysis of a subset of this data, to 1.8 σ with all data combined. Single scatter events in the low energy region are thus used to exclude the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation as being due to dark matter electron interactions via axial vector coupling at 5.7 σ .

  19. Search for Electronic Recoil Event Rate Modulation with 4 Years of XENON100 Data.

    PubMed

    Aprile, E; Aalbers, J; Agostini, F; Alfonsi, M; Amaro, F D; Anthony, M; Arneodo, F; Barrow, P; Baudis, L; Bauermeister, B; Benabderrahmane, M L; Berger, T; Breur, P A; Brown, A; Brown, E; Bruenner, S; Bruno, G; Budnik, R; Bütikofer, L; Calvén, J; Cardoso, J M R; Cervantes, M; Cichon, D; Coderre, D; Colijn, A P; Conrad, J; Cussonneau, J P; Decowski, M P; de Perio, P; Di Gangi, P; Di Giovanni, A; Diglio, S; Eurin, G; Fei, J; Ferella, A D; Fieguth, A; Franco, D; Fulgione, W; Gallo Rosso, A; Galloway, M; Gao, F; Garbini, M; Geis, C; Goetzke, L W; Greene, Z; Grignon, C; Hasterok, C; Hogenbirk, E; Itay, R; Kaminsky, B; Kessler, G; Kish, A; Landsman, H; Lang, R F; Lellouch, D; Levinson, L; Lin, Q; Lindemann, S; Lindner, M; Lopes, J A M; Manfredini, A; Maris, I; Marrodán Undagoitia, T; Masbou, J; Massoli, F V; Masson, D; Mayani, D; Messina, M; Micheneau, K; Miguez, B; Molinario, A; Murra, M; Naganoma, J; Ni, K; Oberlack, U; Pakarha, P; Pelssers, B; Persiani, R; Piastra, F; Pienaar, J; Pizzella, V; Piro, M-C; Plante, G; Priel, N; Rauch, L; Reichard, S; Reuter, C; Rizzo, A; Rosendahl, S; Rupp, N; Dos Santos, J M F; Sartorelli, G; Scheibelhut, M; Schindler, S; Schreiner, J; Schumann, M; Scotto Lavina, L; Selvi, M; Shagin, P; Silva, M; Simgen, H; Sivers, M V; Stein, A; Thers, D; Tiseni, A; Trinchero, G; Tunnell, C; Wang, H; Wei, Y; Weinheimer, C; Wulf, J; Ye, J; Zhang, Y

    2017-03-10

    We report on a search for electronic recoil event rate modulation signatures in the XENON100 data accumulated over a period of 4 yr, from January 2010 to January 2014. A profile likelihood method, which incorporates the stability of the XENON100 detector and the known electronic recoil background model, is used to quantify the significance of periodicity in the time distribution of events. There is a weak modulation signature at a period of 431_{-14}^{+16} day in the low energy region of (2.0-5.8) keV in the single scatter event sample, with a global significance of 1.9σ; however, no other more significant modulation is observed. The significance of an annual modulation signature drops from 2.8σ, from a previous analysis of a subset of this data, to 1.8σ with all data combined. Single scatter events in the low energy region are thus used to exclude the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation as being due to dark matter electron interactions via axial vector coupling at 5.7σ.

  20. Hydrogen analysis for granite using proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, T; Sasa, K; Ohshima, H; Kimura, H; Tajima, Y; Takahashi, T; Ishii, S; Yamato, Y; Kurosawa, M

    2008-07-01

    In an effort to develop DS02, a new radiation dosimetry system for the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, measurements of neutron-induced activities have provided valuable information to reconstruct the radiation situation at the time of the bombings. In Hiroshima, the depth profile of (152)Eu activity measured in a granite pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge (128 m from the hypocenter) was compared with that calculated using the DS02 methodology. For calculation of the (152)Eu production due to the thermal-neutron activation reaction, (151)Eu(n,gamma)(152)Eu, information on the hydrogen content in granite is important because the transport and slowing-down process of neutrons penetrating into the pillar is strongly affected by collisions with the protons of hydrogen. In this study, proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry has been used to deduce the proton density in the Motoyasu pillar granite. Slices of granite samples were irradiated by a 20 MeV proton beam, and the energies of scattered and recoil protons were measured with a coincidence method. The water concentration in the pillar granite was evaluated to be 0.30 +/- 0.07%wt. This result is consistent with earlier data on adsorptive water (II) and bound water obtained by the Karl Fisher method.

  1. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of low energy recoil events in MgO

    DOE PAGES

    Petersen, B. A.; Liu, B.; Weber, W. J.; ...

    2017-01-11

    In this paper, low-energy recoil events in MgO are studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the dynamic displacement processes and final defect configurations. Threshold displacement energies, Ed, are obtained for Mg and O along three low-index crystallographic directions, [100], [110], and [111]. The minimum values for Ed are found along the [110] direction consisting of the same element, either Mg or O atoms. Minimum threshold values of 29.5 eV for Mg and 25.5 eV for O, respectively, are suggested from the calculations. For other directions, the threshold energies are considerably higher, 65.5 and 150.0 eV for Omore » along [111] and [100], and 122.5 eV for Mg along both [111] and [100] directions, respectively. These results show that the recoil events in MgO are partial-charge transfer assisted processes where the charge transfer plays an important role. Finally, there is a similar trend found in other oxide materials, where the threshold displacement energy correlates linearly with the peak partial-charge transfer, suggesting this behavior might be universal in ceramic oxides.« less

  2. Recoil effects due to electron shake-off following the beta decay of 6 He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Gordon W. F.; Schulhoff, Eva

    2016-05-01

    There are currently several experiments in progress to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model by high precision studies of angular correlations in the β decay of the helium isotope 6He to form 6Li +e- +νe. After the β decay process, the atomic electrons of 6 Li+ adjust to the sudden change of nuclear charge from 2 to 3. We calculate the probabilities for electron shake-up and shake-off, including recoil effects, by the use of a Stieltjes imaging representation of the final states. A variety of sum rules provides tight consistency checks on the accuracy of the results. Results obtained previously indicate that there is a 7 σ disagreement between theory and experiment for the additional nuclear recoil induced by the emission of atomic shake-off electrons. This disagreement will be further studied, and the results extended to the 1 s 2 p3 P and metastable 1 s 2 s3 S states as initial states of 6 He before β-decay. Research supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  3. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of low energy recoil events in MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, B. A.; Liu, B.; Weber, W. J.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Low-energy recoil events in MgO are studied using ab intio molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the dynamic displacement processes and final defect configurations. Threshold displacement energies, Ed, are obtained for Mg and O along three low-index crystallographic directions, [100], [110], and [111]. The minimum values for Ed are found along the [110] direction consisting of the same element, either Mg or O atoms. Minimum threshold values of 29.5 eV for Mg and 25.5 eV for O, respectively, are suggested from the calculations. For other directions, the threshold energies are considerably higher, 65.5 and 150.0 eV for O along [111] and [100], and 122.5 eV for Mg along both [111] and [100] directions, respectively. These results show that the recoil events in MgO are partial-charge transfer assisted processes where the charge transfer plays an important role. There is a similar trend found in other oxide materials, where the threshold displacement energy correlates linearly with the peak partial-charge transfer, suggesting this behavior might be universal in ceramic oxides.

  4. Photodissociation of laboratory oriented molecules: Revealing molecular frame properties of nonaxial recoil

    SciTech Connect

    Brom, Alrik J. van den; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Janssen, Maurice H.M.

    2004-12-15

    We report the photodissociation of laboratory oriented OCS molecules. A molecular beam of OCS molecules is hexapole state-selected and spatially oriented in the electric field of a velocity map imaging lens. The oriented OCS molecules are dissociated at 230 nm with the linear polarization set at 45 deg. to the orientation direction of the OCS molecules. The CO({nu}=0,J) photofragments are quantum state-selectively ionized by the same 230 nm pulse and the angular distribution is measured using the velocity map imaging technique. The observed CO({nu}=0,J) images are strongly asymmetric and the degree of asymmetry varies with the CO rotational state J. From the observed asymmetry in the laboratory frame we can directly extract the molecular frame angles between the final photofragment recoil velocity and the permanent dipole moment and the transition dipole moment. The data for CO fragments with high rotational excitation reveal that the dissociation dynamics is highly nonaxial, even though conventional wisdom suggests that the nearly limiting {beta} parameter results from fast axial recoil dynamics. From our data we can extract the relative contribution of parallel and perpendicular transitions at 230 nm excitation.

  5. Scintillation efficiency measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) below the DAMA/LIBRA energy threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingke; Shields, Emily; Calaprice, Frank; Westerdale, Shawn; Froborg, Francis; Suerfu, Burkhant; Alexander, Thomas; Aprahamian, Ani; Back, Henning O.; Casarella, Clark; Fang, Xiao; Gupta, Yogesh K.; Ianni, Aldo; Lamere, Edward; Lippincott, W. Hugh; Liu, Qian; Lyons, Stephanie; Siegl, Kevin; Smith, Mallory; Tan, Wanpeng; Kolk, Bryant Vande

    2015-07-01

    The dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal depends on the NaI(Tl) scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoils. Previous measurements for Na recoils have large discrepancies, especially in the DAMA/LIBRA modulation energy region. We report a quenching effect measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) from 3 to 52 keVnr, covering the whole DAMA/LIBRA energy region for dark matter-Na scattering interpretations. By using a low-energy, pulsed neutron beam, a double time-of-flight technique, and pulse-shape discrimination methods, we obtained the most accurate measurement of this kind for NaI(Tl) to date. The results differ significantly from the DAMA reported values at low energies but fall between the other previous measurements. We present the implications of the new quenching results for the dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal.

  6. Simultaneous enantioselective separation of azelastine and three of its metabolites for the investigation of the enantiomeric metabolism in rats. I. Liquid chromatography-ionspray tandem mass spectrometry and electrokinetic capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Ute; Blaschke, Gottfried; Knebel, Norbert

    2003-08-15

    Enantioselective separation methods and the enantioselective determination of the anti-allergic drug azelastine and of three of its main phase I metabolites in a biological matrix underwent chromatographic and electrophoretic investigations. An enantioselective assay of a coupling of HPLC using a beta-cyclodextrin chiral stationary phase to ionspray tandem mass spectrometry is presented. Additionally, this assay is compared to another enantioselective assay using electrokinetic capillary chromatography with beta-cyclodextrin and carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin in polyacrylamide-coated capillaries. For capillary electrophoresis (CE) the importance of polyacrylamide coating for the validation of this separation method is highlighted. Extracted rat plasma samples of enantioselective metabolism studies were measured by both validated assays. Differences in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics were evaluated for the main substance azelastine and its main metabolite demethylazelastine. So, a first hint about the enantioselectivity of biotransformation of azelastine in rats was seen after oral application of either enantiomer or the racemate to rats.

  7. The offline combination of thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and micrOTOF-Q mass spectrometry for the separation and identification of spinochromes from sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) shells.

    PubMed

    Shikov, Alexander N; Ossipov, Vladimir I; Martiskainen, Olli; Pozharitskaya, Olga N; Ivanova, Svetlana A; Makarov, Valery G

    2011-12-16

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) with off-line high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detection and micrOTOF-Q mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS) resulted in the successful fractionation, separation and identification of spinochrome pigments from sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) shells. Two fractions of pigments were separated by TLC and eluted with methanol using a TLC-MS interface. HPLC-DAD-MS analysis of the fractions indicated the presence of six sea urchin pigments: spinochrome monomers B and D, three spinochrome dimers (anhydroethylidene-6,6'-bis(2,3,7-trihydroxynaphthazarin) and its isomer and ethylidene-6,6'-bis(2,3,7-trihydroxynaphthazarin)), and one pigment that was preliminary identified as a spinochrome dimer with the structural formula C(22)H(16)O(16).

  8. Proteome analysis of Myxococcus xanthus by off-line two-dimensional chromatographic separation using monolithic poly-(styrene-divinylbenzene) columns combined with ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schley, Christian; Altmeyer, Matthias O; Swart, Remco; Müller, Rolf; Huber, Christian G

    2006-10-01

    Myxobacteria are potent producers of secondary metabolites exhibiting diverse biological activities and pharmacological potential. The proteome of Myxococcus xanthus DK1622 was characterized by two-dimensional chromatographic separation of tryptic peptides from a lysate followed by tandem mass spectrometric identification. The high degree of orthogonality of the separation system employing polymer-based strong cation-exchange and monolithic reversed-phase stationary phases was clearly demonstrated. Upon automated database searching, 1312 unique peptides were identified, which were associated with 631 unique proteins. High-molecular polyketide synthetases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases, known to be involved in the biosynthesis of various secondary metabolites, were readily detected. Besides the identification of gene products associated with the production of known secondary metabolites, proteins could also be identified for six gene clusters, for which no biosynthetic product has been known so far.

  9. Serial mixed-mode cation- and anion-exchange solid-phase extraction for separation of basic, neutral and acidic pharmaceuticals in wastewater and analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lavén, Martin; Alsberg, Tomas; Yu, Yong; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Sun, Hongwen

    2009-01-02

    A novel solid-phase extraction (SPE) method is presented whereby 15 basic, neutral and acidic pharmaceuticals in wastewater were simultaneously extracted and subsequently separated into different fractions. This was achieved using mixed-mode cation- and anion-exchange SPE (Oasis MCX and MAX) in series. Analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC/QTOF-MS). A fast separation was achieved, with all compounds eluting within 6min, narrow chromatographic peaks, with a peak base width of 6s on average, and a high mass accuracy of quantified wastewater sample ions, with average mass errors in absolute value of 0.7mDa or 2.7ppm. The recovery of the SPE method in the analysis of sewage treatment plant (STP) influent and effluent wastewater was on average 80% and the ion suppression 30%. For less demanding samples Oasis MCX used alone may be an alternative method, although for STP influent waters containing high loads of organic compounds the clean-up achieved using only Oasis MCX was insufficient, leading to unreliable quantitation. Furthermore, serial SPE separation according to molecular charge added an additional degree of analyte confirmation. For quantitation, an approach combining external standard calibration curves, isotopically labelled surrogate standards and single-point standard addition was used. The applicability of the method was demonstrated in the analysis of influent and effluent wastewater from an STP, using small sample volumes (25-50mL). The effluent wastewater had been subjected to three different treatments; activated sludge, activated sludge followed by ozonation, and a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Ozone treatment proved superior in removal of the analysed pharmaceuticals, while the MBR provided higher removal efficiencies than the activated sludge process.

  10. Separation and characterisation of beta2-microglobulin folding conformers by ion-exchange liquid chromatography and ion-exchange liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bertoletti, Laura; Regazzoni, Luca; Aldini, Giancarlo; Colombo, Raffaella; Abballe, Franco; Caccialanza, Gabriele; De Lorenzi, Ersilia

    2013-04-10

    In this work we present for the first time the use of ion-exchange liquid chromatography to separate the native form and a partially structured intermediate of the folding of the amyloidogenic protein beta2-microglobulin. Using a strong anion-exchange column that accounts for the differences in charge exposure of the two conformers, a LC-UV method is initially optimised in terms of mobile phase pH, composition and temperature. The preferred mobile phase conditions that afford useful information were found to be 35 mM ammonium formate, pH 7.4 at 25°C. The dynamic equilibrium of the two species is demonstrated upon increasing the concentration of acetonitrile in the protein sample. Then, the chromatographic method is transferred to MS detection and the respective charge state distributions of the separated conformers are identified. The LC-MS results demonstrate that one of the conformers is partially unfolded, compared with the native and more compact species. The correspondence with previous results obtained in free solution by capillary electrophoresis suggest that strong ion exchange LC-MS does not alter beta2-microglobulin conformation and maintains the dynamic equilibrium already observed between the native protein and its folding intermediate.

  11. Separation and analysis of phenolic acids from Salvia miltiorrhiza and its related preparations by off-line two-dimensional hydrophilic interaction chromatography×reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled with ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wanyang; Tong, Ling; Miao, Jingzhuo; Huang, Jingyi; Li, Dongxiang; Li, Yunfei; Xiao, Hongting; Sun, Henry; Bi, Kaishun

    2016-01-29

    Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) is one of the most widely used Traditional Chinese Medicine. Active constituents of SM mainly contain hydrophilic phenolic acids (PAs) and lipophilic tanshinones. However, due to the existing of multiple ester bonds and unsaturated bonds in the structures, PAs have numerous chemical conversion products. Many of them are so low-abundant that hard to be separated using conventional methods. In this study, an off-line two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) method was developed to separate PAs in SM and its related preparations. In the first dimension, samples were fractionated by hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) (Acchrom×Amide, 4.6×250mm, 5μm) mainly based on the hydrogen bonding effects. The fractions were then separated on reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) (Acquity HSS T3, 2.1×50mm, 1.7μm) according to hydrophobicity. For the selective identification of PAs, diode array detector (DAD) and electrospray ionization tandem ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-TOF-MS) were employed. Practical and effective peak capacities of all the samples were greater than 2046 and 1130, respectively, with the orthogonalities ranged from 69.7% to 92.8%, which indicated the high efficiency and versatility of this method. By utilizing the data post-processing techniques, including mass defect filter, neutral loss filter and product ion filter, a total of 265 compounds comprising 196 potentially new PAs were tentatively characterized. Twelve kinds of derivatives, mainly including glycosylated compounds, O-alkylated compounds, condensed compounds and hydrolyzed compounds, constituted the novelty of the newly identified PAs. The HILIC×RP-LC/TOF-MS system expanded our understanding on PAs of S. miltiorrhiza and its related preparations, which could also benefit the separation and characterization of polar constituents in complicated herbal extracts.

  12. Development of an on-line flow injection Sr/matrix separation method for accurate, high-throughput determination of Sr isotope ratios by multiple collector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Galler, Patrick; Limbeck, Andreas; Boulyga, Sergei F; Stingeder, Gerhard; Hirata, Takafumi; Prohaska, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    This work introduces a newly developed on-line flow injection (FI) Sr/Rb separation method as an alternative to the common, manual Sr/matrix batch separation procedure, since total analysis time is often limited by sample preparation despite the fast rate of data acquisition possible by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometers (ICPMS). Separation columns containing approximately 100 muL of Sr-specific resin were used for on-line FI Sr/matrix separation with subsequent determination of (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratios by multiple collector ICPMS. The occurrence of memory effects exhibited by the Sr-specific resin, a major restriction to the repetitive use of this costly material, could successfully be overcome. The method was fully validated by means of certified reference materials. A set of two biological and six geological Sr- and Rb-bearing samples was successfully characterized for its (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratios with precisions of 0.01-0.04% 2 RSD (n = 5-10). Based on our measurements we suggest (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratios of 0.713 15 +/- 0.000 16 (2 SD) and 0.709 31 +/- 0.000 06 (2 SD) for the NIST SRM 1400 bone ash and the NIST SRM 1486 bone meal, respectively. Measured (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratios for five basalt samples are in excellent agreement with published data with deviations from the published value ranging from 0 to 0.03%. A mica sample with a Rb/Sr ratio of approximately 1 was successfully characterized for its (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope signature to be 0.718 24 +/- 0.000 29 (2 SD) by the proposed method. Synthetic samples with Rb/Sr ratios of up to 10/1 could successfully be measured without significant interferences on mass 87, which would otherwise bias the accuracy and uncertainty of the obtained data.

  13. B →D ℓν form factors at nonzero recoil and |Vc b| from 2 +1 -flavor lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jon A.; Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Foley, J.; Freeland, E. D.; Gámiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Komijani, J.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Laiho, J.; Levkova, L.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Neil, E. T.; Qiu, Si-Wei; Simone, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, Ran; Fermilab Lattice; MILC Collaborations

    2015-08-01

    We present the first unquenched lattice-QCD calculation of the hadronic form factors for the exclusive decay B ¯→D ℓν ¯ at nonzero recoil. We carry out numerical simulations on 14 ensembles of gauge-field configurations generated with 2 +1 flavors of asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. The ensembles encompass a wide range of lattice spacings (approximately 0.045 to 0.12 fm) and ratios of light (up and down) to strange sea-quark masses ranging from 0.05 to 0.4. For the b and c valence quarks we use improved Wilson fermions with the Fermilab interpretation, while for the light valence quarks we use asqtad-improved staggered fermions. We extrapolate our results to the physical point using rooted staggered heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory. We then parametrize the form factors and extend them to the full kinematic range using model-independent functions based on analyticity and unitarity. We present our final results for f+(q2) and f0(q2), including statistical and systematic errors, as coefficients of a series in the variable z and the covariance matrix between these coefficients. We then fit the lattice form-factor data jointly with the experimentally measured differential decay rate from BABAR to determine the CKM matrix element, |Vc b|=(39.6 ±1. 7QCD +exp±0. 2QED)×10-3 . As a byproduct of the joint fit we obtain the form factors with improved precision at large recoil. Finally, we use them to update our calculation of the ratio R (D ) in the Standard Model, which yields R (D )=0.299 (11 ).

  14. B → Dℓν form factors at nonzero recoil and |Vcb| from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2015-08-10

    We present the first unquenched lattice-QCD calculation of the hadronic form factors for the exclusive decay B¯→Dℓν¯ at nonzero recoil. We carry out numerical simulations on 14 ensembles of gauge-field configurations generated with 2+1 flavors of asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. The ensembles encompass a wide range of lattice spacings (approximately 0.045 to 0.12 fm) and ratios of light (up and down) to strange sea-quark masses ranging from 0.05 to 0.4. For the b and c valence quarks we use improved Wilson fermions with the Fermilab interpretation, while for the light valence quarks we use asqtad-improved staggered fermions. We extrapolate our results to the physical point using rooted staggered heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory. We then parametrize the form factors and extend them to the full kinematic range using model-independent functions based on analyticity and unitarity. We present our final results for f+(q2) and f0(q2), including statistical and systematic errors, as coefficients of a series in the variable z and the covariance matrix between these coefficients. We then fit the lattice form-factor data jointly with the experimentally measured differential decay rate from BABAR to determine the CKM matrix element, |Vcb|=(39.6 ± 1.7QCD+exp ± 0.2QED) × 10–3. As a byproduct of the joint fit we obtain the form factors with improved precision at large recoil. In conclusion, we use them to update our calculation of the ratio R(D) in the Standard Model, which yields R(D)=0.299(11).

  15. Rutherford forward scattering and elastic recoil detection (RFSERD) as a method for characterizing ultra-thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Lohn, Andrew J.; Doyle, Barney L.; Stein, Gregory J.; ...

    2014-04-03

    We present a novel ion beam analysis technique combining Rutherford forward scattering and elastic recoil detection (RFSERD) and demonstrate its ability to increase efficiency in determining stoichiometry in ultrathin (5-50 nm) films as compared to Rutherford backscattering. In the conventional forward geometries, scattering from the substrate overwhelms the signal from light atoms but in RFSERD, scattered ions from the substrate are ranged out while forward scattered ions and recoiled atoms from the thin film are simultaneously detected in a single detector. Lastly, the technique is applied to tantalum oxide memristors but can be extended to a wide range of materialsmore » systems.« less

  16. Rutherford forward scattering and elastic recoil detection (RFSERD) as a method for characterizing ultra-thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Lohn, Andrew J.; Doyle, Barney L.; Stein, Gregory J.; Mickel, Patrick R.; Stevens, Jim E.; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2014-04-03

    We present a novel ion beam analysis technique combining Rutherford forward scattering and elastic recoil detection (RFSERD) and demonstrate its ability to increase efficiency in determining stoichiometry in ultrathin (5-50 nm) films as compared to Rutherford backscattering. In the conventional forward geometries, scattering from the substrate overwhelms the signal from light atoms but in RFSERD, scattered ions from the substrate are ranged out while forward scattered ions and recoiled atoms from the thin film are simultaneously detected in a single detector. Lastly, the technique is applied to tantalum oxide memristors but can be extended to a wide range of materials systems.

  17. Stereoisomers Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, Piotr

    The use of capillary electrophoresis for enantiomer separation and optical purity determination is presented. The contents start with basic information about the nature of stereoizomers and the mechanism of enantioseparation using capillary electrophoresis techniques. The molecules to be separated show identical chemical structure and electrochemical behavior. Therefore, the chiral recognition of enantiomers is possible only by bonding to chiral selector and the separation based on very small differences in complexation energies of diastereomer complexes formed. This method is useful for this purpose due to the fact that different compounds can be used as chiral selectors. The mostly used chiral selectors like cyclodextrins, crown ethers, chiral surfactants, macrocyclic antibiotics, transition metal complexes, natural, and synthetic polymers and their application for this purpose is also discussed. Finally, examples of practical applications of electromigration techniques for enantiomers separation and determination are presented.

  18. Mist separator

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, T.M.

    1984-04-17

    An apparatus for the removal of particulates from a flowing gas stream and a process for its use are provided. A perforated screen separator formed as a plate having parallel rows of perforations formed by pushing alternating strips of the plate material forward and backward from the plane of the plate is used. The perforated screen separator may be used alone or with a fiber bed mist eliminator for increased particulate removal.

  19. The Separation and Quantitation of Peptides with and without Oxidation of Methionine and Deamidation of Asparagine Using Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography with Mass Spectrometry (HILIC-MS).

    PubMed

    Badgett, Majors J; Boyes, Barry; Orlando, Ron

    2017-01-03

    Peptides with deamidated asparagine residues and oxidized methionine residues are often not resolved sufficiently to allow quantitation of their native and modified forms using reversed phase (RP) chromatography. The accurate quantitation of these modifications is vital in protein biotherapeutic analysis because they can affect a protein's function, activity, and stability. We demonstrate here that hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) adequately and predictably separates peptides with these modifications from their native counterparts. Furthermore, coefficients describing the extent of the hydrophilicity of these modifications have been derived and were incorporated into a previously made peptide retention prediction model that is capable of predicting the retention times of peptides with and without these modifications. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. Separation of geometric isomers of native lutein diesters in marigold (Tagetes erecta L.) by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Rong; Yang, Raymond; Young, J Christopher; Zhu, Honghui; Manolis, Tony

    2004-08-06

    Lutein is found in many foods; the richest and purest plant source is marigold flower (Tagetes erecta L.). In this plant, lutein is in the form of saturated fatty acid diesters. By using a binary mobile phase consisting of ethyl acetate and acetonitrile-methanol (9:1), improved separation was achieved on a C18-bonded phase. The unique absorption of lutein cis isomers at 330nm was used in combination with MS to identify the novel cis-lutein isomeric dimyristate, myristate-palmitate, dipalmitate, and palmitate-stearate diesters, as well as the rare combinations of both trans- and cis-lutein laurate-palmitate and trans- and cis-lutein myristate-stearate. The presence of the all-trans-lutein laurate-myristate, dimyristate, myristate-palmitate, palmitate-stearate, and distearate diesters, reported by others, was also confirmed.