Science.gov

Sample records for recombinant adenoviral-mediated mikappabalpha

  1. Lipid- and adenoviral-mediated gene transfer into AIDS-Kaposi's sarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Campain, J A; Matassa, A A; Felgner, P L; Barnhart, K M; Curiel, D T; Harrison, G S

    1998-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most frequent malignancy occurring in HIV-positive individuals. AIDS-KS is a more aggressive disease than the classical form, frequently having a rapid clinical course with numerous serious complications. Current systemic treatments for KS, such as chemotherapy and the administration of biological modifiers, are complicated by both the drug resistance of the tumor and the dose-limiting toxicity of the reagents. The relative accessibility of many KS lesions makes the disease a particularly attractive candidate for in vivo gene therapy protocols. In this regard, we are interested in delivering conditionally toxic suicide and/or antiangiogenic vectors to accomplish targeted cell death selectively in AIDS-KS cells. To this end, we examined both cationic lipid- and adenoviral-mediated DNA transfection methods. Using the firefly luciferase reporter gene, we optimized numerous variables known to be important in lipid-mediated DNA transfection, including lipid formulation, the amount of lipid and DNA, lipid/DNA ratio, and cell concentration. Under optimal transfection conditions, approximately 5-25% of KS cells expressed the introduced DNA sequences. Adenoviral-mediated DNA delivery was more efficient than lipid delivery in 4 of 5 primary KS cell lines. Two of the lines (RW248 and RW376) were transduced by adenovirus at frequencies approaching 100%; two cell lines (CVU-1 and RW80) gave efficiencies of 20-35%. Two immortalized KS cell lines (KS Y-1 and KS SLK) were poorly infected, giving a transduction efficiency of <5%. These findings demonstrate that gene transfer into AIDS-KS cells is feasible, and suggest that vector strategies may be permissive for translating gene therapy approaches for the disease.

  2. Restoration of β -Adrenergic Signaling in Failing Cardiac Ventricular Myocytes via Adenoviral-Mediated Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shahab A.; Skaer, Christine A.; Kypson, Alan P.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Peppel, Karsten C.; Glower, Donald D.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.; Koch, Walter J.

    1997-10-01

    Cardiovascular gene therapy is a novel approach to the treatment of diseases such as congestive heart failure (CHF). Gene transfer to the heart would allow for the replacement of defective or missing cellular proteins that may improve cardiac performance. Our laboratory has been focusing on the feasibility of restoring β -adrenergic signaling deficiencies that are a characteristic of chronic CHF. We have now studied isolated ventricular myocytes from rabbits that have been chronically paced to produce hemodynamic failure. We document molecular β -adrenergic signaling defects including down-regulation of myocardial β -adrenergic receptors (β -ARs), functional β -AR uncoupling, and an upregulation of the β -AR kinase (β ARK1). Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of the human β 2-AR or an inhibitor of β ARK1 to these failing myocytes led to the restoration of β -AR signaling. These results demonstrate that defects present in this critical myocardial signaling pathway can be corrected in vitro using genetic modification and raise the possibility of novel inotropic therapies for CHF including the inhibition of β ARK1 activity in the heart.

  3. AMELIORATION OF ETHANOL-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS BY ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED CU,ZN-SOD AND MN-SOD EXPRESSION IN NEURULATION STAGED MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    AMELIORATION OF ETHANOL-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS BY ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED Cu,Zn-SOD AND Mn-SOD EXPRESSION IN NEURULATION STAGED MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO. JB Smith1, PC Hartig3, MR Blanton3, KK Sulik1,2, and ES Hunter3. 1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology and 2Bowles Cente...

  4. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo. PMID:26808122

  5. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo. PMID:26808122

  6. STRO-1 selected rat dental pulp stem cells transfected with adenoviral-mediated human bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene show enhanced odontogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuechao; van der Kraan, Peter M; van den Dolder, Juliette; Walboomers, X Frank; Bian, Zhuan; Fan, Mingwen; Jansen, John A

    2007-11-01

    Dental pulp stem cells harbor great potential for tissue-engineering purposes. However, previous studies have shown variable results, and some have reported only limited osteogenic and odontogenic potential.Because bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-established agents to induce bone and dentin formation,in this study STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp-derived stem cells were transfected with the adenoviral mediated human BMP-2 gene. Subsequently, the cells were evaluated for their odontogenic differentiation ability in medium not containing dexamethasone or other stimuli. Cultures were investigated using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and evaluated for cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase(ALP) activity, and calcium content. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed for gene expression of Alp, osteocalcin, collagen type I, bone sialoprotein, dentin sialophosphoprotein, and dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1. Finally, an oligo-microarray was used to profile the expression of odontogenesis-related genes. Results of ALP activity, calcium content, and real-time PCR showed that only BMP2-transfected cells had the ability to differentiate into the odontoblast phenotype and to produce a calcified extracellular matrix. SEM and oligo-microarray confirmed these results. In contrast, the non-transfected cells represented a less differentiated cell phenotype. Based on our results, we concluded that the adenovirus can transfect STRO-1 selected cells with high efficacy. After BMP2 gene transfection, these cells had the ability to differentiate into odontoblast phenotype, even without the addition of odontogenic supplements to the medium. PMID:17824831

  7. Permissive environment in postnatal wounds induced by adenoviral-mediated overexpression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 prevents scar formation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ashley; Kozin, Elliott D; Keswani, Sundeep G; Vaikunth, Sachin S; Katz, Anna B; Zoltick, Philip W; Favata, Michele; Radu, Antoneta P; Soslowsky, Louis J; Herlyn, Meenhard; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Wound healing in the mid-gestation fetus is scarless with minimal inflammation and a unique extracellular matrix. We have previously documented the relative lack of inflammatory cytokines in this environment. We demonstrate that interleukin (IL)-10 is highly expressed in mid-gestation human fetal skin but is absent in postnatal human skin. We hypothesize that overexpression of IL-10 in postnatal skin may replicate a permissive environment for scarless healing. To study the mechanism underlying this process we performed immunohistochemistry for IL-10 in human mid-gestation fetal and postnatal skin. We also determined if adenoviral-mediated overexpression of IL-10 could allow for scarless wound healing in a murine incisional wound model. Wounds were analyzed at 1-90 days postwounding for effects on scar formation, inflammatory response, and biomechanical properties. Ad-IL-10 reconstitutes a permissive environment for scarless healing as shown by reconstitution of a normal dermal reticular collagen pattern and distribution of dermal elements. Compared with controls, Ad-IL-10 treated wounds showed reduced inflammatory response and no difference in biomechanical parameters. Therefore, overexpression of IL-10 in postnatal wounds results in a permissive environment for scarless wound repair, possibly by replicating a fetal wound environment. PMID:18086289

  8. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Alexander J.; Gardner, Oliver F. W.; Williams, Rebecca; Alini, Mauro; Archer, Charles W.; Stoddart, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs) represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs) are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase). To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs represent a

  9. Adenoviral-mediated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene transfer has a protective effect on sciatic nerve following constriction-induced spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Chou, An-Kuo; Yang, Ming-Chang; Tsai, Hung-Pei; Chai, Chee-Yin; Tai, Ming-Hong; Kwan, Aij-Li; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve injury may be associated with abnormal central nerve activity. Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can help attenuate neuropathic pain in different animal models of nerve injury. However, whether GDNF can ameliorate neuropathic pain in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in constriction-induced peripheral nerve injury remains unknown. We investigated the therapeutic effects of adenoviral-mediated GDNF on neuropathic pain behaviors, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and programmed cell death in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) nerve injury animal model. In this study, neuropathic pain was produced by CCI on the ipsilateral SCDH. Mechanical allodynia was examined with von Frey filaments and thermal sensitivity was tested using a plantar test apparatus post-operatively. Target proteins GDNF-1, GDNFRa-1, MMP2, MMP9, p38, phospho-p38, ED1, IL6, IL1β, AIF, caspase-9, cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, PARP, cleaved PARP, SPECTRIN, cleaved SPECTRIN, Beclin-1, PKCσ, PKCγ, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS were detected. Microglial activity was measured by observing changes in immunoreactivity with OX-42. NeuN and TUNEL staining were used to reveal whether apoptosis was attenuated by GDNF. Results showed that administrating GDNF began to attenuate both allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7. CCI-rats were found to have lower GDNF and GDNFRa-1 expression compared to controls, and GDNF re-activated their expression. Also, GDNF significantly down-regulated CCI-induced protein expression except for MMP2, eNOS and nNOS, indicating that the protective action of GDNF might be associated with anti-inflammation and prohibition of microglia activation. Immunocytochemistry staining showed that GDNF reduced CCI-induced neuronal apoptosis. In sum, GDNF enhanced the neurotrophic effect by inhibiting microglia activation and cytokine production via p38 and PKC signaling. GDNF could be a good

  10. Combined use of adenoviral vector Ad5/F35-mediated APE1 siRNA enhances the therapeutic efficacy of adenoviral-mediated p53 gene transfer in hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cun, Yanping; Zhang, Qinhong; Xiong, Chengjie; Li, Mengxia; Dai, Nan; Zhang, Shiheng; Wang, Dong

    2013-06-01

    Gene therapy has emerged as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. In order to establish a more effective therapeutic strategy against unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we evaluated, in the present study, the effects of combined treatment with adenoviral vector Ad5/F35-mediated APE1 siRNA (Ad5/F35-siAPE1) and adenoviral-mediated p53 gene transfer (Ad-p53) in hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Infection of SMMC-7721 cells with Ad5/F35-siAPE1 resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease of APE1 protein, while Ad-p53 treatment led to a time- and dose-dependent increase of p53 protein expression. Ad5/F35-siAPE1 significantly enhanced the cytotoxic effect of SMMC-7721 cells to Ad-p53 in cell survival assays, associated with increased cell apoptosis. Moreover, administration of Ad5/F35-siAPE1 and Ad-p53 into nude mice resulted in tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in SMMC-7721 xenografts compared to administration of either agent alone. These results suggest that combination of Ad5/F35-siAPE1 and Ad-p53 could be a promising gene therapeutic approach against human HCC.

  11. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  12. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  13. Adenoviral-mediated RNA interference targeting URG11 inhibits growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rui; Li, Xiaohua; Du, Wenqi; Zou, Xue; Du, Rui; Zhao, Lina; Luo, Guanhong; Mo, Ping; Xia, Lin; Pan, Yanglin; Shi, Yongquan; Lian, Zhaorui; Feitelson, Mark A; Nie, Yongzhan; Liu, Jie; Fan, Daiming

    2011-06-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second most common malignancy in Asia, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5% due to high recurrence after surgery and resistance to chemotherapy. A variety of therapeutic interventions to treat HCC, particularly gene therapy, have recently been investigated in tumor model systems to provide a more complete understanding of hepatocarcinogenesis and effectively design therapeutic strategies to treat this disease. In our study, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting a newly discovered gene named upregulated gene 11 (URG11). We introduced this vector into HCC cells to investigate the role of URG11 in HCC carcinogenesis. We observed that upon URG11 knockdown, HCC cell proliferation was inhibited through downregulation of several G1-S phase related molecules including cyclin D1 and apoptosis was induced as a result of Bcl-2 downregulation. Besides decreased expression of cyclin D1, CDK4, pRb and Bcl-2, URG11 also suppressed several other proteins including CAPN9, which was identified by cDNA microarray and 2D gel electrophoresis. Moreover, Ad-URG11-siRNA significantly suppressed HCC tumor growth in nude mice. In conclusion, Ad-URG11-siRNA can significantly suppress HCC tumor growth in vitro and in vivo by silencing the URG11 gene, and the use of this vector for gene therapy may represent a novel strategy to treat human HCC.

  14. Adenoviral-mediated imaging of gene transfer using a somatostatin receptor-cytosine deaminase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Lears, K A; Parry, J J; Andrews, R; Nguyen, K; Wadas, T J; Rogers, B E

    2015-03-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy owing to the enzyme's ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  15. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  16. Recombinant AAV9-TLK1B Administration Ameliorates Fractionated Radiation-Induced Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Prakash Srinivasan Timiri; Dayton, Robert D.; Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Abreo, Fleurette; Caldito, Gloria; Klein, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Salivary glands are highly susceptible to radiation, and patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiotherapy invariably suffer from its distressing side effect, salivary hypofunction. The reduction in saliva disrupts oral functions, and significantly impairs oral health. Previously, we demonstrated that adenoviral-mediated expression of Tousled-like kinase 1B (TLK1B) in rat submandibular glands preserves salivary function after single-dose ionizing radiation. To achieve long-term transgene expression for protection of salivary gland function against fractionated radiation, this study examines the usefulness of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector for TLK1B delivery. Lactated Ringers or AAV2/9 with either TLK1B or GFP expression cassette were retroductally delivered to rat submandibular salivary glands (1011 vg/gland), and animals were exposed, or not, to 20 Gy in eight fractions of 2.5 Gy/day. AAV2/9 transduced predominantly the ductal cells, including the convoluted granular tubules of the submandibular glands. Transgene expression after virus delivery could be detected within 5 weeks, and stable gene expression was observed till the end of study. Pilocarpine-stimulated saliva output measured at 8 weeks after completion of radiation demonstrated >10-fold reduction in salivary flow in saline- and AAV2/9-GFP-treated animals compared with the respective nonirradiated groups (90.8% and 92.5% reduction in salivary flow, respectively). Importantly, there was no decrease in stimulated salivary output after irradiation in animals that were pretreated with AAV2/9-TLK1B (121.5% increase in salivary flow; p<0.01). Salivary gland histology was better preserved after irradiation in TLK1B-treated group, though not significantly, compared with control groups. Single preemptive delivery of AAV2/9-TLK1B averts salivary dysfunction resulting from fractionated radiation. Although AAV2/9 transduces mostly the ductal cells of the gland, their protection

  17. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  18. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  19. Photoionization and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretically self-consistent calculations for photoionization and (e + ion) recombination are described. The same eigenfunction expansion for the ion is employed in coupled channel calculations for both processes, thus ensuring consistency between cross sections and rates. The theoretical treatment of (e + ion) recombination subsumes both the non-resonant recombination ("radiative recombination"), and the resonant recombination ("di-electronic recombination") processes in a unified scheme. In addition to the total, unified recombination rates, level-specific recombination rates and photoionization cross sections are obtained for a large number of atomic levels. Both relativistic Breit-Pauli, and non-relativistic LS coupling, calculations are carried out in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. Although the calculations are computationally intensive, they yield nearly all photoionization and recombination parameters needed for astrophysical photoionization models with higher precision than hitherto possible, estimated at about 10-20% from comparison with experimentally available data (including experimentally derived DR rates). Results are electronically available for over 40 atoms and ions. Photoionization and recombination of He-, and Li-like C and Fe are described for X-ray modeling. The unified method yields total and complete (e+ion) recombination rate coefficients, that can not otherwise be obtained theoretically or experimentally.

  20. Recombination of cluster ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  1. Recombinant baculovirus isolation.

    PubMed

    King, Linda A; Hitchman, Richard; Possee, Robert D

    2007-01-01

    Although there are several different methods available of making recombinant baculovirus expression vectors (reviewed in Chapter 3), all require a stage in which insect cells are transfected with either the virus genome alone (Bac-to-Bac or BaculoDirect, Invitrogen) or virus genome and transfer vector. In the latter case, this allows the natural process of homologous recombination to transfer the foreign gene, under control of the polyhedrin or other baculovirus gene promoter, from the transfer vector to the virus genome to create the recombinant virus. Additionally, many systems require a plaque-assay to separate parental and recombinant virus prior to amplification and use of the recombinant virus. This chapter provides an overview of the historical development of increasingly more efficient systems for the isolation of recombinant baculoviruses (Chapter 3 provides a full account of the different systems and transfer vectors available). The practical details cover: transfection of insect cells with either virus DNA or virus DNA and plasmid transfer vector; a reliable plaque-assay method that can be used to separate recombinant virus from parental (nonrecombinant) virus where this is necessary; methods for the small-scale amplification of recombinant virus; and subsequent titration by plaque-assay. Methods unique to the Bac-to-Bac system are also covered and include the transformation of bacterial cells and isolation of bacmid DNA ready for transfection of insect cells.

  2. Genetic recombination. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    The molecular pathways of gene recombination are explored and compared in studies of the model organisms, Escherichia coli and phase lambda. In the discussion of data from these studies it seems that recombination varies with the genetic idiosyncrasies of the organism and may also vary within a single organism.

  3. Recombination and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Hawkins, Michelle; McGlynn, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The links between recombination and replication have been appreciated for decades and it is now generally accepted that these two fundamental aspects of DNA metabolism are inseparable: Homologous recombination is essential for completion of DNA replication and vice versa. This review focuses on the roles that recombination enzymes play in underpinning genome duplication, aiding replication fork movement in the face of the many replisome barriers that challenge genome stability. These links have many conserved features across all domains of life, reflecting the conserved nature of the substrate for these reactions, DNA. PMID:25341919

  4. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  5. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  6. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  7. Effect of adenoviral mediated overexpression of fibromodulin on human dermal fibroblasts and scar formation in full-thickness incisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Stoff, Alexander; Rivera, Angel A; Mathis, J Michael; Moore, Steven T; Banerjee, N S; Everts, Maaike; Espinosa-de-los-Monteros, Antonio; Novak, Zdenek; Vasconez, Luis O; Broker, Thomas R; Richter, Dirk F; Feldman, Dale; Siegal, Gene P; Stoff-Khalili, Mariam A; Curiel, David T

    2007-05-01

    Fibromodulin, a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan family, has been recently suggested as a biologically significant mediator of fetal scarless repair. To assess the role of fibromodulin in the tissue remodeling, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing human fibromodulin cDNA. We evaluated the effect of adenovirus-mediated overexpression of fibromodulin in vitro on transforming growth factors and metalloproteinases in fibroblasts and in vivo on full-thickness incisional wounds in a rabbit model. In vitro, we found that Ad-Fibromodulin induced a decrease of expression of TGF-beta(1) and TGF-beta(2) precursor proteins, but an increase in expression of TGF-beta(3) precursor protein and TGF-beta type II receptor. In addition, fibromodulin overexpression resulted in decreased MMP-1 and MMP-3 protein secretion but increased MMP-2, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 secretion, whereas MMP-9 and MMP-13 were not influenced by fibromodulin overexpression. In vivo evaluation by histopathology and tensile strength demonstrated that Ad-Fibromodulin administration could ameliorate wound healing in incisional wounds. In conclusion, although the mechanism of scar formation in adult wounds remains incompletely understood, we found that fibromodulin overexpression improves wound healing in vivo, suggesting that fibromodulin may be a key mediator in reduced scarring.

  8. Receptor interactions involved in adenoviral-mediated gene delivery after systemic administration in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Smith, Theodore A G; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Marshall-Neff, Jennifer; Rollence, Michele L; Wright, Patrick; Kaloss, Michele; King, Laura; Mech, Christine; Dinges, Lisa; Iverson, William O; Sherer, Alfred D; Markovits, Judit E; Lyons, Russette M; Kaleko, Michael; Stevenson, Susan C

    2003-11-20

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors can bind at least three separate cell surface receptors for efficient cell entry: the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), alpha nu integrins, and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (HSG). To address the role of each receptor involved in adenoviral cell entry, we mutated critical amino acids in fiber or penton to inhibit receptor interaction. A series of five adenoviral vectors was prepared and the biodistribution of each was previously characterized in mice. To evaluate possible species differences in Ad vector tropism, we characterized the effects of each detargeting mutation in non-human primates after systemic delivery to confirm our conclusions made in mice. In non-human primates, CAR was found to have minimal effects on vector delivery to all organs examined including liver and spleen. Cell-surface alpha nu integrins played a significant role in delivery of vector to the spleen, lung and kidney. The fiber shaft mutation S*, which presumably inhibits HSG binding, was found to significantly decrease delivery to all organs examined. The ability to detarget the liver corresponded with decreased elevations in liver serum enzymes (aspartate transferase [AST] and alanine transferase [ALT]) 24 hr after vector administration and also in serum interleukin (IL)-6 levels 6 hr after vector administration. The biodistribution data generated in cynomolgus monkeys correspond with those data derived from mice, demonstrating that CAR binding is not the major determinant of viral tropism in vivo. Vectors containing the fiber shaft modification may provide for a detargeted adenoviral vector on which to introduce new tropisms for the development of targeted, systemically deliverable adenoviral vectors for human clinical application.

  9. Adenoviral-mediated transfer of human BMP-6 gene accelerates healing in a rabbit ulnar osteotomy model.

    PubMed

    Bertone, A L; Pittman, D D; Bouxsein, M L; Li, J; Clancy, B; Seeherman, H J

    2004-11-01

    This study evaluated healing of rabbit bilateral ulnar osteotomies 6 and 8 weeks after surgery in response to percutaneous injection of transgenic adenoviral (Ad) bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) vector or green fluorescent protein vector control (Ad-GFP) administered 7 days after surgery compared to untreated osteotomy controls. The amount, composition and biomechanical properties of the healing bone repair tissue were compared among groups and to historical data for intact rabbit ulnae obtained from similar studies at the same institution. Quantitative computed tomography was used to determine area, density and mineral content of the mineralized callus in the harvested ulnae. Maximum torque, torsional stiffness, and energy absorbed to failure were determined at 1.5 degrees /s. Calcified sections of excised ulnae (5 microm) were stained with Goldner's Trichrome and Von Kossa, and evaluated for callus composition, maturity, cortical continuity, and osteotomy bridging. Radiographic assessment of bone formation indicated greater mineralized callus in the ulnae injected with Ad-hBMP-6 as early as 1 week after treatment (2 weeks after surgery) compared to untreated osteotomy ulnae (p < 0.006) and Ad-GFP treated osteotomy ulnae (p < 0.002). Quantitative computed tomography confirmed greater bone area and bone mineral content at the osteotomy at 6 weeks in Ad-BMP-6 treated osteotomy as compared to untreated osteotomy ulnae (p < 0.001) and Ad-GFP treated osteotomy ulnae (p < 0.01). Ad-BMP-6 treated osteotomy ulnae were stronger (p < 0.001 and 0.003) and stiffer (p < 0.004 and 0.003) in torsion at 6 weeks than untreated osteotomy ulnae or Ad-GFP treated osteotomy ulnae, respectively. Maximum torque, torsional stiffness, and energy absorbed to failure were greater in Ad-BMP-6 treated osteotomy ulnae compared to their respective untreated contralateral osteotomy ulnae at 8 weeks [p < 0.03]. Maximum torque and torsional stiffness in the Ad-BMP-6 treated osteotomy ulnae were not different to intact ulnae values at 6 and 8 weeks. These experiments confirm that BMP-6 can be potently osteoinductive in vivo resulting in acceleration of bone repair.

  10. Meiotic recombination mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized cell division at the origin of the haploid cells that eventually develop into the gametes. It therefore lies at the heart of Mendelian heredity. Recombination and redistribution of the homologous chromosomes arising during meiosis constitute an important source of genetic diversity, conferring to meiosis a particularly important place in the evolution and the diversification of the species. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing meiotic recombination has considerably progressed these last decades, benefiting from complementary approaches led on various model species. An overview of these mechanisms will be provided as well as a discussion on the implications of these recent discoveries. PMID:27180110

  11. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  12. Recombineering Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the identification of functions that promote genomic recombination of linear DNA introduced into Pseudomonas cells by electroporation. The genes encoding these functions were identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a based on similarity to the lambda Red Exo/Beta and RecE...

  13. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  14. Genomic homologous recombination in planta.

    PubMed Central

    Gal, S; Pisan, B; Hohn, T; Grimsley, N; Hohn, B

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants is described. A multimer of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) sequences, arranged such that CaMV could only be produced by recombination, was integrated into Brassica napus nuclear DNA. This set-up allowed scoring of recombination events by the appearance of viral symptoms. The repeated homologous regions were derived from two different strains of CaMV so that different recombinant viruses (i.e. different recombination events) could be distinguished. In most of the transgenic plants, a single major virus species was detected. About half of the transgenic plants contained viruses of the same type, suggesting a hotspot for recombination. The remainder of the plants contained viruses with cross-over sites distributed throughout the rest of the homologous sequence. Sequence analysis of two recombinant molecules suggest that mismatch repair is linked to the recombination process. Images PMID:2026150

  15. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  16. The recombination epoch revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies of cosmological recombination have shown that this process produces as a by-product a highly superthermal population of Ly-alpha photons which retard completion of recombination. Cosmological redshifting was thought to determine the frequency distribution of the photons, while two-photon decay of hydrogen's 2s state was thought to control their numbers. It is shown here that frequency diffusion due to photon scattering dominate the cosmological redshift in the frequency range near line center which fixes the ratio of ground state to excited state population, while incoherent scattering into the far-red damping wing effectively destroys Ly-alpha photons as a rate which is competitive with two-photon decay. The former effect tends to hold back recombination, while the latter tends to accelerate it; the net results depends on cosmological parameters, particularly the combination Omega(b) h/sq rt (2q0), where Omega(b) is the fraction of the critical density provided by baryons.

  17. Dielectronic recombination theory

    SciTech Connect

    LaGattuta, K.J.

    1991-12-31

    A theory now in wide use for the calculation of dielectronic recombination cross sections ({sigma}{sup DR}) and rate coefficients ({alpha}{sup DR}) was one introduced originally by Feshbach for nuclear physics applications, and then later adapted for atomic scattering problems by Hahn. In the following, we briefly review this theory in a very general form, which allows one to account for the effects of overlapping and interacting resonances, as well as continuum-continuum coupling. An extension of our notation will then also allow for the inclusion of the effects of direct radiative recombination, along with a treatment of the interference between radiative and dielectronic recombination. Other approaches to the calculation of {sigma}{sup DR} have been described by Fano and by Seaton. We will not consider those theories here. Calculations of {alpha}{sup DR} have progressed considerably over the last 25 years, since the early work of Burgess. Advances in the reliability of theoretical predictions have also been promoted recently b a variety of direct laboratory measurements of {sigma}{sup DR}. While the measurements of {sigma}{sup DR} for {delta}n {ne} 0 excitations have tended to agree very well with calculations, the case of {delta}n = 0 has been much problematic. However, by invoking a mechanism originally proposed by Jacobs, which takes into account the effect of stray electric fields on high Rydberg states (HRS) participating in the DR process, new calculations have improved the agreement between theory and experiment for these cases. Nevertheless, certain discrepancies still remain.

  18. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  19. Innovation by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, Devin L; Smith, Matthew A; Arnold, Frances H

    2013-12-01

    Swapping fragments among protein homologs can produce chimeric proteins with a wide range of properties, including properties not exhibited by the parents. Computational methods that use information from structures and sequence alignments have been used to design highly functional chimeras and chimera libraries. Recombination has generated proteins with diverse thermostability and mechanical stability, enzyme substrate specificity, and optogenetic properties. Linear regression, Gaussian processes, and support vector machine learning have been used to model sequence-function relationships and predict useful chimeras. These approaches enable engineering of protein chimeras with desired functions, as well as elucidation of the structural basis for these functions.

  20. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  1. Recombinant electric storage battery

    SciTech Connect

    Flicker, R.P.; Fenstermacher, S.

    1989-10-10

    This patent describes a recombinant storage battery. It comprises: a plurality of positive plates containing about 2 to 4 percent of antimony based upon the total weight of the alloy and positive active material, and essentially antimony free negative plates in a closed case; a fibrous sheet plate separator between adjacent ones of the plates, and a body of an electrolyte to which the sheet separators are inert absorbed by each of the separators and maintained in contact with each of the adjacent ones of the plates. Each of the separator sheets comprising first fibers which impart to the sheet a given absorbency greater than 90 percent relative to the electrolyte and second fibers which impart to the sheet a different absorbency less than 80 percent relative to the electrolyte. The first and second fibers being present in such proportions that each of the sheet separators has an absorbency with respect to the electrolyte of from 75 to 95 percent and the second fibers being present in such proportions that the battery has a recombination rate adequate to compensate for gassing.

  2. Unraveling recombination rate evolution using ancestral recombination maps

    PubMed Central

    Munch, Kasper; Schierup, Mikkel H; Mailund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recombination maps of ancestral species can be constructed from comparative analyses of genomes from closely related species, exemplified by a recently published map of the human-chimpanzee ancestor. Such maps resolve differences in recombination rate between species into changes along individual branches in the speciation tree, and allow identification of associated changes in the genomic sequences. We describe how coalescent hidden Markov models are able to call individual recombination events in ancestral species through inference of incomplete lineage sorting along a genomic alignment. In the great apes, speciation events are sufficiently close in time that a map can be inferred for the ancestral species at each internal branch - allowing evolution of recombination rate to be tracked over evolutionary time scales from speciation event to speciation event. We see this approach as a way of characterizing the evolution of recombination rate and the genomic properties that influence it. PMID:25043668

  3. Primordial magnetogenesis before recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, Ophélia; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2016-04-01

    The origin of large magnetic fields in the Universe remains currently unknown. We investigate here a mechanism before recombination based on known physics. The source of the vorticity is due to the changes in the photon distribution function caused by the fluctuations in the background photons. We show that the magnetic field generated in the MHD limit, due to the Coulomb scattering, is of the order 10-49 G on a coherence scale of 10 kpc. We explicitly show that the magnetic fields generated from this process are sustainable and are not erased by resistive diffusion. We compare the results with current observations and discuss the implications. Our seed magnetic fields are generated on small scales whereas the main mechanisms studied in the literature are on scale bigger than 1 Mpc. However, compared to more exotic theories generating seed magnetic fields on similar scales, the strength of our fields are generally smaller.

  4. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Claudia; Späte, Kira; Krampe, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still unsatisfactory and essentially non-existing for the progressive course of the disease. Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) may be a promising neuroprotective/neuroregenerative treatment of MS. In the nervous system, EPO acts anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic and plasticity-modulating. Beneficial effects have been shown in animal models of various neurological and psychiatric diseases, including different models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. EPO is also effective in human brain disease, as shown in double-blind placebo-controlled clinical studies on ischemic stroke and chronic schizophrenia. An exploratory study on chronic progressive MS yielded lasting improvement in motor and cognitive performance upon high-dose long-term EPO treatment. PMID:21180577

  5. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  6. The recombination of genetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.B.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic recombination is the major mechanism by which new arrangements of genetic elements are produced in all living organisms, from the simplest bacterial viruses to humans. This volume presents an overview of the types of recombination found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  7. Bimolecular recombination in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, Girish; Rao, Akshay; Friend, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    The recombination of electrons and holes is a major loss mechanism in photovoltaic devices that controls their performance. We review scientific literature on bimolecular recombination (BR) in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices to bring forward existing ideas on the origin and nature of BR and highlight both experimental and theoretical work done to quantify its extent. For these systems, Langevin theory fails to explain BR, and recombination dynamics turns out to be dependent on mobility, temperature, electric field, charge carrier concentration, and trapped charges. Relationships among the photocurrent, open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and morphology are discussed. Finally, we highlight the recent emergence of a molecular-level picture of recombination, taking into account the spin and delocalization of charges. Together with the macroscopic picture of recombination, these new insights allow for a comprehensive understanding of BR and provide design principles for future materials and devices.

  8. Retroviral recombination during reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, D W; Duesberg, P H

    1990-03-01

    After mixed infection, up to half of related retroviruses are recombinants. During infection, retroviral RNA genomes are first converted to complementary DNA (cDNA) and then to double-stranded DNA. Thus recombination could occur during reverse transcription, by RNA template switching, or after reverse transcription, by breakage and reunion of DNA. It has not been possible to distinguish between these two potential mechanisms of recombination because both single-stranded cDNA and double-stranded proviral DNA exist in infected cells during the eclipse period. Therefore we have analyzed for recombinant molecules among cDNA products transcribed in vitro from RNA of disrupted virions. Since recombinants from allelic parents can only be distinguished from parental genomes by point mutations, we have examined the cDNAs from virions with distinct genetic structures for recombinant-specific size and sequence markers. The parents share a common internal allele that allows homology-directed recombination, but each contains specific flanking sequences. One parent is a synthetically altered Harvey murine sarcoma virus RNA that lacks a retroviral 3' terminus but carries a Moloney murine retrovirus-derived envelope gene (env) fragment 3' of its transforming ras gene. The other parent is intact Moloney virus. Using a Harvey-specific 5' primer and a Moloney-specific 3' primer, we have found recombinant cDNAs with the polymerase chain reaction, proving directly that retroviruses can recombine during reverse transcription unassisted by cellular enzymes, probably by template switching during cDNA synthesis. The recombinants that were obtained in vitro were identical with those obtained in parallel experiments in vivo.

  9. Delayed recombination and standard rulers

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Galli, Silvia; Silk, Joseph I.; Verde, Licia

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in galaxy surveys have been recognized as a powerful tool for constraining dark energy. However, this method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at recombination derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. This estimate is typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme; additional radiation sources can delay recombination altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from CMB and BAO data. In this paper we quantify the effect of delayed recombination on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph. We find the impact to be small but still not negligible. In particular, if recombination is nonstandard (to a level still allowed by CMB data), but this is ignored, future surveys may incorrectly suggest the presence of a redshift-dependent dark energy component. On the other hand, in the case of delayed recombination, adding to the analysis one extra parameter describing deviations from standard recombination does not significantly degrade the error bars on dark energy parameters and yields unbiased estimates. This is due to the CMB-BAO complementarity.

  10. Analysis of interchromosomal mitotic recombination.

    PubMed

    McGill, C B; Shafer, B K; Higgins, D R; Strathern, J N

    1990-07-01

    A novel synthetic locus is described that provides a simple assay system for characterizing mitotic recombinants. The locus consists of the TRP1 and HIS3 genes inserted into chromosome III of S. cerevisiae between the CRY1 and MAT loci. Defined trp1 and his3 alleles have been generated that allow the selection of interchromosomal recombinants in this interval. Trp+ or His+ recombinants can be divided into several classes based on coupling of the other alleles in the interval. The tight linkage of the CRY1 and MAT loci, combined with the drug resistance and cell type phenotypes that they respectively control, facilitates the classification of the recombinants without resorting to tetrad dissection. We present the distribution of spontaneous recombinants among the classes defined by this analysis. The data suggest that the recombination intermediate can have regions of symmetric strand exchange and that co-conversion tracts can extend over 1-3 kb. Continuous conversion tracts are favored over discontinuous tracts. The distribution among the classes defined by this analysis is altered in recombinants induced by UV irradiation.

  11. Aspergillus: sex and recombination.

    PubMed

    Varga, János; Szigeti, Gyöngyi; Baranyi, Nikolett; Kocsubé, Sándor; O'Gorman, Céline M; Dyer, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    The genus Aspergillus is one of the most widespread groups of fungi on Earth, comprised of about 300-350 species with very diverse lifestyles. Most species produce asexual propagula (conidia) on conidial heads. Despite their ubiquity, a sexual cycle has not yet been identified for most of the aspergilli. Where sexual reproduction is present, species exhibit either homothallic (self fertile) or heterothallic (obligate outcrossing) breeding systems. A parasexual cycle has also been described in some Aspergillus species. As in other fungi, sexual reproduction is governed by mating-type (MAT) genes, which determine sexual identity and are involved in regulating later stages of sexual development. Previous population genetic studies have indicated that some supposedly asexual aspergilli exhibit evidence of a recombining population structure, suggesting the presence of a cryptic sexual cycle. In addition, genome analyses have revealed networks of genes necessary for sexual reproduction in several Aspergillus species, again consistent with latent sexuality in these fungi. Knowledge of MAT gene presence has then successfully been applied to induce sexual reproduction between MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isolates of certain supposedly asexual aspergilli. Recent progress in understanding the extent and significance of sexual reproduction is described here, with special emphasis on findings that are relevant to clinically important aspergilli.

  12. Aspergillus: sex and recombination.

    PubMed

    Varga, János; Szigeti, Gyöngyi; Baranyi, Nikolett; Kocsubé, Sándor; O'Gorman, Céline M; Dyer, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    The genus Aspergillus is one of the most widespread groups of fungi on Earth, comprised of about 300-350 species with very diverse lifestyles. Most species produce asexual propagula (conidia) on conidial heads. Despite their ubiquity, a sexual cycle has not yet been identified for most of the aspergilli. Where sexual reproduction is present, species exhibit either homothallic (self fertile) or heterothallic (obligate outcrossing) breeding systems. A parasexual cycle has also been described in some Aspergillus species. As in other fungi, sexual reproduction is governed by mating-type (MAT) genes, which determine sexual identity and are involved in regulating later stages of sexual development. Previous population genetic studies have indicated that some supposedly asexual aspergilli exhibit evidence of a recombining population structure, suggesting the presence of a cryptic sexual cycle. In addition, genome analyses have revealed networks of genes necessary for sexual reproduction in several Aspergillus species, again consistent with latent sexuality in these fungi. Knowledge of MAT gene presence has then successfully been applied to induce sexual reproduction between MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isolates of certain supposedly asexual aspergilli. Recent progress in understanding the extent and significance of sexual reproduction is described here, with special emphasis on findings that are relevant to clinically important aspergilli. PMID:25118872

  13. Controlled release from recombinant polymers.

    PubMed

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-09-28

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed.

  14. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  15. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  16. Recombinant DNA means and method

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, B.L.; Mao, J.I.; Moir, D.T.; Taunton-Rigby, A.; Vovis, G.F.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes a transformed living cell selected from the group consisting of fungi, yeast and bacteria, and containing genetic material derived from recombinant DNA material and coding for bovine rennin.

  17. Recombination system for storage batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, B.; Ledjeff, K.; Winsel, A.

    1983-03-29

    A recombination system for catalytic oxidation of hydrogen in storage battery gases includes a gas supply duct which makes it possible for the combustible gas flowing through it to aspirate from the ambient the necessary combustion air, following the principle of a bunsen burner, and to entrain it to the recombination catalyst. In case of over-supply of gas, an acid separator positioned in the gas supply pipe counteracts the gas aspiration by means of its flow impedance and thereby makes the recombination system safe from overload. It can also be connected following a conventional recombiner, thereby increasing its effectiveness, by receiving the excess hydrogen from same and reacting it with the aid of the air aspiration.

  18. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    MedlinePlus

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  19. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, Helmut; Ledjeff, Konstantin

    1985-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive he discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  20. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, H.; Ledjeff, K.

    1984-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive the discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  1. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  2. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Beall, David S.; Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H.; Guimaraes, Walter V.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    1995-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  3. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, David E.; Horton, Philip G.; Ben-Bassat, Arie

    1996-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  4. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Bean, Rachel; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, ns, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z*=1078±11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1σ to R=1.734±0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: γα<0.39 and γi<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  5. Recombination at the DNA level. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of papers in the following areas are presented: (1) chromosome mechanics; (2) yeast systems; (3) mammalian homologous recombination; (4) transposons; (5) Mu; (6) plant transposons/T4 recombination; (7) topoisomerase, resolvase, and gyrase; (8) Escherichia coli general recombination; (9) recA; (10) repair; (11) eucaryotic enzymes; (12) integration and excision of bacteriophage; (13) site-specific recombination; and (14) recombination in vitro. (ACR)

  6. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  7. Progenitors of Recombining Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  8. Electron-Beam Recombination Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoades, Robert Lewis

    1992-01-01

    The first known instance of electron-beam pumping of the 546.1 nm mercury laser is reported. This has been achieved using high-energy electrons to create intense ionization in a coaxial diode chamber containing a mixture of noble gases with a small amount of mercury vapor. Also reported are the results of a study of the 585.3 nm neon laser in He:Ne:Ar mixtures under similar experimental conditions. Both of these lasers are believed to be predominantly pumped by recombination. For the mercury laser, kinetic processes in the partially ionized plasma following the excitation pulse of high-energy electrons should favor the production of atomic mercury ions and molecular ions containing mercury. Subsequent recombination with electrons heavily favors the production of the 7^3S and 6^3 D states of Hg, of which 7^3S is the upper level of the reported laser. For the neon laser, the dominant recombining ion has been previously shown to be Ne_2^{+}. One of the dominant roles of helium in recombination lasers is inferred from the data for the neon laser at low helium concentrations. Helium appears to be necessary for the rapid relaxation of the electron energy which then increases the reaction rates for all known recombination processes thus increasing the pump rate into the upper state.

  9. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

  10. DNA recombination: the replication connection.

    PubMed

    Haber, J E

    1999-07-01

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) arise after exposure to ionizing radiation or enzymatic cleavage, but especially during the process of DNA replication itself. Homologous recombination plays a critical role in repair of such DSBs. There has been significant progress in our understanding of two processes that occur in DSB repair: gene conversion and recombination-dependent DNA replication. Recent evidence suggests that gene conversion and break-induced replication are related processes that both begin with the establishment of a replication fork in which both leading- and lagging-strand synthesis occur. There has also been much progress in characterization of the biochemical roles of recombination proteins that are highly conserved from yeast to humans.

  11. The Dissociative Recombination of OH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical quantum chemical calculations of the cross sections and rates for the dissociative recombination of the upsilon = 0 level of the ground state of OH(+) show that recombination occurs primarily along the 2 (2)Pi diabatic route. The products are 0((1)D) and a hot H atom with 6.1 eV kinetic energy. The coupling to the resonances is very small and the indirect recombination mechanism plays only a minor role. The recommended value for the rate coefficient is (6.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp -9)x (T(e)/1300)(exp -0.48) cu.cm/s for 10 less than T(e) less than 1000 K.

  12. Recombinant snake venom prothrombin activators.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Three prothrombin activators; ecarin, which was originally isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, trocarin from the rough-scaled snake Tropidechis carinatus, and oscutarin from the Taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus, were expressed in mammalian cells with the purpose to obtain recombinant prothrombin activators that could be used to convert prothrombin to thrombin. We have previously reported that recombinant ecarin can efficiently generate thrombin without the need for additional cofactors, but does not discriminate non-carboxylated prothrombin from biologically active γ-carboxylated prothrombin. Here we report that recombinant trocarin and oscutarin could not efficiently generate thrombin without additional protein co-factors. We confirm that both trocarin and oscutarin are similar to human coagulation Factor X (FX), explaining the need for additional cofactors. Sequencing of a genomic fragment containing 7 out of the 8 exons coding for oscutarin further confirmed the similarity to human FX. PMID:23111318

  13. Selenium incorporation using recombinant techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, Helen

    2010-04-01

    An overview of techniques for recombinant incorporation of selenium and subsequent purification and crystallization of the resulting labelled protein. Using selenomethionine to phase macromolecular structures is common practice in structure determination, along with the use of selenocysteine. Selenium is consequently the most commonly used heavy atom for MAD. In addition to the well established recombinant techniques for the incorporation of selenium in prokaryal expression systems, there have been recent advances in selenium labelling in eukaryal expression, which will be discussed. Tips and things to consider for the purification and crystallization of seleno-labelled proteins are also included.

  14. Classifications and comparisons of multilocus recombination distributions

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Samuel; Liberman, Uri

    1978-01-01

    Various classifications and representations of multilocus recombination structures are delineated based on generalized notions of linkage values and recombination rates. An important class of recombination distributions (called the count-location chiasma process) is parameterized by a distribution of the number of crossover events and, for each such crossover count, by a conditional distribution of crossover locations. A number of properties of this recombination structure are developed. A multilocus definition of a “natural” recombination range is set forth. Orderings among recombination distributions in the multilocus setting are also discussed. Comparisons are made in terms of complete linkage, free assortment and noninterference schemes serving as standards. PMID:16592601

  15. Genetic recombination and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, B; Betancourt, A J; Kaiser, V B; Gordo, I

    2009-01-01

    Reduced rates of genetic recombination are often associated with reduced genetic variability and levels of adaptation. Several different evolutionary processes, collectively known as Hill-Robertson (HR) effects, have been proposed as causes of these correlates of recombination. Here, we use DNA sequence polymorphism and divergence data from the noncrossing over dot chromosome of Drosophila to discriminate between two of the major forms of HR effects: selective sweeps and background selection. This chromosome shows reduced levels of silent variability and reduced effectiveness of selection. We show that neither model fits the data on variability. We propose that, in large genomic regions with restricted recombination, HR effects among nonsynonymous mutations undermine the effective strength of selection, so that their background selection effects are weakened. This modified model fits the data on variability and also explains why variability in very large nonrecombining genomes is not completely wiped out. We also show that HR effects of this type can produce an individual selection advantage to recombination, as well as greatly reduce the mean fitness of nonrecombining genomes and genomic regions.

  16. Recombinant DNA: History of the Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigue, Charles L.; Stanziale, William G.

    1979-01-01

    The hazards associated with recombinant DNA research are presented along with some social implications and the development of recombinant DNA research guidelines by the National Institutes of Health. (SA)

  17. Meiotic Recombination: The Essence of Heredity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Neil

    2015-10-28

    The study of homologous recombination has its historical roots in meiosis. In this context, recombination occurs as a programmed event that culminates in the formation of crossovers, which are essential for accurate chromosome segregation and create new combinations of parental alleles. Thus, meiotic recombination underlies both the independent assortment of parental chromosomes and genetic linkage. This review highlights the features of meiotic recombination that distinguish it from recombinational repair in somatic cells, and how the molecular processes of meiotic recombination are embedded and interdependent with the chromosome structures that characterize meiotic prophase. A more in-depth review presents our understanding of how crossover and noncrossover pathways of meiotic recombination are differentiated and regulated. The final section of this review summarizes the studies that have defined defective recombination as a leading cause of pregnancy loss and congenital disease in humans.

  18. Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: origin and recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, W P; Bernasconi, F; Mutirangura, A; Ledbetter, D H; Langlois, S; Malcolm, S; Morris, M A; Schinzel, A A

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N = 27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N = 5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination are utilized. Standard methods of centromere mapping are employed to determine the level of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, most paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome. PMID:8352279

  19. Recombinant protein polymers in biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wookhyun

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring protein-based materials have been found that function as critical components in biomechanical response, fibers and adhesives. A relatively small but growing number of recombinant protein-based materials that mimic the desired features of their natural sources, such as collagens, elastins and silks, are considered as an alternative to conventional synthetic polymers. Advances in genetic engineering have facilitated the synthesis of repetitive protein polymers with precise control of molecular weights which are designed by using synthetic genes encoding tandem repeats of oligopeptide originating from a modular domain of natural proteins. Many repeat sequences as protein polymer building blocks adopt a well-defined secondary structure and undergo self-assembly to result in physically cross-linked networks or with chemical cross-linking so that further form three-dimensional architectures similar to natural counterparts. In this review, recombinant protein polymers currently developed will be presented that have emerged as promising class of next generation biomaterials. PMID:23276922

  20. Recombinant bacteriophage lysins as antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Mark; Ross, Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; O'Mahony, Jim

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing worldwide prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, bacteriophage endolysins (lysins) represent a very promising novel alternative class of antibacterial in the fight against infectious disease. Lysins are phage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases which, when applied exogenously (as purified recombinant proteins) to Gram-positive bacteria, bring about rapid lysis and death of the bacterial cell. A number of studies have recently demonstrated the strong potential of these enzymes in human and veterinary medicine to control and treat pathogens on mucosal surfaces and in systemic infections. They also have potential in diagnostics and detection, bio-defence, elimination of food pathogens and control of phytopathogens. This review discusses the extensive research on recombinant bacteriophage lysins in the context of antibacterials, and looks forward to future development and potential. PMID:21327123

  1. Recombination Catalysts for Hypersonic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of commercially-viable access to space will require technologies that reduce propulsion system weight and complexity, while extracting maximum energy from the products of combustion. This work is directed toward developing effective nozzle recombination catalysts for the supersonic and hypersonic aeropropulsion engines used to provide such access to space. Effective nozzle recombination will significantly reduce rk=le length (hence, propulsion system weight) and reduce fuel requirements, further decreasing the vehicle's gross lift-off weight. Two such catalysts have been identified in this work, barium and antimony compounds, by developing chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for these materials and determining the engine performance enhancement for a typical flight trajectory. Significant performance improvements are indicated, using only 2% (mole or mass) of these compounds in the combustor product gas.

  2. Chemical kinetics of geminal recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, P.P.; Khudyakov, I.V.; Brin, E.F.; Kuz'min, V.A.

    1988-09-01

    The kinetics of geminal recombination of triplet radical pairs formed in photoreduction of benzophenone by p-cresol in glycerin solution was studied by pulsed laser photolysis. The experiments were conducted at several temperatures and in a constant magnetic field of H = 0.34 T. The parameters in six kinetic equations describing geminal recombination were determined with a computer. The values of the sums of the squares of the residual deviations of the approximation were obtained. It was found that the kinetics are best described by the functions proposed by Noyes and Shushin. It was shown that it is necessary to use the mutual diffusion coefficient of the radicals, which is significantly smaller than the sum of the estimations of the experimental values of the radical diffusion coefficients, for describing the kinetics due to the correlations of the molecular motions of the radicals in the cage.

  3. Recombinant vector and eukaryotic host transformed thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Sugden, W.M.

    1987-08-11

    A recombinant plasmid is described comprising: a segment from a first plasmid which is not a lymphotrophic herpes virus segment and which facilitates the replication of the recombinant plasmid in a prokaryotic host; a segment from a lymphotrophic herpes virus which is linked to the first plasmid segment such that is a capable of assisting in maintaining the recombinant plasmid as a plasmid if the recombinant plasmid is inserted into a eukaryotic host that has been transformed by the lymphotrophic herpes virus; and a foreign eukaryotic gene component linked as part of the recombinant plasmid.

  4. Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: Origin and recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A.; Mutirangura, A.; Ledbetter, D.H. ); Langlois, S. ); Morris, M.A.; Malcolm, S.

    1993-09-01

    Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N=27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N-5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, more paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome. 33 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  5. Effect of gamma radiation on retroviral recombination.

    PubMed

    Hu, W S; Temin, H M

    1992-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) of retroviral recombination, we exposed virions to gamma radiation prior to infecting target cells. By using previously described spleen necrosis virus-based vectors containing multiple markers, recombinant proviruses were studied after a single round of retrovirus replication. The current models of retroviral recombination predict that breaking virion RNA should promote minus-strand recombination (forced copy-choice model), decrease or not affect plus-strand recombination (strand displacement/assimilation model), and shift plus-strand recombination towards the 3' end of the genome. However, we found that while gamma irradiation of virions reduced the amount of recoverable viral RNA, it did not primarily cause breaks. Thus, the frequency of selected recombinants was not significantly altered with greater doses of radiation. In spite of this, the irradiation did decrease the number of recombinants with only one internal template switch. As a result, the average number of additional internal template switches in the recombinant proviruses increased from 0.7 to 1.4 as infectivity decreased to 6%. The unselected internal template switches tended to be 5' of the selected crossover even in the recombinants from irradiated viruses, inconsistent with a plus-strand recombination mechanism.

  6. Mating-induced recombination in fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Priest, Nicholas K; Roach, Deborah A; Galloway, Laura F

    2007-01-01

    In traditional deterministic models the conditions for the evolution of sex and sexual behavior are limited because their benefits are context dependent. In novel and adverse environments both multiple mating and recombination can help generate gene combinations that allow for rapid adaptation. Mating frequency often increases in conditions in which recombination might be beneficial; therefore, increased sexual behavior might evolve to act as a cue that stimulates recombination. We conducted two experiments in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, using linked phenotypic markers to determine how recent bouts of additional mating affect female recombination rate. The first experiment examined the effect of additional mating, mating history, and age on female recombination rate. The second experiment assessed the effect of recent mating events on recombination rate. Together, the experiments suggest that each additional bout of mating temporarily increases female recombination rate. These findings imply that the conditions favoring the evolution of sexual reproduction and multiple mating behaviors are broader than currently appreciated.

  7. Isoform-Specific Modulation of Inflammation Induced by Adenoviral Mediated Delivery of Platelet-Derived Growth Factors in the Adult Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Betsholtz, Christer; Andrae, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) are key regulators of mesenchymal cells in vertebrate development. To what extent PDGFs also exert beneficial homeostatic or reparative roles in adult organs, as opposed to adverse fibrogenic responses in pathology, are unclear. PDGF signaling plays critical roles during heart development, during which forced overexpression of PDGFs induces detrimental cardiac fibrosis; other studies have implicated PDGF signaling in post-infarct myocardial repair. Different PDGFs may exert different effects mediated through the two PDGF receptors (PDGFRα and PDGFRβ) in different cell types. Here, we assessed responses induced by five known PDGF isoforms in the adult mouse heart in the context of adenovirus vector-mediated inflammation. Our results show that different PDGFs have different, in some cases even opposing, effects. Strikingly, whereas the major PDGFRα agonists (PDGF-A and -C) decreased the amount of scar tissue and increased the numbers of PDGFRα-positive fibroblasts, PDGFRβ agonists either induced large scars with extensive inflammation (PDGF-B) or dampened the adenovirus-induced inflammation and produced a small and dense scar (PDGF-D). These results provide evidence for PDGF isoform-specific inflammation-modulating functions that may have therapeutic implications. They also illustrate a surprising complexity in the PDGF-mediated pathophysiological responses. PMID:27513343

  8. Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor in critical limb ischemia: safety results from a phase I trial.

    PubMed

    Mohler, Emile R; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Olin, Jeffrey W; Trachtenberg, Jeffrey D; Rasmussen, Henrik; Pak, Raphael; Crystal, Ronald G

    2003-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is typified by rest pain and/or tissue necrosis secondary to advanced peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and is characterized by diminution in limb perfusion at rest. We tested the safety of an angiogenic strategy with CI-1023 (Ad(GV)VEGF121.10), a replication-deficient adenovirus encoding human vascular endothelial growth factor isoform 121 in patients with CLI as part of a phase I trial. Fifteen subjects >35 years of age with CLI and angiographic disease involving the infra-inguinal vessels underwent intramuscular injection of CI-1023 (4 x 10(8) to 4 x 10(10) particle units, n = 13) or placebo (n = 2). All of the patients tolerated the injection well and there were no serious complications related to the procedure. Transient edema was noted in one patient. A total of 79 adverse events were reported over the course of one year. One death (day 136) and one malignancy (day 332) occurred in the CI-1023 group. CI-1023 appears to be well tolerated and safe for single-dose administration in patients with critical limb ischemia due to PAD. Further studies are needed to determine the efficacy of this form of therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:12866606

  9. Off-the-shelf adenoviral-mediated immunotherapy via bicistronic expression of tumor antigen and iMyD88/CD40 adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Kemnade, Jan Ole; Seethammagari, Mamatha; Narayanan, Priya; Levitt, Jonathan M; McCormick, Alison A; Spencer, David M

    2012-07-01

    Recent modest successes in ex vivo dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy have motivated continued innovation in the area of DC manipulation and activation. Although ex vivo vaccine approaches continue to be proving grounds for new DC manipulation techniques, the intrinsic limits of ex vivo therapy, including high cost, minimal standardization, cumbersome delivery, and poor accessibility, incentivizes the development of vaccines compatible with in vivo DC targeting. We describe here a method to co-deliver both tumor-specific antigen (TSA) and an iMyD88/CD40 adjuvant (iMC), to DCs that combines toll-like receptor (TLR) and CD40 signaling. In this study, we demonstrate that simple TSA delivery via adenoviral vectors results in strong antitumor immunity. Addition of iMC delivered in a separate vector is insufficient to enhance this effect. However, when delivered simultaneously with TSA in a single bicistronic vector (BV), iMC is able to significantly enhance antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses and inhibit established tumor growth. This study demonstrates the spatial-temporal importance of concurrent DC activation and TSA presentation. Further, it demonstrates the feasibility of in vivo molecular enhancement of DCs necessary for effective antitumor immune responses.

  10. Osteogenic gene regulation and relative acceleration of healing by adenoviral-mediated transfer of human BMP-2 or -6 in equine osteotomy and ostectomy models.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akikazu; Shields, Kathleen M; Litsky, Alan S; Mattoon, John S; Weisbrode, Steven E; Bartlett, Jeffrey S; Bertone, Alicia L

    2008-06-01

    This study evaluated healing of equine metatarsal osteotomies and ostectomies in response to percutaneous injection of adenoviral (Ad) bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, Ad-BMP-6, or beta-galactosidase protein vector control (Ad-LacZ) administered 14 days after surgery. Radiographic and quantitative computed tomographic assessment of bone formation indicated greater and earlier mineralized callus in both the osteotomies and ostectomies of the metatarsi injected with Ad-BMP-2 or Ad-BMP-6. Peak torque to failure and torsional stiffness were greater in osteotomies treated with Ad-BMP-2 than Ad-BMP-6, and both Ad-BMP-2- and Ad-BMP-6-treated osteotomies were greater than Ad-LacZ or untreated osteotomies. Gene expression of ostectomy mineralized callus 8 weeks after surgery indicated upregulation of genes related to osteogenesis compared to intact metatarsal bone. Expression of transforming growth factor beta-1, cathepsin H, and gelsolin-like capping protein were greater in Ad-BMP-2- and Ad-BMP-6-treated callus compared to Ad-LacZ-treated or untreated callus. Evidence of tissue biodistribution of adenovirus in distant organs was not identified by quantitative PCR, despite increased serum antiadenoviral vector antibody. This study demonstrated a greater relative potency of Ad-BMP-2 over Ad-BMP-6 in accelerating osteotomy healing when administered in this regimen, although both genes were effective at increasing bone at both osteotomy and ostectomy sites.

  11. Bacteriophage recombination systems and biotechnical applications.

    PubMed

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophage recombination systems have been widely used in biotechnology for modifying prokaryotic species, for creating transgenic animals and plants, and more recently, for human cell gene manipulation. In contrast to homologous recombination, which benefits from the endogenous recombination machinery of the cell, site-specific recombination requires an exogenous source of recombinase in mammalian cells. The mechanism of bacteriophage evolution and their coexistence with bacterial cells has become a point of interest ever since bacterial viruses' life cycles were first explored. Phage recombinases have already been exploited as valuable genetic tools and new phage enzymes, and their potential application to genetic engineering and genome manipulation, vectorology, and generation of new transgene delivery vectors, and cell therapy are attractive areas of research that continue to be investigated. The significance and role of phage recombination systems in biotechnology is reviewed in this paper, with specific focus on homologous and site-specific recombination conferred by the coli phages, λ, and N15, the integrase from the Streptomyces phage, ΦC31, the recombination system of phage P1, and the recently characterized recombination functions of Yersinia phage, PY54. Key steps of the molecular mechanisms involving phage recombination functions and their application to molecular engineering, our novel exploitations of the PY54-derived recombination system, and its application to the development of new DNA vectors are discussed. PMID:24442504

  12. Bacteriophage recombination systems and biotechnical applications.

    PubMed

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophage recombination systems have been widely used in biotechnology for modifying prokaryotic species, for creating transgenic animals and plants, and more recently, for human cell gene manipulation. In contrast to homologous recombination, which benefits from the endogenous recombination machinery of the cell, site-specific recombination requires an exogenous source of recombinase in mammalian cells. The mechanism of bacteriophage evolution and their coexistence with bacterial cells has become a point of interest ever since bacterial viruses' life cycles were first explored. Phage recombinases have already been exploited as valuable genetic tools and new phage enzymes, and their potential application to genetic engineering and genome manipulation, vectorology, and generation of new transgene delivery vectors, and cell therapy are attractive areas of research that continue to be investigated. The significance and role of phage recombination systems in biotechnology is reviewed in this paper, with specific focus on homologous and site-specific recombination conferred by the coli phages, λ, and N15, the integrase from the Streptomyces phage, ΦC31, the recombination system of phage P1, and the recently characterized recombination functions of Yersinia phage, PY54. Key steps of the molecular mechanisms involving phage recombination functions and their application to molecular engineering, our novel exploitations of the PY54-derived recombination system, and its application to the development of new DNA vectors are discussed.

  13. Recombinant erythropoietin in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ng, T; Marx, G; Littlewood, T; Macdougall, I

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin (RHuEPO) has revolutionised the treatment of patients with anaemia of chronic renal disease. Clinical studies have demonstrated that RHuEPO is also useful in various non-uraemic conditions including haematological and oncological disorders, prematurity, HIV infection, and perioperative therapies. Besides highlighting both the historical and functional aspects of RHuEPO, this review discusses the applications of RHuEPO in clinical practice and the potential problems of RHuEPO treatment. PMID:12897214

  14. Recombinant DNA production of spider silk proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tokareva, Olena; Michalczechen-Lacerda, Valquíria A; Rech, Elíbio L; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is considered to be the toughest biopolymer on Earth due to an extraordinary combination of strength and elasticity. Moreover, silks are biocompatible and biodegradable protein-based materials. Recent advances in genetic engineering make it possible to produce recombinant silks in heterologous hosts, opening up opportunities for large-scale production of recombinant silks for various biomedical and material science applications. We review the current strategies to produce recombinant spider silks. PMID:24119078

  15. Recombinant bacteria for mosquito control.

    PubMed

    Federici, B A; Park, H-W; Bideshi, D K; Wirth, M C; Johnson, J J

    2003-11-01

    Bacterial insecticides have been used for the control of nuisance and vector mosquitoes for more than two decades. Nevertheless, due primarily to their high cost and often only moderate efficacy, these insecticides remain of limited use in tropical countries where mosquito-borne diseases are prevalent. Recently, however, recombinant DNA techniques have been used to improve bacterial insecticide efficacy by markedly increasing the synthesis of mosquitocidal proteins and by enabling new endotoxin combinations from different bacteria to be produced within single strains. These new strains combine mosquitocidal Cry and Cyt proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis with the binary toxin of Bacillus sphaericus, improving efficacy against Culex species by 10-fold and greatly reducing the potential for resistance through the presence of Cyt1A. Moreover, although intensive use of B. sphaericus against Culex populations in the field can result in high levels of resistance, most of this can be suppressed by combining this bacterial species with Cyt1A; the latter enables the binary toxin of this species to enter midgut epithelial cells via the microvillar membrane in the absence of a midgut receptor. The availability of these novel strains and newly discovered mosquitocidal proteins, such as the Mtx toxins of B. sphaericus, offers the potential for constructing a range of recombinant bacterial insecticides for more effective control of the mosquito vectors of filariasis, Dengue fever and malaria. PMID:14506223

  16. Dissociative recombination in planetary ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Ionization in planetary atmospheres can be produced by solar photoionization, photoelectron impact ionization, and, in auroral regions, by impact of precipitating particles. This ionization is lost mainly in dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions. Although atomic ions cannot undergo DR, they can be transformed locally through ion-molecule reactions into molecular ions, or they may be transported vertically or horizontally to regions of the atmosphere where such transformations are possible. Because DR reactions tend to be very exothermic, they can be an important source of kinetically or internally excited fragments. In interplanetary thermospheres, the neutral densities decrease exponentially with altitude. Below the homopause (or turbopause), the atmosphere is assumed to be throughly mixed by convection and/or turbulence. Above the homopause, diffusion is the major transport mechanism, and each species is distributed according to its mass, with the logarithmic derivative of the density with repect to altitude given approximately by -1/H, where H = kT/mg is the scale height. In this expression, T is the neutral temperature, g is the local acceleratiion of gravity, and m is the mass of the species. Thus lighter species become relatively more abundant, and heavier species less abundant, as the altitude increases. This variation of the neutral composition can lead to changes in the ion composition; furthermore, as the neutral densities decrease, dissociative recombination becomes more important relative to ion-neutral reactions as a loss mechanism for molecular ions.

  17. Effects of recombination on densovirus phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Martynova, Elena U; Schal, Coby; Mukha, Dmitry V

    2016-01-01

    Densoviruses are a group of arthropod-infecting viruses with a small single-stranded linear DNA genome. These viruses constitute the subfamily Densovirinae of the family Parvoviridae. While recombination in between vertebrate-infecting parvoviruses has been investigated, to date, no systematic analysis of recombination has been carried out for densoviruses. The aim of the present work was to study possible recombination events in the evolutionary history of densoviruses and to assess possible effects of recombination on phylogenies inferred using amino acid sequences of nonstructural (NS) and capsid (viral protein, VP) proteins. For this purpose, the complete or nearly complete genome nucleotide sequences of 40 densoviruses from the GenBank database were used to construct a phylogenetic cladogram. The viruses under study clustered into five distinct groups corresponding to the five currently accepted genera. Recombination within each group was studied independently. The RDP4 software revealed three statistically highly credible recombination events, two of which involved viruses of the genus Ambidensovirus, and the other, viruses from the genus Iteradensovirus. These recombination events led to mismatches between phylogenetic trees constructed using comparison of amino acid sequences of proteins encoded by genome regions of recombinant and non-recombinant origin (regulatory NS1 and NS3 proteins and capsid VP protein).

  18. Deleterious background selection with recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, R.R.; Kaplan, N.L.

    1995-12-01

    An analytic expression for the expected nucleotide diversity is obtained for a neutral locus in a region with deleterious mutation and recombination. Our analytic results are used to predict levels of variation for the entire third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. The predictions are consistent with the low levels of variation that have been observed at loci near the centromeres of the third chromosome of D. melanogaster. However, the low levels of variation observed near the tips of this chromosome are not predicted using currently available estimates of the deleterious mutation rate and of selection coefficients. If considerably smaller selection coefficients are assumed, the low observed levels of variation at the tips of the third chromosome are consistent with the background selection model. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Dielectronic recombination of tungsten ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowen; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dong, Chenzhong; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio calculations of dielectronic recombination rate coefficients of Ne-, Pd- and Ag-like tungsten have been performed. Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities and autoionization rates were calculated using the Flexible Atomic Code. The contributions from different channels to the total rate coefficients are discussed. The present calculated rate coefficients are compared with other calculations where available. Excellent agreement has been found for Ne-like W while a large discrepancy was found for Pd-like W, which implies that more ab initio calculations and experimental measurements are badly needed. Further calculations demonstrated that the influence of configuration interaction is small while nonresonant radiative stabilizing (NRS) contribution to doubly excited non-autoionizing states are vital. The data obtained are expected to be useful for modeling plasmas for fusion applications, especially for the ITER community, which makes experimental verification even more essential.

  20. Fundamental Studies of Recombinant Hydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael W

    2014-01-25

    This research addressed the long term goals of understanding the assembly and organization of hydrogenase enzymes, of reducing them in size and complexity, of determining structure/function relationships, including energy conservation via charge separation across membranes, and in screening for novel H2 catalysts. A key overall goal of the proposed research was to define and characterize minimal hydrogenases that are produced in high yields and are oxygen-resistant. Remarkably, in spite of decades of research carried out on hydrogenases, it is not possible to readily manipulate or design the enzyme using molecular biology approaches since a recombinant form produced in a suitable host is not available. Such resources are essential if we are to understand what constitutes a “minimal” hydrogenase and design such catalysts with certain properties, such as resistance to oxygen, extreme stability and specificity for a given electron donor. The model system for our studies is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophile that grows optimally at 100°C, which contains three different nickel-iron [NiFe-] containing hydrogenases. Hydrogenases I and II are cytoplasmic while the other, MBH, is an integral membrane protein that functions to both evolve H2 and pump protons. Three important breakthroughs were made during the funding period with P. furiosus soluble hydrogenase I (SHI). First, we produced an active recombinant form of SHI in E. coli by the co-expression of sixteen genes using anaerobically-induced promoters. Second, we genetically-engineered P. furiosus to overexpress SHI by an order of magnitude compared to the wild type strain. Third, we generated the first ‘minimal’ form of SHI, one that contained two rather than four subunits. This dimeric form was stable and active, and directly interacted with a pyruvate-oxidizing enzyme with any intermediate electron carrier. The research resulted in five peer-reviewed publications.

  1. Recombining without Hotspots: A Comprehensive Evolutionary Portrait of Recombination in Two Closely Related Species of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Smukowski Heil, Caiti S; Ellison, Chris; Dubin, Matthew; Noor, Mohamed A F

    2015-10-01

    Meiotic recombination rate varies across the genome within and between individuals, populations, and species in virtually all taxa studied. In almost every species, this variation takes the form of discrete recombination hotspots, determined in some mammals by a protein called PRDM9. Hotspots and their determinants have a profound effect on the genomic landscape, and share certain features that extend across the tree of life. Drosophila, in contrast, are anomalous in their absence of hotspots, PRDM9, and other species-specific differences in the determination of recombination. To better understand the evolution of meiosis and general patterns of recombination across diverse taxa, we present a truly comprehensive portrait of recombination across time, combining recently published cross-based contemporary recombination estimates from each of two sister species with newly obtained linkage-disequilibrium-based historic estimates of recombination from both of these species. Using Drosophila pseudoobscura and Drosophila miranda as a model system, we compare recombination rate between species at multiple scales, and we suggest that Drosophila replicate the pattern seen in human-chimpanzee in which recombination rate is conserved at broad scales. We also find evidence of a species-wide recombination modifier(s), resulting in both a present and historic genome-wide elevation of recombination rates in D. miranda, and identify broad scale effects on recombination from the presence of an inversion. Finally, we reveal an unprecedented view of the distribution of recombination in D. pseudoobscura, illustrating patterns of linked selection and where recombination is taking place. Overall, by combining these estimation approaches, we highlight key similarities and differences in recombination between Drosophila and other organisms.

  2. High efficiency recombineering in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter; Britton, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to efficiently generate targeted point mutations in the chromosome without the need for antibiotics, or other means of selection, is a powerful strategy for genome engineering. Although oligonucleotide-mediated recombineering (ssDNA recombineering) has been utilized in Escherichia coli for over a decade, the successful adaptation of ssDNA recombineering to Gram-positive bacteria has not been reported. Here we describe the development and application of ssDNA recombineering in lactic acid bacteria. Mutations were incorporated in the chromosome of Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactococcus lactis without selection at frequencies ranging between 0.4% and 19%. Whole genome sequence analysis showed that ssDNA recombineering is specific and not hypermutagenic. To highlight the utility of ssDNA recombineering we reduced the intrinsic vancomymycin resistance of L. reuteri >100-fold. By creating a single amino acid change in the d-Ala-d-Ala ligase enzyme we reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration for vancomycin from >256 to 1.5 µg/ml, well below the clinically relevant minimum inhibitory concentration. Recombineering thus allows high efficiency mutagenesis in lactobacilli and lactococci, and may be used to further enhance beneficial properties and safety of strains used in medicine and industry. We expect that this work will serve as a blueprint for the adaptation of ssDNA recombineering to other Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:22328729

  3. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, John; Piddington, Chris S.; Kovacevich, Brian R.; Young, Kevin D.; Denome, Sylvia A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

  4. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, J.; Piddington, C.S.; Kovacevich, B.R.; Young, K.D.; Denome, S.A.

    1994-10-18

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous. 13 figs.

  5. Dielectronic recombination lines of C{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Sochi, Taha Storey, Peter J.

    2013-11-15

    The present paper presents atomic data generated to investigate the recombination lines of C II in the spectra of planetary nebulae. These data include energies of bound and autoionizing states, oscillator strengths and radiative transition probabilities, autoionization probabilities, and recombination coefficients. The R-matrix method of electron scattering theory was used to describe the C{sup 2+} plus electron system.

  6. Recombinant Vaccinia Virus: Immunization against Multiple Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkus, Marion E.; Piccini, Antonia; Lipinskas, Bernard R.; Paoletti, Enzo

    1985-09-01

    The coding sequences for the hepatitis B virus surface antigen, the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D, and the influenza virus hemagglutinin were inserted into a single vaccinia virus genome. Rabbits inoculated intravenously or intradermally with this polyvalent vaccinia virus recombinant produced antibodies reactive to all three authentic foreign antigens. In addition, the feasibility of multiple rounds of vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus was demonstrated.

  7. Chi Enhances Heteroduplex DNA Levels during Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Holbeck, S. L.; Smith, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    The major pathway of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli, the RecBCD pathway, is stimulated by Chi sites. To determine whether Chi enhances an early or late step in recombination, we measured formation of heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) in extracts of lambda-infected E. coli. Chi elevated hDNA levels in these extracts, supporting a role for Chi early (before hDNA formation) in recombination. RecA protein and RecBCD enzyme were both necessary for detection of hDNA, indicating that they, too, act early. Analysis of a panel of recBCD mutants indicated that Chi-nicking activity was needed for Chi's stimulation of hDNA formation. These results support a previously proposed model of recombination. Further results suggested that RecBCD enzyme has an additional role late in recombination. PMID:1459441

  8. Electron Recombination in a Dense Hydrogen Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, M.R.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Yonehara, K.; Leonova, M.A.; Schwarz, T.A.; Chung, M.; /Unlisted /IIT, Chicago /Fermilab /MUONS Inc., Batavia /Turin Polytechnic

    2012-05-01

    A high pressure hydrogen gas filled RF cavity was subjected to an intense proton beam to study the evolution of the beam induced plasma inside the cavity. Varying beam intensities, gas pressures and electric fields were tested. Beam induced ionized electrons load the cavity, thereby decreasing the accelerating gradient. The extent and duration of this degradation has been measured. A model of the recombination between ionized electrons and ions is presented, with the intent of producing a baseline for the physics inside such a cavity used in a muon accelerator. Analysis of the data taken during the summer of 2011 shows that self recombination takes place in pure hydrogen gas. The decay of the number of electrons in the cavity once the beam is turned off indicates self recombination rather than attachment to electronegative dopants or impurities. The cross section of electron recombination grows for larger clusters of hydrogen and so at the equilibrium of electron production and recombination in the cavity, processes involving H{sub 5}{sup +} or larger clusters must be taking place. The measured recombination rates during this time match or exceed the analytic predicted values. The accelerating gradient in the cavity recovers fully in time for the next beam pulse of a muon collider. Exactly what the recombination rate is and how much the gradient degrades during the 60 ns muon collider beam pulse will be extrapolated from data taken during the spring of 2012.

  9. Initiation of meiotic recombination in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Kojic, Milorad; Sutherland, Jeanette H; Pérez-Martín, José; Holloman, William K

    2013-12-01

    A central feature of meiosis is the pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes. Ustilago maydis, a biotrophic fungus that parasitizes maize, has long been utilized as an experimental system for studying recombination, but it has not been clear when in the life cycle meiotic recombination initiates. U. maydis forms dormant diploid teliospores as the end product of the infection process. Upon germination, teliospores complete meiosis to produce four haploid basidiospores. Here we asked whether the meiotic process begins when teliospores germinate or at an earlier stage in development. When teliospores homozygous for a cdc45 mutation temperature sensitive for DNA synthesis were germinated at the restrictive temperature, four nuclei became visible. This implies that teliospores have already undergone premeiotic DNA synthesis and suggests that meiotic recombination initiates at a stage of infection before teliospores mature. Determination of homologous recombination in plant tissue infected with U. maydis strains heteroallelic for the nar1 gene revealed that Nar(+) recombinants were produced at a stage before teliospore maturation. Teliospores obtained from a spo11Δ cross were still able to germinate but the process was highly disturbed and the meiotic products were imbalanced in chromosomal complement. These results show that in U. maydis, homologous recombination initiates during the infection process and that meiosis can proceed even in the absence of Spo11, but with loss of genomic integrity.

  10. Electron-ion recombination rates for merged-beams experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pajek, M.

    1994-12-31

    Energy dependence of the electron-ion recombination rates are studied for different recombination processes (radiative recombination, three-body recombination, dissociative recombination) for Maxwellian relative velocity distribution of arbitrary asymmetry. The results are discussed in context of the electron-ion merged beams experiments in cooling ion storage rings. The question of indication of a possible contribution of the three-body recombination to the measured recombination rates versus relative energy is particularly addressed. Its influence on the electron beam temperature derived from the energy dependence of recombination rate is discussed.

  11. Intraspecific variation of recombination rate in maize

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In sexually reproducing organisms, meiotic crossovers ensure the proper segregation of chromosomes and contribute to genetic diversity by shuffling allelic combinations. Such genetic reassortment is exploited in breeding to combine favorable alleles, and in genetic research to identify genetic factors underlying traits of interest via linkage or association-based approaches. Crossover numbers and distributions along chromosomes vary between species, but little is known about their intraspecies variation. Results Here, we report on the variation of recombination rates between 22 European maize inbred lines that belong to the Dent and Flint gene pools. We genotype 23 doubled-haploid populations derived from crosses between these lines with a 50 k-SNP array and construct high-density genetic maps, showing good correspondence with the maize B73 genome sequence assembly. By aligning each genetic map to the B73 sequence, we obtain the recombination rates along chromosomes specific to each population. We identify significant differences in recombination rates at the genome-wide, chromosome, and intrachromosomal levels between populations, as well as significant variation for genome-wide recombination rates among maize lines. Crossover interference analysis using a two-pathway modeling framework reveals a negative association between recombination rate and interference strength. Conclusions To our knowledge, the present work provides the most comprehensive study on intraspecific variation of recombination rates and crossover interference strength in eukaryotes. Differences found in recombination rates will allow for selection of high or low recombining lines in crossing programs. Our methodology should pave the way for precise identification of genes controlling recombination rates in maize and other organisms. PMID:24050704

  12. Recombination every day: abundant recombination in a virus during a single multi-cellular host infection.

    PubMed

    Froissart, Remy; Roze, Denis; Uzest, Marilyne; Galibert, Lionel; Blanc, Stephane; Michalakis, Yannis

    2005-03-01

    Viral recombination can dramatically impact evolution and epidemiology. In viruses, the recombination rate depends on the frequency of genetic exchange between different viral genomes within an infected host cell and on the frequency at which such co-infections occur. While the recombination rate has been recently evaluated in experimentally co-infected cell cultures for several viruses, direct quantification at the most biologically significant level, that of a host infection, is still lacking. This study fills this gap using the cauliflower mosaic virus as a model. We distributed four neutral markers along the viral genome, and co-inoculated host plants with marker-containing and wild-type viruses. The frequency of recombinant genomes was evaluated 21 d post-inoculation. On average, over 50% of viral genomes recovered after a single host infection were recombinants, clearly indicating that recombination is very frequent in this virus. Estimates of the recombination rate show that all regions of the genome are equally affected by this process. Assuming that ten viral replication cycles occurred during our experiment-based on data on the timing of coat protein detection-the per base and replication cycle recombination rate was on the order of 2 x 10(-5) to 4 x 10(-5). This first determination of a virus recombination rate during a single multi-cellular host infection indicates that recombination is very frequent in the everyday life of this virus. PMID:15737066

  13. Advances in recombinant antibody manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Renate; Reinhart, David

    2016-04-01

    Since the first use of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for recombinant protein expression, production processes have steadily improved through numerous advances. In this review, we have highlighted several key milestones that have contributed to the success of CHO cells from the beginning of their use for monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression until today. The main factors influencing the yield of a production process are the time to accumulate a desired amount of biomass, the process duration, and the specific productivity. By comparing maximum cell densities and specific growth rates of various expression systems, we have emphasized the limiting parameters of different cellular systems and comprehensively described scientific approaches and techniques to improve host cell lines. Besides the quantitative evaluation of current systems, the quality-determining properties of a host cell line, namely post-translational modifications, were analyzed and compared to naturally occurring polyclonal immunoglobulin fractions from human plasma. In summary, numerous different expression systems for mAbs are available and also under scientific investigation. However, CHO cells are the most frequently investigated cell lines and remain the workhorse for mAb production until today.

  14. Dissociative recombination of CH4(+).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Richard D; Kashperka, Iryna; Vigren, E; Geppert, Wolf D; Hamberg, Mathias; Larsson, Mats; af Ugglas, Magnus; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2013-10-01

    CH4(+) is an important molecular ion in the astrochemistry of diffuse clouds, dense clouds, cometary comae, and planetary ionospheres. However, the rate of one of the common destruction mechanisms for molecular ions in these regions, dissociative recombination (DR), is somewhat uncertain. Here, we present absolute measurements for the DR of CH4(+) made using the heavy ion storage ring CRYRING in Stockholm, Sweden. From our collision-energy dependent cross-sections, we infer a thermal rate constant of k(Te) = 1.71(±0.02) × 10(–6)(Te/300)(−0.66(±0.02)) cm3 s(–1) over the region of electron temperatures 10 ≤ Te ≤ 1000 K. At low collision energies, we have measured the branching fractions of the DR products to be CH4 (0.00 ± 0.00); CH3 + H (0.18 ± 0.03); CH2 + 2H (0.51 ± 0.03); CH2 + H2 (0.06 ± 0.01); CH + H2 + H (0.23 ± 0.01); and CH + 2H2 (0.02 ± 0.01), indicating that two or more C–H bonds are broken in 80% of all collisions.

  15. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes. PMID:25790500

  16. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes.

  17. Copy-choice illegitimate DNA recombination revisited.

    PubMed Central

    d'Alençon, E; Petranovic, M; Michel, B; Noirot, P; Aucouturier, A; Uzest, M; Ehrlich, S D

    1994-01-01

    Nearly precise excision of a transposon related to Tn10 from an Escherichia coli plasmid was used as a model to study illegitimate DNA recombination between short direct repeats. The excision was stimulated 100-1000 times by induction of plasmid single-stranded DNA synthesis and did not involve transfer of DNA from the parental to the progeny molecule. We conclude that it occurred by copy-choice DNA recombination, and propose that other events of recombination between short direct repeats might be a result of the same process. Images PMID:8013470

  18. Development of recombinant baculoviruses for insect control.

    PubMed

    Bonning, B C; Hammock, B D

    1996-01-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of the current status of recombinant baculoviruses, describe the development of genetically engineered baculoviruses for use as rapid-action biological insecticides, and provide more detailed information on one particular set of recombinant viruses. The advantages and disadvantages of recombinant baculovirus insecticides, and the importance of risk-assessment studies of these genetically modified organisms, are reviewed. Finally the importance of sensible regulatory strategies to the success and future prospects of this technology is discussed. PMID:8546446

  19. Spacecraft thermal energy accommodation from atomic recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carleton, Karen L.; Marinelli, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of atomic recombination probabilities important in determining energy release to reusable spacecraft thermal protection surfaces during reentry are presented. An experimental apparatus constructed to examine recombination of atomic oxygen from thermal protection and reference materials at reentry temperatures is described. The materials are examined under ultrahigh vacuum conditions to develop and maintain well characterized surface conditions that are free of contamination. When compared with stagnation point heat transfer measurements performed in arc jet facilities, these measurements indicate that a significant fraction of the excess energy available from atom recombination is removed from the surface as metastable O2.

  20. Dissociative Recombination without a Curve Crossing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1994-01-01

    Ab initio calculations show that a curve crossing is not always needed for a high dissociative- recombination cross section. For HeH(+), in which no neutral states cross the ion potential curve, dissociative recombination is driven by the nuclear kinetic-energy operator on adiabatic potential curves. The kinetic-energy derivative operator allows for capture into repulsive curves that are outside of the classical turning points for the nuclear motion. The dominant dissociative route is the C (2)Sigma(+) state leading to H(n = 2) atoms. An analogous mechanism is proposed for the dissociative recombination of H3(+).

  1. Recombination of N4(+) ions with electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Y. S.; Johnsen, R.

    1991-01-01

    Using a modified high-pressure-afterglow/mass spectrometer apparatus similar to that described by Lee and Johnsen (1989), spectroscopic observations of afterglow helium plasmas, with N2 as a minor additive, were carried out in order to verify the mechanism suggested by Bates (1991) for dissociative recombination of electrons with N4(+) ions. It was found that dissociative recombination of electrons with N4(+) ions results in the formation of N2 molecules in the C 3Pi(u) (v = 0,1) state, with the recombination rate coefficient of (2.6 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -6 cu cm/sec at 300 K.

  2. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  3. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  4. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  5. Mapping Recombination Initiation Sites Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Wang, Minghui; Sun, Qi; Pawlowski, Wojciech P

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide maps of recombination sites provide valuable information not only on the recombination pathway itself but also facilitate the understanding of genome dynamics and evolution. Here, we describe a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol to map the sites of recombination initiation in plants with maize used as an example. ChIP is a method that allows identification of chromosomal sites occupied by specific proteins. Our protocol utilizes RAD51, a protein involved in repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination, to identify DSB formation hotspots. Chromatin is extracted from meiotic flowers, sheared and enriched in fragments bound to RAD51. Genomic location of the protein is then identified by next-generation sequencing. This protocol can also be used in other species of plants, animals, and fungi. PMID:27511175

  6. Recombinant allergens: what does the future hold?

    PubMed

    Valenta, Rudolf; Niespodziana, Katarzyna; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Marth, Katharina; Huber, Hans; Neubauer, Angela; Niederberger, Verena

    2011-04-01

    This year we are celebrating not only the centenary of allergen-specific immunotherapy but also the 10-year anniversary of the first administration of recombinant allergen-based vaccines to allergic patients. By using recombinant DNA technology, defined and safe allergy vaccines can be produced that allow us to overcome many, if not all, of the problems associated with the use of natural allergen extracts, such as insufficient quality, allergenic activity, and poor immunogenicity. Here we provide an update of clinical studies with recombinant allergen-based vaccines, showing that some of these vaccines have undergone successful clinical evaluation up to phase III studies. Furthermore, we introduce a strategy for allergen-specific immunotherapy based on recombinant fusion proteins consisting of viral carrier proteins and allergen-derived peptides without allergenic activity, which holds the promise of being free of side effects and eventually being useful for prophylactic vaccination.

  7. The homologous recombination system of Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Holloman, William K.; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a high fidelity, template-dependent process that is used in repair of damaged DNA, recovery of broken replication forks, and disjunction of homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Much of what is known about recombination genes and mechanisms comes from studies on baker's yeast. Ustilago maydis, a basidiomycete fungus, is distant evolutionarily from baker's yeast and so offers the possibility of gaining insight into recombination from an alternative perspective. Here we have surveyed the genome of Ustilago maydis to determine the composition of its homologous recombination system. Compared to baker's yeast, there are fundamental differences in the function as well as in the repertoire of dedicated components. These include the use of a BRCA2 homolog and its modifier Dss1 rather than Rad52 as a mediator of Rad51, the presence of only a single Rad51 paralog, and the absence of Dmc1 and auxiliary meiotic proteins. PMID:18502156

  8. The Kinetics of Nitrogen Atom Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, G. Ronald; Winkler, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a study of the kinetics of the recombination of nitrogen atoms in which concentration-time relations are determined directly by utilizing visual observations of emissions to make gas phase titrations of N atoms with NO. (MLH)

  9. Chemical recombination in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakos, Robert J.; Morgan, Richard G.

    1994-01-01

    The note describes the theoretical basis of chemical recombination in an expansion tube which simulates energy, Reynolds number, and stream chemistry at near-orbital velocities. Expansion tubes can satisfy ground-based hypersonic propulsion and aerothermal testing requirements.

  10. Fermentations with new recombinant organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Bothast, R.J.; Nichols, N.N.; Dien, B.S.

    1999-10-01

    US fuel ethanol production in 1998 exceeded the record production of 1.4 billion gallons set in 1995. Most of this ethanol was produced from over 550 million bushels of corn. Expanding fuel ethanol production will require developing lower-cost feedstocks, and only lignocellulosic feedstocks are available in sufficient quantities to substitute for corn starch. Major technical hurdles to converting lignocellulose to ethanol include the lack of low-cost efficient enzymes for saccharification of biomass to fermentable sugars and the development of microorganisms for the fermentation of these mixed sugars. To date, the most successful research approaches to develop novel biocatalysts that will efficiently ferment mixed sugar syrups include isolation of novel yeasts that ferment xylose, genetic engineering of Escherichia coli and other gram negative bacteria for ethanol production, and genetic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis for pentose utilization. The authors have evaluated the fermentation of corn fiber hydrolyzates by the various strains developed. E. coli K011, E. coli SL40, E. coli FBR3, Zymomonas CP4 (pZB5), and Saccharomyces 1400 (pLNH32) fermented corn fiber hydrolyzates to ethanol in the range of 21--34 g/L with yields ranging from 0.41 to 0.50 g of ethanol per gram of sugar consumed. Progress with new recombinant microorganisms has been rapid and will continue with the eventual development of organisms suitable for commercial ethanol production. Each research approach holds considerable promise, with the possibility existing that different industrially hardened strains may find separate applications in the fermentation of specific feedstocks.

  11. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  12. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  13. Recombination-deficient mutant of Streptococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Y.; Clewell, D.B.

    1980-08-01

    An ultraviolet radiation-sensitive derivative of Streptococcus faecalis strain JH2-2 was isolated and found to be deficient in recombination, using a plasmid-plasmid recombination system. The strain was sensitive to chemical agents which interact with deoxyribonucleic acid and also underwent deoxyribonucleic acid degradation after ultraviolet irradiation. Thus, the mutant has properties similar to those of recA strains of Escherichia coli.

  14. Recombination-generation currents in degenerate semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1978-01-01

    The classical Shockley-Read-Hall theory of free carrier recombination and generation via traps is extended to degenerate semiconductors. A concise and simple expression is found which avoids completely the concept of a Fermi level, a concept which is alien to nonequilibrium situations. Assumptions made in deriving the recombination generation current are carefully delineated and are found to be basically identical to those made in the original theory applicable to nondegenerate semiconductors.

  15. Biochemistry of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Dixon, D A; Eggleston, A K; Lauder, S D; Rehrauer, W M

    1994-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental biological process. Biochemical understanding of this process is most advanced for Escherichia coli. At least 25 gene products are involved in promoting genetic exchange. At present, this includes the RecA, RecBCD (exonuclease V), RecE (exonuclease VIII), RecF, RecG, RecJ, RecN, RecOR, RecQ, RecT, RuvAB, RuvC, SbcCD, and SSB proteins, as well as DNA polymerase I, DNA gyrase, DNA topoisomerase I, DNA ligase, and DNA helicases. The activities displayed by these enzymes include homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, helicase, branch migration, Holliday junction binding and cleavage, nuclease, ATPase, topoisomerase, DNA binding, ATP binding, polymerase, and ligase, and, collectively, they define biochemical events that are essential for efficient recombination. In addition to these needed proteins, a cis-acting recombination hot spot known as Chi (chi: 5'-GCTGGTGG-3') plays a crucial regulatory function. The biochemical steps that comprise homologous recombination can be formally divided into four parts: (i) processing of DNA molecules into suitable recombination substrates, (ii) homologous pairing of the DNA partners and the exchange of DNA strands, (iii) extension of the nascent DNA heteroduplex; and (iv) resolution of the resulting crossover structure. This review focuses on the biochemical mechanisms underlying these steps, with particular emphases on the activities of the proteins involved and on the integration of these activities into likely biochemical pathways for recombination. Images PMID:7968921

  16. Dissociation of recombinant prion autocatalysis from infectivity.

    PubMed

    Noble, Geoffrey P; Supattapone, Surachai

    2015-01-01

    Within the mammalian prion field, the existence of recombinant prion protein (PrP) conformers with self-replicating (ie. autocatalytic) activity in vitro but little to no infectious activity in vivo challenges a key prediction of the protein-only hypothesis of prion replication--that autocatalytic PrP conformers should be infectious. To understand this dissociation of autocatalysis from infectivity, we recently performed a structural and functional comparison between a highly infectious and non-infectious pair of autocatalytic recombinant PrP conformers derived from the same initial prion strain. (1) We identified restricted, C-terminal structural differences between these 2 conformers and provided evidence that these relatively subtle differences prevent the non-infectious conformer from templating the conversion of native PrP(C) substrates containing a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. (1) In this article we discuss a model, consistent with these findings, in which recombinant PrP, lacking post-translational modifications and associated folding constraints, is capable of adopting a wide variety of autocatalytic conformations. Only a subset of these recombinant conformers can be adopted by post-translationally modified native PrP(C), and this subset represents the recombinant conformers with high specific infectivity. We examine this model's implications for the generation of highly infectious recombinant prions and the protein-only hypothesis of prion replication.

  17. Recombination rate predicts inversion size in Diptera.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, M; Barbadilla, A; Ruiz, A

    1999-09-01

    Most species of the Drosophila genus and other Diptera are polymorphic for paracentric inversions. A common observation is that successful inversions are of intermediate size. We test here the hypothesis that the selected property is the recombination length of inversions, not their physical length. If so, physical length of successful inversions should be negatively correlated with recombination rate across species. This prediction was tested by a comprehensive statistical analysis of inversion size and recombination map length in 12 Diptera species for which appropriate data are available. We found that (1) there is a wide variation in recombination map length among species; (2) physical length of successful inversions varies greatly among species and is inversely correlated with the species recombination map length; and (3) neither the among-species variation in inversion length nor the correlation are observed in unsuccessful inversions. The clear differences between successful and unsuccessful inversions point to natural selection as the most likely explanation for our results. Presumably the selective advantage of an inversion increases with its length, but so does its detrimental effect on fertility due to double crossovers. Our analysis provides the strongest and most extensive evidence in favor of the notion that the adaptive value of inversions stems from their effect on recombination.

  18. Recombination rate predicts inversion size in Diptera.

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, M; Barbadilla, A; Ruiz, A

    1999-01-01

    Most species of the Drosophila genus and other Diptera are polymorphic for paracentric inversions. A common observation is that successful inversions are of intermediate size. We test here the hypothesis that the selected property is the recombination length of inversions, not their physical length. If so, physical length of successful inversions should be negatively correlated with recombination rate across species. This prediction was tested by a comprehensive statistical analysis of inversion size and recombination map length in 12 Diptera species for which appropriate data are available. We found that (1) there is a wide variation in recombination map length among species; (2) physical length of successful inversions varies greatly among species and is inversely correlated with the species recombination map length; and (3) neither the among-species variation in inversion length nor the correlation are observed in unsuccessful inversions. The clear differences between successful and unsuccessful inversions point to natural selection as the most likely explanation for our results. Presumably the selective advantage of an inversion increases with its length, but so does its detrimental effect on fertility due to double crossovers. Our analysis provides the strongest and most extensive evidence in favor of the notion that the adaptive value of inversions stems from their effect on recombination. PMID:10471710

  19. Oligonucleotide recombination enabled site-specific mutagenesis in bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombineering refers to a strategy for engineering DNA sequences using a specialized mode of homologous recombination. This technology can be used for rapidly constructing precise changes in bacterial genome sequences in vivo. Oligo recombination is one type of recombineering that uses ssDNA olig...

  20. Multiplex PCR Method for Identifying Recombinant Vaccine-Related Polioviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, David R.; Ching, Karen; Iber, Jane; Campagnoli, Ray; Freeman, Christopher J.; Mishrik, Nada; Liu, Hong-Mei; Pallansch, Mark A.; Kew, Olen M.

    2004-01-01

    The recent discovery of recombinant circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (recombinant cVDPV) has highlighted the need for enhanced global poliovirus surveillance to assure timely detection of any future cVDPV outbreaks. Six pairs of Sabin strain-specific recombinant primers were designed to permit rapid screening for VDPV recombinants by PCR. PMID:15365031

  1. Genetic recombination of the hepatitis C virus: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Morel, V; Fournier, C; François, C; Brochot, E; Helle, F; Duverlie, G; Castelain, S

    2011-02-01

    Genetic recombination is a well-known feature of RNA viruses that plays a significant role in their evolution. Although recombination is well documented for Flaviviridae family viruses, the first natural recombinant strain of hepatitis C virus (HCV) was identified as recently as 2002. Since then, a few other natural inter-genotypic, intra-genotypic and intra-subtype recombinant HCV strains have been described. However, the frequency of recombination may have been underestimated because not all known HCV recombinants are screened for in routine practice. Furthermore, the choice of treatment regimen and its predictive outcome remain problematic as the therapeutic strategy for HCV infection is genotype dependent. HCV recombination also raises many questions concerning its mechanisms and effects on the epidemiological and physiopathological features of the virus. This review provides an update on recombinant HCV strains, the process that gives rise to recombinants and clinical implications of recombination.

  2. Recombination in Eukaryotic Single Stranded DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Darren P.; Biagini, Philippe; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Golden, Michael; Roumagnac, Philippe; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Although single stranded (ss) DNA viruses that infect humans and their domesticated animals do not generally cause major diseases, the arthropod borne ssDNA viruses of plants do, and as a result seriously constrain food production in most temperate regions of the world. Besides the well known plant and animal-infecting ssDNA viruses, it has recently become apparent through metagenomic surveys of ssDNA molecules that there also exist large numbers of other diverse ssDNA viruses within almost all terrestrial and aquatic environments. The host ranges of these viruses probably span the tree of life and they are likely to be important components of global ecosystems. Various lines of evidence suggest that a pivotal evolutionary process during the generation of this global ssDNA virus diversity has probably been genetic recombination. High rates of homologous recombination, non-homologous recombination and genome component reassortment are known to occur within and between various different ssDNA virus species and we look here at the various roles that these different types of recombination may play, both in the day-to-day biology, and in the longer term evolution, of these viruses. We specifically focus on the ecological, biochemical and selective factors underlying patterns of genetic exchange detectable amongst the ssDNA viruses and discuss how these should all be considered when assessing the adaptive value of recombination during ssDNA virus evolution. PMID:21994803

  3. An enhancer of recombination in polyomavirus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, D; Delbecchi, L; Bourgaux-Ramoisy, D; Bourgaux, P

    1996-01-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has indicated that intramolecular homologous recombination of polyomavirus (Py) DNA is dependent upon promoter structure or function. In this report, we demonstrate that Py DNA contains not two but three binding sites for transcription factor YY1, all located on the late side of viral origin of replication (ori) and the third well within the VP1 coding sequence. This third site (Y3), which may or may not play a role in transcription regulation, is immediately adjacent to a previously described recombination hot spot (S1/S2). We found that Py replicons carrying an altered Y3 site recombined in a manner suggesting partial inactivation of the S1/S hot spot. Point mutations precluding the binding of YY1 to Y3 in vitro depressed hot spot activity in vivo; however, of the two reciprocal products reflecting recombination at this spot, only that carrying the mutated Y3 site arose at a reduced rate. These results are interpreted in light of a model assuming that recombination occurs within a transcriptionally active viral chromatin tethered to the nuclear matrix by YY1. PMID:8676502

  4. Recombinant allergen-based provocation testing☆

    PubMed Central

    Niederberger, Verena; Eckl-Dorna, Julia; Pauli, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, recombinant allergens from all important allergen sources have been cloned and are now available as recombinant proteins. These molecules can be produced in practically unlimited amounts without biological or batch-to-batch variability. It has been shown in provocation tests that recombinant allergens have similar clinical effects as their natural counterparts. With the help of these tools it is possible to reveal the precise reactivity profiles of patients and to uncover and differentiate cross-reactivity from genuine sensitization to an allergen source. Although it has been shown some time ago that it would be possible to replace crude allergen extracts with recombinant allergens for skin prick testing, and even though the use of allergen components can improve routine diagnosis, these tools are still not available for clinical routine applications. The use of provocation tests is a crucial step in the development of new, hypoallergenic vaccines for therapy of allergic disease. Here we describe important provocation methods (skin prick test, intradermal test, atopy patch test, nasal provocation, colonoscopic provocation test) and give an overview of the clinical provocation studies which have been performed with recombinant allergens so far. PMID:23920475

  5. Recombinant expression systems for allergen vaccines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L

    2006-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy of future is likely to be based on allergy vaccines that contain engineered allergens modified to abolish or substantially reduce their IgE-binding activity in order to remove the risk of unwanted anaphylactic responses. The development of efficient systems for the production of recombinant allergens in sufficient quantities is requirement for establishing use of engineered allergens as components of allergy vaccines. This review outlines relative advantages and disadvantages of various heterologous systems for production of recombinant allergens. Microbial systems are most convenient and cost effective platforms for the production of recombinant allergens. However, lack of post-translational processing implies that some allergens have to be expressed in eukaryotic systems for proper folding and post-translational modifications such as glycosylation. Yeast systems can yield high levels of recombinant allergens but often are associated with hyper- glycosylation problems. Mammalian cell culture systems offer suitable post -translational modifications but are nearly hundred fold more expensive than microbial systems. The use of plants as bio-factories for production of recombinant allergens is emerging as a very attractive option as plants-based production system offer several advantages over other expression systems such as post translational processing of proteins, low production costs, scale up ability and enhanced safety due to absence of animal or human pathogens.

  6. Perinatal induction of Cre recombination with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Lizen, Benoit; Claus, Melissa; Jeannotte, Lucie; Rijli, Filippo M; Gofflot, Françoise

    2015-12-01

    Temporal control of site-specific recombination is commonly achieved by using a tamoxifen-inducible form of Cre or Flp recombinases. Although powerful protocols of induction have been developed for gene inactivation at adult stages or during embryonic development, induction of recombination at late gestational or early postnatal stages is still difficult to achieve. In this context, using the ubiquitous CMV-CreER(T2) transgenic mice, we have tested and validated two procedures to achieve recombination just before and just after birth. The efficiency of recombination was evaluated in the brain, which is known to be more problematic to target. For the late gestation treatment with tamoxifen, different protocols of complementary administration of progesterone and estrogen were tested. However, delayed delivery and/or mortality of pups due to difficult delivery were always observed. To circumvent this problem, pups were collected from tamoxifen-treated pregnant dams by caesarian section at E18.5 and given to foster mothers. For postnatal treatment, different dosages of tamoxifen were administered by intragastric injection to the pups during 3 or 4 days after birth. The efficiency of these treatments was analyzed at P7 using a transgenic reporter line. They were also validated with the Hoxa5 conditional allele. In conclusion, we have developed efficient procedures that allow achieving efficient recombination of floxed alleles at perinatal stages. These protocols will allow investigating the late/adult functions of many developmental genes, whose characterization has been so far restricted to embryonic development. PMID:26395370

  7. Evolvability of an Optimal Recombination Rate.

    PubMed

    Lobkovsky, Alexander E; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-12-10

    Evolution and maintenance of genetic recombination and its relation to the mutational process is a long-standing, fundamental problem in evolutionary biology that is linked to the general problem of evolution of evolvability. We explored a stochastic model of the evolution of recombination using additive fitness and infinite allele assumptions but no assumptions on the sign or magnitude of the epistasis and the distribution of mutation effects. In this model, fluctuating negative epistasis and predominantly deleterious mutations arise naturally as a consequence of the additive fitness and a reservoir from which new alleles arrive with a fixed distribution of fitness effects. Analysis of the model revealed a nonmonotonic effect of recombination intensity on fitness, with an optimal recombination rate value which maximized fitness in steady state. The optimal recombination rate depended on the mutation rate and was evolvable, that is, subject to selection. The predictions of the model were compatible with the observations on the dependence between genome rearrangement rate and gene flux in microbial genomes.

  8. Human recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Espejo-Mojica, Ángela J; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Rodríguez, Alexander; Mosquera, Ángela; Díaz, Dennis; Beltrán, Laura; Díaz, Sergio; Pimentel, Natalia; Moreno, Jefferson; Sánchez, Jhonnathan; Sánchez, Oscar F; Córdoba, Henry; Poutou-Piñales, Raúl A; Barrera, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are caused by accumulation of partially degraded substrates within the lysosome, as a result of a function loss of a lysosomal protein. Recombinant lysosomal proteins are usually produced in mammalian cells, based on their capacity to carry out post-translational modifications similar to those observed in human native proteins. However, during the last years, a growing number of studies have shown the possibility to produce active forms of lysosomal proteins in other expression systems, such as plants and microorganisms. In this paper, we review the production and characterization of human lysosomal proteins, deficient in several LSDs, which have been produced in microorganisms. For this purpose, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Ogataea minuta have been used as expression systems. The recombinant lysosomal proteins expressed in these hosts have shown similar substrate specificities, and temperature and pH stability profiles to those produced in mammalian cells. In addition, pre-clinical results have shown that recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms can be taken-up by cells and reduce the substrate accumulated within the lysosome. Recently, metabolic engineering in yeasts has allowed the production of lysosomal enzymes with tailored N-glycosylations, while progresses in E. coli N-glycosylations offer a potential platform to improve the production of these recombinant lysosomal enzymes. In summary, microorganisms represent convenient platform for the production of recombinant lysosomal proteins for biochemical and physicochemical characterization, as well as for the development of ERT for LSD.

  9. Transcription and Recombination: When RNA Meets DNA

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Andrés; Gaillard, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    A particularly relevant phenomenon in cell physiology and proliferation is the fact that spontaneous mitotic recombination is strongly enhanced by transcription. The most accepted view is that transcription increases the occurrence of double-strand breaks and/or single-stranded DNA gaps that are repaired by recombination. Most breaks would arise as a consequence of the impact that transcription has on replication fork progression, provoking its stalling and/or breakage. Here, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the cross talk between transcription and recombination, with emphasis on (1) the transcription–replication conflicts as the main source of recombinogenic DNA breaks, and (2) the formation of cotranscriptional R-loops as a major cause of such breaks. The new emerging questions and perspectives are discussed on the basis of the interference between transcription and replication, as well as the way RNA influences genome dynamics. PMID:25085910

  10. Protein building blocks preserved by recombination.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Christopher A; Martinez, Carlos; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Mayo, Stephen L; Arnold, Frances H

    2002-07-01

    Borrowing concepts from the schema theory of genetic algorithms, we have developed a computational algorithm to identify the fragments of proteins, or schemas, that can be recombined without disturbing the integrity of the three-dimensional structure. When recombination leaves these schemas undisturbed, the hybrid proteins are more likely to be folded and functional. Crossovers found by screening libraries of several randomly shuffled proteins for functional hybrids strongly correlate with those predicted by this approach. Experimental results from the construction of hybrids of two beta-lactamases that share 40% amino acid identity demonstrate a threshold in the amount of schema disruption that the hybrid protein can tolerate. To the extent that introns function to promote recombination within proteins, natural selection would serve to bias their locations to schema boundaries. PMID:12042875

  11. Dielectronic recombination of xenonlike tungsten ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schippers, S.; Bernhardt, D.; Mueller, A.; Krantz, C.; Grieser, M.; Repnow, R.; Wolf, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Hahn, M.; Novotny, O.; Savin, D. W.

    2011-01-15

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) of xenonlike W{sup 20+} forming W{sup 19+} has been studied experimentally at a heavy-ion storage ring. A merged-beams method has been employed for obtaining absolute rate coefficients for electron-ion recombination in the collision-energy range 0-140 eV. The measured rate coefficient is dominated by strong DR resonances even at the lowest experimental energies. At plasma temperatures where the fractional abundance of W{sup 20+} is expected to peak in a fusion plasma, the experimentally derived plasma recombination rate coefficient is over a factor of 4 larger than the theoretically calculated rate coefficient which is currently used in fusion plasma modeling. The largest part of this discrepancy stems most probably from the neglect in the theoretical calculations of DR associated with fine-structure excitations of the W{sup 20+}([Kr]4d{sup 10} 4f{sup 8}) ion core.

  12. Absence of Detectable Mitochondrial Recombination in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Adoutte, André; Knowles, Jonathan K.; Sainsard-Chanet, Annie

    1979-01-01

    An extensive search for recombination between mitochondrial markers was carried out in Paramecium tetraurelia. Thirty-two combinations, altogether involving 24 different markers, were studied. The markers belonged to the three main categories of mitochondrial mutations presently available in this organism. (a) Spontaneous or UV-induced antibiotic resistance mutations, most probably affecting mitochondrial ribosomes, (b) nitrosoguanidine-induced antibiotic resistance markers displaying thermosensitivity or slow growth, enabling easy selection of possible wild-type recombinants, and (c) mitochondrial partial suppressors of a nuclear gene, probably corresponding to molecular alterations distinct from the preceding two categories. In addition, different genetic configurations were analyzed (i.e., mutant x mutant, double-mutant x wild-type, etc.).—None of the combinations yielded any evidence for the occurrence of recombined genomes despite the fact that: (1) all of them were studied on a large scale involving the screening of at least several thousand mitochondrial genomes (often several millions), (2) in many of them the detection level was sufficiently high to enable the isolation of spontaneous mutants in control cells, and (3) in several of them, reconstitution experiments carried out in parallel show that the conditions were fully adequate to detect recombinant genotypes. The results are in marked contrast with those obtained on the few other organisms in which mitochondrial recombination has been studied, particularly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which mitochondrial recombination is intense. —The most likely basis for the various manifestations of mitochondrial genetic autonomy in Paramecium, described in this as well as in previous publications, is that the chondriome of this organism is made up of thousands of structurally discrete, noninteracting units. PMID:296761

  13. Selections that isolate recombinant mitochondrial genomes in animals

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hansong; O'Farrell, Patrick H

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination is widespread and catalyzes evolution. Nonetheless, its existence in animal mitochondrial DNA is questioned. We designed selections for recombination between co-resident mitochondrial genomes in various heteroplasmic Drosophila lines. In four experimental settings, recombinant genomes became the sole or dominant genome in the progeny. Thus, selection uncovers occurrence of homologous recombination in Drosophila mtDNA and documents its functional benefit. Double-strand breaks enhanced recombination in the germline and revealed somatic recombination. When the recombination partner was a diverged Drosophila melanogaster genome or a genome from a different species such as Drosophila yakuba, sequencing revealed long continuous stretches of exchange. In addition, the distribution of sequence polymorphisms in recombinants allowed us to map a selected trait to a particular region in the Drosophila mitochondrial genome. Thus, recombination can be harnessed to dissect function and evolution of mitochondrial genome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07247.001 PMID:26237110

  14. [Recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Nuc, Przemysław; Nuc, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    Growing needs for efficient recombinant production pose new challenges; starting from cell growth optimization under overexpression conditions, improving vectors, gene and protein sequence to suit them to protein biosynthesis machinery of the host, through extending the knowledge of protein folding, fusion protein construction, and coexpression systems, to improvements in protein purification and renaturation technologies. Hitherto Escherichia coli is the most defined and the cheapest protein biosynthesis system. With its wealth of available mutants tested is the best suited to economically test new gene constructs and to scale up the recombinant protein production.

  15. CosmoRec: Cosmological Recombination code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chluba, Jens; Thomas, Rajat Mani

    2013-04-01

    CosmoRec solves the recombination problem including recombinations to highly excited states, corrections to the 2s-1s two-photon channel, HI Lyn-feedback, n>2 two-photon profile corrections, and n≥2 Raman-processes. The code can solve the radiative transfer equation of the Lyman-series photon field to obtain the required modifications to the rate equations of the resolved levels, and handles electron scattering, the effect of HeI intercombination transitions, and absorption of helium photons by hydrogen. It also allows accounting for dark matter annihilation and optionally includes detailed helium radiative transfer effects.

  16. Graph Model of Coalescence with Recombinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, Laxmi

    One of the primary genetic events shaping an autosomal chromosome is recombination. This is a process that occurs during meiosis, in eukaryotes, that results in the offsprings having different combinations of (homologous) genes, or chromosomal segments, of the two parents. The presence of these recombination events in the evolutionary history of each chromosome complicates the genetic landscape of a population, and understanding the manifestations of these genetic exchanges in the chromosome sequences has been a subject of intense curiosity (see [Hud83, Gri99, HSW05] and citations therein).

  17. Recent Theoretical Studies On Excitation and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, Anil K.

    2000-01-01

    New advances in the theoretical treatment of atomic processes in plasmas are described. These enable not only an integrated, unified, and self-consistent treatment of important radiative and collisional processes, but also large-scale computation of atomic data with high accuracy. An extension of the R-matrix work, from excitation and photoionization to electron-ion recombination, includes a unified method that subsumes both the radiative and the di-electronic recombination processes in an ab initio manner. The extensive collisional calculations for iron and iron-peak elements under the Iron Project are also discussed.

  18. The mismatch repair system reduces meiotic homeologous recombination and stimulates recombination-dependent chromosome loss.

    PubMed

    Chambers, S R; Hunter, N; Louis, E J; Borts, R H

    1996-11-01

    Efficient genetic recombination requires near-perfect homology between participating molecules. Sequence divergence reduces the frequency of recombination, a process that is dependent on the activity of the mismatch repair system. The effects of chromosomal divergence in diploids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which one copy of chromosome III is derived from a closely related species, Saccharomyces paradoxus, have been examined. Meiotic recombination between the diverged chromosomes is decreased by 25-fold. Spore viability is reduced with an observable increase in the number of tetrads with only two or three viable spores. Asci with only two viable spores are disomic for chromosome III, consistent with meiosis I nondisjunction of the homeologs. Asci with three viable spores are highly enriched for recombinants relative to tetrads with four viable spores. In 96% of the class with three viable spores, only one spore possesses a recombinant chromosome III, suggesting that the recombination process itself contributes to meiotic death. This phenomenon is dependent on the activities of the mismatch repair genes PMS1 and MSH2. A model of mismatch-stimulated chromosome loss is proposed to account for this observation. As expected, crossing over is increased in pms1 and msh2 mutants. Furthermore, genetic exchange in pms1 msh2 double mutants is affected to a greater extent than in either mutant alone, suggesting that the two proteins act independently to inhibit homeologous recombination. All mismatch repair-deficient strains exhibited reductions in the rate of chromosome III nondisjunction. PMID:8887641

  19. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V

    2013-04-30

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  20. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

    2012-02-21

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  1. Recombination walking: genetic selection of clones from pooled libraries of yeast artificial chromosomes by homologous recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A M; Savinelli, E A; Couture, S M; Hannigan, G M; Han, Z; Selden, R F; Treco, D A

    1993-01-01

    Recombination walking is based on the genetic selection of specific human clones from a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library by homologous recombination. The desired clone is selected from a pooled (unordered) YAC library, eliminating labor-intensive steps typically used in organizing and maintaining ordered YAC libraries. Recombination walking represents an efficient approach to library screening and is well suited for chromosome-walking approaches to the isolation of genes associated with common diseases. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8367472

  2. Science: The Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Susan

    1979-01-01

    Reports on the status of the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) and attempts to rationalize Suburban Highway Policy. Effective communication among members of the RAC is a current problem facing the committee. A federal transportation priority spending policy is suggested during these times of money and fuel shortages. (MA)

  3. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for "molecular pharming" in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered - from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity.

  4. The Role of Recombinant Genetics in Humanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Troy A.

    1983-01-01

    To eliminate the public's fear of recombinant genetics the important link between science and the humanities should be part of the educational system. Universal applied genetics guidelines are needed that encompass philosophical and technical issues. Biological advances can revitalize humankind in the future. (AM)

  5. Precise genotyping and recombination detection of Enterovirus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chieh-Hua; Wang, Yu-Bin; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EV) with different genotypes cause diverse infectious diseases in humans and mammals. A correct EV typing result is crucial for effective medical treatment and disease control; however, the emergence of novel viral strains has impaired the performance of available diagnostic tools. Here, we present a web-based tool, named EVIDENCE (EnteroVirus In DEep conception, http://symbiont.iis.sinica.edu.tw/evidence), for EV genotyping and recombination detection. We introduce the idea of using mixed-ranking scores to evaluate the fitness of prototypes based on relatedness and on the genome regions of interest. Using phylogenetic methods, the most possible genotype is determined based on the closest neighbor among the selected references. To detect possible recombination events, EVIDENCE calculates the sequence distance and phylogenetic relationship among sequences of all sliding windows scanning over the whole genome. Detected recombination events are plotted in an interactive figure for viewing of fine details. In addition, all EV sequences available in GenBank were collected and revised using the latest classification and nomenclature of EV in EVIDENCE. These sequences are built into the database and are retrieved in an indexed catalog, or can be searched for by keywords or by sequence similarity. EVIDENCE is the first web-based tool containing pipelines for genotyping and recombination detection, with updated, built-in, and complete reference sequences to improve sensitivity and specificity. The use of EVIDENCE can accelerate genotype identification, aiding clinical diagnosis and enhancing our understanding of EV evolution.

  6. Recombination of ozone via the chaperon mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Mikhail V.; Schinke, Reinhard

    2006-03-01

    The recombination of ozone via the chaperon mechanism, i.e., ArO +O2→Ar+O3 and ArO2+O→Ar+O3, is studied by means of classical trajectories and a pairwise additive Ar -O3 potential energy surface. The recombination rate coefficient has a strong temperature dependence, which approximately can be described by T-n with n ≈3. It is negligible for temperatures above 700 K or so, but it becomes important for low temperatures. The calculations unambiguously affirm the conclusions of Hippler et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 6560 (1990)] and Luther et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 7, 2764 (2005)] that the chaperon mechanism makes a sizable contribution to the recombination of O3 at room temperature and below. The dependence of the chaperon recombination rate coefficient on the isotopomer, studied for two different isotope combinations, is only in rough qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The oxygen atom isotope exchange reaction involving ArO and ArO2 van der Waals complexes is also investigated; the weak binding of O or O2 to Ar has only a small effect.

  7. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for "molecular pharming" in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered - from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity. PMID:24596570

  8. Evidence for homologous recombination in Chikungunya Virus.

    PubMed

    Casal, Pablo E; Chouhy, Diego; Bolatti, Elisa M; Perez, Germán R; Stella, Emma J; Giri, Adriana A

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV), a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus, causes acute fever and joint pain in humans. Recently, endemic CHIKV infection outbreaks have jeopardized public health in wider geographical regions. Here, we analyze the phylogenetic associations of CHIKV and explore the potential recombination events on 152 genomic isolates deposited in GenBank database. The CHIKV genotypes [West African, Asian, East/Central/South African (ECSA)], and a clear division of ECSA clade into three sub-groups (I-II-III), were defined by Bayesian analysis; similar results were obtained using E1 gene sequences. A nucleotide identity-based approach is provided to facilitate CHIKV classification within ECSA clade. Using seven methods to detect recombination, we found a statistically significant event (p-values range: 1.14×10(-7)-4.45×10(-24)) located within the nsP3 coding region. This finding was further confirmed by phylogenetic networks (PHI Test, p=0.004) and phylogenetic tree incongruence analysis. The recombinant strain, KJ679578/India/2011 (ECSA III), derives from viruses of ECSA III and ECSA I. Our study demonstrates that recombination is an additional mechanism of genetic diversity in CHIKV that might assist in the cross-species transmission process.

  9. Precise genotyping and recombination detection of Enterovirus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EV) with different genotypes cause diverse infectious diseases in humans and mammals. A correct EV typing result is crucial for effective medical treatment and disease control; however, the emergence of novel viral strains has impaired the performance of available diagnostic tools. Here, we present a web-based tool, named EVIDENCE (EnteroVirus In DEep conception, http://symbiont.iis.sinica.edu.tw/evidence), for EV genotyping and recombination detection. We introduce the idea of using mixed-ranking scores to evaluate the fitness of prototypes based on relatedness and on the genome regions of interest. Using phylogenetic methods, the most possible genotype is determined based on the closest neighbor among the selected references. To detect possible recombination events, EVIDENCE calculates the sequence distance and phylogenetic relationship among sequences of all sliding windows scanning over the whole genome. Detected recombination events are plotted in an interactive figure for viewing of fine details. In addition, all EV sequences available in GenBank were collected and revised using the latest classification and nomenclature of EV in EVIDENCE. These sequences are built into the database and are retrieved in an indexed catalog, or can be searched for by keywords or by sequence similarity. EVIDENCE is the first web-based tool containing pipelines for genotyping and recombination detection, with updated, built-in, and complete reference sequences to improve sensitivity and specificity. The use of EVIDENCE can accelerate genotype identification, aiding clinical diagnosis and enhancing our understanding of EV evolution. PMID:26678286

  10. CATALYTIC RECOMBINER FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1960-07-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen recombiner is described for use with water-boiler type reactors. The catalyst used is the wellknown platinized alumina, and the novelty lies in the structural arrangement used to prevent flashback through the gas input system. The recombiner is cylindrical, the gases at the input end being deflected by a baffle plate through a first flashback shield of steel shot into an annular passage adjacent to and extending the full length of the housing. Below the baffle plate the gases flow first through an outer annular array of alumina pellets which serve as a second flashback shield, a means of distributing the flowing gases evenly and as a means of reducing radiation losses to the walls. Thereafter the gases flow inio the centrally disposed catalyst bed where recombination is effected. The steam and uncombined gases flow into a centrally disposed cylindrical passage inside the catalyst bod and thereafter out through the exit port. A high rate of recombination is effected.

  11. Precise genotyping and recombination detection of Enterovirus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chieh-Hua; Wang, Yu-Bin; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EV) with different genotypes cause diverse infectious diseases in humans and mammals. A correct EV typing result is crucial for effective medical treatment and disease control; however, the emergence of novel viral strains has impaired the performance of available diagnostic tools. Here, we present a web-based tool, named EVIDENCE (EnteroVirus In DEep conception, http://symbiont.iis.sinica.edu.tw/evidence), for EV genotyping and recombination detection. We introduce the idea of using mixed-ranking scores to evaluate the fitness of prototypes based on relatedness and on the genome regions of interest. Using phylogenetic methods, the most possible genotype is determined based on the closest neighbor among the selected references. To detect possible recombination events, EVIDENCE calculates the sequence distance and phylogenetic relationship among sequences of all sliding windows scanning over the whole genome. Detected recombination events are plotted in an interactive figure for viewing of fine details. In addition, all EV sequences available in GenBank were collected and revised using the latest classification and nomenclature of EV in EVIDENCE. These sequences are built into the database and are retrieved in an indexed catalog, or can be searched for by keywords or by sequence similarity. EVIDENCE is the first web-based tool containing pipelines for genotyping and recombination detection, with updated, built-in, and complete reference sequences to improve sensitivity and specificity. The use of EVIDENCE can accelerate genotype identification, aiding clinical diagnosis and enhancing our understanding of EV evolution. PMID:26678286

  12. Gas recombination assembly for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Levy, Isaac; Charkey, Allen

    1989-01-01

    An assembly for recombining gases generated in electrochemical cells wherein a catalyst strip is enveloped within a hydrophobic, gas-porous film which, in turn, is encased between gas-porous, metallic layers. The sandwich construction of metallic layers and film is formed into a spiral with a tab for connection to the cell.

  13. Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone Criticism Grows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaard, Greta

    1995-01-01

    Discusses concerns related to the use of recombinant bovine growth hormone in the United States and other countries. Analyses the issue from the perspectives of animal rights, human health, world hunger, concerns of small and organic farmers, costs to the taxpayer, and environmental questions. A sidebar discusses Canadian review of the hormone.…

  14. Recombinant protein blends: silk beyond natural design.

    PubMed

    Dinjaski, Nina; Kaplan, David L

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant DNA technology and new material concepts are shaping future directions in biomaterial science for the design and production of the next-generation biomaterial platforms. Aside from conventionally used synthetic polymers, numerous natural biopolymers (e.g., silk, elastin, collagen, gelatin, alginate, cellulose, keratin, chitin, polyhydroxyalkanoates) have been investigated for properties and manipulation via bioengineering. Genetic engineering provides a path to increase structural and functional complexity of these biopolymers, and thereby expand the catalog of available biomaterials beyond that which exists in nature. In addition, the integration of experimental approaches with computational modeling to analyze sequence-structure-function relationships is starting to have an impact in the field by establishing predictive frameworks for determining material properties. Herein, we review advances in recombinant DNA-mediated protein production and functionalization approaches, with a focus on hybrids or combinations of proteins; recombinant protein blends or 'recombinamers'. We highlight the potential biomedical applications of fibrous protein recombinamers, such as Silk-Elastin Like Polypeptides (SELPs) and Silk-Bacterial Collagens (SBCs). We also discuss the possibility for the rationale design of fibrous proteins to build smart, stimuli-responsive biomaterials for diverse applications. We underline current limitations with production systems for these proteins and discuss the main trends in systems/synthetic biology that may improve recombinant fibrous protein design and production. PMID:26686863

  15. Ancestries of a recombining diploid population.

    PubMed

    Sainudiin, R; Thatte, B; Véber, A

    2016-01-01

    We derive the exact one-step transition probabilities of the number of lineages that are ancestral to a random sample from the current generation of a bi-parental population that is evolving under the discrete Wright-Fisher model with n diploid individuals. Our model allows for a per-generation recombination probability of r . When r = 1, our model is equivalent to Chang's (Adv Appl Probab 31:1002-1038, 1999) model for the karyotic pedigree. When r = 0, our model is equivalent to Kingman's (Stoch Process Appl 13:235-248, 1982) discrete coalescent model for the cytoplasmic tree or sub-karyotic tree containing a DNA locus that is free of intra-locus recombination. When 0 < r < 1 our model can be thought to track a sub-karyotic ancestral graph containing a DNA sequence from an autosomal chromosome that has an intra-locus recombination probability r . Thus, our family of models indexed by r ∈ [0, 1] connects Kingman's discrete coalescent to Chang's pedigree in a continuous way as r goes from 0 to 1. For large populations, we also study three properties of the ancestral process corresponding to a given r ∈ (0, 1): the time Tn to a most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the population, the time Un at which all individuals are either common ancestors of all present day individuals or ancestral to none of them, and the fraction of individuals that are common ancestors at time Un. These results generalize the three main results of Chang's (Adv Appl Probab 31:1002-1038, 1999). When we appropriately rescale time and recombination probability by the population size, our model leads to the continuous time Markov chain called the ancestral recombination graph of Hudson (Theor Popul Biol 23:183-201, 1983) and Griffiths (The two-locus ancestral graph, Institute of Mathematical Statistics 100-117, 1991). PMID:25925241

  16. Conjugational Recombination in Escherichia Coli: Genetic Analysis of Recombinant Formation in Hfr X F(-) Crosses

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, R. G.; Buckman, C.

    1995-01-01

    The formation of recombinants during conjugation between Hfr and F(-) strains of Escherichia coli was investigated using unselected markers to monitor integration of Hfr DNA into the circular recipient chromosome. In crosses selecting a marker located ~500 kb from the Hfr origin, 60-70% of the recombinants appeared to inherit the Hfr DNA in a single segment, with the proximal exchange located >300 kb from the selected marker. The proportion of recombinants showing multiple exchanges increased in matings selecting more distal markers located 700-2200 kb from the origin, but they were always in the minority. This effect was associated with decreased linkage of unselected proximal markers. Mutation of recB, or recD plus recJ, in the recipient reduced the efficiency of recombination and shifted the location of the proximal exchange (s) closer to the selected marker. Mutation of recF, recO or recQ produced recombinants in which this exchange tended to be closer to the origin, though the effect observed was rather small. Up to 25% of recombinant colonies in rec(+) crosses showed segregation of both donor and recipient alleles at a proximal unselected locus. Their frequency varied with the distance between the selected and unselected markers and was also related directly to the efficiency of recombination. Mutation of recD increased their number by twofold in certain crosses to a value of 19%, a feature associated with an increase in the survival of linear DNA in the absence of RecBCD exonuclease. Mutation of recN reduced sectored recombinants in these crosses to ~1% in all the strains examined, including recD. A model for conjugational recombination is proposed in which recombinant chromosomes are formed initially by two exchanges that integrate a single piece of duplex Hfr DNA into the recipient chromosome. Additional pairs of exchanges involving the excised recipient DNA, RecBCD enzyme and RecN protein, can subsequently modify the initial product to generate the

  17. High recombination potential of subtype A HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Nikolaitchik, Olga; Keele, Brandon; Gorelick, Robert; Alvord, W Gregory; Mazurov, Dmitriy; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2015-10-01

    Recombination can assort polymorphic alleles to increase diversity in the HIV-1 population. To better understand the recombination potential of subtype A HIV-1, we generated viruses containing sequences from two variants circulating in Russia and analyzed the polymerase gene (pol) of the recombinants after one round of HIV-1 replication using single-genome sequencing. We observed that recombination occurred throughout pol and could easily assort alleles containing mutations that conferred resistance to currently approved antivirals. We measured the recombination rate in various regions of pol including a G-rich region that has been previously proposed to be a recombination hot spot. Our study does not support a recombination hot spot in this G-rich region. Importantly, of the 58 proviral sequences containing crossover event(s) in pol, we found that each sequence was a unique genotype indicating that recombination is a powerful genetic mechanism in assorting the genomes of subtype A HIV-1 variants.

  18. Caenorhabditis briggsae Recombinant Inbred Line Genotypes Reveal Inter-Strain Incompatibility and the Evolution of Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph A.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Staisch, Julia E.; Chamberlin, Helen M.; Gupta, Bhagwati P.; Baird, Scott E.; Haag, Eric S.

    2011-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae is an emerging model organism that allows evolutionary comparisons with C. elegans and exploration of its own unique biological attributes. To produce a high-resolution C. briggsae recombination map, recombinant inbred lines were generated from reciprocal crosses between two strains and genotyped at over 1,000 loci. A second set of recombinant inbred lines involving a third strain was also genotyped at lower resolution. The resulting recombination maps exhibit discrete domains of high and low recombination, as in C. elegans, indicating these are a general feature of Caenorhabditis species. The proportion of a chromosome's physical size occupied by the central, low-recombination domain is highly correlated between species. However, the C. briggsae intra-species comparison reveals striking variation in the distribution of recombination between domains. Hybrid lines made with the more divergent pair of strains also exhibit pervasive marker transmission ratio distortion, evidence of selection acting on hybrid genotypes. The strongest effect, on chromosome III, is explained by a developmental delay phenotype exhibited by some hybrid F2 animals. In addition, on chromosomes IV and V, cross direction-specific biases towards one parental genotype suggest the existence of cytonuclear epistatic interactions. These interactions are discussed in relation to surprising mitochondrial genome polymorphism in C. briggsae, evidence that the two strains diverged in allopatry, the potential for local adaptation, and the evolution of Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities. The genetic and genomic resources resulting from this work will support future efforts to understand inter-strain divergence as well as facilitate studies of gene function, natural variation, and the evolution of recombination in Caenorhabditis nematodes. PMID:21779179

  19. QA-RecombineIt: a server for quality assessment and recombination of protein models

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowski, Marcin; Bogdanowicz, Albert; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2013-01-01

    QA-RecombineIt provides a web interface to assess the quality of protein 3D structure models and to improve the accuracy of models by merging fragments of multiple input models. QA-RecombineIt has been developed for protein modelers who are working on difficult problems, have a set of different homology models and/or de novo models (from methods such as I-TASSER or ROSETTA) and would like to obtain one consensus model that incorporates the best parts into one structure that is internally coherent. An advanced mode is also available, in which one can modify the operation of the fragment recombination algorithm by manually identifying individual fragments or entire models to recombine. Our method produces up to 100 models that are expected to be on the average more accurate than the starting models. Therefore, our server may be useful for crystallographic protein structure determination, where protein models are used for Molecular Replacement to solve the phase problem. To address the latter possibility, a special feature was added to the QA-RecombineIt server. The QA-RecombineIt server can be freely accessed at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/qarecombineit/. PMID:23700309

  20. Orientation-dependent perimeter recombination in GaAs diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellwag, T. B.; Melloch, M. R.; Lundstrom, M. S.; Carpenter, M. S.; Pierret, R. F.

    1990-04-01

    Perimeter recombination currents affect the performance of GaAs-based devices such as solar cells, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and injection lasers. We report that the n≂2 perimeter recombination current has a strong orientation dependence. More than a factor of five variation in the surface recombination current at mesa-etched edges has been observed. These results suggest that with proper device design, perimeter recombination currents could be substantially reduced.

  1. Orientation-dependent perimeter recombination in GaAs diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Stellwag, T.B.; Melloch, M.R.; Lundstrom, M.S.; Carpenter, M.S.; Pierret, R.F. )

    1990-04-23

    Perimeter recombination currents affect the performance of GaAs-based devices such as solar cells, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and injection lasers. We report that the {ital n}{congruent}2 perimeter recombination current has a strong orientation dependence. More than a factor of five variation in the surface recombination current at mesa-etched edges has been observed. These results suggest that with proper device design, perimeter recombination currents could be substantially reduced.

  2. Replication, recombination, and repair: going for the gold.

    PubMed

    Klein, Hannah L; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2002-03-01

    DNA recombination is now appreciated to be integral to DNA replication and cell survival. Recombination allows replication to successfully maneuver through the roadblocks of damaged or collapsed replication forks. The signals and controls that permit cells to transition between replication and recombination modes are now being identified.

  3. Bayesian inference of shared recombination hotspots between humans and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Rannala, Bruce

    2014-12-01

    Recombination generates variation and facilitates evolution. Recombination (or lack thereof) also contributes to human genetic disease. Methods for mapping genes influencing complex genetic diseases via association rely on linkage disequilibrium (LD) in human populations, which is influenced by rates of recombination across the genome. Comparative population genomic analyses of recombination using related primate species can identify factors influencing rates of recombination in humans. Such studies can indicate how variable hotspots for recombination may be both among individuals (or populations) and over evolutionary timescales. Previous studies have suggested that locations of recombination hotspots are not conserved between humans and chimpanzees. We made use of the data sets from recent resequencing projects and applied a Bayesian method for identifying hotspots and estimating recombination rates. We also reanalyzed SNP data sets for regions with known hotspots in humans using samples from the human and chimpanzee. The Bayes factors (BF) of shared recombination hotspots between human and chimpanzee across regions were obtained. Based on the analysis of the aligned regions of human chromosome 21, locations where the two species show evidence of shared recombination hotspots (with high BFs) were identified. Interestingly, previous comparative studies of human and chimpanzee that focused on the known human recombination hotspots within the β-globin and HLA regions did not find overlapping of hotspots. Our results show high BFs of shared hotspots at locations within both regions, and the estimated locations of shared hotspots overlap with the locations of human recombination hotspots obtained from sperm-typing studies.

  4. Molecular hydrogen in the cosmic recombination epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Alizadeh, Esfandiar; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2011-10-15

    The advent of precise measurements of the CMB anisotropies has motivated correspondingly precise calculations of the cosmic recombination history. Cosmic recombination proceeds far out of equilibrium because of a ''bottleneck'' at the n=2 level of hydrogen: atoms can only reach the ground state via slow processes--two-photon decay or Lyman-{alpha} resonance escape. However, even a small primordial abundance of molecules could have a large effect on the interline opacity in the recombination epoch and lead to an additional route for hydrogen recombination. Therefore, this paper computes the abundance of the H{sub 2} molecule during the cosmic recombination epoch. Hydrogen molecules in the ground electronic levels X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} can either form from the excited H{sub 2} electronic levels B{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} and C{sup 1}{Pi}{sub u} or through the charged particles H{sub 2}{sup +}, HeH{sup +}, and H{sup -}. We follow the transitions among all of these species, resolving the rotational and vibrational sublevels. Since the energies of the X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}-B{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} (Lyman band) and X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}-C{sup 1}{Pi}{sub u} (Werner band) transitions are near the Lyman-{alpha} energy, the distortion of the CMB spectrum caused by escaped H Lyman-line photons accelerates both the formation and the destruction of H{sub 2} due to this channel relative to the thermal rates. This causes the populations of H{sub 2} molecules in X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} energy levels to deviate from their thermal equilibrium abundances. We find that the resulting H{sub 2} abundance is 10{sup -17} at z=1200 and 10{sup -13} at z=800, which is too small to have any significant influence on the recombination history.

  5. Computer applications in recombinant DNA research.

    PubMed

    Modelevsky, J L

    1983-01-01

    I have tried to describe why the computer is an essential tool for the recombinant DNA scientist. As our data bases grow, we will require information storage and communication systems unlike the paper based record systems with which we currently work. Molecular biological data is being generated so rapidly that I believe electronic data exchange will soon be the only way we will be able to keep each other up to date. We have seen some specific computer applications which provide assistance to the researcher at the bench. Sequence manipulation, analysis, and display are too difficult for the unaided molecular biologist to accomplish readily. The computer, being able to provide intelligence at speeds unmatchable by humans, will continue to be used as a tool in recombinant DNA research and will rapidly grow to be an essential tool for all scientists.

  6. Recombinant organisms for production of industrial products

    PubMed Central

    Adrio, Jose-Luis

    2010-01-01

    A revolution in industrial microbiology was sparked by the discoveries of ther double-stranded structure of DNA and the development of recombinant DNA technology. Traditional industrial microbiology was merged with molecular biology to yield improved recombinant processes for the industrial production of primary and secondary metabolites, protein biopharmaceuticals and industrial enzymes. Novel genetic techniques such as metabolic engineering, combinatorial biosynthesis and molecular breeding techniques and their modifications are contributing greatly to the development of improved industrial processes. In addition, functional genomics, proteomics and metabolomics are being exploited for the discovery of novel valuable small molecules for medicine as well as enzymes for catalysis. The sequencing of industrial microbal genomes is being carried out which bodes well for future process improvement and discovery of new industrial products. PMID:21326937

  7. Recombination clumping factor during cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. E-mail: gnedin@fnal.gov

    2014-06-01

    We discuss the role of recombinations in the intergalactic medium, and the related concept of the clumping factor, during cosmic reionization. The clumping factor is, in general, a local quantity that depends on both the local overdensity and the scale below which the baryon density field can be assumed smooth. That scale, called the filtering scale, depends on over-density and local thermal history. We present a method for building a self-consistent analytical model of inhomogeneous reionization, assuming the linear growth rate of the density fluctuation, which simultaneously accounts for these effects. We show that taking into account the local clumping factor introduces significant corrections to the total recombination rate, compared to the model with a globally uniform clumping factor.

  8. Ultrafast recombination and trapping in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, A.; Seibert, K.; Kurz, H.; Parsons, G. N.; Wang, C.; Davidson, B. N.; Lucovsky, G.; Nemanich, R. J.

    1990-02-01

    We have studied the time-resolved reflectivity and transmission changes induced by femtosecond laser pulses in hydrogenated and nonhydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films, a-Si:H and a-Si, respectively. By varying the pump power, and hence the photoexcited free-carrier densities, by several orders of magnitude, a quadratic, nonradiative recombination process has been identified that controls the density of free carriers on a picosecond time scale for excitation levels above 5×1018 cm-3 in a-Si:H and above 5×1019 cm-3 in a-Si. At lower free-carrier densities, the reflectivity transients display the dynamics expected from a trapping mechanism. We suggest that the process that dominates for the higher free-carrier densities may result from Auger recombination but with a dependence on the carrier density that is different from that which has been observed in crystalline semiconductors where k selection prevails.

  9. Hα diagnostic in a recombining plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, U.; Goto, M.

    2016-05-01

    In fusion devices the hydrogen Balmer lines are used to measure the neutral flux from the walls into the plasma using the atomic physics factor S/XB. This is a standard diagnostic which can be applied in ionizing plasma using {{H}α} , {{H}β} or {{H}γ} without knowledge of the electron density. We will extend this method to a recombining plasma in front of a surface. {{H}α} can be used in an analogous way to measure the plasma flow to this surface which can be e.g. a divertor target. The other Balmer lines are not suitable because the corresponding atomic physics factor R/YB depends on density due to three-body recombination. An application of this diagnostic method is provided.

  10. Dissipative Stern-Gerlach recombination experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Thiago R. de; Caldeira, A. O.

    2006-04-15

    The possibility of obtaining the initial pure state in a usual Stern-Gerlach experiment through the recombination of the two emerging beams is investigated. We have extended the previous work of Englert, Schwinger, and Scully [Found Phys. 18, 1045 (1988)] including the fluctuations of the magnetic field generated by a properly chosen magnet. As a result we obtained an attenuation factor to the possible revival of coherence when the beams are perfectly recombined. When the source of the magnetic field is a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) the attenuation factor can be controlled by external circuits and the spin decoherence directly measured. For the proposed SQUID with dimensions in the scale of microns the attenuation factor has been shown unimportant when compared with the interaction time of the spin with the magnet.

  11. Recombination energy in double white dwarf formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandez, J. L. A.; Ivanova, N.; Lombardi, J. C.

    2015-06-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the role of recombination energy during a common envelope event. We confirm that taking this energy into account helps to avoid the formation of the circumbinary envelope commonly found in previous studies. For the first time, we can model a complete common envelope event, with a clean compact double white dwarf binary system formed at the end. The resulting binary orbit is almost perfectly circular. In addition to considering recombination energy, we also show that between 1/4 and 1/2 of the released orbital energy is taken away by the ejected material. We apply this new method to the case of the double white dwarf system WD 1101+364, and we find that the progenitor system at the start of the common envelope event consisted of an ˜1.5 M⊙ red giant star in an ˜30 d orbit with a white dwarf companion.

  12. Mechanism and regulation of meiotic recombination initiation

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Isabel; Keeney, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic recombination involves the formation and repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the conserved Spo11 protein. This review summarizes recent studies pertaining to the formation of meiotic DSBs, including the mechanism of DNA cleavage by Spo11, proteins required for break formation, and mechanisms that control the location, timing, and number of DSBs. Where appropriate, findings in different organisms are discussed to highlight evolutionary conservation or divergence. PMID:25324213

  13. Recombinant organisms capable of fermenting cellobiose

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Lai, Xiaokuang; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; York, Sean W.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant microorganism which expresses pyruvate decarboxylase, alcohol dehydrogenase, Klebsiella phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and Klebsiella (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II, wherein said phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and said (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II are heterologous to said microorganism and wherein said microorganism is capable of utilizing both hemicellulose and cellulose, including cellobiose, in the production of ethanol.

  14. Designing recombinant Pseudomonas strains to enhance biodesulfurization.

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, M E; Ferrández, A; De Lorenzo, V; García, J L; Díaz, E

    1997-01-01

    The dsz biodesulfurization cluster from Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8 has been engineered under the control of heterologous broad-host-range regulatory signals to alleviate the mechanism of sulfur repression, and it was stably inserted into the chromosomes of different Pseudomonas strains. The recombinant bacteria were able to desulfurize dibenzothiophene more efficiently than the native host. Furthermore, these new biocatalysts combine relevant industrial and environmental traits, such as production of biosurfactants, with the enhanced biodesulfurization phenotype. PMID:9371464

  15. Cultivating Insect Cells To Produce Recombinant Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn; Goodwin, Thomas; Prewett, Tacey; Andrews, Angela; Francis, Karen; O'Connor, Kim

    1996-01-01

    Method of producing recombinant proteins involves growth of insect cells in nutrient solution in cylindrical bioreactor rotating about cylindrical axis, oriented horizontally and infecting cells with viruses into which genes of selected type cloned. Genes in question those encoding production of desired proteins. Horizontal rotating bioreactor preferred for use in method, denoted by acronym "HARV", described in "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662).

  16. Three-Body Recombination of Oxygen Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2002-05-01

    Dayside photodissociation of O2 and CO2 in the atmospheres of Earth, Venus, and Mars produces oxygen atoms that eventually undergo three-body recombination O + O + M -> O2* + M The variety of electronic states produced is observable as nightglow emissions, which have been the subject of many laboratory and interpretive investigations. Here we review the current understanding of the overall temperature-dependent rate coefficient for three-body recombination of oxygen atoms and describe a strategy for its measurement. The most recent measurement [1] is almost 30 years old. The most comprehensive review [2] is more than 25 years old and shows that the absolute rate coefficients for recombination and the reverse process, collision-induced dissociation, as well as the dependence on temperature and collider, are poorly determined, in spite of the relatively narrow error bars reported in the various studies. The most recent high-temperature dissociation study [3] actually increases the divergence. We plan experiments with a commercial F2 laser, providing roughly 50 mJ of 157 nm radiation in a 3-4 mm beam, to achieve greater than 80% dissociation of molecular oxygen, in the range from 0.5 to 5 torr. In a high-pressure N2 background (30-200 torr) the oxygen atoms will recombine in a time scale from 0.1 to 10 ms, as monitored by 845 nm fluorescence excited by two photons at 226 nm. [1] I. M. Campbell and C. N. Gray, Chem. Phys. Lett. 18, 607 (1973). [2] D. L. Baulch, D. D. Drysdale, J. Duxbury, and S. J. Grant, Evaluated Kinetic Data for High Temperature Reactions Vol. 3 ``Homogeneous Gas Phase Reactions of the O2--O3 System, the CO--O2--H2 System, and of Sulphur-Containing Species," (Butterworths, London, 1976). [3] V. Naudet, S. Abid, and C. E. Paillard, J. Chim. Phys. 96, 1123 (1999).

  17. RECOMBINATION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF Be-LIKE Si

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, I.; Boehm, S.; Schuch, R.; Loch, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    Recombination of Be-like Si{sup 10+} over the 0-43 eV electron-ion energy range is measured at the CRYRING electron cooler. In addition to radiative and dielectronic recombination, the recombination spectrum also shows strong contributions from trielectronic recombination. Below 100 meV, several very strong resonances associated with a spin-flip of the excited electron dominate the spectrum and also dominate the recombination in the photoionized plasma. The resonant plasma rate coefficients corrected for the experimental field ionization are in good agreement with calculated results by Gu and with AUTOSTRUCTURE calculations. All other calculations significantly underestimate the plasma rate coefficients at low temperatures.

  18. [Homologous recombination among bacterial genomes: the measurement and identification].

    PubMed

    Xianwei, Yang; Ruifu, Yang; Yujun, Cui

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination is one of important sources in shaping the bacterial population diversity, which disrupts the clonal relationship among different lineages through horizontal transferring of DNA-segments. As consequence of blurring the vertical inheritance signals, the homologous recombination raises difficulties in phylogenetic analysis and reconstruction of population structure. Here we discuss the impacts of homologous recombination in inferring phylogenetic relationship among bacterial isolates, and summarize the tools and models separately used in recombination measurement and identification. We also highlight the merits and drawbacks of various approaches, aiming to assist in the practical application for the analysis of homologous recombination in bacterial evolution research. PMID:26907777

  19. Radiative recombination of hot carriers in narrow-gap semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, N. V.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2012-01-15

    The mechanism of the radiative recombination of hot carriers in narrow-gap semiconductors is analyzed using the example of indium antimonide. It is shown that the CHCC Auger recombination process may lead to pronounced carrier heating at high excitation levels. The distribution functions and concentrations of hot carriers are determined. The radiative recombination rate of hot carriers and the radiation gain coefficient are calculated in terms of the Kane model. It is demonstrated that the radiative recombination of hot carriers will make a substantial contribution to the total radiative recombination rate at high carrier concentrations.

  20. Use of Helical Transport Channels for Bunch Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; Yonehara, Katsuya; Yoshikawa, Cary; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2010-03-01

    Cooling scenarios for a high-luminosity Muon Collider require bunch recombination for optimal luminosity. In this report we note that the tunable chronicity property of a helical transport channel (HTC) makes it a desirable component of a bunch recombiner. A large chronicity HTC is desirable for the bunch recombining transport, while more isochronous transport may be preferred for rf manipulations. Scenarios for bunch recombination are presented, with initial 1-D simulations, in order to set the stage for future 3-D simulation and optimization. HTC transports may enable a very compact bunch recombiner.

  1. Subunit dissociations in natural and recombinant hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Manning, L R; Jenkins, W T; Hess, J R; Vandegriff, K; Winslow, R M; Manning, J M

    1996-04-01

    A precise and rapid procedure employing gel filtration on Superose-12 to measure the tetramer-dimer dissociation constants of some natural and recombinant hemoglobins in the oxy conformation is described. Natural sickle hemoglobin was chosen to verify the validity of the results by comparing the values with those reported using an independent method not based on gel filtration. Recombinant sickle hemoglobin, as well as a sickle double mutant with a substitution at the Val-6(beta) receptor site, had approximately the same dissociation constant as natural sickle hemoglobin. Of the two recombinant hemoglobins with amino acid replacements in the alpha 1 beta 2 subunit interface, one was found to be extensively dissociated and the other completely dissociated. In addition, the absence of an effect of the allosteric regulators DPG and IHP on the dissociation constant was demonstrated. Thus, a tetramer dissociation constant can now be determined readily and used together with other criteria for characterization of hemoglobins and their interaction with small regulatory molecules. PMID:8845768

  2. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  3. Monitoring DNA recombination initiated by HO endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Neal; Haber, James E

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) have proven to be very potent initiators of recombination in yeast and other organisms. A single, site-specific DSB initiates homologous DNA repair events such as gene conversion, break-induced replication, and single-strand annealing, as well as nonhomologous end joining, microhomology-mediated end joining, and new telomere addition. When repair is either delayed or prevented, a single DSB can trigger checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest. In budding yeast, expressing the HO endonuclease under the control of a galactose-inducible promoter has been instrumental in the study of these processes by providing us a way to synchronously induce a DSB at a unique site in vivo. We describe how the HO endonuclease has been used to study the recombination events in mating-type (MAT) switching. Southern blots provide an overview of the process by allowing one to examine the formation of the DSB, DNA degradation at the break, and formation of the product. Denaturing gels and slot blots as well as PCR have provided important tools to follow the progression of resection in wild-type and mutant cells. PCR has also been important in allowing us to follow the kinetics of certain recombination intermediates such as the initiation of repair DNA synthesis or the removal of nonhomologous Y sequences during MAT switching. Finally chromatin immunoprecipitation has been used to follow the recruitment of key proteins to the DSB and in subsequent steps in DSB repair.

  4. Dissociative recombination of molecular ions with electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented for the present state of the art of laboratory measurements of the dissociative recombination of molecular ions with electrons. Most work has focussed on obtaining rates and their temperature dependence, as these are of primary interest for model calculations of ionospheres. A comparison of data obtained using the microwave afterglow method, the flowing afterglow technique, and the merged beam technique shows that generally the agreement is quite good, but there are some serious discrepancies, especially in the case of H(3+) recombination, that need to be resolved. Results of some earlier experimental work need to be reexamined in the light of more recent developments. Such cases are pointed out and a compilation of rate coefficients that have withstood scrutiny is presented. Recent advances in experimental methods, such as the use of laser-in-duced fluorescence, make it possible to identify some neutral products of dissociative recombination. What has been done so far and what results one might expect from future work are briefly reviewed.

  5. Homologous recombination in rat germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kanatsu-Shinohara, Mito; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Takehashi, Masanori; Sanbo, Makoto; Morioka, Yuka; Tanaka, Takashi; Morimoto, Hiroko; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Shinohara, Takashi

    2011-07-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are the only stem cells in the body with germline potential, which makes them an attractive target for germline modification. We previously showed the feasibility of homologous recombination in mouse SSCs and produced knockout (KO) mice by exploiting germline stem (GS) cells, i.e., cultured spermatogonia with SSC activity. In this study, we report the successful homologous recombination in rat GS cells, which can be readily established by their ability to form germ cell colonies on culture plates whose surfaces are hydrophilic and neutrally charged and thus limit somatic cell binding. We established a drug selection protocol for GS cells under hypoxic conditions. The frequency of the homologous recombination of the Ocln gene was 4.2% (2 out of 48 clones). However, these GS cell lines failed to produce offspring following xenogeneic transplantation into mouse testes and microinsemination, suggesting that long-term culture and drug selection have a negative effect on GS cells. Nevertheless, our results demonstrate the feasibility of gene targeting in rat GS cells and pave the way toward the generation of KO rats.

  6. FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.

  7. Recombination Pattern Reanalysis of Some HIV-1 Circulating Recombination Forms Suggest the Necessity and Difficulty of Revision

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lei; Li, Lin; Li, Hanping; Liu, Siyang; Wang, Xiaolin; Bao, Zuoyi; Li, Tianyi; Zhuang, Daomin; Liu, Yongjian; Li, Jingyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Recombination is one of the major mechanisms underlying the generation of HIV-1 variability. Currently 61 circulating recombinant forms of HIV-1 have been identified. With the development of recombination detection techniques and accumulation of HIV-1 reference stains, more accurate mosaic structures of circulating recombinant forms (CRFs), like CRF04 and CRF06, have undergone repeated analysis and upgrades. Such revisions may also be necessary for other CRFs. Unlike previous studies, whose results are based primarily on a single recombination detection program, the current study was based on multiple recombination analysis, which may have produced more impartial results. Methods Representative references of 3 categories of intersubtype recombinants were selected, including BC recombinants (CRF07 and CRF08), BG recombinants (CRF23 and CRF24), and BF recombinants (CRF38 and CRF44). They were reanalyzed in detail using both the jumping profile hidden Markov model and RDP3. Results The results indicate that revisions and upgrades are very necessary and the entire re-analysis suggested 2 types of revision: (i) length of inserted fragments; and (ii) number of inserted fragments. The reanalysis also indicated that determination of small regions of about 200 bases or fewer should be performed with more caution. Conclusion Results indicated that the involvement of multiple recombination detection programs is very necessary. Additionally, results suggested two major challenges, one involving the difficulty of accurately determining the locations of breakpoints and the second involving identification of small regions of about 200 bases or fewer with greater caution. Both indicate the complexity of HIV-1 recombination. The resolution would depend critically on development of a recombination analysis algorithm, accumulation of HIV-1 stains, and a higher sequencing quality. With the changes in recombination pattern, phylogenetic relationships of some CRFs may also

  8. Evolution of recombination in eutherian mammals: insights into mechanisms that affect recombination rates and crossover interference.

    PubMed

    Segura, Joana; Ferretti, Luca; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastián; Capilla, Laia; Farré, Marta; Reis, Fernanda; Oliver-Bonet, Maria; Fernández-Bellón, Hugo; Garcia, Francisca; Garcia-Caldés, Montserrat; Robinson, Terence J; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2013-11-22

    Recombination allows faithful chromosomal segregation during meiosis and contributes to the production of new heritable allelic variants that are essential for the maintenance of genetic diversity. Therefore, an appreciation of how this variation is created and maintained is of critical importance to our understanding of biodiversity and evolutionary change. Here, we analysed the recombination features from species representing the major eutherian taxonomic groups Afrotheria, Rodentia, Primates and Carnivora to better understand the dynamics of mammalian recombination. Our results suggest a phylogenetic component in recombination rates (RRs), which appears to be directional, strongly punctuated and subject to selection. Species that diversified earlier in the evolutionary tree have lower RRs than those from more derived phylogenetic branches. Furthermore, chromosome-specific recombination maps in distantly related taxa show that crossover interference is especially weak in the species with highest RRs detected thus far, the tiger. This is the first example of a mammalian species exhibiting such low levels of crossover interference, highlighting the uniqueness of this species and its relevance for the study of the mechanisms controlling crossover formation, distribution and resolution.

  9. Evidence of structural genomic region recombination in Hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Cristina, Juan; Colina, Rodney

    2006-01-01

    Background/Aim Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been the subject of intense research and clinical investigation as its major role in human disease has emerged. Although homologous recombination has been demonstrated in many members of the family Flaviviridae, to which HCV belongs, there have been few studies reporting recombination on natural populations of HCV. Recombination break-points have been identified in non structural proteins of the HCV genome. Given the implications that recombination has for RNA virus evolution, it is clearly important to determine the extent to which recombination plays a role in HCV evolution. In order to gain insight into these matters, we have performed a phylogenetic analysis of 89 full-length HCV strains from all types and sub-types, isolated all over the world, in order to detect possible recombination events. Method Putative recombinant sequences were identified with the use of SimPlot program. Recombination events were confirmed by bootscaning, using putative recombinant sequence as a query. Results Two crossing over events were identified in the E1/E2 structural region of an intra-typic (1a/1c) recombinant strain. Conclusion Only one of 89 full-length strains studied resulted to be a recombinant HCV strain, revealing that homologous recombination does not play an extensive roll in HCV evolution. Nevertheless, this mechanism can not be denied as a source for generating genetic diversity in natural populations of HCV, since a new intra-typic recombinant strain was found. Moreover, the recombination break-points were found in the structural region of the HCV genome. PMID:16813646

  10. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki; Gang, David R.; Sarkanen, Simo; Ford, Joshua D.

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  11. Live-Cell Imaging of Vaccinia Virus Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Paszkowski, Patrick; Noyce, Ryan S.; Evans, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Recombination between co-infecting poxviruses provides an important mechanism for generating the genetic diversity that underpins evolution. However, poxviruses replicate in membrane-bound cytoplasmic structures known as factories or virosomes. These are enclosed structures that could impede DNA mixing between co-infecting viruses, and mixing would seem to be essential for this process. We hypothesize that virosome fusion events would be a prerequisite for recombination between co-infecting poxviruses, and this requirement could delay or limit viral recombination. We have engineered vaccinia virus (VACV) to express overlapping portions of mCherry fluorescent protein fused to a cro DNA-binding element. In cells also expressing an EGFP-cro fusion protein, this permits live tracking of virus DNA and genetic recombination using confocal microscopy. Our studies show that different types of recombination events exhibit different timing patterns, depending upon the relative locations of the recombining elements. Recombination between partly duplicated sequences is detected soon after post-replicative genes are expressed, as long as the reporter gene sequences are located in cis within an infecting genome. The same kinetics are also observed when the recombining elements are divided between VACV and transfected DNA. In contrast, recombination is delayed when the recombining sequences are located on different co-infecting viruses, and mature recombinants aren’t detected until well after late gene expression is well established. The delay supports the hypothesis that factories impede inter-viral recombination, but even after factories merge there remain further constraints limiting virus DNA mixing and recombinant gene assembly. This delay could be related to the continued presence of ER-derived membranes within the fused virosomes, membranes that may once have wrapped individual factories. PMID:27525721

  12. Live-Cell Imaging of Vaccinia Virus Recombination.

    PubMed

    Paszkowski, Patrick; Noyce, Ryan S; Evans, David H

    2016-08-01

    Recombination between co-infecting poxviruses provides an important mechanism for generating the genetic diversity that underpins evolution. However, poxviruses replicate in membrane-bound cytoplasmic structures known as factories or virosomes. These are enclosed structures that could impede DNA mixing between co-infecting viruses, and mixing would seem to be essential for this process. We hypothesize that virosome fusion events would be a prerequisite for recombination between co-infecting poxviruses, and this requirement could delay or limit viral recombination. We have engineered vaccinia virus (VACV) to express overlapping portions of mCherry fluorescent protein fused to a cro DNA-binding element. In cells also expressing an EGFP-cro fusion protein, this permits live tracking of virus DNA and genetic recombination using confocal microscopy. Our studies show that different types of recombination events exhibit different timing patterns, depending upon the relative locations of the recombining elements. Recombination between partly duplicated sequences is detected soon after post-replicative genes are expressed, as long as the reporter gene sequences are located in cis within an infecting genome. The same kinetics are also observed when the recombining elements are divided between VACV and transfected DNA. In contrast, recombination is delayed when the recombining sequences are located on different co-infecting viruses, and mature recombinants aren't detected until well after late gene expression is well established. The delay supports the hypothesis that factories impede inter-viral recombination, but even after factories merge there remain further constraints limiting virus DNA mixing and recombinant gene assembly. This delay could be related to the continued presence of ER-derived membranes within the fused virosomes, membranes that may once have wrapped individual factories.

  13. Green biofactories: recombinant protein production in plants.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Adil; Pereira, Eridan O; Conley, Andrew J; Richman, Alex S; Menassa, Rima

    2010-11-01

    Until recently, low accumulation levels have been the major bottleneck for plant-made recombinant protein production. However, several breakthroughs have been described in the past few years allowing for very high accumulation levels, mainly through chloroplast transformation and transient expression, coupled with subcellular targeting and protein fusions. Another important factor influencing our ability to use plants for the production of recombinant proteins is the availability of quick and simple purification strategies. Recent developments using oleosin, zein, ELP and hydrophobin fusion tags have shown promise as efficient and cost-effective methods for non-chromatographic separation. Furthermore, plant glycosylation is a major barrier to the parenteral administration of plant-made biopharmaceuticals because of potential immunogenicity concerns. A major effort has been invested in humanizing plant glycosylation, and several groups have been able to reduce or eliminate immunogenic glycans while introducing mammalian-specific glycans. Finally, biosafety issues and public perception are essential for the acceptance of plants as bioreactors for the production of proteins. Over recent years, it has become clear that food and feed plants carry an inherent risk of contaminating our food supply, and thus much effort has focused on the use of non-food plants. Presently, Nicotiana benthamiana has emerged as the preferred host for transient expression, while tobacco is most frequently used for chloroplast transformation. In this review, we focus on the main issues hindering the economical production of recombinant proteins in plants, describing the current efforts for addressing these limitations, and we include an extensive list of recent patents generated with the intention of solving these limitations. PMID:21171961

  14. Spatiotemporal regulation of meiotic recombination by Liaisonin.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Ito, Masaru; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    Sexual reproduction involves diversification of genetic information in successive generations. Meiotic recombination, which substantially contributes to the increase in genetic diversity, is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the evolutionarily conserved Spo11 protein. Spo11 requires additional partner proteins for its DNA cleavage reaction. DSBs are preferentially introduced at defined chromosomal sites called "recombination hotspots." Recent studies have revealed that meiotically established higher-order chromosome structures, such as chromosome axes and loops, are also crucial in the control of DSB formation. Most of the DSB sites are located within chromatin loop regions, while many of the proteins involved in DSB formation reside on chromosomal axes. Hence, DSB proteins and DSB sites seem to be distantly located. To resolve this paradox, we conducted comprehensive proteomics and ChIP-chip analyses on Spo11 partners in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in combination with mutant studies. We identified two distinct DSB complexes, the "DSBC (DSB Catalytic core)" and "SFT (Seven-Fifteen-Twenty four; Rec7-Rec15-Rec24)" subcomplexes. The DSBC subcomplex contains Spo11 and functions as the catalytic core for the DNA cleavage reaction. The SFT subcomplex is assumed to execute regulatory functions. To activate the DSBC subcomplex, the SFT subcomplex tethers hotspots to axes via its interaction with Mde2, which can interact with proteins in both DSBC and SFT subcomplexes. Thus, Mde2 is likely to bridge these two subcomplexes, forming a "tethered loop-axis complex." It should be noted that Mde2 expression is strictly regulated by S phase checkpoint monitoring of the completion of DNA replication. From these observations, we proposed that Mde2 is a central coupler for meiotic recombination initiation to establish a tethered loop-axis complex in liaison with the S phase checkpoint.

  15. Population inversion in a stationary recombining plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, M.

    1980-12-01

    Population inversion, which occurs in a recombining plasma when a stationary He plasma is brought into contact with a neutral gas, is examined. With hydrogen as a contact gas, noticeable inversion between low-lying levels of H as been found. The overpopulation density is of the order of 10/sup 8/ cm/sup -3/, which is much higher then that (approx. =10/sup 5/ cm/sup -3/) obtained previously with He as a contact gas. Relations between these experimental results and the conditions for population inversion are discussed with the CR model.

  16. Nanobodies and recombinant binders in cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Helma, Jonas; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Muyldermans, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are key reagents to investigate cellular processes. The development of recombinant antibodies and binders derived from natural protein scaffolds has expanded traditional applications, such as immunofluorescence, binding arrays, and immunoprecipitation. In addition, their small size and high stability in ectopic environments have enabled their use in all areas of cell research, including structural biology, advanced microscopy, and intracellular expression. Understanding these novel reagents as genetic modules that can be integrated into cellular pathways opens up a broad experimental spectrum to monitor and manipulate cellular processes. PMID:26056137

  17. Dissociation and recombination in an inhomogeneous gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuščer, Ivan

    1991-09-01

    The system of Boltzmann equations of Ludwig and Heil for a dissociating gas mixture is reviewed and reformulated in terms of differential cross sections. For the purpose of Monte Carlo simulations, collision models of the type of Borgnakke and Larsen are proposed. In case of short-lived transient flows of molecular gases and at not too high temperatures, simulation of scattering collisions is expected to suffice; the distribution function of the dissociated particles can be evaluated afterwards by integration, and recombination can be ignored.

  18. Hydrogen recombiner catalyst test supporting data

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, M.D.

    1995-01-19

    This is a data package supporting the Hydrogen Recombiner Catalyst Performance and Carbon Monoxide Sorption Capacity Test Report, WHC-SD-WM-TRP-211, Rev 0. This report contains 10 appendices which consist of the following: Mass spectrometer analysis reports: HRC samples 93-001 through 93-157; Gas spectrometry analysis reports: HRC samples 93-141 through 93-658; Mass spectrometer procedure PNL-MA-299 ALO-284; Alternate analytical method for ammonia and water vapor; Sample log sheets; Job Safety analysis; Certificate of mixture analysis for feed gases; Flow controller calibration check; Westinghouse Standards Laboratory report on Bois flow calibrator; and Sorption capacity test data, tables, and graphs.

  19. Patterns of recombination on human chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Schlumpf, K.S.; Kim, D.; Haines, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    Virtually all genetic linkage maps generated to date are gross averages across individuals, ages, and (often) sexes. In addition, although some level of positive interference has been assumed, until recently little evidence to support this in humans has been available. The major stumbling block has been the quality of the data available, since even a few genotypic errors can have drastic effects on both the map length and the number of apparent recombinants. In addition, variation in recombination by factors other than sex have pretty much been ignored. To explore recombination in more detail, we have generated a microsatellite marker map of human chromosome 22. This map includes 32 markers genotyped through 46 sibships of the Venezuelan Reference Pedigree (VRP). Extensive error checking and regenotyping was performed to remove as many genotypic errors as possible, but no genotypes were removed simply because they created unlikely events. The following 1000:1 odds map has been obtained: cen--F8VWFP1--11--S264--3-S311--4--S257--2--TOP1P2--3--S156--1--CRYB2--1--S258--2--S310--6--S193--1--S275--3--S268--1--S280--4--S304--3--S283--2--LiR1--3--IL2RB--3--S299--1--S302--1--S537--2--S270--4--PDGF--8--S274--qter. The female map (91 cM) is twice as long as the male map (46 cM) and the log-likelihood difference in the maps (22.3) is highly significant (P=0.001, df=22) and appears constant across the chromosome. Analysis of recombination with age showed no particular trends for either males or females when chromosomes were grouped into three categories (20, 20-30, 30+) by parental age at birth of child. Positive interference was found in maternally derived chromosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=30.5 (4), p<0.005), but not in paternally derived chromosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=6.24 (3), P=0.10). This contrasts to data from chromosomes 9 and 21 where positive interference was found for both sexes. More detailed analyses are in progress.

  20. An introduction to recombination and linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mcpeek, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    With a garden as his laboratory, Mendel was able to discern basic probabilistic laws of heredity. Although it first appeared as a baffling exception to one of Mendel`s principles, the phenomenon of variable linkage between characters was soon recognized to be a powerful tool in the process of chromosome mapping and location of genes of interest. In this introduction, we first describe Mendel`s work and the subsequent discovery of linkage. Next we describe the apparent cause of variable linkage, namely recombination, and we introduce linkage analysis. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Single-stranded DNA as a recombination substrate in plants as assessed by stable and transient recombination assays.

    PubMed Central

    Bilang, R; Peterhans, A; Bogucki, A; Paszkowski, J

    1992-01-01

    Two separate assays, one that requires stable integration of recombination products and one that does not, were employed to elucidate the role of single-stranded DNA in extrachromosomal homologous recombination in Nicotiana tabacum. Both assays revealed that single-stranded DNA in linear and in circular forms was an efficient substrate for recombination, provided that the cotransformed recombination substrates were of complementary sequence, so that direct annealing was possible. Recombination was inefficient when both single-stranded recombination partners contained homologous regions of identical sequence and generation of a double-stranded DNA was required prior to heteroduplex formation. These results indicate that direct annealing of single strands is an important initial step for intermolecular recombination in tobacco cells. Annealed cotransformed single-stranded molecules yielded intermediates that could be further processed by either continuous or discontinuous second-strand synthesis. The type of intermediate had no influence on the recombination efficiency. Double-stranded circles were unable to recombine efficiently either with each other or with single-stranded DNA. Our results suggest that a helicase activity is involved in the initial steps of double-stranded DNA recombination which unwinds duplex molecules at the site of double-strand breaks. Images PMID:1729608

  2. Recombination in feline immunodeficiency virus genomes from naturally infected cougars.

    PubMed

    Bruen, Trevor C; Poss, Mary

    2007-08-01

    Recombination contributes significantly to diversity within virus populations and ultimately to viral evolution. Here we use a recently developed statistical test to perform exploratory analysis of recombination in fourteen feline immunodeficiency virus (FIVpco) genomes derived from a wild population of cougars. We use both the global and local Phi statistical test as an overall guide to predict where recombination may have occurred. Further analyses, including similarity plots and phylogenetic incongruence tests, confirmed that three FIVpco lineages were derived from recombinant events. Interestingly, the regions of mosaic origin were clustered in the area encoding lentiviral accessory genes and largely spared the viral structural genes. Because some of the mosaic strains are currently geographically disparate, our data indicate that the dispersal of cougars infected with these strains was preceded by recombination events. These results suggest that recombination has played an important role in the evolution of FIVpco for this wild population of cougars.

  3. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  4. High spontaneous intrachromosomal recombination rates in ataxia-telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Meyn, M.S. )

    1993-05-28

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an inherited human disease associated with neurologic degeneration, immune dysfunctions, and high cancer risk. It has been proposed that the underlying abnormality in A-T is a defect in genetic recombination that interferes with immune gene rearrangements and the repair of DNA damage. Recombination was studied in A-T and control human fibroblast lines by means of two recombination vectors. Unexpectedly, spontaneous intrachromosomal recombination rates were 30 to 200 times higher in A-T fibroblast lines than in normal cells, whereas extrachromosomal recombination frequencies were near normal. Increased recombination is thus a component of genetic instability in A-T and may contribute to the cancer risk seen in A-T patients. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Recombinant DNA products: Insulin, interferon and growth hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Bollon, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    This book provides the discussion of products of biotechnology of recombinant DNA. The contents include: Recombinant DNA techniques; isolation, cloning, and expression of genes; from somatostatin to human insulin; yeast; an alternative organism for foreign protein production; background in human interferon; preclinical assessment of biological properties of recombinant DNA derived human interferons; human clinical trials of bacteria-derived human ..cap alpha.. interferon.f large scale production of human alpha interferon from bacteria; direct expression of human growth hormone in escherichia coli with the lipoprotein promoter; biological actions in humans of recombinant DNA synthesized human growth hormone; NIH guidelines for research involving recombinant DNA molecules; appendix; viral vectors and the NHY guidelines; FDA's role in approval and regulation of recombinant DNA drugs; and index.

  6. Recombinant allergens for allergen-specific immunotherapy: 10 years anniversary of immunotherapy with recombinant allergens.

    PubMed

    Valenta, Rudolf; Linhart, B; Swoboda, I; Niederberger, V

    2011-06-01

    The broad applicability of allergen-specific immunotherapy for the treatment and eventually prevention of IgE-mediated allergy is limited by the poor quality and allergenic activity of natural allergen extracts that are used for the production of current allergy vaccines. Today, the genetic code of the most important allergens has been deciphered; recombinant allergens equalling their natural counterparts have been produced for diagnosis and immunotherapy, and a large panel of genetically modified allergens with reduced allergenic activity has been characterized to improve safety of immunotherapy and explore allergen-specific prevention strategies. Successful immunotherapy studies have been performed with recombinant allergens and hypoallergenic allergen derivatives and will lead to the registration of the first recombinant allergen-based vaccines in the near future. There is no doubt that recombinant allergen-based vaccination strategies will be generally applicable to most allergen sources, including respiratory, food and venom allergens and allow to produce safe allergy vaccines for the treatment of the most common forms of IgE-mediated allergies.

  7. Antibiotic-mediated recombination: ciprofloxacin stimulates SOS-independent recombination of divergent sequences in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    López, Elena; Elez, Marina; Matic, Ivan; Blázquez, Jesús

    2007-04-01

    The widespread use and abuse of antibiotics as therapeutic agents has produced a major challenge for bacteria, leading to the selection and spread of antibiotic resistant variants. However, antibiotics do not seem to be mere selectors of these variants. Here we show that the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin, an inhibitor of type II DNA topoisomerases, stimulates intrachromosomal recombination of DNA sequences. The stimulation of recombination between divergent sequences occurs via either the RecBCD or RecFOR pathways and is, surprisingly, independent of SOS induction. Additionally, this stimulation also occurs in a hyperrecombinogenic mismatch repair mutS mutant. It is worth noting that ciprofloxacin also stimulates the conjugational recombination of an antibiotic resistance gene. Finally, we demonstrate that Escherichia coli is able to recover from treatments with recombination-stimulating concentrations of the antibiotic. Thus, fluoroquinolones can increase genetic variation by the stimulation of the recombinogenic capability of treated bacteria (via an SOS-independent mechanism) and consequently may favour the acquisition, evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance determinants. PMID:17376074

  8. Patents in therapeutic recombinant protein production using mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Picanco-Castro, Virginia; de Freitas, Marcela Cristina Correa; Bomfim, Aline de Sousa; de Sousa Russo, Elisa Maria

    2014-01-01

    The industrial production of recombinant proteins preferentially requires the generation of stable cell lines expressing proteins in a quick, relatively facile, and a reproducible manner. Different methods are used to insert exogenous DNA into the host cell, and choosing the appropriate producing cell is of paramount importance for the efficient production and quality of the recombinant protein. This review addresses the advances in recombinant protein production in mammalian cell lines, according to key patents from the last 30 years.

  9. Characterization of recombination in the HLA class II region

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, M.; Carrington, M.; Noble, J.

    1997-02-01

    Studies of linkage disequilibrium across the HLA class II region have been useful in predicting where recombination is most likely to occur. The strong associations between genes within the 85-kb region from DQB1 to DRB1 are consistent with low frequency of recombination in this segment of DNA. Conversely, a lack of association between alleles of TAP1 and TAP2 ({approximately}15 kb) has been observed, suggesting that recombination occurs here with relatively high frequency. Much of the HLA class II region has now been sequenced, providing the tools to undertake detailed analysis of recombination. Twenty-seven families containing one or two recombinant chromosomes within the 500-kb interval between the DPB1 and DRB1 genes were used to determine patterns of recombination across this region. SSCP analysis and microsatellite typing yielded identification of 127 novel polymorphic markers distributed throughout the class II region, allowing refinement of the site of crossover in 30 class II recombinant chromosomes. The three regions where recombination was observed most frequently are as follows: the 45-kb interval between HLA-DNA and RING3 (11 cases), the 50-kb interval between DQB3 and DQB1 (6 cases), and an 8.8-kb segment of the TAP2 gene (3 cases). Six of the 10 remaining recombinants await further characterization, pending identification of additional informative markers, while four recombinants were localized to other intervals (outliers). Analysis of association between markers flanking HLA-DNA to RING3 (45 kb), as well as TAP1 to TAP2 (15 kb), by use of independent CEPH haplotypes indicated little or no linkage disequilibrium, supporting the familial recombination data. A notable sequence motif located within a region associated with increased rates of recombination consisted of a (TGGA){sub 12} tandem repeat within the TAP2 gene. 74 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. The Many Landscapes of Recombination in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Comeron, Josep M.; Ratnappan, Ramesh; Bailin, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Recombination is a fundamental biological process with profound evolutionary implications. Theory predicts that recombination increases the effectiveness of selection in natural populations. Yet, direct tests of this prediction have been restricted to qualitative trends due to the lack of detailed characterization of recombination rate variation across genomes and within species. The use of imprecise recombination rates can also skew population genetic analyses designed to assess the presence and mode of selection across genomes. Here we report the first integrated high-resolution description of genomic and population variation in recombination, which also distinguishes between the two outcomes of meiotic recombination: crossing over (CO) and gene conversion (GC). We characterized the products of 5,860 female meioses in Drosophila melanogaster by genotyping a total of 139 million informative SNPs and mapped 106,964 recombination events at a resolution down to 2 kilobases. This approach allowed us to generate whole-genome CO and GC maps as well as a detailed description of variation in recombination among individuals of this species. We describe many levels of variation in recombination rates. At a large-scale (100 kb), CO rates exhibit extreme and highly punctuated variation along chromosomes, with hot and coldspots. We also show extensive intra-specific variation in CO landscapes that is associated with hotspots at low frequency in our sample. GC rates are more uniformly distributed across the genome than CO rates and detectable in regions with reduced or absent CO. At a local scale, recombination events are associated with numerous sequence motifs and tend to occur within transcript regions, thus suggesting that chromatin accessibility favors double-strand breaks. All these non-independent layers of variation in recombination across genomes and among individuals need to be taken into account in order to obtain relevant estimates of recombination rates, and should

  11. The landscape of recombination in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hinch, Anjali G.; Tandon, Arti; Patterson, Nick; Song, Yunli; Rohland, Nadin; Palmer, Cameron D.; Chen, Gary K.; Wang, Kai; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Akylbekova, Meggie; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Amos, Christopher; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cai, Qiuyin; Caporaso, Neil; Casey, Graham; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Deming, Sandra L.; Diver, W. Ryan; Divers, Jasmin; Fornage, Myriam; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Glessner, Joseph; Harris, Curtis C.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ingles, Sue A.; Isaacs, Williams; John, Esther M.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Keating, Brendan; Kittles, Rick A.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Larkin, Emma; Le Marchand, Loic; McNeill, Lorna H.; Millikan, Robert C.; Murphy, Adam; Musani, Solomon; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Nyante, Sarah; Papanicolaou, George J.; Press, Michael F.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reiner, Alex P.; Rich, Stephen S.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Spitz, Margaret; Strom, Sara S.; Thun, Michael J.; Tucker, Margaret A.; Wang, Zhaoming; Wiencke, John K.; Witte, John S.; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Yamamura, Yuko; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Redline, Susan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Taylor, Herman A.; Price, Alkes L.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Chanock, Stephen J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Wilson, James G.; Reich, David; Myers, Simon R.

    2011-01-01

    Recombination, together with mutation, is the ultimate source of genetic variation in populations. We leverage the recent mixture of people of African and European ancestry in the Americas to build a genetic map measuring the probability of crossing-over at each position in the genome, based on about 2.1 million crossovers in 30,000 unrelated African Americans. At intervals of more than three megabases it is nearly identical to a map built in Europeans. At finer scales it differs significantly, and we identify about 2,500 recombination hotspots that are active in people of West African ancestry but nearly inactive in Europeans. The probability of a crossover at these hotspots is almost fully controlled by the alleles an individual carries at PRDM9 (P<10−245). We identify a 17 base pair DNA sequence motif that is enriched in these hotspots, and is an excellent match to the predicted binding target of African-enriched alleles of PRDM9. PMID:21775986

  12. Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-Ds) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by defective switched isotype (IgG/IgA/IgE) production. Depending on the molecular defect in question, the Ig-CSR-D may be combined with an impairment in somatic hypermutation (SHM). Some of the mechanisms underlying Ig-CSR and SHM have been described by studying natural mutants in humans. This approach has revealed that T cell-B cell interaction (resulting in CD40-mediated signaling), intrinsic B-cell mechanisms (activation-induced cytidine deaminase-induced DNA damage), and complex DNA repair machineries (including uracil-N-glycosylase and mismatch repair pathways) are all involved in class-switch recombination and SHM. However, several of the mechanisms required for full antibody maturation have yet to be defined. Elucidation of the molecular defects underlying the diverse set of Ig-CSR-Ds is essential for understanding Ig diversification and has prompted better definition of the clinical spectrum of diseases and the development of increasingly accurate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:22894609

  13. Photoexcited charge pair escape and recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, C.L.

    1991-11-15

    We report photocurrent transients arising from the pulsed laser excitation of the dipolar first excited singlet sate S{sub 1} of trans 4-dimethyl-amino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene (DMANS) in toluene solution. The currents arise from rotational reorientation of DMANS dipoles with respect to the axis of an applied electric field. The method appears to offer a simple and general approach to the measurement of the change in dipole moment upon electronic excitation of a molecule. In another experiment, durene (1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene) dissolved in n-hexane was photoionized by 35 psec pulses at 266 nm. Transient absorption at 1064 nm arising chiefly from geminate electrons was detected and used to monitor the recombination of the electron-cation pairs produced by two-photon ionization. An excellent fit to the recombination kinetics was obtained by assuming that the distribution of initial electron-cation separations was of the form r{sup 2}EXP = r{sup 2}/(2L{sup 3})exp({minus}r/L) with a mean radius 3L = 5.7 nm.

  14. Production of recombinant proteins by yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Celik, Eda; Calık, Pınar

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts are widely used in production of recombinant proteins of medical or industrial interest. For each individual product, the most suitable expression system has to be identified and optimized, both on the genetic and fermentative level, by taking into account the properties of the product, the organism and the expression cassette. There is a wide range of important yeast expression hosts including the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Hansenula polymorpha, Kluyveromyces lactis, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Yarrowia lipolytica and Arxula adeninivorans, with various characteristics such as being thermo-tolerant or halo-tolerant, rapidly reaching high cell densities or utilizing unusual carbon sources. Several strains were also engineered to have further advantages, such as humanized glycosylation pathways or lack of proteases. Additionally, with a large variety of vectors, promoters and selection markers to choose from, combined with the accumulated knowledge on industrial-scale fermentation techniques and the current advances in the post-genomic technology, it is possible to design more cost-effective expression systems in order to meet the increasing demand for recombinant proteins and glycoproteins. In this review, the present status of the main and most promising yeast expression systems is discussed. PMID:21964262

  15. [Telomere Recombination in Normal Mammalian Cells].

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, N S; Rubtsov, N B

    2016-01-01

    Two mechanisms of telomere length maintenance are known to date. The first includes the use of a special enzymatic telomerase complex to solve the problems that arise during the replication of linear DNA in a normal diploid and part of tumor cells. Alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), which is based on the homologous recombination of telomere DNA, represents the second mechanism. Until recently, ALT was assumed to be expressed only in 15-20% of tumors lacking active telomerase and, together with telomerase reactivation represented one of two possibilities to overcome the replicative senescence observed in somatic mammalian cells due to aging or during cell culturing in vitro. Previously described sporadic cases of combinations of the two mechanisms of telomere length maintenance in several cell lines in vitro were attributed to the experimental design rather than to a real biological phenomenon, since active cellular division without active telomerase was considered to be the "gold standard" of ALT. The present review describes the morphological and functional reorganizations of mammalian telomeres observed with ALT activation, as well as recently observed,and well-documented cases of combinations between ALT-like and telomerase-dependent mechanisms in mammalian cells. The possible role of telomere recombination in telomerase-dependent cells is discussed.

  16. Dissociative recombination of N2H+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, S. Fonseca; Ngassam, V.; Orel, A. E.; Larson, Å.

    2016-08-01

    The direct and indirect mechanisms of dissociative recombination of N2H+ are theoretically studied. At low energies, the electron capture is found to be driven by recombination into bound Rydberg states, while at collision energies above 0.1 eV, the direct capture and dissociation along electronic resonant states becomes important. Electron-scattering calculations using the complex Kohn variational method are performed to obtain the scattering matrix as well as energy positions and autoionization widths of resonant states. Potential-energy surfaces of electronic bound states of N2H and N2H+ are computed using structure calculations with the multireference configuration interaction method. The cross section for the indirect mechanism is calculated using a vibrational frame transformation of the elements of the scattering matrix at energies just above the ionization threshold. Here vibrational excitations of the ionic core from v =0 to v =1 and v =2 for all three normal modes are considered and autoionization is neglected. The cross section for the direct dissociation along electronic resonant states is computed with wave-packet calculations using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method, where all three internal degrees of freedom are considered. The calculated cross sections are compared to measurements.

  17. Sorbitol production using recombinant Zymomonas mobilis strain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changjun; Dong, Hongwei; Zhong, Jianjiang; Ryu, Dewey D Y; Bao, Jie

    2010-07-20

    A recombinant Zymomonas mobilis strain harboring the plasmid pHW20a-gfo for over-expression of glucose-fructose oxidoreductase (GFOR) was constructed. The specific activity of GFOR enzyme in the new recombinant strain was at least two folds greater than that in the wild strain. The maximum GFOR activity achieved in terms of the volumetric, and the cellular were 2.59 U ml(-1), and 0.70 U mg(-1), respectively, in the batch cultures. A significant improvement of the bioconversion process for the production of sorbitol and gluconic acid from glucose and fructose was made using divalent metal ions which drastically reduced the ethanol yield and significantly increased the yield of target product. Among several divalent metal ions evaluated, Zn(2+) was found to be most effective by inhibiting the Entner-Doudoroff pathway enzymes. The yield of the byproduct ethanol was reduced from 16.7 to 1.8 gl(-1) and the sorbitol yield was increased to almost 100% from 89%. The Ca(2+) enhanced the sorbitol yield and the formation of calcium gluconate salt made the separation of gluconate from the reaction system easier.

  18. Recombinant viral vaccines for enzootic bovine leucosis.

    PubMed

    Daniel, R C; Gatei, M H; Good, M F; Boyle, D B; Lavin, M F

    1993-10-01

    Recently published studies on the development and use of recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) vaccines incorporating either the complete envelope (env) gene or only a fragment of the env gene consisting of the coding sequence for the env glycoprotein 51 (gp51) and part of gp30 of the bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) are described. It has been reported that vaccination of sheep with recombinant VV vaccines containing the complete env gene appears to protect sheep against challenge infection with BLV. The evidence for this protection is based on the lack of persistence of high titres of anti-gp51 antibodies compared with unvaccinated BLV infected controls, on the enhanced CD4 proliferative responses to specific BLV gp51 synthetic peptides in the vaccinated sheep, and on the inability to detect BLV pro-virus by polymerase chain reaction in the vaccinated sheep after 4 months following challenge infection compared with continual detection in unvaccinated sheep over a 16 month trial period. It has been suggested that cell-mediated immune responses may be an important aspect of protective immunity against BLV infection and it has been reported that large tracts of amino acid sequences within the env and pol genes are highly conserved in different isolates from different countries which is of importance in designing peptide derived vaccines. PMID:8270269

  19. Mitotic recombination of chromosome 17 in astrocytomas

    SciTech Connect

    James, C.D.; Carlbom, E.; Nordenskjold, M.; Collins, V.P.; Cavenee, W.K. )

    1989-04-01

    Allelic combinations at seven loci on human chromosome 17 defined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms were determined in tumor and normal tissues from 35 patients with gliomas. Loss of constitutional heterozygosity at one or more of these loci was observed in 8 of the 24 tumors displaying astrocytic differentiation and in the single primitive neuroectodermal tumor examined. The astrocytomas showing these losses included examples of each adult malignancy grade of the disease, including glioblastoma (malignancy grade IV), and seven of them demonstrated concurrent maintenance of heterozygosity for at least one chromosome 17 locus. Determination of allele dosage together with the genotypic data indicated that the tumor chromosomes 17 were derived by mitotic recombination in 7 of the 9 cases with shared homozygosity of the region 17p11.2-ptr in all cases. In contrast, tumors of oligodendrocytic, ependymal, or mixed cellular differentiation did not exhibit loss of alleles at any of the loci examined. These data suggest that the somatic attainment of homozygosity for loci on chromosome 17p is frequently associated with the oncogenesis of central nervous system tumors, particularly those showing solely astrocytic differentiation, and that mitotic recombination mapping is a useful approach towards the subregional localization of a locus whose rearrangement is involved in this disease.

  20. Recombinant protein scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M

    2012-02-01

    New biological materials for tissue engineering are now being developed using common genetic engineering capabilities to clone and express a variety of genetic elements that allow cost-effective purification and scaffold fabrication from these recombinant proteins, peptides or from chimeric combinations of these. The field is limitless as long as the gene sequences are known. The utility is dependent on the ease, product yield and adaptability of these protein products to the biomedical field. The development of recombinant proteins as scaffolds, while still an emerging technology with respect to commercial products, is scientifically superior to current use of natural materials or synthetic polymer scaffolds, in terms of designing specific structures with desired degrees of biological complexities and motifs. In the field of tissue engineering, next generation scaffolds will be the key to directing appropriate tissue regeneration. The initial period of biodegradable synthetic scaffolds that provided shape and mechanical integrity, but no biological information, is phasing out. The era of protein scaffolds offers distinct advantages, particularly with the combination of powerful tools of molecular biology. These include, for example, the production of human proteins of uniform quality that are free of infectious agents and the ability to make suitable quantities of proteins that are found in low quantity or are hard to isolate from tissue. For the particular needs of tissue engineering scaffolds, fibrous proteins like collagens, elastin, silks and combinations of these offer further advantages of natural well-defined structural scaffolds as well as endless possibilities of controlling functionality by genetic manipulation.

  1. Recombinant antigens for immunodiagnosis of cystic echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Wen-Bao

    2004-01-01

    Three cDNAs, termed EpC1, TPxEg and EgG5, were isolated by immunoscreening from an Echinococcus granulosus cDNA library. The recombinant phages exhibited strong reactivity with sera from humans with confirmed cystic echinococcosis (CE) and with sera from mice infected with E. granulosus oncospheres. The cDNAs were subcloned into a pET vector, expressed as fusion proteins tagged with GST and affinity purified against the GST tag. Of the three recombinant proteins, EpC1 achieved the highest performance for serodiagnosis of CE in Western blot analysis using a panel of clinically defined human sera to initially address the sensitivity and specificity of the molecules. The protein yielded an overall sensitivity of 92.2% and specificity of 95.6%, levels unprecedented taking into account the large panel of 896 human sera that were tested. The strategy used may also prove suitable for improved immunodiagnosis of other parasitic infections. PMID:15188015

  2. The landscape of recombination in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Hinch, Anjali G; Tandon, Arti; Patterson, Nick; Song, Yunli; Rohland, Nadin; Palmer, Cameron D; Chen, Gary K; Wang, Kai; Buxbaum, Sarah G; Akylbekova, Ermeg L; Aldrich, Melinda C; Ambrosone, Christine B; Amos, Christopher; Bandera, Elisa V; Berndt, Sonja I; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cai, Qiuyin; Caporaso, Neil; Casey, Graham; Cupples, L Adrienne; Deming, Sandra L; Diver, W Ryan; Divers, Jasmin; Fornage, Myriam; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Glessner, Joseph; Harris, Curtis C; Hu, Jennifer J; Ingles, Sue A; Isaacs, William; John, Esther M; Kao, W H Linda; Keating, Brendan; Kittles, Rick A; Kolonel, Laurence N; Larkin, Emma; Le Marchand, Loic; McNeill, Lorna H; Millikan, Robert C; Murphy, Adam; Musani, Solomon; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Nyante, Sarah; Papanicolaou, George J; Press, Michael F; Psaty, Bruce M; Reiner, Alex P; Rich, Stephen S; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rotter, Jerome I; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Schwartz, Ann G; Signorello, Lisa B; Spitz, Margaret; Strom, Sara S; Thun, Michael J; Tucker, Margaret A; Wang, Zhaoming; Wiencke, John K; Witte, John S; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Yamamura, Yuko; Zanetti, Krista A; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Redline, Susan; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Henderson, Brian E; Taylor, Herman A; Price, Alkes L; Hakonarson, Hakon; Chanock, Stephen J; Haiman, Christopher A; Wilson, James G; Reich, David; Myers, Simon R

    2011-07-20

    Recombination, together with mutation, gives rise to genetic variation in populations. Here we leverage the recent mixture of people of African and European ancestry in the Americas to build a genetic map measuring the probability of crossing over at each position in the genome, based on about 2.1 million crossovers in 30,000 unrelated African Americans. At intervals of more than three megabases it is nearly identical to a map built in Europeans. At finer scales it differs significantly, and we identify about 2,500 recombination hotspots that are active in people of West African ancestry but nearly inactive in Europeans. The probability of a crossover at these hotspots is almost fully controlled by the alleles an individual carries at PRDM9 (P value < 10(-245)). We identify a 17-base-pair DNA sequence motif that is enriched in these hotspots, and is an excellent match to the predicted binding target of PRDM9 alleles common in West Africans and rare in Europeans. Sites of this motif are predicted to be risk loci for disease-causing genomic rearrangements in individuals carrying these alleles. More generally, this map provides a resource for research in human genetic variation and evolution.

  3. Magnetic field spectrum at cosmological recombination revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saga, Shohei; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Takahashi, Keitaro; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2015-06-01

    If vector type perturbations are present in the primordial plasma before recombination, the generation of magnetic fields is known to be inevitable through the Harrison mechanism. In the context of the standard cosmological perturbation theory, nonlinear couplings of first-order scalar perturbations create second-order vector perturbations, which generate magnetic fields. Here we reinvestigate the generation of magnetic fields at second-order in cosmological perturbations on the basis of our previous study, and extend it by newly taking into account the time evolution of purely second-order vector perturbations with a newly developed second-order Boltzmann code. We confirm that the amplitude of magnetic fields from the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes is consistent with the result in our previous study. However, we find, both numerically and analytically, that the magnetic fields from the purely second-order vector perturbations partially cancel out the magnetic fields from one of the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes, in the tight coupling regime in the radiation dominated era. Therefore, the amplitude of the magnetic fields on small scales, k ≳10 h Mpc-1 , is smaller than the previous estimates. The amplitude of the generated magnetic fields at cosmological recombination is about Brec=5.0 ×10-24 Gauss on k =5.0 ×10-1 h Mpc-1 . Finally, we discuss the reason for the discrepancies that exist in estimates of the amplitude of magnetic fields among other authors.

  4. Regulation of DNA Pairing in Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Daley, James M.; Gaines, William A.; Kwon, YoungHo; Sung, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a major mechanism for eliminating DNA double-strand breaks from chromosomes. In this process, the break termini are resected nucleolytically to form 3′ ssDNA (single-strand DNA) overhangs. A recombinase (i.e., a protein that catalyzes homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange) assembles onto the ssDNA and promotes pairing with a homologous duplex. DNA synthesis then initiates from the 3′ end of the invading strand, and the extended DNA joint is resolved via one of several pathways to restore the integrity of the injured chromosome. It is crucial that HR be carefully orchestrated because spurious events can create cytotoxic intermediates or cause genomic rearrangements and loss of gene heterozygosity, which can lead to cell death or contribute to the development of cancer. In this review, we will discuss how DNA motor proteins regulate HR via a dynamic balance of the recombination-promoting and -attenuating activities that they possess. PMID:25190078

  5. Modified Fragmentation Function from Quark Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Wang, Enke; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-07-26

    Within the framework of the constituent quark model, it isshown that the single hadron fragmentation function of a parton can beexpressed as a convolution of shower diquark or triquark distributionfunction and quark recombination probability, if the interference betweenamplitudes of quark recombination with different momenta is neglected.Therecombination probability is determined by the hadron's wavefunction inthe constituent quark model. The shower diquark or triquark distributionfunctions of a fragmenting jet are defined in terms of overlappingmatrices of constituent quarks and parton field operators. They aresimilar in form to dihadron or trihadron fragmentation functions in termsof parton operator and hadron states. Extending the formalism to thefield theory at finite temperature, we automatically derive contributionsto the effective single hadron fragmentation function from therecombination of shower and thermal constituent quarks. Suchcontributions involve single or diquark distribution functions which inturn can be related to diquark or triquark distribution functions via sumrules. We also derive QCD evolution equations for quark distributionfunctions that in turn determine the evolution of the effective jetfragmentation functions in a thermal medium.

  6. [Enzymatic control of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli cells and hyper-recombination].

    PubMed

    Bakhlanova, I V; Dudkina, A V; Baĭtin, D M

    2013-01-01

    The RecA protein is a major enzyme of homologous recombination in bacterial cell. Forming a right-handed helical filament on ssDNA, it provides a homology search between two DNA molecules and homologous strand exchange. The RecA protein not only defends the cell from exposure to ionizing radiation and UV-irradiation, but also ensures the recombination process in the course of normal cell growth. A number of wild-type or mutant RecA proteins demonstrate increased recombinogenic properties in vitro and in vivo as compared with the wild-type RecA protein from Escherichia coli, which leads to hyper-recombination. The hyper-rec activity of RecA proteins during the recombination process in many depends on the filamentation dynamics on ssDNA and DNA-transferase properties. Changes in filamentation and DNA-transferase abilities of RecA protein may be the result of not only specific amino-acid substitutions, but also the functioning of the cell enzymatic apparatus, including such proteins as RecO, RecR, RecF, RecX, DinI, SSB, PsiB. To date, the function of each of these proteins is identified at the molecular level. However, the role of some of them in the cell metabolism remains to be seen. Increase in recombination in vivo is not always useful for a cell and faces various limitations. Moreover, in the bacterial cell some mechanisms are activated, that cause genomic reorganization, directed to suppress the expression of hyper-active RecA protein. The ways of hyper-active RecA protein regulation are very interesting, and they are studied in different model systems. PMID:23808153

  7. Selection by parasites may increase host recombination frequency.

    PubMed

    Fischer, O; Schmid-Hempel, P

    2005-06-22

    Meiotic recombination destroys successful genotypes and it is therefore thought to evolve only under a very limited set of conditions. Here, we experimentally show that recombination rates across two linkage groups of the host, the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, increase with exposure to the microsporidian parasite, Nosema whitei, particularly when parasites were allowed to coevolve with their hosts. Selection by randomly varied parasites resulted in smaller effects, while directional selection for insecticide resistance initially reduced recombination slightly. These results, at least tentatively, suggest that short-term benefits of recombination--and thus the evolution of sex--may be related to parasitism.

  8. Sex, not genotype, determines recombination levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Audrey; Schrump, Stefanie; Cherry, Jonathan; Hassold, Terry; Hunt, Patricia

    2005-10-01

    Recombination, the precise physical breakage and rejoining of DNA between homologous chromosomes, plays a central role in mediating the orderly segregation of meiotic chromosomes in most eukaryotes. Despite its importance, the factors that control the number and placement of recombination events within a cell remain poorly defined. The rate of recombination exhibits remarkable species specificity, and, within a species, recombination is affected by the physical size of the chromosome, chromosomal location, proximity to other recombination events (i.e., chiasma interference), and, intriguingly, the sex of the transmitting parent. To distinguish between simple genetic and nongenetic explanations of sex-specific recombination differences in mammals, we compared recombination in meiocytes from XY sex-reversed and XO females with that in meiocytes from XX female and XY male mice. The rate and pattern of recombination in XY and XO oocytes were virtually identical to those in normal XX females, indicating that sex, not genotype, is the primary determinant of meiotic recombination patterns in mammals.

  9. Recombination between defective tombusvirus RNAs generates functional hybrid genomes

    SciTech Connect

    White, K.A.; Morris, T.J.

    1994-04-26

    The tombusviruses represent a group of small icosahedral plant viruses that contain monopartite positive-sense RNA genomes. Tombusviruses are able to generate small replicating deletion mutants of their genomes (i.e., defective interfering RNAs) during infections via RNA recombination and/or rearrangement. To further study the process of RNA recombination and to determine whether tombusviruses were capable of trans-recombination, protoplasts were coinoculated with in vitro-generated transcripts of a nonreplicating 3{prime}-truncated genomic RNA of cucumber necrosis tombusvirus and either replicative or replication-defective DI RNAs of tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus. After 48-hr incubation, two dominant replicative chimeric recombinant viral RNA populations were detected that contained various large contiguous 5{prime} segments of the cucumber necrosis tombusvirus genomic RNA fused to 3{prime}-terminal regions of the tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus defective interfering RNA. Some of the larger chimeric recombinants formed in protoplasts were able to systemically infect plants and induce wild-type symptoms. In addition, a functional chimeric genome was generated in planta after direct coinoculation of whole plants with the defective RNA components. These results indicate that (i) RNA recombination can occur relatively efficiently in single-cell infections, (ii) trans-recombination can occur with nonreplicating viral RNA components, and (iii) functional chimeric genomes can be generated via recombination. Possible mechanisms for the formation of the recombinants are proposed, and evolutionary implications are discussed.

  10. Recombination increases human immunodeficiency virus fitness, but not necessarily diversity.

    PubMed

    Vijay, N N V; Vasantika; Ajmani, Rahul; Perelson, Alan S; Dixit, Narendra M

    2008-06-01

    Recombination can facilitate the accumulation of mutations and accelerate the emergence of resistance to current antiretroviral therapies for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Yet, since recombination can also dissociate favourable combinations of mutations, the benefit of recombination to HIV remains in question. The confounding effects of mutation, multiple infections of cells, random genetic drift and fitness selection that underlie HIV evolution render the influence of recombination difficult to unravel. We developed computer simulations that mimic the genomic diversification of HIV within an infected individual and elucidate the influence of recombination. We find, interestingly, that when the effective population size of HIV is small, recombination increases both the diversity and the mean fitness of the viral population. When the effective population size is large, recombination increases viral fitness but decreases diversity. In effect, recombination enhances (lowers) the likelihood of the existence of multi-drug resistant strains of HIV in infected individuals prior to the onset of therapy when the effective population size is small (large). Our simulations are consistent with several recent experimental observations, including the evolution of HIV diversity and divergence in vivo. The intriguing dependencies on the effective population size appear due to the subtle interplay of drift, selection and epistasis, which we discuss in the light of modern population genetics theories. Current estimates of the effective population size of HIV have large discrepancies. Our simulations present an avenue for accurate determination of the effective population size of HIV in vivo and facilitate establishment of the benefit of recombination to HIV.

  11. Expression and purification of recombinant nattokinase in Spodoptera frugiperda cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Xiaoli; Xiong, Shaoling; Zhang, Jing; Cai, Litao; Yang, Yanyan

    2007-10-01

    A recombinant baculovirus, rv-egfp-NK, containing a reporter gene encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), was used to express nattokinase (NK), a fibrinolytic enzyme, in Spodoptera frugiperda (SF-9) cells. The recombinant protein also included a histidine tag for purification using Ni(2+) resins. The recombinant NK, approximately 30 kDa, retained fibrinolytic activity (60 U/ml). The integration of the EGFP expression cassette in the Bac-to-Bac system is thus an effective method for the expression and purification of recombinant NK protein in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells.

  12. Rogue athletes and recombinant DNA technology: challenges for doping control.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Mansour, Mai M H

    2007-10-01

    The quest for athletic excellence holds no limit for some athletes, and the advances in recombinant DNA technology have handed these athletes the ultimate doping weapons: recombinant proteins and gene doping. Some detection methods are now available for several recombinant proteins that are commercially available as pharmaceuticals and being abused by dopers. However, researchers are struggling to come up with efficient detection methods in preparation for the imminent threat of gene doping, expected in the 2008 Olympics. This Forum article presents the main detection strategies for recombinant proteins and the forthcoming detection strategies for gene doping as well as the prime analytical challenges facing them.

  13. High Recombinant Frequency in Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Tourret, Jérôme; Tenaillon, Olivier; López, Elena; Bourdelier, Emmanuelle; Costas, Coloma; Matic, Ivan; Denamur, Erick; Blázquez, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    Homologous recombination promotes genetic diversity by facilitating the integration of foreign DNA and intrachromosomal gene shuffling. It has been hypothesized that if recombination is variable among strains, selection should favor higher recombination rates among pathogens, as they face additional selection pressures from host defenses. To test this hypothesis we have developed a plasmid-based method for estimating the rate of recombination independently of other factors such as DNA transfer, selective processes, and mutational interference. Our results with 160 human commensal and extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) isolates show that the recombinant frequencies are extremely diverse (ranging 9 orders of magnitude) and plastic (they are profoundly affected by growth in urine, a condition commonly encountered by ExPEC). We find that the frequency of recombination is biased by strain lifestyle, as ExPEC isolates display strikingly higher recombination rates than their commensal counterparts. Furthermore, the presence of virulence factors is positively associated with higher recombination frequencies. These results suggest selection for high homologous recombination capacity, which may result in a higher evolvability for pathogens compared with commensals.

  14. Photoionization and electron-ion recombination of Ti I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2016-07-01

    Study of the inverse processes of photoionization and electron-ion recombination of (Ti I + h ν ⇋ Ti II + e) using the unified method is reported. The method, based on close coupling (CC) approximation and R-matrix method, subsumes both the radiative recombination (RR) and dielectronic recombination (DR) in a unified manner and provides state-specific and total electron-ion recombination rate coefficients which are self-consistent with the state-specific photoionization cross sections. The present results include state-specific electron-ion recombination rates (αRC(i))and partial photoionization cross sections (σPI(i)) leaving the ion in the ground state of 813 bound states with n ≤ 10 and l ≤ 9 of Ti I. Various features of state-specific and total electron-ion recombination with temperature, and the corresponding photoionization cross sections with energies are discussed with illustrations. Due to closely lying excited states near the ground state of the core, photoionization cross sections show presence of narrow Rydberg resonances in low energy region near the ionization threshold. Many excited states also show broad and enhanced Seaton resonances due to PEC (photo-excitation-of-core) which contribute to the high temperature recombination. The total recombination rate coefficient is found to show a low hump around temperature 280 K and a high dielectronic recombination peak at temperature 25,000 K. Total spectrum of recombination cross sections and rates with photoelectron energy are also presented for experimental observation. Calculations were carried out using a CC wave function expansion of 36 states of the core ion Ti II. The large set of data for recombination rates and partial photoionization cross sections with resonances should provide a complete and accurate modelings of plasmas.

  15. Recombination of Globally Circulating Varicella-Zoster Virus

    PubMed Central

    Depledge, Daniel P.; Kundu, Samit; Atkinson, Claire; Brown, Julianne; Haque, Tanzina; Hussaini, Yusuf; MacMahon, Eithne; Molyneaux, Pamela; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Sengupta, Nitu; Koay, Evelyn S. C.; Tang, Julian W.; Underhill, Gillian S.; Grahn, Anna; Studahl, Marie; Breuer, Judith; Bergström, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human herpesvirus, which during primary infection typically causes varicella (chicken pox) and establishes lifelong latency in sensory and autonomic ganglia. Later in life, the virus may reactivate to cause herpes zoster (HZ; also known as shingles). To prevent these diseases, a live-attenuated heterogeneous vaccine preparation, vOka, is used routinely in many countries worldwide. Recent studies of another alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus, demonstrate that live-attenuated vaccine strains can recombine in vivo, creating virulent progeny. These findings raised concerns about using attenuated herpesvirus vaccines under conditions that favor recombination. To investigate whether VZV may undergo recombination, which is a prerequisite for VZV vaccination to create such conditions, we here analyzed 115 complete VZV genomes. Our results demonstrate that recombination occurs frequently for VZV. It thus seems that VZV is fully capable of recombination if given the opportunity, which may have important implications for continued VZV vaccination. Although no interclade vaccine-wild-type recombinant strains were found, intraclade recombinants were frequently detected in clade 2, which harbors the vaccine strains, suggesting that the vaccine strains have already been involved in recombination events, either in vivo or in vitro during passages in cell culture. Finally, previous partial and complete genomic studies have described strains that do not cluster phylogenetically to any of the five established clades. The additional VZV strains sequenced here, in combination with those previously published, have enabled us to formally define a novel sixth VZV clade. IMPORTANCE Although genetic recombination has been demonstrated to frequently occur for other human alphaherpesviruses, herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2, only a few ancient and isolated recent recombination events have hitherto been demonstrated for VZV. In the

  16. Genetic Recombination in Sexual Crosses of Phycomyces

    PubMed Central

    Eslava, A. P.; Alvarez, M. I.; Burke, Patricia V.; Delbrück, M.

    1975-01-01

    Sexual crosses between strains of Phycomyces blakesleeanus , involving three auxotrophic and one color marker and yielding a high proportion of zygospore germination, are described. Samples of 20–40 germ spores from 311 individual fertile germ sporangia originating from five two-factor and three three-factor crosses were characterized. The results show: (1) absence of any contribution of apogamic nuclei to the progeny, (2) confirmation of Burgeff's conjecture that the germ spores of any germ sporangium in most cases derive from one meiosis. In a cross involving two allelic markers the analysis of 175 pooled germ sporangia suggests an intragenic recombination frequency of 0.6%. All other factor combinations tested are unlinked. The bulk of the germ spores are homokaryotic. However, a small portion (4%) are heterokaryotic with respect to mating type. PMID:17248685

  17. Soluble variants of human recombinant glutaminyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Castaldo, Cristiana; Ciambellotti, Silvia; de Pablo-Latorre, Raquel; Lalli, Daniela; Porcari, Valentina; Turano, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant human Glutaminyl Cyclase expressed in E. coli is produced as inclusion bodies. Lack of glycosylation is the main origin of its accumulation in insoluble aggregates. Mutation of single isolated hydrophobic amino acids into negative amino acids was not able to circumvent inclusion bodies formation. On the contrary, substitution with carboxyl-terminal residues of two or three aromatic residues belonging to extended hydrophobic patches on the protein surface provided soluble but still active forms of the protein. These mutants could be expressed in isotopically enriched forms for NMR studies and the maximal attainable concentration was sufficient for the acquisition of (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra that represent the starting point for future drug development projects targeting Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23977104

  18. Integrative mobile elements exploiting Xer recombination.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhabatosh; Martínez, Eriel; Midonet, Caroline; Barre, François-Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Integrative mobile genetic elements directly participate in the rapid response of bacteria to environmental challenges. They generally encode their own dedicated recombination machineries. CTXφ, a filamentous bacteriophage that harbors the genes encoding cholera toxin in Vibrio cholerae provided the first notable exception to this rule: it hijacks XerC and XerD, two chromosome-encoded tyrosine recombinases for lysogenic conversion. XerC and XerD are highly conserved in bacteria because of their role in the topological maintenance of circular chromosomes and, with the advent of high throughput sequencing, numerous other integrative mobile elements exploiting them have been discovered. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of integration of the different integrative mobile elements exploiting Xer (IMEXs) so far described. PMID:23127381

  19. Recombination spectrum and reddening in NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Matthews, K.; Soifer, B. T.; Morton, D.; Oke, J. B.; Becklin, E. E.; Daltabuit, E.; Torres-Peimbert, S.; Persson, S. E.; Smith, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the emission-line intensities of NGC 1068 have been made over the wavelength range extending from rest wavelengths equal to 1216 A to 1.875 micron. The data, plus other available emission-line data, can be explained in terms of a simple model where the emission lines are formed in an H II region, and the line ratios are consistent with those predicted by standard radiative recombination theory and reddening corresponding to 0.4 mag. The continuum flux is seen to consist of a galaxy component plus a nonstellar component which dominates the observed flux in the ultraviolet. The observed ultraviolet continuum does not show an absorption dip caused by the intertellar 2200 A feature nor does it contain enough energy to power the observed infrared flux.

  20. MSD Recombination Method in Statistical Machine Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, Jerneja Žganec

    2008-11-01

    Freely available tools and language resources were used to build the VoiceTRAN statistical machine translation (SMT) system. Various configuration variations of the system are presented and evaluated. The VoiceTRAN SMT system outperformed the baseline conventional rule-based MT system in all English-Slovenian in-domain test setups. To further increase the generalization capability of the translation model for lower-coverage out-of-domain test sentences, an "MSD-recombination" approach was proposed. This approach not only allows a better exploitation of conventional translation models, but also performs well in the more demanding translation direction; that is, into a highly inflectional language. Using this approach in the out-of-domain setup of the English-Slovenian JRC-ACQUIS task, we have achieved significant improvements in translation quality.

  1. How homologous recombination maintains telomere integrity.

    PubMed

    Tacconi, Eliana M C; Tarsounas, Madalena

    2015-06-01

    Telomeres protect the ends of linear chromosomes against loss of genetic information and inappropriate processing as damaged DNA and are therefore crucial to the maintenance of chromosome integrity. In addition to providing a pathway for genome-wide DNA repair, homologous recombination (HR) plays a key role in telomere replication and capping. Consistent with this, the genomic instability characteristic of HR-deficient cells and tumours is driven in part by telomere dysfunction. Here, we discuss the mechanisms by which HR modulates the response to intrinsic cellular challenges that arise during telomere replication, as well as its impact on the assembly of telomere protective structures. How normal and tumour cells differ in their ability to maintain telomeres is deeply relevant to the search for treatments that would selectively eliminate cells whose capacity for HR-mediated repair has been compromised.

  2. Visible charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.C.; Fonck, R.J.; Jaehnig, K.P.; Schechtman, N.; Synakowski, E.J.

    1991-03-01

    Visible charge exchange recombination spectroscopy is routinely used to measure the time evolution of the ion temperature (T{sub i}) and toroidal rotation velocity (v{sub {phi}}) profiles on TFTR. These measurements are made with the CHERS diagnostic, a fiber-optically coupled spectrometer equipped with a two-dimensional photodiode array detector which provides both spectral and spatial resolution. The instrumentation, data analysis techniques, and examples of T{sub i} and v{sub {phi}} measurements are described. Recently, CHERS has been used to perform impurity transport experiments: radial profiles of diffusivities and convective velocities for helium and iron have been deduced from measurements of the time evolutions of He{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 24+} profiles following impurity injection. Examples of these measurements are given. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Transductional targeting with recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Valerie; Leissner, Philippe; Winter, Arend; Mehtali, Majid; Lusky, Monika

    2002-09-01

    Replication-deficient adenoviruses are considered as gene delivery vectors for the genetic treatment of a variety of diseases. The ability of such vectors to mediate efficient expression of therapeutic genes in a broad spectrum of dividing and non-dividing cell types constitutes an advantage over alternative gene transfer vectors. However, this broad tissue tropism may also turn disadvantageous when genes encoding potentially harmful proteins (e.g. cytokines, toxic proteins) are expressed in surrounding normal tissues. Therefore, specific restrictions of the viral tropism would represent a significant technological advance towards safer and more efficient gene delivery vectors, in particular for cancer gene therapy applications. In this review, we summarize various strategies used to selectively modify the natural tropism of recombinant adenoviruses. The advantages, limitations and potential impact on gene therapy operations of such modified vectors are discussed. PMID:12189719

  4. Soluble Variants of Human Recombinant Glutaminyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Castaldo, Cristiana; Ciambellotti, Silvia; de Pablo-Latorre, Raquel; Lalli, Daniela; Porcari, Valentina; Turano, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant human Glutaminyl Cyclase expressed in E. coli is produced as inclusion bodies. Lack of glycosylation is the main origin of its accumulation in insoluble aggregates. Mutation of single isolated hydrophobic amino acids into negative amino acids was not able to circumvent inclusion bodies formation. On the contrary, substitution with carboxyl-terminal residues of two or three aromatic residues belonging to extended hydrophobic patches on the protein surface provided soluble but still active forms of the protein. These mutants could be expressed in isotopically enriched forms for NMR studies and the maximal attainable concentration was sufficient for the acquisition of 1H-15N HSQC spectra that represent the starting point for future drug development projects targeting Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23977104

  5. Recombinant protein materials for bioengineering and nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Corchero, José Luis; Vázquez, Esther; García-Fruitós, Elena; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Villaverde, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Proteins are essential macromolecules supporting life. Being efficient catalyzers and offering specific cross-molecular contacts, proteins are largely exploited in biotechnology and biomedicine as therapeutics, in industrial catalysis or as molecular reagents. Recombinant enzymes, hormones, immunogens and antibodies are produced aiming to different applications, on the basis of their ability to interact with or modify substrates or biological targets. In nature, proteins also perform task-specific architectonic roles, and they can organize in supramolecular complexes with intriguing physical properties such as elasticity and adhesiveness, and with regulatable stiffness, flexibility and mechanical strength. Proteins have recently gained interest as materials for bioengineering and nanomedicine as they can combine these features with functionality, biocompatibility and degradability in unusually versatile composites. We revise here the fundamental properties of the diverse categories of emerging protein materials resulting from biological synthesis and how they can be genetically re-designed to engineer the interplay between mechanical and biological properties in a medically oriented exploitable way.

  6. Recombinant bacterial lipoproteins as vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Chong, Pele

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant bacterial lipoproteins (RLP) with built-in immuno-stimulating properties for novel subunit vaccine development are reviewed. This platform technology offers the following advantages: easily converts antigens into highly immunogenic RLP using a fusion sequence containing lipobox; the lipid moiety of RLP is recognized as the danger signals in the immune system through the Toll-like receptor 2, so both innate and adaptive immune responses can be induced by RLP; serves as an efficient and cost-effective bioprocess for producing RLP in Escherichia coli and the feasibility and safety of this core platform technology has been successfully demonstrated in animal model studies including meningococcal group B subunit vaccine, dengue subunit vaccine, novel subunit vaccine against Clostridium difficile-associated diseases and HPV-based immunotherapeutic vaccines. PMID:26420467

  7. Epidemiology, Genetic Recombination, and Pathogenesis of Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Wong, Gary; Shi, Weifeng; Liu, Jun; Lai, Alexander C K; Zhou, Jiyong; Liu, Wenjun; Bi, Yuhai; Gao, George F

    2016-06-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) were first described in the 1960s for patients with the common cold. Since then, more HCoVs have been discovered, including those that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), two pathogens that, upon infection, can cause fatal respiratory disease in humans. It was recently discovered that dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia harbor three different HCoV species, including a dominant MERS HCoV lineage that was responsible for the outbreaks in the Middle East and South Korea during 2015. In this review we aim to compare and contrast the different HCoVs with regard to epidemiology and pathogenesis, in addition to the virus evolution and recombination events which have, on occasion, resulted in outbreaks amongst humans.

  8. Epidemiology, Genetic Recombination, and Pathogenesis of Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Wong, Gary; Shi, Weifeng; Liu, Jun; Lai, Alexander C K; Zhou, Jiyong; Liu, Wenjun; Bi, Yuhai; Gao, George F

    2016-06-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) were first described in the 1960s for patients with the common cold. Since then, more HCoVs have been discovered, including those that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), two pathogens that, upon infection, can cause fatal respiratory disease in humans. It was recently discovered that dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia harbor three different HCoV species, including a dominant MERS HCoV lineage that was responsible for the outbreaks in the Middle East and South Korea during 2015. In this review we aim to compare and contrast the different HCoVs with regard to epidemiology and pathogenesis, in addition to the virus evolution and recombination events which have, on occasion, resulted in outbreaks amongst humans. PMID:27012512

  9. Acid phosphatase production by recombinant Arxula adeninivorans.

    PubMed

    Minocha, Neha; Kaur, Parvinder; Satyanarayana, T; Kunze, G

    2007-08-01

    Acid phosphatase production by recombinant Arxula adeninivorans was carried out in submerged fermentation. Using the Plackett-Burman design, three fermentation variables (pH, sucrose concentration, and peptone concentration) were identified to significantly affect acid phosphatase and biomass production, and these were optimized using response surface methodology of central composite design. The highest enzyme yields were attained in the medium with 3.9% sucrose and 1.6% peptone at pH 3.8. Because of optimization, 3.86- and 4.19-fold enhancement in enzyme production was achieved in shake flasks (17,054 U g(-1) DYB) and laboratory fermenter (18,465 U g(-1) DYB), respectively. PMID:17541580

  10. Evolution and recombination of bovine DNA repeats.

    PubMed

    Jobse, C; Buntjer, J B; Haagsma, N; Breukelman, H J; Beintema, J J; Lenstra, J A

    1995-09-01

    The history of the abundant repeat elements in the bovine genome has been studied by comparative hybridization and PCR. The Bov-A and Bov-B SINE elements both emerged just after the divergence of the Camelidae and the true ruminants. A 31-bp subrepeat motif in satellites of the Bovidae species cattle, sheep, and goat is also present in Cervidae (deer) and apparently predates the Bovidae. However, the other components of the bovine satellites were amplified after the divergence of the cattle and the Caprinae (sheep and goat). A 23-bp motif, which as subrepeat of two major satellites occupies 5% of the cattle genome, emerged only after the split of the water buffalo and other cattle species. During the evolution of the Bovidae the satellite repeat units were shaped by recombination events involving subrepeats, other satellite components, and SINE elements. Differences in restriction sites of homologous satellites indicate a continuing rapid horizontal spread of new sequence variants.

  11. Recombinant production of spider silk proteins.

    PubMed

    Heidebrecht, Aniela; Scheibel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Natural spider silk fibers combine extraordinary properties such as stability and flexibility which results in a toughness superseding that of all other fiber materials. As the spider's aggressive territorial behavior renders their farming not feasible, the biotechnological production of spider silk proteins (spidroins) is essential in order to investigate and employ them for applications. In order to accomplish this task, two approaches have been tested: firstly, the expression of partial cDNAs, and secondly, the expression of synthetic genes in several host organisms, including bacteria, yeast, plants, insect cells, mammalian cells, and transgenic animals. The experienced problems include genetic instability, limitations of the translational and transcriptional machinery, and low solubility of the produced proteins. Here, an overview of attempts to recombinantly produce spidroins will be given, and advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches and host organisms will be discussed. PMID:23415154

  12. Elastomeric Recombinant Protein-based Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, Nasim; Mithieux, Suzanne M.; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Weiss, Anthony S.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Elastomeric protein-based biomaterials, produced from elastin derivatives, are widely investigated as promising tissue engineering scaffolds due to their remarkable properties including substantial extensibility, long-term stability, self-assembly, high resilience upon stretching, low energy loss, and excellent biological activity. These elastomers are processed from different sources of soluble elastin such as animal-derived soluble elastin, recombinant human tropoelastin, and elastin-like polypeptides into various forms including three dimensional (3D) porous hydrogels, elastomeric films, and fibrous electrospun scaffolds. Elastin-based biomaterials have shown great potential for the engineering of elastic tissues such as skin, lung and vasculature. In this review, the synthesis and properties of various elastin-based elastomers with their applications in tissue engineering are described. PMID:23935392

  13. Functional, Responsive Materials Assembled from Recombinant Oleosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel

    Biological cells are surrounded by a plasma membrane made primarily of phospholipids that form a bilayer. This membrane is permselective and compartmentalizes the cell. A simple form of artificial cell is the vesicle, in which a phospholipid bilayer membrane surrounds an aqueous solution. However, there is no a priori reason why a membrane needs to be made of phospholipids. It could be made of any surfactant that forms a bilayer. We have assembled membranes and other structures from the recombinant plant protein oleosin. The ability to assemble from a recombinant protein means that every molecule is identical, we have complete control over the sequence, and hence can build in designer functionality with high fidelity, including adhesion and enzymatic activity. Such incorporation is trivial using the tools of molecular biology. We find that while many variants of oleosin make membranes, others make micelles and sheets. We show how the type of supramolecular structure can be altered by the conditions of solvent, such as ionic strength, and the architecture of the surfactant itself. We show that protease cleavable domains can be incorporated within oleosin, and be engineered to protect other functional domains such as adhesive motifs, to make responsive materials whose activity and shape depend on the action of proteases. We will also present the idea of making ``Franken''-oleosins, where large domains of native oleosin are replaced with domains from other functional proteins, to make hybrids conferred by the donor protein. Thus, we can view oleosin as a template upon which a vast array of designer functionalities can be imparted..

  14. Inference of Ancestral Recombination Graphs through Topological Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, Pablo G.; Levine, Arnold J.; Rabadán, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    The recent explosion of genomic data has underscored the need for interpretable and comprehensive analyses that can capture complex phylogenetic relationships within and across species. Recombination, reassortment and horizontal gene transfer constitute examples of pervasive biological phenomena that cannot be captured by tree-like representations. Starting from hundreds of genomes, we are interested in the reconstruction of potential evolutionary histories leading to the observed data. Ancestral recombination graphs represent potential histories that explicitly accommodate recombination and mutation events across orthologous genomes. However, they are computationally costly to reconstruct, usually being infeasible for more than few tens of genomes. Recently, Topological Data Analysis (TDA) methods have been proposed as robust and scalable methods that can capture the genetic scale and frequency of recombination. We build upon previous TDA developments for detecting and quantifying recombination, and present a novel framework that can be applied to hundreds of genomes and can be interpreted in terms of minimal histories of mutation and recombination events, quantifying the scales and identifying the genomic locations of recombinations. We implement this framework in a software package, called TARGet, and apply it to several examples, including small migration between different populations, human recombination, and horizontal evolution in finches inhabiting the Galápagos Islands. PMID:27532298

  15. Evolution of recombination and genome structure in eusocial insects.

    PubMed

    Kent, Clement F; Zayed, Amro

    2013-03-01

    Eusocial Hymenoptera, such as the European honey bee, Apis mellifera, have the highest recombination rates of multicellular animals.(1) Recently, we showed(2) that a side-effect of recombination in the honey bee, GC biased gene conversion (bGC), helps maintain the unusual bimodal GC-content distribution of the bee genome by increasing GC-content in high recombination areas while low recombination areas are losing GC-content because of biased AT mutations and low rates of bGC. Although the very high recombination rate of A. mellifera makes GC-content evolution easier to study, the pattern is consistent with results found in many other species including mammals and yeast.(3) Also consistent across phyla is the association of higher genetic diversity and divergence with high GC and high recombination areas.(4) (,) (5) Finally, we showed that genes overexpressed in the brains of workers cluster in GC-rich genomic areas with the highest rates of recombination and molecular evolution.(2) In this Addendum we present a conceptual model of how eusociality and high recombination rates may co-evolve.

  16. A Heritable Recombination system for synthetic Darwinian evolution in yeast.

    PubMed

    Romanini, Dante W; Peralta-Yahya, Pamela; Mondol, Vanessa; Cornish, Virginia W

    2012-12-21

    Genetic recombination is central to the generation of molecular diversity and enhancement of evolutionary fitness in living systems. Methods such as DNA shuffling that recapitulate this diversity mechanism in vitro are powerful tools for engineering biomolecules with useful new functions by directed evolution. Synthetic biology now brings demand for analogous technologies that enable the controlled recombination of beneficial mutations in living cells. Thus, here we create a Heritable Recombination system centered around a library cassette plasmid that enables inducible mutagenesis via homologous recombination and subsequent combination of beneficial mutations through sexual reproduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using repair of nonsense codons in auxotrophic markers as a model, Heritable Recombination was optimized to give mutagenesis efficiencies of up to 6% and to allow successive repair of different markers through two cycles of sexual reproduction and recombination. Finally, Heritable Recombination was employed to change the substrate specificity of a biosynthetic enzyme, with beneficial mutations in three different active site loops crossed over three continuous rounds of mutation and selection to cover a total sequence diversity of 10(13). Heritable Recombination, while at an early stage of development, breaks the transformation barrier to library size and can be immediately applied to combinatorial crossing of beneficial mutations for cell engineering, adding important features to the growing arsenal of next generation molecular biology tools for synthetic biology. PMID:23412545

  17. Recombination in viruses: mechanisms, methods of study, and evolutionary consequences.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Arenas, Miguel; Galán, Juan Carlos; Palero, Ferran; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Recombination is a pervasive process generating diversity in most viruses. It joins variants that arise independently within the same molecule, creating new opportunities for viruses to overcome selective pressures and to adapt to new environments and hosts. Consequently, the analysis of viral recombination attracts the interest of clinicians, epidemiologists, molecular biologists and evolutionary biologists. In this review we present an overview of three major areas related to viral recombination: (i) the molecular mechanisms that underlie recombination in model viruses, including DNA-viruses (Herpesvirus) and RNA-viruses (Human Influenza Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus), (ii) the analytical procedures to detect recombination in viral sequences and to determine the recombination breakpoints, along with the conceptual and methodological tools currently used and a brief overview of the impact of new sequencing technologies on the detection of recombination, and (iii) the major areas in the evolutionary analysis of viral populations on which recombination has an impact. These include the evaluation of selective pressures acting on viral populations, the application of evolutionary reconstructions in the characterization of centralized genes for vaccine design, and the evaluation of linkage disequilibrium and population structure. PMID:25541518

  18. Heterogeneity in rates of recombination across the mouse genome

    SciTech Connect

    Nachman, M.W.; Churchill, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    If loci are randomly distributed on a physical map, the density of markers on a genetic map will be inversely proportional to recombination rate. First proposed by Mary Lyon, we have used this idea to estimate recombination rates from the Drosophila melanogaster linkage map. These results were compared with results of two other studies that estimated regional recombination rates in D. melanogaster using both physical and genetic maps. The three methods were largely concordant in identifying large-scale genomic patterns of recombination. The marker density method was then applied to the Mus musculus microsatellite linkage map. The distribution of microsatellites provided evidence for heterogeneity in recombination rates. Centromeric regions for several mouse chromosomes had significantly greater numbers of markers than expected, suggesting that recombination rates were lower in these regions. In contrast, most telomeric regions contained significantly fewer markers than expected. This indicates that recombination rates are elevated at the telomeres of many mouse chromosomes and is consistent with a comparison of the genetic and cytogenetic maps in these regions. The density of markers on a genetic map may provide a generally useful way to estimate regional recombination rates in species for which genetic, but not physical, maps are available. 44 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. The Landscape of Realized Homologous Recombination in Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Koji; Didelot, Xavier; Jolley, Keith A.; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Maiden, Martin C.J.; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Falush, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Recombination enhances the adaptive potential of organisms by allowing genetic variants to be tested on multiple genomic backgrounds. Its distribution in the genome can provide insight into the evolutionary forces that underlie traits, such as the emergence of pathogenicity. Here, we examined landscapes of realized homologous recombination of 500 genomes from ten bacterial species and found all species have “hot” regions with elevated rates relative to the genome average. We examined the size, gene content, and chromosomal features associated with these regions and the correlations between closely related species. The recombination landscape is variable and evolves rapidly. For example in Salmonella, only short regions of around 1 kb in length are hot whereas in the closely related species Escherichia coli, some hot regions exceed 100 kb, spanning many genes. Only Streptococcus pyogenes shows evidence for the positive correlation between GC content and recombination that has been reported for several eukaryotes. Genes with function related to the cell surface/membrane are often found in recombination hot regions but E. coli is the only species where genes annotated as “virulence associated” are consistently hotter. There is also evidence that some genes with “housekeeping” functions tend to be overrepresented in cold regions. For example, ribosomal proteins showed low recombination in all of the species. Among specific genes, transferrin-binding proteins are recombination hot in all three of the species in which they were found, and are subject to interspecies recombination. PMID:26516092

  20. Inference of Ancestral Recombination Graphs through Topological Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Pablo G; Levine, Arnold J; Rabadán, Raúl

    2016-08-01

    The recent explosion of genomic data has underscored the need for interpretable and comprehensive analyses that can capture complex phylogenetic relationships within and across species. Recombination, reassortment and horizontal gene transfer constitute examples of pervasive biological phenomena that cannot be captured by tree-like representations. Starting from hundreds of genomes, we are interested in the reconstruction of potential evolutionary histories leading to the observed data. Ancestral recombination graphs represent potential histories that explicitly accommodate recombination and mutation events across orthologous genomes. However, they are computationally costly to reconstruct, usually being infeasible for more than few tens of genomes. Recently, Topological Data Analysis (TDA) methods have been proposed as robust and scalable methods that can capture the genetic scale and frequency of recombination. We build upon previous TDA developments for detecting and quantifying recombination, and present a novel framework that can be applied to hundreds of genomes and can be interpreted in terms of minimal histories of mutation and recombination events, quantifying the scales and identifying the genomic locations of recombinations. We implement this framework in a software package, called TARGet, and apply it to several examples, including small migration between different populations, human recombination, and horizontal evolution in finches inhabiting the Galápagos Islands. PMID:27532298

  1. Heterogeneity in Rates of Recombination across the Mouse Genome

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, M. W.; Churchill, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    If loci are randomly distributed on a physical map, the density of markers on a genetic map will be inversely proportional to recombination rate. First proposed by MARY LYON, we have used this idea to estimate recombination rates from the Drosophila melanogaster linkage map. These results were compared with results of two other studies that estimated regional recombination rates in D. melanogaster using both physical and genetic maps. The three methods were largely concordant in identifying large-scale genomic patterns of recombination. The marker density method was then applied to the Mus musculus microsatellite linkage map. The distribution of microsatellites provided evidence for heterogeneity in recombination rates. Centromeric regions for several mouse chromosomes had significantly greater numbers of markers than expected, suggesting that recombination rates were lower in these regions. In contrast, most telomeric regions contained significantly fewer markers than expected. This indicates that recombination rates are elevated at the telomeres of many mouse chromosomes and is consistent with a comparison of the genetic and cytogenetic maps in these regions. The density of markers on a genetic map may provide a generally useful way to estimate regional recombination rates in species for which genetic, but not physical, maps are available. PMID:8852851

  2. Not so fast on recombination analysis of Newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regarding the letter published in the Journal of Virology Vol. 82 No. 13 p. 6782 indicating that “powerful evidence” of recombination is a call for caution in the use of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) based vaccines, I would like to suggest that evidence for recombination is still weak. The authors ...

  3. Oxygen recombination in the sealed nickel-cadmium cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Al H.; Barrera, Tom P.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what parameters are most critical for controlling overcharge pressure in a sealed nickel cadmium cell. Topics covered in viewgraph format are: parameters examined; oxygen evolution and recombination; experimental test description; and effect of parameters on recombination rate.

  4. Recombinant HT.sub.m4 gene, protein and assays

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Bing; Adra, Chaker N.; Lelias, Jean-Michel

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein and a recombinant HT.sub.m4 protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy.

  5. Construction and characterization of a recombinant invertebrate iridovirus.

    PubMed

    Ozgen, Arzu; Muratoglu, Hacer; Demirbag, Zihni; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M; Nalcacioglu, Remziye

    2014-08-30

    Chilo iridescent virus (CIV), officially named Insect iridescent virus 6 (IIV6), is the type species of the genus Iridovirus (family Iridoviridae). In this paper we constructed a recombinant CIV, encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP). This recombinant can be used to investigate viral replication dynamics. We showed that homologous recombination is a valid method to make CIV gene knockouts and to insert foreign genes. The CIV 157L gene, putatively encoding a non-functional inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP), was chosen as target for foreign gene insertion. The gfp open reading frame preceded by the viral mcp promoter was inserted into the 157L locus by homologous recombination in Anthonomus grandis BRL-AG-3A cells. Recombinant virus (rCIV-Δ157L-gfp) was purified by successive rounds of plaque purification. All plaques produced by the purified recombinant virus emitted green fluorescence due to the presence of GFP. One-step growth curves for recombinant and wild-type CIV were similar and the recombinant was fully infectious in vivo. Hence, CIV157L can be inactivated without altering the replication kinetics of the virus. Consequently, the CIV 157L locus can be used as a site for insertion of foreign DNA, e.g. to modify viral properties for insect biocontrol.

  6. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K; Corey, David P

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications.

  7. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications. PMID:26943906

  8. Modulating Mek1 kinase alters outcomes of meiotic recombination and the stringency of the recombination checkpoint response

    PubMed Central

    Hsin-Yen, Wu; Hsuan-Chung, Ho; Burgess, Sean M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background During meiosis, recombination between homologous chromosomes promotes their proper segregation. In budding yeast, programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs) promote recombination between homologs versus sister chromatids by dimerizing and activating Mek1, a chromosome axis-associated kinase. Mek1 is also a proposed effector kinase in the recombination checkpoint that arrests exit from pachytene in response to aberrant DNA/axis structures. Elucidating a role for Mek1 in the recombination checkpoint has been difficult since in mek1 loss-of-function mutants DSBs are rapidly repaired using a sister chromatid thereby bypassing formation of checkpoint-activating lesions. Here we tested the hypothesis that a MEK1 gain-of-function allele would enhance interhomolog bias and the recombination checkpoint response. Results When Mek1 activation was artificially maintained through GST-mediated dimerization, there was an enhanced skew toward interhomolog recombination and reduction of intersister events including multi-chromatid joint molecules. Increased interhomolog events were specifically repaired as noncrossovers rather than crossovers. Ectopic Mek1 dimerization was also sufficient to impose interhomolog bias in the absence of recombination checkpoint functions, thereby uncoupling these two processes. Finally, the stringency of the recombination checkpoint was enhanced in weak meiotic recombination mutants by blocking prophase exit in a subset of cells where arrest is not absolute. Conclusions We propose that Mek1 plays dual roles during meiotic prophase I by phosphorylating targets directly involved in the recombination checkpoint as well as targets involved in sister chromatid recombination. We discuss how regulation of pachytene exit by Mek1 or similar kinases could influence checkpoint stringency, which may differ among species and between sexes. PMID:20888230

  9. Utilization of Site-Specific Recombination in Biopharmaceutical Production.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Damavandi, Narges; Akbari Eidgahi, Mohammad Reza; Davami, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian expression systems, due to their capacity in post-translational modification, are preferred systems for biopharmaceutical protein production. Several recombinant protein systems have been introduced to the market, most of which are under clinical development. In spite of significant improvements such as cell line engineering, introducing novel expression methods, gene silencing and process development, expression level is unpredictable and unstable because of the random location of integration in the genome. Site-specific recombination techniques are capable of producing stable and high producer clonal cells; therefore, they are gaining more importance in the biopharmaceutical production. Site-specific recombination methods increase the recombinant protein production by specifically inserting a vector at a locus with specific expression trait. The present review focused on the latest developments in site-specific recombination techniques, their specific features and comparisons.

  10. Utilization of Site-Specific Recombination in Biopharmaceutical Production

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Damavandi, Narges; Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Davami, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian expression systems, due to their capacity in post-translational modification, are preferred systems for biopharmaceutical protein production. Several recombinant protein systems have been introduced to the market, most of which are under clinical development. In spite of significant improvements such as cell line engineering, introducing novel expression methods, gene silencing and process development, expression level is unpredictable and unstable because of the random location of integration in the genome. Site-specific recombination techniques are capable of producing stable and high producer clonal cells; therefore, they are gaining more importance in the biopharmaceutical production. Site-specific recombination methods increase the recombinant protein production by specifically inserting a vector at a locus with specific expression trait. The present review focused on the latest developments in site-specific recombination techniques, their specific features and comparisons. PMID:26602035

  11. Using weighted features to predict recombination hotspots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqing; Xing, Yongqiang; Cai, Lu

    2015-10-01

    Characterization and accurate prediction of recombination hotspots and coldspots have crucial implications for the mechanism of recombination. Several models have predicted recombination hot/cold spots successfully, but there is still much room for improvement. We present a novel classifier in which k-mer frequency, physical and thermodynamic properties of DNA sequences are incorporated in the form of weighted features. Applying the classifier to recombination hot/cold ORFs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we achieved an accuracy of 90%, which is ~5% higher than existing methods, such as iRSpot-PseDNC, IDQD and Random Forest. The model also predicted non-ORF recombination hot/cold spots sequences in S. cerevisiae with high accuracy. A broad applicability of the model in the field of classification is expected.

  12. Streptomyces as host for recombinant production of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins.

    PubMed

    Vallin, Carlos; Ramos, Astrid; Pimienta, Elsa; Rodríguez, Caridad; Hernández, Tairí; Hernández, Ivones; Del Sol, Ricardo; Rosabal, Grisel; Van Mellaert, Lieve; Anné, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    The 45/47 kDa APA protein (Rv1860) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was produced by Streptomyces lividans. The recombinant protein could be recovered from the culture medium of an S. lividans clone containing the apa gene under control of the promoter and signal sequence of the Streptomyces coelicolor agarase gene. The recombinant protein production was further scaled-up using fermentation conditions. The APA protein was subsequently purified from the culture supernatant by means of immunochromatography. About 80 mg of recombinant protein were obtained per liter of culture media. In vivo tests with the APA protein purified from S. lividans TK24/pRGAPA1 revealed that the recombinant protein was antigenic and could induce high titers of specific antibodies in the mouse biological model. Results obtained concerning heterologous production of APA, its immunogenic and antigenic capacity, demonstrated the potential of S. lividans as a valuable host for the production of recombinant proteins from M. tuberculosis.

  13. Sex recombination, and reproductive fitness: an experimental study using Paramecium

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, D.

    1982-08-01

    The effect of sex and recombination on reproductive fitness are measured using five wild stocks of Paramecium primaurelia. Among the wild stocks there were highly significant differences in growth rates. No hybrid had as low a fitness as the least fit parental stock. Recombination produced genotypes of higher fitness than those of either parent only in the cross between the two stocks of lowest fitness. The increase in variance of fitness as a result of recombination was almost exclusively attributable to the generation lines with low fitness. The fitness consequences of sexuality and mate choice were stock specific; some individuals leaving the most descendants by inbreeding, others by outcrossing. For most crosses the short-term advantage of sex, if any, accrue from the fusion of different gametes (hybrid vigor) and not from recombination. Since the homozygous genotype with the highest fitnes left the most progeny by inbreeding (no recombination), the persistence of conjugation in P. primaurelia is paradoxical. (JMT)

  14. CRISPR-directed mitotic recombination enables genetic mapping without crosses.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, Meru J; Bloom, Joshua S; Day, Laura; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2016-05-27

    Linkage and association studies have mapped thousands of genomic regions that contribute to phenotypic variation, but narrowing these regions to the underlying causal genes and variants has proven much more challenging. Resolution of genetic mapping is limited by the recombination rate. We developed a method that uses CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats) to build mapping panels with targeted recombination events. We tested the method by generating a panel with recombination events spaced along a yeast chromosome arm, mapping trait variation, and then targeting a high density of recombination events to the region of interest. Using this approach, we fine-mapped manganese sensitivity to a single polymorphism in the transporter Pmr1. Targeting recombination events to regions of interest allows us to rapidly and systematically identify causal variants underlying trait differences.

  15. Colony mutants of compatible nocardiae displaying variations in recombining capacity.

    PubMed

    Brownell, G H; Walsh, R S

    1972-03-01

    Colonial morphology mutants of Nocardia erythropolis were isolated following ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The alleles rou-1/smo-1 were located by recombinant analysis and found to be linked to previously mapped characters. On the basis of recombinant class type patterns obtained from various selective characters it was postulated that the rou-1 allele may span a region of unique nucleotides in the Mat-Ce genome. Recombination frequencies of rou-1 and smo-2 bearing mutants of the Mat-Ce mating type were found to differ by over 1000 fold. Attempts to demonstrate that low recombination frequencies produced by the Smo mutants were due to Rec(-) genes were unsuccessful. No increased sensitivity to either UV or X irradiation was observed by the Smo mutants. Acriflavine treatment of either Rou or Smo colony mutants failed to accelerate reversion or to alter the recombining potentials of the mutants.

  16. Production and secretion of recombinant proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, W; Williams, K L; Slade, M B

    1994-06-01

    We have expressed useful amounts of three recombinant proteins in a new eukaryotic host/vector system. The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum efficiently secreted two recombinant products, a soluble form of the normally cell surface associated D. discoideum glycoprotein (PsA) and the heterologous protein glutathione-S-transferase (GST) from Schistosoma japonicum, while the enzyme beta-glucuronidase (GUS) from Escherichia coli was cell associated. Up to 20mg/l of recombinant PsA and 1mg/l of GST were obtained after purification from a standard, peptone based growth medium. The secretion signal peptide was correctly cleaved from the recombinant GST- and PsA-proteins and the expression of recombinant PsA was shown to be stable for at least one hundred generations in the absence of selection. PMID:7764951

  17. Recombination in polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Sarah; Roy, Anshuman; Heeger, Alan

    2010-12-16

    Recombination of photogenerated charge carriers in polymer bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells reduces the short circuit current (Jsc ) and the fill factor (FF). Identifying the mechanism of recombination is, therefore, fundamentally important for increasing the power conversion efficiency. Light intensity and temperature-dependent current-voltage measurements on polymer BHJ cells made from a variety of different semiconducting polymers and fullerenes show that the recombination kinetics are voltage dependent and evolve from first-order recombination at short circuit to bimolecular recombination at open circuit as a result of increasing the voltage-dependent charge carrier density in the cell. The “missing 0.3 V” inferred from comparison of the band gaps of the bulk heterojunction materials and the measured open-circuit voltage at room-temperature results from the temperature dependence of the quasi-Fermi levels in the polymer and fullerene domains—a conclusion based on the fundamental statistics of fermions.

  18. High cell density cultivation of recombinant Escherichia coli for prodrug of recombinant human GLPs production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Ma, Xue; Hou, Zheng; Xue, Xiaoyan; Meng, Jingru; Li, Mingkai; Jia, Min; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2012-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)(2) has been attracting increasing interest on account of its prominent benefits in type 2 diabetes. However, its clinical applications are limited by the short half-life in vivo. To overcome this limitation, a new polymer of GLP-1 was developed by prodrug strategy. In this study a recombinant protein, rhGLPs, was successfully constructed, cloned into plasmid pET30a (+) and expressed in Escherichia coli ArcticExpress(DE3)RP in the form of inclusion body. The recombinant fusion protein productivity could be enhanced by high cell density culture of the recombinant strain. As a result, about 40 g wet weight cells per liter were obtained. The protein was purified by size-exclusion chromatography on a Superdex 75 column and refolded using reverse dilution and dialysis methods. SDS-PAGE, HPLC and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry were undertaken to determine the purity and molecular weight of rhGLPs. Bioactivity assay revealed that it had glucose-lowering and insulin-releasing action in vivo. PMID:22771632

  19. Expression and Purification of Recombinant Hemoglobin in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Jiang, Xiaoben; Fago, Angela; Weber, Roy E.; Moriyama, Hideaki; Storz, Jay F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Recombinant DNA technologies have played a pivotal role in the elucidation of structure-function relationships in hemoglobin (Hb) and other globin proteins. Here we describe the development of a plasmid expression system to synthesize recombinant Hbs in Escherichia coli, and we describe a protocol for expressing Hbs with low intrinsic solubilities. Since the α- and β-chain Hbs of different species span a broad range of solubilities, experimental protocols that have been optimized for expressing recombinant human HbA may often prove unsuitable for the recombinant expression of wildtype and mutant Hbs of other species. Methodology/Principal Findings As a test case for our expression system, we produced recombinant Hbs of the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), a species that has been the subject of research on mechanisms of Hb adaptation to hypoxia. By experimentally assessing the combined effects of induction temperature, induction time and E. coli expression strain on the solubility of recombinant deer mouse Hbs, we identified combinations of expression conditions that greatly enhanced the yield of recombinant protein and which also increased the efficiency of post-translational modifications. Conclusion/Significance Our protocol should prove useful for the experimental study of recombinant Hbs in many non-human animals. One of the chief advantages of our protocol is that we can express soluble recombinant Hb without co-expressing molecular chaperones, and without the need for additional reconstitution or heme-incorporation steps. Moreover, our plasmid construct contains a combination of unique restriction sites that allows us to produce recombinant Hbs with different α- and β-chain subunit combinations by means of cassette mutagenesis. PMID:21625463

  20. Estimation of recombination frequency in bi-parental genetic populations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ziqi; Li, Huihui; Zhang, Luyan; Wang, Jiankang

    2012-06-01

    Summary Linkage analysis plays an important role in genetic studies. In linkage analysis, accurate estimation of recombination frequency is essential. Many bi-parental populations have been used, and determining an appropriate population is of great importance in precise recombination frequency. In this study, we investigated the estimation efficiency of recombination frequency in 12 bi-parental populations. The criteria that we used for comparison were LOD score in testing linkage relationship, deviation between estimated and real recombination frequency, standard error (SE) of estimates and the least theoretical population size (PS) required to observe at least one recombinant and to declare the statistically significant linkage relationship. Theoretical and simulation results indicated that larger PS and smaller recombination frequency resulted in higher LOD score and smaller deviation. Lower LOD score, higher deviation and higher SE for estimating the recombination frequency in the advanced backcrossing and selfing populations are larger than those in backcross and F2 populations, respectively. For advanced backcrossing and selfing populations, larger populations were needed in order to observe at least one recombinant and to declare significant linkage. In comparison, in F2 and F3 populations higher LOD score, lower deviation and SE were observed for co-dominant markers. A much larger population was needed to observe at least one recombinant and to detect loose linkage for dominant and recessive markers. Therefore, advanced backcrossing and selfing populations had lower precision in estimating the recombination frequency. F2 and F3 populations together with co-dominant markers represent the ideal situation for linkage analysis and linkage map construction.

  1. AMELIORATION OF ETHANOL-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS IN RODENT EMBRYOS IN VITRO USING ADENOVIRAL-MEDIATED EXPRESSION OF CU,ZN-SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE (SOD1) OR MN-SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE (SOD2)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol produces dysmorphogenesis in offspring when pregnant animals are exposed in vivo (Chaudhuri 2000; Hannigan and Armant, 2000) and by direct exposure of neurulation staged embryos to ethanol in vitro (Kotch et al., 1995; Hunter et al., 1994 ; Thompson and Folb, 1982). The a...

  2. Effect of sex, age, and breed on genetic recombination features in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meiotic recombination is a fundamental biological process which generates genetic diversity, affects fertility, and influences evolvability. Here we investigate the roles of sex, age, and breed in cattle recombination features, including recombination rate, location and crossover interference. Usin...

  3. Auger recombination as the dominant recombination process in indium nitride at low temperatures during steady-state photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Seetoh, I. P.; Soh, C. B.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Chua, S. J.

    2013-03-11

    Auger recombination in InN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition was studied by steady-state photoluminescence at different laser excitation powers and sample temperatures. It was dominant over radiative recombination and Shockley-Read-Hall recombination at low temperatures, contributing to the sub-linear relationship between the integrated photoluminescence intensity and laser excitation power. Auger recombination rates increased gradually with temperature with an activation energy of 10-17 meV, in good agreement with values from transient photoluminescence reported in literature. As the Auger recombination rates were independent of material quality, they may form an upper limit to the luminous efficiency of InN.

  4. Evidence of recombination within human alpha-papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Manuel; Carvajal-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a causal role in cervical cancer with almost half a million new cases occurring each year. Presence of the carcinogenic HPV is necessary for the development of the invasive carcinoma of the genital tract. Therefore, persistent infection with carcinogenic HPV causes virtually all cervical cancers. Some aspects of the molecular evolution of this virus, as the putative importance of recombination in its evolutionary history, are an opened current question. In addition, recombination could also be a significant issue nowadays since the frequency of co-infection with more than one HPV type is not a rare event and, thus, new recombinant types could be currently being generated. Results We have used human alpha-PV sequences from the public database at Los Alamos National Laboratory to report evidence that recombination may exist in this virus. A model-based population genetic approach was used to infer the recombination signal from the HPV DNA sequences grouped attending to phylogenetic and epidemiological information, as well as to clinical manifestations. Our results agree with recently published ones that use a different methodology to detect recombination associated to the gene L2. In addition, we have detected significant recombination signal in the genes E6, E7, L2 and L1 at different groups, and importantly within the high-risk type HPV16. The method used has recently been shown to be one of the most powerful and reliable procedures to detect the recombination signal. Conclusion We provide new support to the recent evidence of recombination in HPV. Additionally, we performed the recombination estimation assuming the best-fit model of nucleotide substitution and rate variation among sites, of the HPV DNA sequence sets. We found that the gene with recombination in most of the groups is L2 but the highest values were detected in L1 and E6. Gene E7 was recombinant only within the HPV16 type. The topic deserves further study

  5. Fluctuation approach to description of nonideal plasma. II: Collisional recombination in nonequilibrium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lankin, A. V.; Norman, G. E.

    2010-12-15

    A model capable of describing the kinetics of collisional recombination in nonideal plasmas by the methods of molecular dynamics is developed. The dependence of the collisional recombination rate on the coupling parameter is found to differ substantially from the extrapolation of the three-body recombination rate in nonideal plasmas. A sharp decrease in the recombination rate in strongly nonideal plasmas is revealed. As the coupling parameter decreases, collisional recombination transforms into three-body recombination.

  6. Monte Carlo Simulations of the Inside Intron Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebrat, Stanisław; PȨKALSKI, Andrzej; Scharf, Fabian

    Biological genomes are divided into coding and non-coding regions. Introns are non-coding parts within genes, while the remaining non-coding parts are intergenic sequences. To study evolutionary significance of the inside intron recombination we have used two models based on the Monte Carlo method. In our computer simulations we have implemented the internal structure of genes by declaring the probability of recombination between exons. One situation when inside intron recombination is advantageous is recovering functional genes by combining proper exons dispersed in the genetic pool of the population after a long period without selection for the function of the gene. Populations have to pass through the bottleneck, then. These events are rather rare and we have expected that there should be other phenomena giving profits from the inside intron recombination. In fact we have found that inside intron recombination is advantageous only in the case when after recombination, besides the recombinant forms, parental haplotypes are available and selection is set already on gametes.

  7. Retroviral Vectors for Analysis of Viral Mutagenesis and Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Jonathan M.O.; Mansky, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Retrovirus population diversity within infected hosts is commonly high due in part to elevated rates of replication, mutation, and recombination. This high genetic diversity often complicates the development of effective diagnostics, vaccines, and antiviral drugs. This review highlights the diverse vectors and approaches that have been used to examine mutation and recombination in retroviruses. Retroviral vectors for these purposes can broadly be divided into two categories: those that utilize reporter genes as mutation or recombination targets and those that utilize viral genes as targets of mutation or recombination. Reporter gene vectors greatly facilitate the detection, quantification, and characterization of mutants and/or recombinants, but may not fully recapitulate the patterns of mutagenesis or recombination observed in native viral gene sequences. In contrast, the detection of mutations or recombination events directly in viral genes is more biologically relevant but also typically more challenging and inefficient. We will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the various vectors and approaches used as well as propose ways in which they could be improved. PMID:25254386

  8. A Glance at Recombination Hotspots in the Domestic Cat

    PubMed Central

    Alhaddad, Hasan; Zhang, Chi; Rannala, Bruce; Lyons, Leslie A.

    2016-01-01

    Recombination has essential roles in increasing genetic variability within a population and in ensuring successful meiotic events. The objective of this study is to (i) infer the population-scaled recombination rate (ρ), and (ii) identify and characterize regions of increased recombination rate for the domestic cat, Felis silvestris catus. SNPs (n = 701) were genotyped in twenty-two East Asian feral cats (random bred). The SNPs covered ten different chromosomal regions (A1, A2, B3, C2, D1, D2, D4, E2, F2, X) with an average region size of 850 Kb and an average SNP density of 70 SNPs/region. The Bayesian method in the program inferRho was used to infer regional population recombination rates and hotspots localities. The regions exhibited variable population recombination rates and four decisive recombination hotspots were identified on cat chromosome A2, D1, and E2 regions. As a description of the identified hotspots, no correlation was detected between the GC content and the locality of recombination spots, and the hotspots enclosed L2 LINE elements and MIR and tRNA-Lys SINE elements. PMID:26859385

  9. Discrete DNA sites regulate global distribution of meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Wahls, Wayne P; Davidson, Mari K

    2010-05-01

    Homologous recombination is induced to high levels in meiosis, is initiated by Spo11-catalyzed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and is clustered at hotspots that regulate its positioning in the genome. Recombination is required for proper chromosome segregation in meiosis and defects in its frequency or positioning cause chromosome mis-segregation and, consequently, congenital birth defects such as Down's syndrome. Therefore, elucidating how meiotic recombination is positioned is of fundamental and biomedical interest. Our integration of historical and contemporary advances in the field, plus the re-analysis of published microarray data on the genome-wide distribution of recombination supports a unifying model for such regulation. We posit that discrete DNA sequence motifs position and regulate essentially all recombination across the genome, in much the same way that DNA sites position and regulate transcription. Moreover, we illustrate the use of overlapping mechanisms for the regulation of transcription and meiotic recombination. Bound transcription factors induce histone modifications that position recombination at hotspots. PMID:20381894

  10. Discrete DNA sites regulate global distribution of meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wahls, Wayne P.; Davidson, Mari K.

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination is induced to high levels in meiosis, is initiated by Spo11-catalyzed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and is clustered at hotspots that regulate its positioning in the genome. Recombination is required for proper chromosome segregation in meiosis; defects in its frequency or positioning cause chromosome mis-segregation and, consequently, congenital birth defects such as Down’s syndrome. Therefore elucidating how meiotic recombination is positioned is of fundamental and biomedical interest. Integration of historical and contemporary advances in the field, plus the re-analysis of published microarray data on the genome-wide distribution of recombination, support a unifying model for such regulation. We posit that discrete DNA sequence motifs position and regulate essentially all recombination across the genome, in much the same way that DNA sites position and regulate transcription. Moreover, we illustrate the use of overlapping mechanisms for the regulation of transcription and meiotic recombination. Bound transcription factors induce histone modifications that position recombination at hotspots. PMID:20381894

  11. Data Mining for Expressivity of Recombinant Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Satoshi; Isoai, Atsushi; Yamamura, Masayuki

    We analyzed the expressivity of recombinant proteins by using data mining methods. The expression technique of recombinant protein is a key step towards elucidating the functions of genes discovered through genomic sequence projects. We have studied the productive efficiency of recombinant proteins in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S.pombe), by mining the expression results. We gathered 57 proteins whose expression levels were known roughly in the host. Correlation analysis, principal component analysis and decision tree analysis were applied to these expression data. Analysis featuring codon usage and amino acid composition clarified that the amino acid composition affected to the expression levels of a recombinant protein strongly than the effect of codon usage. Furthermore, analysis of amino acid composition showed that protein solubility and the metabolism cost of amino acids correlated with a protein expressivity. Codon usage was often interesting in the field of recombinant expressions. However, our analysis found the weak correlation codon features with expressivities. These results indicated that ready-made indices of codon bias were irrelevant ones for modeling the expressivities of recombinant proteins. Our data driven approach was an easy and powerful method to improve recombinant protein expression, and this approach should be concentrated attention with the huge amount of expression data accumulating through the post-genome era.

  12. Retroviral vectors for analysis of viral mutagenesis and recombination.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Jonathan M O; Mansky, Louis M

    2014-09-24

    Retrovirus population diversity within infected hosts is commonly high due in part to elevated rates of replication, mutation, and recombination. This high genetic diversity often complicates the development of effective diagnostics, vaccines, and antiviral drugs. This review highlights the diverse vectors and approaches that have been used to examine mutation and recombination in retroviruses. Retroviral vectors for these purposes can broadly be divided into two categories: those that utilize reporter genes as mutation or recombination targets and those that utilize viral genes as targets of mutation or recombination. Reporter gene vectors greatly facilitate the detection, quantification, and characterization of mutants and/or recombinants, but may not fully recapitulate the patterns of mutagenesis or recombination observed in native viral gene sequences. In contrast, the detection of mutations or recombination events directly in viral genes is more biologically relevant but also typically more challenging and inefficient. We will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the various vectors and approaches used as well as propose ways in which they could be improved.

  13. A Glance at Recombination Hotspots in the Domestic Cat.

    PubMed

    Alhaddad, Hasan; Zhang, Chi; Rannala, Bruce; Lyons, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    Recombination has essential roles in increasing genetic variability within a population and in ensuring successful meiotic events. The objective of this study is to (i) infer the population-scaled recombination rate (ρ), and (ii) identify and characterize regions of increased recombination rate for the domestic cat, Felis silvestris catus. SNPs (n = 701) were genotyped in twenty-two East Asian feral cats (random bred). The SNPs covered ten different chromosomal regions (A1, A2, B3, C2, D1, D2, D4, E2, F2, X) with an average region size of 850 Kb and an average SNP density of 70 SNPs/region. The Bayesian method in the program inferRho was used to infer regional population recombination rates and hotspots localities. The regions exhibited variable population recombination rates and four decisive recombination hotspots were identified on cat chromosome A2, D1, and E2 regions. As a description of the identified hotspots, no correlation was detected between the GC content and the locality of recombination spots, and the hotspots enclosed L2 LINE elements and MIR and tRNA-Lys SINE elements.

  14. Mechanics and Single-Molecule Interrogation of DNA Recombination.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jason C; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    The repair of DNA by homologous recombination is an essential, efficient, and high-fidelity process that mends DNA lesions formed during cellular metabolism; these lesions include double-stranded DNA breaks, daughter-strand gaps, and DNA cross-links. Genetic defects in the homologous recombination pathway undermine genomic integrity and cause the accumulation of gross chromosomal abnormalities-including rearrangements, deletions, and aneuploidy-that contribute to cancer formation. Recombination proceeds through the formation of joint DNA molecules-homologously paired but metastable DNA intermediates that are processed by several alternative subpathways-making recombination a versatile and robust mechanism to repair damaged chromosomes. Modern biophysical methods make it possible to visualize, probe, and manipulate the individual molecules participating in the intermediate steps of recombination, revealing new details about the mechanics of genetic recombination. We review and discuss the individual stages of homologous recombination, focusing on common pathways in bacteria, yeast, and humans, and place particular emphasis on the molecular mechanisms illuminated by single-molecule methods.

  15. Plasmid Recombination in a Rad52 Mutant of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dornfeld, K. J.; Livingston, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Using plasmids capable of undergoing intramolecular recombination, we have compared the rates and the molecular outcomes of recombination events in a wild-type and a rad52 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The plasmids contain his3 heteroalleles oriented in either an inverted or a direct repeat. Inverted repeat plasmids recombine approximately 20-fold less frequently in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. Most events from both cell types have continuous coconversion tracts extending along one of the homologous segments. Reciprocal exchange occurs in fewer than 30% of events. Direct repeat plasmids recombine at rates comparable to those of inverted repeat plasmids in wild-type cells. Direct repeat conversion tracts are similar to inverted repeat conversion tracts in their continuity and length. Inverted and direct repeat plasmid recombination differ in two respects. First, rad52 does not affect the rate of direct repeat recombination as drastically as the rate of inverted repeat recombination. Second, direct repeat plasmids undergo crossing over more frequently than inverted repeat plasmids. In addition, crossovers constitute a larger fraction of mutant than wild-type direct repeat events. Many crossover events from both cell types are unusual in that the crossover HIS3 allele is within a plasmid containing the parental his3 heteroalleles. PMID:1644271

  16. Analysis of Meiotic Recombination Pathways in the Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mao-Draayer, Y.; Galbraith, A. M.; Pittman, D. L.; Cool, M.; Malone, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, several genes appear to act early in meiotic recombination. HOP1 and RED1 have been classified as such early genes. The data in this paper demonstrate that neither a red1 nor a hop1 mutation can rescue the inviable spores produced by a rad52 spo13 strain; this phenotype helps to distinguish these two genes from other early meiotic recombination genes such as SPO11, REC104, or MEI4. In contrast, either a red1 or a hop1 mutation can rescue a rad50S spo13 strain; this phenotype is similar to that conferred by mutations in the other early recombination genes (e.g., REC104). These two different results can be explained because the data presented here indicate that a rad50S mutation does not diminish meiotic intrachromosomal recombination, similar to the mutant phenotypes conferred by red1 or hop1. Of course, RED1 and HOP1 do act in the normal meiotic interchromosomal recombination pathway; they reduce interchromosomal recombination to ~10% of normal levels. We demonstrate that a mutation in a gene (REC104) required for initiation of exchange is completely epistatic to a mutation in RED1. Finally, mutations in either HOP1 or RED1 reduce the number of double-strand breaks observed at the HIS2 meiotic recombination hotspot. PMID:8878674

  17. The Contribution of Genetic Recombination to CRISPR Array Evolution.

    PubMed

    Kupczok, Anne; Landan, Giddy; Dagan, Tal

    2015-06-16

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) is a microbial immune system against foreign DNA. Recognition sequences (spacers) encoded within the CRISPR array mediate the immune reaction in a sequence-specific manner. The known mechanisms for the evolution of CRISPR arrays include spacer acquisition from foreign DNA elements at the time of invasion and array erosion through spacer deletion. Here, we consider the contribution of genetic recombination between homologous CRISPR arrays to the evolution of spacer repertoire. Acquisition of spacers from exogenic arrays via recombination may confer the recipient with immunity against unencountered antagonists. For this purpose, we develop a novel method for the detection of recombination in CRISPR arrays by modeling the spacer order in arrays from multiple strains from the same species. Because the evolutionary signal of spacer recombination may be similar to that of pervasive spacer deletions or independent spacer acquisition, our method entails a robustness analysis of the recombination inference by a statistical comparison to resampled and perturbed data sets. We analyze CRISPR data sets from four bacterial species: two Gammaproteobacteria species harboring CRISPR type I and two Streptococcus species harboring CRISPR type II loci. We find that CRISPR array evolution in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus agalactiae can be explained solely by vertical inheritance and differential spacer deletion. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we find an excess of single spacers potentially incorporated into the CRISPR locus during independent acquisition events. In Streptococcus thermophilus, evidence for spacer acquisition by recombination is present in 5 out of 70 strains. Genetic recombination has been proposed to accelerate adaptation by combining beneficial mutations that arose in independent lineages. However, for most species under study, we find that CRISPR evolution is shaped mainly by spacer acquisition and

  18. Allelic exchange in Mycobacterium tuberculosis with long linear recombination substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, V; Pavelka, M S; Bardarov, S S; Martin, J; Weisbrod, T R; McAdam, R A; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1996-01-01

    Genetic studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been greatly hampered by the inability to introduce specific chromosomal mutations. Whereas the ability to perform allelic exchanges has provided a useful method of gene disruption in other organisms, in the clinically important species of mycobacteria, such as M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis, similar approaches have thus far been unsuccessful. In this communication, we report the development of a shuttle mutagenesis strategy that involves the use of long linear recombination substrates to reproducibly obtain recombinants by allelic exchange in M. tuberculosis. Long linear recombination substrates, approximately 40 to 50 kb in length, were generated by constructing libraries in the excisable cosmid vector pYUB328. The cosmid vector could be readily excised from the recombinant cosmids by digestion with PacI, a restriction endonuclease for which there exist few, if any, sites in mycobacterial genomes. A cosmid containing the mycobacterial leuD gene was isolated, and a selectable marker conferring resistance to kanamycin was inserted into the leuD gene in the recombinant cosmid by interplasmid recombination in Escherichia coli. A long linear recombination substrate containing the insertionally mutated leuD gene was generated by PacI digestion. Electroporation of this recombination substrate containing the insertionally mutated leuD allele resulted in the generation of leucine auxotrophic mutants by homologous recombination in 6% of the kanamycin-resistant transformants for both the Erdman and H37Rv strains of M. tuberculosis. The ability to perform allelic exchanges provides an important approach for investigating the biology of this pathogen as well as developing new live-cell M. tuberculosis-based vaccines. PMID:8550428

  19. Recombination characteristics of therapeutic ion beams on ion chamber dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Matsuyama, Tetsuharu; Sato, Shinji; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    In heavy ion radiotherapy, ionization chambers are regarded as a standard for determining the absorbed dose given to patients. In ion dosimetry, it is necessary to correct the radiation quality, which depends on the initial recombination effect. This study reveals for the radiation quality dependence of the initial recombination in air in ion dosimetry. Ionization charge was measured for the beams of protons at 40-160 MeV, carbon at 21-400 MeV/n, and iron at 23.5-500 MeV/n using two identical parallel-plate ionization chambers placed in series along the beam axis. The downstream chamber was used as a monitor operated with a constant applied voltage, while the other chamber was used for recombination measurement by changing the voltage. The ratio of the ionization charge measured by the two ionization chambers showed a linear relationship with the inverse of the voltage in the high-voltage region. The initial recombination factor was estimated by extrapolating the obtained linear relationship to infinite voltage. The extent of the initial recombination was found to increase with decreasing incident energy or increasing atomic number of the beam. This behavior can be explained with an amorphous track structure model: the increase of ionization density in the core region of the track due to decreasing kinetic energy or increasing atomic number leads to denser initial ion production and results in a higher recombination probability. For therapeutic carbon ion beams, the extent of the initial recombination was not constant but changed by 0.6% even in the target region. This tendency was quantitatively well reproduced with the track-structure based on the initial recombination model; however, the transitional change in the track structure is considered to play an important role in further understanding of the characteristics of the initial recombination.

  20. Coacervate microspheres as carriers of recombinant adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Kalyanasundaram, S; Feinstein, S; Nicholson, J P; Leong, K W; Garver, R I

    1999-01-01

    The therapeutic utility of recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) is limited in part by difficulties in directing the viruses to specific sites and by the requirement for bolus administration, both of which limit the efficiency of target tissue infection. As a first step toward overcoming these limitations, rAds were encapsulated in coacervate microspheres comprised of gelatin and alginate followed by stabilization with calcium ions. Ultrastructural evaluation showed that the microspheres formed in this manner were 0.8-10 microM in diameter, with viruses evenly distributed. The microspheres achieved a sustained release of adenovirus with a nominal loss of bioactivity. The pattern of release and the total amount of virus released was modified by changes in microsphere formulation. Administration of the adenovirus-containing microspheres to human tumor nodules engrafted in mice showed that the viral transgene was transferred to the tumor cells. It is concluded that coacervate microspheres can be used to encapsulate bioactive rAd and release it in a time-dependent manner.

  1. Development of recombinant vaccines for botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A

    1998-11-01

    Synthetic genes encoding non-toxic, carboxyl-terminal regions (approximately 50 kDa) of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A and B (referred to as fragment C or HC) were constructed and cloned into the methylotropic yeast, Pichia pastoris. Genes specifying BoNTA(HC) and BoNTB(HC) were expressed as both intracellular and secreted products. Recombinants, expressed intracellularly, yielded products with the expected molecular weight as judged by SDS PAGE and Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, while secreted products were larger due to glycosylation. Gene products were used to vaccinate mice and evaluated for their ability to elicit protective antibody titers in vivo. Mice given three intramuscular vaccinations with yeast supernatant containing glycosylated BoNTA(HC) were protected against an intraperitoneal challenge of 10(6) 50% mouse lethal doses (MLD50) of serotype A neurotoxin, a result not duplicated by its BoNTB(HC) counterpart. Vaccinating mice with cytoplasmically produced BoNTA(HC) and BoNTB(HC) protected animals from a challenge of 10(6) MLD50 of serotype A and B toxins, respectively. Because of the glycosylation encountered with secreted BoNT(HC), our efforts focused on the production and purification of products from intracellular expression. PMID:9792170

  2. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  3. Epigenetic Codes Programing Class Switch Recombination.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Class switch recombination imparts B cells with a fitness-associated adaptive -advantage during a humoral immune response by using a precision-tailored DNA excision and ligation process to swap the default constant region gene of the antibody with a new one that has unique effector functions. This secondary diversification of the antibody repertoire is a hallmark of the adaptability of B cells when confronted with environmental and pathogenic challenges. Given that the nucleotide sequence of genes during class switching remains unchanged (genetic constraints), it is logical and necessary therefore, to integrate the adaptability of B cells to an epigenetic state, which is dynamic and can be heritably modulated before, after, or even during an antibody-dependent immune response. Epigenetic regulation encompasses heritable changes that affect function (phenotype) without altering the sequence information embedded in a gene, and include histone, DNA and RNA modifications. Here, we review current literature on how B cells use an epigenetic code language as a means to ensure antibody plasticity in light of pathogenic insults. PMID:26441954

  4. Recombinant Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Christine; Jakob, Franz; Seefried, Lothar; Mentrup, Birgit; Graser, Stephanie; Plotkin, Horacio; Girschick, Hermann J; Liese, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a rare monogenetic and multisystemic disease with involvement of different organs, including bone, muscle, kidney, lung, gastrointestinal tract and the nervous system. The exact metabolic mechanisms of the effects of TNAP deficiency in different tissues are not understood in detail. There is no approved specific treatment for HPP; therefore symptomatic treatment in order to improve the clinical features is of major interest. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is a relatively new type of treatment based on the principle of administering a medical treatment replacing a defective or absent enzyme. Recently ERT with a bone targeted recombinant human TNAP molecule has been reported to be efficient in ten severely affected patients and improved survival of life threatening forms. These results are very promising especially with regard to the skeletal phenotype but it is unclear whether ERT also has beneficial effects for craniosynostosis and in other affected tissues in HPP such as brain and kidney. Long-term data are not yet available and further systematic clinical trials are needed. It is also necessary to establish therapeutic approaches to help patients who are affected by less severe forms of HPP but also suffer from a significant reduction in quality of life. Further basic research on TNAP function and role in different tissues and on its physiological substrates is critical to gain a better insight in the pathogenesis in HPP. This and further experiences in new therapeutic strategies may improve the prognosis and quality of life of patients with all forms of HPP.

  5. HSV Recombinant Vectors for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manservigi, Roberto; Argnani, Rafaela; Marconi, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    The very deep knowledge acquired on the genetics and molecular biology of herpes simplex virus (HSV), has allowed the development of potential replication-competent and replication-defective vectors for several applications in human healthcare. These include delivery and expression of human genes to cells of the nervous systems, selective destruction of cancer cells, prophylaxis against infection with HSV or other infectious diseases, and targeted infection to specific tissues or organs. Replication-defective recombinant vectors are non-toxic gene transfer tools that preserve most of the neurotropic features of wild type HSV-1, particularly the ability to express genes after having established latent infections, and are thus proficient candidates for therapeutic gene transfer settings in neurons. A replication-defective HSV vector for the treatment of pain has recently entered in phase 1 clinical trial. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are becoming a suitable and powerful tool to eradicate brain tumours due to their ability to replicate and spread only within the tumour mass, and have reached phase II/III clinical trials in some cases. The progress in understanding the host immune response induced by the vector is also improving the use of HSV as a vaccine vector against both HSV infection and other pathogens. This review briefly summarizes the obstacle encountered in the delivery of HSV vectors and examines the various strategies developed or proposed to overcome such challenges. PMID:20835362

  6. Epigenetic Codes Programing Class Switch Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Class switch recombination imparts B cells with a fitness-associated adaptive ­advantage during a humoral immune response by using a precision-tailored DNA excision and ligation process to swap the default constant region gene of the antibody with a new one that has unique effector functions. This secondary diversification of the antibody repertoire is a hallmark of the adaptability of B cells when confronted with environmental and pathogenic challenges. Given that the nucleotide sequence of genes during class switching remains unchanged (genetic constraints), it is logical and necessary therefore, to integrate the adaptability of B cells to an epigenetic state, which is dynamic and can be heritably modulated before, after, or even during an antibody-dependent immune response. Epigenetic regulation encompasses heritable changes that affect function (phenotype) without altering the sequence information embedded in a gene, and include histone, DNA and RNA modifications. Here, we review current literature on how B cells use an epigenetic code language as a means to ensure antibody plasticity in light of pathogenic insults. PMID:26441954

  7. Therapeutic Use of Native and Recombinant Enteroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Pelto, Jani; Tripathi, Lav; Susi, Petri

    2016-01-01

    Research on human enteroviruses has resulted in the identification of more than 100 enterovirus types, which use more than 10 protein receptors and/or attachment factors required in cell binding and initiation of the replication cycle. Many of these “viral” receptors are overexpressed in cancer cells. Receptor binding and the ability to replicate in specific target cells define the tropism and pathogenesis of enterovirus types, because cellular infection often results in cytolytic response, i.e., disruption of the cells. Viral tropism and cytolytic properties thus make native enteroviruses prime candidates for oncolytic virotherapy. Copy DNA cloning and modification of enterovirus genomes have resulted in the generation of enterovirus vectors with properties that are useful in therapy or in vaccine trials where foreign antigenic epitopes are expressed from or on the surface of the vector virus. The small genome size and compact particle structure, however, set limits to enterovirus genome modifications. This review focuses on the therapeutic use of native and recombinant enteroviruses and the methods that have been applied to modify enterovirus genomes for therapy. PMID:26907330

  8. Therapeutic Use of Native and Recombinant Enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Ylä-Pelto, Jani; Tripathi, Lav; Susi, Petri

    2016-02-23

    Research on human enteroviruses has resulted in the identification of more than 100 enterovirus types, which use more than 10 protein receptors and/or attachment factors required in cell binding and initiation of the replication cycle. Many of these "viral" receptors are overexpressed in cancer cells. Receptor binding and the ability to replicate in specific target cells define the tropism and pathogenesis of enterovirus types, because cellular infection often results in cytolytic response, i.e., disruption of the cells. Viral tropism and cytolytic properties thus make native enteroviruses prime candidates for oncolytic virotherapy. Copy DNA cloning and modification of enterovirus genomes have resulted in the generation of enterovirus vectors with properties that are useful in therapy or in vaccine trials where foreign antigenic epitopes are expressed from or on the surface of the vector virus. The small genome size and compact particle structure, however, set limits to enterovirus genome modifications. This review focuses on the therapeutic use of native and recombinant enteroviruses and the methods that have been applied to modify enterovirus genomes for therapy.

  9. Consistency and stability of recombinant fermentations.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, M E; Builder, S E

    1994-01-01

    Production of proteins of consistent quality in heterologous, genetically-engineered expression systems is dependent upon identifying the manufacturing process parameters which have an impact on product structure, function, or purity, validating acceptable ranges for these variables, and performing the manufacturing process as specified. One of the factors which may affect product consistency is genetic instability of the primary product sequence, as well as instability of genes which code for proteins responsible for post-translational modification of the product. Approaches have been developed for mammalian expression systems to assure that product quality is not changing through mechanisms of genetic instability. Sensitive protein analytical methods, particularly peptide mapping, are used to evaluate product structure directly, and are more sensitive in detecting genetic instability than is direct genetic analysis by nucleotide sequencing of the recombinant gene or mRNA. These methods are being employed to demonstrate that the manufacturing process consistently yields a product of defined structure from cells cultured through the range of cell ages used in the manufacturing process and well beyond the maximum cell age defined for the process. The combination of well designed validation studies which demonstrate consistent product quality as a function of cell age, and rigorous quality control of every product lot by sensitive protein analytical methods provide the necessary assurance that product structure is not being altered through mechanisms of mutation and selection.

  10. Overview of the Purification of Recombinant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    When the first version of this unit was written in 1995 protein purification of recombinant proteins was based on a variety of standard chromatographic methods and approaches many of which were described and mentioned in this unit and elsewhere in the book. In the interim there has been a shift towards an almost universal usage of the affinity or fusion tag. This may not be the case for biotechnology manufacture where affinity tags can complicate producing proteins under regulatory conditions. Regardless of the protein expression system, questions are asked as to which and how many affinity tags to use, where to attach them in the protein and whether to engineer a self cleavage system or simply leave them on. We will briefly address some of these issues. Also although this overview focuses on E.coli, protein expression and purification from the other commonly used expression systems are mentioned and apart from cell breakage methods, the protein purification methods and strategies are essentially the same. PMID:25829302

  11. Recombinant albumin monolayers on latex particles.

    PubMed

    Sofińska, Kamila; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Kujda, Marta; Nattich-Rak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-14

    The adsorption of recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) on negatively charged polystyrene latex micro-particles was studied at pH 3.5 and the NaCl concentration range of 10(-3) to 0.15 M. The electrophoretic mobility of latex monotonically increased with the albumin concentration in the suspension. The coverage of adsorbed albumin was quantitatively determined using the depletion method, where the residual protein concentration was determined by electrokinetic measurements and AFM imaging. It was shown that albumin adsorption was irreversible. Its maximum coverage on latex varied between 0.7 mg m(-2) for 10(-3) M NaCl to 1.3 mg m(-2) for 0.15 M NaCl. The latter value matches the maximum coverage previously determined for human serum albumin on mica using the streaming potential method. The increase in the maximum coverage was interpreted in terms of reduced electrostatic repulsion among adsorbed molecules. These facts confirm that albumin adsorption at pH 3.5 is governed by electrostatic interactions and proceeds analogously to colloid particle deposition. The stability of albumin monolayers was measured in additional experiments where changes in the latex electrophoretic mobility and the concentration of free albumin in solutions were monitored over prolonged time periods. Based on these experimental data, a robust procedure of preparing albumin monolayers on latex particles of well-controlled coverage and molecule distribution was proposed. PMID:24354916

  12. Recombinant human erythropoietin and high flux haemodiafiltration.

    PubMed

    Lippi, A; Rindi, P; Baronti, R; Caprioli, R; Favilla, G; Palmarini, D; Cioni, L

    1995-01-01

    Since 1982, 32 uraemic patients were treated in our institution by high flux haemodiafiltration (H-HDF) in order to shorten significantly the dialytic treatment session. H-HDF used a high surface area filter (1.4-1.9 m2) with high hydraulic permeability (polyacrylonitrile and polysulfone), at high blood flow (450 ml/min) and high rates of reinfusion of substitution fluid (22 l/session). In this way the dialytic session was shortened to 140 +/- 19 min, maintaining a good cardiovascular stability and high dialytic efficiency (Kt/V > 1.1). Human recombinant erythropoietin rHuEpo introduced in the therapy of this group in 1987 has resulted in an improvement of renal anaemia, but also a prolongation of the time of dialytic treatment due to a decrease in the efficiency of filters. During the period of the study, the treatment time increased from 140 +/- 19 min to 168 +/- 25 min with a concomitant increase of haematocrit and haemoglobin (from 24% to 36% and from 7.9 to 10.5 g/dl, respectively). H-HDF maintains a noticeable increase in dialytic efficacy with good cardiovascular stability, but the goal of a significant reduction in the time of treatment can no longer be obtained. PMID:8524496

  13. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  14. Recombinant protein vaccines produced in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, Manon M J

    2012-02-27

    The baculovirus-insect cell expression system is a well known tool for the production of complex proteins. The technology is also used for commercial manufacture of various veterinary and human vaccines. This review paper provides an overview of how this technology can be applied to produce a multitude of vaccine candidates. The key advantage of this recombinant protein manufacturing platform is that a universal "plug and play" process may be used for producing a broad range of protein-based prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for both human and veterinary use while offering the potential for low manufacturing costs. Large scale mammalian cell culture facilities previously established for the manufacturing of monoclonal antibodies that have now become obsolete due to yield improvement could be deployed for the manufacturing of these vaccines. Alternatively, manufacturing capacity could be established in geographic regions that do not have any vaccine production capability. Dependent on health care priorities, different vaccines could be manufactured while maintaining the ability to rapidly convert to producing pandemic influenza vaccine when the need arises. PMID:22265860

  15. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukic, D. V.; Schnell, M.; Savin, D. W.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E. W.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Sprenger, F.; Lestinsky, M.; Wolf, A.

    2006-01-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show rich spectra of X-ray absorption lines. These observations have detected a broad unresolved transition array (UTA) between approx. 15-17 A. This is attributed to inner-shell photoexcitation of M-shell iron ions. Modeling these UTA features is currently limited by uncertainties in the low-temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) data for M-shell iron. In order to resolve this issue, and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for plasma modeling, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Currently, laboratory measurements of low temperature DR can only be performed at storage rings. We use the DR data obtained at TSR, to calculate rate coefficients for plasma modeling and to benchmark theoretical DR calculations. Here we report our recent experimental results for DR of Fe XIV forming Fe XIII.

  16. Dynamics of carrier recombination in a semiconductor laser structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhioev, R. I. Kavokin, K. V.; Kusrayev, Yu. G.; Poletaev, N. K.

    2015-11-15

    Carrier-recombination dynamics is studied by the method of optical orientation at room temperature in the active layer of a laser diode structure. The dependence of the degree of electron-spin orientation on the excitation density is attributed to saturation of the nonradiative-recombination channel. The time of electron capture at recombination centers is determined to be τ{sub e} = 5 × 10{sup –9} s. The temperature of nonequilibrium electrons heated by a He–Ne laser is estimated.

  17. General features of the dissociative recombination of polyatomic molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Pratt, S. T.; Jungen, Ch.; Schneider, I. F.; Dulieu, O.; Robert, J.

    2015-01-29

    We discuss some aspects of a simple expression for the low-energy dissociative recombination cross section that applies when the recombination process is dominated by the indirect mechanism. In most previous applications, this expression has been applied to capture into vibrationally excited Rydberg states with the assumption that capture is always followed by prompt dissociation. Here we consider the dissociative recombination of larger polyatomic ions and electrons. More specifically, we consider capture into electronically core-excited Rydberg states, and begin to assess its potential importance for larger systems.

  18. Charge injection and recombination at the metal organic interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. Campbell; Malliaras, George G.

    1999-01-01

    We consider the mechanism of charge injection from metals into amorphous organic semiconductors. By first treating charge recombination at the interface as a hopping process in the image potential, we obtain an expression for the surface recombination rate. The principle of detailed balance is then used to determine the injection current. This simple approach yields the effective Richardson constant for injection from metal to organic, and provides a means to derive the electric field dependence of thermionic injection. The result for the net current, injected minus recombination, is in agreement with a more exact treatment of the drift-diffusion equation.

  19. Determination of surface recombination velocity in heavily doped silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, M.; Gatos, H. C.; Actor, G.

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed and successfully tested for the determination of the effective surface recombination velocity of silicon layers doped by diffusion of phosphorus to a level of 10 to the 19th to 10 to the 21st per cu cm. The effective recombination velocity was obtained from the dependence of the electron-beam-induced current on the penetration of the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope. A special silicon diode was constructed which permitted the collection at the p-n junction of the carriers excited by the electron beam. This diode also permitted the study of the effects of surface preparation on the effective surface recombination velocity.

  20. Further corrections to the theory of cosmological recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1990-01-01

    Krolik (1989) pointed out that frequency redistribution due to scattering is more important than cosmological expansion in determining the Ly-alpha frequency profile during cosmological recombination, and that its effects substantially modify the rate of recombination. Although the first statement is true, the second statement is not: a basic symmetry of photon scattering leads to identical cancellations which almost completely erase the effects of both coherent and incoherent scattering. Only a small correction due to atomic recoil alters the line profile from the prediction of pure cosmological expansion, so that the pace of cosmological recombination can be well approximated by ignoring Ly-alpha scattering.

  1. Plasmodium knowlesi Sporozoite Antigen: Expression by Infectious Recombinant Vaccinia Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Godson, G. Nigel; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.; Barnwell, John; Moss, Bernard

    1984-04-01

    The gene coding for the circumsporozoite antigen of the malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi was inserted into the vaccinia virus genome under the control of a defined vaccinia virus promoter. Cells infected with the recombinant virus synthesized polypeptides of 53,000 to 56,000 daltons that reacted with monoclonal antibody against the repeating epitope of the malaria protein. Furthermore, rabbits vaccinated with the recombinant virus produced antibodies that bound specifically to sporozoites. These data provide evidence for expression of a cloned malaria gene in mammalian cells and illustrate the potential of vaccinia virus recombinants as live malaria vaccines.

  2. Crossing over is rarely associated with mitotic intragenic recombination in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Virgin, J B; Bailey, J P; Hasteh, F; Neville, J; Cole, A; Tromp, G

    2001-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements can result from crossing over during ectopic homologous recombination between dispersed repetitive DNA. We have previously shown that meiotic ectopic recombination between artificially dispersed ade6 heteroalleles in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe frequently results in chromosomal rearrangements. The same recombination substrates have been studied in mitotic recombination. Ectopic recombination rates in haploids were approximately 1-4 x 10(-6) recombinants per cell generation, similar to allelic recombination rates in diploids. In contrast, ectopic recombination rates in heterozygous diploids were 2.5-70 times lower than allelic recombination or ectopic recombination in haploids. These results suggest that diploid-specific factors inhibit ectopic recombination. Very few crossovers occurred in ade6 mitotic recombination, either allelic or ectopic. Allelic intragenic recombination was associated with 2% crossing over, and ectopic recombination between multiple different pairing partners showed 1-7% crossing over. These results contrast sharply with the 35-65% crossovers associated with meiotic ade6 recombination and suggest either differential control of resolution of recombination intermediates or alternative pathways of recombination in mitosis and meiosis. PMID:11139492

  3. Nonradiative recombination of excitons in semimagnetic quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Chernenko, A. V.

    2015-12-15

    The mechanisms of the nonradiative recombination of excitons in neutral and charged quantum dots based on II–VI semimagnetic semiconductors are investigated. It is shown that, along with the dipole–dipole and direct-exchange mechanisms, there is one more mechanism referred to as the indirect-exchange mechanism and related to sp–d mixing. The selection rules for nonradiative recombination by exchange mechanisms are subsequently derived. The dependence of the efficiency of all recombination mechanisms on the quantum-dot size is studied. The experimentally observed growth in the intracenter photoluminescence intensity with decreasing size of dots and nanocrystals is accounted for. Methods for experimental determination of the contributions of different mechanisms to nonradiative recombination are discussed.

  4. Substrate length requirements for efficient mitotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Jinks-Robertson, S; Michelitch, M; Ramcharan, S

    1993-01-01

    An ectopic recombination system using ura3 heteroalleles varying in size from 80 to 960 bp has been used to examine the effect of substrate length on spontaneous mitotic recombination. The ura3 heteroalleles were positioned either on nonhomologous chromosomes (heterochromosomal repeats) or as direct or inverted repeats on the same chromosome (intrachromosomal repeats). While the intrachromosomal events occur at rates at least 2 orders of magnitude greater than the corresponding heterochromosomal events, the recombination rate for each type of repeat considered separately exhibits a linear dependence on substrate length. The linear relationships allow estimation of the corresponding minimal efficient processing segments, which are approximately 250 bp regardless of the relative positions of the repeats in the yeast genome. An examination of the distribution of recombination events into simple gene conversion versus crossover events indicates that reciprocal exchange is more sensitive to substrate size than is gene conversion. PMID:8321201

  5. New strategies for genetic engineering Pseudomonas syringae using recombination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report that DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced directly into bacteria by electroporation can recombine with the bacterial chromosome. This phenomenon was identified in Pseudomonas syringae and we subsequently found that Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri are...

  6. Photodissociation of alkyl iodides in helium nanodroplets. III. Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Andreas; Drabbels, Marcel

    2007-09-21

    The recombination of fragments resulting from the photodissociation of (fluorinated) alkyl iodides in helium nanodroplets at a wavelength of 266 nm has been investigated by means of ion imaging techniques. It is found that in the case of CH{sub 3}I an appreciable fraction of the fragments recombine in the aftermath of the photolysis. The proposed mechanism involves a complete translational relaxation of both photofragments inside the nanodroplets followed by geminate recombination of the fragments. In contrast with CH{sub 3}I, no recombination is observed for CF{sub 3}I. This is attributed to the larger masses and the different initial kinetic energies of the fragments produced by the photolysis of CF{sub 3}I, which strongly diminishes the fragment thermalization efficiency.

  7. Break-induced replication and recombinational telomere elongation in yeast.

    PubMed

    McEachern, Michael J; Haber, James E

    2006-01-01

    When a telomere becomes unprotected or if only one end of a chromosomal double-strand break succeeds in recombining with a template sequence, DNA can be repaired by a recombination-dependent DNA replication process termed break-induced replication (BIR). In budding yeasts, there are two BIR pathways, one dependent on the Rad51 recombinase protein and one Rad51 independent; these two repair processes lead to different types of survivors in cells lacking the telomerase enzyme that is required for normal telomere maintenance. Recombination at telomeres is triggered by either excessive telomere shortening or disruptions in the function of telomere-binding proteins. Telomere elongation by BIR appears to often occur through a "roll and spread" mechanism. In this process, a telomeric circle produced by recombination at a dysfunctional telomere acts as a template for a rolling circle BIR event to form an elongated telomere. Additional BIR events can then copy the elongated sequence to all other telomeres.

  8. Human norovirus genogroup II recombinants in Thailand, 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    Phumpholsup, Tikumporn; Chieochansin, Thaweesak; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Vuthitanachot, Viboonsuk; Payungporn, Sunchai; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a major cause of nonbacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide. New strains emerge partly due to viral recombination. In Thailand, there is a lack of data on NoV recombinants among clinical isolates. We screened stool samples from pediatric diarrheal patients for norovirus by RT-PCR and found GII.4 to be the most prevalent genotype. Phylogenetic and SimPlot analyses detected seven intra-genogroup recombinant strains: three GII.21/GII.3, two GII.12/GII.3, and two GII.12/GII.1 recombinants. Maximum chi-square analysis indicated that all had similar breakpoints near the ORF1/ORF2 junction (p < 0.001), either slightly upstream within the C-terminus of RdRp or downstream within the N-terminal domain of VP1.

  9. Ram vehicle glow spectrum - Implication of NO2 recombination continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment was operated on several Space Shuttle missions to provide spatial and spectral distributions of a ram glow associated with the Orbiter. The most recent data featured resolved spectrum and imagery of the glow with spectroscopic resolution of 34 A FWHM between 4000 and 8000 A. The spectrum of the glow on the Shuttle tail pod could be clearly separated from spectrum of the reflected light from the Orbiter. Analysis and comparison have been performed which strongly suggest the emission originates from recombination continuum of NO2. Both fast recombination (high temperature) and the spectral dependence in lifetime can describe the spectral difference. If the recombined NO2 retains 25 percent of the kinetic energy of the ram OI, the thickness of the glow layer can be explained by the lifetime of NO2 (2B1) recombination emission.

  10. DNA damage tolerance by recombination: Molecular pathways and DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Branzei, Dana; Szakal, Barnabas

    2016-08-01

    Replication perturbations activate DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways, which are crucial to promote replication completion and to prevent fork breakage, a leading cause of genome instability. One mode of DDT uses translesion synthesis polymerases, which however can also introduce mutations. The other DDT mode involves recombination-mediated mechanisms, which are generally accurate. DDT occurs prevalently postreplicatively, but in certain situations homologous recombination is needed to restart forks. Fork reversal can function to stabilize stalled forks, but may also promote error-prone outcome when used for fork restart. Recent years have witnessed important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and DNA structures that mediate recombination-mediated damage-bypass and highlighted principles that regulate DDT pathway choice locally and temporally. In this review we summarize the current knowledge and paradoxes on recombination-mediated DDT pathways and their workings, discuss how the intermediate DNA structures may influence genome integrity, and outline key open questions for future research. PMID:27236213

  11. Experimental study of columnar recombination in fission chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filliatre, P.; Lamirand, V.; Geslot, B.; Jammes, C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present experimental saturation curves of a small gap miniature fission chamber obtained in the MINERVE reactor. The chamber is filled with argon at various pressures, and the fissile material can be coated on the anode, cathode, or both. For analyzing the recombination regime, we consider a model of columnar recombination and discuss its applicability to our chamber. By applying this model to the data, it is possible to estimate the ratio between the recombination coefficient k and an effective column radius b, appearing in the model, to be k / b =(2.5 ± 0.9) ×10-6m2 / s for argon. From these results, a routine measurement of the recombination regime is proposed in order to detect gas leakage. This online diagnosis would be beneficial in terms of lifetime and reliability of the neutron instrumentation of nuclear reactors.

  12. Meiotic recombination in normal and cloned bulls and their offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homologous chromosome pairing and recombination are essential components of meiosis and sexual reproduction. The reshuffling of genetic material through breakage and reunion of chromatids ensure proper segregation of homologous chromosomes in reduction division and genetic diversity in the progeny....

  13. Paracentric inversions do not normally generate monocentric recombinant chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.; Callen, D.F.; Gardner, R.J.M.

    1995-11-20

    Dr. Pettenati et al. recently reported a review of paracentric inversions in humans in which they concluded that carriers of these have a 3.8% risk of viable offspring with recombinant chromosomes. We are of the view that there are serious problems with this estimate which should be much closer to zero. The only recombinant chromosomes which can be generated by a paracentric inversion undergoing a normal meiotic division are dicentrics and acentric fragments. Only two such cases were found by Pettenati et al. Several of the alleged monocentric recombinants were originally reported as arising from parental insertions (3-break rearrangements) and it is not legitimate to include them in any analysis of paracentric inversions. Any monocentric recombinant chromosome can only arise from a paracentric inversion by some abnormal process which must involve chromatid breakage and reunion. 4 refs.

  14. Effect Of Auger Recombination In An Ion Track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents theoretical calculations of contribution of Auger recombination to depletion of charge carriers from ionization track left by passage of energetic heavy ion through silicon-based electronic device.

  15. Iron ionization and recombination rates and ionization equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, M.; Raymond, J.

    1992-01-01

    In the past few years important progress has been made on the knowledge of ionization and recombination rates of iron, an astrophysically abundant heavy element and a major impurity in laboratory fusion devices. We make a critical review of the existing data on ionization and dielectronic recombination and present new computations of radiative recombination rate coefficients of Fe(+14) through Fe(+25) using the photoionization cross sections of Clark et al. (1986). We provide analytical fits to the recommended data (direct ionization and excitation-autoionization cross sections; radiative and dielectronic recombination rate coefficients). Finally we determine the iron ionic fractions at ionization equilibrium and compare them with previous computations as well as with observational data.

  16. Auger recombination in sodium-iodide scintillators from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, Andrew; Åberg, Daniel; Schleife, André; Kioupakis, Emmanouil

    2015-04-06

    Scintillator radiation detectors suffer from low energy resolution that has been attributed to non-linear light yield response to the energy of the incident gamma rays. Auger recombination is a key non-radiative recombination channel that scales with the third power of the excitation density and may play a role in the non-proportionality problem of scintillators. In this work, we study direct and phonon-assisted Auger recombination in NaI using first-principles calculations. Our results show that phonon-assisted Auger recombination, mediated primarily by short-range phonon scattering, dominates at room temperature. We discuss our findings in light of the much larger values obtained by numerical fits to z-scan experiments.

  17. Purification of recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Vaibhav; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant ovalbumin expressed in bacterial host is essentially free from post-translational modifications and can be useful in understanding the structure-function relationship of the protein. In this study, ovalbumin was expressed in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies. Ovalbumin inclusion bodies were solubilized using urea and refolded by decreasing the urea concentration by dilution. Refolded protein was purified by anion exchange chromatography. Overall recovery of purified recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies was about 30% with 98% purity. Purified recombinant ovalbumin was characterized by mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Recombinant ovalbumin was shown to be resistant to trypsin using protease resistance assay. This indicated proper refolding of ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of E. coli. This method provides a simple way of producing ovalbumin free of post-translational modifications.

  18. Recombinational Cloning Using Gateway and In-Fusion Cloning Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Throop, Andrea L.; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The comprehensive study of protein structure and function, or proteomics, depends on the obtainability of full-length cDNAs in species-specific expression vectors and subsequent functional analysis of the expressed protein. Recombinational cloning is a universal cloning technique based on site-specific recombination that is independent of the insert DNA sequence of interest, which differentiates this method from the classical restriction enzyme-based cloning methods. Recombinational cloning enables rapid and efficient parallel transfer of DNA inserts into multiple expression systems. This unit summarizes strategies for generating expression-ready clones using the most popular recombinational cloning technologies, including the commercially available Gateway® (Life Technologies) and In-Fusion® (Clontech) cloning technologies. PMID:25827088

  19. Products of Dissociative Recombination in the Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosby, Philip

    1996-01-01

    SRI International undertook a novel experimental measurement of the product states formed by dissociative recombination (DR) of O2(+), NO(+), and N2(+) as a function of both electron energy and reactant ion vibrational level. For these measurements we used a recently developed experimental technique for measuring dissociation product distributions that allows both the branching ratios to be accurately determined and the electronic and rovibrational state composition of the reactant ions to be specified. DR is the dominant electron loss mechanism in all regions of the ionosphere. In this process, electron attachment to the molecular ion produces an unstable neutral molecule that rapidly dissociates. For a molecular ion such as O2(+), the dissociation recombination reaction is (1) O2(+) + e yields O + O + W. The atomic products of this reaction, in this case two oxygen atoms, can be produced in a variety of excited states and with a variety of kinetic energies, as represented by W in Eq. (1). These atoms are not only active in the neutral chemistry of the ionosphere, but are also especially important because their optical emissions are often used to infer in situ concentrations of the parent molecular ion and ambient electron densities. Many laboratory measurements have been made of DR reaction rates under a wide range of electron temperatures, but very little is known about the actual distributions among the final states of the atomic products. This lack of knowledge seriously limits the validity and effectiveness of efforts to model both natural and man-made ionospheric disturbances. Bates recently identified major deficiencies in the currently accepted branching ratios for O2(+) as they relate to blue and green line emission measurements in the nocturnal F-region. During our two-year effort, we partially satisfied our ambitious goals. We constructed and operated a variable pressure, electron-impact ion source and a high pressure, hollow-cathode discharge ion

  20. The Judicious Use of Recombinant Factor VIIa.

    PubMed

    Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Levy, Jerrold H

    2016-03-01

    Recombinant activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is a prohemostatic agent initially approved for use in hemophilia patients with inhibitors and recently for Glanzmann thrombasthenia. Despite its approval indications, rFVIIa has also been used for a diverse range of off-label indications to treat bleeding related to traumatic injury, major hemorrhage following surgery, intracranial hemorrhage, and for uncontrolled bleeding as a prothrombotic hemostatic agent. Despite its off-label use, the benefit of rFVIIa in most nonhemophilia settings remains uncertain as the majority of clinical trials have not consistently demonstrated beneficial effects as determined by reduced bleeding, decreased blood product utilization, or have not demonstrated a mortality benefit. As with any prohemostatic agent, the risk of thromboembolic events is increased when rFVIIa is used off-label. Pooled data from randomized nonhemophilia studies report an increased risk in the elderly for arterial thromboses, although most individual trials have been underpowered to determine adverse thrombotic events. The causes of thrombotic adverse events associated with off-label use of rFVIIa may be due to an increased risk of adverse events due to critical illness or due to higher doses of rFVIIa used in off-label trials. Without clearly supportive data, physicians should consider risk versus benefit and exercise restraint using rFVIIa in off-label settings. Further, evidence-based guidelines should be developed by professional organizations, and additional randomized controlled clinical trials are needed to further assess the efficacy and safety of off-label rFVIIa use. PMID:26838698

  1. Therapeutic use of recombinant methionyl human leptin.

    PubMed

    Vatier, Camille; Gautier, Jean-François; Vigouroux, Corinne

    2012-10-01

    Recombinant methionyl human leptin (r-metHuLeptin) was first used as a replacement therapy in patients bearing inactivating mutations in the leptin gene. In this indication, it was shown since 1999 to be very efficient in inducing a dramatic weight loss in rare children and adults with severe obesity due to the lack of leptin. These first clinical trials clearly showed that r-metHuLeptin acted centrally to reduce food intake, inducing loss of fat mass, and to correct metabolic alterations, immune and neuroendocrine defects. A few years later, r-metHuLeptin was also shown to reverse the metabolic complications associated with lipodystrophic syndromes, due to primary defects in fat storage, which induce leptin deficiency. The beneficial effects, which could be mediated by central and/or peripheral mechanisms, are thought to mainly involve the lowering effects of leptin on ectopic lipid storage, in particular in liver and muscles, reducing insulin resistance. Interestingly, r-metHuLeptin therapy also reversed the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis dysfunctions associated with hypothalamic amenorrhea. However, if r-metHuLeptin treatment has been shown to be dramatically efficient in leptin-deficient states, its very limited effect in inducing weight loss in common obese patients revealed that, in patients with adequate leptin secretion, mechanisms of leptin resistance and leptin tolerance prevent r-metHuLeptin from inducing any additional effects. This review will present the current data about the effects of r-metHuLeptin therapy in humans, and discuss the recent perspectives of this therapy in new indications.

  2. Dissociative Recombination of Molecular Ions for Astrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Oldrich; Becker, A.; Buhr, H.; Fleischmann, Andreas; Gamer, Lisa; Geppert, W.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Schwalm, D.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2014-06-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions is a key chemical process in the cold interstellar medium (ISM). DR affects the composition, charge state, and energy balance of such environments. Astrochemical models of the ISM require reliable total DR cross sections as well as knowledge of the chemical composition of the neutral DR products. We have systematically measured DR for many astrophysically relevant molecular ions utilizing the TSR storage ring at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg, Germany. We used the merged ion-electron beam technique combined with an energy- and position-sensitive imaging detector and are able to study DR down to plasma temperatures as low as 10 K. The DR count rate is used to obtain an absolute merged beams DR rate coefficient from which we can derive a thermal rate coefficient needed for plasma models. Additionally we determine the masses of the DR products by measuring their kinetic energy in the laboratory reference frame. This allows us to assign particular DR fragmentation channels and to obtain their branching ratios. All this information is particularly important for understanding DR of heteronuclear polyatomic ions. We will present DR results for several ions recently investigated at TSR. A new Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) is currently being commissioned at MPIK. With the chamber cooled down to ~10 K and a base pressure better than 10-13 mbar, this setup will allow internal cooling of the stored ions down to their rotational ground states, thus opening a new era in DR experiments. New technological challenges arise due to the ultracold, ultra-high vacuum environment of the CSR and thus the detection techniques used at TSR cannot be easily transferred to CSR. We will present new approaches for DR fragment detection in cryogenic environment. This work is supported in part by NASA and the NSF.

  3. Antipyretic actions of human recombinant lipocortin-1.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J; Flower, R J; Milton, A S; Peers, S H; Rotondo, D

    1991-01-01

    The effect of human recombinant lipocortin-1 (hrLC-1) on the pyrogenic actions of the synthetic polyribonucleotide polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) has been studied in conscious rabbits. Poly I:C (2.5 micrograms kg-1) given i.v. produced a biphasic fever with a first peak after 90-105 min and a second peak between 225-240 min. hrLC-1 (50 micrograms kg-1) given i.v. simultaneously with the poly I:C produced a significant reduction in the febrile response but without complete suppression. The thermal response index over 5 h (TRI5) was 4.69 +/- 0.51 for poly I:C given with saline and the TRI5 for poly I:C given with hrLC-1 was 2.66 +/- 0.45 (values are for n = 5 +/- s.e. mean, P less than 0.05). hrLC-1 administered alone had no effect on body temperature and its antipyretic activity was lost on heating. In a separate series of experiments 1 h pretreatment with dexamethasone (1 mg kg-1) given i.v. reduced the pyrogenic response (TRI5) to poly I:C (2.5 micrograms kg-1) from 4.87 +/- 0.54 without dexamethasone to 2.00 +/- 0.25 (n = 5, P less than 0.05) and dexamethasone given alone had no effect on body temperature. These data demonstrate that LC-1 possesses antipyretic actions and raises the possibility that the antipyretic actions of dexamethasone are mediated through the induction of LC-1.

  4. Generation of monoclonal antibodies to recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Shein, S A; Gurina, O I; Leopol'd, A V; Baklaushev, V P; Korchagina, A A; Grinenko, N F; Ivanova, N V; Volgina, N E; Ryabukhin, I A; Chekhonin, V P

    2012-05-01

    Female BALB/c mice were subcutaneously immunized with recombinant VEGF-164. After 3 immunization cycles, splenic B cells from immunized mouse were fused with immortalized myeloma culture SP2/0-Ag14 cells. Screening of hybrid cells producing anti-VEGF antibodies was performed by ELISA and immunocytochemical analysis on cultured C6 glioma cells. Subsequent cloning yielded hybridoma stably expressing monoclonal anti-VEGF antibodies recognizing recombinant and native VEGF. PMID:22808513

  5. Recombination of H3+ Ions with Electrons in Afterglow Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Rainer; Glosik, Juraj; Dohnal, Petr; Rubovic, Peter; Kalosi, Abel; Plasil, Radek

    2015-09-01

    Our past and ongoing flowing and stationary afterglow experiments at temperatures from 60-340 K have resulted in a more complete picture of the plasma recombination of H3+ ions: (1) Optical absorption studies indicate that at T = 300 K both para and ortho H3+ ions recombine with nearly the same binary coefficient αbin ~ 0.6 × 10-7 cm3/s. However, at T = 60 K para H3+ recombines faster by about a factor of ~10 than does ortho H3+.(2) Earlier discrepancies between data obtained in plasmas and those obtained in merged-beam or storage-rings have been traced to ternary recombination due to ambient helium atoms and/or hydrogen molecules. Ternary recombination of H3+ due to He or H2 is more efficient by factors ~ 102 or 105, respectively, than expected from the theoretical model of Bates and Khare for atomic ions. (3) The ternary processes enhance recombination at low third-body densities (1017 cm-3) but then level off (``saturate'') when their contribution approaches ~ 1.5 × 10-7 cm3/s. This saturation can lead to the false inference that the overall recombination is binary, resulting in a recombination coefficient that is about 3 times too large. (4) A tentative complex model has been developed that rationalizes the observed effects. This work was partly supported by Czech Science Foundation projects GACR 14-14649P and GACR 15-15077S and by Charles University in Prague projects GAUK 692214, GAUK 572214, UNCE 204020/2012 and SVV 260.

  6. Recombinant protein production and insect cell culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas (Inventor); Francis, Karen (Inventor); Andrews, Angela (Inventor); Oconnor, Kim (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using the cultured insect cells as host for a virus encoding the described polypeptide such as baculovirus. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  7. Recombinant Protein Production and Insect Cell Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Andrews, Angela D. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using virtually infected or stably transformed insect cells containing a gene encoding the described polypeptide. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  8. Green factory: plants as bioproduction platforms for recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianfeng; Dolan, Maureen C; Medrano, Giuliana; Cramer, Carole L; Weathers, Pamela J

    2012-01-01

    Molecular farming, long considered a promising strategy to produce valuable recombinant proteins not only for human and veterinary medicine, but also for agriculture and industry, now has some commercially available products. Various plant-based production platforms including whole-plants, aquatic plants, plant cell suspensions, and plant tissues (hairy roots) have been compared in terms of their advantages and limits. Effective recombinant strategies are summarized along with descriptions of scalable culture systems and examples of commercial progress and success. PMID:21924345

  9. Characterization of recombinant β-amylases from Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Koide, Tomojiro; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2011-01-01

    Four putative β-amylase genes found in the Oryza sativa cDNA sequence database (KOME) were expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant proteins from two of these genes showed β-amylase activity. Similarly to β-amylases from other plants, the optimum pH of the recombinant rice β-amylases was about 5.5-6.0, but they exhibited inferior heat stability to soybean β-amylase.

  10. Green factory: plants as bioproduction platforms for recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianfeng; Dolan, Maureen C; Medrano, Giuliana; Cramer, Carole L; Weathers, Pamela J

    2012-01-01

    Molecular farming, long considered a promising strategy to produce valuable recombinant proteins not only for human and veterinary medicine, but also for agriculture and industry, now has some commercially available products. Various plant-based production platforms including whole-plants, aquatic plants, plant cell suspensions, and plant tissues (hairy roots) have been compared in terms of their advantages and limits. Effective recombinant strategies are summarized along with descriptions of scalable culture systems and examples of commercial progress and success.

  11. Comparative and Evolutionary Analysis of the Bacterial Homologous Recombination Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C; Cornet, Emmanuel; Michel, Bénédicte

    2005-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a housekeeping process involved in the maintenance of chromosome integrity and generation of genetic variability. Although detailed biochemical studies have described the mechanism of action of its components in model organisms, there is no recent extensive assessment of this knowledge, using comparative genomics and taking advantage of available experimental data on recombination. Using comparative genomics, we assessed the diversity of recombination processes among bacteria, and simulations suggest that we missed very few homologs. The work included the identification of orthologs and the analysis of their evolutionary history and genomic context. Some genes, for proteins such as RecA, the resolvases, and RecR, were found to be nearly ubiquitous, suggesting that the large majority of bacterial genomes are capable of homologous recombination. Yet many genomes show incomplete sets of presynaptic systems, with RecFOR being more frequent than RecBCD/AddAB. There is a significant pattern of co-occurrence between these systems and antirecombinant proteins such as the ones of mismatch repair and SbcB, but no significant association with nonhomologous end joining, which seems rare in bacteria. Surprisingly, a large number of genomes in which homologous recombination has been reported lack many of the enzymes involved in the presynaptic systems. The lack of obvious correlation between the presence of characterized presynaptic genes and experimental data on the frequency of recombination suggests the existence of still-unknown presynaptic mechanisms in bacteria. It also indicates that, at the moment, the assessment of the intrinsic stability or recombination isolation of bacteria in most cases cannot be inferred from the identification of known recombination proteins in the genomes. PMID:16132081

  12. Major psychological factors affecting acceptance of gene-recombination technology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yutaka

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the validity of a causal model that was made to predict the acceptance of gene-recombination technology. A structural equation model was used as a causal model. First of all, based on preceding studies, the factors of perceived risk, perceived benefit, and trust were set up as important psychological factors determining acceptance of gene-recombination technology in the structural equation model. An additional factor, "sense of bioethics," which I consider to be important for acceptance of biotechnology, was added to the model. Based on previous studies, trust was set up to have an indirect influence on the acceptance of gene-recombination technology through perceived risk and perceived benefit in the model. Participants were 231 undergraduate students in Japan who answered a questionnaire with a 5-point bipolar scale. The results indicated that the proposed model fits the data well, and showed that acceptance of gene-recombination technology is explained largely by four factors, that is, perceived risk, perceived benefit, trust, and sense of bioethics, whether the technology is applied to plants, animals, or human beings. However, the relative importance of the four factors was found to vary depending on whether the gene-recombination technology was applied to plants, animals, or human beings. Specifically, the factor of sense of bioethics is the most important factor in acceptance of plant gene-recombination technology and animal gene-recombination technology, and the factors of trust and perceived risk are the most important factors in acceptance of human being gene-recombination technology.

  13. Theoretical progress and challenges in H3+ dissociative recombination.

    PubMed

    Greene, Chris H; Kokoouline, V

    2006-11-15

    We discuss the Jahn-Teller mechanism for dissociative recombination in low energy collisions between electrons and H3+ ions, in energy ranges relevant to the processes underway in interstellar clouds. While theory has become capable of predicting recombination rates in reasonable agreement with storage ring experiments, some discrepancies remain with them, and a long-standing discrepancy with stationary afterglow measurements remains troubling. Speculations about the desirable improvements in both theory and experiment are presented.

  14. Recombinant HT{sub m4} gene, protein and assays

    DOEpatents

    Lim, B.; Adra, C.N.; Lelias, J.M.

    1996-09-03

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein and a recombinant HT{sub m4} protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy. 2 figs.

  15. Efficient Assembly of DNA Using Yeast Homologous Recombination (YHR).

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sunil; Shapland, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    The assembly of multiple DNA parts into a larger DNA construct is a requirement in most synthetic biology laboratories. Here we describe a method for the efficient, high-throughput, assembly of DNA utilizing the yeast homologous recombination (YHR). The YHR method utilizes overlapping DNA parts that are assembled together by Saccharomyces cerevisiae via homologous recombination between designed overlapping regions. Using this method, we have successfully assembled up to 12 DNA parts in a single reaction. PMID:27671941

  16. Recombination and population inversion in plasmas generated by tunneling ionization.

    PubMed

    Pert, G J

    2006-06-01

    Above-threshold ionization (ATI) ionization by linearly polarized light has been proposed by several authors as a means of driving recombination lasers in the soft x-ray spectral region. The pump radiation generates a cold electron plasma with ions in a single ionization stage, which is an ideal starting condition for strong recombination. Population inversions form during the recombination cascade to the ground state of the next ionization stage. In the absence of any relaxation the electron distribution is strongly peaked near zero energy. However, a number of different processes all heat the cold electrons towards Maxwellian, and may thereby reduce the recombination rate in the higher levels. Using numerical models we investigate these relaxation processes and their effect on recombination. We show that the recombination can be well described by the standard cascade model, provided an appropriate temperature is used. We examine two cases in detail, hydrogen-like lithium where the inversion is with respect to the ground state, and lithium-like nitrogen where it is with the first excited state. The two cases differ markedly in the degree of relaxation achieved, and in the duration of the population inversion.

  17. Why have sex? The population genetics of sex and recombination.

    PubMed

    Otto, S P; Gerstein, A C

    2006-08-01

    One of the greatest puzzles in evolutionary biology is the high frequency of sexual reproduction and recombination. Given that individuals surviving to reproductive age have genomes that function in their current environment, why should they risk shuffling their genes with those of another individual? Mathematical models are especially important in developing predictions about when sex and recombination can evolve, because it is difficult to intuit the outcome of evolution with several interacting genes. Interestingly, theoretical analyses have shown that it is often quite difficult to identify conditions that favour the evolution of high rates of sex and recombination. For example, fitness interactions among genes (epistasis) can favour sex and recombination but only if such interactions are negative, relatively weak and not highly variable. One reason why an answer to the paradox of sex has been so elusive is that our models have focused unduly on populations that are infinite in size, unstructured and isolated from other species. Yet most verbal theories for sex and recombination consider a finite number of genotypes evolving in a biologically and/or physically complex world. Here, we review various hypotheses for why sex and recombination are so prevalent and discuss theoretical results indicating which of these hypotheses is most promising.

  18. Charge relaxation and recombination in photo-excited Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelovšek, P.; Lenarčič, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Recent femtosecond pump-probe experiments on Mott insulators reveal charge recombination, which is in picosecond range, i.e., much faster than in clean bandgap semiconductors although excitation gaps in Mott insulators are even larger. The charge response in photo-excited insulators can be generally divided in femtosecond transient relaxation of charge excitations, which are holons and doublons, and a second slower, but still very fast, holon-doublon (HD) recombination. We present a theory of the recombination rate of the excited HD pairs, based on the two-dimensional (2D) model relevant for cuprates, which shows that such fast processes can be explained even quantitatively with the multi-magnon emission. We show that the condition for the exponential decay as observed in the experiment is the existence of the exciton, i.e., the bound HD pair. Its recombination rate is exponentially dependent on the charge gap and on the magnon energy, while the ultrafast process can be traced back to strong charge-spin coupling. We comment also fast recombination times in the one-dimensional (1D) Mott insulators, as e.g., organic salts. The recombination rate in the latter cases can be explained with the stronger coupling with phonon excitations.

  19. Meiotic Recombination, Noncoding DNA and Genomic Organization in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, T. M.; Kohara, Y.; Coulson, A.; Hekimi, S.

    1995-01-01

    The genetic map of each Caenorhabditis elegans chromosome has a central gene cluster (less pronounced on the X chromosome) that contains most of the mutationally defined genes. Many linkage group termini also have clusters, though involving fewer loci. We examine the factors shaping the genetic map by analyzing the rate of recombination and gene density across the genome using the positions of cloned genes and random cDNA clones from the physical map. Each chromosome has a central gene-dense region (more diffuse on the X) with discrete boundaries, flanked by gene-poor regions. Only autosomes have reduced rates of recombination in these gene-dense regions. Cluster boundaries appear discrete also by recombination rate, and the boundaries defined by recombination rate and gene density mostly, but not always, coincide. Terminal clusters have greater gene densities than the adjoining arm but similar recombination rates. Thus, unlike in other species, most exchange in C. elegans occurs in gene-poor regions. The recombination rate across each cluster is constant and similar; and cluster size and gene number per chromosome are independent of the physical size of chromosomes. We propose a model of how this genome organization arose. PMID:8536965

  20. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate recombination structures is central to driving the specific outcomes of DSB repair during meiosis. Replication protein A (RPA) is the main ssDNA-binding protein complex involved in DNA metabolism. However, the existence of RPA orthologs in plants and the recent discovery of meiosis specific with OB domains (MEIOB), a widely conserved meiosis-specific RPA1 paralog, strongly suggest that multiple RPA complexes evolved and specialized to subdivide their roles during DNA metabolism. Here we review ssDNA formation and maturation during mitotic and meiotic recombination underlying the meiotic specific features. We describe and discuss the existence and properties of MEIOB and multiple RPA subunits in plants and highlight how they can provide meiosis-specific fates to ssDNA processing during homologous recombination. Understanding the functions of these RPA homologs and how they interact with the canonical RPA subunits is of major interest in the fields of meiosis and DNA repair.

  1. Recombination and natural selection in hepatitis E virus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qian; He, Chao; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jinghua; Zhang, Weilu; Cao, Wei; Lv, Yong-Gang; Liu, Zhengcai; Zhang, Jing-Xia; Shao, Zhong-Jun

    2012-09-01

    To gain new insights into the evolutionary processes that created the genetic diversity of the hepatitis E virus (HEV), the Recombination Detection Program (RDP) and SimPlot program were employed to detect recombination events in the genome, then the fixed-effects likelihood (FEL) method was used to detect natural selection effects on viral proteins. Recombination analysis provided strong evidence for both intergenotype and intragenotype recombination events in the sequences analyzed. Recombination events were found to be distributed non-randomly, with the highest frequency in the X domain and the helicase. Strain DQ450072 was identified as intergenotype-recombinant. Natural selection analysis revealed that codons under both negative selection and positive selection were distributed non-randomly. ORF1 and ORF2 have experienced strong purifying selection across genotypes. Furthermore, potentially important sites were also found under positive selection in the N-terminal end of ORF2 and the C-terminal end of ORF3. No significant difference was found among the selective pressures on different genotypes.

  2. Genetic diversity and recombination analysis of sweepoviruses from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Monopartite begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) that infect sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) around the world are known as sweepoviruses. Because sweet potato plants are vegetatively propagated, the accumulation of viruses can become a major constraint for root production. Mixed infections of sweepovirus species and strains can lead to recombination, which may contribute to the generation of new recombinant sweepoviruses. Results This study reports the full genome sequence of 34 sweepoviruses sampled from a sweet potato germplasm bank and commercial fields in Brazil. These sequences were compared with others from public nucleotide sequence databases to provide a comprehensive overview of the genetic diversity and patterns of genetic exchange in sweepoviruses isolated from Brazil, as well as to review the classification and nomenclature of sweepoviruses in accordance with the current guidelines proposed by the Geminiviridae Study Group of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Co-infections and extensive recombination events were identified in Brazilian sweepoviruses. Analysis of the recombination breakpoints detected within the sweepovirus dataset revealed that most recombination events occurred in the intergenic region (IR) and in the middle of the C1 open reading frame (ORF). Conclusions The genetic diversity of sweepoviruses was considerably greater than previously described in Brazil. Moreover, recombination analysis revealed that a genomic exchange is responsible for the emergence of sweepovirus species and strains and provided valuable new information for understanding the diversity and evolution of sweepoviruses. PMID:23082767

  3. Spontaneous and cisplatin-induced recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nowosielska, Anetta; Calmann, Melissa A; Zdraveski, Zoran; Essigmann, John M; Marinus, M G

    2004-07-01

    To measure cisplatin (cis-diaminodichloroplatinum(II))-induced recombination, we have used a qualitative intrachromosomal assay utilizing duplicate inactive lac operons containing non-overlapping deletions and selection for Lac+ recombinants. The two operons are separated by one Mb and conversion of one of them yields the Lac+ phenotype. Lac+ formation for both spontaneous and cisplatin-induced recombination requires the products of the recA, recBC, ruvA, ruvB, ruvC, priA and polA genes. Inactivation of the recF, recO, recR and recJ genes decreased cisplatin-induced, but not spontaneous, recombination. The dependence on PriA and RecBC suggests that recombination is induced following stalling or collapse of replication forks at DNA lesions to form double strand breaks. The lack of recombination induction by trans-DDP suggests that the recombinogenic lesions for cisplatin are purine-purine intrastrand crosslinks. PMID:15177181

  4. Recombination, chromosome number and eusociality in the Hymenoptera

    PubMed Central

    Ross, L; Blackmon, H; Lorite, P; Gokhman, V E; Hardy, N B

    2015-01-01

    Extraordinarily high rates of recombination have been observed in some eusocial species. The most popular explanation is that increased recombination increases genetic variation among workers, which in turn increases colony performance, for example by increasing parasite resistance. However, support for the generality of higher recombination rates among eusocial organisms remains weak, due to low sample size and a lack of phylogenetic independence of observations. Recombination rate, although difficult to measure directly, is correlated with chromosome number. As predicted, several authors have noted that chromosome numbers are higher among the eusocial species of Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). Here, we present a formal comparative analysis of karyotype data from 1567 species of Hymenoptera. Contrary to earlier studies, we find no evidence for an absolute difference between chromosome number in eusocial and solitary species of Hymenoptera. However, we find support for an increased rate of chromosome number change in eusocial taxa. We show that among eusocial taxa colony size is able to explain some of the variation in chromosome number: intermediate-sized colonies have more chromosomes than those that are either very small or very large. However, we were unable to detect effects of a number of other colony characteristics predicted to affect recombination rate – including colony relatedness and caste number. Taken together, our results support the view that a eusocial lifestyle has led to variable selection pressure for increased recombination rates, but that identifying the factors contributing to this variable selection will require further theoretical and empirical effort. PMID:25382409

  5. Metabolic approaches for the optimisation of recombinant fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Cserjan-Puschmann, M; Kramer, W; Duerrschmid, E; Striedner, G; Bayer, K

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this work was the establishment of a novel method to determine the metabolic load on host-cell metabolism resulting from recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli. This tool can be used to develop strategies to optimise recombinant fermentation processes through adjustment of recombinant-protein expression to the biosynthetic capacity of the host-cell. The signal molecule of the stringent-response network, guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), and its precursor nucleotides were selected for the estimation of the metabolic load relating to recombinant-protein production. An improved analytical method for the quantification of nucleotides by ion-pair, high-performance liquid chromatography was established. The host-cell response upon overexpression of recombinant protein in fed-batch fermentations was investigated using the production of human superoxide dismutase (rhSOD) as a model system. E. coli strains with different recombinant systems (the T7 and pKK promoter system) exerting different loads on host-cell metabolism were analysed with regard to intracellular nucleotide concentration, rate of product formation and plasmid copy number.

  6. Genetic recombination is targeted towards gene promoter regions in dogs.

    PubMed

    Auton, Adam; Rui Li, Ying; Kidd, Jeffrey; Oliveira, Kyle; Nadel, Julie; Holloway, J Kim; Hayward, Jessica J; Cohen, Paula E; Greally, John M; Wang, Jun; Bustamante, Carlos D; Boyko, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the H3K4 trimethylase, PRDM9, as the gene responsible for recombination hotspot localization has provided considerable insight into the mechanisms by which recombination is initiated in mammals. However, uniquely amongst mammals, canids appear to lack a functional version of PRDM9 and may therefore provide a model for understanding recombination that occurs in the absence of PRDM9, and thus how PRDM9 functions to shape the recombination landscape. We have constructed a fine-scale genetic map from patterns of linkage disequilibrium assessed using high-throughput sequence data from 51 free-ranging dogs, Canis lupus familiaris. While broad-scale properties of recombination appear similar to other mammalian species, our fine-scale estimates indicate that canine highly elevated recombination rates are observed in the vicinity of CpG rich regions including gene promoter regions, but show little association with H3K4 trimethylation marks identified in spermatocytes. By comparison to genomic data from the Andean fox, Lycalopex culpaeus, we show that biased gene conversion is a plausible mechanism by which the high CpG content of the dog genome could have occurred.

  7. Meiotic recombination analysis in female ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Pigozzi, M I; Del Priore, L

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic recombination in female ducks was directly studied by immunolocalization of MLH1 protein, a mismatch repair protein of mature recombination nodules. In total, 6820 crossovers were scored along the autosomal synaptonemal complexes in 122 meiotic nuclei. From this analysis we predict that the female map length of the duck is 2845 cM, with a genome wide recombination rate of 2 cM/Mb. MLH1-focus mapping along the six largest bivalents shows regional variations of recombination frequencies that can be linked to differences in chromosome morphology. From this MLH1 mapping it can be inferred that distally located markers will appear more separated in genetic maps than physically equidistant markers located near the centromeres on bivalents 1 and 2. Instead, markers at interstitial positions on the acrocentric bivalents 3-6 will appear more tightly linked than expected on the basis of their physical distance because recombination is comparatively lower at the mid region of these chromosomes. The present results provide useful information to complement linkage mapping in ducks and extend previous knowledge about the variation of recombination rates among domestic Galloanserae.

  8. Recombination, chromosome number and eusociality in the Hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Ross, L; Blackmon, H; Lorite, P; Gokhman, V E; Hardy, N B

    2015-01-01

    Extraordinarily high rates of recombination have been observed in some eusocial species. The most popular explanation is that increased recombination increases genetic variation among workers, which in turn increases colony performance, for example by increasing parasite resistance. However, support for the generality of higher recombination rates among eusocial organisms remains weak, due to low sample size and a lack of phylogenetic independence of observations. Recombination rate, although difficult to measure directly, is correlated with chromosome number. As predicted, several authors have noted that chromosome numbers are higher among the eusocial species of Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). Here, we present a formal comparative analysis of karyotype data from 1567 species of Hymenoptera. Contrary to earlier studies, we find no evidence for an absolute difference between chromosome number in eusocial and solitary species of Hymenoptera. However, we find support for an increased rate of chromosome number change in eusocial taxa. We show that among eusocial taxa colony size is able to explain some of the variation in chromosome number: intermediate-sized colonies have more chromosomes than those that are either very small or very large. However, we were unable to detect effects of a number of other colony characteristics predicted to affect recombination rate - including colony relatedness and caste number. Taken together, our results support the view that a eusocial lifestyle has led to variable selection pressure for increased recombination rates, but that identifying the factors contributing to this variable selection will require further theoretical and empirical effort.

  9. Genetic Recombination Is Targeted towards Gene Promoter Regions in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Auton, Adam; Rui Li, Ying; Kidd, Jeffrey; Oliveira, Kyle; Nadel, Julie; Holloway, J. Kim; Hayward, Jessica J.; Cohen, Paula E.; Greally, John M.; Wang, Jun; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Boyko, Adam R.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the H3K4 trimethylase, PRDM9, as the gene responsible for recombination hotspot localization has provided considerable insight into the mechanisms by which recombination is initiated in mammals. However, uniquely amongst mammals, canids appear to lack a functional version of PRDM9 and may therefore provide a model for understanding recombination that occurs in the absence of PRDM9, and thus how PRDM9 functions to shape the recombination landscape. We have constructed a fine-scale genetic map from patterns of linkage disequilibrium assessed using high-throughput sequence data from 51 free-ranging dogs, Canis lupus familiaris. While broad-scale properties of recombination appear similar to other mammalian species, our fine-scale estimates indicate that canine highly elevated recombination rates are observed in the vicinity of CpG rich regions including gene promoter regions, but show little association with H3K4 trimethylation marks identified in spermatocytes. By comparison to genomic data from the Andean fox, Lycalopex culpaeus, we show that biased gene conversion is a plausible mechanism by which the high CpG content of the dog genome could have occurred. PMID:24348265

  10. Recombinant bovine rhodanese: purification and comparison with bovine liver rhodanese.

    PubMed

    Miller, D M; Kurzban, G P; Mendoza, J A; Chirgwin, J M; Hardies, S C; Horowitz, P M

    1992-06-24

    Recombinant bovine rhodanese (thiosulfate: cyanide sulfurtransferase, EC 2.8.1.1) has been purified to homogeneity from Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) by cation-exchange chromatography. Recombinant and bovine liver rhodanese coelectrophorese under denaturing conditions, with an apparent subunit molecular weight of 33,000. The amino terminal seven residues of the recombinant protein are identical to those of the bovine enzyme, indicating that E. coli also removes the N-terminal methionine. The Km for thiosulfate is the same for the two proteins. The specific activity of the recombinant enzyme is 12% higher (816 IU/mg) than that of the bovine enzyme (730 IU/mg). The two proteins are indistinguishable as to their ultraviolet absorbance and their intrinsic fluorescence. The ability of the two proteins to refold from 8 M urea to enzymatically active species was similar both for unassisted refolding, and when folding was assisted either by the detergent, lauryl maltoside or by the E. coli chaperonin system composed of cpn60 and cpn10. Bovine rhodanese is known to have multiple electrophoretic forms under native conditions. In contrast, the recombinant protein has only one form, which comigrates with the least negatively charged of the bovine liver isoforms. This is consistent with the retention of the carboxy terminal residues in the recombinant protein that are frequently removed from the bovine liver protein.

  11. A novel and simple method for construction of recombinant adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rong; Li, Chunhua; Jiang, Sijing; Ma, Lixin

    2006-07-19

    Recombinant adenoviruses have been widely used for various applications, including protein expression and gene therapy. We herein report a new and simple cloning approach to an efficient and robust construction of recombinant adenoviral genomes based on the mating-assisted genetically integrated cloning (MAGIC) strategy. The production of recombinant adenovirus serotype 5-based vectors was greatly facilitated by the use of the MAGIC procedure and the development of the Adeasy adenoviral vector system. The recombinant adenoviral plasmid can be generated by a direct and seamless substitution, which replaces the stuff fragment in a full-length adenoviral genome with the gene of interest in a small plasmid in Escherichia coli. Recombinant adenoviral plasmids can be rapidly constructed in vivo by using the new method, without manipulations of the large adenoviral genome. In contrast to other traditional systems, it reduces the need for multiple in vitro manipulations, such as endonuclease cleavage, ligation and transformation, thus achieving a higher efficiency with negligible background. This strategy has been proven to be suitable for constructing an adenoviral cDNA expression library. In summary, the new method is highly efficient, technically less demanding and less labor-intensive for constructing recombinant adenoviruses, which will be beneficial for functional genomic and proteomic researches in mammalian cells.

  12. “Genome-wide recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes and embryos reveal selection for maternal recombination rates”

    PubMed Central

    Natesan, Senthilkumar A.; Joshi, Hrishikesh A.; Cimadomo, Danilo; Griffin, Darren K.; Sage, Karen; Summers, Michael C.; Thornhill, Alan R.; Housworth, Elizabeth; Herbert, Alex D.; Rienzi, Laura; Ubaldi, Filippo M.; Handyside, Alan H.; Hoffmann, Eva R.

    2015-01-01

    Crossover recombination reshuffles genes and prevents errors in segregation that lead to extra or missing chromosomes (aneuploidy) in human eggs, a major cause of pregnancy failure and congenital disorders. Here, we generate genome-wide maps of crossovers and chromosome segregation patterns by recovering all three products of single female meioses. Genotyping > 4 million informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 23 complete meioses allowed us to map 2,032 maternal and 1,342 paternal crossovers and to infer the segregation patterns of 529 chromosome pairs. We uncover a novel reverse chromosome segregation pattern in which both homologs separate their sister chromatids at meiosis I; detect selection for higher recombination rates in the female germline by the elimination of aneuploid embryos; and report chromosomal drive against non-recombinant chromatids at meiosis II. Collectively, our findings reveal that recombination not only affects homolog segregation at meiosis I but also the fate of sister chromatids at meiosis II. PMID:25985139

  13. Comparison of the single molecule activity distributions of recombinant and non-recombinant bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Craig, Douglas B; Hanlon-Dearman, Fiona; Beaudry, Shailah; Shek, Kevin; King, Steffany D

    2015-10-01

    Single molecule assays were performed on bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the recombinant enzyme expressed in Pichia pastoris using a capillary electrophoresis-based method. The catalytic rates for the bovine and recombinant enzymes were found to be 11,000±7000min(-1) (N=161) and 12,000±7000min(-1) (N=173), respectively. Mean catalytic rates and variances did not differ significantly between the enzyme from both sources. Furthermore, the distribution of catalytic rates were indistinguishable.

  14. Evidence for similarity-assisted recombination and predicted stem-loop structure determinant in potato virus X RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Draghici, Heidrun-Katharina; Varrelmann, Mark

    2010-02-01

    Virus RNA recombination, one of the main factors for genetic variability and evolution, is thought to be based on different mechanisms. Here, the recently described in vivo potato virus X (PVX) recombination assay [Draghici, H.-K. & Varrelmann, M. (2009). J Virol 83, 7761-7769] was applied to characterize structural parameters of recombination. The assay uses an Agrobacterium-mediated expression system incorporating a PVX green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labelled full-length clone. The clone contains a partial coat protein (CP) deletion that causes defectiveness in cell-to-cell movement, together with a functional CP+3' non-translated region (ntr) transcript, in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf tissue. The structural parameters assessed were the length of sequence overlap, the distance between mutations and the degree of sequence similarity. The effects on the observed frequency of reconstitution and the composition of the recombination products were characterized. Application of four different type X intact PVX CP genes with variable composition allowed the estimation of the junction sites of precise homologous recombination. Although one template switch would have been sufficient for functional reconstitution, between one and seven template switches were observed. Use of PVX-GFP mutants with CP deletions of variable length resulted in a linear decrease of the reconstitution frequency. The critical length observed for homologous recombination was 20-50 nt. Reduction of the reconstitution frequency was obtained when a phylogenetically distant PVX type Bi CP gene was used. Finally, the prediction of CP and 3'-ntr RNA secondary structure demonstrated that recombination-junction sites were located mainly in regions of stem-loop structures, allowing the recombination observed to be categorized as similarity-assisted.

  15. A universal BMV-based RNA recombination system--how to search for general rules in RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Alejska, Magdalena; Figlerowicz, Magdalena; Malinowska, Nelli; Urbanowicz, Anna; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2005-07-07

    At present, there is no doubt that RNA recombination is one of the major factors responsible for the generation of new RNA viruses and retroviruses. Numerous experimental systems have been created to investigate this complex phenomenon. Consequently, specific RNA structural motifs mediating recombination have been identified in several viruses. Unfortunately, up till now a unified model of genetic RNA recombination has not been formulated, mainly due to difficulties with the direct comparison of data obtained for different RNA-based viruses. To solve this problem, we have attempted to construct a universal system in which the recombination activity of various RNA sequences could be tested. To this end, we have used brome mosaic virus, a model (+)RNA virus of plants, for which the structural requirements of RNA recombination are well defined. The effectiveness of the new homomolecular system has been proven in an experiment involving two RNA sequences derived from the hepatitis C virus genome. In addition, comparison of the data obtained with the homomolecular system with those generated earlier using the heteromolecular one has provided new evidence that the mechanisms of homologous and non-homologous recombination are different and depend on the virus' mode of replication.

  16. Characterization of recombination intermediates from DNA injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes: evidence for a nonconservative mechanism of homologous recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Maryon, E; Carroll, D

    1991-01-01

    Homologous recombination between DNA molecules injected into Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclei is extremely efficient if injected molecules have overlapping homologous ends. Earlier work demonstrated that ends of linear molecules are degraded by a 5'----3' exonuclease activity, yielding 3' tails that participate in recombination. Here, we have characterized intermediates further advanced along the recombination pathway. The intermediates were identified by their unique electrophoretic and kinetic properties. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and hybridization with oligonucleotide probes showed that the intermediates had heteroduplex junctions within their homologous overlaps in which strands ending 3' were full length and those ending 5' were shortened. Additional characterization suggested that these intermediates had formed by the annealing of complementary 3' tails. Annealed junctions made in vitro were rapidly processed to products, indicating that they are on the normal recombination pathway. These results support a nonconservative, single-strand annealing mode of recombination. This recombination mechanism appears to be shared by many organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and mammals. Images PMID:2038331

  17. Recombinant human antithrombin III: rhATIII.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    GTC Biotherapeutics (formerly Genzyme Transgenics Corporation) is developing a transgenic form of antithrombin III known as recombinant human antithrombin III [rhATIII]. It is produced by inserting human DNA into the cells of goats so that the targeted protein is excreted in the milk of the female offspring. The transgenic goats have been cloned in collaboration with the Louisiana State University Agriculture Center. GTC Biotherapeutics is conducting clinical trials of rhATIII in coagulation disorders. rhATIII is believed to be both safer and more cost-effective than the currently available plasma-derived product. rhATIII is also being investigated in cancer and acute lung injury. Genzyme Transgenics Corporation, originally a subsidiary of Genzyme Corporation, changed its name to GTC Biotherapeutics in June 2002; it is no longer a subsidiary of Genzyme Corporation. GTC Biotherapeutics is seeking partners for the commercialisation of rhATIII. Restructuring of GTC Biotherapeutics to support its commercialisation programmes was announced in February 2004. Genzyme Transgenics Corporation was developing rhATIII in association with Genzyme General (Genzyme Corporation) in the ATIII LLC joint venture, but in November 2000 a letter of intent was signed for the reacquisition of the rights by Genzyme Transgenics Corporation. It was announced in February 2001 that this reacquisition was not going to be completed and that the development of rhATIII was to continue with ATIII LLC. However, in July 2001, Genzyme Transgenics Corporation reacquired all the rights in the transgenic antithrombin III programme. SMI Genzyme Ltd, a joint venture between Sumitomo Metal Industries, Japan, and Genzyme Transgenics Corporation, USA, was set up to fund development of transgenic antithrombin III in Asia. However, in October 2000, Genzyme Transgenics Corporation reacquired, from Sumitomo Metal Industries, the rights to its technology for production of medicines from milk in 18 Asian countries

  18. Recombination and assortment in the macronucleus of Tetrahymena thermophila: a theoretical study by computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Doerder, F P; Diblasi, S L

    1984-12-01

    The compound nature of the macronucleus of Tetrahymena thermophila presents multiple opportunities for recombination between genes on the same macronuclear chromosome. Such recombinants should be detectable through their assortment at subsequent amitotic macronuclear divisions. Thus, a macronucleus that is initially AB/ab should produce recombinant assortees of the genotypes Ab/aB. Computer simulation shows that, when the recombination frequency is two or fewer times per cell cycle, recombinant assortees are produced at experimentally measurable frequencies of less than 40%. At higher recombination frequencies, linked genes appear to assort independently. The simulations also show that recombination during macronuclear development can be distinguished from recombination in subsequent cell cycles only if the first appearance of recombinant assortees is 100 or more fissions after conjugation. The use of macronuclear recombination and assortment as a means of mapping macronuclear genes is severely constrained by the large variances in assortment outcomes; with experimentally small sample sizes, such mapping is impossible.

  19. Error catastrophe in populations under similarity-essential recombination.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Marcus A M; Schneider, David M; do Carmo, Eduardo; Campos, Paulo R A; Martins, Ayana B

    2015-06-01

    Organisms are often more likely to exchange genetic information with others that are similar to themselves. One of the most widely accepted mechanisms of RNA virus recombination requires substantial sequence similarity between the parental RNAs and is termed similarity-essential recombination. This mechanism may be considered analogous to assortative mating, an important form of non-random mating that can be found in animals and plants. Here we study the dynamics of haplotype frequencies in populations evolving under similarity-essential recombination. Haplotypes are represented by a genome of B biallelic loci and the Hamming distance between individuals is used as a criterion for recombination. We derive the evolution equations for the haplotype frequencies assuming that recombination does not occur if the genetic distance is larger than a critical value G and that mutation occurs at a rate μ per locus. Additionally, uniform crossover is considered. Although no fitness is directly associated to the haplotypes, we show that frequency-dependent selection emerges dynamically and governs the haplotype distribution. A critical mutation rate μc can be identified as the error threshold transition, beyond which this selective information cannot be stored. For μ<μc the distribution consists of a dominant sequence surrounded by a cloud of closely related sequences, characterizing a quasispecies. For μ>μc the distribution becomes uniform, with all haplotypes having the same frequency. In the case of extreme assortativeness, where individuals only recombine with others identical to themselves (G=0), the error threshold results μc=1/4, independently of the genome size. For weak assortativity (G=B-1)μc=2(-(B+1)) and for the case of no assortativity (G=B) μc=0. We compute the mutation threshold for 0recombination in viruses and for speciation.

  20. Genome-wide recombination dynamics are associated with phenotypic variation in maize.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qingchun; Li, Lin; Yang, Xiaohong; Tong, Hao; Xu, Shutu; Li, Zhigang; Li, Weiya; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Li, Jiansheng; Yan, Jianbing

    2016-05-01

    Meiotic recombination is a major driver of genetic diversity, species evolution, and agricultural improvement. Thus, an understanding of the genetic recombination landscape across the maize (Zea mays) genome will provide insight and tools for further study of maize evolution and improvement. Here, we used c. 50 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms to precisely map recombination events in 12 artificial maize segregating populations. We observed substantial variation in the recombination frequency and distribution along the ten maize chromosomes among the 12 populations and identified 143 recombination hot regions. Recombination breakpoints were partitioned into intragenic and intergenic events. Interestingly, an increase in the number of genes containing recombination events was accompanied by a decrease in the number of recombination events per gene. This kept the overall number of intragenic recombination events nearly invariable in a given population, suggesting that the recombination variation observed among populations was largely attributed to intergenic recombination. However, significant associations between intragenic recombination events and variation in gene expression and agronomic traits were observed, suggesting potential roles for intragenic recombination in plant phenotypic diversity. Our results provide a comprehensive view of the maize recombination landscape, and show an association between recombination, gene expression and phenotypic variation, which may enhance crop genetic improvement.

  1. High frequency of microsatellites in S. cerevisiae meiotic recombination hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Andrew TM; Pitt, Joel PW; Gemmell, Neil J

    2008-01-01

    Background Microsatellites are highly abundant in eukaryotic genomes but their function and evolution are not yet well understood. Their elevated mutation rate makes them ideal markers of genetic difference, but high levels of unexplained heterogeneity in mutation rates among microsatellites at different genomic locations need to be elucidated in order to improve the power and accuracy of the many types of study that use them as genetic markers. Recombination could contribute to this heterogeneity, since while replication errors are thought to be the predominant mechanism for microsatellite mutation, meiotic recombination is involved in some mutation events. There is also evidence suggesting that microsatellites could function as recombination signals. The yeast S. cerevisiae is a useful model organism with which to further explore the link between microsatellites and recombination, since it is very amenable to genetic study, and meiotic recombination hotspots have been mapped throughout its entire genome. Results We examined in detail the relationship between microsatellites and hotspots of meiotic double-strand breaks, the precursors of meiotic recombination, throughout the S. cerevisiae genome. We included all tandem repeats with motif length (repeat period) between one and six base pairs. Long, short and two-copy arrays were considered separately. We found that long, mono-, di- and trinucleotide microsatellites are around twice as frequent in hot than non-hot intergenic regions. The associations are weak or absent for repeats with less than six copies, and also for microsatellites with 4–6 base pair motifs, but high-copy arrays with motif length greater than three are relatively very rare throughout the genome. We present evidence that the association between high-copy, short-motif microsatellites and recombination hotspots is not driven by effects on microsatellite distribution of other factors previously linked to both recombination and microsatellites

  2. Evolutionary advantage via common action of recombination and neutrality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakian, David B.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2013-11-01

    We investigate evolution models with recombination and neutrality. We consider the Crow-Kimura (parallel) mutation-selection model with the neutral fitness landscape, in which there is a central peak with high fitness A, and some of 1-point mutants have the same high fitness A, while the fitness of other sequences is 0. We find that the effect of recombination and neutrality depends on the concrete version of both neutrality and recombination. We consider three versions of neutrality: (a) all the nearest neighbor sequences of the peak sequence have the same high fitness A; (b) all the l-point mutations in a piece of genome of length l≥1 are neutral; (c) the neutral sequences are randomly distributed among the nearest neighbors of the peak sequences. We also consider three versions of recombination: (I) the simple horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of one nucleotide; (II) the exchange of a piece of genome of length l, HGT-l; (III) two-point crossover recombination (2CR). For the case of (a), the 2CR gives a rather strong contribution to the mean fitness, much stronger than that of HGT for a large genome length L. For the random distribution of neutral sequences there is a critical degree of neutrality νc, and for μ<μc and (μc-μ) is not large, the 2CR suppresses the mean fitness while HGT increases it; for ν much larger than νc, the 2CR and HGT-l increase the mean fitness larger than that of the HGT. We also consider the recombination in the case of smooth fitness landscapes. The recombination gives some advantage in the evolutionary dynamics, where recombination distinguishes clearly the mean-field-like evolutionary factors from the fluctuation-like ones. By contrast, mutations affect the mean-field-like and fluctuation-like factors similarly. Consequently, recombination can accelerate the non-mean-field (fluctuation) type dynamics without considerably affecting the mean-field-like factors.

  3. On the evolutionary advantage of fitness-associated recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Hadany, Lilach; Beker, Tuvik

    2003-01-01

    The adaptive value of recombination remains something of a puzzle. One of the basic problems is that recombination not only creates new and advantageous genetic combinations, but also breaks down existing good ones. A negative correlation between the fitness of an individual and its recombination rate would result in prolonged integrity of fitter genetic combinations while enabling less fit ones to produce new combinations. Such a correlation could be mediated by various factors, including stress responses, age, or direct DNA damage. For haploid population models, we show that an allele for such fitness-associated recombination (FAR) can spread both in asexual populations and in populations reproducing sexually at any uniform recombination rate. FAR also carries an advantage for the population as a whole, resulting in a higher average fitness at mutation-selection balance. These results are demonstrated in populations adapting to new environments as well as in well-adapted populations coping with deleterious mutations. Current experimental results providing evidence for the existence of FAR in nature are discussed. PMID:14704195

  4. Association between Maternal Age and Meiotic Recombination for Trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Neil E.; Yu, Kai; Shaffer, John; Feingold, Eleanor; Sherman, Stephanie L.

    2005-01-01

    Altered genetic recombination has been identified as the first molecular correlate of chromosome nondisjunction in both humans and model organisms. Little evidence has emerged to link maternal age—long recognized as the primary risk factor for nondisjunction—with altered recombination, although some studies have provided hints of such a relationship. To determine whether an association does exist, chromosome 21 recombination patterns were examined in 400 trisomy 21 cases of maternal meiosis I origin, grouped by maternal age. These recombination patterns were used to predict the chromosome 21 exchange patterns established during meiosis I. There was no statistically significant association between age and overall rate of exchange. The placement of meiotic exchange, however, differed significantly among the age groups. Susceptible patterns (pericentromeric and telomeric exchanges) accounted for 34% of all exchanges among the youngest class of women but only 10% of those among the oldest class. The pattern of exchanges among the oldest age group mimicked the pattern observed among normally disjoining chromosomes 21. These results suggest that the greatest risk factor for nondisjunction among younger women is the presence of a susceptible exchange pattern. We hypothesize that environmental and age-related insults accumulate in the ovary as a woman ages, leading to malsegregation of oocytes with stable exchange patterns. It is this risk, due to recombination-independent factors, that would be most influenced by increasing age, leading to the observed maternal age effect. PMID:15551222

  5. Replication-Associated Recombinational Repair: Lessons from Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Jaclyn N.; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    Recombinational repair processes multiple types of DNA lesions. Though best understood in the repair of DNA breaks, recombinational repair is intimately linked to other situations encountered during replication. As DNA strands are decorated with many types of blocks that impede the replication machinery, a great number of genomic regions cannot be duplicated without the help of recombinational repair. This replication-associated recombinational repair employs both the core recombination proteins used for DNA break repair and the specialized factors that couple replication with repair. Studies from multiple organisms have provided insights into the roles of these specialized factors, with the findings in budding yeast being advanced through use of powerful genetics and methods for detecting DNA replication and repair intermediates. In this review, we summarize recent progress made in this organism, ranging from our understanding of the classical template switch mechanisms to gap filling and replication fork regression pathways. As many of the protein factors and biological principles uncovered in budding yeast are conserved in higher eukaryotes, these findings are crucial for stimulating studies in more complex organisms. PMID:27548223

  6. Recombination shapes the structure of an environmental Vibrio cholerae population.

    PubMed

    Keymer, Daniel P; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae consists of pathogenic strains that cause sporadic gastrointestinal illness or epidemic cholera disease and nonpathogenic strains that grow and persist in coastal aquatic ecosystems. Previous studies of disease-causing strains have shown V. cholerae to be a primarily clonal bacterial species, but isolates analyzed have been strongly biased toward pathogenic genotypes, while representing only a small sample of the vast diversity in environmental strains. In this study, we characterized homologous recombination and structure among 152 environmental V. cholerae isolates and 13 other putative Vibrio isolates from coastal waters and sediments in central California, as well as four clinical V. cholerae isolates, using multilocus sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes. Recombinant regions were identified by at least three detection methods in 72% of our V. cholerae isolates. Despite frequent recombination, significant linkage disequilibrium was still detected among the V. cholerae sequence types. Incongruent but nonrandom associations were observed for maximum likelihood topologies from the individual loci. Overall, our estimated recombination rate in V. cholerae of 6.5 times the mutation rate is similar to those of other sexual bacteria and appears frequently enough to restrict selection from purging much of the neutral intraspecies diversity. These data suggest that frequent recombination among V. cholerae may hinder the identification of ecotypes in this bacterioplankton population. PMID:21075874

  7. Recombinant host cells and media for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Brent E; Ingram, Lonnie O; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W

    2014-02-18

    Disclosed are recombinant host cells suitable for degrading an oligosaccharide that have been optimized for growth and production of high yields of ethanol, and methods of making and using these cells. The invention further provides minimal media comprising urea-like compounds for economical production of ethanol by recombinant microorganisms. Recombinant host cells in accordance with the invention are modified by gene mutation to eliminate genes responsible for the production of unwanted products other than ethanol, thereby increasing the yield of ethanol produced from the oligosaccharides, relative to unmutated parent strains. The new and improved strains of recombinant bacteria are capable of superior ethanol productivity and yield when grown under conditions suitable for fermentation in minimal growth media containing inexpensive reagents. Systems optimized for ethanol production combine a selected optimized minimal medium with a recombinant host cell optimized for use in the selected medium. Preferred systems are suitable for efficient ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using lignocellulose as an oligosaccharide source. The invention also provides novel isolated polynucleotide sequences, polypeptide sequences, vectors and antibodies.

  8. Epistasis and the selective advantage of sex and recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Viviane M.; da Silva, Juliana K.; Campos, Paulo R. A.

    2008-09-01

    The understanding of the central mechanisms favoring sex and recombination in real populations is one of the fundamental issues in evolutionary biology. Based on a previous stochastic formulation for the study of sex, here we aim to investigate the conditions under which epistasis favors the fixation of the sexual mode of reproduction in a given population. In addition, we try to identify the evolutionary forces which contribute to this process. One considers a finite population model which assumes the existence of a recombination modifier allele that can activate the recombination mechanism. We have found that sex is very little favored in a scenario of antagonistic epistasis, and this advantage only occurs in a narrow range of values of the selection coefficient sd . On the other hand, synergistic epistasis favors recombination in a very broad domain. However, the major mechanism contributing to the spreading of the modifier allele depends on the range of values of sd . At large sd , background selection favors recombination since it increases the efficacy of selection, while at low sd Muller’s ratchet is the leading mechanism.

  9. Recombination spot identification Based on gapped k-mers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Xu, Yong; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Recombination is crucial for biological evolution, which provides many new combinations of genetic diversity. Accurate identification of recombination spots is useful for DNA function study. To improve the prediction accuracy, researchers have proposed several computational methods for recombination spot identification. The k-mer feature is one of the most useful features for modeling the properties and function of DNA sequences. However, it suffers from the inherent limitation. If the value of word length k is large, the occurrences of k-mers are closed to a binary variable, with a few k-mers present once and most k-mers are absent. This usually causes the sparse problem and reduces the classification accuracy. To solve this problem, we add gaps into k-mer and introduce a new feature called gapped k-mer (GKM) for identification of recombination spots. By using this feature, we present a new predictor called SVM-GKM, which combines the gapped k-mers and Support Vector Machine (SVM) for recombination spot identification. Experimental results on a widely used benchmark dataset show that SVM-GKM outperforms other highly related predictors. Therefore, SVM-GKM would be a powerful predictor for computational genomics. PMID:27030570

  10. Diversity, Mutation and Recombination Analysis of Cotton Leaf Curl Geminiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Huma; Nahid, Nazia; Shakir, Sara; Ijaz, Sehrish; Murtaza, Ghulam; Khan, Asif Ali; Mubin, Muhammad; Nawaz-ul-Rehman, Muhammad Shah

    2016-01-01

    The spread of cotton leaf curl disease in China, India and Pakistan is a recent phenomenon. Analysis of available sequence data determined that there is a substantial diversity of cotton-infecting geminiviruses in Pakistan. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that recombination between two major groups of viruses, cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMuV) and cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV), led to the emergence of several new viruses. Recombination detection programs and phylogenetic analyses showed that CLCuMuV and CLCuKoV are highly recombinant viruses. Indeed, CLCuKoV appeared to be a major donor virus for the coat protein (CP) gene, while CLCuMuV donated the Rep gene in the majority of recombination events. Using recombination free nucleotide datasets the substitution rates for CP and Rep genes were determined. We inferred similar nucleotide substitution rates for the CLCuMuV-Rep gene (4.96X10-4) and CLCuKoV-CP gene (2.706X10-4), whereas relatively higher substitution rates were observed for CLCuMuV-CP and CLCuKoV-Rep genes. The combination of sequences with equal and relatively low substitution rates, seemed to result in the emergence of viral isolates that caused epidemics in Pakistan and India. Our findings also suggest that CLCuMuV is spreading at an alarming rate, which can potentially be a threat to cotton production in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:26963635

  11. Suppression of auger recombination in ""giant"" core/shell nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia Santamaria, Florencio; Vela, Javier; Schaller, Richard D; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Klimov, Victor I; Chen, Yongfen

    2009-01-01

    Many potential applications of semiconductor nanocrystals are hindered by nonradiative Auger recombination wherein the electron-hole (exciton) recombination energy is transferred to a third charge carrier. This process severely limits the lifetime and bandwidth of optical gain, leads to large nonradiative losses in light emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells, and is believed to be responsible for intermittency ('blinking') of emission from single nanocrystals. The development of nanostructures in which Auger recombination is suppressed has been a longstanding goal in colloidal nanocrystal research. Here, we demonstrate that such suppression is possible using so-called 'giant' nanocrystals that consist of a small CdSe core and a thick CdS shell. These nanostructures exhibit a very long biexciton lifetime ({approx}10 ns) that is likely dominated by radiative decay instead of non-radiative Auger recombination. As a result of suppressed Auger recombination, even high-order multiexcitons exhibit high emission efficiencies, which allows us to demonstrate optical amplification with an extraordinarily large bandwidth (>500 me V) and record low excitation thresholds.

  12. Synonymous and nonsynonymous distances help untangle convergent evolution and recombination.

    PubMed

    Chi, Peter B; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Lemey, Philippe; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Minin, Vladimir N

    2015-08-01

    When estimating a phylogeny from a multiple sequence alignment, researchers often assume the absence of recombination. However, if recombination is present, then tree estimation and all downstream analyses will be impacted, because different segments of the sequence alignment support different phylogenies. Similarly, convergent selective pressures at the molecular level can also lead to phylogenetic tree incongruence across the sequence alignment. Current methods for detection of phylogenetic incongruence are not equipped to distinguish between these two different mechanisms and assume that the incongruence is a result of recombination or other horizontal transfer of genetic information. We propose a new recombination detection method that can make this distinction, based on synonymous codon substitution distances. Although some power is lost by discarding the information contained in the nonsynonymous substitutions, our new method has lower false positive probabilities than the comparable recombination detection method when the phylogenetic incongruence signal is due to convergent evolution. We apply our method to three empirical examples, where we analyze: (1) sequences from a transmission network of the human immunodeficiency virus, (2) tlpB gene sequences from a geographically diverse set of 38 Helicobacter pylori strains, and (3) hepatitis C virus sequences sampled longitudinally from one patient. PMID:26061623

  13. Novel Heterotypic Rox Sites for Combinatorial Dre Recombination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Katherine; Nguyen, Eileen; Sergeev, Yuri; Badea, Tudor C.

    2015-01-01

    Site-specific recombinases (SSRs) such as Cre are widely used in gene targeting and genetic approaches for cell labeling and manipulation. They mediate DNA strand exchange between two DNA molecules at dedicated recognition sites. Precise understanding of the Cre recombination mechanism, including the role of individual base pairs in its loxP target site, guided the generation of mutant lox sites that specifically recombine with themselves but not with the wild type loxP. This has led to the development of a variety of combinatorial Cre-dependent genetic strategies, such as multicolor reporters, irreversible inversions, or recombination-mediated cassette exchange. Dre, a Cre-related phage integrase that recognizes roxP sites, does not cross-react with the Cre-loxP system, but has similar recombination efficiency. We have previously described intersectional genetic strategies combining Dre and Cre. We now report a mutagenesis screen aimed at identifying roxP base pairs critical for self-recognition. We describe several rox variant sites that are incompatible with roxP, but are able to efficiently recombine with themselves in either purified systems or bacterial and eukaryotic tissue culture systems. These newly identified rox sites are not recognized by Cre, thus enabling potential combinatorial strategies involving Cre, Dre, and target loci including multiple loxP and roxP variants. PMID:26715092

  14. Recombination and the maintenance of plant organelle genome stability.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, Alexandre; Brisson, Normand

    2010-04-01

    Like their nuclear counterpart, the plastid and mitochondrial genomes of plants have to be faithfully replicated and repaired to ensure the normal functioning of the plant. Inability to maintain organelle genome stability results in plastid and/or mitochondrial defects, which can lead to potentially detrimental phenotypes. Fortunately, plant organelles have developed multiple strategies to maintain the integrity of their genetic material. Of particular importance among these processes is the extensive use of DNA recombination. In fact, recombination has been implicated in both the replication and the repair of organelle genomes. Revealingly, deregulation of recombination in organelles results in genomic instability, often accompanied by adverse consequences for plant fitness. The recent identification of four families of proteins that prevent aberrant recombination of organelle DNA sheds much needed mechanistic light on this important process. What comes out of these investigations is a partial portrait of the recombination surveillance machinery in which plants have co-opted some proteins of prokaryotic origin but have also evolved whole new factors to keep their organelle genomes intact. These new features presumably optimized the protection of plastid and mitochondrial genomes against the particular genotoxic stresses they face.

  15. A critical review of H3+ recombination studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    After more that 30 years of experimental and theoretical work it now appears that theory and experiment on H3+ recombination have finally converged. Since the storage ring results come very close to the latest theoretical calculations one might conclude that "the case is closed". However, some troublesome issues remain and should not be dismissed too quickly. For instance, some afterglow measurements showed faster decays at early afterglow times. It is now clear that the fast recombining species cannot be vibrationally excited ions since the same rates were found for spectroscopically identified H3+ ions in ν=0. On the other hand, there is no convincing explanation for the very small rates obtained in the Prague experiments at low H2 densities. It is also puzzling that some measurements find nearly the same recombination coefficients for H3+ and D3+, while others indicate that H3+ recombines much faster. It has often been stated that vibrational excitation of the H3+ ions tends to enhance recombination, but the evidence for that is far from solid; some observations suggest that the opposite is just as likely.

  16. The recombination landscape in Arabidopsis thaliana F2 populations.

    PubMed

    Salomé, P A; Bomblies, K; Fitz, J; Laitinen, R A E; Warthmann, N; Yant, L; Weigel, D

    2012-04-01

    Recombination during meiosis shapes the complement of alleles segregating in the progeny of hybrids, and has important consequences for phenotypic variation. We examined allele frequencies, as well as crossover (XO) locations and frequencies in over 7000 plants from 17 F(2) populations derived from crosses between 18 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. We observed segregation distortion between parental alleles in over half of our populations. The potential causes of distortion include variation in seed dormancy and lethal epistatic interactions. Such a high occurrence of distortion was only detected here because of the large sample size of each population and the number of populations characterized. Most plants carry only one or two XOs per chromosome pair, and therefore inherit very large, non-recombined genomic fragments from each parent. Recombination frequencies vary between populations but consistently increase adjacent to the centromeres. Importantly, recombination rates do not correlate with whole-genome sequence differences between parental accessions, suggesting that sequence diversity within A. thaliana does not normally reach levels that are high enough to exert a major influence on the formation of XOs. A global knowledge of the patterns of recombination in F(2) populations is crucial to better understand the segregation of phenotypic traits in hybrids, in the laboratory or in the wild. PMID:22072068

  17. Minimizing DNA recombination during long RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Fang, G; Zhu, G; Burger, H; Keithly, J S; Weiser, B

    1998-12-01

    Recent developments have made it possible to reverse transcribe RNA and amplify cDNA molecules of > 10 kb in length, including the HIV-1 genome. To use long reverse transcription combined with polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to best advantage, it is necessary to determine the frequency of recombination during the combined procedure and then take steps to reduce it. We investigated the requirements for minimizing DNA recombination during long RT-PCR of HIV-1 by experimenting with three different aspects of the procedure: conditions for RT, conditions for PCR, and the molar ratios of different templates. We used two distinct HIV-1 strains as templates and strain-specific probes to detect recombination. The data showed that strategies aimed at completing DNA strand synthesis and the addition of proofreading function to the PCR were most effective in reducing recombination during the combined procedure. This study demonstrated that by adjusting reaction conditions, the recombination frequency during RT-PCR can be controlled and greatly reduced.

  18. Fine mapping of epitopes by intradomain Kd/Dd recombinants

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    11 intradomain recombinants between H-2Kd and H-2Dd were produced using an original technique based on in vivo recombination in Escherichia coli. After transfection into mouse L cells, all these recombinants were expressed at high levels on the cell surface. The specificities of 77 mAbs were examined on these cell lines. mAbs could be organized in 12 groups. In each group, a small number of amino acids participating in the recognized epitope(s) were identified. In a few instances, noncontinuous epitopes comprising amino acids belonging to different domains of the antigen were found. The data thus obtained are compatible with those produced in previous exon-shuffling experiments, but permit a much more precise definition of recognized epitope(s). PMID:2439641

  19. Charge recombination in CuPc/PTCDA thin films.

    PubMed

    Heutz, S; Nogueira, A F; Durrant, J R; Jones, T S

    2005-06-16

    The recombination kinetics of photogenerated charge carriers in perylene-3, 4, 9, 10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) thin films grown by organic molecular beam deposition have been studied using transient absorption spectroscopy. Optical excitation is observed to generate long-lived polaron states, which exhibit power law recombination dynamics on time scales from microseconds to milliseconds. Studies as a function of excitation density and temperature, and comparison between heterostructures and PTCDA single layers, all indicate that this power law behavior results from trapping of PTCDA- polarons in localized states, with an estimated trap state density of approximately 6 x 10(17) polarons cm(-3). This recombination behavior is found to be remarkably similar to that previously observed for polymer/fullerene blends, suggesting that it may be generic to a range of semiconducting materials.

  20. Recombinative generalization of within-syllable units in prereading children.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, M M; Olmi, D J; Saunders, K J

    2000-01-01

    This study demonstrates recombinative generalization of within-syllable units in prereading children. Three kindergarten children learned to select printed consonant-vowel-consonant words upon hearing the corresponding spoken words. The words were taught in sets; there were six sets, presented consecutively. Within sets, the four words that were taught had overlapping letters, for example, sat, mat, sop, and sug. Tests for recombinative generalization determined whether the children selected novel words with the same components as the trained words (e.g., mop and mug). Two children demonstrated recombinative generalization after one training set, and the 3rd demonstrated it after two training sets. In contrast, 2 other children, who received tests but no training, showed low accuracy across six sets. The 3 experimental children then demonstrated highly accurate printed-word-to-picture matching, and named the majority of the printed words. These findings are a promising step in the development of a computerized instructional technology for reading. PMID:11214028

  1. Titration of recombinant woodchuck hepatitis virus DNA in adult woodchucks.

    PubMed

    Chen, H S; Miller, R H; Hornbuckle, W E; Tennant, B C; Cote, P J; Gerin, J L; Purcell, R H

    1998-02-01

    In vivo transfection of Eastern woodchucks (Marmota monax) with recombinant woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) DNA is effective in inducing virus infection for the study of replication, pathogenicity, and oncogenicity of wild-type and mutated WHV. The one drawback to this procedure is the need for preparation of large amounts of WHV DNA. Reduction of the amount of WHV DNA in the transfection protocol necessary to induce infection would save considerable time and resources. Therefore, we conducted a titration of WHV DNA, ranging from 50 micrograms to 50 pg of DNA, in adult woodchucks to determine the minimum infectious dose of recombinant WHV DNA. As little as 50 ng of transfected WHV DNA induced productive infection in adult woodchucks. Thus, transfection with large amounts of recombinant WHV DNA appears to be unnecessary.

  2. Microelectronic circuit characterization via photothermal radiometry of scribeline recombination lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M. E.; Mandelis, A.; Pan, G.; Garcia, J. A.; Riopel, Y.

    2000-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) photothermal radiometric microscopic imaging and laser-intensity-modulation frequency scans have been used for the non-contact, non-intrusive measurement of electronic transport properties of integrated circuits in patterned 4″ Si wafers. The experimental data showed that carrier recombination lifetimes along each scribeline remain constant. However, variations in surface recombination velocities and carrier diffusion coefficients were found. It was further found that such variations are related to the presence of highly doped poly-Si structures adjacent to the scribeline. As a result of these measurements, it is concluded that scribeline photothermal radiometric probing can be used effectively for monitoring local values of the carrier recombination lifetime and, through those, wafer contamination and damage during device fabrication processing.

  3. Interspecific plastidial recombination in the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia.

    PubMed

    D'Alelio, Domenico; Ruggiero, Maria Valeria

    2015-12-01

    Plastids are usually uni-parentally inherited and genetic recombination between these organelles is seldom observed. The genus Pseudo-nitzschia, a globally relevant marine diatom, features bi-parental plastid inheritance in the course of sexual reproduction. This observation inspired the recombination detection we pursued in this paper over a ~1,400-nucleotide-long region of the plastidial rbcL, a marker used in both molecular taxonomy and phylogenetic studies in diatoms. Among all the rbcL-sequences available in web-databases for Pseudo-nitzschia, 42 haplotypes were identified and grouped in five clusters by Bayesian phylogeny. Signs of hybridization were evident in four of five clusters, at both intra- and interspecific levels, suggesting that, in diatoms, (i) plastidial recombination is not absent and (ii) hybridization can play a role in speciation of Pseudo-nitzschia spp.

  4. Matter-wave recombiners for trapped Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, T.; van Frank, S.; Bücker, R.; Schumm, T.; Schaff, J.-F.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Julía-Díaz, B.; Polls, A.

    2016-06-01

    Interferometry with trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) requires the development of techniques to recombine the two paths of the interferometer and map the accumulated phase difference to a measurable atom number difference. We have implemented and compared two recombining procedures in a double-well-based BEC interferometer. The first procedure utilizes the bosonic Josephson effect and controlled tunneling of atoms through the potential barrier, similar to laser light in an optical fiber coupler. The second one relies on the interference of the reflected and transmitted parts of the BEC wave function when impinging on the potential barrier, analogous to light impinging on a half-silvered mirror. Both schemes were implemented successfully, yielding an interferometric contrast of ˜20 % and 42% respectively. Building efficient matter-wave recombiners represents an important step towards the coherent manipulation of external quantum superposition states of BECs.

  5. Mechanisms underlying allergy vaccination with recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives.

    PubMed

    Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2012-06-19

    Hundred years ago therapeutic vaccination with allergen-containing extracts has been introduced as a clinically effective, disease-modifying, allergen-specific and long-lasting form of therapy for allergy, a hypersensitivity disease affecting more than 25% of the population. Today, the structures of most of the disease-causing allergens have been elucidated and recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives with reduced allergenic activity have been engineered to reduce side effects during allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT). These recombinant hypoallergens have been characterized in vitro, in experimental animal models and in clinical trials in allergic patients. This review provides a summary of the molecular, immunological and preclinical evaluation criteria applied for this new generation of allergy vaccines. Furthermore, we summarize the mechanisms underlying SIT with recombinant hypoallergens which are thought to be responsible for their therapeutic effect.

  6. Primary charge-recombination in an artificial photosynthetic reaction center

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Yasuhiro; Yamauchi, Seigo; Akiyama, Kimio; Tero-Kubota, Shozo; Imahori, Hiroshi; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Norris, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Photoinduced primary charge-separation and charge-recombination are characterized by a combination of time-resolved optical and EPR measurements of a fullerene-porphyrin-linked triad that undergoes fast, stepwise charge-separation processes. The electronic coupling for the energy-wasting charge recombination is evaluated from the singlet-triplet electronic energy gap in the short-lived, primary charge-separated state. The electronic coupling is found to be smaller by ≈40% than that for the primary charge-separation. This inhibition of the electronic interaction for the charge-recombination to excited triplet state largely results from a symmetry-broken electronic structure modulated by configuration interaction between 3(b1u,b3g) and 3(au, b3g) electronic states of the free-base porphyrin. PMID:16014413

  7. Stability of artificial oil bodies constituted with recombinant caleosins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-hang; Chyan, Chia-lin; Li, Feng-yin; Tzen, Jason T C

    2009-03-25

    Caleosin is a unique calcium binding protein anchoring to the surface of seed oil bodies by its central hydrophobic domain composed of an amphiphatic alpha-helix and a proline-knot subdomain. Stable artificial oil bodies were successfully constituted with recombinant caleosin overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The stability of artificial oil bodies was slightly or severely reduced when the amphiphatic alpha-helix or proline-knot subdomain in the hydrophobic domain of caleosin was truncated. Deletion of the entire central hydrophobic domain substantially increased the solubility of the recombinant caleosin, leading to a complete loss of its capability to stabilize these oil bodies. A recombinant protein engineered with the hydrophobic domain of caleosin replaced by that of oleosin, the abundant structural protein of seed oil bodies, could stabilize the artificial oil bodies, in terms of thermo- and structural stability, as effectively as caleosin or oleosin. PMID:19216529

  8. Challenges and opportunities in the purification of recombinant tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Pina, Ana Sofia; Lowe, Christopher R; Roque, Ana Cecília A

    2014-01-01

    The purification of recombinant proteins by affinity chromatography is one of the most efficient strategies due to the high recovery yields and purity achieved. However, this is dependent on the availability of specific affinity adsorbents for each particular target protein. The diversity of proteins to be purified augments the complexity and number of specific affinity adsorbents needed, and therefore generic platforms for the purification of recombinant proteins are appealing strategies. This justifies why genetically encoded affinity tags became so popular for recombinant protein purification, as these systems only require specific ligands for the capture of the fusion protein through a pre-defined affinity tag tail. There is a wide range of available affinity pairs "tag-ligand" combining biological or structural affinity ligands with the respective binding tags. This review gives a general overview of the well-established "tag-ligand" systems available for fusion protein purification and also explores current unconventional strategies under development. PMID:24334194

  9. Historical Perspectives Pertaining to the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Science is host to a constantly emerging series of new paradigms, and it is this characteristic that makes science both interesting and dynamic. As a part of this continuum, it became possible to create recombinant DNA molecules. Immediately it was recognized that there was a potential for serious adverse events associated with this new technology. Following two scientific conferences at Asilomar, California, the National Institutes of Health moved quickly to create the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC). For approximately 38 years the RAC has served as an open forum for review of various recombinant DNA experiments, and for the last 23 years it has played a pivotal role in the oversight of human gene therapy. The RAC's existence obviated the need for more restrictive governmental legislation and has supported the development of genetic interventions that are leading to actual human therapies. PMID:24444182

  10. Systemic delivery of recombinant proteins by genetically modified myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, E.; Leiden, J.M. )

    1991-12-06

    The ability to stably deliver recombinant proteins to the systemic circulation would facilitate the treatment of a variety of acquired and inherited diseases. To explore the feasibility of the use of genetically engineered myoblasts as a recombinant protein delivery system, stable transfectants of the murine C2C12 myoblast cell line were produced that synthesize and secrete high levels of human growth hormone (hGH) in vitro. Mice injected with hGH-transfected myoblasts had significant levels of hGH in both muscle and serum that were stable for at least 3 weeks after injection. Histological examination of muscles injected with {beta}-galactosidase-expressing C2C12 myoblasts demonstrated that many of the injected cells had fused to form multinucleated myotubes. Thus, genetically engineered myoblasts can be used for the stable delivery of recombinant proteins into the circulation.

  11. Recombinant lentivector as a genetic immunization vehicle for antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    He, Yukai; Munn, David; Falo, Louis D

    2011-01-01

    Summary Encouraged by remarkable successes in preventing infectious diseases and by the well established potential of immune system for controlling tumor growth, active therapeutic immunization approaches hold great promise for treating malignant tumors. In recent years, engineered recombinant viral vectors have been carefully examined as genetic immunization vehicles and have been demonstrated to induce potent T cell mediated immune responses that can control tumor growth. Very recent efforts suggest that lentivectors possess important advantages over other candidate recombinant viral vectors for genetic immunization. Here we review the development of recombinant lentivectors and the characteristics of T cell immune responses elicited by lentivector immunization, including the mechanism of T cell priming with a focus on the role of skin dendritic cells (DC) and potential applications for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:18377355

  12. Nonuniform radiative recombination in n - i - p LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laikhtman, B.; Suchalkin, S.; Westerfeld, D.; Belenky, G.

    2015-02-01

    Radiative recombination of InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) n - i - p light emitting diodes (LED) was studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that recombination takes place not uniformly in the whole SL i region but in a very close vicinity of the p contact. The physics behind this is the formation of high electric field and high carrier concentration domains in a biased device near SL interfaces with the contacts. As a result, in narrow hole miniband the hole vertical diffusion coefficient falling off with the electric field is so small that holes are confined very close to the p contact. This reduces the effective recombination area to 1-2 periods of the SL.

  13. Marker-Dependent Recombination in T4 Bacteriophage. IV. Recombinational Effects of Antimutator T4 DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakov, V. P.; Plugina, L. A.; Kudryashova, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Recombinational effects of the antimutator allele tsL42 of gene 43 of phage T4, encoding DNA polymerase, were studied in crosses between rIIB mutants. Recombination under tsL42-restricted conditions differed from the normal one in several respects: (1) basic recombination was enhanced, especially within very short distances; (2) mismatch repair tracts were shortened, while the contribution of mismatch repair to recombination was not changed; (3) marker interference at very short distances was augmented. We infer that the T4 DNA polymerase is directly involved in mismatch repair, performing both excision of a nonmatched single strand (by its 3' -> 5' exonuclease) and filling the resulting gap. A pathway for the mismatch repair was substantiated; it includes sequential action of endo VII (gp49) -> 3'->5' exonuclease (gp43) -> DNA polymerase (gp43) -> DNA ligase (gp30). It is argued that the marker interference at very short distances may result from the same sequence of events during the final processing of recombinational intermediates. PMID:7635281

  14. Unraveling a Region-Specific Hyper-Recombination Phenomenon: Genetic Control and Modalities of Terminal Recombination in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Corre, J.; Cornet, F.; Patte, J.; Louarn, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The propensity of the terminus of the Escherichia coli chromosome for recombination has been further explored, using a test based on the selectable loss of a λ prophage inserted between repeated sequences from Tn10. Terminal recombination appears region-specific and unrelated to replication termination in a strain harboring a major chromosomal rearrangement. It requires RecBC(D) activity and must therefore occur between sister chromosomes, to conserve genomic integrity in spite of DNA degradation by RecBCD. Terminal recombination is maximal in the dif region and its intensity on either side of this recombination site depends on the orientation of the repeated sequences, probably because of the single χ site present in each repeat. Additional observations support the model that the crossover is initiated by single-strand invasion between sister chromosomes followed by RecBCD action as a consequence of DNA breakage due to the initial invasion event. Crossover location within repeats inserted at dif position supports the possibility that sister chromosomes are tightly paired in the centre of the terminal recombination zone. These data reinforce the model that postreplicative reconstruction of nucleoid organization creates a localized synapsis between the termini of sister chromosomes. PMID:9383046

  15. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher L.; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9 +/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  16. Recombinant transfer in the basic genome of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Purushottam D; Pang, Tin Yau; Studier, F William; Maslov, Sergei

    2015-07-21

    An approximation to the ∼4-Mbp basic genome shared by 32 strains of Escherichia coli representing six evolutionary groups has been derived and analyzed computationally. A multiple alignment of the 32 complete genome sequences was filtered to remove mobile elements and identify the most reliable ∼90% of the aligned length of each of the resulting 496 basic-genome pairs. Patterns of single base-pair mutations (SNPs) in aligned pairs distinguish clonally inherited regions from regions where either genome has acquired DNA fragments from diverged genomes by homologous recombination since their last common ancestor. Such recombinant transfer is pervasive across the basic genome, mostly between genomes in the same evolutionary group, and generates many unique mosaic patterns. The six least-diverged genome pairs have one or two recombinant transfers of length ∼40-115 kbp (and few if any other transfers), each containing one or more gene clusters known to confer strong selective advantage in some environments. Moderately diverged genome pairs (0.4-1% SNPs) show mosaic patterns of interspersed clonal and recombinant regions of varying lengths throughout the basic genome, whereas more highly diverged pairs within an evolutionary group or pairs between evolutionary groups having >1.3% SNPs have few clonal matches longer than a few kilobase pairs. Many recombinant transfers appear to incorporate fragments of the entering DNA produced by restriction systems of the recipient cell. A simple computational model can closely fit the data. Most recombinant transfers seem likely to be due to generalized transduction by coevolving populations of phages, which could efficiently distribute variability throughout bacterial genomes.

  17. Recombinant transfer in the basic genome of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Purushottam D.; Pang, Tin Yau; Studier, F. William; Maslov, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    An approximation to the ∼4-Mbp basic genome shared by 32 strains of Escherichia coli representing six evolutionary groups has been derived and analyzed computationally. A multiple alignment of the 32 complete genome sequences was filtered to remove mobile elements and identify the most reliable ∼90% of the aligned length of each of the resulting 496 basic-genome pairs. Patterns of single base-pair mutations (SNPs) in aligned pairs distinguish clonally inherited regions from regions where either genome has acquired DNA fragments from diverged genomes by homologous recombination since their last common ancestor. Such recombinant transfer is pervasive across the basic genome, mostly between genomes in the same evolutionary group, and generates many unique mosaic patterns. The six least-diverged genome pairs have one or two recombinant transfers of length ∼40–115 kbp (and few if any other transfers), each containing one or more gene clusters known to confer strong selective advantage in some environments. Moderately diverged genome pairs (0.4–1% SNPs) show mosaic patterns of interspersed clonal and recombinant regions of varying lengths throughout the basic genome, whereas more highly diverged pairs within an evolutionary group or pairs between evolutionary groups having >1.3% SNPs have few clonal matches longer than a few kilobase pairs. Many recombinant transfers appear to incorporate fragments of the entering DNA produced by restriction systems of the recipient cell. A simple computational model can closely fit the data. Most recombinant transfers seem likely to be due to generalized transduction by coevolving populations of phages, which could efficiently distribute variability throughout bacterial genomes. PMID:26153419

  18. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  19. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape.

  20. Biochemical and immunological characterization of recombinant allergen Lol p 1.

    PubMed

    Tamborini, E; Faccini, S; Lidholm, J; Svensson, M; Brandazza, A; Longhi, R; Groenlund, H; Sidoli, A; Arosio, P

    1997-11-01

    Pollen from perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne), a major cause of type-I allergy worldwide, contains a complex mixture of allergenic proteins among which Lol p 1 is one of the most important. We describe the expression, purification and characterization of a recombinant Lol p 1 overproduced in Escherichia coli. The recombinant allergen, expressed in high yields and purified in milligram amounts, bound to specific IgE antibodies from human sera, induced histamine release from sensitized human basophils, and elicited rabbit antisera that recognize specifically recombinant Lol p 1 and natural Lol p 1 of pollen extract. Recombinant Lol p 1 was used to develop ImmunoCAP assays for analysis of 150 sera that were Radioallergosorbent test positive to L. perenne pollen. In 130 of them (87%) the assay detected a significant level of IgE antibodies to Lol p 1, reaching on average 37% of the level obtained with a test for IgE to the whole grass pollen extract. To map epitopes on Lol p 1, we produced three deletion mutants [des-(116-240)-Lol p 1, des-(1-88)-Lol p 1 and des-(133-189)-Lol p 1], which were efficiently expressed in bacteria. These all showed a strong reactivity with the specific rabbit IgG antibodies, but lacked most or all the allergenic properties of recombinant Lol p 1. A study of the antigenic structure of Lol p 1 was performed using the three deletion mutants and a set of 17-18-residue overlapping synthetic peptides covering the whole allergen sequence. The results indicate that human IgE and rabbit IgG antibodies bind to distinct regions of Lol p 1, and that at least some important IgE epitopes are mainly conformational. The findings suggest that recombinant allergens constitute useful reagents for further development of serological diagnosis of allergy, and that it should be possible to produce immunogenic fragments of allergenic proteins without allergenic properties.

  1. Interplasmidic recombination following irradiation of the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed Central

    Daly, M J; Ling, O; Minton, K W

    1994-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans R1 and other members of the eubacterial family Deinococcaceae are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and many other agents that damage DNA. For example, after irradiation, D. radiodurans can repair > 100 DNA double-strand breaks per chromosome without lethality or mutagenesis, while most other organisms can survive no more than 2 or 3 double-strand breaks. The unusual resistance of D. radiodurans is recA dependent, but the repair pathway(s) is not understood. Recently, we described how a plasmid present in D. radiodurans (plasmid copy number, approximately 6 per cell; chromosome copy number, approximately 4 per cell) during high-dose irradiation undergoes extreme damage like the chromosome and is retained by the cell without selection and fully repaired with the same efficiency as the chromosome. In the current work, we have investigated the repair of two similar plasmids within the same cell. These two plasmids were designed to provide both restriction fragment polymorphisms and a drug selection indicator of recombination. This study presents a novel system of analysis of in vivo damage and recombinational repair, exploiting the unique ability of D. radiodurans to survive extraordinarily high levels of DNA damage. We report that homologous recombination among plasmids following irradiation is extensive. For example, 2% of Tcs plasmids become Tcr as a result of productive recombination within a 929-bp region of the plasmids after repair. Our results suggest that each plasmid may participate in as many as 6.7 recombinational events during repair, a value that extrapolates to > 700 events per chromosome undergoing repair simultaneously. These results indicate that the study of plasmid recombination within D. radiodurans may serve as an accurate model system for simultaneously occurring repair in the chromosome. Images PMID:8002574

  2. Recombinant production of mecasermin in E. coli expression system

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, S.; Babaeipour, V.; Seyedi, H.A. Eslampanah; Rahaie, M.; Mofid, M.R.; Haddad, L.; Namvaran, M.M.; Fallah, J.

    2014-01-01

    Human Insulin-like growth factor 1 (hIGF-1) consists of 70 amino acids in a single chain with three intermolecular disulfide bridges possessing valuable therapeutic effects. To date, numerous variants of specifically engineered hIGF-1 have been produced so as to improve hIGF-1 biological activity, stability and stronger binding to IGF-1 receptor. Mecasermin is one of the modified variants with one amino acid substitution near the N-terminal (T4I) approved for the treatment of growth failure diabetes, wound healing, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and severe primary IGF-1 deficiency. No scientific report for recombinant production of mecasermin in Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system has been sofar reported. In the present study, we therefore investigated the overexpression of mecasermin in two different E. coli strains in order to obtain higher yield of recombinant protein. To achieve this goal, mecasermin DNA encoding sequence was designed based on polypeptide sequence, optimized according to E. coli codon preference, and cloned in pET15b. Recombinant vector, pET15-mecasermin, transferred into two E. coli strains rigami B (DE3) and BL21 (DE3) and induced for expression in a small scale. Results revealed the E. coli Origami B (DE3) expression system was a preferable host for mecasermin production due to its high expression level being around twice as much as BL21 (DE3). Large scale mecasermin production was performed in batch culture and produced recombinant protein specifically confirmed by western blotting and mass spectroscopy. Since major part of recombinant mecasermin was expressed as inclusion body, isolation and refolding was accomplished through developed purification procedure, and finally recombinant protein was successfully purified by gel filtration chromatography. PMID:26339260

  3. Recombination accelerates adaptation on a large-scale empirical fitness landscape in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Kouyos, Roger; Hinkley, Trevor; Haddad, Mojgan; Petropoulos, Christos J; Engelstädter, Jan; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2014-06-01

    Recombination has the potential to facilitate adaptation. In spite of the substantial body of theory on the impact of recombination on the evolutionary dynamics of adapting populations, empirical evidence to test these theories is still scarce. We examined the effect of recombination on adaptation on a large-scale empirical fitness landscape in HIV-1 based on in vitro fitness measurements. Our results indicate that recombination substantially increases the rate of adaptation under a wide range of parameter values for population size, mutation rate and recombination rate. The accelerating effect of recombination is stronger for intermediate mutation rates but increases in a monotonic way with the recombination rates and population sizes that we examined. We also found that both fitness effects of individual mutations and epistatic fitness interactions cause recombination to accelerate adaptation. The estimated epistasis in the adapting populations is significantly negative. Our results highlight the importance of recombination in the evolution of HIV-I.

  4. Harnessing recombination to speed adaptive evolution in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Winkler, James; Kao, Katy C

    2012-09-01

    Evolutionary engineering typically involves asexual propagation of a strain to improve a desired phenotype. However, asexual populations suffer from extensive clonal interference, a phenomenon where distinct lineages of beneficial clones compete and are often lost from the population given sufficient time. Improved adaptive mutants can likely be generated by genetic exchange between lineages, thereby reducing clonal interference. We present a system that allows continuous in situ recombination by using an Esherichia coli F-based conjugation system lacking surface exclusion. Evolution experiments revealed that Hfr-mediated recombination significantly speeds adaptation in certain circumstances. These results show that our system is stable, effective, and suitable for use in evolutionary engineering applications.

  5. Efficient preparation of shuffled DNA libraries through recombination (Gateway) cloning.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Soili I; Taskinen, Barbara; Ojala, Elina; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Rahikainen, Rolle; Riihimäki, Tiina A; Laitinen, Olli H; Kulomaa, Markku S; Hytönen, Vesa P

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and robust subcloning is essential for the construction of high-diversity DNA libraries in the field of directed evolution. We have developed a more efficient method for the subcloning of DNA-shuffled libraries by employing recombination cloning (Gateway). The Gateway cloning procedure was performed directly after the gene reassembly reaction, without additional purification and amplification steps, thus simplifying the conventional DNA shuffling protocols. Recombination-based cloning, directly from the heterologous reassembly reaction, conserved the high quality of the library and reduced the time required for the library construction. The described method is generally compatible for the construction of DNA-shuffled gene libraries.

  6. Distribution of meiotic recombination events: Talking to your neighbors

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Colaiácovo, Monica P.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis is essential for a species' survival. Therefore, a series of events unfold during meiosis, including pairing, synapsis and recombination between homologous chromosomes, to ultimately ensure the successful completion of this task. This review will focus on how the regulation of crossover recombination events between homologous chromosomes plays a key role in promoting faithful segregation. Although our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which crossovers are formed has increased significantly, the mechanisms governing the distribution of crossovers along meiotic chromosomes remain largely mysterious. Here, we review the different levels of apparent control of meiotic crossover formation and distribution. PMID:19328674

  7. Surface recombination effects in soft X-ray efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez, E. L.; Husk, D. E.; Tarrio, C.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1991-07-01

    The soft X-ray efficiencies of a silicon p-i-n photodiode and an La2O2S:Tm phosphor were measured over a broad energy range. Also, the inelastic electron scattering spectra of the constituent materials were measured and values of optical absorption coefficients versus energy were obtained. The energy dependence of the efficiencies is well explained by a model based on surface recombination of electron hole pairs, and the quality of data which can now be obtained from synchrotrons makes possible quantitative fits from which diffusion length, surface recombination velocity, and bulk quantum efficiency are obtained.

  8. Generation and Selection of Orf Virus (ORFV) Recombinants.

    PubMed

    Rziha, Hanns-Joachim; Rohde, Jörg; Amann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Orf virus (ORFV) is an epitheliotropic poxvirus, which belongs to the genus Parapoxvirus. Among them the highly attenuated, apathogenic strain D1701-V is regarded as a promising candidate for novel virus vector vaccines. Our recent work demonstrated that those ORFV-based recombinants were able to induce protective, long-lasting immunity in various hosts that are non-permissive for ORFV. In this chapter we describe procedures for the generation, selection, propagation, and titration of ORFV recombinants as well as transgene detection by PCR or immunohistochemical staining.

  9. Influenza vaccines: from whole virus preparations to recombinant protein technology.

    PubMed

    Huber, Victor C

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination against influenza represents our most effective form of prevention. Historical approaches toward vaccine creation and production have yielded highly effective vaccines that are safe and immunogenic. Despite their effectiveness, these historical approaches do not allow for the incorporation of changes into the vaccine in a timely manner. In 2013, a recombinant protein-based vaccine that induces immunity toward the influenza virus hemagglutinin was approved for use in the USA. This vaccine represents the first approved vaccine formulation that does not require an influenza virus intermediate for production. This review presents a brief history of influenza vaccines, with insight into the potential future application of vaccines generated using recombinant technology.

  10. All-guided stellar interferometer with an integrated optics recombiner.

    PubMed

    Huss, G; Schanen-Duport, L; Delage, L; Reynaud, F

    2001-06-01

    We report laboratory tests of an all-guided stellar interferometer used for optical aperture synthesis. In anticipation of use of the interferometer in space missions, this research is focused especially on compactness of the recombining device. The coherent transport and delay lines are implemented with polarization-maintaining fiber. Beam recombination is achieved by means of an integrated optics component. This two-arm interferometer operates at 670-nm mean wavelength and allows for a 24-cm correction for the differential air path. PMID:18040444

  11. Efficient production of recombinant human pleiotrophin in yeast, Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Murasugi, Akira; Kido, Isao; Kumai, Hideshi; Asami, Yukio

    2003-10-01

    Approximately 260 mg/l of authentic recombinant human pleiotrophin (rhPTN) was expressed into the medium of high-cell density fermentation using a Pichia pastoris protein expression system. The prepro-sequence of yeast alpha-mating factor was used successfully. The recombinant hPTN was efficiently recovered from the medium by expanded bed adsorption, and purified using successive column chromatography steps. In the purified rhPTN preparation, modified rhPTN were scarcely detected. Circular dichroism measurement of the purified PTN showed the presence of the characteristic beta-structures in the protein.

  12. Modeling of recombinant yeast cells: reduction of phase space.

    PubMed

    Birol, G; Birol, I; Kirdar, B; Onsan, Z I

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of starch fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae in batch reactor is studied. Experiments were carried in the presence and absence of oxygen, with different initial starch concentrations. A variety of data concerning biotic and abiotic phases are collected. Nonlinear data analysis techniques are used to determine the block diagram of the system under study. Data analysis and processing reported here, are believed to form a basis in further work in structured modeling of biological systems, recombinant yeast cultures in particular. PMID:9603032

  13. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the organisms of choice for the production of recombinant proteins. Its use as a cell factory is well-established and it has become the most popular expression platform. For this reason, there are many molecular tools and protocols at hand for the high-level production of heterologous proteins, such as a vast catalog of expression plasmids, a great number of engineered strains and many cultivation strategies. We review the different approaches for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in E. coli and discuss recent progress in this ever-growing field. PMID:24860555

  14. Mechanism for radiative recombination in ZnCdO alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buyanova, I. A.; Bergman, J. P.; Pozina, G.; Chen, W. M.; Rawal, S.; Norton, D. P.; Pearton, S. J.; Osinsky, A.; Dong, J. W.

    2007-06-25

    Temperature dependent cw- and time-resolved photoluminescence combined with absorption measurements are employed to evaluate the origin of radiative recombination in ZnCdO alloys grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The near-band-edge emission is attributed to recombination of excitons localized within band tail states likely caused by nonuniformity in Cd distribution. Energy transfer between the tail states is argued to occur via tunneling of localized excitons. The transfer is shown to be facilitated by increasing Cd content due to a reduction of the exciton binding energy and, therefore, an increase of the exciton Bohr radius in the alloys with a high Cd content.

  15. Recombinant chromosome 18 resulting from a maternal pericentric inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Ayukawa, Hiroshi; Tsukahara, Masato; Fukuda, Masamichi; Kondoh, Osamu

    1994-05-01

    We report on a newborn girl with duplication of 18q12.2{yields}18 qter and deficiency of 18p11.2{yields}18pter which resulted from meiotic recombination of the maternal pericentric inversion, inv(18)(p11.2q12.2). Her clinical manifestations were compatible with those of partial trisomy 18q syndrome. We review the previously reported 9 cases in 8 families of rec(18) resulting from recombination of a parental pericentric inversion. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Random-walk mechanism in the genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Youhei; Kawai, Junji; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2010-01-01

    We have explained some experimental data of the homologous recombination and the genetic interference in terms of one-dimensional random walk over discrete sites. We first review our previous results. Next, we modify our random-walk model for the homologous recombination into a continuous-site model, and discuss a possible explanation for the previous experimental data obtained by means of the plasmid having one-side homology. Finally, we show that a reaction between an intermediate and a product is indispensable in explaining the genetic interference in terms of our reaction-diffusion model.

  17. Recombination of H(3+) and D(3+) ions with electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, R.; Gougousi, T.; Golde, M. F.

    1994-01-01

    Flowing-afterglow measurements in decaying H3(+) or D3(+) plasmas suggest that de-ionization does not occur by simple binary recombination of a single ion species. We find that vibrational excitation of the ions fails to provide an explanation for the effect, contrary to an earlier suggestion. Instead, we suggest that collisional stabilization of H3** Rydberg molecules by ambient electrons introduces an additional dependence on electron density. The proposed mechanism would permit plasma de-ionization to occur without the need for dissociative recombination by the mechanism of potential-surface crossings.

  18. Renner-Teller effects in HCO+ dissociative recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Ivan A.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Larson, Åsa; Tonzani, Stefano; Greene, Chris H.

    2006-09-01

    A theoretical description of the dissociative recombination process for the HCO+ ion suggests that the nonadiabatic Renner-Teller coupling between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom plays an important role. This finding is consistent with a recent study of this process for another closed-shell molecule, the H3+ ion, where Jahn-Teller coupling was shown to generate a relatively high rate. The cross section obtained here for the dissociative recombination of HCO+ exhibits encouraging agreement with a merged-beam experiment.

  19. Enteric Immunization of Mice Against Influenza with Recombinant Vaccinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitin, Catherine A.; Bender, Bradley S.; Small, Parker A., Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Intrajejunal administration to mice of a recombinant vaccinia virus containing the influenza virus hemagglutinin gene induced IgA antibody in nasal, gut, and vaginal secretions. It also induced IgG antibody in serum and cell-mediated immunity. The immunization provided significant protection against an influenza virus challenge. This work suggests that enteric-coated recombinant vaccinia could be an orally administered, inexpensive, multivalent, temperature-stable, safe, and effective vaccine for children that could be particularly useful in developing nations, where multiple injections are not easily administered. Oral administration of vaccines should also reduce children's fear of shots at the doctor's office.

  20. Making recombinant proteins in animals--different systems, different applications.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Michael K; Lacroix, Dan; Pothier, François; Sirard, Marc-André

    2003-09-01

    Transgenic animal bioreactors represent a powerful tool to address the growing need for therapeutic recombinant proteins. The ability of transgenic animals to produce complex, biologically active recombinant proteins in an efficient and economic manner has stimulated a great deal of interest in this area. As a result, genetically modified animals of several species, expressing foreign proteins in various tissues, are currently being developed. However, the generation of transgenic animals is a cumbersome process and remains problematic in the application of this technology. The advantages and disadvantages of different transgenic systems in relation to other bioreactor systems are discussed.

  1. Mediation of surface recombination in a II-VI powder by palladium microislands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1987-04-01

    The recombination mechanisms in a Zn(Cd)S:Ag phosphor powder have been probed by luminescence and flash-photolysis time-resolved dielectric loss techniques. The influence of Pd-microislands chemically deposited thereon, alone, and in conjunction with recombination mediators phenylhydrazine and phenylacetic acid (in xylene solution) on the recombination pathways was studied. The Pd deposit affects recombination by increasing the fraction of the particle volume dominated by the surface processes, by providing a pathway for photoelectrons to reach the (negative) surface to participate in surface recombination, and by providing recombination centers per se. The implications of these results for heterogeneous photocatalysis are discussed.

  2. Extensive recombination-induced disruption of genetic interactions is highly deleterious but can be partially reversed by small numbers of secondary recombination events.

    PubMed

    Monjane, Adérito L; Martin, Darren P; Lakay, Francisco; Muhire, Brejnev M; Pande, Daniel; Varsani, Arvind; Harkins, Gordon; Shepherd, Dionne N; Rybicki, Edward P

    2014-07-01

    Although homologous recombination can potentially provide viruses with vastly more evolutionary options than are available through mutation alone, there are considerable limits on the adaptive potential of this important evolutionary process. Primary among these is the disruption of favorable coevolved genetic interactions that can occur following the transfer of foreign genetic material into a genome. Although the fitness costs of such disruptions can be severe, in some cases they can be rapidly recouped by either compensatory mutations or secondary recombination events. Here, we used a maize streak virus (MSV) experimental model to explore both the extremes of recombination-induced genetic disruption and the capacity of secondary recombination to adaptively reverse almost lethal recombination events. Starting with two naturally occurring parental viruses, we synthesized two of the most extreme conceivable MSV chimeras, each effectively carrying 182 recombination breakpoints and containing thorough reciprocal mixtures of parental polymorphisms. Although both chimeras were severely defective and apparently noninfectious, neither had individual movement-, encapsidation-, or replication-associated genome regions that were on their own "lethally recombinant." Surprisingly, mixed inoculations of the chimeras yielded symptomatic infections with viruses with secondary recombination events. These recombinants had only 2 to 6 breakpoints, had predominantly inherited the least defective of the chimeric parental genome fragments, and were obviously far more fit than their synthetic parents. It is clearly evident, therefore, that even when recombinationally disrupted virus genomes have extremely low fitness and there are no easily accessible routes to full recovery, small numbers of secondary recombination events can still yield tremendous fitness gains. Importance: Recombination between viruses can generate strains with enhanced pathological properties but also runs the risk

  3. High-Resolution Mapping of Homologous Recombination Events in rad3 Hyper-Recombination Mutants in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dominska, Margaret; Moriel-Carretero, María; Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Aguilera, Andrés; Petes, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisae RAD3 gene is the homolog of human XPD, an essential gene encoding a DNA helicase of the TFIIH complex involved in both nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription. Some mutant alleles of RAD3 (rad3-101 and rad3-102) have partial defects in DNA repair and a strong hyper-recombination (hyper-Rec) phenotype. Previous studies showed that the hyper-Rec phenotype associated with rad3-101 and rad3-102 can be explained as a consequence of persistent single-stranded DNA gaps that are converted to recombinogenic double-strand breaks (DSBs) by replication. The systems previously used to characterize the hyper-Rec phenotype of rad3 strains do not detect the reciprocal products of mitotic recombination. We have further characterized these events using a system in which the reciprocal products of mitotic recombination are recovered. Both rad3-101 and rad3-102 elevate the frequency of reciprocal crossovers about 100-fold. Mapping of these events shows that three-quarters of these crossovers reflect DSBs formed at the same positions in both sister chromatids (double sister-chromatid breaks, DSCBs). The remainder reflects DSBs formed in single chromatids (single chromatid breaks, SCBs). The ratio of DSCBs to SCBs is similar to that observed for spontaneous recombination events in wild-type cells. We mapped 216 unselected genomic alterations throughout the genome including crossovers, gene conversions, deletions, and duplications. We found a significant association between the location of these recombination events and regions with elevated gamma-H2AX. In addition, there was a hotspot for deletions and duplications at the IMA2 and HXT11 genes near the left end of chromosome XV. A comparison of these data with our previous analysis of spontaneous mitotic recombination events suggests that a sub-set of spontaneous events in wild-type cells may be initiated by incomplete NER reactions, and that DSCBs, which cannot be repaired by sister

  4. Electroinduced release of recombinant β-galactosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ganeva, Valentina; Stefanova, Debora; Angelova, Boyana; Galutzov, Bojidar; Velasco, Isabel; Arévalo-Rodríguez, Miguel

    2015-10-10

    Yeasts are one of the most commonly used systems for recombinant protein production. When the protein is intracelullarly expressed the first step comprises a cell lysis, achieved usually by a mechanical disintegration. This leads to non-selective liberation of the cytoplasmic content, which complicates the following downstream process. Here, we present a new approach suitable for more selective and efficient recovery of large intracellular proteins from yeast, based on the combination of electropermeabilisation and subsequent treatment with lytic enzyme. The experiments were performed with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing LYTAG-β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli. The permeabilzation of plasma membrane was induced by application of rectangular electric pulses, with 1.25ms duration and field intensity of 4.3-5.4kV/cm. In the presence of a reducing agent the cells released approximately 80% of the total protein 4h after electrical treatment. At the same conditions the release of the recombinant protein was very slow, reaching 45% from total activity 20h after pulse application. The great difference in the release kinetics enabled to remove a part of the total protein, without significant loss of β-galactosidase activity, only by substituting the incubation buffer. The subsequent addition of lyticase (1-2U/ml) led to recovery of approximately 70% from the recombinant enzyme, with a factor of purification 2.6, without provoking a significant cell lysis. The applicability of similar protocol for liberation of large recombinant and native proteins from yeast is discussed. PMID:26142064

  5. The kinetochore prevents centromere-proximal crossover recombination during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Vincenten, Nadine; Kuhl, Lisa-Marie; Lam, Isabel; Oke, Ashwini; Kerr, Alastair RW; Hochwagen, Andreas; Fung, Jennifer; Keeney, Scott; Vader, Gerben; Marston, Adèle L

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, crossover recombination is essential to link homologous chromosomes and drive faithful chromosome segregation. Crossover recombination is non-random across the genome, and centromere-proximal crossovers are associated with an increased risk of aneuploidy, including Trisomy 21 in humans. Here, we identify the conserved Ctf19/CCAN kinetochore sub-complex as a major factor that minimizes potentially deleterious centromere-proximal crossovers in budding yeast. We uncover multi-layered suppression of pericentromeric recombination by the Ctf19 complex, operating across distinct chromosomal distances. The Ctf19 complex prevents meiotic DNA break formation, the initiating event of recombination, proximal to the centromere. The Ctf19 complex independently drives the enrichment of cohesin throughout the broader pericentromere to suppress crossovers, but not DNA breaks. This non-canonical role of the kinetochore in defining a chromosome domain that is refractory to crossovers adds a new layer of functionality by which the kinetochore prevents the incidence of chromosome segregation errors that generate aneuploid gametes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10850.001 PMID:26653857

  6. Registration of 'RU9101001'/'Katy' recombinant inbred lines of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cross of RU9101001/'Katy' rice (Oryza sativa L.) was used to develop a mapping population consisting of 238 F9 generation recombinant inbred lines of rice (Oryza sativa L.) (GSOR100361 to GSOR100600). This population has been used to map major genes that provide resistance to the rice blast pat...

  7. A Collaborative, Investigative Recombinant DNA Technology Course with Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzementi, Leo; Johnson, Joy F.

    2002-01-01

    A recombinant DNA technology course was designed to promote contextual, collaborative, inquiry-based learning of science where students learn from one another and have a sense of ownership of their education. The class stressed group presentations and critical reading and discussion of scientific articles. The laboratory consisted of two research…

  8. Recent advances in yeast molecular biology: recombinant DNA. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 25 papers presented at a workshop focusing on chromosomal structure, gene regulation, recombination, DNA repair, and cell type control, that have been obtained by experimental approaches incorporating the new technologies of yeast DNA transformation, molecular cloning, and DNA sequence analysis. (KRM)

  9. Detecting Recombination Hotspots from Patterns of Linkage Disequilibrium.

    PubMed

    Wall, Jeffrey D; Stevison, Laurie S

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies, it has become increasingly easy to use whole-genome sequencing of unrelated individuals to assay patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) across the genome. One type of analysis that is commonly performed is to estimate local recombination rates and identify recombination hotspots from patterns of LD. One method for detecting recombination hotspots, LDhot, has been used in a handful of species to further our understanding of the basic biology of recombination. For the most part, the effectiveness of this method (e.g., power and false positive rate) is unknown. In this study, we run extensive simulations to compare the effectiveness of three different implementations of LDhot. We find large differences in the power and false positive rates of these different approaches, as well as a strong sensitivity to the window size used (with smaller window sizes leading to more accurate estimation of hotspot locations). We also compared our LDhot simulation results with comparable simulation results obtained from a Bayesian maximum-likelihood approach for identifying hotspots. Surprisingly, we found that the latter computationally intensive approach had substantially lower power over the parameter values considered in our simulations. PMID:27226166

  10. Inducible site-specific recombination in myelinating cells.

    PubMed

    Doerflinger, Nathalie H; Macklin, Wendy B; Popko, Brian

    2003-01-01

    To explore the function of genes expressed by myelinating cells we have developed a model system that allows for the inducible ablation of predetermined genes in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells. The Cre/loxP recombination system provides the opportunity to generate tissue-specific somatic mutations in mice. We have used a fusion protein between the Cre recombinase and a mutated ligand-binding domain of the human estrogen receptor (CreER(T)) to obtain inducible, site-specific recombination. CreER(T) expression was placed under the transcriptional control of the regulatory sequences of the myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) gene, which is abundantly expressed in oligodendrocytes and to a lesser extent in Schwann cells. The CreER(T) fusion protein translocated to the nucleus and mediated the recombination of a LacZ reporter transgene in myelinating cells of PLP/CreER(T) mice injected with the synthetic steroid tamoxifen. In untreated animals CreER(T) remained cytoplasmic, and there was no evidence of recombination. The PLP/ CreER(T) animals should be very useful in elucidating and distinguishing a particular gene's function in the formation and maintenance of the myelin sheath and in analyzing mature oligodendrocyte function in pathological conditions. PMID:12481300

  11. Chimeragenesis of distantly-related proteins by noncontiguous recombination.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew A; Romero, Philip A; Wu, Timothy; Brustad, Eric M; Arnold, Frances H

    2013-02-01

    We introduce a method for identifying elements of a protein structure that can be shuffled to make chimeric proteins from two or more homologous parents. Formulating recombination as a graph-partitioning problem allows us to identify noncontiguous segments of the sequence that should be inherited together in the progeny proteins. We demonstrate this noncontiguous recombination approach by constructing a chimera of β-glucosidases from two different kingdoms of life. Although the protein's alpha-beta barrel fold has no obvious subdomains for recombination, noncontiguous SCHEMA recombination generated a functional chimera that takes approximately half its structure from each parent. The X-ray crystal structure shows that the structural blocks that make up the chimera maintain the backbone conformations found in their respective parental structures. Although the chimera has lower β-glucosidase activity than the parent enzymes, the activity was easily recovered by directed evolution. This simple method, which does not rely on detailed atomic models, can be used to design chimeras that take structural, and functional, elements from distantly-related proteins. PMID:23225662

  12. Recombinant pharmaceuticals from microbial cells: a 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Laura; Martín, Lucas; Mangues, Ramon; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes, growth or clotting disorders are among the spectrum of human diseases related to protein absence or malfunction. Since these pathologies cannot be yet regularly treated by gene therapy, the administration of functional proteins produced ex vivo is required. As both protein extraction from natural producers and chemical synthesis undergo inherent constraints that limit regular large-scale production, recombinant DNA technologies have rapidly become a choice for therapeutic protein production. The spectrum of organisms exploited as recombinant cell factories has expanded from the early predominating Escherichia coli to alternative bacteria, yeasts, insect cells and especially mammalian cells, which benefit from metabolic and protein processing pathways similar to those in human cells. Up to date, around 650 protein drugs have been worldwide approved, among which about 400 are obtained by recombinant technologies. Other 1300 recombinant pharmaceuticals are under development, with a clear tendency towards engineered versions with improved performance and new functionalities regarding the conventional, plain protein species. This trend is exemplified by the examination of the contemporary protein-based drugs developed for cancer treatment. PMID:26861699

  13. Dissociative recombination of ammonia clusters studied by storage ring experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Oejekull, J.; Andersson, P. U.; Naagaard, M. B.; Pettersson, J. B. C.; Neau, A.; Rosen, S.; Thomas, R. D.; Larsson, M.; Semaniak, J.; Oesterdahl, F.; Danared, H.; Kaellberg, A.; Ugglas, M. af.

    2006-11-21

    Dissociative recombination of ammonia cluster ions with free electrons has been studied at the heavy-ion storage ring CRYRING (Manne Siegbahn Laboratory, Stockholm University). The absolute cross sections for dissociative recombination of H{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}, H{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub 3}, D{sup +}(ND{sub 3}){sub 2}, and D{sup +}(ND{sub 3}){sub 3} in the collision energy range of 0.001-27 eV are reported, and thermal rate coefficients for the temperature interval from 10 to 1000 K are calculated from the experimental data and compared with earlier results. The fragmentation patterns for the two ions H{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} and D{sup +}(ND{sub 3}){sub 2} show no clear isotope effect. Dissociative recombination of X{sup +}(NX{sub 3}){sub 2} (X=H or D) is dominated by the product channels 2NX{sub 3}+X [0.95{+-}0.02 for H{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} and 1.00{+-}0.02 for D{sup +}(ND{sub 3}){sub 2}]. Dissociative recombination of D{sup +}(ND{sub 3}){sub 3} is dominated by the channels yielding three N-containing fragments (0.95{+-}0.05)

  14. Excitation rate dependence of Auger recombination in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Patrick E.; Barnat, Edward V.; Cruz-Campa, Jose L.; Grubbs, Robert K.; Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2010-03-01

    This work reports on measurements of the Auger recombination coefficients in silicon wafers with pump-probe thermoreflectance techniques operating at two different excitation rates: 250 kHz (low repetition rate) and 80 MHz (high repetition rate). The different excitation frequencies give rise to different thermoreflectance signals in the Si samples, which is ascribed to the excited number density in the conduction band. In the low repetition rate case, the excited carriers recombine via Auger processes before the next pump excitation is absorbed. However, in the high repetition rate case, the rate in which the pump excitations are absorbed at the sample surface is higher than the Auger recombination rate, indicating that the excited carrier densities in the high repetition rate experiments are much higher than in the low repetition rate measurements even though the pump fluences are comparable. This is ascribed to pulse accumulation in the high repetition rate measurements, and is quantified with rate equation and thermoreflectance models fit to the experimental data. Comparing the data taken at the two different excitation modulations gives insight into the excited carrier density when recombination rate are on the same order as excitation frequencies.

  15. Progress toward the development of diploid recombinant inbred lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant inbred lines (RILs) offer new opportunities for mapping traits in potato. They also provide an opportunity to evaluate responses to inbreeding in interspecific hybrids. We are developing a set of six RILs, which will comprise a nested association mapping population. The common parent is ...

  16. Production of recombinant proteins in microalgae at pilot greenhouse scale.

    PubMed

    Gimpel, Javier A; Hyun, James S; Schoepp, Nathan G; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant protein production in microalgae chloroplasts can provide correctly folded proteins in significant quantities and potentially inexpensive costs compared to other heterologous protein production platforms. The best results have been achieved by using the psbA promoter and 5' untranslated region (UTR) to drive the expression of heterologous genes in a psbA-deficient, non-photosynthetic, algal host. Unfortunately, using such a strategy makes the system unviable for large scale cultivation using natural sunlight for photosynthetic growth. In this study we characterized eight different combinations of 5' regulatory regions and psbA coding sequences for their ability to restore photosynthesis in a psbA-deficient Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, while maintaining robust accumulation of a commercially viable recombinant protein driven by the psbA promoter/5'UTR. The recombinant protein corresponded to bovine Milk Amyloid A (MAA), which is present in milk colostrum and could be used to prevent infectious diarrhea in mammals. This approach allowed us to identify photosynthetic strains that achieved constitutive production of MAA when grown photosynthetically in 100 L bags in a greenhouse. Under these conditions, the maximum MAA expression achieved was 1.86% of total protein, which corresponded to 3.28 mg/L of culture medium. Within our knowledge, this is the first report of a recombinant protein being produced this way in microalgae. PMID:25116083

  17. Herpes simplex virus type 1-derived recombinant and amplicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Fraefel, Cornel; Marconi, Peggy; Epstein, Alberto L

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153 kbp double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes (1) the two approaches most commonly used to prepare recombinant vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria, and (2) the two methodologies currently used to generate helper-free amplicon vectors, either using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based approach or a Cre/loxP site-specific recombination strategy.

  18. Auger recombination in scintillator materials from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Andrew; Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Åberg, Daniel; Schleife, André

    2015-03-01

    Scintillators convert high energy radiation into lower energy photons which are easier to detect and analyze. One of the uses of these devices is identifying radioactive materials being transported across national borders. However, scintillating materials have a non-proportional light yield in response to incident radiation, which makes this task difficult. One possible cause of the non-proportional light yield is non-radiative Auger recombination. Auger recombination can occur in two ways - direct and phonon-assisted. We have studied both types of Auger recombination from first principles in the common scintillating material sodium iodide. Our results indicate that the phonon-assisted process, assisted primarily by short-range optical phonons, dominates the direct process. The corresponding Auger coefficients are 5 . 6 +/- 0 . 3 ×10-32cm6s-1 for the phonon-assisted process versus 1 . 17 +/- 0 . 01 ×10-33cm6s-1 for the direct process. At higher electronic temperatures the direct Auger recombination rate increases but remains lower than the phonon-assisted rate. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation CAREER award through Grant No. DMR-1254314 and NA-22. Computational Resources provide by LLNL and DOE NERSC Facility.

  19. Male recombination in Brazilian populations of Drosophila ananassae.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Beatriz; Matsuda, Muneo; Tobari, Yoshiko N

    2016-07-01

    With few exceptions, spontaneous crossing over does not normally occur in male Drosophila. Drosophila ananassae males show considerable amounts of crossing over. In wild males of D. ananassae from Asian (2008) and Brazilian populations (1986 and 2007) variable frequencies of meiotic crossing over, estimated from chiasmata counts, suggested the existence of factors controlling male crossing over in these populations. To corroborate for such prediction, we present data on spontaneous recombination in F1 males of D. ananassae heterozygous for chromosomes of the same Brazilian populations (1986) and marker chromosomes using three testers stocks. Mean recombination value was low, although high variability existed between individual frequencies. Recombination frequencies between lines in each tester stock were not significantly different, excepting when the 3ple-px and 3ple-cy testers were compared (p < 0.05). These two testers differ in respect to the regional distribution of crossovers. The occurrence of recombination in chromosomes 2 and 3 in F1 males tested with e(65) se; bri ru was not related, suggesting they are under independent genetic control. Our data are consistent with proposed genetic factors controlling male crossing over in the tester stocks and to the presence of enhancers and suppressors of male crossing over segregating in the Brazilian populations (1986).

  20. Genetic manipulation of poxviruses using bacterial artificial chromosome recombineering.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Matthew G

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for genetic manipulation of poxviruses rely on low-frequency natural recombination in virus-infected cells. Although these powerful systems represent the technical foundation of current knowledge and applications of poxviruses, they require long (≥ 500 bp) flanking sequences for homologous recombination, an efficient viral selection method, and burdensome, time-consuming plaque purification. The beginning of the twenty-first century has seen the application of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology to poxviruses as an alternative method for their genetic manipulation, following the invention of a long-sought-after method for deriving a BAC clone of vaccinia virus (VAC-BAC) by Arban Domi and Bernard Moss. The key advantages of the BAC system are the ease and versatility of performing genetic manipulation using bacteriophage λ Red recombination (recombineering), which requires only ∼50 bp homology arms that can be easily created by PCR, and which allows seamless mutations lacking any marker gene without having to perform transient-dominant selection. On the other hand, there are disadvantages, including the significant setup time, the risk of contamination of the cloned genome with bacterial insertion sequences, and the nontrivial issue of removal of the BAC cassette from derived viruses. These must be carefully weighed to decide whether the use of BACs will be advantageous for a particular application, making pox-BAC systems likely to complement, rather than supplant, traditional methods in most laboratories. PMID:22688760

  1. Analysis of Hydrogen Depletion Using a Scaled Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, T.K.; Malliakos, A.

    1998-10-28

    Hydrogen depletion tests of a scaled passive autocatalytic recombine (pAR) were performed in the Surtsey test vessel at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The experiments were used to determine the hydrogen depletion rate of a PAR in the presence of steam and also to evaluate the effect of scale (number of cartridges) on the PAR performance at both low and high hydrogen concentrations.

  2. Heteroduplex DNA in Meiotic Recombination in Drosophila mei-9 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Sarah J.; McMahan, Susan; Blanton, Hunter L.; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Meiotic recombination gives rise to crossovers, which are required in most organisms for the faithful segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiotic cell division. Characterization of crossover-defective mutants has contributed much to our understanding of the molecular mechanism of crossover formation. We report here a molecular analysis of recombination in a Drosophila melanogaster crossover-defective mutant, mei-9. In the absence of mei-9 activity, postmeiotic segregation associated with noncrossovers occurs at the expense of crossover products, suggesting that the underlying meiotic function for MEI-9 is in crossover formation rather than mismatch repair. In support of this, analysis of the arrangement of heteroduplex DNA in the postmeiotic segregation products reveals different patterns from those observed in Drosophila Msh6 mutants, which are mismatch-repair defective. This analysis also provides evidence that the double-strand break repair model applies to meiotic recombination in Drosophila. Our results support a model in which MEI-9 nicks Holliday junctions to generate crossovers during meiotic recombination, and, in the absence of MEI-9 activity, the double Holliday junction intermediate instead undergoes dissolution to generate noncrossover products in which heteroduplex is unrepaired. PMID:17339219

  3. Cysticercosis: identification and cloning of protective recombinant antigens.

    PubMed

    Manoutcharian, K; Rosas, G; Hernandez, M; Fragoso, G; Aluja, A; Villalobos, N; Rodarte, L F; Sciutto, E

    1996-04-01

    We describe the cloning and the evaluation of the protective capacity of 5 recombinant antigens expressed during the cysticercus stage of both Taenia crassiceps and Taenia solium. A cDNA library was constructed in bacteriophage lambda ZAP using mRNA isolated from larvae of T. crassiceps of the ORF strain. The recombinant phage library was screened with polyclonal antibodies against 56- and 74-kDa protective antigen fractions. This screening identified 13 recombinant clones, 5 of which were also strongly recognized by pooled sera from pigs experimentally infected with T. solium. The native antigens are proteins of 56 (clones KETcl, 4, 7) and 74 and 78 kDa (clones KETc11, 12) of T. crassiceps cysticerci. Vaccination experiments using these 5 recombinant clones against murine cysticercosis point to the relevance of KETcl, 4, 7, and 12 in host protection, whereas immunization with the clone KETc11 does not modify the parasite load in females and facilitates the parasitosis in males. We report here the DNA and the deduced amino acid sequence (100 amino acids) of the first protective antigen (KETc7) of potential interest for T. solium pig cysticercosis prevention.

  4. Recombinant Protein Production by In Vivo Polymer Inclusion Display ▿

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Katrin; Peters, Verena; Rehm, Bernd H. A.

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach to produce purified recombinant proteins was established. The target protein is produced as polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase fusion protein, which mediates intracellular formation of PHA inclusions displaying the target protein. After isolation of the PHA inclusions, the pure target protein was released by simple enterokinase digestion. PMID:21803888

  5. The kinetochore prevents centromere-proximal crossover recombination during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Vincenten, Nadine; Kuhl, Lisa-Marie; Lam, Isabel; Oke, Ashwini; Kerr, Alastair Rw; Hochwagen, Andreas; Fung, Jennifer; Keeney, Scott; Vader, Gerben; Marston, Adèle L

    2015-12-14

    During meiosis, crossover recombination is essential to link homologous chromosomes and drive faithful chromosome segregation. Crossover recombination is non-random across the genome, and centromere-proximal crossovers are associated with an increased risk of aneuploidy, including Trisomy 21 in humans. Here, we identify the conserved Ctf19/CCAN kinetochore sub-complex as a major factor that minimizes potentially deleterious centromere-proximal crossovers in budding yeast. We uncover multi-layered suppression of pericentromeric recombination by the Ctf19 complex, operating across distinct chromosomal distances. The Ctf19 complex prevents meiotic DNA break formation, the initiating event of recombination, proximal to the centromere. The Ctf19 complex independently drives the enrichment of cohesin throughout the broader pericentromere to suppress crossovers, but not DNA breaks. This non-canonical role of the kinetochore in defining a chromosome domain that is refractory to crossovers adds a new layer of functionality by which the kinetochore prevents the incidence of chromosome segregation errors that generate aneuploid gametes.

  6. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  7. Tetrasomic Recombination Is Surprisingly Frequent in Allotetraploid Arachis

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Bertioli, Soraya; Shirasawa, Kenta; Abernathy, Brian; Moretzsohn, Marcio; Chavarro, Carolina; Clevenger, Josh; Ozias-Akins, Peggy; Jackson, Scott; Bertioli, David

    2015-01-01

    Arachis hypogaea L. (cultivated peanut) is an allotetraploid (2n = 4x = 40) with an AABB genome type. Based on cytogenetic studies it has been assumed that peanut and wild-derived induced AABB allotetraploids have classic allotetraploid genetic behavior with diploid-like disomic recombination only between homologous chromosomes, at the exclusion of recombination between homeologous chromosomes. Using this assumption, numerous linkage map and quantitative trait loci studies have been carried out. Here, with a systematic analysis of genotyping and gene expression data, we show that this assumption is not entirely valid. In fact, autotetraploid-like tetrasomic recombination is surprisingly frequent in recombinant inbred lines generated from a cross of cultivated peanut and an induced allotetraploid derived from peanut’s most probable ancestral species. We suggest that a better, more predictive genetic model for peanut is that of a “segmental allotetraploid” with partly disomic, partly tetrasomic genetic behavior. This intermediate genetic behavior has probably had a previously overseen, but significant, impact on the genome and genetics of cultivated peanut. PMID:25701284

  8. The insecticidal activity of recombinant garlic lectins towards aphids.

    PubMed

    Fitches, Elaine; Wiles, Duncan; Douglas, Angela E; Hinchliffe, Gareth; Audsley, Neil; Gatehouse, John A

    2008-10-01

    The heterodimeric and homodimeric garlic lectins ASAI and ASAII were produced as recombinant proteins in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The proteins were purified as functional dimeric lectins, but underwent post-translational proteolysis. Recombinant ASAII was a single homogenous polypeptide which had undergone C-terminal processing similar to that occurring in planta. The recombinant ASAI was glycosylated and subject to variable and heterogenous proteolysis. Both lectins showed insecticidal effects when fed to pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) in artificial diet, ASAII being more toxic than ASAI at the same concentration. Acute toxicity (mortality at < or =48 h exposure; similar timescale to starvation) was only apparent at the highest lectin concentrations tested (2.0 mg ml(-)1), but dose-dependent chronic toxicity (mortality at >3d exposure) was observed over the concentration range 0.125-2.0 mg ml(-1). The recombinant lectins caused mortality in both symbiotic and antibiotic-treated aphids, showing that toxicity is not dependent on the presence of the bacterial symbiont (Buchnera aphidicola), or on interaction with symbiont proteins, such as the previously identified lectin "receptor" symbionin. A pull-down assay coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting identified two abundant membrane-associated aphid gut proteins, alanyl aminopeptidase N and sucrase, as "receptors" for lectin binding. PMID:18707000

  9. Analysis of European mtDNAs for Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Elson, J. L.; Andrews, R. M.; Chinnery, P. F.; Lightowlers, R. N.; Turnbull, D. M.; Howell, Neil

    2001-01-01

    The standard paradigm postulates that the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is strictly maternally inherited and that, consequently, mtDNA lineages are clonal. As a result of mtDNA clonality, phylogenetic and population genetic analyses should therefore be free of the complexities imposed by biparental recombination. The use of mtDNA in analyses of human molecular evolution is contingent, in fact, on clonality, which is also a condition that is critical both for forensic studies and for understanding the transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations within families. This paradigm, however, has been challenged recently by Eyre-Walker and colleagues. Using two different tests, they have concluded that recombination has contributed to the distribution of mtDNA polymorphisms within the human population. We have assembled a database that comprises the complete sequences of 64 European and 2 African mtDNAs. When this set of sequences was analyzed using any of three measures of linkage disequilibrium, one of the tests of Eyre-Walker and colleagues, there was no evidence for mtDNA recombination. When their test for excess homoplasies was applied to our set of sequences, only a slight excess of homoplasies was observed. We discuss possible reasons that our results differ from those of Eyre-Walker and colleagues. When we take the various results together, our conclusion is that mtDNA recombination has not been sufficiently frequent during human evolution to overturn the standard paradigm. PMID:11115380

  10. Gene delivery into plant cells for recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lai, Huafang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  11. Recombinant pharmaceuticals from microbial cells: a 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Laura; Martín, Lucas; Mangues, Ramon; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2016-02-09

    Diabetes, growth or clotting disorders are among the spectrum of human diseases related to protein absence or malfunction. Since these pathologies cannot be yet regularly treated by gene therapy, the administration of functional proteins produced ex vivo is required. As both protein extraction from natural producers and chemical synthesis undergo inherent constraints that limit regular large-scale production, recombinant DNA technologies have rapidly become a choice for therapeutic protein production. The spectrum of organisms exploited as recombinant cell factories has expanded from the early predominating Escherichia coli to alternative bacteria, yeasts, insect cells and especially mammalian cells, which benefit from metabolic and protein processing pathways similar to those in human cells. Up to date, around 650 protein drugs have been worldwide approved, among which about 400 are obtained by recombinant technologies. Other 1300 recombinant pharmaceuticals are under development, with a clear tendency towards engineered versions with improved performance and new functionalities regarding the conventional, plain protein species. This trend is exemplified by the examination of the contemporary protein-based drugs developed for cancer treatment.

  12. Electroinduced release of recombinant β-galactosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ganeva, Valentina; Stefanova, Debora; Angelova, Boyana; Galutzov, Bojidar; Velasco, Isabel; Arévalo-Rodríguez, Miguel

    2015-10-10

    Yeasts are one of the most commonly used systems for recombinant protein production. When the protein is intracelullarly expressed the first step comprises a cell lysis, achieved usually by a mechanical disintegration. This leads to non-selective liberation of the cytoplasmic content, which complicates the following downstream process. Here, we present a new approach suitable for more selective and efficient recovery of large intracellular proteins from yeast, based on the combination of electropermeabilisation and subsequent treatment with lytic enzyme. The experiments were performed with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing LYTAG-β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli. The permeabilzation of plasma membrane was induced by application of rectangular electric pulses, with 1.25ms duration and field intensity of 4.3-5.4kV/cm. In the presence of a reducing agent the cells released approximately 80% of the total protein 4h after electrical treatment. At the same conditions the release of the recombinant protein was very slow, reaching 45% from total activity 20h after pulse application. The great difference in the release kinetics enabled to remove a part of the total protein, without significant loss of β-galactosidase activity, only by substituting the incubation buffer. The subsequent addition of lyticase (1-2U/ml) led to recovery of approximately 70% from the recombinant enzyme, with a factor of purification 2.6, without provoking a significant cell lysis. The applicability of similar protocol for liberation of large recombinant and native proteins from yeast is discussed.

  13. Recombineering using RecET from Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the identification of functions that promote genomic recombination of linear DNA introduced into Pseudomonas cells by electroporation. The genes encoding these functions were identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a based on similarity to the lambda Red Exo/Beta and RecE...

  14. Structural characterization of recombinant therapeutic proteins by circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Carlo; Pistolozzi, Marco; De Simone, Angela

    2011-10-01

    Most of the protein therapeutics are now produced by recombinant DNA technology. The advantages of recombinant proteins are related to their higher specificity and to their safety as exposure to animal or human diseases. However, several problems are still present in development of recombinant proteins as therapeutics, such as low bioavailability, short serum half-life, and immune response. Their successful application hinges on the protein stereochemical stability, and on the folding and the tendency to aggregate induced by purification steps and storage. All these aspects determine the failure of many potential protein therapies, and limitations in the development of the formulation. The application of multiple analytical techniques is important in order to obtain a detailed product profile and to understand how manufacturing can influence product structure and activity. Surely the protein conformation is a key aspect to be assessed, because a specific conformation is often essential for the biological function of the protein. Thus, there is a growing need to perform structural studies under the conditions in which the proteins operate, and to monitor the structural changes of the protein. Circular dichroism has been increasingly recognised as a valuable and reliable technique to get this information. In particular, examples will be here reported on the use of circular dichroism spectroscopy in the structural characterization of free and formulated recombinant proteins, looking at the prediction of the secondary structure, propensity to conformational changes, stability, and tendency to aggregate.

  15. Expression and characterisation of recombinant molecules in transgenic soybean.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Nicolau B; Murad, Andre M; Vianna, Giovanni R; Coelho, Cintia; Rech, Elibio L

    2013-01-01

    Seeds are organs specialised in accumulating proteins, and they may provide a potential economically viable platform for the large-scale production and storage of many molecules for pharmaceutical and other productive sectors. Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] has a high seed protein content and represents an excellent source of abundant and cheap biomass. Under greenhouse conditions and a daily photoperiod of 23 h of light, the soybean plant's vegetative growth can be significantly extended by inducing more than a tenfold increase in seed production when compared with plants cultivated under field conditions. Some factors involved in the production of different recombinant proteins in soybean seeds are discussed in this review. These include transgenic system, regulatory sequences and the use of Mass Spectrometry as a new tool for molecular characterisation of seed produced recombinant proteins. The important intrinsic characteristics and possibility of genetically engineering soybean seeds, using current advances in recombinant DNA technology including metabolic engineering and synthetic biology, should form the foundation for large-scale and more precise genome modification, making this crop an important candidate as bioreactor for production of recombinant molecules.

  16. Natural interspecies recombinant bovine/porcine enterovirus in sheep.

    PubMed

    Boros, Akos; Pankovics, Péter; Knowles, Nick J; Reuter, Gábor

    2012-09-01

    Members of the genus Enterovirus (family Picornaviridae) are believed to be common and widespread among humans and different animal species, although only a few enteroviruses have been identified from animal sources. Intraspecies recombination among human enteroviruses is a well-known phenomenon, but only a few interspecies examples have been reported and, to our current knowledge, none of these have involved non-primate enteroviruses. In this study, we report the detection and complete genome characterization (using RT-PCR and long-range PCR) of a natural interspecies recombinant bovine/porcine enterovirus (ovine enterovirus type 1; OEV-1) in seven (44 %) of 16 faecal samples from 3-week-old domestic sheep (Ovis aries) collected in two consecutive years. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete coding region revealed that OEV-1 (ovine/TB4-OEV/2009/HUN; GenBank accession no. JQ277724) was a novel member of the species Porcine enterovirus B (PEV-B), implying the endemic presence of PEV-B viruses among sheep. However, the 5' UTR of OEV-1 showed a high degree of sequence and structural identity to bovine enteroviruses. The presumed recombination breakpoint was mapped to the end of the 5' UTR at nucleotide position 814 using sequence and SimPlot analyses. The interspecies-recombinant nature of OEV-1 suggests a closer relationship among bovine and porcine enteroviruses, enabling the exchange of at least some modular genetic elements that may evolve independently.

  17. Rescuing Recombinant Proteins by Sequestration Into the P22 VLP

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Dustin P.; LaFrance, Benjamin; Douglas, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the use of a self-assembling protein cage to sequester and solubilize recombinant proteins which are usually trafficked to insoluble inclusion bodies. Our results suggest that protein cages can be used as novel vehicles to rescue and produce soluble proteins that are otherwise difficult to obtain using conventional methods. PMID:24079011

  18. Isolation of recombinant MVA using F13L selection.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M; Lorenzo, María M; Blasco, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has become a widely used vector for vaccine and laboratory purposes. Despite significant advances in recombinant MVA technology, the isolation of recombinant viruses remains a tedious and difficult process. This chapter describes the use of an efficient and easy-to-use selection system adapted for MVA. The system is based on the requirement of the viral gene F13L for efficient virus spread in cell culture, which results in a severe block in virus transmission when F13L gene is deleted (Blasco R, Moss B. J Virol 65:5910-5920, 1991; Blasco R, Moss B. J Virol 66:4170-4179, 1992). The insertion of foreign genes in the MVA genome is accomplished by recombination of a transfected plasmid carrying the foreign genes and the F13L with the genome of an F13L knockout virus. Subsequently, selection of virus recombinants is carried out by serial passage and/or plaque purification of viruses that have recovered the F13L gene.

  19. Recombination by grain-boundary type in CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, John Ahrenkiel, Richard K.; Metzger, Wyatt K.; Moutinho, Helio R.; Guthrey, Harvey L.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.; Paudel, Naba; Yan, Yanfa

    2015-07-14

    We conducted cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum imaging and electron backscatter diffraction on the same microscopic areas of CdTe thin films to correlate grain-boundary (GB) recombination by GB “type.” We examined misorientation-based GB types, including coincident site lattice (CSL) Σ = 3, other-CSL (Σ = 5–49), and general GBs (Σ > 49), which make up ∼47%–48%, ∼6%–8%, and ∼44%–47%, respectively, of the GB length at the film back surfaces. Statistically averaged CL total intensities were calculated for each GB type from sample sizes of ≥97 GBs per type and were compared to the average grain-interior CL intensity. We find that only ∼16%–18% of Σ = 3 GBs are active non-radiative recombination centers. In contrast, all other-CSL and general GBs are observed to be strong non-radiative centers and, interestingly, these GB types have about the same CL intensity. Both as-deposited and CdCl{sub 2}-treated films were studied. The CdCl{sub 2} treatment reduces non-radiative recombination at both other-CSL and general GBs, but GBs are still recombination centers after the CdCl{sub 2} treatment.

  20. Radical Recombination Kinetics: An Experiment in Physical Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Miles

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student kinetic experiment involving second order kinetics as well as displaying photochromism using a wide variety of techniques from both physical and organic chemistry. Describes measurement of (1) the rate of the recombination reaction; (2) the extinction coefficient; and (3) the ESR spectrometer signal. (Author/JN)