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Sample records for recombinant adenovirus boosting

  1. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  2. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  3. Protective effect of a prime-boost strategy with plasmid DNA followed by recombinant adenovirus expressing TgAMA1 as vaccines against Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Longzheng; Yamagishi, Junya; Zhang, Shoufa; Jin, Chunmei; Aboge, Gabriel Oluga; Zhang, Houshuang; Zhang, Guohong; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Fujisaki, Kozo; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Xuan, Xuenan

    2012-09-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy with priming plasmid DNA followed by recombinant virus expressing relevant antigens is known to stimulate protective immunity against intracellular parasites. In this study, we have evaluated a heterologous prime-boost strategy for immunizing mice against Toxoplasma gondii infection. Our results revealed that the prime-boost strategy using both plasmid DNA and adenoviral vector encoding TgAMA1 may stimulate both humoral and Th1/Th2 cellular immune responses specific for TgAMA1. Moreover, C57BL/6 mice immunized with the pAMA1/Ad5Null, pNull/Ad5AMA1, and pAMA1/Ad5AMA1 constructs showed survival rates of 12.5%, 37.5%, and 50%, respectively. In contrast, all the pNull/Ad5Null immunized mice died after infection with the PLK-GFP strain of T. gondii. Brain cyst burden was reduced by 23% in mice immunized with pAMA1/Ad5AMA1 compared with the pNull/Ad5AMA1 immunized mice. These results demonstrate that the heterologous DNA priming and recombinant adenovirus boost strategy may provide protective immunity against T. gondii infection.

  4. HIV-1-Specific Antibody Response and Function after DNA Prime and Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost HIV Vaccine in HIV-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gach, Johannes S.; Gorlani, Andrea; Dotsey, Emmanuel Y.; Becerra, Juan C.; Anderson, Chase T. M.; Berzins, Baiba; Felgner, Philip L.; Forthal, Donald N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Wilkin, Timothy J.; Casazza, Joseph P.; Koup, Richard A.; Katlama, Christine; Autran, Brigitte; Murphy, Robert L.; Achenbach, Chad J.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the humoral immune response against DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 (rAd5) boost HIV vaccine among HIV-infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). Previous studies emphasized cellular immune responses; however, current research suggests both cellular and humoral responses are likely required for a successful therapeutic vaccine. Thus, we aimed to understand antibody response and function induced by vaccination of ART-treated HIV-1-infected patients with immune recovery. All subjects participated in EraMune 02, an open-label randomized clinical trial of ART intensification followed by a six plasmid DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB) and rAd5 boost HIV vaccine with matching inserts. Antibody binding levels were determined with a recently developed microarray approach. We also analyzed neutralization efficiency and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We found that the DNA prime-rAd5 boost vaccine induced a significant cross-clade HIV-specific antibody response, which correlated with antibody neutralization efficiency. However, despite the increase in antibody binding levels, the vaccine did not significantly stimulate neutralization or ADCC responses. This finding was also reflected by a lack of change in total CD4+ cell associated HIV DNA in those who received the vaccine. Our results have important implications for further therapeutic vaccine design and administration, especially in HIV-1 infected patients, as boosting of preexisting antibody responses are unlikely to lead to clearance of latent proviruses in the HIV reservoir. PMID:27500639

  5. HIV-1-Specific Antibody Response and Function after DNA Prime and Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost HIV Vaccine in HIV-Infected Subjects.

    PubMed

    Gach, Johannes S; Gorlani, Andrea; Dotsey, Emmanuel Y; Becerra, Juan C; Anderson, Chase T M; Berzins, Baiba; Felgner, Philip L; Forthal, Donald N; Deeks, Steven G; Wilkin, Timothy J; Casazza, Joseph P; Koup, Richard A; Katlama, Christine; Autran, Brigitte; Murphy, Robert L; Achenbach, Chad J

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the humoral immune response against DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 (rAd5) boost HIV vaccine among HIV-infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). Previous studies emphasized cellular immune responses; however, current research suggests both cellular and humoral responses are likely required for a successful therapeutic vaccine. Thus, we aimed to understand antibody response and function induced by vaccination of ART-treated HIV-1-infected patients with immune recovery. All subjects participated in EraMune 02, an open-label randomized clinical trial of ART intensification followed by a six plasmid DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB) and rAd5 boost HIV vaccine with matching inserts. Antibody binding levels were determined with a recently developed microarray approach. We also analyzed neutralization efficiency and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We found that the DNA prime-rAd5 boost vaccine induced a significant cross-clade HIV-specific antibody response, which correlated with antibody neutralization efficiency. However, despite the increase in antibody binding levels, the vaccine did not significantly stimulate neutralization or ADCC responses. This finding was also reflected by a lack of change in total CD4+ cell associated HIV DNA in those who received the vaccine. Our results have important implications for further therapeutic vaccine design and administration, especially in HIV-1 infected patients, as boosting of preexisting antibody responses are unlikely to lead to clearance of latent proviruses in the HIV reservoir.

  6. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  7. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  8. T cells induced by recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus alone and in prime-boost regimens decrease chimeric EcoHIV/NDK challenge virus load.

    PubMed

    Roshorm, Yaowaluck; Cottingham, Mathew G; Potash, Mary-Jane; Volsky, David J; Hanke, Tomáš

    2012-12-01

    The popularity of nonreplicating adenoviruses of chimpanzee origin (ChAdVs) as vectors for subunit vaccines is on the rise. This is mainly for their excellent safety and impressive immunogenicity observed in human studies to date. Here, we recloned the chimpanzee adenovirus sero type 68 (ChAdV-68), also designated SAdV-25 and AdC68, genome and demonstrated its straightforward genetic manipulation facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome recombineering. To generate the ChAdV68.GagB vaccine, the HIV-1 consensus clade B Gag-derived Tg was inserted into the E1 region. In part confirming previous observations, the ChAdV68.GagB vaccine alone and in heterologous prime-boost regimens with plasmid DNA- and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-vectored vaccines induced robust polyfunctional HIV-1-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell responses with a gut-homing phenotype. Importantly, we showed that when a single epitope is expressed as an immunodominant CD8(+) T-cell determinant, responses elicited by ChAdV68.GagB alone and in combination lowered surrogate challenge EcoHIV/NDK (where EcoHIV is chimeric ecotropic HIV) virus load in mice both at the peak T-cell frequencies 2 weeks after vaccination and 16 weeks later indicating development of protective effector memory. These results parallel the immunogenicity of similar vaccine regimens in macaques and an ongoing phase I/IIa trial in humans, and support further development of vaccines vectored by ChAdVs.

  9. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  10. Perforin and gamma interferon expression are required for CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-dependent protective immunity against a human parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, elicited by heterologous plasmid DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 boost vaccination.

    PubMed

    de Alencar, Bruna C G; Persechini, Pedro M; Haolla, Filipe A; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silverio, Jaline C; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Machado, Alexandre V; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2009-10-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA, followed by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus 5, is being proposed as a powerful way to elicit CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. We confirmed this concept and furthered existing research by providing evidence that the heterologous prime-boost regimen using the gene encoding amastigote surface protein 2 elicited CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated protective immunity (reduction of acute parasitemia and prolonged survival) against experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Protective immunity correlated with the presence of in vivo antigen-specific cytotoxic activity prior to challenge. Based on this, our second goal was to determine the outcome of infection after heterologous prime-boost immunization of perforin-deficient mice. These mice were highly susceptible to infection. A detailed analysis of the cell-mediated immune responses in immunized perforin-deficient mice showed an impaired gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) secretion by immune spleen cells upon restimulation in vitro with soluble recombinant antigen. In spite of a normal numeric expansion, specific CD8(+) T cells presented several functional defects detected in vivo (cytotoxicity) and in vitro (simultaneous expression of CD107a/IFN-gamma or IFN-gamma/tumor necrosis factor alpha) paralleled by a decreased expression of CD44 and KLRG-1. Our final goal was to determine the importance of IFN-gamma in the presence of highly cytotoxic T cells. Vaccinated IFN-gamma-deficient mice developed highly cytotoxic cells but failed to develop any protective immunity. Our study thus demonstrated a role for perforin and IFN-gamma in a number of T-cell-mediated effector functions and in the antiparasitic immunity generated by a heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination strategy.

  11. Perforin and Gamma Interferon Expression Are Required for CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell-Dependent Protective Immunity against a Human Parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, Elicited by Heterologous Plasmid DNA Prime-Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost Vaccination▿

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Persechini, Pedro M.; Haolla, Filipe A.; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silverio, Jaline C.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Machado, Alexandre V.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2009-01-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA, followed by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus 5, is being proposed as a powerful way to elicit CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. We confirmed this concept and furthered existing research by providing evidence that the heterologous prime-boost regimen using the gene encoding amastigote surface protein 2 elicited CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity (reduction of acute parasitemia and prolonged survival) against experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Protective immunity correlated with the presence of in vivo antigen-specific cytotoxic activity prior to challenge. Based on this, our second goal was to determine the outcome of infection after heterologous prime-boost immunization of perforin-deficient mice. These mice were highly susceptible to infection. A detailed analysis of the cell-mediated immune responses in immunized perforin-deficient mice showed an impaired gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion by immune spleen cells upon restimulation in vitro with soluble recombinant antigen. In spite of a normal numeric expansion, specific CD8+ T cells presented several functional defects detected in vivo (cytotoxicity) and in vitro (simultaneous expression of CD107a/IFN-γ or IFN-γ/tumor necrosis factor alpha) paralleled by a decreased expression of CD44 and KLRG-1. Our final goal was to determine the importance of IFN-γ in the presence of highly cytotoxic T cells. Vaccinated IFN-γ-deficient mice developed highly cytotoxic cells but failed to develop any protective immunity. Our study thus demonstrated a role for perforin and IFN-γ in a number of T-cell-mediated effector functions and in the antiparasitic immunity generated by a heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination strategy. PMID:19651871

  12. Heterologous Plasmid DNA Prime-Recombinant Human Adenovirus 5 Boost Vaccination Generates a Stable Pool of Protective Long-Lived CD8+ T Effector Memory Cells Specific for a Human Parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi▿†

    PubMed Central

    Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; de Alencar, Bruna C.; de Vasconcelos, José Ronnie C.; Dominguez, Mariana R.; Araújo, Adriano F.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we described a heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA followed by replication-defective human recombinant adenovirus type 5 as a powerful strategy to elicit long-lived CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity against experimental systemic infection of mice with a human intracellular protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. In the present study, we further characterized the protective long-lived CD8+ T cells. We compared several functional and phenotypic aspects of specific CD8+ T cells present 14 or 98 days after the last immunizing dose and found the following: (i) the numbers of specific cells were similar, as determined by multimer staining or by determining the number of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting cells by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay; (ii) these cells were equally cytotoxic in vivo; (iii) following in vitro stimulation, a slight decline in the frequency of multifunctional cells (CD107a+ IFN-γ+ or CD107a+ IFN-γ+ tumor necrosis factor alpha positive [TNF-α+]) was paralleled by a significant increase of CD107a singly positive cells after 98 days; (iv) the expression of several surface markers was identical, except for the reexpression of CD127 after 98 days; (v) the use of genetically deficient mice revealed a role for interleukin-12 (IL-12)/IL-23, but not IFN-γ, in the maintenance of these memory cells; and (vi) subsequent immunizations with an unrelated virus or a plasmid vaccine or the depletion of CD4+ T cells did not significantly erode the number or function of these CD8+ T cells during the 15-week period. From these results, we concluded that heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination generated a stable pool of functional protective long-lived CD8+ T cells with an effector memory phenotype. PMID:21357719

  13. A Monovalent Chimpanzee Adenovirus Ebola Vaccine Boosted with MVA.

    PubMed

    Ewer, Katie; Rampling, Tommy; Venkatraman, Navin; Bowyer, Georgina; Wright, Danny; Lambe, Teresa; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B; Payne, Ruth; Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Strecker, Thomas; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Krähling, Verena; Tully, Claire M; Edwards, Nick J; Bentley, Emma M; Samuel, Dhanraj; Labbé, Geneviève; Jin, Jing; Gibani, Malick; Minhinnick, Alice; Wilkie, Morven; Poulton, Ian; Lella, Natalie; Roberts, Rachel; Hartnell, Felicity; Bliss, Carly; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Powlson, Jonathan; Berrie, Eleanor; Tedder, Richard; Roman, Francois; De Ryck, Iris; Nicosia, Alfredo; Sullivan, Nancy J; Stanley, Daphne A; Mbaya, Olivier T; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Schwartz, Richard M; Siani, Loredana; Colloca, Stefano; Folgori, Antonella; Di Marco, Stefania; Cortese, Riccardo; Wright, Edward; Becker, Stephan; Graham, Barney S; Koup, Richard A; Levine, Myron M; Volkmann, Ariane; Chaplin, Paul; Pollard, Andrew J; Draper, Simon J; Ballou, W Ripley; Lawrie, Alison; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2016-04-28

    The West African outbreak of Ebola virus disease that peaked in 2014 has caused more than 11,000 deaths. The development of an effective Ebola vaccine is a priority for control of a future outbreak. In this phase 1 study, we administered a single dose of the chimpanzee adenovirus 3 (ChAd3) vaccine encoding the surface glycoprotein of Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) to 60 healthy adult volunteers in Oxford, United Kingdom. The vaccine was administered in three dose levels--1×10(10) viral particles, 2.5×10(10) viral particles, and 5×10(10) viral particles--with 20 participants in each group. We then assessed the effect of adding a booster dose of a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) strain, encoding the same Ebola virus glycoprotein, in 30 of the 60 participants and evaluated a reduced prime-boost interval in another 16 participants. We also compared antibody responses to inactivated whole Ebola virus virions and neutralizing antibody activity with those observed in phase 1 studies of a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccine expressing a ZEBOV glycoprotein (rVSV-ZEBOV) to determine relative potency and assess durability. No safety concerns were identified at any of the dose levels studied. Four weeks after immunization with the ChAd3 vaccine, ZEBOV-specific antibody responses were similar to those induced by rVSV-ZEBOV vaccination, with a geometric mean titer of 752 and 921, respectively. ZEBOV neutralization activity was also similar with the two vaccines (geometric mean titer, 14.9 and 22.2, respectively). Boosting with the MVA vector increased virus-specific antibodies by a factor of 12 (geometric mean titer, 9007) and increased glycoprotein-specific CD8+ T cells by a factor of 5. Significant increases in neutralizing antibodies were seen after boosting in all 30 participants (geometric mean titer, 139; P<0.001). Virus-specific antibody responses in participants primed with ChAd3 remained positive 6 months after vaccination (geometric mean titer, 758) but

  14. Mucosal prior to systemic application of recombinant adenovirus boosting is more immunogenic than systemic application twice but confers similar protection against SIV-challenge in DNA vaccine-primed macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Reiner; Suh, You-Suk; Sauermann, Ulrike; Ochieng, Washingtone; Sopper, Sieghart; Kim, Kwang S.; Ahn, So-Shin; Park, Ki S.; Stolte-Leeb, Nicole; Hunsmann, Gerhard; Sung, Young C. Stahl-Hennig, Christiane

    2009-01-20

    We investigated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a bimodal prime/boost vaccine regimen given by various routes in the Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) rhesus monkey model for AIDS. Twelve animals were immunized with SIV DNA-vectors followed by the application of a recombinant adenovirus (rAd5) expressing the same genes either intramuscularly (i.m.) or by oropharyngeal spray. The second rAd5-application was given i.m. All vaccinees plus six controls were challenged orally with SIVmac239 12 weeks post-final immunization. Both immunization strategies induced strong SIV Gag-specific IFN-{gamma} and T-cell proliferation responses and mediated a conservation of CD4{sup +} memory T-cells and a reduction of viral load during peak viremia following infection. Interestingly, the mucosal group was superior to the systemic group regarding breadth and strength of SIV-specific T-cell responses and exhibited lower vector specific immune responses. Therefore, our data warrant the inclusion of mucosal vector application in a vaccination regimen which makes it less invasive and easier to apply.

  15. Sequential priming with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccines, with or without encoded cytokines, and a replicating adenovirus-SIV recombinant followed by protein boosting does not control a pathogenic SIVmac251 mucosal challenge.

    PubMed

    Demberg, Thorsten; Boyer, Jean D; Malkevich, Nina; Patterson, L Jean; Venzon, David; Summers, Ebonita L; Kalisz, Irene; Kalyanaraman, V S; Lee, Eun Mi; Weiner, David B; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2008-11-01

    Previously, combination DNA/nonreplicating adenovirus (Ad)- or poxvirus-vectored vaccines have strongly protected against SHIV(89.6P), DNAs expressing cytokines have modulated immunity elicited by DNA vaccines, and replication-competent Ad-recombinant priming and protein boosting has strongly protected against simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge. Here we evaluated a vaccine strategy composed of these promising components. Seven rhesus macaques per group were primed twice with multigenic SIV plasmid DNA with or without interleukin-12 (IL-12) DNA or IL-15 DNA. After a multigenic replicating Ad-SIV immunization, all groups received two booster immunizations with SIV gp140 and SIV Nef protein. Four control macaques received control DNA plasmids, empty Ad vector, and adjuvant. All vaccine components were immunogenic, but the cytokine DNAs had little effect. Macaques that received IL-15-DNA exhibited higher peak anti-Nef titers, a more rapid anti-Nef anamnestic response postchallenge, and expanded CD8(CM) T cells 2 weeks postchallenge compared to the DNA-only group. Other immune responses were indistinguishable between groups. Overall, no protection against intrarectal challenge with SIV(mac251) was observed, although immunized non-Mamu-A*01 macaques as a group exhibited a statistically significant 1-log decline in acute viremia compared to non-Mamu-A*01 controls. Possible factors contributing to the poor outcome include administration of cytokine DNAs to sites different from the Ad recombinants (intramuscular and intratracheal, respectively), too few DNA priming immunizations, a suboptimal DNA delivery method, failure to ensure delivery of SIV and cytokine plasmids to the same cell, and instability and short half-life of the IL-15 component. Future experiments should address these issues to determine if this combination approach is able to control a virulent SIV challenge.

  16. Boosting oncolytic adenovirus potency with magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic force.

    PubMed

    Tresilwised, Nittaya; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Holm, Per Sonne; Holzmüller, Regina; Anton, Martina; Thalhammer, Stefan; Adigüzel, Denis; Döblinger, Markus; Plank, Christian

    2010-08-02

    Oncolytic adenoviruses rank among the most promising innovative agents in cancer therapy. We examined the potential of boosting the efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl520 by associating it with magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic-field-guided infection in multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells in vitro and upon intratumoral injection in vivo. The virus was complexed by self-assembly with core-shell nanoparticles having a magnetite core of about 10 nm and stabilized by a shell containing 68 mass % lithium 3-[2-(perfluoroalkyl)ethylthio]propionate) and 32 mass % 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine. Optimized virus binding, sufficiently stable in 50% fetal calf serum, was found at nanoparticle-to-virus ratios of 5 fg of Fe per physical virus particle (VP) and above. As estimated from magnetophoretic mobility measurements, 3,600 to 4,500 magnetite nanocrystallites were associated per virus particle. Ultrastructural analysis by electron and atomic force microscopy showed structurally intact viruses surrounded by magnetic particles that occasionally bridged several virus particles. Viral uptake into cells at a given virus dose was enhanced 10-fold compared to nonmagnetic virus when infections were carried out under the influence of a magnetic field. Increased virus internalization resulted in a 10-fold enhancement of the oncolytic potency in terms of the dose required for killing 50% of the target cells (IC(50) value) and an enhancement of 4 orders of magnitude in virus progeny formation at equal input virus doses compared to nonmagnetic viruses. Furthermore, the full oncolytic effect developed within two days postinfection compared with six days in a nonmagnetic virus as a reference. Plotting target cell viability versus internalized virus particles for magnetic and nonmagnetic virus showed that the inherent oncolytic productivity of the virus remained unchanged upon association with magnetic nanoparticles. Hence, we conclude that the mechanism of boosting the

  17. Targeting the Genital Tract Mucosa with a Lipopeptide/Recombinant Adenovirus Prime/Boost Vaccine Induces Potent and Long-Lasting CD8+ T Cell Immunity Against Herpes: Importance of Myeloid Differentiation Factor 881

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuli; Dervillez, Xavier; Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Badakhshan, Tina; Bettahi, Ilham; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the mucosal immune system of the genital tract (GT) with subunit vaccines failed to induce potent and durable local CD8+ T cell immunity, crucial for protection against many sexually transmitted viral (STV) pathogens, including herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) that causes genital herpes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential of a novel lipopeptide/adenovirus type 5 (Lipo/rAdv5) prime/boost mucosal vaccine for induction of CD8+ T cell immunity to protect the female genital tract from herpes. The lipopeptide and the rAdv5 vaccine express the immunodominant HSV-2 CD8+ T cell epitope (gB498-505) and both were delivered intravaginally (IVAG) in the progesterone-induced B6 mouse model of genital herpes. Compared to its homologous lipopeptide/lipopeptide (Lipo/Lipo); the Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost immunized mice: (i) developed potent and sustained HSV-specific CD8+ T cells, detected in both the GT draining nodes (GT-DLN) and in the vaginal mucosa (VM); (ii) had significantly lower virus titers; (iii) had decreased overt signs of genital herpes disease; and (iv) did not succumb to lethal infection (p < 0.005), following intravaginal HSV-2 challenge. Polyfunctional CD8+ T cells, producing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 and exhibiting cytotoxic activity, were associated with protection (p < 0.005). The protective CD8+ T cell response was significantly compromised in the absence of the adaptor myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) (p = 0.0001). Taken together, these findings indicate that targeting the VM with a Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost vaccine elicits a potent, MyD88-dependent, and long-lasting mucosal CD8+ T cell protective immunity against sexually transmitted herpes infection and disease. PMID:23018456

  18. Targeting the genital tract mucosa with a lipopeptide/recombinant adenovirus prime/boost vaccine induces potent and long-lasting CD8+ T cell immunity against herpes: importance of MyD88.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuli; Dervillez, Xavier; Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Badakhshan, Tina; Bettahi, Ilham; Benmohamed, Lbachir

    2012-11-01

    Targeting of the mucosal immune system of the genital tract with subunit vaccines has failed to induce potent and durable local CD8(+) T cell immunity, which is crucial for protection against many sexually transmitted viral pathogens, including HSV type 2 (HSV-2), which causes genital herpes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential of a novel lipopeptide/adenovirus type 5 (Lipo/rAdv5) prime/boost mucosal vaccine for induction of CD8(+) T cell immunity to protect the female genital tract from herpes. The lipopeptide vaccine and the rAdv5 vaccine express the immunodominant HSV-2 CD8(+) T cell epitope (gB(498-505)), and both were delivered intravaginally in the progesterone-induced B6 mouse model of genital herpes. Compared with mice immunized with the homologous lipopeptide/lipopeptide (Lipo/Lipo) vaccine, the Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost immunized mice 1) developed potent and sustained HSV-specific CD8(+) T cells, detected in both the genital tract draining nodes and in the vaginal mucosa; 2) had significantly lower virus titers; 3) had decreased overt signs of genital herpes disease; and 4) did not succumb to lethal infection (p < 0.005) after intravaginal HSV-2 challenge. Polyfunctional CD8(+) T cells, producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 and exhibiting cytotoxic activity, were associated with protection (p < 0.005). The protective CD8(+) T cell response was significantly compromised in the absence of the adapter MyD88 (p = 0.0001). Taken together, these findings indicate that targeting of the vaginal mucosa with a Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost vaccine elicits a potent, MyD88-dependent, and long-lasting mucosal CD8(+) T cell protective immunity against sexually transmitted herpes infection and disease.

  19. Prime-boost vaccination with Bacillus Calmette Guerin and a recombinant adenovirus co-expressing CFP10, ESAT6, Ag85A and Ag85B of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces robust antigen-specific immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Li, Min; Deng, Guangcun; Zhao, Liping; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2015-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains to be a prevalent health issue worldwide. At present, Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) is the singular anti-TB vaccine available for the prevention of disease in humans; however, this vaccine only provides limited protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Therefore, the development of alternative vaccines and strategies for increasing the efficacy of vaccination against TB are urgently required. The present study aimed to evaluate the ability of a recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad5-CEAB) co-expressing 10-kDa culture filtrate protein, 6-kDa early-secreted antigenic target, antigen 85 (Ag85)A and Ag85B of Mtb to boost immune responses following primary vaccination with BCG in mice. The mice were first subcutaneously primed with BCG and boosted with two doses of Ad5-CEAB via an intranasal route. The immunological effects of Ad5-CEAB boosted mice primed with BCG were then evaluated using a series of immunological indexes. The results demonstrated that the prime-boost strategy induced a potent antigen-specific immune response, which was primarily characterized by an enhanced T cell response and increased production of cytokines, including interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2, in mice. In addition, this vaccination strategy was demonstrated to have an elevated humoral response with increased concentrations of antigen-specific bronchoalveolar lavage secretory immunoglobulin (Ig)A and serum IgG in mice compared with those primed with BCG alone. These data suggested that the regimen of subcutaneous BCG prime and mucosal Ad5-CEAB boost was a novel strategy for inducing a broad range of antigen-specific immune responses to Mtb antigens in vivo, which may provide a promising strategy for further development of adenoviral-based vaccine against Mtb infection.

  20. Construction, production, and purification of recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Miravet, Susana; Ontiveros, Maria; Piedra, Jose; Penalva, Cristina; Monfar, Mercè; Chillón, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses provide a versatile system for gene expression studies and therapeutic applications. In this chapter, a standard procedure for their generation and small-scale production is described. Homologous recombination in E. coli between shuttle plasmids and full-length adenovirus backbones (E1-deleted) is used for the generation of recombinant adenoviral vectors genomes. The adenovirus genomes are then analyzed to confirm their identity and integrity, and further linearized and transfected to generate a recombinant adenoviral vector in permissive human cells. These vectors are then purified by two sequential CsCl gradient centrifugations and subjected to a chromatography step in order to eliminate the CsCl and exchange buffers. Finally, the viral stock is characterized through the quantification of its viral particle content and its infectivity.

  1. One-prime multi-boost strategy immunization with recombinant DNA, adenovirus, and MVA vector vaccines expressing HPV16 L1 induces potent, sustained, and specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Li; Wang, He-Rong; Zhou, Zhi-Yi; Luo, Jing; Xiao, Xiang-Qian; Wang, Xiao-Li; Li, Jin-Tao; Zhou, Yu-Bai; Zeng, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with various human diseases, including cancer, and developing vaccines is a cost-efficient strategy to prevent HPV-related disease. The major capsid protein L1, which an increasing number of studies have confirmed is typically expressed early in infection, is a promising antigen for such a vaccine, although the E6 and E7 proteins have been characterized more extensively. Thus, the L1 gene from HPV16 was inserted into a recombinant vector, AdHu5, and MVA viral vectors, and administered by prime-boost immunization. Virus-like particles were used as control antigens. Our results indicate that prime-boost immunization with heterologous vaccines induced robust and sustained cellular and humoral response specific to HPV16 L1. In particular, sera obtained from mice immunized with DNA + DNA + Ad + MVA had excellent antitumor activity in vivo. However, the data also confirm that virus-like particles can only elicit low levels cellular immunity and not be long-lasting, and are therefore unsuitable for treatment of existing HPV infections.

  2. Avian influenza mucosal vaccination in chickens with replication-defective recombinant adenovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Toro, Haroldo; Suarez, David L; Tang, De-chu C; van Ginkel, Frederik W; Breedlovea, Cassandra

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated protection conferred by mucosal vaccination with replication-competent adenovirus-free recombinant adenovirus expressing a codon-optimized avian influenza (AI) H5 gene from A/turkey/WI/68 (AdTW68.H5ck). Commercial, layer-type chicken groups were either singly vaccinated ocularly at 5 days of age, singly vaccinated via spray at 5 days of age, or ocularly primed at 5 days and ocularly boosted at 15 days of age. Only chickens primed and boosted via the ocular route developed AI systemic antibodies with maximum hemagglutination inhibition mean titers of 3.9 log2 at 32 days of age. In contrast, single vaccination via the ocular or spray routes maintained an antibody status similar to unvaccinated controls. All chickens (16/16) subjected to ocular priming and boosting with AdTW68.H5ck survived challenge with highly pathogenic AI virus A/chicken/Queretaro/14588-19/95 (H5N2). Single ocular vaccination resulted in 63% (10/16) of birds surviving the challenge followed by a 44% (7/16) survival of single-sprayed vaccinated birds. Birds vaccinated twice via the ocular route also showed significantly lower (P < 0.05) AI virus RNA concentrations in oropharyngeal swabs compared to unvaccinated-challenged controls.

  3. Avian influenza mucosal vaccination in chickens with replication-defective recombinant adenovirus vaccine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We evaluated protection conferred by mucosal vaccination with replication competent adenovirus (RCA)-free recombinant adenovirus expressing a codon-optimized avian influenza (AI) H5 gene (AdTW68.H5ck). Commercial layer-type chicken groups were singly vaccinated ocularly at 5 days of age, or singly v...

  4. Recombination in adenovirus: analysis of crossover sites in intertypic overlap recombinants.

    PubMed

    Mautner, V; Mackay, N

    1984-11-01

    Overlap recombination has been used as a means of generating intertypic recombinants with crossover sites located within a defined region of the adenovirus genome. Using terminal DNA fragments of adenovirus type 2 and type 5 that overlap within the vicinity of the hexon coding region (51.6-59.7 map units), two different crosses could be studied; in one the overlap entirely encompasses the hexon and there are homologous regions at either side of the overlap where recombination is expected, and in the other only one side of the overlap is capable of sustaining recombination. The overall distribution of crossover sites within the overlap has been determined by restriction endonuclease mapping, and analysed in terms of the extent of homology between Ad2 and Ad5 in this region as defined by the DNA sequences (R. Kinloch, N. Mackay, and V. Mautner (1984). J. Biol. Chem., 259, 6431-6436; G. Akusjärvi, P. Aleström, M. Pettersson, M. Lager, H. Jörnvall, and U. Pettersson (1984). Submitted). Crossovers are found only in regions of relatively high DNA homology, as previously shown for intertypic recombination between temperature-sensitive viruses (M. E. G. Boursnell and V. Mautner (1981). Virology 112, 198-209). The presence of a free DNA end within the heterologous zone is insufficient to overcome the barrier to recombination. In crosses where recombination is confined to a relatively small homologous zone (45.9-53.0 mu) there is no special distribution of crossovers within the interval; no "hot spot" is discernible at the free DNA end, suggesting that a free DNA end is not especially recombinogenic, nor at the junction between the homologous and heterologous zones, suggesting that branch migration up to the heterology does not always occur. A cross designed to furnish evidence for gene conversion gave rise to a "conventional" recombinant with a crossover located within a 21-nucleotide tract of homology.

  5. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Recombinant Adenovirus Serotype 35-Vectored HIV-1 Vaccine in Adenovirus Serotype 5 Seronegative and Seropositive Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jonathan D; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Frahm, Nicole; Morgan, Cecilia; Gilbert, Peter B; Kochar, Nidhi; DeRosa, Stephen C; Tomaras, Georgia D; Wagner, Theresa M; Baden, Lindsey R; Koblin, Beryl A; Rouphael, Nadine G; Kalams, Spyros A; Keefer, Michael C; Goepfert, Paul A; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Mayer, Kenneth H; Swann, Edith; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Graham, Barney S; McElrath, M Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Background Recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5)-vectored HIV-1 vaccines have not prevented HIV-1 infection or disease and pre-existing Ad5 neutralizing antibodies may limit the clinical utility of Ad5 vectors globally. Using a rare Ad serotype vector, such as Ad35, may circumvent these issues, but there are few data on the safety and immunogenicity of rAd35 directly compared to rAd5 following human vaccination. Methods HVTN 077 randomized 192 healthy, HIV-uninfected participants into one of four HIV-1 vaccine/placebo groups: rAd35/rAd5, DNA/rAd5, and DNA/rAd35 in Ad5-seronegative persons; and DNA/rAd35 in Ad5-seropositive persons. All vaccines encoded the HIV-1 EnvA antigen. Antibody and T-cell responses were measured 4 weeks post boost immunization. Results All vaccines were generally well tolerated and similarly immunogenic. As compared to rAd5, rAd35 was equally potent in boosting HIV-1-specific humoral and cellular immunity and responses were not significantly attenuated in those with baseline Ad5 seropositivity. Like DNA, rAd35 efficiently primed rAd5 boosting. All vaccine regimens tested elicited cross-clade antibody responses, including Env V1/V2-specific IgG responses. Conclusions Vaccine antigen delivery by rAd35 is well-tolerated and immunogenic as a prime to rAd5 immunization and as a boost to prior DNA immunization with the homologous insert. Further development of rAd35-vectored prime-boost vaccine regimens is warranted. PMID:26587311

  6. Construction of adenovirus vectors encoding the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Fang; Qi, Bing; Tu, Lei-Lei; Liu, Lian; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To construct adenovirus vectors of lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology to further understand the role of lumican gene in myopia. METHODS Gateway recombinant cloning technology was used to construct adenovirus vectors. The wild-type (wt) and mutant (mut) forms of the lumican gene were synthesized and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lumican cDNA fragments were purified and ligated into the adenovirus shuttle vector pDown-multiple cloning site (MCS)-/internal ribozyme entry site (IRES)/enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Then the desired DNA fragments were integrated into the destination vector pAV.Des1d yielding the final expression constructs pAV.Ex1d-cytomegalovirus (CMV)>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES /EGFP, respectively. RESULTS The adenovirus plasmids pAV.Ex1d-CMV>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES/EGFP were successfully constructed by gateway recombinant cloning technology. Positive clones identified by PCR and sequencing were selected and packaged into recombinant adenovirus in HEK293 cells. CONCLUSION We construct adenovirus vectors containing the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology, which provides a basis for investigating the role of lumican gene in the pathogenesis of high myopia. PMID:27672590

  7. A replicating adenovirus capsid display recombinant elicits antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites in Aotus nancymaae monkeys.

    PubMed

    Karen, Kasey A; Deal, Cailin; Adams, Robert J; Nielsen, Carolyn; Ward, Cameron; Espinosa, Diego A; Xie, Jane; Zavala, Fidel; Ketner, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Decades of success with live adenovirus vaccines suggest that replication-competent recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) could serve as effective vectors for immunization against other pathogens. To explore the potential of a live rAd vaccine against malaria, we prepared a viable adenovirus 5 (Ad5) recombinant that displays a B-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum on the virion surface. The recombinant induced P. falciparum sporozoite-neutralizing antibodies in mice. Human adenoviruses do not replicate in mice. Therefore, to examine immunogenicity in a system in which, as in humans, the recombinant replicates, we constructed a similar recombinant in an adenovirus mutant that replicates in monkey cells and immunized four Aotus nancymaae monkeys. The recombinant replicated in the monkeys after intratracheal instillation, the first demonstration of replication of human adenoviruses in New World monkeys. Immunization elicited antibodies both to the Plasmodium epitope and the Ad5 vector. Antibodies from all four monkeys recognized CSP on intact parasites, and plasma from one monkey neutralized sporozoites in vitro and conferred partial protection against P. falciparum sporozoite infection after passive transfer to mice. Prior enteric inoculation of two animals with antigenically wild-type adenovirus primed a response to the subsequent intratracheal inoculation, suggesting a route to optimizing performance. A vaccine is not yet available against P. falciparum, which induces the deadliest form of malaria and kills approximately one million children each year. The live capsid display recombinant described here may constitute an early step in a critically needed novel approach to malaria immunization.

  8. Construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus carrying a mouse TIGIT-GFP gene.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J M; Cui, J L; He, W T; Yu, D W; Gao, Y; Wang, L; Chen, Z K; Zhou, H M

    2015-12-29

    Recombinant adenovirus vector systems have been used extensively in protein research and gene therapy. However, the construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus is a tedious and time-consuming process. TIGIT is a recently discovered immunosuppressive molecule that plays an important role in maintaining immunological balance. The construction of recombinant adenovirus mediating TIGIT expression must be simplified to facilitate its use in the study of TIGIT. In this study, the TIGIT gene was combined with green fluorescent protein (GFP); the TIGIT-GFP gene was inserted into a gateway plasmid to construct a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus. HEK 293A cells were infected with the adenovirus, which was then purified and subjected to virus titering. TIGIT-GFP adenovirus was characterized by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, and its expression in mouse liver was detected by infection through caudal vein injection. The results showed the successful construction of the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus (5 x 10(10) PFU/mL). Co-expression of TIGIT and GFP was identified in 293A and liver cells; synthesis and positioning of TIGIT-GFP was viewed under a fluorescence microscope. TIGIT-GFP was highly expressed on liver cells 1 day (25.53%) after infection and faded 3 days (11.36%) after injection. In conclusion, the fusion of TIGIT with GFP allows easy, rapid, and uncomplicated detection of TIGIT translation. The construction of a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus, mediating TIGIT expression in vitro and in vivo, lays the foundation for further research into TIGIT function and gene therapy. Moreover, the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus is a helpful tool for studying other proteins (which could replace the TIGIT gene).

  9. Recruitment of wild-type and recombinant adeno-associated virus into adenovirus replication centers.

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, M D; Fisher, K J; Wilson, J M

    1996-01-01

    Replication of a human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), is facilitated by coinfection with adeno-virus to provide essential helper functions. We have used the techniques of in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to characterize the localization of AAV replication within infected cells, Previous studies have shown that adenovirus establishes foci called replication centers within the nucleus, where adenoviral replication and transcription occur. Our studies indicate that AAV is colocalized with the adenovirus replication centers, where it may utilize adenovirus and cellular proteins for its own replication. Expression of the AAV Rep protein inhibits the normal maturation of the adenovirus centers. Similar experiments were performed with recombinant AAV (rAAV) to establish a relationship between intranuclear localization and rAAV transduction. rAAV efficiently entered the cell, and its genome was faintly detectable in a perinuclear distribution and was mobilized to replication centers when the cell was infected with adenovirus. The recruitment of the replication-defective genome into the intranuclear adenovirus domains resulted in enhanced transduction. These studies illustrate the importance of intracellular compartmentalization for such complex interactions as the relationship between AAV and adenovirus. PMID:8627709

  10. Recruitment of wild-type and recombinant adeno-associated virus into adenovirus replication centers.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, M D; Fisher, K J; Wilson, J M

    1996-03-01

    Replication of a human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), is facilitated by coinfection with adeno-virus to provide essential helper functions. We have used the techniques of in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to characterize the localization of AAV replication within infected cells, Previous studies have shown that adenovirus establishes foci called replication centers within the nucleus, where adenoviral replication and transcription occur. Our studies indicate that AAV is colocalized with the adenovirus replication centers, where it may utilize adenovirus and cellular proteins for its own replication. Expression of the AAV Rep protein inhibits the normal maturation of the adenovirus centers. Similar experiments were performed with recombinant AAV (rAAV) to establish a relationship between intranuclear localization and rAAV transduction. rAAV efficiently entered the cell, and its genome was faintly detectable in a perinuclear distribution and was mobilized to replication centers when the cell was infected with adenovirus. The recruitment of the replication-defective genome into the intranuclear adenovirus domains resulted in enhanced transduction. These studies illustrate the importance of intracellular compartmentalization for such complex interactions as the relationship between AAV and adenovirus.

  11. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of 3β-hydroxysteroid-Δ24 reductase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiuli; Jia, Dan; Zhao, Chenguang; Wang, Weiqi; Liu, Ting; Chen, Shuchao; Quan, Xiaoping; Sun, Deliang; Gao, Bing

    2014-01-01

    3β-Hydroxysteroid-Δ24 reductase (DHCR24) is a multifunctional enzyme that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and has neuroprotective and cholesterol-synthesizing activities. DHCR24 overexpression confers neuroprotection against apoptosis caused by amyloid β deposition. The present study aimed to construct two recombinant adenoviruses driving DHCR24 expression specifically in neurons. Two SYN1 promoter DNA fragments were obtained from human (h) and rat (r). Recombinant Ad-r(h)SYN1-DHCR24 was transfected into AD-293, N2A (mouse neuroblastoma), and MIN6 (mouse pancreatic carcinoma) cells. Western blot analysis showed DHCR24 was specially expressed in 293 and N2A cells, but no specific band was found in MIN6 cells. This demonstrates that the recombinant adenoviruses successfully express DHCR24, and no expression is observed in non-neuronal cells. TUNEL assay results showed apoptosis was inhibited in adenovirus-transfected neurons. Detecting reactive oxygen species by immunofluorescence, we found that adenovirus transfection inhibits apoptosis through scavenging excess reactive oxygen species. Our findings show that the recombinant DHCR24 adenoviruses induce neuron-specific DHCR24 expression, and thereby lay the foundation for further studies on DHCR24 gene therapy for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25206847

  12. Alpha fetoprotein DNA prime and adenovirus boost immunization of two hepatocellular cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alpha fetoprotein (AFP) is an oncofetal antigen over-expressed by many hepatocellular cancers (HCC). We previously demonstrated that HLA-A2-restricted epitopes derived from AFP are immunogenic in vitro and in vivo despite high circulating levels of this oncofetal antigen. In order to test a more broadly applicable, HLA-unrestricted, inexpensive, cell-free vaccine platform capable of activating tumor antigen-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, we tested full length AFP in a plasmid DNA construct in combination with an AFP-expressing replication-deficient adenovirus (AdV) in a prime-boost vaccine strategy. Methods HCC patients who had an AFP+ tumor and previous treatment for HCC were screened and two patients received vaccination with three plasmid DNA injections followed by a single AdV injection, all delivered intramuscularly (i.m.). Results The vaccine was well tolerated and safe. Both patients showed immunologic evidence of immunization. The first patient had a weak AFP-specific T cell response, a strong AdV-specific cellular response and recurred with an AFP-expressing HCC at nine months. The second patient developed a strong AFP-specific CD8+ and CD4+ cellular response and an AdV neutralizing antibody response, and recurred at 18 months without an increase in serum AFP. Conclusions The AFP DNA prime-AdV boost vaccine was safe and immunogenic. Circulating anti-AdV neutralizing antibodies at baseline did not prohibit the development of AFP-specific cellular immunity. The patient who developed CD8+ and CD4+ AFP-specific T cell immunity had more favorable progression-free survival. The observations with these two patients support development of this vaccine strategy in a larger clinical trial. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00093548 PMID:24708667

  13. Replicating adenovirus vector prime/protein boost strategies for HIV vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, L. Jean; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2008-01-01

    Background In the last few years the HIV vaccine field has moved forward a number of promising vaccine candidates into human clinical trials. Objective In this review we briefly discuss the advances made in vaccine development and HIV pathogenesis and give an overview of the body of work our lab has generated in multiple animal models on replication-competent Ad recombinant vaccines. Methods Emphasis is placed on comparative examination of vaccine components, routes of immunization and challenge models using replicating Ad vectors. Results/conclusion The overall findings make the case that replicating Ad vectors are superior in priming multiple arms of the immune system, and in conjunction with protein boosting, have resulted in dramatic protective efficacy leading to their advancement to phase 1 trials. Implications of the recent halting of the Merck Ad5-HIV phase 2b clinical trial for our vaccine approach and other vectored vaccines are discussed. PMID:18694354

  14. Diagnosis of eight groups of xeroderma pigmentosum by genetic complementation using recombinant adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Toshiharu; Okura, Masae; Ishii-Osai, Yasue; Hida, Tokimasa

    2016-10-01

    Because patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) must avoid ultraviolet (UV) light from an early age, an early diagnosis of this disorder is essential. XP is composed of seven genetic complementation groups, XP-A to -G, and a variant type (XP-V). To establish an easy and accurate diagnosis of the eight disease groups, we constructed recombinant adenoviruses that expressed one of the XP cDNA. When fibroblasts derived from patients with XP-A, -B, -C, -D, -F or -G were infected with the adenovirus expressing XPA, XPB, XPC, XPD, XPF or XPG, respectively, and UV-C at 5-20 J/m(2) was irradiated, cell viability was clearly recovered by the corresponding recombinant adenoviruses. In contrast, XP-E and XP-V cells were not significantly sensitive to UV irradiation and were barely complemented by the matched recombinant adenoviruses. However, co-infection of Ad-XPA with Ad-XPE increased survival rate of XP-E cells after UV-C exposure. When XP-V cell strains, including one derived from a Japanese patient, were infected with Ad-XPV, exposed to UV-B and cultured with 1 mmol/L of caffeine, flow cytometry detected a characteristic decrease in the S phase in all the XP-V cell strains. From these results, the eight groups of XP could be differentiated by utilizing a set of recombinant adenoviruses, indicating that our procedure provides a convenient and correct diagnostic method for all the XP groups including XP-E and XP-V. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  15. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H.C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  16. [Construction of recombinant adenovirus vector of calcitonin gene-related peptide gene and transfection to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi-hui; Han, Jie; Shao, Lei; Wang, Li-hong; Song, Jun-xian; Wei, Zhong-hai; Zheng, Liang-rong

    2010-05-01

    To construct a recombinant adenovirus vector of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) by AdEasy system and to validate its expression in myocardial cells. The full-length of CGRP gene cDNA was acquired by RT-PCR and cloned into pShuttle-CMV. After linearization with Pme I, the recombinant plasmid (pShuttle-CMV-CGRP) was transformed into E.coli BJ5183 by electroporation to construct the recombinant adenovirus plasmid AdEasy-pShuttle-CGRP. The recombinant adenovirus plasmids were transformed into E.coli XL10-Gold cells to be amplified. Then the recombinant plasmid was digested with Pac I and transfected to 293 cells to package recombinant adenovirus particles. PCR technique was used to detect target gene. The recombinant adenovirus particles were purified by CsC1 density gradient. The purified recombinant adenovirus was transfected to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes,and the recombinant adenovirus production was observed by fluorescent microscope. Expression of CGRP in hearts 7 days after intravenous delivery of adenoviral vectors AV-CGRP was determined by radioimmunoassay. The RT-PCR products confirmed a full-length cDNA of CGRP gene in PUC(57) by sequencing. The corresponding double endonuclease and PCR analysis certified the successful cloning of the gene into the pShuttle-CMV. The recombinant adenovirus plasmid AdEasy-pShuttle-CGRP was digested by Pac I endonuclease to form the typical DNA segments, whose length was about 3 kb and 30 kb. PCR analysis and fluorescent microscope observation confirmed that the CGRP gene was inserted into the adenovirus vector with very strong power of transfection. The recombinant adenovirus particles infected neonatal rat cardiomyocytes successfully. Radioimmunoassay showed that delivery of AV-CGRP significantly increased the expression of CGRP in mice hearts. The recombinant adenovirus vector of CGRP gene has been constructed,and it can infect neonatal rat cardiomyocytes successfully. Somatic delivery of CGRP gene can significantly

  17. Intranasal Mucosal Boosting with an Adenovirus-Vectored Vaccine Markedly Enhances the Protection of BCG-Primed Guinea Pigs against Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Zhou; McFarland, Christine T.; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Izzo, Angelo; Wang, Jun; McMurray, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recombinant adenovirus-vectored (Ad) tuberculosis (TB) vaccine platform has demonstrated great potential to be used either as a stand-alone or a boost vaccine in murine models. However, Ad TB vaccine remains to be evaluated in a more relevant and sensitive guinea pig model of pulmonary TB. Many vaccine candidates shown to be effective in murine models have subsequently failed to pass the test in guinea pig models. Methods and Findings Specific pathogen-free guinea pigs were immunized with BCG, AdAg85A intranasally (i.n), AdAg85A intramuscularly (i.m), BCG boosted with AdAg85A i.n, BCG boosted with AdAg85A i.m, or treated only with saline. The animals were then infected by a low-dose aerosol of M. tuberculosis (M.tb). At the specified times, the animals were sacrificed and the levels of infection in the lung and spleen were assessed. In separate studies, the long-term disease outcome of infected animals was monitored until the termination of this study. Immunization with Ad vaccine alone had minimal beneficial effects. Immunization with BCG alone and BCG prime-Ad vaccine boost regimens significantly reduced the level of M.tb infection in the tissues to a similar extent. However, while BCG alone prolonged the survival of infected guinea pigs, the majority of BCG-immunized animals succumbed by 53 weeks post-M.tb challenge. In contrast, intranasal or intramuscular Ad vaccine boosting of BCG-primed animals markedly improved the survival rate with 60% of BCG/Ad i.n- and 40% of BCG/Ad i.m-immunized guinea pigs still surviving by 74 weeks post-aerosol challenge. Conclusions Boosting, particularly via the intranasal mucosal route, with AdAg85A vaccine is able to significantly enhance the long-term survival of BCG-primed guinea pigs following pulmonary M.tb challenge. Our results thus support further evaluation of this viral-vectored TB vaccine in clinical trials. PMID:19516906

  18. Recombinant interferon-γ lentivirus co-infection inhibits adenovirus replication ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Yin, Sen; Tan, Wanlong; Xiao, Dong; Weng, Yunceng; Wang, Wenjing; Li, Tingting; Shi, Junwen; Shuai, Lifang; Li, Hongwei; Zhou, Jianhua; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant interferon-γ (IFNγ) production in cultured lentivirus (LV) was explored for inhibition of target virus in cells co-infected with adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). The ability of three different promoters of CMV, EF1α and Ubiquitin initiating the enhanced green fluorescence protein (GFP) activities within lentiviruses was systematically assessed in various cell lines, which showed that certain cell lines selected the most favorable promoter driving a high level of transgenic expression. Recombinant IFNγ lentivirus carrying CMV promoter (LV-CMV-IFNγ) was generated to co-infect 293A cells with a viral surrogate of recombinant GFP Ad5 in parallel with LV-CMV-GFP control. The best morphologic conditions were observed from the two lentiviruses co-infected cells, while single adenovirus infected cells underwent clear pathologic changes. Viral load of adenoviruses from LV-CMV-IFNγ or LV-CMV-GFP co-infected cell cultures was significantly lower than that from adenovirus alone infected cells (P=0.005-0.041), and the reduction of adenoviral load in the co-infected cells was 86% and 61%, respectively. Ad5 viral load from LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infected cells was significantly lower than that from LV-CMV-GFP co-infection (P=0.032), which suggested that IFNγ rather than GFP could further enhance the inhibition of Ad5 replication in the recombinant lentivirus co-infected cells. The results suggest that LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infection could significantly inhibit the target virus replication and might be a potential approach for alternative therapy of severe viral diseases.

  19. Recombinant Interferon-γ Lentivirus Co-Infection Inhibits Adenovirus Replication Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Yin, Sen; Tan, Wanlong; Xiao, Dong; Weng, Yunceng; Wang, Wenjing; Li, Tingting; Shi, Junwen; Shuai, Lifang; Li, Hongwei; Zhou, Jianhua; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant interferon-γ (IFNγ) production in cultured lentivirus (LV) was explored for inhibition of target virus in cells co-infected with adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). The ability of three different promoters of CMV, EF1α and Ubiquitin initiating the enhanced green fluorescence protein (GFP) activities within lentiviruses was systematically assessed in various cell lines, which showed that certain cell lines selected the most favorable promoter driving a high level of transgenic expression. Recombinant IFNγ lentivirus carrying CMV promoter (LV-CMV-IFNγ) was generated to co-infect 293A cells with a viral surrogate of recombinant GFP Ad5 in parallel with LV-CMV-GFP control. The best morphologic conditions were observed from the two lentiviruses co-infected cells, while single adenovirus infected cells underwent clear pathologic changes. Viral load of adenoviruses from LV-CMV-IFNγ or LV-CMV-GFP co-infected cell cultures was significantly lower than that from adenovirus alone infected cells (P = 0.005–0.041), and the reduction of adenoviral load in the co-infected cells was 86% and 61%, respectively. Ad5 viral load from LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infected cells was significantly lower than that from LV-CMV-GFP co-infection (P = 0.032), which suggested that IFNγ rather than GFP could further enhance the inhibition of Ad5 replication in the recombinant lentivirus co-infected cells. The results suggest that LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infection could significantly inhibit the target virus replication and might be a potential approach for alternative therapy of severe viral diseases. PMID:22916129

  20. A Recombinant Adenovirus Expressing Ovine Interferon Tau Prevents Influenza Virus-Induced Lethality in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, E.; Avia, M.; Rangel, G.; de Molina, A.; Alejo, A.; Sevilla, N.

    2016-01-01

    Ovine interferon tau (IFN-τ) is a unique type I interferon with low toxicity and a broad host range in vivo. We report the generation of a nonreplicative recombinant adenovirus expressing biologically active IFN-τ. Using the B6.A2G-Mx1 mouse model, we showed that single-dose intranasal administration of recombinant Ad5-IFN-τ can effectively prevent lethality and disease induced by highly virulent hv-PR8 influenza virus by activating the interferon response and preventing viral replication. PMID:26739058

  1. Clinical and parasitological protection in a Leishmania infantum-macaque model vaccinated with adenovirus and the recombinant A2 antigen.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Gabriel; Teva, Antonio; Porrozzi, Renato; Pinto, Marcelo A; Marchevsky, Renato S; Rocha, Maria Gabrielle L; Dutra, Miriam S; Bruña-Romero, Oscar; Fernandes, Ana-Paula; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2014-06-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe vector-born disease of humans and dogs caused by Leishmania donovani complex parasites. Approximately 0.2 to 0.4 million new human VL cases occur annually worldwide. In the new world, these alarming numbers are primarily due to the impracticality of current control methods based on vector reduction and dog euthanasia. Thus, a prophylactic vaccine appears to be essential for VL control. The current efforts to develop an efficacious vaccine include the use of animal models that are as close to human VL. We have previously reported a L. infantum-macaque infection model that is reliable to determine which vaccine candidates are most worthy for further development. Among the few amastigote antigens tested so far, one of specific interest is the recombinant A2 (rA2) protein that protects against experimental L. infantum infections in mice and dogs. Primates were vaccinated using three rA2-based prime-boost immunization regimes: three doses of rA2 plus recombinant human interleukin-12 (rhIL-12) adsorbed in alum (rA2/rhIL-12/alum); two doses of non-replicative adenovirus recombinant vector encoding A2 (Ad5-A2) followed by two boosts with rA2/rhIL-12/alum (Ad5-A2+rA2/rhIL12/alum); and plasmid DNA encoding A2 gene (DNA-A2) boosted with two doses of Ad5-A2 (DNA-A2+Ad5-A2). Primates received a subsequent infectious challenge with L. infantum. Vaccines, apart from being safe, were immunogenic as animals responded with increased pre-challenge production of anti-A2-specific IgG antibodies, though with some variability in the response, depending on the vaccine formulation/protocol. The relative parasite load in the liver was significantly lower in immunized macaques as compared to controls. Protection correlated with hepatic granuloma resolution, and reduction of clinical symptoms, particularly when primates were vaccinated with the Ad5-A2+rA2/rhIL12/alum protocol. The remarkable clinical protection induced by A2 in an animal model that is

  2. Clinical and Parasitological Protection in a Leishmania infantum-Macaque Model Vaccinated with Adenovirus and the Recombinant A2 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Gabriel; Teva, Antonio; Porrozzi, Renato; Pinto, Marcelo A.; Marchevsky, Renato S.; Rocha, Maria Gabrielle L.; Dutra, Miriam S.; Bruña-Romero, Oscar; Fernandes, Ana-Paula; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe vector-born disease of humans and dogs caused by Leishmania donovani complex parasites. Approximately 0.2 to 0.4 million new human VL cases occur annually worldwide. In the new world, these alarming numbers are primarily due to the impracticality of current control methods based on vector reduction and dog euthanasia. Thus, a prophylactic vaccine appears to be essential for VL control. The current efforts to develop an efficacious vaccine include the use of animal models that are as close to human VL. We have previously reported a L. infantum-macaque infection model that is reliable to determine which vaccine candidates are most worthy for further development. Among the few amastigote antigens tested so far, one of specific interest is the recombinant A2 (rA2) protein that protects against experimental L. infantum infections in mice and dogs. Methodology/Principal Findings Primates were vaccinated using three rA2-based prime-boost immunization regimes: three doses of rA2 plus recombinant human interleukin-12 (rhIL-12) adsorbed in alum (rA2/rhIL-12/alum); two doses of non-replicative adenovirus recombinant vector encoding A2 (Ad5-A2) followed by two boosts with rA2/rhIL-12/alum (Ad5-A2+rA2/rhIL12/alum); and plasmid DNA encoding A2 gene (DNA-A2) boosted with two doses of Ad5-A2 (DNA-A2+Ad5-A2). Primates received a subsequent infectious challenge with L. infantum. Vaccines, apart from being safe, were immunogenic as animals responded with increased pre-challenge production of anti-A2-specific IgG antibodies, though with some variability in the response, depending on the vaccine formulation/protocol. The relative parasite load in the liver was significantly lower in immunized macaques as compared to controls. Protection correlated with hepatic granuloma resolution, and reduction of clinical symptoms, particularly when primates were vaccinated with the Ad5-A2+rA2/rhIL12/alum protocol. Conclusions/Significance The

  3. Inhibitory effect of recombinant adenovirus carrying immunocaspase-3 on hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohua; Fan, Rui; Zou, Xue; Gao, Lin; Jin, Haifeng; Du, Rui; Xia, Lin; Fan, Daiming . E-mail: fandaim@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-06-29

    Previously, Srinivasula devised a contiguous molecule (C-cp-3 or immunocaspase-3) containing the small and large subunits similar to that in the active form of caspas-3 and found C-cp-3 had similar cleavage activity to the active form of caspase-3. To search for a new clinical application of C-cp-3 to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, recombinant adenoviruses carrying the C-cp-3 and a-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter (Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3) were constructed through a bacterial homologous recombinant system. The efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and the inhibitory effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on the proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells were determined by X-gal stain and MTT assay, respectively. The tumorigenicity of hepatocarcinoma cells transfected by Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 and the antitumor effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on transplanted tumor in nude mice were detected in vivo. The results suggested that Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 can inhibit specifically proliferation of AFP-producing human hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo and adenovirus-mediated C-cp-3 transfer could be used as a new method to treat human hepatocarcinoma.

  4. An unusual symmetric recombinant between adenovirus type 12 DNA and human cell DNA

    PubMed Central

    Deuring, Renate; Klotz, Günther; Doerfler, Walter

    1981-01-01

    On purification of human adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) by equilibrium sedimentation in CsCl density gradients, two bands of particles, Ad12-3 and Ad12-3a, are observed. The particles from band Ad12-3a contain a recombinant of human host cell DNA and of Ad12 DNA. The human cell DNA sequences contain repetitive DNA recurring 200 to 500 times in cellular DNA. Ad12 DNA and the recombinant genomes exhibit the same or similar lengths. This finding suggests that a constant amount of DNA is packaged into complete Ad12 particles. On cleavage of KB cellular DNA with EcoRI, BamHI, HinfI, Msp I, Mbo I Pst I, or Bgl II, the 32P-labeled cellular DNA from Ad12-3a particles hybridizes on Southern blots to distinct bands of KB DNA. There is also less-specific background hybridization that is not observed in the control. The cellular DNA from Ad12-3a particles is not methylated, whereas the same cellular sequences in KB cell DNA appear to be extensively methylated. On denaturation and renaturation, the recombinant DNA molecules are converted to molecules half as long as Ad12 DNA, as determined by gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The recombinant DNA molecules were terminally labeled by exonuclease III treatment and subsequent refilling of the depleted segments with [32P]dNTPs by using DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment). When these molecules were cleaved with EcoRI, BamHI, Msp I, or Pst I, only one terminal DNA fragment was found to be labeled. The results of partial digestion experiments using Msp I, HinfI, or Mbo I are consistent with a model in which 700-1150 base pairs from the left terminus of Ad12 DNA are linked to host cell DNA containing repetitious sequences, and this structure is symmetrically duplicated as a large inverted repeat of the type ABCDD′C′B′A′. The Ad12 DNA sequences are flanking the entire molecule, which consists mainly of human KB cell DNA. The recombinants appear to be stable on serial passage of the virus preparation for many years, although

  5. Prime-boost vaccination with plasmid and adenovirus gene vaccines control HER2/neu+ metastatic breast cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jian-Ping; Rao, Xiao-Mei; Price, Janet E; Zhou, Heshan S; Lachman, Lawrence B

    2005-01-01

    Once metastasis has occurred, the possibility of completely curing breast cancer is unlikely, particularly for the 30 to 40% of cancers overexpressing the gene for HER2/neu. A vaccine targeting p185, the protein product of the HER2/neu gene, could have therapeutic application by controlling the growth and metastasis of highly aggressive HER2/neu+ cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of two gene vaccines targeting HER2/neu in preventive and therapeutic tumor models. The mouse breast cancer cell line A2L2, which expresses the gene for rat HER2/neu and hence p185, was injected into the mammary fat pad of mice as a model of solid tumor growth or was injected intravenously as a model of lung metastasis. SINCP-neu, a plasmid containing Sindbis virus genes and the gene for rat HER2/neu, and Adeno-neu, an E1,E2a-deleted adenovirus also containing the gene for rat HER2/neu, were tested as preventive and therapeutic vaccines. Vaccination with SINCP-neu or Adeno-neu before tumor challenge with A2L2 cells significantly inhibited the growth of the cells injected into the mammary fat or intravenously. Vaccination 2 days after tumor challenge with either vaccine was ineffective in both tumor models. However, therapeutic vaccination in a prime-boost protocol with SINCP-neu followed by Adeno-neu significantly prolonged the overall survival rate of mice injected intravenously with the tumor cells. Naive mice vaccinated using the same prime-boost protocol demonstrated a strong serum immunoglobulin G response and p185-specific cellular immunity, as shown by the results of ELISPOT (enzyme-linked immunospot) analysis for IFNgamma. We report herein that vaccination of mice with a plasmid gene vaccine and an adenovirus gene vaccine, each containing the gene for HER2/neu, prevented growth of a HER2/neu-expressing breast cancer cell line injected into the mammary fat pad or intravenously. Sequential administration of the vaccines in a prime-boost protocol was

  6. Protection of Non-Human Primates against Rabies with an Adenovirus Recombinant Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H. C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. PMID:24503087

  7. High expression of functional adenovirus DNA polymerase and precursor terminal protein using recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Stunnenberg, H G; Lange, H; Philipson, L; van Miltenburg, R T; van der Vliet, P C

    1988-01-01

    Initiation of Adenovirus (Ad) DNA replication occurs by a protein-priming mechanism in which the viral precursor terminal protein (pTP) and DNA polymerase (pol) as well as two nuclear DNA-binding proteins from uninfected HeLa cells are required. Biochemical studies on the pTP and DNA polymerase proteins separately have been hampered due to their low abundance and their presence as a pTP-pol complex in Ad infected cells. We have constructed a genomic sequence containing the large open reading frame from the Ad5 pol gene to which 9 basepairs from a putative exon were ligated. When inserted behind a modified late promoter of vaccinia virus the resulting recombinant virus produced enzymatically active 140 kDa Ad DNA polymerase. The same strategy was applied to express the 80 kDa pTP gene in a functional form. Both proteins were overexpressed at least 30-fold compared to extracts from Adenovirus infected cells and, when combined, were fully active for initiation in an in vitro Adenovirus DNA replication system. Images PMID:3362670

  8. Effects of endostatin-vascular endothelial growth inhibitor chimeric recombinant adenoviruses on antiangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xin; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Min; Pan, Wei; Qi, Zhong-Tian; Cao, Guang-Wen

    2004-05-15

    To investigate the inhibitory effects of endostatin-vascular endothelial growth inhibitor (VEGI151) recombinant adenoviruses on neovascularization. We used recombinant adenoviruses to treat human vascular endothelial cell line ECV304, human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2, and murine fibroblast cell line L929, in order to study the chimeric gene expression in these cell lines. Chick choriallantic membrane (CAM) model, rabbit inflammatory corneal neovascularization (CNV) model, and liver cancer-bearing nude mice model were employed to investigate the negative biological effect of fusion molecules on neovascularization in vivo. Western blot showed that the molecular weight of fusion protein was about 41 kD after infection of ECV304, HepG2 and L929 cells with supernatant of AdhENDO-VEGI151. The fusion protein showed a specific inhibitory effect on the proliferation of ECV304 cells, but no inhibitory effect on the growth of HepG2 and L929 cells (F=13112.13, P=0.0001). In the chick choriallantic membrane (CAM) assay, the expressed fusion protein significantly inhibited neovascularization. Rabbit inflammatory corneal neovascularization (CNV) induced by intrastromal sutures resulted in a uniform neovascular response. In this model, direct subconjunctival injection of AdhENDO-VEGI151 expressed the fusion protein in vivo and suppressed the development of CNV. Topical application of AdhENDO-VEGI151 led to a significant suppression of CNV (F=1413.11, P=0.0001), as compared with the control group of AdLacZ. Immunohistochemical staining showed the fusion protein dominantly expressed in corneal epithelium. Compared with the control group of AdLacZ (4075.9+/-1849.9 mm(3)), the average tumor size of group AdhENDO-VEGI151 reduced in size (487.7+/-241.2 mm(3)) (F=14.80, P=0.0085), with an inhibition rate of 88.03%. Immunohistochemical staining showed the adenoviruses carried the fusion gene expressed on liver cancer cell membrane. MVD decreased more significantly in treated

  9. Effects of endostatin-vascular endothelial growth inhibitor chimeric recombinant adenoviruses on antiangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xin; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Min; Pan, Wei; Qi, Zhong-Tian; Cao, Guang-Wen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effects of endostatin-vascular endothelial growth inhibitor (VEGI151) recombinant adenoviruses on neovascularization. METHODS: We used recombinant adenoviruses to treat human vascular endothelial cell line ECV304, human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2, and murine fibroblast cell line L929, in order to study the chimeric gene expression in these cell lines. Chick choriallantic membrane (CAM) model, rabbit inflammatory corneal neovascularization (CNV) model, and liver cancer-bearing nude mice model were employed to investigate the negative biological effect of fusion molecules on neovascularization in vivo. RESULTS: Western blot showed that the molecular weight of fusion protein was about 41kD after infection of ECV304, HepG2 and L929 cells with supernatant of AdhENDO-VEGI151. The fusion protein showed a specific inhibitory effect on the proliferation of ECV304 cells, but no inhibitory effect on the growth of HepG2 and L929 cells (F = 13112.13, P = 0.0001). In the chick choriallantic membrane (CAM) assay, the expressed fusion protein significantly inhibited neovascularization. Rabbit inflammatory corneal neovasculari-zation (CNV) induced by intrastromal sutures resulted in a uniform neovascular response. In this model, direct subconjunctival injection of AdhENDO-VEGI151 expressed the fusion protein in vivo and suppressed the development of CNV. Topical application of AdhENDO-VEGI151 led to a significant suppression of CNV (F = 1413.11, P = 0.0001), as compared with the control group of AdLacZ. Immunohist-ochemical staining showed the fusion protein dominantly expressed in corneal epithelium. Compared with the control group of AdLacZ (4075.9 ± 1849.9 mm3), the average tumor size of group AdhENDO-VEGI151 reduced in size (487.7 ± 241.2 mm3) (F = 14.80, P = 0.0085), with an inhibition rate of 88.03%. Immunohistochemical staining showed the adenoviruses carried the fusion gene expressed on liver cancer cell membrane. MVD

  10. Recombinant Human Adenovirus: Targeting to the Human Transferrin Receptor Improves Gene Transfer to Brain Microcapillary Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Haibin; Anderson, Brian; Mao, Qinwen; Davidson, Beverly L.

    2000-01-01

    Some inborn errors of metabolism due to deficiencies of soluble lysosomal enzymes cause global neurodegenerative disease. Representative examples include the infantile and late infantile forms of the ceroid lipofuscinoses (CLN1 or CLN2 deficiency, respectively) and mucopolysaccharidoses type VII (MPS VII), a deficiency of β-glucuronidase. Treatment of the central nervous system component of these disorders will require widespread protein or enzyme replacement, either through dissemination of the protein or through dissemination of a gene encoding it. We hypothesize that transduction of brain microcapillary endothelium (BME) with recombinant viral vectors, with secretion of enzyme product basolaterally, could allow for widespread enzyme dissemination. To achieve this, viruses should be modified to target the BME. This requires (i) identification of a BME-resident target receptor, (ii) identification of motifs targeted to that molecule, (iii) the construction of modified viruses to allow for binding to the target receptor, and (iv) demonstrated transduction of receptor-expressing cells. In proof of principal experiments, we chose the human transferrin receptor (hTfR), a molecule found at high density on human BME. A nonamer phage display library was panned for motifs which could bind hTfR. Forty-three clones were sequenced, most of which contained an AKxxK/R, KxKxPK/R, or KxK motif. Ten peptides representative of the three motifs were cloned into the HI loop of adenovirus type 5 fiber. All motifs tested retained their ability to trimerize and bind transferrin receptor, and seven allowed for recombinant adenovirus production. Importantly, the fiber-modified viruses facilitated increased gene transfer (2- to 34-fold) to hTfR expressing cell lines and human brain microcapillary endothelia expressing high levels of endogenous receptor. Our data indicate that adenoviruses can be modified in the HI loop for expanded tropism to the hTfR. PMID:11070036

  11. Simian adenovirus type 35 has a recombinant genome comprising human and simian adenovirus sequences, which predicts its potential emergence as a human respiratory pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Shoaleh; Seto, Jason; Jones, Morris S.; Dyer, David W.; Chodosh, James; Seto, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Emergent human and simian adenoviruses (HAdVs) may arise from genome recombination. Computational analysis of SAdV type 35 reveals a genome comprising a chassis with elements mostly from two simian adenoviruses, SAdV-B21 and -B27, and regions of high sequence similarity shared with HAdV-B21 and HAdV-B16. Although recombination direction cannot be determined, the presence of these regions suggests prior infections of humans by an ancestor of SAdV-B35, and/or vice versa. Absence of this virus in humans may reflect non-optimal conditions for zoonosis. The presence of both a critical viral replication element found in HAdV genomes and genes that are highly similar to ones in HAdVs suggest the potential to establish in a human host. This allows a prediction that this virus may be a nascent human respiratory pathogen. The recombination potential of human and simian adenovirus genomes should be considered in the use of SAdVs as vectors for gene delivery in humans. PMID:24210123

  12. Enhancement of survivin-specific anti-tumor immunity by adenovirus prime protein-boost immunity strategy with DDA/MPL adjuvant in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Qian; Zhang, Hai-Hong; Liu, Chen-Lu; Wu, Hui; Wang, Peng; Xia, Qiu; Zhang, Li-Xing; Li, Bo; Wu, Jia-Xin; Yu, Bin; Gu, Tie-Jun; Yu, Xiang-Hui; Kong, Wei

    2013-09-01

    As an ideal tumor antigen, survivin has been widely used for tumor immunotherapy. Nevertheless, no effective protein vaccine targeting survivin has been reported, which may be due to its poor ability to induce cellular immunity. Thus, a suitable immunoadjuvant and optimized immunization strategy can greatly enhance the cellular immune response to this protein vaccine. DDA/MPL (monophosphoryl lipid A formulated with cationic dimethyldioctadecylammonium) has been reported to enhance the antigen uptake and presentation to T cells as an adjuvant. Meanwhile, a heterologous prime-boost strategy can enhance the cellular immunity of a protein vaccine by applying different antigen-presenting systems. Here, DDA/MPL and an adenovirus prime-protein boost strategy were applied to enhance the specific anti-tumor immunity of a truncated survivin protein vaccine. Antigen-specific IFN-γ-secreting T cells were increased by 10-fold, and cytotoxic T lympohocytes (CTLs) were induced effectively when the protein vaccine was combined with the DDA/MPL adjuvant. Meanwhile, the Th1 type cellular immune response was strongly enhanced and tumor inhibition was significantly increased by 96% with the adenovirus/protein prime-boost strategy, compared to the protein homologous prime-boost strategy. Moreover, this adjuvanted heterologous prime-boost strategy combined with oxaliplatin could significantly enhance the efficiency of tumor growth inhibition through promoting the proliferation of splenocytes. Thus, our results provide a novel vaccine strategy for cancer therapy using an adenovirus prime-protein boost strategy in a murine melanoma model, and its combination with oxaliplatin may further enhance the anti-tumor efficacy while alleviating side effects of the drug.

  13. Priming T-cell responses with recombinant measles vaccine vector in a heterologous prime-boost setting in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Diane L; Santra, Sampa; Swett-Tapia, Cindy; Custers, Jerome; Song, Kaimei; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Mach, Linh; Naim, Hussein; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Lifton, Michelle; Goudsmit, Jaap; Letvin, Norman; Roederer, Mario; Radošević, Katarina

    2012-09-07

    Licensed live attenuated virus vaccines capable of expressing transgenes from other pathogens have the potential to reduce the number of childhood immunizations by eliciting robust immunity to multiple pathogens simultaneously. Recombinant attenuated measles virus (rMV) derived from the Edmonston Zagreb vaccine strain was engineered to express simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag protein for the purpose of evaluating the immunogenicity of rMV as a vaccine vector in rhesus macaques. rMV-Gag immunization alone elicited robust measles-specific humoral and cellular responses, but failed to elicit transgene (Gag)-specific immune responses, following aerosol or intratracheal/intramuscular delivery. However, when administered as a priming vaccine to a heterologous boost with recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 expressing the same transgene, rMV-Gag significantly enhanced Gag-specific T lymphocyte responses following rAd5 immunization. Gag-specific humoral responses were not enhanced, however, which may be due to either the transgene or the vector. Cellular response priming by rMV against the transgene was highly effective even when using a suboptimal dose of rAd5 for the boost. These data demonstrate feasibility of using rMV as a priming component of heterologous prime-boost vaccine regimens for pathogens requiring strong cellular responses.

  14. Priming T-cell responses with recombinant measles vaccine vector in a heterologous prime-boost setting in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Diane L.; Santra, Sampa; Swett, Cindy; Custers, Jerome; Song, Kaimei; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Letvin, Norman; Roederer, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Licensed live attenuated virus vaccines capable of expressing transgenes from other pathogens have the potential to reduce the number of childhood immunizations by eliciting robust immunity to multiple pathogens simultaneously. Recombinant attenuated measles virus (rMV) derived from the Edmonston Zagreb vaccine strain was engineered to express simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag protein for the purpose of evaluating the immunogenicity of rMV as a vaccine vector in rhesus macaques. rMV-Gag immunization alone elicited robust measles-specific humoral and cellular responses, but failed to elicit transgene (Gag)-specific immune responses, following aerosol or intratracheal/intramuscular delivery. However, when administered as a priming vaccine to a heterologous boost with recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 expressing the same transgene, rMV-Gag significantly enhanced Gag-specific T lymphocyte responses following rAd5 immunization. Gag-specific humoral responses were not enhanced, however, which may be due to either the transgene or the vector. Cellular response priming by rMV against the transgene was highly effective even when using a suboptimal dose of rAd5 for the boost. These data demonstrate feasibility of using rMV as a priming component of heterologous prime-boost vaccine regimens for pathogens requiring strong cellular responses. PMID:22732429

  15. Immunology and evolvement of the adenovirus prime, MVA boost Ebola virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Sullivan, Nancy J

    2015-08-01

    The 2014 Ebola virus outbreak caused an order of magnitude more deaths in a single outbreak than all previous known outbreaks combined, affecting both local and international public health, and threatening the security and economic stability of the countries in West Africa directly confronting the outbreak. The severity of the epidemic lead to a global response to assist with patient care, outbreak control, and deployment of vaccines. The latter was possible due to the long history of basic and clinical research aimed at identifying a safe and effective vaccine to protect against Ebola virus infection. This review highlights the immunology, development, and progress of vaccines based on replication-defective adenovirus vectors, culminating in the successful launch of the first Phase III trial of an Ebola virus vaccine.

  16. The Change of Immunoactivity of Dendritic Cells Induced by Mouse 4-1BBL Recombinant Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Youlin, Kuang; Xiaodong, Weng; Zhiyuan, Chen; Hengcheng, Zhu; Hui, Chen; Botao, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to construct a recombinant adenovirus vector carrying mouse 4-1BBL and observe its effects in dendritic cells. Materials and Methods Mouse 4-1BBL cDNA was taken from the plasmid pcDNA3-m4-1BBL and subcloned into adenovirus shuttle plasmid pAdTrack-CMV, and then transformed into competent BJ5183 with plasmid pAdEasy-1. After recombination in E. coli, Ad-4-1BBL was packaged and amplified in HEK 293 cells. The expression of 4-1BBL in Ad-4-1BBL-transfected mouse prostate cancer cell line RM-1 was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. After the co-culture of dendritic cells (DCs) with Ad-4-1BBL-transfected RM-1 cells, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-12 production were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and co-stimulatary moleculs (CD80 and CD86) on DCs were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results The levels of IL-6 (3,960 pg/mL) and IL-12 (249 pg/mL) production in Ad-m4-1BBL-pulsed DCs were more than those in none-pulsed DCs. The differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The expression of co-stimulatary molecules (CD80 and CD86) was up-regulated in Ad-m4-1BBL-pulsed DCs. Conclusion The results indicated the recombinant mouse 4-1BBL can effectively activate DCs. PMID:20499429

  17. Receptor-targeted recombinant adenovirus conglomerates: a novel molecular conjugate vector with improved expression characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenberger, P; Hunt, J D; Robert, E; Theodossiou, C; Kolls, J K

    1997-01-01

    To develop improved strategies for gene transfer to hematopoietic cells, we have explored targeted gene transfer using molecular conjugate vectors (MCVs). MCVs are constructed by condensing plasmid DNA containing the gene of interest with polylysine (PL), PL linked to a replication-incompetent adenovirus (endosomolytic agent), and PL linked to streptavidin for targeting with biotinylated ligands. In this report, we compare gene transfer to K562 cells by using the previously described transferrin-targeted MCV (Trans-MCV) to a novel transferrin-targeted MCV. In the novel MCV, the transferred gene (luciferase) is in the genome of recombinant replication-incompetent adenovirus (recMCV), which also acts as the endosomolytic agent. The level of luciferase gene expression was fivefold higher in K562 cells transfected with Trans-recMCV than in cells transfected with Trans-MCV. Furthermore, targeted transfection with recMCV resulted in prolonged luciferase expression that declined 14 to 20 days after transfection, in comparison with Trans-MCV, where luciferase expression declined by 4 to 8 days. Moreover, targeted transfection of K562 cells with the Trans-recMCV resulted in persistent luciferase gene expression for 6 months. Analysis of luciferase gene expression in K562 single-cell clones that were subcloned 5 weeks after transfection with Trans-recMCV showed that 35 to 50% of the single-cell clones had intermediate to high levels of luciferase gene expression that was stable for 6 months, with the remaining clones showing low or no luciferase gene expression. Stable gene expression was associated with integration of adenovirus sequences into genomic DNA. PMID:9343214

  18. Immunity, safety and protection of an Adenovirus 5 prime--Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara boost subunit vaccine against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in calves.

    PubMed

    Bull, Tim J; Vrettou, Christina; Linedale, Richard; McGuinnes, Catherine; Strain, Sam; McNair, Jim; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hope, Jayne C

    2014-10-29

    Vaccination is the most cost effective control measure for Johne's disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) but currently available whole cell killed formulations have limited efficacy and are incompatible with the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis by tuberculin skin test. We have evaluated the utility of a viral delivery regimen of non-replicative human Adenovirus 5 and Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara recombinant for early entry MAP specific antigens (HAV) to show protection against challenge in a calf model and extensively screened for differential immunological markers associated with protection. We have shown that HAV vaccination was well tolerated, could be detected using a differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) test, showed no cross-reactivity with tuberculin and provided a degree of protection against challenge evidenced by a lack of faecal shedding in vaccinated animals that persisted throughout the 7 month infection period. Calves given HAV vaccination had significant priming and boosting of MAP derived antigen (PPD-J) specific CD4+, CD8+ IFN-γ producing T-cell populations and, upon challenge, developed early specific Th17 related immune responses, enhanced IFN-γ responses and retained a high MAP killing capacity in blood. During later phases post MAP challenge, PPD-J antigen specific IFN-γ and Th17 responses in HAV vaccinated animals corresponded with improvements in peripheral bacteraemia. By contrast a lack of IFN-γ, induction of FoxP3+ T cells and increased IL-1β and IL-10 secretion were indicative of progressive infection in Sham vaccinated animals. We conclude that HAV vaccination shows excellent promise as a new tool for improving control of MAP infection in cattle.

  19. Adenovirus vector-induced immune responses in nonhuman primates: responses to prime boost regimens.

    PubMed

    Tatsis, Nia; Lasaro, Marcio O; Lin, Shih-Wen; Haut, Larissa H; Xiang, Zhi Q; Zhou, Dongming; Dimenna, Lauren; Li, Hua; Bian, Ang; Abdulla, Sarah; Li, Yan; Giles-Davis, Wynetta; Engram, Jessica; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Silvestri, Guido; Ertl, Hildegund C; Betts, Michael R

    2009-05-15

    In the phase IIb STEP trial an HIV-1 vaccine based on adenovirus (Ad) vectors of the human serotype 5 (AdHu5) not only failed to induce protection but also increased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in individuals with preexisting neutralizing Abs against AdHu5. The mechanisms underlying the increased HIV-1 acquisition rates have not yet been elucidated. Furthermore, it remains unclear if the lack of the vaccine's efficacy reflects a failure of the concept of T cell-mediated protection against HIV-1 or a product failure of the vaccine. Here, we compared two vaccine regimens based on sequential use of AdHu5 vectors or two different chimpanzee-derived Ad vectors in rhesus macaques that were AdHu5 seropositive or seronegative at the onset of vaccination. Our results show that heterologous booster immunizations with the chimpanzee-derived Ad vectors induced higher T and B cell responses than did repeated immunizations with the AdHu5 vector, especially in AdHu5-preexposed macaques.

  20. Recombinant adenovirus encoding NLRP3 RNAi attenuate inflammation and brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bangqing; Shen, Hanchao; Lin, Li; Su, Tonggang; Zhong, Shanchuan; Yang, Zhao

    2015-10-15

    Numerous evidence have shown that microglia mediated inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Therefore anti-inflammation therapy represents a potentially promising approach to ICH. Recently, NLRP3 inflammasome was discovered to facilitate the inflammatory response. However, the effect of NLRP3 inflammasome after ICH has not been fully studied. To explore the potential of NLRP3 inflammasome, we detected NLRP3 expression, inflammation, brain edema and neurological functions in vitro and in vivo. We found that ICH activated the NLRP3 inflammasome and inflammation. However, NLRP3 RNAi could attenuate inflammation and brain injury after ICH. Therefore, the findings suggested that recombinant adenovirus encoding NLRP3 RNAi might be valuable as a potential strategy for anti-inflammation therapy in ICH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Oral immunization of raccoons and skunks with a canine adenovirus recombinant rabies vaccine.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Heather; Jackson, Felix; Bean, Kayla; Panasuk, Brian; Niezgoda, Michael; Slate, Dennis; Li, Jianwei; Dietzschold, Bernard; Mattis, Jeff; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2009-11-27

    Oral vaccination is an important part of wildlife rabies control programs. Currently, the vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus is the only oral rabies vaccine licensed in the United States, and it is not effective in skunks. In the current study, captive raccoons and skunks were used to evaluate a vaccine developed by incorporating the rabies virus glycoprotein gene into a canine adenovirus serotype 2 vector (CAV2-RVG). Seven of 7 raccoons orally vaccinated with CAV2-RVG developed virus neutralizing antibodies and survived lethal challenge. Five of 5 and 6 of 6 skunks in 2 experimental groups receiving 10-fold different dilutions of CAV2-RVG developed neutralizing antibodies and survived challenge. The results of this preliminary study suggest that CAV2-RVG stimulates protective immunity against rabies in raccoons and skunks.

  2. Use of an Automated Image Processing Program to Quantify Recombinant Adenovirus Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenauer-Kutner, Linda J.; Halperin, Rebecca; Ihnat, Peter M.; Tully, Christopher P.; Bordens, Ronald W.; Grace, Michael J.

    2005-02-01

    Electron microscopy has a pivotal role as an analytical tool in pharmaceutical research. However, digital image data have proven to be too large for efficient quantitative analysis. We describe here the development and application of an automated image processing (AIP) program that rapidly quantifies shape measurements of recombinant adenovirus (rAd) obtained from digitized field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images. The program was written using the macro-recording features within Image-Pro® Plus software. The macro program, which is linked to a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, consists of a series of subroutines designed to automatically measure rAd vector objects from the FESEM images. The application and utility of this macro program has enabled us to rapidly and efficiently analyze very large data sets of rAd samples while minimizing operator time.

  3. [Delivery of secreted placental alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) gene in vitro and in vivo as a component of recombinant avian adenovirus (CELO)].

    PubMed

    Logunov, D Iu; Cherenova, L V; Shmarov, M M; Shashkova, E V; Verkhovskaia, L V; Doronin, K K; Naroditskiĭ, B S

    2002-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses capable of expressing the gene of secreted placentary alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under control of CMV-promoter was obtained on the basis of CELO avian adenovirus and human adenovirus-5 (Ad5) genomes. The efficiency of the CELO vector was determined in experiments with transduction of human (293, A549, and H1299), mouse (B16), and avian (LMH) cell cultures. It was shown in C57BL/6 mice in vivo that SEAP gene is expressed under conditions of intravenous, intranasal, and intratumoral application of recombinant adenovirus CELO-SEAP. The duration of expression of the alkaline phosphatase CELO = SEAP gene in immunocompetent mouse body was 21 days. The level of SEAP gene expression was measured in the allantois fluid of chicken embryo infected with recombinant adenovirus CELO-SEAP.

  4. Immunogenicity analysis following human immunodeficiency virus recombinant DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus Tian Tan prime-boost immunization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cunxia; Du, Shouwen; Li, Chang; Wang, Yuhang; Wang, Maopeng; Li, Yi; Yin, Ronglan; Li, Xiao; Ren, Dayong; Qin, Yanqing; Ren, Jingqiang; Jin, Ningyi

    2013-06-01

    This study assessed and compared the immunogenicity of various immunization strategies in mice using combinations of recombinant DNA (pCCMp24) and recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus Tian Tan (rddVTT-CCMp24). Intramuscular immunization was performed on days 0 (prime) and 21 (boost). The immunogenicity of the vaccine schedules was determined by measuring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific binding antibody levels and cytokine (interleukin-2 and interleukin-4) concentrations in peripheral blood, analyzing lymphocyte proliferation capacity against HIV epitopes and CD4(+)/CD8(+) cell ratio, and monitoring interferon-gamma levels at different times post-immunization. The results showed that pCCMp24, rddVTT-CCMp24 and their prime-boost immunization induced humoral and cellular immune responses. The pCCMp24/rddVTT-CCMp24 immunization strategy increased CD8(+) T cells and induced more IFN-γ-secreting cells compared with single-shot rDNA. The prime-boost immunization strategy also induced the generation of cellular immunological memory to HIV epitope peptides. These results demonstrated that prime-boost immunization with rDNA and rddVTT-CCMp24 had a tendency to induce greater cellular immune response than single-shot vaccinations, especially IFN-γ response, providing a basis for further studies.

  5. Heterologous Prime-Boost Regimens with a Recombinant Chimpanzee Adenoviral Vector and Adjuvanted F4 Protein Elicit Polyfunctional HIV-1-Specific T-Cell Responses in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lorin, Clarisse; Vanloubbeeck, Yannick; Baudart, Sébastien; Ska, Michaël; Bayat, Babak; Brauers, Geoffroy; Clarinval, Géraldine; Donner, Marie-Noëlle; Marchand, Martine; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Mettens, Pascal; Cohen, Joe; Voss, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are important for HIV-1 replication control. F4/AS01 consists of F4 recombinant fusion protein (containing clade B Gag/p24, Pol/RT, Nef and Gag/p17) formulated in AS01 Adjuvant System, and was shown to induce F4-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses in humans. While replication-incompetent recombinant HIV-1/SIV antigen-expressing human adenoviral vectors can elicit high-frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, their use is hampered by widespread pre-existing immunity to human serotypes. Non-human adenovirus serotypes associated with lower prevalence may offer an alternative strategy. We evaluated the immunogenicity of AdC7-GRN (‘A’), a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus type 7 vector expressing clade B Gag, RT and Nef, and F4/AS01 (‘P’), when delivered intramuscularly in homologous (PP or AA) and heterologous (AAPP or PPAA) prime-boost regimens, in macaques and mice. Vaccine-induced HIV-1-antigen-specific T cells in peripheral blood (macaques), liver, spleen, and intestinal and genital mucosa (mice) were characterized by intracellular cytokine staining. Vaccine-specific IgG antibodies (macaques) were detected using ELISA. In macaques, only the heterologous prime-boost regimens induced polyfunctional, persistent and balanced CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses specific to each HIV-1 vaccine antigen. AdC7-GRN priming increased the polyfunctionality of F4/AS01-induced CD4+ T cells. Approximately 50% of AdC7-GRN-induced memory CD8+ T cells exhibited an effector-memory phenotype. HIV-1-specific antibodies were detected with each regimen. In mice, antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were detected in the mucosal and systemic anatomical compartments assessed. When administered in heterologous prime-boost regimens, AdC7-GRN and F4/AS01 candidate vaccines acted complementarily in inducing potent and persistent peripheral blood HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses and antibodies in macaques

  6. Therapeutic vaccination with recombinant adenovirus reduces splenic parasite burden in experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Maroof, Asher; Brown, Najmeeyah; Smith, Barbara; Hodgkinson, Michael R; Maxwell, Alice; Losch, Florian O; Fritz, Ulrike; Walden, Peter; Lacey, Charles N J; Smith, Deborah F; Aebischer, Toni; Kaye, Paul M

    2012-03-01

    Therapeutic vaccines, when used alone or in combination therapy with antileishmanial drugs, may have an important place in the control of a variety of forms of human leishmaniasis. Here, we describe the development of an adenovirus-based vaccine (Ad5-KH) comprising a synthetic haspb gene linked to a kmp11 gene via a viral 2A sequence. In nonvaccinated Leishmania donovani-infected BALB/c mice, HASPB- and KMP11-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were undetectable, although IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies were evident. After therapeutic vaccination, antibody responses were boosted, and IFNγ(+)CD8(+) T cell responses, particularly to HASPB, became apparent. A single vaccination with Ad5-KH inhibited splenic parasite growth by ∼66%, a level of efficacy comparable to that observed in early stage testing of clinically approved antileishmanial drugs in this model. These studies indicate the usefulness of adenoviral vectors to deliver leishmanial antigens in a potent and host protective manner to animals with existing L. donovani infection.

  7. Therapeutic Vaccination With Recombinant Adenovirus Reduces Splenic Parasite Burden in Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Maroof, Asher; Brown, Najmeeyah; Smith, Barbara; Hodgkinson, Michael R.; Maxwell, Alice; Losch, Florian O.; Fritz, Ulrike; Walden, Peter; Lacey, Charles N. J.; Smith, Deborah F.; Aebischer, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines, when used alone or in combination therapy with antileishmanial drugs, may have an important place in the control of a variety of forms of human leishmaniasis. Here, we describe the development of an adenovirus-based vaccine (Ad5-KH) comprising a synthetic haspb gene linked to a kmp11 gene via a viral 2A sequence. In nonvaccinated Leishmania donovani–infected BALB/c mice, HASPB- and KMP11-specific CD8+ T cell responses were undetectable, although IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies were evident. After therapeutic vaccination, antibody responses were boosted, and IFNγ+CD8+ T cell responses, particularly to HASPB, became apparent. A single vaccination with Ad5-KH inhibited splenic parasite growth by ∼66%, a level of efficacy comparable to that observed in early stage testing of clinically approved antileishmanial drugs in this model. These studies indicate the usefulness of adenoviral vectors to deliver leishmanial antigens in a potent and host protective manner to animals with existing L. donovani infection. PMID:22301630

  8. Intensive Pharmacological Immunosuppression Allows for Repetitive Liver Gene Transfer With Recombinant Adenovirus in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Fontanellas, Antonio; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Mauleón, Itsaso; Dubrot, Juan; Mancheño, Uxua; Collantes, María; Sampedro, Ana; Unzu, Carmen; Alfaro, Carlos; Palazón, Asis; Smerdou, Cristian; Benito, Alberto; Prieto, Jesús; Peñuelas, Iván; Melero, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    Repeated administration of gene therapies is hampered by host immunity toward vectors and transgenes. Attempts to circumvent antivector immunity include pharmacological immunosuppression or alternating different vectors and vector serotypes with the same transgene. Our studies show that B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and concomitant T-cell inhibition with clinically available drugs permits repeated liver gene transfer to a limited number of nonhuman primates with recombinant adenovirus. Adenoviral vector–mediated transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene was visualized in vivo with a semiquantitative transgene-specific positron emission tomography (PET) technique, liver immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot for the reporter transgene in needle biopsies. Neutralizing antibody and T cell–mediated responses toward the viral capsids were sequentially monitored and found to be repressed by the drug combinations tested. Repeated liver transfer of the HSV1-tk reporter gene with the same recombinant adenoviral vector was achieved in macaques undergoing a clinically feasible immunosuppressive treatment that ablated humoral and cellular immune responses. This strategy allows measurable gene retransfer to the liver as late as 15 months following the first adenoviral exposure in a macaque, which has undergone a total of four treatments with the same adenoviral vector. PMID:20087317

  9. Intensive pharmacological immunosuppression allows for repetitive liver gene transfer with recombinant adenovirus in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Fontanellas, Antonio; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Mauleón, Itsaso; Dubrot, Juan; Mancheño, Uxua; Collantes, María; Sampedro, Ana; Unzu, Carmen; Alfaro, Carlos; Palazón, Asis; Smerdou, Cristian; Benito, Alberto; Prieto, Jesús; Peñuelas, Iván; Melero, Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    Repeated administration of gene therapies is hampered by host immunity toward vectors and transgenes. Attempts to circumvent antivector immunity include pharmacological immunosuppression or alternating different vectors and vector serotypes with the same transgene. Our studies show that B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and concomitant T-cell inhibition with clinically available drugs permits repeated liver gene transfer to a limited number of nonhuman primates with recombinant adenovirus. Adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene was visualized in vivo with a semiquantitative transgene-specific positron emission tomography (PET) technique, liver immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot for the reporter transgene in needle biopsies. Neutralizing antibody and T cell-mediated responses toward the viral capsids were sequentially monitored and found to be repressed by the drug combinations tested. Repeated liver transfer of the HSV1-tk reporter gene with the same recombinant adenoviral vector was achieved in macaques undergoing a clinically feasible immunosuppressive treatment that ablated humoral and cellular immune responses. This strategy allows measurable gene retransfer to the liver as late as 15 months following the first adenoviral exposure in a macaque, which has undergone a total of four treatments with the same adenoviral vector.

  10. Use of recombinant adenovirus vectored consensus IFN-α to avert severe arenavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Gowen, Brian B; Ennis, Jane; Russell, Andrew; Sefing, Eric J; Wong, Min-Hui; Turner, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Several arenaviruses can cause viral hemorrhagic fever, a severe disease with case-fatality rates in hospitalized individuals ranging from 15-30%. Because of limited prophylaxis and treatment options, new medical countermeasures are needed for these viruses classified by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) as top priority biodefense Category A pathogens. Recombinant consensus interferon alpha (cIFN-α) is a licensed protein with broad clinical appeal. However, while cIFN-α has great therapeutic value, its utility for biodefense applications is hindered by its short in vivo half-life, mode and frequency of administration, and costly production. To address these limitations, we describe the use of DEF201, a replication-deficient adenovirus vector that drives the expression of cIFN-α, for pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis of acute arenaviral infection modeled in hamsters. Intranasal administration of DEF201 24 h prior to challenge with Pichindé virus (PICV) was highly effective at protecting animals from mortality and preventing viral replication and liver-associated disease. A significant protective effect was still observed with a single dosing of DEF201 given two weeks prior to PICV challenge. DEF201 was also efficacious when administered as a treatment 24 to 48 h post-virus exposure. The protective effect of DEF201 was largely attributed to the expression of cIFN-α, as dosing with a control empty vector adenovirus did not protect hamsters from lethal PICV challenge. Effective countermeasures that are highly stable, easily administered, and elicit long lasting protective immunity are much needed for arena and other viral infections. The DEF201 technology has the potential to address all of these issues and may serve as a broad-spectrum antiviral to enhance host defense against a number of viral pathogens.

  11. Stable delivery of physiologic levels of recombinant erythropoietin to the systemic circulation by intramuscular injection of replication-defective adenovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, S K; Goldwasser, E; Lu, M M; Barr, E; Leiden, J M

    1994-01-01

    A number of inherited and acquired serum protein deficiencies including hemophilias A and B, diabetes mellitus, and the erythropoietin-responsive anemias are currently treated with repeated subcutaneous or intravenous infusions of purified or recombinant proteins. The development of an in vivo gene-transfer approach to deliver physiologic levels of recombinant proteins to the systemic circulation would represent a significant advance in the treatment of these disorders. Here we describe the construction of a replication-defective adenovirus (AdEF1hEpo) containing the human erythropoietin (hEpo) cDNA under the transcriptional control of the cellular elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1 alpha) promoter and the 4F2 heavy chain (4F2HC) enhancer. Neonatal CD-1 and adult SCID mice injected once intramuscularly (i.m.) with 10(7) to 10(9) plaque-forming units (pfu) of this virus displayed significant dose-dependent elevations of serum hEpo levels and increased hematocrits, which were stable over the 4-month time course of these experiments. Adenovirus injected i.m. remained localized at the site of injection and there was no evidence of either systemic infection or a localized inflammatory response. These results suggest that i.m. injection of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vectors may serve as a paradigm for the treatment of human serum protein deficiencies. Images PMID:7972101

  12. Recombinant GABAC receptors expressed in rat hippocampal neurons after infection with an adenovirus containing the human ρ1 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Filippova, Natalia; Sedelnikova, Anna; Tyler, William J; Whitworth, Terri L; Fortinberry, Henry; Weiss, David S

    2001-01-01

    A recombinant adenovirus was generated with the human ρ1 GABAC receptor subunit (adeno-ρ). Patch-clamp and antibody staining were employed to confirm functional expression of recombinant ρ1 receptors after infection of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293 cell line), human embryonic retinal cells (911 cell line), dissociated rat hippocampal neurons and cultured rat hippocampal slices. Standard whole-cell recording and Western blot analysis using ρ1 GABAC receptor antibodies revealed that recombinant ρ1 receptors were expressed in HEK293 and 911 cells after adeno-ρ infection and exhibited properties similar to those of ρ1 receptors after standard transfection. Cultured rat hippocampal neurons (postnatal day (P)3-P5) did not show a native GABAC-like current. After adeno-ρ infection, however, a GABAC-like current appeared in 70-90 % of the neurons. Five days after infection, expression of GABAC receptors in hippocampal neurons significantly decreased native GABAA receptor currents from 1200 ± 300 to 150 ± 70 pA (n = 10). The native glutamate-activated current was unchanged. Hippocampal slices (P8) did not show a native GABAC-like current, although recombinant ρ1 receptors could be expressed in cultured hippocampal slices after adeno-ρ infection. These data indicate that an adenovirus can be used to express recombinant GABAC receptors in hippocampal neurons. This finding could represent an important step towards the gene therapy of CNS receptor-related diseases. PMID:11507165

  13. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer.

    PubMed

    Mesonero, Alexander; Suarez, David L; van Santen, Edzard; Tang, De-Chu C; Toro, Haroldo

    2011-06-01

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibody persistence, transfer of maternal antibodies (MtAb), and interference between MtAb and active in ovo or mucosal immunization with RCA-free recombinant Ad expressing a codon-optimized AIV H5 HA gene from A/turkey/WI/68 (AdTW68.H5(ck)). Vaccine coverage and intrapotency test repeatability were based on anti-H5 hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody levels detected in in ovo vaccinated chickens. Even though egg inoculation of each replicate was performed by individuals with varying expertise and with different vaccine batches, the average vaccine coverage of three replicates was 85%. The intrapotency test repeatability, which considers both positive as well as negative values, varied between 0.69 and 0.71, indicating effective vaccination. Highly pathogenic (HP) AIV challenge of chicken groups vaccinated with increasing vaccine doses showed 90% protection in chickens receiving > or = 10(8) ifu (infectious units)/bird. The protective dose 50% (PD50) was determined to be 10(6.5) ifu. Even vaccinated chickens that did not develop detectable antibody levels were effectively protected against HP AIV challenge. This result is consistent with previous findings ofAd-vector eliciting T lymphocyte responses. Higher vaccine doses significantly reduced viral shedding as determined by AIV RNA concentration in oropharyngeal swabs. Assessment of antibody persistence showed that antibody levels of in ovo immunized chickens continued to increase until 12 wk and started to decline after 18 wk of age. Intramuscular (IM) booster vaccination with the same vaccine at 16 wk of age significantly increased the antibody responses in breeder hens, and these responses were maintained at high

  14. HSV-1 amplicon vectors elicit polyfunctional T cell responses to HIV-1 Env, and strongly boost responses to an adenovirus prime

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Cindy M.P.; Maguire, Casey A.; Keefer, Michael C.; Federoff, Howard J.; Bowers, William J.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    HSV-1 amplicon vectors elicit strong T-cell responses to encoded antigens but the qualitative nature of these responses is poorly understood. Antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses to amplicon and adenovirus (rAd5) vectors encoding HIV-1 gp120 were assessed following immunization of mice, by performing intracellular cytokine staining for IFNγ, IL-2 and TNFα, following stimulation of splenocytes with a HIV-1 Env peptide pool. The quality of the primary T-cell response to amplicon and rAd5 vectors was strikingly similar, but there were qualitative differences in responses to amplicon vectors that incorporated different promoters upstream of gp120 - suggesting that promoters can significantly influence immune response quality. When prime-boost combinations were studied, a rAd5 prime and amplicon boost elicited the highest T-cell response. Furthermore, protocols that incorporated a rAd5 prime consistently elicited a greater proportion of polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells - regardless of boost. This suggests that initial priming can shape immune response quality after a boost. Overall, these findings provide insight into effective vector combinations for HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:17868958

  15. DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 Induces Sterile Protection Associated with Cell-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ilin; Sedegah, Martha; Cicatelli, Susan; Spring, Michele; Polhemus, Mark; Tamminga, Cindy; Patterson, Noelle; Guerrero, Melanie; Bennett, Jason W.; McGrath, Shannon; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Farooq, Fouzia; Abot, Esteban; Banania, Jo Glenna; Huang, Jun; Newcomer, Rhonda; Rein, Lisa; Litilit, Dianne; Richie, Nancy O.; Wood, Chloe; Murphy, Jittawadee; Sauerwein, Robert; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; McCoy, Andrea J.; Kamau, Edwin; Cummings, James; Komisar, Jack; Sutamihardja, Awalludin; Shi, Meng; Epstein, Judith E.; Maiolatesi, Santina; Tosh, Donna; Limbach, Keith; Angov, Evelina; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke; Bruder, Joseph T.; Doolan, Denise L.; King, C. Richter; Carucci, Daniel; Dutta, Sheetij; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Richie, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene-based vaccination using prime/boost regimens protects animals and humans against malaria, inducing cell-mediated responses that in animal models target liver stage malaria parasites. We tested a DNA prime/adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection. Methodology/Principal Findings The vaccine regimen was three monthly doses of two DNA plasmids (DNA) followed four months later by a single boost with two non-replicating human serotype 5 adenovirus vectors (Ad). The constructs encoded genes expressing P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1). The regimen was safe and well-tolerated, with mostly mild adverse events that occurred at the site of injection. Only one AE (diarrhea), possibly related to immunization, was severe (Grade 3), preventing daily activities. Four weeks after the Ad boost, 15 study subjects were challenged with P. falciparum sporozoites by mosquito bite, and four (27%) were sterilely protected. Antibody responses by ELISA rose after Ad boost but were low (CSP geometric mean titer 210, range 44–817; AMA1 geometric mean micrograms/milliliter 11.9, range 1.5–102) and were not associated with protection. Ex vivo IFN-γ ELISpot responses after Ad boost were modest (CSP geometric mean spot forming cells/million peripheral blood mononuclear cells 86, range 13–408; AMA1 348, range 88–1270) and were highest in three protected subjects. ELISpot responses to AMA1 were significantly associated with protection (p = 0.019). Flow cytometry identified predominant IFN-γ mono-secreting CD8+ T cell responses in three protected subjects. No subjects with high pre-existing anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibodies were protected but the association was not statistically significant. Significance The DNA/Ad regimen provided the highest sterile immunity achieved against malaria following immunization with a gene-based subunit vaccine (27%). Protection was

  16. Recombination analysis of intermediate human adenovirus type 53 in Japan by complete genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Hisatoshi; Aoki, Koki; Ishida, Susumu; Ohno, Shigeaki; Kitaichi, Nobuyoshi; Ishiko, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Tsuguto; Ikeda, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Masako; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Koyanagi, Kanako O; Watanabe, Hidemi; Suzutani, Tatsuo

    2011-06-01

    Human adenovirus type 53 (HAdV-53) has commonly been detected in samples from epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) patients in Japan since 1996. HAdV-53 is an intermediate virus, containing hexon-chimeric, penton base and fiber structures similar to HAdV-22 and -37, HAdV-37 and HAdV-8, respectively. HAdV-53-like intermediate strains were first isolated from EKC samples in Japan in the 1980s. Here, the complete genome sequences of three such HAdV-53-like intermediate strains (870006C, 880249C and 890357C) and four HAdV-53 strains were determined, and their relationships were analysed. The seven HAdV strains were classified into three groups, 870006C/880249C, 890357C and the four HAdV-53 strains, on the basis of phylogenetic analyses of the partial and complete genome sequences. HAdV strains within the same group showed the highest nucleotide identities (99.87-100.00 %). Like HAdV-53, the hexon loop 1 and 2 regions of 870006C, 880249C and 890357C showed the highest identity with HAdV-22. However, these strains did not show a hexon-chimeric structure similar to HAdV-22 and -37, or a penton base similar to HAdV-37. The fiber genes of 870006C and 880249C were identical to that of HAdV-37, but not HAdV-8. Thus, the three intermediate HAdVs isolated in the 1980s were similar to each other but not to HAdV-53. The recombination breakpoints were inferred by the Recombination Detection Program (rdp) using whole-genome sequences of these seven HAdV and of 12 HAdV-D strains from GenBank. HAdV-53 may have evolved from intermediate HAdVs circulating in the 1980s, and from HAdV-8, -22 and -37, by recombination of sections cut at the putative breakpoints.

  17. Treatment of leptomeningeal metastases in a rat model using a recombinant adenovirus containing the HSV-tk gene.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A J; Esandi, M D; van Someren, G; Noteboom, J L; Avezaat, C J; Vecht, C; Smitt, P A; van Bekkum, D W; Valerio, D; Hoogerbrugge, P M; Bout, A

    1996-10-01

    The authors constructed recombinant adenoviral vectors to investigate their potential for gene therapy treatment of leptomeningeal metastases. Several human cell lines that were derived from tumors occurring as leptomeningeal metastases and that were infected in vitro with major late promoter recombinant adenovirus containing the luciferase (luc) gene (IG.Ad.MLP.luc) showed high levels of expression. When these human tumor cell lines were infected in vitro with recombinant adenovirus harboring the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene (IG.Ad.MLP.TK), they were highly sensitive to the killing effects of ganciclovir (GCV). Transduction efficiency of leptomeningeal tumor cells in vivo was assessed by injecting 9-L rat brain tumor cells into the cerebrospinal fluid of Fischer rats via the cisterna magna. After 3 days, recombinant adenovirus containing the lacZ reporter gene (IG.Ad.MLP.lacZ) was injected via the same route. Six days after tumor cell injection, expression of the reporter gene was observed in tumor cells along the total neural axis. Subsequently, rats with leptomeningeal metastases were treated 3 days after tumor cell injection with HSV-tk. Beginning on the next day, GCV was injected intraperitoneally for 10 days. The rats that developed neurological symptoms were killed immediately. The symptom-free latency of every rat was determined. The rats treated with HSV-tk and subsequent GCV had significantly longer (p < 0.01) symptom-free latency than all control groups. This study demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of this therapeutic approach in a rat model. Clinically, it should be used in the palliative treatment of patients with leptomeningeal metastases.

  18. [Effects of recombinant adenovirus Ad-miR-29b2c on HGC-27 cell proliferation and migration].

    PubMed

    Luo, Ailing; Du, Chunyuan; Zhao, Xuemei; Liang, Jichao; Chen, Yong

    2017-07-25

    We constructed recombinant adenoviruses expressing miR-29b2c (Ad-miR29b2c), and analyzed their effects on the proliferation and migration of HGC-27 and MGC-803 cells. miR-29b2c gene was amplified by PCR from genomic DNA and cloned into the pAdTrack-CMV vector to create the shuttle plasmid pAdT-29b2c. The recombinant plasmid was verified by restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The linearized shuttle vector was mixed with an adenoviral backbone plasmid (pAdEasy-1), followed by cotransformation into competent BJ5183 cells to generate the recombinant plasmid pAd-miR-29b2c. Finally, recombinant adenoviral vectors were generated by transfecting the recombinant plasmid into 293A packaging cell line. HGC-27 and MGC-803 cells were infected with the recombinant adenoviruses expressing pAd-miR-29b2c, then MTT and wound-healing assay were used to analyze the effects of pAd-miR-29b2c on the proliferation and migration of HGC-27 and MGC-803 cells. The miR-29b and miR-29c levels were significantly increased in HGC-27 cells after infected with pAd-miR-29b2c. MTT and wound-healing analysis also revealed a significant decrease in proliferation and migration of HGC-27 and MGC-803 cells compared to the control Ad-GFP-infected cells. Furthermore, western blotting results demonstrated that the protein expression level of δ-catenin was reduced in pAd-miR-29b2c transfected HGC-27 and MGC-803 cells. Taken together, the recombinant adenoviral vector was generated, and it can significantly inhibit the proliferation and migration of HGC-27 and MGC-803 cells.

  19. Effect of homologous and heterologous prime-boost on the immune response to recombinant plague antigens.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Audrey; Freytag, Lucy C; Clements, John D

    2005-03-14

    Among the pathogens that have been identified as potential agents of biological warfare or bioterrorism, Yersinia pestis is one of the main concerns due to the severity and potential transmissibility of the pneumonic form of the disease in humans. There are no approved vaccines for protection against pneumonic plague, but a Y. pestis-derived fusion protein (F1-V) has shown great promise as a protective antigen in murine studies. In the current study, we examine different prime-boost regimens, including parenteral, mucosal, and transcutaneous delivery, in order to explore the effect of changing the route of prime and boost on the ability of recombinant F1-V to promote the development of long-lasting, high-titer antibodies. The most significant findings of the study reported here are that (1) intranasal and subcutaneous immunizations are both effective and essentially equivalent for induction of serum and bronchioalveolar anti-F1-V IgG1 responses when a single booster dose is administered by the same (homologous) route, (2) heterologous boosting can be as or more effective than homologous boosting for induction of either serum or bronchioalveolar anti-F1-V IgG1 responses, and (3) anti-F1 and anti-V total IgG responses were highest in animals primed intranasally and boosted by any route when compared to animals primed transcutaneously or subcutaneously. As with previously published studies, there were still significant levels of circulating anti-F1-V antibodies 1 year post-primary immunization. These studies provide important insights into the development of new-generation biodefense vaccines.

  20. Production of lentiviral vectors by transient expression of minimal packaging genes from recombinant adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Kuate, Seraphin; Stefanou, Daniela; Hoffmann, Dennis; Wildner, Oliver; Uberla, Klaus

    2004-11-01

    The potential of lentiviral vectors for clinical gene therapy has not yet been evaluated. One of the reasons is the cytotoxicity of lentiviral packaging genes which makes the generation of stable producer cell lines difficult. Therefore, a novel packaging system for lentiviral vectors based on transient expression of packaging genes by recombinant adenoviruses was developed. Adenoviral vectors expressing VSV-G, codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol, and codon-optimized SIV gag-pol under the control of a tetracycline-regulatable promoter (adenoviral lenti-pack vectors) were constructed and the production levels of this vector system were evaluated. The generated adenoviral lenti-pack vectors could be grown to high titers when transgene expression was suppressed and no evidence for instabilities was obtained. Cells stably transfected with a SIV-based vector construct were converted into lentiviral vector producer cells by infection with the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors. Lentiviral vector titers obtained were as high as vector titers obtained by transient cotransfection experiments. A protocol was developed that allowed preparation of lentiviral vector stocks with undetectable levels of contaminating adenoviral lenti-pack vectors. The adenoviral lenti-pack vectors described should provide a convenient alternative approach to inducible packaging cell lines for large-scale lentiviral vector production. Transient expression of cytotoxic lentiviral packaging genes by the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors circumvents loss of titers during prolonged culture of packaging cell lines. The design of the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors should reduce the risk of transfer of packaging genes to target cells and at the same time provide flexibility with respect to the lentiviral vector constructs that can be packaged.

  1. Heterologous prime-boost-boost immunisation of Chinese cynomolgus macaques using DNA and recombinant poxvirus vectors expressing HIV-1 virus-like particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is renewed interest in the development of poxvirus vector-based HIV vaccines due to the protective effect observed with repeated recombinant canarypox priming with gp120 boosting in the recent Thai placebo-controlled trial. This study sought to investigate whether a heterologous prime-boost-boost vaccine regimen in Chinese cynomolgus macaques with a DNA vaccine and recombinant poxviral vectors expressing HIV virus-like particles bearing envelopes derived from the most prevalent clades circulating in sub-Saharan Africa, focused the antibody response to shared neutralising epitopes. Methods Three Chinese cynomolgus macaques were immunised via intramuscular injections using a regimen composed of a prime with two DNA vaccines expressing clade A Env/clade B Gag followed by boosting with recombinant fowlpox virus expressing HIV-1 clade D Gag, Env and cholera toxin B subunit followed by the final boost with recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing HIV-1 clade C Env, Gag and human complement protein C3d. We measured the macaque serum antibody responses by ELISA, enumerated T cell responses by IFN-γ ELISpot and assessed seroneutralisation of HIV-1 using the TZM-bl β-galactosidase assay with primary isolates of HIV-1. Results This study shows that large and complex synthetic DNA sequences can be successfully cloned in a single step into two poxvirus vectors: MVA and FPV and the recombinant poxviruses could be grown to high titres. The vaccine candidates showed appropriate expression of recombinant proteins with the formation of authentic HIV virus-like particles seen on transmission electron microscopy. In addition the b12 epitope was shown to be held in common by the vaccine candidates using confocal immunofluorescent microscopy. The vaccine candidates were safely administered to Chinese cynomolgus macaques which elicited modest T cell responses at the end of the study but only one out of the three macaques elicited an HIV-specific antibody

  2. Recombinant adenovirus containing hyper-interleukin-6 and hepatocyte growth factor ameliorates acute-on-chronic liver failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dan-Dan; Fu, Jia; Qin, Bo; Huang, Wen-Xiang; Yang, Chun; Jia, Bei

    2016-04-28

    To investigate the protective efficacy of recombinant adenovirus containing hyper-interleukin-6 (Hyper-IL-6, HIL-6) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) (Ad-HGF-HIL-6) compared to that of recombinant adenovirus containing either HIL-6 or HGF (Ad-HIL-6 or Ad-HGF) in rats with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The recombinant adenoviruses containing HIL-6 and/or HGF were constructed. We established an ACLF model, and rats were randomly assigned to control, model, Ad-GFP, Ad-HIL-6, Ad-HGF or Ad-HGF-HIL-6 group. We collected serum and liver tissue samples to test pathological changes, biochemical indexes and molecular biological indexes. Attenuated alanine aminotransferase, prothrombin time, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), endotoxin, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon-γ were observed in the Ad-HGF-, Ad-HIL-6- and Ad-HGF-HIL-6-treated rats with ACLF. Likewise, reduced hepatic damage and apoptotic activity, as well as reduced HMGB1 and Bax proteins, but raised expression of Ki67 and Bcl-2 proteins and Bcl-2/Bax ratio were also observed in the Ad-HGF-, Ad-HIL-6- and Ad-HGF-HIL-6-treated rats with ACLF. More significant changes were observed in the Ad-HGF-HIL-6 treatment group without obvious side effects. Furthermore, caspase-3 at the protein level decreased in the Ad-HIL-6 and Ad-HGF-HIL-6 treatment groups, more predominantly in the latter group. This study identifies that the protective efficacy of Ad-HGF-HIL-6 is more potent than that of Ad-HGF or Ad-HIL-6 in ACLF rats, with no significant side effects.

  3. In vitro and in vivo genetic stability studies of a human adenovirus type 5 recombinant rabies glycoprotein vaccine (ONRAB).

    PubMed

    Knowles, M Kimberly; Roberts, Danielle; Craig, Sheona; Sheen, Mary; Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Wandeler, Alexander I

    2009-05-05

    Investigation into the genetic stability of a replication-competent human adenovirus rabies glycoprotein recombinant (ONRAB) developed for use as an oral vaccine for wildlife rabies prevention is of major importance due to the vaccine's intended placement in the environment. Using a collection of murine monoclonal antibodies directed to six distinct antigenic sites on the rabies glycoprotein, preservation of all main immunogenic epitopes of the protein after virus growth in vitro was established. A competition experiment which involved the in vitro passaging of a mixture of ONRAB and wild-type human adenovirus type 5 demonstrated that the two viruses do not exhibit noticeably different fitness levels in this environment. Nucleotide sequencing of the expression cassette of multiple viral clones recovered after 20 serial passages in cell culture and 5 serial passages in cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), a species susceptible to human adenovirus infection, indicated no changes in comparison to the original virus. These trials demonstrated the stability of the insert gene of ONRAB during in vivo and in vitro passaging.

  4. Ammonium sulphate precipitation of recombinant adenovirus from culture medium: an easy method to increase the total virus yield.

    PubMed

    Schagen, F H; Rademaker, H J; Rabelink, M J; van Ormondt, H; Fallaux, F J; van der Eb, A J; Hoeben, R C

    2000-09-01

    In the majority of the methods for purifying and concentrating recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) the virus that is associated with the helper cells is harvested, while the virus that is present in the cell-culture medium is discarded. During routine propagation of adenovirus type-5 vectors at optimised conditions we noted that, on average, 47% of the total amount of virus is present in the culture medium. To recover and concentrate these rAds from the medium, we devised a method, which is based on ammonium sulphate ((NH4)2SO4) precipitation. At 40% (NH4)2SO4 saturation, 95 +/- 6% of the available virus precipitates from the medium, while the majority of the protein (85%) remains in solution. In contrast to adenovirus precipitation with polyethylene glycol, the (NH4)2SO4 precipitation technique allows collection of precipitated rAds by filtration. We demonstrate here that (NH4)2SO4 precipitation of rAds from cell-culture medium is a simple and fast technique that can be used in combination with standard virus isolation methods to increase the yields of rAds.

  5. [Producing recombinant adenovirus encoding green fluorescent protein (Ad-GFP) by suspension cultured HEK-293 N3S cells].

    PubMed

    Tian, Bo; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Bi, Jian-Jin; Wang, Lan; Zhu, Bao-Zhen; Geng, Yue; Wu, Zu-Ze

    2007-09-01

    Adenovirus vectors are one of the most promising gene transfer systems. They are of great value for gene therapy because these vectors achieve temporal high-level transgene expression and high gene transfer efficiency. To meet increasing needs of adenovirus vectors for gene therapy programs, parallel development of efficient, scalable and reproducible production processes is required. Perfusion cultivation of 293 cells is one of the most commonly used methods to produce adenovirus vectors and it is suitable for industrialized production specially. Experimental studies had been carried out to produce recombinant adenovirus containing the green fluorescent protein gene (Ad-GFP) by perfusion cultivation of HEK-293 N3S cells in a 5L stirring bioreactors. Perfusion rate was 1-2 volume/day. To infect the 293 N3S cells with Ad-GFP at the density of (2-4) x 10(6) cells/ ml. The time of collecting cells was 48 hours post infection. After three rounds of freeze/thaw and centrifugation, the crude viral lysates were stored at--80 degrees C until use. Then to get the Ad-GFP products by 2 x CsCl-gradient purification. The purity of the products was determined by the A260/A280 ratio and a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay. The infective titer was determined by a TCID50 assay. The culture term was 10-12 days. The infectious titer, the number of virus particle and the ratio of infectious titer to virus particle for the product were 1.0 x 10(11) IU/mL, 1.68 x 10(12) VP/mL and 6.0% IU/VP respectively. The A260/A280 ratio was 1.33, and the purity determined by HPLC was 99.2%. The cell specific productivity was around 1000 IU/cell. By perfusion cultivation of 293 N3S cells in a 5L stirring bioreactors, we established the production process for Ad-GFP, which paves a way to produce other recombinant adenovirus for gene therapy.

  6. Intertypic modular exchanges of genomic segments by homologous recombination at universally conserved segments in human adenovirus species D.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Koyanagi, Kanako O; Aoki, Koki; Kitaichi, Nobuyoshi; Ohno, Shigeaki; Kaneko, Hisatoshi; Ishida, Susumu; Watanabe, Hidemi

    2014-08-15

    Human adenovirus species D (HAdV-D), which is composed of clinically and epidemiologically important pathogens worldwide, contains more taxonomic "types" than any other species of the genus Mastadenovirus, although the mechanisms accounting for the high level of diversity remain to be disclosed. Recent studies of known and new types of HAdV-D have indicated that intertypic recombination between distant types contributes to the increasing diversity of the species. However, such findings raise the question as to how homologous recombination events occur between diversified types since homologous recombination is suppressed as nucleotide sequences diverge. In order to address this question, we investigated the distribution of the recombination boundaries in comparison with the landscape of intergenomic sequence conservation assessed according to the synonymous substitution rate (dS). The results revealed that specific genomic segments are conserved between even the most distantly related genomes; we call these segments "universally conserved segments" (UCSs). These findings suggest that UCSs facilitate homologous recombination, resulting in intergenomic segmental exchanges of UCS-flanking genomic regions as recombination modules. With the aid of such a mechanism, the haploid genomes of HAdV-Ds may have been reshuffled, resulting in chimeric genomes out of diversified repertoires in the HAdV-D population analogous to the MHC region reshuffled via crossing over in vertebrates. In addition, some HAdVs with chimeric genomes may have had the opportunity to avoid host immune responses thereby causing epidemics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of parallel line analysis criteria for recombinant adenovirus potency assay and definition of a unit of potency.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yasushi; Fawaz, Farah; Reyes, Candice; Lai, Julie; Pungor, Erno

    2007-01-01

    Parameter settings of a parallel line analysis procedure were defined by applying statistical analysis procedures to the absorbance data from a cell-based potency bioassay for a recombinant adenovirus, Adenovirus 5 Fibroblast Growth Factor-4 (Ad5FGF-4). The parallel line analysis was performed with a commercially available software, PLA 1.2. The software performs Dixon outlier test on replicates of the absorbance data, performs linear regression analysis to define linear region of the absorbance data, and tests parallelism between the linear regions of standard and sample. Width of Fiducial limit, expressed as a percent of the measured potency, was developed as a criterion for rejection of the assay data and to significantly improve the reliability of the assay results. With the linear range-finding criteria of the software set to a minimum of 5 consecutive dilutions and best statistical outcome, and in combination with the Fiducial limit width acceptance criterion of <135%, 13% of the assay results were rejected. With these criteria applied, the assay was found to be linear over the range of 0.25 to 4 relative potency units, defined as the potency of the sample normalized to the potency of Ad5FGF-4 standard containing 6 x 10(6) adenovirus particles/mL. The overall precision of the assay was estimated to be 52%. Without the application of Fiducial limit width criterion, the assay results were not linear over the range, and an overall precision of 76% was calculated from the data. An absolute unit of potency for the assay was defined by using the parallel line analysis procedure as the amount of Ad5FGF-4 that results in an absorbance value that is 121% of the average absorbance readings of the wells containing cells not infected with the adenovirus.

  8. Recombinant human adenovirus-5 expressing capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus elicits effective antibody response in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasa, B P; Mohapatra, J K; Pauszek, S J; Koster, M; Dhanya, V C; Tamil Selvan, R P; Hosamani, M; Saravanan, P; Basagoudanavar, Suresh H; de Los Santos, T; Venkataramanan, R; Rodriguez, L L; Grubman, M J

    2017-05-01

    Recombinant adenovirus-5 vectored foot-and-mouth disease constructs (Ad5- FMD) were made for three Indian vaccine virus serotypes O, A and Asia 1. Constructs co-expressing foot-and- mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and viral 3C protease sequences, were evaluated for their ability to induce a neutralizing antibody response in indigenous cattle (Bos indicus). Purified Ad5-FMD viruses were inoculated in cattle as monovalent (5×10(9) pfu/animal) or trivalent (5×10(9) pfu/animal per serotype) vaccines. Animals vaccinated with monovalent Ad5-FMD vaccines were boosted 63days later with the same dose. After primary immunization, virus neutralization tests (VNT) showed seroconversion in 83, 67 and 33% of animals vaccinated with Ad5-FMD O, A and Asia 1, respectively. Booster immunization elicited seroconversion in all of the animals (100%) in the monovalent groups. When used in a trivalent form, the Ad5-FMD vaccine induced neutralizing antibodies in only 33, 50 and 16% of animals against serotypes O, A and Asia 1, respectively on primo-vaccination, and titers were significantly lower than when the same vectors were used in monovalent form. Neutralizing antibody titers differed by serotype for both Ad5-FMD monovalent and trivalent vaccines, with Asia 1 serotype inducing the lowest titers. Antibody response to Ad5 vector in immunized cattle was also assessed by VNT. It appeared that the vector immunity did not impact the recall responses to expressed FMDV antigens on booster immunization. In summary, the study suggested that the recombinant Ad5-FMD vaccine has a potential use in monovalent form, while its application in multivalent form is not currently encouraging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Immune responses against hepatitis C virus genotype 3a virus-like particles in mice: A novel VLP prime-adenovirus boost strategy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj; Das, Soma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Lahiri, Priyanka; Tatineni, Ranjitha; Goswami, Debashree; Bhat, Prasanna; Torresi, Joseph; Gowans, Eric James; Karande, Anjali Anoop; Das, Saumitra

    2016-02-17

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents a major health threat to global population. In India, approximately 15-20% of cases of chronic liver diseases are caused by HCV infection. Although, new drug treatments hold great promise for HCV eradication in infected individuals, the treatments are highly expensive. A vaccine for preventing or treating HCV infection would be of great value, particularly in developing countries. Several preclinical trials of virus-like particle (VLP) based vaccine strategies are in progress throughout the world. Previously, using baculovirus based system, we have reported the production of hepatitis C virus-like particles (HCV-LPs) encoding structural proteins for genotype 3a, which is prevalent in India. In the present study, we have generated HCV-LPs using adenovirus based system and tried different immunization strategies by using combinations of both kinds of HCV-LPs with other genotype 3a-based immunogens. HCV-LPs and peptides based ELISAs were used to evaluate antibody responses generated by these combinations. Cell-mediated immune responses were measured by using T-cell proliferation assay and intracellular cytokine staining. We observed that administration of recombinant adenoviruses expressing HCV structural proteins as final booster enhances both antibody as well as T-cell responses. Additionally, reduction of binding of VLP and JFH1 virus to human hepatocellular carcinoma cells demonstrated the presence of neutralizing antibodies in immunized sera. Taken together, our results suggest that the combined regimen of VLP followed by recombinant adenovirus could more effectively inhibit HCV infection, endorsing the novel vaccine strategy.

  10. Effects of recombinant human adenovirus-p53 on the regression of hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yehong; Yang, Puye; Chen, Na; Lin, Shumei; Liu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a scarring process that may progress to hepatic cirrhosis and even hepatic carcinoma if left untreated. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play essential roles in the development of hepatic fibrosis. The tumor suppressor protein p53 is a transcription factor that is involved in cell proliferation, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and DNA repair. Recombinant human adenovirus-p53 (Ad-p53) has been demonstrated to act as a promising antitumor gene therapy in various types of cancer. However, there is limited infomration regarding the therapeutic effect of Ad-p53 on the regression of hepatic fibrosis. In order to examine the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for the effects of Ad-p53 on HSCs, a rat model of hepatic fibrosis was established and HSC-T6 cells were cultured under different conditions. The expression of p53, transforming growth factor (TGF-β1) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), which is a marker of activated HSCs, was detected by immunohistochemical assays and RT-qPCR. In vitro, five different concentrations (1×106, 5×106, 1×107, 2×107 and 5×107 PFU/ml) of Ad-p53 were selected for use in the MTT assay to analyze the proliferation of HSCs at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h. Flow cytometric analysis was applied to determine the effect of three different concentrations of Ad-p53 (5×106, 1×107 and 2×107 PFU/ml) on the cell cycle and the apoptosis of HSC-T6 cells at 24 and 48 h. The results of immunohistochemical studies and RT-qPCR showed that Ad-p53 upregulated the expression of p53, and downregulated the expression of TGF-β1 and α-SMA. The MTT assay revealed that when treated with various doses of Ad-p53, the proliferation of HSCs was inhibited within a certain range of concentrations and time periods. Analysis of flow cytometric data showed that Ad-p53 arrested the cell cycle in G1 phase and significantly induced apoptosis. Taken together, these findings suggest that Ad-p53 promotes apoptosis and inhibits the proliferation of HSCs in

  11. Mucosal immunization with recombinant adenovirus encoding soluble globular head of hemagglutinin protects mice against lethal influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Young; Choi, Youngjoo; Nguyen, Huan H; Song, Man Ki; Chang, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Influenza virus is one of the major sources of respiratory tract infection. Due to antigenic drift in surface glycoproteins the virus causes annual epidemics with severe morbidity and mortality. Although hemagglutinin (HA) is one of the highly variable surface glycoproteins of the influenza virus, it remains the most attractive target for vaccine development against seasonal influenza infection because antibodies generated against HA provide virus neutralization and subsequent protection against the virus infection. Combination of recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vector-based vaccine and mucosal administration is a promising regimen for safe and effective vaccination against influenza. In this study, we constructed rAd encoding the globular head region of HA from A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus as vaccine candidate. The rAd vaccine was engineered to express high level of the protein in secreted form. Intranasal or sublingual immunization of mice with the rAd-based vaccine candidates induced significant levels of sustained HA-specific mucosal IgA and IgG. When challenged with lethal dose of homologous virus, the vaccinated mice were completely protected from the infection. The results demonstrate that intranasal or sublingual vaccination with HA-encoding rAd elicits protective immunity against infection with homologous influenza virus. This finding underlines the potential of our recombinant adenovirus-based influenza vaccine candidate for both efficacy and rapid production.

  12. Recombinant BCG prime and PPE protein boost provides potent protection against acute Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Enzhuo; Gu, Jin; Wang, Feifei; Wang, Honghai; Shen, Hongbo; Chen, Zheng W

    2016-04-01

    Since BCG, the only vaccine widely used against tuberculosis (TB) in the world, provides varied protective efficacy and may not be effective for inducing long-term cellular immunity, it is in an urgent need to develop more effective vaccines and more potent immune strategies against TB. Prime-boost is proven to be a good strategy by inducing long-term protection. In this study, we tested the protective effect against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) challenge of prime-boost strategy by recombinant BCG (rBCG) expressing PPE protein Rv3425 fused with Ag85B and Rv3425. Results showed that the prime-boost strategy could significantly increase the protective efficiency against Mtb infection, characterized by reduction of bacterial load in lung and spleen, attenuation of tuberculosis lesions in lung tissues. Importantly, we found that Rv3425 boost, superior to Ag85B boost, provided better protection against Mtb infection. Further research proved that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost could obviously increase the expansion of lymphocytes, significantly induce IL-2 production by lymphocytes upon PPD stimulation, and inhibit IL-6 production at an early stage. It implied that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost opted to induce Th1 immune response and provided a long-term protection against TB. These results implicated that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost is a potent and promising strategy to prevent acute Mtb infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vaccination with recombinant adenoviruses expressing the peste des petits ruminants virus F or H proteins overcomes viral immunosuppression and induces protective immunity against PPRV challenge in sheep.

    PubMed

    Rojas, José M; Moreno, Héctor; Valcárcel, Félix; Peña, Lourdes; Sevilla, Noemí; Martín, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious disease of small ruminants caused by the Morbillivirus peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). Two recombinant replication-defective human adenoviruses serotype 5 (Ad5) expressing either the highly immunogenic fusion protein (F) or hemagglutinin protein (H) from PPRV were used to vaccinate sheep by intramuscular inoculation. Both recombinant adenovirus vaccines elicited PPRV-specific B- and T-cell responses. Thus, neutralizing antibodies were detected in sera from immunized sheep. In addition, we detected a significant antigen specific T-cell response in vaccinated sheep against two different PPRV strains, indicating that the vaccine induced heterologous T cell responses. Importantly, no clinical signs and undetectable virus shedding were observed after virulent PPRV challenge in vaccinated sheep. These vaccines also overcame the T cell immunosuppression induced by PPRV in control animals. The results indicate that these adenovirus constructs could be a promising alternative to current vaccine strategies for the development of PPRV DIVA vaccines.

  14. Recombinant adenovirus as a model to evaluate the efficiency of free chlorine disinfection in filtered water samples.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Mariana A; Magri, Maria E; Schissi, Camila D; Barardi, Célia Rm

    2015-02-22

    In Brazil, ordinance no. 2,914/2011 of the Ministry of Health requires the absence of total coliforms and Escherichia coli (E. coli) in treated water. However it is essential that water treatment is effective against all pathogens. Disinfection in Water Treatment Plants (WTP) is commonly performed with chlorine. The recombinant adenovirus (rAdV), which expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) when cultivated in HEK 293A cells, was chosen as a model to evaluate the efficiency of chlorine for human adenovirus (HAdV) inactivation in filtered water samples from two WTPs: Lagoa do Peri (pH 6.9) and Morro dos Quadros (pH 6.5). Buffered demand free (BDF) water (pH 6.9 and 8.0) was used as control. The samples were previously submitted to physicochemical characterization, and bacteriological analysis. Two free chlorine concentrations and two temperatures were assayed for all samples (0.2 mg/L, 0.5 mg/L, and 15°C, and 20°C). Fluorescence microscopy (FM) was used to check viral infectivity in vitro and qPCR as a molecular method to determine viral genome copies. Real treated water samples from the WTP (at the output of WTP and the distribution network) were also evaluated for total coliforms, E. coli and HAdV. The time required to inactivate 4log₁₀ of rAdV was less than 1 min, when analyzed by FM, except for BDF pH 8.0 (up to 2.5 min for 4log₁₀). The pH had a significant influence on the efficiency of disinfection. The qPCR assay was not able to provide information regarding rAdV inactivation. The data were modeled (Chick-Watson), and the observed Ct values were comparable with the values reported in the literature and smaller than the values recommended by the EPA. In the treated water samples, HAdV was detected in the distribution network of the WTP Morro dos Quadros (2.75 × 10(3) PFU/L). The Chick-Watson model proved to have adjusted well to the experimental conditions used, and it was possible to prove that the adenoviruses were rapidly inactivated in the

  15. Prime-boost vaccinations using recombinant flavivirus replicon and vaccinia virus vaccines: an ELISPOT analysis.

    PubMed

    Rattanasena, Paweena; Anraku, Itaru; Gardner, Joy; Le, Thuy T; Wang, Xiang Ju; Khromykh, Alexander A; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Recombinant Kunjin replicon virus-like particle (VLP), vaccinia virus (rVV) and DNA vaccines were tested in a large series of prime-boost vaccinations using interferon (IFN)γ ELISPOT assays that reflected effector (E), effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) responses. All vaccine constructs encoded the murine polytope immunogen and responses to four CD8 T-cell epitopes (TYQRTRALV, SYIPSAEKI, YPHFMPTNL and RPQASGVYM) were measured. VLP/rVV out performed (by 14- to 20-fold) DNA/rVV for induction of CM responses, whereas EM responses were only marginally increased. DNA/VLP induced more EM, but not CM responses, than VLP alone, illustrating that DNA priming is not universally beneficial. rVV/VLP gave comparable results to VLP/rVV combinations, although the former induced approximately threefold more E responses, illustrating the utility of poxvirus priming in this setting. Although higher doses of VLP and rVV increased responses after single immunizations, such dose increases provided only marginal benefit in heterologous prime-boost settings. Triple combinations also provided no benefit over two vaccinations. DNA vaccination was associated with broad CM, but not EM responses, and the breadth of EM and E responses was significantly improved by increasing viral vector dose. VLP/rVV, rather than DNA priming, induced T cells with consistently high IFNγ secretion profiles across all ELISPOT measures. Vector-specific CD8 T-cell responses generally correlated well with immunogen-specific responses, although, as expected, single use of each vector reduced the relative levels of vector-specific responses. These experiments illustrate the utility of replicons in heterologous prime-boost vaccinations, and illustrate the diversity of data that can be obtained from ELISPOT analyses.

  16. Recombinant poxvirus boosting of DNA-primed rhesus monkeys augments peak but not memory T lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Santra, Sampa; Barouch, Dan H; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Lord, Carol I; Krivulka, Georgia R; Yu, Faye; Beddall, Margaret H; Gorgone, Darci A; Lifton, Michelle A; Miura, Ayako; Philippon, Valerie; Manson, Kelledy; Markham, Phillip D; Parrish, John; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Schmitz, Jörn E; Gelman, Rebecca S; Shiver, John W; Montefiori, David C; Panicali, Dennis; Letvin, Norman L

    2004-07-27

    Although a consensus has emerged that an HIV vaccine should elicit a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, the characteristics of an effective vaccine-induced T lymphocyte response remain unclear. We explored this issue in the simian human immunodeficiency virus/rhesus monkey model in the course of assessing the relative immunogenicity of vaccine regimens that included a cytokine-augmented plasmid DNA prime and a boost with DNA or recombinant pox vectors. Recombinant vaccinia virus, recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), and recombinant fowlpox were comparable in their immunogenicity. Moreover, whereas the magnitude of the peak vaccine-elicited T lymphocyte responses in the recombinant pox virus-boosted monkeys was substantially greater than that seen in the monkeys immunized with plasmid DNA alone, the magnitudes of recombinant pox boosted CTL responses decayed rapidly and were comparable to those of the DNA-alone-vaccinated monkeys by the time of viral challenge. Consistent with these comparable memory T cell responses, the clinical protection seen in all groups of experimentally vaccinated monkeys was similar. This study, therefore, indicates that the steady-state memory, rather than the peak effector vaccine-elicited T lymphocyte responses, may be the critical immune correlate of protection for a CTL-based HIV vaccine.

  17. BTK gene targeting by homologous recombination using a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus hybrid vector.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Ishimura, M; Ochiai, M; Takada, H; Kusuhara, K; Nakatsu, Y; Tsuzuki, T; Mitani, K; Hara, T

    2016-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is one of the most common humoral immunodeficiencies, which is caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. To examine the possibility of using gene therapy for XLA, we constructed a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus BTK targeting vector (HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector) composed of a genomic sequence containing BTK exons 6-19 and a green fluorescence protein-hygromycin cassette driven by a cytomegalovirus promoter. We first used NALM-6, a human male pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, as a recipient to measure the efficiency of gene targeting by homologous recombination. We identified 10 clones with the homologous recombination of the BTK gene among 107 hygromycin-resistant stable clones isolated from two independent experiments. We next used cord blood CD34⁺ cells as the recipient cells for the gene targeting. We isolated colonies grown in medium containing cytokines and hygromycin. We found that the targeting of the BTK gene occurred in four of the 755 hygromycin-resistant colonies. Importantly, the gene targeting was also observed in CD19⁺ lymphoid progenitor cells that were differentiated from the homologous recombinant CD34⁺ cells during growth in selection media. Our study shows the potential for the BTK gene therapy using the HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector via homologous recombination in hematopoietic stem cells.

  18. Coexpression of the simian immunodeficiency virus Env and Rev proteins by a recombinant human adenovirus host range mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, S M; Lee, S G; Ronchetti-Blume, M; Virk, K P; Mizutani, S; Eichberg, J W; Davis, A; Hung, P P; Hirsch, V M; Chanock, R M

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human adenoviruses (Ads) that replicate in the intestinal tract offer a novel, yet practical, means of immunoprophylaxis against a wide variety of viral and bacterial pathogens. For some infectious agents such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the potential for residual infectious material in vaccine preparations must be eliminated. Therefore, recombinant human Ads that express noninfectious HIV or other microbial proteins are attractive vaccine candidates. To test such an approach for HIV, we chose an experimental model of AIDS based on simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of macaques. Our data demonstrate that the SIV Env gene products are expressed in cultured cells after infection with a recombinant Ad containing both SIV env and rev genes. An E3 deletion vector derived from a mutant of human Ad serotype 5 that efficiently replicates in both human and monkey cells was used to bypass the usual host range restriction of Ad infection. In addition, we show that the SIV rev gene is properly spliced from a single SIV subgenomic DNA fragment and that the Rev protein is expressed in recombinant Ad-SIV-infected human as well as monkey cells. The expression of SIV gene products in suitable live Ad vectors provides an excellent system for studying the regulation of SIV gene expression in cultured cells and evaluating the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of SIV proteins in macaques. Images PMID:1404612

  19. Recombinant human adenovirus-5 expressing capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus elicits effective antibody response in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recombinant adenovirus-5 vectored foot-and-mouth disease constructs (Ad5- FMD) were made for three Indian vaccine virus serotypes O,A and Asia 1. Constructs co-expressing foot-and- mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and viral 3C protease sequences, were evaluated for their ability to induce a neutral...

  20. Avian Influenza Vaccination in Chickens and Pigs with Replication-Competent Adenovirus–Free Human Recombinant Adenovirus 5

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Haroldo; van Ginkel, Frederik W.; Tang, De-chu C.; Schemera, Bettina; Rodning, Soren; Newton, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Protective immunity to avian influenza (AI) virus can be elicited in chickens by in ovo or intramuscular vaccination with replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) encoding AI virus H5 (AdTW68.H5) or H7 (AdCN94.H7) hemagglutinins. We evaluated bivalent in ovo vaccination with AdTW68.H5 and AdCN94.H7 and determined that vaccinated chickens developed robust hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody levels to both H5 and H7 AI strains. Additionally, we evaluated immune responses of 1-day-old chickens vaccinated via spray with AdCN94.H7. These birds showed increased immunoglobulin A responses in lachrymal fluids and increased interleukin-6 expression in Harderian gland–derived lymphocytes. However, specific HI antibodies were not detected in the sera of these birds. Because pigs might play a role as a “mixing vessel” for the generation of pandemic influenza viruses we explored the use of RCA-free adenovirus technology to immunize pigs against AI virus. Weanling piglets vaccinated intramuscularly with a single dose of RCA-free AdTW68.H5 developed strong systemic antibody responses 3 wk postvaccination. Intranasal application of AdTW68.H5 in piglets resulted in reduced vaccine coverage, i.e., 33% of pigs (2/6) developed an antibody response, but serum antibody levels in those successfully immunized animals were similar to intramuscularly vaccinated animals. PMID:20521636

  1. Inhibition of mouse alkali burn induced-corneal neovascularization by recombinant adenovirus encoding human vasohibin-1

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhao-lian; Xiao, Ou; Yang, Xiao-ru; Heng, Boon Chin; Sato, Yasufumi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the activity of recombinant adenovirus encoding human vasohibin-1 (Ad-Vasohibin-1) on mouse corneal neovasularization induced by alkali burn. Methods For the treatment group, 50 mice each received subconjunctival injection (5 μl) of 109 plaque forming units of replication-defective Ad-Vasohibin-1. Control group mice received the same dosage of blank adenoviral vector (AdNull). Five days after injection, corneal neovascularization (CNV) was induced by placing 2.5 μl of 0.1 M NaOH on the right cornea for 30 s. Subsequently, CNV was observed and photographed every 3 days for a total duration of 9 days after the alkali burn. The percentage of neovascularized area was measured and compared with the AdNull control. The expression of human vasohibin-1 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry and western blotting at 5, 8, and 14 days after injection. The mRNA expression levels of murine vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf), VEGF receptor 1 and 2 (Vegfr1, Vegfr2), and vasohibin-1 (Vash1) were analyzed and compared by real time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results The percentage of neovascularized area within the cornea was significantly reduced in mice treated with Ad-Vasohibin-1 compared to mice treated with AdNull at every time point after alkali-induced injury (7.11%±3.91% and 15.48%±1.79% of corneal area in the treatment and control groups, respectively, on day 3; 31.64%±4.71% and 43.93%±6.15% on day 6, and 45.02%±9.98% and 66.24%±7.17% on day 9, all p<0.001). Human vasohibin-1 protein was detected at the injection sites on day 3 after corneal burn and was highly expressed in the central subepithelial stroma and co-localized with neovascularized vessels within the alkali-treated cornea on day 6. On day 9, the peripheral cornea exhibited a similar staining pattern as the central cornea, but a more intense vasohibin-1 immunostaining signal was detected in the deep stroma. Some of the vasohibin-1 stain

  2. Long-term gene transfer to mouse fetuses with recombinant adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, M; Jerebtsova, M; Batshaw, M L; Newman, K; Ye, X

    2000-12-01

    We have developed a micro-injection technique to deliver recombinant adenovirus and AAV to mouse fetuses at day 15 after conception. Several routes of delivery, including injections to the amniotic fluid, the front limb, the placenta, the liver, and the retro-orbital venus plexus, were tested using an E1-deleted recombinant adenovirus (Ad.CBlacZ) or a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV.CMVlacZ) carrying a beta-galactosidase (lacZ) gene. Injection of Ad.CBlacZ into the amniotic cavity led to transgene expression in the skin and in the digestive tract of the fetuses. Injection of Ad.CBlacZ in the front limb resulted in LacZ expression in all major muscle groups around the injection site and at low levels in the liver. The other three routes of delivery, ie intra-placental, intra-hepatic and retro-orbital injections of Ad.CBlacZ, all led to lacZ expression predominantly in the liver. Further studies revealed a maximal tolerant dose (defined as the highest viral dose with < or =20% mortality in the injected fetuses) of 1 x 10(9) particles per fetus for intra- hepatic injections, 3 x 10(9) particles per fetus for intra-placental injection, 1 x 1010 particles per fetus for retro-orbital and intra-amniotic injections, and 2 x 10(10) particle per fetus for intra-muscular injection. The adenovirus-mediated lacZ expression in liver and muscle persisted for at least 6 weeks. Intra-muscular injection of AAV.CMVlacZ also resulted in lacZ expression in the muscle up to 3 months after birth with no indication of cellular immune response at the injection site. Taken together, our results demonstrated that prolonged transgene expression can be achieved by in utero gene transfer using either adenoviral or AAV vectors. The distribution of virus-mediated gene transfer appeared to determined mostly by the route of viral administration.

  3. Adenovirus prime, Env protein boost vaccine protects against neutralization-resistant SIVsmE660 variants in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Keele, Brandon F; Li, Wenjun; Borducchi, Erica N; Nkolola, Joseph P; Abbink, Peter; Chen, Bing; Seaman, Michael S; Barouch, Dan H

    2017-06-05

    Previous studies have shown that DNA prime, Ad5 boost vaccines protect against neutralization-sensitive but not neutralization-resistant virus variants within the SIVsmE660 swarm. Here we show that Ad prime, Env protein boost vaccines protect against neutralization-resistant SIVsmE660 variants. We perform two studies in rhesus monkeys with Ad35/Ad26 vectors expressing SIVmac239 Gag/Pol/Env with or without an AS01B-adjuvanted SIVmac32H gp140 protein boost. In a repetitive, low-dose challenge study, we observe robust protection against acquisition of infection by both Ad Alone and Ad/Env vaccines. In a single, high-dose challenge study, only the Ad/Env vaccine affords significant protection against acquisition of infection. Analysis of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses from this study demonstrates that the Ad/Env vaccine blocks both neutralization-sensitive and neutralization-resistant SIVsmE660 variants in rhesus monkeys with restrictive TRIM5α alleles. These data demonstrate that the adjuvanted Env protein boost is critical for protecting against high-dose SIVsmE660 challenge and for blocking neutralization-resistant viruses within the SIVsmE660 swarm.

  4. Determination of particle heterogeneity and stability of recombinant adenovirus by analytical ultracentrifugation in CsCl gradients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Agarwala, Shilpi; Ravindran, Sundari; Vellekamp, Gary

    2008-02-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses (rAd), widely used as vectors for gene therapy, are generally purified by column chromatography and frequently contain empty capsids and other aberrant forms of virus particles. To determine particle heterogeneity we utilized analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) in CsCl density gradients. Preparations of three different rAd vectors were assessed. AUC was able to resolve multiple density forms including two empty capsid types in various virus preparations. One unusual density form (form V), was noninfectious and lacked protein VI. AUC was able to quantify empty capsids and monitor their removal during process development. Their relative concentrations were reduced by either addition of an immobilized zinc affinity chromatography (IZAC) step or by extension of the infection time. The Adenovirus Reference Material (ARM), a wild-type Ad5, had 2.2% empty capsids and no other detectable minor particle forms. Finally, AUC was utilized to monitor the thermal instability of the three rAd vectors via the transformations of different density forms. The vector and empty capsids containing protein IX were more stable than those without IX. Together, these results exemplify AUC in CsCl density gradients as a valuable technique for evaluating product particle heterogeneity and stability.

  5. [Deletion of IV a2 gene from adenoviral genome by lambda-Red recombinase system and packaging of the recombinant adenovirus].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-Fan; Yu, Chi-Jie; Wang, Gang; Tian, Wen-Hong; Lu, Yue; Liu, Xue-Rong; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Gang; Shen, Wei; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Ruan, Li

    2011-05-01

    This investigation is to delete the most of the coding sequence (1104 bp) of the IV a2 gene in an adenovirus genome by a lambda-Red recombinase system-mediated PCR-targeting approach and rescue a recombinant adenovirus with IV a2 deletion. First, the template pAK of PCR targeting, containing kanamycin cassette, was constructed. Then, a linear fragment for PCR targeting, which had 39 bp homologous arms at both of its terminus, was amplified by PCR from the pAK. The pFG140 and the linear fragment were electroporated into E. coli BW25113/pIJ790 sequentially and the recombinant pFG140-deltaIV a2 (1104) was established by homologous recombination between the linear fragment and the pFG140 with aid of X-Red recombinase. The precise deletion of 1 104 bp fragment from IV a2 was confirmed by restriction endonucleases digestion and DNA sequencing. ORF of IV a2 was amplified by PCR from pFG140 and then cloned into the pAAV2neo vector. The recombinant adenovirus Ad5delta IV a2 (1104) was rescued by co-transfection of pFG140-deltaIV a2 (1104) and pAAV2neo-IV a2 into HEK293 cells. It was shown by Western Blot that IV a2 could not be detected in the Ad5deltaIV a2 (1104)- infected HEK293 cells. This study established a PCR-targeting strategy for manipulating adenovirus genome directly by a lambda-Red recombinase system, and a recombinant adenovirus with IV a2 deletion was obtained.

  6. Influenza recombinant vaccine: matrix protein M1 on the platform of the adenovirus dodecahedron.

    PubMed

    Naskalska, A; Szolajska, E; Chaperot, L; Angel, J; Plumas, J; Chroboczek, J

    2009-12-09

    We propose a novel influenza vaccine composed of the adenovirus dodecahedron (Dd) as delivery platform carrying an internal influenza matrix protein M1. To attach the antigen to the vector we used WW domains interacting with Dd. Successful internalization of the Dd-M1WW complex was observed using biochemical and cell biology techniques. We show here that the complex of Dd with antigen is a potent activator of human myeloid dendritic cells (MDC), and that it is efficiently presented by MDC to M1-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes. These results show that proposed vaccine model is feasible and that adenovirus dodecahedron is a potent delivery platform for foreign antigens to human cells.

  7. Protection of guinea pigs and swine by a recombinant adenovirus expressing O serotype of foot-and-mouth disease virus whole capsid and 3C protease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zengjun; Bao, Huifang; Cao, Yimei; Sun, Pu; Guo, Jianhun; Li, Pinghua; Bai, Xingwen; Chen, Yingli; Xie, Baoxia; Li, Dong; Liu, Zaixin; Xie, Qingge

    2008-12-19

    Two recombinant adenoviruses were constructed expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and 3C/3CD proteins in replicative deficient human adenovirus type 5 vector. Guinea pigs vaccinated with 1-3 x 10(8)TCID(50) Ad-P12x3C recombinant adenovirus were completely protected against 10,000GID(50) homologous virulent FMDV challenge 25 days post vaccination (dpv). Ad-P12x3CD vaccinated guinea pigs were only partially protected. Swine were vaccinated once with 1x10(9)TCID(50) Ad-P12x3C hybrid virus and challenged 28 days later. Three of four vaccinated swine were completely protected against 200 pig 50% infectious doses (ID(50)) of homologous FMDV challenge, and vaccinated pigs developed specific cellular and humoral immune responses. The immune effect of Ad-P12x3C in swine further indicated that the recombinant adenovirus was highly efficient in transferring the foreign gene. This approach may thus be a very hopeful tool for developing FMD live virus vector vaccine.

  8. Prime-boost immunization using DNA vaccine and recombinant Orf virus protects pigs against Pseudorabies virus (Herpes suid 1).

    PubMed

    Dory, Daniel; Fischer, Timo; Béven, Véronique; Cariolet, Roland; Rziha, Hanns-Joachim; Jestin, André

    2006-09-11

    The present study demonstrates the protective potential of a novel prime-boost vaccination strategy of pigs against lethal Pseudorabies virus (PRV; Herpes suid 1) infection. Animals were primed with Sindbis virus-derived plasmids that express viral glycoproteins gC and gD (gC- and gD-pSIN) and subsequently booster immunized with Orf virus (ORFV; Parapoxvirus) recombinants expressing gC and gD (D1701-VrVgC and -VrVgD). The prime-boost vaccination induced strong humoral and cellular-like PRV-specific immune responses. All prime-boost vaccinated pigs survived the lethal challenge infection without PRV-specific clinical symptoms and presented excellent body weight loss attenuation. Most notably, nasal shedding of challenge virus was reduced by more than about 3log(10), clearly reducing the risk of infection of non-immunized pigs.

  9. Development of a novel recombinant adenovirus containing gfp-zeocin fusion expression cassette for conditional replication in p53-deficient human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baoli; Joshua, Mallam Nock; Dong, Changyuan; Qi, Yipeng

    2004-05-01

    Two obstacles limiting the efficacy of nearly all cancer gene therapy trails are low gene transduction efficiency and the lack of tumor specificity. Fortunately, a replication-competent, E1B-deficient adenovirus (dl1520) was developed that could overcome these limitations, because it was capable of efficiently and selectively destroying tumor cells lacking functional p53. In an attempt to appraise the efficiency and safety of this approach, a novel recombinant adenovirus, r3/Ad, containing a gfp-zeocin expression cassette was constructed in this work. The study in vitro demonstrated that r3/Ad has the ability to replicate in and lyse only the p53-deficient human tumor cells such as the human glioblastoma cells (U251) and human bladder cells (EJ) but not in the human fibroblast cells (MRC-5) with functional p53. Importantly, this gfp-zeocin fusion gene driven by the bipromoter (CMV and EM-7) could be used as an effective selective marker and reporter in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; and also zeocin as a selective marker could minimize contamination of the recombinant virus by the wt-Ad5. Additionally, it was found that the r3/Ad could be useful for studying the selective replication of E1B-deficient adenovirus in vivo, it could be used as a "guide" to study the ability of the recombinant adenovirus to spread and to infect distant tumor cells in any tumor bearing animal model by GFP as a reporter. This may help determine the safety of using any E1B-deficient adenovirus in cancer gene therapy.

  10. DNA vaccine prime and recombinant FPV vaccine boost: an important candidate immunization strategy to control bluetongue virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Junping; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Sun, Encheng; Feng, Yufei; Lv, Shuang; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Haixiu; Wu, Donglai

    2015-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of bluetongue (BT), an important sheep disease that caused great economic loss to the sheep industry. There are 26 BTV serotypes based on the outer protein VP2. However, the serotypes BTV-1 and BTV-16 are the two most prevalent serotypes in China. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing viral infections. Therefore, the need for an effective vaccine against BTV is urgent. In this study, DNA vaccines and recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV) vaccines expressing VP2 alone or VP2 in combination with VP5 or co-expressing the VP2 and VP5 proteins of BTV-1 were evaluated in both mice and sheep. Several strategies were tested in mice, including DNA vaccine prime and boost, rFPV vaccine prime and boost, and DNA vaccine prime and rFPV vaccine boost. We then determined the best vaccine strategy in sheep. Our results indicated that a strategy combining a DNA vaccine prime (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) followed by an rFPV vaccine boost (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) induced a high titer of neutralizing antibodies in sheep. Therefore, our data suggest that a DNA vaccine consisting of a pCAG-(VP2+VP5) prime and an rFPV-(VP2+VP5) boost is an important candidate for the design of a novel vaccine against BTV-1.

  11. [Construction of replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus vector with hTFPI-2 gene by AdMax system and expression in U937 monocytes in vitro].

    PubMed

    Pan, Junjie; Shi, Haiming; Luo, Xinping; Ma, Duan; Liang, Wang; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Jun; Li, Jian

    2011-04-01

    We tried to construct and identify the recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus vector coding for human tissue factor pathway inhibitor 2 (hTFPI-2) gene by AdMax system in HEK293 cells. Firstly, we obtained hTFPI-2 gene from the recombinant plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-TFPI-2 by PCR using primers with restriction endonuclease site of EcoRI or SacI. After digesting the hTFPI-2 gene and plasmid PDC316-IRES-EGFP shuttle vector, we ligated them with T4 ligase and formed the recombinant shuttle vector PDC316-IRES-EGFP-hTFPI-2. It was confirmed that the ligation product was inserted the gene of hTFPI-2 correctly by sequencing. Then we took cotransfection of HEK293 cells with the recombinant shuttle vector and genomic plasmid pBHGloxdeltaE1,3Cre by liposome lipofectamine2000, and finished the package of recombinant adenovirus Ad-hTFPI-2. The results of the PCR test and restriction endonuclease digestion confirmed the successful construction of the recombinants Ad-hTFPI-2. Furthermore, we measured the titre of Ad-hTFPI-2 with the aid of green fluorescence protein expression after multiplication and purification. The titre was 0.931 x 10(12) pfu/ml. Finally, we infected U937 monocytes by purified Ad-hTFPI-2, and determined the infection efficiency and the TFPI-2's level and activity. The efficiency of Ad-hTFPI-2 infection in U937 cells was 89.33%. After infected by Ad-hTFPI-2, the TFPI-2's level in supernatant increased about 7 fold. Also the TFPI-2 in supernatant had activities of inhibiting trypsin and plasmin. The recombinant adenovirus with the hTFPI-2 gene was constructed successfully. It will be helpful for the further investigation of its potentiality to be applied in antiatherosclerosis.

  12. Construction and characterization of recombinant human adenovirus type 5 expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strain, O/IND/R2/75

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh; Sreenivasa, B. P.; Tamilselvan, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Generation of recombinant human adenovirus type 5 expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid protein genes along with full-length 2B, 3B and 3Cpro and its characterization. Materials and Methods: FMD viral RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis, and polymerase chain reaction were performed to synthesize expression cassettes (P1-2AB3BCwt and P1-2AB3BCm) followed by cloning in pShuttle-CMV vector. Chemically competent BJ5183-AD-1 cells were transformed with the recombinant pShuttle-CMV to produce recombinant adenoviral plasmids. HEK-293 cells were transfected with the recombinant adenoviral plasmids to generate recombinant adenoviruses (hAd5/P1-2AB3BCwt and hAd5/P1-2AB3BCm). Expression of the target proteins was analyzed by sandwich ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence assay. The recombinant adenoviruses were purified and concentrated by CsCl density gradient ultracentrifugation. Growth kinetics and thermostability of the recombinant adenoviruses were compared with that of non-recombinant replication-defective adenovirus (dAd5). Results: The recombinant adenoviruses containing capsid protein genes of the FMDV O/IND/R2/75 were generated and amplified in HEK-293 cells. The titer of the recombinant adenoviruses was approximately 108, 109.5 and 1011 TCID50/ml in supernatant media, cell lysate and CsCl purified preparation, respectively. Expression of the FMDV capsid protein was detectable in sandwich ELISA and confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. Growth kinetics of the recombinant adenoviruses did not reveal a significant difference when compared with that of dAd5. A decrement of up to 10-fold at 4°C and 21-fold at 37°C was recorded in the virus titers during 60 h incubation period and found to be statistically significant (p<0.01). Conclusion: Recombinant adenoviruses expressing capsid proteins of the FMDV O/IND/R2/75 were constructed and produced in high titers. In vitro expression of the target proteins in the adenovirus vector system was detected by

  13. Inhalation of Nebulized Perfluorochemical Enhances Recombinant Adenovirus and Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Gene Expression in Lung Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Travis; Bonneau, Laura; Howard, Alan; Blanchard, James; Borda, Juan; Weiner, Daniel J.; Wang, Lili; Gao, Guang Ping; Kolls, Jay K.; Bohm, Rudolf; Liggitt, Denny

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Use of perfluorochemical liquids during intratracheal vector administration enhances recombinant adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated lung epithelial gene expression. We hypothesized that inhalation of nebulized perfluorochemical vapor would also enhance epithelial gene expression after subsequent intratracheal vector administration. Freely breathing adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed for selected times to nebulized perflubron or sterile saline in a sealed Plexiglas chamber. Recombinant adenoviral vector was administered by transtracheal puncture at selected times afterward and mice were killed 3 days after vector administration to assess transgene expression. Mice tolerated the nebulized perflubron without obvious ill effects. Vector administration 6 hr after nebulized perflubron exposure resulted in an average 540% increase in gene expression in airway and alveolar epithelium, compared with that with vector alone or saline plus vector control (p<0.05). However, vector administration 1 hr, 1 day, or 3 days after perflubron exposure was not different from either nebulized saline with vector or vector alone and a 60-min exposure to nebulized perflubron is required. In parallel pilot studies in macaques, inhalation of nebulized perflubron enhanced recombinant AAV2/5 vector expression throughout the lung. Serial chest radiographs, bronchoalveolar lavages, and results of complete blood counts and serum biochemistries demonstrated no obvious adverse effects of nebulized perflubron. Further, one macaque receiving nebulized perflubron only was monitored for 1 year with no obvious adverse effects of exposure. These results demonstrate that inhalation of nebulized perflubron, a simple, clinically more feasible technique than intratracheal administration of liquid perflubron, safely enhances lung gene expression. PMID:22568624

  14. Antitumor effects of recombinant human adenovirus-p53 against human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanchao; He, Wei; Wang, Rupeng; Yang, Libin; Zhou, Chunli; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to identify the anti-tumor effects of rAd/p53, which is a recombinant human serotype 5 adenovirus, in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Mouse models of human cSCC were constructed by injecting human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma cells into both flanks of nude mice. Subsequently, the 75 nude mice with cSCC xenograft tumors were randomly divided into recombinant human serotype 5 adenovirus (rAd)/p53, rAd/p53 + 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) and 5-Fu groups. One side of the tumors was administered the therapeutic agents as the therapeutic group, whereas the remaining side was treated with medical saline as the control. At 24, 48, 72, 120 and 168 h post-intratumoral injection, alterations in tumor volume, tumor necrosis and the expression of several tumor-associated genes, including Smad4, Brca1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2), were analyzed. Compared with its control group, the rAd/P53 group exhibited a significantly increased tumor necrosis ratio. In addition, Smad4 and Brca1 expression levels increased significantly at various time points (P<0.05), and MMP-2 expression decreased significantly (P<0.05). In the rAd/p53 + 5-Fu group, the tumor necrosis ratio, and Smad4 and Brca1 expression levels also significantly increased at various time points (P<0.05). MMP-2 gene transcription gradually decreased, high expression of Smad4 was prolonged, and high expression of Brca1 was observed in the early period following treatment compared with the rAd/P53 group. In addition, p53 expression exhibited a positive correlation with the tumor necrosis ratio and Smad4 expression, and showed a negative correlation with MMP-2 gene transcription (P<0.05). These findings indicate that rAd/p53 has a potent anti-tumor effect in cSCC via the promotion of tumor necrosis and regulating the expression of various tumor-associated genes. PMID:28105142

  15. Recombinant Adenovirus Delivery of Calreticulin–ESAT-6 Produces an Antigen-Specific Immune Response but no Protection Against a Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Esparza-González, S. C.; Troy, A.; Troudt, J.; Loera-Arias, M. J.; Villatoro-Hernández, J.; Torres-López, E.; Ancer-Rodríguez, J.; Gutiérrez-Puente, Y.; Muñoz-Maldonado, G.; Saucedo-Cárdenas, O.; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, R.; Izzo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG) has failed to efficaciously control the worldwide spread of the disease. New vaccine development targets virulence antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are deleted in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Immunization with ESAT-6 and CFP10 provides protection against M. tuberculosis in a murine infection model. Further, previous studies have shown that calreticulin increases the cell-mediated immune responses to antigens. Therefore, to test whether calreticulin enhances the immune response against M. tuberculosis antigens, we fused ESAT-6 to calreticulin and constructed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus to express the resulting fusion protein (AdCRT–ESAT-6). The adjuvant effect of calreticulin was assayed by measuring cytokine responses specific to ESAT-6. Recombinant adenovirus expressing the fusion protein produced higher levels of interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α in response to ESAT-6. This immune response was not improved by the addition of CFP-10 to the CRT-ESAT-6 fusion protein (AdCRT–ESAT-6–CFP10). Mice immunized with these recombinant adenoviruses did not decrease the mycobacterial burden after low-dose aerosol infection with M. tuberculosis. We conclude that calreticulin can be used as an adjuvant to enhance the immune response against mycobacterial antigens, but it is not enough to protect against tuberculosis. PMID:22010821

  16. DNA vaccination by electroporation and boosting with recombinant proteins enhances the efficacy of DNA vaccines for Schistosomiasis japonica.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yang; Zhu, Yinchang; Harn, Donald A; Wang, Xiaoting; Tang, Jianxia; Zhao, Song; Lu, Fei; Guan, Xiaohong

    2009-12-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica is an endemic, zoonotic disease of major public health importance in China. Control programs combining chemotherapy and snail killing have not been able to block transmission of infection in lakes and marsh regions. Vaccination is needed as a complementary approach to the ongoing control programs. In the present study, we wanted to determine if the efficacies of DNA vaccines encoding the 23-kDa tetraspanin membrane protein (SjC23), triose phosphate isomerase (SjCTPI), and sixfold-repeated genes of the complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) in the H chain of NP30 could be enhanced by boosting via electroporation in vivo and/or with cocktail protein vaccines. Mice vaccinated with cocktail DNA vaccines showed a significant worm reduction of 32.88% (P < 0.01) and egg reduction of 36.20% (P < 0.01). Vaccine efficacy was enhanced when animals were boosted with cocktail protein vaccines; adult worm and liver egg burdens were reduced 45.35% and 48.54%, respectively. Nearly identical results were obtained in mice boosted by electroporation in vivo, with adult worm and egg burdens reduced by 45.00% and 50.88%, respectively. The addition of a protein vaccine boost to this regimen further elevated efficacy to approximately 60% for adult worm burden and greater than 60% for liver egg reduction. The levels of interleukin-2, gamma interferon, and the ratios of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a)/IgG1 clearly showed that cocktail DNA vaccines induced CD4(+) Th1-type responses. Boosting via either electroporation or with recombinant proteins significantly increased associated immune responses over those seen in mice vaccinated solely with DNA vaccines. Thus, schistosome DNA vaccine efficacy was significantly enhanced via boosting by electroporation in vivo and/or cocktail protein vaccines.

  17. Prime-boost vaccination with chimpanzee adenovirus and modified vaccinia Ankara encoding TRAP provides partial protection against Plasmodium falciparum infection in Kenyan adults

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Nick J.; Roberts, Rachel; Mwacharo, Jedidah; Bowyer, Georgina; Bliss, Carly; Hodgson, Susanne H.; Njuguna, Patricia; Viebig, Nicola K.; Nicosia, Alfredo; Gitau, Evelyn; Douglas, Sandy; Illingworth, Joe; Marsh, Kevin; Lawrie, Alison; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B.; Ewer, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Protective immunity to the liver stage of the malaria parasite can be conferred by vaccine-induced T cells, but no subunit vaccination approach based on cellular immunity has shown efficacy in field studies. We randomly allocated 121 healthy adult male volunteers in Kilifi, Kenya, to vaccination with the recombinant viral vectors chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), both encoding the malaria peptide sequence ME-TRAP (the multiple epitope string and thrombospondin-related adhesion protein), or to vaccination with rabies vaccine as a control. We gave antimalarials to clear parasitemia and conducted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis on blood samples three times a week to identify infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. On Cox regression, vaccination reduced the risk of infection by 67% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33 to 83%; P = 0.002] during 8 weeks of monitoring. T cell responses to TRAP peptides 21 to 30 were significantly associated with protection (hazard ratio,0.24; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.75; P = 0.016). PMID:25947165

  18. Prime-boost vaccination with chimpanzee adenovirus and modified vaccinia Ankara encoding TRAP provides partial protection against Plasmodium falciparum infection in Kenyan adults.

    PubMed

    Ogwang, Caroline; Kimani, Domtila; Edwards, Nick J; Roberts, Rachel; Mwacharo, Jedidah; Bowyer, Georgina; Bliss, Carly; Hodgson, Susanne H; Njuguna, Patricia; Viebig, Nicola K; Nicosia, Alfredo; Gitau, Evelyn; Douglas, Sandy; Illingworth, Joe; Marsh, Kevin; Lawrie, Alison; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B; Ewer, Katie; Urban, Britta C; S Hill, Adrian V; Bejon, Philip

    2015-05-06

    Protective immunity to the liver stage of the malaria parasite can be conferred by vaccine-induced T cells, but no subunit vaccination approach based on cellular immunity has shown efficacy in field studies. We randomly allocated 121 healthy adult male volunteers in Kilifi, Kenya, to vaccination with the recombinant viral vectors chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), both encoding the malaria peptide sequence ME-TRAP (the multiple epitope string and thrombospondin-related adhesion protein), or to vaccination with rabies vaccine as a control. We gave antimalarials to clear parasitemia and conducted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis on blood samples three times a week to identify infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. On Cox regression, vaccination reduced the risk of infection by 67% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33 to 83%; P = 0.002] during 8 weeks of monitoring. T cell responses to TRAP peptides 21 to 30 were significantly associated with protection (hazard ratio, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.75; P = 0.016).

  19. [Construction of a recombined adenovirus vector carrying pri-miR-21 gene and research on it's target gene TLR4].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Xu, Guang-xian; Jia, Wei; Dong, Hui; Zhang, Yi-lin; Zhao, Zhi-jun; Wei, Jun

    2012-02-01

    To construct the recombined adenovirus vector carrying pri-miR-21 gene, which can express mature miR-21 efficiently, and to study the interaction of miR- 21 with its target gene TLR4. Using healthy mouse's gDNA as template, the primary miR-21 coding sequence was amplified by PCR and cloned into a shuttle vector pAdTrack-CMV. Constructed plasmid was sequenced and linearized for homologous recombination with pAdEasy-1 vector in BJ5183 bacteria. The recombined adenovirus vector carrying pri-miR-21 gene was used to challenge HeLa cell. The candidate target gene of miR-21 was determined by miRNA analysis databases. The expression level of TLR4 protein was detected by western blotting. Through the PCR, restriction enzyme digestion, DNA sequencing and expression of GFP, recombinant adenoviral vector pri-miR-21 gene was constructed successfully. Bioinformatic analysis suggested a few possible binding sites between miR-21 and TLR4. Results showed that miR-21 down-regulated TLR4 at protein levels. The recombinant adenoviral vector containing pri- miR-21 was successfully constructed. miR-21 gene interfered with the expression of TLR4 target gene.

  20. Immunotherapeutic effects of recombinant adenovirus encoding granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor in experimental pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Francisco-Cruz, A.; Mata-Espinosa, D.; Estrada-Parra, S.; Xing, Z.; Hernández-Pando, R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary BALB/c mice with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) develop a T helper cell type 1 that temporarily controls bacterial growth. Bacterial proliferation increases, accompanied by decreasing expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Activation of dendritic cells (DCs) is delayed. Intratracheal administration of only one dose of recombinant adenoviruses encoding granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (AdGM-CSF) 1 day before Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection produced a significant decrease of pulmonary bacterial loads, higher activated DCs and increased expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and iNOS. When AdGM-CSF was given in female mice B6D2F1 (C57BL/6J X DBA/2J) infected with a low Mtb dose to induce chronic infection similar to latent infection and corticosterone was used to induce reactivation, a very low bacilli burden in lungs was detected, and the same effect was observed in healthy mice co-housed with mice infected with mild and highly virulent bacteria in a model of transmissibility. Thus, GM-CSF is a significant cytokine in the immune protection against Mtb and gene therapy with AdGM-CSF increased protective immunity when administered in a single dose 1 day before Mtb infection in a model of progressive disease, and when used to prevent reactivation of latent infection or transmission. PMID:23379435

  1. An Adenovirus Type 5 Mutant with the Preterminal Protein Gene Deleted Efficiently Provides Helper Functions for the Production of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Ian H.; Maxwell, Francoise; Schaack, Jerome

    1998-01-01

    Production of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) requires helper functions that have routinely been provided by infection of the producer cells with adenovirus. Complete removal and/or inactivation of progeny adenovirus, present in such rAAV preparations, presents significant difficulty. Here, we report that an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) mutant with the preterminal protein (pTP) gene deleted can provide helper function for the growth of rAAV. At high multiplicity, Ad5dl308ΔpTP was as efficient as the phenotypically wild-type Ad5dl309 in permitting growth of rAAV. Use of Ad5dl308ΔpTP, which is incapable of replication in the absence of complementation for pTP, as a helper avoids the need to remove contaminating adenovirus infectious activity by heat inactivation or by purification. Comparison of the transducing ability of rAAV generated with either Ad5dl308ΔpTP or Ad5dl309 as a helper demonstrated that the heat inactivation protocol generally used does not remove all of the helper Ad5dl309 function. PMID:9733887

  2. High prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus (CAV) type 2 in domestic dog populations in South Africa precludes the use of CAV-based recombinant rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wright, N; Jackson, F R; Niezgoda, M; Ellison, J A; Rupprecht, C E; Nel, L H

    2013-08-28

    Rabies in dogs can be controlled through mass vaccination. Oral vaccination of domestic dogs would be useful in the developing world, where greater vaccination coverage is needed especially in inaccessible areas or places with large numbers of free-roaming dogs. From this perspective, recent research has focused on development of new recombinant vaccines that can be administered orally in a bait to be used as adjunct for parenteral vaccination. One such candidate, a recombinant canine adenovirus type 2 vaccine expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (CAV2-RG), is considered a promising option for dogs, given host specificity and safety. To assess the potential use of this vaccine in domestic dog populations, we investigated the prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus type 2 in South African dogs. Blood was collected from 241 dogs from the Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces. Sampled dogs had not previously been vaccinated against canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV1) or canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2). Animals from both provinces had a high percentage of seropositivity (45% and 62%), suggesting that CAV2 circulates extensively among domestic dog populations in South Africa. Given this finding, we evaluated the effect of pre-existing CAV-specific antibodies on the efficacy of the CAV2-RG vaccine delivered via the oral route in dogs. Purpose-bred Beagle dogs, which received prior vaccination against canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus and CAV, were immunized by oral administration of CAV2-RG. After rabies virus (RABV) infection all animals, except one vaccinated dog, developed rabies. This study demonstrated that pre-existing antibodies against CAV, such as naturally occurs in South African dogs, inhibits the development of neutralizing antibodies against RABV when immunized with a CAV-based rabies recombinant vaccine.

  3. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: Vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibo...

  4. Vaccination with Recombinant Adenoviruses Expressing the Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus F or H Proteins Overcomes Viral Immunosuppression and Induces Protective Immunity against PPRV Challenge in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, José M.; Moreno, Héctor; Valcárcel, Félix; Peña, Lourdes; Sevilla, Noemí; Martín, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious disease of small ruminants caused by the Morbillivirus peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). Two recombinant replication-defective human adenoviruses serotype 5 (Ad5) expressing either the highly immunogenic fusion protein (F) or hemagglutinin protein (H) from PPRV were used to vaccinate sheep by intramuscular inoculation. Both recombinant adenovirus vaccines elicited PPRV-specific B- and T-cell responses. Thus, neutralizing antibodies were detected in sera from immunized sheep. In addition, we detected a significant antigen specific T-cell response in vaccinated sheep against two different PPRV strains, indicating that the vaccine induced heterologous T cell responses. Importantly, no clinical signs and undetectable virus shedding were observed after virulent PPRV challenge in vaccinated sheep. These vaccines also overcame the T cell immunosuppression induced by PPRV in control animals. The results indicate that these adenovirus constructs could be a promising alternative to current vaccine strategies for the development of PPRV DIVA vaccines. PMID:25013961

  5. Molecular evolution of human species D adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christopher M.; Seto, Donald; Jones, Morris S.; Dyer, David W.; Chodosh, James

    2011-01-01

    Adenoviruses are medium-sized double stranded DNA viruses that infect vertebrates. Human adenoviruses cause an array of diseases. Currently there are 56 human adenovirus types recognized and characterized within seven species (A-G). Of those types, a majority belongs to species D. In this review, the genomic conservation and diversity are examined amongst human adenoviruses within species D, particularly in contrast to other human adenovirus species. Specifically, homologous recombination is presented as a driving force for the molecular evolution of human adenoviruses and the emergence of new adenovirus pathogens. PMID:21570490

  6. Protection Against Aerosolized Yersinia pestis Challenge Following Homologous and Heterologous Prime-Boost With Recombinant Plague Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    INFECTION AND IMMUNITY , Aug. 2005, p. 5256–5261 Vol. 73, No. 8 0019-9567/05/$08.000 doi:10.1128/IAI.73.8.5256–5261.2005 Copyright © 2005, American...and heterologous prime-boost with recombinant plague antigens, Infection and Immunity 73:5256 - 5261 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM... infection following aerosol challenge with Y. pestis with a median survival time (MST) of 72 h. By con- trast, 9/10 positive-control animals immunized

  7. Sterile Immunity to Malaria after DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Immunization Is Associated with Effector Memory CD8+T Cells Targeting AMA1 Class I Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Farooq, Fouzia; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Kim, Yohan; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro; Huang, Jun; McGrath, Shannon; Abot, Esteban; Limbach, Keith; Shi, Meng; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter; Chuang, Ilin; Tamminga, Cindy; Epstein, Judith E.; Villasante, Eileen; Richie, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fifteen volunteers were immunized with three doses of plasmid DNA encoding P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1) and boosted with human adenovirus-5 (Ad) expressing the same antigens (DNA/Ad). Four volunteers (27%) demonstrated sterile immunity to controlled human malaria infection and, overall, protection was statistically significantly associated with ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ activities to AMA1 but not CSP. DNA priming was required for protection, as 18 additional subjects immunized with Ad alone (AdCA) did not develop sterile protection. Methodology/Principal Findings We sought to identify correlates of protection, recognizing that DNA-priming may induce different responses than AdCA alone. Among protected volunteers, two and three had higher ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to CSP and AMA1, respectively, than non-protected volunteers. Unexpectedly, non-protected volunteers in the AdCA trial showed ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to AMA1 equal to or higher than the protected volunteers. T cell functionality assessed by intracellular cytokine staining for IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 likewise did not distinguish protected from non-protected volunteers across both trials. However, three of the four protected volunteers showed higher effector to central memory CD8+ T cell ratios to AMA1, and one of these to CSP, than non-protected volunteers for both antigens. These responses were focused on discrete regions of CSP and AMA1. Class I epitopes restricted by A*03 or B*58 supertypes within these regions of AMA1 strongly recalled responses in three of four protected volunteers. We hypothesize that vaccine-induced effector memory CD8+ T cells recognizing a single class I epitope can confer sterile immunity to P. falciparum in humans. Conclusions/Significance We suggest that better understanding of which epitopes within malaria antigens can confer sterile immunity and design of vaccine approaches

  8. Production of High-Titer Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors in the Absence of Helper Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiao; Li, Juan; Samulski, Richard Jude

    1998-01-01

    Recently, efficient and long-term in vivo gene transfer by recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 (rAAV) vectors has been demonstrated in a variety of tissues. Further improvement in vector titer and purity will expedite this in vivo exploration and provide preclinical information required for use in human gene therapy. In an effort to obtain higher titers, we constructed a novel AAV helper plasmid which utilizes translational control of AAV Rep genes (J. Li et al., J. Virol. 71:5236–5243, 1997). To address the issue of purity, in this study we report the first rAAV production method which is completely free of adenovirus (Ad) helper virus. The new production system uses a plasmid construct which contains a mini-Ad genome capable of propagating rAAV in the presence of AAV Rep and Cap genes. This construct is missing some of the early and most of the late Ad genes and is incapable of producing infectious Ad. Transfection of 293 cells with the new mini-Ad helper and AAV packaging plasmids results in high-titer rAAV vectors with yields greater than 1,000 transducing units, or 105 viral particles per cell. When rAAV vectors were produced by using this production scheme and compared to traditional heat-inactivated rAAV preparations in vitro and in vivo, we observed transduction equivalent to or better than normal levels. The complete removal of infectious Ad from AAV production should facilitate a better understanding of immune response to AAV vectors in vivo, eliminate the need for developing replication-competent Ad assays, and provide a more defined reagent for clinical use. PMID:9499080

  9. Microneedle mediated intradermal delivery of adjuvanted recombinant HIV-1 CN54gp140 effectively primes mucosal boost inoculations.

    PubMed

    Pattani, Aditya; McKay, Paul F; Garland, Martin J; Curran, Rhonda M; Migalska, Katarzyna; Cassidy, Corona M; Malcolm, R Karl; Shattock, Robin J; McCarthy, Helen O; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2012-09-28

    Dissolving polymeric microneedle arrays formulated to contain recombinant CN54 HIVgp140 and the TLR4 agonist adjuvant MPLA were assessed for their ability to elicit antigen-specific immunity. Using this novel microneedle system we successfully primed antigen-specific responses that were further boosted by an intranasal mucosal inoculation to elicit significant antigen-specific immunity. This prime-boost modality generated similar serum and mucosal gp140-specific IgG levels to the adjuvanted and systemic subcutaneous inoculations. While the microneedle primed groups demonstrated a balanced Th1/Th2 profile, strong Th2 polarization was observed in the subcutaneous inoculation group, likely due to the high level of IL-5 secretion from cells in this group. Significantly, the animals that received a microneedle prime and intranasal boost regimen elicited a high level IgA response in both the serum and mucosa, which was greatly enhanced over the subcutaneous group. The splenocytes from this inoculation group secreted moderate levels of IL-5 and IL-10 as well as high amounts of IL-2, cytokines known to act in synergy to induce IgA. This work opens up the possibility for microneedle-based HIV vaccination strategies that, once fully developed, will greatly reduce risk for vaccinators and patients, with those in the developing world set to benefit most.

  10. The complete genome sequence of human adenovirus 84, a highly recombinant new Human mastadenovirus D type with a unique fiber gene.

    PubMed

    Kaján, Győző L; Kajon, Adriana E; Pinto, Alexis Castillo; Bartha, Dániel; Arnberg, Niklas

    2017-09-15

    A novel human adenovirus was isolated from a pediatric case of acute respiratory disease in Panama City, Panama in 2011. The clinical isolate was initially identified as an intertypic recombinant based on hexon and fiber gene sequencing. Based on the analysis of its complete genome sequence, the novel complex recombinant Human mastadenovirus D (HAdV-D) strain was classified into a new HAdV type: HAdV-84, and it was designated Adenovirus D human/PAN/P309886/2011/84[P43H17F84]. HAdV-D types possess usually an ocular or gastrointestinal tropism, and respiratory association is scarcely reported. The virus has a novel fiber type, most closely related to, but still clearly distant from that of HAdV-36. The predicted fiber is hypothesised to bind sialic acid with lower affinity compared to HAdV-37. Bioinformatic analysis of the complete genomic sequence of HAdV-84 revealed multiple homologous recombination events and provided deeper insight into HAdV evolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Targeted delivery of CYP2E1 recombinant adenovirus to malignant melanoma by bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as vehicles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jishi; Ma, Dan; Li, Yan; Yang, Yuan; Hu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Wei; Fang, Qin

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) as intermediate carriers on targeting of P450 gene recombinant adenovirus to malignant melanoma in vitro and in vivo. BMSCs were transduced with pAd5-CMV-CYP2E1 recombinant adenovirus. BMSC migration was detected by Transwell plates in vitro and by superparamagnetic iron oxide particles in vivo. Growth-inhibitory effect and apoptosis were determined by MTT and immunity fluorescence staining. Anticancer effects were examined by a human melanoma nude mouse model in vivo. BMSCs moved toward A375 cells in Transwell plates. Numerous superparamagnetic MSCs labeled with iron oxide were identified in the peripheral areas of the tumor, but were detected in primary organs by Prussian blue staining. BMSC-CYP2E1 cells mediated a bystander killing effect on CYP2E1-negative A375 cells during coculture (IC50 values for A375 cells cocultured with BMSC-EGFP and BMSC-CYP2E1 were 4.08 and 2.68 mmol/l, respectively). Intravenously injecting CYP2E1 recombinant adenovirus-loaded BMSCs in mice with established human melanoma managed to target the tumor site, and BMSCs with forced expression of CYP2E1 inhibited the growth of malignant cells in vivo by activating 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide. BMSCs may serve as a platform of P450 gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy for the delivery of chemotherapeutic prodrugs to tumors.

  12. [Effect of recombinant adenovirus Ad-DT-A in targeted therapy for malignant cancer cell lines with loss of IGF2 imprinting].

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu-qin; He, Bang-shun; Zhu, Chan; Qu, Li-li; Xu, Xiong-fei; Wang, Shu-kui

    2011-11-01

    To explore the feasibility of IGF2 imprinting system in target gene therapy for tumors. The mouse H19 enhancer, DMD and promoter H19 were amplified by PCR from mouse genomic DNA and then cloned into the plasmid pDC312. The EGFP and DT-A fragments were amplified by PCR and cloned into the recombinant plasmid, and then the shuttle plasmid were transfected into HEK293 cells together with the adenoviral vector Ad5, namely, Ad-EGFP and Ad-DT-A. Adenovirus hexon gene expression was applied to confirm the presence of adenovirus infections. The effect of the IGF2 imprinting system was tested by fluorescence microscopy. RT-PCR and Western blotting after transfection of the recombinant adenoviral vectors into cancer cells were used to show loss of IGF2 imprinting (LOI) and maintenance of IGF2 imprinting (MOI), respectively. The anti-tumor effect was assessed by MTT and flow cytometry after the HCT-8 (LOI). Human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 (MOI) and human normal gastric epithelial GES-1 (MOI) cell line were transfected with Ad-DT-A in vitro. The anti-tumor effect was detected by injecting the Ad-DT-A in nude mice carrying HCT-8 tumors. The expression of EGFP protein, DT-A mRNA and DT-A protein were seen to be positive only in the HCT-8 tumor cell line. Infection with Ad-DT-A resulted in obviously growth inhibition in HCT-8 cells (75.4 ± 6.4)% compared with that in the control group, and increased the percentage of apoptosis in the HCT-8 cells (20.8 ± 5.9)%. The anti-tumor effect was further confirmed by injecting the recombinant adenoviruses in HCT-8 tumor-bearing nude mice, and the results showed that the Ad-DT-A inhibited the tumor growth, with on inhibition rate of 36.4%. The recombinant adenoviruses carrying IGF2 imprinting system and DT-A gene have been successfully constructed, while Ad-DT-A can effectively kill the tumor cells showing loss of IGF2 imprinting. It might play an important role in future target gene therapy against malignant tumors based on loss of

  13. Recombination between adenovirus type 12 DNA and a hamster preinsertion sequence in a cell-free system. Patch homologies and fractionation of nuclear extracts.

    PubMed

    Tatzelt, J; Scholz, B; Fechteler, K; Jessberger, R; Doerfler, W

    1992-07-05

    We have previously described a cell-free recombination system derived from hamster cell nuclear extracts in which the in vitro recombination between a hamster preinsertion sequence, the cloned 1768 base-pair p7 fragment, and adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) DNA has been demonstrated. The nuclear extracts have now been subfractionated by gel filtration on a Sephacryl S-300 column. The activity promoting cell-free recombination elutes from the Sephacryl S-300 matrix with the shoulder and not the peak fractions of the absorbancy profile. By using these protein subfractions, in vitro recombinants have been generated between the p7 preinsertion sequence and the 60 to 70 map unit fragment of Ad12 DNA, which has previously shown high recombination frequency. In all of the analyzed recombinants thus produced in vitro, striking patchy homologies have been observed between the p7 and Ad12 junction sequences, and between Ad12 DNA or p7 DNA and pBR322 DNA. The patchy homologies are similar to those found earlier during the analyses of some of the junction sequences in integrated Ad12 genomes in Ad12-induced hamster tumor cell lines. Proteins in the shoulder fractions of the gel-filtration experiment can form specific complexes with double-stranded synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides corresponding to several p7 and Ad12 DNA sequences. These sequences participate in the recombination reactions catalyzed by the same column fractions in the shoulder of the absorbancy profile. Such proteins have not been found in the peak fractions. Further work will be required to ascertain that the cell-free recombination system mimics certain elements of the mechanisms of integrative recombination and to purify the cellular components essential for recombination.

  14. Vaccine strategies against Babesia bovis based on prime-boost immunizations in mice with modified vaccinia Ankara vector and recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo Ortiz, José Manuel; Del Médico Zajac, María Paula; Zanetti, Flavia Adriana; Molinari, María Paula; Gravisaco, María José; Calamante, Gabriela; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth

    2014-08-06

    In this study, a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vector expressing a chimeric multi-antigen was obtained and evaluated as a candidate vaccine in homologous and heterologous prime-boost immunizations with a recombinant protein cocktail. The chimeric multi-antigen comprises immunodominant B and T cell regions of three Babesia bovis proteins. Humoral and cellular immune responses were evaluated in mice to compare the immunogenicity induced by different immunization schemes. The best vaccination scheme was achieved with a prime of protein cocktail and a boost with the recombinant virus. This scheme induced high level of specific IgG antibodies and secreted IFN and a high degree of activation of IFNγ(+) CD4(+) and CD8(+) specific T cells. This is the first report in which a novel vaccine candidate was constructed based on a rationally designed multi-antigen and evaluated in a prime-boost regime, optimizing the immune response necessary for protection against bovine babesiosis.

  15. Mifepristone-inducible recombinant adenovirus attenuates paraquat-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Hong, G-L; Cai, Q-Q; Tan, J-P; Jiang, X-Z; Zhao, G-J; Wu, B; Li, M-F; Qiu, Q-M; Lu, Z-Q

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of overexpression of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (NRF2) on lung injury in rats exposed to paraquat (PQ) poisoning. A mifepristone (RU486)-inducible recombinant adenoviral vector carrying the human NRF2 gene (Ad-RUNRF2) was constructed and transfected via airway into the rats 7 days before the administration of RU486. Rats were orally challenged with PQ at 20 mg/kg 24 h after the injection of RU486. On days 0.5, 3 and 21 after PQ poisoning, the expressions of NRF2 and cytokines related to inflammation and oxidation in lung tissue were examined. RU486 remarkably enhanced NRF2 mRNA and NRF2 protein levels in Ad-RUNRF2-transfected rats in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.01). PQ stimulated compensatory overexpression of NRF2, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) in lungs on days 0.5 and 3 after exposure (p < 0.05), but depleted the expression of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione (GSH), with an increased malondialdehyde (MDA) (p < 0.05). However, pretreatment with Ad-RUNRF2 and RU486 strongly enhanced the expression levels of NRF2, HO-1, NQO-1, CAT and GSH-Px in the lungs of PQ intoxicated rats, with increased GSH and decreased MDA (p < 0.05). Pretreatment with Ad-RUNRF2 and RU486 also strongly suppressed the PQ-induced activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and decreased the levels of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). In addition, Ad-RUNRF2 and RU486 induction significantly reduced PQ-induced pathological changes in lungs and attenuated lung oedema and protein leakage caused by PQ (p < 0.05). RU486-induced overexpression of NRF2 in lungs transfected with Ad-RUNRF2 can ameliorate PQ-induced lung injury by the activation of the NRF2-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Prime-boost vaccination with plasmid DNA followed by recombinant vaccinia virus expressing BgGARP induced a partial protective immunity to inhibit Babesia gibsoni proliferation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shinuo; Mousa, Ahmed Abdelmoniem; Aboge, Gabriel Oluga; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Zhou, Mo; Moumouni, Paul Franck Adjou; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Masatani, Tatsunori; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Fukumoto, Shinya; Xuan, Xuenan

    2013-12-01

    A heterologous prime-boost vaccination regime with DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus (rvv) vectors expressing relevant antigens has been shown to induce effective immune responses against several infectious pathogens. In this study, we describe the effectiveness of the prime-boost strategy by immunizing dogs with a recombinant plasmid followed by vaccinia virus, both of which expressed the glutamic acid-rich protein (BgGARP) of Babesia gibsoni. The dogs immunized with the prime-boost regime developed a significantly high level of specific antibodies against BgGARP when compared with the control groups. The antibody level was strongly increased after a booster immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus. Two weeks after the booster immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing BgGARP, the dogs were challenged with B. gibsoni parasite. The dogs immunized with the prime-boost regime showed partial protection, manifested as a significantly low level of parasitemia. These results indicated that this type of DNA/rvv prime-boost immunization approach may have use against B. gibsoni infection in dogs.

  17. Oral vaccination and protection of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) against rabies using ONRAB, an adenovirus-rabies recombinant vaccine.

    PubMed

    Brown, L J; Rosatte, R C; Fehlner-Gardiner, C; Bachmann, P; Ellison, J A; Jackson, F R; Taylor, J S; Davies, C; Donovan, D

    2014-02-12

    Twenty-seven red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) were each offered a bait containing ONRAB, a recombinant oral rabies vaccine that uses a human adenovirus vector to express the immunogenic rabies virus glycoprotein; 10 controls received no vaccine baits. Serum samples collected from all foxes before treatment, and each week post-treatment for 16 weeks, were tested for the presence of rabies virus neutralizing antibody (RVNA). In the bait group, a fox was considered a responder to vaccination if serum samples from 3 or more consecutive weeks had RVNA ≥0.5 IU/ml. Using this criterion, 79% of adult foxes (11/14) and 46% of juveniles (6/13) responded to vaccination with ONRAB. Serum RVNA of adults first tested positive (≥0.5 IU/ml) between weeks 1 and 3, about 4 weeks earlier than in juveniles. Adults also responded with higher levels of RVNA and these levels were maintained longer. Serum samples from juveniles tested positive for 1-4 consecutive weeks; in adults the range was 2-15 weeks, with almost half of adults maintaining titres above 0.5 IU/ml for 9 or more consecutive weeks. Based on the kinetics of the antibody response to ONRAB, the best time to sample sera of wild adult foxes for evidence of vaccination is 7-11 weeks following bait distribution. Thirty-four foxes (25 ONRAB, 9 controls) were challenged with vulpine street virus 547 days post-vaccination. All controls developed rabies whereas eight of 13 adult vaccinates (62%) and four of 12 juvenile vaccinates (33%) survived. All foxes classed as non-responders to vaccination developed rabies. Of foxes considered responders to vaccination, 80% of adults (8/10) and 67% of juveniles (4/6) survived challenge. The duration of immunity conferred to foxes would appear adequate for bi-annual and annual bait distribution schedules as vaccinates were challenged 1.5 years post-vaccination. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Adenovirus-vectored novel African Swine Fever Virus antigens elicit robust immune responses in swine.

    PubMed

    Lokhandwala, Shehnaz; Waghela, Suryakant D; Bray, Jocelyn; Sangewar, Neha; Charendoff, Chloe; Martin, Cameron L; Hassan, Wisam S; Koynarski, Tsvetoslav; Gabbert, Lindsay; Burrage, Thomas G; Brake, David; Neilan, John; Mwangi, Waithaka

    2017-01-01

    African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) is a high-consequence transboundary animal pathogen that often causes hemorrhagic disease in swine with a case fatality rate close to 100%. Lack of treatment or vaccine for the disease makes it imperative that safe and efficacious vaccines are developed to safeguard the swine industry. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of seven adenovirus-vectored novel ASFV antigens, namely A151R, B119L, B602L, EP402RΔPRR, B438L, K205R and A104R. Immunization of commercial swine with a cocktail of the recombinant adenoviruses formulated in adjuvant primed strong ASFV antigen-specific IgG responses that underwent rapid recall upon boost. Notably, most vaccinees mounted robust IgG responses against all the antigens in the cocktail. Most importantly and relevant to vaccine development, the induced antibodies recognized viral proteins from Georgia 2007/1 ASFV-infected cells by IFA and by western blot analysis. The recombinant adenovirus cocktail also induced ASFV-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells that were recalled upon boosting. Evaluation of local and systemic effects of the recombinant adenovirus cocktail post-priming and post-boosting in the immunized animals showed that the immunogen was well tolerated and no serious negative effects were observed. Taken together, these outcomes showed that the adenovirus-vectored novel ASFV antigen cocktail was capable of safely inducing strong antibody and IFN-γ+ cell responses in commercial swine. The data will be used for selection of antigens for inclusion in a multi-antigen prototype vaccine to be evaluated for protective efficacy.

  19. Adenovirus-vectored novel African Swine Fever Virus antigens elicit robust immune responses in swine

    PubMed Central

    Waghela, Suryakant D.; Bray, Jocelyn; Sangewar, Neha; Charendoff, Chloe; Martin, Cameron L.; Hassan, Wisam S.; Koynarski, Tsvetoslav; Gabbert, Lindsay; Burrage, Thomas G.; Brake, David; Neilan, John; Mwangi, Waithaka

    2017-01-01

    African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) is a high-consequence transboundary animal pathogen that often causes hemorrhagic disease in swine with a case fatality rate close to 100%. Lack of treatment or vaccine for the disease makes it imperative that safe and efficacious vaccines are developed to safeguard the swine industry. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of seven adenovirus-vectored novel ASFV antigens, namely A151R, B119L, B602L, EP402RΔPRR, B438L, K205R and A104R. Immunization of commercial swine with a cocktail of the recombinant adenoviruses formulated in adjuvant primed strong ASFV antigen-specific IgG responses that underwent rapid recall upon boost. Notably, most vaccinees mounted robust IgG responses against all the antigens in the cocktail. Most importantly and relevant to vaccine development, the induced antibodies recognized viral proteins from Georgia 2007/1 ASFV-infected cells by IFA and by western blot analysis. The recombinant adenovirus cocktail also induced ASFV-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells that were recalled upon boosting. Evaluation of local and systemic effects of the recombinant adenovirus cocktail post-priming and post-boosting in the immunized animals showed that the immunogen was well tolerated and no serious negative effects were observed. Taken together, these outcomes showed that the adenovirus-vectored novel ASFV antigen cocktail was capable of safely inducing strong antibody and IFN-γ+ cell responses in commercial swine. The data will be used for selection of antigens for inclusion in a multi-antigen prototype vaccine to be evaluated for protective efficacy. PMID:28481911

  20. Vaccination with recombinant adenoviruses expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein elicits protection in the interferon alpha/beta receptor knock-out mouse.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Lyn M; Stokes, Margaret G; Lonsdale, Stephen G; Maslowski, David R; Smither, Sophie J; Lever, Mark S; Laws, Thomas R; Perkins, Stuart D

    2014-03-01

    The resistance of adult immunocompetent mice to infection with ebolaviruses has led to the development of alternative small animal models that utilise immunodeficient mice, for example the interferon α/β receptor knock-out mouse (IFNR(-/-)). IFNR(-/-) mice have been shown to be susceptible to infection with ebolaviruses by multiple routes but it is not known if this murine model is suitable for testing therapeutics that rely on the generation of an immune response for efficacy. We have tested recombinant adenovirus vectors for their ability to protect IFNR(-/-) mice from challenge with Ebola virus and have analysed the humoral response generated after immunisation. The recombinant vaccines elicited good levels of protection in the knock-out mouse and the antibody response in IFNR(-/-) mice was similar to that observed in vaccinated wild-type mice. These results indicate that the IFNR(-/-) mouse is a relevant small animal model for studying ebolavirus-specific therapeutics.

  1. A Novel Recombinant Peste des Petits Ruminants-Canine Adenovirus Vaccine Elicits Long-Lasting Neutralizing Antibody Response against PPR in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Junling; Huang, Hainan; Ruan, Yang; Hou, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Songtao; Wang, Chengyu; Huang, Geng; Wang, Tiecheng; Feng, Na; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2012-01-01

    Background Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious infectious disease of goats, sheep and small wild ruminant species with high morbidity and mortality rates. The Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) expresses a hemagglutinin (H) glycoprotein on its outer envelope that is crucial for viral attachment to host cells and represents a key antigen for inducing the host immune response. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine whether H can be exploited to generate an effective PPRV vaccine, a replication-competent recombinant canine adenovirus type-2 (CAV-2) expressing the H gene of PPRV (China/Tibet strain) was constructed by the in vitro ligation method. The H expression cassette, including the human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) promoter/enhancer and the BGH early mRNA polyadenylation signal, was inserted into the SspI site of the E3 region, which is not essential for proliferation of CAV-2. Infectious recombinant rCAV-2-PPRV-H virus was generated in transfected MDCK cells and used to immunize goats. All vaccinated animals produced antibodies upon primary injection that were effective in neutralizing PPRV in vitro. Higher antibody titer was obtained following booster inoculation, and the antibody was detectable in goats for at least seven months. No serious recombinant virus-related adverse effect was observed in immunized animals and no adenovirus could be isolated from the urine or feces of vaccinated animals. Results showed that the recombinant virus was safe and could stimulate a long-lasting immune response in goats. Conclusions/Significance This strategy not only provides an effective PPR vaccine candidate for goats but may be a valuable mean by which to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals (the so-called DIVA approach). PMID:22623990

  2. A novel recombinant Peste des petits ruminants-canine adenovirus vaccine elicits long-lasting neutralizing antibody response against PPR in goats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Junling; Huang, Hainan; Ruan, Yang; Hou, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Songtao; Wang, Chengyu; Huang, Geng; Wang, Tiecheng; Feng, Na; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2012-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious infectious disease of goats, sheep and small wild ruminant species with high morbidity and mortality rates. The Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) expresses a hemagglutinin (H) glycoprotein on its outer envelope that is crucial for viral attachment to host cells and represents a key antigen for inducing the host immune response. To determine whether H can be exploited to generate an effective PPRV vaccine, a replication-competent recombinant canine adenovirus type-2 (CAV-2) expressing the H gene of PPRV (China/Tibet strain) was constructed by the in vitro ligation method. The H expression cassette, including the human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) promoter/enhancer and the BGH early mRNA polyadenylation signal, was inserted into the SspI site of the E3 region, which is not essential for proliferation of CAV-2. Infectious recombinant rCAV-2-PPRV-H virus was generated in transfected MDCK cells and used to immunize goats. All vaccinated animals produced antibodies upon primary injection that were effective in neutralizing PPRV in vitro. Higher antibody titer was obtained following booster inoculation, and the antibody was detectable in goats for at least seven months. No serious recombinant virus-related adverse effect was observed in immunized animals and no adenovirus could be isolated from the urine or feces of vaccinated animals. Results showed that the recombinant virus was safe and could stimulate a long-lasting immune response in goats. This strategy not only provides an effective PPR vaccine candidate for goats but may be a valuable mean by which to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals (the so-called DIVA approach).

  3. Time-dependent biodistribution and transgene expression of a recombinant human adenovirus serotype 5-luciferase vector as a surrogate agent for rAd5-FMDV vaccines in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Replication-defective recombinant adenovirus 5 (rAd5) vectors carrying foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) transgenes elicit a robust immune response to FMDV challenge in cattle; however vaccine function mechanisms are incompletely understood. Recent efforts addressing critical interactions of rAd5 ...

  4. Microencapsulation of recombinant adenovirus within poly-DL-lactide-poly(ethylene glycol) microspheres for enhanced gene transfection efficiency and inhibitory effects on hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dong; Feng, Li-Bo; Wu, Xiao-Long; Xia, Guo-Dong; Xu, Liang

    2015-08-01

    When gene therapy is performed for the treatment of malignant tumors, gene transfer efficiency and selectivity are highly important. Polymer vehicle microspheres are a novel type of therapy, which have been developed rapidly in recent years and are able to control drug release, prolong the biological half-life of drugs, decrease side effects and achieve targeted delivery. The present study was designed to construct a polymer microsphere-encapsulated recombinant adenovirus with human tissue inhibitors of the matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) gene, and to discuss its characterization for the purpose of liver cancer gene therapy. The microsphere was prepared from biodegradable poly-DL-lactide-poly(ethylene glycol) (PELA) encapsulating rAdTIMP-1, the recombinant adenovirus carrying TIMP-1, by a modified double-emulsion method. The particle morphology, diameter, virus encapsulation, loading rate and release kinetics of the rAd-microspheres were determined in vitro. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cells were transfected with the rAd-microsphere and the efficiency of transfection was assessed by fluorescent microscopy. The production and expression of TIMP-1 was identified by gelatin zymography and western blot analysis, and the invasiveness was detected by a matrigel matrix invasion assay. The microsphere encapsulating rAdTIMP-1 was successfully constructed with a diameter of 1.965 μm, encapsulation efficiency of 60.0%, a viral load of 10.5 x 10(8)/mg, a virus release of ~60% within 120 h and a total release time of >240 h. The resultant rAd-microspheres were able to efficiently transfect HepG2 cells with the transfection efficiency enhanced by ~90%. As a result, the transfected HepG2 cells had significantly increased TIMP-1 enzyme activity and the expression of TIMP-1 was detected by western blot analysis. In addition, the proliferation and invasion ability of the HCC cells was markedly inhibited by the rAd-microspheres. The resultant rAd-microspheres, PELA

  5. Treatment of Parkinson disease with C17.2 neural stem cells overexpressing NURR1 with a recombined republic-deficit adenovirus containing the NURR1 gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Jun; Tang, Ya-Mei; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Dao-You; Li, Xiang-Pen; Xiao, Song-Hua; Jian, Dong-Xing; Xing, Yi-Gang

    2007-12-01

    To study the potential benefit of the NURR1 gene in Parkinson's disease (PD), we constructed a recombinant republic-deficit adenovirus containing the NURR1 gene (Ad-NURR1) and expressed it in transplanted neural stem cells (NSC). Ad-NURR1 was constructed, and NURR1 mRNA and protein expression were identified by in situ hybridization and western blot analysis, respectively. The identified NURR1 protein could directly or indirectly induce NSC differentiation into neurons. To identify a potential therapeutic use for the transfected NSCs, cells were transplanted into 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. Histopathological and behavioral alterations were evaluated via immunohistochemistry and the ration test, respectively, in rats transplanted with NSCs with or without the Ad-NURR1 adenovirus. The Ad-NURR1 construct effectively expressed the NURR1 protein, which could directly or indirectly induce NSC differentiation into neurons. Both histopathological and behavioral alterations were seen in rats treated with NSCs with or without the Ad-NURR1 construct, although in the case of the latter, the benefits were more robust. These results suggest a potential therapeutic benefit for Ad-NURR1-expressing cells in the treatment of PD. The Ad-NURR1 modification induced NSC differentiation and therefore represents a potential therapy for PD.

  6. Heterologous prime-boost strategy in non-human primates combining the infective dengue virus and a recombinant protein in a formulation suitable for human use.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Iris; Hermida, Lisset; Gil, Lázaro; Lazo, Laura; Castro, Jorge; Martín, Jorge; Bernardo, Lídice; López, Carlos; Niebla, Olivia; Menéndez, Tamara; Romero, Yaremis; Sánchez, Jorge; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to test the concept of the heterologous prime-boost strategy combining an infective dengue virus with a recombinant chimeric protein carrying domain III of the envelope protein. Two studies in monkeys, combining recombinant protein PD5 (domain III of the envelope protein from dengue-2 virus, fused to the protein carrier P64k) and the infective dengue virus in the same immunization schedules were carried out. Humoral and cell-mediated immunity were evaluated. In the first study, monkeys received four doses of the protein PD5 and were subsequently infected with one dose of dengue virus. Antibody response measured after virus inoculation was significantly higher compared to that in non-primed monkeys and comparable to that elicited after two doses of infective virus. In a second study, monkeys were infected with one dose of the virus and subsequently boosted with one dose of the recombinant protein, reaching high levels of neutralizing antibodies, which were still detectable 14 months after the last immunization. In addition, the cellular immune response was also recalled. The results obtained in the present work support the approach of heterologous prime-boosting, in either order prime or boost, combining the chimeric protein PD5 (formulated in alum-CPS-A) and an infective dengue virus. The latter could potentially be replaced by an attenuated vaccine candidate. Copyright 2009 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Response to Multiple Radiation Doses of Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells Infected with Recombinant Adenovirus Containing Dominant-Negative Ku70 Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Muneyasu; He, Fuqiu; Minami, Akiko; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing DN(dominant-negative)Ku70 fragment on the response of tumor cells to multiple small radiation doses. Ultimate goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of using this virus in gene-radiotherapy to enhance the radiation response of tumor cells. Materials and Methods Human colorectal HCT8 and HT29 carcinoma cells were plated in glass tubes, infected with virus (25 MOI) and irradiated with single doses or 0-5 doses of 3 Gy with 6 h intervals. Hypoxia was induced by flushing 100% N2. Cells were trypsinized 0 or 6 h after (final) irradiation, and cell survival determined by colony formation. Survival data were fitted to L-Q model or exponential line. Results Virus infection enhanced the radiation response of HCT8 and HT29 cells. Virus enhancement ratio (VER) for single dose irradiation at surviving fraction of 0.1 was ~1.3 for both oxic and hypoxic HCT8, and 1.4 and 1.1 for oxic and hypoxic HT29, respectively. Similar VER of 1.2–1.3 was observed for both oxic and hypoxic cells irradiated with multiple doses but these values were smaller than values found for DNKu70-transfected Rat-1 cells. This difference is discussed. The OERs for HCT8 and HT29 receiving fractionated doses were 1.2 and 2.0, respectively, and virus-infection slightly altered them. Conclusion Infection of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing DNKu70 fragment enhanced the response of human colorectal cancer cells to single and multiple doses. PMID:20510198

  8. Response to Multiple Radiation Doses of Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells Infected With Recombinant Adenovirus Containing Dominant-Negative Ku70 Fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Muneyasu; He Fuqiu; Minami, Akiko; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing dominant-negative Ku70 fragment on the response of tumor cells to multiple small radiation doses. Our ultimate goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of using this virus in gene-radiotherapy to enhance the radiation response of tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human colorectal HCT8 and HT29 carcinoma cells were plated in glass tubes, infected with virus (25 multiplicity of infection), and irradiated with a single dose or zero to five doses of 3 Gy each at 6-h intervals. Hypoxia was induced by flushing with 100% nitrogen gas. The cells were trypsinized 0 or 6 h after the final irradiation, and cell survival was determined by colony formation. The survival data were fitted to linear-quadratic model or exponential line. Results: Virus infection enhanced the radiation response of the HCT8 and HT29 cells. The virus enhancement ratio for single-dose irradiation at a surviving fraction of 0.1 was {approx}1.3 for oxic and hypoxic HCT8 and 1.4 and 1.1 for oxic and hypoxic HT29, respectively. A similar virus enhancement ratio of 1.2-1.3 was observed for both oxic and hypoxic cells irradiated with multiple doses; however, these values were smaller than the values found for dominant-negative Ku70-transfected Rat-1 cells. This difference has been discussed. The oxygen enhancement ratio for HCT8 and HT29 receiving fractionated doses was 1.2 and 2.0, respectively, and virus infection altered them slightly. Conclusion: Infection of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing dominant-negative Ku70 fragment enhanced the response of human colorectal cancer cells to single and multiple radiation doses.

  9. A single immunization with a recombinant canine adenovirus expressing the rabies virus G protein confers protective immunity against rabies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jianwei; Faber, Milosz; Papaneri, Amy; Faber, Marie-Luise; McGettigan, James P.; Schnell, Matthias J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard . E-mail: bernhard.dietzschold@jefferson.edu

    2006-12-20

    Rabies vaccines based on live attenuated rabies viruses or recombinant pox viruses expressing the rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein (G) hold the greatest promise of safety and efficacy, particularly for oral immunization of wildlife. However, while these vaccines induce protective immunity in foxes, they are less effective in other animals, and safety concerns have been raised for some of these vaccines. Because canine adenovirus 2 (CAV2) is licensed for use as a live vaccine for dogs and has an excellent efficacy and safety record, we used this virus as an expression vector for the RVG. The recombinant CAV2-RV G produces virus titers similar to those produced by wild-type CAV2, indicating that the RVG gene does not affect virus replication. Comparison of RVG expressed by CAV2-RV G with that of vaccinia-RV G recombinant virus (V-RG) revealed similar amounts of RV G on the cell surface. A single intramuscular or intranasal immunization of mice with CAV2-RVG induced protective immunity in a dose-dependent manner, with no clinical signs or discomfort from the virus infection regardless of the route of administration or the amount of virus.

  10. Flagellin FljB as an adjuvant to the recombinant adenovirus rabies glycoprotein vaccine increases immune responses against rabies in mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xingxing; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Qiaolin; Yin, Xiangping

    2017-05-26

    Rabies virus (RABV) causes an acute progressive viral encephalitis. Although currently licensed vaccines have an excellent safety and efficacy record, the development of a safer and more cost-effective vaccine is still being sought. An E1-deleted, replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (HAd5) vector expressing RABV glycoprotein (HAd5-G) is thought to be a promising candidate vaccine for immune prophylaxis against rabies. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) flagellin is a well-known immune adjuvant. In this work, we have researched the adjuvant effect of flagellins (FljB and FliC) for HAd5 in mice for the first time. We found that the recombinant HAd5 expressing RABV glycoprotein and FljB (HAd5-GB), if administered intramuscularly, but not orally, could induce stronger immune responses and provide better protection against rabies than HAd5-G or the recombinant HAd5 expressing glycoprotein and FliC (HAd5-GC). These results suggest that the recombinant HAd5-GB has potential for development as a promising rabies vaccine.

  11. Experimental immunization of cats with a recombinant rabies-canine adenovirus vaccine elicits a long-lasting neutralizing antibody response against rabies.

    PubMed

    Hu, R L; Liu, Y; Zhang, S F; Zhang, F; Fooks, A R

    2007-07-20

    During the past decade, human rabies caused by cats has ranked the second highest in China. Several recombinant rabies vaccines have been developed for dogs. However, seldom have these vaccines been assessed or used in cats. In this trial, we report the experimental immunization of a recombinant canine adenovirus-rabies vaccine, CAV-2-E3Delta-RGP, in cats. Thirty cats were inoculated with the recombinant vaccine intramuscularly, orally and intranasally, respectively. Safety and efficacy studies were undertaken using the fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test and evaluated. Results showed that this recombinant vaccine is safe for cats as demonstrated by the three different routes of administration. The vaccine stimulated an efficient humoral response in the vaccinated cats when 10(8.5)PFU/ml of the recombinant vaccine was injected intramuscularly in a single dose. The neutralizing antibody level increased above 0.5IU/ml at 4 weeks after the vaccination. The mean antibody level ranged from 0.96+/-0.26 to 4.47+/-1.57IU/ml among individuals, and the antibody levels were elicited for at least 12 months. After this period, the immunized cats survived the challenge of CVS-24 and an obvious anemnestic and protective immune response was stimulated after the challenge. The immune response occurred later than the inactivated vaccine and the overall antibody level in the vaccinated cats was lower, but it was sufficient to confer protection of cats against infection. This demonstrated that a single, intramuscular dose of CAV-2-E3Delta-RGP stimulated a long-lasting protective immune response in cats and suggested that CAV-2-E3Delta-RGP could be considered as a potential rabies vaccine candidate for cats.

  12. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Prime and Intramuscular Protein Boost Provides Protection against Intrarectal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge in Macaques.

    PubMed

    Thippeshappa, Rajesh; Tian, Baoping; Cleveland, Brad; Guo, Wenjin; Polacino, Patricia; Hu, Shiu-Lok

    2015-12-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) acquisition occurs predominantly through mucosal transmission. We hypothesized that greater mucosal immune responses and protective efficacy against mucosal HIV-1 infection may be achieved by prime-boost immunization at mucosal sites. We used a macaque model to determine the safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of orally delivered, replication-competent but attenuated recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing full-length HIV-1 SF162 envelope (Env) or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag-Pol proteins. We examined the dose and route that are suitable for oral immunization with recombinant vaccinia viruses. We showed that sublingual inoculation of two vaccinia virus-naive pigtailed macaques with 5 × 10(8) PFU of recombinant vaccinia viruses was safe. However, sublingual inoculation with a higher dose or tonsillar inoculation resulted in secondary oral lesions, indicating the need to optimize the dose and route for oral immunization with replication-competent vaccinia virus vectors. Oral priming alone elicited antibody responses to vaccinia virus and to the SF162 Env protein. Intramuscular immunization with the SF162 gp120 protein at either 20 or 21 weeks postpriming resulted in a significant boost in antibody responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments. Furthermore, we showed that immune responses induced by recombinant vaccinia virus priming and intramuscular protein boosting provided protection against intrarectal challenge with the simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-SF162-P4.

  13. Protective effects of recombinant glycoprotein D based prime boost approach against duck enteritis virus in mice model.

    PubMed

    Aravind, S; Kamble, Nitin Machindra; Gaikwad, Satish S; Shukla, Sanjeev Kumar; Saravanan, R; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan

    2015-11-01

    Duck virus enteritis, also known as duck plague, is an acute herpes viral infection of ducks caused by duck enteritis virus (DEV). The method of repeated immunization with a live attenuated vaccine has been used for the prevention and control of duck enteritis virus (DEV). However, the incidence of the disease in vaccinated flocks and latency reactivation are the major constraints in the present vaccination programme. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy afforded by intramuscular inoculation of plasmid DNA encoding DEV glycoprotein D (pCDNA-gD) followed by DEV gD expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisia (rgD) was assessed in a murine model. Compared with mice inoculated with DNA (pCDNA-gD) or protein (rgD) only, mice inoculated with the combination of gD DNA and protein had enhanced ELISA antibody titers to DEV and had accelerated clearance of virus following challenge infection. Furthermore, the highest levels of lymphocyte proliferation response, IL-4, IL-12 and IFN-γ production were induced following priming with the DNA vaccine and boosting with the rgD protein. For instance, the specially designed recombinant DEV vector vaccine would be the best choice to use in ducks. It offers an excellent solution to the low vaccination coverage rate in ducks. We expect that the application of this novel vaccine in the near future will greatly decrease the virus load in the environment and reduce outbreaks of DEV in ducks.

  14. Enhanced potency of plasmid DNA microparticle human immunodeficiency virus vaccines in rhesus macaques by using a priming-boosting regimen with recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Otten, Gillis R; Schaefer, Mary; Doe, Barbara; Liu, Hong; Srivastava, Indresh; Megede, Jan zur; Kazzaz, Jina; Lian, Ying; Singh, Manmohan; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Montefiori, David; Lewis, Mark; Driver, David A; Dubensky, Thomas; Polo, John M; Donnelly, John; O'Hagan, Derek T; Barnett, Susan; Ulmer, Jeffrey B

    2005-07-01

    DNA vaccines have been used widely in experimental primate models of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but their effectiveness has been limited. In this study, we evaluated three technologies for increasing the potency of DNA vaccines in rhesus macaques. These included DNA encoding Sindbis virus RNA replicons (pSINCP), cationic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) microparticles for DNA delivery, and recombinant protein boosting. The DNA-based pSINCP replicon vaccines encoding HIV Gag and Env were approximately equal in potency to human cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-driven conventional DNA vaccines (pCMV). The PLG microparticle DNA delivery system was particularly effective at enhancing antibody responses induced by both pCMV and pSINCP vaccines and had less effect on T cells. Recombinant Gag and Env protein boosting elicited rapid and strong recall responses, in some cases to levels exceeding those seen after DNA or DNA/PLG priming. Of note, Env protein boosting induced serum-neutralizing antibodies and increased frequencies of gamma interferon-producing CD4 T cells severalfold. Thus, PLG microparticles are an effective means of delivering DNA vaccines in nonhuman primates, as demonstrated for two different types of DNA vaccines encoding two different antigens, and are compatible for use with DNA prime-protein boost regimens.

  15. Waterborne adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviruses are associated with numerous disease outbreaks, particularly those involving d-cares, schools, children's camps, hospitals and other health care centers, and military settings. In addition, adenoviruses have been responsible for many recreational water outbreaks, including a great number of swimming pool outbreaks than any other waterborne virus (Gerba and Enriquez 1997). Two drinking water outbreaks have been documented for adenovirus (Divizia et al. 2004; Kukkula et al. 1997) but none for food. Of the 51 known adenovirus serotypes, one third are associated with human disease, while other infections are asymptomatic. Human disease associated with adenovirus infections include gastroenteritis, respiratory infections, eye infections, acute hemorrhagic cystitis, and meningoencephalitis (Table 2). Children and the immunocompromised are more severely impacted by adenovirus infections. Subsequently, adenovirus is included in the EPA's Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL), which is a list of unregulated contaminants found in public water systems that may pose a risk to public health (National Research Council 1999). Adenoviruses have been detected in various waters worldwide including wastewater, river water, oceans, and swimming pools (Hurst et al. 1988; Irving and Smith 1981; Pina et al. 1998). Adenoviruses typically outnumber the enteroviruses, when both are detected in surface waters. Chapron et al. (2000) found that 38% of 29 surface water samples were positive for infectious Ad40 and Ad41. Data are lacking regarding the occurrence of adenovirus in water in the US, particularly for groundwater and drinking water. Studies have shown, however, that adenoviruses survive longer in water than enteroviruses and hepatitis A virus (Enriquez et al. 1995), which may be due to their double-stranded DNA. Risk assessments have been conducted on waterborne adenovirus (Crabtree et al. 1997; van Heerden et al. 2005c). Using dose-response data for inhalation

  16. Recombinant adenovirus expressing the haemagglutinin of peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) protects goats against challenge with pathogenic virus; a DIVA vaccine for PPR

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) is a morbillivirus that can cause severe disease in sheep and goats, characterised by pyrexia, pneumo-enteritis, and gastritis. The socio-economic burden of the disease is increasing in underdeveloped countries, with poor livestock keepers being affected the most. Current vaccines consist of cell-culture attenuated strains of PPRV, which induce a similar antibody profile to that induced by natural infection. Generation of a vaccine that enables differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) would benefit PPR control and eradication programmes, particularly in the later stages of an eradication campaign and for countries where the disease is not endemic. In order to create a vaccine that would enable infected animals to be distinguished from vaccinated ones (DIVA vaccine), we have evaluated the immunogenicity of recombinant fowlpox (FP) and replication-defective recombinant human adenovirus 5 (Ad), expressing PPRV F and H proteins, in goats. The Ad constructs induced higher levels of virus-specific and neutralising antibodies, and primed greater numbers of CD8+ T cells than the FP-vectored vaccines. Importantly, a single dose of Ad-H, with or without the addition of Ad expressing ovine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and/or ovine interleukin-2, not only induced strong antibody and cell-mediated immunity but also completely protected goats against challenge with virulent PPRV, 4 months after vaccination. Replication-defective Ad-H therefore offers the possibility of an effective DIVA vaccine. PMID:24568545

  17. Experimental oral immunization of ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) with a recombinant canine adenovirus vaccine CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP and an attenuated rabies virus SRV9.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinghui; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Shoufeng; Fang, Lijun; Zhang, Fei; Hu, Rongliang

    2014-04-01

    Ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) are a major reservoir of rabies virus in southeastern China. Oral immunization has been shown to be a practical method for wildlife rabies management in Europe and North America. Two groups of 20 ferret badgers were given a single oral dose of a recombinant canine adenovirus-rabies vaccine, CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP, or an experimental attenuated rabies virus vaccine, SRV9. At 21 days, all ferret badgers had seroconverted, with serum virus-neutralizing antibodies ranging from 0.1 to 4.5 IU/mL. Titers were >0.50 IU/mL (an acceptable level) in 17/20 and 16/20 animals receiving CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP or SRV9, respectively. The serologic results indicate that the recombinant CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP is at least as effective as the attenuated rabies virus vaccine. Both may be considered for additional research as oral rabies vaccine candidates for ferret badgers.

  18. Immunogenicity and efficacy of a recombinant adenovirus expressing hemagglutinin from the H5N1 subtype of swine influenza virus in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yunpu; Qiao, Chuanling; Yang, Huanliang; Chen, Yan; Xin, Xiaoguang; Chen, Hualan

    2014-01-01

    The H5N1 influenza viruses infect a range of avian species and have recently been isolated from humans and pigs. In this study we generated a replication-defective recombinant adenovirus (rAd-H5HA-EGFP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of H5N1 A/Swine/Fujian/1/2001 (SW/FJ/1/01) and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective efficacy in BALB/c mice. The recombinant virus induced high levels of hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody at a median tissue culture infective dose of 108 or 107. Compared with mice in the control groups, the mice vaccinated with rAd-H5HA-EGFP did not show apparent weight loss after challenge with either the homologous SW/FJ/1/01 or the heterologous H5N1 A/Chicken/Hunan/77/2005 (CK/HuN/77/05). Replication of the challenge virus was partially or completely inhibited, and viruses were detected at significantly lower numbers in the organs of the vaccinated mice, all of which survived the challenge with CK/HuN/77/05, whereas most of the control mice did not. These results indicate that rAd-H5HA-EGFP can provide effective immune protection from highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses in mice and is therefore a promising new candidate vaccine against H5N1 influenza in animals. PMID:24688173

  19. Recombinant adenovirus expressing the haemagglutinin of Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) protects goats against challenge with pathogenic virus; a DIVA vaccine for PPR.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Rebecca; Baron, Jana; Batten, Carrie; Baron, Michael; Taylor, Geraldine

    2014-02-26

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) is a morbillivirus that can cause severe disease in sheep and goats, characterised by pyrexia, pneumo-enteritis, and gastritis. The socio-economic burden of the disease is increasing in underdeveloped countries, with poor livestock keepers being affected the most. Current vaccines consist of cell-culture attenuated strains of PPRV, which induce a similar antibody profile to that induced by natural infection. Generation of a vaccine that enables differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) would benefit PPR control and eradication programmes, particularly in the later stages of an eradication campaign and for countries where the disease is not endemic. In order to create a vaccine that would enable infected animals to be distinguished from vaccinated ones (DIVA vaccine), we have evaluated the immunogenicity of recombinant fowlpox (FP) and replication-defective recombinant human adenovirus 5 (Ad), expressing PPRV F and H proteins, in goats. The Ad constructs induced higher levels of virus-specific and neutralising antibodies, and primed greater numbers of CD8+ T cells than the FP-vectored vaccines. Importantly, a single dose of Ad-H, with or without the addition of Ad expressing ovine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and/or ovine interleukin-2, not only induced strong antibody and cell-mediated immunity but also completely protected goats against challenge with virulent PPRV, 4 months after vaccination. Replication-defective Ad-H therefore offers the possibility of an effective DIVA vaccine.

  20. Imaging of radioiodine-labeled KH901, a tumor-specific oncolytic recombinant adenovirus, in nude mice with human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yan-Xia; Li, Yun-Chun; Long, Ya-Hong

    2010-05-01

    To study the biodistribution and imaging of I/I-labeled KH901, a tumor-specific oncolytic recombinant adenovirus, in nude mice bearing human hepatocarcinoma. KH901 was labeled with I/I according to the N-bromosuccinimide labeling method. The activity of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After I-KH901 was injected into the tumor, the label was followed in different organs and tumor tissues in nude mice with hepatocellular carcinoma. I-KH901 was injected directly into the tumor of nude mice bearing hepatocellular carcinoma, and their concentrations were detected at different times on radionuclide images. The radiochemical purity of I/I-KH901 was over 95%. I-KH901 stimulated massive expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in tumor cells. Twenty-four hours after the addition of I-KH901, the concentrations of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were 183.27+/-6.90 and 20.44+/-0.77 pg/ml in tumor and normal cells, respectively. I-KH901 was mainly distributed in the tumor and had a longer retention time, which was 14.93%ID/g at 24 h. Radionuclide imaging showed that the radioactive retention of I-KH901 in the tumor was significant. The tumor was shown clearly in the whole-body scan at 2 h after injection. I or I-KH901 concentrates specifically at the tumor site, which makes it a novel drug (combination of oncolytic adenovirus and radionuclide therapies) for the treatment of cancer.

  1. Potent Functional Antibody Responses Elicited by HIV-I DNA Priming and Boosting with Heterologous HIV-1 Recombinant MVA in Healthy Tanzanian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Joachim, Agricola; Nilsson, Charlotta; Aboud, Said; Bakari, Muhammad; Lyamuya, Eligius F.; Robb, Merlin L.; Marovich, Mary A.; Earl, Patricia; Moss, Bernard; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Sandström, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Ferrari, Guido; Polonis, Victoria R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-induced HIV antibodies were evaluated in serum samples collected from healthy Tanzanian volunteers participating in a phase I/II placebo-controlled double blind trial using multi-clade, multigene HIV-DNA priming and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (HIV-MVA) virus boosting (HIVIS03). The HIV-DNA vaccine contained plasmids expressing HIV-1 gp160 subtypes A, B, C, Rev B, Gag A, B and RTmut B, and the recombinant HIV-MVA boost expressed CRF01_AE HIV-1 Env subtype E and Gag-Pol subtype A. While no neutralizing antibodies were detected using pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl cell assay, this prime-boost vaccination induced neutralizing antibodies in 83% of HIVIS03 vaccinees when a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) assay using luciferase reporter-infectious molecular clones (LucR-IMC) was employed. The serum neutralizing activity was significantly (but not completely) reduced upon depletion of natural killer (NK) cells from PBMC (p=0.006), indicating a role for antibody-mediated Fcγ-receptor function. High levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)-mediating antibodies against CRF01_AE and/or subtype B were subsequently demonstrated in 97% of the sera of vaccinees. The magnitude of ADCC-mediating antibodies against CM235 CRF01_AE IMC-infected cells correlated with neutralizing antibodies against CM235 in the IMC/PBMC assay. In conclusion, HIV-DNA priming, followed by two HIV-MVA boosts elicited potent ADCC responses in a high proportion of Tanzanian vaccinees. Our findings highlight the potential of HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccines for induction of functional antibody responses and suggest this vaccine regimen and ADCC studies as potentially important new avenues in HIV vaccine development. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials ISRCTN90053831 The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry ATMR2009040001075080 (currently PACTR2009040001075080) PMID:25874723

  2. Oral vaccination of dogs (Canis familiaris) with baits containing the recombinant rabies-canine adenovirus type-2 vaccine confers long-lasting immunity against rabies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shoufeng; Liu, Ye; Fooks, Anthony R; Zhang, Fei; Hu, Rongliang

    2008-01-17

    Rabies is a reemerging and fatal infectious disease in Asia mainly caused by exposure to rabid dogs. Prevention of dog rabies would be the most effective way to stop rabies transmission to humans. However, vaccinating stray dogs in urban and rural areas using conventional vaccines is always difficult and is not cost-effective for use in most areas including China. Further to previous studies from our laboratory, we developed a bait containing the recombinant rabies vaccine and performed a non-parenteral trial in dogs. This vaccine was intranasally administrated once to 46 dogs in solution form with 1 x 10(8.5) PFU and orally to 90 dogs in specially designed baits with 3 x 10(8.5) PFU of the recombinant canine adenovirus. Results showed that about 87.5% (119/136) of the immunized dogs developed virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA). The immune response against rabies in dogs was detectable at 2-3 weeks after administration, reaching a peak by 5-6 weeks. Among the seroconverted animals, 90.8% (108/119) elicited a VNA response for over 24 months. The antibody titer during the 2 years was above 0.5IU /ml while showing a gradual but slow decline from the 6th week after vaccination. In a challenge experiment of 10 dogs with 60,000 mouse LD(50) of CVS-24 2 years after the vaccination, all the dogs survived. This demonstrated that the recombinant vaccine could be orally administrated and the bait was effective for the oral vaccination of dogs.

  3. Immune responses of mice to prime-boost vaccination with the recombinant DNA and Fowlpox virus both expressing HIV-2 Gag-gp105.

    PubMed

    Song, Y; Zhang, L S; Wang, H; Jin, H; Li, Ch; Jin, N

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses 1 and 2 (HIV-1, 2) present a public health problem for which there is neither an effective antiviral therapy nor a preventive vaccine. In this study, the immune responses of mice to prime-boost vaccination with the recombinant DNA (rDNA) and recombinant Fowlpox virus (rFPV) both expressing HIV-2 Gag-gp105 chimeric protein, were compared to those elicited by each vector alone. Mice primed with the rDNA and boosted with the rFPV showed HIV-2-specific antibody levels, splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers, and Gag-gp105-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) activity increased by 20-30% as compared with those elicited by these vaccines alone. These findings suggested that the prime-boost strategy combining rDNA and rFPV elicited significant Gag-gp105 - specific cellular and humoral immune responses, thus supporting this novel approach to the immunization against HIV infections.

  4. A Plasmodium vivax plasmid DNA- and adenovirus-vectored malaria vaccine encoding blood stage antigens AMA1 and MSP142 in a prime/boost heterologous immunization regimen partially protects Aotus monkeys against blood stage challenge.

    PubMed

    Obaldia, Nicanor; Stockelman, Michael G; Otero, William; Cockrill, Jennifer A; Ganeshan, Harini; Abot, Esteban N; Zhang, Jianfeng; Limbach, Keith; Charoenvit, Yupin; Doolan, Denise L; Tang, De-Chu C; Richie, Thomas L

    2017-02-08

    Malaria is caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium that are transmitted to humans by the bites of Anopheles mosquitoes. After the elimination of P. falciparum it is predicted that Plasmodium vivax will remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality outside of Africa, stressing the importance of developing a vaccine against malaria. In this study we assess the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of two P. vivax antigens, AMA1 and MSP142 in a recombinant DNA plasmid prime/adenoviral vector (Ad) boost regimen in Aotus monkeys. Groups of 4 to 5 monkeys were immunized with DNA alone, Ad alone, prime/boost regimens of each antigen, prime/boost with both antigens, and empty vector controls, and then subjected to blood stage challenge. The heterologous immunization regimen with the antigen pair was more protective than either antigen alone or both antigens delivered with a single vaccine platform, based on their ability to induced the longest pre-patent period and time to peak parasitemia; the lowest peak and mean parasitemia; the smallest area under the parasitemia curve and the highest self-cured rate. Overall, pre-challenge MSP1 antibody titers strongly correlated with decreased parasite burden. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of immunized animals developed anemia. In conclusion, P. vivax plasmid DNA/Ad5 vaccine encoding blood stage parasite antigens AMA1 and MSP142 in a heterologous prime/boost immunization regimen, provided significant protection against blood-stage challenge in Aotus monkeys, indicating the suitability of these antigens and regimen for further development.

  5. Sublingual immunization with recombinant adenovirus encoding SARS-CoV spike protein induces systemic and mucosal immunity without redirection of the virus to the brain.

    PubMed

    Shim, Byoung-Shik; Stadler, Konrad; Nguyen, Huan Huu; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Kim, Dong Wook; Chang, Jun; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Song, Man Ki

    2012-09-21

    Sublingual (s.l.) administration of soluble protein antigens, inactivated viruses, or virus-like particles has been shown to induce broad immune responses in mucosal and extra-mucosal tissues. Recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vectors (rADVs) infect mucosa surface and therefore can serve as a mucosal antigen delivery vehicle. In this study we examined whether s.l. immunization with rADV encoding spike protein (S) (rADV-S) of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) induces protective immunity against SARS-CoV and could serve as a safe mucosal route for delivery of rADV. Here, we show that s.l. administration of rADV-S induced serum SARS-CoV neutralizing and airway IgA antibodies in mice. These antibody responses are comparable to those induced by intranasal (i.n.) administration. In addition, s.l. immunization induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the lungs that are superior to those induced by intramuscular immunization. Importantly, unlike i.n. administration, s.l. immunization with rADV did not redirect the rADV vector to the olfactory bulb. Our study indicates that s.l. immunization with rADV-S is safe and effective in induction of a broad spectrum of immune responses and presumably protection against infection with SARS-CoV.

  6. Sublingual immunization with recombinant adenovirus encoding SARS-CoV spike protein induces systemic and mucosal immunity without redirection of the virus to the brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sublingual (s.l.) administration of soluble protein antigens, inactivated viruses, or virus-like particles has been shown to induce broad immune responses in mucosal and extra-mucosal tissues. Recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vectors (rADVs) infect mucosa surface and therefore can serve as a mucosal antigen delivery vehicle. In this study we examined whether s.l. immunization with rADV encoding spike protein (S) (rADV-S) of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) induces protective immunity against SARS-CoV and could serve as a safe mucosal route for delivery of rADV. Results Here, we show that s.l. administration of rADV-S induced serum SARS-CoV neutralizing and airway IgA antibodies in mice. These antibody responses are comparable to those induced by intranasal (i.n.) administration. In addition, s.l. immunization induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the lungs that are superior to those induced by intramuscular immunization. Importantly, unlike i.n. administration, s.l. immunization with rADV did not redirect the rADV vector to the olfactory bulb. Conclusion Our study indicates that s.l. immunization with rADV-S is safe and effective in induction of a broad spectrum of immune responses and presumably protection against infection with SARS-CoV. PMID:22995185

  7. Protection in mice immunized with a heterologous prime-boost regime using DNA and recombinant pseudorabies expressing TgSAG1 against Toxoplasma gondii challenge.

    PubMed

    Shang, Limin; Liu, Quan; Liu, Wensen; Men, Jingtao; Gao, Shengyan; Jiang, Li; Wang, Ze; Zhai, Yujia; Jin, Hongtao; Lian, Hai; Chen, Chen; Xia, Zhiping; Yuan, Ziguo; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2009-05-11

    An effective vaccine of animals can block transmission of Toxoplasma gondii to humans. In this study, mice have been protected against lethal T. gondii challenge by a prime-boost vaccination strategy using DNA vaccine pVAX/TgSAG1 and recombinant pseudorabies virus rPRV/TgSAG1, both expressing the major immunodominant surface antigen of T. gondii (TgSAG1). High levels of splenocyte proliferative responses and significant levels of IFN-gamma resulted, with strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses in vitro. After lethal challenge, prime-boost vaccinated mice showed an increased survival time (15.4+/-5.0 days) and a 40% survival rate compared with controls who all died within 11 days of challenge. Results of the present study indicated that this novel immunization strategy is useful in enhancing immune protection in mice against lethal T. gondii infection, which would provide foundation for the development of effective vaccines against T. gondii.

  8. Recombinant hexon antigen based single serum dilution ELISA for rapid serological profiling against fowl adenovirus-4 causing hydropericardium syndrome in chickens.

    PubMed

    R, Rajasekhar; Roy, Parimal

    2014-10-01

    A recombinant hexon antigen based single serum dilution enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to measure the specific antibody in sera of chickens against Fowl adenovirus-4 (FAdV) causing Hydropericardium syndrome (HPS). An immunodominant partial hexon gene of 737bp was cloned into pRSET vector and expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 DE3 pLys S. Expression was tested by Western Blot test. The purified recombinant protein antigen was used in coating ELISA plate for FAdV-4 serology. A linear relationship was found between the predicted antibody titres at a single working dilution of 1:100 and the corresponding observed serum titres as determined by the standard serial dilution method. Regression analysis was used to determine a standard curve from which an equation was derived that allowed the demonstration of this correlation. The equation was then used to convert the corrected absorbance readings of the single working dilution directly into the predicted ELISA antibody titres. The assay proved to be sensitive, specific and accurate as compared to Q-AGID test. Recombinant antigen was also used in Dot ELISA. In an experimental vaccination of broiler chicken at 10 days old age, the geometric mean (GM) antibody titres as measured by ELISA ranged from 5.006±0.11log10 to 4.526±0.04log10 and by Dot ELISA titre were from 2.240±0.08log10 to 0.180±0.04log10 during 5th-8th weeks of age, results were compared with Q-AGID results. Field samples were collected randomly from breeder flocks, found to have antibody titre by both ELISA and Dot ELISA at 10th and only 75% samples were positive at 14th weeks of age. After revaccination at 16th weeks of age, all sera samples were found have considerably high antibody titre on 24th week but all samples were negative at 32nd weeks. Advantages of recombinant hexon antigen based ELISA and Dot ELISA in FAdV-4 serology have been discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A DNA vaccine encoding the E protein of West Nile virus is protective and can be boosted by recombinant domain DIII.

    PubMed

    Schneeweiss, Anne; Chabierski, Stefan; Salomo, Mathias; Delaroque, Nicolas; Al-Robaiy, Samiya; Grunwald, Thomas; Bürki, Kurt; Liebert, Uwe G; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2011-08-26

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is an emerging pathogenic flavivirus with increasing distribution worldwide. Birds are the natural host of the virus, but also mammals, including humans, can be infected. In some cases, a WNV infection can be associated with severe neurological symptoms. All currently available WNV vaccines are in the veterinary sector, and there is a need to develop safe and effective immunization technologies, which can also be used in humans. An alternative to current vaccination methods is DNA immunization. Most current DNA vaccine candidates against flaviviruses simultaneously express the viral envelope (E) and membrane (prM) proteins, which leads to the formation of virus-like particles. Here we generated a DNA plasmid, which expresses only the E-protein ectodomain. Vaccination of mice stimulated anti-WNV T-cell responses and neutralizing antibodies that were higher than those obtained after immunizing with a recombinant protein previously shown to be a protective WNV vaccine. A single dose of the plasmid was sufficient to protect animals from a lethal challenge with the virus. Moreover, immunogenicity could be boosted when DNA injection was followed by immunization with recombinant domain DIII of the E-protein. This resulted in significantly enhanced neutralizing antibody titers and a more prominent cellular immune response. The results suggest that the WNV E-protein is sufficient as a protective antigen in DNA vaccines and that protection can be significantly improved by adding a recombinant protein boost to the DNA prime.

  10. Protection against aerosolized Yersinia pestis challenge following homologous and heterologous prime-boost with recombinant plague antigens.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Audrey; Roy, Chad J; Powell, Bradford S; Adamovicz, Jeffrey J; Freytag, Lucy C; Clements, John D

    2005-08-01

    A Yersinia pestis-derived fusion protein (F1-V) has shown great promise as a protective antigen against aerosol challenge with Y. pestis in murine studies. In the current study, we examined different prime-boost regimens with F1-V and demonstrate that (i) boosting by a route other than the route used for the priming dose (heterologous boosting) protects mice as well as homologous boosting against aerosol challenge with Y. pestis, (ii) parenteral immunization is not required to protect mice against aerosolized plague challenge, (iii) the route of immunization and choice of adjuvant influence the magnitude of the antibody response as well as the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1)/IgG2a ratio, and (iv) inclusion of an appropriate adjuvant is critical for nonparenteral immunization.

  11. Suppression effect of recombinant adenovirus vector containing hIL-24 on Hep-2 laryngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuemei; Liu, DI; Wang, Junfu; Su, Qinghong; Zhou, Peng; Liu, Jinsheng; Luan, Meng; Xu, Xiaoqun

    2014-03-01

    The melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7 [MDA-7; renamed interleukin (IL)-24] was isolated from human melanoma cells induced to terminally differentiate by treatment with interferon and mezerein. MDA-7/IL-24 functions as a multimodality anticancer agent, possessing proapoptotic, antiangiogenic and immunostimulatory properties. All these attributes make MDA-7/IL-24 an ideal candidate for cancer gene therapy. In the present study, the human MDA-7/IL-24 gene was transfected into the human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with a replication-incompetent adenovirus vector. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis confirmed that the Ad-hIL-24 was expressed in the two cells. The expression of the antiapoptotic gene, Bcl-2, was significantly decreased and the IL-24 receptor was markedly expressed in Hep-2 cells following infection with Ad-hIL-24, but not in HUVECs. In addition, the expression of the proapoptotic gene, Bax, was induced and the expression of caspase-3 was increased in the Hep-2 cells and HUVECs. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay indicated that Ad-hIL-24 may induce growth suppression in Hep-2 cells but not in HUVECs. In conclusion, Ad-hIL-24 selectively inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in Hep-2 cells. No visible damage was found in HUVECs. Therefore, the results of the current study indicated that Ad-hIL-24 may have a potent suppressive effect on human laryngeal carcinoma cell lines, but is safe for healthy cells.

  12. DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 Induces Sterile Protection Associated with Cell-Mediated Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-14

    Vaccination of monkeys with recombinant Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 confers protection against blood-stage malaria . Infect Immun...circumsporozoite protein partially protects healthy malaria -naive adults against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite challenge. Infect Immun 74: 5933–5942...Ballou WR, et al. (1986) Malaria transmitted to humans by mosquitoes infected from cultured Plasmodium falciparum . Am J Trop Med Hyg 35: 66–68. 37

  13. Fusion-Expressed CTB Improves Both Systemic and Mucosal T-Cell Responses Elicited by an Intranasal DNA Priming/Intramuscular Recombinant Vaccinia Boosting Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Sugan; Ren, Xiaonan; Ben, Yinyin; Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wan, Yanmin; Xu, Jianqing

    2014-01-01

    Previous study showed that CTB (Cholera toxin subunit B) can be used as a genetic adjuvant to enhance the systemic immune responses. To further investigate whether it can also be used as a genetic adjuvant to improve mucosal immune responses, we constructed DNA and recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV) vaccines expressing OVA-CTB fusion antigen. Female C57BL/6 mice were immunized with an intranasal DNA priming/intramuscular rTTV boosting regimen. OVA specific T-cell responses were measured by IFN-γ ELISPOT and specific antibody responses were determined by ELISA. Compared to the nonadjuvant group (pSV-OVA intranasal priming/rTTV-OVA intramuscular boosting), pSV-OVA-CTB intranasal priming/rTTV-OVA-CTB intramuscular boosting group significantly improved the magnitudes of T-cell responses at spleen (1562 ± 567 SFCs/106 splenocytes versus 330 ± 182 SFCs/106 splenocytes, P < 0.01), mesenteric LN (96 ± 83 SFCs/106 lymphocytes versus 1 ± 2 SFCs/106 lymphocytes, P < 0.05), draining LNs of respiratory tract (109 ± 60 SFCs/106 lymphocytes versus 2 ± 2 SFCs/106 lymphocytes, P < 0.01) and female genital tract (89 ± 48 SFCs/106 lymphocytes versus 23 ± 21 SFCs/106 lymphocytes, P < 0.01). These results collectively demonstrated that fusion-expressed CTB could act as a potent adjuvant to improve both systemic and mucosal T-cell responses. PMID:24741585

  14. Cloning, biological characterization and high-level expression of rat interleukin-3 using recombinant adenovirus: description of a new splicing variant.

    PubMed

    del C Esandi, M; van Someren, G D; van der Velde, I; van Bekkum, D W; Valerio, D; Noteboom, J L; Bout, A

    1998-04-28

    In the present study, we describe the cloning and sequence analysis of rat IL-3. Two different mRNA isoforms were isolated after transfection of COS cells with the cytokine genomic sequences. One of the isoforms has been predicted before by Cohen et al. (1986), and the other one is identical except that it encodes a protein with an insertion of three amino acids at position 56. As names for the two isoforms, we propose IL-3alpha for the predicted and IL-3beta for the novel molecule. IL-3beta mRNA was detected as the predominant isoform in rat lymphocytes in vivo. High levels of the cytokine were obtained after infection of human cells (A549) with a recombinant adenovirus harboring rIL-3beta cDNA (IG.Ad.CMV.IL-3beta). The biological properties of the IL-3beta protein were tested in a FDC-P1 proliferation assay and in a hematopoietic progenitor colony forming assay. To assess in-vivo bioactivity, lysed 293 cells containing IG.Ad.CMV.rIL-3beta virus were injected subcutaneously into F344 rats. Stimulation of hematopoiesis and leucocytosis were observed during the treatment. After subcutaneous injections of the lysed adeno-producer cells in mice, the only effect observed was a cellular infiltration at the site of injection, confirming the poor cross-reactivity between the two species. The biological properties in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that the cDNA sequences of IL-3beta presented here encode active rat IL-3 protein.

  15. Immunogenicity of the recombinant adenovirus type-5 vector -based Ebola vaccine (Ad5-EBOV) expressing the glycoprotein of the 2014 epidemic strain in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Liu, Jing Jing; Kong, Yan; Hou, Li Hua; Li, Yu Hua

    2017-08-10

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has brought great threat to the public health worldwide. Development of Ebola vaccine is urgent. A novel recombinant adenovirus type-5 vector-based Ebola vaccine (Ad5-EBOV) based on the 2014 Zaire Guinea epidemic strain was developed in China. A good safety profile and robust immune response elicited by Ad5-EBOV were confirmed in Phase I and Phase II clinical trial. However, clinical studies of Ebola vaccine are still at an early stage and no solid efficacy data for human beings yet. For efficacy evaluation and quality control of Ad5-EBOV, the cellular and humoral immune responses were examined at different time points in BALB/c mice which were vaccinated with the Ad5-EBOV. EBOV GP-specific T-cell responses were detected early in the first week, increased overtime, reached the peak at week 4 and lasted to week 6 by ELISpot and Flow cytometric analysis. High titer of EBOV glycoprotein-specific antibody was found at week 1 at 1783(geometric mean, GM), peaked at week 10 at 26,214(GM), and lasted to six months at 1351(GM). The titer of neutralizing antibody based on pseudovirus also increased overtime, peaked at 1:16 in one mouse and 1:8 in nine mice at week 6, then decreased to zero at week 12. These results suggest that BALB/c mice can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of Ad5-EBOV, while cellular immune response and humoral immune response can be used as indicators for the evaluation of vaccine effectiveness. Determination of methods and indicators as soon as possible is critical and valuable for efficacy evaluation of Ebola vaccine, and is expected to provide an important guarantee for quality control of Ad5-EBOV.

  16. Evaluation of efficacy and safety for recombinant human adenovirus-p53 in the control of the malignant pleural effusions via thoracic perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Biaoxue, Rong; Hui, Pan; Wenlong, Gao; Shuanying, Yang

    2016-01-01

    A certain number of studies have showed that p53 gene transfer has an anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. This study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of thoracic perfusion of recombinant human adenovirus p53 (rAd-p53, Gendicine) for controlling malignant pleural effusion (MPE). We searched for the relevant studies from the database of MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE, Cochrance Library and CNKI to collect the trials concerning the efficacy and safety of rAd-p53 to treat MPE. Fourteen randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with 879 patients were involved in this analysis. The rAd-p53 combined with chemotherapeutic agents significantly improved the overall response rate (ORR) (P < 0.001; odds ratio = 3.73) and disease control rate (DCR) (P < 0.001; odds ratio = 2.32) of patients with MPE as well as the quality of life (QOL) of patients (P < 0.001; odds ratio = 4.27), compared with that of chemotherapeutic agents alone. In addition, the participation of rAd-p53 did not have an obvious impact on the most of incidence of adverse reactions (AEs) (P < 0.05) except the fever (P < 0.001). However, the fever was self-limited and could be tolerated well. The application of rAd-p53 through thoracic perfusion for treating MPE had a better efficacy and safety, which could be a potential choice for controlling MPE. PMID:27976709

  17. Medial hypothalamic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors regulate neuroendocrine responses to stress and exploratory locomotor activity: application of recombinant adenovirus containing 5-HT1A sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Holmes, Andrew; Ma, Li; Van de Kar, Louis D; Garcia, Francisca; Murphy, Dennis L

    2004-12-01

    Our previous studies found that serotonin transporter (SERT) knock-out mice showed increased sensitivity to minor stress and increased anxiety-like behavior but reduced locomotor activity. These mice also showed decreased density of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT1A) receptors in the hypothalamus, amygdala, and dorsal raphe. To evaluate the contribution of hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors to these phenotypes of SERT knock-out mice, two studies were conducted. Recombinant adenoviruses containing 5-HT1A sense and antisense sequences (Ad-1AP-sense and Ad-1AP-antisense) were used to manipulate 5-HT1A receptors in the hypothalamus. The expression of the 5-HT1A genes is controlled by the 5-HT1A promoter, so that they are only expressed in 5-HT1A receptor-containing cells. (1) Injection of Ad-1AP-sense into the hypothalamus of SERT knock-out mice restored 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus; this effect was accompanied by elimination of the exaggerated adrenocorticotropin responses to a saline injection (minor stress) and reduced locomotor activity but not by a change in increased exploratory anxiety-like behavior. (2) To further confirm the observation in SERT-/- mice, Ad-1AP-antisense was injected into the hypothalamus of normal mice. The density and the function of 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus were significantly reduced in Ad-1AP-antisense-treated mice. Compared with the control group (injected with Ad-track), Ad-1A-antisense-treated mice showed a significant reduction in locomotor activity, but again no changes in exploratory anxiety-like behaviors, tested by elevated plus-maze and open-field tests. Thus, the present results demonstrate that medial hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors regulate stress responses and locomotor activity but may not regulate exploratory anxiety-like behaviors.

  18. A recombinant adenovirus expressing CFP10, ESAT6, Ag85A and Ag85B of Mycobacterium tuberculosis elicits strong antigen-specific immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Deng, Guangcun; Li, Min; Zeng, Jin; Zhao, Liping; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2014-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by an infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and remains an enormous and increasing health burden worldwide. To date, Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) is the only licensed anti-TB vaccine worldwide, which provides an important but limited protection from the Mtb infection. The development of alternative anti-TB vaccines is therefore urgently needed. Here we report, the generation of Ad5-CEAB, a recombinant adenovirus expressing Mtb antigens of CFP10, ESAT6, Ag85A and Ag85B proteins in a form of mixture. In order to evaluate the immunogenicity of Ad5-CEAB, mice were immunized with Ad5-CEAB by intranasal instillation three times with 2-week intervals. The results demonstrated that Ad5-CEAB elicited a strong antigen-specific immune response, particularly of the Th1 immune responses that were characterized by an increased ratio of IgG2a/IgG1 and secretions of Th1 type cytokines, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-12. In addition, the Ad5-CEAB also showed an ability to enhance humoral responses with a dramatically augmented antigen-specific serum IgG. Furthermore, an elevated sIgA were also found in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of the immunized mice, suggesting the elicitation of mucosal immune responses. These data indicate that Ad5-CEAB can induce a broad range of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, which provides a promising and novel route for developing anti-TB vaccines and warrants further investigation.

  19. Overexpression of Cyclin A Inhibits Augmentation of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Transduction by the Adenovirus E4orf6 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Grifman, Mirta; Chen, Nancie N.; Gao, Guang-ping; Cathomen, Toni; Wilson, James M.; Weitzman, Matthew D.

    1999-01-01

    The 34-kDa product of adenovirus E4 region open reading frame 6 (E4orf6) dramatically enhances transduction by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors (rAAV). This is achieved by promoting the conversion of incoming single-stranded viral genomes into transcriptionally competent duplex molecules. The molecular mechanism for enhancing second-strand synthesis is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed the cellular consequences of E4orf6 expression and the requirements for efficient rAAV transduction mediated by E4orf6. Expression of E4orf6 in 293 cells led to an inhibition of cell cycle progression and an accumulation of cells in S phase. This was preceded by specific degradation of cyclin A and p53, while the levels of other proteins involved in cell cycle control remained unchanged. In addition, the kinase activity of cdc2 was inhibited. We further showed that p53 expression is not necessary or inhibitory for augmentation of rAAV transduction by E4orf6. However, overexpression of cyclin A inhibited E4orf6-mediated enhancement of rAAV transduction. A cyclin A mutant incapable of recruiting protein substrates for cdk2 was unable to inhibit E4orf6-mediated augmentation. In addition, we created an E4orf6 mutant that is selectively defective in rAAV augmentation of transduction. Based on these findings, we suggest that cyclin A degradation represents a viral mechanism to disrupt cell cycle progression, resulting in enhanced viral transduction. Understanding the cellular pathways used during transduction will increase the utility of rAAV vectors in a wide range of gene therapy applications. PMID:10559315

  20. Effect of UV light on the inactivation of recombinant human adenovirus and murine norovirus seeded in seawater in shellfish depuration tanks.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lucas A T; Nascimento, Mariana A; Barardi, Célia R M

    2015-03-01

    Shellfish depuration is a process that aims to eliminate pathogens from mollusk tissues. Seawater disinfection during the depuration process is important and ultraviolet (UV) light treatment is the most used method worldwide. Viral models are usually employed as surrogates of fastidious viruses in viability studies. The aim of this study was to employ methods based on green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence and plaque forming units to detect, respectively, recombinant adenovirus (rAdV-GFP) and murine norovirus (MNV) artificially seeded in environmental matrices. These assays were applied to assess the inactivation of rAdV-GFP and MNV in seawater in recirculation shellfish depuration tanks with and without UV light treatment. Kinetics of rAdV GFP-expression was previously measured by UV-spectrophotometer. Flow cytometry (FC), fluorescence microscopy (FM), and plaque assay were used to determine virus titer and detection limits. The influence of the environmental matrix on the performance of the methods was prior determined using either drinking water or filtered seawater seeded with rAdV-GFP. Disinfection of seeded seawater was evaluated with and without UV treatment. The time of 24-h post-infection was established as ideal for fluorescence detection on rAdV-GFP infected cells. FC showed lower sensitivity, when compared to FM, which was similar to plaque assay. Seawater disinfection on depuration tanks was promising and rAdV-GFP declined 99.99 % after 24 and 48 h with and without UV treatment, respectively. MNV was completely inactivated after 24 h in both treatments. As conclusion, the depuration tanks were effective to inactivate rAdV-GFP and MNV and the UV disinfection treatment accelerated the process.

  1. Broad and potent immune responses to a low dose intradermal HIV-1 DNA boosted with HIV-1 recombinant MVA among healthy adults in Tanzania☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Bakari, Muhammad; Aboud, Said; Nilsson, Charlotta; Francis, Joel; Buma, Deus; Moshiro, Candida; Aris, Eric A.; Lyamuya, Eligius F.; Janabi, Mohamed; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Joachim, Agricola; Polonis, Victoria R.; Bråve, Andreas; Earl, Patricia; Robb, Merlin; Marovich, Mary; Wahren, Britta; Pallangyo, Kisali; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Mhalu, Fred; Sandström, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted a phase I/II randomized placebo-controlled trial with the aim of exploring whether priming with a low intradermal dose of a multiclade, multigene HIV-1 DNA vaccine could improve the immunogenicity of the same vaccine given intramuscularly prior to boosting with a heterologous HIV-1 MVA among healthy adults in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods Sixty HIV-uninfected volunteers were randomized to receive DNA plasmid vaccine 1 mg intradermally (id), n = 20, or 3.8 mg intramuscularly (im), n = 20, or placebo, n = 20, using a needle-free injection device. DNA plasmids encoding HIV-1 genes gp160 subtype A, B, C; rev B; p17/p24 gag A, B and Rtmut B were given at weeks 0, 4 and 12. Recombinant MVA (108 pfu) expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol of CRF01_AE or placebo was administered im at month 9 and 21. Results The vaccines were well tolerated. Two weeks after the third HIV-DNA injection, 22/38 (58%) vaccinees had IFN-γ ELISpot responses to Gag. Two weeks after the first HIV-MVA boost all 35 (100%) vaccinees responded to Gag and 31 (89%) to Env. Two to four weeks after the second HIV-MVA boost, 28/29 (97%) vaccinees had IFN-γ ELISpot responses, 27 (93%) to Gag and 23 (79%) to Env. The id-primed recipients had significantly higher responses to Env than im recipients. Intracellular cytokine staining for Gag-specific IFN-γ/IL-2 production showed both CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses. All vaccinees had HIV-specific lymphoproliferative responses. All vaccinees reacted in diagnostic HIV serological tests and 26/29 (90%) had antibodies against gp160 after the second HIV-MVA boost. Furthermore, while all of 29 vaccinee sera were negative for neutralizing antibodies against clade B, C and CRF01 AE pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl neutralization assay, in a PBMC assay, the response rate ranged from 31% to 83% positives, depending upon the clade B or CRF01_AE virus tested. This vaccine approach is safe and highly immunogenic. Low dose, id HIV-DNA priming elicited higher

  2. Pre-Clinical Development of a Recombinant, Replication-Competent Adenovirus Serotype 4 Vector Vaccine Expressing HIV-1 Envelope 1086 Clade C

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jeff; Mendy, Jason; Vang, Lo; Avanzini, Jenny B.; Garduno, Fermin; Manayani, Darly J.; Ishioka, Glenn; Farness, Peggy; Ping, Li-Hua; Swanstrom, Ronald; Parks, Robert; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Montefiori, David C.; LaBranche, Celia; Smith, Jonathan; Gurwith, Marc; Mayall, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a well-acknowledged need for an effective AIDS vaccine that protects against HIV-1 infection or limits in vivo viral replication. The objective of these studies is to develop a replication-competent, vaccine vector based on the adenovirus serotype 4 (Ad4) virus expressing HIV-1 envelope (Env) 1086 clade C glycoprotein. Ad4 recombinant vectors expressing Env gp160 (Ad4Env160), Env gp140 (Ad4Env140), and Env gp120 (Ad4Env120) were evaluated. Methods The recombinant Ad4 vectors were generated with a full deletion of the E3 region of Ad4 to accommodate the env gene sequences. The vaccine candidates were assessed in vitro following infection of A549 cells for Env-specific protein expression and for posttranslational transport to the cell surface as monitored by the binding of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). The capacity of the Ad4Env vaccines to induce humoral immunity was evaluated in rabbits for Env gp140 and V1V2-specific binding antibodies, and HIV-1 pseudovirus neutralization. Mice immunized with the Ad4Env160 vaccine were assessed for IFNγ T cell responses specific for overlapping Env peptide sets. Results Robust Env protein expression was confirmed by western blot analysis and recognition of cell surface Env gp160 by multiple bNAbs. Ad4Env vaccines induced humoral immune responses in rabbits that recognized Env 1086 gp140 and V1V2 polypeptide sequences derived from 1086 clade C, A244 clade AE, and gp70 V1V2 CASE A2 clade B fusion protein. The immune sera efficiently neutralized tier 1 clade C pseudovirus MW965.26 and neutralized the homologous and heterologous tier 2 pseudoviruses to a lesser extent. Env-specific T cell responses were also induced in mice following Ad4Env160 vector immunization. Conclusions The Ad4Env vaccine vectors express high levels of Env glycoprotein and induce both Env-specific humoral and cellular immunity thus supporting further development of this new Ad4 HIV-1 Env vaccine platform in Phase 1 clinical

  3. Adenovirus Specific Pre-Immunity Induced by Natural Route of Infection Does Not Impair Transduction by Adenoviral Vaccine Vectors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade Pereira, Bruna; E. Maduro Bouillet, Leoneide; Dorigo, Natalia A.; Fraefel, Cornel; Bruna-Romero, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAd5V) vectors are gold standards of T-cell immunogenicity as they efficiently induce also humoral responses to exogenous antigens, in particular when used in prime-boost protocols. Some investigators have shown that pre-existing immunity to adenoviruses interferes with transduction by adenoviral vectors, but the actual extent of this interference is not known since it has been mostly studied in mice using unnatural routes of infection and virus doses. Here we studied the effects of HAd5V-specific immune responses induced by intranasal infection on the transduction efficiency of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Of interest, when HAd5V immunity was induced in mice by the natural respiratory route, the pre-existing immunity against HAd5V did not significantly interfere with the B and T-cell immune responses against the transgene products induced after a prime/boost inoculation protocol with a recombinant HAd5V-vector, as measured by ELISA and in vivo cytotoxic T-cell assays, respectively. We also correlated the levels of HAd5V-specific neutralizing antibodies (Ad5NAbs) induced in mice with the levels of Ad5NAb titers found in humans. The data indicate that approximately 60% of the human serum samples tested displayed Ad5NAb levels that could be overcome with a prime-boost vaccination protocol. These results suggest that recombinant HAd5V vectors are potentially useful for prime-boost vaccination strategies, at least when pre-existing immunity against HAd5V is at low or medium levels. PMID:26679149

  4. Adenovirus Specific Pre-Immunity Induced by Natural Route of Infection Does Not Impair Transduction by Adenoviral Vaccine Vectors in Mice.

    PubMed

    de Andrade Pereira, Bruna; Maduro Bouillet, Leoneide E; Dorigo, Natalia A; Fraefel, Cornel; Bruna-Romero, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAd5V) vectors are gold standards of T-cell immunogenicity as they efficiently induce also humoral responses to exogenous antigens, in particular when used in prime-boost protocols. Some investigators have shown that pre-existing immunity to adenoviruses interferes with transduction by adenoviral vectors, but the actual extent of this interference is not known since it has been mostly studied in mice using unnatural routes of infection and virus doses. Here we studied the effects of HAd5V-specific immune responses induced by intranasal infection on the transduction efficiency of recombinant adenovirus vectors. Of interest, when HAd5V immunity was induced in mice by the natural respiratory route, the pre-existing immunity against HAd5V did not significantly interfere with the B and T-cell immune responses against the transgene products induced after a prime/boost inoculation protocol with a recombinant HAd5V-vector, as measured by ELISA and in vivo cytotoxic T-cell assays, respectively. We also correlated the levels of HAd5V-specific neutralizing antibodies (Ad5NAbs) induced in mice with the levels of Ad5NAb titers found in humans. The data indicate that approximately 60% of the human serum samples tested displayed Ad5NAb levels that could be overcome with a prime-boost vaccination protocol. These results suggest that recombinant HAd5V vectors are potentially useful for prime-boost vaccination strategies, at least when pre-existing immunity against HAd5V is at low or medium levels.

  5. Canine adenovirus based rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tordo, N; Foumier, A; Jallet, C; Szelechowski, M; Klonjkowski, B; Eloit, M

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus based vectors are very attractive candidates for vaccination purposes as they induce in mammalian hosts potent humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted genes. We have generated E1-deleted and replication-competent recombinant canine type-2 adenoviruses expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G). The effectiveness of both vectors to express a native G protein has been characterized in vitro in permissive cell lines. We compared the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by intramuscular injection of the recombinant canine adenovirus vectors with those induced by a human (Ad5) E1-deleted virus expressing the same rabies G protein. Humoral responses specific to the adenoviruses or the rabies glycoprotein antigens were studied. The influence of the mouse strain was observed using replication-competent canine adenovirus. A high level of rabies neutralizing antibody was observed upon i.m. inoculation, and 100% of mice survived lethal challenge. These results are very promising in the perspective of oral vaccine for dog rabies control.

  6. Adenovirus dodecahedron, a new vector for human gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Fender, P; Ruigrok, R W; Gout, E; Buffet, S; Chroboczek, J

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus is one of most efficient delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, the initial enthusiasm for the use of recombinant adenovirus for gene therapy has been tempered by strong immune responses that develop to the virus and virus-infected cells. Even though recombinant adenoviruses are replication-defective, they introduce into the recipient cell, together with the gene of interest, viral genetes that might lead to fortuitous recombination if the recipient is infected by wild-type adenovirus. We propose the use of a dodecahedron made of adenovirus pentons or penton bases as an alternative vector for human gene therapy. The penton is a complex of two oligomeric proteins, a penton base and fiber, involved in the cell attachment, internalization, and liberation of virus into the cytoplasm. The dodecahedron retains many of the advantages of adenovirus for gene transfer such as efficiency of entry, efficient release of DNA from endosomes, and wide range of cell and tissue targets. Because it consists of only one or two adenovirus proteins instead of the 11 contained in an adenovirus virion and it does not contain the viral genome, it is potentially a safer alternative to recombinant adenovirus.

  7. Anti-prostate cancer effects of CTL cell induction in vitro by recombinant adenovirus mediated PSMA/4-1BBL dendritic cells: an immunotherapy study.

    PubMed

    Sui, C-G; Wu, D; Meng, F-D; Yang, M-H; Jiang, Y-H

    2015-06-29

    This study aimed to examine anti-prostate cancer immune response induced by dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with PSMA/4-1BBL recombinant adenoviruses in vitro. Ad-PSMA, Ad-4-1BBL, and Ad-GFP were transfected into DCs derived from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. Ad-PSMA/4-1BBL-DC, Ad-PSMA-DC, Ad-4-1BBL-DC, Ad-GFP-DC, and normal-DC, PSMA and 4-1BBL protein levels in DCs were detected by western blot. IL-12, IFN-γ and IL-10 were measured by ELISA. Mixed lymphocyte reaction and the cytotoxicity of each group targeted to LNCap, Du145, and 22RV prostate cancer cells were determined by CCK-8 assay. PSMA and 4-1BBL protein could express on DC successfully, the IL-12 supernatant content (134.29 ± 2.22 pg) was higher than others (P < 0.05). The ability to stimulate autologous T lymphocyte proliferation in the co-transfection group was higher than others (P < 0.05). When the DCs were co-cultured with CTLs, the PSMA/4-1BBL-DC-CTL group showed the highest content of IFN-γ (1176.10 ± 14.37pg/5 x 10(6) cells), but the lowest IL-10 content (75.14 ± 2.01 pg/5 x 10(6) cells) (P < 0.05), and the strongest anti-tumor effect when the effector to target ratio was 40:1, along with a higher killing ratio of LNCap cells than others (P < 0.05). Overall, Mature DCs transfected with Ad-PSMA/4- 1BBL not only showed high secretion of IL-12, but also induced CTLs to stimulate and enhance the killing effect of PSMA specific effector cells to PSMA positively expressing prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the DCs infected with two kinds of tumor-associated antigens would induce more effective tumor-specific CTL induction.

  8. Inflammation scores predict the survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were treated with transarterial chemoembolization and recombinant human type-5 adenovirus H101

    PubMed Central

    He, Chao-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Background The systemic inflammatory response plays an important role in cancer development and progression. An original inflammation-based staging system for predicting survival in patients undergoing transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) combined with recombinant human type-5 adenovirus H101 is not available. This study aimed to validate the prognostic value of inflammation scores for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who were treated with TACE combined with H101. Methods The data from 216 patients with HCC who underwent TACE combined with H101 from January 2007 to July 2015 were retrospectively collected, and the association of the inflammation scores with overall survival (OS) was analyzed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify variables associated with OS. The prognostic value of the inflammation scores, including the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), neutrophil/ platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR-PLR), modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), prognostic nutritional index (PNI), prognostic index (PI), tumor-node-metastasis (TNM), Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) and Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP) staging systems were analyzed and compared using the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROCs). Results The estimated 1-, 2-, and 3-year OS rates were 61.3%, 44.2%, and 40.5% for the entire study cohort, respectively; the median OS was 17 months. According to the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, the pretreatment NLR, tumor diameter and pretreatment alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels were independent predictors of OS. The CLIP score had superior discriminative abilities compared with other staging systems, and the NLR-PLR score consistently displayed a higher AUROC value than the other inflammation-based prognostic scores. The combination of the NLR-PLR and CLIP scores exhibited a superior prognostic ability for OS compared to the NLR-PLR or

  9. [Effect of recombinant human p53 adenovirus (Ad-p53) combined with EGFR inhibitor gefitinib on the sensitivity of breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinzhao; Guan, Xiyun; Wang, Leilei; Xie, Li; Liu, Qi; Yu, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    To observe the impact of concurrent administration of recombinant human p53 adenovirus (Ad-p53) with EGFR inhibitor gefitinib on breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells. MDA-MB-468 cells were treated with Ad-p53 and/or gefitinib. The effect of Ad-p53 and gefitinib on the growth of MDA-MB-468 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to detect the alteration of p53,EGFR, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway and apoptosis-related proteins. Ad-p53 combined with gefitinib was used in vivo to explore their effect on tumor xenograft in nude mice. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the p53 expression in vivo. The MTT assay showed a stronger inhibitory effect of gefitinib on MDA-MB-468 cells infected with Ad-p53 than on the control cells. Cell apoptosis assay revealed that the apoptosis rates of MDA-MB-468 cells in vehicle-treated group, Ad-p53 group, gefitinib group, and combination group were 8.5%, 17.4%, 20.5% and 32.6%, respectively. The apoptosis rate of MDA-MB-468 cells in the combination group was higher than that in other groups (P < 0.05, for all) . Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of p53 was significantly up-regulated in the presence of Ad-p53. The combination of Ad-p53 and gefitinib significantly down-regulated p-Akt (S473)(P < 0.01) and up-regulated caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3 (P < 0.01 for both). Tumor inhibition rates (TIR) in the Ad-p53, gefitinib, and combination groups were 35.7%, 28.7% and 74.4%, respectively. Ad-p53 and gefitinib combination therapy significantly reduced the tumor burden in nude mice (P < 0.05 for all).Immunohistochemistry showed that after intratumoral administration of Ad-p53, wild-type p53 was increased (P < 0.01). p53 expressions in the vehicle-treated, Ad-p53, gefitinib and combination groups were 45.2%, 80.1%, 50.7% and 90.6%, respectively. Wild-type p53 may reverse the sensitivity of MDA-MB-468 cells to gefitinib through

  10. Co-expression of Erns and E2 genes of classical swine fever virus by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus completely protects pigs against virulent challenge with classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongke; Yang, Yuai; Zheng, Huanli; Xi, Dongmei; Lin, Mingxing; Zhang, Xiaomin; Yang, Linfu; Yan, Yulin; Chu, Xiaohui; Bi, Baoliang

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a recombinant adenovirus for future CSFV vaccines used in the pig industry for the reduction of losses involved in CSF outbreaks. The Erns and E2 genes of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), which encode the two main protective glycoproteins from the "Shimen" strain of CSFV, were combined and inserted into the replication-defective human adenovirus type-5 and named the rAd-Erns-E2. Nine pigs were randomly assigned to three treatment groups (three pigs in each group) including the rAd-Erns-E2, hAd-CMV control and DMEM control. Intramuscular vaccination with 2×10(6) TCID(50) of the rAd-Erns-E2 was administered two times with an interval of 21 days. At 42 days post inoculation, pigs in all groups were challenged with a lethal dose of 1×10(3) TCID(50) CSFV "Shimen" strain. Observation of clinical signs was made and the existence of CSFV RNA was detected. Animals in the hAd-CMV and DMEM groups showed severe clinical CSF symptoms and were euthanized from 7 to 10 days after the challenge. However, no adverse clinical CSF signs were observed in vaccinated pigs after the administration of rAd-Erns-E2 and even after CSFV challenge. Neither CSFV RNA nor pathological changes were detected in the tissues of interest of the above vaccinated pigs. These results implied that the recombination adenovirus carrying the Erns-E2 genes could be used to prevent swine from classical swine fever. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Combined prime-boost vaccination against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) using a recombinant vaccinia virus and a bacterial plasmid both expressing TBE virus non-structural NS1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Aleshin, SE; Timofeev, AV; Khoretonenko, MV; Zakharova, LG; Pashvykina, GV; Stephenson, JR; Shneider, AM; Altstein, AD

    2005-01-01

    Background Heterologous prime-boost immunization protocols using different gene expression systems have proven to be successful tools in protecting against various diseases in experimental animal models. The main reason for using this approach is to exploit the ability of expression cassettes to prime or boost the immune system in different ways during vaccination procedures. The purpose of the project was to study the ability of recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) and bacterial plasmid, both carrying the NS1 gene from tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus under the control of different promoters, to protect mice against lethal challenge using a heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocol. Results The heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocol, using a VV recombinant and bacterial plasmid, both containing the NS1 TBE virus protein gene under the control of different promoters, achieved a high level of protection in mice against lethal challenge with a highly pathogenic TBE virus strain. No signs of pronounced TBE infection were detected in the surviving animals. Conclusion Heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocols using recombinant VV and bacterial plasmids could be used for the development of flavivirus vaccines. PMID:16076390

  12. A prime-boost immunization with Tc52 N-terminal domain DNA and the recombinant protein expressed in Pichia pastoris protects against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marina N; Sánchez Alberti, Andrés; Morales, Celina; Cazorla, Silvia I; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2016-06-14

    We have previously reported that the N-terminal domain of the antigen Tc52 (NTc52) is the section of the protein that confers the strongest protection against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. To improve vaccine efficacy, we conducted here a prime-boost strategy (NTc52PB) by inoculating two doses of pcDNA3.1 encoding the NTc52 DNA carried by attenuated Salmonella (SNTc52), followed by two doses of recombinant NTc52 expressed in Picchia pastoris plus ODN-CpG as adjuvant. This strategy was comparatively analyzed with the following protocols: (1) two doses of NTc52+ODN-CpG by intranasal route followed by two doses of NTc52+ODN-CpG by intradermal route (NTc52CpG); (2) four doses of SNTc52; and (3) a control group with four doses of Salmonella carrying the empty plasmid. All immunized groups developed a predominant Th1 cellular immune response but with important differences in antibody development and protection against infection. Thus, immunization with just SNTc52 induces a strong specific cellular response, a specific systemic antibody response that is weak yet functional (considering lysis of trypomastigotes and inhibition of cell invasion), and IgA mucosal immunity, protecting in both the acute and chronic stages of infection. The group that received only recombinant protein (NTc52CpG) developed a strong antibody immune response but weaker cellular immunity than the other groups, and the protection against infection was clear in the acute phase of infection but not in chronicity. The prime-boost strategy, which combines DNA and protein vaccine and both mucosal and systemic immunizations routes, was the best assayed protocol, inducing strong cellular and humoral responses as well as specific mucosal IgA, thus conferring better protection in the acute and chronic stages of infection.

  13. Adenovirus structure.

    PubMed

    Rux, John J; Burnett, Roger M

    2004-12-01

    Structural studies continue to play an essential role as the focus of adenovirus research shifts in emphasis from basic biology to adenovirus-based vector technologies. A crucial step in developing novel therapeutics for gene replacement, cancer, and vaccines is often to modify the virion. Such engineered changes are designed to retarget the virus, or to reduce the immunological responses to infection. These efforts are far more effective when they are based on detailed structural knowledge. This minireview provides a brief summary of the wealth of information that has been obtained from the combined application of X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy. This knowledge now includes a good working model for the architectural organization of the virion, and atomic resolution molecular structures for all the major capsid proteins, hexon, penton, and fiber. We highlight new developments, which include the structure of the penton base and the discovery that adenovirus has several relatives. We sketch how the structural information can be used to engineer novel virions and conclude with the prospects for future progress.

  14. Development of Novel Prime-Boost Strategies Based on a Tri-Gene Fusion Recombinant L. tarentolae Vaccine against Experimental Murine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Saljoughian, Noushin; Taheri, Tahereh; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Taslimi, Yasaman; Doustdari, Fatemeh; Bolhassani, Azam; Doroud, Delaram; Azizi, Hiva; Heidari, Kazem; Vasei, Mohammad; Namvar Asl, Nabiollah; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Rafati, Sima

    2013-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a vector-borne disease affecting humans and domestic animals that constitutes a serious public health problem in many countries. Although many antigens have been examined so far as protein- or DNA-based vaccines, none of them conferred complete long-term protection. The use of the lizard non-pathogenic to humans Leishmania (L.) tarentolae species as a live vaccine vector to deliver specific Leishmania antigens is a recent approach that needs to be explored further. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of live vaccination in protecting BALB/c mice against L. infantum infection using prime-boost regimens, namely Live/Live and DNA/Live. As a live vaccine, we used recombinant L. tarentolae expressing the L. donovani A2 antigen along with cysteine proteinases (CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB-CTE)) as a tri-fusion gene. For DNA priming, the tri-fusion gene was encoded in pcDNA formulated with cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (cSLN) acting as an adjuvant. At different time points post-challenge, parasite burden and histopathological changes as well as humoral and cellular immune responses were assessed. Our results showed that immunization with both prime-boost A2-CPA-CPB-CTE-recombinant L. tarentolae protects BALB/c mice against L. infantum challenge. This protective immunity is associated with a Th1-type immune response due to high levels of IFN-γ production prior and after challenge and with lower levels of IL-10 production after challenge, leading to a significantly higher IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio compared to the control groups. Moreover, this immunization elicited high IgG1 and IgG2a humoral immune responses. Protection in mice was also correlated with a high nitric oxide production and low parasite burden. Altogether, these results indicate the promise of the A2-CPA-CPB-CTE-recombinant L. tarentolae as a safe live vaccine candidate against VL. PMID:23638195

  15. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    PubMed Central

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  16. Chimeric adenovirus type 5/35 vector encoding SIV gag and HIV env genes affords protective immunity against the simian/human immunodeficiency virus in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Someya, Kenji; Xin, Ke-Qin; Ami, Yasushi; Izumi, Yasuyuki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Shinrai; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo; Okuda, Kenji

    2007-10-25

    Replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector-based vaccines are widely known to induce strong immunity against immunodeficiency viruses. To exploit this immunogenicity while overcoming the potential problem of preexisting immunity against human adenoviruses type 5, we developed a recombinant chimeric adenovirus type 5 with type 35 fiber vector (rAd5/35). We initially produced a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag DNA plasmid (rDNA-Gag), a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 89.6 env DNA plasmid (rDNA-Env) and a recombinant Ad5/35 vector encoding the SIV gag and HIV env gene (rAd5/35-Gag and rAd5/35-Env). Prime-boost vaccination with rDNA-Gag and -Env followed by high doses of rAd5/35-Gag and -Env elicited higher levels of cellular immune responses than did rDNAs or rAd5/35s alone. When challenged with a pathogenic simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), animals receiving a prime-boost regimen or rAd5/35s alone maintained a higher number of CD4(+) T cells and remarkably suppressed plasma viral RNA loads. These findings suggest the clinical promise of an rAd5/35 vector-based vaccine.

  17. Comparison of different prime-boost regimes with DNA and recombinant Orf virus based vaccines expressing glycoprotein D of pseudorabies virus in pigs.

    PubMed

    van Rooij, E M A; Rijsewijk, F A M; Moonen-Leusen, H W; Bianchi, A T J; Rziha, H-J

    2010-02-17

    Both DNA and Orf virus (ORFV; Parapox virus) based vaccines have shown promise as alternatives for conventional vaccines in pigs against pseudorabies virus (PRV) infection causing Aujeszky's disease. In the present study we evaluated the efficacy of different prime-boost regimes in pigs in terms of immunogenicity and protection against challenge infection with PRV. The different prime-boost regimes consisted of the homologous prime-boost regimes (DNA followed by DNA or ORFV followed by ORFV) and the heterologous prime-boost regimes (DNA followed by ORFV and ORFV followed by DNA), all based on glycoprotein D (gD) of PRV. Moreover, we compared the efficacy of the different prime-boost regimes with the efficacy of a conventional modified live vaccine (MLV). The different prime-boost regimes resulted in different levels of immunity and protection against challenge infection. Most effective was the regime of priming with DNA vaccine followed by boosting with the ORFV based vaccine. This regime resulted in strong antibody responses, comparable to the antibody responses obtained after prime-boost vaccination with a conventional MLV vaccine. Also with regard to protection, the prime DNA-boost ORFV regime performed better than the other prime-boost regimes. This study demonstrates the potential of a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy against PRV based on a single antigen, and that in the natural host, the pig.

  18. Immune responses in mice induced by prime-boost schemes of the Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1)-based DNA, protein and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara vaccines.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jun; Li, Xun; Liu, Zhongxiang; Xue, Caifang; Bujard, Hermann; Cui, Liwang

    2006-09-11

    The apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) of malaria parasites is a leading vaccine candidate. Its expression in merozoites and sporozoites and its importance for erythrocyte and hepatocyte invasion underline the significance of both humoral and cellular immunities against this antigen in malaria protection. We have generated a DNA construct and a recombinant poxvirus (rMVA) for expressing the Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 ectodomain, produced recombinant AMA1 protein (rAMA1) and evaluated their antigenicity in mice using single and combinatory vaccine schemes. Our results showed that although vaccinations of mice by either DNA or rMVA alone did not yield high antibody responses, they had primed significant numbers of rAMA1-responsive splenocytes. Under heterologous prime-boost schemes, priming with DNA followed by boosting with rMVA or rAMA1 protein resulted in a significant increase in antibody titers. In addition, the antibody titers to AMA1 appeared to be correlated with the levels of inhibition of merozoite invasion of erythrocytes in vitro. Furthermore, different prime-boost schemes resulted in different AMA1-specific antibody isotype (IgG1/IgG2a) ratios, providing us with an indication about Th1 or Th2 responses the vaccination regimens have induced. This study has yielded useful information for further in vivo evaluation of the suitability and effectiveness of the heterologous prime-boost strategy in AMA1 vaccination.

  19. Development of replication-deficient adenovirus malaria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hollingdale, Michael R; Sedegah, Martha; Limbach, Keith

    2017-03-01

    Malaria remains a major threat to endemic populations and travelers, including military personnel to these areas. A malaria vaccine is feasible, as radiation attenuated sporozoites induce nearly 100% efficacy. Areas covered: This review covers current malaria clinical trials using adenoviruses and pre-clinical research. Heterologous prime-boost regimens, including replication-deficient human adenovirus 5 (HuAd5) carrying malaria antigens, are efficacious. However, efficacy appears to be adversely affected by pre-existing anti-HuAd5 antibodies. Current strategies focus on replacing HuAd5 with rarer human adenoviruses or adenoviruses isolated from non-human primates (NHPs). The chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 is undergoing evaluation in clinical trials including infants in malaria-endemic areas. Key antigens have been identified and are being used alone, in combination, or with protein subunit vaccines. Gorilla adenoviruses carrying malaria antigens are also currently being evaluated in preclinical models. These replacement adenovirus vectors will be successfully used to develop vaccines against malaria, as well as other infectious diseases. Expert commentary: Simplified prime-boost single shot regimens, dry-coated live vector vaccines or silicon microneedle arrays could be developed for malaria or other vaccines. Replacement vectors with similar or superior immunogenicity have rapidly advanced, and several are now in extensive Phase 2 and beyond in malaria as well as other diseases, notably Ebola.

  20. Recombinant BCG expressing a PspA-PdT fusion protein protects mice against pneumococcal lethal challenge in a prime-boost strategy.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Cibelly; Rodriguez, Dunia; Kanno, Alex I; Lu, Ying-Jie; Malley, Richard; Leite, Luciana C C

    2017-03-23

    Pneumococcal proteins have been evaluated as genetically-conserved potential vaccine candidates. We have previously demonstrated that a fragment of PspA in fusion with PdT (rPspA-PdT) induced protective immune responses in mice. However, purified proteins have shown poor immunogenicity and often require the combination with strong adjuvants and booster doses. Here, we investigated the use of a Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) strain, a well-established prophylactic vaccine for tuberculosis with known adjuvant properties, for delivery of the PspA-PdT fusion protein. Immunization of mice in a prime-boost strategy, using rPspA-PdT as a boost, demonstrated that rBCG PspA-PdT/rPspA-PdT was able to induce an antibody response against both proteins, promoting an IgG1 to IgG2 antibody isotype shift. Sera from rBCG PspA-PdT/rPspA-PdT immunized mice showed antibodies able to bind to the pneumococcal surface and promoted higher complement deposition when compared with WT-BCG/rPspA-PdT or a single dose of rPspA-PdT. In addition, these antisera inhibited the cytolytic activity of Ply. Production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was increased in splenocytes culture. Furthermore, a higher expression of CD69 early activation molecule was observed on splenic CD4(+) T cells from mice immunized with rBCG PspA-PdT before and after the protein booster dose. Finally, immunization with rBCG PspA-PdT/rPspA-PdT protected mice against pneumococcal lethal challenge. These results support the further investigation of recombinant BCG strains to express pneumococcal proteins, which could be administered in early stages of life and lead to protective pneumococcal immunity in infants and children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thrombopoietin (TPO) knockout phenotype induced by cross-reactive antibodies against TPO following injection of mice with recombinant adenovirus encoding human TPO.

    PubMed

    Abina, M A; Tulliez, M; Duffour, M T; Debili, N; Lacout, C; Villeval, J L; Wendling, F; Vainchenker, W; Haddada, H

    1998-05-01

    Adenovirus vectors have emerged as potent agents for gene transfer. Immune response against the vector and the encoded protein is one of the major factors in the transient expression following in vivo gene transfer. A single injection of an adenovirus encoding human thrombopoietin (TPO) into mice induced transient thrombocytosis, followed by a chronic immune thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenic mice had anti-human TPO Abs of the IgG2a and IgG1 isotypes. Thrombocytopenic mice sera neutralized more efficiently human than murine TPO, and exhibited no detectable anti-murine TPO Abs. Despite their low affinity for murine TPO, anti-TPO Abs induced a TPO knockout-like phenotype, i.e., low number of marrow megakaryocytes and of all kinds of hemopoietic progenitors. Hybridomas derived from a thrombocytopenic mouse revealed cross-reactivity of all of the secreted anti-TPO Ab isotypes. Mice subjected to myelosuppression after virus injection showed that anti-human TPO of IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes disappeared. Thus, sustained human TPO production was responsible for platelet elevation for at least 5 mo. Compelling results showed that elevated IgG2a/IgG2b ratios are always associated with thrombocytopenia, whereas low ratios are associated with tolerance or normal platelet counts. Finally, we hypothesize that in humans some chronic thrombocytopenia associated with a low TPO plasma level are due to anti-TPO Abs.

  2. Anti-tumor immunity elicited by direct intratumoral administration of a recombinant adenovirus expressing either IL-28A/IFN-λ2 or IL-29/IFN-λ1.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, K; Tagawa, M; Takagi, K; Tsukamoto, H; Tomioka, Y; Suzuki, T; Nishioka, Y; Ohrui, T; Numasaki, M

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-28A/interferon (IFN)-λ2 and IL-29/IFN-λ1 have been demonstrated to elicit direct and indirect anti-tumor actions. In this study, we constructed an adenovirus vector expressing either IL-28A/IFN-λ2 (AdIL-28A) or IL-29/IFN-λ1 (AdIL-29) to evaluate the therapeutic properties of intratumoral injection of recombinant adenovirus to apply for the clinical implementation of cancer gene therapy. Despite the lack of an anti-proliferative effect on MCA205 and B16-F10 cells, a retarded growth of established subcutaneous tumors was observed following multiple injections of either AdIL-28A or AdIL-29 when compared with AdNull. In vivo cell depletion experiments displayed that both NK cells and CD8(+) T cells have a major role in AdIL-28A-mediated tumor growth suppression. A significant increase in the number of infiltrating CD8(+) T cells into the tumors treated with either AdIL-28A or AdIL-29 was observed. Moreover, specific anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte reactivity was detected in spleen cells from animals treated with either AdIL-28A or AdIL-29. In IFN-γ-deficient mice, anti-tumor activities of AdIL-28A were completely impaired, indicating that IFN-γ is critically involved in the tumor growth inhibition triggered by AdIL-28A. IL-12 provided a synergistic anti-tumor effect when combined with AdIL-28A. These results indicate that AdIL-28A and AdIL-29 could be successfully utilized as an alternative cancer immunogene therapy.

  3. Canine Recombinant Adenovirus Vector Induces an Immunogenicity-Related Gene Expression Profile in Skin-Migrated CD11b+ -Type DCs

    PubMed Central

    Jouneau, Luc; Bourge, Mickael; Bouet-Cararo, Coraline; Bonneau, Michel; Zientara, Stephan; Klonjkowski, Bernard; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression profiling of the blood cell response induced early after vaccination has previously been demonstrated to predict the immunogenicity of vaccines. In this study, we evaluated whether the analysis of the gene expression profile of skin-migrated dendritic cells (DCs) could be informative for the in vitro prediction of immunogenicity of vaccine, using canine adenovirus serotype 2 (CAV2) as vaccine vector. CAV2 has been shown to induce immunity to transgenes in several species including sheep and is an interesting alternative to human adenovirus-based vectors, based on the safety records of the parental strain in dogs and the lack of pre-existing immunity in non-host species. Skin-migrated DCs were collected from pseudo-afferent lymph in sheep. Both the CD11b+ -type and CD103+ -type skin-migrated DCs were transduced by CAV2. An analysis of the global gene response to CAV2 in the two skin DC subsets showed that the gene response in CD11b+ -type DCs was far higher and broader than in the CD103+ -type DCs. A newly released integrative analytic tool from Ingenuity systems revealed that the CAV2-modulated genes in the CD11b+ -type DCs clustered in several activated immunogenicity-related functions, such as immune response, immune cell trafficking and inflammation. Thus gene profiling in skin-migrated DC in vitro indicates that the CD11b+ DC type is more responsive to CAV2 than the CD103+ DC type, and provides valuable information to help in evaluating and possibly improving viral vector vaccine effectiveness. PMID:23300693

  4. Recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara-based malaria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Sarah; Gilbert, Sarah C

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective malaria vaccine is a crucial part of the roadmap to malaria elimination/eradication by the year 2050. Viral-vectored vaccines based on adenoviruses and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing malaria immunogens are currently being used in heterologous prime-boost regimes in clinical trials for induction of strong antigen-specific T-cell responses and high-titer antibodies. Recombinant MVA is a safe and well-tolerated attenuated vector that has consistently shown significant boosting potential. Advances have been made in large-scale MVA manufacture as high-yield producer cell lines and high-throughput purification processes have recently been developed. This review describes the use of MVA as malaria vaccine vector in both preclinical and clinical studies in the past 5 years.

  5. Robust Protection against Highly Virulent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Swine by Combination Treatment with Recombinant Adenoviruses Expressing Porcine Alpha and Gamma Interferons and Multiple Small Interfering RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Kim, Se-Kyung; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Taeseong; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Seo, Min-Goo; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because the currently available vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) provide no protection until 4 to 7 days postvaccination, the only alternative method to halt the spread of the FMD virus (FMDV) during outbreaks is the application of antiviral agents. Combination treatment strategies have been used to enhance the efficacy of antiviral agents, and such strategies may be advantageous in overcoming viral mechanisms of resistance to antiviral treatments. We have developed recombinant adenoviruses (Ads) for the simultaneous expression of porcine alpha and gamma interferons (Ad-porcine IFN-αγ) as well as 3 small interfering RNAs (Ad-3siRNA) targeting FMDV mRNAs encoding nonstructural proteins. The antiviral effects of Ad-porcine IFN-αγ and Ad-3siRNA expression were tested in combination in porcine cells, suckling mice, and swine. We observed enhanced antiviral effects in porcine cells and mice as well as robust protection against the highly pathogenic strain O/Andong/SKR/2010 and increased expression of cytokines in swine following combination treatment. In addition, we showed that combination treatment was effective against all serotypes of FMDV. Therefore, we suggest that the combined treatment with Ad-porcine IFN-αγ and Ad-3siRNA may offer fast-acting antiviral protection and be used with a vaccine during the period that the vaccine does not provide protection against FMD. IMPORTANCE The use of current foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines to induce rapid protection provides limited effectiveness because the protection does not become effective until a minimum of 4 days after vaccination. Therefore, during outbreaks antiviral agents remain the only available treatment to confer rapid protection and reduce the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in livestock until vaccine-induced protective immunity can become effective. Interferons (IFNs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been reported to be effective antiviral agents against

  6. Robust Protection against Highly Virulent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Swine by Combination Treatment with Recombinant Adenoviruses Expressing Porcine Alpha and Gamma Interferons and Multiple Small Interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Mi; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Kim, Se-Kyung; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Taeseong; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Seo, Min-Goo; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-08-01

    Because the currently available vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) provide no protection until 4 to 7 days postvaccination, the only alternative method to halt the spread of the FMD virus (FMDV) during outbreaks is the application of antiviral agents. Combination treatment strategies have been used to enhance the efficacy of antiviral agents, and such strategies may be advantageous in overcoming viral mechanisms of resistance to antiviral treatments. We have developed recombinant adenoviruses (Ads) for the simultaneous expression of porcine alpha and gamma interferons (Ad-porcine IFN-αγ) as well as 3 small interfering RNAs (Ad-3siRNA) targeting FMDV mRNAs encoding nonstructural proteins. The antiviral effects of Ad-porcine IFN-αγ and Ad-3siRNA expression were tested in combination in porcine cells, suckling mice, and swine. We observed enhanced antiviral effects in porcine cells and mice as well as robust protection against the highly pathogenic strain O/Andong/SKR/2010 and increased expression of cytokines in swine following combination treatment. In addition, we showed that combination treatment was effective against all serotypes of FMDV. Therefore, we suggest that the combined treatment with Ad-porcine IFN-αγ and Ad-3siRNA may offer fast-acting antiviral protection and be used with a vaccine during the period that the vaccine does not provide protection against FMD. The use of current foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines to induce rapid protection provides limited effectiveness because the protection does not become effective until a minimum of 4 days after vaccination. Therefore, during outbreaks antiviral agents remain the only available treatment to confer rapid protection and reduce the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in livestock until vaccine-induced protective immunity can become effective. Interferons (IFNs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been reported to be effective antiviral agents against FMDV, although the

  7. Enhanced immunogenicity and antitumour effects with heterologous prime-boost regime using vaccines based on MG7-Ag mimotope of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, T; Liang, S; Meng, F; Han, Q; Guo, C; Sun, L; Chen, Y; Liu, Z; Yu, Z; Xie, H; Ding, J; Fan, D

    2006-05-01

    MG7-Ag, gastric cancer-associated antigen, has been shown to be immunogenic and has been used as marker molecule for prognosis. In a previous study, we developed an oral DNA vaccine based on MG7-Ag mimotope. However, we failed to detect cellular immune response using the oral MG7-Ag mimotope DNA vaccine. To induce significant T cell response, we developed a recombinant adenovirus vaccine based on MG7-Ag mimotope and evaluated the efficacy and protective effects of heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol with an oral DNA vaccine previously developed. We found that both vaccines were able to elicit a significant humoral response against MG7-Ag, while the highest serum titre MG7 antibody was detected in mice immunized with the heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol. Enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay demonstrated that the heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy was more efficient in inducing T cell response than the homologous prime-boost strategy. In the tumour challenge assay, 2 of 5 mice immunized with the heterologous prime-boost protocol were tumour free, while none of the mice in homologous prime-boost groups or control groups was tumour free. Those tumour-bearing mice in the heterologous prime-boost regime had smaller tumour masses than their counterparts in the homologous prime-boost groups or control groups. Therefore, our study suggests that vaccines against MG7-Ag induce significant immune response against gastric cancer, and that the heterologous prime-boost protocol using different types of vaccines could achieve better protective effect than the homologous prime-boost protocol.

  8. Widespread and efficient marker gene expression in the airway epithelia of fetal sheep after minimally invasive tracheal application of recombinant adenovirus in utero.

    PubMed

    Peebles, D; Gregory, L G; David, A; Themis, M; Waddington, S N; Knapton, H J; Miah, M; Cook, T; Lawrence, L; Nivsarkar, M; Rodeck, C; Coutelle, C

    2004-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a common lethal genetic disease caused by functional absence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Although a candidate disease for in utero gene therapy, demonstration of potentially therapeutic levels of transgene expression in the fetal airways after minimally invasive gene delivery is a mandatory prerequisite before application of this approach in humans can be considered. We report here on the delivery of a beta-galactosidase expressing adenovirus directly to the airways of fetal sheep in utero using ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of the trachea in the fetal chest. Injection of adenoviral particles to the fetal airways was not associated with mortality and resulted in low-level expression in the peripheral airways. However, complexation of the virus with DEAE dextran, which confers a positive charge to the virus, and pretreatment of the airways with Na-caprate, which opens tight junctions, increased transgene expression, and a combination of these two enhancers resulted in widespread and efficient gene transfer of the fetal trachea and bronchial tree. Using a percutaneous ultrasound-guided injection technique, we have clearly demonstrated proof of principle for substantial transgene delivery to the fetal airways providing levels of gene expression that could be relevant for a therapeutic application of CFTR expressing vectors.

  9. Safety studies on an adenovirus recombinant vaccine for rabies (AdRG1.3-ONRAB) in target and non-target species.

    PubMed

    Knowles, M Kimberly; Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Sheen, Mary; Rosatte, Rick; Mueller, Rudi; Beresford, Andrew

    2009-11-05

    A replication-competent human adenovirus vector in which the rabies virus glycoprotein gene was inserted (AdRG1.3-ONRAB) was given by direct instillation into the oral cavity to representatives of three wildlife vector species of concern in Ontario (red fox, raccoon and striped skunk) and to a variety of non-target wildlife species, domestic and laboratory species. Despite use of a relatively high dose of vaccine, no untoward clinical signs were observed. Subsequent to vaccine exposure, detection of vaccine virus in lung, spleen, intestine, liver, kidney and brain of each animal was attempted using an ONRAB-specific assay combining PCR with Southern blotting (PCR-SB). Of the 1280 tissue samples obtained from vaccinates or contact animals, 18 (1.4%) were found to be PCR-SB positive. Virus isolation attempts were performed utilizing cell culture for all PCR-SB positive tissues and a selection of PCR-SB negative tissues. Histological examination performed on all PCR-SB positive tissues failed to identify lesions attributed to the vaccine. A quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the excretion of the vaccine in feces and in the oral cavity with 0.8% of oral swabs and 6.8% of fecal specimens found to be positive. The low rates of recovery of vaccine virus from tissues, feces and the oral cavity suggest that the likelihood of ONRAB causing a negative impact on wildlife species is unlikely.

  10. Computational analysis of human adenovirus serotype 18

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michael P.; Seto, Jason; Tirado, Damaris; Chodosh, James; Schnurr, David; Seto, Donald; Jones, Morris S.

    2010-01-01

    The genome of the sole remaining unsequenced member of species A, human adenovirus type 18 (HAdV-A18), has been sequenced and analyzed. Members of species A are implicated as gastrointestinal pathogens and were shown to be tumorigenic in rodents. These whole genome and in silico proteome data are important as references for re-examining and integrating earlier work and observations based on lower resolution techniques, such as restriction enzyme digestion patterns, particularly for hypotheses based on pre-genomics data. Additionally, the genome of HAdV-A18 will also serve as reference for current studies examining the molecular evolution and origins of human and simian adenoviruses, particularly genome recombination studies. Applications of this virus as a potential vector for gene delivery protocols may be practical as data accumulates on this and other adenovirus genomes. PMID:20542532

  11. Genetic stability of a recombinant adenovirus vaccine vector seed library expressing human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Chen, Ke-DA; Gao, Meng; Chen, Gang; Jin, Su-Feng; Zhuang, Fang-Cheng; Wu, Xiao-Hong; Jiang, Yun-Shui; Li, Jian-Bo

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to understand the genetic stability of a master seed bank (MSB) and a working seed bank (WSB) of an adenovirus vector vaccine expressing the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E6 and E7 fusion proteins (Ad-HPV16E6E7). Microscopic examination and viral infectious efficacy were used to measure the infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB. Polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the stability of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target gene insertion, while western blot analysis and immunofluorescence were used to assess the expression levels of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 target protein. A C57BL/6 mouse TC-1 tumor cell growth inhibition model was used to evaluate the biological effect of Ad-HPV16E6E7 administration. The infectious titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 6.31×10(9) IU/ml and 3.0×10(9) IU/ml, respectively. In addition, the expression levels of the inserted target genes and target proteins were found to be stable. In the mouse TC-1 tumor inhibition analysis, when the virus titers of the Ad-HPV16E6E7 MSB and WSB were 10(9) IU/ml, the tumor inhibition rate was 100%, which was significantly different when compared with the control group (χ(2)MSB=20.00 and χ(2)WSB=20.00; P<0.01). Therefore, the Ad-HPV16E6E7 vaccine seed bank is genetically stable and meets the requirements for vaccine development.

  12. Predicting the Next Eye Pathogen: Analysis of a Novel Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christopher M.; Zhou, Xiaohong; Rajaiya, Jaya; Yousuf, Mohammad A.; Singh, Gurdeep; DeSerres, Joshua J.; Walsh, Michael P.; Wong, Sallene; Seto, Donald; Dyer, David W.; Chodosh, James; Jones, Morris S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT For DNA viruses, genetic recombination, addition, and deletion represent important evolutionary mechanisms. Since these genetic alterations can lead to new, possibly severe pathogens, we applied a systems biology approach to study the pathogenicity of a novel human adenovirus with a naturally occurring deletion of the canonical penton base Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) loop, thought to be critical to cellular entry by adenoviruses. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a new highly recombinant species D human adenovirus (HAdV-D60). A synthesis of in silico and laboratory approaches revealed a potential ocular tropism for the new virus. In vivo, inflammation induced by the virus was dramatically greater than that by adenovirus type 37, a major eye pathogen, possibly due to a novel alternate ligand, Tyr-Gly-Asp (YGD), on the penton base protein. The combination of bioinformatics and laboratory simulation may have important applications in the prediction of tissue tropism for newly discovered and emerging viruses. PMID:23572555

  13. Increased immunogenicity of recombinant Ad35-based malaria vaccine through formulation with aluminium phosphate adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Ophorst, Olga J A E; Radosević, Katarina; Klap, Jaco M; Sijtsma, Jeroen; Gillissen, Gert; Mintardjo, Ratna; van Ooij, Mark J M; Holterman, Lennart; Companjen, Arjen; Goudsmit, Jaap; Havenga, Menzo J E

    2007-08-29

    Previously, we have shown the potency of recombinant Adenovirus serotype 35 viral vaccines (rAd35) to induce strong immune response against the circumsporozoite protein (CS) of the plasmodium parasite. To further optimize immunogenicity of Ad35-based malaria vaccines we formulated rAd35.CS vaccine with aluminium phosphate adjuvant (AlPO(4)). In contrast to the conventional protein based vaccines no absorption to aluminium adjuvant was observed and rAd35 viral in vitro infectivity in mammalian cells was preserved. Immunization with Ad35.CS formulated with AlPO(4) resulted in significantly higher CS specific T and B cell responses in mice upon either single or prime-boost vaccination regimens as compared to rAd35.CS alone. With these results we report for the first time the feasibility of using an AlPO(4) adjuvant to increase the potency of a live adenovirus serotype 35-based vaccine.

  14. Adrenal Gland Infection by Serotype 5 Adenovirus Requires Coagulation Factors

    PubMed Central

    Franken, Philippe R.; Darcourt, Jacques; Cornilleau, Gaétan; Benihoud, Karim; Vassaux, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant, replication-deficient serotype 5 adenovirus infects the liver upon in vivo, systemic injection in rodents. This infection requires the binding of factor X to the capsid of this adenovirus. Another organ, the adrenal gland is also infected upon systemic administration of Ad, however, whether this infection is dependent on the cocksackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) or depends on the binding of factor X to the viral capsid remained to be determined. In the present work, we have used a pharmacological agent (warfarin) as well as recombinant adenoviruses lacking the binding site of Factor X to elucidate this mechanism in mice. We demonstrate that, as observed in the liver, adenovirus infection of the adrenal glands in vivo requires Factor X. Considering that the level of transduction of the adrenal glands is well-below that of the liver and that capsid-modified adenoviruses are unlikely to selectively infect the adrenal glands, we have used single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of gene expression to determine whether local virus administration (direct injection in the kidney) could increase gene transfer to the adrenal glands. We demonstrate that direct injection of the virus in the kidney increases gene transfer in the adrenal gland but liver transduction remains important. These observations strongly suggest that serotype 5 adenovirus uses a similar mechanism to infect liver and adrenal gland and that selective transgene expression in the latter is more likely to be achieved through transcriptional targeting. PMID:23638001

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Adenoviruses Persistently Shed from the Gastrointestinal Tract of Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Kryazhimskiy, Sergey; Grant, Rebecca; Calcedo, Roberto; Yuan, Xin; Keough, Martin; Sandhu, Arbans; Wang, Qiang; Medina-Jaszek, C. Angelica; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Wilson, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Adenoviruses are important human pathogens that have been developed as vectors for gene therapies and genetic vaccines. Previous studies indicated that human infections with adenoviruses are self-limiting in immunocompetent hosts with evidence of some persistence in adenoid tissue. We sought to better understand the natural history of adenovirus infections in various non-human primates and discovered that healthy populations of great apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans) and macaques shed substantial quantities of infectious adenoviruses in stool. Shedding in stools from asymptomatic humans was found to be much less frequent, comparable to frequencies reported before. We purified and fully sequenced 30 novel adenoviruses from apes and 3 novel adenoviruses from macaques. Analyses of the new ape adenovirus sequences (as well as the 4 chimpanzee adenovirus sequences we have previously reported) together with 22 complete adenovirus genomes available from GenBank revealed that (a) the ape adenoviruses could clearly be classified into species corresponding to human adenovirus species B, C, and E, (b) there was evidence for intraspecies recombination between adenoviruses, and (c) the high degree of phylogenetic relatedness of adenoviruses across their various primate hosts provided evidence for cross species transmission events to have occurred in the natural history of B and E viruses. The high degree of asymptomatic shedding of live adenovirus in non-human primates and evidence for zoonotic transmissions warrants caution for primate handling and housing. Furthermore, the presence of persistent and/or latent adenovirus infections in the gut should be considered in the design and interpretation of human and non-human primate studies with adenovirus vectors. PMID:19578438

  16. NY-ESO-1 specific antibody and cellular responses in melanoma patients primed with NY-ESO-1 protein in ISCOMATRIX and boosted with recombinant NY-ESO-1 fowlpox virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Li; Dawoodji, Amina; Tarlton, Andrea; Gnjatic, Sacha; Tajar, Abdelouahid; Karydis, Ioannis; Browning, Judy; Pratap, Sarah; Verfaille, Christian; Venhaus, Ralph R; Pan, Linda; Altman, Douglas G; Cebon, Jonathan S; Old, Lloyd L; Nathan, Paul; Ottensmeier, Christian; Middleton, Mark; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2015-03-15

    Vaccination strategies based on repeated injections of NY-ESO-1 protein formulated in ISCOMATRIX particles (NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX) have shown to elicit combined NY-ESO-1 specific antibody and T cell responses. However, it remains unclear whether heterologous prime-boost strategies based on the combination with NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX with different NY-ESO-1 boosting reagents could be used to increase NY-ESO-1 CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cell responses. To address this question, we carried out a randomized clinical trial in 39 high-risk, resected melanoma patients vaccinated with NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX, and then boosted with repeated injections of either recombinant fowlpox virus encoding full length NY-ESO-1 (rF-NY-ESO-1) (Arm A) or NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX alone (Arm B). We have comprehensively analyzed NY-ESO-1 specific T cells and B cells response in all patients before and after vaccination for a total of seven time points per patient. NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX alone elicited a strong NY-ESO-1 specific CD4(+) T cell and antibody response, which was maintained by both regiments at similar levels. However, CD8(+) T cell responses were significantly boosted in 3 out of 18 patients in Arm A after the first rF-NY-ESO-1 injection and such responses were maintained until the end of the trial, while no patients in Arm B showed similar CD8(+) T cell responses. In addition, our results clearly identified immunodominant regions in the NY-ESO-1 protein: NY-ESO-179-102 and NY-ESO-1115-138 for CD4+ T cells and NY-ESO-185-108 for CD8+ T cells in a large proportion of vaccinated patients. These regions of NY-ESO-1 protein should be considered in future clinical trials as immunodominant epitopes. © 2014 UICC.

  17. A human type 5 adenovirus-based tuberculosis vaccine induces robust T cell responses in humans despite preexisting anti-adenovirus immunity.

    PubMed

    Smaill, Fiona; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Smieja, Marek; Medina, Maria Fe; Thanthrige-Don, Niroshan; Zganiacz, Anna; Yin, Cindy; Heriazon, Armando; Damjanovic, Daniela; Puri, Laura; Hamid, Jemila; Xie, Feng; Foley, Ronan; Bramson, Jonathan; Gauldie, Jack; Xing, Zhou

    2013-10-02

    There is an urgent need to develop new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines to safely and effectively boost Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-triggered T cell immunity in humans. AdHu5Ag85A is a recombinant human type 5 adenovirus (AdHu5)-based TB vaccine with demonstrated efficacy in a number of animal species, yet it remains to be translated to human applications. In this phase 1 study, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of AdHu5Ag85A in both BCG-naïve and previously BCG-immunized healthy adults. Intramuscular immunization of AdHu5Ag85A was safe and well tolerated in both trial volunteer groups. Moreover, although AdHu5Ag85A was immunogenic in both trial volunteer groups, it much more potently boosted polyfunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell immunity in previously BCG-vaccinated volunteers. Furthermore, despite prevalent preexisting anti-AdHu5 humoral immunity in most of the trial volunteers, we found little evidence that such preexisting anti-AdHu5 immunity significantly dampened the potency of AdHu5Ag85A vaccine. This study supports further clinical investigations of the AdHu5Ag85A vaccine for human applications. It also suggests that the widely perceived negative effect of preexisting anti-AdHu5 immunity may not be universally applied to all AdHu5-based vaccines against different types of human pathogens.

  18. 78 FR 3906 - Prospective Grant of a Co-Exclusive License: Adenovirus-Based Controls and Calibrators for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... October 24, 2000, and entitled ``Replication Deficient Recombinant Adenovirus Vector'' to Life... recombinant constructs as controls and calibrators for molecular diagnostics for infectious disease agents...-0220; Email: Reichmau@mail.nih.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The invention relates to...

  19. Innate Immunity to Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Rodinde; Stichling, Nicole; Koelen, Jorien; Kuryk, Lukasz; Lipiec, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses are the most widely used vectors in gene medicine, with applications ranging from oncolytic therapies to vaccinations, but adenovirus vectors are not without side effects. In addition, natural adenoviruses pose severe risks for immunocompromised people, yet infections are usually mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals. Here we describe how adenoviruses are recognized by the host innate defense system during entry and replication in immune and nonimmune cells. Innate defense protects the host and represents a major barrier to using adenoviruses as therapeutic interventions in humans. Innate response against adenoviruses involves intrinsic factors present at constant levels, and innate factors mounted by the host cell upon viral challenge. These factors exert antiviral effects by directly binding to viruses or viral components, or shield the virus, for example, soluble factors, such as blood clotting components, the complement system, preexisting immunoglobulins, or defensins. In addition, Toll-like receptors and lectins in the plasma membrane and endosomes are intrinsic factors against adenoviruses. Important innate factors restricting adenovirus in the cytosol are tripartite motif-containing proteins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like inflammatory receptors, and DNA sensors triggering interferon, such as DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 41 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate synthase. Adenovirus tunes the function of antiviral autophagy, and counters innate defense by virtue of its early proteins E1A, E1B, E3, and E4 and two virus-associated noncoding RNAs VA-I and VA-II. We conclude by discussing strategies to engineer adenovirus vectors with attenuated innate responses and enhanced delivery features. PMID:24512150

  20. Innate immunity to adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Rodinde; Stichling, Nicole; Koelen, Jorien; Kuryk, Lukasz; Lipiec, Agnieszka; Greber, Urs F

    2014-04-01

    Human adenoviruses are the most widely used vectors in gene medicine, with applications ranging from oncolytic therapies to vaccinations, but adenovirus vectors are not without side effects. In addition, natural adenoviruses pose severe risks for immunocompromised people, yet infections are usually mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals. Here we describe how adenoviruses are recognized by the host innate defense system during entry and replication in immune and nonimmune cells. Innate defense protects the host and represents a major barrier to using adenoviruses as therapeutic interventions in humans. Innate response against adenoviruses involves intrinsic factors present at constant levels, and innate factors mounted by the host cell upon viral challenge. These factors exert antiviral effects by directly binding to viruses or viral components, or shield the virus, for example, soluble factors, such as blood clotting components, the complement system, preexisting immunoglobulins, or defensins. In addition, Toll-like receptors and lectins in the plasma membrane and endosomes are intrinsic factors against adenoviruses. Important innate factors restricting adenovirus in the cytosol are tripartite motif-containing proteins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like inflammatory receptors, and DNA sensors triggering interferon, such as DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 41 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate synthase. Adenovirus tunes the function of antiviral autophagy, and counters innate defense by virtue of its early proteins E1A, E1B, E3, and E4 and two virus-associated noncoding RNAs VA-I and VA-II. We conclude by discussing strategies to engineer adenovirus vectors with attenuated innate responses and enhanced delivery features.

  1. Alphavirus Replicon DNA Expressing HIV Antigens Is an Excellent Prime for Boosting with Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) or with HIV gp140 Protein Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Maria L.; Ljungberg, Karl; Tatoud, Roger; Weber, Jonathan; Esteban, Mariano; Liljeström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination with DNA is an attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific T cells and antibodies. Studies in humans have shown that DNA vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity needs further improvement. As a step towards this goal, we have previously demonstrated that immunogenicity is increased with the use of an alphavirus DNA-launched replicon (DREP) vector compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In this study, we investigated the effect of varying the dose and number of administrations of DREP when given as a prime prior to a heterologous boost with poxvirus vector (MVA) and/or HIV gp140 protein formulated in glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA-AF) adjuvant. The DREP and MVA vaccine constructs encoded Env and a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein from HIV clade C. One to three administrations of 0.2 μg DREP induced lower HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses than the equivalent number of immunizations with 10 μg DREP. However, the two doses were equally efficient as a priming component in a heterologous prime-boost regimen. The magnitude of immune responses depended on the number of priming immunizations rather than the dose. A single low dose of DREP prior to a heterologous boost resulted in greatly increased immune responses compared to MVA or protein antigen alone, demonstrating that a mere 0.2 μg DREP was sufficient for priming immune responses. Following a DREP prime, T cell responses were expanded greatly by an MVA boost, and IgG responses were also expanded when boosted with protein antigen. When MVA and protein were administered simultaneously following multiple DREP primes, responses were slightly compromised compared to administering them sequentially. In conclusion, we have demonstrated efficient priming of HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses with a low dose of DREP, and shown that the priming effect depends on number of primes administered rather than dose. PMID:25643354

  2. Alphavirus replicon DNA expressing HIV antigens is an excellent prime for boosting with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) or with HIV gp140 protein antigen.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Maria L; Ljungberg, Karl; Tatoud, Roger; Weber, Jonathan; Esteban, Mariano; Liljeström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination with DNA is an attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific T cells and antibodies. Studies in humans have shown that DNA vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity needs further improvement. As a step towards this goal, we have previously demonstrated that immunogenicity is increased with the use of an alphavirus DNA-launched replicon (DREP) vector compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In this study, we investigated the effect of varying the dose and number of administrations of DREP when given as a prime prior to a heterologous boost with poxvirus vector (MVA) and/or HIV gp140 protein formulated in glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA-AF) adjuvant. The DREP and MVA vaccine constructs encoded Env and a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein from HIV clade C. One to three administrations of 0.2 μg DREP induced lower HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses than the equivalent number of immunizations with 10 μg DREP. However, the two doses were equally efficient as a priming component in a heterologous prime-boost regimen. The magnitude of immune responses depended on the number of priming immunizations rather than the dose. A single low dose of DREP prior to a heterologous boost resulted in greatly increased immune responses compared to MVA or protein antigen alone, demonstrating that a mere 0.2 μg DREP was sufficient for priming immune responses. Following a DREP prime, T cell responses were expanded greatly by an MVA boost, and IgG responses were also expanded when boosted with protein antigen. When MVA and protein were administered simultaneously following multiple DREP primes, responses were slightly compromised compared to administering them sequentially. In conclusion, we have demonstrated efficient priming of HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses with a low dose of DREP, and shown that the priming effect depends on number of primes administered rather than dose.

  3. Vaccination with recombinant adenovirus expressing multi-stage antigens of Toxoplasma gondii by the mucosal route induces higher systemic cellular and local mucosal immune responses than with other vaccination routes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Yin, Huiquan; Li, Yan; Zhao, Lingxiao; Sun, Xiahui; Cong, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan, is a cause of congenital disease and abortion in humans and animals. Various vaccination strategies against toxoplasmosis in rodent models have been used in the past few decades; however, effective vaccines remain a challenge. A recombinant adenovirus vaccine expressing ubiquitin-conjugated multi-stage antigen segments (Ad-UMAS) derived from different life-cycle stages of T. gondii was constructed previously. Here, we compared the immune responses and protection effects in vaccination of mice with Ad-UMAS by five vaccination routes including intramuscular (i.m.), intravenous (i.v.), subcutaneous (s.c.), intraoral (i.o.), and intranasal (i.n.). Much higher levels of T. gondii-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were detected in the sera of the intraoral and intranasal vaccination groups on day 49 compared with controls (p < 0.05). The percentages of CD8+ T-cells in mice immunized intranasally and intraorally were larger than in mice immunized intramuscularly (p < 0.05). The highest level of IL-2 and IFN-γ was detected in the group with nasal immunization, and splenocyte proliferation activity was significantly enhanced in mice immunized via the oral and nasal routes. Furthermore, the higher survival rate (50%) and lower cyst numbers observed in the intraoral and intranasal groups all indicate that Ad-UMAS is far more effective in protecting mice against T. gondii infection via the mucosal route. Ad-UMAS could be an effective and safe mucosal candidate vaccine to protect animals and humans against T. gondii infection. PMID:28367800

  4. Further reduction in adenovirus vector-mediated liver transduction without largely affecting transgene expression in target organ by exploiting microrna-mediated regulation and the Cre-loxP recombination system.

    PubMed

    Bennett, David; Sakurai, Fuminori; Shimizu, Kahori; Matsui, Hayato; Tomita, Kyoko; Suzuki, Takayuki; Katayama, Kazufumi; Kawabata, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-03

    In order to detarget undesirable transduction in the liver by an adenovirus (Ad) vector, we previously demonstrated that insertion of sequences perfectly complementary to liver-specific miR-122a into the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of transgene specifically reduced the transgene expression in the liver by approximately 100-fold; however, a certain level of residual transgene expression was still found in the liver. In order to further suppress the hepatic transduction, we developed a two-Ad vector system that uses the microRNA (miRNA)-regulated transgene expression system and the Cre-loxP recombination system, i.e., insertion of miR-122a target sequences and loxP sites into the transgene expression cassette and coadministration of a Cre recombinase-expressing Ad vector. In addition, to maintain as much as possible the transgene expression in the spleen, which is the target organ of this study, spleen-specific miR-142-3p target sequences were inserted into the 3'-UTR of the Cre recombinase gene to suppress Cre recombinase expression in the spleen. The spleen is an attractive target for immunotherapy because the spleen plays important roles in the immune system. Coadministration of Ad vector possessing CMV promoter-driven Cre recombinase expression cassette with miR-142-3p target sequences resulted in a further 24-fold reduction in the hepatic transgene expression by the Ad vector containing miR-122a target sequences and loxP sites, compared with coadministration of control Ad vector. On the other hand, there was no significant reduction of transgene expression in the spleen.

  5. Vaccination with recombinant adenovirus expressing multi-stage antigens of Toxoplasma gondii by the mucosal route induces higher systemic cellular and local mucosal immune responses than with other vaccination routes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Yin, Huiquan; Li, Yan; Zhao, Lingxiao; Sun, Xiahui; Cong, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan, is a cause of congenital disease and abortion in humans and animals. Various vaccination strategies against toxoplasmosis in rodent models have been used in the past few decades; however, effective vaccines remain a challenge. A recombinant adenovirus vaccine expressing ubiquitin-conjugated multi-stage antigen segments (Ad-UMAS) derived from different life-cycle stages of T. gondii was constructed previously. Here, we compared the immune responses and protection effects in vaccination of mice with Ad-UMAS by five vaccination routes including intramuscular (i.m.), intravenous (i.v.), subcutaneous (s.c.), intraoral (i.o.), and intranasal (i.n.). Much higher levels of T. gondii-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were detected in the sera of the intraoral and intranasal vaccination groups on day 49 compared with controls (p < 0.05). The percentages of CD8(+) T-cells in mice immunized intranasally and intraorally were larger than in mice immunized intramuscularly (p < 0.05). The highest level of IL-2 and IFN-γ was detected in the group with nasal immunization, and splenocyte proliferation activity was significantly enhanced in mice immunized via the oral and nasal routes. Furthermore, the higher survival rate (50%) and lower cyst numbers observed in the intraoral and intranasal groups all indicate that Ad-UMAS is far more effective in protecting mice against T. gondii infection via the mucosal route. Ad-UMAS could be an effective and safe mucosal candidate vaccine to protect animals and humans against T. gondii infection.

  6. Potential use of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vector carrying the C-terminal portion of the P97 adhesin protein as a vaccine against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in swine.

    PubMed

    Okamba, Faust René; Arella, Maximilien; Music, Nedzad; Jia, Jian Jun; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Gagnon, Carl A

    2010-07-05

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae causes severe economic losses to the swine industry worldwide and the prevention of its related disease, enzootic porcine pneumonia, remains a challenge. The P97 adhesin protein of M. hyopneumoniae should be a good candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine because antibodies produced against P97 could prevent the adhesion of the pathogen to the respiratory epithelial cells in vitro. In the present study, a P97 recombinant replication-defective adenovirus (rAdP97c) subunit vaccine efficiency was evaluated in pigs. The rAdP97c vaccine was found to induce both strong P97 specific humoral and cellular immune responses. The rAdP97c vaccinated pigs developed a lower amount of macroscopic lung lesions (18.5 + or - 9.6%) compared to the unvaccinated and challenged animals (45.8 + or - 11.5%). rAdP97c vaccine reduced significantly the severity of inflammatory response and the amount of M. hyopneumoniae in the respiratory tract. Furthermore, the average daily weight gain was slightly improved in the rAdP97c vaccinated pigs (0.672 + or - 0.068 kg/day) compared to the unvaccinated and challenged animals (0.568 + or - 0.104 kg/day). A bacterin-based commercial vaccine (Suvaxyn MH-one) was more efficient to induce a protective immune response than rAdP97c even if it did not evoke a P97 specific immune response. These results suggest that immunodominant antigens other than P97 adhesin are also important in the induction of a protective immune response and should be taken into account in the future development of M. hyopneumoniae subunit vaccines. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Oral priming with replicating adenovirus serotype 4 followed by subunit H5N1 vaccine boost promotes antibody affinity maturation and expands H5N1 cross-clade neutralization.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Surender; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Manischewitz, Jody; King, Lisa R; Ishioka, Glenn; Alexander, Jeff; Smith, Jon; Gurwith, Marc; Golding, Hana

    2015-01-01

    A Phase I trial conducted in 2009-2010 demonstrated that oral vaccination with a replication competent Ad4-H5 (A/Vietnam) vector with dosages ranging from 107-1011 viral particles was well tolerated. HA-specific T-cell responses were efficiently induced, but very limited hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) humoral responses were measured. However, a single boost of Ad4-H5-Vtn vaccinated individuals with a unadjuvanted licensed H5N1 (A/Vietnam) subunit vaccine resulted in superior HI titers compared with unprimed subjects. In the current study, the impact of Ad4-H5 priming on the quality of the polyclonal humoral immune response was evaluated using a real-time kinetics assay by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Total binding of serum polyclonal antibodies from the Ad4-H5-Vtn primed groups against both homologous H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1) and heterologous A/Indonesia-5/2005 (clade 2.1) HA1 head domain was significantly higher compared with sera from individuals that received subunit H5N1 vaccination alone. SPR measurements also demonstrated that the antigen-antibody complex dissociation rates (a surrogate for antibody affinity) of serum antibodies against the HA1 of H5N1-A/Vietnam were significantly higher in the Ad4-H5 primed groups compared with those from the unprimed group. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between the antibody affinities for HA1 (but not HA2) and the virus neutralization titers against the homologous strain and a panel of heterologous clade 2 H5N1 strains. These findings support the concept of oral prime-boost vaccine approaches against pandemic influenza to elicit long-term memory B cells with high affinity capable of rapid response to variant pandemic viruses likely to emerge and adapt to human transmissions.

  8. Adenovirus (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the virus by holding hands or sharing a toy with an infected person. Adenovirus can survive on ... by sharing contaminated objects (such as towels or toys), or by touch. Once a child is exposed ...

  9. Improved Protection of Rhesus Macaques against Intrarectal Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac251 Challenge by a Replication-Competent Ad5hr-SIVenv/rev and Ad5hr-SIVgag Recombinant Priming/gp120 Boosting Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Pinczewski, Joel; Gómez-Román, Victor R.; Venzon, David; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Markham, Phillip D.; Aldrich, Kristine; Moake, Matthew; Montefiori, David C.; Lou, Yuanmei; Pavlakis, George N.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2003-01-01

    In this study we investigated the ability of a replication-competent Ad5hr-SIVenv/rev and Ad5hr-SIVgag recombinant priming/gp120 boosting regimen to induce protective immunity in rhesus macaques against pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virusmac251. Immunization of macaques by two sequential administrations of the same recombinants by the same route resulted in boosting and persistence of SIV-specific cellular immune responses for 42 weeks past the initial immunization. Anti-SIV gp120 immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies were induced in secretory fluids, and all macaques exhibited serum neutralizing antibody activity. After intrarectal SIVmac251 challenge, all of the macaques became infected. However, relative protection, as assessed by statistically significant lower SIV viral loads in plasma at both acute infection and set point, was observed in 8 out of 12 immunized non-Mamu-A∗01 animals. Elevated mean cellular immune responses to Gag and Env, neutralizing antibody activity, and IgG and IgA binding antibody levels were observed in the eight protected macaques. Statistically significant correlations with protective outcome were observed for cellular immune responses to SIV Env and Gag and for SIV gp120-specific IgG antibodies in nasal and vaginal fluids. Two macaques that exhibited the greatest and most persistent viremia control also exhibited strong CD8+ T-cell antiviral activity. The results suggest that a spectrum of immune responses may be necessary for adequate control of viral replication and disease progression and highlight a potential role for nonneutralizing antibodies at mucosal sites. PMID:12857905

  10. Protection against Enterovirus 71 with Neutralizing Epitope Incorporation within Adenovirus Type 3 Hexon

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xingui; Su, Xiaobo; Li, Xiao; Li, Haitao; Li, Ting; Zhou, Zhichao; Zhong, Tianhua; Zhou, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease with high mortality among children. Various neutralizing B cell epitopes of EV71 have been identified as potential vaccine candidates. Capsid-incorporation of antigens into adenovirus (Ad) has been developed for a novel vaccine approach. We constructed Ad3-based EV71 vaccine vectors by incorporating a neutralizing epitope SP70 containing 15 amino acids derived from capsid protein VP1 of EV71 within the different surface-exposed domains of the capsid protein hexon of Ad3EGFP, a recombinant adenovirus type 3 (Ad3) expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein. Thermostability and growth kinetic assays suggested that the SP70 epitope incorporation into hypervariable region (HVR1, HVR2, or HVR7) of the hexon did not affect Ad fitness. The SP70 epitopes were thought to be exposed on all hexon-modified intact virion surfaces. Repeated administration of BALB/c mice with the modified Ads resulted in boosting of the anti-SP70 humoral immune response. Importantly, the modified Ads immunization of mother mice conferred protection in vivo to neonatal mice against the lethal EV71 challenge, and the modified Ads-immunized mice serum also conferred passive protection against the lethal challenge in newborn mice. Compared with the recombinant GST-fused SP70 protein immunization, immunization with the Ads containing SP70 in HVR1 or HVR2 elicited higher SP70-specific IgG titers, higher neutralization titers, and conferred more effective protection to neonatal mice. Thus, this study provides valuable information for hexon-modified Ad3 vector development as a promising EV71 vaccine candidate and as an epitope-delivering vehicle for other pathogens. PMID:22848478

  11. Inhibition of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection by recombinant adenovirus- and/or exosome-delivered the artificial microRNAs targeting sialoadhesin and CD163 receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Song, Hongqin; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli; Sun, Huaichang

    2014-12-19

    The current vaccines failed to provide substantial protection against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) and the new vaccine development faces great challenges. Sialoadhesin (Sn) and CD163 are the two key receptors for PRRS virus (PRRSV) infection of porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), but the artificial microRNA (amiRNA) strategy targeting two viral receptors has not been described. The candidate miRNAs targeting Sn or CD163 receptor were predicted using a web-based miRNA design tool and validated by transfection of cells with each amiRNA expression vector plus the reporter vector. The amiRNA-expressing recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) were generated using AdEasy Adenoviral Vector System. The rAd transduction efficiencies for pig cells were measured by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. The expression and exosome-mediated secretion of amiRNAs were detected by RT-PCR. The knock-down of Sn or CD163 receptor by rAd- and/or exosome-delivered amiRNA was detected by quantitative RT-PCR and flow cytometry. The additive anti-PRRSV effect between the two amiRNAs was detected by quantitative RT-PCR and viral titration. All 18 amiRNAs validated were effective against Sn or CD163 receptor mRNA expression. Two rAds expressing Sn- or CD163-targeted amiRNA were generated for further study. The maximal rAd transduction efficiency was 62% for PAMs at MOI 800 or 100% for PK-15 cells at MOI 100. The sequence-specific amiRNAs were expressed efficiently in and secreted from the rAd-transduced cells via exosomes. The expression of Sn and CD163 receptors was inhibited significantly by rAd transduction and/or amiRNA-containing exosome treatment at mRNA and protein levels. Both PRRSV ORF7 copy number and viral titer were reduced significantly by transduction of PAMs with the two rAds and/or by treatment with the two amiRNA-containing exosomes. The additive anti-PRRSV effect between the two amiRNAs was relatively long-lasting (96 h) and effective against three

  12. AdHu5Ag85A Respiratory Mucosal Boost Immunization Enhances Protection against Pulmonary Tuberculosis in BCG-Primed Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuefeng; Harkness, Robin; Jiang, Rong; Li, Junqiang; Xing, Zhou; Zhu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Persisting high global tuberculosis (TB) morbidity and mortality and poor efficacy of BCG vaccine emphasizes an urgent need for developing effective novel boost vaccination strategies following parenteral BCG priming in humans. Most of the current lead TB vaccine candidates in the global pipeline were developed for parenteral route of immunization. Compelling evidence indicates respiratory mucosal delivery of vaccine to be the most effective way to induce robust local mucosal protective immunity against pulmonary TB. However, despite ample supporting evidence from various animal models, there has been a lack of evidence supporting the safety and protective efficacy of respiratory mucosal TB vaccination in non-human primates (NHP) and humans. By using a rhesus macaque TB model we have evaluated the safety and protective efficacy of a recombinant human serotype 5 adenovirus-based TB vaccine (AdHu5Ag85A) delivered via the respiratory mucosal route. We show that mucosal AdHu5Ag85A boost immunization was safe and well tolerated in parenteral BCG-primed rhesus macaques. A single AdHu5Ag85A mucosal boost immunization in BCG-primed rhesus macaques enhanced the antigen–specific T cell responses. Boost immunization significantly improved the survival and bacterial control following M.tb challenge. Furthermore, TB-related lung pathology and clinical outcomes were lessened in BCG-primed, mucosally boosted animals compared to control animals. Thus, for the first time we show that a single respiratory mucosal boost immunization with a novel TB vaccine enhances protection against pulmonary TB in parenteral BCG-primed NHP. Our study provides the evidence for the protective potential of AdHu5Ag85A as a respiratory mucosal boost TB vaccine for human application. PMID:26252520

  13. Labeling of Adenovirus Particles with PARACEST Agents

    PubMed Central

    Vasalatiy, Olga; Gerard, Robert D; Zhao, Piyu; Sun, Xiankai; Sherry, A. Dean

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus type 5 particles (AdCMVLuc) were labeled with two different bifunctional ligands capable of forming stable complexes with paramagnetic lanthanide ions. The number of covalently attached ligands varied between 630 and 1960 per adenovirus particle depending upon the chemical reactivity of the bifunctional ligand (NHS ester versus isothiocyanide), the amount of excess ligand added, and the reaction time. The bioactivity of each labeled adenovirus derivative, as measured by the ability of the virus to infect cells and express luciferase, was shown to be highly dependent upon the number of covalently attached ligands. This indicates that certain amino groups, likely on the surface of the adenovirus fiber protein where cell binding is known to occur, are critical for viral attachment and infection. Addition of 177Lu3+ to chemically modified versus control viruses demonstrated a significant amount of nonspecific binding of 177Lu3+ to the virus particles that could not be sequestered by addition of excess DTPA. Thus, it became necessary to implement a prelabeling strategy for conjugation of preformed lanthanide ligand chelates to adenovirus particles. Using preformed Tm3+-L2, a large number of chelates having chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) properties were attached to the surface residues of AdCMVLuc without nonspecific binding of metal ions elsewhere on the virus particle. The potential of such conjugates to act as PARACEST imaging agents was tested using an on-resonance WALTZ sequence for CEST activation. A 12% decrease in bulk water signal intensity was observed relative to controls. This demonstrates that viral particles labeled with PARACEST-type imaging agents can potentially serve as targeted agents for molecular imaging. PMID:18254605

  14. Bolstering Components of the Immune Response Compromised by Prior Exposure to Adenovirus: Guided Formulation Development for a Nasal Ebola Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The severity and longevity of the current Ebola outbreak highlight the need for a fast-acting yet long-lasting vaccine for at-risk populations (medical personnel and rural villagers) where repeated prime-boost regimens are not feasible. While recombinant adenovirus (rAd)-based vaccines have conferred full protection against multiple strains of Ebola after a single immunization, their efficacy is impaired by pre-existing immunity (PEI) to adenovirus. To address this important issue, a panel of formulations was evaluated by an in vitro assay for their ability to protect rAd from neutralization. An amphiphilic polymer (F16, FW ∼39,000) significantly improved transgene expression in the presence of anti-Ad neutralizing antibodies (NAB) at concentrations of 5 times the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50). In vivo performance of rAd in F16 was compared with unformulated virus, virus modified with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG), and virus incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) polymeric beads. Histochemical analysis of lung tissue revealed that F16 promoted strong levels of transgene expression in naive mice and those that were exposed to adenovirus in the nasal cavity 28 days prior to immunization. Multiparameter flow cytometry revealed that F16 induced significantly more polyfunctional antigen-specific CD8+ T cells simultaneously producing IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α than other test formulations. These effects were not compromised by PEI. Data from formulations that provided partial protection from challenge consistently identified specific immunological requirements necessary for protection. This approach may be useful for development of formulations for other vaccine platforms that also employ ubiquitous pathogens as carriers like the influenza virus. PMID:25549696

  15. Prime-boost vaccination with recombinant H5-fowlpox and Newcastle disease virus vectors affords lasting protection in SPF Muscovy ducks against highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Niqueux, Eric; Guionie, Olivier; Amelot, Michel; Jestin, Véronique

    2013-08-28

    Vaccination protocols were evaluated in one-day old Muscovy ducklings, using an experimental Newcastle disease recombinant vaccine (vNDV-H5) encoding an optimized synthetic haemagglutinin gene from a clade 2.2.1 H5N1 highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza virus (AIV), either as a single administration or as a boost following a prime inoculation with a fowlpox vectored vaccine (vFP89) encoding a different H5 HP haemagglutinin from an Irish H5N8 strain. These vaccination schemes did not induce detectable levels of serum antibodies in HI test using a clade 2.2.1 H5N1 antigen, and only induced H5 ELISA positive response in less than 10% of vaccinated ducks. However, following challenge against a clade 2.2.1 HPAIV, both protocols afforded full clinical protection at six weeks of age, and full protection against mortality at nine weeks. Only the prime-boost vaccination (vFP89+vNDV-H5) was still fully protecting Muscovy ducks against disease and mortality at 12 weeks of age. Reduction of oropharyngeal shedding levels was also constantly observed from the onset of the follow-up at 2.5 or three days post-infection in vaccinated ducks compared to unvaccinated controls, and was significantly more important for vFP89+vNDV-H5 vaccination than for vNDV-H5 alone. Although the latter vaccine is shown immunogenic in one-day old Muscovy ducks, the present work is original in demonstrating the high efficacy of the successive administration of two different vector vaccines encoding two different H5 in inducing lasting protection (at least similar to the one induced by an inactivated reassortant vaccine, Re-5). In addition, such a prime-boost schedule allows implementation of a DIVA strategy (to differentiate vaccinated from infected ducks) contrary to Re-5, involves easy practice on the field (with injection at the hatchery and mass vaccination later on), and should avoid eventual interference with NDV maternally derived antibodies. Last, the HA insert could be updated according to

  16. Correction of a deletion mutant by gene targeting with an adenovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q; Taylor, M W

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness of adenovirus type 5 as a vector for homologous recombination was examined in CHO cells by using the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) gene. Infection of a hemizygous CHO APRT- cell line containing a 3-bp deletion in exon 5 of the aprt gene with a recombinant adenovirus containing the wild-type gene resulted in restoration of the APRT+ phenotype at a frequency of 10(-5) to 10(-6) per infected cell. A relatively high frequency (approximately 6 to 20%) of the transductants appears to result from a homologous recombination event. The mutation on the chromosomal aprt gene is corrected in the homologous recombinants, and APRT expression is restored to a normal hemizygous level. Neither adenovirus nor exogenous promoter sequences are detected in the homologous recombinants. The remaining transductants result from random integration of the aprt gene with the adenovirus sequence. A number of adenovirus vectors containing different promoter sequences linked to the hamster aprt gene were constructed. A possible role for the promoter region in the homologous recombination event was indicated by the lack of homologous recombination in constructs lacking an active promoter. Images PMID:8423811

  17. Boost in bioethanol production using recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae with mutated strictly NADPH-dependent xylose reductase and NADP(+)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Sadat Mohammad Rezq; Saimura, Masayuki; Kodaki, Tsutomu

    2013-06-10

    The xylose-fermenting recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its improvement have been studied extensively. The redox balance between xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) is thought to be an important factor in effective xylose fermentation. Using protein engineering, we previously successfully reduced xylitol accumulation and improved ethanol production by reversing the dependency of XDH from NAD(+) to NADP(+). We also constructed a set of novel strictly NADPH-dependent XR from Pichia stipitis by site-directed mutagenesis. In the present study, we constructed a set of recombinant S. cerevisiae carrying a novel set of mutated strictly NADPH-dependent XR and NADP(+)-dependent XDH genes with overexpression of endogenous xylulokinase (XK) to study the effects of complete NADPH/NADP(+) recycling on ethanol fermentation and xylitol accumulation. All mutated strains demonstrated reduced xylitol accumulation, ranging 34.4-54.7% compared with the control strain. Moreover, compared with the control strain, the two strains showed 20% and 10% improvement in ethanol production.

  18. A Heterologous Multiepitope DNA Prime/Recombinant Protein Boost Immunisation Strategy for the Development of an Antiserum against Micrurus corallinus (Coral Snake) Venom

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Henrique Roman; Junqueira-de-Azevedo, Inácio de Loiola M.; Novo, Juliana Branco; Castro, Karen; Duarte, Clara Guerra; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo A.; Chavez-Olortegui, Carlos; Ho, Paulo Lee

    2016-01-01

    Background Envenoming by coral snakes (Elapidae: Micrurus), although not abundant, represent a serious health threat in the Americas, especially because antivenoms are scarce. The development of adequate amounts of antielapidic serum for the treatment of accidents caused by snakes like Micrurus corallinus is a challenging task due to characteristics such as low venom yield, fossorial habit, relatively small sizes and ophiophagous diet. These features make it difficult to capture and keep these snakes in captivity for venom collection. Furthermore, there are reports of antivenom scarcity in USA, leading to an increase in morbidity and mortality, with patients needing to be intubated and ventilated while the toxin wears off. The development of an alternative method for the production of an antielapidic serum, with no need for snake collection and maintenance in captivity, would be a plausible solution for the antielapidic serum shortage. Methods and Findings In this work we describe the mapping, by the SPOT-synthesis technique, of potential B-cell epitopes from five putative toxins from M. corallinus, which were used to design two multiepitope DNA strings for the genetic immunisation of female BALB/c mice. Results demonstrate that sera obtained from animals that were genetically immunised with these multiepitope constructs, followed by booster doses of recombinant proteins lead to a 60% survival in a lethal dose neutralisation assay. Conclusion Here we describe that the genetic immunisation with a synthetic multiepitope gene followed by booster doses with recombinant protein is a promising approach to develop an alternative antielapidic serum against M. corallinus venom without the need of collection and the very challenging maintenance of these snakes in captivity. PMID:26938217

  19. Adenovirus DNA polymerase is a phosphoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, M; Nakano, R; Mohan, P M; Rawitch, A B; Padmanabhan, R

    1993-01-05

    Biological activities of many of the eukaryotic DNA replication proteins are modulated by protein phosphorylation. Investigations of the phosphorylation of adenovirus DNA polymerase (AdPol) have been difficult mainly because of its low level of synthesis in adenovirus-infected HeLa cells. However, when AdPol was overproduced using the recombinant vaccinia virus (RV-AdPol) and the baculovirus expression systems, or by a large scale metabolic labeling of adenovirus 2-infected HeLa cells (native AdPol), in vivo phosphorylation of AdPol could be demonstrated. Phosphoamino acid analysis of [32P]AdPol indicated the presence of phosphoserine independent of the source of AdPol. Comparison of tryptic peptide maps of native AdPol and RV-AdPol revealed that the majority of phosphopeptides were common. Fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography and sequencing of one of the major phosphopeptides revealed serine 67 as a site of phosphorylation. Interestingly, this site is located close to the nuclear localization signal of AdPol and has a consensus substrate recognition sequence for histone H1 (cdc2-related) kinases and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Dephosphorylation of AdPol with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase resulted in significant decrease in its activity in the in vitro DNA replication initiation assay, suggesting that phosphorylation is important for its biological activity.

  20. Efficient generation of recombinant adenoviral vectors by Cre-lox recombination in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, K.; Barker, C.; Danthinne, X.; Imperiale, M. J.; Nabel, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although recombinant adenovirus vectors are attractive for use in gene expression studies and therapeutic applications, the construction of these vectors remains relatively time-consuming. We report here a strategy that simplifies the production of adenoviruses using the Cre-loxP system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Full-length recombinant adenovirus DNA was generated in vitro by Cre-mediated recombination between loxP sites in a linearized shuttle plasmid containing a transgene and adenovirus genomic DNA. RESULTS: After transfection of Cre-treated DNA into 293 cells, replication-defective viral vectors were rapidly obtained without detectable wild-type virus. CONCLUSION: This system facilitates the development of recombinant adenoviral vectors for basic and clinical research. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:10448644

  1. A functional high-content miRNA screen identifies miR-30 family to boost recombinant protein production in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Simon; Buck, Theresa; Wagner, Andreas; Ehrhart, Carolin; Giancaterino, Julia; Mang, Samuel; Schad, Matthias; Mathias, Sven; Aschrafi, Armaz; Handrick, René; Otte, Kerstin

    2014-10-01

    The steady improvement of mammalian cell factories for the production of biopharmaceuticals is a key challenge for the biotechnology community. Recently, small regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) were identified as novel targets for optimizing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) production cells as they do not add any translational burden to the cell while being capable of regulating entire physiological pathways. The aim of the present study was to elucidate miRNA function in a recombinant CHO-SEAP cell line by means of a genome-wide high-content miRNA screen. This screen revealed that out of the 1, 139 miRNAs examined, 21% of the miRNAs enhanced cell-specific SEAP productivity mainly resulting in elevated volumetric yields, while cell proliferation was accelerated by 5% of the miRNAs. Conversely, cell death was diminished by 13% (apoptosis) or 4% (necrosis) of all transfected miRNAs. Besides these large number of identified target miRNAs, the outcome of our studies suggest that the entire miR-30 family substantially improves bioprocess performance of CHO cells. Stable miR-30 over expressing cells outperformed parental cells by increasing SEAP productivity or maximum cell density of approximately twofold. Our results highlight the application of miRNAs as powerful tools for CHO cell engineering, identified the miR-30 family as a critical component of cell proliferation, and support the notion that miRNAs are powerful determinants of cell viability. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A prime/boost DNA/Modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine expressing recombinant Leishmania DNA encoding TRYP is safe and immunogenic in outbred dogs, the reservoir of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Carson, Connor; Antoniou, Maria; Ruiz-Argüello, Maria Begoña; Alcami, Antonio; Christodoulou, Vasiliki; Messaritakis, Ippokratis; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Courtenay, Orin

    2009-02-11

    Previous studies demonstrated safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA/modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) prime/boost vaccines expressing tryparedoxin peroxidase (TRYP) and Leishmania homologue of the mammalian receptor for activated C kinase (LACK) against Leishmania major challenge in mice, which was consistent with results from TRYP protein/adjuvant combinations in non-human primates. This study aimed to conduct safety and immunogenicity trials of these DNA/MVA vaccines in dogs, the natural reservoir host of Leishmania infantum, followed-up for 4 months post-vaccination. In a cohort of 22 uninfected outbred dogs, blinded randomised administration of 1000 microg (high dose) or 100 microg (low dose) DNA prime (day 0) and 1x10(8)pfu MVA boost (day 28) was shown to be safe and showed no clinical side effects. High dose DNA/MVA vaccinated TRYP dogs produced statistically higher mean levels of the type-1 pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma than controls in whole blood assays (WBA) stimulated with the recombinant vaccine antigen TRYP, up to the final sampling at day 126, and in the absence of challenge with Leishmania. TRYP vaccinated dogs also demonstrated significantly higher TRYP-specific total IgG and IgG2 subtype titres than in controls, and positive in vivo intradermal reactions at day 156 in the absence of natural infection, observed in 6/8 TRYP vaccinated dogs. No significant increases in IFN-gamma in LACK-stimulated WBA, or in LACK-specific IgG levels, were detected in LACK vaccinated dogs compared to controls, and only 2/9 LACK vaccinated dogs demonstrated DTH responses at day 156. In all groups, IgG1 subclass responses and antigen-specific stimulation of IL-10 were similar to controls demonstrating an absence of Th2/T(reg) response, as expected in the absence of in vivo restimulation or natural/experimental challenge with Leishmania. These collective results indicate significant antigen-specific type-1 responses and in vivo memory phase cellular immune

  3. RNAi suppressor P19 can be broadly exploited for enhanced adenovirus replication and microRNA knockdown experiments.

    PubMed

    Rauschhuber, Christina; Mueck-Haeusl, Martin; Zhang, Wenli; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a key regulator of various biological systems including viral infection. Within a virus life cycle gene products can be modulated by the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway which can crucially impact productive virus replication. Herein we explored the RNA interference suppressor protein P19 derived from a plant virus and we found that P19 enhanced adenovirus replication up to 100-fold. Critical factors responsible for this observation were overexpression of adenovirus encoded genes on mRNA and protein levels. To investigate the impact of this phenomenon on recombinant viruses, we exploited its feasibility for therapeutic and genomic applications. We found that P19 significantly increased recombinant adenovirus yields enabling up-scaling for preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, adenoviruses possessed significantly higher oncolytic activity by expression of P19. Finally, we show that introducing a p19 expression cassette into high-capacity adenovirus provides a strategy to analyze RNAi knockdown in a tissue-specific manner.

  4. Novel recombinant alphaviral and adenoviral vectors for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Osada, Takuya; Morse, Michael A; Hobeika, Amy; Lyerly, H Kim

    2012-06-01

    Although cellular immunotherapy based on autolgous dendritic cells (DCs) targeting antigens expressed by metastatic cancer has demonstrated clinical efficacy, the logistical challenges in generating an individualized cell product create an imperative to develop alternatives to DC-based cancer vaccines. Particularly attractive alternatives include in situ delivery of antigen and activation signals to resident antigen-presenting cells (APCs), which can be achieved by novel fusion molecules targeting the mannose receptor and by recombinant viral vectors expressing the antigen of interest and capable of infecting DCs. A particular challenge in the use of viral vectors is the well-appreciated clinical obstacles to their efficacy, specifically vector-specific neutralizing immune responses. Because heterologous prime and boost strategies have been demonstrated to be particularly potent, we developed two novel recombinant vectors based on alphaviral replicon particles and a next-generation adenovirus encoding an antigen commonly overexpressed in many human cancers, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The rationale for developing these vectors, their unique characteristics, the preclinical studies and early clinical experience with each, and opportunities to enhance their effectiveness will be reviewed. The potential of each of these potent recombinant vectors to efficiently generate clinically active anti-tumor immune response alone, or in combination, will be discussed.

  5. Permissive growth of human adenovirus type 4 vaccine strain-based vector in porcine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-sheng; Li, Xiao-jing; Wan, Wen-yan; Li, Hong-jie; Wang, Xiao-xue; Yang, Xia; Li, Yong-tao; Chang, Hong-tao; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chuan-qing; Zhao, Jun

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in using adenoviruses as live vectors to develop recombinant vaccines. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of HIV/SIV and influenza vaccine candidates based on human adenovirus type 4 (Ad4) replication-competent vectors in rhesus macaque and human model. To explore the possibility of human Ad4 vaccine strain used as a vector in developing porcine vaccines, the growth properties of replication-competent human Ad4 vaccine strain recombinant encoding EGFP in different porcine cell lines were investigated. All tested cell lines are permissive for Ad4 vaccine strain vector with varied replication efficiency. Thus, human Ad4 based vectors would be promising supplement to adenovirus vectors as a delivery vehicle for recombinant vaccines in swine industry.

  6. Tropism modification of adenovirus vectors by peptide ligand insertion into various positions of the adenovirus serotype 41 short-fiber knob domain.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Andrea; Kosmides, Daniela; Kontermann, Roland E; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2007-03-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses have emerged as promising agents in therapeutic gene transfer, genetic vaccination, and viral oncolysis. Therapeutic applications of adenoviruses, however, would benefit substantially from targeted virus cell entry, for example, into cancer or immune cells, as opposed to the broad tropism that adenoviruses naturally possess. Such tropism modification of adenoviruses requires the deletion of their natural cell binding properties and the incorporation of cell binding ligands. The short fibers of subgroup F adenoviruses have recently been suggested as a tool for genetic adenovirus detargeting based on the reduced infectivity of corresponding adenovectors with chimeric fibers in vitro and in vivo. The goal of our study was to determine functional insertion sites for peptide ligands in the adenovirus serotype 41 (Ad41) short fiber knob. With a model peptide, CDCRGDCFC, we could demonstrate that ligand incorporation into three of five analyzed loops of the knob, namely, EG, HI, and IJ, is feasible without a loss of fiber trimerization. The resulting adenovectors showed enhanced infectivity for various cell types, which was superior to that of viruses with the same peptide fused to the fiber C terminus. Strategies to further augment gene transfer efficacy by extension of the fiber shaft, insertion of tandem copies of the ligand peptide, or extension of the ligand-flanking linkers failed, indicating that precise ligand positioning is pivotal. Our study establishes that internal ligand incorporation into a short-shafted adenovirus fiber is feasible and suggests the Ad41 short fiber with ligand insertion into the top (IJ loop) or side (EG and HI loops) of the knob domain as a novel platform for genetic targeting of therapeutic adenoviruses.

  7. [PERSPECTIVES OF DEVELOPMENT OF LIVE RECOMBINANT ANTHRAX VACCINES BASED ON OPPORTUNISTIC AND APATHOGENIC MICROORGANISMS].

    PubMed

    Popova, P Yu; Mikshis, N I

    2016-01-01

    Live genetic engineering anthrax vaccines on the platform of avirulent and probiotic micro-organisms are a safe and adequate alternative to preparations based on attenuated Bacillus anthracis strains. Mucosal application results in a direct contact of the vaccine preparations with mucous membranes in those organs arid tissues of the macro-organisms, that are exposed to the pathogen in the first place, resulting in a development of local and systemic immune response. Live recombinant anthrax vaccines could be used both separately as well as in a prime-boost immunization scheme. The review focuses on immunogenic and protective properties of experimental live genetic engineering prearations, created based on members of geni of Salmonella, Lactobacillus and adenoviruses.

  8. Mechanisms of pathogenesis of emerging adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cook, James; Radke, Jay

    2017-01-01

    Periodic outbreaks of human adenovirus infections can cause severe illness in people with no known predisposing conditions. The reasons for this increased viral pathogenicity are uncertain. Adenoviruses are constantly undergoing mutation during circulation in the human population, but related phenotypic changes of the viruses are rarely detected because of the infrequency of such outbreaks and the limited biological studies of the emergent strains. Mutations and genetic recombinations have been identified in these new strains. However, the linkage between these genetic changes and increased pathogenicity is poorly understood. It has been observed recently that differences in virus-induced immunopathogenesis can be associated with altered expression of non-mutant viral genes associated with changes in viral modulation of the host innate immune response. Initial small animal studies indicate that these changes in viral gene expression can be associated with enhanced immunopathogenesis in vivo. Available evidence suggests the hypothesis that there is a critical threshold of expression of certain viral genes that determines both the sustainability of viral transmission in the human population and the enhancement of immunopathogenesis. Studies of this possibility will require extension of the analysis of outbreak viral strains from a sequencing-based focus to biological studies of relationships between viral gene expression and pathogenic responses. Advances in this area will require increased coordination among public health organizations, diagnostic microbiology laboratories, and research laboratories to identify, catalog, and systematically study differences between prototype and emergent viral strains that explain the increased pathogenicity that can occur during clinical outbreaks. PMID:28184296

  9. E1A RNA transcripts amplify adenovirus-mediated tumor reduction.

    PubMed

    Dion, L D; Goldsmith, K T; Strong, T V; Bilbao, G; Curiel, D T; Garver, R I

    1996-11-01

    Previous work by this group has established that E1-defective, recombinant adenoviruses can be replication-enabled by the codelivery of a plasmid encoding the deleted E1 functions, a strategy now designated conditional replication-enablement system for adenovirus (CRESA). In the studies reported here, the original replication-enabling plasmid was replaced by two separate plasmids that encoded the necessary E1A and E1B functions, respectively. An RNA transcript encoding the requisite E1A functions was shown to substitute functionally for the E1A plasmid without significant loss of new adenovirus production in in vitro experiments. No replication competent adenovirus was detectable in the cells treated with the plasmids, or the RNA and plasmid combinations. Subcutaneous human tumor nodules containing a fraction of cells cotransduced with the replication-enabling RNA + DNA and an adenovirus containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) expression cassette were reduced to a greater extent than control nodules containing the same fraction of cells cotransduced with the virus and an irrelevant plasmid. These experiments show that an E1-defective adenovirus can be conditionally replication-enabled by an RNA transcript encoding the required E1 functions, and that the replication-enablement is sufficient to produce an augmentation of an adenovirus-mediated therapeutic effect in vivo.

  10. Mucosal immunity induced by adenovirus-based H5N1 HPAI vaccine confers protection against a lethal H5N2 avian influenza virus challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ki Seok; Lee, Jiyeung; Ahn, So Shin; Byun, Young-Ho; Seong, Baik Lin; Baek, Yun Hee; Song, Min-Suk; Choi, Young Ki; Na, Yun Jeong; Hwang, Inhwan; Sung, Young Chul; Lee, Chang Geun

    2009-12-20

    Development of effective vaccines against highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses is a global public health priority. Considering the difficulty in predicting HPAI H5N1 pandemic strains, one strategy used in their design includes the development of formulations with the capacity of eliciting broad cross-protective immunity against multiple viral antigens. To this end we constructed a replication-defective recombinant adenovirus-based avian influenza virus vaccine (rAdv-AI) expressing the codon-optimized M2eX-HA-hCD40L and the M1-M2 fusion genes from HPAI H5N1 human isolate. Although there were no significant differences in the systemic immune responses observed between the intramuscular prime-intramuscular boost regimen (IM/IM) and the intranasal prime-intramuscular boost regimen (IN/IM), IN/IM induced more potent CD8{sup +} T cell and antibody responses at mucosal sites than the IM/IM vaccination, resulting in more effective protection against lethal H5N2 avian influenza (AI) virus challenge. These findings suggest that the strategies used to induce multi-antigen-targeted mucosal immunity, such as IN/IM delivery of rAdv-AI, may be a promising approach for developing broad protective vaccines that may be more effective against the new HPAI pandemic strains.

  11. Purification and characterization of adenovirus core protein VII: a histone-like protein that is critical for adenovirus core formation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Moria, Nithesh; Williams, Martin; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Pouton, Colin W

    2017-07-01

    Adenovirus protein VII is a highly cationic core protein that forms a nucleosome-like structure in the adenovirus core by condensing DNA in combination with protein V and mu. It has been proposed that protein VII could condense DNA in a manner analogous to mammalian histones. Due to the lack of an expression and purification protocol, the interactions between protein VII and DNA are poorly understood. In this study we describe methods for the purification of biologically active recombinant protein VII using an E. coli expression system. We expressed a cleavable fusion of protein VII with thioredoxin and established methods for purification of this fusion protein in denatured form. We describe an efficient method for resolving the cleavage products to obtain pure protein VII using hydroxyapatite column chromatography. Mass spectroscopy data confirmed its mass and purity to be 19.4 kDa and >98 %, respectively. Purified recombinant protein VII spontaneously condensed dsDNA to form particles, as shown by dye exclusion assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and nuclease protection assay. Additionally, an in vitro bioluminescence assay revealed that protein VII can be used to enhance the transfection of mammalian cells with lipofectamine/DNA complexes. The availability of recombinant protein VII will facilitate future studies of the structure of the adenovirus core. Improved understanding of the structure and function of protein VII will be valuable in elucidating the mechanism of adenoviral DNA condensation, defining the morphology of the adenovirus core and establishing the mechanism by which adenoviral DNA enters the nucleus.

  12. Extended follow-up confirms early vaccine-enhanced risk of HIV acquisition and demonstrates waning effect over time among participants in a randomized trial of recombinant adenovirus HIV vaccine (Step Study).

    PubMed

    Duerr, Ann; Huang, Yunda; Buchbinder, Susan; Coombs, Robert W; Sanchez, Jorge; del Rio, Carlos; Casapia, Martin; Santiago, Steven; Gilbert, Peter; Corey, Lawrence; Robertson, Michael N

    2012-07-15

    The Step Study tested whether an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-vectored human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine could prevent HIV acquisition and/or reduce viral load set-point after infection. At the first interim analysis, nonefficacy criteria were met. Vaccinations were halted; participants were unblinded. In post hoc analyses, more HIV infections occurred in vaccinees vs placebo recipients in men who had Ad5-neutralizing antibodies and/or were uncircumcised. Follow-up was extended to assess relative risk of HIV acquisition in vaccinees vs placebo recipients over time. We used Cox proportional hazard models for analyses of vaccine effect on HIV acquisition and vaccine effect modifiers, and nonparametric and semiparametric methods for analysis of constancy of relative risk over time. One hundred seventy-two of 1836 men were infected. The adjusted vaccinees vs placebo recipients hazard ratio (HR) for all follow-up time was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.92; P= .03). Vaccine effect differed by baseline Ad5 or circumcision status during first 18 months, but neither was significant for all follow-up time. The HR among uncircumcised and/or Ad5-seropositive men waned with time since vaccination. No significant vaccine-associated risk was seen among circumcised, Ad5-negative men (HR, 0.97; P=1.0) over all follow-up time. The vaccine-associated risk seen in interim analysis was confirmed but waned with time from vaccination.

  13. Robust vaccine-elicited cellular immune responses in breast milk following systemic simian immunodeficiency virus DNA prime and live virus vector boost vaccination of lactating rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Andrew B; Christian, Elizabeth C; Seaman, Michael S; Sircar, Piya; Carville, Angela; Gomez, Carmen E; Esteban, Mariano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Barouch, Dan H; Letvin, Norman L; Permar, Sallie R

    2010-12-01

    Breast milk transmission of HIV remains an important mode of infant HIV acquisition. Enhancement of mucosal HIV-specific immune responses in milk of HIV-infected mothers through vaccination may reduce milk virus load or protect against virus transmission in the infant gastrointestinal tract. However, the ability of HIV/SIV strategies to induce virus-specific immune responses in milk has not been studied. In this study, five uninfected, hormone-induced lactating, Mamu A*01(+) female rhesus monkey were systemically primed and boosted with rDNA and the attenuated poxvirus vector, NYVAC, containing the SIVmac239 gag-pol and envelope genes. The monkeys were boosted a second time with a recombinant Adenovirus serotype 5 vector containing matching immunogens. The vaccine-elicited immunodominant epitope-specific CD8(+) T lymphocyte response in milk was of similar or greater magnitude than that in blood and the vaginal tract but higher than that in the colon. Furthermore, the vaccine-elicited SIV Gag-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte polyfunctional cytokine responses were more robust in milk than in blood after each virus vector boost. Finally, SIV envelope-specific IgG responses were detected in milk of all monkeys after vaccination, whereas an SIV envelope-specific IgA response was only detected in one vaccinated monkey. Importantly, only limited and transient increases in the proportion of activated or CCR5-expressing CD4(+) T lymphocytes in milk occurred after vaccination. Therefore, systemic DNA prime and virus vector boost of lactating rhesus monkeys elicits potent virus-specific cellular and humoral immune responses in milk and may warrant further investigation as a strategy to impede breast milk transmission of HIV.

  14. Extended Follow-up Confirms Early Vaccine-Enhanced Risk of HIV Acquisition and Demonstrates Waning Effect Over Time Among Participants in a Randomized Trial of Recombinant Adenovirus HIV Vaccine (Step Study)

    PubMed Central

    Duerr, Ann; Huang, Yunda; Buchbinder, Susan; Coombs, Robert W.; Sanchez, Jorge; del Rio, Carlos; Casapia, Martin; Santiago, Steven; Gilbert, Peter; Corey, Lawrence; Robertson, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The Step Study tested whether an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)–vectored human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine could prevent HIV acquisition and/or reduce viral load set-point after infection. At the first interim analysis, nonefficacy criteria were met. Vaccinations were halted; participants were unblinded. In post hoc analyses, more HIV infections occurred in vaccinees vs placebo recipients in men who had Ad5-neutralizing antibodies and/or were uncircumcised. Follow-up was extended to assess relative risk of HIV acquisition in vaccinees vs placebo recipients over time. Methods. We used Cox proportional hazard models for analyses of vaccine effect on HIV acquisition and vaccine effect modifiers, and nonparametric and semiparametric methods for analysis of constancy of relative risk over time. Results. One hundred seventy-two of 1836 men were infected. The adjusted vaccinees vs placebo recipients hazard ratio (HR) for all follow-up time was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–1.92; P = .03). Vaccine effect differed by baseline Ad5 or circumcision status during first 18 months, but neither was significant for all follow-up time. The HR among uncircumcised and/or Ad5-seropositive men waned with time since vaccination. No significant vaccine-associated risk was seen among circumcised, Ad5-negative men (HR, 0.97; P = 1.0) over all follow-up time. Conclusions. The vaccine-associated risk seen in interim analysis was confirmed but waned with time from vaccination. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00095576. PMID:22561365

  15. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vector Ebola Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ledgerwood, Julie E; DeZure, Adam D; Stanley, Daphne A; Coates, Emily E; Novik, Laura; Enama, Mary E; Berkowitz, Nina M; Hu, Zonghui; Joshi, Gyan; Ploquin, Aurélie; Sitar, Sandra; Gordon, Ingelise J; Plummer, Sarah A; Holman, LaSonji A; Hendel, Cynthia S; Yamshchikov, Galina; Roman, Francois; Nicosia, Alfredo; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Bailer, Robert T; Schwartz, Richard M; Roederer, Mario; Mascola, John R; Koup, Richard A; Sullivan, Nancy J; Graham, Barney S

    2017-03-09

    The unprecedented 2014 epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) prompted an international response to accelerate the availability of a preventive vaccine. A replication-defective recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus type 3-vectored ebolavirus vaccine (cAd3-EBO), encoding the glycoprotein from Zaire and Sudan species, that offers protection in the nonhuman primate model, was rapidly advanced into phase 1 clinical evaluation. We conducted a phase 1, dose-escalation, open-label trial of cAd3-EBO. Twenty healthy adults, in sequentially enrolled groups of 10 each, received vaccination intramuscularly in doses of 2×10(10) particle units or 2×10(11) particle units. Primary and secondary end points related to safety and immunogenicity were assessed throughout the first 8 weeks after vaccination; in addition, longer-term vaccine durability was assessed at 48 weeks after vaccination. In this small study, no safety concerns were identified; however, transient fever developed within 1 day after vaccination in two participants who had received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose. Glycoprotein-specific antibodies were induced in all 20 participants; the titers were of greater magnitude in the group that received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose than in the group that received the 2×10(10) particle-unit dose (geometric mean titer against the Zaire antigen at week 4, 2037 vs. 331; P=0.001). Glycoprotein-specific T-cell responses were more frequent among those who received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose than among those who received the 2×10(10) particle-unit dose, with a CD4 response in 10 of 10 participants versus 3 of 10 participants (P=0.004) and a CD8 response in 7 of 10 participants versus 2 of 10 participants (P=0.07) at week 4. Assessment of the durability of the antibody response showed that titers remained high at week 48, with the highest titers in those who received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose. Reactogenicity and immune responses to cAd3-EBO vaccine were dose

  16. A heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy comprising the Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain capB mutant and recombinant attenuated Listeria monocytogenes expressing F. tularensis IglC induces potent protective immunity in mice against virulent F. tularensis aerosol challenge.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qingmei; Bowen, Richard; Sahakian, Jacob; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2013-05-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is a category A bioterrorism agent. A vaccine that is safer and more effective than the currently available unlicensed F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) is needed to protect against intentional release of aerosolized F. tularensis, the most dangerous type of exposure. In this study, we employed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy comprising intradermally administered LVS ΔcapB (highly attenuated capB-deficient LVS mutant) as the primer vaccine and rLm/iglC (recombinant attenuated Listeria monocytogenes expressing the F. tularensis immunoprotective antigen IglC) as the booster vaccine. Boosting LVS ΔcapB-primed mice with rLm/iglC significantly enhanced T cell immunity; their splenic T cells secreted significantly more gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and had significantly more cytokine (IFN-γ and/or tumor necrosis factor [TNF] and/or interleukin-2 [IL-2])-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells upon in vitro IglC stimulation. Importantly, mice primed with LVS ΔcapB or rLVS ΔcapB/IglC, boosted with rLm/iglC, and subsequently challenged with 10 50% lethal doses (LD50) of aerosolized highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 had a significantly higher survival rate and mean survival time than mice immunized with only LVS ΔcapB (P < 0.0001); moreover, compared with mice immunized once with LVS, primed-boosted mice had a higher survival rate (75% versus 62.5%) and mean survival time during the first 21 days postchallenge (19 and 20 days for mice boosted after being primed with LVS ΔcapB and rLVS ΔcapB/IglC, respectively, versus 17 days for mice immunized with LVS) and maintained their weight significantly better (P < 0.01). Thus, the LVS ΔcapB-rLm/iglC prime-boost vaccination strategy holds substantial promise for a vaccine that is safer and at least as potent as LVS.

  17. A Heterologous Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy Comprising the Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain capB Mutant and Recombinant Attenuated Listeria monocytogenes Expressing F. tularensis IglC Induces Potent Protective Immunity in Mice against Virulent F. tularensis Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qingmei; Bowen, Richard; Sahakian, Jacob; Dillon, Barbara Jane

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is a category A bioterrorism agent. A vaccine that is safer and more effective than the currently available unlicensed F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) is needed to protect against intentional release of aerosolized F. tularensis, the most dangerous type of exposure. In this study, we employed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy comprising intradermally administered LVS ΔcapB (highly attenuated capB-deficient LVS mutant) as the primer vaccine and rLm/iglC (recombinant attenuated Listeria monocytogenes expressing the F. tularensis immunoprotective antigen IglC) as the booster vaccine. Boosting LVS ΔcapB-primed mice with rLm/iglC significantly enhanced T cell immunity; their splenic T cells secreted significantly more gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and had significantly more cytokine (IFN-γ and/or tumor necrosis factor [TNF] and/or interleukin-2 [IL-2])-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells upon in vitro IglC stimulation. Importantly, mice primed with LVS ΔcapB or rLVS ΔcapB/IglC, boosted with rLm/iglC, and subsequently challenged with 10 50% lethal doses (LD50) of aerosolized highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 had a significantly higher survival rate and mean survival time than mice immunized with only LVS ΔcapB (P < 0.0001); moreover, compared with mice immunized once with LVS, primed-boosted mice had a higher survival rate (75% versus 62.5%) and mean survival time during the first 21 days postchallenge (19 and 20 days for mice boosted after being primed with LVS ΔcapB and rLVS ΔcapB/IglC, respectively, versus 17 days for mice immunized with LVS) and maintained their weight significantly better (P < 0.01). Thus, the LVS ΔcapB-rLm/iglC prime-boost vaccination strategy holds substantial promise for a vaccine that is safer and at least as potent as LVS. PMID:23439306

  18. LDA boost classification: boosting by topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, La; Qiao, Guo; Qimin, Cao; Qitao, Li

    2012-12-01

    AdaBoost is an efficacious classification algorithm especially in text categorization (TC) tasks. The methodology of setting up a classifier committee and voting on the documents for classification can achieve high categorization precision. However, traditional Vector Space Model can easily lead to the curse of dimensionality and feature sparsity problems; so it affects classification performance seriously. This article proposed a novel classification algorithm called LDABoost based on boosting ideology which uses Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) to modeling the feature space. Instead of using words or phrase, LDABoost use latent topics as the features. In this way, the feature dimension is significantly reduced. Improved Naïve Bayes (NB) is designed as the weaker classifier which keeps the efficiency advantage of classic NB algorithm and has higher precision. Moreover, a two-stage iterative weighted method called Cute Integration in this article is proposed for improving the accuracy by integrating weak classifiers into strong classifier in a more rational way. Mutual Information is used as metrics of weights allocation. The voting information and the categorization decision made by basis classifiers are fully utilized for generating the strong classifier. Experimental results reveals LDABoost making categorization in a low-dimensional space, it has higher accuracy than traditional AdaBoost algorithms and many other classic classification algorithms. Moreover, its runtime consumption is lower than different versions of AdaBoost, TC algorithms based on support vector machine and Neural Networks.

  19. TheQ1 Influence of Innate and Pre-Existing Immunity on Adenovirus Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zaiss, Anne K.; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Herschman, Harvey R.

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors have been studied extensively in preclinical gene therapy models and in a range of clinical trials. However, innate immune responses to adenovirus vectors limit effectiveness of Ad5 based therapies. Moreover, extensive pre-existing Ad5 immunity in human populations will likely limit the clinical utility of adenovirus vectors, unless methods to circumvent neutralizing antibodies that bind virus and block target cell transduction can be developed; Furthermore, memory T cell and humoral responses to Ad5 are associated with increased toxicity, raising safety concerns for therapeutic adenovirus vectors in immunized hosts. Most preclinical studies have been performed in naïve animals; although pre-existing immunity is among the greatest hurdles for adenovirus therapies, it is also one of the most neglected experimentally. Here we summarize findings using adenovirus vectors in naïve animals, in Ad-immunized animals and in clinical trials, and review strategies proposed to overcome innate immune responses and pre-existing immunity. PMID:19711370

  20. Direct selection of targeted adenovirus vectors by random peptide display on the fiber knob.

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Yoshida, K; Nishimoto, T; Hatanaka, K; Ohnami, S; Asaka, M; Douglas, J T; Curiel, D T; Yoshida, T; Aoki, K

    2007-10-01

    Targeting of gene transfer at the level of cell entry is one of the most attractive challenges in vector development. However, attempts to redirect adenovirus vectors to alternative receptors by engineering the capsid-coding region have shown limited success because proper targeting ligand-receptor systems on the cells of interest are generally unknown. Systematic approaches to generate adenovirus vectors targeting any given cell type need to be developed to achieve this goal. Here, we constructed an adenovirus library that was generated by a Cre-lox-mediated in vitro recombination between an adenoviral fiber-modified plasmid library and genomic DNA to display random peptides on a fiber knob. As proof of concept, we screened the adenovirus display library on a glioma cell line and observed selection of several particular peptide sequences. The targeted vector carrying the most frequently isolated peptide significantly enhanced gene transduction in the glioma cell line but not in many other cell lines. Because the insertion of a pre-selected peptide into a fiber knob often fails to generate an adenovirus vector, the selection of targeting peptides is highly useful in the context of the adenoviral capsid. This vector-screening system can facilitate the development of a targeted adenovirus vector for a variety of applications in medicine.

  1. Adenovirus-mediated efficient gene transfer into cultured three-dimensional organoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Bing-Qiang; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Zhang, Hongmei; Deng, Fang; Wu, Ningning; Chen, Xian; Wen, Sheng; Zhang, Junhui; Liao, Zhan; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Zhengjian; Yin, Liangjun; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Luu, Hue H; Haydon, Rex C; Liang, Houjie; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional organoids have been recently established from various tissue-specific progenitors (such as intestinal stem cells), induced pluripotent stem cells, or embryonic stem cells. These cultured self-sustaining stem cell-based organoids may become valuable systems to study the roles of tissue-specific stem cells in tissue genesis and disease development. It is thus conceivable that effective genetic manipulations in such organoids may allow us to reconstruct disease processes and/or develop novel therapeutics. Recombinant adenoviruses are one of the most commonly used viral vectors for in vitro and in vivo gene deliveries. In this study, we investigate if adenoviruses can be used to effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured "mini-gut" organoids derived from intestinal stem cells. Using adenoviral vectors that express fluorescent proteins, we demonstrate that adenoviruses can effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured 3-D "mini-gut" organoids. The transgene expression can last at least 10 days in the cultured organoids. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate that adenovirus-mediated noggin expression effectively support the survival and self-renewal of mini-gut organoids, while adenovirus-mediated expression of BMP4 inhibits the self-sustainability and proliferation of the organoids. Thus, our results strongly suggest that adenovirus vectors can be explored as effective gene delivery vehicles to introduce genetic manipulations in 3-D organoids.

  2. Priming Immunization with DNA Augments Immunogenicity of Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors for Both HIV-1 Specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Koup, Richard A.; Roederer, Mario; Lamoreaux, Laurie; Fischer, Jennifer; Novik, Laura; Nason, Martha C.; Larkin, Brenda D.; Enama, Mary E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Bailer, Robert T.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Graham, Barney S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Induction of HIV-1-specific T-cell responses relevant to diverse subtypes is a major goal of HIV vaccine development. Prime-boost regimens using heterologous gene-based vaccine vectors have induced potent, polyfunctional T cell responses in preclinical studies. Methods The first opportunity to evaluate the immunogenicity of DNA priming followed by recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) boosting was as open-label rollover trials in subjects who had been enrolled in prior studies of HIV-1 specific DNA vaccines. All subjects underwent apheresis before and after rAd5 boosting to characterize in depth the T cell and antibody response induced by the heterologous DNA/rAd5 prime-boost combination. Results rAd5 boosting was well-tolerated with no serious adverse events. Compared to DNA or rAd5 vaccine alone, sequential DNA/rAd5 administration induced 7-fold higher magnitude Env-biased HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell responses and 100-fold greater antibody titers measured by ELISA. There was no significant neutralizing antibody activity against primary isolates. Vaccine-elicited CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells expressed multiple functions and were predominantly long-term (CD127+) central or effector memory T cells and that persisted in blood for >6 months. Epitopes mapped in Gag and Env demonstrated partial cross-clade recognition. Conclusion Heterologous prime-boost using vector-based gene delivery of vaccine antigens is a potent immunization strategy for inducing both antibody and T-cell responses. Trial Registration ClinicalTrails.gov NCT00102089, NCT00108654 PMID:20126394

  3. Adenoviruses in the immunocompromised host.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C

    1992-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the many pathogens and opportunistic agents that cause serious infection in the congenitally immunocompromised, in patients undergoing immunosuppressive treatment for organ and tissue transplants and for cancers, and in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Adenovirus infections in these patients tend to become disseminated and severe, and the serotypes involved are clustered according to the age of the patient and the nature of the immunosuppression. Over 300 adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients, with an overall case fatality rate of 48%, are reviewed in this paper. Children with severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome and other primary immunodeficiencies are exposed to the serotypes of subgroups B and C that commonly infect young children, and thus their infections are due to types 1 to 7 and 31 of subgenus A. Children with bone marrow and liver transplants often have lung and liver adenovirus infections that are due to an expanded set of subgenus A, B, C, and E serotypes. Adults with kidney transplants have viruses of subgenus B, mostly types 11, 34, and 35, which cause cystitis. This review indicates that 11% of transplant recipients become infected with adenoviruses, with case fatality rates from 60% for bone marrow transplant patients to 18% for renal transplant patients. Patients with AIDS become infected with a diversity of serotypes of all subgenera because their adult age and life-style expose them to many adenoviruses, possibly resulting in antigenically intermediate strains that are not found elsewhere. Interestingly, isolates from the urine of AIDS patients are generally of subgenus B and comprise types 11, 21, 34, 35, and intermediate strains of these types, whereas isolates from stool are of subgenus D and comprise many rare, new, and intermediate strains that are untypeable for practical purposes. It has been estimated that adenoviruses cause active infection in 12% of AIDS patients and that 45% of

  4. Heterologous Immunity between Adenoviruses and Hepatitis C Virus: A New Paradigm in HCV Immunity and Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used as vectors for gene therapy and/or vaccine delivery. Recombinant Ad vectors are being tested as vaccines for many pathogens. We have made a surprising observation that peptides derived from various hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens contain extensive regions of homology with multiple adenovirus proteins, and conclusively demonstrate that adenovirus vector can induce robust, heterologous cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. Intriguingly, the induction of this cross-reactive immunity leads to significant reduction of viral loads in a recombinant vaccinia-HCV virus infected mouse model, supporting their role in antiviral immunity against HCV. Healthy human subjects with Ad-specific pre-existing immunity demonstrated cross-reactive cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. These findings reveal the potential of a previously uncharacterized property of natural human adenovirus infection to dictate, modulate and/or alter the course of HCV infection upon exposure. This intrinsic property of adenovirus vectors to cross-prime HCV immunity can also be exploited to develop a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine against HCV.

  5. Heterologous Immunity between Adenoviruses and Hepatitis C Virus: A New Paradigm in HCV Immunity and Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used as vectors for gene therapy and/or vaccine delivery. Recombinant Ad vectors are being tested as vaccines for many pathogens. We have made a surprising observation that peptides derived from various hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens contain extensive regions of homology with multiple adenovirus proteins, and conclusively demonstrate that adenovirus vector can induce robust, heterologous cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. Intriguingly, the induction of this cross-reactive immunity leads to significant reduction of viral loads in a recombinant vaccinia-HCV virus infected mouse model, supporting their role in antiviral immunity against HCV. Healthy human subjects with Ad-specific pre-existing immunity demonstrated cross-reactive cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. These findings reveal the potential of a previously uncharacterized property of natural human adenovirus infection to dictate, modulate and/or alter the course of HCV infection upon exposure. This intrinsic property of adenovirus vectors to cross-prime HCV immunity can also be exploited to develop a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine against HCV. PMID:26751211

  6. Adenovirus Core Protein pVII Is Translocated into the Nucleus by Multiple Import Receptor Pathways†

    PubMed Central

    Wodrich, Harald; Cassany, Aurelia; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A.; Guan, Tinglu; Nemerow, Glen; Gerace, Larry

    2006-01-01

    Adenoviruses are nonenveloped viruses with an ∼36-kb double-stranded DNA genome that replicate in the nucleus. Protein VII, an abundant structural component of the adenovirus core that is strongly associated with adenovirus DNA, is imported into the nucleus contemporaneously with the adenovirus genome shortly after virus infection and may promote DNA import. In this study, we evaluated whether protein VII uses specific receptor-mediated mechanisms for import into the nucleus. We found that it contains potent nuclear localization signal (NLS) activity by transfection of cultured cells with protein VII fusion constructs and by microinjection of cells with recombinant protein VII fusions. We identified three NLS-containing regions in protein VII by deletion mapping and determined important NLS residues by site-specific mutagenesis. We found that recombinant protein VII and its NLS-containing domains strongly and specifically bind to importin α, importin β, importin 7, and transportin, which are among the most abundant cellular nuclear import receptors. Moreover, these receptors can mediate the nuclear import of protein VII fusions in vitro in permeabilized cells. Considered together, these data support the hypothesis that protein VII is a major NLS-containing adaptor for receptor-mediated import of adenovirus DNA and that multiple import pathways are utilized to promote efficient nuclear entry of the viral genome. PMID:16973564

  7. Adenovirus core protein pVII is translocated into the nucleus by multiple import receptor pathways.

    PubMed

    Wodrich, Harald; Cassany, Aurelia; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A; Guan, Tinglu; Nemerow, Glen; Gerace, Larry

    2006-10-01

    Adenoviruses are nonenveloped viruses with an approximately 36-kb double-stranded DNA genome that replicate in the nucleus. Protein VII, an abundant structural component of the adenovirus core that is strongly associated with adenovirus DNA, is imported into the nucleus contemporaneously with the adenovirus genome shortly after virus infection and may promote DNA import. In this study, we evaluated whether protein VII uses specific receptor-mediated mechanisms for import into the nucleus. We found that it contains potent nuclear localization signal (NLS) activity by transfection of cultured cells with protein VII fusion constructs and by microinjection of cells with recombinant protein VII fusions. We identified three NLS-containing regions in protein VII by deletion mapping and determined important NLS residues by site-specific mutagenesis. We found that recombinant protein VII and its NLS-containing domains strongly and specifically bind to importin alpha, importin beta, importin 7, and transportin, which are among the most abundant cellular nuclear import receptors. Moreover, these receptors can mediate the nuclear import of protein VII fusions in vitro in permeabilized cells. Considered together, these data support the hypothesis that protein VII is a major NLS-containing adaptor for receptor-mediated import of adenovirus DNA and that multiple import pathways are utilized to promote efficient nuclear entry of the viral genome.

  8. An adenovirus-simian immunodeficiency virus env vaccine elicits humoral, cellular, and mucosal immune responses in rhesus macaques and decreases viral burden following vaginal challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Buge, S L; Richardson, E; Alipanah, S; Markham, P; Cheng, S; Kalyan, N; Miller, C J; Lubeck, M; Udem, S; Eldridge, J; Robert-Guroff, M

    1997-01-01

    Six female rhesus macaques were immunized orally and intranasally at 0 weeks and intratracheally at 12 weeks with an adenovirus type 5 host range mutant (Ad5hr)-simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsm env recombinant and at 24 and 36 weeks with native SIVmac251 gp120 in Syntex adjuvant. Four macaques received the Ad5hr vector and adjuvant alone; two additional controls were naive. In vivo replication of the Ad5hr wild-type and recombinant vectors occurred with detection of Ad5 DNA in stool samples and/or nasal secretions in all macaques and increases in Ad5 neutralizing antibody in 9 of 10 macaques following Ad administrations. SIV-specific neutralizing antibodies appeared after the second recombinant immunization and rose to titers > 10,000 following the second subunit boost. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies able to bind gp120 developed in nasal and rectal secretions, and SIV-specific IgGs were also observed in vaginal secretions and saliva. T-cell proliferative responses to SIV gp140 and T-helper epitopes were sporadically detected in all immunized macaques. Following vaginal challenge with SIVmac251, transient or persistent infection resulted in both immunized and control monkeys. The mean viral burden in persistently infected immunized macaques was significantly decreased in the primary infection period compared to that of control macaques. These results establish in vivo use of the Ad5hr vector, which overcomes the host range restriction of human Ads for rhesus macaques, thereby providing a new model for evaluation of Ad-based vaccines. In addition, they show that a vaccine regimen using the Ad5hr-SIV env recombinant and gp120 subunit induces strong humoral, cellular, and mucosal immunity in rhesus macaques. The reduced viral burden achieved solely with an env-based vaccine supports further development of Ad-based vaccines comprising additional viral components for immune therapy and AIDS vaccine development. PMID:9343211

  9. A novel pathogenic aviadenovirus from red-bellied parrots (Poicephalus rufiventris) unveils deep recombination events among avian host lineages.

    PubMed

    Das, Shubhagata; Fearnside, Kathleen; Sarker, Subir; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2017-02-01

    Competing roles of coevolution, selective pressure and recombination are an emerging interest in virus evolution. We report a novel aviadenovirus from captive red-bellied parrots (Poicephalus rufiventris) that uncovers evidence of deep recombination among aviadenoviruses. The sequence identity of the virus was most closely related to Turkey adenovirus D (42% similarity) and other adenoviruses in chickens, turkeys and pigeons. Sequencing and comparative analysis showed that the genome comprised 40,930 nucleotides containing 42 predicted open reading frames (ORFs) 19 of which had strong similarity with genes from other adenovirus species. The new genome unveiled a lineage that likely participated in deep recombination events across the genus Aviadenovirus accounting for an ancient evolutionary relationship. We hypothesize frequent host switch events and recombination among adenovirus progenitors in Galloanserae hosts caused the radiation of extant aviadenoviruses and the newly assembled Poicephalus adenovirus genome points to a potentially broader host range of these viruses among birds.

  10. Biobased monoliths for adenovirus purification.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Gonçalves, Bianca; Sousa, Margarida; Martins, Duarte L; Barroso, Telma; Pina, Ana Sofia; Peixoto, Cristina; Aguiar-Ricardo, Ana; Roque, A Cecília A

    2015-04-01

    Adenoviruses are important platforms for vaccine development and vectors for gene therapy, increasing the demand for high titers of purified viral preparations. Monoliths are macroporous supports regarded as ideal for the purification of macromolecular complexes, including viral particles. Although common monoliths are based on synthetic polymers as methacrylates, we explored the potential of biopolymers processed by clean technologies to produce monoliths for adenovirus purification. Such an approach enables the development of disposable and biodegradable matrices for bioprocessing. A total of 20 monoliths were produced from different biopolymers (chitosan, agarose, and dextran), employing two distinct temperatures during the freezing process (-20 °C and -80 °C). The morphological and physical properties of the structures were thoroughly characterized. The monoliths presenting higher robustness and permeability rates were further analyzed for the nonspecific binding of Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) preparations. The matrices presenting lower nonspecific Ad5 binding were further functionalized with quaternary amine anion-exchange ligand glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride hydrochloride by two distinct methods, and their performance toward Ad5 purification was assessed. The monolith composed of chitosan and poly(vinyl) alcohol (50:50) prepared at -80 °C allowed 100% recovery of Ad5 particles bound to the support. This is the first report of the successful purification of adenovirus using monoliths obtained from biopolymers processed by clean technologies.

  11. Protective Immunity Against a Lethal Respiratory Yersinia pestis Challenge Induced by V Antigen or the F1 Capsular Antigen Incorporated into Adenovirus Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Julie L.; Sofer-Podesta, Carolina; Ang, John; Hackett, Neil R.; Chiuchiolo, Maria J.; Senina, Svetlana; Perlin, David

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The aerosol form of the bacterium Yersinia pestis causes pneumonic plague, a rapidly fatal disease that is a biothreat if deliberately released. At present, no plague vaccines are available for use in the United States, but subunit vaccines based on the Y. pestis V antigen and F1 capsular protein show promise when administered with adjuvants. In the context that adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors have a strong adjuvant potential related to the ability to directly infect dendritic cells, we hypothesized that modification of the Ad5 capsid to display either the Y. pestis V antigen or the F1 capsular antigen on the virion surface would elicit high V antigen- or F1-specific antibody titers, permit boosting with the same Ad serotype, and provide better protection against a lethal Y. pestis challenge than immunization with equivalent amounts of V or F1 recombinant protein plus conventional adjuvant. We constructed AdYFP-pIX/V and AdLacZ-pIX/F1, E1–, E3– serotype 5 Ad gene transfer vectors containing a fusion of the sequence for either the Y. pestis V antigen or the F1 capsular antigen to the carboxy-terminal sequence of pIX, a capsid protein that can accommodate the entire V antigen (37 kDa) or F1 protein (15 kDa) without disturbing Ad function. Immunization with AdYFP-pIX/V followed by a single repeat administration of the same vector at the same dose resulted in significantly better protection of immunized animals compared with immunization with a molar equivalent amount of purified recombinant V antigen plus Alhydrogel adjuvant. Similarly, immunization with AdLacZ-pIX/F1 in a prime–boost regimen resulted in significantly enhanced protection of immunized animals compared with immunization with a molar-equivalent amount of purified recombinant F1 protein plus adjuvant. These observations demonstrate that Ad vaccine vectors containing pathogen-specific antigens fused to the pIX capsid protein have strong adjuvant properties and stimulate more robust

  12. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  13. Inducible Overexpression of a Toxic Protein by an Adenovirus Vector with a Tetracycline-Regulatable Expression Cassette†

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Bernard; Couture, France; Lamoureux, Linda; Mosser, Dick D.; Guilbault, Claire; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Bélanger, François; Langelier, Yves

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed two new adenovirus expression cassettes that expand both the range of genes which can be expressed with adenovirus vectors (AdV) and the range of cells in which high-level expression can be attained. By inclusion of a tetracycline-regulated promoter in the transfer vector pAdTR5, it is now possible to generate recombinant adenoviruses expressing proteins that are either cytotoxic or that interfere with adenovirus replication. We have used this strategy to generate a recombinant adenovirus encoding a deletion in the R1 subunit [R1(Δ2-357)] of the herpes simplex virus type 2 ribonucleotide reductase. Cell lines expressing the tetracycline-regulated transactivator (tTA) from an integrated vector or following infection with an AdV expressing tTA are able to produce ΔR1 protein at a level approaching 10% total cell protein (TCP) when infected with Ad5TR5ΔR1 before they subsequently die. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the overexpression of a toxic gene product with AdV. We have also constructed a new constitutive adenovirus expression cassette based on an optimized cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter-enhancer that allows the expression of recombinant proteins at a level greater than 20% TCP in nonpermissive cell lines. Together, these new expression cassettes significantly improve the utility of the adenovirus system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in animal cells and will undoubtedly find useful applications in gene therapy. PMID:9499088

  14. Antigen capsid-display on human adenovirus 35 via pIX fusion is a potent vaccine platform.

    PubMed

    Salisch, Nadine C; Vujadinovic, Marija; van der Helm, Esmeralda; Spek, Dirk; Vorthoren, Lars; Serroyen, Jan; Kuipers, Harmjan; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Zahn, Roland; Custers, Jerome; Vellinga, Jort

    2017-01-01

    Durable protection against complex pathogens is likely to require immunity that comprises both humoral and cellular responses. While heterologous prime-boost regimens based on recombinant, replication-incompetent Adenoviral vectors (AdV) and adjuvanted protein have been able to induce high levels of concomitant humoral and cellular responses, complex manufacturing and handling in the field may limit their success. To combine the benefits of genetic and protein-based vaccination within one vaccine construct and to facilitate their use, we generated Human Adenovirus 35 (HAdV35) vectors genetically encoding a model antigen based on the Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) circumsporozoite (CS) protein and displaying a truncated version of the same antigen (CSshort) via protein IX on the capsid, with or without a flexible glycine-linker and/or a 45Å-spacer. The four tested pIX-antigen display variants were efficiently incorporated and presented on the HAdV35 capsid irrespective of whether a transgene was encoded or not. Transgene-expression and producibility of the display-/expression vectors were not impeded by the pIX-display. In mice, the pIX-modified vectors induced strong humoral antigen-specific immunity that increased with the inclusion of the linker-/spacer molecules, exceeded the responses induced by the genetic, transgene-expressing HAdV35 vector, and surpassed recombinant protein in potency. In addition, the pIX- display/expression vectors elicited high antigen-specific cellular immune responses that matched those of the genetic HAdV35 vector expressing CS. pIX-modified display-/expression HAdV vectors may therefore be a valuable technology for the development of vaccines against complex pathogens, especially in resource-limited settings.

  15. Antigen capsid-display on human adenovirus 35 via pIX fusion is a potent vaccine platform

    PubMed Central

    van der Helm, Esmeralda; Spek, Dirk; Vorthoren, Lars; Serroyen, Jan; Kuipers, Harmjan; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Zahn, Roland; Custers, Jerome; Vellinga, Jort

    2017-01-01

    Durable protection against complex pathogens is likely to require immunity that comprises both humoral and cellular responses. While heterologous prime-boost regimens based on recombinant, replication-incompetent Adenoviral vectors (AdV) and adjuvanted protein have been able to induce high levels of concomitant humoral and cellular responses, complex manufacturing and handling in the field may limit their success. To combine the benefits of genetic and protein-based vaccination within one vaccine construct and to facilitate their use, we generated Human Adenovirus 35 (HAdV35) vectors genetically encoding a model antigen based on the Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) circumsporozoite (CS) protein and displaying a truncated version of the same antigen (CSshort) via protein IX on the capsid, with or without a flexible glycine-linker and/or a 45Å-spacer. The four tested pIX-antigen display variants were efficiently incorporated and presented on the HAdV35 capsid irrespective of whether a transgene was encoded or not. Transgene-expression and producibility of the display-/expression vectors were not impeded by the pIX-display. In mice, the pIX-modified vectors induced strong humoral antigen-specific immunity that increased with the inclusion of the linker-/spacer molecules, exceeded the responses induced by the genetic, transgene-expressing HAdV35 vector, and surpassed recombinant protein in potency. In addition, the pIX- display/expression vectors elicited high antigen-specific cellular immune responses that matched those of the genetic HAdV35 vector expressing CS. pIX-modified display-/expression HAdV vectors may therefore be a valuable technology for the development of vaccines against complex pathogens, especially in resource-limited settings. PMID:28362809

  16. Analysis of the adenovirus type 5 terminal protein precursor and DNA polymerase by linker insertion mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Roovers, D J; van der Lee, F M; van der Wees, J; Sussenbach, J S

    1993-01-01

    A series of adenovirus type 5 precursor terminal protein (pTP) and DNA polymerase (Ad pol) genes with linker insertion mutations were separately introduced into the vaccinia virus genome under the control of a late vaccinia virus promoter. The recombinant viruses were used for overexpression of the mutant genes in HeLa cells. In total, 22 different mutant pTP and 10 different Ad pol vaccinia virus recombinants were constructed, including some that expressed carboxyl-terminus-truncated forms of both proteins and one that produced the mutant H5ts149 Ad pol. To investigate the structure-function relationships of both proteins, extracts from cells infected with the recombinant viruses were tested for in vitro complementation of the initiation and elongation steps in adenovirus DNA replication. The results were in accordance with those of earlier in vivo experiments with these insertion mutants and indicate that multiple regions of both proteins are essential for adenovirus DNA replication. The carboxyl termini of both pTP and Ad pol were shown to be essential for proper functioning of these proteins during initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. Three different DNA replication-negative pTP mutants were shown to have residual activity in the initiation assay, suggesting not only that pTP is required for initiation but also that it may play a role in DNA replication after the deoxycytidylation step. Images PMID:8416372

  17. Template requirements for the initiation of adenovirus DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Challberg, M D; Rawlins, D R

    1984-01-01

    The first step in the replication of the adenovirus genome is the covalent attachment of the 5'-terminal nucleotide, dCMP, to the virus-encoded terminal protein precursor (pTP). This reaction can be observed in vitro and has been previously shown to be dependent upon either viral DNA or linearized plasmid DNA containing viral terminal sequences. Plasmids containing deletions or point mutations within the viral terminal sequence were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. In the case of linear double-stranded templates, pTP-dCMP formation required sequences located within the first 18 base pairs of the viral genome. This sequence contains a segment of 10 base pairs that is conserved in all human adenovirus serotypes. Point mutations within the conserved segment greatly reduced the efficiency of initiation, while a point mutation at a nonconserved position within the first 18 base pairs had little effect. Single-stranded DNAs can also support pTP-dCMP formation in vitro. In contrast to the results obtained with duplex templates, experiments with a variety of single-stranded templates, including phage M13-adenovirus recombinants, denatured plasmids, and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, failed to reveal any requirements for specific nucleotide sequences. With single-stranded templates containing no dG residues, the specific deoxynucleoside triphosphate requirements of the initiation reaction were altered. Images PMID:6320160

  18. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches.

  19. Co-infections of Adenovirus Species in Previously Vaccinated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Gary J.; Lin, Baochuan; Gratwick, Kevin; Meador, Carolyn; Hansen, Christian; Tibbetts, Clark; Stenger, David A.; Irvine, Marina; Seto, Donald; Purkayastha, Anjan; Freed, Nikki E.; Gibson, Marylou G.; Russell, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Despite the success of the adenovirus vaccine administered to US military trainees, acute respiratory disease (ARD) surveillance still detected breakthrough infections (respiratory illnesses associated with the adenovirus serotypes specifically targeted by the vaccine). To explore the role of adenoviral co-infection (simultaneous infection by multiple pathogenic adenovirus species) in breakthrough disease, we examined specimens from patients with ARD by using 3 methods to detect multiple adenoviral species: a DNA microarray, a polymerase chain reaction­ (PCR)–enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and a multiplex PCR assay. Analysis of 52 samples (21 vaccinated, 31 unvaccinated) collected from 1996 to 2000 showed that all vaccinated samples had co-infections. Most of these co-infections were community-acquired serotypes of species B1 and E. Unvaccinated samples primarily contained only 1 species (species E) associated with adult respiratory illness. This study highlights the rarely reported phenomenon of adenoviral co-infections in a clinically relevant environment suitable for the generation of new recombinational variants. PMID:16707047

  20. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8+ T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides ‘self-adjuvanting’ activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches. PMID:25876176

  1. Safety and Immunogenicity Study of Multiclade HIV-1 Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Alone or as Boost following a Multiclade HIV-1 DNA Vaccine in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Susan; Than, Soe; Adams, Elizabeth M.; Graham, Barney S.; Koup, Richard A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Smith, Carol; Dally, Len; Tarragona-Fiol, Tony; Bergin, Philip J.; Hayes, Peter; Ho, Martin; Loughran, Kelley; Komaroff, Wendy; Stevens, Gwynneth; Thomson, Helen; Boaz, Mark J.; Cox, Josephine H.; Schmidt, Claudia; Gilmour, Jill; Nabel, Gary J.; Fast, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I study of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) vector expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol from subtype B and Env from subtypes A, B and C, given alone or as boost following a DNA plasmid vaccine expressing the same HIV-1 proteins plus Nef, in 114 healthy HIV-uninfected African adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Volunteers were randomized to 4 groups receiving the rAd5 vaccine intramuscularly at dosage levels of 1×1010 or 1×1011 particle units (PU) either alone or as boost following 3 injections of the DNA vaccine given at 4 mg/dose intramuscularly by needle-free injection using Biojector® 2000. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated for 12 months. Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Overall, 62% and 86% of vaccine recipients in the rAd5 alone and DNA prime - rAd5 boost groups, respectively, responded to the HIV-1 proteins by an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) ELISPOT. The frequency of immune responses was independent of rAd5 dosage levels. The highest frequency of responses after rAd5 alone was detected at 6 weeks; after DNA prime - rAd5 boost, at 6 months (end of study). At baseline, neutralizing antibodies against Ad5 were present in 81% of volunteers; the distribution was similar across the 4 groups. Pre-existing immunity to Ad5 did not appear to have a significant impact on reactogenicity or immune response rates to HIV antigens by IFN-γ ELISPOT. Binding antibodies against Env were detected in up to 100% recipients of DNA prime - rAd5 boost. One volunteer acquired HIV infection after the study ended, two years after receipt of rAd5 alone. Conclusions/Significance The HIV-1 rAd5 vaccine, either alone or as a boost following HIV-1 DNA vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic in African adults. DNA priming increased the frequency and magnitude of cellular and humoral immune responses, but there was no effect of rAd5 dosage on immunogenicity endpoints. Trial

  2. Potent immune responses and in vitro pro-inflammatory cytokine suppression by a novel adenovirus vaccine vector based on rare human serotype 28

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Christoph A.; Bonnell, Jessica; Hiriyanna, Suja; Fultz, Megan; Nyberg-Hoffman, Cassandra; Chen, Ping; King, C. Richter; Gall, Jason G. D.

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus vaccine vectors derived from rare human serotypes have been shown to be less potent than serotype 5 (Ad5) at inducing immune responses to encoded antigens. To identify highly immunogenic adenovirus vectors, we assessed pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, binding to the CD46 receptor, and immunogenicity. Species D adenoviruses uniquely suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokines and induced high levels of type I interferon. Thus, it was unexpected that a vector derived from a representative serotype, Ad28, induced significantly higher transgene-specific T-cell responses than an Ad35 vector. Prime-boost regimens with Ad28, Ad35, Ad14, or Ad5 significantly boosted T cell and antibody responses. The seroprevalence of Ad28 was confirmed to be <10% in the United States. Together, this shows that a rare human serotype-based vector can elicit strong immune responses, which was not predicted by in vitro results. PMID:20600496

  3. Potent immune responses and in vitro pro-inflammatory cytokine suppression by a novel adenovirus vaccine vector based on rare human serotype 28.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Christoph A; Bonnell, Jessica; Hiriyanna, Suja; Fultz, Megan; Nyberg-Hoffman, Cassandra; Chen, Ping; King, C Richter; Gall, Jason G D

    2010-08-09

    Adenovirus vaccine vectors derived from rare human serotypes have been shown to be less potent than serotype 5 (Ad5) at inducing immune responses to encoded antigens. To identify highly immunogenic adenovirus vectors, we assessed pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, binding to the CD46 receptor, and immunogenicity. Species D adenoviruses uniquely suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokines and induced high levels of type I interferon. Thus, it was unexpected that a vector derived from a representative serotype, Ad28, induced significantly higher transgene-specific T cell responses than an Ad35 vector. Prime-boost regimens with Ad28, Ad35, Ad14, or Ad5 significantly boosted T cell and antibody responses. The seroprevalence of Ad28 was confirmed to be <10% in the United States. Together, this shows that a rare human serotype-based vector can elicit strong immune responses, which was not predicted by in vitro results.

  4. A Replication-Defective Human Type 5 Adenovirus-Based Trivalent Vaccine Confers Complete Protection against Plague in Mice and Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; Klages, Curtis; Erova, Tatiana E; Telepnev, Maxim; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C; Baze, Wallace B; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K; Lawrence, William S; Patrikeev, Igor; Peel, Jennifer E; Andersson, Jourdan A; Kozlova, Elena V; Tiner, Bethany L; Peterson, Johnny W; McWilliams, David; Patel, Snehal; Rothe, Eric; Motin, Vladimir L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-07-01

    Currently, no plague vaccine exists in the United States for human use. The capsular antigen (Caf1 or F1) and two type 3 secretion system (T3SS) components, the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) and the needle protein YscF, represent protective antigens of Yersinia pestis We used a replication-defective human type 5 adenovirus (Ad5) vector and constructed recombinant monovalent and trivalent vaccines (rAd5-LcrV and rAd5-YFV) that expressed either the codon-optimized lcrV or the fusion gene designated YFV (consisting of ycsF, caf1, and lcrV). Immunization of mice with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by either the intramuscular (i.m.) or the intranasal (i.n.) route provided protection superior to that with the monovalent rAd5-LcrV vaccine against bubonic and pneumonic plague when animals were challenged with Y. pestis CO92. Preexisting adenoviral immunity did not diminish the protective response, and the protection was always higher when mice were administered one i.n. dose of the trivalent vaccine (priming) followed by a single i.m. booster dose of the purified YFV antigen. Immunization of cynomolgus macaques with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by the prime-boost strategy provided 100% protection against a stringent aerosol challenge dose of CO92 to animals that had preexisting adenoviral immunity. The vaccinated and challenged macaques had no signs of disease, and the invading pathogen rapidly cleared with no histopathological lesions. This is the first report showing the efficacy of an adenovirus-vectored trivalent vaccine against pneumonic plague in mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) models. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. A Replication-Defective Human Type 5 Adenovirus-Based Trivalent Vaccine Confers Complete Protection against Plague in Mice and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Kirtley, Michelle L.; Klages, Curtis; Erova, Tatiana E.; Telepnev, Maxim; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C.; Baze, Wallace B.; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K.; Lawrence, William S.; Patrikeev, Igor; Peel, Jennifer E.; Andersson, Jourdan A.; Kozlova, Elena V.; Tiner, Bethany L.; Peterson, Johnny W.; McWilliams, David; Patel, Snehal; Rothe, Eric; Motin, Vladimir L.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no plague vaccine exists in the United States for human use. The capsular antigen (Caf1 or F1) and two type 3 secretion system (T3SS) components, the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) and the needle protein YscF, represent protective antigens of Yersinia pestis. We used a replication-defective human type 5 adenovirus (Ad5) vector and constructed recombinant monovalent and trivalent vaccines (rAd5-LcrV and rAd5-YFV) that expressed either the codon-optimized lcrV or the fusion gene designated YFV (consisting of ycsF, caf1, and lcrV). Immunization of mice with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by either the intramuscular (i.m.) or the intranasal (i.n.) route provided protection superior to that with the monovalent rAd5-LcrV vaccine against bubonic and pneumonic plague when animals were challenged with Y. pestis CO92. Preexisting adenoviral immunity did not diminish the protective response, and the protection was always higher when mice were administered one i.n. dose of the trivalent vaccine (priming) followed by a single i.m. booster dose of the purified YFV antigen. Immunization of cynomolgus macaques with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by the prime-boost strategy provided 100% protection against a stringent aerosol challenge dose of CO92 to animals that had preexisting adenoviral immunity. The vaccinated and challenged macaques had no signs of disease, and the invading pathogen rapidly cleared with no histopathological lesions. This is the first report showing the efficacy of an adenovirus-vectored trivalent vaccine against pneumonic plague in mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) models. PMID:27170642

  6. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... identify adenoviruses directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by adenoviruses and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Adenovirus infections may cause pharyngitis (inflammation of the throat), acute respiratory diseases, and certain external...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... identify adenoviruses directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by adenoviruses and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Adenovirus infections may cause pharyngitis (inflammation of the throat), acute respiratory diseases, and certain external...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... identify adenoviruses directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by adenoviruses and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Adenovirus infections may cause pharyngitis (inflammation of the throat), acute respiratory diseases, and certain external...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... identify adenoviruses directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by adenoviruses and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Adenovirus infections may cause pharyngitis (inflammation of the throat), acute respiratory diseases, and certain external...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... identify adenoviruses directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by adenoviruses and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Adenovirus infections may cause pharyngitis (inflammation of the throat), acute respiratory diseases, and certain external...

  11. Adenovirus Early Proteins and Host Sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sook-Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus genome is transported into the nucleus, where viral gene transcription, viral DNA replication, and virion assembly take place. Posttranslational modifications by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, particularly nuclear events. It is not surprising, therefore, that adenovirus modulates and utilizes the host sumoylation system. Adenovirus early proteins play an important role in establishing optimal host environments for virus replication within infected cells by stimulating the cell cycle and counteracting host antiviral defenses. Here, we review findings on the mechanisms and functional consequences of the interplay between human adenovirus early proteins and the host sumoylation system. PMID:27651358

  12. Combination therapy with conditionally replicating adenovirus and replication defective adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choon-Taek; Park, Kyung-Ho; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yasushi; Ohm, Joyce E; Nadaf, Sorena; Dikov, Mikhail M; Curiel, David T; Carbone, David P

    2004-09-15

    Low gene transfer rate is the most substantial hurdle in the practical application of gene therapy. One strategy to improve transfer efficiency is the use of a conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAD) that can selectively replicate in tumor cells. We hypothesized that conventional E1-deleted adenoviruses (ad) can become replication-competent when cotransduced with a CRAD to selectively supply E1 in trans in tumors. The resulting selective production of large numbers of the E1-deleted ad within the tumor mass will increase the transduction efficiency. We used a CRAD (Delta24RGD) that produces a mutant E1 without the ability to bind retinoblastoma but retaining viral replication competence in cancer cells with a defective pRb/p16. Ad-lacZ, adenovirus-luciferase (ad-luc), and adenovirus insulin-like growth factor-1R/dominant-negative (ad-IGF-1R/dn; 482, 950) are E1-deleted replication-defective adenoviruses. The combination of CRAD and ad-lacZ increased the transduction efficiency of lacZ to 100% from 15% observed with ad-lacZ alone. Transfer of media of CRAD and ad-lacZ cotransduced cells induced the transfer of lacZ (media transferable bystander effect). Combination of CRAD and ad-IGF-1R/dn increased the production of truncated IGF-1R or soluble IGF-1R > 10 times compared with transduction with ad-IGF-1R/dn alone. Combined intratumoral injection of CRAD and ad-luc increased the luciferase expression about 70 times compared with ad-luc alone without substantial systemic spread. Combined intratumoral injection of CRAD and ad-IGF-1R/482 induced stronger growth suppression of established lung cancer xenografts than single injections. The combination of CRAD and E1-deleted ad induced tumor-specific replication of CRAD and E1-deleted ad and increased the transduction rate and therapeutic efficacy of these viruses in model tumors.

  13. Characterization of the knob domain of the adenovirus type 5 fiber protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, L J; Xia, D; Wilke, M E; Deisenhofer, J; Gerard, R D

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus fiber protein is used for attachment of the virus to a specific receptor on the cell surface. Structurally, the protein consists of a long, thin shaft that protrudes from the vertex of the virus capsid and terminates in a globular domain termed the knob. To verify that the knob is the domain which interacts with the cellular receptor, we have cloned and expressed the knob from adenovirus type 5 together with a single repeat of the shaft in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified by conventional chromatography and functionally characterized for its interaction with the adenovirus receptor. The recombinant knob domain bound about 4,700 sites per HeLa cell with an affinity of 3 x 10(9) M-1 and blocked adenovirus infection of human cells. Antibodies raised against the knob also blocked virus infection. By gel filtration and X-ray diffraction analysis of protein crystals, the knob was shown to consist of a homotrimer of 21-kDa subunits. The results confirm that the trimeric knob is the ligand for attachment to the adenovirus receptor. Images PMID:8035520

  14. Identification and Application of Neutralizing Epitopes of Human Adenovirus Type 55 Hexon Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xingui; Ma, Qiang; Jiang, Zaixue; Huang, Junfeng; Liu, Qian; Lu, Xiaomei; Luo, Qingming; Zhou, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 55 (HAdV55) is a newly identified re-emergent acute respiratory disease (ARD) pathogen with a proposed recombination of hexon gene between HAdV11 and HAdV14 strains. The identification of the neutralizing epitopes is important for the surveillance and vaccine development against HAdV55 infection. In this study, four type-specific epitope peptides of HAdV55 hexon protein, A55R1 (residues 138 to 152), A55R2 (residues 179 to 187), A55R4 (residues 247 to 259) and A55R7 (residues 429 to 443), were predicted by multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling methods, and then confirmed with synthetic peptides by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization tests (NT). Finally, the A55R2 was incorporated into human adenoviruses 3 (HAdV3) and a chimeric adenovirus rAd3A55R2 was successfully obtained. The chimeric rAd3A55R2 could induce neutralizing antibodies against both HAdV3 and HAdV55. This current study will contribute to the development of novel adenovirus vaccine candidate and adenovirus structural analysis. PMID:26516903

  15. Localization of the N-terminus of minor coat protein IIIa in the adenovirus capsid

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, Carmen; Glasgow, Joel N.; Borovjagin, Anton; Beatty, Matthew S.; Kashentseva, Elena A.; T. Curiel, David; Marabini, Roberto; Dmitriev, Igor P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Minor coat protein IIIa is conserved in all adenoviruses and required for correct viral assembly, but its precise function in capsid organization is unknown. The latest adenovirus capsid model proposes that IIIa is located underneath the vertex region. To obtain experimental evidence on the location of IIIa and further define its role, we engineered the IIIa gene to encode heterologous N-terminal peptide extensions. Recombinant adenovirus variants with IIIa encoding six-histidine tag (6-His), 6-His and FLAG peptides, or 6-His linked to FLAG with a (Gly4Ser)3 linker were rescued and analyzed for virus yield, capsid incorporation of heterologous peptides, and capsid stability. Longer extensions could not be rescued. Western blot analysis confirmed that the modified IIIa proteins were expressed in infected cells and incorporated into virions. In the adenovirus encoding the 6-His-linker-FLAG-IIIa gene, the 6-His tag was present in light particles but not in mature virions. Immuno-electron microscopy of this virus showed that the FLAG epitope is not accessible to antibodies on the viral particles. Three-dimensional electron microscopy (3DEM) and difference mapping located the IIIa N-terminal extension beneath the vertex complex, wedged at the interface between penton base and the peripentonal hexons, therefore supporting the latest proposed model. The position of the IIIa N-terminus and its low tolerance for modification provide new clues for understanding the role of this minor coat protein in adenovirus capsid assembly and disassembly. PMID:18786542

  16. Model-driven Approaches for in Vitro Combination Therapy using ONYX-015 Replicating Oncolytic Adenovirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Zurakowski, Ryan; Wodarz, Dominik

    2009-01-01

    Replicating genetically modified adenoviruses have shown promise as a new treatment approach against cancer. Recombinant adenoviruses replicate only in cancer cells which contain certain mutations, such as the loss of functional p53, as is the case in the virus ONYX-015. The successful entry of the viral particle into target cells is strongly dependent on the presence of the main receptor for adenovirus, the coxsackie- and adeno-virus receptor (CAR). This receptor is frequently down-regulated in highly malignant cells, rendering this population less vulnerable to viral attack. It has been shown that use of MEK inhibitors can up-regulate CAR expression, resulting in enhanced adenovirus entry into the cells. However, inhibition of MEK results in G1 cell cycle arrest, rendering infected cells temporarily unable to produce virus. This forces a tradeo1. While drug mediated up-regulation of CAR enhances virus entry into cancer cells, the consequent cell cycle arrest inhibits production of new virus particles and the replication of the virus. Optimal control-based schedules of MEK inhibitor application should increase the efficacy of this treatment, maximizing the overall tumor toxicity by exploiting the dynamics of CAR expression and viral production. We introduce a mathematical model of these dynamics and show simple optimal control based strategies which motivate this approach. PMID:17095020

  17. Online Bagging and Boosting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunji C.

    2005-01-01

    Bagging and boosting are two of the most well-known ensemble learning methods due to their theoretical performance guarantees and strong experimental results. However, these algorithms have been used mainly in batch mode, i.e., they require the entire training set to be available at once and, in some cases, require random access to the data. In this paper, we present online versions of bagging and boosting that require only one pass through the training data. We build on previously presented work by presenting some theoretical results. We also compare the online and batch algorithms experimentally in terms of accuracy and running time.

  18. Computational analysis and identification of an emergent human adenovirus pathogen implicated in a respiratory fatality

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christopher M.; Singh, Gurdeep; Henquell, Cécile; Walsh, Michael P.; Peigue-Lafeuille, Hélène; Seto, Donald; Jones, Morris S.; Dyer, David W.; Chodosh, James

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviral infections are typically acute, self-limiting, and not associated with death. However, we present the genomic and bioinformatics analysis of a novel recombinant human adenovirus (HAdV-D56) isolated in France that caused a rare neonatal fatality, and keratoconjunctivitis in three health care workers who cared for the neonate. Whole genome alignments revealed the expected diversity in the penton base, hexon, E3, and fiber coding regions, and provided evidence for extensive recombination. Bootscan analysis confirmed recombination between HAdV-D9, HAdV-D26, HAdV-D15, and HAdV-D29 in the penton base and hexon proteins, centered around hypervariable loops within the putative proteins. Protein structure analysis of the fiber coding region revealed similarity with HAdV-D8, HAdV-D9, and HAdV-D53, possibly accounting for the ocular tropism of the virus. Based on these data, this virus appears to be a new HAdV-D type (HAdV-D56), underscoring the importance of recombination events in human adenovirus evolution and the emergence of new adenovirus pathogens. PMID:21056888

  19. Induction of CD8(+) T cell responses and protective efficacy following microneedle-mediated delivery of a live adenovirus-vectored malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Frances E; O'Mahony, Conor; Moore, Anne C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2015-06-22

    There is an urgent need for improvements in vaccine delivery technologies. This is particularly pertinent for vaccination programmes within regions of limited resources, such as those required for adequate provision for disposal of used needles. Microneedles are micron-sized structures that penetrate the stratum corneum of the skin, creating temporary conduits for the needle-free delivery of drugs or vaccines. Here, we aimed to investigate immunity induced by the recombinant simian adenovirus-vectored vaccine ChAd63.ME-TRAP; currently undergoing clinical assessment as a candidate malaria vaccine, when delivered percutaneously by silicon microneedle arrays. In mice, we demonstrate that microneedle-mediated delivery of ChAd63.ME-TRAP induced similar numbers of transgene-specific CD8(+) T cells compared to intradermal (ID) administration with needle-and-syringe, following a single immunisation and after a ChAd63/MVA heterologous prime-boost schedule. When mice immunised with ChAd63/MVA were challenged with live Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, microneedle-mediated ChAd63.ME-TRAP priming demonstrated equivalent protective efficacy as did ID immunisation. Furthermore, responses following ChAd63/MVA immunisation correlated with a specific design parameter of the array used ('total array volume'). The level of transgene expression at the immunisation site and skin-draining lymph node (dLN) was also linked to total array volume. These findings have implications for defining silicon microneedle array design for use with live, vectored vaccines.

  20. Hypersonic Boost Glider

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1957-04-15

    Hypersonic Boost Glider in 11 Inch Hypersonic Tunnel L57-1681 In 1957 Langley tested its HYWARDS design in the 11 Inch Hypersonic Tunnel. Photograph published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen. Page 369.

  1. Oxygen boost pump study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An oxygen boost pump is described which can be used to charge the high pressure oxygen tank in the extravehicular activity equipment from spacecraft supply. The only interface with the spacecraft is the +06 6.205 Pa supply line. The breadboard study results and oxygen tank survey are summarized and the results of the flight-type prototype design and analysis are presented.

  2. Can you boost your metabolism?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can ward off weight gain as you age. Alternative Names Weight-loss boost metabolism; Obesity - boost metabolism; ... Does glycogen availability influence the motivation to eat, energy intake or food choice? Sports Med . 2011;41( ...

  3. Boosted apparent horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp

    Boosted black holes play an important role in General Relativity (GR), especially in relation to the binary black hole problem. Solving Einstein vac- uum equations in the strong field regime had long been the holy grail of numerical relativity until the significant breakthroughs made in 2005 and 2006. Numerical relativity plays a crucial role in gravitational wave detection by providing numerically generated gravitational waveforms that help search for actual signatures of gravitational radiation exciting laser interferometric de- tectors such as LIGO, VIRGO and GEO600 here on Earth. Binary black holes orbit each other in an ever tightening adiabatic inspiral caused by energy loss due to gravitational radiation emission. As the orbits shrinks, the holes speed up and eventually move at relativistic speeds in the vicinity of each other (separated by ~ 10M or so where 2M is the Schwarzschild radius). As such, one must abandon the Newtonian notion of a point mass on a circular orbit with tangential velocity and replace it with the concept of black holes, cloaked behind spheroidal event horizons that become distorted due to strong gravity, and further appear distorted because of Lorentz effects from the high orbital velocity. Apparent horizons (AHs) are 2-dimensional boundaries that are trapped surfaces. Conceptually, one can think of them as 'quasi-local' definitions for a black hole horizon. This will be explained in more detail in chapter 2. Apparent horizons are especially important in numerical relativity as they provide a computationally efficient way of describing and locating a black hole horizon. For a stationary spacetime, apparent horizons are 2-dimensional cross-sections of the event horizon, which is itself a 3-dimensional null surface in spacetime. Because an AH is a 2-dimensional cross-section of an event horizon, its area remains invariant under distortions due to Lorentz boosts although its shape changes. This fascinating property of the AH can be

  4. A fatal case of neonatal adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Cynthia J

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus can produce severe disease and even death in the immunocompromised neonate. Symptoms of adenovirus infection are similar to those seen with bacterial infections in neonates, making early recognition and diagnosis difficult. Consideration of adenovirus as a causative agent is important to early diagnosis. Currently available culture techniques, particularly the shell vial culture technique, make more rapid identification of adenovirus infection possible. Early identification and treatment are necessary to improve patient outcomes and prevent the spread of infection to other neonates. Available agents for the treatment of adenovirus have had mixed results, yet their use is preferable to nontreatment of critical patients. This article presents the case of a preterm infant who became fatally ill from disseminated adenoviral infection.

  5. Identification of a Nonstructural DNA-Binding Protein (DBP) as an Antigen with Diagnostic Potential for Human Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongli; Wu, Chao; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vernet, Guy; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei; Hung, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been implicated as important agents in a wide range of human illnesses. To date, 58 distinct HAdV serotypes have been identified and can be grouped into six species. For the immunological diagnosis of adenoviruses, the hexon protein, a structural protein, has been used. The potential of other HAdV proteins has not been fully addressed. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, a nonstructural antigenic protein, the DNA binding protein (DBP) of human adenovirus 5 and 35 (Ad5, Ad35) - was identified using immunoproteomic technology. The expression of Ad5 and Ad35 DBP in insect cells could be detected by rhesus monkey serum antibodies and healthy adult human serum positive for Ad5 and Ad35. Recombinant DBPs elicited high titer antibodies in mice. Their conserved domain displayed immunological cross-reactions with heterologous DBP antibodies in Western blot assays. DBP-IgM ELISA showed higher sensitivity adenovirus IgM detection than the commercial Adenovirus IgM Human ELISA Kit. A Western blot method developed based on Ad5 DBP was highly consistent with (χ2 =  44.9, P<0.01) the Western blot assay for the hexon protein in the detection of IgG, but proved even more sensitive. Conclusions/Significance The HAdV nonstructural protein DBP is an antigenic protein that could serve as an alternative common antigen for adenovirus diagnosis. PMID:23516396

  6. RNAi suppressor P19 can be broadly exploited for enhanced adenovirus replication and microRNA knockdown experiments

    PubMed Central

    Rauschhuber, Christina; Mueck-Haeusl, Martin; Zhang, Wenli; Nettelbeck, Dirk M.; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a key regulator of various biological systems including viral infection. Within a virus life cycle gene products can be modulated by the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway which can crucially impact productive virus replication. Herein we explored the RNA interference suppressor protein P19 derived from a plant virus and we found that P19 enhanced adenovirus replication up to 100-fold. Critical factors responsible for this observation were overexpression of adenovirus encoded genes on mRNA and protein levels. To investigate the impact of this phenomenon on recombinant viruses, we exploited its feasibility for therapeutic and genomic applications. We found that P19 significantly increased recombinant adenovirus yields enabling up-scaling for preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, adenoviruses possessed significantly higher oncolytic activity by expression of P19. Finally, we show that introducing a p19 expression cassette into high-capacity adenovirus provides a strategy to analyze RNAi knockdown in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:23455436

  7. Towards a universal vaccine for avian influenza: protective efficacy of modified Vaccinia virus Ankara and Adenovirus vaccines expressing conserved influenza antigens in chickens challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Amy C; Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Peroval, Marylene Y; Carson, Connor; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Turner, Alison V; Hill, Adrian V S; Gilbert, Sarah C; Butter, Colin

    2013-01-11

    Current vaccines targeting surface proteins can drive antigenic variation resulting either in the emergence of more highly pathogenic viruses or of antigenically distinct viruses that escape control by vaccination and thereby persist in the host population. Influenza vaccines typically target the highly mutable surface proteins and do not provide protection against heterologous challenge. Vaccines which induce immune responses against conserved influenza epitopes may confer protection against heterologous challenge. We report here the results of vaccination with recombinant modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) and Adenovirus (Ad) expressing a fusion construct of nucleoprotein and matrix protein (NP+M1). Prime and boost vaccination regimes were trialled in different ages of chicken and were found to be safe and immunogenic. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) ELISpot was used to assess the cellular immune response post secondary vaccination. In ovo Ad prime followed by a 4 week post hatch MVA boost was identified as the most immunogenic regime in one outbred and two inbred lines of chicken. Following vaccination, one inbred line (C15I) was challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H7N7 (A/Turkey/England/1977). Birds receiving a primary vaccination with Ad-NP+M1 and a secondary vaccination with MVA-NP+M1 exhibited reduced cloacal shedding as measured by plaque assay at 7 days post infection compared with birds vaccinated with recombinant viruses containing irrelevant antigen. This preliminary indication of efficacy demonstrates proof of concept in birds; induction of T cell responses in chickens by viral vectors containing internal influenza antigens may be a productive strategy for the development of vaccines to induce heterologous protection against influenza in poultry.

  8. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 104 level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  9. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A.; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W.; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.

  10. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    DOE PAGES

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; ...

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved tomore » have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.« less

  11. Vasculature-Specific Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    translation and, thus, never become available to the disulfide isomerases, the ER-localized enzymes that facilitate the formation of the disulfide bonds...duplexes and cloned into Bael-cut expression vectors. Upon transformation of Ecoli , colonies containing recombinant plasmids were identified by PCR...R. L. Crowell, and R. W. Finberg. 1997. Isolation of a common receptor for Coxsackie B viruses and adenoviruses 2 and 5. Science 275:1320-3. 6

  12. Expression of the gene encoding secreted placental alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) by a nondefective adenovirus vector.

    PubMed

    Doronin, K K; Zakharchuk, A N; Grinenko, N F; Yurov, G K; Krougliak, V A; Naroditsky, B S

    1993-04-30

    A nondefective recombinant human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) carrying the SEAP gene, encoding human secreted placental alkaline phosphatase, in the E3 region of the Ad5 genome was obtained. The expression of SEAP at the early and late stages of Ad5 infection was demonstrated in permissive and semi-permissive cell cultures. The amount of SEAP in the culture medium of the 293 cells was 13.6% of the total protein.

  13. Functional characterization of a PEI-CyD-FA-coated adenovirus as delivery vector for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Chen, Shih-Chi; Shen, Zan; Huang, Yun-Chao; Zhu, Xiao; Wang, Xiao-mei; Jiang, Wenqi; Wang, Zi-Feng; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Ling, Eng-Ang; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Lin, Marie C

    2013-01-01

    The recombinant adenovirus is evolving as a promising gene delivery vector for gene therapy due to its efficiency in transducing different genes into most types of cells. However, the host-immune response elicited by primary inoculation of an adenovirus can cause rapid clearance of the vector, impairing the efficacy of the adenovirus and hence obstructing its clinical application. We have previously synthesized a biodegradable co-polymer consisting of a low molecular weight PEI (MW 600 Da), cross-linked with β-cyclodextrin, and conjugated with folic acid (PEI-CyD-FA, named H1). Here we report that coating the adenovirus vector (Adv) with H1 (H1/rAdv) could significantly improve both the efficacy and biosafety of Adv. Enhanced transfection efficiency as well as prolonged duration of gene expression were clearly demonstrated either by intratumoral or systemic injection of a single dose of H1/rAdv in immunocompetent mice. Importantly, repeated injections of H1/rAdv did not reduce the transfection efficiency in immunocompetent mice. Furthermore, H1 transformed the surface charge of the adenovirus capsomers from negative to positive in physiological solution, suggesting that H1 coated the capsid protein of the adenovirus. This could shelter the epitopes of capsid proteins of the adenovirus, resulting in a reduced host-immune response and enhanced transfection efficiency. Taken together, these findings suggest that H1/rAdv is an effective gene delivery system superior to the adenovirus alone and that it could be considered as a preferred vehicle for gene therapy.

  14. StructBoost: Boosting Methods for Predicting Structured Output Variables.

    PubMed

    Chunhua Shen; Guosheng Lin; van den Hengel, Anton

    2014-10-01

    Boosting is a method for learning a single accurate predictor by linearly combining a set of less accurate weak learners. Recently, structured learning has found many applications in computer vision. Inspired by structured support vector machines (SSVM), here we propose a new boosting algorithm for structured output prediction, which we refer to as StructBoost. StructBoost supports nonlinear structured learning by combining a set of weak structured learners. As SSVM generalizes SVM, our StructBoost generalizes standard boosting approaches such as AdaBoost, or LPBoost to structured learning. The resulting optimization problem of StructBoost is more challenging than SSVM in the sense that it may involve exponentially many variables and constraints. In contrast, for SSVM one usually has an exponential number of constraints and a cutting-plane method is used. In order to efficiently solve StructBoost, we formulate an equivalent 1-slack formulation and solve it using a combination of cutting planes and column generation. We show the versatility and usefulness of StructBoost on a range of problems such as optimizing the tree loss for hierarchical multi-class classification, optimizing the Pascal overlap criterion for robust visual tracking and learning conditional random field parameters for image segmentation.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrach, Balázs; Benko, Mária

    2007-01-01

    Members of the family Adenoviridae have been isolated from a large variety of hosts, including representatives from every major vertebrate class from fish to mammals. The high prevalence, together with the fairly conserved organization of the central part of their genomes, make the adenoviruses one of (if not the) best models for studying viral evolution on a larger time scale. Phylogenetic calculation can infer the evolutionary distance among adenovirus strains on serotype, species, and genus levels, thus helping the establishment of a correct taxonomy on the one hand, and speeding up the process of typing new isolates on the other. Initially, four major lineages corresponding to four genera were recognized. Later, the demarcation criteria of lower taxon levels, such as species or types, could also be defined with phylogenetic calculations. A limited number of possible host switches have been hypothesized and convincingly supported. Application of the web-based BLAST and MultAlin programs and the freely available PHYLIP package, along with the TreeView program, enables everyone to make correct calculations. In addition to step-by-step instruction on how to perform phylogenetic analysis, critical points where typical mistakes or misinterpretation of the results might occur will be identified and hints for their avoidance will be provided.

  16. Severe conjunctivitis due to multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae and adenovirus 53 coinfection in a traveler returning from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Dennis; Mueller, Andreas; Weißbrich, Benedikt; Schubert, Jörg; Schargus, Marc; Stich, August

    2013-01-01

    A male traveler returning from Thailand with severe bilateral conjunctivitis was tested for causative pathogens by culture and polymerase chain reaction in late 2010. The culturally grown Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain was resistant against penicillin, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline. The patient was also found to have an eye infection with the unusual and likely recombinant adenovirus type 53. Besides multidrug-resistant gonococcal strains the unusual adenovirus strain is found circulating in Asia and both pathogens may be a risk for travelers. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  17. Meeting product development challenges in manufacturing clinical grade oncolytic adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Working, Peter K; Lin, Andy; Borellini, Flavia

    2005-11-21

    Oncolytic adenoviruses have been considered for use as anticancer therapy for decades, and numerous means of conferring tumor selectivity have been developed. As with any new therapy, the trip from the laboratory bench to the clinic has revealed a number of significant development hurdles. Viral therapies are subject to specific regulations and must meet a variety of well-defined criteria for purity, potency, stability, and product characterization prior to their use in the clinic. Published regulatory guidelines, although developed specifically for biotechnology-derived products, are applicable to the production of oncolytic adenoviruses and other cell-based products, and they should be consulted early during development. Most importantly, both the manufacturing process and the development of characterization and release assays should be science-driven, use the best available science and technology, and must consider the unique nature of the product: a living, and mutatable, virus. Potentially significant impacts on product quality and safety stem from the possibility of genetic instability related to over-engineering the viruses (as evidenced by their recombination and/or occasional reversion to wild-type virus during manufacturing). This report provides examples of some of the critical components affecting the development and production of clinical grade material and summarizes the significant progress made in recent years.

  18. Adenovirus Replaces Mitotic Checkpoint Controls

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Roberta L.; Groitl, Peter; Dobner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with adenovirus triggers the cellular DNA damage response, elements of which include cell death and cell cycle arrest. Early adenoviral proteins, including the E1B-55K and E4orf3 proteins, inhibit signaling in response to DNA damage. A fraction of cells infected with an adenovirus mutant unable to express the E1B-55K and E4orf3 genes appeared to arrest in a mitotic-like state. Cells infected early in G1 of the cell cycle were predisposed to arrest in this state at late times of infection. This arrested state, which displays hallmarks of mitotic catastrophe, was prevented by expression of either the E1B-55K or the E4orf3 genes. However, E1B-55K mutant virus-infected cells became trapped in a mitotic-like state in the presence of the microtubule poison colcemid, suggesting that the two viral proteins restrict entry into mitosis or facilitate exit from mitosis in order to prevent infected cells from arresting in mitosis. The E1B-55K protein appeared to prevent inappropriate entry into mitosis through its interaction with the cellular tumor suppressor protein p53. The E4orf3 protein facilitated exit from mitosis by possibly mislocalizing and functionally inactivating cyclin B1. When expressed in noninfected cells, E4orf3 overcame the mitotic arrest caused by the degradation-resistant R42A cyclin B1 variant. IMPORTANCE Cells that are infected with adenovirus type 5 early in G1 of the cell cycle are predisposed to arrest in a mitotic-like state in a p53-dependent manner. The adenoviral E1B-55K protein prevents entry into mitosis. This newly described activity for the E1B-55K protein appears to depend on the interaction between the E1B-55K protein and the tumor suppressor p53. The adenoviral E4orf3 protein facilitates exit from mitosis, possibly by altering the intracellular distribution of cyclin B1. By preventing entry into mitosis and by promoting exit from mitosis, these adenoviral proteins act to prevent the infected cell from arresting in a

  19. Overcoming pre-existing adenovirus immunity by genetic engineering of adenovirus-based vectors.

    PubMed

    Seregin, Sergey S; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors offer several benefits showing their potential for use in a variety of vaccine applications. Recombinant Ad-based vaccines possess potent immunogenic potential, capable of generating humoral and cellular immune responses to a variety of pathogen-specific antigens expressed by the vectors. Ad5 vectors can be readily produced, allowing for usage in thousands of clinical trial subjects. This is now coupled with a history of safe clinical use in the vaccine setting. However, traditional Ad5-based vaccines may not be generating optimal antigen-specific immune responses, and generate diminished antigen-specific immune responses when pre-existing Ad5 immunity is present. These limitations have driven initiation of several approaches to improve the efficacy of Ad-based vaccines, and/or allow modified vaccines to overcome pre-existing Ad immunity. These include: generation of chemically modified Ad5 capsids; generation of chimeric Ads; complete replacement of Ad5-based vaccine platforms with alternative (human and non-human origin) Ad serotypes, and Ad5 genome modification approaches that attempt to retain the native Ad5 capsid, while simultaneously improving the efficacy of the platform as well as minimizing the effect of pre-existing Ad immunity. Here we discuss recent advances in- and limitations of each of these approaches, relative to their abilities to overcome pre-existing Ad immunity.

  20. A human type 5 adenovirus-based Trypanosoma cruzi therapeutic vaccine re-programs immune response and reverses chronic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Isabela Resende; Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Marques, Virgínia; da Silva, Andrea Alice; Caetano, Bráulia; Moreira, Otacilio Cruz; Machado, Alexandre Vieira; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD), caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is a prototypical neglected tropical disease. Specific immunity promotes acute phase survival. Nevertheless, one-third of CD patients develop chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) associated with parasite persistence and immunological unbalance. Currently, the therapeutic management of patients only mitigates CCC symptoms. Therefore, a vaccine arises as an alternative to stimulate protective immunity and thereby prevent, delay progression and even reverse CCC. We examined this hypothesis by vaccinating mice with replication-defective human Type 5 recombinant adenoviruses (rAd) carrying sequences of amastigote surface protein-2 (rAdASP2) and trans-sialidase (rAdTS) T. cruzi antigens. For prophylactic vaccination, naïve C57BL/6 mice were immunized with rAdASP2+rAdTS (rAdVax) using a homologous prime/boost protocol before challenge with the Colombian strain. For therapeutic vaccination, rAdVax administration was initiated at 120 days post-infection (dpi), when mice were afflicted by CCC. Mice were analyzed for electrical abnormalities, immune response and cardiac parasitism and tissue damage. Prophylactic immunization with rAdVax induced antibodies and H-2Kb-restricted cytotoxic and interferon (IFN)γ-producing CD8+ T-cells, reduced acute heart parasitism and electrical abnormalities in the chronic phase. Therapeutic vaccination increased survival and reduced electrical abnormalities after the prime (analysis at 160 dpi) and the boost (analysis at 180 and 230 dpi). Post-therapy mice exhibited less heart injury and electrical abnormalities compared with pre-therapy mice. rAdVax therapeutic vaccination preserved specific IFNγ-mediated immunity but reduced the response to polyclonal stimuli (anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28), CD107a+ CD8+ T-cell frequency and plasma nitric oxide (NO) levels. Moreover, therapeutic rAdVax reshaped immunity in the heart tissue as reduced the number of perforin+ cells, preserved the

  1. A Human Type 5 Adenovirus-Based Trypanosoma cruzi Therapeutic Vaccine Re-programs Immune Response and Reverses Chronic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Isabela Resende; Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Marques, Virgínia; da Silva, Andrea Alice; Caetano, Bráulia; Moreira, Otacilio Cruz; Machado, Alexandre Vieira; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD), caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is a prototypical neglected tropical disease. Specific immunity promotes acute phase survival. Nevertheless, one-third of CD patients develop chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) associated with parasite persistence and immunological unbalance. Currently, the therapeutic management of patients only mitigates CCC symptoms. Therefore, a vaccine arises as an alternative to stimulate protective immunity and thereby prevent, delay progression and even reverse CCC. We examined this hypothesis by vaccinating mice with replication-defective human Type 5 recombinant adenoviruses (rAd) carrying sequences of amastigote surface protein-2 (rAdASP2) and trans-sialidase (rAdTS) T. cruzi antigens. For prophylactic vaccination, naïve C57BL/6 mice were immunized with rAdASP2+rAdTS (rAdVax) using a homologous prime/boost protocol before challenge with the Colombian strain. For therapeutic vaccination, rAdVax administration was initiated at 120 days post-infection (dpi), when mice were afflicted by CCC. Mice were analyzed for electrical abnormalities, immune response and cardiac parasitism and tissue damage. Prophylactic immunization with rAdVax induced antibodies and H-2Kb-restricted cytotoxic and interferon (IFN)γ-producing CD8+ T-cells, reduced acute heart parasitism and electrical abnormalities in the chronic phase. Therapeutic vaccination increased survival and reduced electrical abnormalities after the prime (analysis at 160 dpi) and the boost (analysis at 180 and 230 dpi). Post-therapy mice exhibited less heart injury and electrical abnormalities compared with pre-therapy mice. rAdVax therapeutic vaccination preserved specific IFNγ-mediated immunity but reduced the response to polyclonal stimuli (anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28), CD107a+ CD8+ T-cell frequency and plasma nitric oxide (NO) levels. Moreover, therapeutic rAdVax reshaped immunity in the heart tissue as reduced the number of perforin+ cells, preserved the

  2. Strengthened tumor antigen immune recognition by inclusion of a recombinant Eimeria antigen in therapeutic cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Dionisia; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Appledorn, Daniel M; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The need for novel, effective adjuvants that are capable of eliciting stronger cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses to antigenic targets is well understood in the vaccine development field. Unfortunately, many adjuvants investigated thus far are either too toxic for human application or too weak to induce a substantial response against difficult antigens, such as tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). In spite of this trend, clinical investigations of recombinant Eimeria antigen (rEA) have revealed this protein to be a non-toxic immunogenic agent with the ability to trigger a Th1-predominant response in both murine and human subjects. Our past studies have shown that the injection of a rEA-encoding adenovirus (rAd5-rEA) alongside an HIV antigen-encoding adenovirus greatly improves the adaptive immune response against this pathogen-derived transgene. In this report, we investigated whether rAd5-rEA could promote and/or alter cytotoxic memory responses toward carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a colorectal cancer-related TAA. We found that the addition of rAd5-rEA to an Ad-based CEA vaccine induced a dose-dependent increase in several anti-CEA T and B cell responses. Moreover, inclusion of rAd5-rEA increased the number of CEA-derived antigenic epitopes that elicited significant cell-mediated and IgG-mediated recognition. These enhanced anti-CEA immune responses also translated into superior CEA-targeted cell killing, as evaluated by an in vivo cytotoxic T lymphocyte assay. Overall, these results suggest that co-administration of rAd5-rEA with a tumor antigen vaccine can substantially boost and broaden the TAA-specific adaptive memory response, thereby validating the potential of rAd5-rEA to be a beneficial adjuvant during therapeutic cancer vaccination.

  3. Parenteral adenoviral boost enhances BCG induced protection, but not long term survival in a murine model of bovine TB.

    PubMed

    Kaveh, Daryan A; Garcia-Pelayo, M Carmen; Webb, Paul R; Wooff, Esen E; Bachy, Véronique S; Hogarth, Philip J

    2016-07-25

    Boosting BCG using heterologous prime-boost represents a promising strategy for improved tuberculosis (TB) vaccines, and adenovirus (Ad) delivery is established as an efficacious boosting vehicle. Although studies demonstrate that intranasal administration of Ad boost to BCG offers optimal protection, this is not currently possible in cattle. Using Ad vaccine expressing the mycobacterial antigen TB10.4 (BCG/Ad-TB10.4), we demonstrate, parenteral boost of BCG immunised mice to induce specific CD8(+) IFN-γ producing T cells via synergistic priming of new epitopes. This induces significant improvement in pulmonary protection against Mycobacterium bovis over that provided by BCG when assessed in a standard 4week challenge model. However, in a stringent, year-long survival study, BCG/Ad-TB10.4 did not improve outcome over BCG, which we suggest may be due to the lack of additional memory cells (IL-2(+)) induced by boosting. These data indicate BCG-prime/parenteral-Ad-TB10.4-boost to be a promising candidate, but also highlight the need for further understanding of the mechanisms of T cell priming and associated memory using Ad delivery systems. That we were able to generate significant improvement in pulmonary protection above BCG with parenteral, rather than mucosal administration of boost vaccine is critical; suggesting that the generation of effective mucosal immunity is possible, without the risks and challenges of mucosal administration, but that further work to specifically enhance sustained protective immunity is required.

  4. Exercise boosts immune response.

    PubMed

    Sander, Ruth

    2012-06-29

    Ageing is associated with a decline in normal functioning of the immune system described as 'immunosenescence'. This contributes to poorer vaccine response and increased incidence of infection and malignancy seen in older people. Regular exercise can enhance vaccination response, increase T-cells and boost the function of the natural killer cells in the immune system. Exercise also lowers levels of the inflammatory cytokines that cause the 'inflamm-ageing' that is thought to play a role in conditions including cardiovascular disease; type 2 diabetes; Alzheimer's disease; osteoporosis and some cancers.

  5. Adenovirus sensing by the immune system.

    PubMed

    Atasheva, Svetlana; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M

    2016-12-01

    The host immune system developed multiple ways for recognition of viral pathogens. Upon disseminated adenovirus infection, the immune system senses adenovirus invasion from the moment it enters the bloodstream. The soluble blood factors, FX, antibodies, and complement, can bind and activate plethora of host-protective immune responses. Adenovirus binding to the cellular β3 integrin and endosomal membrane rupture trigger activation of IL-1α/IL-1R1 proinflammatory cascade leading to attraction of cytotoxic immune cells to the site of infection. Upon cell entry, adenovirus exposes its DNA genome in the cytoplasm and triggers DNA sensors signaling. Even when inside the nucleus, the specialized cellular machinery that recognizes the double-strand DNA breaks become activated and triggers viral DNA replication arrest. Thus, the host employs very diverse mechanisms to prevent viral dissemination.

  6. Suicide gene therapy using adenovirus vector for human oral squamous carcinoma cell line in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Hayashi, Yasushi; Kagami, Hideaki; Fukui, Takafumi; Fukuhara, Hirokazu; Tohnai, Iwai; Ueda, Minoru; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yoshida, Jun

    2005-06-01

    Recently, suicide gene therapy using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene followed by ganciclovir (GCV) administration was evaluated for the treatment of cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of suicide gene therapy using the replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus vector for human oral squamous carcinoma cell lines. To evaluate transduction efficiency, each cell line was transduced in vitro with an adenovirus vector containing the beta-galactosidase gene. By 24 hours after transduction, nearly 100% of the cells were transduced at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 10, and from 30 to 10% at an MOI of 1. Next, each cell line was transduced with an adenovirus vector containing the HSVtk gene, and a subsequent administration of GCV for the assessment of suicide gene therapy. A subsequent administration of GCV resulted in complete tumor cell death. In addition, we conducted a morphological analysis of that cell death using video-enhanced contrast differential interference contrast microscopy, and we observed that it included both apoptosis and necrosis after HSVtk gene and GCV treatment. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy induced remarkable cytotoxicity with a bystander effect in human oral squamous cell carcinoma thus suggesting an effective treatment strategy for that tumor.

  7. Packaging capacity and stability of human adenovirus type 5 vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bett, A J; Prevec, L; Graham, F L

    1993-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are extensively used for high-level expression of proteins in mammalian cells and are receiving increasing attention for their potential use as live recombinant vaccines and as transducing viruses for use in gene therapy. Although it is commonly argued that one of the chief advantages of adenovirus vectors is their relative stability, this has not been thoroughly investigated. To examine the genetic stability of adenovirus type 5 vectors and in particular to examine the relationship between genetic stability and genome size, adenovirus vectors were constructed with inserts of 4.88 (herpes simplex virus type 1 gB), 4.10 (herpes simplex virus type 1 gB), or 3.82 (LacZ) kb combined with a 1.88-kb E3 deletion or with a newly generated 2.69-kb E3 deletion. The net excess of DNA over the wild-type (wt) genome size ranged from 1.13 to 3.00 kb or 3.1 to 8.3%. Analysis of these vectors during serial passage in tissue culture revealed that when the size exceeded 105% of the wt genome length by approximately 1.2 kb (4.88-kb insert combined with a 1.88-kb deletion), the resulting vector grew very poorly and underwent rapid rearrangement, resulting in loss of the insert after only a few passages. In contrast, vectors with inserts resulting in viral DNA close to or less than a net genome size of 105% of that of the wt grew well and were relatively stable. In general, viruses with genomes only slightly above 105% of that of the wt were unstable and the rapidity with which rearrangement occurred correlated with the size of the insert. These findings suggest that there is a relatively tight constraint on the amount of DNA which can be packaged into virions and that exceeding the limit results in a sharply decreased rate of virus growth. The resultant strong selection for variants which have undergone rearrangement, generating smaller genomes, is manifested as genetic instability of the virus population. Images PMID:8371349

  8. Core labeling of adenovirus with EGFP

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Long P.; Le, Helen N.; Nelson, Amy R.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T. . E-mail: curiel@uab.edu

    2006-08-01

    The study of adenovirus could greatly benefit from diverse methods of virus detection. Recently, it has been demonstrated that carboxy-terminal EGFP fusions of adenovirus core proteins Mu, V, and VII properly localize to the nucleus and display novel function in the cell. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the core proteins may serve as targets for labeling the adenovirus core with fluorescent proteins. To this end, we constructed various chimeric expression vectors with fusion core genes (Mu-EGFP, V-EGFP, preVII-EGFP, and matVII-EGFP) while maintaining expression of the native proteins. Expression of the fusion core proteins was suboptimal using E1 expression vectors with both conventional CMV and modified (with adenovirus tripartite leader sequence) CMV5 promoters, resulting in non-labeled viral particles. However, robust expression equivalent to the native protein was observed when the fusion genes were placed in the deleted E3 region. The efficient Ad-wt-E3-V-EGFP and Ad-wt-E3-preVII-EGFP expression vectors were labeled allowing visualization of purified virus and tracking of the viral core during early infection. The vectors maintained their viral function, including viral DNA replication, viral DNA encapsidation, cytopathic effect, and thermostability. Core labeling offers a means to track the adenovirus core in vector targeting studies as well as basic adenovirus virology.

  9. Nuclear actin and myosins in adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Fuchsova, Beata; Serebryannyy, Leonid A; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2015-11-01

    Adenovirus serotypes have been shown to cause drastic changes in nuclear organization, including the transcription machinery, during infection. This ability of adenovirus to subvert transcription in the host cell facilitates viral replication. Because nuclear actin and nuclear myosin I, myosin V and myosin VI have been implicated as direct regulators of transcription and important factors in the replication of other viruses, we sought to determine how nuclear actin and myosins are involved in adenovirus infection. We first confirmed reorganization of the host's transcription machinery to viral replication centers. We found that nuclear actin also reorganizes to sites of transcription through the intermediate but not the advanced late phase of viral infection. Furthermore, nuclear myosin I localized with nuclear actin and sites of transcription in viral replication centers. Intriguingly, nuclear myosins V and VI, which also reorganized to viral replication centers, exhibited different localization patterns, suggesting specialized roles for these nuclear myosins. Finally, we assessed the role of actin in adenovirus infection and found both cytoplasmic and nuclear actin likely play roles in adenovirus infection and replication. Together our data suggest the involvement of actin and multiple myosins in the nuclear replication and late viral gene expression of adenovirus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2016-05-20

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, D2, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits. By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted Z boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. In conclusion, our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.

  11. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    DOE PAGES

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2016-05-20

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, D2, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits.more » By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted Z boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. In conclusion, our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.« less

  12. Boosted Beta Regression

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Matthias; Wickler, Florian; Maloney, Kelly O.; Mitchell, Richard; Fenske, Nora; Mayr, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Regression analysis with a bounded outcome is a common problem in applied statistics. Typical examples include regression models for percentage outcomes and the analysis of ratings that are measured on a bounded scale. In this paper, we consider beta regression, which is a generalization of logit models to situations where the response is continuous on the interval (0,1). Consequently, beta regression is a convenient tool for analyzing percentage responses. The classical approach to fit a beta regression model is to use maximum likelihood estimation with subsequent AIC-based variable selection. As an alternative to this established - yet unstable - approach, we propose a new estimation technique called boosted beta regression. With boosted beta regression estimation and variable selection can be carried out simultaneously in a highly efficient way. Additionally, both the mean and the variance of a percentage response can be modeled using flexible nonlinear covariate effects. As a consequence, the new method accounts for common problems such as overdispersion and non-binomial variance structures. PMID:23626706

  13. Nucleic acid sequences encoding D1 and D1/D2 domains of human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2010-04-06

    The invention provides recombinant human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) polypeptides which bind adenovirus. Specifically, polypeptides corresponding to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2 are provided. In another aspect, the invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains and expression vectors for producing the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. The invention also includes an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide fused to a polypeptide which facilitates folding of D1 when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a CAR D1-binding virus, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. The invention also provides a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  14. A simple method for the simultaneous detection of E1A and E1B in adenovirus stocks.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Erika; Murata, Takehide; Watanabe, Sanae; Kujime, Yukari; Hirose, Megumi; Pan, Jianzhi; Yamazaki, Takahito; Ugai, Hideyo; Yokoyama, Kazunari K

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors have been developed for use as therapeutic agents and for the introduction of exogenous genes into living cells. However, the occurrence of replication-competent adenoviruses (RCA) in adenovirus stocks produced in 293 cells remains a major problem in terms of the safe use of such vectors. To overcome the problems associated with the occurrence of RCA, we have established a simple method for the simultaneous detection of amplified E1A and E1B from RCA that might contaminate adenoviral stocks. The products amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were fractionated by regular electrophoresis on agarose gels and visualized by staining with ethidium bromide. This method is rapid and inexpensive for detection of RCA in the preparation of adenoviruses.

  15. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and expression of human beta-glucuronidase gene in the liver, spleen, and central nervous system in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mice.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, T; Watabe, K; Uehara, K; Sly, W S; Vogler, C; Eto, Y

    1997-02-18

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (Sly syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase. A murine model of this disorder has been well characterized and used to study a number of forms of experimental therapies, including gene therapy. We produced recombinant adenovirus that expresses human beta-glucuronidase and administered this recombinant adenovirus to beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice intravenously. The beta-glucuronidase activities in liver and spleen were elevated to 40% and 20%, respectively, of the heterozygote enzymatic level at day 16. Expression persisted for at least 35 days. Pathological abnormalities of these tissues were also improved, and the elevated levels of urinary glycosaminoglycans were reduced in treated mice. However, the beta-glucuronidase activity in kidney and brain was not significantly increased. After administration of the recombinant adenovirus directly into the lateral ventricles of mutant mice, the beta-glucuronidase activity in crude brain homogenates increased to 30% of heterozygote activity. Histochemical demonstration of beta-glucuronidase activity in brain revealed that the enzymatic activity was mainly in ependymal cells and choroid. However, in some regions, the adenovirus-mediated gene expression was also evident in brain parenchyma associated with vessels and in the meninges. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated gene delivery might improve the central nervous system pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis in addition to correcting visceral pathology.

  16. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and expression of human β-glucuronidase gene in the liver, spleen, and central nervous system in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Toya; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Uehara, Keiko; Sly, William S.; Vogler, Carole; Eto, Yoshikatsu

    1997-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (Sly syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase. A murine model of this disorder has been well characterized and used to study a number of forms of experimental therapies, including gene therapy. We produced recombinant adenovirus that expresses human β-glucuronidase and administered this recombinant adenovirus to β-glucuronidase-deficient mice intravenously. The β-glucuronidase activities in liver and spleen were elevated to 40% and 20%, respectively, of the heterozygote enzymatic level at day 16. Expression persisted for at least 35 days. Pathological abnormalities of these tissues were also improved, and the elevated levels of urinary glycosaminoglycans were reduced in treated mice. However, the β-glucuronidase activity in kidney and brain was not significantly increased. After administration of the recombinant adenovirus directly into the lateral ventricles of mutant mice, the β-glucuronidase activity in crude brain homogenates increased to 30% of heterozygote activity. Histochemical demonstration of β-glucuronidase activity in brain revealed that the enzymatic activity was mainly in ependymal cells and choroid. However, in some regions, the adenovirus-mediated gene expression was also evident in brain parenchyma associated with vessels and in the meninges. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated gene delivery might improve the central nervous system pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis in addition to correcting visceral pathology. PMID:9037045

  17. Robust boosting via convex optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rätsch, Gunnar

    2001-12-01

    In this work we consider statistical learning problems. A learning machine aims to extract information from a set of training examples such that it is able to predict the associated label on unseen examples. We consider the case where the resulting classification or regression rule is a combination of simple rules - also called base hypotheses. The so-called boosting algorithms iteratively find a weighted linear combination of base hypotheses that predict well on unseen data. We address the following issues: o The statistical learning theory framework for analyzing boosting methods. We study learning theoretic guarantees on the prediction performance on unseen examples. Recently, large margin classification techniques emerged as a practical result of the theory of generalization, in particular Boosting and Support Vector Machines. A large margin implies a good generalization performance. Hence, we analyze how large the margins in boosting are and find an improved algorithm that is able to generate the maximum margin solution. o How can boosting methods be related to mathematical optimization techniques? To analyze the properties of the resulting classification or regression rule, it is of high importance to understand whether and under which conditions boosting converges. We show that boosting can be used to solve large scale constrained optimization problems, whose solutions are well characterizable. To show this, we relate boosting methods to methods known from mathematical optimization, and derive convergence guarantees for a quite general family of boosting algorithms. o How to make Boosting noise robust? One of the problems of current boosting techniques is that they are sensitive to noise in the training sample. In order to make boosting robust, we transfer the soft margin idea from support vector learning to boosting. We develop theoretically motivated regularized algorithms that exhibit a high noise robustness. o How to adapt boosting to regression problems

  18. Incorporation of adenovirus in calcium phosphate precipitates enhances gene transfer to airway epithelia in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Fasbender, A; Lee, J H; Walters, R W; Moninger, T O; Zabner, J; Welsh, M J

    1998-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia is inefficient because the apical membrane lacks the receptor activity to bind adenovirus fiber protein. Calcium phosphate (CaPi) precipitates have been used to deliver plasmid DNA to cultured cell lines. However, such precipitates are not effective in many primary cultures or in vivo. Here we show that incorporating recombinant adenovirus into a CaPi coprecipitate markedly enhances transgene expression in cells that are resistant to adenovirus infection. Enhancement requires that the virus be contained in the precipitate and viral proteins are required to increase expression. Ad: CaPi coprecipitates increase gene transfer by increasing fiber-independent binding of virus to cells. With differentiated cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelia in vitro, a 20-min application of Ad:CaPi coprecipitates that encode CF transmembrane conductance regulator produced as much CF transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- current as a 24-h application of adenovirus alone. We found that Ad:CaPi coprecipitates also increased transgene expression in mouse lung in vivo; importantly, expression was particularly prominent in airway epithelia. These results suggest a new mechanism for gene transfer that may be applicable to a number of different gene transfer applications and could be of value in gene transfer to CF airway epithelia in vivo. PMID:9649572

  19. Chromosomal damage induced by human adenovirus type 12 requires expression of the E1B 55-kilodalton viral protein.

    PubMed Central

    Schramayr, S; Caporossi, D; Mak, I; Jelinek, T; Bacchetti, S

    1990-01-01

    Infection of human embryonic kidney cells with adenovirus type 12 results in the induction of damage at specific (17q21-22, 1p36, 1q21, and 1q42-43) and random sites in the cellular chromosomes. A previous study by Durnam et al. (D. M. Durnam, P. P. Smith, J. C. Menninger, and J. K. McDougall, Cancer Cells 4:349-354, 1986) indicated that the expression of viral early region 1 (E1) is sufficient for the induction of damage at band 17q21-22. In the present report we used an adenovirus type 12-adenovirus type 5 recombinant with E1A hybrid sequences as well as viruses with mutations in the adenovirus type 12 E1B genes to map adenovirus type 12 E1 functions involved in the induction of genetic damage. Our results show that the expression of the E1A proteins is not sufficient for this effect. On the other hand, mutations within the E1B 55-kilodalton protein but not the E1B 19-kilodalton protein affect the ability of the virus to induce both specific and random chromosomal damage. Images PMID:2325204

  20. Molecular Analysis of Adenovirus Isolates from Previously Vaccinated Young Adults

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF ADENOVIRUS ISOLATES FROM PREVIOUSLY VACCINATED YOUNG ADULTS D. A. Blasiole...Molecular Analysis of Adenovirus Isolates From Previously Vaccinated Young Adults . 6. AUTHORS Daniel A Blasiole, David Metzgar, Luke T Daum, Margaret AK

  1. Mechanistic Aspects of Adenovirus Serotype 2 Inactivation with Free Chlorine ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Page, Martin A.; Shisler, Joanna L.; Mariñas, Benito J.

    2010-01-01

    Free chlorine is an effective disinfectant for controlling adenoviruses in drinking water, but little is known about the underlying inactivation mechanisms. The objective of this study was to elucidate the molecular components of adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) targeted by free chlorine during the inactivation process. The effects of free chlorine treatment on several Ad2 molecular components and associated life cycle events were compared to its effect on the ability of adenovirus to complete its life cycle, i.e., viability. Free chlorine treatment of Ad2 virions did not impair their ability to interact with monoclonal antibodies specific for hexon and fiber proteins of the Ad2 capsid, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, nor did it impair their interaction with recombinant, purified Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) proteins in vitro. Free chlorine-treated Ad2 virions also retained their ability to bind to CAR receptors on A549 cell monolayers, despite being unable to form plaques, suggesting that free chlorine inactivates Ad2 by inhibiting a postbinding event of the Ad2 life cycle. DNA isolated from Ad2 virions that had been inactivated by free chlorine was able to be amplified by PCR, indicating that genome damage was not the cause of inactivation. However, inactivated Ad2 virions were unable to express E1A viral proteins during infection of A549 host cells, as measured by using immunoblotting. Collectively, these results indicate that free chlorine inactivates adenovirus by damaging proteins that govern life cycle processes occurring after host cell attachment, such as endocytosis, endosomal lysis, or nuclear delivery. PMID:20305026

  2. Adenovirus mediated BIMS transfer induces growth supression and apoptosis in Raji lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya Ning; Li, Qiang

    2014-09-01

    To transfer pro-apoptotic BIM directly into tumor cells bypass the complicated biological processes of BIM activation so as to reverse the chemoresistance of cancer cells. BIMS was specifically amplified from HL-60 cells by RT-PCR, confirmed to be correct by sequencing and cloned into shuttle vector pAdTrack-CMV carrying a green fluorescence protein gene to generate a recombinant plasmid pAdTrack-CMV-BIMS. This plasmid and adenovirus backbone plasmid pAdEasy-1 were linearized and electroporated into E.coli BJ5183 host bacteria to mediate homologous recombination. The positive clone was identified by restrict endonuclease digestion. The recombinant pAdEasy-CMV-BIMS was transferred into HEK293 cells for packaging and amplification. The successful construction of recombinant human BIMS adenovirus (Ad-BIMS) was demonstrated by Western blot. To test whether Ad-BIMS has the capability of inducing apoptosis of tumor cells, Ad-BIMS was used to infect GC resistant Burkitt lymphoma Raji cells. After infected for 2-5 days, BIMS expression in Raji cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. The significant growth retardation and apoptosis of Raji cells were also observed by MTT and flow cytometry. These results indicated that BIMS might be a potential candidate of gene therapy for chemoresistant tumor cells. Copyright © 2014 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  3. Rotavirus and adenovirus gastroenteritis: time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Celik, Cem; Gozel, Mustafa Gokhan; Turkay, Hakan; Bakici, Mustafa Zahir; Güven, Ahmet Sami; Elaldi, Nazif

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of changes in weather conditions (monthly average temperature, monthly minimum temperature, monthly average humidity) on rotavirus and adenovirus gastroenteritis frequency and whether there was a seasonal correlation. Between 2006 and 2012, 4702 fecal samples were taken from patients ≤ 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis; these samples were analyzed in terms of rotavirus group A and adenovirus serotype 40-41 antigens using time-series and negative binomial regression analysis. Rotavirus antigens were found in 797 samples (17.0%), adenovirus antigens in 113 samples (2.4%), and rotavirus and adenovirus antigens together in 16 samples (0.3%). There was a seasonal change in rotavirus gastroenteritis (P < 0.001), and a 1°C decrease in average temperature increased the ratio of rotavirus cases in those with diarrhea by 0.523%. In addition, compared with data from other years, the number of patients was lower in the first month of 2008 and in the second month of 2012, when the temperature was below -20°C (monthly minimum temperature). There was no statistically significant relationship between adenovirus infection and change in weather conditions. Various factors such as change in weather conditions, as well as the population's sensitivity and associated changes in activity, play a role in the spread of rotavirus infection. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  4. Elasticity and Binding of Adenovirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Garrett; Negishi, Atsuko; Seeger, Adam; McCarty, Doug; Taylor, Russell; Samulshi, Jude; Superfine, Richard

    1999-11-01

    Adenovirus was the first human virus found to cause the transformation of cells and is one of the more common vectors being used for the development of gene therapy. As such, much is known about the viral structure and genome; however, the events of the early infection cycle, such as binding of the virus to the cell membrane and the release of genetic material from the capsid, for this and other nonenveloped viruses, are not fully understood. With the atomic force microscope (AFM) we are able to image the virus in both air and liquids, allowing us to change the surrounding environment, varying such physiologically relevant parameters as osmolality or pH. We additionally have the ability to do manipulations on single virus particles in these environments using the nanoManipulator. The nanoManipulator is an advanced interface for AFM that allows real time three dimensional rendering of the topographical data, allows the sample surface to be non-destructively felt using a hand held stylus that responds to the information being sensed at the tip, and allows controlled modification of the surface. Using this tool we have translated single virions over various surfaces, allowing us to measure the adhesion between the capsid and these surfaces. Additionally, we are able to place the tip directly atop individual viruses and measure their elasticity under a compressive load being supplied by that tip. We can explore how this property changes as a function of the properties of the surrounding liquid.

  5. Components of Adenovirus Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are icosahedral viruses with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Genome packaging in AdV is thought to be similar to that seen in dsDNA containing icosahedral bacteriophages and herpesviruses. Specific recognition of the AdV genome is mediated by a packaging domain located close to the left end of the viral genome and is mediated by the viral packaging machinery. Our understanding of the role of various components of the viral packaging machinery in AdV genome packaging has greatly advanced in recent years. Characterization of empty capsids assembled in the absence of one or more components involved in packaging, identification of the unique vertex, and demonstration of the role of IVa2, the putative packaging ATPase, in genome packaging have provided compelling evidence that AdVs follow a sequential assembly pathway. This review provides a detailed discussion on the functions of the various viral and cellular factors involved in AdV genome packaging. We conclude by briefly discussing the roles of the empty capsids, assembly intermediates, scaffolding proteins, portal vertex and DNA encapsidating enzymes in AdV assembly and packaging. PMID:27721809

  6. Adenovirus Serotype 14 Infection, New Brunswick, Canada, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Garceau, Richard; Thibault, Louise; Oussedik, Youcef; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    We describe 3 culture-proven cases of adenovirus serotype 14 infection in New Brunswick, Canada, during the summer of 2011. Strains isolated from severely ill patients were closely related to strains of a genomic variant, adenovirus 14p1, circulating in the United States and Ireland. Physicians in Canada should be aware of this emerging adenovirus. PMID:23260201

  7. Project BOOST implementation: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark V; Li, Jing; Hansen, Luke O; Forth, Victoria; Budnitz, Tina; Greenwald, Jeffrey L; Howell, Eric; Halasyamani, Lakshmi; Vidyarthi, Arpana; Coleman, Eric A

    2014-07-01

    Enhancing care coordination and reducing hospital readmissions have been a focus of multiple quality improvement (QI) initiatives. Project BOOST (Better Outcomes by Optimizing Safe Transitions) aims to enhance the discharge transition from hospital to home. Previous research indicates that QI initiatives originating externally often face difficulties gaining momentum or effecting lasting change in a hospital. We performed a qualitative evaluation of Project BOOST implementation by examining the successes and failures experienced by six pilot sites. We also evaluated the unique physician mentoring component of this program. Finally, we examined the impact of intensification of the physician mentoring model on adoption of BOOST interventions in two later Illinois cohorts (27 hospitals). Qualitative analysis of six pilot hospitals used a process of methodological triangulation and analysis of the BOOST enrollment applications, the listserv, and content from telephone interviews. Evaluation of BOOST implementation at Illinois hospitals occurred via mid-year and year-end surveys. The identified common barriers included inadequate understanding of the current discharge process, insufficient administrative support, lack of protected time or dedicated resources, and lack of frontline staff buy-in. Facilitators of implementation included the mentor, a small beginning, teamwork, and proactive engagement of the patient. Notably, hospitals viewed their mentors as essential facilitators of change. Sites consistently commented that the individualized mentoring was extremely helpful and provided significant accountability and stimulated creativity. In the Illinois cohorts, the improved mentoring model showed more complete implementation of BOOST interventions. The implementation of Project BOOST was well received by hospitals, although sites faced substantial barriers consistent with other QI research reports. The unique mentorship element of Project BOOST proved extremely

  8. Early detection and visualization of human adenovirus serotype 5-viral vectors carrying foot-and-mouth disease virus or luciferase transgenes in cell lines and bovine tissues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recombinant replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vaccines containing capsid-coding regions from foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) have been demonstrated to induce effective immune responses and provide homologous protective immunity against FMDV in cattle. However, basic mechanisms ...

  9. ADV36 adipogenic adenovirus in human liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Garozzo, Adriana; Martines, G Fabio; Pirri, Clara; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and liver steatosis are usually described as related diseases. Obesity is regarded as exclusive consequence of an imbalance between food intake and physical exercise, modulated by endocrine and genetic factors. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is a condition whose natural history is related to, but not completely explained by over-nutrition, obesity and insulin resistance. There is evidence that environmental infections, and notably adipogenic adenoviruses (ADV) infections in humans, are associated not only with obesity, which is sufficiently established, but also with allied conditions, such as fatty liver. In order to elucidate the role, if any, of previous ADV36 infection in humans, we investigated association of ADV36-ADV37 seropositivity with obesity and fatty liver in humans. Moreover, the possibility that lifestyle-nutritional intervention in patients with NAFLD and different ADV36 seropositive status, achieves different clinical outcomes on ultrasound bright liver imaging, insulin resistance and obesity was challenged. ADV36 seropositive patients have a more consistent decrease in insulin resistance, fatty liver severity and body weight in comparison with ADV36 seronegative patients, indicating a greater responsiveness to nutritional intervention. These effects were not dependent on a greater pre-interventional body weight and older age. These results imply that no obvious disadvantage - and, seemingly, that some benefit - is linked to ADV36 seropositivity, at least in NAFLD. ADV36 previous infection can boost weight loss and recovery of insulin sensitivity under interventional treatment. PMID:25356033

  10. Rapid Adenovirus typing method for species identification.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Fabienne; Wittkop, Linda; Bader, Clément; Kassab, Somar; Tumiotto, Camille; Berciaud, Sylvie; Wodrich, Harald; Lafon, Marie-Edith

    2017-11-01

    Adenoviruses are characterized by a large variability, reflected by their classification in species A to G. Certain species, eg A and C, could be associated with increased clinical severity, both in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts suggesting that in some instances species identification provides clinically relevant information. Here we designed a novel "pVI rapid typing method" to obtain quick, simple and cost effective species assignment for Adenoviruses, thanks to combined fusion temperature (Tm) and amplicon size analysis. Rapid typing results were compared to Sanger sequencing in the hexon gene for 140 Adenovirus-positive clinical samples included in the Typadeno study. Species A and C could be identified with a 100% positive predictive value, thus confirming the value of this simple typing method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. AveBoost2: Boosting for Noisy Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.

    2004-01-01

    AdaBoost is a well-known ensemble learning algorithm that constructs its constituent or base models in sequence. A key step in AdaBoost is constructing a distribution over the training examples to create each base model. This distribution, represented as a vector, is constructed to be orthogonal to the vector of mistakes made by the pre- vious base model in the sequence. The idea is to make the next base model's errors uncorrelated with those of the previous model. In previous work, we developed an algorithm, AveBoost, that constructed distributions orthogonal to the mistake vectors of all the previous models, and then averaged them to create the next base model s distribution. Our experiments demonstrated the superior accuracy of our approach. In this paper, we slightly revise our algorithm to allow us to obtain non-trivial theoretical results: bounds on the training error and generalization error (difference between training and test error). Our averaging process has a regularizing effect which, as expected, leads us to a worse training error bound for our algorithm than for AdaBoost but a superior generalization error bound. For this paper, we experimented with the data that we used in both as originally supplied and with added label noise-a small fraction of the data has its original label changed. Noisy data are notoriously difficult for AdaBoost to learn. Our algorithm's performance improvement over AdaBoost is even greater on the noisy data than the original data.

  12. Boosted ellipsoid ARTMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, Georgios C.; Georgiopoulos, Michael; Verzi, Steven J.; Heileman, Gregory L.

    2002-03-01

    Ellipsoid ARTMAP (EAM) is an adaptive-resonance-theory neural network architecture that is capable of successfully performing classification tasks using incremental learning. EAM achieves its task by summarizing labeled input data via hyper-ellipsoidal structures (categories). A major property of EAM, when using off-line fast learning, is that it perfectly learns its training set after training has completed. Depending on the classification problems at hand, this fact implies that off-line EAM training may potentially suffer from over-fitting. For such problems we present an enhancement to the basic Ellipsoid ARTMAP architecture, namely Boosted Ellipsoid ARTMAP (bEAM), that is designed to simultaneously improve the generalization properties and reduce the number of created categories for EAM's off-line fast learning. This is being accomplished by forcing EAM to be tolerant about occasional misclassification errors during fast learning. An additional advantage provided by bEAM's desing is the capability of learning inconsistent cases, that is, learning identical patterns with contradicting class labels. After we present the theory behind bEAM's enhancements, we provide some preliminary experimental results, which compare the new variant to the original EAM network, Probabilistic EAM and three different variants of the Restricted Coulomb Energy neural network on the square-in-a-square classification problem.

  13. Bidirectional buck boost converter

    DOEpatents

    Esser, Albert Andreas Maria

    1998-03-31

    A bidirectional buck boost converter and method of operating the same allows regulation of power flow between first and second voltage sources in which the voltage level at each source is subject to change and power flow is independent of relative voltage levels. In one embodiment, the converter is designed for hard switching while another embodiment implements soft switching of the switching devices. In both embodiments, first and second switching devices are serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a first voltage source with third and fourth switching devices serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a second voltage source. A free-wheeling diode is coupled, respectively, in parallel opposition with respective ones of the switching devices. An inductor is coupled between a junction of the first and second switching devices and a junction of the third and fourth switching devices. Gating pulses supplied by a gating circuit selectively enable operation of the switching devices for transferring power between the voltage sources. In the second embodiment, each switching device is shunted by a capacitor and the switching devices are operated when voltage across the device is substantially zero.

  14. Bidirectional buck boost converter

    DOEpatents

    Esser, A.A.M.

    1998-03-31

    A bidirectional buck boost converter and method of operating the same allows regulation of power flow between first and second voltage sources in which the voltage level at each source is subject to change and power flow is independent of relative voltage levels. In one embodiment, the converter is designed for hard switching while another embodiment implements soft switching of the switching devices. In both embodiments, first and second switching devices are serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a first voltage source with third and fourth switching devices serially coupled between a relatively positive terminal and a relatively negative terminal of a second voltage source. A free-wheeling diode is coupled, respectively, in parallel opposition with respective ones of the switching devices. An inductor is coupled between a junction of the first and second switching devices and a junction of the third and fourth switching devices. Gating pulses supplied by a gating circuit selectively enable operation of the switching devices for transferring power between the voltage sources. In the second embodiment, each switching device is shunted by a capacitor and the switching devices are operated when voltage across the device is substantially zero. 20 figs.

  15. Postexposure Protection Against Marburg Haemorrhagic Fever with Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vectors in Non-Human Primates: An Efficacy Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-29

    virus (MARV). We aimed to test the effi cacy of a replication -competent vaccine based on attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV...including vaccines based on recombinant adenoviruses12,13 and recombinant alphaviruses .8 We previously described the generation and assessment of a live...such as Marburg virus (MARV). We aimed to test the efficacy of a replication -competent vaccine based on attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis

  16. Circumvention of Immunity to the Adenovirus Major Coat Protein Hexon

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumitra; Shirley, Pamela S.; McClelland, Alan; Kaleko, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Immunity to adenoviruses is an important hurdle to be overcome for successful gene therapy. The presence of antibodies to the capsid proteins prevents efficacious adenovirus vector administration in vivo. We tested whether immunity to a particular serotype of adenovirus (Ad5) may be overcome with a vector that encodes the hexon sequences from a different adenovirus serotype (Ad12). We successfully constructed an adenovirus vector with a chimeric Ad5-Ad12 hexon which was not neutralized by plasma from C57BL/6 mice immunized with Ad5. The vector was also capable of transducing the livers of C57BL/6 mice previously immunized with Ad5. PMID:9658137

  17. Yoga May Boost Aging Brains

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_167693.html Yoga May Boost Aging Brains Changes seen in areas involved with attention and ... may have greater "thickness" in areas of the brain involved in memory and attention, a small study ...

  18. The long repeat region is dispensable for fowl adenovirus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ojkic, D; Nagy, E

    2001-05-10

    Two regions containing tandemly repeated sequences are present in the fowl adenovirus 9 (FAdV-9) genome. The longer repeat region (TR-2) is composed of 13 contiguous 135-bp-long direct repeats, the function of which is unknown. An infectious FAdV-9 genomic clone, constructed by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli, was used for engineering of recombinant viruses. The enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) coding sequence was cloned in both rightward and leftward orientations so as to replace TR-2. Replication-competent recombinant FAdVs were recovered, demonstrating that TR-2 was dispensable for FAdV-9 propagation in vitro. The expression of EGFP in infected cells was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy, immunoprecipitation, and RT-PCR.

  19. Immunologic and Genetic Selection of Adenovirus Vaccine Strains: Synthesis and Characterization of Adenovirus Antigens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    exhibited strikingly different chromatographic characteristics. 2. Effect of proflavine on the synthesis of adenovirus, type 5, and associated soluble...antigens. The synthesis of type 5 adenovirus in HeLa cells was suppressed to a considerable extent by low concentrations of proflavine , an acridine dye...chemical. Addition of proflavine to infected cells at different times during the virus growth cycle revealed that the processes leading to the synthesis

  20. Phylogenetic Analysis and Structural Predictions of Human Adenovirus Penton Proteins as a Basis for Tissue-Specific Adenovirus Vector Design▿

    PubMed Central

    Madisch, Ijad; Hofmayer, Soeren; Moritz, Christian; Grintzalis, Alexander; Hainmueller, Jens; Pring-Akerblom, Patricia; Heim, Albert

    2007-01-01

    The penton base is a major capsid protein of human adenoviruses (HAdV) which forms the vertices of the capsid and interacts with hexon and fiber protein. Two hypervariable loops of the penton are exposed on the capsid surface. Sequences of these and 300 adjacent amino acid residues of all 51 HAdV and closely related simian adenoviruses were studied. Adjacent sequences and predicted overall secondary structure were conserved. Phylogenetic analysis revealed clustering corresponding to the HAdV species and recombination events in the origin of HAdV prototypes. All HAdV except serotypes 40 and 41 of species F exhibited an integrin binding RGD motif in the second loop. The lengths of the loops (HVR1 and RGD loops) varied significantly between HAdV species with the longest RGD loop observed in species C and the longest HVR1 in species B. Long loops may permit the insertion of motifs that modify tissue tropism. Genetic analysis of HAdV prime strain p17′H30, a neutralization variant of HAdV-D17, indicated the significance of nonhexon neutralization epitopes for HAdV immune escape. Fourteen highly conserved motifs of the penton base were analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis of HAdV-D8 and tested for sustained induction of early cytopathic effects. Thus, three new motifs essential for penton base function were identified additionally to the RGD site, which interacts with a secondary cellular receptor responsible for internalization. Therefore, our penton primary structure data and secondary structure modeling in combination with the recently published fiber knob sequences may permit the rational design of tissue-specific adenoviral vectors. PMID:17522221

  1. Intramuscular delivery of adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing humanized protective antigen induces rapid protection against anthrax that may bypass intranasally originated preexisting adenovirus immunity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shipo; Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ying; Song, Xiaohong; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Ju; Chen, Jianqin; Yin, Ying; Xu, Junjie; Hou, Lihua; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Developing an effective anthrax vaccine that can induce a rapid and sustained immune response is a priority for the prevention of bioterrorism-associated anthrax infection. Here, we developed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus serotype 5-based vaccine expressing the humanized protective antigen (Ad5-PAopt). A single intramuscular injection of Ad5-PAopt resulted in rapid and robust humoral and cellular immune responses in Fisher 344 rats. Animals intramuscularly inoculated with a single dose of 10⁸ infectious units of Ad5-PAopt achieved 100% protection from challenge with 10 times the 50% lethal dose (LD₅₀) of anthrax lethal toxin 7 days after vaccination. Although preexisting intranasally induced immunity to Ad5 slightly weakened the humoral and cellular immune responses to Ad5-PAopt via intramuscular inoculation, 100% protection was achieved 15 days after vaccination in Fisher 344 rats. The protective efficacy conferred by intramuscular vaccination in the presence of preexisting intranasally induced immunity was significantly better than that of intranasal delivery of Ad5-PAopt and intramuscular injection with recombinant PA and aluminum adjuvant without preexisting immunity. As natural Ad5 infection often occurs via the mucosal route, the work here largely illuminates that intramuscular inoculation with Ad5-PAopt can overcome the negative effects of immunity induced by prior adenovirus infection and represents an efficient approach for protecting against emerging anthrax.

  2. Proposed Nomenclature for Mutants of Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Harold S.; Williams, James F.; Doerfler, Walter H.; Shimojo, Hiroto

    1973-01-01

    In accord with the nomenclature proposed for mutants of simian virus 40 the same rules, with minor modifications, are recommended for naming mutants of adenoviruses. It is further suggested that these rules, which pertain to a system of classification based primarily upon complementation analysis, also be applied to mutants of other DNA-containing animal viruses. PMID:4355864

  3. Structure and Uncoating of Immature Adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Berna, A.J.; Mangel, W.; Marabini, R.; Scheres, S. H. W., Menendez-Conejero, R.; Dmitriev, I. P.; Curiel, D. T.; Flint, S. J.; San Martin, C.

    2009-09-18

    Maturation via proteolytic processing is a common trait in the viral world and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion, and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytic processing are not infectious. We studied the three-dimensional structure of immature adenovirus particles as represented by the adenovirus type 2 thermosensitive mutant ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions and compared it with the mature capsid. Our three-dimensional electron microscopy maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large-scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the locations of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged.

  4. Inactivation of adenovirus type 5 by caustics.

    PubMed

    Jannat, Risat; Hsu, David; Maheshwari, Gargi

    2005-01-01

    Adenovirus shows significant promise as a vehicle for transfer of therapeutic genes into humans. Based on the importance of this viral vector, it is critical that adequate decontamination procedures are implemented during its large-scale production in multiproduct manufacturing facilities to prevent cross-product contamination and to reduce the risk of personnel exposure. Liquid decontamination procedures based on caustics are easily implemented in a manufacturing setting and are not corrosive to stainless steel surfaces at the concentrations found to inactivate viral proteins and nucleic acids. In this study, we have conducted small-scale experiments to determine the effectiveness of caustic inactivation procedures on adenovirus type 5 and have evaluated the robustness of the process to different sample matrices and adenovirus constructs. We find that the pH of a sample post-addition of caustic solution is a more accurate indicator of the effectiveness of the caustic than its concentration. We have demonstrated that a greater than 6 log reduction in the potency of adenovirus type 5 may be obtained upon exposure of the sample to sodium hydroxide and CIP-100 at concentrations greater than 0.09 M and 0.9%, respectively, at times greater than 10 min.

  5. Optimization of Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategies Against Mouse-Adapted Ebolavirus in a Short-Term Protection Study.

    PubMed

    Aviles, Jenna; Bello, Alexander; Wong, Gary; Fausther-Bovendo, Hugues; Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary

    2015-10-01

    In nonhuman primates, complete protection against an Ebola virus (EBOV) challenge has previously been achieved after a single injection with several vaccine platforms. However, long-term protection against EBOV after a single immunization has not been demonstrated to this date. Interestingly, prime-boost regimens have demonstrated longer protection against EBOV challenge, compared with single immunizations. Since prime-boost regimens have the potential to achieve long-term protection, determining optimal vector combinations is crucial. However, testing prime-boost efficiency in long-term protection studies is time consuming and resource demanding. Here, we investigated the optimal prime-boost combination, using DNA, porcine-derived adeno-associated virus serotype 6 (AAV-po6), and human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector, in a short-term protection study in the mouse model of EBOV infection. In addition, we also investigated which immune parameters were indicative of a strong boost. Each vaccine platform was titrated in mice to identify which dose (single immunization) induced approximately 20% protection after challenge with a mouse-adapted EBOV. These doses were then used to determine the protection efficacy of various prime-boost combinations, using the same mouse model. In addition, humoral and cellular immune responses against EBOV glycoprotein were analyzed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a neutralizing antibody assay, and an interferon γ-specific enzyme-linked immunospot assay. When DNA was used as a prime, Ad5 boost induced the best protection, which correlated with a higher cellular response. In contrast, when AAV-po6 or Ad5 were injected first, better protection was achieved after DNA boost, and this correlated with a higher total glycoprotein-specific immunoglobulin G titer. Prime-boost regimens using independent vaccine platforms may provide a useful strategy to induce long-term immune protection against filoviruses. © Crown copyright 2015.

  6. Limited temperature-sensitive transactivation by mutant adenovirus type 2 E1a proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fahnestock, M L; Lewis, J B

    1989-01-01

    A series of linker-scanning and deletion mutations was generated in the transactivating domain of the larger, 289-amino-acid-residue E1a protein of adenovirus type 2. Mutant genes were recombined into virus to assay the ability of the variant E1a proteins to activate expression of an E1a-dependent viral gene during infection. Results of assays performed at 32, 37, and 40 degrees C indicated that at least 2 of the 10 mutants tested showed limited temperature sensitivity for transactivation. Images PMID:2523001

  7. Suppression of Adenovirus Replication by Cardiotonic Steroids.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Filomena; Stoilov, Peter; Lingwood, Clifford; Brown, Martha; Cochrane, Alan

    2017-02-01

    The dependence of adenovirus on the host pre-RNA splicing machinery for expression of its complete genome potentially makes it vulnerable to modulators of RNA splicing, such as digoxin and digitoxin. Both drugs reduced the yields of four human adenoviruses (HAdV-A31, -B35, and -C5 and a species D conjunctivitis isolate) by at least 2 to 3 logs by affecting one or more steps needed for genome replication. Immediate early E1A protein levels are unaffected by the drugs, but synthesis of the delayed protein E4orf6 and the major late capsid protein hexon is compromised. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that both drugs altered E1A RNA splicing (favoring the production of 13S over 12S RNA) early in infection and partially blocked the transition from 12S and 13S to 9S RNA at late stages of virus replication. Expression of multiple late viral protein mRNAs was lost in the presence of either drug, consistent with the observed block in viral DNA replication. The antiviral effect was dependent on the continued presence of the drug and was rapidly reversible. RIDK34, a derivative of convallotoxin, although having more potent antiviral activity, did not show an improved selectivity index. All three drugs reduced metabolic activity to some degree without evidence of cell death. By blocking adenovirus replication at one or more steps beyond the onset of E1A expression and prior to genome replication, digoxin and digitoxin show potential as antiviral agents for treatment of serious adenovirus infections. Furthermore, understanding the mechanism(s) by which digoxin and digitoxin inhibit adenovirus replication will guide the development of novel antiviral therapies.

  8. Listeria-vectored vaccine expressing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 30 kDa major secretory protein via the constitutively active prfA* regulon boosts BCG efficacy against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qingmei; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Masleša-Galić, Saša; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2017-06-19

    A potent vaccine against tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest diseases, is needed to enhance the immunity of people worldwide, most of whom have been vaccinated with the partially effective BCG vaccine. Here we investigate novel live attenuated recombinant Listeria monocytogenes (rLm) vaccines expressing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) 30 kDa major secretory protein (r30/Ag85B) (rLm30) as heterologous booster vaccines in animals primed with BCG. Using three attenuated Lm vectors, rLm ΔactA (LmI), rLm ΔactA ΔinlB (LmII), and rLm ΔactA ΔinlBprfA* (LmIII), we constructed five rLm30 vaccine candidates expressing the r30 linked in-frame to the Lm Listeriolycin O signal sequence and driven by the hly promoter (h30) or linked in-frame to the ActA N-terminus and driven by the actA promoter (a30). All five rLm30 vaccines secreted r30 in broth and macrophages; while rLm expressing r30 via a constitutively active prfA* regulon (rLmIII/a30) expressed the greatest amount of r30 in broth culture, all five rLm vaccines expressed equivalent amounts of r30 in infected macrophages. In comparative studies, boosting BCG-immunized mice with rLmIII/a30 induced the strongest antigen-specific T-cell responses, including splenic and lung polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells expressing the three cytokines of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) (P < 0.001) and splenic and lung CD8+ T-cells expressing IFN-γ (P < 0.0001). In mice and guinea pigs, rLmIII/a30 and rLmI/h30 vaccines were generally more potent booster vaccines than r30 in adjuvant and a recombinant adenovirus vaccine expressing r30. In a setting in which BCG alone was highly immunoprotective, boosting mice with rLmIII/a30, the most potent of the vaccines, significantly enhanced protection against aerosolized Mtb (P <0.01). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. The product of the adenovirus intermediate gene IX is a transcriptional activator.

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, P; Rosa-Calatrava, M; Kedinger, C

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the functional properties of the product of the adenovirus type 5 gene IX. This gene, which is expressed at intermediate times postinfection, encodes a small polypeptide (pIX) of 140 residues that has previously been shown to be incorporated into the viral capsid. Here, we show that pIX, in addition to its structural contribution, exhibits transcriptional properties. In transient transfection experiments, expression of pIX stimulated adenovirus major late promoter activity. The effect was independent of other viral proteins, but the level of promoter activation appeared strongly pIX dose dependent; similar levels of induction were observed with other cellular or viral TATA-containing (but not with TATA-less) promoters. This promoter specificity could be reproduced in a cell-free transcription system by the addition of purified recombinant pIX, further stressing the transcriptional nature of the phenomenon. A preliminary structural analysis of pIX indicated that the integrity of a putative leucine zipper at the carboxy-terminal end of the molecule, as well as elements within the amino-terminal half, was critical for pIX transcriptional activity. The relevance of these findings in adenovirus infection is discussed. PMID:9188576

  10. Combination of adenovirus and cross-linked low molecular weight PEI improves efficiency of gene transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianfeng; Zhao, Dong; Zhong, Zhirong; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2010-03-01

    Recombinant adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene therapy is an exciting novel strategy in cancer treatment. However, poor infection efficiency with coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) down-regulated cancer cell lines is one of the major challenges for its practical and extensive application. As an alternative method of viral gene delivery, a non-viral carrier using cationic materials could compensate for the limitation of adenovirus. In our study, adenovectors were complexed with a new synthetic polymer PEI-DEG-bis-NPC (PDN) based on polyethylenimine (PEI), and then the properties of the vehicle were characterized by measurement of size distribution, zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Enhancement of gene transduction by Ad/PDN complexes was observed in both CAR-overexpressing cell lines (A549) and CAR-lacking cell lines (MDCK, CHO, LLC), as a result of facilitating binding and cell uptake of adenoviral particles by the cationic component. Ad/PDN complexes also promoted the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo and prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that a combination of viral and non-viral gene delivery methods may offer a new approach to successful cancer gene therapy.

  11. A rapid generation of adenovirus vector with a genetic modification in hexon protein.

    PubMed

    Di, Bingyan; Mao, Qinwen; Zhao, Junli; Li, Xing; Wang, Dongyang; Xia, Haibin

    2012-02-10

    The generation of hexon-modified adenovirus vector has proven difficult. In this paper, we developed a novel method for rapid generation of hexon-modified adenoviral vector via one step ligation in vitro followed by quick white/blue color screening. The new system has the following features. First, eGFP expression driven by the CMV promoter in E1 region functions as a reporter to evaluate the tropism of hexon-modified adenovirus in vitro. Second, it has two unique restriction enzyme sites with sticky ends located in the hexon HVR5 region. Third, a lacZ expression cassette under the control of plac promoter is placed between the two restriction enzyme sites, which allows recombinants to be selected using blue/white screening. To prove the principle of the method, genetically modified adenoviruses were successfully produced by insertion of NGR, RGD or Tat PTD peptide into hexon HVR5. Furthermore, the transduction efficiency of the Tat PTD modified virus was shown to be a significant enhancement in A172 and CHO-K1 cells. In conclusion, the novel system makes the production of truly retargeted vectors more promising, which would be of substantial benefit for cancer gene therapy.

  12. A subunit vaccine against the adenovirus egg-drop syndrome using part of its fiber protein.

    PubMed

    Fingerut, E; Gutter, B; Gallili, G; Michael, A; Pitcovski, J

    2003-06-20

    In this study, the effectiveness of antibodies against the hexon, fiber or a fiber fragment of an avian adenovirus egg-drop syndrome (EDS), in neutralizing the virus was tested. The fiber protein is responsible for binding the virus to the target cell. The fiber fragment knob-s comprises the carboxy-terminal knob domain and 34 amino acids of the immediately adjacent shaft domain of the adenovirus fiber protein. The hexon, fiber capsid protein and knob-s were produced in E. coli and injected into chickens. Antibodies that were produced against the whole fiber protein showed some hemagglutination inhibition (HI) activity. Antibodies produced against the knob-s protein showed HI activity and serum neutralization (SN) activity similar to the positive control-whole virus vaccine. We assume that production of only part of the fiber enables the protein produced in E. coli to fold correctly. Antibodies produced against the hexon protein showed no SN activity. In summary, knob-s induced SN and HI antibodies against EDS virus at a rate similar to the whole virus and were significantly more efficient than the full-length fiber. The recombinant knob-s protein may be used as a vaccine against pathogenic adenovirus infections.

  13. Norovirus recombination.

    PubMed

    Bull, Rowena A; Tanaka, Mark M; White, Peter A

    2007-12-01

    RNA recombination is a significant driving force in viral evolution. Increased awareness of recombination within the genus Norovirus of the family Calicivirus has led to a rise in the identification of norovirus (NoV) recombinants and they are now reported at high frequency. Currently, there is no classification system for recombinant NoVs and a widely accepted recombinant genotyping system is still needed. Consequently, there is duplication in reporting of novel recombinants. This has led to difficulties in defining the number and types of recombinants in circulation. In this study, 120 NoV nucleotide sequences were compiled from the current GenBank database and published literature. NoV recombinants and their recombination breakpoints were identified using three methods: phylogenetic analysis, SimPlot analysis and the maximum chi2 method. A total of 20 NoV recombinant types were identified in circulation worldwide. The recombination point is the ORF1/2 overlap in all isolates except one, which demonstrated a double recombination event within the polymerase region.

  14. Adenoviruses associated with acute diarrhea in children in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liying; Qian, Yuan; Zhang, You; Deng, Jie; Jia, Liping; Dong, Huijin

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviruses have been recognized as important causal pathogens of community-acquired diarrhea (CAD) among children, but their role in hospital-acquired diarrhea (HAD) is not well-understood. Hospitalized children with acute diarrhea and children who visited the outpatient department due to diarrhea were investigated from 2011 to 2012. Adenovirus was detected in stool specimens by PCR and further characterized by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. SPSS software (version 19.0) was used for statistical analyses. A total of 2233 diarrheal children were enrolled in this study; this sample was comprised of 1371 hospitalized children, including 885 with CAD (IP-CAD) and 486 with HAD, and 862 outpatients with CAD (OP-CAD). Among these 2,233 patients, adenovirus was detected in 219 cases (9.8%). The positive rates for adenovirus were significantly different between the IP-CAD (9.3%), HAD (13.8%) and OP-CAD (8.1%) cases (X² = 11.76, p = 0.003). The positive rate of adenovirus was lower in infants under six months of age compared to the positive rates in the other age groups. Of the 219 of adenovirus positive patients, 91 (41.6%) were identified as having serotype 41. Although enteric adenovirus (group F) was the most frequently detected adenovirus among children with either CAD or HAD, the role of non-enteric adenoviruses, especially the adenovirus 31 type (19.7%), cannot be ignored in diarrheal children.

  15. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F.

    2015-12-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm [1] smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  16. Physical mapping of a large-plaque mutation of adenovirus type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Chinnadurai, G; Chinnadurai, S; Brusca, J

    1979-01-01

    We have developed a simple method based on cotransfection of overlapping DNA restriction fragments for construction of recombinants of adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) and Ad5. When Ad2 DNA digested with restriction endonuclease EcoRI was cotransfected with Ad5 DNA digested with SalI, recombination occurred between Ad2 EcoRI-A (map position 0 to 59) and Ad5 SalI-A (map position 45 to 100). Analysis of the recombinant DNAs by digestion with EcoRI or BamHI restriction endonucleases indicated that, as expected, recombination had occurred in overlapping sequences (map position 45 to 59) between the Ad2 EcoRI-A fragment and the Ad5 SalI-A fragment. By using this method, several recombinants were constructed between a large-plaque (lp) mutant of Ad2 and wild-type Ad5. Cleavage of the recombinant genomes with restriction endonucleases BamHI, EcoRI, and HindIII revealed that the lp mutation is located within the left 41% of Ad2 genome. Images PMID:501803

  17. Significant inhibition of Tembusu virus envelope and NS5 gene using an adenovirus-mediated short hairpin RNA delivery system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Feng, Qiang; Wei, Lei; Zhuo, Liling; Chen, Hao; Diao, Youxiang; Tang, Yi

    2017-10-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus, which was first isolated in the tropics during the 1970s. Recently, a disease characterized by ovarian haemorrhage and neurological symptoms was observed in ducks in China, which threatens poultry production. However, there is no suitable vaccination strategy or effective antiviral drugs to combat TMUV infections. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop a new anti-TMUV therapy. In this study, we report an efficient short hairpin RNA (shRNA) delivery strategy for the inhibition of TMUV production using an adenovirus vector system. Using specifically designed shRNAs based on the E and NS5 protein genes of TMUV, the vector-expressed viral genes, TMUV RNA replication and infectious virus production were downregulated at different levels in Vero cells, where the shRNA (NS52) was highly effective in inhibiting TMUV. Using the human adenovirus type 5 shRNA delivery system, the recombinant adenovirus (rAd-NS52) inhibited TMUV multiplication with high efficiency. Furthermore, the significant dose-dependent inhibition of viral RNA copies induced by rAd-NS52 was found in TMUV-infected cells, which could last for at least 96h post infection. Our results indicated that the adenovirus-mediated delivery of shRNAs could play an active role in future TMUV antiviral therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Adenovirus-mediated GDF-5 promotes the extracellular matrix expression in degenerative nucleus pulposus cells*

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xu-wei; Liu, Kang; Chen, Zhu; Zhao, Ming; Han, Xiao-wei; Bai, Yi-guang; Feng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To construct a recombinant adenovirus vector-carrying human growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) gene, investigate the biological effects of adenovirus-mediated GDF-5 (Ad-GDF-5) on extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in human degenerative disc nucleus pulposus (NP) cells, and explore a candidate gene therapy method for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Methods: Human NP cells of a degenerative disc were isolated, cultured, and infected with Ad-GDF-5 using the AdEasy-1 adenovirus vector system. On Days 3, 7, 14, and 21, the contents of the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and hydroxyproline (Hyp), synthesis of proteoglycan and collagen II, gene expression of collagen II and aggrecan, and NP cell proliferation were assessed. Results: The adenovirus was an effective vehicle for gene delivery with prolonged expression of GDF-5. Biochemical analysis revealed increased sGAG and Hyp contents in human NP cells infected by Ad-GDF-5 whereas there was no conspicuous change in basal medium (BM) or Ad-green fluorescent protein (GFP) groups. Only cells in the Ad-GDF-5 group promoted the production of ECM, as demonstrated by the secretion of proteoglycan and up-regulation of collagen II and aggrecan at both protein and mRNA levels. The NP cell proliferation was significantly promoted. Conclusions: The data suggest that Ad-GDF-5 gene therapy is a potential treatment for IDD, which restores the functions of degenerative intervertebral disc through enhancing the ECM production of human NP cells. PMID:26739524

  19. Evaluation of the concentration and bioactivity of adenovirus vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Mittereder, N; March, K L; Trapnell, B C

    1996-01-01

    Development of adenovirus vectors as potential therapeutic agents for multiple applications of in vivo human gene therapy has resulted in numerous preclinical and clinical studies. However, lack of standardization of the methods for quantifying the physical concentration and functionally active fraction of virions in these studies has often made comparison between various studies difficult or impossible. This study was therefore carried out to define the variables for quantification of the concentration of adenovirus vectors. The methods for evaluation of total virion concentration included electron microscopy and optical absorbance. The methods for evaluation of the concentration of functional virions included detection of gene transfer (transgene transfer and expression) and the plaque assay on 293 cells. Enumeration of total virion concentration by optical absorbance was found to be a precise procedure, but accuracy was dependent on physical disruption of the virion to eliminate artifacts from light scattering and also on a correct value for the extinction coefficient. Both biological assays for enumerating functional virions were highly dependent on the assay conditions and in particular the time of virion adsorption and adsorption volume. Under optimal conditions, the bioactivity of the vector, defined as the fraction of total virions which leads to detected target cell infection, was determined to be 0.10 in the plaque assay and 0.29 in the gene transfer assay. This difference is most likely due to the fact that detection by gene transfer requires only measurement of levels of transgene expression in the infected cell whereas plaque formation is dependent on a series of biological events of much greater complexity. These results show that the exact conditions for determination of infectious virion concentration and bioactivity of recombinant adenovirus vectors are critical and must be standardized for comparability. These observations may be very useful in

  20. SemiBoost: boosting for semi-supervised learning.

    PubMed

    Mallapragada, Pavan Kumar; Jin, Rong; Jain, Anil K; Liu, Yi

    2009-11-01

    Semi-supervised learning has attracted a significant amount of attention in pattern recognition and machine learning. Most previous studies have focused on designing special algorithms to effectively exploit the unlabeled data in conjunction with labeled data. Our goal is to improve the classification accuracy of any given supervised learning algorithm by using the available unlabeled examples. We call this as the Semi-supervised improvement problem, to distinguish the proposed approach from the existing approaches. We design a metasemi-supervised learning algorithm that wraps around the underlying supervised algorithm and improves its performance using unlabeled data. This problem is particularly important when we need to train a supervised learning algorithm with a limited number of labeled examples and a multitude of unlabeled examples. We present a boosting framework for semi-supervised learning, termed as SemiBoost. The key advantages of the proposed semi-supervised learning approach are: 1) performance improvement of any supervised learning algorithm with a multitude of unlabeled data, 2) efficient computation by the iterative boosting algorithm, and 3) exploiting both manifold and cluster assumption in training classification models. An empirical study on 16 different data sets and text categorization demonstrates that the proposed framework improves the performance of several commonly used supervised learning algorithms, given a large number of unlabeled examples. We also show that the performance of the proposed algorithm, SemiBoost, is comparable to the state-of-the-art semi-supervised learning algorithms.

  1. Molecular characterization of adenoviruses among finnish military conscripts.

    PubMed

    Mölsä, Markos; Hemmilä, Heidi; Rönkkö, Esa; Virkki, Maria; Nikkari, Simo; Ziegler, Thedi

    2016-04-01

    Although adenoviruses were identified as important respiratory pathogens many years ago, little information is available concerning the prevalence of different adenovirus serotypes, which are circulating and causing epidemics in Finnish military training centers. Over a period of five years from 2008 to 2012, 3577 respiratory specimens were collected from military conscripts presenting with symptoms compatible with acute respiratory tract infection. Upon initial testing for certain respiratory viruses by real-time PCR, 837 of these specimens were identified as adenovirus-positive. For 672 of these specimens, the serotype of the adenovirus responsible was successfully determined by DNA sequencing. Serotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4 were detected in 1, 3, 181, and 487 samples, respectively. Adenovirus epidemics were observed during each year of this study. Based on these findings, adenovirus vaccination should be considered for military conscripts in the Finnish Defence Forces.

  2. Representing Arbitrary Boosts for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Charles P.

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a derivation for the matrix representation of an arbitrary boost, a Lorentz transformation without rotation, suitable for undergraduate students with modest backgrounds in mathematics and relativity. The derivation uses standard vector and matrix techniques along with the well-known form for a special Lorentz transformation. (BT)

  3. ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOWITT,J.; ANDERSON,C.W.; FREIMUTH,P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10{sup 4} high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994).

  4. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    DOE PAGES

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core ismore » more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.« less

  5. Structure and uncoating of immature adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; Marabini, Roberto; Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Curiel, David T.; Mangel, Walter F.; Flint, S. Jane; Martín, Carmen San

    2009-01-01

    Summary Maturation via proteolytical processing is a common trait in the viral world, and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins, but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion; and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytical processing are not infectious. We present the 3D structure of immature adenovirus particles, as represented by the thermosensitive mutant Ad2 ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions, and compare it with the mature capsid. Our 3DEM maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the location of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help to define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged. PMID:19563809

  6. Structure, Function and Dynamics in Adenovirus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. Finally, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed. PMID:25421887

  7. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  8. General Strategy for Broadening Adenovirus Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Laura; Nuzzo, Maurizio; Urbanelli, Lorena; Monaci, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    In spite of its broad host range, adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) transduces a number of clinically relevant tissues and cell types inefficiently, mostly because of low expression of the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR). To improve gene transfer to such cells, we modified the Ad5 fiber knob to recognize novel receptors. We expressed a functional Ad5 fiber knob domain on the capsid of phage λ and employed this display system to construct a large collection of ligands in the HI loop of the Ad5 knob. Panning this library on the CAR-negative mouse fibroblast cell line NIH 3T3 resulted in the identification of three clones with increased binding to these cells. Adenoviruses incorporating these ligands in the fiber gene transduced NIH 3T3 cells 2 or 3 orders of magnitude better than the parent vector. The same nonnative tropism was revealed in other cell types, independently of CAR expression. These Ad5 derivatives proved capable of transducing mouse and human primary immature dendritic cells with up to 100-fold increased efficiency. PMID:14512557

  9. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation.

    PubMed

    Mangel, Walter F; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a "molecular sled" to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. Finally, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  10. Characterization of human adenovirus 35 and derivation of complex vectors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vectors based on human serotype 35 (Ad35) are desirable due to the relatively low prevalence of neutralizing antibodies in the human population. The structure of the viral genome and life cycle of Ad35 differs from the better characterized Ad5 and these differences require differences in the strategies for the generation of vectors for gene delivery. Results Sequences essential for E1 and E4 function were identified and removed and the effects of the deletions on viral gene transcription were determined. In addition, the non-essential E3 region was deleted from rAd35 vectors and a sequence was found that did not have an effect on viability but reduced viral fitness. The packaging capacity of rAd35 was dependent on pIX and vectors were generated with stable genome sizes of up to 104% of the wild type genome size. These data were used to make an E1-, E3-, E4-deleted rAd35 vector. This rAd35 vector with multiple gene deletions has the advantages of multiple blocks to viral replication (i.e., E1 and E4 deletions) and a transgene packaging capacity of 7.6 Kb, comparable to rAd5 vectors. Conclusions The results reported here allow the generation of larger capacity rAd35 vectors and will guide the derivation of adenovirus vectors from other serotypes. PMID:20959004

  11. Adenovirus vector-based vaccines for human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Barouch, Dan H; Nabel, Gary J

    2005-02-01

    Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vectors have received considerable attention for gene therapy because of their high transduction efficiency. However, recombinant gene expression from rAd vectors elicits rapid and potent immune responses to foreign transgene products. Such immunogenicity limits the duration of transgene expression and poses a major challenge to the use of rAd vectors for gene therapy. In contrast, the inherent immunogenicity of these vectors is a desirable feature for vaccine development. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of rAd vector-based vaccines have now been demonstrated in a number of animal models, and rAd vaccines for a variety of pathogens are currently being explored in early-phase clinical trials. In this review, we describe progress in the development of rAd vector-based vaccines with a focus on human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

  12. Reconstruction of adenovirus replication origins with a human nuclear factor I binding site.

    PubMed

    Adhya, S; Shneidman, P S; Hurwitz, J

    1986-03-05

    Nuclear factor I is a host-coded DNA-binding protein that stimulates initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. To understand the mechanism of action of nuclear factor I, we have constructed, by recombinant DNA techniques, origins of replication in which the adenovirus type 5 nuclear factor I binding site (FIB site) has been replaced by a FIB site isolated from human genomic DNA (Gronostajski, R. M., Nagata, K., and Hurwitz, J. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 81, 4013-4017). Assays of such recombinants for initiation and elongation in vitro showed that nuclear factor I was active only when the FIB site was relatively close to the DNA terminus, i.e. the FIB site was centered at nucleotides 30-36 from the end of the DNA. Nuclear factor I was active in either orientation within this distance range. The presence of one or two additional FIB sites in the downstream region had no effect. The implications of these results for the mechanism of nuclear factor I action are discussed.

  13. Evaluation of polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) as a disinfectant for adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Romanowski, Eric G; Yates, Kathleen A; O'Connor, Katherine E; Mah, Francis S; Shanks, Robert M Q; Kowalski, Regis P

    2013-04-01

    Swimming pools can be a vector for transmission of adenovirus ocular infections. Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is a disinfectant used in swimming pools and hot tubs. To determine whether PHMB is an effective disinfectant against ocular adenovirus serotypes at a concentration used to disinfect swimming pools and hot tubs. In vitro laboratory study. The direct disinfecting activity of PHMB was determined in triplicate assays by incubating 9 human adenovirus types (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7a, 8, 19, and 37) with PHMB concentrations of 50 and 0 ppm (micrograms per milliliter) for 24 hours at room temperature to simulate swimming pool temperatures or 40oC to simulate hot tub temperatures. Plaque assays were performed to determine adenovirus titers after incubation. Titers were log10 converted and mean (SD) log10 reductions relative to controls were calculated. Virucidal (>99.9%) decreases in mean adenovirus titers after PHMB treatment were determined for each adenovirus type and temperature tested. RESULTS At room temperature, 50 ppm of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 log10 for all adenovirus types tested. At 40°C, 50 ppm of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 log10 for 2 adenovirus types and greater than 1 but less than 3 log10 for 7 of 9 adenovirus types. At a concentration of 50 ppm, PHMB was not virucidal against adenovirus at temperatures consistent with swimming pools or hot tubs. Recreational water maintained and sanitized with PHMB can serve as a vector for the transmission of ocular adenovirus infections.

  14. Transduction of skin-migrating dendritic cells by human adenovirus 5 occurs via an actin-dependent phagocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Efrain; Taylor, Geraldine; Hope, Jayne; Herbert, Rebecca; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Charleston, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are central to the initiation of immune responses, and various approaches have been used to target vaccines to DC in order to improve immunogenicity. Cannulation of lymphatic vessels allows for the collection of DC that migrate from the skin. These migrating DC are involved in antigen uptake and presentation following vaccination. Human replication-deficient adenovirus (AdV) 5 is a promising vaccine vector for delivery of recombinant antigens. Although the mechanism of AdV attachment and penetration has been extensively studied in permissive cell lines, few studies have addressed the interaction of AdV with DC. In this study, we investigated the interaction of bovine skin-migrating DC and replication-deficient AdV-based vaccine vectors. We found that, despite lack of expression of Coxsackie B-Adenovirus Receptor and other known adenovirus receptors, AdV readily enters skin-draining DC via an actin-dependent endocytosis. Virus exit from endosomes was pH independent, and neutralizing antibodies did not prevent virus entry but did prevent virus translocation to the nucleus. We also show that combining adenovirus with adjuvant increases the absolute number of intracellular virus particles per DC but not the number of DC containing intracellular virus. This results in increased trans-gene expression and antigen presentation. We propose that, in the absence of Coxsackie B-Adenovirus Receptor and other known receptors, AdV5-based vectors enter skin-migrating DC using actin-dependent endocytosis which occurs in skin-migrating DC, and its relevance to vaccination strategies and vaccine vector targeting is discussed.

  15. Elimination of both E1 and E2 from adenovirus vectors further improves prospects for in vivo human gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Gorziglia, M I; Kadan, M J; Yei, S; Lim, J; Lee, G M; Luthra, R; Trapnell, B C

    1996-01-01

    A novel recombinant adenovirus vector, Av3nBg, was constructed with deletions in adenovirus E1, E2a, and E3 regions and expressing a beta-galactosidase reporter gene. Av3nBg can be propagated at a high titer in a corresponding A549-derived cell line, AE1-2a, which contains the adenovirus E1 and E2a region genes inducibly expressed from separate glucocorticoid-responsive promoters. Av3nBg demonstrated gene transfer and expression comparable to that of Av1nBg, a first-generation adenovirus vector with deletions in E1 and E3. Several lines of evidence suggest that this vector is significantly more attenuated than E1 and E3 deletion vectors. Metabolic DNA labeling studies showed no detectable de novo vector DNA synthesis or accumulation, and metabolic protein labeling demonstrated no detectable de novo hexon protein synthesis for Av3nBg in naive A549 cells even at a multiplicity of infection of up to 3,000 PFU per cell. Additionally, naive A549 cells infected by Av3nBg did not accumulate infectious virions. In contrast, both Av1nBg and Av2Lu vectors showed DNA replication and hexon protein synthesis at multiplicities of infection of 500 PFU per cell. Av2Lu has a deletion in E1 and also carries a temperature-sensitive mutation in E2a. Thus, molecular characterization has demonstrated that the Av3nBg vector is improved with respect to the potential for vector DNA replication and hexon protein expression compared with both first-generation (Av1nBg) and second-generation (Av2Lu) adenoviral vectors. These observations may have important implications for potential use of adenovirus vectors in human gene therapy. PMID:8648763

  16. Marine Lectins DlFBL and HddSBL Fused with Soluble Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor Facilitate Adenovirus Infection in Cancer Cells BUT Have Different Effects on Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bingbing; Mei, Shengsheng; Cui, Lianzhen; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Jianhong; Wu, Tao; Li, Gongchu

    2017-01-01

    Cancer development and progression are usually associated with glycosylation change, providing prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers, as well as therapeutic targets, for various cancers. In this work, Dicentrarchus labrax fucose binding lectin (DlFBL) and Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin (HddSBL) were genetically fused with soluble coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (sCAR), and produced through a bacterial expression system. Results showed that recombinant sCAR-DlFBL not only facilitated adenovirus Ad-EGFP infection in K562/ADR and U87MG cells, but also enhanced the cytotoxicity of adenovirus harboring gene encoding Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin (PPA) or DlFBL (Ad-PPA or Ad-DlFBL) on U87MG cells through inducing apoptosis. Recombinant sCAR-HddSBL facilitated Ad-EGFP infection, but dramatically counteracted the cytotoxicity of both Ad-PPA and Ad-DlFBL in U87MG cells. Further analysis revealed that sCAR-HddSBL, but not sCAR-DlFBL, significantly upregulated transcription factor E2F1 levels in U87MG cells, which might be responsible for the adverse effect of sCAR-HddSBL on Ad-PPA and Ad-DlFBL. Taken together, our data suggested that sCAR-DlFBL could be further developed to redirect therapeutic adenoviruses to infect cancer cells such as U87MG, and the sCAR-lectin fusion proteins for adenoviral retargeting should be carefully examined for possible survival signaling induced by lectins, such as HddSBL. PMID:28335432

  17. Actively induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cells by epitope-bearing parasite pre-infection but not prime/boost virus vector vaccination could ameliorate the course of Plasmodium yoelii blood-stage infection.

    PubMed

    Ono, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Oguma, Takemi; Takayama, Eiji; Takashima, Yasuhiro; Tadakuma, Takushi; Miyahira, Yasushi

    2012-09-28

    The lack of MHC molecules on red blood cells (RBCs) has led to questions regarding the immunological function of CD8(+) T cells against malarial blood-stage (MBS). However, several recent reports contradicting with this concept have suggested that they play an important role in the course of MBS infection. The present study generated genetically engineered murine malaria, Plasmodium yoelii, which expresses a well-defined Trypanosoma cruzi-derived, H-2K(b)-restricted CD8(+) T cell epitope, ANYNFTLV. Prime/boost vaccination by the use of recombinant adenovirus and recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA), which induced an enhanced number of ANYNFTLV-specific CD8(+) T cells, failed to prevent a pathological outcome to occur upon ANYNFTLV-expressing murine MBS infection. This outcome did not change even with the combination of passive transfer of an appreciable number of in vitro-expanded ANYNFTLV-specific CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, the pre-infection of mice with T. cruzi, which intrinsically bears the same CD8(+) T cell epitope significantly improved the survival of ANYNFTLV-expressing malaria-infected mice but not that of control malaria-infected ones. This protective effect was abrogated by the use of a CD8(+) T cell-depleting monoclonal antibody. Although the protective effect was observed only in certain situations, the actively induced antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells could ameliorate the pathologies caused by the MBS. This is the first study to implicate that the active induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells should be included in the development of a vaccine against MBS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  19. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  20. Tracking novel adenovirus in environmental and human clinical samples: no evidence of endemic human adenovirus type 58 circulation in Córdoba city, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ferreyra, L J; Giordano, M O; Martínez, L C; Barril, P A; Masachessi, G; Isa, M B; Poma, R; Rajal, V; Biganzoli, P; Nates, S V; Pavan, J V

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, several types of human adenovirus (HAdV) have arisen from the recombination between two or more previously known HAdV types, but their epidemiology is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the circulation of HAdV-58, a recently described HAdV isolated from an HIV-positive patient in Córdoba city, Argentina. For this purpose, a 30-month survey was conducted to study the presence of this type of adenovirus in sewage samples collected at the inlet from a wastewater treatment plant in Córdoba city, Argentina. Complementarily, the virus was sought in stools of HIV-positive patients. Although HAdVs were detected in human stool samples and in a high percentage of sewage samples, no evidence of HAdV-58 circulation was detected. We suggest that there is no endemic circulation of HAdV-58 in the geographical local area. The trend is that the number of identified HAdVs increases over time. In this context, understanding the current circulating HAdVs may be biologically relevant.

  1. Mechanism of inhibition of adenovirus DNA replication by the acyclic nucleoside triphosphate analogue (S)-HPMPApp: influence of the adenovirus DNA binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mul, Y M; van Miltenburg, R T; De Clercq, E; van der Vliet, P C

    1989-01-01

    The acyclic adenosine analogue (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [S]-HPMPA) is a potent and selective inhibitor of adenovirus (Ad) replication in cell culture. We studied the mechanism of inhibition using a reconstituted in vitro DNA replication system. The diphosphoryl derivative (S)-HPMPApp, but not (S)-HPMPA, inhibited the DNA replication of origin containing fragments strongly. The inhibitory effect was exerted at the level of elongation, while initiation was resistant to the drug. Remarkably, the elongation of short strands was only slightly impaired, while inhibition was maximal upon synthesis of long DNA fragments. (S)-HPMPApp appeared to be competitive with dATP, suggesting that the Ad DNA polymerase is the prime target for the drug. We purified the Ad DNA polymerase in complex to the precursor terminal protein to homogeneity from cells infected with overproducing recombinant vaccinia viruses. Employing gapped DNA or poly(dT).oligo(dA) templates, only a weak inhibition was observed. However, inhibition was strongly enhanced in the presence of the adenovirus DNA binding protein (DBP). We interpret this to mean that the increased processivity of the polymerization reaction in the presence of DBP leads to increased drug sensitivity. Images PMID:2587248

  2. Enhanced Protection against Ebola Virus Mediated by an Improved Adenovirus-Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kaylie N.; Croyle, Maria A.; Strong, James E.; Feldmann, Heinz; Kobinger, Gary P.

    2009-01-01

    Background The Ebola virus is transmitted by direct contact with bodily fluids of infected individuals, eliciting death rates as high as 90% among infected humans. Currently, replication defective adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine is being studied in a phase I clinical trial. Another Ebola vaccine, based on an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus has shown efficacy in post-exposure treatment of nonhuman primates to Ebola infection. In this report, we modified the common recombinant adenovirus serotype 5-based Ebola vaccine expressing the wild-type ZEBOV glycoprotein sequence from a CMV promoter (Ad-CMVZGP). The immune response elicited by this improved expression cassette vector (Ad-CAGoptZGP) and its ability to afford protection against lethal ZEBOV challenge in mice was compared to the standard Ad-CMVZGP vector. Methodology/Principal Findings Ad-CMVZGP was previously shown to protect mice, guinea pigs and nonhuman primates from an otherwise lethal challenge of Zaire ebolavirus. The antigenic expression cassette of this vector was improved through codon optimization, inclusion of a consensus Kozak sequence and reconfiguration of a CAG promoter (Ad-CAGoptZGP). Expression of GP from Ad-CAGoptZGP was substantially higher than from Ad-CMVZGP. Ad-CAGoptZGP significantly improved T and B cell responses at doses 10 to 100-fold lower than that needed with Ad-CMVZGP. Additionally, Ad-CAGoptZGP afforded full protections in mice against lethal challenge at a dose 100 times lower than the dose required for Ad-CMVZGP. Finally, Ad-CAGoptZGP induced full protection to mice when given 30 minutes post-challenge. Conclusions/Significance We describe an improved adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine capable of affording post-exposure protection against lethal challenge in mice. The molecular modifications of the new improved vaccine also translated in the induction of significantly enhanced immune responses and complete protection at a dose 100 times lower than with the previous generation

  3. Interferometric resolution boosting for spectrographs

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J

    2004-05-25

    Externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) is a technique for enhancing the performance of spectrographs for wide bandwidth high resolution spectroscopy and Doppler radial velocimetry. By placing a small angle-independent interferometer near the slit of a spectrograph, periodic fiducials are embedded on the recorded spectrum. The multiplication of the stellar spectrum times the sinusoidal fiducial net creates a moir{acute e} pattern, which manifests high detailed spectral information heterodyned down to detectably low spatial frequencies. The latter can more accurately survive the blurring, distortions and CCD Nyquist limitations of the spectrograph. Hence lower resolution spectrographs can be used to perform high resolution spectroscopy and radial velocimetry. Previous demonstrations of {approx}2.5x resolution boost used an interferometer having a single fixed delay. We report new data indicating {approx}6x Gaussian resolution boost (140,000 from a spectrograph with 25,000 native resolving power), taken by using multiple exposures at widely different interferometer delays.

  4. Reweighting with Boosted Decision Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhnikov, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Machine learning tools are commonly used in modern high energy physics (HEP) experiments. Different models, such as boosted decision trees (BDT) and artificial neural networks (ANN), are widely used in analyses and even in the software triggers [1]. In most cases, these are classification models used to select the “signal” events from data. Monte Carlo simulated events typically take part in training of these models. While the results of the simulation are expected to be close to real data, in practical cases there is notable disagreement between simulated and observed data. In order to use available simulation in training, corrections must be introduced to generated data. One common approach is reweighting — assigning weights to the simulated events. We present a novel method of event reweighting based on boosted decision trees. The problem of checking the quality of reweighting step in analyses is also discussed.

  5. Capturing and concentrating adenovirus using magnetic anionic nanobeads

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated how various enveloped viruses can be efficiently concentrated using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). However, the exact mechanism of interaction between the virus particles and anionic beads remains unclear. To further investigate whether these magnetic anionic beads specifically bind to the viral envelope, we examined their potential interaction with a nonenveloped virus (adenovirus). The beads were incubated with either adenovirus-infected cell culture medium or nasal aspirates from adenovirus-infected individuals and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thoroughly washing the beads, adsorption of adenovirus was confirmed by a variety of techniques, including immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and cell culture infection assays. These detection methods positively identified the hexon and penton capsid proteins of adenovirus along with the viral genome on the magnetic beads. Furthermore, various types of adenovirus including Types 5, 6, 11, 19, and 41 were captured using the magnetic bead procedure. Our bead capture method was also found to increase the sensitivity of viral detection. Adenovirus below the detectable limit for immunochromatography was efficiently concentrated using the magnetic bead procedure, allowing the virus to be successfully detected using this methodology. Moreover, these findings clearly demonstrate that a viral envelope is not required for binding to the anionic magnetic beads. Taken together, our results show that this capture procedure increases the sensitivity of detection of adenovirus and would, therefore, be a valuable tool for analyzing both clinical and experimental samples. PMID:27274228

  6. Adenovirus dodecahedron allows large multimeric protein transduction in human cells.

    PubMed

    Fender, P; Schoehn, G; Foucaud-Gamen, J; Gout, E; Garcel, A; Drouet, E; Chroboczek, J

    2003-04-01

    Adenovirus dodecahedron is a virus-like particle composed of only two viral proteins of human adenovirus serotype 3 that are responsible for virus attachment and internalization. We show here that this dodecameric particle, devoid of genetic information, efficiently penetrates human cells and can deliver large multimeric proteins such as immunoglobulins.

  7. A novel adenovirus in Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Yon Mi; Shin, Ok Sarah; Kim, Hankyeom; Choi, Han-Gu; Song, Jin-Won

    2014-05-07

    Adenoviruses (family Adenoviridae) infect various organ systems and cause diseases in a wide range of host species. In this study, we examined multiple tissues from Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica), collected in Antarctica during 2009 and 2010, for the presence of novel adenoviruses by PCR. Analysis of a 855-bp region of the hexon gene of a newly identified adenovirus, designated Chinstrap penguin adenovirus 1 (CSPAdV-1), showed nucleotide (amino acid) sequence identity of 71.8% (65.5%) with South Polar skua 1 (SPSAdV-1), 71% (70%) with raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1), 71.4% (67.6%) with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) and 61% (61.6%) with frog adenovirus 1 (FrAdV-1). Based on the genetic and phylogenetic analyses, CSPAdV-1 was classified as a member of the genus, Siadenovirus. Virus isolation attempts from kidney homogenates in the MDTC-RP19 (ATCC® CRL-8135™) cell line were unsuccessful. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence of new adenovirus species in Antarctic penguins.

  8. The search for adenovirus 14 in children in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Laham, Federico R; Jewell, Alan M; Schoonover, Shauna L; Demmler, Gail J; Piedra, Pedro A

    2008-07-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)14 has recently emerged in the United States causing outbreaks of severe respiratory disease. To determine if Ad14 circulated in Houston, Texas, during the same time as an outbreak in military recruits in nearby San Antonio, 215 pediatric adenovirus isolates were serotyped using microneutralization. None were Ad14; Ad1, Ad2, and Ad3 were the most common identified serotypes.

  9. Enhanced inactivation of adenovirus under polychromatic UV lamps

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adenovirus is recognized as the most UV-resistant waterborne pathogen of concern to public health microbiologists. The US EPA has stipulated that a UV fluence (dose) of 186 mJ cm-2 is required for 4-log inactivation credit in water treatment. However, all adenovirus inactivation data to date publi...

  10. Group C adenovirus DNA sequences in human lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.; Palkonyay, L.; Weber, J.

    1986-07-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy adults, cord blood lymphocytes, and lymphoblastoid cell lines were screened by hybridization for the presence of group C adenovirus DNA sequences. In 13 of 17 peripheral blood lymphocyte samples from adults, 1 of 10 cord blood samples, and seven of seven lymphoblastoid cell lines tested, results were positive for Group C adenovirus DNA (adenovirus 1 (Ad1), Ad2, Ad5, or Ad6). About 1 to 2% of the lymphocytes carried 50 to 100 viral genome copies per positive cell, as estimated by in situ hybridization. Infectious virus representing all members of group C were recovered, but cultivation in the presence of adenovirus antibody did not cure the cells of free viral genomes. Viral DNA was found in B, T, and N cells but only in 1 of 10 cord blood samples. The results suggest that group C adenovirus infectious in childhood result in the persistence of the viral genome in circulating lymphocytes.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of the DNA and Protein Binding Activities of Adenovirus Core Protein V

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Vaughan, Robert C.; Houser, Carolyn; Hastie, Kathryn M.; Kao, C. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The structure of adenovirus outer capsid was revealed recently at 3- to 4-Å resolution (V. Reddy, S. Natchiar, P. Stewart, and G. Nemerow, Science 329:1071–1075, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1187292); however, precise details on the function and biochemical and structural features for the inner core still are lacking. Protein V is one the most important components of the adenovirus core, as it links the outer capsid via association with protein VI with the inner DNA core. Protein V is a highly basic protein that strongly binds to DNA in a nonspecific manner. We report the expression of a soluble protein V that exists in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Using reversible cross-linking affinity purification in combination with mass spectrometry, we found that protein V contains multiple DNA binding sites. The binding sites from protein V mediate heat-stable nucleic acid associations, with some of the binding sites possibly masked in the virus by other core proteins. We also demonstrate direct interaction between soluble proteins V and VI, thereby revealing the bridging of the inner DNA core with the outer capsid proteins. These findings are consistent with a model of nucleosome-like structures proposed for the adenovirus core and encapsidated DNA. They also suggest an additional role for protein V in linking the inner nucleic acid core with protein VI on the inner capsid shell. IMPORTANCE Scant knowledge exists of how the inner core of adenovirus containing its double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome and associated proteins is organized. Here, we report a purification scheme for a recombinant form of protein V that allowed analysis of its interactions with the nucleic acid core region. We demonstrate that protein V exhibits stable associations with dsDNA due to the presence of multiple nucleic acid binding sites identified both in the isolated recombinant protein and in virus particles. As protein V also binds to the membrane lytic protein VI molecules

  12. Gene therapy of experimental malignant mesothelioma using adenovirus vectors encoding the HSVtk gene.

    PubMed

    Esandi, M C; van Someren, G D; Vincent, A J; van Bekkum, D W; Valerio, D; Bout, A; Noteboom, J L

    1997-04-01

    Replication-defective adenovirus vectors were generated in which the gene of interest (lacZ, luciferase or HSV-tk) is driven by the adenovirus major late promoter (MLP) or the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early gene promoter/enhancer (CMV). In vitro experiments with rat (II-45) and human (MERO 25) mesothelioma cell lines revealed that the CMV promoter was stronger than the MLP promoter regarding levels of expression of the luciferase reporter gene and ganciclovir (GCV) killing efficiency after tk gene transfer. Following administration of IG.Ad.CMV.lacZ recombinant adenovirus (Introgene, IG) into the pleural cavity of Fischer rats with established mesothelioma, a widespread distribution of infectious virus particles through the thorax contents was demonstrated. However, a relatively small proportion of tumor cells were transduced. Nevertheless, a strong tumor growth inhibition was observed following treatment with IG.Ad.CMV.TK recombinant adenovirus and GCV. Separate groups of rats inoculated on day 0 with 10(5) II-45 cells in the pleural cavity, received 7 x 10(9) infectious particles of IG.Ad. CMV.TK on day 1, day 2, day 4 or day 8. One day after virus administration, 25 mg/kg GCV or PBS (controls) was injected i.p. (intraperitoneally) twice daily. On day 15, all animals were killed. Significant tumor regression, equivalent to 5 log cell kill, occurred in the treated rats suggesting an impressive bystander effect. In a survival study, animals were treated 9 days after inoculation of 10(5) tumor cells with IG.Ad.CMV.TK and a 14 days course of GCV. This treatment prolonged symptom-free survival time from 19 days in the controls to 33 days in the treated group. These responses can be best explained by assuming continued tk expression in or around the tumor tissue during GCV treatment. Our results confirm and extend earlier findings with the same model and demonstrate the potential of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene therapy as a local

  13. Isolation and characterization of the DNA and protein binding activities of adenovirus core protein V.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Vaughan, Robert C; Houser, Carolyn; Hastie, Kathryn M; Kao, C Cheng; Nemerow, Glen R

    2014-08-01

    The structure of adenovirus outer capsid was revealed recently at 3- to 4-Å resolution (V. Reddy, S. Natchiar, P. Stewart, and G. Nemerow, Science 329:1071-1075, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1187292); however, precise details on the function and biochemical and structural features for the inner core still are lacking. Protein V is one the most important components of the adenovirus core, as it links the outer capsid via association with protein VI with the inner DNA core. Protein V is a highly basic protein that strongly binds to DNA in a nonspecific manner. We report the expression of a soluble protein V that exists in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Using reversible cross-linking affinity purification in combination with mass spectrometry, we found that protein V contains multiple DNA binding sites. The binding sites from protein V mediate heat-stable nucleic acid associations, with some of the binding sites possibly masked in the virus by other core proteins. We also demonstrate direct interaction between soluble proteins V and VI, thereby revealing the bridging of the inner DNA core with the outer capsid proteins. These findings are consistent with a model of nucleosome-like structures proposed for the adenovirus core and encapsidated DNA. They also suggest an additional role for protein V in linking the inner nucleic acid core with protein VI on the inner capsid shell. Scant knowledge exists of how the inner core of adenovirus containing its double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome and associated proteins is organized. Here, we report a purification scheme for a recombinant form of protein V that allowed analysis of its interactions with the nucleic acid core region. We demonstrate that protein V exhibits stable associations with dsDNA due to the presence of multiple nucleic acid binding sites identified both in the isolated recombinant protein and in virus particles. As protein V also binds to the membrane lytic protein VI molecules, this core protein may

  14. Chimpanzee adenovirus and MVA-vectored respiratory syncytial virus vaccine is safe and expands humoral and cellular immunity in adults

    PubMed Central

    Green, CA; Scarselli, E; Sande, CJ; Thompson, AJ; de Lara, CM; Taylor, K; Haworth, K; Del Sorbo, M; Angus, B; Siani, L; Di Marco, S; Traboni, C; Folgori, A; Colloca, S; Capone, S; Vitelli, A; Cortese, R; Klenerman, P; Nicosia, A; Pollard, AJ

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory infection in annual epidemics, with infants and the elderly at particular risk of developing severe disease and death. However, despite its importance, no vaccine exists. The chimpanzee adenovirus, PanAd3-RSV, and modified vaccinia virus Ankara, MVA-RSV, are replication defective viral vectors encoding the RSV proteins F, N and M2-1 for the induction of humoral and cellular responses. We performed an open-label, dose-escalation, phase 1 clinical trial in 42 healthy adults in which four different combinations of prime/boost vaccinations were investigated for safety and immunogenicity, including both intra-muscular and intra-nasal administration of the adenoviral vectored vaccine. The vaccines were safe and well tolerated, with the most common reported adverse events being mild injection site reactions. No vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred. RSV neutralising antibody titres rose in response to intramuscular (IM) prime with PanAd3-RSV, and after IM boost for individuals primed by the intra-nasal (IN) route. Circulating anti-F IgG and IgA antibody secreting cells (ASCs) were observed after IM prime and IM boost. RSV-specific T-cell responses were increased after IM PanAd3-RSV prime and were most efficiently boosted by IM MVA-RSV. IFNγ secretion after boost was from both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, without detectable Th2 cytokines that have been previously associated with immune pathogenesis following exposure to RSV after formalin inactivated RSV vaccine. In conclusion, PanAd3-RSV and MVA-RSV are safe and immunogenic in healthy adults. These vaccine candidates warrant further clinical evaluation of efficacy to assess their potential to reduce the burden of RSV disease. PMID:26268313

  15. Engineered adenovirus fiber shaft fusion homotrimer of soluble TRAIL with enhanced stability and antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, J; Wang, L; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Wang, B; Zhu, R; Bi, J; Wu, J; Zhang, H; Wu, H; Yu, B; Kong, W; Yu, X

    2016-01-01

    Successful cancer therapies aim to induce selective apoptosis in neoplastic cells. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered an attractive anticancer agent due to its tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity. However, earlier studies with recombinant TRAIL revealed many shortcomings, including a short half-life, off-target toxicity and existence of TRAIL-resistant tumor cells. In this study, we developed a novel engineering strategy for recombinant soluble TRAIL by redesigning its structure with the adenovirus knobless fiber motif to form a stable homotrimer with improved antitumor activity. The result is a highly stable fiber-TRAIL fusion protein that could form homotrimers similar to natural TRAIL. The recombinant fusion TRAIL developed here displayed high specific activity in both cell-based assays in vitro and animal tests in vivo. This construct will serve as a foundation for a new generation of recombinant proteins suitable for use in preclinical and clinical studies and for effective combination therapies to overcome tumor resistance to TRAIL. PMID:27336718

  16. Isolation and Epidemiology of Falcon Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Schrenzel, Mark; Rideout, Bruce; Sandfort, Cal

    2005-01-01

    An adenovirus was detected by electron microscopy in tissues from falcons that died during an outbreak of inclusion body hepatitis and enteritis that affected neonatal Northern aplomado (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) and peregrine (Falco peregrinus anatum) falcons. Molecular characterization has identified the falcon virus as a new member of the aviadenovirus group (M. Schrenzel, J. L. Oaks, D. Rotstein, G. Maalouf, E. Snook, C. Sandfort, and B. Rideout, J. Clin. Microbiol. 43:3402-3413, 2005). In this study, the virus was successfully isolated and propagated in peregrine falcon embryo fibroblasts, in which it caused visible and reproducible cytopathology. Testing for serum neutralizing antibodies found that infection with this virus was limited almost exclusively to falcons. Serology also found that wild and captive peregrine falcons had high seropositivity rates of 80% and 100%, respectively, although clinical disease was rarely reported in this species. These data implicate peregrine falcons as the natural host and primary reservoir for the virus. Other species of North American falcons, including aplomado falcons, had lower seropositivity rates of 43 to 57%. Falcon species of tropical and/or island origin were uniformly seronegative, although deaths among adults of these species have been described, suggesting they are highly susceptible. Chickens and quail were uniformly seronegative and not susceptible to infection, indicating that fowl were not the source of infection. Based on the information from this study, the primary control of falcon adenovirus infections should be based on segregation of carrier and susceptible falcon species. PMID:16000467

  17. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2004-05-18

    Disclosed is a mutant adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have significantly weakened binding affinity for CARD1 relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type. In the method, residues of the adenovirus fiber protein knob domain which are predicted to alter D1 binding when mutated, are identified from the crystal structure coordinates of the AD12knob:CAR-D1 complex. A mutation which alters one or more of the identified residues is introduced into the genome of the adenovirus to generate a mutant adenovirus. Whether or not the mutant produced exhibits altered adenovirus-CAR binding properties is then determined.

  18. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Nikitenko, N. A.; Speiseder, T.; Lam, E.; Rubtsov, P. M.; Tonaeva, Kh. D.; Borzenok, S. A.; Dobner, T.; Prassolov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy. PMID:26483965

  19. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Lam, E; Rubtsov, P M; Tonaeva, Kh D; Borzenok, S A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy.

  20. Identification of Excipients for Stabilizing Fiberless Adenovirus as Biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kupgan, Grit; Choudhari, Shyamal P; Flynn, Nicholas H; Nigatu, Adane; Vupputuri, Sravanthi; Picking, Wendy L; Picking, William D; Ramsey, Joshua D

    2017-07-01

    Reducing the promiscuous tropism of native adenovirus by using fiberless adenovirus is advantageous toward its use as a gene therapy vector or vaccine component. The removal of the fiber protein on native adenovirus abrogates several undesirable interactions; however, this approach decreases the particle's physical stability. To create stable fiberless adenovirus for pharmaceutical use, the effects of temperature and pH on the particle's stability profile must be addressed. Our results indicate that the stability of fiberless adenovirus is increased when it is stored in mildly acidic conditions around pH 6. The stability of fiberless adenovirus can be further enhanced by using excipients. Excipient screening results indicate that the nonionic surfactant Pluronic F-68 and the amino acid glycine are potential stabilizers because of their ability to increase the thermal transition temperature of the virus particle and promote retention of biological activity after exposure to prolonged thermal stress. Our data indicate that the instability of fiberless adenovirus can be ameliorated by storing the virus in the appropriate environment, and it should be possible to further optimize the virus so that it can be used as a biopharmaceutical. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Where boosted significances come from

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plehn, Tilman; Schichtel, Peter; Wiegand, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    In an era of increasingly advanced experimental analysis techniques it is crucial to understand which phase space regions contribute a signal extraction from backgrounds. Based on the Neyman-Pearson lemma we compute the maximum significance for a signal extraction as an integral over phase space regions. We then study to what degree boosted Higgs strategies benefit ZH and tt¯H searches and which transverse momenta of the Higgs are most promising. We find that Higgs and top taggers are the appropriate tools, but would profit from a targeted optimization towards smaller transverse momenta. MadMax is available as an add-on to MadGraph 5.

  2. Electric rockets get a boost

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1995-12-01

    This article reports that xenon-ion thrusters are expected to replace conventional chemical rockets in many nonlaunch propulsion tasks, such as controlling satellite orbits and sending space probes on long exploratory missions. The space age dawned some four decades ago with the arrival of powerful chemical rockets that could propel vehicles fast enough to escape the grasp of earth`s gravity. Today, chemical rocket engines still provide the only means to boost payloads into orbit and beyond. The less glamorous but equally important job of moving vessels around in space, however, may soon be assumed by a fundamentally different rocket engine technology that has been long in development--electric propulsion.

  3. Effects of adenovirus-mediated expression of p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A in cell lines derived from t(2;5) anaplastic large cell lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Turturro, Franceso; Arnold, Marilyn D; Frist, Audrey Y; Seth, Prem

    2002-06-01

    We investigated the response of SUDHL-1 and L428 cells, derived from t(2;5)-anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and Hodgkin's disease (HD), respectively, to recombinant adenoviruses expressing cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) p27Kip1 (Adp27), p21Waf1 (Adp21) and p16INK4A (Adp16). Cell cycle analysis of SUDHL-1 cells after 24 h of infection with 200 multiplicity of infection (MOI) of Adp27, Adp21, and Adp16, showed very high levels of cell debris in the subG1 area. The magnitude of cell debris-events was Adp27/Adp21 > Adp16. Cell cycle analysis of L428 cells revealed absence of cell debris and increased G2 phase in all the groups of cells tested as compared to the controls (mock and AdNull). A minimal increase in G1 phase was also evident in cells infected with Adp27 (52%) compared to uninfected cells (43%), AdNull (45%) and to cells infected with Adp21 (37%) and Adp16 (31%). The presence of significant levels of Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) on the cell surface of L428 cells excluded the cell membrane-barrier as responsible for the differences in cell observed in response to the recombinant adenovirus-mediated CDKIs expression as compared to SUDHL-1. We also showed that the recombinant adenovirus-mediated cytotoxicity measured as apoptosis was MOI- and vector-dependent in SUDHL-1 cells at lower MOI (100). In conclusion, the therapeutic effect induced by recombinant adenoviruses expressing p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A is cell-dependent in cells derived from selected lymphoid malignancies. Biochemical cellular differences more than cell surface barriers seem to be responsible for differences in response to recombinant adenovirus-mediated expression of cytotoxic genes. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of recombinant adenoviruses expressing p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A may be further explored as a tool for gene therapy of t(2;5)-derived ALCL.

  4. Repair of segmental bone defects with bone marrow and BMP-2 adenovirus in the rabbit radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lijia; Lu, Xiaofeng; Shi, Yujun; Li, Li; Xue, Jing; Zhang, Li; Xia, Jie; Wang, Yujia; Zhang, Xingdong; Bu, Hong

    2012-12-01

    Bone tissue engineering (BTE) is approached via implantation of autogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), marrow cells, or platelet-rich plasma, etc. To the contrary, gene therapy combining with the bone marrow (BM) has not been often reported. This study was performed to investigate whether a modified BTE method, that is, the BM and a recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 adenovirus (Ad.hBMP-2) gene administering in hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) ceramics could accelerate the healing of segmental defects in the rabbit radius. In our study, ceramics were immersed in the adenovirus overnight, and half an hour before surgery, autologous BM aspirates were thoroughly mixed with the ceramics; at the same time, a 15-mm radius defect was introduced in the bilateral forelimbs of all animals, after that, this defect was filled with the following: (1) Ad.hBMP-2 + HA/β-TCP + autologous BM (group 1); (2) HA/β-TCP + Ad.hBMP-2 (group 2); (3) HA/β-TCP alone (group 3); (4) an empty defect as a control (group 4). Histological observation and μ-CT analyses were performed on the specimens at weeks 2, 4, 8, and 12, respectively. In group 1, new bone was observed at week 4 and BM appeared at week 12, in groups 2 and 3, new bone was observed at week 8 and it was more mature at week 12, in contrast, the defect was not bridged in group 4 at week 12. The new bone area percentage in group 1 was significantly higher than that in groups 2 and 3. Our study indicated that BM combined with hBMP-2 adenovirus and porous ceramics could significantly increase the amount of newly formed bone. And this modified BTE method thus might have potentials in future clinical application.

  5. Stochastic approximation boosting for incomplete data problems.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Joseph; Laake, Petter

    2009-12-01

    Boosting is a powerful approach to fitting regression models. This article describes a boosting algorithm for likelihood-based estimation with incomplete data. The algorithm combines boosting with a variant of stochastic approximation that uses Markov chain Monte Carlo to deal with the missing data. Applications to fitting generalized linear and additive models with missing covariates are given. The method is applied to the Pima Indians Diabetes Data where over half of the cases contain missing values.

  6. Proinflammatory Effects of Interferon Gamma in Mouse Adenovirus 1 Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Mary K.; Procario, Megan C.; Twisselmann, Nele; Wilkinson, J. Erby; Archambeau, Ashley J.; Michele, Daniel E.; Day, Sharlene M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adenoviruses are frequent causes of pediatric myocarditis. Little is known about the pathogenesis of adenovirus myocarditis, and the species specificity of human adenoviruses has limited the development of animal models, which is a significant barrier to strategies for prevention or treatment. We have developed a mouse model of myocarditis following mouse adenovirus 1 (MAV-1) infection to study the pathogenic mechanisms of this important cause of pediatric myocarditis. Following intranasal infection of neonatal C57BL/6 mice, we detected viral replication and induction of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in the hearts of infected mice. MAV-1 caused myocyte necrosis and induced substantial cellular inflammation that was composed predominantly of CD3+ T lymphocytes. Depletion of IFN-γ during acute infection reduced cardiac inflammation in MAV-1-infected mice without affecting viral replication. We observed decreased contractility during acute infection of neonatal mice, and persistent viral infection in the heart was associated with cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy in adulthood. IFN-γ is a proinflammatory mediator during adenovirus-induced myocarditis, and persistent adenovirus infection may contribute to ongoing cardiac dysfunction. IMPORTANCE Studying the pathogenesis of myocarditis caused by different viruses is essential in order to characterize both virus-specific and generalized factors that contribute to disease. Very little is known about the pathogenesis of adenovirus myocarditis, which is a significant impediment to the development of treatment or prevention strategies. We used MAV-1 to establish a mouse model of human adenovirus myocarditis, providing the means to study host and pathogen factors contributing to adenovirus-induced cardiac disease during acute and persistent infection. The MAV-1 model will enable fundamental studies of viral myocarditis, including IFN-γ modulation as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:25320326

  7. Recursive bias estimation and L2 boosting

    SciTech Connect

    Hengartner, Nicolas W; Cornillon, Pierre - Andre; Matzner - Lober, Eric

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a general iterative bias correction procedure for regression smoothers. This bias reduction schema is shown to correspond operationally to the L{sub 2} Boosting algorithm and provides a new statistical interpretation for L{sub 2} Boosting. We analyze the behavior of the Boosting algorithm applied to common smoothers S which we show depend on the spectrum of I - S. We present examples of common smoother for which Boosting generates a divergent sequence. The statistical interpretation suggest combining algorithm with an appropriate stopping rule for the iterative procedure. Finally we illustrate the practical finite sample performances of the iterative smoother via a simulation study.

  8. Adenovirus hepatitis presenting as tumoral lesions in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Putra, Juan; Suriawinata, Arief A

    2014-01-01

    A 59-year-old man with T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia on alemtuzumab presented with neutropenic fever, intermittent nausea, and multiple ill-defined low attenuation foci in the liver on abdominal computed tomography scan which were suspicious for metastatic disease. Histological examination revealed the diagnosis of adenovirus hepatitis. Patient responded well to cidofovir. Adenovirus hepatitis is a rare but important entity to be considered by the clinicians, radiologists, and pathologists. Timely diagnosis and appropriate management are essential to improve the prognosis of adenovirus hepatitis in immunocompromised patients.

  9. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a mutant CAR-DI-binding adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have a significantly weakened binding affinity for CAR-DI relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type.

  10. Targeting Motor End Plates for Delivery of Adenoviruses: An Approach to Maximize Uptake and Transduction of Spinal Cord Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tosolini, Andrew Paul; Morris, Renée

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy can take advantage of the skeletal muscles/motor neurons anatomical relationship to restrict gene expression to the spinal cord ventral horn. Furthermore, recombinant adenoviruses are attractive viral-vectors as they permit spatial and temporal modulation of transgene expression. In the literature, however, several inconsistencies exist with regard to the intramuscular delivery parameters of adenoviruses. The present study is an evaluation of the optimal injection sites on skeletal muscle, time course of expression and mice’s age for maximum transgene expression in motor neurons. Targeting motor end plates yielded a 2.5-fold increase in the number of transduced motor neurons compared to injections performed away from this region. Peak adenoviral transgene expression in motor neurons was detected after seven days. Further, greater numbers of transduced motor neurons were found in juvenile (3–7 week old) mice as compared with adults (8+ weeks old). Adenoviral injections produced robust transgene expression in motor neurons and skeletal myofibres. In addition, dendrites of transduced motor neurons were shown to extend well into the white matter where the descending motor pathways are located. These results also provide evidence that intramuscular delivery of adenovirus can be a suitable gene therapy approach to treat spinal cord injury. PMID:27619631

  11. Adenovirus Microsatellite Reveals Dynamics of Transmission during a Recent Epidemic of Human Adenovirus Serotype 14 Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Houng, Huo-Shu H.; Lott, Lisa; Gong, Heping; Kuschner, Robert A.; Lynch, Julia A.; Metzgar, David

    2009-01-01

    This study reveals diverse-length polymorphisms in long mononucleotide repeats (microsatellites) in several serotypes of epidemic human respiratory adenovirus. The length of one of these microsatellites, a homopolymeric thymidine [poly(T)] repeat, is measured in 68 isolates of adenovirus serotype 14. These isolates were collected during a series of sudden and sometimes fatal outbreaks among both military recruits and civilians as the virus emerged for the first time in the United States in 2006 and 2007. The results demonstrate the usefulness of adenoviral microsatellites as high-resolution molecular strain markers. The described homopolymer is hypervariable in length, varying from 12 to 17 bp in the analyzed sample set. All intermediate lengths were identified in at least one isolate. Furthermore, the specific length of the marker is stable for significant periods of time (up to 7 months) at individual sites where the virus is in consistent circulation. The microsatellite also can maintain specific length identity through site-to-site transmission events, as determined by the analysis of isolates from three advanced training sites that appeared to be subject to pathogen transfer from one of the affected recruit training installations. Public database searches revealed that the polymorphic nature of the microsatellite extends to other species B serotypes, and that other polymorphic microsatellites can be identified readily in a variety of epidemic respiratory adenovirus clades. This study shows that microsatellites are a ubiquitous source of polymorphic markers for human adenoviruses and demonstrates their use through an epidemiological analysis of isolates from a recent North American epidemic. PMID:19403773

  12. The Intracellular Domain of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor Differentially Influences Adenovirus Entry.

    PubMed

    Loustalot, Fabien; Kremer, Eric J; Salinas, Sara

    2015-09-01

    The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule used as a docking molecule by some adenoviruses (AdVs) and group B coxsackieviruses. We previously proposed that the preferential transduction of neurons by canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) is due to CAR-mediated internalization. Our proposed pathway of CAV-2 entry is in contrast to that of human AdV type 5 (HAdV-C5) in nonneuronal cells, where internalization is mediated by auxiliary receptors such as integrins. We therefore asked if in fibroblast-like cells the intracellular domain (ICD) of CAR plays a role in the internalization of the CAV-2 fiber knob (FK(CAV)), CAV-2, or HAdV-C5 when the capsid cannot engage integrins. Here, we show that in fibroblast-like cells, the CAR ICD is needed for FK(CAV) entry and efficient CAV-2 transduction but dispensable for HAdV-C5 and an HAdV-C5 capsid lacking the RGD sequence (an integrin-interacting motif) in the penton. Moreover, the deletion of the CAR ICD further impacts CAV-2 intracellular trafficking, highlighting the crucial role of CAR in CAV-2 intracellular dynamics. These data demonstrate that the CAR ICD contains sequences important for the recruitment of the endocytic machinery that differentially influences AdV cell entry. Understanding how viruses interact with the host cell surface and reach the intracellular space is of crucial importance for applied and fundamental virology. Here, we compare the role of a cell adhesion molecule (CAR) in the internalization of adenoviruses that naturally infect humans and Canidae. We show that the intracellular domain of CAR differentially regulates AdV entry and trafficking. Our study highlights the mechanistic differences that a receptor can have for two viruses from the same family. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. IMMUNOFLUORESCENT STUDIES OF THE POTENTIATION OF AN ADENOVIRUS-ASSOCIATED VIRUS BY ADENOVIRUS 7

    PubMed Central

    Blacklow, Neil R.; Hoggan, M. David; Rowe, Wallace P.

    1967-01-01

    A quantitative immunofluorescent procedure for detection of viral antigen was used to study the potentiation of AAV-1 by Ad.7. AAV viral antigen formed only when the cells were also infected with adenovirus, and only in cell culture systems in which the adenovirus infection proceeded to completion. Ad. 7 infection of AGMK. cell cultures did not potentiate AAV unless the Ad. 7 infection was itself potentiated by SV40. Dose-response studies indicated that a single AAV particle and a single infectious Ad. 7 particle sufficed to initiate AAV antigen synthesis. Sequential inoculation studies showed that AAV antigen formed simultaneously with Ad. 7 viral antigen when the AAV was inoculated any time between 15 hr before to 10 hr after the Ad. 7, both antigens appearing about 15 hr after inoculation of Ad. 7. The AAV-1 antigen formation had a minimum latent period of 5 hr, as seen with Ad. 7 preinfection of 10 hr or more. When UV-irradiated Ad. 7 was used as helper, the AAV antigen still appeared simultaneously with the Ad. 7 viral antigen, even though the latter was delayed by 23 hr compared to nonirradiated virus. When the early replicative events of both viruses were allowed to proceed in FUDR-inhibited cells, and then the FUDR inhibition was reversed, AAV antigen formed within 2 hr, which was 3 hr before the Ad. 7 viral antigen appeared. It was inferred that the event in the adenovirus cycle that renders a cell competent to synthesize AAV occurs after the 10th hr and may be temporally associated with replication of the adenovirus DNA. PMID:4225814

  14. Tamoxifen improves cytopathic effect of oncolytic adenovirus in primary glioblastoma cells mediated through autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Ulasov, Ilya V.; Shah, Nameeta; Kaverina, Natalya V.; Lee, Hwahyang; Lin, Biaoyang; Lieber, Andre; Kadagidze, Zaira G.; Yoon, Jae-Guen; Schroeder, Brett; Hothi, Parvinder; Ghosh, Dhimankrishna; Baryshnikov, Anatoly Y.; Cobbs, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic gene therapy using viral vectors may provide an attractive therapeutic option for malignant gliomas. These viral vectors are designed in a way to selectively target tumor cells and spare healthy cells. To determine the translational impact, it is imperative to assess the factors that interfere with the anti-glioma effects of the oncolytic adenoviral vectors. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of survivin-driven oncolytic adenoviruses pseudotyping with adenoviral fiber knob belonging to the adenoviral serotype 3, 11 and 35 in their ability to kill glioblastoma (GBM) cells selectively without affecting normal cells. Our results indicate that all recombinant vectors used in the study can effectively target GBM in vitro with high specificity, especially the 3 knob-modified vector. Using intracranial U87 and U251 GBM xenograft models we have also demonstrated that treatment with Conditionally Replicative Adenovirus (CRAd-S-5/3) vectors can effectively regress tumor. However, in several patient-derived GBM cell lines, cells exhibited resistance to the CRAd infection as evident from the diminishing effects of autophagy. To improve therapeutic response, tumor cells were pretreated with tamoxifen. Our preliminary data suggest that tamoxifen sensitizes glioblastoma cells towards oncolytic treatment with CRAd-S-5/3, which may prove useful for GBM in future experimental therapy. PMID:25738357

  15. Adenovirus with p16 gene exerts antitumor effect on laryngeal carcinoma Hep2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengang; Hu, Jingxia; Li, Dajun; Pan, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Laryngeal cancer is an uncommon form of cancer. The tumor suppressor P16, known to be mutated or deleted in various types of human tumor, including laryngeal carcinoma, is involved in the formation and development of laryngeal carcinoma. It has been previously reported that the inactivation or loss of P16 is associated with the acquisition of malignant characteristics. The current study hypothesized that restoring wild‑type P16 activity into P16‑null malignant Hep2 cells may exert an antitumor effect. A recombinant adenovirus carrying the P16 gene (Ad‑P16) was used to infect and express high levels of P16 protein in P16‑null Hep2 cells. Cell proliferation and invasion assays and polymerase chain reaction were performed to evaluate the effects of the P16 gene on cell proliferation and the antitumor effect on Hep2 cells. The results demonstrated that the Hep2 cells infected with Ad‑P16 exhibited significantly reduced cell proliferation, invasion and tumor volume compared with untreated or control adenovirus cells. Furthermore, the expression of laryngeal carcinoma‑associated genes, EGFR, survivin and cyclin D1, were measured in Ad‑P16‑infected cells and were significantly reduced compared with control groups. The results of the current study demonstrate that restoring wild‑type P16 activity into P16-null Hep2 cells exerts an antitumor effect.

  16. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a modified human proinsulin gene reverses hyperglycemia in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Short, D K; Okada, S; Yamauchi, K; Pessin, J E

    1998-11-01

    The human proinsulin cDNA was introduced into a replication-defective adenovirus and was found to confer proinsulin expression to a hepatocyte (H4-II-E) cell line upon infection. A second virus was constructed in which the dibasic prohormone convertase recognition sequence was mutated to a tetrabasic furin cleavage site. Cells infected with this virus synthesized both proinsulin and mature insulin. Gel filtration chromatography, competition of insulin binding, and activation of the insulin receptor kinase activity demonstrated that this mature insulin was functionally identical to that of authentic processed insulin. Injection of these viral constructs into the external jugular vein of mice resulted in insulin gene expression in the liver. Expression from the mutated proinsulin virus dramatically improved the glycemic state of diabetic mice. However, the effects of the viral infection were transient, being maximal at approximately 5-7 days and returning to steady-state levels by 14-21 days. These data demonstrate that somatic cell insulin gene delivery by the use of recombinant adenovirus can be used to transiently reverse the diabetic state in mice.

  17. Human adenovirus serotypes 3 and 5 bind to two different cellular receptors via the fiber head domain.

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, S C; Rollence, M; White, B; Weaver, L; McClelland, A

    1995-01-01

    The adenovirus fiber protein is responsible for attachment of the virion to cell surface receptors. The identity of the cellular receptor which mediates binding is unknown, although there is evidence suggesting that two distinct adenovirus receptors interact with the group C (adenovirus type 5 [Ad5]) and the group B (Ad3) adenoviruses. In order to define the determinants of adenovirus receptor specificity, we have carried out a series of competition binding experiments using recombinant native fiber polypeptides from Ad5 and Ad3 and chimeric fiber proteins in which the head domains of Ad5 and Ad3 were exchanged. Specific binding of fiber to HeLa cell receptors was assessed with radiolabeled protein synthesized in vitro, and by competition analysis with baculovirus-expressed fiber protein. Fiber produced in vitro was found as both monomer and trimer, but only the assembled trimers had receptor binding activity. Competition data support the conclusion that Ad5 and Ad3 interact with different cellular receptors. The Ad5 receptor distribution on several cell lines was assessed with a fiber binding flow cytometric assay. HeLa cells were found to express high levels of receptor, while CHO and human diploid fibroblasts did not. A chimeric fiber containing the Ad5 fiber head domain blocked the binding of Ad5 fiber but not Ad3 fiber. Similarly, a chimeric fiber containing the Ad3 fiber head blocked the binding of labeled Ad3 fiber but not Ad5 fiber. In addition, the isolated Ad3 fiber head domain competed effectively with labeled Ad3 fiber for binding to HeLa cell receptors. These results demonstrate that the determinants of receptor binding are located in the head domain of the fiber and that the isolated head domain is capable of trimerization and binding to cellular receptors. Our results also show that it is possible to change the receptor specificity of the fiber protein by manipulation of sequences contained in the head domain. Modification or replacement of the fiber

  18. Recombinant allergens

    PubMed Central

    Jutel, Marek; Solarewicz-Madejek, Katarzyna; Smolinska, Sylwia

    2012-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only known causative treatment of allergic diseases. Recombinant allergen-based vaccination strategies arose from a strong need to both to improve safety and enhance efficacy of SIT. In addition, new vaccines can be effective in allergies including food allergy or atopic dermatitis, which poorly respond to the current treatment with allergen extracts. A number of successful clinical studies with both wild-type and hypoallergenic derivatives of recombinant allergens vaccines have been reported for the last decade. They showed high efficacy and safety profile as well as very strong modulation of T and B cell responses to specific allergens. PMID:23095874

  19. Ljungan virus and an adenovirus in Italian squirrel populations.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Claudia; Ferrari, Nicola; Rossi, Chiara; Everest, David J; Grierson, Sylvia S; Lanfranchi, Paolo; Martinoli, Adriano; Saino, Nicola; Wauters, Lucas A; Hauffe, Heidi C

    2014-04-01

    We report Ljungan virus infection in Eurasian red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) for the first time, and extend the known distribution of adenoviruses in both native red squirrels and alien gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) to southern Europe.

  20. Temporal regulation of adenovirus major late alternative RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Akusjarvi, Goran

    2008-05-01

    Adenovirus makes extensive use of alternative RNA splicing to produce a complex set of spliced mRNAs during replication. The accumulation of viral mRNAs is subjected to a temporal regulation, a mechanism that ensures that proteins that are needed at certain stages of the virus life cycle are produced in a timely fashion. The complex interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery has been studied in detail during the last decade. These studies have resulted in the characterization of two viral proteins, E4-ORF4 and L4-33K, that adenovirus uses to remodel the host cell RNA splicing machinery. Here I will review the current knowledge of how mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit is controlled with a particular emphasis on how cis-acting sequence element, trans-acting factors and mechanisms regulating adenovirus major late L1 alternative RNA splicing is controlled.

  1. Beyond Oncolytics: E1B55K-Deleted Adenovirus as a Vaccine Delivery Vector

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Michael A.; Nyanhete, Tinashe; Tuero, Iskra; Venzon, David; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Type 5 human adenoviruses (Ad5) deleted of genes encoding the early region 1B 55-kDa (E1B55K) protein including Onyx-015 (dl1520) and H101 are best known for their oncolytic potential. As a vaccine vector the E1B55K deletion may allow for the insertion of a transgene nearly 1,000 base pairs larger than now possible. This has the potential of extending the application for which the vectors are clinically known. However, the immune priming ability of E1B55K-deleted vectors is unknown, undermining our ability to gauge their usefulness in vaccine applications. For this reason, we created an E1B55K-deleted Ad5 vector expressing full-length single chain HIVBaLgp120 attached to a flexible linker and the first two domains of rhesus CD4 (rhFLSC) in exchange for the E3 region. In cell-based experiments the E1B55K-deleted vector promoted higher levels of innate immune signals including chemokines, cytokines, and the NKG2D ligands MIC A/B compared to an E1B55K wild-type vector expressing the same immunogen. Based on these results we evaluated the immune priming ability of the E1B55K-deleted vector in mice. The E1B55K-deleted vector promoted similar levels of Ad5-, HIVgp120, and rhFLSC-specific cellular and humoral immune responses as the E1B55K wild-type vector. In pre-clinical HIV-vaccine studies the wild-type vector has been employed as part of a very effective prime-boost strategy. This study demonstrates that E1B55K-deleted adenoviruses may serve as effective vaccine delivery vectors. PMID:27391605

  2. Differential immunogenicity between HAdV-5 and chimpanzee adenovirus vector ChAdOx1 is independent of fiber and penton RGD loop sequences in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dicks, Matthew D. J.; Spencer, Alexandra J.; Coughlan, Lynda; Bauza, Karolis; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Cottingham, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Replication defective adenoviruses are promising vectors for the delivery of vaccine antigens. However, the potential of a vector to elicit transgene-specific adaptive immune responses is largely dependent on the viral serotype used. HAdV-5 (Human adenovirus C) vectors are more immunogenic than chimpanzee adenovirus vectors from species Human adenovirus E (ChAdOx1 and AdC68) in mice, though the mechanisms responsible for these differences in immunogenicity remain poorly understood. In this study, superior immunogenicity was associated with markedly higher levels of transgene expression in vivo, particularly within draining lymph nodes. To investigate the viral factors contributing to these phenotypes, we generated recombinant ChAdOx1 vectors by exchanging components of the viral capsid reported to be principally involved in cell entry with the corresponding sequences from HAdV-5. Remarkably, pseudotyping with the HAdV-5 fiber and/or penton RGD loop had little to no effect on in vivo transgene expression or transgene-specific adaptive immune responses despite considerable species-specific sequence heterogeneity in these components. Our results suggest that mechanisms governing vector transduction after intramuscular administration in mice may be different from those described in vitro. PMID:26576856

  3. Adenovirus Infections in Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are an important cause of infections in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, and they continue to provide clinical challenges pertaining to diagnostics and treatment. The growing number of HAdV types identified by genomic analysis, as well as the improved understanding of the sites of viral persistence and reactivation, requires continuous adaptions of diagnostic approaches to facilitate timely detection and monitoring of HAdV infections. In view of the clinical relevance of life-threatening HAdV diseases in the immunocompromised setting, there is an urgent need for highly effective treatment modalities lacking major side effects. The present review summarizes the recent progress in the understanding and management of HAdV infections. PMID:24982316

  4. [Gene engineering of the adenovirus vector].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Saki; Terashima, Miho; Fukuda, Hiromitsu; Saito, Izumu; Kanegae, Yumi

    2007-06-01

    The adenovirus vector is very attractive tool not only for the gene therapy but also for the basic sciences. However, because a construction method of this vector had been complex, only limited scientists had constructed and enjoyed the benefits. Recently, various methods were developed and the researchers came to be able to choose an efficient method, which is the COS-TPC method, or a concise procedure, which is the intact-genome transfection method (in vitro ligation method). Here we described not only these methods but also new method to construct the various Ads simultaneously using the recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) by the site-specific recombinase. And also we want to refer the possibility to the worth of the vector, especially the vector of the expression-switch.

  5. Polymeric oncolytic adenovirus for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Lee, Young Sook; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Sung Wan

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) vectors present a promising modality to treat cancer. Many clinical trials ha